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Sample records for hymenoptera pteromalidae parasitoide

  1. Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae parasitóide de dípteros muscóides coletado em Itumbiara, Goiás Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae parasitoid of muscoids dipterous collected in Itumbiara, Goias, Brazil

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    C.H. Marchiori

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the occurrence of parasitoid Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae parasitizing pupae of flies (Diptera in different substrata in Itumbiara, Goiás. The pupae were obtained by the flotation method. They were individually placed in gelatin capsules until the emergence of flies or their parasitoids. From May 1998 through April 2002, 737 parasitoids were collected in human feces, cattle liver, chicken, fish and cattle kidney. The prevalence of parasitism was 67.8%.

  2. Competition between the filth fly parasitoids Muscidifurax raptor and M. raptorellus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

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    Geden, C J; Johnson, D M; Kaufman, P E; Boohene, C K

    2014-12-01

    Competition bioassays were conducted with the filth fly pupal parasitoids Muscidurax raptor (Girault & Sanders) and M. raptorellus (Kogan & Legner) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) using house fly Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae) hosts at different host densities. Muscidifurax raptor had a significant impact on M. raptorellus when hosts were limiting in sequential parasitism tests. Fewer than six M. raptorellus adult progeny emerged from groups of 50 fly pupae that were parasitized by M. raptor at the same time or when M. raptor parasitism preceded M. raptorellus by 48 h, respectively, compared with 42-55 M. raptorellus progeny produced when this species was tested alone. Production of M. raptor was significantly lower when parasitism by this species was preceded by M. raptorellus (25) than when M. raptor was tested alone (43). When the two species parasitized hosts at the same time in different proportions at low host:parasitoid densities (5:1), M. raptorellus produced 13 progeny per parent female when it was the sole species present and fewer than two when M. raptor was present. No negative impact of M. raptorellus on M. raptor was observed. Neither species had a substantial effect on the success of the other at higher host:parasitoid densities.

  3. Eurytoma sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae como parasitóide de Fannia pusio (Wiedemann (Diptera: Fanniidae no Brasil Eurytoma sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae as a parasitoid of Fannia pusio (Wiedemann (Diptera: Fanniidae in Brazil

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    C.H. Marchiori

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports, for the first time, the occurrence of Eurytoma sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae as parasitoid of Fannia pusio (Wiedemann (Diptera: Fanniidae found in chicken dung in Itumbiara, Goiás, Brazil. Manure samples, collected at two weeks intervals, were taken to the laboratory and the pupae were extracted by water flotation. Each pupa was placed in capsules of colorless gelatin until the emergence of dipterous or their parasitoids. The parasitism was 1.3%.

  4. Eurytoma sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) como parasitóide de Fannia pusio (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Fanniidae) no Brasil Eurytoma sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) as a parasitoid of Fannia pusio (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Fanniidae) in Brazil

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    C.H. Marchiori

    2007-01-01

    This study reports, for the first time, the occurrence of Eurytoma sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) as parasitoid of Fannia pusio (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Fanniidae) found in chicken dung in Itumbiara, Goiás, Brazil. Manure samples, collected at two weeks intervals, were taken to the laboratory and the pupae were extracted by water flotation. Each pupa was placed in capsules of colorless gelatin until the emergence of dipterous or their parasitoids. The parasitism was 1.3%.

  5. First report of Lecanodiaspis dendrobii Douglas, 1892 (Hemiptera: Lecanodiaspididae) and the associated parasitoid Cephaleta sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) in Brazil.

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    Marsaro Júnior, A L; Peronti, A L B G; Costa, V A; Morais, E G F; Pereira, P R V S

    2016-02-01

    Lecanodiaspis dendrobii Douglas, 1892 (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Lecanodiaspididae) and the associated parasitoid Cephaleta sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) are reported for the first time in Brazil. Specimens of this scale insect were collected on branches and stems of Acacia mangium Willd., Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit (Fabaceae), Morus nigra L. (Moraceae), Citrus reticulata Blanco (Rutaceae), Tectona grandis L. f. (Verbenaceae), Anacardium occidentale (Anacardiaceae), Annona squamosa L. and Xylopia aromatica (Lam.) Mart. (Annonaceae), in three municipalities of the Roraima state. All plants here mentioned are recorded for the first time as a host for L. dendrobii. Morphological characters of L. dendrobii and symptoms presented by the host plants infested by this pest are included in this work.

  6. Evidence for divergence in cuticular hydrocarbon sex pheromone between California and Mississippi (United States of America) populations of bark beetle parasitoid Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

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    Brian Sullivan; Nadir Erbilgin

    2014-01-01

    Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Ratzeburg) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is a common Holarctic parasitoid of the larvae and pupae of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scotytinae). In no-choice laboratory bioassays, we found that male wasps derived either from northern California or southwestern Mississippi, United States of America more frequently displayed sexual...

  7. First report of Lecanodiaspis dendrobii Douglas, 1892 (Hemiptera: Lecanodiaspididae and the associated parasitoid Cephaleta sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae in Brazil

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    A. L. Marsaro Júnior

    Full Text Available Abstract Lecanodiaspis dendrobii Douglas, 1892 (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Lecanodiaspididae and the associated parasitoid Cephaleta sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae are reported for the first time in Brazil. Specimens of this scale insect were collected on branches and stems of Acacia mangium Willd., Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit (Fabaceae, Morus nigra L. (Moraceae, Citrus reticulata Blanco (Rutaceae, Tectona grandis L. f. (Verbenaceae, Anacardium occidentale (Anacardiaceae, Annona squamosa L. and Xylopia aromatica (Lam. Mart. (Annonaceae, in three municipalities of the Roraima state. All plants here mentioned are recorded for the first time as a host for L. dendrobii. Morphological characters of L. dendrobii and symptoms presented by the host plants infested by this pest are included in this work.

  8. Pachycrepoideus vindemiae Rondani (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae as parasitoid of Diptera, in Brazil

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    Marchiori C.H.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo determinou as espécies de hospedeiros do parasitóide Pachycrepoideusvindemiae Rondani (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae em fezes humanas, rins e fígado de bovino, peixe e frutos. As pupas, obtidas pelo método de flutuação, foram colocadas individualmente em cápsulas de gelatina e mantidas até a emergência das moscas e/ou parasitóides. A prevalência total de parasitismo foi de 15,7%. Este trabalho registra a primeira ocorrência de Pachycrepoideusvindemiae em pupas de Peckiachrysostoma.

  9. Suitability of five species of stored-product insects as hosts for development and reproduction of the parasitoid Anisopteromalus calandrae (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

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    Ghimire, Mukti N; Phillips, Thomas W

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the ability of two populations of Anisopteromalus calandrae (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), to parasitize and develop on late instars of five different stored-product insects that typically complete their development inside seeds of grain or legume species or other dry commodity. The host species were the cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne (F.); cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.); rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.); lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.); and Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier). Experiments were conducted in the laboratory in a no-choice design by using petri dishes (15 by 100 mm) as experimental arenas with 20 host larvae. A. calandrae females from populations originating in Georgia (GA) and Oklahoma (OK) were introduced singly into experimental arenas and allowed to sting and oviposit for 24 h. Parasitism by the OK population was greater than that for the GA population across all hosts. However, no or very low parasitism was found on Angoumois grain moth for either population in this experiment. The highest number of parasitoid progeny was recorded on cowpea weevil (15.9) followed by rice weevil (11.5) and cigarette beetle (10.8) for the OK population. A similar trend was observed in the GA population. The highest proportion of female progeny was produced on cowpea weevil (73.0%) by the OK population. Conversely, a higher proportion of female progeny was produced on rice weevil (64.6%) by the GA population than produced by the OK population. Parasitoid adults were significantly larger and heavier when they developed on cowpea weevil irrespective of parasitoid population. The possible application of these results for biological control of stored-product insects is discussed.

  10. Primeiro relato de Muscidifurax raptorellus Kogan & Legner, 1970 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) no Brasil First report of Muscidifurax raptorellus Kogan & Legner, 1970) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) in Brazil

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    C.H. Marchiori; Miranda, J.M.; V.A Costa

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the first occurrence of Muscidifurax raptorellus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) in Brazil. Chicken manure samples, collected at two-week interval, were taken to the laboratory and the pupae were extracted by the method of flotation. Each pupa was placed in capsules of colorless gelatin until the emergence of dipterous or their parasitoids. In the study, ten pupae of Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830) (Diptera: Fanniidae) were obtained, two of which yielded the parasitoid M. raptor...

  11. Effects of female diet and age on offspring sex ratio of the solitary parasitoid Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae Efeitos da dieta e idade da fêmea em relação à prole e à razão sexual do parasitoide solitário Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae

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    Hao-Yuan Hu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of female diet and age on offspring sex ratio of the solitary parasitoid Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae. Theories predict that females of parasitoid wasps would adjust the offspring sex ratio to environmental conditions in the oviposition patch, but the diet and age of females would also affect the sex ratio adjustment. Our focus was to test the effects of female diet and age on offspring sex ratio of the solitary parasitoid wasp, Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani, 1875. Our results showed that females fed with honey had significantly less female biased offspring sex ratio than those fed only with water. Offspring sex ratio (male percentage decreased with female age or female longevity at the beginning of oviposition but increased at the end. There should be a sperm limitation in P. vindemmiae females at the end of oviposition, and a higher frequency of unfertilized eggs were laid then. Females also laid more unfertilized eggs at the beginning of oviposition, which would be necessary to insure the mating among offspring. Male offspring developed faster and emerged earlier, which would also reduce the risk of virginity in offspring with female-biased sex ratio.Efeitos da dieta e idade da fêmea em relação à prole e à razão sexual do parasitoide solitário Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae. As teorias predizem que as fêmeas parasitoides de vespas ajustam a relação razão sexual dos descendentes, de acordo com condições ambientais, em cada oviposição. Entretanto, a dieta e idade das fêmeas também podem afetar o ajuste da razão sexual. Nosso foco foi testar os efeitos da dieta e idade da fêmeas em relação a razão sexual da prole da vespa parasitoide Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani, 1875. Nossos resultados mostraram que as fêmeas alimentadas com mel apresentaram uma razão sexual significativa menor de fêmeas, do que aquelas alimentadas apenas com água. A

  12. Comparison of host-seeking behavior of the filth fly pupal parasitoids, Spalangia cameroni and Muscidifurax raptor (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

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    The pupal parasitoids, Spalangia cameroni Perkins and Muscidifurax raptor Girault and Sanders, are often sold together for biological control of house flies (Musca domestica L.) and stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans L.) (Diptera: Muscidae). Little is known about the odors involved in host-seeking b...

  13. Susceptibility of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) and its parasitoid Dinarmus basalis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) to three essential oils.

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    Ketoh, Guillaume K; Glitho, Adole I; Huignard, Jacques

    2002-02-01

    The bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) causes major losses during the storage of seeds of Vigna unguiculata (Walp.) in West Africa. An endemic parasitoid, the pteromalid Dinarmus basalis (Rond.) reduces the increase in bruchid populations in stores and could be used for biological control. African farmers often introduce essential oils into granaries at harvest time. In Togo, essential oils were extracted from two Gramineae, Cymbopogon nardus (L.) and Cymbopogon schoenanthus (L.) and from a Lamiaceae, Ocimum basilicum (L.). The major components of these essential oils were citronellal in C. nardus, carene-2 and piperitone in C. schoenanthus and estragol in O. basilicum. Cymbopogon schoenanthus was the most toxic oil for C. maculatus adults. D. basalis adults were more susceptible to the three essential oils than the adults of their hosts C. maculatus. In the presence of cowpea seeds, the LC50s of the three essential oils were lower than in their absence, suggesting that the seeds may absorb a part of the volatiles. High doses of three essential oils slightly affected the survival of the fourth instar or the pupae of C. maculatus. This high survival was due to protection of larvae from volatiles by the surrounding seeds. The D. basalis were more affected by the oil volatiles than their hosts. Sub-lethal doses of essential oils reduced the duration of the adult life of both insect species and fecundity of the females. The differences in sensitivity of the host and its parasitoid could influence their population dynamics. The introduction of the essential oils into storage systems potentially could reduce density of parasitoid populations and increase seed losses.

  14. Effects on microhymenopteran progeny of different host exposure periods (Chrysomya megacephala, Calliphoridae to the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae

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    Renata da Silva Mello

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To test the assumption that exposure of the host to parasitoid for long periods could provoke superparasitism, the aim of this work was to test the consequences on the immature development time, productivity of parasitoids per pupa, sex ratio and rate of parasitism of Nasonia vitripennis bred in Chrysomya megacephala pupae. Each individual pupa was placed in a glass tube with one parasitoid female for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h period of exposure, under controlled laboratory conditions. Twenty replicates of each period were performed. ANOVA with a 5% significance level was applied. The 72 h exposure caused the immature development time to increase. The mean parasitoids emergence per pupa did not vary significantly with the time of exposure. There were a significantly higher number of females than males and a trend in sex ratio deviation towards the females in all of the treatments. An increase in the number of unviable pupae rates were observed with increased exposure time.Para testar a hipótese que longos períodos de exposição do hospedeiro ao parasitóide podem ocasionar o superparasitismo, o presente estudo teve como objetivo testar as conseqüências sobre o tempo de desenvolvimento do imaturo, a produtividade de parasitóides, razão sexual e taxa de parasitismo de Nasonia vitripennis criadas em pupas de Chrysomya megacephala. Cada pupa foi individualizada e alocada em um tudo de ensaio com uma fêmea de N. vitripennis por 24, 48, 72 ou 96 h, sob condições laboratoriais controladas. Foram realizadas 20 réplicas para cada período de exposição. ANOVA com significância de 5 % foi aplicada. A exposição de 72 h causou um aumento no tempo desenvolvimento. A média de emergência de parasitóides não variou significativamente entre os tempos de exposição. Houve um número significativamente maior de fêmeas e uma tendência ao desvio da razão sexual para fêmeas em todos os tratamentos. Foi verificado um aumento no número de pupas invi

  15. Primeiro relato de Muscidifurax raptorellus Kogan & Legner, 1970 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae no Brasil First report of Muscidifurax raptorellus Kogan & Legner, 1970 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae in Brazil

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    C.H. Marchiori

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the first occurrence of Muscidifurax raptorellus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae in Brazil. Chicken manure samples, collected at two-week interval, were taken to the laboratory and the pupae were extracted by the method of flotation. Each pupa was placed in capsules of colorless gelatin until the emergence of dipterous or their parasitoids. In the study, ten pupae of Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Fanniidae were obtained, two of which yielded the parasitoid M. raptorellus . The percentage of parasitism was 5.0%.

  16. Hyperparasitism in a Generalist Ectoparasitic Pupal Parasitoid, Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), on Its Own Conspecifics: When the Lack of Resource Lead to Cannibalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; He, Zhang; Ji, Xiao-Li; Tang, Si-Ting; Hu, Hao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Hyperparasitism is a normal behavior of parasitoids, which often happens among species. Conspecific hyperparasitism, such as some kinds of heteronomous hyperparasitic behaviors, has been only reported in some species belonging to Aphelinidae. In this article, the conspecific hyperparasitism of Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Pteromalidae) is reported, with Drosophila puparia as hosts. Hosts were exposed to P. vindemmiae females twice to parasitism with nine, twelve, and fifteen day intervals between the two exposures. None of the infested hosts emerged more than one offspring, and emergence of parasitoid offspring occurred in two obvious events, synchronously with the exposure time intervals, which suggested that offspring emerging during the first and second events would come from the primary and secondary parasitoids, respectively, and the inference with the developmental duration of offspring also indicated this. With two P. vindemmiae strains that could be identified by a simple sequence repeat marker, the above speculation of the origin of those offspring emerging during the two events was confirmed. Dissection of hosts exposed twice revealed a cannibalism behavior of larvae from the secondary foundresses on the primary conspecific pupae. Our results suggested a conspecific hyperparasitism behavior of the secondary parasitoids on the primary conspecifics. Measures showed a reduced body size for the adults from the conspecific hyperparasitism. Foundresses from the conspecific hyperparasitism had less fitness variables than those from primary parasitism, with shorter longevity, less life time fecundity, lower values of infestation degree, and lower success rate of parasitism. However, when the parasitoids from the conspecific hyperparasitism met healthy Drosophila puparia, their offspring would recover to normal size. Frequency of the conspecific hyperparasitism behavior enhanced with the decreasing of proportion of healthy hosts in the oviposition patch. The

  17. Hyperparasitism in a Generalist Ectoparasitic Pupal Parasitoid, Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, on Its Own Conspecifics: When the Lack of Resource Lead to Cannibalism.

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    Wei Chen

    Full Text Available Hyperparasitism is a normal behavior of parasitoids, which often happens among species. Conspecific hyperparasitism, such as some kinds of heteronomous hyperparasitic behaviors, has been only reported in some species belonging to Aphelinidae. In this article, the conspecific hyperparasitism of Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Pteromalidae is reported, with Drosophila puparia as hosts. Hosts were exposed to P. vindemmiae females twice to parasitism with nine, twelve, and fifteen day intervals between the two exposures. None of the infested hosts emerged more than one offspring, and emergence of parasitoid offspring occurred in two obvious events, synchronously with the exposure time intervals, which suggested that offspring emerging during the first and second events would come from the primary and secondary parasitoids, respectively, and the inference with the developmental duration of offspring also indicated this. With two P. vindemmiae strains that could be identified by a simple sequence repeat marker, the above speculation of the origin of those offspring emerging during the two events was confirmed. Dissection of hosts exposed twice revealed a cannibalism behavior of larvae from the secondary foundresses on the primary conspecific pupae. Our results suggested a conspecific hyperparasitism behavior of the secondary parasitoids on the primary conspecifics. Measures showed a reduced body size for the adults from the conspecific hyperparasitism. Foundresses from the conspecific hyperparasitism had less fitness variables than those from primary parasitism, with shorter longevity, less life time fecundity, lower values of infestation degree, and lower success rate of parasitism. However, when the parasitoids from the conspecific hyperparasitism met healthy Drosophila puparia, their offspring would recover to normal size. Frequency of the conspecific hyperparasitism behavior enhanced with the decreasing of proportion of healthy hosts in the

  18. Natural history of interaction between Meteorus sp. Haliday, 1835 (Hymenoptera: Braconidae and its hyperparasitoid Toxeumella albipes Girault, 1913 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae

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    JF Sobczak

    Full Text Available Some parasitoids build a cocoon mass that hangs in the host body until the adults emergence, which is an advantage against attack by predators who troll the vegetation in search of prey. However, such behaviour is not effective against the hyperparasitoid attacks. This study reports the interaction between the caterpillar Manduca sexta Linnaeus, 1763 (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae parasitised by Meteorus sp. (Hymenoptera, Braconidae larvae and its hyperparasitoid Toxeumella albipes (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae. This is the first description of the attack and oviposition of T. albipes.

  19. Primeiro relato de Spalangia nigroaenea Curtis, 1839 (Hymenoptera: pteromalidae) em pupas de fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830) (Diptera: fanniidae) no Brasil First report of Spalangia nigroaenea Curtis, 1839 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) in pupae of Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830) (Diptera: Fanniidae) in Brazil

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    Carlos Henrique Marchiori; Vanessa Alves Alvarenga

    2008-01-01

    Relata-se a primeira ocorrência do parasitóide Spalangia nigroaenea Curtis, 1839 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) em pupas de Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830) (Diptera: Fanniidae), no Brasil. Pupas de F. pusio foram coletadas em armadilhas utilizando-se fezes humanas como atrativo para os adultos. Obtiveram-se 10 pupas, das quais duas estavam parasitadas por S. nigroaenea, verificando-se uma porcentagem de parasitismo de 20,0%.The first occurrence in Brazil of the parasitoid Spalangia nigroaenea Cur...

  20. Primeiro relato de Spalangia nigroaenea Curtis, 1839 (Hymenoptera: pteromalidae em pupas de fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: fanniidae no Brasil First report of Spalangia nigroaenea Curtis, 1839 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae in pupae of Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Fanniidae in Brazil

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    Carlos Henrique Marchiori

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se a primeira ocorrência do parasitóide Spalangia nigroaenea Curtis, 1839 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae em pupas de Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Fanniidae, no Brasil. Pupas de F. pusio foram coletadas em armadilhas utilizando-se fezes humanas como atrativo para os adultos. Obtiveram-se 10 pupas, das quais duas estavam parasitadas por S. nigroaenea, verificando-se uma porcentagem de parasitismo de 20,0%.The first occurrence in Brazil of the parasitoid Spalangia nigroaenea Curtis, 1839 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae in pupae of Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Fanniidae is reported. Pupae of F. pusio were collected in traps using human feces to attract the adults. Ten pupae were obtained, of which two were parasitized by S. nigroaenea, thus demonstrating a parasitism rate of 20.0%.

  1. Effects of Size and Age of the Host Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) on Production of the Parasitoid Wasp Spalangia endius (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

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    Broski, Scott A; King, B H

    2017-02-01

    One method of control of house flies, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), and other filth flies is by repeated release of large numbers of pupal parasitoids such as Spalangia endius Walker. Rearing these parasitoids may be facilitated by understanding how host factors affect their production. Previous studies have examined the effects of host size and host age on parasitoid production, but have not examined the interaction between host size and host age or the effects with older females, which may be less capable of drilling tough hosts. Females were given hosts of a single size-age category (small young, small old, large young, or large old) for 2 wk. The effect of host size and of host age on parasitoid production depended on female age. On their first day of oviposition, females produced more offspring from large than from small hosts, but host age had no significant effect. The cumulative number of parasitoids produced in the first week was not significantly affected by host size or host age. However, the cumulative number of parasitoids produced over 2 wk was affected by both host size and host age, with the greatest number of parasitoids produced from small young hosts. Thus, not only are smaller hosts cheaper to produce, but these results suggest that their use may have no effect or a positive effect on the number of parasitoids that can be produced when females are ovipositing for a week or two. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Increase of acceptability period of Musca domestic l., 1758 (diptera: muscidae) pupae, irradiated by gamma radiation as host of the pupal parasitoid Spalangia endius, Walker, 1839 (hymenoptera: pteromalidae)

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    Itepan, Natanael M., E-mail: nmitepan@ifsp.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Sao Paulo (IFSP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Itepan, Sara E.D.Z., E-mail: sarazenitepan@ig.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras; Arthur, Valter, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This experiment was carried out in Biological Control of Domestic Fly 'Eduardo Hiroshi Mizumoto' Laboratory at Entomology and Acarology Department (LEA/ESALQ/USP) and in Food Irradiation and Radioentomology Laboratory (LIARE/CENA/USP). The gamma radiation source used was a Co-60 irradiator model Gammabeam-650 of the Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. whose activity in the beginning of the experiments was 9.8x10{sup 13} Bq. (2,644 Ci). The lots of pupae of Musca domestic L., 1758 and the parasitoid Spalangia endius Walker, 1839 had been kept in acclimatized room with 25 ± 2 deg C of temperature and 70 ± 5% of relative humidity. This experiment was designed to investigate if the non-viabilization M. domestic pupae, using gamma radiation, could build up the acceptability period as host of the pupal parasitoid S. endius. At these age intervals, the dose to prevent adult emergence was 25, 220, 360 and 520 Gy respectively. The 1, 2, 3 and 4 days old pupae were irradiated (dose rate: 1,510 Gy/hr) and exposed to the parasitoid S. endius at a proportion of one female parasitoid to five housefly pupae, during different periods after the irradiation. The results allow us to conclude that irradiation increase the acceptability period of the housefly pupae by the parasitoid. The best age to irradiate the housefly pupae was one day. (author)

  3. Biocontrol Potential of Lariophagus distinguendus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) Against Sitophilus granarius (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) at Low Temperatures: Reproduction and Parasitoid-Induced Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Stengård

    2007-01-01

    , it amounted to 70% of the total mortality exerted by the parasitoid; at 18 and 16°C, it was 57 and 42% of the total, respectively. L. distinguendus is a promising biocontrol agent for grain stores in temperate regions because it is able to develop and reproduce at temperatures down to 16°C; its development...

  4. Impacts of extended laboratory rearing on female fitness in Florida colonies of the parasitoid spalangia cameroni (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) with an analysis of wolbachia strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalangia cameroni is used as a biological control agent of filth flies. These parasitoids are reared commercially, but little is known about the impact of colony age on host-seeking and life history parameters. Host-seeking in equine shavings and manure was analyzed with two colony ages established...

  5. An update on the diversity of Wolbachia in Spalangia spp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infections of Wolbachia bacteria have the potential to improve the efficacy of their host insects as biological control agents. Results of an earlier study documented numerous cases of such infections in a beneficial guild of wasps (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) parasitic on pest flies affecting lives...

  6. Attraction of Dibrachys cavus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) to its host frass volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuche, Julien; Xuéreb, Anne; Thiéry, Denis

    2006-12-01

    The European grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a polyphagous insect able to develop on grapes and wild plants. We tested the hypothesis that the parasitoid Dibrachys cavus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) uses the larval frass in its host search. A two-armed olfactometer was used to measure the attractiveness of L. botrana larvae, their silk, or their frass after larvae were fed on different host plants. Frass of three Lepidoptera (L. botrana, Eupoecillia ambiguella, Sphinx ligustri) and one Orthoptera (Chorthippus brunneus) was assayed, but only L. botrana was used to test an effect of the larval host plant (two grape cultivars and three other plant species) to D. cavus females. Larvae without frass did not attract D. cavus whatever their origin, but their frass was attractive at a dose of 2-3 days equivalent of larval frass production. The silk produced by a single larva (L. botrana) was not attractive to D. cavus. The parasitoid was most attracted to the odor of S. ligustri; the frass of L. botrana was more attractive than that of E. ambiguella, irrespective of the species on which D. cavus had been reared. There was no difference in attractiveness of frass collected from L. botrana raised on food containing different plants. Chemical extracts using five different polarity solvents (acetone, dichloromethane, hexane, methanol, and water) differed in attractiveness to D. cavus. Water and dichloromethane were the most attractive. This suggests that a complex volatile signal made from intermediate to polar volatiles may be involved in attraction. D. cavus used frass to discriminate between different potential host species. Our results revealed that the larval food of L. botrana did not modify frass attractiveness, but that the moth species did.

  7. CEPF Western Ghats Special Series : Parasitoids (Hymenoptera of xylophagous beetles (Coleoptera attacking dead wood in southern Western Ghats, Kerala, India, with descriptions of two new species

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    P.M. Sureshan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An account is given of four species of Hymenoptera parasitoids probably of the wood boring beetle Clytocera chinospila Gahan (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae from Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary, southern Western Ghats, Kerala. Two new hymenopteran species, Eurytoma chinnarensis (Eurytomidae and Foenatopus idukkiensis (Stephanidae are described. Solenura ania Walker (Pteromalidae is reported for the first time from Kerala and Western Ghats with a new host record, and Doryctus sp. (Braconidae is reported here.

  8. Survival and development of a stored-product pest, Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and its natural enemy, the parasitoid Lariophagus distinguendus (Hymenoptera. Pteromalidae), on transgenic Bt maize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise S.; Lövei, Gabor L; Székács, András

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) containing a lepidopteran-specific Bt toxin on a stored-product pest, Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, and its parasitoid, Lariophagus distinguendus Förster, was examined in the laboratory to test the impact of transgenic maize on stored...

  9. Survival and development of a stored-product pest, Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and its natural enemy, the parasitoid Lariophagus distinguendus (Hymenoptera. Pteromalidae), on transgenic Bt maize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise S.; Lövei, Gabor L; Székács, András

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) containing a lepidopteran-specific Bt toxin on a stored-product pest, Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, and its parasitoid, Lariophagus distinguendus Förster, was examined in the laboratory to test the impact of transgenic maize on stored...

  10. Host Suitability of House Fly, Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae, Pupae Killed by High or Low Temperature Treatment for a Parastoid, Spalangia endius (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae

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    Kohei Ogawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to establish a high quality progeny production system for the house fly parasitoid, Spalangia endius (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, by stockpiling hosts. We performed two host killing methods before host storage: (i heat-killed by 30 min exposure to 50°C or (ii freeze-killed by 10 min exposure to −80°C. The average number of parasitoids that emerged from nonstored house fly pupae after heat- or freeze-killing was not significantly different from live pupae. When house fly pupae stored at −20°C after heat-killing were supplied to S. endius, progeny production was significantly less than live pupae. Moreover, productivity became very low when house fly pupae refrigerated at 3°C after heat- or freeze-killing were supplied to S. endius. On the other hand, when house fly pupae stored at −80°C for 1 year after heat-killing were supplied to S. endius, the average number of parasitoids that emerged was not significantly different from live pupae. The average number of parasitoids that emerged from freeze-killed hosts kept for more than 8 weeks at −80°C was significantly fewer than live pupae. Thus, this study clarified that a higher-quality host can be maintained not only by simply storing at –80°C but also by adding heat treatment before storage.

  11. Fluorescence technique application of X-ray in labeling with Mn, Sr and Cu, of the parasitoid and host: Muscidifuax uniraptor Kogan and Legner, 1970 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) and Musca domestica L., 1758 (Diptera: Muscidae); Aplicacao com tecnica de fluorescencia de raios X na marcacao com Mn, Sr e Cu, do parasitoide e hospedeiro: Muscidifurax uniraptor Kogan and Legner, 1970 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) e Musca domestica L., 1758 (Diptera: Muscidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itepan, Natanael Marcio

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this work was to develop the methodology of the labeling adult of Musca domestica and Muscidifurax uniraptor using the elements Mn, Sr and Cu with the use of x-ray fluorescence. This work was carried out in the Laboratory of Biological Control of House Flies, 'Eduardo Hiroshi Mizumoto', of the 'Entomology, Phytopatology and Zoology Department of the College of Agriculture 'Luiz de Queiroz' ESALQ/USP), and the Division of Methods the Development and Nuclear Analytics Techniques, of CENA/USP, Piracicaba, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The larvae was removed to the labeled diet with increasing level of the elements Mn, Sr and Cu. The levels tested for all element were: 0 (control); 0,25; 0,50; 1,00; 2,00; 4,00; 8,00; 16,00; 32,00 and 64,00 mg/gr of diet. Labeled pupae with 1,00 to 4,00 (Mn) and 1,00 (Sr and Cu) mg/gr of diet were tested for the pupal parasitoid M. uniraptor. The concentration quantity of the chemical elements was realized by the Analytical Technique denominated (EDXRF) energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence. Concentrations of 2,00 (Mn) and 1,00 (Sr) supplemented to the diet of M. domestica were sufficient for the adult insect labeled, however, not affecting its life expectancy. Pupae originated from the larvae of M. domestica treated with dose of 2,00 (Mn) and 1,00 (Sr and Cu) mg supplemented to the diet, and used as hosts of the parasitoid M. uniraptor, affected the viability of the immature phase and did not label the adults. (author)

  12. Ocorrência de Spalangia endius Walker, 1839 (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae em pupas de Musca domestica L. e Stomoxys calcitrans L. (Diptera, Muscidae no sul do Rio Grande do Sul

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    R.K Brandão

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It was reported the occurrence of Spalangia endius Walker, 1839 (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae as a parasitoid of pupae of Musca domestica Linnaeus, 1758 (Diptera, Muscidae and Stomoxys calcitrans Linnaeus, 1758 (Diptera, Muscidae in the extreme Southern of Brazil. The collection of pupae was performed in January and February, 2008. The pupae of M. domestica and S. calcitrans were collected from bovine feces using the flotation method. The pupae were individualized in glass tubes and maintained in acclimatized chamber at 27±2ºC with relative air humidity > 70% until the emergence of the flies or the parasitoids. The referred occurrence consists in the first report to Rio Grande do Sul.

  13. Saltbush-associated Asphondylia species (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in the Mediterranean Basin and their chalcidoid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorchin, Netta; Mifsud, David; Askew, Richard

    2014-10-02

    Numerous species of gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) have been recorded from saltbush (Chenopodiaceae: Atriplex) around the world but only 11 of them belong to the large cecidomyiid genus Asphondylia. Of these, two species were described in the late 19th century from complex bud galls on Atriplex halimus in the Mediterranean Basin. In the present study Asphondylia punica is redescribed, A. conglomerata is synonymized with it, and Asphondylia scopuli is described from Atriplex lanfrancoi, an endemic plant to the Maltese Islands. Descriptions are accompanied by information about the galls and life history of the gall midges, and a review of the parasitic Hymenoptera associated with A. scopuli is provided. Four species of parasitoids were found and attributed to the families Eurytomidae, Pteromalidae, Eupelmidae and Eulophidae, of which the pteromalid Mesopolobus melitensis is described as new.

  14. Effect of host decoys on the ability of the parasitoids Muscidifurax raptor and Spalangia cameroni to parasitize house fly (Diptera: Muscidae) puparia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pteromalid pupal parasitoids Muscidifurax raptor Girault and Sanders and Spalangia cameroni Perkins (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) are commonly released on livestock farms for management of house flies (Diptera: Muscidae). To be effective, parasitoids must be able to locate live host puparia in co...

  15. A new species and new records of parasitic wasps (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae of wood boring beetles from southern Western Ghats, Kerala, India

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    P.M. Sureshan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Pteromalidae (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea parasitising wood boring beetles, Cleonymus kamijoi, and two species of Pteromalidae, Trigonoderus pulcher Walker and male of Heydenia tuberculata Sureshan are reported for the first time from the southern Western Ghats, Kerala. The genus Trigonoderus Westwood is reported for the first time from India and the male of Heydenia tuberculata Sureshan is reported and described for the first time.

  16. Parasitoids (Hymenoptera of dipterous collected in manure chicken in south of Goias/ Parasitóides (Hymenoptera de dípteros coletados em fezes de galinha no sul de Goiás

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    Carlos Henrique Marchiori

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study had as objective to verify the parasitoids associated with synanthropic dipterous in manure chicken, in Itumbiara, State of Goiás, from April 2006 to March 2007. The pupae were obtained by the flotation method. They were individually placed in gelatin capsules until the emergency of the adult flies or their parasitoids. The species of parasitoids collected were: one specimen of Aphaereta sp. (Braconidae: Alysiinae, two specimens of Eurytoma sp. (Eurytomidae, 26 specimens of Nasonia vitripennis (Walker, 1836 (Pteromalidae, 65 specimens of Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani, 1875 (Pteromalidae, 38 specimens of Spalangia cameroni Perkins, 1910, (Pteromalidae, um specimen of Spalangia drosophilae Ashmead, 1887, 147 specimes de Spalangia endius Walker, 1839, three specimens of Spalangia nigra Latrielle, 1805, 10 specimens of Spalangia nigroaenea Curtis, 1839, 21 specimens of Spalangia sp. And 54 specimens of Tachinaephagus zealandicus (Ashmead, 1904 (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae. The specie more frequent was S. endius with 47.7%.Este estudo teve como objetivo verificar os parasitóides associados com dípteros sinantrópicos em fezes de galinha, em Itumbiara, Estado de Goiás, de abril de 2006 a março de 2007. As pupas foram obtidas pelo método de flutuação. Elas foram individualizadas em cápsulas de gelatina até a emergência das moscas domésticas e/ou dos seus parasitóides. As espécies de parasitóides coletados foram: um espécime de Aphaereta sp. (Braconidae: Alysiinae, dois espécimes de Eurytoma sp. (Eurytomidae, 26 espécimes de Nasonia vitripennis (Walker, 1836 (Pteromalidae, 65 espécimes de Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani, 1875 (Pteromalidae, 38 espécimes de Spalangia cameroni Perkins, 1910 (Pteromalidae, um espécime de Spalangia drosophilae Ashmead, 1887, 147 espécimes de Spalangia endius Walker, 1839, três espécimes de Spalangia nigra Latrielle, 1805, 10 espécimes de Spalangia nigroaenea Curtis, 1839, 21 esp

  17. A review of insect parasitoids associated with Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775) in Italy. 1. DipteraTachinidae and HymenopteraBraconidae (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramozzino, Pier Luigi; Loni, Augusto; Lucchi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This paper is aimed to summarize the information available on the parasitoid complex of the European Grapevine Moth (EGVM), Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775) (Lepidoptera Tortricidae) in Italy. The list is the result of the consultation of a vast bibliography published in Italy for almost two hundred years, from 1828 to date. This allowed the clarification and correction of misunderstandings and mistakes on the taxonomic position of each species listed. In Italy the complex of parasitoids detected on EGVM includes approximately 90 species belonging to ten families of Hymenoptera (Braconidae, Ichneumonidae, Chalcididae, Eulophidae, Eupelmidae, Eurytomidae, Pteromalidae, Torymidae, Trichogrammatidae, and Bethylidae) and one family of Diptera (Tachinidae). This paper deals with EGVM parasitoids of the families Tachinidae (Diptera) and Braconidae (Hymenoptera). Only two species of Tachinidae are associated to EGVM larvae in Italy, Actia pilipennis (Fallen) and Phytomyptera nigrina (Meigen), whereas the record of Eurysthaea scutellaris (Robineau-Desvoidy) is doubtful. Moreover, 21 species of Braconidae are reported to live on EGVM, but, unfortunately, eight of them were identified only at generic level. Bracon mellitor Say has been incorrectly listed among the parasitoids of Lobesia botrana. Records concerning Ascogaster rufidens Wesmael, Meteorus sp., Microgaster rufipes Nees, and Microplitis tuberculifer (Wesmael) are uncertain.

  18. A review of insect parasitoids associated with Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775 in Italy. 1. Diptera Tachinidae and Hymenoptera Braconidae (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae

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    Pier Luigi Scaramozzino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed to summarize the information available on the parasitoid complex of the European Grapevine Moth (EGVM, Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775 (Lepidoptera Tortricidae in Italy. The list is the result of the consultation of a vast bibliography published in Italy for almost two hundred years, from 1828 to date. This allowed the clarification and correction of misunderstandings and mistakes on the taxonomic position of each species listed. In Italy the complex of parasitoids detected on EGVM includes approximately 90 species belonging to ten families of Hymenoptera (Braconidae, Ichneumonidae, Chalcididae, Eulophidae, Eupelmidae, Eurytomidae, Pteromalidae, Torymidae, Trichogrammatidae, and Bethylidae and one family of Diptera (Tachinidae. This paper deals with EGVM parasitoids of the families Tachinidae (Diptera and Braconidae (Hymenoptera. Only two species of Tachinidae are associated to EGVM larvae in Italy, Actia pilipennis (Fallen and Phytomyptera nigrina (Meigen, whereas the record of Eurysthaea scutellaris (Robineau-Desvoidy is doubtful. Moreover, 21 species of Braconidae are reported to live on EGVM, but, unfortunately, eight of them were identified only at generic level. Bracon mellitor Say has been incorrectly listed among the parasitoids of L. botrana. Records concerning Ascogaster rufidens Wesmael, Meteorus sp., Microgaster rufipes Nees, and Microplitis tuberculifer (Wesmael are uncertain.

  19. Desempenho reprodutivo de Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae em pupas crioconservadas de Chrysomya megacephala Fabricius (Diptera: Calliphoridae: avaliação preliminar Reproductive performance of Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae on Chrysomya megacephala Fabricius (Diptera: Calliphoridae cryopreserved pupae: preliminary evaluation

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    Eliane Maria Vieira Milward-de-Azevedo

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o desempenho reprodutivo de Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae em pupas de Chrysomya megacephala Fabricius (Diptera: Calliphoridae previamente armazenadas a - 20ºC de temperatura, durante 77 dias, com e sem passagem prévia em nitrogênio líquido (NL por um, três e 15 minutos. O grupo controle foi caracterizado por pupas hospedeiras frescas. Os muscóides foram expostos aos parasitóides durante 72 horas. Utilizou-se a relação de uma pupa muscóide por fêmea parasitóide. A amostra de pupas frescas permitiu a emergência de 15 parasitóides/ pupa, em média, enquanto 10 parasitóides / pupa emergiram dos espécimens prévia e diretamente armazenados em freezer (-20ºC. Observou-se um acentuado decréscimo do desempenho reprodutivo dos microhimenópteros que exploraram os substratos previamente submetidos ao NL durante um, três e 15 minutos (: 6,1; 5,5 e 5,7, respectivamente. A dissecação das pupas hospedeiras revelou um expressivo número de pteromalídeos imaturos, nas amostras que foram expostas ao NL, e de adultos faratos, em todos os tratamentosThe reproductive performance of Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae was evaluated on pupae of Chrysomya megacephala Fabricius (Diptera: Calliphoridae kept at -20ºC, during 77 days, with and no previous passage for liquid nitrogen (NL by one, three and 15 minutes. Control groups were characterized for fresh pupae hosts. There was one pupa for each parasitoid. The sample of fresh pupae exhibited average of 15 emergent parasitoids / pupa while pupae stored directly at freezer (-20ºC presented an average of 10 emergent parasitoids / pupa. In the samples exposed at one, three and 15 minutes in NL, accentuated decrease was observed on emergent hymenopterans reproductive performance (: 6.1; 5.5 and 5.7 respectively. The dissection of pupae revealed a large number of immature pteromalid in the groups with liquid nitrogen passage and farate adults in

  20. Spalangia drosophilae (Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae como inimigo natural de Archisepsis scabra (Loew (Diptera: Sepsidae em fezes bovinas Spalangia drosophilae (Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae as natural enemy of Archisepsis scabra (Loew (Diptera: Sepsidae in catlle dung

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    C.H. Marchiori

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports, for the first time, the occurrence of the parasite Spalangia drosophilae (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae in pupae of Archisepsis scabra (Diptera: Sespsidae found in cow manure in the municipality of Cachoeira Dourada, GO, Brazil (18º29´S and 49º´W. Manure samples, collected at two-week intervals, were taken to the laboratory, and the pupae were extracted by water flotation. Each pupa was placed in capsules of colorless gelatin until the emergence of adult flies or their parasites. The parasitism prevalence was 5.7%.

  1. Genomic and karyotypic variation in Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae

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    Vladimir Gokhman

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830 has served as a model insect for over a century. Sequencing of the 11 additional Drosophila Fallen, 1823 species marks substantial progress in comparative genomics of this genus. By comparison, practically nothing is known about the genome size or genome sequences of parasitic wasps of Drosophila. Here, we present the first comparative analysis of genome size and karyotype structures of Drosophila parasitoids of the Leptopilina Förster, 1869 and Ganaspis Förster, 1869 species. The gametic genome size of Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896 is larger than those of the three Leptopilina species studied. The genome sizes of all parasitic wasps studied here are also larger than those known for all Drosophila species. Surprisingly, genome sizes of these Drosophila parasitoids exceed the average value known for all previously studied Hymenoptera. The haploid chromosome number of both Leptopilina heterotoma (Thomson, 1862 and L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 is ten. A chromosomal fusion appears to have produced a distinct karyotype for L. boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979 (n = 9, whose genome size is smaller than that of wasps of the L. heterotoma clade. Like L. boulardi, the haploid chromosome number for G. xanthopoda is also nine. Our studies reveal a positive, but non linear, correlation between the genome size and total chromosome length in Drosophila parasitoids. These Drosophila parasitoids differ widely in their host range, and utilize different infection strategies to overcome host defense. Their comparative genomics, in relation to their exceptionally well-characterized hosts, will prove to be valuable for understanding the molecular basis of the host-parasite arms race and how such mechanisms shape the genetic structures of insect communities.

  2. On the parasitoid complex of butterflies with descriptions of two new species of parasitic wasps (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) from Goa, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankita; Gawas, Sandesh M; Bhambure, Ravindra

    2015-11-01

    In comprehensive rearing of butterflies from Goa, India, an interesting parasitoid complex of wasps and tachinid flies was found. Two new species of parasitic wasps are described and illustrated: Tetrastichus thetisae n. sp. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregarious parasitoid reared from the pupa of Curetis thetis (Drury) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) on the host plant Derris sp., and Sympiesis thyrsisae n. sp. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregarious parasitoid reared from the caterpillar of Gangara thyrsis (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) on the host plant Cocos nucifera L. Additionally, the following host-parasitoid associations are recorded: Amblypodia anita Hewitson (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) with Parapanteles sp. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae); Coladenia indrani (Moore) (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) with Sympiesis sp. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae); Danaus chrysippus L. (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) with Sturmia convergens (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tachinidae); Idea malabarica Moore (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) with Brachymeria sp. (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) and Palexorista sp. (Diptera: Tachinidae); Notocrypta curvifascia Felder & Felder (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) with Cotesia erionotae (Wilkinson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae); and Rapala sp. (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) with an inominate species close to Aplomya spp. (Diptera: Tachinidae). This discovery is the first record of Tetrastichus as parasitoid of Curetis thetis, Sympiesis as parasitoid of Gangara thyrsis and Coladenia indrani, Brachymeria and Palexorista as parasitoids of Idea malabarica, and Cotesia erionotae as parasitoid of Notocrypta curvifascia. Data on habitat, brief diagnoses and host records for all parasitoids are provided.

  3. Description of the male of Psyllaephagus euphyllurae (Masi (Hymenoptera, Encyrtidae, a parasitoid of the olive psylla, Euphyllura olivina (Costa (Hemiptera, Liviidae, with notes on its reproductive traits and hyperparasitoids

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    S.V. Triapitsyn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A colony of the encyrtid wasp Psyllaephagus euphyllurae (Masi (Hymenoptera, Encyrtidae has been established in the quarantine laboratory at the University of California, Riverside, California, USA as part of a classical biological control program against its invasive host, the olive psylla, Euphyllura olivina (Costa (Hemiptera, Psylloidea, Liviidae, an important pest of olives in some parts of the world. The colony originators were reared from the same host found on abandoned, commercial olives in Catalonia, Spain; additional collections were made in Murcia. The parasitoid reproduces primarily by thelytoky; however, a few occasional males have been found in the field in Spain, but not in colonies reared under quarantine or laboratory conditions. Here, the female of P. euphyllurae is redescribed and its male is described and illustrated for the first time; the only previous mention of male P. euphyllurae was from Tunisia, reared from the same psyllid host but without any details on its morphology. A lectotype is designated for Encyrtus euphyllurae Masi. Information is given on the results of genetic matching between the two sexes of the parasitoid and also on the presence of the bacterial Wolbachia symbiont that apparently is affecting reproduction of this species, including its sex ratio in the field. Two species of hyperparasitoids have also emerged from the parasitized olive psylla nymphs from Catalonia: numerous specimens of Apocharips trapezoidea (Hartig (Hymenoptera, Figitidae and one specimen of a Pachyneuron sp. (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae.

  4. Side Effects of IGR Cyromazine on Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, a Parasitic Wasp of House Fly Pupae

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    B Vazirianzadeh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Combination of cyromazine as an Insect Growth Regulator (IGR and Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenop¬tera: Pteromalidae a parasitic wasp may be an effective tool for reducing the house-fly populations in poultry houses and livestock farms. This study was conducted to assess the side effects of the IGR cyromazine on the level of parasit¬ism and numbers and the longevity of emerged N. vitripennis parasitoids from house fly pupae.Methods: Cyromazine treated cloth target was used as the contaminating method of the parasitoids which was ap¬plied in this research study. Results: The Weibull distribution showed that there was no significant difference among controls and cyromazine treated targets for longevity data. There was no significant effect of cyromazine on the level of parasitism of N. vitripennis using 2 test. One-way ANOVA showed that the actual numbers emerging were significantly higher in the control than in two cyromazine treatments; however, it is a useful phenomenon because of reducing the hyperparasitism.Conclusion: There is a good consistency between using N. vitripennis and 1.1% or 0.9% cyromazine treated targets. There¬fore cyromazine treated targets can be applied as a safe delivery vehicle for applying the cyromazine IGR in the poultry houses and livestock farms in an Integrated Pest Management (IPM program.

  5. Side Effects of IGR Cyromazine on Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, a Parasitic Wasp of House Fly Pupae

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    B Vazirianzadeh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Combination of cyromazine as an Insect Growth Regulator (IGR and Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenop¬tera: Pteromalidae a parasitic wasp may be an effective tool for reducing the house-fly populations in poultry houses and livestock farms. This study was conducted to assess the side effects of the IGR cyromazine on the level of parasit¬ism and numbers and the longevity of emerged N. vitripennis parasitoids from house fly pupae."nMethods: Cyromazine treated cloth target was used as the contaminating method of the parasitoids which was ap¬plied in this research study. "nResults: The Weibull distribution showed that there was no significant difference among controls and cyromazine treated targets for longevity data. There was no significant effect of cyromazine on the level of parasitism of N. vitripennis using 2 test. One-way ANOVA showed that the actual numbers emerging were significantly higher in the control than in two cyromazine treatments; however, it is a useful phenomenon because of reducing the hyperparasitism."nConclusion: There is a good consistency between using N. vitripennis and 1.1% or 0.9% cyromazine treated targets. There¬fore cyromazine treated targets can be applied as a safe delivery vehicle for applying the cyromazine IGR in the poultry houses and livestock farms in an Integrated Pest Management (IPM program.

  6. Persistent pods of the tree Acacia caven: a natural refuge for diverse insects including Bruchid beetles and the parasitoids Trichogrammatidae, Pteromalidae and Eulophidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Rousse, D

    2006-01-01

    The persistent pods of the tree, Acacia caven that do not fall from the tree provide opportunities for the appearance of a diverse group of insects the following season. Such pods collected during the spring of 1999 in Chile were indehiscent with highly sclerified pod walls. In contrast, persistent pods collected in Uruguay after a wet winter and spring (2002) were partially dehiscent, inducing the deterioration of the woody pods, and consequently exposing the seeds. These persistent pods are a natural refuge for insect species, namely two bruchid beetles (Pseudopachymeria spinipes, Stator furcatus), one scolytidae (Dendroctonus sp), lepidopterous larvae, ant colonies (Camponotus sp), one species of oophagous parasitoid (Uscana espinae group senex), the gregarious larval-pupae parasitoid Monoksa dorsiplana (Pteromalidae) and two species of Horismenus spp. (Eulophidae). The patriline of M. dorsiplana is frequently formed by 1 son + 7 daughters.

  7. The spatial distribution of Hymenoptera parasitoids in a forest reserve in Central Amazonia, Manaus, AM, Brazil

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    RB. Querino

    Full Text Available Parasitoids are of great importance to forest ecosystems due to their ecological role in the regulation of the population of other insects. The species richness and abundance of parasitoids in the forest canopy and understory, both on the borders and in the interior of a tropical forest reserve in Central Amazonia were investigated. For a 12-month period, specimen collections were made every 15 days from suspended traps placed in the forest canopy and in the understory strata, both on the border and in the interior of forest areas. A total of 12,835 Hymenoptera parasitoids from 23 families were acquired. Braconidae, Diapriidae, Mymaridae, Eulophidae, and Scelionidae were the most represented in the area and strata samples. The results indicate that there were no significant differences in the species richness or abundance of Hymenoptera between the forest borders and the inner forest. The data does show that the presence of Hymenoptera is significantly greater in the understory in both the border and interior areas than in the canopy (vertical stratification. Aphelinidae and Ceraphronidae were significantly associated with the inner forest, while the other seven families with the border of the reserve. The abundance of Hymenoptera parasitoids presented seasonal variations during the year related to the rainy and dry seasons.

  8. Primera cita de la Argentina de Ophelimus maskelli (Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae y su parasitoide, Closterocerus chamaeleon (Girault (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A AQUINO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Se cita por primera vez de la Argentina la presencia de la avispa galí - cola exótica Ophelimus maskelli (Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae y su para - sitoide natural, Closterocerus chamaeleon (Girault (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae en Eucalyptus camaldulensis de la provincia de Buenos Aires. Ophelimus maskelli es una especie invasora de origen Australiano que ha sido reportada como plaga de los eucaliptos en numerosos países de Asia, Europa y América. Closterocerus chamaleon es un parasitoide exótico cuyo potencial como biocontrolador de O. maskelli está siendo evaluado en algunos países.

  9. Reproductive and developmental biology of the emerald ash borer parasitoid Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) as affected by temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive pest of serious concern in North America. To complement ongoing biological control efforts, Spathius galinae Belokobylskij and Strazenac (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a recently-described specialist parasitoid of ...

  10. Effect of Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) host plants on life-history parameters of the parasitoid Apanteles taragamae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dannon, A.E.; Tamo, M.; Agboton, C.; Huis, van A.; Dicke, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of four host plant species of the herbivore Maruca vitrata Fabricius (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) on development time, longevity, fecundity and sex ratio of the parasitoid Apanteles taragamae Viereck (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) was investigated under laboratory conditions. The larvae were

  11. Parasitism of Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) by the endoparasitic wasp Pteromalus puparum (Hymenoptera:Pteromalidae): Effects of parasitism on differential hemocyte counts, micro-and ultra-structures of host hemocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-Qian Zhang; Jia Huang; Jia-Ying Zhu; Gong-Yin Ye

    2012-01-01

    Parasitism by the endoparasitic wasp Pteromalus puparum (Hymenoptera:Pteromalidae) by using only its associated venom,can suppress the immunal responses of Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera:Pieridae).However,up to now,current knowledge of the mechanisms has been limited.The response of host hemocytes to parasitism was investigated using a combination of light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Five hemocyte types,prohemocytes (PRs),granulocytes (GRs),plasmatocytes (PLs),oenocytoids (OEs) and coagulocytes (COs),were observed and characterized from both unparasitized and parasitized Pieris rapae pupae.Light microscopy showed that both GRs and PLs became more round and spread abnormally after parasitism,whereas the shape of other types of hemocytes remained unaffected.In addition,the size of PRs and PLs became larger while OEs became smaller.The proportion of PRs significantly increased after parasitism and that of PLs decreased by 43.9%,but there was no significant increase of GRs and OEs.TEM showed that all types of hemocytes except COs were damaged to various degrees after parasitism,especially resulting in electron opaque cytoplasm and nucleus,fewer cell organelles of rough endoplasmic reticulum,mitochondria and vesicles.Our results indicate that parasitism by P.puparum affects differential hemocyte counts and structures of host hemocytes,particularly for GRs and PLs,which may be the main cause of the parasitoid suppressing host cellular immune responses.

  12. Molecular approaches identify known species, reveal cryptic species and verify host specificity of Chinese Philotrypesis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mei-Jiao; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Bian, Sheng-Nan; Li, Yan-Wei; Niu, Li-Ming; Hu, Hao-Yuan; Wu, Wen-Shan; Murphy, Robert W; Huang, Da-Wei

    2012-07-01

    Philotrypesis, a major component of the fig wasp community (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), is a model taxon for studying male fighting and mating behaviour. Its extreme sexual dimorphism and male polymorphism render species identification uncertain and in-depth research on its ecology, behaviour and other evolutionary topics challenging. The fig wasps' enclosed habitat within the syconia makes their mating behaviour inaccessible, to the extent of matching conspecific females and males. In this study, we combine morphological and molecular analyses to identify species of Philotrypesis sampled from south China and to associate their extraordinarily dimorphic genders and labile male morphologies. Morphological evaluations of females identify 22 species and 28 male morphs. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2 data detect 21 species using females, and 15 species among the males. Most of the males match the species as delimited by females. Both markers reveal cryptic species in P. quadrisetosa on Ficus vasculosa. Most species of wasps live on one species of fig but three species co-occur in two hosts (F. microcarpa and F. benjamina), which indicates host switching.

  13. Pushing the limits - two new species of Pteromalus (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea, Pteromalidae) from Central Europe with remarkable morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Two new species, Pteromalusbriani sp. n. and Pteromalusjanstai sp. n., with unusual characters are described from the Central Plateau and the Alps in Switzerland, respectively. Pteromalusbriani sp. n. is remarkable in that it has the metatibia quite abruptly expanded before the middle. This type of modification of the hind tibia is unique within the Pteromalidae and probably also the entire Chalcidoidea. It is also very rare in other parasitic wasps, where it is suspected to be associated with pheromone glands. The species is a gregarious endoparasitoid of pupae of Vanessaatalanta (Linnaeus) and Aglaisurticae (Linnaeus), two common butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) in Europe. It is furthermore a koinobiont parasitoid ovipositing in an early larval stage of the host. The other species, Pteromalusjanstai sp. n., shows a flattened mesosoma. A dorsoventrally depressed body is a unique feature within the genus Pteromalus, but known from a number species in unrelated genera and subfamilies. The two records demonstrate that it is possible to discover entirely new species with extraordinary characters even in one of the taxonomically most thoroughly explored parts of the world.

  14. Pushing the limits – two new species of Pteromalus (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea, Pteromalidae) from Central Europe with remarkable morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two new species, Pteromalus briani sp. n. and Pteromalus janstai sp. n., with unusual characters are described from the Central Plateau and the Alps in Switzerland, respectively. Pteromalus briani sp. n. is remarkable in that it has the metatibia quite abruptly expanded before the middle. This type of modification of the hind tibia is unique within the Pteromalidae and probably also the entire Chalcidoidea. It is also very rare in other parasitic wasps, where it is suspected to be associated with pheromone glands. The species is a gregarious endoparasitoid of pupae of Vanessa atalanta (Linnaeus) and Aglais urticae (Linnaeus), two common butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) in Europe. It is furthermore a koinobiont parasitoid ovipositing in an early larval stage of the host. The other species, Pteromalus janstai sp. n., shows a flattened mesosoma. A dorsoventrally depressed body is a unique feature within the genus Pteromalus, but known from a number species in unrelated genera and subfamilies. The two records demonstrate that it is possible to discover entirely new species with extraordinary characters even in one of the taxonomically most thoroughly explored parts of the world. PMID:26261432

  15. Parasitóides de Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Fanniidae coletados em Caldas Novas, Goiás, Brasil Parasitoids of Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Fanniidae collected in Caldas Novas, Goiás, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Marchiori

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Com este estudo, objetivou-se verificar as espécies de insetos parasitando Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Fanniidaeem Caldas Novas, Goiás, de agosto de 2003 a maio de 2004, empregando como atrativo de alimentação iscas formadas por fezes humanas, fígado bovino e peixe, com pupas sendo isoladas pelo método da flutuação, em água e individualizadas em cápsulas de gelatina até a emergência das moscas e/ou dos seus parasitóides. As porcentagens de parasitismo apresentada por Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani, 1875 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, Spalangia nigra Latrielle, 1805 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae Paraganaspis egeria Díaz, Gallardo & Walsh., 1996 (Hymenoptera: Figitidae e Spalangia drosophilae Ashmead, 1887 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae foram de 4,3, 1,5 0,9 e 0,6%, respectivamente. A porcentagem total de parasitismo observada foi de 7,4%. Relata-se a primeira ocorrência de S. nigra em pupas de F. pusio no Brasil.The aim of this study was to report the insect species parasitizing Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Fanniidae, in Caldas Novas, State of Goiás, between August 2003 and May 2004. Flies were attracted to baits consisting of human feces, bovine liver and fish, with the pupae being isolated by the flotation method, in water, and individually placed in gelatin capsules until the emergence of the flies and/or their parasitoids. The parasitism percentages presented by Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani, 1875 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, Spalangia nigra Latrielle, 1805 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, Paraganaspis egeria Díaz, Gallardo & Walsh, 1996 (Hymenoptera: Figitidae and Spalangia drosophilae Ashmead, 1887 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae were 4.3, 1.5, 0.9 and 0.6%, respectively. The total percentage of parasitism was 7.4%. This study reports the first occurrence of S. nigra in pupae of F. pusio in Brazil.

  16. Transgenic cry1C(⁎) gene rough rice line T1C-19 does not change the host preferences of the non-target stored product pest, Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), and its parasitoid wasp, Anisopteromalus calandrae (Howard) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Yan, Miao-Jun; Zhang, Aijun; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-10-01

    Rough rice grains are often stored for extended periods before they are used or consumed. However, during storage, the rough rice is vulnerable to insect infestation, resulting in significant economic loss. Previous studies have shown that volatiles cues, physical characteristics, and taste chemicals on the grains could be the important key behavior factors for storage insect pests to locate the hosts and select oviposition sites. It is also well known that the transgenic Bt rough rice line T1C-19, which expresses a cry1C(⁎) gene has a high resistance to Lepidoptera pests. However, there were no evidences to show the consequences of host preference for non-target insect pests after growing Bt transgenic rice. In this study, the potential key factors of Bt rough rice were investigated for their impacts on the behaviors of non-target pest lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica, the main weevil pest of grain and its parasitic wasps Anisopteromalus calandrae, the natural enemy of the beetle. Both electronic nose and electronic tongue analyses showed that the parameters of Bt rough rice were analogous to those of the non-Bt rough rice. The volatile profiles of Bt and non-Bt rough rice examined by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were similar. For most volatile compounds, there were no significantly quantitative differences in compound quantities between Bt and non-Bt rough rice. The densities of sclereids and trichomes on the rough rice husk surface were statistically equal in Bt and non-Bt rough rice. The non-target pest, R. dominica, and its parasitoid wasp, A. calandrae, were attracted to both rough rice and could not distinguish the transgenic T1C-19 from the isogenic rough rice. These results demonstrated that Bt rough rice has no negative impacts on the host preference behaviors of non-target stored product pest R. dominica and its parasitoid A. calandrae.

  17. Comparaison de quelques caractéristiques biologiques entre Dinarmus basalis Rond. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae élevé soit sur son hôte habituel Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae soit sur Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus Schaef. ou Bruchidius lineatopygus Pic. identifiés comme hôtes de substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuto, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of some Biological Characteristics between Dinarmus basalis Rond. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae Reared either on his Habitual Host Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae or on Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus Schaef. and Bruchidius lineatopygus Pic. Identified as Substitution Hosts. In this study, we have measured some biological parameters of Dinarmus basalis Rond. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae when this parasitoid grows on three hosts: Callosobruchus maculatus F. (usual host, Acanthoscelides macrophthalma Schaef. and Bruchidius lineatopygus Pic. (substitution hosts. The results of this comparative study in no choice situation show that, life duration and development duration of this parasitoid are identical in laboratory conditions. By contrast, the female fecundity, the sexual rate and the parasitism rate of D. basalis are different according to the hosts presented. Although such differences appear to be small between C. maculatus and A. macrophthalmus. In presence of these two species, the number of eggs laid by the female of D. basalis is respectively 61 ± 5.24 and 54 ± 5.60, the sexual rate 37.63 ± 2.13% and 41.73 ± 3.69% and the parasitism rate 85.46 ± 2.61% and 76.48 ± 5.90%. This indicates that these two Bruchids can be used as hosts to D. basalis for a mass production. In presence of B. lineatopygus, the fecundity and the parasitism rate of D. basalis female are very low and the sexual rate more favourable of the males. This situation is unfavourable for a parasitoid production. When D. basalis females are placed in choice situation with equal number of the hosts nowely C. maculatus and A. macrophthalmus, the parasitism rate obtained, is higher for C. maculatus that of A. macrophthalmus. This parasitism rate remains high for C. maculatus even when the other host A. macrophthalmus is twice the number of C. maculatus. Thus the parasitoid seems to have a preference for his natural host. However, A. macrophthalmus can

  18. PERBANDINGAN KEANEKARAGAMAN HYMENOPTERA PARASITOID PADA AGROEKOSISTEM KEDELAI DENGAN APLIKASI DAN TANPA APLIKASI INSEKTISIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrival Hendrival

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Sistem pengelolaan tanaman kedelai dengan penggunaan insektisida sintetik yang intensif akan menurunkan keanekaragaman jenis Hymenoptera parasitoid. Penelitian bertujuan untuk memban-dingkan keanekaragaman Hymenoptera parasitoid pada agroekosistem kedelai dengan dan tanpa aplikasi insektisida sintetik. Pengumpulan data serangga menggunakan perangkap dari jaring serangga dan nampan kuning. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa indeks keanekaragaman jenis pada fase pertumbuhan vegetatif dan generatif kedelai dengan aplikasi insektisida lebih rendah dibandingkan dengan yang tanpa aplikasi insektisida, yang keduanya tergolong sedang. Indeks kemerataan jenis pada fase pertumbuhan vegetatif dan generatif dari kedua agroekosistem kedelai tergolong tinggi. Indeks kekayaan jenis pada fase vegetatif dari agroekosistem kedelai dengan aplikasi insektisida tergolong rendah (0<2,3955≤2,5, sedangkan pada fase generatif tergolong sedang (0<3,6118≤4. Indeks kekayaan jenis pada fase vegetatif (0<2,6229≤4 dan generatif (0<3,8287≤4 dari agroekosistem kedelai tanpa aplikasi insektisida tergolong sedang. Komunitas Hymenoptera parasitoid pada agroekosistem kedelai tanpa aplikasi insektisida memiliki kemiripan lebih rendah daripada yang dengan aplikasi insektisida. Aplikasi insektisida mempengaruhi indeks kekayaan jenis pada fase generatif dan kemiripan komunitasnya, yaitu nilainya lebih rendah daripada yang tanpa insektisida. Abstract The management system of soybean agroecosystem with an intensive use of synthetic insecticides will reduce the diversity of parasitoid Hymenoptera species. The study aimed to compare the diversity of the parasitoids in soybean agroecosystem with and without insecticide application. The collection of the parasitoid used insect net and yellow tray. The results showed that the diversity index of the parasitoids during vegetative and generative growth of the soybean with the insecticide application was lower than the one without

  19. Can the Understory Affect the Hymenoptera Parasitoids in a Eucalyptus Plantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall’Oglio, Onice Teresinha; Ribeiro, Rafael Coelho; Ramalho, Francisco de Souza; Fernandes, Flávio Lemes; Wilcken, Carlos Frederico; de Assis Júnior, Sebastião Lourenço; Rueda, Rosa Angélica Plata; Serrão, José Eduardo; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2016-01-01

    The understory in forest plantations can increase richness and diversity of natural enemies due to greater plant species richness. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the presence of the understory and climatic season in the region (wet or dry) can increase the richness and abundance of Hymenoptera parasitoids in Eucalyptus plantations, in the municipality of Belo Oriente, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. In each eucalyptus cultivation (five areas of cultivation) ten Malaise traps were installed, five with the understory and five without it. A total of 9,639 individuals from 30 families of the Hymenoptera parasitoids were collected, with Mymaridae, Scelionidae, Encyrtidae and Braconidae being the most collected ones with 4,934, 1,212, 619 and 612 individuals, respectively. The eucalyptus stands with and without the understory showed percentage of individuals 45.65% and 54.35% collected, respectively. The understory did not represent a positive effect on the overall abundance of the individuals Hymenoptera in the E. grandis stands, but rather exerted a positive effect on the specific families of the parasitoids of this order. PMID:26954578

  20. Can the Understory Affect the Hymenoptera Parasitoids in a Eucalyptus Plantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Oglio, Onice Teresinha; Ribeiro, Rafael Coelho; Ramalho, Francisco de Souza; Fernandes, Flávio Lemes; Wilcken, Carlos Frederico; Assis Júnior, Sebastião Lourenço de; Rueda, Rosa Angélica Plata; Serrão, José Eduardo; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2016-01-01

    The understory in forest plantations can increase richness and diversity of natural enemies due to greater plant species richness. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the presence of the understory and climatic season in the region (wet or dry) can increase the richness and abundance of Hymenoptera parasitoids in Eucalyptus plantations, in the municipality of Belo Oriente, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. In each eucalyptus cultivation (five areas of cultivation) ten Malaise traps were installed, five with the understory and five without it. A total of 9,639 individuals from 30 families of the Hymenoptera parasitoids were collected, with Mymaridae, Scelionidae, Encyrtidae and Braconidae being the most collected ones with 4,934, 1,212, 619 and 612 individuals, respectively. The eucalyptus stands with and without the understory showed percentage of individuals 45.65% and 54.35% collected, respectively. The understory did not represent a positive effect on the overall abundance of the individuals Hymenoptera in the E. grandis stands, but rather exerted a positive effect on the specific families of the parasitoids of this order.

  1. Development of microsporidia-infected Muscidifurax raptor (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscididfurax raptor, a pupal parasitoid of house flies and other filth flies, is commonly infected with the microsporidium Nosema muscidifuracis. To determine the effects of infection on developmental time, uninfected and infected adult M. raptor were allowed to parasitize pupae of the house fly (M...

  2. KEANEKARAGAMAN HYMENOPTERA PARASITOID PADA PERKEBUNAN KELAPA SAWIT PTPN VIII CINDALI, BOGOR

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    Ichsan Luqmana Indra Putra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of parasitic Hymenoptera in PTPN VIII oil palm plantation Cindali, Bogor. One group of important natural enemies in oil palm plantation is parasitic Hymenoptera. The purpose of this research is to know the diversity and fluctuation of parasitic Hymenoptera PTPN VIII Cindali oil palm plantation. This research was conducted in 6 blocks of oil palm in September 2014 – June 2015. There were 5 plots in every observation blocks 39.2 x 39.2 m in size, and used direct and indirect method. Direct method done by 5 plants in every plots was taken randomized to observed and taken the herbivore insects to reared until the parasitic Hymenoptera came out. Observation of cover crops conducted by 3 subplots determined diagonally in every plots 9.8 x 9.8 m in size and herbivore insects was observed and collected. Indirect methods used sweep net and yellow pan trap. The result of this research, 26 parasitic Hymenoptera families was found, with the Braconidae was the most morphospecies found and the most individual amount was Scelionidae. The abundance of parasitoid in every month fluctuated.

  3. Potential of Hymenopteran larval and egg parasitoids to control stored-product beetle and moth infestation in jute bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adarkwah, C; Ulrichs, C; Schaarschmidt, S; Badii, B K; Addai, I K; Obeng-Ofori, D; Schöller, M

    2014-08-01

    The control of stored-product moths in bagged commodities is difficult because the developmental stages of the moths are protected by the bagging material from control measures such as the application of contact insecticides. Studies were carried out to assess the ability of Hymenopteran parasitoids to locate their hosts inside jute bags in the laboratory. The ability of different parasitoids to penetrate jute bags containing rice was investigated in a controlled climate chamber. Few Habrobracon hebetor (Say) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) passed through the jute material while a high percentage of Lariophagus distinguendus (Förster), Anisopteromalus calandrae (Howard) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), Theocolax elegans (Westwood) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) and Trichogramma evanescens Westwood (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) were able to enter the Petri-dishes. Significantly more L. distinguendus and T. elegans entered compared to H. hebetor. There was significant difference in the mean percentage parasitoids invading depending on species. Head capsules and/or thorax widths were measured in order to determine whether the opening in the jute material would be large enough for entry of the parasitoids. These morphometric data differed depending on parasitoid species and sex. The parasitoid Venturia canescens (Gravenhorst) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) did not enter the bags, but located host larvae inside the jute bags and parasitized rice moths Corcyra cephalonica larvae by stinging through the jute material. Venturia canescens significantly reduced the number of C. cephalonica adults emerging from the bagged rice; therefore, it could be released in storage rooms containing bagged rice for biological control of C. cephalonica. The use of parasitoids to suppress stored-product insect pests in bagged commodities could become a valuable supplement to the use of synthetic pesticides.

  4. Species of Spalangia (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae collected from buffalo dung in Itumbiara, Goias, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel E. V. Milhomem

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This study had the objective of determining the species of Spalangia in pupae of muscoid Diptera present in buffalo dung, collected in the municipality of Itumbiara, GO, from May to December 2003. The dipterous pupae were obtained by the flotation method. They were individually placed in gelatin capsules until the emergence of the flies and/or their parasitoids. The overall prevalence of parasitism was 2.59%. The prevalences of parasitism presented by the parasitoid species Spalangia cameroni (Perkins, Spalangia drosophilae (Ashmead, Spalangia endius (Walker, Spalangia nigra (Letraille and Spalangia nigroaenea (Curtis were 0.53%, 1.37%, 0.15%, 0.04% and 0.49%, respectively.

  5. Reproductive Capacities and Development of a Seed Bruchid Beetle, Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus, a Potential Host for the Mass Rearing of the Parasitoid, Dinarmus basalis

    OpenAIRE

    TQ, Effowe; K, Amevoin; Y, Nuto; D, Mondedji; IA, Glitho

    2010-01-01

    The reproductive capacities and development of the seed beetle Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus (Schaeffer) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), found in Togo, were determined under natural conditions in a Guinean zone for its use as a substitute host for the mass rearing of the parasitoid Dinarmus basalts Rond (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), a biological agent for the control of beetles that are pests of cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walpers (Fabales: Fabaceae). Population dynamics at the field level; and s...

  6. Sugar convertibility in the parasitoid Cotesia glomerata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, C.; Wäckers, F.L.; Dorn, S.

    2005-01-01

    Lack of suitable sugar sources for adult parasitic wasps is an important cause of failure in biological control programs, but the metabolic constraints of sugar feeding are poorly understood. Here we investigated the suitability of 11 naturally occurring sugars as energy sources for the parasitoid C

  7. Automictic parthenogenesis in the parasitoid Venturia canescens (Hymenoptera : Ichneumonidae) revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukeboom, LW; Pijnacker, LP; Traut, W.

    2000-01-01

    Both arrhenotokous and thelytokous reproduction are known to occur in the parasitoid wasp Venturia canescens. The cytological mechanism of thelytoky was previously reported to involve the formation of a restitution metaphase after the reduction division, but the exact nature of the subsequent divisi

  8. Toxicidad de insecticidas sobre Catolaccus hunteri Crawford (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) parasitoide de Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    OpenAIRE

    Murillo Hernández, Juan Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Cuando no se puede evitar el uso de insecticidas es recomendable que la propuesta de manejo de sus plagas incluya el efecto de dichos insecticidas sobre los enemigos naturales (EN). En el presente estudio se evaluó el efecto de la residualidad y la toxicidad letal y subletal de los insecticidas beta-cyfluthrin, bifenazate, clorantraniliprol, flonicamid, spirotetramat y thiametoxam sobre Catolaccus hunteri, un ectoparasitoide del picudo del chile, Anthonomus eugenii. En las evaluaciones se emp...

  9. Toxicidad de insecticidas sobre Catolaccus hunteri Crawford (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) parasitoide de Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    OpenAIRE

    Murillo Hernández, Juan Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Cuando no se puede evitar el uso de insecticidas es recomendable que la propuesta de manejo de sus plagas incluya el efecto de dichos insecticidas sobre los enemigos naturales (EN). En el presente estudio se evaluó el efecto de la residualidad y la toxicidad letal y subletal de los insecticidas beta-cyfluthrin, bifenazate, clorantraniliprol, flonicamid, spirotetramat y thiametoxam sobre Catolaccus hunteri, un ectoparasitoide del picudo del chile, Anthonomus eugenii. En las evaluaciones se emp...

  10. Parasitoids of flies collected in chicken viscera in Itumbiara, Goiás, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchiori C.H.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo determinar as espécies de parasitoides associados com moscas coletadas em vísceras de galinha, em Itumbiara, Goiás. Armadilhas contendo vísceras de galinha como isca foram utilizadas para atrair a moscas. As pupas, obtidas pelo método de flutuação, foram colocadas individualmente em cápsulas de gelatina (nmasculine 00 e mantidas em laboratório até a emergência das moscas e/ou dos parasitoides. A prevalência total de parasitismo foi de 20,0%. Brachymeria podagrica, Hemencyrtus sp. (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae, Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, Paraganaspis egeria (Díaz, Gallardo & Wash (Hymenoptera: Figitidae, apresentaram prevalência de parasitismo de 8,9%, 10,8%, 0,9% e 0,3%, respectivamente.

  11. Two new Aprostocetus species (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), fortuitous parasitoids of invasive eulophid gall inducers (Tetrastichinae) on Eucalyptus and Erythrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Man-Miao; Lin, Yu-Che; Wu, Yaojun; Fisher, Nicole; Saimanee, Titiporn; Sangtongpraow, Benjakhun; Zhu, Chaodong; Chiu, William Chien-Hsien; La Salle, John

    2014-08-01

    Two closely related new species of Aprostocetus Westwood (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae) are described as fortuitous parasitoids of invasive gall inducers in two other genera of Tetrastichinae, Leptocybe Fisher & LaSalle and Quadrastichus Girault. Aprostocetus causalis La Salle & Wu is a parasitoid of Leptocybe invasa Fisher & La Salle on Eucalyptus spp. (Myrtaceae) in China and Thailand, and A. felix La Salle, Yang & Lin is a parasitoid of Quadrastichus erythrinae Kim on Erythrina spp. (Fabaceae) in Taiwan. Epitetrastichus nigriventris Girault, 1913 is removed from synonymy from Aprostocetus gala (Walker), and treated as the valid species A. nigriventris (Girault). 

  12. Dirhinus giffardii (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae, parasitoid affecting Black Soldier Fly production systems in West Africa

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    Emilie Devic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Interest for insect farming is currently growing globally. Conditions in West Africa appear suitable for developing such farming systems that can benefit communities by improving livelihoods, food and feed security or sanitation. In Ghana and Mali, the Black Soldier Fly (Hermetia illucens Linnaeus, 1758 is being produced for waste recycling and animal feed. In a two stages process (egg and larvae production, egg production was hampered by a pupal parasitoid, Dirhinus giffardii Silvestri, 1913 (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae, which reduced future broodstock by almost 72%. This is the first time D. giffardii is reported as a parasitoid of H. illucens pupae and one of the first reports of parasitism in this commercially important fly species. The introduction of precautionary measures is highly recommended for the success of H. illucens production systems in West Africa.

  13. Parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera from puparia of sarcosaprophagous flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae; Sarcophagidae in Buenos Aires, Argentina

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    Adriana OLIVA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Se registró la emergencia de parasitoides (Hymenoptera de crías experimentales de Diptera sarcosaprófagas (Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, atraídas a cebos de carne bovina, en Buenos Aires (Argentina durante 1998-2003. Se determinaron cuatro taxones: Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead (Encyrtidae, Brachymeria podagrica (Fabricius (Chalcididae, Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Pteromaliidae y Alysia sp. (Braconidae: Alysiinae. Sólo las dos primeras especies resultaron abundantes en todos los años. Se ha graficado el número total de emergencias de cada especie para cada mes, junto con las temperaturas promedio máxima y mínima.

  14. A new species of Tamarixia Mercet (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae), parasitoid of Trioza aguacate Hollis & Martin (Hemiptera, Triozidae) in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefremova, Zoya; González-Santarosa, Graciela; Lomeli-Flores, J Refugio; Bautista-Martínez, Néstor

    2014-01-01

    Tamarixia aguacatensis Yefremova, sp. n. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae) is described from Mexico as a parasitoid of the avocado psyllid, Trioza aguacate Hollis & Martin (Hemiptera: Triozidae). Trioza aguacate is a serious pest of avocado, Persea americana Miller. A key to the species of Tamarixia Mercet in Mexico is given.

  15. A new species of Tamarixia Mercet (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae, parasitoid of Trioza aguacate Hollis & Martin (Hemiptera, Triozidae in Mexico

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    Zoya Yefremova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tamarixia aguacatensis Yefremova, sp. n. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae is described from Mexico as a parasitoid of the avocado psyllid, Trioza aguacate Hollis & Martin (Hemiptera: Triozidae. Trioza aguacate is a serious pest of avocado, Persea americana Miller. A key to the species of Tamarixia Mercet in Mexico is given.

  16. A new species of Tamarixia Mercet (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae), parasitoid of Trioza aguacate Hollis & Martin (Hemiptera, Triozidae) in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefremova, Zoya; González-Santarosa, Graciela; Lomeli-Flores, J. Refugio; Bautista-Martínez, Néstor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tamarixia aguacatensis Yefremova, sp. n. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae) is described from Mexico as a parasitoid of the avocado psyllid, Trioza aguacate Hollis & Martin (Hemiptera: Triozidae). Trioza aguacate is a serious pest of avocado, Persea americana Miller. A key to the species of Tamarixia Mercet in Mexico is given. PMID:24478580

  17. Biological parameters and thermal requirements of the parasitoid Praon volucre (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) with Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) as host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conti, De B.F.; Bueno, V.H.P.; Sampaio, M.V.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the biology of Praon volucre (Haliday, 1833) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas, 1878) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) hosts was studied and the thermal requirements of the parasitoid were determined. Experiments were carried out at 16, 19, 22, 25, and 28

  18. Side-Effects of Glyphosate to the Parasitoid Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecca, C S; Bueno, A F; Pasini, A; Silva, D M; Andrade, K; Filho, D M Z

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the side-effects of glyphosate to the parasitoid Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) when parasitoids were exposed to this chemical at the pupal (inside host eggs) and adult stages. Bioassays were conducted under laboratory conditions according to the International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC) standard methods for testing side-effects of pesticides to egg parasitoids. Different glyphosate-based pesticides (Roundup Original®, Roundup Ready®, Roundup Transorb®, Roundup WG®, and Zapp Qi®) were tested at the same acid equivalent concentration. Treatments were classified following the IOBC toxicity categories as (1) harmless, (2) slightly harmful, (3) moderately harmful, and (4) harmful. When tested against T. remus adults, Roundup Original®, Roundup Ready®, Roundup Transorb®, and Roundup WG® reduced parasitism 2 days after parasitoid emergence, being classified as slightly harmful. Differently, when tested against T. remus pupae, all tested glyphosate-based products did not differ in their lethal effect and therefore did not reduce T. remus adult emergence or parasitism capacity, being classified as harmless. However, differences on sublethal toxicity were found. Parasitism of individuals emerging from parasitized eggs sprayed at the pupal stage of T. remus with Zapp Qi® was lower compared to control, but parasitism was still higher than 66%, and therefore, Zapp Qi® was still classified as harmless. In conclusion, all tested glyphosate-based products can be used in agriculture without negative impact to T. remus as none was classified as harmful or moderately harmful to this parasitoid when exposure occurred at the pupal or adult stages.

  19. KAPASITAS REPRODUKSI PARASITOID TELUR Trichogrammatoidea nana Zehntner (Hymenoptera:Trichogrammatidae

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    - Sujak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Trichogramma nana is one species of egg parasitoids that are polifag. insect pests that attack crops such as soybean pod borer and rice. Research conducted at the Laboratory of Entomology Research Institute for Tobacco and Fiber Crops Malang in March until June 2009 that aims to determine the reproductive capacity of T. nana on eggs  C. cephalonica. Reproductive capacity of T. nana allegedly using the net reproductive rate (Ro, estimatedtime of one generation (T, the capacity of population growth (r, and the rate of parasitoids per day (λ. T. nana were tested  came from the rice stem borer  eggs collected from the land in the district of East Java Beji Pasuruan. Eggs C.cephalonica which is used as the host is the result of breeding in the laboratory of Entomology Research Institute for Tobacco and Fiber Crops. The results showed that T. nana has greatpotential  as  biological agents.  Most  female  progeny  produced by adult females aged 1-2 days . On the first day produced 12 and 8 tails on the second day or 40% and 27% of the total of 30 females produced by a female during life.  Reproductive capacity of  T. nana on eggs C. cephalonica the net reproductive rate  Ro = 44.7, Capacity of population growth (r = 1.78,  parasitoid growth rate per day (λ=5.9, and mean - mean length of generation (T = 10, 9 days.

  20. Critical rearing parameters of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) as affected by host plant substrate and host-parasitoid group structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Oppel, Craig

    2012-06-01

    In laboratory assays, we evaluated the potential impact of host plant substrate types, host-parasitoid group sizes (densities), and parasitoid-to-host ratios on select fitness parameters of the larval endoparasitoid Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), newly introduced for biological control of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in the United States. Results from our study showed that offspring production and critical fitness parameters (body size and sex ratio) of T. planipennisi from parasitized emerald ash borer larvae are significantly influenced by host plant substrate type, host-parasitoid group size, parasitoid-to-host ratio, or a combination in the primary exposure assay. The number of both female and male T. planipennisi progeny was significantly greater when emerald ash borer larvae were inserted into tropical ash [Fraxinus uhdei (Wenz.) Lingelsh.] logs rather than green ash (Fraxinus pensylvanica Marshall). When maintained at a constant 1:1 parasitoid-to-host ratio, assays with larger host-parasitoid group sizes (3:3-12:12) produced significantly greater numbers of both male and female offspring per parental wasp compared with those with the single host-parasitoid (1:1) group treatment. As the parasitoid-to-host ratio increased from 1:1 to 8:1 in the assay, the average brood size (number of offspring per parasitized emerald ash borer larva) increased significantly, whereas the average brood sex ratio (female to male) changed from being female-biased (6:1) to male-biased (1:2); body size of female offspring as measured by the length of ovipositor and left hind tibia also was reduced significantly. Based on these findings, we suggest that the current method of rearing T. planipennisi with artificially infested-emerald ash borer larvae use the tropical ash logs for emerald ash borer insertion, a larger (> or = 3:3) host-parasitoid group size and 1:1 parasitoid-to-host ratio in the primary

  1. Development of Spalangia cameroni and Muscidifurax raptor (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) on Live and Freeze-killed House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Pupae

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to determine if the reduced suitability of freeze-killed pupae for Pteromalidae, particularly Spalangia cameroni Perkins, is due to freezing, freezing duration or the type of freezer utilized. Processing pupae through freezing had a considerably greater negative effect on ...

  2. Towards the conservation of parasitoid wasp species in Canada: Preliminary assessment of Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Fernandez-Triana

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the first to consider braconid parasitoid wasps in conservation efforts in Canada. Out of the 28 genera of the subfamily Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae present in the country, 13 genera were studied and 16 species were identified as potential candidates to be included in the Species Candidate Lists of COSEWIC (The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. For every selected species a brief summary of its broad geographical distribution is provided, with detailed and in many cases new information of its distribution and collecting dates in Canada, hosts (Lepidoptera if known, and color pictures of all wasp species. A preliminary assessment is made using Prioritization Criteria developed by COSEWIC, and some general recommendations are made based in those analyses.

  3. First record of Rhoptrocentrus piceus Marshall (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Doryctinae as parasitoid of Psacothea hilaris hilaris (Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Loni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The species Rhoptrocentrus piceus Marshall (Hymenoptera: Braconidae was reared from the larvae of the xylophagous beetle Psacothea hilaris hilaris (Pascoe (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, an exotic pest of Ficus and Morus species native to eastern Asia. It was recorded in the north of Italy in September 2005. This discovery is the first report of this species as parasitoids of the yellow spotted longicorn beetle all over the world.

  4. Selectivity of organic compounds to the egg parasitoid Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Plastygastridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Mello da Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The selectivity of insecticides, bio-protective mixtures, and biofertilizers used in organic soybean production was evaluated for adults and pupae of the egg parasitoid Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae under laboratory conditions in accordance with protocols proposed by the International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC. The products sprayed (dosage/180L of water were: 1 Baculovírus anticarsia 140x109 cpi; 2 Bacillus thuringiensis 16.8g; 3 Azadirachtin-A, azadirachtin-B, nimbina and salamina 9.6 ppm; 4 Rotenoids 4 liters; 5 Nitrogen 1.3%, phosphorus 3.0% and total organic carbon 8.0% 3 liters; 6 Sodium silicate 2% 4 liters; 7 Copper 7% + calcium 3.3% 1.8 liters; 8 Sulfur 20% + quicklime 10% 1.8 liters; 9 Chlorpyrifos 384g (positive control; 10 Distilled H2O (negative control. The results of experiments using pupae indicate that the organic compounds were classified as harmless (Class 1, except for the copper 7% + calcium 3.3% and sulfur 20% + quicklime 10%, which were classified as slightly harmful (Class 2. The contact bioassay with adults showed that all products were classified as harmless (Class 1. Only chlorpyrifos (384g was classified as harmful (Class 4 for both stages of the parasitoid. However, the use of this product (chlorpyrifos is not permitted in organic farming, and even in conventional farming is recommended, where feasible, replacement of the product with one compatible with the preservation of T. remus in nature. Thus, the products tested and used in organic soybean production were considered compatible with the parasitoid eggs of T. remus.

  5. Durations of immature stage development period of Nasonia vitripennis (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) under laboratory conditions: implications for forensic entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Renata da Silva; Aguiar-Coelho, Valéria M

    2009-01-01

    Some microhymenopterans are parasitoids of flies of forensic importance. Their parasitic habit can alter the duration of post-embryonic development of these flies, altering the postmortem interval. In order to analyze possible alterations occurring during the immature development period of Nasonia vitripennis, this study tested different quantitative associations between female parasitoids and pupae of Chrysomya megacephala, which were defined by: (a) one pupa was exposed to different numbers of female parasitoids (1:1, 1:3, 1:5, 1:7, 1:9, 1:11) and (b) different numbers of pupae were exposed to one female parasitoid (1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1, 5:1). Analysis of variance (5% significance level) and Tukey's honestly significant difference tests were used for statistical analysis. There was a tendency of prolongation of the duration of parasitoid development, both by increasing the number of female parasitoids and by increasing the number of hosts in the associations. By increasing the number of female parasitoids per host, there is a possibility of increasing the occurrence of superparasitism, leading to competition for food source, then prolonging the duration of the immature development period. Increasing the number of hosts in the associations, females may distribute their postures among the available pupae and can cause reduction of the number of eggs per host. Since these insects are gregarious, the reduction of the number of eggs may delay the offspring development.

  6. Determination of Opiinae parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) associated with crop infesting Bactrocera spp. (Diptera: Tephritidae) using COI and Cyt b sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Safiah; Yaakop, Salmah; Zain, Badrul Munir Md.

    2013-11-01

    Members of the Opiinae subfamily (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) are well known as important parasitoids of fruit fly larvae (Diptera: Tephritidae). They are widely used as biological control agents of fruit flies, especially the Bactrocera Macquart species that infest fruits. In this study, the larvae of fruit flies were collected from infested crops including star fruit, guava, wax apple and ridge gourd. The parasitized larvae were then reared under laboratory conditions until emergence of the adult parasitoids. Additionally, Malaise trap also was used to collect parasitoid species. The general concept of the multiplex PCR has been performed is to amplify two mitochondrial DNA markers, namely cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and cytochrome b (Cyt b) simultaneously. Therefore, the lengthy process of reaction will be reduced. The status of the fruit fly species has also been confirmed by using COI marker on the early stage of the larvae. Maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayesian Inference (BI) were implemented to help and support the identification of Opiinae species. The result obtained from this study showed three parasitoid genera of the Opiinae viz. Fopius Wharton, Psyttalia Walker and Diachasmimorpha Viereck. Each genus has been determined by clustering together in a similar clade according to their infested crops. Therefore, accurate determination of parasitoids and the fruit fries species was highly useful and necessary for successful biological control of Bactrocera species.

  7. Oogenesis pattern and type of ovariole of the parasitoid Palmistichus elaeisis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae

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    Gilberto S. Andrade

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge on ovigeny in parasitoids is important for basic studies on physiology and applied biological control. The ovigeny pattern and type of ovariole of the parasitoid Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare & LaSalle (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae were studied in newly-emerged females at seven, 14, 24 and 48 h intervals after their emergence from Tenebrio molitor L. pupae (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae. Females of P. elaeisis presented ovaries composed by four ovarioles of the meroistic polytrophic type. The yolk accumulation and chorionogenesis in P. elaeisis were concluded 24 h after the female emergence. The 48 h-old females show a high quantity of egg ready for oviposition. These findings can help to improve the mass production of P. elaeisis and the augmentative biological control by using this natural enemy.O conhecimento da ovigenia em parasitóides é importante para estudos básicos em fisiologia e para o controle biológico aplicado. O padrão de ovigenia e OVIGENY OF Palmistichus elaeisis (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE o tipo de ovaríolo do parasitóide Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare & LaSalle (Hymenopera: Eulophidae foram estudados em fêmeas recém-emergidas e em intervalos de sete, 14, 24 de 48 horas após a emergência em pupas de Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae. Fêmeas de P. elaesis apresentaram o ovário composto por quatro ovaríolos do tipo meroístico politrófico. A deposição de vitelo e corionogênese em P. elaeisis foram concluídas 24 horas após a emergência. Fêmeas com 48 horas de idade apresentam grande quantidade de ovos prontos para a oviposição. Esses resultados podem ajudar a melhoria da produção massal de P. elaeisis e o controle biológico aplicado com esse parasitóide.

  8. DNA barcoding reveals diversity of Hymenoptera and the dominance of parasitoids in a sub-arctic environment

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    Stahlhut Julie K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insect diversity typically declines with increasing latitude, but previous studies have shown conflicting latitude-richness gradients for some hymenopteran parasitoids. However, historical estimates of insect diversity and species richness can be difficult to confirm or compare, because they may be based upon dissimilar methods. As a proxy for species identification, we used DNA barcoding to identify molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs for 7870 Hymenoptera specimens collected near Churchill, Manitoba, from 2004 through 2010. Results We resolved 1630 MOTUs for this collection, of which 75% (1228 were ichneumonoids (Ichneumonidae + Braconidae and 91% (1484 were parasitoids. We estimate the total number of Hymenoptera MOTUs in this region at 2624-2840. Conclusions The diversity of parasitoids in this sub-Arctic environment implies a high diversity of potential host species throughout the same range. We discuss these results in the contexts of resolving interspecific interactions that may include cryptic species, and developing reproducible methods to estimate and compare species richness across sites and between surveys, especially when morphological specialists are not available to identify every specimen.

  9. Parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae) of northeastern Iran: aphidiine-aphid-plant associations, key and description of a new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshani, Ehsan; Kazemzadeh, Sedigheh; Starý, Petr; Barahoei, Hossein; Kavallieratos, Nickolas G; Ćetković, Aleksandar; Popović, Anđelka; Bodlah, Lmran; Tomanović, Željko

    2012-01-01

    Aphid parasitoids of the subfamily Aphidiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) of northeastern Iran were studied in this paper. A total of 29 species are keyed and illustrated with line drawings. The aphidiines presented in this work have been reared from 42 aphid host taxa occurring on 49 plant taxa from a total of 33 sampling sites. Sixty-six aphidiine-aphid-plant associations are presented. Trioxys metacarpalis sp. nov. from Chaitaphis tenuicaudata Nevsky (Hemiptera: Aphididae) on Kochia scoparia, is described. The species diversity based on the comparative faunistic analysis is discussed.

  10. A new Anagyrus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) from Argentina, parasitoid of Hypogeococcus sp. (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) on Harrisia pomanensis (Cactaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triapitsyn, Serguei V; Aguirre, María B; Logarzo, Guillermo A

    2016-05-26

    A new species of Anagyrus Howard (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), A. lapachosus sp. n., is described from Salta Province of Argentina as a parasitoid of Hypogeococcus sp. (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) on Harrisia pomanensis cactus (Cactaceae). It is a candidate "new association" biological control agent for quarantine evaluation and possible following introduction to Puerto Rico (USA) against another Hypogeococcus sp., commonly called the Harrisia cactus mealybug and often misidentified as H. pungens Granara de Willink (according to our unpublished data the latter attacks only Amaranthaceae), which devastates or threatens the native cacti there and also in some other Caribbean islands (Triapitsyn, Aguirre et al. 2014; Carrera-Martínez et al. 2015).

  11. Distribution and abundance of mymarid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) of Sophonia rufofascia Kuoh and Kuoh (Homoptera: Cicadellidae)in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P.; Foote, D.; Alyokhin, A.V.; Lenz, L.; Messing, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    The abundance of mymarid parasitoids attacking the two-spotted leafhopper (Sophonia rufofascia [Kuoh and Kuoh]), a polyphagous pest recently adventive to Hawaii, was monitored using yellow sticky cards deployed in several areas on the islands of Kauai and Hawaii. The yellow cards captured Chaetomymar sp. nr bagicha Narayanan, Subba Rao, & Kaur and Schizophragma bicolor (Dozier), both adventive species, and Polynema sp. Haliday, which is endemic to Hawaii (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae). The former two species were most abundant at all sites. On Kauai, there was a negative correlation between the captures of C. sp. nr bagicha and those of Polynema sp. Throughout the season, the increase in parasitoid numbers generally followed the increase in leafhopper numbers. C. sp. nr. bagicha and S. bicolor showed distinct habitat preferences. Removal of Myrica faya Aiton, an invasive weed that is a highly preferred two-spotted leafhopper host, decreased the overall numbers of captured parasitoids, but led to a twofold increase in the ratio of trapped parasitoids/hosts in weed-free areas. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  12. Impact of the egg parasitoid Uscana lariophaga and the larval-pupal parasitoid Dinarmus basalis on Callosobruchus maculatus populations and cowpea losses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis, van A.; Alebeek, van F.A.N.; Es, van M.; Sagnia, S.B.

    2002-01-01

    In West Africa, Uscana lariophaga Steffan (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) and Dinarmus basalis (Rondani) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) parasitize the eggs and larvae, respectively, of Callosobruchus maculatus Fab. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), an important pest of stored cowpea. The impact of the

  13. Ocorrência de Aprostocetus hagenowii (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae, parasitoide de ootecas da barata americana, no Rio Grande do Sul Occurrence of Aprostocetus hagenowii (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae, parasitoid of the american cockroach oothecae at Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcial Corrêa Cárcamo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se a ocorrência do parasitoide Aprostocetus hagenowii (Ratzeburg, 1952 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae em ooteca de Periplaneta americana Linnaeus, 1758 (Blattodea: Blattidae, no extremo Sul do Brasil. As ootecas foram coletadas no mês de dezembro de 2007, no campus da Universidade Federal de Pelotas (31°48'34"S, 52°25'42"O, Município do Capão do Leão, Rio Grande do Sul. Após a coleta, as ootecas foram acondicionadas individualmente em tubos de ensaio, sendo posteriormente mantidas em câmara climatizada a 25°C, com umidade relativa =70%, até a eclosão das ninfas ou emergência dos parasitoides. Uma das ootecas estava parasitada e apresentou 89 parasitoides (79 fêmeas e 10 machos; a referida ocorrência constitui o primeiro registro para o Sul do Brasil. O conhecimento das regiões de ocorrência dos inimigos naturais de P. americana é de grande importância para se traçar uma estratégia de controle das populações desse blatódeo.It is reported the occurrence of the parasitoid Aprostocetus hagenowii (Ratzeburg, 1952 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae in oothecae of Periplaneta americana Linnaeus, 1758 (Blattodea: Blattidae at the extreme southern Brazil. The oothecae were collected in December of 2007 at the campus of the Universidade Federal de Pelotas (31°48'34"S, 52°25'42"W, city of Capão do Leão, Rio Grande do Sul. After the collection the oothecae were placed individually in glass vials maintained in acclimatized chamber at 25°C, with relative air humidity =70% until the eclosion of the nymphs or the emergence of the parasitoids. The infested ootheca presented 89 parasitoids (79 females and 10 males. The referred occurrence represents the first report to southern Brazil. Knowing the regions of occurrence of the natural enemies of P. americana is of great importance when developing a control strategy to the populations of the blatod.

  14. Dinâmica populacional do parasitoide de ovos erythmelus tingitiphagus (hymenoptera: mymaridae em clone de seringueira, em Itiquira, MT Population dynamic of egg parasitoid erythmelus tingitiphagus (hymenoptera: mymaridae in rubber tree clone in Itiquira, Mato Grosso State, Brazil

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    Rodrigo Souza Santos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available O percevejo-de-renda Leptopharsa heveae Drake & Poor (Hemiptera: Tingidae é uma das mais importantes pragas da heveicultura no Brasil, principalmente nas regiões Sudeste e Centro-Oeste. Devido ao seu hábito sugador, na face abaxial das folhas, esta praga leva à senescência precoce das mesmas e a reduções na produção de látex em até 30%. Dentre os inimigos naturais de L. heveae está o parasitoide de ovos Erythmelus tingitiphagus (Soares (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae, regulando suas populações em condições naturais. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a dinâmica populacional deste parasitoide, bem como correlacioná-la com os fatores meteorológicos temperatura e pluviosidade, em plantio comercial de seringueira do clone PB 217, em Itiquira, MT. Semanalmente foram coletadas quatro folhas maduras por árvore, no terço inferior da copa de 40 árvores, totalizando 160 folhas por amostragem, no período de agosto de 2006 a janeiro de 2007. Houve correlação positiva entre a dinâmica populacional e os fatores meteorológicos, sendo o pico populacional do parasitoide observado no mês de novembro e declinando até janeiro na área estudada.The lace bug Leptopharsa heveae Drake & Poor (Hemiptera: Tingidae is one of the most import heveiculture pests in Brazil, mainly in the southeast and central-west regions. Due to its sucking habit on the abaxial surface, this pest causes precocious senescence in leaves, and leads to the reduction in latex production in up to 30% of them. Among the natural enemies of L. heveae is the egg parasitoid Erythmelus tingitiphagus (Soares (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae, regulating populations of L. heveae in natural conditions. The objective of this work was to verify the population dynamics of this parasitoid, as well as to correlate it with meteorological factors such as temperature and rainfall, in a commercial plantation of rubber trees of the PB 217 clone, in Itiquira, in the Mato Grosso state, Brazil. Four

  15. Description of the male Hymenoepimecis japi Sobczak et al. 2009 (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae parasitoid of Leucauge roseosignata Mello-Leitão 1943 (Araneae: Tetragnathidae

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    JF. Sobczak

    Full Text Available The male of Hymenoepimecis japi (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Pimplinae is described and illustrated. The specimen was collected in a modified web (cocoon web of Leucauge roseosignata (Araneae, Tetragnathidae made in a laboratory. Both, host and parasitoid were collected in Reserva Biológica Serra do Japi, located in Jundiaí, São Paulo, Brazil.

  16. Functional anatomy of the ovipositor clip in the parasitoid Leptopilina heterotoma (Thompson) (Hymenoptera: Eucoilidae): a structure to grip escaping host larvae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenteren, van J.C.; Isidoro, N.; Bin, F.

    1998-01-01

    Observations on the host attack behaviour of the parasitoid Leptopilina heterotoma (Hymenoptera : Eucoilidae) led to the supposition that this wasp should possess a structure on its ovipositor by which it can hold a host larvae in a fixed position until the larva is paralyzed. The ovipositor was stu

  17. Field-cage evaluation of the parasitoid Phymastichus coffea LaSalle (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) as a natural enemy of the coffee berry borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phymastichus coffea (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is an African parasitoid that has been imported to Mexico and other Latin American countries for the biological control of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae). As a part of the evaluation of this ...

  18. Parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera from puparia of sarcosaprophagous flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae; Sarcophagidae in Buenos Aires, Argentina Avispas parasitoides (Hymenoptera a partir de puparios de moscas sarcosaprófagas (Diptera: Calliphoridae; Sarcophagidae en Buenos Aires, Argentina

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    Adriana Oliva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of parasitoid Hymenoptera from experimental rearings of sarcosaprophagous Diptera (Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae attracted to beef baits were recorded in Buenos Aires (Argentina from 1998 to 2003. Four taxa were identified: Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead (Encyrtidae, Brachymeria podagrica (Fabricius (Chalcididae, Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Pteromaliidae and Alysia sp. (Braconidae: Alysiinae. Only the first two species were abundant in all years. The number of added monthly emergences of each species is presented and correlated with monthly mean maximum-minimum temperatures.Se registró la emergencia de parasitoides (Hymenoptera de crías experimentales de Diptera sarcosaprófagas (Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, atraídas a cebos de carne bovina, en Buenos Aires (Argentina durante 1998-2003. Se determinaron cuatro taxones: Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead (Encyrtidae, Brachymeria podagrica (Fabricius (Chalcididae, Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Pteromaliidae y Alysia sp. (Braconidae: Alysiinae. Sólo las dos primeras especies resultaron abundantes en todos los años. Se ha graficado el número total de emergencias de cada especie para cada mes, junto con las temperaturas promedio máxima y mínima.

  19. Susceptibility of the Parasitoid Phymastichus coffea LaSalle (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) to Beauveria bassiana under laboratory conditions; Susceptibilidad del parasitoide Phymastichus coffea LaSalle (Hymenoptera:Eulophidae) a Beauveria bassiana en condiciones de laboratorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Alfredo; Gomez, Jaime; Infante, Francisco [El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR), Chiapas (Mexico). Dept. de Entomologia Tropical], e-mail: acastill@ecosur.mx, e-mail: jgomez@ecosur.mx, e-mail: finfante@ecosur.mx; Vega, Fernando E. [United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Beltsville, MD (United States). Agricultural Research Service. Sustainable Perennial Crops Lab.], e-mail: fernando.vega@ars.usda.gov

    2009-09-15

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most important coffee pest worldwide. Beauveria bassiana is a generalist entomopathogenic fungus widely used by coffee farmers to control this pest and Phymastichus coffea LaSalle (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is an African endo parasitoid of H. hampei adults, recently imported to several Latin American and Caribbean countries to aid in the coffee berry borer control. The objective of this study was to determine if B. bassiana is detrimental to P. coffea. The susceptibility of the parasitoid was evaluated in terms of adult survivorship, mean lethal concentration (LC{sub 50}), mean lethal time (LT{sub 50}), reproduction and immature mortality. The main effect of the fungus resulted in reduction of adult longevity and mortality of 100% for immature stages of this parasitoid. The LC{sub 50} for adults was 0.11% equivalent to 9.53 x 10{sup 7} conidia/ml of B. bassiana and a LT{sub 50} of 29.4 h, equivalent to reduction of 22% of its normal longevity as an adult. P. coffea was capable of disseminating spores of B. bassiana to non-infected H. hampei adults, which could indirectly cause the death of its own progeny. These results could be valuable when considering the use of both organisms in the field, especially in an integrated pest management program. (author)

  20. Biological control of cultural heritage pest Coleoptera and Lepidoptera with the help of parasitoid Hymenoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schöller

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural enemies are known from many cultural heritage pests, but their potential for biological control has been marginally exploited only. In this publication, examples of practical and commercial application of parasitoids of beetles and moths are compiled as well as laboratory research that contributes to the development of guidelines for parasitoid releases. One the one hand there are parasitoids found to occur simultaneously with the pests in buildings, on the other hand there are parasitoids that were never found to be associated with the respective pests but accept them if brought into the cultural heritage environments. An example for the latter is the egg parasitoid Trichogramma evanescens euproctidis, a parasitoid of moth eggs including those of the cloth moth Tineola bisselliella. In semi-field trials it was shown that inundative releases of the egg parasitoids are necessary and that effectiveness is reduced on thick cloth with long strand. Trichogramma release units have to be placed directly on the cloth to be protected. A naturally occuring parasitoid of Anobiid beetles is the pteromalid larval parasitoid Lariophagus distinguendus. This parasitoid was applied against the drugstore beetle Stegobium paniceum in historic libraries and against spider beetles (Ptininae in historic buildings. A simulation model for the population-dynamics of L. distinguendus and the golden spider beetle Niptus hololeucus is presented. Finally, monitoring of the Braconid larval parasitoid Spathius exarator used for indirect monitoring of the common furniture beetle Anobium punctatum is described. The future potential of parasitoids to control cultural heritage pests is discussed.

  1. An Old Remedy for a New Problem? Identification of Ooencyrtus kuvanae (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an Egg Parasitoid of Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Houping; Mottern, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Spotted Lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula (White) is a recently introduced pest of Tree-of-Heaven, Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle in North America. Natural enemy surveys for this pest in Pennsylvania in 2016 recovered an encyrtid egg parasitoid from both field collections and laboratory rearing of field-collected L. delicatula egg masses. Both molecular and morphological data confirm that the egg parasitoids are Ooencyrtus kuvanae (Howard) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae). Ooencyrtus kuvanae (Howard) is primarily an egg parasitoid of gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), and was introduced to North America in 1908 for gypsy moth biological control. Although O. kuvanae is known to attack multiple host species, to our knowledge, this is the first report of O. kuvanae as a primary parasitoid of a non-lepidopteran host. Potential of O. kuvanae in the biological control of L. delicatula in North America and research needs are discussed. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  2. Temperature-dependent functional response of Spalangia cameroni (Perkins) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), a parasitoid of Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgård, Henrik; Nachman, Gösta

    2015-01-01

    , where the maximum attack rate is 20.2 pupae day(-1). The lower and upper temperature thresholds for attacks were found as 8.1 and 36.6 degrees C, respectively. The temperature range for attacks that resulted in successful parasitism was narrower, namely, 15.0 and 35.5 degrees C. Maximum rate...... of successful parasitism was estimated to be 18.2 progeny day(-1) occurring at 27.9 degrees C. The proportion of attacks resulting in successful parasitism increased steeply with temperatures >15 degrees C and declined steeply at temperatures >30 degrees C....

  3. PLANTAS HOSPEDEIRAS DE Thyrinteina arnobia (LEPIDOPTERA: GEOMETRIDAE AFETAM O DESENVOLVIMENTO DO PARASITOIDE Palmistichus elaeisis (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE1

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    Silma da Silva Camilo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência do parasitismo e a biologia da prole do parasitoide Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare e La Salle (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae em pupas de Thyrinteina arnobia Stoll (Lepidoptera: Geometridae quando criadas em plantas de Psidium guajava ou Eucalyptus cloeziana. Ovos de T. arnobia foram coletados e colocados em sacos de tecido tipo organza envolvendo galhos de plantas de P. guajava (T1 e E. cloeziana (T2 até as lagartas alcançarem a fase de pupa. Trinta pupas de cada tratamento foram individualizadas em tubos de vidro e expostas ao parasitismo por quatro fêmeas de P. elaeisis por 24 h. Avaliaram-se a emergência da progênie do parasitoide por pupa; a porcentagem de parasitismo, pupas mortas e de adultos de T. arnobia emergidos; a duração do ciclo de vida (ovo-adulto;a longevidade; a razão sexual; e o tamanho da cápsula cefálica e do corpo do parasitoide. A porcentagem de parasitismo, a emergência de P. elaeisis por pupa, a longevidade das fêmeas e o tamanho da cápsula cefálica e do corpo dos machos do parasitoide foram menores quando seu hospedeiro foi criado em plantas de eucalipto. Isso pode ter ocorrido devido à grande quantidade de compostos do metabolismo secundário presentes nesta planta, que podem ser acumulados no corpo do herbívoro ao se alimentar, afetando negativamente o inimigo natural. Palmistichus elaeisis mostrou-se mais adaptado à mirtácea nativa da América P. guajava.

  4. Effect of Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) host plants on life-history parameters of the parasitoid Apanteles taragamae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elie A.Dannon; Manuele Tamò; Cyriaque Agboton; Arnold van Huis; Marcel Dicke

    2012-01-01

    The effect of four host plant species of the herbivore Maruca vitrata Fabricius (Lepidoptera:Crambidae) on development time,longevity,fecundity and sex ratio of the parasitoid Apanteles taragamae Viereck (Hymenoptera:Braconidae) was investigated under laboratory conditions.The larvae were parasitized when in the second instar.Maruca vitrata larvae were fed with flowers of four legumes,that is,Vigna unguiculata (cowpea),Sesbania rostrata,Lonchocarpus sericeus and Pterocarpus santalinoides,or an artificial diet both before and after parasitization.The parasitoid did not develop in hosts feeding on L.sericeus or V.unguiculata at 25℃,or on P.santalinoides at 25℃ or 29℃.Apanteles taragaraae had the shortest development time on artificial diet at both 25℃ and 29℃ while the longest development time was recorded on L.sericeus at 29℃.Female wasps took longer to develop compared to males at the two temperatures,regardless of the feeding substrate of their host.The longevity of the wasps at 25℃ varied among feeding substrates,but not at 29℃.Survival rate of parasitized larvae depends on the feeding substrate.Moreover,infection of host larvae with Maruca vitrata multi-nucleopolyhedrovirus (MaviMNPV) killed larger proportions of parasitized larvae at 25℃ than at 29℃,which was likely caused by the difference in parasitoid developmental rate.The proportion of female parasitoids was lowest on L.sericeus.The daily fecundity showed a nonlinear trend regardless of the feeding substrate,indicating that A.taragaraae is a pro-ovigenic species.The data support the slow growth-high mortality hypothesis.

  5. Asociaciones áfido-parasitoide (Hemiptera: Aphididae; Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae en cultivos hortícolas orgánicos en Los Cardales, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea V. ANDORNO

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Diez especies de áfidos (Hemiptera: Aphididae se hallaron parasitados por siete especies de parasitoides (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae en cultivos hortícolas orgánicos. Myzus persicae (Sulzer fue el áfido más frecuentemente encontrado sobre una amplia variedad de cultivos, y con mayor diversidad de parasitoides asociados. Aphidius colemani Viereck fue el afidiino más usual, que ataca varias especies de áfidos. Ocho asociaciones tritróficas, involucrando Aphidius matricariae Haliday, han sido registradas por primera vez para la Argentina.

  6. Biological control of cultural heritage pest Coleoptera and Lepidoptera with the help of parasitoid Hymenoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Schöller; Sabine Prozell

    2011-01-01

    Natural enemies are known from many cultural heritage pests, but their potential for biological control has been marginally exploited only. In this publication, examples of practical and commercial application of parasitoids of beetles and moths are compiled as well as laboratory research that contributes to the development of guidelines for parasitoid releases. One the one hand there are parasitoids found to occur simultaneously with the pests in buildings, on the other hand there are parasi...

  7. Un nuevo huésped para Cheiloneurus cupreicollis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae, parasitoide de Dryinidae (Hymenoptera en la Argentina A new host for Cheiloneurus cupreicollis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae, parasitoid of Dryinidae (Hymenoptera in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo G. Virla

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available El objeto de la presente contribución es informar sobre el comportamiento parasitoide del encírtido Cheiloneurus cupreicollis Ashmead sobre Gonatopus chilensis Olmi (Dryinidae: Gonatopodinae, y ampliar su distribución geográfica a la provincia de Catamarca (Santa María.The objective of this contribution is to mention Gonatopus chilensis Olmi (Dryinidae: Gonatopodinae as a new host for the encyrtid Cheiloneurus cupreicollis Ashmead, and enlarge the geographic distribution of the parasitoid to Catamarca province (Santa María.

  8. Effect of mutual interference on the ability of Spalangia cameroni (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) to attack and parasitize pupae of Stomoxys calcitrans (Diptera: Muscidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgård, Henrik; Nachman, Gösta

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of mutual interference on the attack efficiency and the rate of successful parasitism on the parasitoid Spalangia cameroni (Perkins) attacking pupae of the stable fly Stomoxys calcitrans (L.). Female parasitoids (2, 4, 8, 16, or 32) were exposed to 100 fly pupae during 24...... h. The number of pupae that were attacked and the number successfully parasitized increased with the parasitoid density and reached a maximum of similar to 70 and 50, respectively. Parasitoid-induced mortality (PIM) was about 20 pupae, irrespective of parasitoid density. The per capita rates...... of attack, successful parasitism and parasitoid-induced mortality declined monotonously with parasitoid density. Progeny sex ratio was female biased for all parasitoid densities, but declined significantly with increasing parasitoid density from similar to 70% females at the lowest density to similar to 60...

  9. Phenology of Spalangia endius Walker (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae in pupae of Musca domestica Linnaeus (Diptera, Muscidae under laboratory conditions

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    Dani Furtado de Araújo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the phenology of Spalangia endius Walker in pupae of Musca domestica Linnaeus under laboratory conditions. In order to understand the developmental cycle of Spalangia endius under laboratory conditions, 360 Musca domestica pupae aged from 24 to 48 hours were exposed to 15 S. endius pairs for a period of 24 hours at 26 ± 2ºC. These pupae were kept in a BOD incubator at the same temperature, with a relative humidity of <70%, and 12 hours photophase. Fifteen hymenopteran specimens were dissected daily to evaluate their stage and development time. The phenology concluded that S. endius had a development cycle of 19 days with an incubation period of 24 hours. The development of the larvae of S. endius occurred in the subsequent eight days, during which a series of morphological alterations were observed. The pre-pupal stage occurred on the tenth day, where the movement ceased and elimination of the meconium started. The pupal stage occurred from the 11th to the 19th day, with emergence of males first, followed by female emergence approximately 24 hours later. These results allowed the evaluation of aspects of the detailed bionomics of the development of S. endius in order to record and program production of this parasitoid, thus optimizing its utilization as a biological control agent.

  10. Effect of host-cocoon mass on adult size in the secondary hyperparasitoid wasp, Pteromalus semotus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffrey A.Harvey; Alex Gumovsky; Rieta Gols

    2012-01-01

    Parasitoids have long proven to be model organisms in studying resourcerelated constraints on immature development.Here we examine the relationship between host cocoon (=pupal) size in the gregarious endoparasitoid wasp,Cotesia glomerata,and development time and adult size in the solitary idiobiont hyperparasitoid,Pteromalus semotus.Little is known about the biology or ecology of this ecto-hyperparasitoid species,although it is one of the major secondary hyperparasitoids of C.glomerata.The size of the adult wasp covaried with the size of the host cocoon at parasitism.Moreover,female wasps were larger than male wasps for a given cocoon size.Adult wasps have remarkably long life-spans,3 months on average.Longevity did not significantly differ with sex.We also examined how larvae of P.semotus exclude other potential competitors.P.semotus is protandrous,with females taking significantly longer to complete their development than males.In experiments where several eggs of P.semotus were placed on individual pupae of C.glomerata,newly hatched hyperparasitoid larvae moved rapidly over the surface of the host and destroyed the eggs of any conspecifics by biting them before they would initiate feeding on host tissues.Our results are discussed in relation to those with other studies with solitary ichneumonid idiobiont hyperparasitoids of C.glomerata.

  11. Brachymeria pandora (Crawford (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae: a new parasitoid of Historis odius (Fabricius (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

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    Hélcio R. Gil-Santana

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The first record of parasitism of Brachymeria pandora (Crawford, 1914 (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae on Historis odius (Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil is presented.Apresenta-se o primeiro registro de parasitismo de Brachymeria pandora (Crawford, 1914 (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae em Historis odius (Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, no estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.

  12. Seasonal ecology and thermal constraints of Telenomus spp. (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae), egg parasitoids of the hemlock looper (Lepidoptera: Geometridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Simon; Hébert, Christian; Blais, Julie; Berthiaume, Richard; Bauce, Eric; Brodeur, Jacques

    2012-12-01

    We describe seasonal patterns of parasitism by Telenomus coloradensis Crawford, Telenomus droozi Muesebeck, Telenomus flavotibiae Pelletier (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae), and Trichogramma spp. (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae), egg parasitoids of the hemlock looper, Lambdina fiscellaria (Guenée) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae), after a 3-yr survey of defoliated stands in the lower St. Lawrence region (Quebec, Canada). Results from sentinel trap sampling indicate that T. coloradensis and T. droozi are the most common species, whereas parasitism by T. flavotibiae and Trichogramma spp. is rare. Telenomus coloradensis and T. droozi show similar seasonal periods of parasitism, both species being active in early spring (late April) at temperatures as low as 4°C. Using thermal threshold (T(0)) and thermal constant (K) for immature development of T. coloradensis males and females from egg to adult emergence, we estimated that the spring progeny emerges in the middle of the summer while hemlock looper eggs are absent from the forest environment. Parasitoid females would then mate and remain in the environment to 1) exploit alternate host species, 2) enter into quiescence and later parasitize eggs laid by hemlock looper females in the fall, 3) enter into a reproductive diapause and parasitize hemlock looper eggs only the next spring, or all of these. Although previous studies have shown that T. coloradensis can overwinter in its immature form within the host egg, our field and laboratory results indicate that in the lower St. Lawrence region, this species principally enters diapause as fertilized females, with a mean supercooling point of -30.6°C in the fall.

  13. Primer registro de Acerophagus griseus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae como parasitoide de Pseudococcus viburni (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae en el Alto Valle de Río Negro, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. AQUINO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se cita por primera vez la presencia de Acerophagus griseus (De Santis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae como parasitoide de ninfas y adultos de Pseudococcus viburni (Signoret (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae y se registra la zona de Alto Valle de Río Negro como nuevo registro de distribución en Argentina. Se brinda una diagnosis y se ilustran los caracteres morfológicos de A. griseus.

  14. Study on the Hymenoptera parasitoid associated with Lepidoptera larvae in reforestation and agrosilvopastoral systems at Fazenda Canchim (Embrapa Pecuária Sudeste) São Carlos, SP, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A G; Silva, R B; Dias, M M; Penteado-Dias, A M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the local fauna of Hymenoptera parasitoids associated with Lepidoptera larvae in areas of reforestation and agrosilvopastoral systems at Fazenda Canchim (Embrapa Pecuária Sudeste, São Carlos, SP, Brazil). Lepidoptera larvae collected with entomological umbrella were kept in the laboratory until emergence of adults or their parasitoids. From those collected in the agrosilvopastoral system, emerged 267 specimens of hymenopteran parasitoids belonging to 16 genera: Braconidae, Agathidinae (Alabagrus), Braconinae (Bracon), Microgastrinae (Cotesia, Diolcogaster, Glyptapanteles, Pholetesor and Protapanteles), Orgilinae (Orgilus); Ichneumonidae, Campopleginae (Casinaria, Charops and Microcharops); Chalcididae, Chalcidinae (Brachymeria and Conura); Eulophidae, Entedoninae (Horismenus), Eulophinae (Elachertus and Euplectrus). From the Lepidoptera larvae collected in the reforestation, emerged 68 specimens of hymenopteran parasitoids, belonging to 8 genera: Chalcididae, Chalcidinae (Conura); Ichneumonidae, Pimplinae (Neotheronia), Campopleginae (Charops and Microcharops) and Braconidae, Microgastrinae (Apanteles, Diolcogaster, Distatrix, Glyptapanteles and Protapanteles). The results of this study suggest the occurrence of a wide variety of Hymenoptera parasitoids in the studied environments.

  15. PARASITOIDES (HYMENOPTERA DE MOSCAS-DAS-FRUTAS (DIPTERA: TEPHRITIDAE NO SEMIÁRIDO DO ESTADO DO CEARÁ, BRASIL

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    ELTON LUCIO ARAUJO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO As moscas-das-frutas (Diptera: Tephritidae, Anastrepha spp. e Ceratitis capitata(Wiedemann, são importantes pragas da fruticultura no Brasil. Para desenvolver um sistema sustentável de manejo integrado para este grupo de pragas, é fundamental conhecer os parasitoides (Hymenoptera que podem regular as populações destes tefritídeos. Portanto, o objetivo deste estudo foi relatar a diversidade, a distribuição geográfica e as relações tritróficas dos himenópteros parasitoides de moscas-das-frutas, na região do Baixo Jaguaribe, no semiárido do Estado do Ceará, Brasil. Foram realizadas coletas de frutos em sete municípios da região, no período de maio de 2010 amaio de 2013. Os frutos foram levados para o laboratório, onde foram contados, pesados, colocados em bandejas plásticas com vermiculita e fechadas com tecido voile. Após sete dias, a vermiculita foi peneirada para a obtenção dos pupários das moscas-das-frutas que, em seguida, foram contados e acondicionados em placas de Petri, onde permaneceram até a emergência dos adultos (moscas e/ou parasitoides. Quatro espécies de parasitoides foram encontradas: Doryctobracon areolatus(Szépligeti, Opius bellus Gahan, Utetes anastrephae(Viereck (Braconidae e Tetrastichus giffardianusSilvestri (Eulophidae,sendo o mais frequente e com maior distribuição geográfica na região, D. areolatus. Doryctobracon areolatusfoi mais comum em associação com espécies de Anastrepha - A. sororcula Zucchi, A. obliqua (Mcquart e A. zenildae Zucchi, em frutos nativos e com C. capitata em frutos exóticos. Tetrastichus giffardianus foi obtido apenas em associação com C. capitata, em frutos nativos e exóticos. Estas informações podem servir de base para inserção de parasitoides em futuros programas de manejo integrado de moscas-das-frutas, nas condições do Semiárido brasileiro.

  16. Superparasitism in the Fruit Fly Parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and the Implications for Mass Rearing and Augmentative Release.

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    Montoya, Pablo; Pérez-Lachaud, Gabriela; Liedo, Pablo

    2012-09-25

    Superparasitism, a strategy in which a female lays eggs in/on a previously parasitized host, was attributed in the past to the inability of females to discriminate between parasitized and non-parasitized hosts. However, superparasitism is now accepted as an adaptive strategy under specific conditions. In fruit fly parasitoids, superparasitism has mainly been studied as concerns the new association between Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and the Mexican fruit fly Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae), wherein this phenomenon is a common occurrence in both mass rearing and field conditions. Studies of this species have shown that moderate levels of superparasitism result in a female-biased sex ratio and that both massreared and wild females superparasitize their hosts without detrimental effects on offspring demographic parameters, including longevity and fecundity. These studies suggest that superparasitism in this species is advantageous. In this paper, we review superparasitism in D. longicaudata, discuss these findings in the context of mass rearing and field releases and address the possible implications of superparasitism in programs employing augmentative releases of parasitoids for the control of fruit fly pests.

  17. Interactions over time between cereal leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and larval parasitoid Tetrastichus julis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Edward W; Karren, Jay B; Israelsen, Clark E

    2006-12-01

    The phenology of parasitism of the cereal leaf beetle, Oulema melanopus (L.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) by Tetrastichus julis (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) was studied in small grain fields from 2000 to 2005 in northern Utah, after release and redistribution of the partially bivoltine larval parasitoid during the 1990s. Host larvae first occurred in May, with peak infestation typically occurring in early to mid-June. Parasitism by overwintering females of T. julis was highest among earliest developing beetle larvae. Thereafter, rates of parasitism fell to low levels (5-10% or less) by the latter half of June, when heat accumulation had reached 280-350 degree-days (based on a minimum threshold of 8.9 degrees C). With the emergence of second generation parasitoids, rates of parasitism rose to levels approaching 100% among the relatively few late-developing larvae of O. inelanopus. Clear and consistent differences over the years were not observed among different crops of small grains (barley, wheat, or oats) either in the phenology and intensity of beetle infestation, or in the rate of parasitism of beetle larvae. The rate of parasitism was especially high in 2005, and an increase in the minimum level of parasitism (observed each year at mid-season) was apparent over the course of the study. These results indicate that the parasitoid has become well established and seems to be continuing to increase in its impact on O. melanopus in northern Utah, despite a relatively hostile environment of crop management, wherein most fields are plowed and disked annually.

  18. Host stage preference and suitability of Allotropa suasaardi Sarkar & Polaszek (Hymenoptera: Platygasteridae, a newly identified parasitoid of pink cassava mealybug, Phenacoccus manihoti (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae

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    Md. Akhtaruzzaman Sarkar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Allotropa suasaardi Sarkar & Polaszek (Hymenoptera: Platygasteridae has been recently reported as a gregarious endoparasitoid of the pink cassava mealybug, Phenacoccus manihoti Matile-Ferrero (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae in Thailand. With the aim of improving mass production of this parasitoid, laboratory experiments were conducted comparing the parasitoid’s preference on different host stages of mealybug, host suitability and its effect on parasitism, development, progeny fitness and sex ratio. All nymphal stages and adult of P. manihoti were parasitized by the parasitoid. However, host stage preference and suitability tests showed that the parasitoid had a significant preference for the older host stages. Percentage parasitization was higher in the third instar and early adult female stages compared with the first and second instar host. Mean developmental time for male parasitoids was shorter than for the females. Higher percentage emergence of parasitoid was observed from older mealybugs. Sex ratios of the offspring produced by the parasitoid were varied in different host stages and the ratio of female to male was higher in the older host stages. The implication of this host selection behavior for mass rearing of A. suasaardi and for evaluating it in a biological control program of the cassava mealybug are discussed.

  19. Interactions between Spathius agrili (Hymenoptera: braconidae) and Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), larval parasitoids of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

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    Three hymenopteran parasitoids introduced from China are currently being released in Michigan and surrounding states in an effort to control the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmare, an Asian beetle species responsible for widespread mortality of Ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North A...

  20. Macrocentrus sylvestrellae spec. nov. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Macrocentrinae), a parasitoid of Dioryctria sylvestrella (Ratzeburg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.

    2001-01-01

    A new species of the genus Macrocentrus Curtis, 1833 (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Macrocentrinae) described and illustrated: M. sylvestrellae spec. nov. from France and Italy. It is a gregarious koinobiont endoparasitoid of the pine stem borer Dioryctria sylvestrella (Ratzeburg, 1840) (Lepidoptera; Pyr

  1. Comparative Study of the Morphology of the Ovipositor of Platygaster diplosisae (Hymenoptera: Platygasteridae and Aprostocetus procerae (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae Two Parasitoids Associated with the African Rice Gall Midge, Orseolia oryzivora (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae

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    Souleymane Nacro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology of the ovipositor of Platygaster diplosisae (Hymenoptera: Platygasteridae and Aprostocetus procerae (= Tetrastichus pachydiplosisae (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae, two parasitoids associated with the African rice gall midge (AFRGM, and Orseolia oryzivora (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae. Scanning electron microscope techniques were used for this study. The ovipositor of P. diplosisae was short (40 μm, and most of the sensillae found on it were mechanoreceptors and located on the distal portion of the 3rd valvulae. These sensillae may be involved in selection of an egg or larval host. The shortness of this ovipositor may be an adaptation to a host whose egg envelope thickness is not more than 0.7 μm. The ovipositor of A. procerae was 30 times (1.2 mm the length of the P. diplosisae ovipositor. It was not only well equipped with mechanoreceptive sensillae, but these sensillae were very diverse and distributed along the length of the valvulae. The 10 denticulations of the lancet of this ovipositor allow this parasitoid to exploit hosts that are not otherwise readily accesible. These two parasitoids share the same resource by infesting different life stages of the host. The ovipositor of each species of parasitoid enhanced resource sharing, due to its length and its sensillae type and distribution.

  2. Effects of rearing conditions on reproduction of Spathius agrili (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

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    Gould, Juli R; Ayer, Tracy; Fraser, Ivich

    2011-04-01

    Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) can be successfully reared on emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), larvae feeding in chambers drilled in small ash twigs that are wrapped with floral tape. Females maintained in groups with males for one week can receive enough sperm for production of female progeny throughout their lives. Volatiles released by emerald ash borer adults feeding on ash foliage increased parasitoid fecundity over ash foliage alone or no stimulus. The temperature at which the parasitoids were reared ranged from 20 to 25 degrees C in a daily cycle; however, raising the daily maximum temperature to 28 degrees C did not affect parasitoid longevity or fecundity. Adult females lived between 12 and 127 d, with an average of 60.8 +/- 4.5 d. Males lived slightly longer, with an average of 66 +/- 4.5 d. The first clutch of eggs was laid when the female was between 2 and 42 d old, with the average preoviposition period lasting 11.4 +/- 1.4 or 19.5 +/- 2.0 d in 2007 and 2009 trials, respectively. A higher proportion of the emerald ash borer larvae were feeding and thus attractive to parasitoids in the 2009 trial, and female S. agrili laid an average of 9.5 +/- 1.0 clutches containing 5.4 +/- 0.2 eggs, for an average of 51.2 eggs per female. Approximately three quarters of the progeny were female. The number of eggs per clutch was significantly greater when deposited on larger emerald ash borer larvae, further highlighting the need for quality larvae in rearing. Chilling S. agrili pupae at 10 degrees C to stockpile them for summer release was not successful; chilling resulted in lower survival and lower fecundity of emerging progeny. Female S. agrili proved capable of attacking emerald ash borer larvae through even the thickest bark of an ash tree that was 30-cm diameter at breast height. Even emerald ash borer larvae that were creating overwintering chambers in the outer sapwood of the tree were successfully

  3. Fitness Effects of Food Resources on the Polyphagous Aphid Parasitoid, Aphidius colemani Viereck (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Jennifer J; Paine, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Conservation biological control involving the polyphagous aphid parasitoid, Aphidius colemani Viereck, may include provisioning resources from a variety of plant sources. The fitness of adult A. colemani was enhanced with the provision of food resources such as floral nectar from a range of both native and introduced plant species and aphid honeydew under laboratory conditions. However, enhanced fitness appeared to be species specific rather than associated with the whether the plant was a native or an introduced species. Parasitoid survival and fecundity were enhanced significantly in response to the availability of floral nectar and honeydew compared to the response to available extrafloral nectar. These positive effects on the parasitoid's reproductive activity can improve the effectiveness of conservation biological control in nursery production systems because of the abundance and diversity of floral resources within typical production areas. Additionally, surrounding areas of invasive weeds and native vegetation could serve as both floral resources and honeydew food resources for A. colemani.

  4. Effects of various insecticides on the development of the egg parasitoid Trichogramma dendrolimi (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Y; Kawamura, S; Tanaka, T

    2001-12-01

    The toxicity of six insecticides, acephate, methomyl, ethofenprox, cartap, chlorfluazuron, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) was tested on different developmental stages of the egg parasitoid, Trichogramma dendrolimi (Matsumura). Each of the insecticides tested showed different degrees of toxicity to the parasitoid, Ethofenprox showed the highest toxicity and cartap showed relatively higher toxicity compared with the other insecticides. The development of the parasitoids treated with these two insecticides was normal, similar to that of the control group. Only the emergence of adult wasps from host eggs was disturbed. Emergence of the host, Mamestra brassicae larva was reduced following treatment with ethofenprox, cartap and methomyl. However, adult female wasps, which emerged from host eggs treated with the insecticides had the ability to oviposit normally.

  5. Effect of temperatures and cold storage on performance of Tetrastichus brontispae (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a parasitoid of Brontispa longissima (Coleptera: Chrysomelidae).

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    Liu, Kui; Fu, Buli; Lin, Jiangrong; Fu, Yueguan; Peng, Zhengqiang; Jin, Qi'an

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effect of temperature and cold storage on the performance of Tetrastichus brontispae (Ferriere) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), one of the major endoparasitoids against coconut hispine beetle, Brontispa longissima (Gestro) (Coleptera: Chrysomelidae). The results revealed that T. brontispae could successfully parasitize host pupae under all seven tested temperatures, but no adult emergence was observed at 32°C. It was also revealed that temperatures between 24 and 26°C appeared to be the optimum temperatures for parasitism, as these temperatures resulted in the most parasitized pupae and a significantly higher emergence rate and progeny production. These measurements significantly declined at 20, 30, and 32°C. This study confirmed developmental periods of parasitoid progeny decreased as the temperature increased, and sex ratio of this female-biased parasitoid was not affected by rearing temperatures. More importantly, this study indicated that cold storage of parasitized pupae could extend up to 30 d at 10°C, and a longer storage period had a significant adverse effect on mean adult emergence and parasitism performance. Ten days might be the optimum cold-storage period at 10°C, as parasitism performance, emergence rate, and progeny production at this storage period were similar to the control of 26°C. Furthermore, the developmental period, emergence rate, and sex ratio of progeny that emerged from cold-stored parasitized pupae were not influenced by storage periods, whereas parasitism performance of progeny decreased as storage period increased. This study suggests that about 24-26°C would be the optimal temperature for mass production and release of T. brontispae for biological control of B. longissima. These results also provide novel findings that a period of 10 d at 10°C may be more suitable and acceptable for ideal cold storage of parasitized pupae of T. brontispae.

  6. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Insecticides on the Egg Parasitoid Telenomus podisi (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae).

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    Turchen, L M; Golin, V; Butnariu, A R; Guedes, R N C; Pereira, M J B

    2016-02-01

    Insecticide use remains controversial, and subjected to increasing environmental and health concerns, even when recent insecticide groups are considered. Neonicotinoids and even bioinsecticides are in the forefront of discussions regarding their nontarget safety. The ubiquitous focus on the lethal effects of insecticides on nontarget species has been expanding to sublethal effects, as sublethal exposure extends for a longer time and affects a broader range of (nontarget) species. Here we explored the lethal and sublethal effects of a lambda-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxan mixture, the neonicotinoid imidacloprid, and the bioinsecticide azadirachtin on the egg parasitoid Telenomus podisi Ashmead, an important parasitoid of stink bug Euschistus heros (F.), a key soybean pest in neotropical America. Contact with dry insecticide residue on glass surface and (parasitized and healthy) host egg immersion exposure bioassays were performed, assessing their acute lethal effects, and their potential sublethal impairment of parasitism, adult emergence, and fertility of the egg parasitoid. Both imidacloprid and the insecticide mixture exhibited high acute lethal activity toward the parasitoid under contact with dry insecticide residue. These insecticides compromised parasitism and wasp emergence when exposure took place before parasitism. In contrast, azadirachtin did not affect adult survival. However, this bioinsecticide compromised parasitism and progeny production, impairing the female parasitoid reproductive potential. Our results indicate strong negative effects of imidacloprid, and specially of the mixture lambda-cyhalthrin + thiamethoxan. However, even azadirachtin, which exhibited low acute lethality, exhibited significant negative sublethal effects on parasitism and population growth of egg parasitoid, cautioning against their use and the need of semifield and field assessments to confirm such an impact. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  7. Hymenopteran parasitoids associated with the banana-skipper Erionota thrax L. (Insecta: Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae in Java, Indonesia

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    ERNIWATI

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Erniwati, Ubaidillah R (2011 Hymenopteran parasitoids associated with the banana-skipper Erionota thrax L. (Insecta: Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae in Java, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 12: 76-85. Hymenopteran parasitoids of banana-skipper Erionota thrax L. (Insecta: Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae from Java, Indonesia are reviewed and an illustrated key to 12 species is presented to include Theronia zebra zebra, Xanthopimpla gamsura, Casinaria sp., Charops sp., Cotesia (Apanteles erionotae, Brachymeria lasus, B. thracis, Ooencyrtus pallidipes, Anastatus sp., Pediobius erionotae, Agiommatus sumatraensis and Sympiesis sp. The surveys of the natural enemies of the banana-skipper were conducted in 1990-2006 in several localities in Java. The aim of this study was to assess the native natural enemies of E. thrax, especially the parasitic Hymenoptera. Infested eggs, larvae and pupae of E. thrax were collected and reared in the laboratory. Emerging parasitoids were preserved in both dry mounting and in 80% alcohol for the species identification. Members of families Braconidae, Ichneumonidae, Encyrtidae, Pteromalidae, Chalcididae, Eupelmidae and Eulophidae were recorded as parasitoids of the banana skipper E. thrax from Java, Indonesia. Species distribution and alternative hosts of the parasitoids are presented.

  8. Pseudacteon Parasitoids of Azteca instabilis Ants in Southern Mexico (Diptera: Phoridae; Hymenoptera: Formicidae

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    Brian V. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of the genus Pseudacteon are described, all from Chiapas, Mexico, and all of which are parasitoids of the ant Azteca instabilis. Sternite 6 of Pseudacteon dorymyrmecis Borgmeier is illustrated for the first time, and P. confusus Disney is synonymized with this species. The natural history of the Azteca-Pseudacteon interaction is described.

  9. Perception of Chromatic cues during host location by the pupal parasitoid Pimpla turionellae (L.) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, S.; Samietz, J.; Wäckers, F.L.; Dorn, S.

    2004-01-01

    Chromatic and achromatic plant cues are expected to be particularly important for parasitoids of endophytic pupal hosts, because these stages do not feed and therefore avoid volatile emission caused by plant tissue damage. Endophytic feeding can cause discoloration or desiccation, leading to changes

  10. [Quality of different aphids as hosts of the parasitoid Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Robson J; Bueno, Vanda H P; Sampaio, Marcus V

    2008-01-01

    Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson) has a broad aphid host range; however the quality of these preys may interfere in its biological feature. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of three Macrosiphini, Brevicoryne brassicae (L.), Lipaphis erysimi (Kaltenbach) and Myzus persicae (Sulzer), and three Aphidini Schizaphis graminum (Rondani) Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch) and Aphis gossypii Glover as hosts to L. testaceipes and to determine the relation possible of host preference, of size and quality of the host. The tests were carried out in climatic chamber at 25 +/- 1 degrees C, RH 70 +/- 10% and 12h photophase. The parasitoid did not oviposite in B. brassicae and L. erysimi, while the other species were nutritionally suitable to the parasitoid. L. testaceipes showed preference for aphids from tribe Aphidini and these hosts presented better quality to the parasitoid when compared to Macrosiphini. Interactions among size, preference and quality between the Aphidini were found. L testaceipes showed preference (parasitism rate 76.7%) for R. maidis, the bigger host (hind tibia with 0.281 mm). This host provided bigger size (hind tibia with 0.49 mm) and higher emergence rate (95.6%) to the parasitoid when compared to A. gossypii (parasitism rate of 55.7%). Also the smaller host A. gossypii (0.266 mm) provided smaller size hind tibia (0.45 mm) and higher mortality of the parasitoid (emergence rate 72.1%). However, the development time was shorter and the longevity was higher in A. gossypii (6.3 and 5.4 days, respectively) when compared to the host R. maidis (6.7 and 3.8 days, respectively), and not been related to host size.

  11. Asociaciones áfido-parasitoide (Hemiptera: Aphididae; Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae en cultivos hortícolas orgánicos en Los Cardales, Buenos Aires, Argentina Aphid-parasitoid associations (Hemiptera: Aphididae; Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae on organic vegetable crops in Los Cardales, Buenos Aires, Argentina

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    Andrea V. Andorno

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Diez especies de áfidos (Hemiptera: Aphididae se hallaron parasitados por siete especies de parasitoides (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae en cultivos hortícolas orgánicos. Myzus persicae (Sulzer fue el áfido más frecuentemente encontrado sobre una amplia variedad de cultivos, y con mayor diversidad de parasitoides asociados. Aphidius colemani Viereck fue el afidiino más usual, que ataca varias especies de áfidos. Ocho asociaciones tritróficas, involucrando Aphidius matricariae Haliday, han sido registradas por primera vez para la Argentina.Ten aphid species (Hemiptera: Aphididae were found parasitized by seven aphid parasitoid species (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae on organic vegetable crops. Myzus persicae (Sulzer was the most frequent aphid found on a wide variety of crops, with the largest parasitoid diversity associated. Aphidius colemani Viereck was the most frequent aphidiine attacking several species of aphids. Eight tritrophic associations involving Aphidius matricariae Haliday are reported for the first time for Argentina.

  12. Two new species of Anagyrus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) from Argentina, parasitoids of Hypogeococcus spp. (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), with taxonomic notes on some congeneric taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triapitsyn, Serguei V; Logarzo, Guillermo A; Aguirre, María B; Aquino, Daniel A

    2014-09-15

    Two new species of Anagyrus Howard (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) are described from Argentina, A. cachamai Triapitsyn, Logarzo & Aguirre sp. n. (Catamarca, Córdoba, Salta and Tucumán Provinces) and A. quilmes Triapitsyn, Logarzo & Aguirre sp. n. (Catamarca, Salta and Tucumán). Both new species are parasitoids of Hypogeococcus spp. (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae). Anagyrus cachamai is a parasitoid of H. pungens Granara de Willink on Alternanthera paronychioides, A. pungens and Gomphrena sp. (Amaranthaceae), and also of a Hypogeococcus sp. on Cleistocactus baumannii and Hypogeococcus sp. on C. smaragdiflorus (Cactaceae). Anagyrus quilmes is a parasitoid of H. pungens on A. paronychioides, A. pungens and Gomphrena sp. Other biological traits of the new species are also reported. These parasitoids may be of importance as potential candidate biological control agents against a Hypogeococcus sp., commonly called the Harrisia cactus mealybug and identified as H. pungens, but possibly not belonging to that species. This mealybug threatens the native cacti in some Caribbean islands and Florida, USA, and is devastating the native columnar cacti in Puerto Rico. Illustrations and taxonomic notes on the type specimens of some other, little known described species of Anagyrus from Argentina and Chile are provided, and a key to females of the 14 species of Anagyrus known from Argentina is given. Anagyrus nigriceps (De Santis) syn. n. is synonymized under A. bellator (De Santis). Lectotypes are designated for Paranusia bifasciata Brèthes, Philoponectroma pectinatum Brèthes, and Protanagyrus aciculatus Blanchard. 

  13. Interactions between the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) and the aphid parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) on Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R J; Alencar, J R D C C; Silva, K P; Cividanes, F J; Duarte, R T; Agostini, L T; Polanczyk, R A

    2014-06-01

    The interactions between the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo-Crivelli) Vuillemin (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) and the aphid parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae McIntoch (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) were evaluated under laboratory conditions. Nymphs of Myzus persicae Sulzer (Hemiptera: Aphididae) were first exposed to parasitoid females for 24 h and then 0, 24, and 48 h afterwards sprayed with a solution of B. bassiana. Likewise, aphids were also sprayed with B. bassiana and then exposed to parasitoids at 0, 24, and 48 h afterwards. Parasitism rate varied from 13 to 66.5%, and were significantly lower in treatments where the two agents were exposed within a 0-24 h time interval compared with the control (without B. bassiana). Parasitoid emergence was negatively affected in treatments with B. bassiana spraying and subsequent exposure to D. rapae. Decreases in longevity of adult females of the D. rapae F1 generation were observed in treatments with B. bassiana spraying. The application of these two biological control agents can be used in combination on the control of M. persicae, wherein this use requires effective time management to avoid antagonistic interactions.

  14. Influence of age and diet on the performance of Cephalonomia stephanoderis (Hymenoptera, Bethylidae a parasitoid of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

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    Jaime Gómez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of age and feeding on the performance of Cephalonomia stephanoderis (Hymenoptera, Bethylidae, a parasitoid of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera, Curculionidae was investigated in the laboratory. Groups of female parasitoids were subject to the following treatments: a group fed during one, five and ten days after emergence of adults with coffee borer larvae; another group fed only with honey solution during five days after emergence; and as a control, a third group was kept without food for five days. At the end of each treatment, survivorship, parasitoid activity (walking and flying capacity in an arena, search capacity for finding coffee borer-infested berries, host feeding and oviposition (on immature hosts, were assessed. Unfed females showed a significant decrease in survivorship compared to individuals that were fed. The type of meal (insects or honey did not significantly influence parasitoid activity, search and oviposition capacities. Females fed with honey solution significantly consumed less immature coffee borers. Younger females (one day old walked and flew out of the arena significantly faster than older ones (5 and 10 days old. Implications of these results are discussed on the performance of C. stephanoderis as a biological control agent of the coffee berry borer.

  15. Structure elucidation of female-specific volatiles released by the parasitoid wasp Trichogramma turkestanica (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae

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    Armin Tröger

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Females of the parasitoid wasp Trichogramma turkestanica produce the putative polydeoxypropionates (2E,4E,6S,8S,10S-4,6,8,10-tetramethyltrideca-2,4-diene and (2E,4E,6S,8S,10S-4,6,8,10-tetramethyltrideca-2,4-dien-1-ol or their enantiomers as sex specific volatiles. The structures were assigned on the basis of GC–MS investigations using synthetic reference compounds.

  16. Long-term monitoring of the introduced emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) egg parasitoid, oobius agrili (Hymenoptera: Encyridae), in Michigan, USA and evaluation of a newly developed monitoring technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. The egg parasitoid Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) was introduced as a biological control agent of this pest in Michiga...

  17. An improved method for monitoring parasitism and establishment of Oobius agrili (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an egg parasitoid introduced for biological control of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Jason A. Hansen; Kristopher J. Abell; Roy. Van Driesche

    2012-01-01

    Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) is a solitary egg parasitoid that has been released in the United States since 2007 for biocontrol of the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Field and laboratory trials with ash logs infested with EAB eggs were conducted...

  18. Differences in the reproductive biology and diapause of two congeneric species of egg parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) from northeast Asia: implications for biological control of the invasive emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oobius primorskyensis Yao and Duan and Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) constitute a cryptic species complex of egg parasitoids attacking the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis (Coleotpera: Buprestidae) in their native range of northeast Asia. While O. primorskyensis is c...

  19. [Quality of different aphids species as hosts for the parasitoid Aphidius ervi Haliday (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidney, Lívia A; Bueno, Vanda H P; Lins, Juracy C; Silva, Diego B; Sampaio, Marcus V

    2010-01-01

    The suitability of Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas), Aulacorthum solani (Kaltenbach) and Acyrthosiphon kondoi Shinji (Hemiptera: Aphididae) as hosts for the aphid parasitoid Aphidius ervi Haliday was evaluated by assessing host size, host preference, and host quality. Tests were carried out in an environmental chamber at 22±1ºC, 70±10% RH and 12h photophase. Replicates (11) consisted of one 24h-old mated female of A. ervi without a previous oviposition experience. Female was released into a Petri dish (5 cm) with 20 2nd and 3rd instars of one of each aphid species tested on a leaf disc of the host plant onto a 1% water-agar layer. Parasitoid emergency was lower in A. kondoi (78.7%) compared to M. euphorbiae (92.2%) and A. solani (91.7%). Acyrthosiphon kondoi (0.36 mm) was the smallest host. The parasitoid showed preference (74.0% parasitism) for M. euphorbiae, the largest host (hind tibia length=0.73 mm), which in turn yielded larger A. ervi females (0.75 mm).

  20. Assessing the suitability of flowering herbs as parasitoid food sources: flower attractiveness and nectar accessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wäckers, F.L.

    2004-01-01

    Eleven insect-pollinated plant species were investigated with respect to their olfactory attractiveness and nectar accessibility for the parasitoid species Cotesia glomerata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Heterospilus prosopidis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), and Pimpla turionellae (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonid

  1. Effect of insecticides on mealybug destroyer (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and parasitoid Leptomastix dactylopii (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), natural enemies of citrus mealybug (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyd, Raymond A; Dickinson, Amy

    2006-10-01

    In this study, we measured, under laboratory conditions, the direct and indirect effects of insecticides on mealybug destroyer, Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), and parasitoid Leptomastix dactylopii Howard (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), natural enemies of citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Risso) (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae). The adult stages of both natural enemies were exposed to sprays of the insecticides buprofezin, pyriproxyfen, flonicamid, acetamiprid, dinotefuran, and clothianidin at label-recommended rates to assess direct mortality after 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. The effects of the insecticides on L. dactylopii parasitization rate and percentage of parasitoid emergence also were monitored using the label and 4x the recommended label rate. Dinotefuran was extremely detrimental to the adult parasitoid at the label rate with 100% mortality after 24 h. Buprofezin, pyriproxyfen, and flonicamid were not harmful to L. dactylopii when applied at the label rate. At 4x the recommended label rate, dinotefuran, acetamiprid, and clothianidin were all harmful to the parasitoid with 100% mortality 72 h after application. Both buprofezin and flonicamid were not toxic to L. dactylopii with 100% adult survival after 72 h. Pyriproxyfen and flonicamid, at both the label and 4x the recommended label rate, did not negatively affect L. dactylopii parasitization rate or percentage of parasitoid emergence. Acetamiprid, dinotefuran, and clothianidin were toxic to C. montrouzieri adults with 100% mortality after 48 h, whereas buprofezin, pyriproxyfen, and flonicamid demonstrated minimal (10-20% mortality after 48 h) harmful effects to the predator. Based on the results from our study, the indirect effects of the insect growth regulator (IGR) buprofezin were not decisive; however, the IGR pyriproxyfen and the insecticide flonicamid were not directly or indirectly harmful to the predator C. montrouzieri and parastioid L. dactylopii, indicating that

  2. The rearranged mitochondrial genome of Leptopilina boulardi (Hymenoptera: Figitidae, a parasitoid wasp of Drosophila

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    Daniel S. Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract The partial mitochondrial genome sequence of Leptopilina boulardi (Hymenoptera: Figitidae was characterized. Illumina sequencing was used yielding 35,999,679 reads, from which 102,482 were utilized in the assembly. The length of the sequenced region of this partial mitochondrial genome is 15,417 bp, consisting of 13 protein-coding, two rRNA, and 21tRNA genes (the trnaM failed to be sequenced and a partial A+T-rich region. All protein-coding genes start with ATN codons. Eleven protein-coding genes presented TAA stop codons, whereas ND6 and COII that presented TA, and T nucleotides, respectively. The gene pattern revealed extensive rearrangements compared to the typical pattern generally observed in insects. These rearrangements involve two protein-coding and two ribosomal genes, along with the 16 tRNA genes. This gene order is different from the pattern described for Ibalia leucospoides (Ibaliidae, Cynipoidea, suggesting that this particular gene order can be variable among Cynipoidea superfamily members. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis of the main groups of Apocrita was performed using amino acid sequence of 13 protein-coding genes, showing monophyly for the Cynipoidea superfamily within the Hymenoptera phylogeny.

  3. Parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) Adjusts Reproductive Strategy When Competing for Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Rashmi; Minor, Maria A

    2017-06-01

    Parasitoid fitness depends on its ability to manipulate reproductive strategies when in competition. This study investigated the parasitism and sex allocation strategies of the parasitic wasp Diaeretiella rapae McIntosh at a range of host (Brevicoryne brassicae L.) and conspecific densities. The results suggest that D. rapae females adjust their progeny production and progeny sex ratio with changing competition. When foraging alone, female D. rapae parasitize larger number of B. brassicae nymphs when the number of available hosts is increased, but the overall proportion of parasitized hosts decreases with increase in host density. The proportion of female offspring also decreases with elevated host density. Increase in the number of female D. rapae foraging together increased total parasitism, but reduced relative contribution of each individual female. The number of female progeny decreased when multiple females competed for the same host. However, foraging experience in the presence of one or more conspecifics increased the parasitism rate and proportion of female progeny. Competing females were more active during oviposition and had shorter lives. The study suggests that both host and foundress (female parasitoid) densities have significant effect on progeny production, sex allocation, and longevity of foraging females. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Poneromorph Ants Associated with Parasitoid Wasps of the Genus Kapala Cameron (Hymenoptera: Eucharitidae in French Guiana

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    Jean-Paul Lachaud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eucharitid wasps are specific, specialized parasitoids of ants. The genus Kapala Cameron is the most common in the Neotropics but few species are described, and information dealing with their biology, behavior and host associations is scarce. Numerous poneromorph ant colonies were inspected over 4 collection surveys in French Guiana. A diverse fauna of parasites and parasitoids was found, including mermithid nematodes, flies, eucharitids, and another gregarious endoparasitoid wasp. Five new host associations for Kapala are reported, all of them involving medium- to large-size poneromorph ant species from 4 genera: Ectatomma brunneum Fr. Smith, Gnamptogenys tortuolosa (Fr. Smith, Odontomachus haematodus (L., O. mayi Mann, and Pachycondyla verenae (Forel. Three other associations involving O. hastatus (Fabr., P. apicalis (Latreille, and P. stigma (Fabr., already reported for other countries but new for French Guiana, are confirmed. The data extend the number of hosts for Kapala to 24 ant species from 7 genera. The high diversity of the ant host genera associated with Kapala, combined with the fact that these ant genera are the most widely distributed among Neotropical poneromorph ants, could account for the dominant status of the genus Kapala among the eucharitine wasps of Central and South America.

  5. Anagrus turpanicus sp. n. (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) from China, an egg parasitoid of Arboridia kakogowana (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong-Ying; Triapitsyn, Serguei V

    2016-01-01

    A new Palaearctic species of Anagrus Haliday (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae), A. turpanicus Triapitsyn & Hu sp. n., is described and illustrated from Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China. It was reared from parasitized eggs of the leafhopper Arboridia kakogowana (Matsumura) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) (Fig. 10) on cultivated table grapes from Turpan, which had been previously misidentified there as Erythroneura apicalis (Nawa) (e.g., Wang et al. 2004, 2011; Luan et al. 2006). This leafhopper has been an important economic pest in Turpan area since 1998, causing serious damage to the cultivated grapevines (Wang et al. 2004; Luan et al. 2006). Wang et al. (2011) reported that the mite Leptus sp. (Erythraeidae) and several unidentified spider species were the main natural enemies of Erythroneura apicalis in and around Turpan. This is the first record of A. kakogowana from China; it was not included in the key to the Chinese species of the genus Arboridia Zachvatkin by Song & Li (2015). Arboridia kakogowana is native to the eastern Palaearctic region (Japan, Korea, and Far East of Russia), and has been recently recorded as an invasive pest of cultivated grapes in southern Russia (Gnezdilov et al. 2008).

  6. Absence of complementary sex determination in the parasitoid wasp genus Asobara (Hymenoptera: Braconidae.

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    Wen-Juan Ma

    Full Text Available An attractive way to improve our understanding of sex determination evolution is to study the underlying mechanisms in closely related species and in a phylogenetic perspective. Hymenopterans are well suited owing to the diverse sex determination mechanisms, including different types of Complementary Sex Determination (CSD and maternal control sex determination. We investigated different types of CSD in four species within the braconid wasp genus Asobara that exhibit diverse life-history traits. Nine to thirteen generations of inbreeding were monitored for diploid male production, brood size, offspring sex ratio, and pupal mortality as indicators for CSD. In addition, simulation models were developed to compare these observations to predicted patterns for multilocus CSD with up to ten loci. The inbreeding regime did not result in diploid male production, decreased brood sizes, substantially increased offspring sex ratios nor in increased pupal mortality. The simulations further allowed us to reject CSD with up to ten loci, which is a strong refutation of the multilocus CSD model. We discuss how the absence of CSD can be reconciled with the variation in life-history traits among Asobara species, and the ramifications for the phylogenetic distribution of sex determination mechanisms in the Hymenoptera.

  7. Biological studies on Trichogrammatoidea bactrae Nagaraja (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae), egg parasitoid of Tuta absoluta Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

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    Virgala, Maria B. Riquelme, E-mail: mbriquelme@cnia.inta.gov.a [Universidade Nacional de Lujan, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. de Zoologia Agricola; Botto, Eduardo N., E-mail: enbotto@cnia.inta.gov.a [Instituto de Microbiologia y Zoologia Agricola (IMYZA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-07-15

    The tomato moth, Tuta absoluta Meyrick, is one of the most important tomato pests in South America. In Argentina, management strategies include only chemical control. In this work, the parasitoid wasp Trichogrammatoidea bactrae Nagaraja was evaluated as a potential natural enemy against this pest. Biological and population parameters were estimated by developing a life table under laboratory conditions at 25 {+-} 1 degree C, 14:10 photo period and 60 {+-} 10% RH. Three cohorts of 26-30 T. bactrae females each were placed with one of the three following treatments: 1 - Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier) eggs on a piece of cardboard; 2 - S. cerealella eggs on a piece of tomato leaf, and 3- T. absoluta eggs on a piece on tomato leaf. The following parameters were estimated for each cohort: survival (egg to adult), longevity, fecundity and oviposition period of females, sex proportion of the F1, net rate of reproduction (Ro), mean generation time (T) and intrinsic rate of population increase (rm). Survival of the T. bactrae immature was higher than 90% on both, S. cerealella and T. absoluta eggs. The female survival curves corresponded to type III and showed no significant differences among treatments. The three cohorts did not show significant differences between sex ratio, female longevity, oviposition period, fecundity and the population parameters studied. These results indicate that T. bactrae would be a potential biological control agent of T. absoluta. (author)

  8. Redescripción de Mastrus ridibundus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae, parasitoide introducido en la Argentina para el control de Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae Redescription of Mastrus ridibundus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae, parasitoid introduced for the control of Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae in Argentina

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    Javier Torréns

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se redescribe el agente de biocontrol introducido en la Argentina, Mastrus ridibundus (Gravenhorst (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae, para el control de Cydia pomonella (L. y se aportan nuevos caracteres para su identificación.The bio-control agent introduced in Argentina Mastrus ridibundus (Gravenhorst (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae for the control of Cydia pomonella (L. is redescribed, providing new characters for the species.

  9. Ecology, Wolbachia infection frequency and mode of reproduction in the parasitoid wasp Tetrastichus coeruleus (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumer, Barbara M; VAN Alphen, Jacques J M; Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2010-04-01

    Whereas sexual reproduction may facilitate adaptation to complex environments with many biotic interactions, simplified environments are expected to favour asexual reproduction. In agreement with this, recent studies on invertebrates have shown a prevalence of asexual species in agricultural (simplified) but not in natural (complex) environments. We investigated whether the same correlation between reproductive mode and habitat can be found in different populations within one species. The parasitoid wasp Tetrastichus coeruleus forms an ideal model to test this question, since it occurs both in natural and agricultural environments. Further, we investigated whether Wolbachia infection caused parthenogenesis in female-biased populations. In contrast to the general pattern, in Dutch and French natural areas, we found Wolbachia-infected, highly female-biased populations that reproduce parthenogenetically. In contrast, populations on Dutch agricultural fields were not infected with Wolbachia, showed higher frequencies of males and reproduced sexually. However, we also found a female-only, Wolbachia-infected population on agricultural fields in north-eastern United States. All Wolbachia-infected populations were infected with the same Wolbachia strain. At this moment, we do not have a convincing explanation for this deviation from the general pattern of ecology and reproductive mode. It may be that asparagus agricultural fields differ from other crop fields in ways that favour sexual reproduction. Alternatively, Wolbachia may manipulate life history traits in its host, resulting in different fitness pay-offs in different habitats. The fixation of Wolbachia in the United States populations (where the species was introduced) may be due to founder effect and lack of uninfected, sexual source populations.

  10. Dispersal capacity of fruit fly parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae in irrigated coffee plantations

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    Maria Gisely Camargos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Diachasmimorpha longicaudata is an Old World parasitoid of tephritid fruit flies that was widely introduced in the Americas to control pest species such as the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata. Augmentative releases in irrigated coffee plantations in semiarid regions of Brazil are under consideration and dispersal capacity of D. longicaudata in this habitat are important to develop release strategies. Approximately 2,000 individuals of D. longicaudata (5 to 7 days old were released in the center of a fruiting coffee plantation every two weeks from Dec. 2009 to Apr. 2010. Dispersal from the central release point was monitored to the north, south, east, west, northeast, northwest, southeast and southwest at 11 distances, beginning at 4.6 m and ending at 90 m from the release point. At each point, a parasitism unit (approximately 120 larvae of C. capitata in the 3rd instar wrapped in voile fabric and 10 coffee beans were collected. The average dispersion distance and dispersion area were estimated by the model proposed by Dobzhansky and Wright (1943. The average dispersion distances were 27.06 m (as estimated by fruit collection and 33.11 m (as estimated by oviposition traps. The average dispersion areas were 1,315.25 m2 and 1,752.45 m2 originating from the collection of beans and parasitism units, respectively. Cohorts of 2,000 adult D. longicaudata released at six points ha−1 are estimated to result in sufficient colonization to exert significant control of Ceratitis capitata.

  11. Impact of Rag1 aphid resistant soybeans on Binodoxys communis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghising, Kiran; Harmon, Jason P; Beauzay, Patrick B; Prischmann-Voldseth, Deirdre A; Helms, Ted C; Ode, Paul J; Knodel, Janet J

    2012-04-01

    Multiple strategies are being developed for pest management of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura; however, there has been little published research thus far to determine how such strategies may influence each other, thereby complicating their potential effectiveness. A susceptible soybean (Glycine max L.) variety without the Rag1 gene and a near isogenic resistant soybean variety with the Rag1 gene were evaluated in the laboratory for their effects on the fitness of the soybean aphid parasitoid, Binodoxys communis (Gahan). The presence or absence of the Rag1 gene was verified by quantifying soybean aphid growth. To test for fitness effects, parasitoids were allowed to attack soybean aphids on either a susceptible or resistant plant for 24 h and then aphids were kept on the same plant throughout parasitoid development. Parasitoid fitness was measured by mummy and adult parasitoid production, adult parasitoid emergence, development time, and adult size. Parasitoids that attacked soybean aphids on susceptible plants produced more mummies, more adult parasitoids, and had a higher emergence rate compared with those on resistant plants. Adult parasitoids that emerged from resistant plants took 1 d longer and were smaller compared with those from susceptible plants. This study suggests that biological control by B. communis may be compromised when host plant resistance is widely used for pest management of soybean aphids.

  12. First report of Maconellicoccus hirsutus (Green, 1908) (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae) and the associated parasitoid Anagyrus kamali Moursi, 1948 (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsaro Júnior, A L; Peronti, A L B G; Penteado-Dias, A M; Morais, E G F; Pereira, P R V S

    2013-05-01

    The pink hibiscus mealybug (PHM), Maconellicoccus hirsutus (Green) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) and the associated hymenopterous parasitoid, Anagyrus kamali Moursi, 1948 (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), are reported for the first time in Brazil. Specimens of the PHM were collected on nine hosts plants, Annona muricata L. (Anonnaceae), Glycine max (L.) Merr. (Fabaceae), Centrolobium paraensis Tul. (Fabaceae), Inga edulis Mart. (Fabaceae), Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. (Malvaceae), Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae), Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae), Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck (Rutaceae) and Solanum lycopersicum L. (Solanaceae), in four municipalities in the north-northeast of the state of Roraima. The plants C. paraensis, I. edulis and C. sinensis are recorded for the first time as a hosts for PHM. Characteristic injuries observed on the host plants infested by PHM and suggestions for its management are presented.

  13. Hymenoepimecis neotropica (Brues & Richardson (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Pimplinae parasitoid of Araneus omnicolor (Keyserling (Araneae, Araneidae: first host record and new occurrence to Brazil Hymenoepimecis neotropica (Brues & Richardson (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae parasitoide de Araneus omnicolor (Keyserling (Araneae, Araneidae: primeiro registro do hospedeiro e nova ocorrência para o Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jober Fernando Sobczak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoepimecis neotropica (Brues & Richardson (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Pimplinae parasitoid of Araneus omnicolor (Keyserling (Araneae, Araneidae: first host record and new occurrence to Brazil. The species of the genus Hymenoepimecis occur only in Neotropical region, being recognized for using as their hosts spiders which build orbicular webs. That wasp was described occurring only in the Guyana. This work expands the geographical distribution of the species to Brazil and records the spider Araneus omnicolor (Araneae, Araneidae as its host. Furthermore, it provides information about the natural history of this interaction.Hymenoepimecis neotropica (Brues & Richardson (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae parasitoide de Araneus omnicolor (Keyserling (Araneae, Araneidae: primeiro registro do hospedeiro e nova ocorrência para o Brasil. Espécies do gênero Hymenoepimecis ocorrem somente na região Neotropical, sendo reconhecidas por utilizarem, como hospedeiras, aranhas que constroem teias orbiculares. Essa vespa foi descrita ocorrendo somente na Guiana. Este trabalho amplia a distribuição geográfica da espécie para o Brasil e registra a aranha Araneus omnicolor (Araneae, Araneidae como sua hospedeira. Além disso, fornece informações sobre a história natural desta interação.

  14. Interaction between the entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana (Ascomycota: Hypocreales and the parasitoid wasp, Aphidius colemani Viereck (Hymenoptera: Braconidae

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    F. Emami

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana, on the biological characteristics of Aphidius colemani, a parasitoid of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, was studied under laboratory conditions. Third-instar nymphs of green peach aphid were infected with 5/3×105 conidia/mL of B. bassiana, which was determined to be the lethal concentration 50 dose. They were then offered to mated female parasitoids for 24 h at different intervals. Results showed that by prolonging the release intervals of parasitoids, the number of mummies and percent emergence of parasitoids were reduced. Moreover, production of male offspring increased in the F1 generation of parasitoids. The interference of B. bassiana with parasitoid development was also studied by first exposing the aphid hosts to the parasitoids for 24 h and subsequently spraying them with B. bassiana 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after exposure. Results showed that by prolonging fungal spraying intervals, the number of mummies and percent emergence of parasitoids were increased. It appeared that the best time for applying B. bassiana would be three to four days after parasitisation.

  15. Discrimination by Coptera haywardi (Hymenoptera:Diapriidae) of hosts previously attacked by conspecifies or by the larval parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coptera haywardi (Oglobin) is an endoparasitoid of fruit fly pupae that could find itself in competition with other parasitoids, both con- and heterospecific, already resident inside hosts. In choice bioassays, ovipositing C. haywardi females strongly discriminated against conspecifically parasitise...

  16. Plant vigor metrics determine spatio-temporal distribution dynamics of Oulema melanopus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and its larval parasitoid, Tetrastichus julis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kher, S V; Dosdall, L M; Cárcamo, H A

    2014-10-01

    The cereal leaf beetle, Oulema melanopus (L.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a new invasive insect pest of oat, wheat, and barley in western Canada. Biological control with its principal larval parasitoid, Tetrastichus julis Walker (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), is the primary management strategy. However, to implement control successfully, a thorough understanding of the spatio-temporal dynamics of the interactions between these two species is important. We examined the nature of spatial associations and distribution dynamics of O. melanopus and T. julis with reference to host plant nutrients and plant vigor traits using Spatial Analysis by Distance Indices. A grid design was used to understand spatial associations between O. melanopus and T. julis. Distributions of O. melanopus and T. julis indicated the presence of significant patches and gaps. Plant nutrient availability and plant vigor varied across the grid in all study years. On a spatial scale, O. melanopus and T. julis represented a tightly coupled system demonstrating the strong density-dependent nature of parasitoid dispersal. Among the factors examined, plant vigor traits significantly influenced field distributions of both O. melanopus and T. julis. Areas across grids with high plant density, greater plant height, and high availability of plant leaves indicated higher establishment of O. melanopus larvae, consequently exhibiting bottom-up effects on T. julis distributions. Maintenance of uniform plant vigor can be a critical aspect in mitigating yield losses from O. melanopus infestation.

  17. Singing on the wings! Male wing fanning performances affect female willingness to copulate in the aphid parasitoid Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni; Kavallieratos, Nickolas G; Donati, Elisa; Giunti, Giulia; Stefanini, Cesare; Canale, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae) is a generalist endoparasitoid attacking more than 100 aphid species. In L. testaceipes, wing fanning is a main male courtship display evoked by a female-borne sex pheromone. However, no information is available on the characteristics and behavioral role of male fanning during courtship in this parasitoid. Here, the courtship behavior of a wild strain of L. testaceipes was quantified and the male wing fanning performances were analyzed through high-speed video recordings and examined in relation to mating success. Courtship sequence of wild L. testaceipes did not substantially differ from that previously reported for other populations mass reared on aphids. We observed that the male courtship duration did not affect mating success. However, video analysis revealed that the males producing high-frequency fanning signals achieved higher mating success over those that display low-frequency fanning. Wing fanning before successful and unsuccessful courtship differed in amplitude of wing movements and alignment toward the mate, highlighting that frontal courtship positively influence the female mating decisions. This study increases knowledge on sexual behavior in a key parasitoid of aphids, highlighting the importance of wing fanning among the range of sensory modalities used in the sexual communication of L. testaceipes. From a practical point of view, this information is useful in L. testaceipes-based biocontrol strategies, since it can help to establish parameters for quality checking of mass-reared wasps over time.

  18. Comparing Immature Development and Life History Traits in Two Coexisting Host-Feeding Parasitoids, Diglyphus isaea and Neochrysocharis formosa (Hymenoptera:Eulophidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi-bo; LU Shu-long; LIU Wan-xue; WANG Wen-xia; WANG Wei; WAN Fang-hao

    2014-01-01

    Coexisting natural enemies that share a common host resource in the same guild usually exhibit variation in their life history traits, due to their need to share a similar ecological niche. In this study, we compared the immature development times and adult life history traits of two coexisting, host-feeding parasitoids, Diglyphus isaea Walker and Neochrysocharis formosa Westwood (Hymenoptera:Eulophidae), of which both attack larvae of the same agromyzid leafminers. These two species are both synovigenic, idiobiont parasitoids, whose adults consume host lfuids (“host feeding”) and lay anhydropic eggs. Of the two, D. isaea has a larger body but little or no initial egg load, and engages in similar lifetime host-feeding events. However, it achieves higher fecundity, longer adult longevity, and higher host suppression ability than N. formosa, which has a smaller body and higher initial egg load. Although D. isaea engages in similar lifetime host-feeding events with N. formosa, all of its gains in life history traits per host-feeding event of D. isaea were larger than those of N. formosa. The age-speciifc fecundity and host mortality curves of N. formosa were more skewed in early life than those of D. isaea. In addition, the ovigeny index of N. formosa was negatively correlated to body size. Our results conifrmed that two coexisting parasitoids, which share the same host resource, show different immature development patterns and life history traits, suggesting that different resource allocation mode could be a general rule of coexisting species sharing the same habitat or host.

  19. First field records of Pachycrepoideus vindemiae as a parasitoid of Drosophila suzukii in European and Oregon small fruit production areas

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    M.V. Rossi Stacconi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae is a destructive crop pest native to Southeast Asia that recently invaded countries in Europe and North America, severely impacting commercial fruit production in its new host range. Here we report the results of a survey aimed at determining the presence of indigenous D. suzukii parasitoid populations carried out from May to October 2012 in two areas negatively affected by this fruit pest: Trento Province, Northern Italy, and Oregon in the Pacific Northwest of the USA. We conducted field and laboratory studies in order to determine the status of biological control agents utilizing D. suzukii as a host. Our study sites included a range of commercial soft fruits and natural non-commercial habitats. In each site, sentinel traps were baited with either D. suzukii or Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae larvae in different food substrates. The generalist parasitoid, Pachycrepoideus vindemiae (Rondani (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, was collected from both D. suzukii and D. melanogaster pupae in traps deployed in a selection of these sites. This report of P. vindemiae in 2012 represents the first identification of D. suzukii parasitoids in Europe. A successive parasitism efficacy test was set up under controlled laboratory conditions confirming the ability of P. vindemiae to attack D. suzukii pupae. In addition, an historical digression with analysis of the original documents in the Italian archives has been provided in order to unravel the correct species name. We finally discuss the possible practical implications of this finding for the biological control of D. suzukii.

  20. Los Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera asociados con agallas de Cinípidos (Hymenoptera, Cynipidae en la Comunidad de Madrid

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    Gómez, J. F.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Information about the chalcid wasp parasitoid community (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea associated with galls of Cynipidae in Madrid (Spain is compiled and updated. Studied material includes more than 1000 published and unpublished records from samplings in 80 sites in the Madrid region carried out over twenty three years by the research team. A check-list of 121 species, 19 of them provisionally identified, from 6 families of Chalcidoidea is provided as follows: 26 Eurytomidae, 27 Torymidae, 9 Ormyridae, 33 Pteromalidae, 9 Eupelmidae and 17 Eulophidae. Ormyrus rufimanus Mayr, 1904 and Idiomacromerus semiaeneus (Szelenyi, 1957 are recorded for the first time in the Iberian Peninsula. For each family and genus of Chalcidoidea data are given on biology, diversity and distribution in Comunidad de Madrid. The composition of the chalcid wasp parasitoid community associated with gall wasps in Comunidad de Madrid is discussed and compared to the same community data from the Iberian Peninsula and the Western Palaearctic. Species from the Iberian community of chalcid parasitoids that are missing from Madrid region, exclusive species and potentially present species are also commented upon. Finally two appendices are presented as follows: a list of the Chalcidoidea species reared from 73 different galls made by 71 cynipid species from Madrid with associated parasitoid records, and a final appendix with full record data of all studied material, including information on the sampling localities with X, Y georeferenced coordinates, host galls and host plants.

    Se compila y actualiza la información existente sobre la comunidad parasitoide de Chalcidoidea, asociada a agallas de cinípidos (Hymenoptera, Cynipidae en la Comunidad de Madrid. Los datos corresponden a más de 1000 registros, tanto de datos publicados, como inéditos, correspondientes a colectas en 80 localidades de Madrid efectuadas por el equipo investigador a lo largo de 23 a

  1. Effect of Parasitoid: Host Ratio and Parasitoid and Host Group Size on Fitness of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a Parasitoid of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): Implications for Mass-Rearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Producing insect natural enemies in laboratories or insectaries for biological pest control is often expensive, and developing cost-effective rearing techniques is a goal of many biological control programs. Spathius galinae Belokobylskij and Strazenac (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a recently described...

  2. Geographical distribution and genetic relatedness of sympatrical thelytokous and arrhenotokous populations of the parasitoid Venturia canescens (Hymenoptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, M.V.; Beukeboom, L.W.; Driessen, G.; Lapchin, L.; Bernstein, C.; Alphen, J.J.M. van

    2002-01-01

    Theory predicts that asexual reproduction has a competitive advantage over sexual reproduction because of the twofold cost of producing males. Few systems are suitable for directly testing this prediction. In the solitary parasitoid wasp Venturia canescens both arrhenotokously (sexual) and

  3. First host record for Anteon pilicorne (Ogloblin) (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae), a parasitoid of Cicadellidae, including the corn leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virla, E G; Espinosa, M S; Moya-Raygoza, G

    2011-01-01

    For the first time the dryinid wasp Anteon pilicorne (Ogloblin) is recorded as a parasitoid of two Macrostelini leafhoppers: Balclutha rosea (Scott) and the corn leafhopper Dalbulus maidis (DeLong & Wolcott). New distributional records are presented.

  4. Longevity of multiple species of tephritid (Diptera) fruit fly parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Opiinae) provided exotic and sympatric-fruit based diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhl, Charles; Cicero, Lizette; Sivinski, John; Teal, Peter; Lapointe, Stephen; Paranhos, Beatriz Jordão; Aluja, Martín

    2011-11-01

    While adult parasitic Hymenoptera in general feed on floral and extrafloral nectars, hemipteran-honeydews and fluids from punctured hosts, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead), an Old World opiine braconid introduced to tropical/subtropical America for the biological control of Anastrepha spp. (Tephritidae), can survive on fruit juices as they seep from injured fruit. An ability to exploit fruit juice would allow such a parasitoid to efficiently forage for hosts and food sources simultaneously. Two New World opiines, Doryctobracon areolatus (Szepligeti) and Utetes anastrephae (Viereck), are also prominent Anastrepha parasitoids and are roughly sympatric. All three species were provided with: (1) pulp and juice diets derived from a highly domesticated Old World fruit (orange, Citrus sinensis L.) that is only recently sympatric with the Mexican flies and parasitoids and so offered little opportunity for the evolution of feeding-adaptations and (2) a less-domesticated New World fruit (guava, Psidium guajava L.), sympatric over evolutionary time with D. areolatus and U. anastrephae. Both sexes of D. longicaudata died when provided guava pulp or juice at a rate similar to a water-only control. D. areolatus and U. anastrephae, presumably adapted to the nutrient/chemical constituents of guava, also died at a similar rate. Survival of all three species on orange pulp and juice was greater than on water, and often equaled that obtained on a honey and water solution. In confirmatory experiments in Mexico, D. areolatus and U. anastrephae, as well as other tephritid parasitoids Doryctobracon crawfordi (Viereck) and Opius hirtus (Fisher), all died at a significantly higher rates when provided guava in comparison to a honey and water diet. Such a result is likely due to guavas being repellent, innutritious or toxic. D. longicaudata clearly consumed guava juice tagged with a colored dye. Dilutions of orange and guava juice resulted in shorter lifespans than dilutions of orange

  5. Evaluación de Spalangia endius y Muscidifurax sp. (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae como controladores de Musca domestica en el Perú

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    Edgar Inciso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se comparó la actividad parasitoide de las microavispas Spalangia endius y Muscidifurax sp. sobre el estadio pupal de Musca domestica. La mejor temperatura para la crianza fue de 25 °C. El ciclo de S. endius se completó en 22,6 días, mientras en Muscidifurax sp. en 14,8 días. La duración del ciclo fue inversamente relacionada con la temperatura, siendo mayor en las hembras que en los machos. La longevidad fue similar en ambas especies de microavispas (20,7 días en S. endius y 18,6 días en Muscifurax sp..La oviposicion de S. endius a los 15 días fue sobre 175 pupas de M. domestica, valor mayor que Muscidifurax que parasitó 140 pupas en 16 días. En ambas especies la mayor postura ocurrió al tercer día. Las pupas de M. domestica de dos días de maduración fueron las mas parasitadas con 66,4% de parasitismo efectivo por S. endius y 60,2% por Muscidifurax sp. El número óptimo de pupas de M. domestica fue 10 (10:1. Se concluye que en condiciones de laboratorio, Spalangia endius puede ser un eficiente controlador biológico de pupas de Musca domestica.

  6. Morphology and Ultrastructure of Brain Tissue and Fat Body from the Flesh Fly, Sarcophaga bullata Parker (Diptera: Sarcophagidae, Envenomated by the Ectoparasitic Wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Rivers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the hypothesis that venom from the ectoparasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis targets brain tissue and fat body from its flesh fly host, Sarcophaga bullata. By 1 h postenvenomation, some brain neurons began to show irregularities in nuclear shape, and though they were predominately euchromatic, there was evidence of heterochromatin formation. Irregularity in the nuclear envelope became more prominent by 3 h after envenomation, as did the condensation of heterochromatin. The severity of ultrastructural changes continued to increase until at least 24 h after parasitoid attack. At this point, cellular swelling and extensive heterochromatic inclusions were evident, multivesicular bodies occurred in the cytoplasm of some cells, and the rough endoplasmic reticulum was dilated in many of the cells. Immunohistochemical staining revealed significant apoptosis in neurons located in brain tissues. By contrast, there was no evidence of any morphological or ultrastructural disturbances in fat body tissues up to 24 h after envenomation, nor did any of the cells display signs of cell death.

  7. Effects of endophyte colonization of Vicia faba (Fabaceae plants on the life-history of leafminer parasitoids Phaedrotoma scabriventris (hymenoptera: braconidae and Diglyphus isaea (hymenoptera: eulophidae.

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    Komivi S Akutse

    Full Text Available Effects of the fungal endophytes Beauveria bassiana (isolates ICIPE 279, G1LU3, S4SU1 and Hypocrea lixii (isolate F3ST1 on the life-history of Phaedrotoma scabriventris and Diglyphus isaea, parasitoids of the pea leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis, were studied in the laboratory. Parasitoids were allowed to parasitize 2(nd and 3(rd instar L. huidobrensis larvae reared on endophytically-inoculated faba bean, Vicia faba. In the control, parasitoids were reared on non-inoculated host plants. Parasitism, pupation, adult emergence and survival were recorded. No significant difference was observed between the control and the endophyte-inoculated plants in terms of parasitism rates of P. scabriventris (p = 0.68 and D. isaea (p = 0.45 and adult' survival times (p = 0.06. The survival period of the F1 progeny of P. scabriventris was reduced (p<0.0001 in B. bassiana S4SU1 to 28 days as compared to more than 40 days for B. bassiana G1LU3, ICIPE 279 and H. lixii F3ST1. However, no significant difference (p = 0.54 was observed in the survival times of the F1 progeny of D. isaea. This study has demonstrated that together, endophytes and parasitoids have beneficial effects in L. huidobrensis population suppression.

  8. Producción masiva y simultánea de machos de Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae y parasitoides Dichasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae Massive and simultaneous production of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae males and Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae parasitoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia N. López

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available En la línea de sexado genético «Cast191» las hembras de Ceratitis capitata son homocigotas para el gen slow , lo que reduce su velocidad de desarrollo; los machos son heterocigotas y muestran una velocidad de desarrollo normal. Esta característica permitió producir, con Cast191, machos estériles por un lado, y parasitoides criados sobre las larvas remanentes por el otro. Nuestro objetivo con este trabajo fue producir ambos insumos simultáneamente y a una escala mayor que hasta ahora. Además, bajo estas condiciones, y en un intento por aumentar la separación entre sexos, se aplicó a las larvas del primer estadío un pulso de 15º C, durante 1 ó 2 días, luego del cual se las mantuvo a 20º C ó 25º C, hasta que entraron al estado de pupa, luego se mantuvo todo el material a 25º C. La mejor separación de sexos, lograda con el tratamiento a 20º C sin pulso de frío, se usó para comparar la calidad del parasitoide Diachasmimorpha longicaudata, criado sobre las larvas obtenidas tras la separación de los machos, con aquellos criados sobre la línea salvaje. Para ello, este tratamiento de separación fue aplicado en la cría de la mosca, y el material remanente de dieta con larvas fue expuesto al parasitoide. La tasa de parasitismo obtenida fue semejante a la hallada sobre la línea salvaje, y la tasa sexual de la F 1 del parasitoide presentó un sesgo hacia las hembras aún mayor. Se discute la factibilidad de utilizar la línea Cast191 de C. Capitata, para la producción a mayor escala de machos de mosca y para la cría masiva del parasitoide D. longicaudata.In the genetic sexing strain «Cast191», the females of Ceratitis capitata are homozygous for the mutation slow , slowing down their rate of development, and the males are heterozygous, having a normal rate of development. This feature made Cast191 capable of producing sterile males, on one hand, and parasitoids that are reared on the remaining larvae, on the other. The

  9. Quality of different aphids as hosts of the parasitoid Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae); Qualidade de diferentes especies de pulgoes como hospedeiros do parasitoide Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Robson J.; Bueno, Vanda H.P. [Universidade Federal de Lavras, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia]. E-mail: vhpbueno@ufla.br; Sampaio, Marcus V.[Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Agrarias]. E-mail: mvsampaio@iciag.ufu.br

    2008-03-15

    Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson) has a broad aphid host range; however the quality of these preys may interfere in its biological feature. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of three Macrosiphini, Brevicoryne brassicae (L.), Lipaphis erysimi (Kaltenbach) and Myzus persicae (Sulzer), and three Aphidini Schizaphis graminum (Rondani) Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch) and Aphis gossypii Glover as hosts to L. testaceipes and to determine the relation possible of host preference, of size and quality of the host. The tests were carried out in climatic chamber at 25 {+-} 1 deg C, RH 70 {+-} 10% and 12h photophase. The parasitoid did not oviposite in B. brassicae and L. erysimi, while the other species were nutritionally suitable to the parasitoid. L. testaceipes showed preference for aphids from tribe Aphidini and these hosts presented better quality to the parasitoid when compared to Macrosiphini. Interactions among size, preference and quality between the Aphidini were found. L. testaceipes showed preference (parasitism rate 76.7%) for R. maidis, the bigger host (hind tibia with 0.281 mm). This host provided bigger size (hind tibia with 0.49 mm) and higher emergence rate (95.6%) to the parasitoid when compared to A. gossypii (parasitism rate of 55.7%). Also the smaller host A. gossypii (0.266 mm) provided smaller size hind tibia (0.45 mm) and higher mortality of the parasitoid (emergence rate 72.1%). However, the development time was shorter and the longevity was higher in A. gossypii (6.3 and 5.4 days, respectively) when compared to the host R. maidis (6.7 and 3.8 days, respectively), and not been related to host size. (author)

  10. Dispersion and movement of the Lygus spp.parasitoid Peristenus relictus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in trapcropped organic strawberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfalfa trap crops can be used to manage Lygus spp. in organic strawberries on the California Central Coast. The retention of Lygus spp. in alfalfa creates aggregated distributions that provide improved opportunities for biological control by the introduced parasitoid Peristenus relictus (Ruthe). ...

  11. The parasitoid, Cotesia flavipes (Cameron) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), influences food consumption and utilization by larval Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Guilherme Duarte; Salvador, Gabriela; Cônsoli, Fernando Luis

    2014-10-01

    Parasitoids exploit host insects for food and other resources; they alter host development and physiology to optimize conditions to favor parasitoid development. Parasitoids influence their hosts by injecting eggs, along with a variety of substances, including venoms, polydnaviruses, ovarian fluids, and other maternal factors, into hosts. These factors induce profound changes in hosts, such as behavior, metabolism, endocrine events, and immune defense. Because endoparasitoids develop and consume tissues from within their hosts, it is reasonable to suggest that internal parasitization would also influence host food consumption and metabolism. We report on the effects of parasitism by Cotesia flavipes on the food consumption and utilization of its host, Diatraea saccharalis. Cotesia flavipes reduces the host food consumption, but parasitized larvae considered a unit with their parasitoid's attained the same final weight as the nonparasitized larvae. Nutritional indices, midgut activities of carbohydrases, and trypsin of parasitized and nonparasitized D. saccharalis were assessed. Parasitized larvae had reduced relative food consumption, metabolic and growth rates, coupled with higher efficiency for conversion of the digested, but not ingested, food into body mass. Parasitism also affected food flux through the gut and protein contents in the midgut of parasitized larvae. The activity of α-amylase and trehalase in parasitized host was enhanced in the first day after parasitism relative to control larvae. Saccharase activity remained unchanged during larval development. Trypsin activity was reduced from the fifth to ninth day after parasitism. We argue on the mechanisms involved in host food processing after parasitism.

  12. A geographic distribution database of the Neotropical cassava whitefly complex (Hemiptera, Aleyrodidae) and their associated parasitoids and hyperparasitoids (Hymenoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Ordóñez, Aymer Andrés; Hazzi, Nicolas A; Escobar-Prieto, David; Paz-Jojoa, Dario; Parsa, Soroush

    2015-01-01

    Whiteflies (Hemiptera, Aleyrodidae) are represented by more than 1,500 herbivorous species around the world. Some of them are notorious pests of cassava (Manihot esculenta), a primary food crop in the tropics. Particularly destructive is a complex of Neotropical cassava whiteflies whose distribution remains restricted to their native range. Despite their importance, neither their distribution, nor that of their associated parasitoids, is well documented. This paper therefore reports observational and specimen-based occurrence records of Neotropical cassava whiteflies and their associated parasitoids and hyperparasitoids. The dataset consists of 1,311 distribution records documented by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) between 1975 and 2012. The specimens are held at CIAT's Arthropod Reference Collection (CIATARC, Cali, Colombia). Eleven species of whiteflies, 14 species of parasitoids and one species of hyperparasitoids are reported. Approximately 66% of the whitefly records belong to Aleurotrachelus socialis and 16% to Bemisia tuberculata. The parasitoids with most records are Encarsia hispida, Amitus macgowni and Encarsia bellottii for Aleurotrachelus socialis; and Encarsia sophia for Bemisia tuberculata. The complete dataset is available in Darwin Core Archive format via the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF).

  13. Quality of the Exotic Parasitoid Cotesia flavipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) Does Not Show Deleterious Effects after Inbreeding for 10 Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Maíra; De Bortoli, Sergio A.; Vacari, Alessandra M.; Laurentis, Valéria L.; Ramalho, Dagmara G.

    2016-01-01

    Although the parasitoid Cotesia flavipes (Cameron) has proven effective in controlling sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius) for many years, concern has arisen over the quality of individuals produced at large scales. The parasitoid has been reared in laboratories in Brazil for more than 40 years, with no new introductions of new populations during that period. Since the quality of the parasitoids was not verified at the time of the species' introduction in Brazil, we do not know if there has been any reduction in quality so far. However, it is possible to determine whether the parasitoid could reduce in quality in future generations. Thus, the objective of this research was to assess the quality of these insects over 10 generations and look for evidence of any loss in quality. We used two populations: one from a biofactory that has been maintained in the laboratory for over 40 years, and an inbred laboratory population. Both were bred, and compared for 10 generations. We wanted to determine what happened to the quality of the parasitoid after 10 generations in an extreme inbreeding situation. To assure inbreeding, newly emerged females were forced to mate with a sibling. Individual females were then allowed to parasitize larvae of D. saccharalis. We performed evaluations for each generation until the tenth generation, and recorded the sex ratio, percentage emergence, number of offspring/females, and longevity of both males and females. Results of the measurements of biological characteristics demonstrated random significant differences between populations; best results were obtained intermittently for both the biofactory population and the inbred population. No significant differences across generations for the same population were observed. Thus, rearing of a C. flavipes population subjected to inbreeding for 10 generations was not sufficient to reveal any deleterious effects of inbreeding. PMID:27509087

  14. A new species of Stenodiplosis (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) on Spartina grasses (Poaceae) with notes on its biology and its parasitoid Tetrastichus bromi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, J Manuel Perilla; Johnson, Paul J; Gagné, Raymond J; Boe, Arvid

    2015-12-09

    Stenodiplosis spartinae Gagné new species (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) is described from eastern South Dakota and coastal North Carolina, and compared with other American congeners. The known host plants are Spartina alterniflora and S. pectinata. The larva is a seed predator of the ovule and immature caryopsis of the host plant. Adult activity is from the early emergence of the host inflorescence through anthesis. Oviposition occurs in the floret with eggs laid under the edges of the palea and lemma. The larva apparently overwinters in dehisced spikelets in the soil among rhizomes of S. pectinata, with pupation in late spring. Laboratory emergence and field activity of the adults suggest a potentialsecond or third generation developing on late emerging inflorescences. Larval feeding does not induce external color or shape changes in the spikelet. Apparently all three instars are ectoparasitized by Tetrastichus bromi Kostyukov (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) that was probably introduced to North America in the late 1800's and is inculcated into parasitoid guilds of several Stenodiplosis species. Resource partitioning appears to occur between the gall midge and early instars of Aethes spartinana Barnes and McDunnough (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) that feed on maturing caryopses. The feeding of this gall midge and the moth probably account for most of the reduced seed production in both natural and agronomic populations of S. pectinata.

  15. Interactions among three trophic levels and diversity of parasitoids: a case of top-down processes in Mexican tropical dry forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-Reyes, Pablo; Quesada, Mauricio; Hanson, Paul; Oyama, Ken

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between plant hosts, galling insects, and their parasitoids in a tropical dry forest at Chamela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve in western Mexico. In 120 transects of 30 by 5 m (60 in deciduous forest and 60 in riparian habitats), 29 galling insects species were found and represented in the following order: Diptera (Cecidomyiidae, which induced the greatest abundance of galls with 22 species; 76%), Homoptera (Psylloidea, 6.9%; Psyllidae, 6.9%; Triozidae, 3.4%), Hymenoptera (Tanaostigmatidae, 3.4%; which were rare), and one unidentified morphospecies (3.4%). In all cases, there was a great specificity between galling insect species and their host plant species; one galling insect species was associated with one specific plant species. In contrast, there was no specificity between parasitoid species and their host galling insect species. Only 11 species of parasitoids were associated with 29 galling insect species represented in the following families: Torymidae (18.2%), Eurytomidae (18.2%), Eulophidae (18.2%), Eupelmidae (9.1%), Pteromalidae (9.1%), family Braconidae (9.1%), Platygastridae (9.1%), and one unidentified (9.1%). Most parasitoid species parasitized several gall species (Torymus sp.: 51.1%, Eurytoma sp.: 49.7%, Torymoides sp.: 46.9%). Therefore, the effects of variation in plant defenses do not extend to the third trophic level, because a few species of parasitoids can determine the community structure and composition of galling insect species in tropical plants, and instead, top-down processes seem to be regulating trophic interactions of galling insect species in tropical gall communities.

  16. Composition of the Family of Parasitoids Wasps in the Parque Nacional da Serra da Canastra, Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Diego Pádua

    2014-12-01

    Resumo. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a composição faunística de Hymenoptera parasitoide do Parque Nacional da Serra da Canastra, utilizando o método de varredura de vegetação. Foram coletadas no período de setembro de 2009 a outubro de 2010, um total de 6.489 exemplares, pertencentes a oito superfamílias e 24 famílias. Eulophidae, Braconidae, Platygastridae, Pteromalidae, Encyrtidae foram às famílias com a maior abundância relativa, sendo responsáveis por 18,6%, 18,5%, 15,8%, 10,3% e 9,8% do número total coletado, respectivamente. Dezenove famílias combinadas tiveram abundancia menor que 4%. As maiores diversidades foram observadas nos pontos localizados na base do chapadão da Canastra, influenciadas, provavelmente, pelo gradiente fitofisionômico desta região. Uma análise de similaridade entre este estudo com outros inventários de vespas parasitoides no Cerrado, além de uma tabela preliminar de gêneros de Pimplinae (Ichneumonidae é apresentada.

  17. Archisepsis scabra (Loew 1861 (Diptera: Sepsidae, new host for the parasitoid Triplasta coxalis (Ashmead, 1865 (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae in Brazil Archisepsis scabra (Loew, 1861 (Diptera: Sepsidae, novo hospedeiro para o parasitóide Triplasta coxalis (Ashmead, 1865 (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae no Brasil

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    Carlos Henrique Marchiori

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to report the first occurrence of the parasitoid Triplasta coxalis (Ashmead, 1865 (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae in pupae of Archisepsis scabra (Loew, 1861 (Diptera: Sepsidae in cattle dung in Brazil. The experiment was carried out in Monte Alegre, MG. One obtained the pupae through the flotation method. They were individually placed in gelatin capsules until the emergence of the adult dipterous or their parasitoids. Fourty seven pupae of A. scabra were obtained, two of which yielded the parasitoid T. coxalis. The percentage of parasitism was 4.3%.Objetivou-se, no presente trabalho, relatar a primeira ocorrência do parasitóide Triplasta coxalis (Ashmead, 1865 (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae como inimigo natural de Archisepsis scabra (Loew, 1861 (Diptera: Sepsidae em fezes bovinas no Brasil. O experimento foi realizado em Monte Alegre, MG. As pupas foram separadas pelo método de flutuação e individualizadas em cápsulas de gelatina onde foram mantidas até a emergência dos dípteros e/ou dos parasitóides. Obtiveram-se 47 pupas de A. scabra, das quais emergiram dois parasitóides pertencentes à espécie T. coxalis. A porcentagem de parasitismo foi de 4,3%.

  18. Additions to the fauna of parasitic wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea and coccoids (Hemiptera: Coccoidea from the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India, with illustrations and diagnosis

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    A. Gupta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An illustrated account with diagnostic details of the reared and collected species of insect parasitoids along with scale insects and mealybugs from the Andaman and Nicobar Islands is presented. Twenty eight species of insect pests and parasitoids under two major orders Hemiptera and Hymenoptera are documented, of which 16 species are reported for the first time from these islands specifically from South and Middle Andamans. The parasitic wasps reared and collected belong to six families-Encyrtidae, Eulophidae, Chalcididae, Eucharitidae, Aphelinidae, and Pteromalidae, including 16 species under 12 genera. The majority of the species are primary or secondary parasitoids attacking many insect groups. The scale insects and mealybugs documented belong to four families-Coccidae, Pseudococcidae, Diaspididae, and Cerococcidae, including 12 species under 11 genera. Information on the species distribution, host association, and brief taxonomical description of each species along with illustrations is provided for easy identification. Illustrations include habitus photographs of 16 species of parasitic wasps and 12 species of scales and mealybugs.

  19. New records of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae), wild hosts and parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in the Brazilian Amazon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Cristiane R. de; Oliveira, Manoela N. de; Silva, Ricardo A. da [EMBRAPA Amapa, Macapa, AP (Brazil); Pereira, Julia D.B. [Universidade Federal do Amapa, Macapa, AP (Brazil); Souza Filho, Miguel F. [Instituto Biologico, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Costa Neto, Salustiano V. da [Instituto de Pesquisas Cientificas e Tecnologicas do Amapa, Macapa, AP (Brazil); Marinho, Claudia F.; Zucchi, Roberto A. [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia, Fitopatologia e Zoologia Agricola

    2008-11-15

    Anastrepha anomala Stone was obtained from Parahancornia amapa (Huber) Ducke (Apocynaceae) fruits, and Anastrepha hastata Stone from Cheiloclinium cognatum (Miers.) (Hippocrateaceae) in the State of Amapa, Brazil. Two braconids, Doryctobracon sp. and Opius bellus Gahan, were reared from the latter fruit fl y species. This is the fi rst record of P. amapa as a fruit fl y host. C. cognatum is the fi rst host known to A. hastata. Both braconids are also the fi rst records of parasitoids for this species. (author)

  20. The preimaginal stages of Pnigalio gyamiensis Myartseva & Kurashev, 1990 (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae, a parasitoid associated with Chrysoesthia sexguttella (Thunberg (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae

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    Еkaterina Yegorenkova

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The larval instars of Pnigalio gyamiensis Myartseva and Kurashev are described in detail for the first time. This species is a larval-pupal ectoparasitoid of Chrysoesthia sexguttella (Thunberg (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae, which forms leaf mines in the plant Chenopodium album L. (Caryophyllales: Amaranthaceae. The female of P. gyamiensis lays a single egg on the skin of the host larva or nearby it, without any significant preference for a particular variant. The presence of long hairs on its body provides the newly-hatched first larval instar with high mobility. Some peculiarities in this parasitoid-host relationship are described.

  1. Biology of Pseudoligosita plebeia (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae), an egg parasitoid of Homalodisca spp. (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) collected from northwestern Mexico as a potential biocontrol agent of H. Vitripennis in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, J M; Bernal, J S; Morse, J G

    2012-10-01

    Pseudoligosita plebeia (Perkins) (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) is a candidate biological control agent targeting the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), in California. Little is known about the biology of P. plebeia. Here we report the results of laboratory studies describing the longevity of P. plebeia adults provided alternative food resources, their ability to parasitize H. vitripennis eggs of different ages, lifetime offspring production when provided steady access to excess host eggs, and levels of mature ovarian eggs present when wasps were held without access to hosts. P. plebeia is a gregarious parasitoid, with up to six adults emerging from a single H. vitripennis egg. When provided with honey and water, water alone, or no food or water, P. plebeia adult females lived an average of 64.1, 2.3, and 2.0 d, respectively. P. plebeia were able to successfully parasitize all ages of H. vitripennis eggs (1-8 d old), with higher parasitism in younger host eggs (1-3 d old) than in older host eggs (5-7 d old). An increasing trend in offspring production was seen for P. plebeia from adult age 2-26 d followed by a decreasing trend with offspring produced up to age 75 d. P. plebeia females are at least partially synovigenic, as they contained fewer mature eggs at younger ages (1 and 3 d old) than at older ages (5, 11, 15, and 31 d old). Our results provide foundational information regarding the biology of P. plebeia useful for its further evaluation as a potential biological control agent in California.

  2. No impact of Bt soybean that express Cry1Ac protein on biological traits of Euschistus heros (Hemiptera, Pentatomidae and its egg parasitoid Telenomus podisi (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae

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    Gabriela Vieira Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available No impact of Bt soybean that express Cry1Ac protein on biological traits of Euschistus heros (Hemiptera, Pentatomidae and its egg parasitoid Telenomus podisi (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae. Biological traits of the stink bug Euschistus heros and its main biological control agent Telenomus podisi were evaluated under controlled environmental conditions (25 ± 2ºC; 60 ± 10% RH; and 14/10 h photoperiod by placing first instar nymphs into Petri dishes with pods originating from two soybean isolines (Bt-soybean MON 87701 × MON 89788, which expresses the Cry1Ac protein, and its near non-Bt isoline A5547 where they remained until the adult stage. Due to gregarious behavior exhibited by first instar nymphs, they were individualized only when at the second instar. Adults were separated by sex and weighed, and pronotum width of each individual was subsequently measured. They were placed into plastic boxes containing soybean grains of the same soybean isoline as food source. Egg viability and female fecundity were assessed in adult individuals. Adult females of T. podisi (up to 24h old were placed with eggs of E. heros from mothers reared on both soybean isolines. Nymphal development time, insect weight, pronotum width, sex ratio, female fecundity, and egg viability (% emergence of Euschistus heros did not differ between treatments. Eggto-adult development time, female longevity, sex ratio, and percentage of parasitized eggs were not impacted by the Bt-soybean (expressing Cry1Ac protein. Results indicate that the Bt-soybean, MON 87701 × MON 89788, has no direct significant impact on the two studied species.

  3. Can the parasitoid Necremnus tutae (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) improve existing biological control of the tomato leafminer Tuta aboluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F J; Soriano, J D; Stansly, P A; Belda, J E

    2016-08-01

    Necremnus tutae is native to the Mediterranean region where it has been observed in greenhouses parasitizing the invasive Tuta absoluta on tomato. The objective of the present study was to determine whether augmentative releases of N. tutae can improve existing biological control of T. absoluta based on predation by Nesidicoris tenuis. Two experiments were carried out, of which the first evaluated different N. tutae release rates (1 and 2 N. tutae m-2 week-1). The parasitoid reduced plant and fruit damage, especially at the higher rate. However, such reduction was considered insufficient given the large numbers of parasitoids needed and still unacceptable level of fruit damage. The second experiment focused on combining the most efficient rate of N. tutae of those evaluated during the first experiment, with the pre- and post-planting release of N. tenuis and supplemental additions of Ephestia kuehniella eggs. Addition of N. tutae decreased leaf damage by T. absoluta regardless the release method for N. tenuis, but the pre-plant release of N. tenuis alone was sufficient to prevent fruit damage by T. absoluta. This suggested that the addition of N. tutae may not be necessary to obtain satisfactory control of T. absoluta following pre-plant application of N. tenuis, although different options for using N. tutae in commercial crops may still be possible.

  4. Biological aspects of Cirrospilus neotropicus Diez and Fidalgo (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), parasitoid of Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae); Aspectos biologicos de Cirrospilus neotropicus Diez e Fidalgo (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), parasitoide de Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foelkel, Ester [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Fitotecnia; Redaelli, Luiza R.; Jahnke, Simone M.; Losekann, Paula B. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fitossanidade

    2008-05-15

    The biology of Cirrospilus neotropicus Diez and Fidalgo reared on third instar Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton larvae having Citrus limonia Osbeck as host plant, was evaluated under controlled conditions (25 {+-} 1 deg C; 12 h photophase). The survival, immature development, longevity, sex ratio, host feeding and oviposition ratio of C. neotropicus, were registered. Two groups of parasitoid females were evaluated: one, with parasitoids obtained from P. citrella pupae collected in citrus orchards and the other group came from laboratory rearing. These females, after mating, were maintained individually on gerbox containers with honey and pollen as food source. At each 48h, 12 P. citrella larvae were changed. The average biological cycle of the female progenies from orchard and laboratory generation groups were 11.8 and 11.6 days, respectively. The males progenies had biological cycles of 11.6 and 10.9 days, as well. The shortest immature survival period, for both studied groups was the larval (57.3% - orchard group and 57.4% - lab group). The mated females average longevity (21.8 days) was superior than the non mated ones (9.1 days) for the orchard group. The average daily oviposition rate for this last group was also significantly superior (2.8 eggs /day) than the lab group (1.6 eggs / day). The same trend was observed for the average daily host feeding rate (1.7 larvae /day for the orchard group and 0.9 larvae/ day for the lab group). These data suggest that C. neotropicus have potential as a biological control agent of P. citrella. (author)

  5. Primeiro registro de ocorrência do parasitóide Brasema sp. (hymenoptera: eupelmidae em ovos de Leptoglossus zonatus (Dallas, 1852 (hemiptera: coreidae no Brasil First record of occurrence of the parasitoid Brasema sp. (hymenoptera: eupelmidae in eggs of Leptoglossus zonatus (Dallas, 1852 (hemiptera: coreidae in Brazil

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    Carlos Henrique Marchiori

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho registra a primeira ocorrência do parasitóide Brasema sp. (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae parasitando ovos de Leptoglossus zonatus (Hemiptera: Coreidae em cultivar de milho em Itumbiara, GO. A porcentagem de parasitismo foi de 4,8%. Brasema sp. constitue-se em ectoparasitóide de larvas de coleópteros e de outros hospedeiros no interior de tecidos de plantas.This work reports, for the first time, of parasitoid Brasema sp. (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae parasitizinf eggs of Leptoglossus zonatus (Hemiptera: Coreidae in maize cultivate in Itumbiara, GO, Brazil. The percentage of parasitizing was 4,8%. Brasema sp. constitutes ectoparasitoid of beetle larvae and other hosts concealed in plant tissue.

  6. Critical rearing parameters of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) as affected by host-plant substrate and host-parasitoid group structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate the potential impact of host-plant substrate types, host-parasitoid group size and host to parasitoid ratios on select fitness parameters of the larval parasitoid Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang, newly introduced for biological control of the invasive eme...

  7. Advance in parasitoids of the Tetrastichus howardi species group in Tetrastichus Haliday(Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)%黑棒啮小蜂种团(膜翅目姬小蜂科)寄生蜂研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭同斌; 颜学武

    2011-01-01

    啮小蜂属黑棒啮小蜂种团(Tetrastichus howardi species group)属膜翅目,姬小蜂科,啮小蜂亚科(Hymenoptera,Eulophidae:Tetrastichinae).笔者详细介绍了该种团的识别特征和8种寄生蜂的地理分布、寄主种类、食性及生物学特性,系统综述了黑棒啮小蜂(Tetrastichus howardi)和白蛾黑基啮小蜂(T.nigricoxae)2种重要寄生蜂的生物学、行为学、人工繁殖与释放应用等方面的研究进展.在分析这些寄生蜂生物学共性与区别的基础上,还探讨了今后应用白蛾黑基啮小蜂防治杨树人工林食叶害虫的研究方向与利用对策.%Tetrastichus howardi species group in Tetrastichus Haliday belongs to Hymenoptera order, Eulophidae family, Tetrastichinae genus. Recognition feature of the species group and geographic distribution, hosts, feeding habits and biological characteristics of 8 parasitic wasps in Tetrastichus howard species group were introduced in detail. Research progresses on biology, behavior, artificial production and releasing technique of two important parasitoids, T, howardi and T. Nigricoxae, were reviewed systematically, and that have important implications for future study on these parasitoid distributed in China. The common character and difference of these parasitoids' biology were discussed and research direction and application strategy of controlling poplar defoliator to use T. Nigricoxae in the future were also explored in this paper.

  8. Tritrophic associations and taxonomic notes on Lysiphlebus fabarum (Marshall (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae, a keystone aphid parasitoid in Iran

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    Rakhshani Ehsan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of host associations, distribution and types of reproduction (sexual, asexual of Lysiphlebus fabarum (Marshall across 20 provinces of Iran during 2006-2011 was undertaken. The parasitoid was reared from three groups of host aphids belonging to genera Aphis and Brachycaudus, and occasional host aphid genera. Aphis craccivora Koch was the most frequent host aphid for L. fabarum on various host plants, including economically important crops. The field sex ratio generally favored females, but in some cases, only thelytokous (uniparental populations were found. In those cases, the host was always an Aphis species. Specimens reared from Brachycaudus aphids were all biparental, indicating the presence of a sibling biological species. Overall analysis of diagnostic morphological characters in the forewing indicated intra-specific variability in forewing marginal setae as well as variations in length of the R1 vein. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43001

  9. Antennal sensilla of female Encarsia guadeloupae Viggiani (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae), a nymphal parasitoid of the spiraling whitefly Aleurodicus dispersus (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Wu, Wei-Jian; Niu, Li-Ming; Fu, Yue-Guan

    2013-01-01

    Encarsia guadeloupae Viggiani (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) is a minute, obligate endoparasitoid against the spiraling whitefly Aleurodicus dispersus nymph. The external morphology and distribution of the antennal sensilla of female E. guadeloupae were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Antennae of female E. guadeloupae were geniculate in shape, which consist of scape with a radicula, pedicel, and flagellum. Eight morphological sensilla types were recorded in the females: nonporous sensilla chaetica (CH-NP) and nonporous sensilla trichodea (ST-NP); uniporous sensilla chaetica (CH-UP) and uniporous sensilla trichodea (ST-UP) with a tip pore, basiconic capitate peg sensilla with numerous pores open at the bottom of the grooves; multiporous sensilla placoid (MSP) with the multiporous cuticular structure; uniporous rod-like sensilla (RO-UP) with robust grooved surfaces and the tremendous apical hole; nonporous finger-like sensilla (FI-NP) with abundant pimples at the bulgy, mortar-shaped short stalk. In order to further explore the host location mechanisms and courtship behavior of E. guadeloupae, the possible roles of the antennal sensilla of this species were discussed.

  10. Neochrysocharis okazakii (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae as a Major Parasitoid Wasp of Stone Leek Leaf Miner Liriomyza chinensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae in Central Vietnam

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    Takatoshi Ueno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liriomyza chinensis is a major pest of Welsh onion Allium fistulosum in Asia but little is known about the abundance of its natural enemies. A field survey was made to explore the major parasitoids of L. chinensis leaf miner in central Vietnam. An eulophid parasitoid, Neochrysocharis okazakii, comprised more than 95% of parasitoids reared from leaf miner larvae collected in the onion field and 98.3% of leaf miner parasitoids found during searches of onion plants. The mean number of female N. okazakii on plants was greater in onion fields with a higher density of L. chinensis, and, during searches, a greater proportion of N. okazakii was found on onion with more L. chinensis mines, suggesting density-dependent parasitoid aggregation. Melanized dead larvae of L. chinensis were more frequently found in onion fields with more parasitoids, demonstrating that melanized leaf miners are a good indicator of parasitoid activity. Mean instant rate of host encounter by N. okazakii in the field was estimated at 0.077, and the likelihood of a parasitoid finding a host increased with host density. Taken together, these results show that N. okazakii is the major parasitoid of L. chinensis. Usefulness of this parasitoid in stone leek leaf miner management is discussed.

  11. First instar larvae morphology of Opiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) parasitoids of Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae) fruit flies. Implications for interspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Félix D; Liedo, Pablo; Nieto-López, María Guadalupe; Cabrera-Mireles, Héctor; Barrera, Juan F; Montoya, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    The morphology of the first instars of the Opiinae braconids Diachasmimorpha longicaudata, Doryctobracon areolatus, Doryctobracon crawfordi, Utetes anastrephae and Opius hirtus (the first is exotic, and the others are natives to Mexico), parasitoids of Anastrepha fruit flies, are described and compared. The possible implications on interspecific competition among these species are discussed. The most significant adaptations found were: (1) the mouth apparatus, where the large mandibles and fang-shaped maxillary lobes present in D. longicaudata and U. anastrephae larvae were absent in O. hirtus, D. areolatus and D. crawfordi larvae, and (2) the degree of mobility for exploration and escape, such as the lateral and caudal appendages that were only present in D. longicaudata (ventrolateral appendages in the base of the head capsule), U. anastrephae (caudal lobe with two appendages) and D. areolatus (caudal lobe with a round apex with a globular shape). The first instar larvae of the species D. longicaudata show morphological adaptations that apparently confer competitive advantages against the larvae of D. areolatus, D. crawfordi and O. hirtus. However, the first instar larvae of U. anastrephae show larger mandibles, an adaptation that could enable this species to resist competition from D. longicaudata. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hospedeiros do parasitóide Paraganaspis egeria Díaz, Gallardo & Walsh (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae coletados em fezes bovinas e de búfalos, no sul do estado de Goiás Hosts of the parasitoid Paraganaspis egeria Díaz, Gallardo & Walsh (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae collected in bovine and buffalo dung in southern Goiás

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    Carlos Henrique Marchiori

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo verificou as espécies hospedeiros do parasitóideParaganaspis egeria Díaz, Gallardo & Walsh (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae em fezes bovinas e fezes de búfalos, coletados no Sul do Estado de Goiás, de janeiro de 1998 a junho de 2004. As pupas foram obtidas por meio do método de flutuação, indivualizadas em cápsulas de gelatina até a emergência dos adultos de moscas ou de seus parasitóides A porcentagem de parasitismo em fezes bovinas e fezes de búfalos foi de 0,5% e 0,8%, respectivamente.This study verified the host species of the parasitoid Paraganaspis egeria Díaz, Gallardo & Walsh (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae in bovine and buffalo dung collected in southern Goias, from January 1998 to June 2004. The pupae were obtained by the flotation method. They were individually placed in gelatin capsules until the emergence of adult flies or their parasitoids. The prevalence of parasitism in cow and buffalo dung was 0.5% and 0.8%, respectively.

  13. The Cotesia sesamiae story: insight into host-range evolution in a Hymenoptera parasitoid and implication for its use in biological control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, L; Dupas, S; Branca, A; Herniou, E A; Clarke, C W; Capdevielle Dulac, C; Obonyo, J; Benoist, R; Gauthier, J; Calatayud, P A; Silvain, J F; Le Ru, B P

    2017-09-22

    This review covers nearly 20 years of studies on the ecology, physiology and genetics of the Hymenoptera Cotesia sesamiae, an African parasitoid of Lepidoptera that reduces populations of common maize borers in East and South Africa. The first part of the review presents studies based on sampling of C. sesamiae from maize crops in Kenya. From this agrosystem including one host plant and three main host borer species, studies revealed two genetically differentiated populations of C. sesamiae species adapted to their local host community, and showed that their differentiation involved the joint evolution of virulence genes and sensory mechanisms of host acceptance, reinforced by reproductive incompatibility due to Wolbachia infection status and natural inbreeding. In the second part, we consider the larger ecosystem of wild Poales plant species hosting many Lepidoptera stem borer species that are potential hosts for C. sesamiae. The hypothesis of other host-adapted C. sesamiae populations was investigated based on a large sampling of stem borer larvae on various Poales across sub-Saharan Africa. The sampling provided information on the respective contribution of local hosts, biogeography and Wolbachia in the genetic structure of C. sesamiae populations. Molecular evolution analyses highlighted that several bracovirus genes were under positive selection, some of them being under different selection pressure in C. sesamiae populations adapted to different hosts. This suggests that C. sesamiae host races result from co-evolution acting at the local scale on different bracovirus genes. The third part considers the mechanisms driving specialization. C. sesamiae host races are more or less host-specialized. This character is crucial for efficient and environmentally-safe use of natural enemies for biological control of pests. One method to get an insight in the evolutionary stability of host-parasite associations is to characterize the phylogenetic relationships between

  14. Evidence For A Sex Pheromone in Bark Beetle Parasitoid Roptrocerus xylophagorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian T. Sullivan

    2002-01-01

    Male Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Ratzeburg) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) exhibited courtship and mating behaviors including wing fanning, antennation, mounting, and copulation attempts when exposed to glass bulb decoys coated with a whole-body extract of females in hexane, acetone, or methanol. Activity of extract-treated decoys declined gradually over...

  15. Molecular and morphological phylogenetics of chelonine parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), with a critical assessment of divergence time estimations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Rebecca N; Austin, Andrew D; Klopfstein, Seraina

    2016-08-01

    Parasitoid wasps of the subfamily Cheloninae are both species rich and poorly known. Although the taxonomy of Cheloninae appears to be relatively stable, there is no clear understanding of relationships among higher-level taxa. We here applied molecular phylogenetic analyses using three markers (COI, EF1α, 28S) and 37 morphological characters to elucidate the evolution and systematics of these wasps. Analyses were based on 83 specimens representing 13 genera. All genera except Ascogaster, Phanerotoma, and Pseudophanerotoma formed monophyletic groups; Furcidentia (stat. rev.) is raised to generic rank. Neither Chelonus (Chelonus) nor Chelonus (Microchelonus) were recovered as monophyletic, but together formed a monophyletic lineage. The tribes Chelonini and Odontosphaeropygini formed monophyletic groups, but the Phanerotomini sensu Zettel and Pseudophanerotomini were retrieved as either para- or polyphyletic. The genera comprising the former subfamily Adeliinae were confirmed as being nested within the Cheloninae. To estimate the age of the subfamily, we used 16 fossil taxa. Three approaches were compared: fixed-rate dating, node dating, and total-evidence dating, with age estimates differing greatly between the three methods. Shortcomings of each approach in relation to our dataset are discussed, and none of the age estimates is deemed sufficiently reliable. Given that most dating studies use a single method only, in most cases without presenting analyses on the sensitivity to priors, it is likely that numerous age estimates in the literature suffer from a similar lack of robustness. We argue for a more rigorous approach to dating analyses and for a faithful presentation of uncertainties in divergence time estimates. Given the results of the phylogenetic analysis the following taxonomic changes are proposed: Furcidentia Zettel (stat. rev.), previously treated as a subgenus of Pseudophanerotoma Zettel is raised to generic rank; Microchelonus Szépligeti (syn. nov

  16. Evaluation of the host specificity of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a larval parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host-specificity determination prior to the introduction of non-native natural enemies (predators and parasitoids) is a critical component of the risk assessment for modern classical biological control programs. In the present study, we assessed the host specificity of a newly described parasitoid,...

  17. Biology, life history, and laboratory rearing of Atanycolus cappaerti (Hymenoptera:Braconidae), a larval parasitoid of the invasive Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanycolus cappaerti Marsh and Strazanac is a native North American parasitoid that has been found to parasitize the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, which has killed millions of ash trees since it was first detected in Michigan. A native parasitoid like A. cappaerti...

  18. Two altemative strategies for spider egg parasitoids

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    El control de la densidad de parasitismo en parasitoides de huevos de arañas requiere de mecanismos naturales más complejos que en la mayoría de los parásitos, ya que los de araña se encuentran en grupos empacados en sacos de seda por lo que se requieren factores adicionales para regular la proporción de huevos que han de ser parasitados en cada saco atacado por los parasitoides.Las avispitas Baeus achaearaneus (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) y Tetrastichus sp. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), ambos par...

  19. Two altemative strategies for spider egg parasitoids

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos E. Valerio

    2016-01-01

    El control de la densidad de parasitismo en parasitoides de huevos de arañas requiere de mecanismos naturales más complejos que en la mayoría de los parásitos, ya que los de araña se encuentran en grupos empacados en sacos de seda por lo que se requieren factores adicionales para regular la proporción de huevos que han de ser parasitados en cada saco atacado por los parasitoides.Las avispitas Baeus achaearaneus (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) y Tetrastichus sp. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), ambos par...

  20. Monograph of the Afrotropical species of Scelio Latreille (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae), egg parasitoids of acridid grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acrididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Matthew J; Valerio, Alejandro A; Polaszek, Andrew; van Noort, Simon; Masner, Lubomír; Johnson, Norman F

    2014-01-01

    The genus Scelio is a cosmopolitan and speciose group of solitary parasitoids of the eggs of short-horned grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae). A number of these hosts are important pests, including plague locusts of the genus Schistocerca. Species of Scelio are recognized as potentially important biological control agents, but this possibility has yet to be fully realized, in part because the species-level taxonomy is still incompletely developed. The species of the pulchripennis group have been recently revised. As a continuation of this effort, here we revise the Afrotropical species of Scelio, excluding the pulchripennis species group. Sixty two (62) species are treated, 48 of which are new. Species are classified into the following species groups: ernstii (12 species, 9 new), howardi (23 species, 19 new), ipomeae (6 species, 5 new), irwini (4 species, 3 new), simoni (3 new species) and walkeri (12 species, 9 new). Keys to species groups and to the species within each group are provided. New species described are: S. albatus Yoder, sp. n., S. aphares Yoder, sp. n., S. apospastos Yoder, sp. n., S. ardelio Yoder, sp. n., S. aurantium Yoder, sp. n., S. balo Valerio & Yoder, sp. n., S. bayanga Yoder, sp. n., S. bubulo Yoder, sp. n., S. cano Yoder, sp. n., S. clypeatus Yoder, sp. n., S. concavus Yoder, sp. n., S. copelandi Yoder, sp. n., S. crepo Yoder, sp. n., S. destico Yoder, sp. n., S. dupondi Yoder, sp. n., S. effervesco Yoder, sp. n., S. erugatus Yoder, sp. n., S. exophthalmus Yoder, sp. n., S. fremo Valerio & Yoder, sp. n., S. gemo Yoder, sp. n., S. grunnio Yoder, sp. n., S. harinhalai Yoder, sp. n., S. igland Yoder, sp. n., S. impostor Yoder, sp. n., S. irwini Yoder, sp. n., S. janseni Yoder, sp. n., S. latro Yoder, sp. n., S. memorabilis Yoder, sp. n., S. modulus Yoder, sp. n., S. mutio Yoder, sp. n., S. ntchisii Yoder, sp. n., S. parkeri Yoder, sp. n., S. phaeoprora Yoder, sp. n., S. pilosilatus Yoder, sp. n., S. pipilo Yoder, sp. n., S. quasiclypeatus

  1. Life-history traits in closely related secondary parasitoids sharing the same primary parasitoid host: evolutionary opportunities and constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, J.A.; Wagenaar, R.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Thus far, few studies have compared life-history traits amongst secondary parasitoids attacking and developing in cocoons of their primary parasitoid hosts. This study examines development and reproduction in Lysibia nana Gravenhorst and Acrolyta nens Hartig (both Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), two re

  2. Direct and indirect sublethal effects of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) on the development of a potato-aphid parasitoid, Aphelinus abdominalis (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couty, A; de la Viña, G; Clark, S J.; Kaiser, L; Pham-Delègue, M -H.; Poppy, G M.

    2001-06-01

    Snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, GNA), has been shown to confer partial resistance to two potato aphids Myzus persicae and Aulacorthum solani, when incorporated in artificial diet and/or expressed in transgenic potato. First-tier laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to assess the potential effect of GNA on the aphid parasitoid Aphelinus abdominalis. GNA (0.1% w/v) was successfully delivered to Macrosiphum euphorbiae via artificial diet and induced a reduced growth rate and increased mortality compared to aphids fed a control diet. As aphid parasitoid larvae are endophagous, they may be exposed to GNA during their larval development and potential "chronic toxicity" on A. abdominalis was investigated. The amounts of GNA present in aphid and parasitoid tissues were estimated by western blotting. Results suggest that parasitoids excrete most of the GNA ingested. Sublethal effects of GNA on several parasitoid fitness parameters (parasitism success, parasitoid development and size, emergence success, progeny survival and sex ratio) were studied. No direct detrimental effect of GNA on A. abdominalis was observed. However, GNA had an indirect host-size-mediated effect on the sex ratio and the size of parasitoids developing in GNA-fed aphids. This work highlights the need to determine the exact "causes and effects" when assessing the ecological impact of transgenic plants on non-target beneficial insects. Such bioassays form the basis of a tiered risk assessment moving from laboratory studies assessing individuals towards field-scale experiments assessing populations.

  3. Monograph of the Afrotropical species of Scelio Latreille (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae), egg parasitoids of acridid grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acrididae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Matthew J.; Valerio, Alejandro A.; Polaszek, Andrew; van Noort, Simon; Masner, Lubomír; Johnson, Norman F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The genus Scelio is a cosmopolitan and speciose group of solitary parasitoids of the eggs of short-horned grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae). A number of these hosts are important pests, including plague locusts of the genus Schistocerca. Species of Scelio are recognized as potentially important biological control agents, but this possibility has yet to be fully realized, in part because the species-level taxonomy is still incompletely developed. The species of the pulchripennis group have been recently revised. As a continuation of this effort, here we revise the Afrotropical species of Scelio, excluding the pulchripennis species group. Sixty two (62) species are treated, 48 of which are new. Species are classified into the following species groups: ernstii (12 species, 9 new), howardi (23 species, 19 new), ipomeae (6 species, 5 new), irwini (4 species, 3 new), simoni (3 new species) and walkeri (12 species, 9 new). Keys to species groups and to the species within each group are provided. New species described are: S. albatus Yoder, sp. n., S. aphares Yoder, sp. n., S. apospastos Yoder, sp. n., S. ardelio Yoder, sp. n., S. aurantium Yoder, sp. n., S. balo Valerio & Yoder, sp. n., S. bayanga Yoder, sp. n., S. bubulo Yoder, sp. n., S. cano Yoder, sp. n., S. clypeatus Yoder, sp. n., S. concavus Yoder, sp. n., S. copelandi Yoder, sp. n., S. crepo Yoder, sp. n., S. destico Yoder, sp. n., S. dupondi Yoder, sp. n., S. effervesco Yoder, sp. n., S. erugatus Yoder, sp. n., S. exophthalmus Yoder, sp. n., S. fremo Valerio & Yoder, sp. n., S. gemo Yoder, sp. n., S. grunnio Yoder, sp. n., S. harinhalai Yoder, sp. n., S. igland Yoder, sp. n., S. impostor Yoder, sp. n., S. irwini Yoder, sp. n., S. janseni Yoder, sp. n., S. latro Yoder, sp. n., S. memorabilis Yoder, sp. n., S. modulus Yoder, sp. n., S. mutio Yoder, sp. n., S. ntchisii Yoder, sp. n., S. parkeri Yoder, sp. n., S. phaeoprora Yoder, sp. n., S. pilosilatus Yoder, sp. n., S. pipilo Yoder, sp. n., S

  4. Effects of feeding frequency and sugar concentration on behavior and longevity of the adult aphid parasitoid: Aphidius ervi (Haliday) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azzouz, H.; Giordanengo, P.; Wäckers, F.L.; Kaiser, L.

    2004-01-01

    Aphidius ervi (Haliday) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a solitary aphid endoparasitoid. Adults feed on honeydew and possibly on other sugar sources such as nectar. Sugar sources can vary qualitatively and quantitatively according to biotic factors and environmental conditions. Experiments were conduct

  5. Effects of feeding frequency and sugar concentration on behavior and longevity of the adult aphid parasitoid: Aphidius ervi (Haliday) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azzouz, H.; Giordanengo, P.; Wäckers, F.L.; Kaiser, L.

    2004-01-01

    Aphidius ervi (Haliday) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a solitary aphid endoparasitoid. Adults feed on honeydew and possibly on other sugar sources such as nectar. Sugar sources can vary qualitatively and quantitatively according to biotic factors and environmental conditions. Experiments were

  6. Parasitismo na população da broca-do-café Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari (Coleoptera: Scolytidae, pelo parasitoide Cephalonomia stephanoderis Betrem (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Abstract. The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari attacks coffee plantations, greatly decreasing the production of coffee plants, causing quantitative and qualitative damage to the grains. Biological control of this pest has focused mostly on entomopathogenic fungi. In the state of Rondonia, studies on parasitism levels of the parasitoids of H. hampei are scarce. The parasitoid Cephalonomia stephanoderis Betrem is a natural enemy of the coffee berry borer and is already used as an agent of biological control in countries of Africa and Latin America. The objective of the present study was to investigate the occurrence and parasitism levels of the parasitoid in a coffee plantation in the municipality of Ouro Preto D’Oeste, State of Rondonia. Coffee beans collected directly from the plants and on the ground were analyzed weekly from January to December 2004. Parasitoid occurred in months of the highest pest infestation. During the studied period, parasitism rate in different microenvironments ranged from 2 to 24%.

  7. Leluthia astigma (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Doryctinae) as a parasitoid of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: Agrilinae), with an assessment of host associations for nearctic species of Leluthia Cameron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Kula; Kathleen S. Knight; Joanne Rebbeck; Leah S. Bauer; David L. Cappaert; Kamal J.K. Gandhi

    2010-01-01

    Published host associations are assessed for Leluthia astigma (Ashmead), Leluthia floridensis Marsh, and Leluthia mexicana Cameron, the three known species of Leluthia Cameron in the Nearctic Region. Leluthia astigma is reported as a parasitoid of Agrilus planipennis...

  8. Suitability of the pest-plant system Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)-tomato for Trichogramma (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) parasitoids and insights for biological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chailleux, Anaïs; Biondi, Antonio; Han, Peng; Tabone, Elisabeth; Desneux, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    The South American tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is a major pest that has recently invaded Afro-Eurasia. Biological control, especially by Trichogramma parasitoids, is considered to be promising as a management tool for this pest. However, further development of Trichogramma-based biocontrol strategies would benefit from assessing the impact of released parasitoid offspring on the pest. Under laboratory conditions, we 1) compared the parasitism of five Trichogramma species-strains on the pest-plant system T. absoluta-tomato, and 2) assessed various biological traits of parasitoids, mass-reared on a factitious host (Ephestia kuehniella Zeller), when developing on T. absoluta. In addition, we evaluated the overall efficiency of two specific Trichogramma species when released under greenhouse conditions in combination with a common natural enemy in tomato crop, the predator Macrolophus pygmaeus Rambur. Parasitoids emerging from T. absoluta on tomato showed lower parasitism rates and poor biological traits, for example, wing deformations, reduced longevity, when compared with the control reared on the factitious host. Under greenhouse conditions, the parasitoids that developed on T. absoluta after initial releases contributed little to biological control of T. absoluta, and parasitism tended to be lower when the predator was present. However, a slightly higher T. absoluta control level was achieved by combining the predator and release of the parasitoid Trichogramma achaeae Nagaraja and Nagarkatti. This study shows that Trichogramma parasitoids may not build up populations on the T. absoluta-tomato system, but that Trichogramma parasitoids can be used in combination with M. pygmaeus to enhance biological control of the pest in tomato crops.

  9. Effects of plant protease inhibitors, oryzacystatin I and soybean Bowman-Birk inhibitor, on the aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Homoptera, Aphididae) and its parasitoid Aphelinus abdominalis (Hymenoptera, Aphelinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, H; Cherqui, A; Campan, E D M; Rahbé, Y; Duport, G; Jouanin, L; Kaiser, L; Giordanengo, P

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic plants expressing protease inhibitors (PIs) have emerged in recent years as an alternative strategy for pest control. Beneficial insects such as parasitoids may therefore be exposed to these entomotoxins either via the host or by direct exposure to the plant itself. With the objective of assessing the effects of PIs towards aphid parasitoids, bioassays using soybean Bowman-Birk inhibitor (SbBBI) or oryzacystatin I (OCI) on artificial diet were performed on Macrosiphum euphorbiae-Aphelinus abdominalis system. OCI significantly reduced nymphal survival of the potato aphid M. euphorbiae and prevented aphids from reproducing. This negative effect was much more pronounced than with other aphid species. On the contrary, SbBBI did not affect nymphal viability but significantly altered adult demographic parameters. Enzymatic inhibition assays showed that digestive proteolytic activity of larvae and adults of Aphelinus abdominalis predominantly relies on serine proteases and especially on chymotrypsin-like activity. Immunoassays suggested that OCI bound to aphid proteins and accumulated in aphid tissues, whereas SbBBI remained unbound in the gut. Bioassays using M. euphorbiae reared on artificial diets supplemented with both OCI and SbBBI showed a fitness impairment of Aphelinus abdominalis that developed on intoxicated aphids. However, only SbBBI was detected in parasitoid larvae, while no PI could be detected in adult parasitoids that emerged from PI-intoxicated aphids. The potential impact of PI-expressing plants on aphid parasitoids and their combined efficiency for aphid control are discussed.

  10. Parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae of the mealy plum aphid Hyalopterus pruni (Geoffr. on common reed (Phragmites australis in different types of habitat in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barczak T.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to determine the parasitoid guild of the mealy plum aphid Hyalopterus pruni on common reed (Phragmites australis in different types of habitats in central Poland. The investigations were carried out in selected areas of the Salted Kujawy Region (central-northern Poland. To compare the parasitoid guilds of H. pruni from common reed in different types of habitats, species composition, number, domination structure and the percentage of parasitization (effectiveness were evaluated. The primary parasitoid guild of H. pruni on common reed in central Poland comprises three aphidiine braconids, mainly Praon volucre and P. abjectum. The number of the primary parasitoid species and their effectiveness in the aphid colonies were very low. Hence, common reed did not seem to be a good reservoir of the H. pruni parasitoids, but it may play a role as a place of dispersion of these insects, beneficial to orchards. A very low number of the hyperparasitoids were observed in the aphid colonies.

  11. Transgenic GNA expressing potato plants augment the beneficial biocontrol of Lacanobia oleracea (Lepidoptera; Noctuidae) by the parasitoid Eulophus pennicornis (Hymenoptera; Eulophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, H A; Fitches, E C; Marris, G C; Bell, J; Edwards, J P; Gatehouse, J A; Gatehouse, A M

    2001-01-01

    The effect of expressing the gene encoding snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, GNA) in transgenic potato plants, on parasitism of the phytophagous insect pest Lacanobia oleracea by the gregarious ectoparasitoid Eulophus pennicornis, was investigated in glasshouse trials. Expression of GNA (approx. 1.0% total soluble protein) by transgenic plants significantly reduced the level of pest damage, thus confirming previous studies. Furthermore, the presence of the parasitoid significantly reduced the levels of damage incurred either by the transgenic or control plants when compared to those plants grown in the absence of the parasitoid. For the GNA expressing plants the presence of the parasitoid resulted in further reductions (ca. 21%) in the level of damage caused by the pest species. The ability of the wasp to parasitise and subsequently develop on the pest larvae was not altered by the presence of GNA in the diet of the host. E. pennicornis progeny that developed on L. oleracea reared on GNA expressing plants showed no significant alteration in fecundity when compared with wasps that had developed on hosts fed on control potato plants, although mean size and longevity of female parasitoids was significantly reduced. The number of F2 progeny produced by parasitoids derived from hosts fed on GNA expressing plants was not significantly different to those produced by parasitoids from hosts fed control plants. Results from the present study demonstrate that the use of transgenic plants expressing insecticidal proteins can be compatible with the deployment of beneficial insects and that the two factors may interact in a positive manner.

  12. Potential effects of plant protease inhibitors, oryzacystatin I and soybean Bowman-Birk inhibitor, on the aphid parasitoid Aphidius ervi Haliday (Hymenoptera, Braconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, H; Campan, E D M; Cherqui, A; Saguez, J; Couty, A; Jouanin, L; Giordanengo, P; Kaiser, L

    2005-08-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) have been shown to cause lethal and sublethal effects on aphids depending on the kind of PI and aphid species. Therefore, these proteins might affect aphid parasitoids directly by inhibiting their digestive proteolysis or indirectly via their development in a less suitable host. In our study, the risk of exposure and the potential effects of soybean Bowman-Birk inhibitor (SbBBI) and oryzacystatin I (OCI) on the aphid endoparasitoid Aphidius ervi were investigated using artificial diet to deliver PIs. Immunoassays showed that both SbBBI and OCI were detected in the honeydew of aphids reared on artificial diet containing these recombinant proteins at 100 microg/mL. However, only SbBBI was detected in parasitoid larvae, while this PI could not be detected in adult parasitoids emerged from PI-intoxicated aphids. Enzymatic inhibition assays showed that digestive proteolytic activity of larvae and adults of A. ervi predominantly relies on serine proteases and especially on chymotrypsin-like activity. Bioassays using SbBBI and OCI on artificial diet were performed. A. ervi that developed on intoxicated aphids had impaired fitness. Thus development and parasitism success of parasitoids exposed to OCI were severely affected. On the contrary, SbBBI only altered significantly female size and sex ratio. Direct exposure to PIs through adult food intake did not affect female's longevity, while SbBBI and OCI (100 microg/mL) induced 69% and 30% inhibition of digestive protease activity, respectively. These studies made it possible to estimate the risk of exposure to plant PIs and the sensitivity of the aphid parasitoid A. ervi to these entomotoxins, by combining immunological, biochemical and biological approaches. First it pointed out that only immature stages are affected by PIs. Secondly, it documented two different modes of effect, according to the nature of the PIs and both host and parasitoid susceptibility. OCI prevented the development of A. ervi

  13. Utilization of an introduced weed biological control agent by a native parasitoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    A native parasitoid, Kalopolynema ema (Schauff and Grissell) (Hymenoptera, Mymaridae), that usually parasitizes the eggs of Megamelus davisi VanDuzee (Hemiptera, Delphacidae), has begun utilizing a new host, Megamelus scutellaris (Berg) (Hemiptera, Delphacidae), the introduced biological control age...

  14. First record of Braconidae as parasitoids of Capnodis tenebrionis (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), with notes on the ecology of Spathius erythrocephalus Wesmael (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonsignore, C.P.; Achterberg, van C.; Vacante, V.

    2008-01-01

    For the first time an ichneumonoid parasitoid is reported from the peach flatheaded rootborer Capnodis tenebrionis (Linnaeus, 1758) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in a heavily infested plum and apricot orchard in south-western Sicily. In 2005 and 2006 the ecology of the ectoparasitoid Spathius erythrocep

  15. Distribution, host range, and climatic constraints on Centistes gasseni (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a South American parasitoid of cucumber beetles, Diabrotica spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Walsh, G; Athanas, M M; Salles, L A B; Schroder, R F W

    2003-12-01

    The genus Diabrotica includes a large number of pest species, including some of the most important crop pests of the Americas. The parasitoid Centistes gasseni Shaw is the first braconid to be described parasitizing Diabrotica in South America, and high natural infestations are reported. Field and experimental observations on the host range, distribution and biology of this parasitoid are described. Centistes gasseniwas collected in southern Brazil, eastern Paraguay and northeastern Argentina, in a region comprising humid lowlands and highlands, and cool temperate to warm subtropical climates, with regular rainfall in excess of 1300 mm. Three Diabroticaspecies, D. limitata (Sahlberg), D. speciosa (Germar) and D. viridula (Fabricius) were found to host the parasitoid, with mean percent parasitism of 5.4, 2.0 and 1.0%, respectively. Diabrotica speciosa and D. viridula are the two most important pest Diabroticaspecies in South America. Laboratory experiments with field-collected beetles and parasitoid cocoons indicated that C. gasseni overwinters in adult host beetles, remaining dormant in its live host below developmental temperatures. A potential distribution of C. gasseni in North America is proposed based on its known climatic range and the distribution of the main pest species of adult overwintering North American Diabrotica.

  16. Effect of fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) strain and diet on oviposition and development in the parasitoid Euplectrus platyhypenae (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviposition tendency and subsequent development of the parasitoid wasp Euplectrus platyhypenae Howard was compared using the corn and rice host strains of Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) fed corn (Zea mays, ‘Truckers Favorite’) or stargrass (Cynodon nlemfuensis Vanderyst var. nlemfuensis, ‘Floro...

  17. Biology and Life History of Atanycolus cappaerti (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a North American Larval Parasitoid Attacking the Invasive Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanycolus cappaerti Marsh and Strazanac is a native North American parasitoid that has been found to parasitize the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, a serious invasive pests of North American ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). To facilitate the development of potential augmentative biocon...

  18. First record of Braconidae as parasitoids of Capnodis tenebrionis (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), with notes on the ecology of Spathius erythrocephalus Wesmael (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonsignore, C.P.; Achterberg, van C.; Vacante, V.

    2008-01-01

    For the first time an ichneumonoid parasitoid is reported from the peach flatheaded rootborer Capnodis tenebrionis (Linnaeus, 1758) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in a heavily infested plum and apricot orchard in south-western Sicily. In 2005 and 2006 the ecology of the ectoparasitoid Spathius

  19. A review of the siricid woodwasps and their Ibaliid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Siricidae, Ibaliidae) in the Eastern United States, with emphasis on the Mid-Atlantic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Smith; Nathan M. Schiff

    2002-01-01

    Keys are presented for the five genera and 15 species of adult Siricidae and one genus and two species of their parasitoids of the family Ibaliidae that occur in or may be adventive in the Eastern United States. Sircid larvae are wood borers in conifers and broadleafed trees. Notes on their biology, fungal symbionts, distributions, and host associations are given. Data...

  20. An old remedy for a new problem? Identification of Ooencyrtus kuvanae (Howard) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) as egg parasitoids of spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotted Lanternfly (SLF), Lycorma delicatula (White) is a recently introduced pest of Tree-of-Heaven, Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle in North America. Natural enemy surveys for this pest in Pennsylvania in 2016 recovered an encyrtid egg parasitoid from both field collections and laboratory rear...

  1. [Synanthropic flies (Diptera: Cyclorrapha) and their microhymenoptera parasitoids (Insecta: Hymenoptera) at Monte Mor poultry production system, São Paulo, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Marisa R; do Prado, Angelo P

    2006-01-01

    A survey of synanthropic flies and their microhymenopteran parasitoids was conducted at the Capuavinha poultry farm, municipality of Monte Mor, State of São Paulo, Brazil, from 1991 to 1992. Bird manure samples were collected biweekly for examined and selected by the following methods: flotation in water, dissected pupae, and sentinel pupae. The species of flies more abundant were: Chrysomya putoria (Wiedeman) (41.2% - Calliphoridae), Muscidae: Muscina stabulans( Fallén) (27.3%), Musca domestica Linnaeus (23.9%), Fannia pusio (Stein) (5.3% - Fanniidae) e Sepsidae (2.3%). The pupal parasitoids were: Tachinaephagus zealandicus (Ashmead) (72.4% - Encyrtidae), Pteromalídeos: Spalangia gemina Boucek (9.2%), S. cameroni (Perkins) (7.3%), S. endius (Walker) (3.7%), Muscidifurax raptoroides (Kogan e Legner) (1.5%), Pachycrepoideus vindemiae (Rondani) (0.8%), Nasonia vitripennis Walker (0.06%). Trichopria sp. Nixon (Diapriídeo 5.5%) detected only in C. putoria pupae (t=-1,5269; P <0,1296). Some significant mean values were obtained for parasitoids in the collected hosts (t = 0.9540; Pr <0.0001), proportion of collected pupae and parasitoids with respect to the collecting site (F = 60.85; Pr <0.0001; F = 358.35; P <0.0001) and for the host species and parasitoid species (F = 2.58; Pr <0.0001; F = 9. 48; P <0.0001). The dissected host species was significant for proportion dissected pupae (F = 1.57; Pr <0.2053). These results concerning the insect fauna can be of help for an appropriate management of this poultry farm in terms of the control of synanthropic flies.

  2. First occurrence of Protapanteles (Protapanteles enephes (Nixon, 1965 (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae in Brazil and new biological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM. Penteado-Dias

    Full Text Available Protapanteles (Protapanteles enephes (Nixon, 1965 (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae was reared from the host Fountainea ryphea phidile (Geyer, 1837 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Charaxinae, collected on Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae in São Carlos, São Paulo state, Brazil. The hyperperparasitoids Conura sp. (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae and a Pteromalidae species are registered on this microgastrine species. Male and female specimens and cocoon of Protapanteles (Protapanteles enephes are illustrated for the first time.

  3. First occurrence of Protapanteles (Protapanteles) enephes (Nixon, 1965) (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae) in Brazil and new biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado-Dias, A M; Fernandes, L B R; Iemma, L G R; Dias, M M

    2011-08-01

    Protapanteles (Protapanteles) enephes (Nixon, 1965) (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae) was reared from the host Fountainea ryphea phidile (Geyer, 1837) (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Charaxinae), collected on Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae) in São Carlos, São Paulo state, Brazil. The hyperperparasitoids Conura sp. (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae) and a Pteromalidae species are registered on this microgastrine species. Male and female specimens and cocoon of Protapanteles (Protapanteles) enephes are illustrated for the first time.

  4. Life history parameters of two geographically separated populations of Spalangia cameroni, a microhymenopteran pupal parasitoid of muscoid flies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkemoe, Tone; Soleng, Arnulf; Skovgård, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Spalangia cameroni Perkins (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is used as a biological control agent against house flies and stable flies in livestock farms in Northern Europe. In the present study, the juvenile development, survival, and sex ratio of one Danish and one Norwegian population of S. cameron...... the populations were small, but might still be important for inundative release programs...

  5. Redescription of Campoletis sonorensis (Cameron, 1886) (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Campopleginae), parasitoid of Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith, 1797) (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, L F; Brito, R A; Penteado-Dias, A M

    2015-11-01

    The fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera; Noctuidae) is a voracious pest of numerous crops of economic importance throughout the New World. In Brazil, its larvae are attacked by several species of parasitoid wasps, making them potential candidate as biological control agents against this pest. A survey of the parasitoid fauna on S. frugiperda in maize crops throughout Brazil reveals two species of Campoletis, which are morphologicaly very similar species. In this paper we combine these data with pictures from the type material of C. sonorensis and C. flavicincta, as well as their descriptions to provide a redescription to Campoletis sonorensis (Cameron, 1886) using for this both morphological characters and DNA Barcoding (Hebert et al., 2003) information, in an attempt to help with the correct identification of the taxa to improve biological control studies.

  6. Redescription of Campoletis sonorensis (Cameron, 1886 (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Campopleginae, parasitoid of Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith, 1797 (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Camargo

    Full Text Available Abstract The fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera; Noctuidae is a voracious pest of numerous crops of economic importance throughout the New World. In Brazil, its larvae are attacked by several species of parasitoid wasps, making them potential candidate as biological control agents against this pest. A survey of the parasitoid fauna on S. frugiperda in maize crops throughout Brazil reveals two species of Campoletis, which are morphologicaly very similar species. In this paper we combine these data with pictures from the type material of C. sonorensis and C. flavicincta, as well as their descriptions to provide a redescription to Campoletis sonorensis (Cameron, 1886 using for this both morphological characters and DNA Barcoding (Hebert et al., 2003 information, in an attempt to help with the correct identification of the taxa to improve biological control studies.

  7. Species Diversity in the Parasitoid Genus Asobara (Hymenoptera: Braconidae from the Native Area of the Fruit Fly Pest Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Guerrieri

    Full Text Available Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura, commonly known as Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD, is a worldwide serious economic threat to the production of berries and stone fruits. The chemical control widely used against this pest is often not able to preventing yield losses because wild flora offers an abundance of fruits to D. suzukii where the pest is able to reproduce and from where it recolonizes neighbouring cultivated fields. Alternatively, within Integrated Pest Management protocols for D. suzukii, biological control could play a key role by reducing its populations particularly in non-cultivated habitats, thus increasing the effectiveness and reducing the side negative effects of other management strategies. Because of the scarcity and of the low efficiency of autochthonous parasitoids in the new invaded territories, in the last few years, a number of surveys started in the native area of D. suzukii to find parasitoid species to be evaluated in quarantine structures and eventually released in the field, following a classical biological control approach. This paper reports the results of these surveys carried out in South Korea and for the first time in China. Among the parasitoids collected, those belonging to the genus Asobara Foerster resulted dominant both by number and species diversity. By combining morphological characters and the mitochondrial COI gene as a molecular marker, we identified seven species of Asobara, of which two associated with D. suzukii, namely A. japonica and A leveri, and five new to science, namely Asobara brevicauda, A. elongata, A mesocauda, A unicolorata, A. triangulata. Our findings offer new opportunity to find effective parasitoids to be introduced in classical biological control programmes in the territories recently invaded by D. suzukii.

  8. Oviposition behaviour of four ant parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Euphorinae, Neoneurini and Ichneumonidae, Hybrizontinae, with the description of three new European species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees van Achterberg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The oviposition behaviour of four ant parasitoids was observed and filmed for the first time. The movies are available from YouTube (search for Elasmosoma, Hybrizon, Kollasmosoma and Neoneurus. Two of the observed species (Neoneurus vesculus sp. n. and Kollasmosoma sentum sp. n. are new to science. A third species (Neoneurus recticalcar sp. n. is described from Slovakia and Norway. Keys to the Palaearctic species of the genera Neoneurus and Kollasmosoma are added.

  9. Classical biological control of an invasive forest pest: a world perspective of the management of Sirex noctilio using the parasitoid Ibalia leucospoides (Hymenoptera: Ibaliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbein, D; Corley, J C

    2015-02-01

    Classical biological control is a key method for managing populations of pests in long-lived crops such as plantation forestry. The execution of biological control programmes in general, as the evaluation of potential natural enemies remains, to a large extent, an empirical endeavour. Thus, characterizing specific cases to determine patterns that may lead to more accurate predictions of success is an important goal of the much applied ecological research. We review the history of introduction, ecology and behaviour of the parasitoid Ibalia leucospoides. The species is a natural enemy of Sirex noctilio, one of the most important pests of pine afforestation worldwide. We use an invasion ecology perspective given the analogy between the main stages involved in classical biological control and the biological invasion processes. We conclude that success in the establishment, a common reason of failure in biocontrol, is not a limiting factor of success by I. leucospoides. A mismatch between the spread capacity of the parasitoid and that of its host could nevertheless affect control at a regional scale. In addition, we suggest that given its known life history traits, this natural enemy may be a better regulator than suppressor of the host population. Moreover, spatial and temporal refuges of the host population that may favour the local persistence of the interaction probably reduce the degree to which S. noctilio population is suppressed by the parasitoid. We emphasize the fact that some of the biological attributes that promote establishment may negatively affect suppression levels achieved. Studies on established non-native pest-parasitoid interactions may contribute to defining selection criteria for classical biological control which may prove especially useful in integrated pest management IPM programmes of invasive forest insects.

  10. Spatial dynamics of two oriental fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) parasitoids, Fopius arisanus and Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), in a Guava orchard in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Roger I; Stark, John D; Banks, John; Leblanc, Luc; Manoukis, Nicholas C; Peck, Steven

    2013-10-01

    We examined spatial patterns of both sexes of oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), and its two most abundant parasitoids, Fopius arisanus (Sonan) and Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead) in a commercial guava (Psidium guajava L.) orchard. Oriental fruit fly spatial patterns were initially random, but became highly aggregated with host fruit ripening and the subsequent colonization of, first, F. arisanus (egg-pupal parasitoid) and, second, D. longicaudata (larval-pupal parasitoid). There was a significant positive relationship between populations of oriental fruit fly and F. arisanus during each of the F. arisanus increases, a pattern not exhibited between oriental fruit fly and D. longicaudata. Generally, highest total numbers of males and females (oriental fruit fly, F. arisanus, and D. longicaudata) occurred on or about the same date. There was a significant positive correlation between male and female populations of all three species; we measured a lag of 2-4 wk between increases of female F. arisanus and conspecific males. There was a similar trend in one of the two years for the second most abundant species, D. longicaudata, but no sign of a time lag between the sexes for oriental fruit fly. Spatially, we found a significant positive relationship between numbers of F. arisanus in blocks and the average number in adjoining blocks. We did not find the same effect for oriental fruit fly and D. longicaudata, possibly a result of lower overall numbers of the latter two species or less movement of F. arisanus within the field.

  11. Producción masiva y simultánea de machos de Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae y parasitoides Dichasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia N. LÓPEZ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available En la línea de sexado genético «Cast191» las hembras de Ceratitis capitata son homocigotas para el gen slow , lo que reduce su velocidad de desarrollo; los machos son heterocigotas y muestran una velocidad de desarrollo normal. Esta característica permitió producir, con Cast191, machos estériles por un lado, y parasitoides criados sobre las larvas remanentes por el otro. Nuestro objetivo con este trabajo fue producir ambos insumos simultáneamente y a una escala mayor que hasta ahora. Además, bajo estas condiciones, y en un intento por aumentar la separación entre sexos, se aplicó a las larvas del primer estadío un pulso de 15º C, durante 1 ó 2 días, luego del cual se las mantuvo a 20º C ó 25º C, hasta que entraron al estado de pupa, luego se mantuvo todo el material a 25º C. La mejor separación de sexos, lograda con el tratamiento a 20º C sin pulso de frío, se usó para comparar la calidad del parasitoide Diachasmimorpha longicaudata, criado sobre las larvas obtenidas tras la separación de los machos, con aquellos criados sobre la línea salvaje. Para ello, este tratamiento de separación fue aplicado en la cría de la mosca, y el material remanente de dieta con larvas fue expuesto al parasitoide. La tasa de parasitismo obtenida fue semejante a la hallada sobre la línea salvaje, y la tasa sexual de la F1 del parasitoide presentó un sesgo hacia las hembras aún mayor. Se discute la factibilidad de utilizar la línea Cast191 de C. Capitata, para la producción a mayor escala de machos de mosca y para la cría masiva del parasitoide D. longicaudata.

  12. Aphid parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae and their associations related to biological control in Brazil Parasitóides (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae de pulgões e suas interações relacionadas ao controle biológico no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Starý

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the parasitoid-aphid-plant associations in Brazil with the objective of developing a useful research database for further studies of aphid parasitoid ecology and aphid management. The original material was obtained from collections made in Paraná, Rio Grande do Sul, Minas Gerais, and São Paulo states. The published information on the Aphidiinae in Brazil is revised. The general features of the target parasitoid fauna of Central and South America is summarized and promising biological control programs of some aphid species in Brazil is discussed.Este trabalho avaliou as interações parasitóides-pulgão-planta no Brasil, com o objetivo de desenvolver um banco útil de dados para estudos subseqüentes em ecologia de parasitóides de afídeos e manejo de pulgões. O material original foi obtido de coletas nos estados do Paraná, Rio Grande do Sul, Minas Gerais e São Paulo, sendo revisadas as informações sobre Aphidiinae publicadas no Brasil. Foram também sumarizadas as caracteristicas gerais da fauna de parasitóides das Américas Central e do Sul e discutidos os programas potenciais de controle biológico de algumas espécies de pulgões no Brasil.

  13. Selectividad de insecticidas biorracionales hacia Pseudapanteles dignus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), parasitoide de Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    La avispa endoparásita Pseudapanteles dignus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) es un importante enemigo natural de la plaga clave del tomate, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), en el Cinturón Hortícola de La Plata (provincia de Buenos Aires). Los daños causados por la plaga pueden llegar hasta el 80% si no se toman los recaudos necesarios. Para su control se utilizan insecticidas altamente tóxicos que generan contaminación ambiental, perjudican la presencia de los EN y promueven la generación ...

  14. New records of two spider-parasitoids of the genus Polysphincta (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Ephialtini from Central Europe, with notes on their host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korenko, Stanislav

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A polysphinctine wasp Polysphincta longa, associated with the orb web building spider Araneus angulatus, was recorded for the first time in Slovakia. Further, the congener Polysphincta tuberosa was recorded in association with a new spider host Araneus sturmi. New distribution records of Polysphincta species from the Czech and Slovak Republics are presented. The final stage larva of both, P. longa and P. tuberosa, induced a specific alteration in web architecture: the spider constructed a unique 3D tangle of silk – so called “cocoon web” – to protect the parasitoid during the pupal stage. The host range of wasps belonging to the genus Polysphincta in Europe is discussed.

  15. Fluctuación poblacional y comportamiento de mariposas (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae) y de sus parasitoides (Hymenoptera y Díptera) en aguacate (Pasea americana)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Este estudio describe la fluctuación, comportamiento y número de parasitoides en diferentes estadios de lepidópteros lasiocámpidos que se alimentan de hojas del aguacatero. A cada quince días, durante un año, treinta árboles fueron examinados, al azar. Tres especies fueron encontradas atacando las hojas del aguacatero: Euglyphis rivulosa. Euglyphis fibra y Nesaradrucei. las cuales fueron más frecuentes desde abril a agosto de 1990 y abril de 1991. Este estudio describe la fluctuación, comp...

  16. Data mining cDNAs reveals three new single stranded RNA viruses in Nasonia (Hymenopetera:Pteromalidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymenopteran viruses may provide insights into colony collapse disorder in honey bees and other insect species. Three novel small RNA viruses were discovered during the genomics effort for the beneficial parasitoid of flies in the genus Nasonia (Hymenoptera). Genomics provides a great deal of inform...

  17. Biology, host instar suitability and susceptibility, and interspecific competition of three introduced parasitoids of Paracoccus marginatus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biology, host stage suitability and susceptibility, and interspecific competition of three previously introduced parasitoids (Acerophagus papayae, Anagyrus loecki, and Pseudleptomastix mexicana) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) of Paracoccus marginatus were studied in the laboratory. Compared to P. mexica...

  18. Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis and parasitoids of late-instar larvae of the spruce budworm (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmaker, A.; Cusson, M.; Frankenhuyzen, van K.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner var. kurstaki and parasitoids that attack late instars of the eastern spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens). In a petri-dish arena, females of Tranosema rostrale rostrale (Brishke) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) were abl

  19. Establishment of the Brown Widow Spider (Araneae: Theridiidae) and Infestation of its Egg Sacs by a Parasitoid, Philolema latrodecti (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae), in French Polynesia and the Cook Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Jérôme; Vetter, Richard S

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents two newly established species for French Polynesia: the invasive brown widow spider, Latrodectus geometricus C. L. Koch, and its potential biocontrol agent, the parasitoid wasp, Philolema latrodecti (Fullaway). The brown widow spider was recorded from the island of Moorea in 2006 and, since that discovery, the occurrence of this species has expanded to two of the five archipelagos of French Polynesia including the main island of Tahiti and four of the Cook Islands. Although the tropical climate contributes to the establishment of L. geometricus, a biotic factor, P. latrodecti, may restrain population from demographic explosion. This eurytomid wasp is present in French Polynesia and is a parasitoid that has been used in biological control of the southern black widow Latrodectus mactans (F.) in Hawaii. This wasp could become a significant limiting factor for L. geometricus distribution on these islands, as it was found in 31% of the Tahitian brown widow spider egg sacs that were dissected. However, thus far, the wasp was only found on Tahiti in association with the brown widow spider. Although the brown widow is generally considered to be less toxic than its black widow relatives, it remains of medical concern in French Polynesia because reactions to its bites can, at times, be severe. The spider remains of public concern because it is a novel species; it has the word widow in its name and dark morphs are mistaken as black widows.

  20. Influence of Constant Temperature on Development and Reproduction of Encarsia guadeloupae Viggiani (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae), a Parasitoid of the Spiraling Whitefly Aleurodicus dispersus Russell (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J Y; Niu, L M; Li, L; Han, D Y; Fu, Y G

    2015-04-01

    Encarsia guadeloupae Viggiani is an important parasitoid of Aleurodicus dispersus Russell. The effects of temperature (16, 20, 24, 28, and 32°C) on development and reproduction of this parasitoid on A. dispersus were studied in laboratory experiments. The developmental duration of E. guadeloupae varied from 14.9 (32°C) to 54.4 days (16°C). The developmental threshold and thermal constant for an entire generation were 10.52°C and 308.85 degree-days, respectively. The highest survival rate (63.8%) of immature E. guadeloupae was recorded at 28°C. The average adult longevity ranged from 6.0 (32°C) to 15.1 days (16°C). The highest fecundity was observed at 28°C. The intrinsic rate of increase (r m ), net reproduction rate (R o ), and finite rate of increase (λ) were the highest at 28°C, which were 0.18, 54.25 and 1.21, respectively. We concluded that 28°C is the most suitable temperature for development and reproduction of E. guadeloupae.

  1. The tritrophic system hyptis suaveolens (Lamiaceae - agromyzid leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae - parasitoids (Hymenoptera: effects of herbivore density, host plant patch size, and habitat complexity on parasitism rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarbas Marcal de Queiroz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study a tritrophic system was evaluated to measure the contributions of the insect host density and its host plant concentration in simple and diversified habitat on the rate of parasitism. The system was composed of the plant Hyptis suaveolens, two species of agromyzid leafminers, and three morphospecies of parasitoids. The parasitism rate, patch size, and habitat complexity were found to be interdependent. If only the habitat complexity or patch size was take into account the differences in parasitism rate are not significant, although habitat diversity seemed to contribute more than the host plant concentration to increase the parasitism rate. The leaves or plants with different number of mines were equally attacked by the parasitoids. The results were representative of what happened to the leafminers at different host plant densities under the homogeneous and heterogeneous habitat condition. This work could help to reinforce the idea of the importance of the plant diversity for enhancing the biological control of the pests by the parasitoids in the managed ecosystems.Foi avaliado um sistema tritrófico para medir os efeitos da densidade de insetos minadores e a concentração da planta hospedeira em habitats simples e diversificados sobre a taxa de parasitismo. O sistema era composto pela planta Hyptis suaveolens, duas espécies de agromizídeos minadores de folhas e três morfoespécies de parasitóides. A taxa de parasitismo, tamanho da mancha e a complexidade do habitat foram interdependentes. Se levarmos em consideração apenas a complexidade ou tamanho de mancha, as diferenças na taxa de parasitismo não foram significativas, embora a diversidade de habitat pareça ter contribuido mais do que a concentração da planta hospedeira para aumentar a taxa de parasitismo. Folhas ou plantas com diferentes números de minas foram igualmente parasitadas. Nossos resultados são representativos do que acontece com insetos minadores em

  2. A new species of Megalommum Szépligeti (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Braconinae; a parasitoid of the pistachio longhorn beetle (Calchaenesthes pistacivora Holzschuh; Coleoptera, Cerambycidae in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees van Achterberg

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of the genus Megalommum Szépligeti (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Braconinae, reared from the pistachio longhorn beetle (Calchaenesthes pistacivora Holzschuh; Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, is described and illustrated. The genera Curreia Ashmead, 1900 and Endovipio Turner, 1922 are new synonyms of Megalommum Szépligeti, 1900. Notes on the biology of M. pistacivorae sp. n. and a key to the West Palaearctic and Oriental species are added. The following new combinations are given: M. xanthoceps (Fahringer, 1928, comb. n., M. jacobsoni (Tobias, 1968, comb. n., M. ayyari (Watanabe, 1950, comb. n., M. philippinense (Baker, 1917, comb. n., M. dodecanesi (Ferrière, 1922, comb. n., M. ceresense (Turner, 1922, comb. n., M. inareatum (Granger, 1949, comb. n., M. antefurcale (Szépligeti, 1915 comb. n. and M. tibiale (Ashmead, 1906, comb. n.  

  3. Nuevos registros de especies del género Eretmocerus (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae, parasitoides de Trialeurodes vaporariorum y el complejo Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae en Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia N. LÓPEZ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es dar a conocer nuevos registros y distribuciones de las especies del género Eretmocerus Haldeman, parasitoides de las dos especies de mosca blanca que tienen mayor importancia económica en cultivos hortícolas y ornamentales en Argentina. Una especie de Eretmocerus Haldeman fue hallada parasitando a Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood en Santa Fe y Buenos Aires; por sus caracteres morfológicos, se encuentra en el grupo californicus , cercana a corni Haldeman, podría tratarse de una nueva especie. Asimismo, se amplía la distribución geográfica de Eretmocerus mundus Mercet, enemigo natural del complejo Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius, a las provincias de San Juan y Buenos Aires.

  4. Seemingly maladaptive refraining from infanticidal probing at the third parasitism attack by the semi-solitary parasitoid Echthrodelphax fairchildii (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EMI ITO; YOSHIHIRO Y. YAMADA

    2006-01-01

    We assessed the adaptiveness of refraining from infanticidal probing at the third attack under triple parasitism in the parasitoid Echthrodelphaxfairchildii Perkins, by comparing fitness returns from the third attack with and without probing. Fitness returns were assessed in terms of the survival rate, mean developmental time, and mean adult head width of the progenies. Not probing was maladaptive under triple parasitism with oviposition intervals of 1/24 and 24/24 hours (where the numbers before and after the slash refer to the first-to-second and second-to-third oviposition intervals, respectively), although no significant difference was detected in fitness returns for oviposition intervals of 24/1 hours. We suggest that the cost of probing (especially the decrease in the chance of future ovipositions) is a reason for the seemingly maladaptive absence of probing.

  5. Associative learning of complex odours in parasitoid host location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiners, T.; Wäckers, F.L.; Lewis, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we address the question how hymenopteran parasitoids deal with complex odour bouquets, using Microplitis croceipes (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) as a model. We examined the capacity of Microplitis croceipes to respond to individual compounds in flight chamber experiments after co

  6. Are synthetic pheromone captures predictive of parasitoid densities as a kairomonal attracted tool?

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    Mohamed Hassan Bayoumy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abundance of White Peach scale (WPS, Pseudaulacaspis pentagona (Targioni-Tozzetti and San José scale (SJS, Diaspidiotus perniciosus (Comstock (Hemiptera: Diaspididae adult males and their attracted parasitoids were monitored using pheromone and sticky tape traps in an orchard of Budapest, Hungary, during 2010. In this study, we tried answer on the question raised whether synthetic commercial pheromones of WSP or SJS could work as a kairomonal stimulant and positively attract higher numbers of the specialized parasitoids. Although pheromone traps attracted a wide range of parasitoid species, most of them were accidentally. However, the parasitoid Thomsonisca amathus (Walker (Hymenoptera: E ncyrtidae and the parasitoid Encarsia perniciosi (Tower (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae significantly respond to the sex pheromones of WPS and SJS, respectively, suggesting that they may play an important role in host location.

  7. Poles Apart: Comparing Trends of Alien Hymenoptera in New Zealand with Europe (DAISIE.

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    Darren Ward

    Full Text Available Developing generalisations of invasive species is an important part of invasion biology. However, trends and generalisations from one part of the world may not necessarily hold elsewhere. We present the first inventory and analysis of all Hymenoptera alien to New Zealand, and compare patterns from New Zealand with those previously published from Europe (DAISIE. Between the two regions there was broad correlation between families with the highest number of alien species (Braconidae, Encyrtidae, Pteromalidae, Eulophidae, Formicidae, Aphelinidae. However, major differences also existed. The number of species alien to New Zealand is higher than for Europe (334 vs 286, and major differences include: i the much lower proportion of intentionally released species in New Zealand (21% vs 63% in Europe; and ii the greater proportion of unintentionally introduced parasitoids in New Zealand (71.2% vs 22.6%. The disharmonic 'island' nature of New Zealand is shown, as a high proportion of families (36% have no native representatives, and alien species also represent >10% of the native fauna for many other families. A much larger proportion of alien species are found in urban areas in New Zealand (60% compared to Europe (~30%, and higher numbers of alien species were present earlier in New Zealand (especially <1950. Differences in the origins of alien species were also apparent. Unlike Europe, the New Zealand data reveals a change in the origins of alien species over time, with an increasing dominance of alien species from Australasia (a regional neighbour during the past 25 years. We recommend that further effort be made towards the formation, and analysis, of regional inventories of alien species. This will allow a wider range of taxa and regions to be examined for generalisations, and help assess and prioritise the risk posed by certain taxa towards the economy or environment.

  8. A comparative cytogenetic study of Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Figitidae) using DNA-binding fluorochromes and FISH with 45S rDNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhman, Vladimir E; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Govind, Shubha; Muravenko, Olga V

    2016-06-01

    Karyotypes of Leptopilina boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979) (n = 9), L. heterotoma (Thomson, 1862) (n = 10), L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 (n = 10) and Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896) (n = 9) (Hymenoptera, Figitidae) were studied using DNA-binding ligands with different base specificity [propidium iodide (PI), chromomycin A3 (CMA3) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)], and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 45S rDNA probe. Fluorochrome staining was similar between the different fluorochromes, except for a single CMA3- and PI-positive and DAPI-negative band per haploid karyotype of each species. FISH with 45S rDNA probe detected a single rDNA site in place of the bright CMA3-positive band, thus identifying the nucleolus organizing region (NOR). Chromosomal locations of NORs were similar for both L. heterotoma and L. victoriae, but strongly differed in L. boulardi as well as in G. xanthopoda. Phylogenetic aspects of NOR localization in all studied species are briefly discussed.

  9. Nuevos registros de especies del género Eretmocerus (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae, parasitoides de Trialeurodes vaporariorum y el complejo Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae en Argentina New records of species of the genus Eretmocerus (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae, parasitoids of Trialeurodes vaporariorum and Bemisia tabaci complex (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae in Argentina

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    Silvia N. López

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es dar a conocer nuevos registros y distribuciones de las especies del género Eretmocerus Haldeman, parasitoides de las dos especies de mosca blanca que tienen mayor importancia económica en cultivos hortícolas y ornamentales en Argentina. Una especie de Eretmocerus Haldeman fue hallada parasitando a Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood en Santa Fe y Buenos Aires; por sus caracteres morfológicos, se encuentra en el grupo californicus, cercana a corni Haldeman, podría tratarse de una nueva especie. Asimismo, se amplía la distribución geográfica de Eretmocerus mundus Mercet, enemigo natural del complejo Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius, a las provincias de San Juan y Buenos Aires.The objective of this paper is to report new records of species of the genus Eretmocerus Haldeman, parasitoids of the most important whitefly pest species in vegetables and ornamental crops in Argentina. One species was found parasitizing Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood in Santa Fe and Buenos Aires provinces and it is grouped into californicus group near corni Haldeman, due to its morphological characters. It could be a new species. The known distribution of Eretmocerus mundus Mercet, a parasitoid of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius, is enlarged to include the provinces of San Juan and Buenos Aires of Argentina.

  10. The effect of snowdrop lectin (GNA) delivered via artificial diet and transgenic plants on Eulophus pennicornis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a parasitoid of the tomato moth Lacanobia oleracea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, H A.; Fitches, E C.; Down, R E.; Marris, G C.; Edwards, J P.; Gatehouse, J A.; Gatehouse, A M.R.

    1999-11-01

    Snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, GNA) has previously been shown to confer significant levels of protection against the lepidopteran pest Lacanobia oleracea when expressed in transgenic potato. The effect of GNA on the parasitism of L. oleracea by the gregarious ectoparasitoid Eulophus pennicornis was investigated. Maize-based, and potato leaf-based diets containing GNA, and excised transgenic potato leaves expressing GNA, were fed to L. oleracea larvae from the beginning of either the third or fourth larval instar. Lacanobia oleracea larvae were individually exposed to single mated adult female E. pennicornis parasitoids from the fifth instar onwards.The success of the wasp was not reduced by the presence of GNA in any of the diets, or by the length of feeding of the host prior to parasitism. However, the mean number of wasps that developed on L. oleracea reared from the third instar on the GNA-containing maize diet was significantly higher than on the controls (20.6 and 9.3 adults/host respectively). In all other cases differences were not significant. Eulophus pennicornis progeny that developed on L. oleracea reared on GNA-containing diets showed little or no alteration in size, longevity, egg load and fecundity when compared with wasps that had developed on hosts fed the respective control diets.The results suggest that expression of GNA in transgenic crops to confer resistance to lepidopteran pests will not adversely affect the ability of the ectoparasitoid E. pennicornis to utilise the pest species as a host.

  11. Geographical transition zone of Solenopsis fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and Pseudacteon fly parasitoids (Diptera: Phoridae) in the state of São Paulo, Brazil.

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    Pesquero, M A; Dias, A M P M

    2011-01-01

    Solenopsis saevissima (Smith) and Solenopsis invicta Buren are the most abundant and widely distributed fire ants in Brazil. The occurrence of the two fire ant species and of their parasitoids Pseudacteon spp. is described for a climatic and phytophysiognomic transition area in the state of São Paulo. Both fire ant species have a parapatric distribution, apparently determined by the climate: S. saevissima predominates in the north part of São Paulo (Aw climate), while S. invicta in the south (Cfa climate). A sympatric area is observed between the latitudes 21ºS and 23ºS. Two different communities of parasitic decapitating flies were associated with S. saevissima in the north and with S. invicta in the south, with a sympatric area in the municipality of São Carlos (21º58'S 47º53'W). The possible causes of this biogeographic pattern are discussed. Preference tests with Pseudacteon flies challenge the association of P. litoralis Borgmeier, P. curvatus Borgmeier, P. wasmanni Schmitz, P. pradei Borgmeier and P. obtusus Borgmeier with S. saevissima, and P. dentiger Borgmeier, P. disneyi Pesquero and P. lenkoi Borgmeier & Prado with S. invicta.

  12. Passive evasion of encapsulation in Macrocentrus cingulum Brischke (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a polyembryonic parasitoid of Ostrinia furnacalis Guenée (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian; Zhu, Xiang-Xiong; Fu, Wen-Jun

    2003-04-01

    The hymenopteran Macrocentrus cingulum usually deposits one egg into the larval body cavity of lepidopteran Ostrinia furnacalis, and the egg subsequently splits into several dozens of embryos during its development. How the parasitoid eggs and embryos avoid encapsulation by the host's immune response remains unknown. We compared hemocyte counts, morphologies and behaviors between unparasitized O. furnacalis larvae, and larvae parasitized by M. cingulum. No distinct differences were observed. Sephadex A-25 beads elicited a strong encapsulation response when injected into the parasitized host larvae, which indicates that parasitism by M. cingulum does not affect host's cellular immunity. However, there were significant differences in the host's encapsulation reactions towards injected eggs from different sources. Injected M. cingulum mature eggs excised from the lateral oviducts of the female wasps were not encapsulated, while immature eggs or driselase treated mature ones provoked an encapsulation response within 2 h after injection. Inspection of eggs by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the driselase collapsed the surface fibrous layer of the eggs, indicating that surface fibrous layer may play a role in protecting eggs from host's immune attack.

  13. Characteristics, phenotype, and transmission of Wolbachia in the sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), and its parasitoid Eretmocerus sp. nr. emiratus (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiel, Elad; Kelly, Suzanne E; Harris, Alexandre M; Gebiola, Marco; Li, Xianchun; Zchori-Fein, Einat; Hunter, Martha S

    2014-04-01

    Wolbachia is a common intracellular bacterial endosymbiont of insects, causing a variety of effects including reproductive manipulations such as cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). In this study, we characterized Wolbachia in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci and in the whitefly parasitoid Eretmocerus sp. nr. emiratus. We also tested for horizontal transmission of Wolbachia between and within trophic levels, and we determined the phenotype of Wolbachia in E. sp. nr. emiratus. Using multilocus sequence typing and phylogenetic analyses, we found that B. tabaci and E. sp. nr. emiratus each harbor a different and unique strain of Wolbachia. Both strains belong to the phylogenetic supergroup B. No evidence for horizontal transmission of Wolbachia between and within trophic levels was found in our study system. Finally, crossing results were consistent with a CI phenotype; when Wolbachia-infected E. sp. nr. emiratus males mate with uninfected females, wasp progeny survival dropped significantly, and the number of females was halved. This is the first description of CI caused by Wolbachia in the economically important genus Eretmocerus. Our study underscores the expectation that horizontal transmission events occur rarely in the dynamics of secondary symbionts such as Wolbachia, and highlights the importance of understanding the effects of symbionts on the biology of natural enemies.

  14. New Host Record for Camponotophilus delvarei (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae, a Parasitoid of Microdontine Larvae (Diptera: Syrphidae, Associated with the Ant Camponotus sp. aff. textor

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    Gabriela Pérez-Lachaud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microdontine syrphid flies are obligate social parasites of ants. Larvae prey on ant brood whereas adults live outside the nests. Knowledge of their interaction with their host is often scarce, as it is information about their natural enemies. Here we report the first case of parasitism of a species of microdontine fly by a myrmecophilous eurytomid wasp. This is also the first host record for Camponotophilus delvarei Gates, a recently described parasitic wasp discovered in Chiapas, Mexico, within the nests of the weaver ant, Camponotus sp. aff. textor Forel. Eleven pupal cases of a microdontine fly were found within a single nest of this ant, five of them being parasitized. Five adult C. delvarei females were reared from a puparium and 29 female and 2 male pupae were obtained from another one. The eurytomid is a gregarious, primary ectoparasitoid of larvae and pupae of Microdontinae, its immature stages developing within the protective puparium of the fly. The species is synovigenic. Adult females likely locate and parasitize their hosts within the ant nest. As some species of Microdontinae are considered endangered, their parasitoids are likewise threatened and in need of accurate and urgent surveys in the future.

  15. Toxicidade de agrotóxicos utilizados na cultura do pessegueiro sobre o parasitóide de ovos Trichogramma atopovirilia Oatman & Platner, 1983 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae Toxicity of pesticides used in peach production on the egg parasitoids Trichogramma atopovirilia Oatman & Platner, 1983 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae

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    Fabrizio Pinheiro Giolo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A toxicidade de dezesseis formulações comerciais de agrotóxicos utilizados na cultura do pessegueiro foi avaliada em laboratório (temperatura 25±1oC, umidade relativa 70±10% e fotofase de 14 horas, expondo-se adultos do parasitóide Trichogramma atopovirilia Oatman & Platner, 1983 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae em contato com uma película seca dos produtos fitossanitários pulverizados sobre placas de vidro, mensurando-se posteriormente o número de ovos parasitados por fêmea. Reduções na capacidade de parasitismo em relação à testemunha (somente água foram utilizadas para classificar os produtos em inócuo (99%. Os agrotóxicos (% da formulação comercial na calda Captan 500 PM (0,240, Cobre Sandoz BR (0,240, Delan (0,125, Dodex 450 SC (0,175, Rovral SC (0,150 e Intrepid 240 SC (0,060 foram inócuos; Manzate 800 (0,200 foi levemente nocivo; Assist (2,000, Finale (1,000 e Roundup (original (3,000 foram moderadamente nocivos; Kumulus DF (0,600, Hokko Cihexatim 500 (0,050, Vertimec 18 CE (0,080, Imidan 500 WP (0,200, Tiomet 400 CE (0,120 e Trebon 100 SC (0,150 foram nocivos a T. atopovirilia.The toxicity of sixteen commercial formulations of pesticides used in peach production was assessed in the laboratory (25±1oC temperature, 70±10% relative humidity and 14h photophase on adults of egg parasitoids Trichogramma atopovirilia Oatman & Platner, 1983 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae by exposing the adult parasitoids to fresh dry pesticide film applied on glass plates and further evaluation of the capacity of parasitism per adult female. The reduction in capacity of parasitism compared with the control (treated with water was used to measure the effect of the chemical. Pesticides were then classified into four categories, according to the reduction in parasitization: 1, harmless (99%. The pesticides (% commercial formulation in spray water Captan 500 PM (0.240, Cobre Sandoz BR (0.240, Delan (0.125, Dodex 450 SC (0.175, Rovral SC (0

  16. Thermal development of Cephalonomia tarsalis (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) parasitoid of the saw-toothed stored product beetles of the genus Oryzaephilus sp. (Coleoptera: Sylvanidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliopoulos, Panagiotis A; Kontodimas, Dimitrios C

    2016-02-01

    The effect of temperature on the development and survival of Cephalonomia tarsalis (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae), larval ectoparasitoid of beetles of Oryzaephilus sp. (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) was studied in the laboratory. Durations of the development of the egg, larva and pupa were measured in eight constant temperatures (15, 17.5, 20, 25, 30, 32.5, 35 and 37.5°C) parasitizing larvae of the saw-toothed beetle Oryzaephilus surinamensis (L.) (Coleoptera: Silvanidae). The duration of development was decreased with temperature increase within the range 17.5-32.5°C. Survival was higher when immatures were exposed to medium temperatures (20-30°C) compared with those lived in a more extreme temperature regime (30°C). Wasps failed to complete their development at 15 and 37.5°C. Thermal parameters (upper, lower and optimum developmental threshold, thermal constant) were estimated by fitting the linear and a non-linear (Logan I) model to our data. Upper and lower developmental thresholds ranged between 35.1-37.0°C and 13.2-13.8°C, respectively. The optimum temperature for development was estimated between 33.6°C and 34.6°C. Tests for developmental rate isomorphy (DRI) showed that change in the average proportion of time spent in each developmental stage was marginally significant, proving that development of C. tarsalis is probably incompatible with DRI. However, this conclusion is questionable given that lower developmental thresholds did not differ significantly among various developmental stages (bootstrap test). Thermal constant for total development was calculated 212.4 degree-days. Our results are discussed not only on the basis of thermal biology, but also of improving the efficiency of C. tarsalis as biocontrol agent.

  17. Influence of host age on critical fitness parameters of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a new parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Timothy J; Duan, Jian J

    2014-08-01

    Spathius galinae Belokobylskij and Strazenac (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a recently discovered gregarious idiobiont larval ectoparasitoid currently being evaluated for biological control against the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in the United States. To aid in the development of laboratory rearing protocols, we assessed the influence of various emerald ash borer stages on critical fitness parameters of S. galinae. We exposed gravid S. galinae females to emerald ash borer host larvae of various ages (3.5, 5, 7, and 10 wk post egg oviposition) that were reared naturally in tropical (evergreen) ash (Fraxinus uhdei (Wenzig) Lingelsh) logs, or to field-collected, late-stage emerald ash borers (nonfeeding J-shaped larvae termed "J-larvae," prepupae, and pupae) that were artificially inserted into green ash logs. When exposed to larvae in tropical ash logs, S. galinae attacked 5 and 7 wk hosts more frequently (68-76%) than 3.5 wk (23%) and 10 wk (12%) hosts. Subsample dissections of the these logs revealed that 3.5, 5, 7 and 10 wk host logs contained mostly second, third, fourth, and J-larvae, respectively, that had already bored into the sapwood for diapause. No J-larvae were attacked by S. galinae when naturally reared in tropical ash logs. When parasitized by S. galinae, 7 and 10 wk hosts produced the largest broods (approximately 6.7 offspring per parasitized host), and the progenies that emerged from these logs had larger anatomical measurements and more female-biased sex ratios. When exposed to emerald ash borer J-larvae, prepupae, or pupae artificially inserted into green ash logs, S. galinae attacked 53% ofJ-larvae, but did not attack any prepupae or pupae. We conclude that large (fourth instar) emerald ash borer larvae should be used to rear S. galinae.

  18. Effect of constant temperatures on the biology, life table, and thermal requirements of Aganaspis pelleranoi (Hymenoptera: Figitidae), a parasitoid of Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, R S; Nava, D E; Andreazza, F; Lisbôa, H; Nunes, A M; Grützmacher, A D; Valgas, R A; Maia, A H N; Pazianotto, R A A

    2014-04-01

    Aganaspis pelleranoi (Brèthes, 1924) (Hymenoptera: Figitidae) is a koinobiont endoparasitoid of larvae of species of the genus Anastrepha and of Ceratitis capitata. It is a candidate for use as a biological control agent, as under field conditions, it may reach a parasitism rate of 62%. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different constant temperatures on biological parameters of A. pelleranoi when parasitizing the larva of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) (Diptera: Tephritidae), as well as to determine its thermal requirements. The study was conducted in environmental chambers at 18, 20, 22, 25, 28, and 30 ± 1°C; 70 ± 10% relative humidity; and a 12-h photophase. Females maintained at 18 and 20°C produced more progeny than females at other temperatures tested. The longevity of males and females was inversely proportional to temperature, ranging from 49.1 to 3.73 d for females and from 32.1 to 3.8 d for males at temperatures of 18-30°C, respectively. The duration of the biological cycle (egg-to-adult) was influenced by temperature, and ranged from 69.1 d at 18°C to 30 d at 25°C. No preimaginal development of A. pelleranoi occurred at 28 and 30°C. The relationship between temperature and the demographic parameters of A. pelleranoi showed a linear effect over the temperature range of 18-25°C. The lower temperature threshold and thermal constant were 11.69°C and 391.70 degree days, respectively.

  19. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Reared Parasitoid Wasps of the Genus Glyptapanteles Ashmead 1904 (Insecta: Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae Associated with Lepidoptera in India.

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    Ankita Gupta

    Full Text Available Glyptapanteles Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae is a cosmopolitan group of hyperdiverse parasitic wasps. The genus remains taxonomically challenging in India due to its highly speciose nature, morphological similarity amongst species and negligible host records. The Indian fauna is one of the most diverse and also the least studied. The present study is based on 60 populations reared from 35 host species, 100+ individual caterpillar rearings (1100 wasp specimens pinned and 2000 in alcohol and from 12 different geographical locations of the country (11 states and one Union territory that represent 26 provisional Glyptapanteles species within 8 species-groups. Out of 60 populations, phylogenetic analyses were performed on 38 based on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI nucleotide sequences. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods displayed three and four major discrete Glyptapanteles clades, respectively. In clade A very few Indian species were grouped along with Neotropical and Thailand species. The other clades B and C grouped the majority of the Indian species and showed considerable host specificity in both the trees. All parasitic wasp species were gregarious in nature, except for two populations. Three different sets of data (morphology, host records, and COI were integrated in order to generate accurate boundaries between species/species-groups. Illustrations of all parasitized caterpillars/cocoons and 42 habitus views of Glyptapanteles spp., distributional information, and GenBank accession numbers, are presented. The present study, perhaps the most comprehensive done to date in India, suggests the presence of several additional Glyptapanteles species, which were previously unrecognized.

  20. Parasitóides (Hymenoptera: Braconidae de Anastrepha Schiner (Diptera: Tephritidae no estado do Acre Parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae of Anastrepha Schiner (Diptera: Tephritidae in the state of Acre, Brazil

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    Marcílio José Thomazini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho relata a primeira ocorrência de parasitóides em moscas-das-frutas do gênero Anastrepha Schiner no estado do Acre. No município de Bujari foram encontrados os braconídeos Opius bellus Gahan (72,5%, Doryctobracon areolatus (Szépligeti (26,8% e Utetes anastrephae (Viereck (0,7% associados a A. obliqua (Macquart em frutos de taperebá (Spondias mombin L., com parasitismo de 29,5%. No município de Rio Branco, em frutos de goiaba (Psidium guajava L., ocorreu somente D. areolatus em A. obliqua com parasitismo de 2,7%.This paper records the first parasitoids occurrence on Anastrepha Schiner fruit flies in the state of Acre, Brazil. In the Bujari County there occurred the braconids Opius bellus Gahan (72.5%, Doryctobracon areolatus (Szépligeti (26.8% e Utetes anastrephae (Viereck (0.7% associated with A. obliqua (Macquart in tapereba fruits (Spondias mombin L., with parasitism of 29.5%. In guajava fruits (Psidium guajava L. at Rio Branco County, only D. areolatus on A. obliqua occurred, with parasitism of 2.7%.

  1. Diversity and seasonality of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae and Lonchaeidae) and their parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae and Figitidae) in orchards of guava, loquat and peach

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    Souza-Filho, M.F.; Raga, A. [Instituto Biologico, Campinas, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: miguelf@biologico.sp.gov.br; Azevedo-Filho, J.A. [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA), Monte Alegre do Sul, SP (Brazil). Polo Regional do Leste Paulista; Strikis, P.C. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Parasitologia; Guimaraes, J.A. [EMBRAPA Agroindustria Tropical, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Zucchi, R.A. [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia, Fitopatologia e Zoologia Agricola

    2009-02-15

    This work was carried out in orchards of guava progenies, and loquat and peach cultivars, in Monte Alegre do Sul, SP, Brazil, in 2002 and 2003. Guavas and loquats were bagged and unbagged bi-weekly and weekly, respectively, for assessment of the infestation period. Peach was only bagged weekly. The assays started when the fruits were at the beginning of development, but still green. Ripe fruits were taken to the laboratory and placed individually into plastic cups. McPhail plastic traps containing torula yeast were hung from January 2002 to January 2004 to assess the fruit fly population in each orchard, but only the Ceratitis capitata population is here discussed. Five tephritid species were reared from the fruits: Anastrepha bistrigata Bezzi, A. fraterculus (Wiedemann), A. obliqua (Macquart), A. sororcula Zucchi, and C. capitata, in addition to six lonchaeid species: Neosilba certa (Walker), N. glaberrima (Wiedemann), N. pendula (Bezzi), N. zadolicha McAlpine and Steyskal, Neosilba sp. 4, and Neosilba sp. 10 (both species are in the process of being described by P. C. Strikis), as well as some unidentified Neosilba species. Ten parasitoid species were obtained from fruit fly puparia, of which five were braconids: Asobara anastrephae (Muesebeck), Doryctobracon areolatus (Szepligeti), D. brasiliensis (Szepligeti), Opius bellus Gahan, and Utetes anastrephae (Viereck), and five figitids: Aganaspis pelleranoi (Brethes), Dicerataspis grenadensis Ashmead, Lopheucoila anastrephae (Rhower), Leptopilina boulardi (Barbotin, Carlton and Kelner-Pillaut), and Trybliographa infuscata Diaz, Gallardo and Uchoa. Ceratitis capitata showed a seasonal behavior with population density peaking at the second semester of each year. Anastrepha and Neosilba species remained in the orchards throughout both years. (author)

  2. Biology, life history, and laboratory rearing of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a larval parasitoid of the invasive emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Watt, Timothy J; Larson, Kristi

    2014-06-01

    Spathius galinae Belokobylskij & Strazanac is a recently described parasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, in the Russian Far East, and is currently being considered for biocontrol introduction in the United States. Using A. planipennis larvae reared with freshly cut ash (Fraxinus spp.) sticks, we investigated the biology, life cycle, and rearing of S. galinae in the laboratory under normal rearing conditions (25 +/- 1 degrees C, 65 +/- 10% relative humidity, and a photoperiod of 16:8 [L:D] h). Our study showed that S. galinae took approximately 1 mo (29 d) to complete a single generation (from egg to adult) under the laboratory rearing conditions. After eclosion from eggs, larvae of S. galinae molted four times to reach the fifth instar, which then spun cocoons for pupation and development to adults. Adult female wasps had a median survival time of 7 wk with fecundity peaking 3 wk after emergence when reared in groups (of five females and five males) and 2 wk in single pairs. Throughout the life span, a single female S. galinae produced a mean (+/- SE) of 31 (+/- 3.0) progeny when reared in groups, and a mean (+/- SE) of 47 (+/- 5.3) progeny when reared in single pairs. Results from our study also showed that S. galinae could be effectively reared with A. planipennis larvae reared in both green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) and tropical [Fraxinus uhdei (Wenzig) Lingelsh] ash sticks. However, the abortion (unemergence) rate of S. galinae progeny was much higher (20%) when reared with host larvae in green ash sticks than that (2.1%) in tropical ash sticks.

  3. Diversity and seasonality of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae and Lonchaeidae and their parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae and Figitidae in orchards of guava, loquat and peach

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    MF. Souza-Filho

    Full Text Available This work was carried out in orchards of guava progenies, and loquat and peach cultivars, in Monte Alegre do Sul, SP, Brazil, in 2002 and 2003. Guavas and loquats were bagged and unbagged bi-weekly and weekly, respectively, for assessment of the infestation period. Peach was only bagged weekly. The assays started when the fruits were at the beginning of development, but still green. Ripe fruits were taken to the laboratory and placed individually into plastic cups. McPhail plastic traps containing torula yeast were hung from January 2002 to January 2004 to assess the fruit fly population in each orchard, but only the Ceratitis capitata population is here discussed. Five tephritid species were reared from the fruits: Anastrepha bistrigata Bezzi, A. fraterculus (Wiedemann, A. obliqua (Macquart, A. sororcula Zucchi, and C. capitata, in addition to six lonchaeid species: Neosilba certa (Walker, N. glaberrima (Wiedemann, N. pendula (Bezzi, N. zadolicha McAlpine and Steyskal, Neosilba sp. 4, and Neosilba sp. 10 (both species are in the process of being described by P. C. Strikis, as well as some unidentified Neosilba species. Ten parasitoid species were obtained from fruit fly puparia, of which five were braconids: Asobara anastrephae (Muesebeck, Doryctobracon areolatus (Szépligeti, D. brasiliensis (Szépligeti, Opius bellus Gahan, and Utetes anastrephae (Viereck, and five figitids: Aganaspis pelleranoi (Brèthes, Dicerataspis grenadensis Ashmead, Lopheucoila anastrephae (Rhower, Leptopilina boulardi (Barbotin, Carlton and Kelner-Pillaut, and Trybliographa infuscata Diaz, Gallardo and Uchôa. Ceratitis capitata showed a seasonal behavior with population density peaking at the second semester of each year. Anastrepha and Neosilba species remained in the orchards throughout both years.

  4. First report of an egg parasitoid reared from Neomusotima conspurcatalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) a biological control agent of Lygodium microphyllum (Schizaeales: Lygodiaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neomusotima conspurcatalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) was first released in Florida as a biological control agent of Lygodium microphyllum (Polypodiales: Lygodiaceae), Old World climbing fern, in 2008. The first egg parasitoid, a Trichogramma sp. (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae), was reared from N. co...

  5. Ação transovariana de lufenuron (50 g/l sobre adultos de Spodoptera Frugiperda (j. e. smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae e seu efeito sobre o parasitóide de ovos Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae Transovarian action of lufenuron on adults of Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae and its effect on the parasitoid Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirceu Pratissoli

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se a ação transovariana do lufenuron em Spodoptera frugiperda e sua seletividade ao parasitóide de ovos Trichogramma pretiosum. Casais da praga foram isolados em gaiolas de PVC e alimentados com solução de mel a 10% na testemunha, e nos outros tratamentos, foi adicionado à solução de mel o regulador de crescimento de insetos Match® CE nas proporções de 12,5; 15,0 e 17,5 g i.a/l. Para verificação da ação transovariana, diariamente foram coletadas as posturas, contado o número de ovos e, posteriormente, o número de larvas eclodidas. Quarenta ovos provenientes de cada tratamento foram colados em cartelas de papel (cartolina e expostos ao parasitismo, dentro de tubos de vidro de 1,0 x 3,5 cm, contendo uma fêmea de T. pretiosum no seu interior. Cartelas contendo 40 ovos de S. frugiperda foram imersas em soluções de lufenuron com a mesma concentração dos tratamentos anteriores e, posteriormente, expostas ao parasitismo por T. pretiosum. O lufenuron afetou consideravelmente a viabilidade dos ovos de S. frugiperda. Pelos resultados obtidos nos ensaios, relativos ao parasitóide, demonstram-se a seletividade do regulador de crescimento lufenuron e a possibilidade de sua utilização em programas de Manejo Integrado, juntamente com o parasitóide de ovos T. pretiosum.The transovarian action of insect growth regulator lufenuron in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae and its effects on the egg parasitoid Trichogramma pretiosum (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae, were evaluated. Pest couples were isolated in PVC's cages and provided with 10% honey solution as control. In the others treatments, the honey solution was mixed with the insect growth regulator Match® CE using the following concentrations of 12.5; 15.0 and 17.5 g i.a./l. For verification of the transovarian action, the eggs were collected daily, with the number of the hatched larvae being subsequently counted. Forty eggs from each treatment were fixed in

  6. The genus Odontofroggatia Ishii (Hymenoptera Chalcidoidea, Pteromalidae Epichrysomallinae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiebes, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Descriptions of three new species of Odontofroggatia: corneri (type locality Penang, Malaya; also recorded from Perak, Malaya and from the Solomon Island Ysabel), galili (type locality Ein Geddi, Israel; also recorded from Perak, Malaya) and ishii (type locality Penang, Malaya) are given. For all sp

  7. Biology of Microctonus sp. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, a parasitoid of Cyrtomon luridus BOH. (Coleoptera: Ccurculionidae Biologia de Microctonus sp. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, parasitóide de Cyrtomon luridus BOH. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Paulo Tironi

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyrtomon luridus (Boh., a native insect of wild Solanaceae, has adapted to the medicinal plant Duboisia sp., introduced from Australia, causing damages up to 100% mortality. Microctonus sp. is the most important natural enemy of C. luridus and its potential for biological control was investigated in this work. This study was carried out in Arapongas, Paraná State, Brazil, from 1994 to 1996. Parasitism of C. luridus by Microctonus sp. was highest from February through June (maximum of 54% in May 1996, when the C. luridus adult population was decreasing. The female sex ratio of Microctonus sp. under natural conditions was 0.57 to 0.69, which was close to 1 male : 2 female. Production of males occurs parthenogetically (arrhenotoky. In the laboratory, parasitism reached 40% when two adult C. luridus were exposed per parasitoid. The number of Microctonus sp. adults that emerged per parasitized beetle ranged from 4.7 to 14.2. Larval-pupal viability was 31.7 to 64.8% and the female sex ratio ranged from 0.0 to 0.37, with prevalence of males. The egg-pupal period was 12.7 days and the pupal-adult period was 10.7 days, resulting in a mean life cycle (egg-adult of 22.4 days for this parasitoid (25ºC, 70% R.H.. This is the first report of a new species of Microctonus sp. in C. luridus.Cyrtomon luridus (Boh. é um inseto nativo de solanáceas silvestres e se adaptou à planta medicinal Duboisia sp., introduzida da Austrália, causando danos de até 100% de mortalidade. Microctonus sp. é o mais importante inimigo natural de C. luridus e seu potencial para o controle biológico foi investigado neste trabalho. Os experimentos foram conduzidos em Arapongas, Estado do Paraná, de 1994 a 1996. O parasitismo de C. luridus, por Microctonus sp. foi maior nos meses de fevereiro a junho (máximo de 54% em maio/96, coincidindo com a diminuição da população de adultos de C. luridus. A razão sexual de fêmeas de Microctonus sp., em condições naturais, foi de 0

  8. Efecto de las aplicaciones aéreas de abamectin sobre Ageniaspis citricola (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), parasitoide del minador de la hoja de los cítricos, en la provincia de Tucumán Effect of abamectin airplane applications on Ageniaspis citricola (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), parasitoid of citrus leafminer, in Tucumán province

    OpenAIRE

    Augusto S. Casmuz; Lucía Goane; Hernán Salas; José Lazcano; Sebastián A. Zapatiel; Eduardo Willink

    2007-01-01

    Una de las herramientas biológicas más importantes para controlar al minador en las principales zonas productoras de cítricos de la Argentina es el parasitoide exótico Ageniaspis citricola. Sin embargo, el control químico sigue siendo la alternativa más utilizada por el productor. En nuestra provincia, en los últimos años se generalizó el uso de pulverizaciones aéreas de abamectin combinado con aceite mineral para controlar las poblaciones del minador de los cítricos, en un esquema de manejo ...

  9. The parasitoids of the asparagus miner (Diptera: Agromyzidae): field parasitism and the influence of food resources on life history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, William R; Gibson, Gary A P; Szendrei, Zsofia

    2014-12-01

    The goals of this study were to identify pupal parasitoids of the asparagus miner, Ophiomyia simplex Loew (Diptera: Agromyzidae), and examine the effect of different diets and floral resources on the lifespan of adult asparagus miners and their parasitoids. We also measured the effect of parasitism on stem damage caused by the asparagus miner. The identity and abundance of the parasitoids of the asparagus miner were determined in asparagus fields in Michigan from weekly asparagus miner pupal collections during the 2010-2013 seasons. Twelve species of hymenopterous parasitoids were reared from asparagus miner pupae, including Chorebus rondanii (Giard) (Ichneumonoidea: Braconidae), 10 species in three families of Chalcidoidea, and one species of Bethylidae (Chrysidoidea), that represent new host records for the asparagus miner. C. rondanii and Thinodytes cephalon (Walker) (Pteromalidae) were the most common parasitoids. The effects of different diets and flowers on the lifespan of the pest and parasitoid adults were also evaluated. Buckwheat resulted in the shortest life span for the asparagus miner, whereas Riddell's goldenrod significantly increased its lifespan relative to the control. Parasitoid lifespan was doubled when individuals were fed sugar-rich diets. In the field, parasitoids preferred stems that contained more pupae and damage. The two most commonly reared parasitoids should be considered as targets for future conservation biological control efforts of the asparagus miner.

  10. Biología y ciclo reproductivo de Apanteles gelechiidivoris (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, parasitoide de Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajonero Johanna

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Apanteles gelechiidivoris es un parasitoide de larvas de Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae, una plaga importante de cultivos como el tomate y la papa. El uso de este insecto para el control biológico no se ha implementado eficientemente debido a la falta de conocimiento de la biología, específicamente del ciclo de vida y el efecto de factores externos, como la temperatura, en su capacidad parasítica. Se evaluó el desarrollo y la capacidad reproductiva de A. gelechiidivoris en cuatro condiciones térmicas: 14, 20, 26 y 32 °C. En la evaluación del desarrollo se realizó una descripción del ciclo, se determinó la duración total de este, se estimaron los umbrales térmicos para cada estadio utilizando el modelo de Lactin y se hallaron los grados día. En la evaluación de la capacidad reproductiva se variaron las densidades del hospedero ofrecidas a una pareja recién emergida de la avispa de 5 hasta 160 y se contó el número de adultos emergidos con los cuales se evaluó longevidad y fecundidad. Adicionalmente se ajustó un modelo de respuesta funcional. La duración del ciclo de vida para las temperaturas evaluadas fue de 39 días en 14 °C, 34 en 20 °C, 19 en 26 °C y 17 en 32 °C. La longevidad fue de 7,5 (14 °C, 7 (20 °C, 5 (26 °C y 2,4 (32 °C días. La temperatura a la cual se pueden optimizar los parámetros reproductivos de esta avispa se encuentra entre 20 y 26 °C.

  11. Egg parasitoids of Megamelus spp. (Hemiptera: Delphacidae in Argentina

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    Serguei V. TRIAPITSYN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se revisaron los parasitoides oófagos (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae, Mymaridae, y Platygastridae de Megamelus spp. (Hemiptera: Delphacidae de la Argentina, y se presenta una clave para su identificación. Se describen cuatro especies nuevas: Anagrus (Anagrus empanadus Triapitsyn, sp. nov. (Mymaridae, parasitoide de M. scutellaris Berg que se alimenta de camalote, Eichhornia crassipes (Martius Solms-Laubach; Aprostocetus (Ootetrastichus riverplaticus Triapitsyn, sp. nov. (Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae, parasitoide de M. bellicus Marino de Remes Lenicov & Sosa; A. (Ootetrastichus yerbamatei Triapitsyn, sp. nov. (parasitoide de M. bellicus, M. scutellaris y Megamelus sp., todos de la provincia de Buenos Aires (A. (Ootetrastichus yerbamatei también se encuentra en Formosa; y Parascelio sabcli Triapitsyn, sp. nov. (Platygastridae: Scelioninae, parasitoide de M. scutellaris en Formosa, la asociación con el huésped es tentativa. Se incluyen otros parasitoides oófagos conocidos de Megamelus spp. en la Argentina, tales como Kalopolynema (Kalopolynema poema Triapitsyn & Berezovskiy (Mymaridae, parasitoide de M. scutellaris en Buenos Aires y también Cremastobaeus atratus Loiácono & Mulvani (Platygastridae: Scelioninae, parasitoide de M. scutellaris en Formosa, la asociación con el huésped es tentativa.

  12. Effects of a fruit and host-derived compound on orientation and oviposition in Utetes anastrephae, a little studied opiine braconid (Hymenoptera) parasitoid of Anastrepha spp. fruit flies (Tephritidae:Diptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augmentative biological control of tephritid fruit flies would benefit from: 1) synthetic attractants to monitor the survival and dispersal of released parasitoids and 2) synthetic oviposition stimulants to more economical to produce parasitoid species that are now prohibitively costly to mass-rear....

  13. Evaluación de algunos insecticidas para el control de la «polilla del tomate», Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae y su efecto residual sobre el parasitoide Trichogrammatoidea bactrae (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae Efficacy of insecticides against the «tomato moth», Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae and their residual effects on the parasitoid Trichogrammatoidea bactrae (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María B. Riquelme Virgala

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available La «polilla del tomate», Tuta absoluta (Meyrick, es una plaga clave de este cultivo en Argentina. Su manejo integrado debería incluir una selección de productos fitosanitarios que sean eficaces para su control y, al mismo tiempo, selectivos respecto de sus enemigos naturales. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la capacidad de control de los insecticidas triflumurón, clorfenapir, abamectin y una cepa experimental de Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt sobre la plaga, y el poder residual de los mismos sobre Trichogrammatoidea bactrae Nagaraja. Se registró la mortalidad de la polilla cada cuatro días, desde la aplicación hasta la emergencia de los adultos. El efecto sobre el parasitoide, se evaluó a través del número de huevos parasitados por hembra expuesta durante 48 horas a folíolos tratados, y su mortalidad luego de 1, 3, 7, 14 y 30 días de la pulverización. Todos los productos ocasionaron una mortalidad de T. absoluta mayor al 65% después de 12 días de aplicados. El Bt fue el único insecticida que no afectó la supervivencia y el parasitismo de T. bactrae . Estos resultados aportan información de interés para la selección de plaguicidas, a emplearse en programas de manejo integrado.The «tomato moth», Tuta absoluta (Meyrick is one of the key pests of tomato crops in Argentina. The compatible use of chemical and biological control is the main purpose of integrated pest management. Selective pesticides that can be successfully used to control pest without adverse side effects on natural enemies are highly required. The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of control of T. absoluta and the residual effect on the oophagous parasitoid, Trichogrammatoidea bactrae Nagaraja of the following insecticides: triflumuron, abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and an experimental strain of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt. Mortality of T. absoluta was evaluated every 4 days from pesticide spraying until adult emergency. The effect of pesticides on

  14. Systemic Imidacloprid Affects Intraguild Parasitoids Differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sally V; Burrack, Hannah J; Roe, R Michael; Bacheler, Jack S; Sorenson, Clyde E

    2015-01-01

    Toxoneuron nigriceps (Viereck) (Hymenoptera, Braconidae) and Campoletis sonorensis (Cameron) (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae) are solitary endoparasitoids of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae). They provide biological control of H. virescens populations in Southeastern US agricultural production systems. Field and greenhouse experiments conducted from 2011-2014 compared parasitism rates of parasitoids that developed inside H. virescens larvae fed on tobacco plants treated with and without imidacloprid. The parasitoids in our study did not have a similar response. Toxoneuron nigriceps had reduced parasitism rates, but parasitism rates of C. sonorensis were unaffected. Preliminary data indicate that adult female lifespans of T. nigriceps are also reduced. ELISA was used to measure concentrations of neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and imidacloprid metabolites in H. virescens larvae that fed on imidacloprid-treated plants and in the parasitoids that fed on these larvae. Concentrations were detectable in the whole bodies of parasitized H. virescens larvae, T. nigriceps larvae and T. nigriceps adults, but not in C. sonorensis larvae and adults. These findings suggest that there are effects of imidacloprid on multiple trophic levels, and that insecticide use may differentially affect natural enemies with similar feeding niches.

  15. Systemic Imidacloprid Affects Intraguild Parasitoids Differently.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally V Taylor

    Full Text Available Toxoneuron nigriceps (Viereck (Hymenoptera, Braconidae and Campoletis sonorensis (Cameron (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae are solitary endoparasitoids of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (Fabricius (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae. They provide biological control of H. virescens populations in Southeastern US agricultural production systems. Field and greenhouse experiments conducted from 2011-2014 compared parasitism rates of parasitoids that developed inside H. virescens larvae fed on tobacco plants treated with and without imidacloprid. The parasitoids in our study did not have a similar response. Toxoneuron nigriceps had reduced parasitism rates, but parasitism rates of C. sonorensis were unaffected. Preliminary data indicate that adult female lifespans of T. nigriceps are also reduced. ELISA was used to measure concentrations of neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and imidacloprid metabolites in H. virescens larvae that fed on imidacloprid-treated plants and in the parasitoids that fed on these larvae. Concentrations were detectable in the whole bodies of parasitized H. virescens larvae, T. nigriceps larvae and T. nigriceps adults, but not in C. sonorensis larvae and adults. These findings suggest that there are effects of imidacloprid on multiple trophic levels, and that insecticide use may differentially affect natural enemies with similar feeding niches.

  16. Egg parasitoids of the corn leafhopper, Dalbulus maidis, in the southernmost area of its distribution range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virla, Eduardo G; Moya-Raygoza, Gustavo; Luft-Albarracin, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Egg parasitoids of the corn leafhopper, Dalbulus maidis (DeLong and Wolcott) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), were surveyed exposing sentinel eggs of the leafhopper along a latitudinal transect of 600 km in Argentina, the southernmost area of its distribution range. Four parasitoid species were obtained: the mymarids Anagrus breviphragma Soyka (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae), Anagrus flaveolus Waterhouse, and Polynema sp., and the trichogrammatid Pseudoligosita longifrangiata (Viggiani) (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae). The low parasitism rate, low species richness, and high proportion of generalist egg parasitoids were quite clear in the southern distribution limit of the vector, in contrast to regions where corn crops are available all year round and there are continuous and overlapping generations of the pest. Further studies need to be done in order to determine the native host of the above egg parasitoids, the seasonal abundance, and the possible occurrence of other species affecting D. maidis populations in the studied area.

  17. Natural distribution of parasitoids of larvae of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriela Murúa, M; Molina-Ochoa, Jaime; Fidalgo, Patricio

    2009-01-01

    To develop a better understanding of the natural distribution of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), and to update the knowledge of the incidence of its complex of parasitoids. S. frugiperda, samplings in whorl-stage corn were carried out in provinces of Argentina from 1999 to 2003. S. frugiperda larvae were collected from corn in localities of the provinces of Tucumán, Salta, Jujuy, Santiago del Estero, La Rioja, Córdoba, San Luis, Chaco and Misiones. In each locality 30 corn plants were sampled and only larvae located in those plants were collected. The parasitoids that emerged from S. frugiperda larvae were identified and counted. The abundance of the parasitoids and the parasitism rate were estimated. The S. frugiperda parasitoids collected were Campoletis grioti (Blanchard) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), Chelonus insularis (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Archytas marmoratus (Townsend) (Diptera Tachinidae) and/or A. incertus (Macquart), Ophion sp. (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), Euplectrus platyhypenae Howard (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), and Incamyia chilensis (Aldrich) (Diptera Tachinidae). C. grioti was the most abundant and frequent during the five-year survey. Similar diversity of parasitoids was obtained in all the provinces, with the exception of I. chilensis and E. platyhypenae that were recovered only in the province of Salta. In the Northwestern region, in Tucumán, C. grioti and species of Archytas were the most abundant and frequent parasitoids. On the contrary, in Salta and Jujuy Ch. insularis was the parasitoid most abundant and frequently recovered. The parasitism rate obtained in Tucumán, Salta and Jujuy provinces were 21.96%, 17.87% and 6.63% respectively with an average of 18.93%. These results demonstrate that hymenopteran and dipteran parasitoids of S. frugiperda occurred differentially throughout the Argentinian provinces and played an important role on the natural control of the S. frugiperda larval

  18. Native and introduced parasitoids attacking the invasive chestnut gall wasp Dryocosmus kuriphilus

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The globally invasive chestnut gall wasp Dryocosmus kuriphilus was recently reported in Italy and threatens European chestnut orchards and native forests. Of Chinese origin, this species has invaded Japan, Korea, the USA, Nepal and Europe and in each region it has been attacked by parasitoids exploiting oak gall wasps. Classical biological control using the parasitoid Torymus sinensis (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) successfully reduced infestation in Japan. Subsequent work in Japan and Korea showed...

  19. Parasitoidism Rate and Life Table Parameters of Aphytis diaspidis (Howard) (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) and Hemiberlesia lataniae (Signoret) (Hemiptera: Diaspididae) Tasa de Parasitoidismo y Parámetros de Tabla de Vida de Aphytis diaspidis (Howard) (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) y Hemiberlesia lataniae (Signoret) (Hemiptera: Diaspididae)

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Latania scale, Hemiberlesia lataniae (Signoret), has become a major pest of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) in Chile and has reached high populations in the fruit because of limited natural control. The objective of this study was to identify the biological parameters of the parasitoid Aphytis diaspidis (Howard) as a control agent of latania scale. Postembryonic development, parasitoidism rate, and life table parameters of the parasitoid and scale were determined under laboratory conditions....

  20. Diversidad de avispas parasitoides de la familia Encyrtidae (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea del bosque tropical caducifolio en San Buenaventura, Jalisco, México Diversity of parasitoid wasps of the family Encyrtidae (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea in the tropical dry forest of San Buenaventura, Jalisco, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Rodríguez-Velez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los resultados del estudio de la fauna de avispas parasitoides de la familia Encyrtidae en el bosque tropical caducifolio de San Buenaventura, Jalisco, México. El estudio se llevó a cabo de noviembre de 1996 a octubre de 1997. La recolección se realizó con trampas Malaise durante 5 días de cada mes. Se registró un total de 61 especies, 30 géneros, 13 tribus y 2 subfamilias. El mayor número de géneros y especies fue de la subfamilia Encyrtinae, con 22 géneros y 44 especies, seguida por Tetracneminae con 8 géneros y 17 especies. El género con mayor número de especies fue Metaphycus con 11. Las especies recolectadas no fueron abundantes, y su riqueza y abundancia varió estacionalmente, registrándose los valores más altos durante la temporada de lluvias. La similitud de la fauna de San Buenaventura, Jalisco con la de Huautla, Morelos fue mayor que la encontrada en otras regiones previamente estudiadas de bosque tropical caducifolio (San Javier, Sonora y Huatulco, Oaxaca.Results of a faunistic study of the parasitoid wasps of the family Encyrtidae of the tropical dry forest of San Buenaventura, Jalisco, Mexico are presented. The study was carried out from November 1996 to October 1997. Collecting technique was Malaise trapping. Collections were carried out during 5 days of every month. A total of 61 species, 30 genera, 13 tribes and 2 subfamilies were recorded. The subfamily with the largest number of species was Encyrtinae with 22 genera and 44 species, followed by Tetracneminae with 8 genera and 17 species. The genus with the largest number of species was Metaphycus with 11. Species had low abundance. Species richness and abundance varied with time, with the highest values recorded in the rainy season. The fauna of San Buenaventura, Jalisco was most similar to that of Huautla, Morelos, than to that of San Javier, Sonora and Huatulco, Oaxaca, all of them previously studied.

  1. Biological control of olive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) by releases of Psyttalia cf. concolor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in California, parasitoid longevity in presence of the host, and host status of Walnut Husk Fly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Victoria Y., E-mail: vyokoyama@fresno.ars.usda.go [U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA/ARS/SJVASC), Parlier, CA (United States). Agricultural Research Service. Subtropical Horticulture Research Station; Rendon, Pedro A., E-mail: prendon@aphisguate.co [U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA/APHIS), Guatemala City (Guatemala). Center for Plant Health Science and Technology. Animal and Plant Health Inspection.; Sivinski, John, E-mail: jsivinski@gainesville.usda.ufl.ed [U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA/ARS/CMAVE), Gainesville, FL (United States). Agricultural Research Service. Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology

    2006-07-01

    The larval parasitoid, Psyttalia cf. concolor, collected from tephritids infesting coffee in Kenya and reared on Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata Weidemann, in Guatemala by USDA-APHIS, PPQ, was imported into California for biological control of olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin), in olives, Olea europaea. Free releases of the parasitoids were made in olive trees infested with olive fruit fly at a coastal and inland valley location during the fall and early winter of 2005. The relative humidity during the releases was significantly higher at the coastal location. Mean percentage parasitism ranged from 0.5 to 4 and 1.5 to 30 at the coastal and inland valley locations respectively, based on same season recovery of the F1 generation. One parasitoid was found in infested olives in the next crop of the following year in San Jose. Survival of the parasitoid in the greenhouse in the presence of olive fruit fly infested olives was not significantly different than in the presence of non-infested olives. The greatest number of progeny was produced from female parasitoids that were 12-16 d old. In laboratory tests, a few individuals of the parasitoid successfully completed one life cycle in walnut husk fly, Rhagoletis completa Cresson, infested English walnuts, Juglans regia L. (author)

  2. Ovarian egg morphology in chalcidoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea parasitizing gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vårdal, H.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We provide morphological egg data of 26 species of 5 chalcidoid families associated with cynipid galls (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae from western Palaearctic, including the first egg data for the family Ormyridae. Adult chalcidoid species were reared from galls, and eggs obtained from dissected female ovaries were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The shape of the eggs varies from oval to elongate and tapered at both ends. Eggs of Eurytomidae as well as some Eulophidae, Eupelmidae and Pteromalidae are equipped with a peduncle at the anterior end. We found a positive correlation between long eggs and long ovipositors and confirmed the expectation that eggs of endoparasitoids are generally shorter and narrower than eggs of ectoparasitoids. We were able to locate the sperm entrance or micropyle at the anterior pole of eggs of several species. It is situated at the anterior end of the egg and at the end of the peduncle when present. In addition, the eggshells of the endoparasitoid Sycophila biguttata (Swederus, 1795 (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae and the ectoparasitoid Cecidostiba fungosa (Geoffroy, 1785 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, are for the first time described.En el presente trabajo se aportan datos morfol.gicos del huevo de 26 especies del Paleártico occidental pertenecientes a 5 familias de Chalcidoidea asociadas con agallas de cinípidos (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae, incluyendo los primeros datos del huevo de especies de Ormyridae. Los ejemplares adultos de las especies estudiadas fueron obtenidos por emergencia de agallas en laboratorio, los ovarios de las hembras diseccionados para obtener los huevos, que fueron finalmente estudiados utilizando técnicas de microscopía electronica de barrido. La forma de los huevos estudiados varía de ovalada a alargada y ahusada en ambos extremos. Los huevos de Eurytomidae, así como algunos de Eulophidae, Eupelmidae y Pteromalidae están provistos de un pedúnculo en el extremo anterior. Se encontr

  3. Skeletomusculature of Scelionidae (Hymenoptera: Platygastroidea): head and mesosoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miko, I.; Vilhelmsen, Lars; Johnson, N.F.;

    2007-01-01

      The skeletomusculature of the head and mesosoma of the parasitoid wasp family Scelionidae is reviewed. Representatives of 27 scelionid genera are examined together with 13 non-scelionid taxa for comparison. Terms employed for other groups of Hymenoptera are reviewed, and a consensus terminology...

  4. High nymphal host density and mortality negatively impact parasitoid complex during an insect herbivore outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Aidan A G; Johnson, Scott N; Cook, James M; Riegler, Markus

    2017-08-26

    Insect herbivore outbreaks frequently occur and this may be due to factors that restrict top-down control by parasitoids, for example, host-parasitoid asynchrony, hyperparasitisation, resource limitation and climate. Few studies have examined host-parasitoid density relationships during an insect herbivore outbreak in a natural ecosystem with diverse parasitoids. We studied parasitisation patterns of Cardiaspina psyllids during an outbreak in a Eucalyptus woodland. First, we established the trophic roles of the parasitoids through a species-specific multiplex PCR approach on mummies from which parasitoids emerged. Then, we assessed host-parasitoid density relationships across three spatial scales (leaf, tree and site) over one year. We detected four endoparasitoid species of the family Encyrtidae (Hymenoptera); two primary parasitoid and one heteronomous hyperparasitoid Psyllaephagus species (the latter with female development as a primary parasitoid and male development as a hyperparasitoid), and the hyperparasitoid Coccidoctonus psyllae. Parasitoid development was host-synchronised, although synchrony between sites appeared constrained during winter (due to temperature differences). Parasitisation was predominantly driven by one primary parasitoid species and was mostly inversely host-density dependent across the spatial scales. Hyperparasitisation by C. psyllae was psyllid-density dependent at the site scale, however, this only impacted the rarer primary parasitod. High larval parasitoid mortality due to density dependent nymphal psyllid mortality (a consequence of resource limitation) compounded by a summer heat wave was incorporated in the assessment and resulted in density independence of host-parasitoid relationships. As such, high larval parasitoid mortality during insect herbivore outbreaks may contribute to the absence of host density dependent parasitisation during outbreak events. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article

  5. Sirovena Bouček (Pteromalidae: Pireninae), a new member of the fig wasp community associated with Ficus microcarpa (Moraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi; Xiao, Hui; Huang, Da-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Sirovena Bouček (Chalcidoidea: Pteromalidae, Pireninae) was known only from females of its type species, S. stigma Bouček, 1988. Males and host associations were both unknown. Both sexes of a second species of Sirovena, S. costallifera sp. nov., reared from Ficus microcarpa L. (Moraceae) in Yunnan, China, are described based on morphological characters and mitochondrial COI sequences. The males of S. costallifera show sexual dimorphism in body coloration, structure of the antennae and notauli, and body sculpture. Reliable host records of Pireninae are Cecidomyiidae (Diptera). Because midges also parasitize some figs, we speculate that S. costallifera is a parasitoid of some cecidomyiid midge that attacks fig syconia. A key to differentiate the two species is provided.

  6. Efecto de las aplicaciones aéreas de abamectin sobre Ageniaspis citricola (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae, parasitoide del minador de la hoja de los cítricos, en la provincia de Tucumán Effect of abamectin airplane applications on Ageniaspis citricola (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae, parasitoid of citrus leafminer, in Tucumán province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto S. Casmuz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Una de las herramientas biológicas más importantes para controlar al minador en las principales zonas productoras de cítricos de la Argentina es el parasitoide exótico Ageniaspis citricola. Sin embargo, el control químico sigue siendo la alternativa más utilizada por el productor. En nuestra provincia, en los últimos años se generalizó el uso de pulverizaciones aéreas de abamectin combinado con aceite mineral para controlar las poblaciones del minador de los cítricos, en un esquema de manejo que incluye muestreos periódicos para monitorear la fluctuación de Phyllocnistis citrella, A. citricola y la brotación del cultivo. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue evaluar el efecto de las pulverizaciones aéreas de abamectin sobre el parasitismo producido por A. citricola en las poblaciones del minador de la hoja de los cítricos. Para ello se analizaron cámaras pupales del minador y se comparó el porcentaje de parasitismo en quintas cítricas tratadas con abamectin y aquellas sin tratamiento para control del minador, ubicadas en la zona norte y sur de la provincia respectivamente. Los resultados de muestreos quincenales durante cuatro campañas cítricas indican que el parasitismo de A. citricola sobre P. citrella fue inferior en las quintas mantenidas bajo el esquema de aplicaciones aéreas de abamectin. Sin embargo, las diferencias significativas observadas en algunos casos no siempre podrían ser atribuidas a las aplicaciones de abamectin realizadas, tanto en la zona norte como sur de la provincia.The foreign parasitoid Ageniaspis citricola is one of the most important biological tools used to control citrus leafminer in the main citrus producing areas of Argentina. However, chemical control is still the alternative most widely used by growers. In our province, airplane sprays of abamectin mixed with mineral oil have become generalized in recent years to control citrus leafminer populations as part of a management program which

  7. A taxonomic investigation on egg parasitoid, Anagrus of rice planthopper in Zhejiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Exploitation and utilization of beneficial arthropods viz. insects and spiders to regulate pest populations has a good prospect in China. The role of non_rice habitats in maintaining the population of natural enemies of the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (stal) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) has been investigated in Zhejiang Province since 1994. The work focused primarily on the egg parasitoids genus Anagrus (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae). Plants laden with eggs of the brown planthopper were exposed 2 d every week in the rice fields and grassy areas dominated by Digitaria spp. Then, the plants were retrieved and brought back to the laboratory for parasitoid rearing. Newly emerged parasitoids were preserved in alcohol solution for further identification.

  8. A native and an introduced parasitoid utilize an exotic gall-maker host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryocosmus kuriphilus (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) is non-native to North America and induces formation of galls on petioles and leaves of all chestnut (Castanea spp., Fagales: Fagaceae). We investigated the interactions between the gall wasp D. kuriphilus, a native parasitoid, Ormyrus labotus (Hymenopt...

  9. Parasitoid Wasps in Flower Heads of Asteraceae in the Brazilian Cerrado: Taxonomical Composition and Determinants of Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, A R; Almeida-Neto, M; Almeida, A M; Fonseca, C R; Lewinsohn, T M; Penteado-Dias, A M

    2014-08-01

    This study provides the first survey of the parasitoid fauna reared in flower heads of Asteraceae in the Brazilian cerrado. We investigated the relative importance of herbivore richness and plant species commonness to differences in parasitoid species richness among the plant species. A total of 15,372 specimens from 192 morphospecies belonging to 103 genera of Hymenoptera were reared from the flower heads of 74 Asteraceae species. Chalcidoidea and Ichneumonoidea were the most common superfamilies, with Eulophidae and Braconidae as the main families of parasitoid wasps. Singletons and doubletons accounted for 45% of total parasitoid species richness. The number of parasitoid species per plant species ranged from 1 to 67, and the variation in parasitoid species richness among plants was mainly explained by the number of sites in which the plants were recorded. This study shows that there is a highly diversified fauna of Hymenoptera parasitoids associated with flower heads of Asteraceae in the Brazilian cerrado. Our findings suggest that the accumulation of parasitoid species on plants is mainly determined by the regional commonness of plant species rather than the number of herbivore species associated with the plants.

  10. Platigástridos (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae parasitoides de Pentatomidae en Córdoba. Caracterización de las masas de huevos parasitoidizadas y aspectos biológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma LA PORTA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se caracterizan las masas de huevos parasitoidizadas de pentatómidos per - tenecientes a cinco especies, cuatro fitófagas y una depredadora. Además, se analizan aspectos biológicos de esas oviposturas (abundancia y parasitoidismo y de sus para - sitoides (proporción sexual y emergencia: cinco especies de microhimenópteros plati - gástridos pertenecientes a los géneros Trissolcus Ashmead, Telenomus Haliday y Gryon Haliday . El análisis de las masas de huevos de pentatómidos en el campo apor ta indi - cadores exomorfológicos para determinar si están o no parasitoidizadas y, en algunos casos, conocer la especie de parasitoide emergente. Los altos niveles de parasitoidismo registrados en ambos sitios muestreados –Marcos Juárez y zona periurbana de Córdoba, sugieren que los parasitoides oófagos inciden de manera importante en las poblaciones de hemípteros presentes en el cultivo de soja. Las especies parasitoides mostraron una proporción de sexos marcadamente sesgada hacia las hembras, con un comportamiento similar respecto a cada huésped con el que interactuaron. Los porcentajes de emergencia resultaron más variables dependiendo de la especie parasitoide, del huésped y del sitio. El multiparasitoidismo fue registrado en todas las especies con excepción de Nezara viridula L. Telenomus podisi Ashmead fue el parasitoide común en las combinaciones observadas, resultando T. podisi-Trissolcus urichi Crawford la más frecuente.

  11. Description of the male of Psyllaephagus euphyllurae (Masi) (Hymenoptera, Encyrtidae), a parasitoid of the olive psylla, Euphyllura olivina (Costa) (Hemiptera, Liviidae), with notes on its reproductive traits and hyperparasitoids

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A colony of the encyrtid wasp Psyllaephagus euphyllurae (Masi) (Hymenoptera, Encyrtidae) has been established in the quarantine laboratory at the University of California, Riverside, California, USA as part of a classical biological control program against its invasive host, the olive psylla, Euphyllura olivina (Costa) (Hemiptera, Psylloidea, Liviidae), an important pest of olives in some parts of the world. The colony originators were reared from the same host found on abandoned, commercial ...

  12. Liriomyza Leafminer (Diptera: Agromyzidae) Parasitoid Complex in Different Agroecological Zones, Seasons, and Host Plants in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foba, C N; Salifu, D; Lagat, Z O; Gitonga, L M; Akutse, K S; Fiaboe, K K M

    2016-04-01

    Liriomyza leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are severe pests of vegetables and ornamentals worldwide. Previous studies revealed low leafminer parasitism across different agroecological zones in Kenya. The present paper reports on the composition of leafminer parasitoids at different elevations, in different seasons, and on different host crops. Surveys were conducted monthly from January to November 2012, and nine parasitoid species were recovered. Total mean parasitism in the study sites was 31.23 ± 1.03% from a total of 20 different vegetable Liriomyza-infested crops belonging to seven families. Diglyphus isaea (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), Phaedrotoma scabriventris, a newly released parasitoid, and Opius dissitus Muesebeck (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) were the most abundant at all elevations, accounting for 67.3, 18.6, and 9.2% of total parasitoids, respectively. Elevation, season, and host crop significantly affected the parasitoid species present and their abundance. Diglyphus isaea was more abundant at the high- and mid-elevations at all seasons compared with the low-elevation, whereas the lower-elevation favored higher abundance of P. scabriventris and O. dissitus during the long rainy season compared with the high- and mid-elevations at all seasons. Of all the host crops surveyed, parasitoids were more abundant on tomato, local kidney bean, snow pea and French bean than other crops. The total parasitism rate observed in this study suggests a considerable improvement in leafminer parasitism compared with previous surveys in Kenya. The implications of these findings for leafminer management in vegetable and ornamental production in Kenya are discussed.

  13. Parasitoidism Rate and Life Table Parameters of Aphytis diaspidis (Howard (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae and Hemiberlesia lataniae (Signoret (Hemiptera: Diaspididae Tasa de Parasitoidismo y Parámetros de Tabla de Vida de Aphytis diaspidis (Howard (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae y Hemiberlesia lataniae (Signoret (Hemiptera: Diaspididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Navea O

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Latania scale, Hemiberlesia lataniae (Signoret, has become a major pest of avocado (Persea americana Mill. in Chile and has reached high populations in the fruit because of limited natural control. The objective of this study was to identify the biological parameters of the parasitoid Aphytis diaspidis (Howard as a control agent of latania scale. Postembryonic development, parasitoidism rate, and life table parameters of the parasitoid and scale were determined under laboratory conditions. Aphytis diaspidis postembryonic development and parasitoidism rate varied significantly when evaluated on distinct latania scale stages with the highest survival (56% occurring at the third scale stage, it also had the shortest development time between egg and adult (19.14 d and the highest parasitoidism rate (66%. The intrinsic growth rate (r m was higher for A. diaspidis (r m = 0.099 than latania scale (r m = 0.068. These laboratory results demonstrated that A. diaspidis is an effective parasitoid for decreasing H. lataniae populations, especially in the third stage.La escama latania, Hemiberlesia lataniae (Signoret, se ha transformado en Chile en una plaga de importancia primaria en palto (Persea americana Mill., donde alcanza altas poblaciones en la fruta debido al escaso control natural existente. El objetivo del presente estudio fue conocer parámetros biológicos del parasitoide Aphytis diaspidis (Howard, como agente de control de la escama latania. Es asi como se determinó en laboratorio el desarrollo postembrionario, tasa de parasitoidismo, y parámetros de tabla de vida del parasitoide y la escama. El desarrollo postembrionario y la tasa de parasitoidismo de A. diaspidis varió significativamente al ser evaluado sobre distintos estadios de la escama latania, alcanzando el mayor porcentaje de supervivencia (56% sobre el tercer estadio de la escama, asi como el menor tiempo de desarrollo entre huevo y adulto (19,14 d y la máxima tasa de

  14. Location of Host and Host Habitat by Fruit Fly Parasitoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Rousse

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Augmentative releases of parasitoids may be a useful tool for the area-wide management of tephritid pests. The latter are parasitized by many wasp species, though only a few of them are relevant for augmentative biocontrol purposes. To date, nearly all the actual or potential biocontrol agents for such programs are egg or larval Opiinae parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae. Here, we review the literature published on their habitat and host location behavior, as well as the factors that modulate this behavior, which is assumed to be sequential; parasitoids forage first for the host habitat and then for the host itself. Parasitoids rely on chemical, visual, and mechanical stimuli, often strongly related to their ecology. Behavioral modulation factors include biotic and abiotic factors including learning, climatic conditions and physiological state of the insect. Finally, conclusions and perspectives for future research are briefly highlighted. A detailed knowledge of this behavior may be very useful for selecting the release sites for both inundative/augmentative releases of mass-reared parasitoids and inoculative releases for classical biocontrol.

  15. Population dispersal of parasitoid Coccobius azumai (Hymenoptera:Aphelinidae) introduced from Japan in Fujian pine forest of China%引进天敌花角蚜小蜂林间扩散的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈顺立; 张飞萍; 洪炳煌

    2011-01-01

    Parasitoid Coccobius azumai is an important biological agent against Hemiberlesia pitysophilahzd pine armored scale imported from Japan in the late 1980s and released in Fujian pine forest of China. This paper analyzed the dispersal ability, post-release parasitic ratio and the driving factors of parasitoid population using a series of observations in selected pine forests in Fujian Province of China for the period 2007-2009. The parasitoid population dispersed much slowly in the field and spread at an approximate velocity of 200 m per year. Even though jerk dispersal of the population was occasionally observed in the field experiment, generalized linear model analysis showed that a displacement dispersal trend which increased with the time of release. The interaction of forest stand and dispersal time significantly influenced population dispersal. High parasitoid release initially, ♀:♂=7: 1 mixture and release in the upper/middle forest slopes enhanced population dispersal. Linear regression analysis revealed that C. Azumai parasitic ratio on H. Pitysophila adult females significantly decreased with increasing distance from parasitoid population dispersal site. Parasitic ratios were 41.8%, 34.7%, 19.8%, 11.0% and 3.8% for initial release intervals of 0, 50 m, 100 m, 150 m and 200 m, respectively. No significant effects of the number of initial release and sex-mix pretreatment were observed on parasitic ratio at 100 m site. It suggested that interaction of high pest-controlling efficiency and low dispersal capability of parasitoid population was disadvantageous to parasitoid stability and sustaining in the field. The long-term efficient control was not sustainable for present releases in small geographic ranges. An effectively considerable measure was to release parasitoids at greater number of sites with reasonable spatial intervals in large geographic ranges, and periodically do so at logical time intervals. In order to fully utilize the parasitoids, useful

  16. Revision of the neotropical genus Sendaphne Nixon (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Fernandez-Triana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Neotropical genus of parasitoid wasps Sendaphne (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae is revised and the following six new species are described, all authored by Fernández-Triana and Whitfield: anitae, bennetti, broadi, dianariaspennae, penteadodiasae, and rogerblancoi. The greatest species richness is found in northern South America, but the genus extends north to 23° N in Mexico. Most species have been collected in rainforest below altitudes of 900 m, with only a few species found in cloud forests up to 1900 m. Nothing is known of the host caterpillars for these parasitoid wasps.

  17. Rapid Communication. Tamarixia monesus (Walker (Hym.: Eulophidae parasitoid of Bactericera tremblayi (Wagner, 1961 (Hemiptera: Triozidae in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfalizadeh Hossein

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bactericera tremblayi (Wagner, 1961 (Hemiptera: Triozidae is reported on Brassica oleracea var. capitata (Brassicaceae in northwestern Iran. Tamarixia monesus (Walker (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea, Eulophidae was reared for the first time on B. tremblayi, and compared with Tamarixia tremblayi, another parasitoid of B. tremblayi. This is a new record of T. monesus from the Middle East.

  18. Understanding biological control of greenhouse whitefly with the parasitoid Encarsia formosa. From individual behaviour to population dynamics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roermund, van H.J.W.

    1995-01-01

    The greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Homoptera, Aleyrodidae), is a very common, highly polyphagous pest insect all over the world. Biological control of whiteflies with the parasitoid Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera, Aphelinidae) was already applied in the 1920s in Engl

  19. A bodyguard or a tastier meal? Dying caterpillar indirectly protects parasitoid cocoons by offering alternate prey to a generalist predator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, J.A.; Weber, D.; De Clerq, P.; Gol, R.

    2013-01-01

    In some parasitic Hymenoptera the dying caterpillars remain attached or close to the parasitoid cocoons. It has been suggested that the caterpillars act as ‘bodyguards’ for the vulnerable cocoons and therefore protect them against predators and/or hyperparasitoids (the ‘usurpation hypothesis’). This

  20. Understanding biological control of greenhouse whitefly with the parasitoid Encarsia formosa : from individual behaviour to population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roermund, van H.J.W.

    1995-01-01

    The greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Homoptera, Aleyrodidae), is a very common, highly polyphagous pest insect all over the world. Biological control of whiteflies with the parasitoid Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera,

  1. A new species of solitary Meteorus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) reared from caterpillars of toxic butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Scott R; Jones, Guinevere Z

    2009-01-01

    A new species of parasitoid wasp, Meteorus rugonasus Shaw and Jones (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), is described from the Yanayacu Biological Station, Napo Province, Ecuador. The new species is diagnosed and compared to other species in the genus. It was reared from larvae of Pteronymia zerlina (Hewitson, 1855) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae) found feeding on leaves of Solanum (Solanaceae). The parasitoid is solitary. This is the first record of a Meteorus species attacking ithomiine Nymphalidae. A new species of parasitoid wasp, Meteorus rugonasus Shaw and Jones (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), is described from the Yanayacu Biological Station, Napo Province, Ecuador. The new species is diagnosed and compared to other species in the genus. It was reared from larvae of Pteronymia zerlina (Hewitson, 1855) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae) found feeding on leaves of Solanum (Solanaceae). The parasitoid is solitary. This is the first record of a Meteorus species attacking ithomiine Nymphalidae.

  2. Wolbachia infection in Cotesia sesamiae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) causes cytoplasmic incompatibility : implications for biological control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mochiah, M.B.; Ngi-Song, A.J.; Overholt, W.A.; Stouthamer, R.

    2002-01-01

    Cotesia sesamiae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is an indigenous, gregarious, larval endoparasitoid that attacks mid- to late-instar of the stem borer larvae. Although the parasitoid is distributed widely throughout Africa, not all local populations appear to be equally effective in controlling stem bore

  3. 栗山天牛幼虫天敌白蜡吉丁肿腿蜂的转主寄主研究%Alternative hosts of Sclerodermus pupariae ( Hymenoptera: Bethylidae),a larval parasitoid of the longhorn beetle Massicus raddei (Coleoptera:Cerambycidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐艳龙; 王小艺; 杨忠岐; 姜静; 王晓红; 吕军

    2012-01-01

    在利用白蜡吉丁肿腿蜂Sclerodermus pupariae防治世代周期长、发育整齐的害虫栗山天牛Massicus raddei中,我们发现该天敌只在寄主1-3龄幼虫时具有良好的寄生效果,而对3龄以上的中老龄幼虫基本不寄生.为了了解释放白蜡吉丁肿腿蜂后其种群能否在栎树林间延续下去,达到持续控制靶标害虫的效果,我们调查了其在栎树林间的转主寄主.结果表明:白蜡吉丁肿腿蜂除了寄生栗山天牛外,还能寄生双簇天牛Moechotypa diphysis、四点象天牛Mesosa myops和栎块斑吉丁Lamprodila virgata幼虫.白蜡吉丁肿腿蜂寄生不同转主寄主幼虫的成功率差异显著,对栎块斑吉丁和双簇天牛幼虫的寄生率最高,分别为76.67%和73.33%.寄生上述4种寄主时,其雌蜂在不同寄主上的产卵前期、产卵量及第2代雌蜂出蜂量、出蜂率、体长和寿命等差异不显著,只有幼虫期和蛹期历期及第2代雌蜂有翅率和雌雄性比略有差异.室内模拟林间寄生试验表明,白蜡吉丁肿腿蜂对双簇天牛和四点象天牛幼虫的寄生率较高.对双簇天牛和四点象天牛野外生活史研究发现,这2种天牛幼虫在白蜡吉丁肿腿蜂不适宜寄生的栗山天牛中老龄幼虫期、蛹期和成虫期均大量存在,表明双簇天牛和四点象天牛是白蜡吉丁肿腿蜂在栎树林中的主要转主寄主.本研究说明,在利用白蜡吉丁肿腿蜂生物防治栗山天牛中,白蜡吉丁肿腿蜂在林间寄生栗山天牛的1-3龄幼虫后,可转移寄生双簇天牛等转主寄主,以延续其种群,待下一代栗山天牛幼龄幼虫出现时再转移寄生栗山天牛,达到持续控制栗山天牛的防治效果.%During the study on a biocontrol program by releasing a parasitoid, Sclerodermus pupariae Yang et Yao ( Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) , for control of Massicus raddei ( Blessig) ( Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) , a wood borer with long generation period and developmental

  4. Reproductive capacities and development of a seed Bruchid beetle, Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus, a potential host for the mass rearing of the parasitoid, Dinarmus basalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effowe, T Q; Amevoin, K; Nuto, Y; Mondedji, D; Glitho, I A

    2010-01-01

    The reproductive capacities and development of the seed beetle Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus (Schaeffer) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), found in Togo, were determined under natural conditions in a Guinean zone for its use as a substitute host for the mass rearing of the parasitoid Dinarmus basalts Rond (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), a biological agent for the control of beetles that are pests of cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walpers (Fabales: Fabaceae). Population dynamics at the field level; and survival, fecundity and offspring production by A. macrophthalmus under laboratory conditions were measured when fed on its natural plant-host Leucaena leucocephala (Lamark) deWit (Fabales: Mimosaceae). The data resulting from the laboratory study were used to calculate the demographic parameters of A. macrophthalmus by establishing its fertility and life tables. Contrary to cultivated leguminous food plants, L. leucocephala is a perennial sub-spontaneous leguminous plant whose pods are available year round. Although A. macrophthalmus was present in nature throughout the year, its infestation rate of the pods fluctuated according to the phenology of the plant. The maximum infestation of L. leucocephala pods was observed between August and December. Four larval stages and one pupal stage of A. macrophthalmus were identified in the laboratory. The total mean development time varied on average 33.75 ± 2.87 days on the mature pods and 33.39 ± 2.02 days on seeds. The adult female lived from one to two weeks. During its life time, the female laid an average of 62.3 ± 19 and 43.1 ± 13 eggs on the mature pods and seeds respectively and produced an average of 36.7 ± 11.3 offspring on the mature pods and 21.8 ± 8.4 offspring on seeds. On seeds, the net reproduction rate was 5.88 females per female and the intrinsic rate of population increase 0.051 per day. The generation time was 34.59 days and the doubling time 13.59 days. The demographic parameters of A. macrophthalmus in this

  5. 引进花角蚜小蜂成虫的寿命和羽化节律%Longevity and emergence rhythm of adult parasitoids of Coccobius asumai Tachikawa(Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae)introduced from Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈顺立; 张飞萍; 洪炳煌

    2011-01-01

    A series of feeding experiment and regular observation were conducted in laboratory to explore the effects of diet and temperature on the longevity of Coccobius azumai adults and their temporal rhythm of emergence.Diet had significant effects on the longevity of the adults.Without any diet supply, the mean longevity of the females and males was 1.5 d; but with the supplement of 20% honey water and of 20% honey water + fresh pine needles, the mean longevity reached 14.8 d and 11.3 d, and 17.3 d and 12.3 d, respectively.Temperature also played an important role on the longevity of the adults fed with 20% honey water.At 23 ℃ and 26 ℃, the longevity of the females and males was obviously longer; while at 32 ℃, the longevity was the shortest.At same temperatures, the mean longevity of the females was significantly longer than that of the males.In their circadian cycle, most of the females emerged from 11:00 to 15:00, but most males emerged from 9:00 to 12:00.Few females emerged after 18:00, and few males after 17:00.Most of the adult parasitoids enclosed from July to September.The amount of emerged adults peaked in July, and showed a fluctuant and descending trend in the subsequent August and September.Over 80% of the emerged adults were female in most days, and the males were always fluctuating in a low level in this period.A separate experiment showed that in the collection of the adult parasitoids, cloth shed was more superior to paper box.This study showed that limited energy was conserved in the parasitoids before adult emergence, and thus, supplementing suitable diet to newly emerged adults before release was necessary for prolonging their longevity and improving the efficiency of biological control.In Fujian and Guandong of China, there would be some potential disadvantage factors against the continuation of the parasitoid population, e.g., high temperature in summer, lack of temporal synchronization between the adult parasitoid females and their

  6. Hymenopterous parasitoids attacking Acanthiophilus helianthi Rossi (Diptera: Tephritidae pupae in Kohgiluyeh Safflower farms of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Saeidi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Safflower capsule fly (SCF, Acanthiophilus helianthi Rossi (Diptera: Tephritidae is the most destructive insect pest attacking the Safflower Carthamus tinctorius L. plant which are cultivated as an oil crop. It is mainly controlled through application of broad-spectrum insecticides, which can adversely affect safflower farms ecosystem and consequently human health. Since a first step in setting up an integrated pest management program is to assess the biological control agents within the ecosystem. Therefore, in this research work the pupal parasitoids of Safflower capsule fly a main insect pest attacking Safflower plants were identified. The impact of these parasitoids against this pest was evaluated on the varying pest generations and within different locations in Kohgiluyeh province during 2008-2009 seasons. Pupal parasitoid adults of SCF were recorded from fieldreared pupae, which had been collected from heavily infested small flower heads of the first generation as well from large flower heads of the second and third generations. Rate of parasitism on A. helianthi pupae was estimated as the number of parasitoids over the total count of parasitoids and flies. Ten hymenopterous species belonging to different families parasitizing insect pupae were screened as follows: Bracon hebetor (Spinola, 1808 and Bracon luteator (Spinola, 1808 (Braconidae; Isocolus tinctorious (Melika and Gharaei, 2006 (Cynipidae; Pronotalia carlinarum (Szelenyi and Erdos, 1951 (Eulophidae; Eurytoma acroptilae (Zerova, 1986 (Eurytomidae; Ormyrus orientalis (Walker, 1871 (Ormyridae; Colotrechnus viridis (Masi, 1921 and Pteromalus sp. (Walker, 1976 (Pteromalidae; and Antistrophoplex conthurnatus (Zerova, 2000 and Microdontomenus annulatus (Masi, 1899 (Torymidae. The average parasitization rate was 23±1 as revealed through the present study. The highest parasitization rate occurred during the first generation in all localities tested, as well as in years. Statistical

  7. Los Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera) asociados con agallas de Cinípidos (Hymenoptera, Cynipidae) en la Comunidad de Madrid

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Information about the chalcid wasp parasitoid community (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea) associated with galls of Cynipidae in Madrid (Spain) is compiled and updated. Studied material includes more than 1000 published and unpublished records from samplings in 80 sites in the Madrid region carried out over twenty three years by the research team. A check-list of 121 species, 19 of them provisionally identified, from 6 families of Chalcidoidea is provided as follows: 26 Eurytomidae, 27 Torymidae, 9 ...

  8. Selection of Trichogramma strains and determination of number of parasitoids to be released to control Gymnandrosoma aurantianum Lima (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae); Selecao de linhagens de Trichogramma (Hymenoptera, Trichogrammatidae) e determinacao do numero de parasitoides a ser liberado para o controle de Gymnandrosoma aurantianum Lima (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, Rosa Maria da Silva; Parra, Jose Roberto Postali [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia, Fitopatologia e Zoologia Agricola], e-mail: rmsmolina@ig.com.br, e-mail: jrpparra@esalq.usp.br

    2006-12-15

    In order to select Trichogramma strains to control G. aurantianum, the biological characteristics of 13 Trichogramma species/strains were evaluated. After selection, the ideal number of T. pretiosum (G18 strain) to be released per G. aurantianum egg was determined in greenhouse tests. The selection test for species/strains was carried out in an incubator adjusted to 25 +- 1 deg C, RH 70 +- 10%, and a 14 h photo phase. The ideal number of parasitoids was estimated in cages covered with a piece of voile-type fabric. The cycle duration for the 13 Trichogramma species/strains varied from 10.2 to 11.9 days. The Atp strain (T. atopovirilia) showed greater parasitism capacity, with an average of 23.3 parasitized eggs and 77.5% parasitism in 24 hours. The G18 strain (T. pretiosum) came next, with an average of 16.8 parasitized eggs and 56.1% parasitism during the same time interval. The emergency, longevity of males, and sex ratio for the 13 species/strains were similar. The number of adults emerged per egg was 1.8 for strains G11 (T. pretiosum) and Br10 (T. bruni), which were different from the G3 strain (T. pretiosum) only, with 1.3 adults per egg. With regard to female longevity, distinct values were observed only between T. pretiosum strains Tp and L2, with 6.3 and 9.3 days, respectively. Under greenhouse conditions, the estimated ratio of 36 T. pretiosum parasitoids per G. aurantianum egg allowed the highest percentage of parasitism (89%). Therefore, Trichogramma spp. has a potential to control G. aurantianum, as long as a large number of parasitoids is released per unit area. (author)

  9. Estrutura da comunidade de moscas-das-frutas (Diptera: Lonchaeidae e Tephritidae) e seus parasitoides (Hymenoptera) relacionados a espécies de plantas em uma policultura orgânica no município de Paraibuna - SP

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    As espécies de plantas disponíveis em uma comunidade, sua estrutura e abundância são elementos cruciais que influenciam nas dinâmicas e interações de populações de insetos herbívoros, uma vez que definem a base de recursos e refletem na interação com outras populações de insetos herbívoros, como predadores e parasitoides. Estudos relacionados às moscas-das-frutas concentram-se em levantamentos de espécies, em especial aquelas consideradas pragas, e abordam principalmente os padrões populacion...

  10. Improvement in the cold storage of Aphidius ervi (Hymenoptera: Aphidiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Frère

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological control is beginning to be more commonly used, especially in greenhouses. The inundatory release of insects, especially parasitoids, requires a thorough knowledge of their biology and of mass-rearing techniques. Moreover, to synchronize releases with host presence, the parasitoids have to be kept in cold storage. However, cold storage may lead to a decrease in the viability of the parasitoids, in particular their survival, mobility and sex ratio. The aim of this study was to determine the best temperature at which to keep parasitoid mummies in cold storage. The parasitoid Aphidius ervi Haliday (Hymenoptera, Braconidae and two of its host aphids, Sitobion avenae and Acyrthosiphon pisum, were used. It is concluded that the mummies can be kept for a maximum of two weeks at 7 °C without emergence of adults and for seven weeks at 2 °C without emergence or mortality. Moreover, storage of the mummies at 7 or 2 °C does not affect fertility. However, parasitoid pupae in A. pisum mummies suffered a higher mortality and took longer to complete their development. The practical implications of these results are discussed.

  11. KEANEKARAGAMAN HYMENOPTERA PARASITIKA PADA TIPE EKOSISTEM BERBEDA DI BANGKA TENGAH, KEPULAUAN BANGKA BELITUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Marta Saputra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of parasitic Hymenoptera in different ecosystem types in Central Bangka, Bangka-Belitung Islands. Hymenoptera richness is dominated by parasitic species. More than 80% of Hymenoptera play a role as parasitoid on arthropods that are mostly insects. Diversity of parasitic Hymenoptera is widely studied in various types of terrestrial ecosystems including agro-ecosystem and non-agro-ecosystem. This study aimed to invent and compare the diversity of parasitic Hymenoptera in three different ecosystems, i.e., forest, oil palm plantation, and ex-tin mining. The location was located in Central Bangka Regency, Bangka Island. The study was conducted in Juli 2014 until October 2015. Parasitic Hymenoptera was collected with insect sweep net and yellow pan trap on one transect line with 1000 m length. Parasitic Hymenoptera were found on forest as much as 732 morphospecies, 326 morphospecies on oil palm plantations, and 293 morphospecies on ex-tin mining. Diversity and abundance of parasitic Hymenoptera on forest was higher than oil palm plantation and ex-tin mining area. Braconidae family was found dominant on forest, however on oil palm plantation and extin mining area the dominant family was Scelionidae.

  12. Use of molecular identification techniques for the study of parasitoids of the chestnut gall wasp

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The chestnut gall wasp Dryocosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu (Hymenoptera, Cynipidae) is considered as a major pest of Castanea species worldwide. A three-year monitoring of the indigenous parasitoids of this pest was performed by collecting specimens inside the galls. Each specimen was processed by molecular analysis. DNA was analysed by amplification and sequencing of the COI gene, coding for cytochrome c oxydase subunit 1. Each sequence was compared with reference sequences from adults sampled i...

  13. Evaluación de algunos insecticidas para el control de la «polilla del tomate», Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae y su efecto residual sobre el parasitoide Trichogrammatoidea bactrae (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María B. RIQUELME VIRGALA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La «polilla del tomate», Tuta absoluta (Meyrick, es una plaga clave de este cultivo en Argentina. Su manejo integrado debería incluir una selección de productos fitosanitarios que sean eficaces para su control y, al mismo tiempo, selectivos respecto de sus enemigos naturales. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la capacidad de control de los insecticidas triflumurón, clorfenapir, abamectin y una cepa experimental de Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt sobre la plaga, y el poder residual de los mismos sobre Trichogrammatoidea bactrae Nagaraja. Se registró la mortalidad de la polilla cada cuatro días, desde la aplicación hasta la emergencia de los adultos. El efecto sobre el parasitoide, se evaluó a través del número de huevos parasitados por hembra expuesta durante 48 horas a folíolos tratados, y su mortalidad luego de 1, 3, 7, 14 y 30 días de la pulverización. Todos los productos ocasionaron una mortalidad de T. absoluta mayor al 65% después de 12 días de aplicados. El Bt fue el único insecticida que no afectó la supervivencia y el parasitismo de T. bactrae . Estos resultados aportan información de interés para la selección de plaguicidas, a emplearse en programas de manejo integrado.

  14. Relationships between parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Opiinae), fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) and their host plants based on 16S rRNA, 12S rRNA, and ND1 gene sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, N. J.; Md-Zain, B. M.; Yaakop, S.

    2013-11-01

    Opiinae is among the l0 largest subfamilies under the family Braconidae. Opiines species have great potential as natural enemies against fruit fly pests. Before using them as a biological control agent, construction of the phylogenetic trees could facilitate in the molecular identification of individual species and their relationships among members of the Opiines, as well as between Opiines and their host plants. Larval specimens of tephritids were collected from four crop species at five localities throughout the Peninsular Malaysia. A total of 44 specimens of opiines had successfully emerged from the hosts, fruit fly larvae. The DNA sequences of 12S and 16S rRNA were obtained for the braconids while the mitochondrial ND1 sequences were obtained for the tephritids species through polymerase chain reaction. Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian trees were constructed by using PAUP 4.0b10 and MrBayes 3.1.2 to identify the relationships among the taxa. This study illustrates the phylogenetic relationships among parasitoid opiines collected and reared from parasitized fruit flies. The phylogenetic trees constructed based on the mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA sequences exhibited similar topology and sequence divergence. The opiines were divided into several clades and subclades according to the genus and species. Each clade also was supported by the similar host plants with high support values. However, their pests were not specific, except for Bactrocera cucurbitae. This study has reconfirmed the associations between Opiinae, tephritids, and host plants based on molecular data.

  15. Trade-Off Between Fitness Gain and Cost Determines Profitability of a Peach Aphid Parasitoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Diwas; He, Xiong Z; Wang, Qiao

    2016-08-01

    Aphidius colemani (Viereck) (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) is commercially produced and utilized for biological control of peach aphid Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) on greenhouse crops in many countries. To provide knowledge for the evaluation of parasitoid-host interactions and development of effective mass rearing programs, we investigated how and why host age or size affected fitness gain in A. colemani We show that the parasitoid was significantly more likely to encounter larger hosts and that an encounter almost always triggered an attack attempt. However, the attack attempt did not proportionally translate into oviposition because larger aphids had greater ability to defend themselves and the parasitoid spent more time in handling larger aphids. The host age at parasitization had no effect on emergence rates and sex ratio of parasitoid progeny, suggesting that pupae and larvae have similar survival rate in hosts of different ages and/or the parasitoid females do not adjust sex allocation based on host size. When parasitizing mid-aged hosts, the parasitoid gained maximum fitness for their progeny in developmental period, body size, and parasitism. Taking all findings together, we suggest that parasitizing mid-aged green peach aphid nymphs is most profitable for A. colemani. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Description of two techniques to increase efficiency in processing and curating minute arthropods, with special reference to parasitic Hymenoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe and illustrate two techniques for enhancing curatorial and processing efficiency as it pertains to parasitic Hymenoptera (Chalcidoidea, Cynipoidea). These techniques were developed in response not only to the massive number of parasitoids that have been acquired through our and others’ ...

  17. First records of parasitoids attacking the Asian citrus psyllid in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego E. Portalanza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT First records of parasitoids attacking the Asian citrus psyllid in Ecuador. The objective of the current study was to investigate the presence of natural enemies of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae (the Asian citrus psyllid in Ecuador. Incidence of parasitoid Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae was assessed between November 2015 and March 2016, in Letamendi, Febres-Cordero and Tarqui, urban districts of Guayaquil. Highest incidence of parasitism occurred in those regions and seasons of the year with the highest temperatures commensurate with increase of citrus plant shoots. Similar to their host, these parasitoids appear to have established in Ecuador by accident, and were not the result of purposeful introduction. This fortuitous introduction is a potentially helpful tool in controlling the Asian citrus psyllid, and potentially Huanglongbing.

  18. Geographic distribution, large-scale spatial structure and diversity of parasitoids of the seed-feeding beetle Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A; Haga, E B; Costa, V A; Rossi, M N

    2016-10-21

    Bruchine beetles are highly host-specific seed feeders during the larval stage. Although some specific parasitoid families have been recorded attacking bruchine beetles, most studies have been done at small spatial scales. Therefore, the current knowledge about the diversity and the geographic distribution of parasitoid species parasitizing bruchines is scarce, especially at a wide geographic area that extends over large distances through a latitudinal cline (i.e. large-scale spatial structure). The present study determined the species richness and evenness of parasitoids attacking the bruchine beetle Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus feeding on Leucaena leucocephala seeds, examined their geographic distribution, and characterized the large-scale spatial structure in parasitoid species composition. A total of 1420 parasitoids (all Hymenoptera) belonging to four families, five subfamilies and eight species were collected (genera: Horismenus, Paracrias, Urosigalphus, Stenocorse, Chryseida, Eupelmus). Most parasitoid species showed wide spatial distribution, high evenness in species abundance and the species richness estimators were close to stabilization (approximately eight species). Overall, greater similarity was observed in the species composition of plant populations near to each other than those farther apart, revealing a large-scale spatial structure in parasitoid species composition.

  19. Effects of local vegetation and plantation age for the parasitoid Asecodes mento-a biocontrol agent in organic strawberry fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johan A.Stenberg

    2012-01-01

    The parasitoid Asecodes mento (Walker,1839) (Hymenoptera:Eulophidae)is the most important biocontrol agent of the strawberry leaf beetle Galerucella tenella (L.) (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae) in northern Europe.Here,I investigated whether natural parasitism in organic strawberry plantations was affected by the presence of the alternative host plant meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria),and whether parasitism rates differed between plantations of different ages (6 to 79 years).I also investigated whether parasitoid brood size,body size and sex ratio differed between the two host plants in the field.Parasitism was very low (0%) in newly established plantations and increased to a plateau (~40%) in fields where strawberries had been grown for approximately 20 years or longer.Such an extended colonization process is unacceptable for commercial growers.It would thus be desirable to find a method to catalyze parasitoid population buildup in young plantations.Parasitoid brood sizes were larger in beetles collected from meadowsweet,while body size and sex ratio did not differ between parasitoids collected from the two plants.These findings suggest that meadowsweet can export parasitoids to neighboring strawberry fields.Although this is a possibility,I did not find any significant differences in parasitism rates between isolated strawberry fields and fields adjacent to meadowsweet stands,indicating that effects of local vegetation are small on parasitism rates.Releasing parasitoids in newly established strawberry plantations may be a better strategy for quickly obtaining high parasitism than intercropping with meadowsweet.

  20. Demonstration of long-term memory in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurmann, D.; Sommer, C.; Schinko, A.P.B.; Greschista, M.; Smid, H.M.; Steidle, J.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the formation of protein synthesis-dependent long-term memory (LTM) in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), a parasitoid of fly pupae. Female wasps were trained in one of five different training procedures in the presence of hosts and the odour cinnam

  1. Novos modelos de armadilhas de emergência para captura de parasitoides de ovos endofíticos New models of emergence traps for endophytic egg parasitoids capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Souza Santos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Para estudos de seleção de linhagens de inimigos naturais provenientes do campo, de comportamento ou mesmo de taxonomia, a captura de insetos vivos é de grande importância. Uma das alternativas para obtenção de parasitoides (Hymenoptera adultos é a utilização de armadilhas de emergência. Sendo assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi propor dois modelos de armadilhas de emergência (armadilhas do tipo "caixa" e "garrafa", para obtenção de parasitoides vivos de ovos endofíticos. Os dois modelos de armadilhas propostas foram eficientes na captura de parasitoides vivos. Entretanto, foi observada uma maior captura de espécimes na armadilha do tipo "caixa" em relação à do tipo "garrafa", decorrente de uma maior armazenagem de folíolos no interior desta. A utilização de cada um dos modelos dependerá do tipo de pesquisa a ser realizada, do custo/benefício da sua confecção e da quantidade de parasitoides necessários para realização do estudo.For strain selection studies of natural enemies from the field, studies of behavior or even of taxonomy, capture of alive insects are of great importance. One alternative for obtaining adult parasitoids (Hymenoptera is the use of emergency traps. Therefore, the objective of this work was to propose two models of emergency traps (traps like "box" and "bottle", for obtaining alive endophytic egg parasitoids. The two models proposed were efficient in the capture of alive parasitoids, however a larger capture of specimens was observed in the "box" trap in relation to the e "bottle", due to larger folioles storage inside the same. The use of each one of the models will depend on the research which is being accomplished, the cost/benefit to built it, the amount parasitoids necessary to accomplish the study.

  2. Whitefly parasitoids: distribution, life history, bionomics, and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong-Xian; Stansly, Philip A; Gerling, Dan

    2015-01-07

    Whiteflies are small hemipterans numbering more than 1,550 described species, of which about 50 are agricultural pests. Adults are free-living, whereas late first to fourth instars are sessile on the plant. All known species of whitefly parasitoids belong to Hymenoptera; two genera, Encarsia and Eretmocerus, occur worldwide, and others are mostly specific to different continents. All parasitoid eggs are laid in-or in Eretmocerus, under-the host. They develop within whitefly nymphs and emerge from the fourth instar, and in Cales, from either the third or fourth instar. Parasitized hosts are recognized by conspecifics, but super- and hyperparasitism occur. Dispersal flights are influenced by gender and mating status, but no long-range attraction to whitefly presence on leaves is known. Studies on En. formosa have laid the foundation for behavioral studies and biological control in general. We review past and ongoing studies of whitefly parasitoids worldwide, updating available information on species diversity, biology, behavior, tritrophic interactions, and utilization in pest management.

  3. Evaluating the quality of the Mexican fruit-fly, Anastrepha ludens, as host for the parasitoid Melittobia digitata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. González

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the presence of Melittobia digitata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae and its associations with its natural hosts in Veracruz, Mexico. The parasitoid was confirmed to be present and found to attack prepupae of Trypoxylon and Sceliphron (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae and Sphecidae, respectively mud daubers as well as pupae of the Mexican fruit fly Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae. Since A. ludens is a very important pest of citrus and mango in Mexico and Central America, we evaluated, in laboratory experiments, the quality of A. ludens as host of M. digitata comparing the development of the parasitoid in another unrelated fly species (Sarcophaga [Neobellieria] bullata (Diptera: Sarcophagidae and in mud dauber wasps (Trypoxylon sp. and Sceliphron sp.. The Mexican fruit fly appears to be a good-quality host for M. digitata, and the results are discussed in the context of their possible interest as a natural enemy of A. ludens.

  4. Inventario de los parasitoides de Liriomyza spp. (Diptera: Agromyzidae) en la región sur de Honduras

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Se presenta un inventario de 25 especies de parasitoides (Hymenoptera) que atacan a tres especies de minadores foliares (Liriomyza) en tres departamentos de la región sur de Honduras. La especie predominante fue Liriomyza sativae. criada de 25 especies de cultivos y plantas silvestres. Las infestaciones de L. sativae fueron mayores en cultivos de Cucurbitaceae, Solanaceae y Fabaceae, y en las plantas silvestres Kallstroemia maxima (Zygophyllaceae) y Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae). Se detall...

  5. Inter and intra-guild interactions in egg parasitoid species of the soybean stink bug complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujii Edison Ryoiti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the parasitism behavior of Telenomus podisi Ashmead, Trissolcus basalis (Wollaston e Trissolcus urichi Crawford (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae on eggs of Nezara viridula L., Euschistus heros F., Piezodorus guildinii Westwood and Acrosternum aseadum Rolston (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae, in no choice and multiple choice experiments. For all parasitoid species, the results demonstrated the existence of a main host species that maximizes the reproductive success. The competitive interactions among the parasitoid species were investigated in experiments of sequential and simultaneous release of different combinations of parasitoid pairs on the hosts N. viridula, E. heros and A. aseadum. Exploitative competition was observed for egg batches at the genus level (Telenomus vs. Trissolcus and interference competition at the species level (T. basalis vs. T. urichi. Trissolcus urichi was the most aggressive species, interfering with the parasitism of T. basalis. Generally, T. basalis showed an opportunistic behavior trying to parasitise eggs after T. urichi had abandoned the egg batch. The selection of parasitoid species for use in augmentative biological control programs should take into account the diversity of pentatomids present in soybean in addition to the interactions among the different species of parasitoids.

  6. Biological Control of Tortricidae in Tea Fields in Japan Using Insect Viruses and Parasitoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madoka Nakai

    2009-01-01

    Tea is a perennial and evergreen plant. Cultivated tea trees provide a habitat for insect pests and their natural enemies. In Japan, granuloviruses (GVs) have successfully controlled two of the most important pests of tea, Adoxophyes honmai and Homona magnanima (Tortricidae: Lepidoptera). The GVs are produced in vivo and a single application sustains pesticidal efficacy throughout a year, which encompasses 4 to 5 discrete generations of both species. A. honmai and H. magnanima also have various natural enemies, especially hymenopteran parasitoids. Such resident natural enemies also play a role in reducing the pest density in virus-controlled fields, but the effect of virus infection on parasitoids sharing the same host larva has not been well studied. Survival of one of the major parasitoids ofA. honmai, Ascogaster reticulata (Braconidae: Hymenoptera), is reduced by virus infection of the host. Viruses, including GV and entomopoxvirus (EPV), and certain koinobiont endoparasitoids, including A. reticulata, are both known to regulate host endocrinology. However, the GV and EPV have distinct host regulation mechanisms, and consequently have different impacts on the survival of A. retuculata, when A. reticulata parasitizes a host that is infected with either GV or EPV. These additional effects on host regulation displayed by both viruses and parasitoids affect the outcome of virus-parasitoid interactions.

  7. Temperature dependent functional response of Diaeretiella rapae (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) to the cabbage aphid, Brevicoryne brassicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moayeri, Hamid R. S.; Madadi, Hossein; Pouraskari, Hossein;

    2013-01-01

    Diaeretiella rapae MacIntosh (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) is one of the most common and successful parasitoids of the cabbage aphid. The functional response of D. rapae towards cabbage aphids was examined in laboratory studies at three constant temperatures, 17°C, 25°C and 30°C. D. rapae exhibited...

  8. Trophic relationships between predators, whiteflies and their parasitoids in tomato greenhouses: a molecular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Ripoll, R; Gabarra, R; Symondson, W O C; King, R A; Agustí, N

    2012-08-01

    The whiteflies Bemisia tabaci Gennadius and Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) are two of the main pests in tomato crops. Their biological control in Mediterranean IPM systems is based on the predators Macrolophus pygmaeus (Rambur) and Nesidiocoris tenuis Reuter (Hemiptera: Miridae), as well as on the parasitoids Eretmocerus mundus (Mercet) and Encarsia pergandiella Howard (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae). These natural enemies may interact with each other and their joint use could interfere with the biological control of those whitefly pests. Analysis of predator-prey interactions under field conditions is therefore essential in order to optimize whitefly control. Species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-primers were designed to detect DNA fragments of these whiteflies and parasitoids within both predator species in tomato greenhouses. We demonstrated that both predators feed on both whitefly species, as well as on both parasitoids under greenhouse conditions. Prey molecular detection was possible where prey abundance was very low or even where predation was not observed under a microscope. Whitefly DNA detection was positively correlated with adult whitefly abundance in the crop. However, a significant relationship was not observed between parasitoid DNA detection and the abundance of parasitoid pupae, even though the predation rate on parasitoids was high. This unidirectional intraguild predation (predators on parasitoids) could potentially reduce their combined impact on their joint prey/host. Prey molecular detection provided improved detection of prey consumption in greenhouse crops, as well as the possibility to identify which prey species were consumed by each predator species present in the greenhouse, offering a blueprint with wider applicability to other food webs.

  9. Occurrence of Dinarmus basalis in Callosobruchus analis in stored soybean in São Paulo, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Costa,Valmir Antonio; Guzzo,Élio César; Lourenção, André Luiz; Tavares,Márcio Aurélio Garcia Correia; Vendramim,José Djair

    2007-01-01

    Callosobruchus analis (F.) is considered an important pest in several countries in Africa, Asia and Oceania. It has been observed infesting seeds belonging to 15 Leguminosae genera, including peanut, bean, chickpea, pea, cowpea, and soybean. One of its main natural enemies is the parasitoid Dinarmus basalis (Rondani) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), whose control efficiency has already been demonstrated in several studies. This paper records the occurrence of C. analis and its parasitoid, D. basa...

  10. Seletividade de Lecanicillium lecanii (Zimm. Zare & W. Gams (classe-forma: Hyphomycetes ao parasitóide Trichogramma atopovirilia Oatman & Platner, 1983 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae Selectivity of Lecanicillium lecanii (Zimm. Zare & W. Gams (class-form: Hyphomycetes to the parasitoid Trichogramma atopovirilia Oatman & Platner, 1983 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Pin Dalvi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se no presente trabalho, as características biológicas de Trichogramma atopovirilia em ovos de Spodoptera frugiperda sob influência do fungo Lecanicillium lecanii, com o objetivo de verificar, em laboratório, se este entomopatógeno é seletivo ao parasitóide. Os estudos foram desenvolvidos no setor entomologia do Núcleo de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico em Manejo Fitossanitário "NUDEMAFI". Os indicativos de seletividade adotados foram: número de ovos parasitados, porcentagem de emergência (viabilidade, número de indivíduos por ovo, razão sexual e longevidade das fêmeas que parasitaram. Nenhum desses parâmetros foi afetado pelo fungo, levando à conclusão de que o mesmo é seletivo a T. atopovirilia, possibilitando ser conveniente a utilização simultânea de ambos os agentes de controle biológico no Manejo Integrado de Pragas.The present work studied the biological characteristics of Trichogramma atopovirilia in eggs of Spodoptera frugiperda under influence of the fungus Lecanicillium lecanii, with the aim of verifing in laboratory if this entomopathogenic fungus is selective to the parasitoid. The studies were carried out in the entomology sector of Nucleus of Scientific & Technological Development in Phytossanitary Management (NUDEMAFI. The indicatives of selectivity adapted used were: number of parasited eggs, emergency percentage (viability, number of individuals for egg, sex ratio and longevity of the females that parasited. None of these parameters were affected by the fungus, leading to the conclusion that the same is selective to T. atopovirilia, possibiliting the simultaneous utilization of both agents of biological control into the Integrated Management of Pests.

  11. THE PARASITOID Anastatus sp. (EUPELMIDAE-HYMENOPTERA ACTION ON Dirphia rosacordis WALKER, 1855 (SATURNIIDAE-LEPIDOPTERA EGGS IN ”PEQUI” (Caryocar brasiliense CAMBESS AÇÃO DO PARASITÓIDE Anastatus sp. (EUPELMIDAE - HYMENOPTERA EM OVOS DE Dirphia rosacordis WALKER, 1855 (LEPIDOPTERA - SATURNIIDAE EM PEQUIZEIRO (Caryocar brasiliense CAMBESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Henrique Garcia

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The action of parasitoid Anastatus sp. on eggs of D. rosacordis, common for defoliating “pequizeiro” (Caryocar brasiliense Cambess, was studied on eggs collected in the field and eggs obtained in laboratory. Eggs were collected in Hidrolândia, Senador Canedo and Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil. In these regions, D. rosacordis shows two generations: September and December. To obtain eggs, a D. rosacordis colony was maintained on pequi leaves over the egg mass obtained in the laboratory and kept under controlled temperature, relative humidity and photoperiod. Among 1,346 eggs obtained in laboratory conditions, 44.3% were parasitized, 40.2% were viable and 15.4 % were not viable. From 697 eggs collected in the field, 25.5% were parasitized, 58.9% were viable and 15.6% were not viable. Adult emergency was observed among 83,4% of parasitized eggs. These data suggest the possibility of using this parasitoid for the pequi caterpillar control, which also causes serious damage on Eucalyptus sp., mainly in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    KEY-WORDS: Anastatus; parasitoid; egg.

    A ação do parasitóide Anastatus sp. sobre os ovos da D. rosacordis, importante desfolhadora do pequizeiro (Caryocar brasiliense Cambess, foi estudada em

  12. 菜蛾绒茧蜂和小菜蛾对杀虫剂的敏感性及酶学特性的比较研究%Susceptibility to insecticides and enzymetic characteristics in the parasitoid Apanteles plutellae Kurdj.(Hymenoptera:Braconidae) and its host Plutella xylostella (L.)( Lepidoptera:Yponomeutidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴刚; 江树人

    2004-01-01

    The susceptibility to insecticides in the larval parasitoid Apanteles plutellae Kurdjumov (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)and its host Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae),collected in Fuzhou, China, were detected using residual film and leaf-dip bioassays, respectively. The results showed that organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, avermectins and fipronil were highly toxic to A. plutellae, but chlorfluazuron and Bt were not. However, A. plutellae could survive from the conventional control doses of fipronil, fenvalerate, cypermethrin and acephate if the parasitoid was left in contact with the insecticides only for short time ( 1 h). In A. plutellae, there were obvious synergisms of piperonyl butoxide ( PB), triphenyl phosphate (TPP) and diethyl maleate (DEM) on methamidophos, carbofuran, fenvalerate, cypermethrin, avermectins and fipronil, but no synergisms on chlorfluazuron were found. The synergism of PB was the highest. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE)activity could not be inhibited by PB, TPP and DEM, but strong inhibition could be found in carboxylesterase (CarE) activity by PB and TPP, and in glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity by DEM, in vivo. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant ( Km ),the maximal velocity (Vmax) of AChE, and the activities of CarE and GST in A. plutellae were 0.22, 2.08, 4.60 and 0.45-fold as those in P. xylostella, respectively. The bimolecular rate constants (Ki ) of AChE to methamidophos, dichlorvos and carbofuran in A. plutellae were 14.7, 10.5 and 26.0-fold as those in P. xylostella, respectively. High inhibition of AChE was found in both species when being incubated with insecticides at high temperature, especially in A. plutellae. The results indicated that the high susceptibilities to organophosphates and carbametes in A. plutellae were related to its high sensitivity of AChE to the insecticides, and the oxidative metabolism might be more effective in tolerance to insecticides than non-oxidative metabolism in A

  13. Revision of Khoikhoiinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sharkey

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The species of the two genera of Khoikhoiinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae are revised. Thirteen species are recognized, of which five are new and eight were previously described: Khoikhoia anthelion Sharkey, sp. n., K. lission Mason, 1984, K. oligospilos Sharkey, sp. n., K. semiadusta Mason, 1983, K. solata Mason, 1983, K. townesi Mason, 1983, K. turneri Mason, 1984, Sania browni Sharkey, sp. n., S. capensis Mason, 1983, S. henryi Mason, 1983, S. marjoriae Mason, 1983, S. masneri Sharkey, sp. n., and S. masoni Sharkey, sp. n.. All are from the Cape Region of South Africa, and all but one species are confined to the western Cape. A dichotomous key to species is presented; links to electronic interactive keys and to distribution maps are also included. Based on phylogenetic position and morphological characters, speculations on life history are made, and it is suggested that some species may be parasitoids of wood- or stem-boring Lepidoptera. The DELTA data matrix and images for the key are available at 10.3897/zookeys.20.108.app.1.ik; Intkey files are available at 10.3897/zookeys.20.108.app.2.ik; Lucid files in LIF and SDD format are available at doi:10.3897/zookeys.20.108.app.3.ik and doi:10.3897/zookeys.20.108.app.4.ik. Publishing of DELTA raw data will facilitate future workers to edit keys and to add newly discovered taxa.

  14. Electrophysiological and Behavioral Responses of Theocolax elegans (Westwood) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) to Cereal Grain Volatiles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Germinara, Giacinto Salvatore; De Cristofaro, Antonio; Rotundo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    ..., and different doses of three individual compounds previously identified in cereal grain odors were investigated in Y-tube olfactometer and Petri dish arena behavioral bioassays and electroantennogram recordings...

  15. Courtship and mating behaviour of interspecific Nasonia hybrids (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae) : A grandfather effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukeboom, L.W.; Assem, J. van den

    2001-01-01

    Nasonia courtship behaviour includes easily quantifiable, stereotyped components. We analysed displays of N. vitripennis × N. longicornis hybrid males. Most of them performed well-organised displays that were intermediate between the parental species. However, in both reciprocal crosses, a significa

  16. Four new species of Pteromalus Swederus (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Pteromalidae) and redescriptions of three other species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijswijt, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    A key to the European species of the Pteromalus altus group is presented. The relationship between this group and species of the genus Euphorbia (Euphorbiaceae) is confirmed. One new species: P. villosae, associated with Euphorbia villosa Waldst. & Kit.is presented. Two new species of the albipennis

  17. Duration of plant damage by host larvae affects attraction of two parasitoid species (Microplitis croceipes and Cotesia marginiventris) to cotton: implications for interspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawo, Tolulope; Fadamiro, Henry

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by herbivore-damaged plants can guide parasitoids to their hosts. The quantity and quality of VOC blends emitted by plants may be affected by the duration of plant damage by herbivores, which could have potential ramifications on the recruitment of competing parasitoids. We used two parasitoid species, Microplitis croceipes and Cotesia marginiventris (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), to address the question of whether duration of plant damage affects parasitoid use of plant VOCs for host location. Both wasp species are larval endoparasitoids of Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), an important pest of cotton. Attraction of the two parasitoid species to odors emitted by undamaged (UD), fresh (6 h infestation) damage (FD), and old (24 h infestation) damage (OD) cotton plants infested by H. virescens larvae was investigated using a headspace volatile collection system coupled with four-choice olfactometer bioassay. Both sexes of M. croceipes showed a preference for FD- and OD-plant odors over UD-plants. On the other hand, more C. marginiventris females were attracted to UD- and FD-plants than to OD-plants. GC/MS analyses showed qualitative and quantitative differences in the VOC profiles of UD, FD, and OD-plants, which may explain the observed preferences of the parasitoids. These results suggest a temporal partitioning in the recruitment of M. croceipes and C. marginiventris to H. virescens-damaged cotton, and may have potential implications for interspecific competition between the two parasitoid species.

  18. Comparative GC-EAD responses of a specialist (Microplitis croceipes) and a generalist (Cotesia marginiventris) parasitoid to cotton volatiles induced by two caterpillar species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngumbi, Esther; Chen, Li; Fadamiro, Henry Yemisi

    2009-09-01

    Plants emit volatile blends that may be quantitatively and/or qualitatively different in response to attack by different herbivores. These differences may convey herbivore-specific information to parasitoids, and are predicted to play a role in mediating host specificity in specialist parasitoids. Here, we tested the above prediction by using as models two parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) of cotton caterpillars with different degree of host specificity: Microplitis croceipes, a specialist parasitoid of Heliothis spp., and Cotesia marginiventris, a generalist parasitoid of caterpillars of several genera including Heliothis spp. and Spodoptera spp. We compared GC-EAD (coupled gas chromatography electroantennogram detection) responses of both parasitoid species to headspace volatiles of cotton plants damaged by H. virescens (a host species for both parasitoids) vs. S. exigua (a host species for C. marginiventris). Based on a recent study in which we reported differences in the EAG responses of both parasitoids to different types of host related volatiles, we hypothesized that M. croceipes (specialist) would show relatively greater GC-EAD responses to the herbivore-induced plant volatile (HIPV) components of cotton headspace, whereas C. marginiventris (generalist) would show greater response to the green leaf volatile (GLV) components. Thirty volatile components were emitted by cotton plants in response to feeding by either of the two caterpillars, however, 18 components were significantly elevated in the headspace of H. virescens damaged plants. Sixteen consistently elicited GC-EAD responses in both parasitoids. As predicted, C. marginiventris showed significantly greater GC-EAD responses than M. croceipes to most GLV components, whereas several HIPV components elicited comparatively greater responses in M. croceipes. These results suggest that differences in the ratios of identical volatile compounds between similar volatile blends may be used by specialist

  19. Occurrence of Eretmocerus mundus Mercet (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae parasitizing Bemisia tabaci (Genn. biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Lourenção

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The parasitism of Bemisia tabaci (Genn. biotype B nymphs on cotton plants was observed during a research on resistance of cotton genotypes to this whitefly. The experiment was set in a greenhouse at the Experimental Station of the Instituto Agronômico (IAC, in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil. Samples of the parasitized nymphs were collected and maintained in laboratory to monitor the parasitism and obtain the adult parasitoids. A total of 129 adult parasitoids were obtained, including one Encarsia inaron (Walker, 13 En. lutea (Masi, and 115 Eretmocerus mundus Mercet (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae. This is the first report of Er. mundus in Brazil.

  20. Metagenomic analysis of microbial community of a parasitoid wasp Megaphragma amalphitanum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Nedoluzhko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of multicellular organisms coexist with bacterial symbionts that may play various roles during their life cycle. Parasitoid wasp Megaphragma amalphitanum (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae belongs to the smallest known insects whose size is comparable with some bacteria. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS, we described microbiota diversity for this arthropod and its potential impact on their lifecycle. Metagenomic sequences were deposited to SRA database which is available at NCBI with accession number SRX2363723 and SRX2363724. We found that small body size and limited lifespan do not lead to a significant reduction of bacterial symbionts diversity. At the same time, we show here a specific feature of microbiota composition in M. amalphitanum – the absence of the Rickettsiaceae family representatives that are known to cause sex-ratio distortion in arthropods and well represented in other populations of parasitoid wasps.

  1. Egg parasitoids of Taosa spp. (Hemiptera: Dictyopharidae in Formosa, Argentina, with descriptions of two new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serguei V. TRIAPITSYN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se revisaron los parasitoides oófagos (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae y Platygastridae de Taosa (Cuernavaca longula Remes Lenicov (Hemiptera: Dictyopharidae y se presenta una clave para su identificación. Este dictiofárido se alimenta de camalote, Eichhornia crassipes (Martius Solms-Laubach, y fue colectado en Formosa, Argentina, donde algunos de sus huevos estaban parasitados. Se describen dos especies nuevas: Aprostocetus (Ootetrastichus taosae Triapitsyn, sp. nov. (Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae y Telenomus formosanus Triapitsyn, sp. nov. (Platygastridae: Telenominae. La última especie, que pertenece al grupo crassiclava de especies de Telenomus Haliday, también ataca los huevos de Taosa sp. sobre Pontederia subovata (Seubert Lowden. Estos son los primeros parasitoides oófagos registrados para el género Taosa Distant.

  2. NATIVE LARVAL PARASITOIDS ASSOCIATED WITH TUTA ABSOLUTA (MEYRICK) IN GREENHOUSE TOMATO CROPS OF SOUTHERN SARDINIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannini, M; Atzori, F; Pisci, R; Sanna, F

    2014-01-01

    Since its first detection in Sardinia (Italy), Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) has been reported as a major pest of greenhouse tomatoes. In recent years, however, a tendency toward a progressive reduction of tomato borer infestation levels has been observed. The reasons behind this decline are probably diverse, including both the increase in growers' ability to manage the pest and the adaptation of native predators and parasitoids to the new prey/host. In order to assess the species composition of the parasitoid complex associated with T. absoluta larvae in Sardinian greenhouse tomatoes, a two-year (2010/11) survey was conducted in one of the island's major horticultural areas (Pula, Cagliari). An estimate of the levels of parasitism caused by native wasps was also carried out. The occurrence of larval parasitoids of T. absoluta was detected in approximately half of the crops monitored. The average parasitism rate recorded in tomato plants infested by tomato borer larvae was 1.3%. Moreover, while no parasitism was observed in 76.4% of the samples collected, only 3.0% of the samples showed a parasitism rate exceeding 10%. The highest rates were recorded in spring and summer, with a peak in July (4.8%). Of 159 adult parasitoids recovered from infested leaves, 62.9% were found to belong to a Necremnus sp. near artynes (Walker), 34.6% to a Necremnus sp. near tidius (Walker), and 2.5% to Neochrysocharis formosa (Westwood) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae). These results show that some native parasitoids have adapted to T. absoluta in the study area. Although parasitoid abundance in tomato crops appeared to be low, their contribution for the control of tomato borer infestation could possibly be enhanced through the application of conservation biological control measures.

  3. Mating and host density affect host feeding and parasitism in two species of whitefly parasitoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Sheng Zang; Tong-Xian Liu; Fan Zhang; Shu-Sen Shi; Fang-Hao Wan

    2011-01-01

    The parasitoids in the genera of Encarsia and Eretmocerus(Hymenoptera:Aphelinidae)are important biological control agents of whiteflies,and some of them not only parasitize hosts but also kill them with strong host-feeding capacity.Two whitefly parasitoid species,Encarsia sophia and Eretmocerus melanoscutus were examined to determine if mating and host density affected their host feeding and parasitism.The whitefly host,Bemisia tabaci,was presented to these two wasp species in densities of 10,20,30,40,50 and 60 third-instar nymphs per clip cage.Mated whitefly parasitoid females fed on more hosts than unmated females under a range of host densities(under all six host densities for En.sophia; under the densities of 40 nymphs or more for Er.melanoscutus).Meanwhile,mated females parasitized more whitefly nymphs than unmated females under all host densities for both species.With increase of host density,mated or unmated Er.melanoscutus females killed more hosts by host feeding and parasitism.Mated En.sophia females killed more hosts by host feeding with increase of host density,whereas unmated females did not parasitze whitefly nymphs at all.Our results suggest that only mated female parasitoids with host-feeding behavior should be released in crop systems to increase their bio-control efficiency.

  4. Parasitoid wasps new to Britain (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae, Eurytomidae, Braconidae & Bethylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Notton

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One genus and five species are recorded as new to Britain: Fidiobia, Fidiobia hispanica, Macroteleia bicolora (Platygastridae; Sycophila binotata (Eurytomidae; Schizoprymnus collaris (Braconidae; and Laelius pedatus (Bethylidae. Keys to British Macroteleia and Laelius are provided. Provisional synonymy is proposed between Macroteleia minor and M. brevigaster, and synonymy is proposed between Laelius femoralis, L. microneurus and L. nigricrus. The possible mode of introduction of Sycophila binotata is discussed. A lectotype is designated for Schizoprymnus collaris.

  5. 伊朗粉虱寄生蜂种类记述(膜翅目:广腹细蜂科、姬小蜂科、蚜小蜂科)%A Contribution to the Iranian Platygastridae, Eulophidae and Aphelinidae (Hymenoptera) as the parasitoids of whiteflies (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hassan; Ghahari; 黄建; Shaaban; Abd-Rabou; Hadi; Ostovan; 王竹红

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with 25 species of the families Platygastridae, Eulophidae and Aphelinidae as the parasitoids of whiteflies for Iranian fauna. Among these parasitoids, 15 asterisk species are newly recorded from Iran.%本文报道了伊朗寄生粉虱的25种寄生蜂,分别隶属于膜翅目的广腹细蜂科、姬小蜂科和蚜小蜂科,其中15种寄生蜂种类为伊朗的分布新纪录(标有*号者).

  6. Identification of Key Plant-Associated Volatiles Emitted by Heliothis virescens Larvae that Attract the Parasitoid, Microplitis croceipes: Implications for Parasitoid Perception of Odor Blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawo, Tolulope; Fadamiro, Henry

    2016-11-01

    Herbivores emit plant-associated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) after feeding on plants. These plant-associated VOCs can be used by parasitoids to locate their hosts. It is hypothesized that certain compounds play key roles in the attractiveness of host-associated odor blends. The larval parasitoid, Microplitis croceipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and its herbivore host, Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a major pest of cotton plant were used as model species to identify key compounds mediating attraction of parasitoids to hosts. Comparative GC/MS analyses of cotton-fed vs. artificial diet-fed hosts indicated that 12 of 17 compounds in the headspace of H. virescens larvae were exclusive to plant-fed hosts, and thus considered to be plant-associated. In order to identify key attractive compounds, a full blend of 15 commercially available synthetic compounds was modified by removing each of the 10 plant-associated compounds emitted by host larvae. In Y-tube olfactometer bioassays testing parasitoid responses to modified blends, 1-octen-3-ol, decanal, (E)-β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, α-farnesene, and β-pinene were identified as key compounds contributing to attractiveness of the natural blend of VOCs emitted by cotton-fed hosts. The results showed that while various host-associated compounds act in concert to serve as useful host location cues, only a fraction of the natural blend mediates attraction in parasitoids. Furthermore, the role of a compound is better assessed in the context of other compounds, and odor blends are better perceived as a whole rather than as individual components.

  7. El género Lysaphidus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae en la Península Ibérica

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    Sanchís Segovia, A.

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Lysaphidus Smith, 1944 (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae is recorded for the first time from the Iberian Peninsula represented by two species: L. arvensis Stary, 1960, first record for the Iberian Peninsula, and L. santolinae n. sp., both of them parasitoids of Coloradoa Wilson,1910 genus (Homoptera, Aphididae. The mummies were collected on Santolina chamaecyparissus L. and Santolina rosmarinifolia L. (Asteraceae.Se detecta la presencia del género Lysaphidus Smith, 1944 (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae en la Península Ibérica, representado por dos especies, L. arvensis Stary, 1960, nueva cita para la Peninsula Ibérica y L. santolinae n. sp., parasitoides ambos del género Coloradoa Wilson, 1910 (Homoptera, Aphididae, cuyas momias fueron recolectadas sobre Santolina chamaecyparissus L. y Santolina rosmarinifolia L. (Asteraceae.

  8. Host instar susceptibility and selection and interspecific competition of three introduced parasitoids of the mealybug Paracoccus marginatus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekare, Kaushalya G; Mannion, Catharine M; Epsky, Nancy D

    2010-10-01

    Three previously introduced parasitoids (Acerophagus papayae Noyes and Schauff, Anagyrus loecki Noyes and Menezes, and Pseudleptomastix mexicana Noyes and Schauff [Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae]) of the mealybug Paracoccus marginatus Williams and Granara de Willink (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) were studied for their host instar susceptibility and sex ratio, host instar selection, and interspecific competition in the laboratory. All three parasitoids were able to develop in the second instars, third-instar females, and adult females of P. marginatus. No progeny emerged from first-instar mealybugs. The proportion of female emergence was increased with increasing host size. Parasitoids selected their host instars for oviposition when they had a choice. Between second- and third-instar hosts, A. papayae and P. mexicana had significantly higher parasitism in second-instar mealybugs, whereas A. loecki had higher parasitism in the third-instar mealybugs. When competed with either one or two parasitoid species, A. papayae was significantly more successful in second-instar hosts and A. loecki was significantly more successful in third-instar mealybugs. P. mexicana was significantly less competitive when with A. papayae in both second and third instars, with A. loecki in third instars and with both A. papayae and A. loecki in second and third instars. Overall, A. papayae provided a better control of the host, when present singly or with the other two parasitoids. This information is important in evaluating the efficiency of A. papayae, A. loecki, and P. mexicana and understanding the outcome of their recovery and establishment in field studies conducted in Florida.

  9. Coccophagus scutellaris (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae): A Highly Effective Biological Control Agent of Soft Scale Insects (Hemiptera: Coccidae) in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Shaaban Abd-Rabou

    2011-01-01

    About 953000 individuals of the cosmopolitan parasitoid, Coccophagus scutellaris (Dalman) (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae), were released and evaluated during 2009-2010 for the control of the following soft scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccidae) infesting the following economic crops in Egypt: Ceroplastes rusci on citrus in Beni Seuf, Ceroplastes floridensis Comstock on citrus in Gharbiya, Coccus hesperidum L. on guava in Giza, Pulvinaria floccifera (Westwood) on mango in Sharqiya, Pulvinaria psidii...

  10. Aphaereta sp. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Alysiinae) as a natural enemy to Peckia chrysostoma (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Sarcophagidae), in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, C H; Pereira, L A; Filho, O M

    2003-02-01

    This paper reports the first occurence of the parasite Aphaereta sp. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Alysiinae) which was collected from Peckia chrysostoma pupae (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) by means of traps containing some fish baits in a wood area close to the Agronomy college (Faculdade of Agronomia) in Itumbiara, Goiás, in the period from March to September, 2001. A total of 362 gregarious specimens of parasitoids from 26 pupae of P. chrysostoma. Aphaereta sp. was collected, with several individuals emerging from the same pupae.

  11. Lepidopterans and their parasitoids on okra plants in Riberão Preto (SP, Brazil Lepidópteros e seus parasitoides em cultura de quiabo em Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil

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    Rogéria Inês Rosa Lara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the defoliating lepidopterans and their parasitoids occurring on okra plants in the district of Riberão Preto city (SP. Brazil. Caterpillars were collected by hand from an experimental field of okra, in March and April, 2009. They were placed individually on Petri dishes lined with wet filter paper, containing shredded okra leaves, and kept in a climactic chamber (25±1°C, 12:12h light/dark photoperiod, RH 70±10% until the emergence of lepidopterans and/or parasitoids. In all, 63 lepidopterans were obtained: three species of Noctuidae, Anomis flava (Fabricius, Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith and Pseudoplusia includens (Walker; one of Pieridae, Ascia monuste orseis (Godart, and an unidentified species of Tortricidae. One unidentified tachinid fly (Diptera and the Hymenoptera parasitoids Copidosoma floridanum (Ashmead (Encyrtidae and Euplectrus sp. (Eulophidae emerged from A. flava, while C. floridanum and an unidentified tachinid, from P. includens. This is the first report of an association between the herbivores S. frugiperda, P. includens and A. monuste orceis, the parasitoids C. floridanum and Euplectrus sp. on okra plants.Este estudo objetivou identificar lepidópteros desfolhadores e seus parasitoides em cultura de quiabo em Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil. As lagartas foram coletadas através de catação manual entre março e abril de 2009, individualizadas em placas de Petri forradas com papel filtro umedecido contendo pedaços de folhas de quiabo e mantidas sob condições controladas (25±1°C, 12 horas de fotofase, 70±10% de UR até a obtenção dos adultos de lepidópteros e/ou de seus parasitoides. Foram obtidos 63 adultos de lepidópteros: três espécies de Noctuidae, Anomis flava (Fabricius, Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker, uma de Pieridae, Ascia monuste orseis (Godart e uma de Tortricidae não identificada. Uma espécie não identificada de taquinídeo (Diptera e os

  12. Description of a new species of Anagyrus Howard (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Encyrtidae), a promising biological control agent of the invasive Madeira mealybug, Phenacoccus madeirensis Green (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameshkumar, A; Noyes, J S; Poorani, J; Chong, J H

    2013-01-01

    Anagyrus amnestos sp. n. (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), a promising parasitoid of the invasive Madeira mealybug, Phenacoccus madeirensis Green (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), is described based on material collected from India. This parasitoid was identified as Anagyrus sp. nov. nr. sinope Noyes & Menezes in recent literature, and was initially collected in Georgia, USA. It was found to be a specific parasitoid of the Madeira mealybug and its biological attributes and potential as a biological control agent of this pest were studied. In what appears to be a case of fortuitous introduction, we detected this parasitoid in large numbers on Madeira mealybugs from the southern Indian state of Karnataka, where the mealybug is a recently introduced invasive pest. In view of its economic importance as a potential biological control agent of the Madeira mealybug, it is formally described and illustrated here. Comparative accounts of the new species vis-a-vis its close relatives in India and the Americas are provided.

  13. Intraguild interactions between two egg parasitoids of a true bug in semi-field and field conditions.

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    Ezio Peri

    Full Text Available Research on interspecific competitive interactions among insect parasitoids has often been characterized by laboratory studies in which host insects are exposed to female parasitoids of different species in various sequences and combinations. In the last years, an increasing number of studies have investigated interspecific interactions under field and semi-field conditions although just a few number of works focused on egg parasitoids. In this work, we undertook a two-year study to investigate interspecific interactions between Trissolcus basalis (Wollaston (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae and Ooencyrtus telenomicida (Vassiliev (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae, two egg parasitoids of the pest Nezara viridula (L. (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae that co-occur in cultivated crops. Under semi-field (in out-door mesh cages and field conditions, we investigated: 1 the seasonal occurrence of competing parasitoid species on sentinel egg masses; 2 the impact achieved by competing species on the shared host on naturally laid egg masses; 3 the outcome of intraguild interactions under controlled conditions. Results from sentinel egg masses showed that T. basalis occurs in May and successfully parasitizes hosts until the end of September/beginning of October, whereas O. telenomicida is mainly occurring in July-August. In both years, it was found that T. basalis is predominant. From naturally laid egg masses, results indicated that T. basalis achieves higher impact on the hosts, even in those egg masses which are parasitized by more than one female of different species ( =  multiparasitism. Results from manipulating intraguild interactions showed that T. basalis achieves higher impact on N. viridula when released alone, but it suffers from competition with O. telenomicida. The ecological factors that play a role in intraguild interactions in the context of biological control perspective are discussed.

  14. Fitness of Encarsia sophia(Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae)parasitizing Trialeurodes vaporariorum and Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Luo; Tong-Xian Liu

    2011-01-01

    Fitness and efficacy of Encarsia sophia(Girault & Dodd)(Hymenoptera:Aphelinidae)as a biological control agent was compared on two species of whitefly(Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)hosts,the relatively smaller sweetpotato whitefly,Bemisia tabaci(Gennadius)biotype 'B',and the larger greenhouse whitefly,Trialeurodes vaporariorum(Westwood).Significant differences were observed on green bean(Phaseolus vulgaris L.)in the laboratory at 27± 2℃,55% ± 5% RH,and a photoperiod of 14 : 10 h(L : D).Adult parasitoids emerging from T.vaporariorum were larger than those emerging from B.tabaci,and almost all biological parameters of E.sophia parasitizing the larger host species were superior except for the developmental times of the parasitoids that were similar when parasitizing the two host species.Furthermore,parasitoids emerging from T.vaporariorum parasitized more of these hosts than did parasitoids emerging from B.tabaci.We conclude that E.sophia reared from larger hosts had better fitness than from smaller hosts.Those from either host also preferred the larger host for oviposition but were just as effective on smaller hosts.Therefore,larger hosts tended to produce better parasitoids than smaller hosts.

  15. Wolbachia in two populations of Melittobia digitata Dahms (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Claudia S.; Sivinski, John [United States Dept. of Agriculture, Gainesville, FL (United States). Center for Medical, Agriculture and Veterinary Entomology]. E-mails: cclaudia@bioinf.uni-leipzig.de; john.sivinski@ars.usda.gov; Matthews, Robert W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Entomology]. E-mail: rmatthew@uga.edu; Gonzalez, Jorge M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Entomology]. E-mail: jmgonzalez@neo.tamu.edu; Aluja, Martin [Instituto de Ecologia A.C., Veracruz (Mexico)]. E-mail: martin.aluja@inecol.edu.mx

    2008-11-15

    We investigated two populations of Melittobia digitata Dahms, a gregarious parasitoid (primarily upon a wide range of solitary bees, wasps, and flies), in search of Wolbachia infection. The first population, from Xalapa, Mexico, was originally collected from and reared on Mexican fruit fly pupae, Anastrepha ludens Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae); the other, from Athens, Georgia, was collected from and reared on prepupae of mud dauber wasps, Trypoxylon politum Say (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae). PCR studies of the ITS2 region corroborated that both parasitoid populations were the same species; this potentially provides a useful molecular taxonomic profile since females of Melittobia species are superficially similar. Amplification of the Wolbachia surface protein gene (wsp) confirmed the presence of this endosymbiont in both populations. Sequencing revealed that the Wolbachia harbored in both populations exhibited a wsp belonging to a unique subgroup (denoted here as Dig) within the B-supergroup of known wsp genes. This new subgroup of wsp may either belong to a different strain of Wolbachia from those previously found to infect Melittobia or may be the result of a recombination event. In either case, known hosts of Wolbachia with a wsp of this subgroup are only distantly related taxonomically. Reasons are advanced as to why Melittobia - an easily reared and managed parasitoid - holds promise as an instructive model organism of Wolbachia infection amenable to the investigation of Wolbachia strains among its diverse hosts. (author)

  16. A new species of Crinibracon Quicke (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) parasitic on pupae of Hasora chromus (Cramer) (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankita; Achterberg, Cornelis Van; Chitrala, Malathi

    2016-08-29

    A new species, Crinibracon chromusae Gupta & van Achterberg sp. n., parasitic on pupae of Hasora chromus (Cramer) (Hesperiidae) on Millettia (= Pongamia) pinnata (L.) Panigrahi (Fabaceae), is described from India and compared with C. sinicus (Yang, Chen & Liu, 2008) from China, the only other species known with a similar general appearance. For the first time biological information for the genus Crinibracon Quicke, 1988, is given. Three species of hyperparasitoids, Philolema braconidis (Ferrière) (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae), Nesolynx javanica Ferrière (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), and an Eupelmus sp. (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae) emerged along with C. chromusae sp. n. from pupae of H. chromus. The generic placement of this new species along with interesting parasitoid biology is discussed.

  17. Relationship between oviposition, virulence gene expression and parasitism success in Cotesia typhae nov. sp. parasitoid strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoist, R; Chantre, C; Capdevielle-Dulac, C; Bodet, M; Mougel, F; Calatayud, P A; Dupas, S; Huguet, E; Jeannette, R; Obonyo, J; Odorico, C; Silvain, J F; Le Ru, B; Kaiser, L

    2017-09-22

    Studying mechanisms that drive host adaptation in parasitoids is crucial for the efficient use of parasitoids in biocontrol programs. Cotesia typhae nov. sp. (Fernández-Triana) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a newly described parasitoid of the Mediterranean corn borer Sesamia nonagrioides (Lefebvre) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Braconidae are known for their domesticated bracovirus, which is injected with eggs in the host larva to overcome its resistance. In this context, we compared reproductive success traits of four Kenyan strains of C. typhae on a French and a Kenyan populations of its host. Differences were found between the four strains and the two most contrasted ones were studied more thoroughly on the French host population. Parasitoid offspring size was correlated with parasitism success and the expression of bracovirus virulence genes (CrV1 and Cystatin) in the host larva after parasitism. Hybrids between these two parasitoid strains showed phenotype and gene expression profiles similar to the most successful parental strain, suggesting the involvement of dominant alleles in the reproductive traits. Ovary dissections revealed that the most successful strain injected more eggs in a single host larva than the less successful one, despite an equal initial ovocyte number in ovaries. It can be expected that the amount of viral particles increase with the number of eggs injected. The ability to bypass the resistance of the allopatric host may in consequence be related to the oviposition behaviour (eggs allocation). The influence of the number of injected eggs on parasitism success and on virulence gene expression was evaluated by oviposition interruption experiments.

  18. Plant-associated odor perception and processing in two parasitoid species with different degrees of host specificity: Implications for host location strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prithwiraj; Morawo, Tolulope; Fadamiro, Henry

    2017-08-01

    Microplitis croceipes and Cotesia marginiventris (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) are parasitoids of lepidopteran larvae with different degrees of host specificity. Both parasitoid species rely on host-related plant volatiles as odor cues to locate their herbivore hosts. To better understand mechanisms of odor processing in parasitoids, we tested responses of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the antennal sensilla placodea of female parasitoids to select plant volatiles and mixtures. The compounds tested include two green leaf volatiles (i.e., cis-3-hexenol and hexanal) and three herbivore-induced plant volatiles (i.e., cis-3-hexenyl butyrate, cis-3-hexenyl acetate and linalool). Single-sensillum recording showed that the test compounds elicited activity in large and small amplitude neurons housed in the short sensilla placodea of both parasitoid species. In general, C. marginiventris showed greater OSN responses to a low dose while M. croceipes showed greater responses to a high dose of test compounds. Binary mixtures of cis-3-hexenol and linalool inhibited OSN activity in M. croceipes, but not in C. marginiventris. These differences may have implications for odor discrimination in the two parasitoid species. In addition, anterograde neurobiotin stainings were performed to map glomerular projections of OSNs in the antennal lobe of the parasitoids. In M. croceipes, a mixture of cis-3-hexenol and linalool inhibited activity of the glomerulus activated by cis-3-hexenol alone. In C. marginiventris, a mixture of cis-3-hexenol and cis-3-hexenyl acetate showed intense labeling in their respective glomeruli, possibly suggesting a synergistic interaction. These differences in detection and coding of single compounds and mixtures may impact host location strategies in the two parasitoid species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A gross anatomy ontology for hymenoptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Yoder

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera is an extraordinarily diverse lineage, both in terms of species numbers and morphotypes, that includes sawflies, bees, wasps, and ants. These organisms serve critical roles as herbivores, predators, parasitoids, and pollinators, with several species functioning as models for agricultural, behavioral, and genomic research. The collective anatomical knowledge of these insects, however, has been described or referred to by labels derived from numerous, partially overlapping lexicons. The resulting corpus of information--millions of statements about hymenopteran phenotypes--remains inaccessible due to language discrepancies. The Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology (HAO was developed to surmount this challenge and to aid future communication related to hymenopteran anatomy. The HAO was built using newly developed interfaces within mx, a Web-based, open source software package, that enables collaborators to simultaneously contribute to an ontology. Over twenty people contributed to the development of this ontology by adding terms, genus differentia, references, images, relationships, and annotations. The database interface returns an Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO formatted version of the ontology and includes mechanisms for extracting candidate data and for publishing a searchable ontology to the Web. The application tools are subject-agnostic and may be used by others initiating and developing ontologies. The present core HAO data constitute 2,111 concepts, 6,977 terms (labels for concepts, 3,152 relations, 4,361 sensus (links between terms, concepts, and references and over 6,000 text and graphical annotations. The HAO is rooted with the Common Anatomy Reference Ontology (CARO, in order to facilitate interoperability with and future alignment to other anatomy ontologies, and is available through the OBO Foundry ontology repository and BioPortal. The HAO provides a foundation through which connections between genomic, evolutionary developmental

  20. A gross anatomy ontology for hymenoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Matthew J; Mikó, István; Seltmann, Katja C; Bertone, Matthew A; Deans, Andrew R

    2010-12-29

    Hymenoptera is an extraordinarily diverse lineage, both in terms of species numbers and morphotypes, that includes sawflies, bees, wasps, and ants. These organisms serve critical roles as herbivores, predators, parasitoids, and pollinators, with several species functioning as models for agricultural, behavioral, and genomic research. The collective anatomical knowledge of these insects, however, has been described or referred to by labels derived from numerous, partially overlapping lexicons. The resulting corpus of information--millions of statements about hymenopteran phenotypes--remains inaccessible due to language discrepancies. The Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology (HAO) was developed to surmount this challenge and to aid future communication related to hymenopteran anatomy. The HAO was built using newly developed interfaces within mx, a Web-based, open source software package, that enables collaborators to simultaneously contribute to an ontology. Over twenty people contributed to the development of this ontology by adding terms, genus differentia, references, images, relationships, and annotations. The database interface returns an Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) formatted version of the ontology and includes mechanisms for extracting candidate data and for publishing a searchable ontology to the Web. The application tools are subject-agnostic and may be used by others initiating and developing ontologies. The present core HAO data constitute 2,111 concepts, 6,977 terms (labels for concepts), 3,152 relations, 4,361 sensus (links between terms, concepts, and references) and over 6,000 text and graphical annotations. The HAO is rooted with the Common Anatomy Reference Ontology (CARO), in order to facilitate interoperability with and future alignment to other anatomy ontologies, and is available through the OBO Foundry ontology repository and BioPortal. The HAO provides a foundation through which connections between genomic, evolutionary developmental biology

  1. Developmental time, longevity, and lifetime fertility of three introduced parasitoids of the mealybug Paracoccus marginatus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekare, Kaushalya G; Mannion, Catharine M; Epsky, Nancy D

    2012-10-01

    Developmental time, longevity, and lifetime fertility of three previously introduced parasitoids (Acerophagus papayae Noyes and Schauff, Anagyrus loecki Noyes and Menezes, and Pseudleptomastix mexicana Noyes and Schauff) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) of the mealybug Paracoccus marginatus Williams and Granara de Willink (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) were studied in the laboratory to understand the outcome of their recovery in field studies conducted in the United States. The developmental time of both male and female A. papayae and A. loecki was shorter than the developmental time of male and female P. mexicana. Male parasitoids of all three species had a shorter developmental time than their females. All parasitoids had a shorter developmental time in adult-female mealybugs than in second instars. Mating status (unmated and mated) had no effect on the male longevity. Unmated and mated females that were not allowed to oviposit had similar longevity and lived longer than those that were allowed to oviposit. Virgin females produced male only progeny with higher number of males from A. loecki or P. mexicana than from A. papayae. The number of females and the cumulative progeny was smaller for A. papayae than for A. loecki or P. mexicana. The progeny sex ratio (proportion of females) was not different among the parasitoids. A. papayae had the shortest reproductive period followed by A. loecki and P. mexicana, respectively. This information is important in evaluating the efficiency, recovery and establishment of A. papayae, A. loecki, and P. mexicana.

  2. Multiplex PCR in determination of Opiinae parasitoids of fruit flies, Bactrocera sp., infesting star fruit and guava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, S; Ibrahim, N J; Md-Zain, B M; Idris, A B; Suhana, Y; Roff, M N; Yaakop, S

    2014-01-23

    Malaysia is a tropical country that produces commercial fruits, including star fruits, Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidales: Oxalidaceae), and guavas, Psidium guajava L. (Myrtales: Myrtaceae). There is a high demand for these fruits, and they are planted for both local consumption and export purposes. Unfortunately, there has been a gradual reduction of these fruits, which has been shown to be related to fruit fly infestation, especially from the Bactrocera species. Most parasitic wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Opiinae) are known as parasitoids of fruit fly larvae. In this study, star fruits and guavas infested by fruit fry larvae were collected from the Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute. The parasitized larvae were reared under laboratory conditions until the emergence of adult parasitoids. Multiplex PCR was performed to determine the braconid species using two mitochondrial DNA markers, namely cytochrome oxidase subunit I and cytochrome b. Two benefits of using multiplex PCR are the targeted bands can be amplified simultaneously using the same reaction and the identification process of the braconid species can be done accurately and rapidly. The species of fruit flies were confirmed using the COI marker. The results obtained from our study show that Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Fopius arisanus (Sonan), and Pysttalia incisi (Silvestri) were parasitoids associated with Bactrocera carambolae (Drew and Hancock) (Diptera: Tephritidae) infested star fruits. Fopius arisanus was also the parasitoid associated with Bactrocera papayae (Drew and Hancock) infested guavas. Maximum parsimony was been constructed in Opiinae species to compare tree resolution between these two genes in differentiating among closely related species. The confirmation of the relationship between braconids and fruit fly species is very important, recognized as preliminary data, and highly necessary in biological control programs. This is an

  3. Oligonucleotide primers for targeted amplification of single-copy nuclear genes in apocritan Hymenoptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Hartig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Published nucleotide sequence data from the mega-diverse insect order Hymenoptera (sawflies, bees, wasps, and ants are taxonomically scattered and still inadequate for reconstructing a well-supported phylogenetic tree for the order. The analysis of comprehensive multiple gene data sets obtained via targeted PCR could provide a cost-effective solution to this problem. However, oligonucleotide primers for PCR amplification of nuclear genes across a wide range of hymenopteran species are still scarce. FINDINGS: Here we present a suite of degenerate oligonucleotide primer pairs for PCR amplification of 154 single-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from Hymenoptera. These primers were inferred from genome sequence data from nine Hymenoptera (seven species of ants, the honeybee, and the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. We empirically tested a randomly chosen subset of these primer pairs for amplifying target genes from six Hymenoptera, representing the families Chrysididae, Crabronidae, Gasteruptiidae, Leucospidae, Pompilidae, and Stephanidae. Based on our results, we estimate that these primers are suitable for studying a large number of nuclear genes across a wide range of apocritan Hymenoptera (i.e., all hymenopterans with a wasp-waist and of aculeate Hymenoptera in particular (i.e., apocritan wasps with stingers. CONCLUSIONS: The amplified nucleotide sequences are (a with high probability from single-copy genes, (b easily generated at low financial costs, especially when compared to phylogenomic approaches, (c easily sequenced by means of an additionally provided set of sequencing primers, and (d suitable to address a wide range of phylogenetic questions and to aid rapid species identification via barcoding, as many amplicons contain both exonic and fast-evolving intronic nucleotides.

  4. Multisensory foraging by hymenopterous parasitoids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wäckers, F.L.

    1994-01-01

    The use of parasitoids as biological control agents is gaining interest as an environmentally sound alternative to the use of chemical insecticides. In order to extend and optimize biological control systems, it is essential to gain insight in the stimuli and mechanisms by which natural enemies loca

  5. Fruit flies (Diptera, Tephritidae and their parasitoids on cultivated and wild hosts in the Cerrado-Pantanal ecotone in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Ledesma Taira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fruit flies (Diptera, Tephritidae and their parasitoids on cultivated and wild hosts in the Cerrado-Pantanal ecotone in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Information on frugivorous flies in cultivated or wild host plants and their parasitoids in the Cerrado-Pantanal ecotone in Aquidauana, Mato Grosso do Sul is presented and discussed. Fruit fly samples were collected weekly in specific fruit trees, and McPhail® traps were installed in the same trees for a period of two years. The fruit flies infested ripe and unripe fruits of Averrhoa carambola L., Schoepfia sp., Psidium guajava L. and Pouteria torta (Mart. Radlk and mature fruits of Anacardium occidentale L. and Inga laurina (Sw. Willd. Nineteen fruit fly species were obtained with the combination of sampling methods (collecting fruits and trapping, nine of them obtained with both methods, five found only in fruits and five only in traps. This is the first record of Anastrepha striata Schiner in a species of Sapotaceae, as well as for A. castanea Norrbom and A. daciformes Bezzi in Schoepfia sp. (Olacaceae, and for A. distincta Greene in fruits of P. guajava in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul. Fruit collections simultaneously associated with capture of fruit flies by McPhail traps in the same host plants are essential to understand the diversity of fruit flies and their relationship with hosts and parasitoids. Species of Braconidae and Pteromalidae were recovered, where Doryctobracon areolatus (Szépligeti was the most abundant parasitoid in larvae of tephritids infesting both cultivated and wild host fruits.

  6. Parasitoides de Trialeurodes vaporariorum Westwood, 1856 (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae en cultivos de fríjol en García Rovira, Santander

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Arnoldo Granadillo-Cuello

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The whitefly complex is one of the main entomological problems of this country, due to the large number of hosts and for their wide distribution. Two species of this complex are Bemisia tabaci and Trialeurodes vaporariorum; the latter has been identified as a pest of tomatoes, beans and snuff in the sampling area. Objective: Determine the species of parasitoids associated with Trialeurodes vaporariorum bean crop in four municipalities of the Province of Garcia Rovira, in the department of Santander. Methods: This investigation was conducted in the municipalities of Enciso, Málaga, Concepción and El Cerrito. Stages random sampling with a sample size of 50 leaflets per culture was grown. The parasitoids were collected through cameras recovery. The measures were, Total nymphs parasitized nymphs emerged parasitoids emerged parasitoids no, emerged nymphs. Results: Two species of the order Hymenoptera, identified as Encarsia pergandiella and Amitus fuscipennis recovered. The results indicate that parasitism levels range from 3% to 20% Amitus fuscipennis (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae was present in 96.48% of the samples. Conclusions. Amitus fuscipennis is the most abundant parasitoid of Trialeurodes vaporariorum in natural conditions in the Province of Garcia Rovira Encarcia pergandiella is less abundant due to its little adaptation to the conditions of the study area.

  7. Alien dominance of the parasitoid wasp community along an elevation gradient on Hawai'i Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, R.W.; Banko, P.C.; Schwarzfeld, M.; Euaparadorn, M.; Brinck, K.W.

    2008-01-01

    Through intentional and accidental introduction, more than 100 species of alien Ichneumonidae and Braconidae (Hymenoptera) have become established in the Hawaiian Islands. The extent to which these parasitoid wasps have penetrated native wet forests was investigated over a 1,765 m elevation gradient on windward Hawai'i Island. For >1 year, malaise traps were used to continuously monitor parasitoid abundance and species richness in nine sites over three elevations. A total of 18,996 individuals from 16 subfamilies were collected. Overall, the fauna was dominated by aliens, with 44 of 58 species foreign to the Hawaiian Islands. Ichneumonidae was dominant over Braconidae in terms of both diversity and abundance, comprising 67.5% of individuals and 69.0% of species collected. Parasitoid abundance and species richness varied significantly with elevation: abundance was greater at mid and high elevations compared to low elevation while species richness increased with increasing elevation, with all three elevations differing significantly from each other. Nine species purposely introduced to control pest insects were found, but one braconid, Meteorus laphygmae, comprised 98.0% of this assemblage, or 28.3% of the entire fauna. Endemic species, primarily within the genera Spolas and Enicospilus, were collected almost exclusively at mid- and high-elevation sites, where they made up 22.1% and 36.0% of the total catch, respectively. Overall, 75.9% of species and 96.0% of individuals are inferred to parasitize Lepidoptera larvae and pupae. Our results support previous data indicating that alien parasitoids have deeply penetrated native forest habitats and may have substantial impacts on Hawaiian ecosystems. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  8. Larval endoparasitoids (Hymenoptera of frugivorous flies (Diptera, Tephritoidea reared from fruits of the cerrado of the State of Mato Grosso do Sul , Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel A. Uchôa-Fernandes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a five years survey of endoparasitoids obtained from the larvae of frugivorous Tephritidae and Lonchaeidae flies. The insects were reared from cultivated and wild fruits collected in areas of the cerrado in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The flies obtained from 14 host fruit species were eight Anastrepha species, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann, 1824 (Tephritidae; Dasiops sp. and Neosilba spp. (Lonchaeidae. Eleven parasitoid species were collected: Braconidae - Asobara anastrephae (Muesebek, 1958, Doryctobracon areolatus (Szépligeti, 1911, D. fluminensis (Costa Lima, 1938, Opius bellus Gahan, 1930 and Utetes anastrephae (Viereck, 1913; Figitidae - Aganaspis nordlanderi Wharton, 1998, Lopheucoila anastrephae (Rhower, 1919, Odontosema anastrephae (Borgmeier, 1935 and Trybliographa infuscata Gallardo, Díaz & Uchôa-Fernandes, 2000 and, Pteromalidae - Spalangia gemina Boucek, 1963 and S. endius Walker, 1839. In all cases only one parasitoid emerged per puparium. D. areolatus was the most abundant and frequent parasitoid of fruit fly species, as was L. anastrephae in Neosilba spp. larvae. This is the first record of A. nordlanderi in the midwestern Brazilian region.

  9. Insect immune resistance to parasitoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yves Carton; Marylène Poirié; Anthony J. Nappi

    2008-01-01

    Insect host-parasitoid interactions involve complex physiological, biochemical and genetic interactions. Against endoparasitoids, immune-competent hosts initiate a blood cell-mediated response that quickly destroys the intruders and envelops them in a multilayered melanotic capsule. During the past decade, considerable progress has been made in identifying some of the critical components of the host response, mainly because of the use of efficient molecular tools. This review examines some of the components of the innate immune response of Drosophila, an insect that has served as an exceptionally good experimental model for studying non-self recognition processes and immune cell signaling mechanisms. Topics considered in this review include hematopoiesis, proliferation and adhesion of hemocytes, melanogenesis and associated cytotoxic molecules, and the genetic aspects of the host-parasitoid interaction.

  10. Bacteria Endosymbiont, Wolbachia, Promotes Parasitism of Parasitoid Wasp Asobara japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furihata, Shunsuke; Hirata, Makiko; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Hayakawa, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia is the most widespread endosymbiotic bacterium that manipulates reproduction of its arthropod hosts to enhance its own spread throughout host populations. Infection with Wolbachia causes complete parthenogenetic reproduction in many Hymenoptera, producing only female offspring. The mechanism of such reproductive manipulation by Wolbachia has been extensively studied. However, the effects of Wolbachia symbiosis on behavioral traits of the hosts are scarcely investigated. The parasitoid wasp Asobara japonica is an ideal insect to investigate this because symbiotic and aposymbiotic strains are available: Wolbachia-infected Tokyo (TK) and noninfected Iriomote (IR) strains originally collected on the main island and southwest islands of Japan, respectively. We compared the oviposition behaviors of the two strains and found that TK strain females parasitized Drosophila melanogaster larvae more actively than the IR strain, especially during the first two days after eclosion. Removing Wolbachia from the TK strain wasps by treatment with tetracycline or rifampicin decreased their parasitism activity to the level of the IR strain. Morphological and behavioral analyses of both strain wasps showed that Wolbachia endosymbionts do not affect development of the host female reproductive tract and eggs, but do enhance host-searching ability of female wasps. These results suggest the possibility that Wolbachia endosymbionts may promote their diffusion and persistence in the host A. japonica population not only at least partly by parthenogenesis but also by enhancement of oviposition frequency of the host females.

  11. Relações interespecíficas entre parasitoides nativos de moscas-das-frutas e o braconídeo exótico Diachasmimorpha longicaudata em frutos de 'umbu-cajá' Interespecific relations between native parasitoids of fruit flies and exotic braconid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata in fruits of 'umbu-cajá'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzinaide Vidal Bomfim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Espécies de vespas parasitoides (Hymenoptera: Braconidae são importantes agentes de controle biológico de moscas-das-frutas (Diptera: Tephritidae. Este trabalho teve por objetivo conhecer os efeitos da liberação e as relações de competitividade interespecífica do parasitoide exótico Diachasmimorpha longicaudata Ashmead sobre o complexo de parasitoides nativos de moscas-das-frutas associado a frutos de 'umbu-cajá' (Spondias spp. na região do Recôncavo Baiano. Entre os meses de abril e julho de 2006, 8.955 frutos (192,93kg foram coletados antes e após (24 e 48 horas a liberação de 9.600 fêmeas de D. longicaudata em campo. Obteve-se um total de 8.724 pupários de Tephritidae, dos quais emergiram 3.963 adultos de Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart e 1.115 parasitoides. A maior frequência relativa foi de Doryctobracon areolatus (Szépligeti, seguida por Asobara Anastrephae (Muesebeck e Utetes Anastrephae (Viereck. Após 24 e 48 horas da liberação do parasitoide exótico D. longicaudata em campo, constatou-se que o índice de parasitismo total aumentou de 15,86 para 20,4 e 45,19%, respectivamente. Assim, observou-se que a liberação da espécie exótica D. longicaudata não apresenta efeitos negativos na ocorrência dos parasitoides nativos e contribui para complementar o controle biológico natural de A. obliqua em frutos de 'umbu-cajá', nas condições deste estudo.Wasps parasitoid species (Hymenoptera: Braconidae are fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae biological control important agents. This study aimed to know the effects of the release and interspecific competitive relationships of the exotic parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Braconidae on the native parasitoid complex of fruit flies in Spondias spp. in the region of Recôncavo Baiano. From April to July of 2006, 8.955 fruits (192.93kg were collected before and after (24 and 48 hours release of 9.600 females of D. longicaudata. Exactly 8.724 Tephritidae

  12. Lariophagus distinguendus Förster (Hym.: Pteromalidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Stengård

    2007-01-01

    The granary weevil Sitophilus granarius is an important pest in grain stores throughout temperate regions. The larval parasitoid Lariophagus distinguendus is a potential candidate for biological control of this pest. In cooler climates the successful use of this parasitoid depends on its ability...

  13. Gall structure affects ecological associations of Dryocosmus kuriphilus (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, W Rodney; Rieske, Lynne K

    2010-06-01

    Gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) induce structures (galls) on their host plants that house developing wasps and provide them with protection from natural enemies. The Asian chestnut gall wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu, is an invasive pest that is destructive to chestnut (Castanea spp.). An improved understanding of the interactions among D. kuriphilus, its host, and its natural enemies is critical for the development of effective management strategies against this pest. The objective of our study was to evaluate the D. kuriphilus community interactions, and relate these interactions to variations among gall traits. Galls were collected from four locations throughout the eastern United States from May (gall initiation) through August (after gall wasp emergence), and January. Gall characteristics (volume, weight, and schlerenchyma layer thickness), gall inhabitants (D. kuriphilus, parasitoids, and chamber fungi), and other community associates (insect herbivores and lesions thought to be caused by endophytes) were evaluated and correlated using canonical correlation analyses. The primary mortality factors for D. kuriphilus were parasitism, gall chamber-invading fungi, and failure of adult gall wasps to emerge. Larger gall size and thicker schlerenchyma layers surrounding the larval chambers were negatively correlated with parasitoids and chamber fungi, indicating these gall traits are important defenses. External fungal lesions and insect herbivory were positively correlated with the absence of D. kuriphilus within galls. This study provides support for the protective role of cynipid galls for the gall inducer, identifies specific gall traits that influence gall wasp mortality, and improves our knowledge of D. kuriphilus ecology in North America.

  14. Foraging behaviour by parasitoids in multiherbivore communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijk, de M.; Dicke, M.; Poelman, E.H.

    2013-01-01

    Parasitoid foraging decisions are often affected by community characteristics such as community diversity and complexity. As part of a complex habitat, the presence of unsuitable hosts may affect foraging behaviour of parasitoids. First, unsuitable herbivores may affect the localization of patches w

  15. Compatibility of Encarsia formosa (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae with Commercial Products Under Laboratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Barrera Mojica

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The greenhouse white fly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum one of the major pests of tomatoes under greenhouse conditions, but, Its mainly controlled with chemical insecticides. However, there are alternative control strategies as entomopathogens fungi and parasitoids (Encarsia formosa. In this study we evaluated the compatibility of commercial product with adults and pupae of E. formosa under laboratory conditions. Eight treatments were evaluated for adults and pupae of the parasitoid, including two concentrations of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (5 x 107 and 5 x 109 conidia/ml, commercial doses of four chemical products commonly used to control pests on tomato crops and two controls. These treatments were applied directly on parasitoids, and their mortality rate on adults and pupae were recorded daily. There was no difference in E. formosa pupae among relative with the Bacillus thuringiensis products (p > 0.05, indicating that its compatible with the parasitoid pupae under laboratory conditions. Finally, it was found that products with active ingredients of Tiocyclam hidrogenoxalato and B. thuringiensis are incompatibles with E. formosa adults under laboratory conditions.COMPATIBILIDAD DE Encarsia formosa (HYMENOPTERA: APHELINIDAE CON PRODUCTOS COMERCIALES EN CONDICIONES DE LABORATORIO La mosca blanca de los invernaderos, Trialeurodes vaporariorum, es una de las principales plagas de cultivos de tomate bajo invernadero y es controlada principalmente con insecticidas químicos. Sin embargo, existen estrategias alternativas de control como hongos entomopatógenos (Beauveria bassiana y enemigos naturales como parasitoides (Encarsia formosa. En el presente estudio se evaluó la compatibilidad de productos comerciales con adultos y pupas de E. formosa bajo condiciones de laboratorio. Se evaluaron ocho tratamientos para pupas y adultos del parasitoide, incluyendo dos concentraciones del hongo entomopatógeno Beauveria

  16. Structure and composition of the assemblage of parasitoids associated to Phyllocnistis citrella pupae Stainton (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) in citrus orchards in Southern Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnke, Simone M.; Redaelli, Luiza R.; Soglio, Fabio K. Dal [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fitossanidade; Diefenbach, Lucia M.G. [Fundacao Estadual de Producao e Pesquisa em Saude (FEPPS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Pesquisas Biologicas. Lab. Central do Estado (LACEN)

    2007-09-15

    The structure and composition of the assemblage of pupal parasitoids of Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, the citrus leaf miner, were studied in two citrus orchards (Citrus deliciosa Tenore cv. Montenegrina and Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck x Citrus reticulata Blanco hybrid Murcott), in Montenegro County (29 deg 68S and 51 deg 46W), southern Brazil. At fortnightly samplings, from July 2001 to June 2003, all the new shoots from 24 randomly selected trees were inspected. The species richness reached five native species in the Murcott orchard, and six in Montenegrina. In Murcott, the presence of Ageniaspis citricola (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an exotic species, was detected in the first year of sampling, probably migrating from the nearby areas where it had been released for the miner control. In Montenegrina, its presence was only registered in the second year. A. citricola in both areas was dominant and changed the community structure of parasitoid complex of P. citrella in both orchards. (author)

  17. Release and establishment of the parasitoid Diachasmimorpha kraussii against the tephritid fruit fly Bactrocera latifrons in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokonon-Ganta, Aimé H; McQuate, Grant T; Messing, Russell H; B Jang, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Diachasmimorpha kraussii (Fullaway) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) was first released against Bactrocera latifrons (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Hawaii in March 2003. Over a three month period, eight releases, totaling 7,696 females and 3,968 males, were made in a turkeyberry, Solanum torvum Swartz (Solanales: Solanaceae) patch known to have a well established B. latifrons population. The establishment of D. kraussii was assessed through fruit collections conducted over a three-year period beyond the last release. D. kraussii was recovered 2 weeks, 31 months, and 39 months after the last parasitoid release, with collections not only from the release site, but also from a control site about 5.0 km distance from the release site. Recovery from fruit collections three years after the last parasitoid release confirmed that D. kraussii had become established in Hawaii. Parasitism rates were low, only 1.0-1.4%, compared to rates of 2.8-8.7% for the earlier established egg-larval parasitoid, Fopius arisanus (Sonan).

  18. Relevamiento y evaluación de parasitoides de huevo para el control de Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) y Grapholita molesta (Lepidotera: Tortricideae)

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar E. TORTOSA; Carmona, Agustín; Monje, Juan Carlos; Giardina, Mónica; Manzano, Pablo; Martinez, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Desde el mes de octubre hasta el mes de abril de los años 2005-2006 y 2006-2007 realizamos la búsqueda e identificación de parasitoides de huevo de Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) y Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepi - doptera: Tortricidae) en tres sitios de Mendoza, Argentina. Trichogramma cacoe - ciae Marchal (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) fue colectado en huevos de las dos especies plagas, en todos los sitios del relevamiento, durante los dos ciclos de colecta. Se encontró ...

  19. A molecular diagnostic tool for the preliminary assessment of host-parasitoid associations in biological control programmes for a new invasive pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariepy, T D; Haye, T; Zhang, J

    2014-08-01

    Evaluation of host-parasitoid associations can be tenuous using conventional methods. Molecular techniques are well placed to identify trophic links and resolve host-parasitoid associations. Establishment of the highly invasive brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), outside Asia has prompted interest in the use of egg parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) as biological control agents. However, little is known regarding their host ranges. To address this, a DNA barcoding approach was taken wherein general PCR primers for Scelionidae and Pentatomidae were developed to amplify and sequence >500-bp products within the DNA barcoding region of the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene that would permit the identification of key players in this association. Amplification of DNA from Pentatomidae and Scelionidae was consistent across a broad range of taxa within these families, and permitted the detection of Scelionidae eggs within H. halys 1 h following oviposition. In laboratory assays, amplification and sequencing of DNA from empty, parasitized eggs was successful for both host (100% success) and parasitoid (50% success). When applied to field-collected, empty egg masses, the primers permitted host identification in 50-100% of the eggs analysed, and yielded species-level identifications. Parasitoid identification success ranged from 33 to 67% among field-collected eggs, with genus-level identification for most specimens. The inability to obtain species-level identities for these individuals is due to the lack of coverage of this taxonomic group in public DNA sequence databases; this situation is likely to improve as more species are sequenced and recorded in these databases. These primers were able to detect and identify both pentatomid host and scelionid parasitoid in a hyperparasitized egg mass, thereby clarifying trophic links otherwise unresolved by conventional methodology.

  20. DISTRIBUCIÓN DE ROGADINAE (HYMENOPTERA: BRACONIDAE) EN UNA GRADIENTE ALTITUDINAL EN LOS ANDES DEL SUR DEL PERÚ

    OpenAIRE

    Sulca Garro, Lidia A.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos (Perú).

    2013-01-01

    Se estudió la variación altitudinal de la riqueza, diversidad y estructura comunitaria de las avispas parasitoides de la subfamilia Rogadinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) en una gradiente altitudinal en el Valle de Cosñipata (Cuzco, Perú). Para ello, se definieron cuatro sitios de estudio entre 800 y 2800 m: Tono (800 m), San Pedro (1500 m), Rocotal (2000 m) y Wayquecha (2800 m) en los que se efectuaron cinco muestreos empleando trampas Malaise. Se capturó un total de 351 individuos comprendiend...

  1. ¿MULTIPLICAR Tetrastichus howardi (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE) EN LA ORUGA DE LA SEDA AFECTA SU BIOLOGÍA?

    OpenAIRE

    Nahara Gabriela Piñeyro; Fabricio Fagundes Pereira; Felipe Luis Gomes Borges; Camila Rossoni; Antonio de Souza Silva; Samir Oliveira Kassab

    2015-01-01

    RESUMENLa multiplicación sucesiva de parasitoides en hospederos alternativos, puede afectar las características biológicas y comprometer los sistemas de cría masiva de estos. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la multiplicación de Tetrastichus howardi (Olliff, 1893) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) en pupas del hospedero alternativo Bombyx mori (Linnaeus, 1758) (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae), durante tres generaciones. Y si eso afecta su desempeño reproductivo, cuando se cría, posteriormente, en pup...

  2. DISTRIBUCIÓN DE ROGADINAE (HYMENOPTERA: BRACONIDAE) EN UNA GRADIENTE ALTITUDINAL EN LOS ANDES DEL SUR DEL PERÚ

    OpenAIRE

    Sulca Garro, Lidia A.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos (Perú).

    2013-01-01

    Se estudió la variación altitudinal de la riqueza, diversidad y estructura comunitaria de las avispas parasitoides de la subfamilia Rogadinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) en una gradiente altitudinal en el Valle de Cosñipata (Cuzco, Perú). Para ello, se definieron cuatro sitios de estudio entre 800 y 2800 m: Tono (800 m), San Pedro (1500 m), Rocotal (2000 m) y Wayquecha (2800 m) en los que se efectuaron cinco muestreos empleando trampas Malaise. Se capturó un total de 351 individuos comprendiend...

  3. Effect of aqueous extracts of black alder (Alnus glutinosa (LINNAEUS, 1753 GAERTNER, 1791 and elder (Sambucus nigra LINNAEUS, 1753 on the occurrence of Brevicoryne brassicae LINNAEUS, 1758 (Hemiptera, Aphidoidea, its parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae (M’INTOSH, 1855 (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonoidea and predatory Syrphidae on white cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankowska Beata

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal and antifeedant effects of aqueous extracts from two common plants (black alder Alnus glutinosa and elder Sambucus nigra on the occurrence of Brevicoryne brassicae, its parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae and predatory Syrphidae on white cabbage were investigated in 2008-2009. Both extracts reduced the number of cabbage aphids, although the Sambucus nigra extract proved to have a better effect. Differences were seen both in the numbers of winged aphids settling on plants and in the overall numbers of aphids on plants during the entire season. There were no significant differences in the degree of parasitization by Diaeretiella rapae in the three experimental combinations. Eight species of Syrphidae were found in the Brevicoryne brassicae colonies: Episyrphus balteatus, Sphaerophoria scripta, S. rueppelli, S. menthastri, Eupeodes corollae, Scaeva pyrastri, Scaeva selenitica and Syrphus vitripennis. The dominant species was Episyrphus balteatus. The largest numbers of syrphid larvae and pupae were collected from cabbage aphid colonies on the control plants. Smaller numbers were recorded on the plot where the cabbages were sprayed with the Sambucus nigra extract. The results of this study indicate that botanical insecticides based on S. nigra have the potential to be incorporated into control programmes for the cabbage aphid.

  4. Adaptation of indigenous larval parasitoids to Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracini, Chiara; Ingegno, Barbara Letizia; Navone, Paolo; Ferrari, Ester; Mosti, Marco; Tavella, Luciana; Alma, Alberto

    2012-08-01

    Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) is a serious threat to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) crops in South America. In Europe, after its first detection in Spain in 2006, it rapidly spread through the Mediterranean basin, reaching Italy 2 yr later. The aim of our work was to find indigenous effective biological control agents and to evaluate their potential role in the control of larval populations of T. absoluta in controlled conditions. Nine species of larval parasitoids emerged from field-collected tomato leaves infested by T. absoluta. The most abundant, Necremnus near artynes (Walker) and Necremnus near tidius (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), were tested in laboratory parasitism trials. Furthermore, because the species N. artynes and N. tidius are each reported in literature as an ectoparasitoid of Cosmopterix pulchrimella Chambers (Lepidoptera: Cosmopterigidae) on upright pellitory plants, olfactometer bioassays were performed to assess the response of our parasitoids to the odors of tomato and pellitory leaves infested by T absoluta and C. pulchrimella, respectively, compared with healthy ones. Both Necremnus species showed good adaptation to the invasive pest, and we observed a high larval mortality of T. absoluta because of host feeding and parasitism. Even olfactory responses highlighted a preference of both wasps for tomato plants infested by the exotic pest. These preliminary results demonstrated a high suitability of these indigenous natural enemies for controlling T. absoluta. Further investigations are needed to confirm their role as potential biological agents in commercial tomato plantations.

  5. Effects of starvation on the vitellogenesis, ovarian development and fecundity in the ectoparasitoid, Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Zhang Dong; Gong-Yin Ye; Peng-Cheng Yao; Yao-Liang Huang; Xue-Xin Chen; Zhi-Cheng Shen; Cui Hu

    2008-01-01

    A female-specific protein, vitellogenin (Vg), and its corresponding egg vitellin (Vt) are identified in the ectoparasific wasp Nasonia vitripennis. Both native Vt and Vg have a molecular mass of about 350 kDa, which is composed of two subunits of approximately 190 kDa and 165 kDa under reducing and denaturing conditions (sodium dodecyl sulfatepolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). An indirect sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay developed with both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against N. vitripennis Vt.Vg was first detected in the hemolymph on the 10th day after parasitism, and was first observed in oocytes on the 12th day. In adults deprived of food, the highest hemolymph Vg level occurred at the time of adult eclosion and the highest level of Vt in ovaries was found at 30 h after eclosion. In contrast, feeding adults with 20% sucrose resulted in the reduction of Vt uptake by ovaries and the extension of life span, but had little effect on Vg production.Deprived of hosts, starvation of female wasps had no significant effects on ovariole growth and oocyte maturation before the wasps died. However, starvation of female wasps supplied with hosts accelerated the wasps laying progeny into hosts, but resulted in a decrease of total progeny production by comparison with wasps fed with 20% sucrose.

  6. Rapidly Evolving Mitochondrial Genome and Directional Selection in Mitochondrial Genes in the Parasitic Wasp Nasonia (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Lavrov, Dennis V.; Werren, John H.

    2008-01-01

    We sequenced the nearly complete mtDNA of 3 species of parasitic wasps, Nasonia vitripennis (2 strains), Nasonia giraulti, and Nasonia longicornis, including all 13 protein-coding genes and the 2 rRNAs, and found unusual patterns of mitochondrial evolution. The Nasonia mtDNA has a unique gene order compared with other insect mtDNAs due to multiple rearrangements. The mtDNAs of these wasps also show nucleotide substitution rates over 30 times faster than nuclear protein-coding genes, indicating among the highest substitution rates found in animal mitochondria (normally <10 times faster). A McDonald and Kreitman test shows that the between-species frequency of fixed replacement sites relative to silent sites is significantly higher compared with within-species polymorphisms in 2 mitochondrial genes of Nasonia, atp6 and atp8, indicating directional selection. Consistent with this interpretation, the Ka/Ks (nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rates) ratios are higher between species than within species. In contrast, cox1 shows a signature of purifying selection for amino acid sequence conservation, although rates of amino acid substitutions are still higher than for comparable insects. The mitochondrial-encoded polypeptides atp6 and atp8 both occur in F0F1ATP synthase of the electron transport chain. Because malfunction in this fundamental protein severely affects fitness, we suggest that the accelerated accumulation of replacements is due to beneficial mutations necessary to compensate mild-deleterious mutations fixed by random genetic drift or Wolbachia sweeps in the fast evolving mitochondria of Nasonia. We further propose that relatively high rates of amino acid substitution in some mitochondrial genes can be driven by a “Compensation-Draft Feedback”; increased fixation of mildly deleterious mutations results in selection for compensatory mutations, which lead to fixation of additional deleterious mutations in nonrecombining mitochondrial genomes, thus accelerating the process of amino acid substitutions. PMID:18653734

  7. Rapidly evolving mitochondrial genome and directional selection in mitochondrial genes in the parasitic wasp nasonia (hymenoptera: pteromalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Deodoro C S G; Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Lavrov, Dennis V; Werren, John H

    2008-10-01

    We sequenced the nearly complete mtDNA of 3 species of parasitic wasps, Nasonia vitripennis (2 strains), Nasonia giraulti, and Nasonia longicornis, including all 13 protein-coding genes and the 2 rRNAs, and found unusual patterns of mitochondrial evolution. The Nasonia mtDNA has a unique gene order compared with other insect mtDNAs due to multiple rearrangements. The mtDNAs of these wasps also show nucleotide substitution rates over 30 times faster than nuclear protein-coding genes, indicating among the highest substitution rates found in animal mitochondria (normally mitochondrial genes of Nasonia, atp6 and atp8, indicating directional selection. Consistent with this interpretation, the Ka/Ks (nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rates) ratios are higher between species than within species. In contrast, cox1 shows a signature of purifying selection for amino acid sequence conservation, although rates of amino acid substitutions are still higher than for comparable insects. The mitochondrial-encoded polypeptides atp6 and atp8 both occur in F0F1ATP synthase of the electron transport chain. Because malfunction in this fundamental protein severely affects fitness, we suggest that the accelerated accumulation of replacements is due to beneficial mutations necessary to compensate mild-deleterious mutations fixed by random genetic drift or Wolbachia sweeps in the fast evolving mitochondria of Nasonia. We further propose that relatively high rates of amino acid substitution in some mitochondrial genes can be driven by a "Compensation-Draft Feedback"; increased fixation of mildly deleterious mutations results in selection for compensatory mutations, which lead to fixation of additional deleterious mutations in nonrecombining mitochondrial genomes, thus accelerating the process of amino acid substitutions.

  8. Natural enemies of Atta vollenweideri (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) leaf-cutter ants negatively affected by synthetic pesticides, chlorpyrifos and fipronil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillade, Andrea C; Folgarait, Patricia J

    2014-02-01

    In southern South America, Ada vollenweideri Forel (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is a significant pest of several crops and forestry, also considered to reduce the carrying capacity of pastures. The most usual control method used in Latin America is the application of synthetic pesticides, mainly chlorpyrifos and fipronil. However, no studies have assessed the effects of these agrochemicals on natural enemies of ants. We aimed to evaluate the efficiency of these pesticides on leaf-cutter ants' control and to test their effect on phorid fly parasitoids. Chlorpyrifos failed to exert complete control over ant colonies in the field and was gravely detrimental to specific parasitoids, reducing their percentage of parasitism, pupal survivorship, and adult longevity. Fipronil, however, exerted complete control over the treated colonies. Laboratory tests using both pesticides, either on ants from foraging trails or on pupariae, showed that chlorpyrifos and fipronil decreased larval and pupal survivorship, as well as adult longevity of parasitoids, in comparison to controls. In conclusion, these pesticides will likely affect parasitoids with regard to their reproductive capacity, leading to the decreased levels of natural parasitism observed in the field after treatments. We discuss why neither pesticide should be taken into account for integrated pest management programs.

  9. Palmistichus elaeisis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae as an indicator of toxicity of herbicides registered for corn in Brazil

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    Claubert W.G de Menezes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of plants in agricultural systems benefits natural enemies. Herbicides are used in weed management in corn (Zea mays L. to reduce competition and productivity losses, but they can impact natural enemies and contaminate the environment. The objective was to evaluate toxicity of herbicides on pupae parasitoid Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare and LaSalle, 1993 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae. The treatments were represented by the host pupae Tenebrio molitor L., 1785 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae and herbicides atrazine, nicosulfuron, paraquat, and tembotrione in commercial doses compared to a control treatment with water. Pupae of T. molitor were immersed in the solution of herbicides and exposed to parasitism by six females of P. elaeisis each. The herbicides atrazine and paraquat were highly toxic and, therefore, not selective to P. elaeisis. Nicosulfuron reduced the sex ratio of P. elaeisis (0.20 ± 0.03, which may affect subsequent generations. Moreover, the herbicide tembotrione was selective to P. elaeisis, showing results comparable to the control. Floristic diversity of weeds can increase food source, habitat, shelter, breeding places and microclimates for insect parasitoids but herbicides formulations can be toxic and these products can affect P. elaeisis or its hosts by direct or indirect contact, showing the importance of selectivity studies for this natural enemy. However, the herbicide tembotrione was selective to P. elaeisis and it can be recommended for programs of sustainable management of weeds in corn crop with this parasitoid.

  10. Host egg age of Leptoglossus occidentalis (Heteroptera, Coreidae) and parasitism by Gryon pennsylvanicum (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peverieri, Giuseppino Sabbatini; Furlan, Paola; Benassai, Daniele; Caradonna, Sarah; Strong, Ward B; Roversi, Pio Federico

    2013-04-01

    Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann (Heteroptera, Coreidae) is native to Western North America and is a serious pest for seed production of conifers. The pest was accidentally introduced into Europe in the 1990s. Since then, seed loss has been recorded in Pinus pinea (L.) forests, with a negative impact on the commercial production of pine nuts. Classical biological control of this pest in P. pinea stands is an attractive proposition. Previous work showed that the egg-parasitoid Gryon pennsylvanicum (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae) had promising life history traits in laboratory studies using L. occidentalis eggs as host. In the present work, the effect of host egg age on parasitization rate was evaluated in the laboratory, using choice and no-choice tests. Host eggs ranged in age from < 24 h to within a day of hatching. Results showed that parasitization rate, juvenile survival rate, sex ratio, and longevity of female G. pennsylvanicum were not significantly affected by the age of the host eggs. However, egg-parasitoid development time was longer in older host eggs, and females were smaller than those that developed in younger host eggs. Parasitization behaviors (drumming, oviposition, and marking) were not affected by the age of the host. G. pennsylvanicum females tended to parasitize all available host eggs within a cluster before moving to a new cluster, without displaying a preferences for host egg age. The ability to exploit host eggs of any age class improves the prospect of successful classical biological control using this egg-parasitoid.

  11. Recombination and its impact on the genome of the haplodiploid parasitoid wasp Nasonia.

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    Oliver Niehuis

    Full Text Available Homologous meiotic recombination occurs in most sexually reproducing organisms, yet its evolutionary advantages are elusive. Previous research explored recombination in the honeybee, a eusocial hymenopteran with an exceptionally high genome-wide recombination rate. A comparable study in a non-social member of the Hymenoptera that would disentangle the impact of sociality from Hymenoptera-specific features such as haplodiploidy on the evolution of the high genome-wide recombination rate in social Hymenoptera is missing. Utilizing single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between two Nasonia parasitoid wasp genomes, we developed a SNP genotyping microarray to infer a high-density linkage map for Nasonia. The map comprises 1,255 markers with an average distance of 0.3 cM. The mapped markers enabled us to arrange 265 scaffolds of the Nasonia genome assembly 1.0 on the linkage map, representing 63.6% of the assembled N. vitripennis genome. We estimated a genome-wide recombination rate of 1.4-1.5 cM/Mb for Nasonia, which is less than one tenth of the rate reported for the honeybee. The local recombination rate in Nasonia is positively correlated with the distance to the center of the linkage groups, GC content, and the proportion of simple repeats. In contrast to the honeybee genome, gene density in the parasitoid wasp genome is positively associated with the recombination rate; regions of low recombination are characterized by fewer genes with larger introns and by a greater distance between genes. Finally, we found that genes in regions of the genome with a low recombination frequency tend to have a higher ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions, likely due to the accumulation of slightly deleterious non-synonymous substitutions. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that recombination reduces interference between linked sites and thereby facilitates adaptive evolution and the purging of deleterious mutations. Our results imply

  12. Trans-generational effects of mild heat stress on the life history traits of an aphid parasitoid.

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    Ibrahim Ismaeil

    Full Text Available Temperature changes are common in nature and insects are particularly exposed and sensitive to such variations which can be potential stresses, ultimately affecting life history traits and overall fitness. Braconids have been widely used to study the effects of temperature on host-parasitoid interactions and the present work focused on the solitary endoparasitoid Aphidius ervi Haliday (Hymenoptera: Braconidae Aphidiidae, an efficient biological control agent commercially used against aphids such as the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae Thomas (Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae. Contrary to previous studies using heat shocks at extreme temperatures, we evaluated the effects of mild heat stresses by transferring young parasitoid adults from the constant temperature of 20°C to either a warm (25°C or hot (28°C temperature, for either 1 h or 48 h. Such treatments are consistent with situations commonly experienced by parasitoids when moved from their rearing conditions to greenhouses or field conditions. The effects were evaluated both on the heat stressed A. ervi adults (G0 (immediate effects and on their first generation (G1 progeny (trans-generational effects. G0 wasps' mortality was significantly affected by the temperature in interaction with the duration of the stress. Longevity of G0 wasps surviving the heat stress was negatively affected by the temperature and females lived longer than males. Heat stress applied to A. ervi parents also had consequences on their G1 progeny whose developmental time, rates of mummification and percentage of parasitoid completing total development were negatively affected. Surprisingly, the egg load at emergence of the G1 female progeny was increased when their mothers had been submitted to a mild heat stress of 25°C or 28°C. These results clearly demonstrate trans-generational phenotypic plasticity, showing that adaptation to thermal stresses may be achieved via maternal effects. This study also sheds light on

  13. Himenópteros parasitoides associados a ninfas de Triozoida limbata na cultura da goiabeira, em Ivinhema, MS, Brasil

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    Vera Alves de Sá

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available O Brasil tem excelentes condições climáticas para a exploração comercial da goiabeira Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae; porém, em todo o país, a cultura é atacada por insetos-praga, sendo Triozoida limbata Enderlein, 1918 (Hemiptera: Triozidae uma das pragas dessa cultura. Como o controle químico dessa praga é muito oneroso e, muitas vezes, indesejável, a utilização de parasitoides é uma excelente alternativa, pois pode atuar eficientemente na regulação das populações dos seus hospedeiros. Assim, este trabalho objetivou identificar as espécies de parasitoides ocorrentes e seus índices de parasitismo natural em T. limbata no cultivo da goiabeira, em Ivinhema, MS. Foram realizadas coletas quinzenais de março a outubro de 2010, sendo coletados dez ramos terminais das plantas com ninfas de T. limbata, por coleta, sempre no início da manhã. Estes ramos tinham suas bases enroladas em algodão hidrófilo, introduzidas em frascos de vidro (5mL com água e acondicionados em copos transparentes de acrílico justapostos, e assim mantidos até que ocorresse a emergência dos parasitoides adultos. Para identificação, foram calculadas a porcentagem e o índice de parasitismo natural. Do total de 349 espécimes de parasitoides encontrados, 91,11% foi Psyllaephagus trioziphagus Howard, 1885 (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae, com 20,96% de parasitismo natural, e 8,89% foram representantes do gênero Signiphora, com 2,04% de parasitismo natural.

  14. ¿MULTIPLICAR Tetrastichus howardi (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE EN LA ORUGA DE LA SEDA AFECTA SU BIOLOGÍA?

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    Nahara Gabriela Piñeyro

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENLa multiplicación sucesiva de parasitoides en hospederos alternativos, puede afectar las características biológicas y comprometer los sistemas de cría masiva de estos. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la multiplicación de Tetrastichus howardi (Olliff, 1893 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae en pupas del hospedero alternativo Bombyx mori (Linnaeus, 1758 (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae, durante tres generaciones. Y si eso afecta su desempeño reproductivo, cuando se cría, posteriormente, en pupas del hospedero natural Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius, 1794 (Lepidoptera: Crambidae. Las informaciones obtenidas en este estudio pueden mejorar y facilitar el control biológico de plagas, principalmente, con la utilización de parasitoides, debido a que T. howardi parasita y se desarrolla en pupas de B. mori. De forma general, la multiplicación de T. howardi durante tres generaciones en pupas del hospedero alternativo B. mori no compromete las características biológicas de este parasitoide cuando se multiplica en su hospedero natural D. saccharalis a los efectos de su utilización en programas de control biológico.ABSTRACTThe successive multiplication of parasitoids in alternative hosts can affect the biological characteristics and compromise the systems for massive rearing. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the multiplication of Tetrastichus howardi (Olliff, 1893 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae in pupae of the alternative host Bombyx mori (Linnaeus, 1758 (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae for three generations, affects its reproductive performance, when are reared, then in pupae of the natural host Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius, 1794 (Lepidoptera: Crambidae. The information obtained in this study can improve and facilitate the biological control of pests, mainly with the use of parasitoids, due to the fact that T. howardi parasite and develops into pupae of B. mori. In general, the multiplication of T. howardi for three generations in the alternative

  15. Morphology and function of the ovipositor mechanism in Ceraphronoidea (Hymenoptera, Apocrita

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    Andrew Ernst

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The ovipositor of apocritan Hymenoptera is an invaluable source of phylogenetically relevant characters, and our understanding of its functional morphology stands to enlighten us about parasitoid life history strategies. Although Ceraphronoidea is one of the most commonly collected Hymenoptera taxa with considerable economic importance, our knowledge about their natural history and phylogenetic relationships, both to other apocritan lineages and within the superfamily itself, is limited. As a first step towards revealing ceraphronoid natural diversity we describe the skeletomuscular system of the ceraphronoid ovipositor for the first time. Dissections and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy 3D media files were used to visualize the ovipositor complex and to develop character concepts. Morphological structures were described in natural language and then translated into a character-character state format, whose terminology was linked to phenotype-relevant ontologies. Four unique anatomical phenotypes were revealed: 1. The first valvifer (gonangulum of the genus Trassedia is composed of two articulating sclerites, a condition present only in a few basal insect taxa. The bipartition of the first valvifer in Trassedia is most likely secondary and might allow more rapid oviposition. 2. Ceraphronoids, unlike other Hymenoptera, lack the retractor muscle of the terebra; instead the egg laying device is retracted by the seventh sternite. 3. Also unlike other Hymenoptera, the cordate apodeme and the anterior flange of the second valvifer are fused and compose one ridge that serves as the site of attachment for the dorsal and ventral T9-second valvifer muscles. Overall, the ceraphronoid ovipositor system is highly variable and can be described by discrete, distinguishable character states. However, these differences, despite their discrete nature, do not reflect the present classification of the superfamily and might represent parallelisms driven by host

  16. Inventario de Hymenoptera (Hexapoda en El Ventorrillo: un rico enclave de biodiversidad en la Sierra de Guadarrama (España Central

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    Nieves-Aldrey, José Luis

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Overall data of the inventory of Hymenoptera from the Biogeological Station of “El Ventorrillo” are presented. The studied site is located at an altitude of 1450 m, on the south face of the Sierra de Guadarrama (Central Spain, about 60 km NW from Madrid. Between 1988 and 1991 an insect biodiversity inventory was carried out using three sampling methods: Malaise traps, yellow pan traps and sweep nets. Out of the more than 1,000,000 insects trapped, increasing the collections of the MNCN, about 600,000 were sorted to order. We found 83,688 individuals of Hymenoptera (representing 13,8% and the second more abundant group in the samples, after Diptera (450,000 individuals and 77,5% of total. Forty nine families, 518 genera and 1310 species de Hymenoptera has been identified until now. The overall richness of Hymenoptera from El Ventorrillo is estimated in 2700 species and about 13,000 the number of insect species from the study site. An appendix is provided with the list of identified species and its overall abundance in the samples. As results of the inventory, ten new species for science have been described, and several more new species are not yet described; additionally, at least 33 genera and more than 170 species were recorded for the first time for Iberia. The abundance of Hymenoptera, as measured by Malaise trap catches, was very high, comparatively to other published data, reaching a peak of 916 individuals per trap day at the most productive trap and sampling period. The more abundant families were, in decreasing order, Braconidae, Ichneumonidae, Mymaridae, Scelionidae, Apidae and Pteromalidae, represented by numbers of individuals between 12,000, for Braconidae, to near 6000 for Pteromalidae. Among the identified families, the more species rich at the study area were in decreasing order: Pteromalidae (290, Ichneumonidae (217, Sphecidae (107 and Eulophidae (101 species. The richness of the 29 remaining families at the area of study was

  17. Toxicity of some insecticides used in maize crop on Trichogramma pretiosum (Hymenoptera, Trichogrammatidae immature stages

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    Jander R Souza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae is an important pest of maize (Zea mays L. crops in Brazil. The effects of beta-cypermethrin, chlorfenapyr, chlorpyrifos, spinosad, etofenprox, triflumuron, alpha-cypermethrin/teflubenzuron, and lambda-cyhalothrin/thiamethoxam on Trichogramma pretiosum Riley, 1879 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae immature stages were evaluated. Eggs of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller, 1879 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae, containing immature stages of the parasitoid were dipped in water solution pesticides, to evaluate their effects on emergence and sex ratio of F1 parasitoids. For F2 parasitoids, emergence, parasitism capacity, and sex ratio were evaluated. Beta-cypermethrin, chlorfenapyr, chlorpyrifos, and spinosad affected the emergence success of F1 T. pretiosum. Insects exposed to etofenprox and alpha-cypermethrin/teflubenzuron during the egg-larval period and to lambda-cyhalothrin/thiamethoxam during the pupal stage also suffered reduction in the emergence. Beta-cypermethrin affected the sex ratio of F1 T. pretiosum from host eggs treated during the egg-larval period; spinosad affected it during the egg-larval period and the pupal stage, whereas chlorpyrifos did the same when applied during the pupal stage. Chlorpyrifos also affected the sex ratio of F2 parasitoids, but only when applied during the egg-larval period, whereas chlorfenapyr reduced this trait when applied during the pre-pupal phase. Chlorpyrifos and alpha-cypermethrin/teflubenzuron affected the parasitism capacity of F1 females from eggs treated during the egg-larval period. Considering the overall effects, only etofenprox and triflumuron were selective on T. pretiosum when applied on parasitized A. kuehniella eggs. Further studies need to be carried out to verify the toxicity of the other pesticides under semi-field and field conditions.

  18. Effects of UV-blocking films on the dispersal behavior of Encarsia formosa (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Dimitrios; Payne, Christopher C

    2007-02-01

    The parasitoid Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) has been used successfully for the control of Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). The development of UV-blocking plastic films has added a new component to future integrated pest management systems by disrupting insect pest infestation when UV light is excluded. Because both T. vaporariorum and E. formosa are reported to have similar spectral efficiency, there was a need to identify the impact of UV-blocking films on the dispersal behavior of both the pest and the natural enemy. In field studies, using choice-chamber experiments, E. formosa showed some preference to disperse into compartments where less UV light was blocked. However, further studies indicated that the effect was primarily attributable to the different light diffusion properties of the films tested. Thus, unlike its whitefly host, when the UV-absorbing properties of the films were similar, but the light diffusion properties differed, E. formosa adults preferred to disperse into compartments clad with films that had high light diffusion properties. When the plastic films differed most in their UV-absorbing capacity and had no light-diffusion capability, the initial dispersal of E. formosa between treatments was similar, although a small preference toward the environment with UV light was observed over time. When parasitoid dispersal was measured 3 h after release, more parasitoids were found on plants, suggesting that the parasitoids would search plants for whitefly hosts, even in a UV-blocked light environment. The potential for the integration of UV-blocking films with E. formosa in an advanced whitefly management system is discussed.

  19. Larvae and Nests of Aculeate Hymenoptera (Hymenoptera: Aculeata) Nesting in Reed Galls Induced by Lipara spp. (Diptera: Chloropidae) with a Review of Species Recorded. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astapenková, Alena; Heneberg, Petr

    2017-01-01

    The ability of aculeate Hymenoptera to utilize wetlands is poorly understood, and descriptions of their nests and developmental stages are largely absent. Here we present results based on our survey of hymenopterans using galls induced by Lipara spp. flies on common reed Phragmites australis in the years 2015–2016. We studied 20,704 galls, of which 9,446 were longitudinally cut and the brood from them reared in the laboratory, while the remaining 11,258 galls reared in rearing bags also in laboratory conditions. We recorded eight species that were previously not known to nest in reed galls: cuckoo wasps Chrysis rutilans and Trichrysis pumilionis, solitary wasps Stenodynerus chevrieranus and Stenodynerus clypeopictus, and bees Pseudoanthidium tenellum, Stelis punctulatissima, Hylaeus communis and Hylaeus confusus. Forty five species of Hymenoptera: Aculeata are known to be associated with reed galls, of which 36 make their nests there, and the other are six parasitoids of the family Chrysididae and three cuckoo bees of the genus Stelis. Of these species, Pemphredon fabricii and in southern Europe also Heriades rubicola are very common in reed galls, followed by Hylaeus pectoralis and two species of the genus Trypoxylon. We also found new host-parasite associations: Chrysis angustula in nests of Pemphredon fabricii, Chrysis rutilans in nests of Stenodynerus clypeopictus, Trichrysis pumilionis in nests of Trypoxylon deceptorium, and Stelis breviuscula in nests of Heriades rubicola. We provide new descriptions of the nests of seven species nesting in reed galls and morphology of mature larvae of eight species nesting in reed galls and two parasitoids and one nest cleptoparasite. The larvae are usually very similar to those of related species but possess characteristics that make them easy to distinguish from related species. Our results show that common reeds are not only expansive and harmful, but very important for many insect species associated with habitats

  20. Food searching and superparasitism in solitary parasitoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirot, Etienne; Bernstein, Carlos

    Optimality theory predicts that, provided that a larva resulting from superparasitism has some chance of winning the competition with the other larvae present in the host, under certain conditions, solitatry parasitoids should resort to superparasitism. Both theoretical and experimental studies have shown that the life expectancy of the parasitoid has a strong influence on the decision to reject or to accept superparasitism. In many species, life expectancy on its turn depends on the feeding behaviour of the parasitoids, which have to forage for non-host food (mainly plant materials), for the maintenance of their energy reseves. As many solitary parasitoids do not find non-host food in their host patches, they have to choose at each instant whether to search for food or to search for hosts. In this paper, we develop a stochastic dynamic programming model to study the behavioural choice between host and food searching, and its consequences for the acceptance and rejection of superparasitism. We study the influence of habitat quality and parasitoid physiological state on the optimal choice. The model predicts that the crucial point determining the optimal strategy is the balance between egg-and time-limitation.

  1. Distribution, parasitoids and cyclic appearance of Russian wheat aphid Diuraphis noxia (Mordvilko, 1913 (Hemiptera, Aphididae in Algeria

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    Malik Laamari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This information on the Russian wheat aphid Diuraphis noxia (Hemiptera, Sternorrhyncha, Aphididae in those regions of Algeria where cereals are grown is based on a nineteen year study. This revealed that this aphid is widely distributed in the high plateaus and interior plains with semi-arid climates. The mummies of this aphid found among its colonies were collected and 4 parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae where identified. These were Diaeretiella rapae (M’Intosh, Aphidius matricariae (Haliday, Aphidius rhopalosiphi (Destefani and Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson, with D. rapae the most abundant. Moreover, this study also indicates that the cyclical appearance of this aphid is determined by the intensity of precipitation during winter and spring.

  2. Parasitoid-plant mutualism : parasitoid attack of herbivore increases plant reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van J.J.A.; Boer, de J.G.; Dicke, M.

    2000-01-01

    We tested whether a plant's life time seed production is increased by parasitization of herbivores in a tritrophic system, Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) plants, Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) caterpillars and the solitary endoparasitoid Cotesia rubecula (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). We esta

  3. Afrotropical Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon van Noort

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Afrotropical Cynipoidea are represented by 306 described species and 54 genera in four families: Cynipidae, Figitidae, Liopteridae and Ibaliidae, the latter represented by a single introduced species. Seven of these genera are only represented by undescribed species in the region. Seven new genus-level synonymies, one genus resurrected from synonymy, 54 new combinations, one combination reinstated, and one new replacement name are presented. We provide identification keys to the families, subfamilies and genera of cynipoid wasps occurring in the Afrotropical region (Africa south of the Sahara, including Madagascar and southern Arabian Peninsula. Online interactive Lucid Phoenix and Lucid matrix keys are available at: http://www.waspweb.org/Cynipoidea/Keys/index.htm. An overview of the biology and checklists of species for each genus are provided. This paper constitutes the first contributory chapter to the book on Afrotropical Hymenoptera.

  4. Field-Cage Methodology for Evaluating Climatic Suitability for Introduced Wood-Borer Parasitoids: Preliminary Results from the Emerald Ash Borer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyshen, Michael D.; Duan, Jian J.; Bauer, Leah S.; Gould, Juli; Taylor, Phil; Bean, Dick; Holko, Carol; Driesche, Roy Van

    2011-01-01

    Field-cage methods were developed to evaluate the abilities of Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), biocontrol agents of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), to parasitize, develop and overwinter following three late-season releases at both a northern (Michigan) and a southern (Maryland) location within the current North American range of A. planipennis. In August, September and October of 2009, five young green ash trees were selected at each location. Tetrastichus planipennisi and S. agrili were each randomly assigned to one of two cages attached to each tree, surrounding separate sections of trunk in which late-instar A. planipennis had been inserted. The following April, the caged trunk sections were dissected to determine the fate of each A. planipennis larva and the developmental stages of all recovered parasitoid progeny. At both locations, T. planipennisi and S. agrili were able to parasitize hosts and successfully overwinter (i.e., reach adulthood the following spring). For T. planipennisi, successful parasitism (i.e., parasitoid progeny reached adulthood) occurred for all caged releases in Maryland, but only for the August and September releases in Michigan. At both locations, percent parasitism by T. planipennisi was higher in August and September than in October. For S. agrili, successful parasitism occurred for all caged releases in Maryland, but only for the August release in Michigan. In Maryland, percent parasitism by S. agrili in August and September was higher than in October. The caging method described here should be useful in determining the climatic suitability of other regions before proceeding with large-scale releases of either species and may have utility in other wood-borer parasitoid systems as well. PMID:22233133

  5. Occurrence of the parasitoid Anastatus sp. in eggs of Leptoglossus zonatus under the maize in Brazil Ocorrência do parasitóide Anastatus sp. em ovos de Leptoglossus zonatus em milho no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Marchiori

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to report, for the first time in Brazil, the occurrence of the parasitoid Anastatus sp. (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae in eggs of Leptoglossus zonatus (Hemiptera: Coreidae on maize (Zea mays L. in Itumbiara County, State of Goias, Brazil (18°25'S; 49°13'W. Percent parasitism was 6.9%.O objetivo dessa nota é registrar a primeira ocorrência, no Brasil, do parasitóide Anastatus sp. (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae em ovos de Leptoglossus zonatus (Hemiptera: Coreidae em cultivar de milho em Itumbiara, Estado de Goiás (18°25'S; 49°13'W. A porcentagem de parasitismo foi de 6,9%.

  6. Revision of the Neotropical genus Eschatocerus Mayr (Hymenoptera, Cynipidae, Eschatocerini) with biological notes and the first description of the terminal larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Aldrey, José Luis; San Blas, Germán

    2015-09-02

    The gall wasp genus Eschatocerus (Hymenoptera, Cynipidae, Eschatocerini), a cynipid genus of gall inducers on Prosopis and Acacia species (Fabaceae), endemic to southern South America, is revised. Complete descriptions of the external morphology of the genus and its three known species, illustrated with scanning electron photographs, are given for the first time, and an updated key for the identification of the species is provided. The biology of the species of Eschatocerus and their galls is described. Host plant associations are given, and the terminal larva of Eschatocerus niger is described for the first time. Preliminary notes on the inquiline and parasitoid community associated with the galls of Eschatocerus species are also given.

  7. The maxillo-labial complex of Sparasion (Hymenoptera, Platygastroidea

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    Ovidiu Popovici

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hymenopterans have evolved a rich array of morphological diversity within the maxillo-labial complex. Although the character system has been extensively studied and its phylogenetic implications revealed in large hymenopterans, e.g. in Aculeata, it remains comparatively understudied in parasitoid wasps. Reductions of character systems due to the small body size in microhymenoptera make it difficult to establish homology and limits the interoperability of morphological data. We describe here the maxillo-labial complex of an ancestral platygastroid lineage, Sparasion, and provide an ontology-based model of the anatomical concepts related to the maxillo-labial complex (MLC of Hymenoptera. The possible functions and putative evolutionary relevance of some anatomical structures of the MLC in Sparasion are discussed. Anatomical structures are visualized with Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

  8. Nesting Biology and Behavior of Euodynerus dantici (Rossi, 1790 (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Eumeninae in Central Mongolia

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    Batchuluun Buyanjargal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nesting biology of Euodynerus dantici (Rossi, 1790 was studied in the Khugnu- Khaan Mountains of Khugnu-Tarna National Park, central Mongolia in 2014 using nest traps. Euodynerus dantici is univoltine in the study site, with one generation per growth season. Nest architecture and its structural parts were described in details. The inner cells of the nests were longer and contained a proportionately larger amount of food than the shorter outer cells. Females developed in inner cells and males developed in outer cells. Developmental stages of E. dantici is studied with details of pupation period. All basic behavioral elements of nesting females are described. A nest parasitoid, Chrysis ignita (Linnaeus, 1758 (Hymenoptera, Chrysididae was reared from E. dantici nests for the fi rst time. For provisioning, caterpillars of the family Noctuidae (Lepidoptera were hunted by females. Diversity in nest architecture is possibly a result of nest parasite pressure

  9. Thermal requirements and estimate number of generations of Palmistichus elaeisis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae in different Eucalyptus plantations regions

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    FF Pereira

    Full Text Available To use Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare and LaSalle, 1993 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae in a biological control programme of Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll, 1782 (Lepidoptera: Geometridae, it is necessary to study thermal requirements, because temperature can affect the metabolism and bioecological aspects. The objective was to determine the thermal requirements and estimate the number of generations of P. elaeisis in different Eucalyptus plantations regions. After 24 hours in contact with the parasitoid, the pupae was placed in 16, 19, 22, 25, 28 and 31 °C, 70 ± 10% of relative humidity and 14 hours of photophase. The duration of the life cycle of P. elaeisis was reduced with the increase in the temperature. At 31 °C the parasitoid could not finish the cycle in T. arnobia pupae. The emergence of P. elaeisis was not affected by the temperature, except at 31 °C. The number of individuals was between six and 1238 per pupae, being higher at 16 °C. The thermal threshold of development (Tb and the thermal constant (K of this parasitoid were 3.92 °C and 478.85 degree-days (GD, respectively, allowing for the completion of 14.98 generations per year in Linhares, Espírito Santo State, 13.87 in Pompéu and 11.75 in Viçosa, Minas Gerais State and 14.10 in Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul State.

  10. ¿MULTIPLICAR Tetrastichus howardi (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE EN LA ORUGA DE LA SEDA AFECTA SU BIOLOGÍA?

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    Nahara Gabriela PIÑEYRO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available La multiplicación sucesiva de parasitoides en hospederos alternativos, puede afectar las características biológicas y comprometer los sistemas de cría masiva de estos. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la multiplicación de Tetrastichus howardi (Olliff, 1893 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae en pupas del hospedero alternativo Bombyx mori (Linnaeus, 1758 (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae, durante tres generaciones. Y si eso afecta su desempeño reproductivo, cuando se cría, posteriormente, en pupas del hospedero natural Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius, 1794 (Lepidoptera: Crambidae. Las informaciones obtenidas en este estudio pueden mejorar y facilitar el control biológico de plagas, principalmente, con la utilización de parasitoides, debido a que T. howardi parasita y se desarrolla en pupas de B. mori. De forma general, la multiplicación de T. howardi durante tres generaciones en pupas del hospedero alternativo B. mori no compromete las características biológicas de este parasitoide cuando se multiplica en su hospedero natural D. saccharalis a los efectos de su utilización en programas de control biológico.

  11. Egg parasitoids of Lobesia botrana (Den. & Schiff. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae in the vineyards of Izmir and Manisa Provinces in Turkey

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    Ozsemerci Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to determine egg parasitoids of Lobesia botrana (Den. & Schiff. on Sultani Cekirdeksiz grape in Izmir and Manisa between 2009–2011. Both eggs found on grape berries in vineyards and the eggs reared in the lab and mounted onto bunches were used to determine egg parasitoids. Minimum 50 lab-reared eggs were mounted at the level of bunches in each vineyard. These eggs were re-collected after 2–4 days and maintained in the climate room for checking daily if parasitized. Parasitism rate by Trichogramma euproctidis Girault (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae on mounted L. botrana eggs was determined as 8% in conventional vineyard of Sarıgöl in 2009, whereas it was found 10.91% in conventional vineyard of Salihli, 5% in organic vineyard of Alaşehir and 1.33% in integrated vineyard of Menemen in 2010. Natural parasitism of L. botrana eggs on berries by T. euproctidiswas determined as 10% and 16% in integrated vineyard of Alaşehir in 2009 and 2010, respectively. T. euproctidisparasitized 38.6% of eggs whereas T. brassicae(Bezdenko parasitised 1.44% of eggs on the berries in 2011. T. euproctidis and T. brassicae have been determined on the eggs of L. botrana in the Aegean Region, Turkey for the first time.

  12. Interspecific competition/facilitation among insect parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano, Antonino; Peri, Ezio; Colazza, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Competition for limited resources is a widespread ecological interaction in animals. In the case of insect parasitoids, species can compete for host resources both at the adult stage as well as at the larval stage. Interspecific competition can play a role in sizing and shaping community structures. In addition of being relevant for basic ecological studies, understanding how interspecific competition between parasitoids affects pest suppression is important for biological control. In this opinion paper we review recent advances in the field of interspecific competition among parasitoids in a biological control perspective. We first discuss adult competition, highlighting which factors are likely to play a role in the outcome of competition when adults interact either directly or indirectly. Then we focus on the interactions occurring between competing larvae that develop within the same host taking also into account the fitness consequences of competition for the larva surviving interspecific competition. We also explore the possibility of interspecific facilitation among parasitoids in those situations in which a given species may benefit from interspecific competition.

  13. Whitefly parasitoids from the Maltese Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Mifsud, David; Viggiani ,Gennaro; Dandria, David; Lanfranco, Edwin

    1995-01-01

    Nine whitefly parasitoids in three different families (Aphelinidae, Eulophidae and Platygasteridae) are recorded from the Maltese Islands. An Amitus sp. and a Euderomphale sp. are recorded for the first time as occuring on Tetralicia ericae Harrison. Notes on introduced species for biological control of whitefly pests are also included.

  14. Diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilo, BM; Rueff, F; Mosbech, H; Bonifazi, F; Oude Elberink, JNG

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of diagnostic procedure is to classify a sting reaction by history, identify the underlying pathogenetic mechanism, and identify the offending insect. Diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy thus forms the basis for the treatment. In the central and northern Europe vespid (mainly Vespula

  15. Sex determination in the Hymenoptera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimpel, George E.; de Boer, Jetske G.

    2008-01-01

    The dominant and ancestral mode of sex determination in the Hymenoptera is arrhenotokous parthenogenesis, in which diploid females develop from fertilized eggs and haploid males develop from unfertilized eggs. We discuss recent progress in the understanding of the genetic and cytoplasmic mechanisms

  16. The Braconidae (Hymenoptera) of Greenland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.

    2006-01-01

    Thirty species belonging to 16 genera of the family Braconidae (Hymenoptera) are reported from Greenland. Seven are new species described and illustrated below: Dacnusa groenlandica spec. nov.; Aphidius tarsalis spec. nov.; Praon brevistigma spec. nov.; Blacus (B.) groenlandicus spec. nov.; Cotesia

  17. Effects of elevated CO2 and plant genotype on interactions among cotton, aphids and parasitoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Cheng Sun; Li Feng; Feng Gao; Feng Ge

    2011-01-01

    Effects of CO2 level (ambient vs.elevated) on the interactions among three cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) genotypes,the cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii Glover),and its hymenoptera parasitoid (Lysiphlebiajaponica Ashrnead) were quantified.It was hypothesized that aphid-parasitoid interactions in crop systems may be altered by elevated CO2,and that the degree of change is influenced by plant genotype.The cotton genotypes had high (M9101),medium (HZ401) and low (ZMS 13) gossypol contents,and the response to elevated CO2 was genotype-specific.Elevated CO2 increased the ratio of total non-structural carbohydrates to nitrogen (TNC:N) in the high-gossypol genotype and the mediumgossypol genotype.For all three genotypes,elevated CO2 had no effect on concentrations of gossypol and condensed tannins.A.gossypii fitness declined when aphids were reared on the high-gossypol genotype versus the low-gossypol genotype under elevated CO2.Furthermore,elevated CO2 decreased the developmental time of L.japonica associated with the high-gossypol genotype and the low-gossypol genotype,but did not affect parasitism or emergence rates.Our study suggests that the abundance of A.gossypii on cotton will not be directly affected by increases in atmospheric CO2.We speculate that A.gossypii may diminish in pest status in elevated CO2 and high-gossypol genotype environments because of reduced fitness to the high-gossypol genotype and shorter developmental time of L.japonica.

  18. The integrative taxonomic approach reveals host specific species in an encyrtid parasitoid species complex.

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    Douglas Chesters

    Full Text Available Integrated taxonomy uses evidence from a number of different character types to delimit species and other natural groupings. While this approach has been advocated recently, and should be of particular utility in the case of diminutive insect parasitoids, there are relatively few examples of its application in these taxa. Here, we use an integrated framework to delimit independent lineages in Encyrtus sasakii (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Encyrtidae, a parasitoid morphospecies previously considered a host generalist. Sequence variation at the DNA barcode (cytochrome c oxidase I, COI and nuclear 28S rDNA loci were compared to morphometric recordings and mating compatibility tests, among samples of this species complex collected from its four scale insect hosts, covering a broad geographic range of northern and central China. Our results reveal that Encyrtus sasakii comprises three lineages that, while sharing a similar morphology, are highly divergent at the molecular level. At the barcode locus, the median K2P molecular distance between individuals from three primary populations was found to be 11.3%, well outside the divergence usually observed between Chalcidoidea conspecifics (0.5%. Corroborative evidence that the genetic lineages represent independent species was found from mating tests, where compatibility was observed only within populations, and morphometric analysis, which found that despite apparent morphological homogeneity, populations clustered according to forewing shape. The independent lineages defined by the integrated analysis correspond to the three scale insect hosts, suggesting the presence of host specific cryptic species. The finding of hidden host specificity in this species complex demonstrates the critical role that DNA barcoding will increasingly play in revealing hidden biodiversity in taxa that present difficulties for traditional taxonomic approaches.

  19. OCORRÊNCIA DE Gryon gallardoi (BRETHES (HYMENOPTERA: SCELIONIDAE PARASITANDO OVOS DE Leptoglossus zonatus (DALLAS (HEMIPTERA: COREIDAE EM ITUMBIARA, GOIÁS, BRASIL OCCURRENCE OF Gryon gallardi (BRETHES (HYMENOPTERA: SCELIONIDAE PARASITING EGGS OF Leptoglossus zonatus (DALLAS (HEMIPTERA: COREIDAE IN ITUMBIARA, GOIÁS, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Marchiori

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Este trabalho relata a primeira ocorrência, em Goiás, de Gryon gallardoi (Bréthes (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae parasitando ovos de Leptoglossus zonatus (Dallas (Hemiptera: Coreidae, em milho cultivar Dekalb 601, no município de Itumbiara, Goiás, Brasil.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Hymenoptera; Hemiptera; parasitóides; controle natural.

    This work reports the first occurrence in Itumbiara, Goiás, Brazil, of Gryon gallardoi (Bréthes (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae parasitizing eggs of Leptoglossus zonatus (Dallas (Hemiptera: Coreidae in maize.

    KEY-WORDS: Hymenoptera; Hemiptera; parasitoids; natural controle.

  20. Dryocosmus kuriphilus (Hymenoptera cynipidae) in Sardegna

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The chestnut gall wasp Dryocosmus kuriphilus was detected in Sardinia in 2007. Two years later its biological control agent, Torymus sinensis, was released and was started the monitoring of native oak gall wasp parasitoids recruited by D. kuriphilus. Five years after its introduction the exotic parasitoid T. sinensis established itself in the study sites and more than 25 morphospecies of native parasitoids emerged from D. kuriphilus galls.

  1. Species and sexual differences in behavioural responses of a specialist and generalist parasitoid species to host-related volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngumbi, E; Fadamiro, H

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between the degree of specialization of parasitoids and their responses to host-related volatiles is an important and current evolutionary question. Specialist parasitoids which have evolved to attack fewer host species are predicted to be more responsive to host-related volatiles than generalists. We tested the above prediction by comparing behavioural responses of both sexes of two parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) with different degrees of host specificity, Microplitis croceipes (Cresson) (specialist) and Cotesia marginiventris (generalist), to different suites of synthetic host-related volatile compounds. The compounds tested at two doses (1 and 100 μg) include two green leaf volatiles (GLVs: hexanal and (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol) and four herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs: (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, linalool, (Z)-3-hexenyl butyrate and (E,E)-α-farnesene). Two hypotheses were tested: (i) M. croceipes (specialist) would show relatively greater behavioural responses to the HIPVs, whereas C. marginiventris (generalist) would show greater behavioural responses to the GLVs, and (ii) females of both species would show greater responses than conspecific males to the host-related volatiles. At the low dose (1 μg), females of the specialist showed significantly greater responses than females of the generalist to three of the tested HIPVs, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, linalool and (Z)-3-hexenyl butyrate. In contrast, females of the generalist showed relatively greater responses to the GLVs. The same trends were recorded at the high dose but fewer significant differences were detected. In general, similar results were recorded for males, with the exception of linalool (an HIPV) which elicited significantly greater response in the generalist than the specialist. Comparing the sexes, females of both species showed greater responses than conspecific males to most of the tested volatiles. The ecological significance of these findings is discussed.

  2. Famílias de Hymenoptera (Insecta como ferramenta avaliadora da conservação de restingas no extremo sul do Brasil

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    Cristina Maria Loyola Zardo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de estimar e comparar a diversidade e flutuação populacional das famílias de Hymenoptera em área de restinga foi realizado um levantamento faunístico em duas áreas de restinga com diferentes níveis de conservação. Foram coletados 5.518 himenópteros distribuídos em 30 famílias. Os picos populacionais na flutuação das famílias ocorreram no verão confirmando a alta correlação da temperatura com a distribuição das famílias. Constatou-se na restinga em sucessão maior riqueza, porém, com alta dominância, abrigando representantes dos três grupos ecológicos (antófilos, generalistas e parasitóides em alta abundância. A restinga preservada, com 17 famílias, verificou-se mais diversa e homogênea, onde verificou-se maior abundância dos parasitóides, devido à maior estabilidade do sistema. A riqueza de famílias de Hymenoptera em áreas de restinga pode ser utilizada como parâmetro indicativo de qualidade ambiental, para este tipo de bioma.Hymenoptera Families (Insecta as Evaluation Tool of the Conservation of Sandbanks in Southern BrazilAbstract. With aim to estimate and compare the diversity and population of the Hymenoptera families in a sandbank area was carried out a wildlife survey in two areas of sandbank with different levels of conservation. We collected 5 518 Hymenoptera distributed in 30 families. The peaks in the families fluctuation occurred in the summer confirmed the high correlation of temperature with the distribution of families. The sandbank in succession had the highest richness, however with high dominance, hosting representatives of the three ecological groups (anthophilous, generalists and parasitoids in high abundance. The sandbank preserved, with 17 families, was more diverse and homogeneous, where the parasitoids showed greater abundance due to greater system stability. The richness of Hymenoptera families in sandbanks can be used as a parameter indicative of environmental quality.

  3. Aphid parasitoids that occur on wheat crops of Northeast of the Parana State with recovery of Aphidius rhopalosiphi in BrazilParasitoides de pulgões-do-trigo que ocorrem no Norte do estado do Paraná e recaptura de Aphidius rhopalosiphi no Brasil

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    Adriano Thibes Hoshino

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae are the main pest of wheat (Hemiptera: Aphididae in several countries. In Brazil, the Biological Control of Wheat Aphids released millions of aphid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae and Aphelinidae on wheat fields and in the present moment the chemical control is rarely necessary. However, since the 80’s few studies was carried out to evaluate the species established in Brazil. For this reason, the aim of this study was to record the species of aphid parasitoids that occur in wheat in the northern region of Parana state, Brazil. Four commercial wheat fields were investigated in the agricultural years of 2008 and 2009. The aphid parasitoids were captured with traps (Moericke and Malaise and aphid mummified were collected. In total, six species of parasitoids were found, Aphidius colemani, A. uzbekistanicus, A. ervi, Aphidius rhopalosiphi, Diaeretiella rapae e Lysiphlebus testaceipes. These results contribute with the register of three exotic species in Parana, and confirm the establishment of A. rhopalosiphi in the country. We emphasize the need for further studies in other regions of the country, as other species introduced also need to have their establishment confirmed.Os pulgões (Hemiptera: Aphididae são pragas de extrema importância em cereais de inverno no mundo todo. No Brasil, o programa Controle Biológico de Pulgões do Trigo liberou milhões de parasitoides (Hymenoptera: Braconidae e Aphelinidae nas áreas tritícolas, reduzindo expressivamente a população da praga, e atualmente raramente o controle químico se faz necessário. Entretanto, desde a década de 80 poucos trabalhos de campo tem sido realizados para verificar as espécies efetivamente estabelecidas no País. Por esta razão, este estudo objetivou registrar as espécies de parasitoides de pulgões ocorrentes em lavouras de trigo na região Norte no Paraná. O trabalho foi realizado em quatro áreas comerciais de trigo, durante as safras

  4. Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), defend Phenacoccus solenopsis (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) against its natural enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aiming; Lu, Yongyue; Zeng, Ling; Xu, Yijuan; Liang, Guangwen

    2013-04-01

    Mutualism is a common and important ecological phenomenon characterized by beneficial interaction between two species. Red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren, tend honeydew-producing hemipteran insects and reduce the activity of these insects' enemies. Ant-hemipteran interactions frequently exert positive effects on the densities of hemipterans. We tested the hypothesis that ant tending can increase the densities of the mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), and reduce the densities of the mealybug's predatory and parasitic enemies, the lady beetle, Menochilus sexmaculata Fabricius (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), and the parasitoid wasp, Aenasius bambawalei Hayat (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae). We found that more ants foraged on mealybug-infested hibiscus plants than on mealybug-free plants. The number of foraging ants on plants infested with high densities of mealybugs (62.5 ants per plant) was nearly six times that on mealybug-free plants (10.2 ants per plant). Experiment results showed that ant tending significantly increased the survival of mealybugs: if predatory and parasitic enemies were present, the survival of mealybugs tended by fire ants was higher than that in the absence of tending ants. Furthermore, this tending by fire ants significantly decreased the survival of lady beetle larvae. However, no apparent effect was observed on the survival of parasitoid.

  5. The foraging behavior of Diaeretiella rapae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae on Diuraphis noxia (Hemiptera: Aphididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tazerouni Zahra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Host stage preference, functional response and mutual interference of Diaeretiella rapae (McIntosh (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae on Diuraphis noxia (Mordvilko (Hemiptera: Aphididae were investigated under defined laboratory conditions (20±1°C; 60±5% relative humidity; 16 h light/8 h dark photoperiod. Nicholson’s model and linear regression were used to determine per capita search-efficiency and the interference coefficient, respectively. There was a significant difference between the rates of parasitism on different stages of D. noxia. The highest parasitism percentage was observed on the third instar nymphs of D. noxia in both choice and no-choice preference tests. Results of logistic regression revealed a type II functional response. The estimated values of search-efficiency (a and handling time (Th were 0.072 h-1 and 0.723 h, respectively. The maximum attack rate was calculated to be 33.22. The per capita search-efficiency decreased from 0.011 to 0.004 (h-1 as parasitoid densities increased from 1 to 8. Therefore, different host-parasitoid ratios can affect the efficacy of D. rapae.

  6. Acquired resistance in a weevil to its parasitoid influenced by host plants

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    Stephen Latham Goldson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Field parasitism rates of the Argentine stem weevil Listronotus bonariensis (Kuschel (Coleoptera: Curculionidae by Microctonus hyperodae Loan (Hymenoptera: Braconidae are known to vary according to different host Lolium species that also differ in ploidy. To further investigate this, a laboratory study was conducted to examine parasitism rates on tetraploid Italian L. multiflorum, diploid L. perenne and diploid hybrid L. perenne × L. multiflorum; none of which were infected by Epichloë endophyte. At the same time, the opportunity was taken to compare the results of this study with observations made during extensive laboratory-based research and parasitoid-rearing in the 1990s using the same host plant species. This made it possible to determine whether there has been any change in weevil susceptibility to the parasitoid over a 20 year period in the presence of the tetraploid Italian, diploid perennial and hybrid host grasses that were common to both experiments.The incidence of parasitism in cages, in the presence of these three grasses mirrored what has recently been observed in the field. When caged, weevil parasitism rates in the presence of a tetraploid Italian ryegrass host were significantly higher (75% than rates that occurred in the presence of either the diploid perennial (46% or the diploid hybrid (52% grass, which were not significantly different from each other. This is very different to laboratory parasitism rates in the 1990s when in the presence of both of the latter grasses high rates of parasitism (c. 75% were recorded. These high rates are typical of those still found in both field and caged tetraploid Italian grasses. In contrast, the abrupt decline in weevil parasitism rates points to the possibility of evolved resistance by the weevil to the parasitoid in the diploid and hybrid grasses, but not so in the tetraploid. The orientation of plants in the laboratory cages had no significant effect on parasitism rates under any

  7. Suitability and accessibility of immature Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) stages to Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyshen, Michael D; Duan, Jian J; Bauer, Leah S; Fraser, Ivich

    2010-08-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregarious larval endo-parasitoid, is one of three biocontrol agents from Asia currently being released in the United States to combat the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). The current protocol for rearing T. planipennisi involves presenting the wasps with artificially infested ash sticks made by placing field-collected larvae into shallow grooves beneath flaps of bark. Although third and fourth instars are readily accepted by T. planipennisi in these exposures, the suitability of younger or older developmental stages, which are often more readily available in the field, has not been tested. In this study, we used both artificially infested ash sticks and naturally infested ash logs to test which emerald ash borer developmental stages (second to fourth instars, J larvae [preprepupae], prepupae, and pupae) are most suitable for rearing T. planipennisi. T. planipennisi parasitized all stages except for pupae, but parasitized fewer J larvae and prepupae in naturally infested logs than in artificially infested ash sticks. This is probably because, in naturally infested ash logs, these stages were confined to pupal chambers excavated in the sapwood and may have been largely beyond the reach of ovipositing T. planipennisi. The number of T. planipennisi progeny produced was positively correlated (logarithmic) with host weight, but this relationship was stronger when J larvae and prepupae were excluded from the data set. Fourth instars yielded the most parasitoid progeny, followed by, in approximately equal numbers, J larvae, prepupae, and third instars. Second instars yielded too few parasitoid progeny to benefit rearing efforts.

  8. Observation on the host parasitoid interaction between Periplaneta americana, the American cockroach and Tetrastichus hagenowii, an oothecal parasitoid

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    R. Srinivasan

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out on the host parasitoid interaction between Periplaneta americana, the American cockroach and Tetrastichus hagenowii, an oothecal parasitoid. This gregarious female parasitoid infected and or oviposited in only one host and caused 100 por cento mortality of the infected host. However, increase in parasitoid density decreased the progeny production and influenced the sex ratio. The progenies produced were male biased. When host preference was tested by offering oothecae of different species of cockroaches, T. hagenowii showed a predilection towards the oothecae of P. americana, suggestings its host specificity.

  9. Observation on the host parasitoid interaction between Periplaneta americana, the American cockroach and Tetrastichus hagenowii, an oothecal parasitoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, R; Panicker, K N

    1994-01-01

    Investigations were carried out on the host parasitoid interaction between Periplaneta americana, the American cockroach and Tetrastichus hagenowii, an oothecal parasitoid. This gregarious female parasitoid infected and or oviposited in only one host and caused 100% mortality of the infected host. However, increase in parasitoid density decreased the progeny production and influenced the sex ratio. The progenies produced were male biased. When host preference was tested by offering oothecae of different species of cockroaches. T. hagenowii showed a predilection towards the oothecae of P. americana, suggesting its host specificity.

  10. A poorly known high-latitude parasitoid wasp community: unexpected diversity and dramatic changes through time.

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    Jose Fernandez-Triana

    Full Text Available Climate change will have profound and unanticipated effects on species distributions. The pace and nature of this change is largely unstudied, especially for the most diverse elements of terrestrial communities--the arthropods--here we have only limited knowledge concerning the taxonomy and the ecology of these groups. Because Arctic ecosystems have already experienced significant increases in temperature over the past half century, shifts in community structure may already be in progress. Here we utilise collections of a particularly hyperdiverse insect group--parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera; Braconidae; Microgastrinae--at Churchill, Manitoba, Canada in the early and mid-twentieth century to compare the composition of the contemporary community to that present 50-70 years ago. Morphological and DNA barcoding results revealed the presence of 79 species of microgastrine wasps in collections from Churchill, but we estimate that 20% of the local fauna awaits detection. Species composition and diversity between the two time periods differ significantly; species that were most common in historic collections were not found in contemporary collections and vice versa. Using barcodes we compared these collections to others from across North America; contemporary Churchill species are most affiliated with more south-western collections, while historic collections were more affiliated with eastern collections. The past five decades has clearly seen a dramatic change of species composition within the area studied coincident with rising temperature.

  11. COMPLEMENTARY SEX DETERMINATION IN HYMENOPTERAN PARASITOIDS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR BIOLOGICAL CONTROL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUZhishan; KeithR.Hopper; PaulJ.Ode; RogerW.Fuester; CHENJia-hua; GeorgeE.Heimpel

    2003-01-01

    In haplodiploid Hymenoptera, unfertilized eggs produce haploid males while fertilized eggs lead to diploid females under most circumstances. Diploid males can also be produced from fertilization under a system of sex determination known as complementary sex determination (CSD). Under single-locus CSD, sex is determined by multiple alleles at a single sex locus. Individuals heterozygous at the sex locus are female while hemizygous and homozygous individuals develop as haploid and diploid males, respectively. In multiple-locus CSD, two or more loci, each with two or more alleles, determine sex. Diploid individuals are female if one or more sex loci are het-erozygous, while a diploid is male only if homozygous at all sex loci. Diploid males are known to occur in 43 hym-enopteran species and single-locus CSD has been demonstrated in 22 of these species. Diploid males are either developmentally inviable or sterile, so their production constitutes a genetic load. Because diploid male production is more likely under inbreeding, CSD is a form of inbreeding depression. It is crucial to preserve the diversity of sex alleles and reduce the loss of genetic variation in biological control. In the parasitoid species with single-locus CSD, certain precautionary procedures can prevent negative effects of single-locus CSD on biological control.

  12. Intraspecific variability in the parasitoid wasp Trichogramma chilonis: can we predict the outcome of hybridization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuto, Chiara; Tabone, Elisabeth; Vercken, Elodie; Sorbier, Nathalie; Colombel, Etty; Warot, Sylvie; Fauvergue, Xavier; Ris, Nicolas

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of biological control, the selection of effective natural enemies determines the final pest control. Thus, the genetic improvement of biocontrol agents could enhance the efficiency of biocontrol programs. Although promising, this approach has rarely been applied in this field. At the intraspecific level, hybridization between divergent populations of biocontrol agents is expected to promote hybrid vigor (heterosis), but it is not clear to what extent. An even more difficult task is the ability to predict the fitness of hybrids from the biological characteristics of their parents. We investigated these general questions by crossing seven populations of the parasitoid wasp Trichogramma chilonis (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae). Our results show different levels of mating compatibilities among populations, including asymmetric or almost complete reproductive isolation. Hybrids' performance (fitness of the F(1) generation) ranges from inbreeding depression to heterosis. It was possible, to some extent, to predict hybrid fitness from pairwise genetic and phenotypic distances among parents, in accordance with the 'dominance' hypothesis. This may provide general guidelines for the genetic improvement of biological control agents.

  13. Deforestation homogenizes tropical parasitoid-host networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, Etienne; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2010-06-01

    Human activities drive biotic homogenization (loss of regional diversity) of many taxa. However, whether species interaction networks (e.g., food webs) can also become homogenized remains largely unexplored. Using 48 quantitative parasitoid-host networks replicated through space and time across five tropical habitats, we show that deforestation greatly homogenized network structure at a regional level, such that interaction composition became more similar across rice and pasture sites compared with forested habitats. This was not simply caused by altered consumer and resource community composition, but was associated with altered consumer foraging success, such that parasitoids were more likely to locate their hosts in deforested habitats. Furthermore, deforestation indirectly homogenized networks in time through altered mean consumer and prey body size, which decreased in deforested habitats. Similar patterns were obtained with binary networks, suggesting that interaction (link) presence-absence data may be sufficient to detect network homogenization effects. Our results show that tropical agroforestry systems can support regionally diverse parasitoid-host networks, but that removal of canopy cover greatly homogenizes the structure of these networks in space, and to a lesser degree in time. Spatiotemporal homogenization of interaction networks may alter coevolutionary outcomes and reduce ecological resilience at regional scales, but may not necessarily be predictable from community changes observed within individual trophic levels.

  14. Five new associations of parasitoids in potter wasps (Vespidae, Eumeninae

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    Tiago H. Auko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Five new associations of parasitoids in potter wasps (Vespidae, Eumeninae. New associations of host and parasitoids involving potter wasps: Toxophora leucon and Pleurochrysis sp. were found parasitizing Cyphomenes anisitsii, Chrysis sp. (gr. intricans was found parasitizing Minixi suffusum, Plega beardi was found parasitizing Montezumia pelagica sepulchralis and Macrosiagon sp. was found parasitizing Pachodynerus nasidens.

  15. Is parasitoid acceptance of different host species dynamic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choice of host individuals by parasitoids is dynamic, varying with physiological state and experience. In particular, female parasitoids with high egg loads and low life expectancy are more willing to accept low quality hosts than females with low egg loads and high life expectancy. However, studi...

  16. Host niches and defensive extended phenotypes structure parasitoid wasp communities.

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    Richard Bailey

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Oak galls are spectacular extended phenotypes of gallwasp genes in host oak tissues and have evolved complex morphologies that serve, in part, to exclude parasitoid natural enemies.Parasitoids and their insect herbivore hosts have coevolved to produce diverse communities comprising about a third of all animal species. The factors structuring these communities, however, remain poorly understood. An emerging theme in community ecology is the need to consider the effects of host traits, shaped by both natural selection and phylogenetic history, on associated communities of natural enemies. Here we examine the impact of host traits and phylogenetic relatedness on 48 ecologically closed and species-rich communities of parasitoids attacking gall-inducing wasps on oaks. Gallwasps induce the development of spectacular and structurally complex galls whose species- and generation-specific morphologies are the extended phenotypes of gallwasp genes. All the associated natural enemies attack their concealed hosts through gall tissues, and several structural gall traits have been shown to enhance defence against parasitoid attack. Here we explore the significance of these and other host traits in predicting variation in parasitoid community structure across gallwasp species. In particular, we test the "Enemy Hypothesis," which predicts that galls with similar morphology will exclude similar sets of parasitoids and therefore have similar parasitoid communities. Having controlled for phylogenetic patterning in host traits and communities, we found significant correlations between parasitoid community structure and several gall structural traits (toughness, hairiness, stickiness, supporting the Enemy Hypothesis. Parasitoid community structure was also consistently predicted by components of the hosts' spatiotemporal niche, particularly host oak taxonomy and gall location (e.g., leaf versus bud versus seed. The combined explanatory power of structural and

  17. Host-released dimethylsulphide activates the dinoflagellate parasitoid Parvilucifera sinerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, Esther; Alacid, Elisabet; Reñé, Albert; Petrou, Katherina; Simó, Rafel

    2013-05-01

    Parasitoids are a major top-down cause of mortality of coastal harmful algae, but the mechanisms and strategies they have evolved to efficiently infect ephemeral blooms are largely unknown. Here, we show that the generalist dinoflagellate parasitoid Parvilucifera sinerae (Perkinsozoa, Alveolata) is activated from dormancy, not only by Alexandrium minutum cells but also by culture filtrates. We unequivocally identified the algal metabolite dimethylsulphide (DMS) as the density-dependent cue of the presence of potential host. This allows the parasitoid to alternate between a sporangium-hosted dormant stage and a chemically-activated, free-living virulent stage. DMS-rich exudates of resistant dinoflagellates also induced parasitoid activation, which we interpret as an example of coevolutionary arms race between parasitoid and host. These results further expand the involvement of dimethylated sulphur compounds in marine chemical ecology, where they have been described as foraging cues and chemoattractants for mammals, turtles, birds, fish, invertebrates and plankton microbes.

  18. Seletividade de diferentes agrotóxicos usados na cultura da soja ao parasitoide de ovos Telenomus remus Selectivity of different pesticides used in soybean to the eggs parasitoid Telenomus remus

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    Eduardo Lima do Carmo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A preservação dos agentes de controle biológico no agroecossistema é indispensável para o sucesso do manejo integrado de pragas. Entretanto, o controle químico de pragas ainda é indispensável em diversas culturas. Nesse contexto, a seletividade dos agrotóxicos aos inimigos naturais deve ser sempre considerada na escolha do melhor produto. Portanto, este estudo verificou o impacto causado por diferentes agrotóxicos na emergência do parasitoide de ovos Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae, quando aplicados nas fases de larva e pupa (posturas de 100 a 150 ovos de Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae seis e 10 dias após o parasitismo, respectivamente. Três ensaios, com 11 tratamentos e cinco repetições, foram conduzidos em laboratório com inseticidas, fungicidas e herbicidas, respectivamente. Cada ensaio foi conduzido com 10 tratamentos de agrotóxicos e água como testemunha seletiva. Todos os produtos fitossanitários foram testados nas doses utilizadas na cultura da soja. Ovos de S. frugiperda parasitados por T. remus foram imersos nos tratamentos por cinco segundos e, após secagem total, foram acondicionados em sacos plásticos até a emergência dos adultos dos parasitoides. A viabilidade do parasitismo foi avaliada, e a redução na emergência dos parasitoides foi classificada segundo as normas da International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC. Os resultados mostraram que os inseticidas do grupo dos reguladores de crescimento, como o flufenoxurom, diflubenzurom e metoxifenozido e também os inseticidas imidacloprido + beta-ciflutrina e acefato, foram seletivos às fases imaturas do parasitoide. Espinosade foi classificado como inócuo para larvas de T. remus. Gama-cialotrina foi levemente nocivo para larvas e inócuo para pupas. Bifentrina e clorpirifós foram, respectivamente, levemente nocivo e nocivo para ambas as fases de desenvolvimento de T. remus. Com relação aos herbicidas

  19. The braconid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) of Kermania pistaciella Amsel (Lepidoptera: Tineidae: Hieroxestinae) in Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.; Mehrnejad, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    Two species of Braconidae (Chelonus kermakiae (Tobias, 2001) (Cheloninae) and Centistidea pistaciella spec. nov. (Miracinae)) have been reared from the pistachio twig borer moth (Kermania pistaciella Amsel) (Tineidae). Both species are described and illustrated; Centistidea pistaciella spec. nov. is

  20. Multifaceted defense against antagonistic microbes in developing offspring of the parasitoid wasp Ampulex compressa (Hymenoptera, Ampulicidae.

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    Katharina Weiss

    Full Text Available Effective antimicrobial strategies are essential adaptations of insects to protect themselves, their offspring, and their foods from microbial pathogens and decomposers. Larvae of the emerald cockroach wasp, Ampulex compressa, sanitize their cockroach hosts, Periplaneta americana, with a cocktail of nine antimicrobials comprising mainly (R-(--mellein and micromolide. The blend of these antimicrobials has broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Here we explore the spatio-temporal pattern of deployment of antimicrobials during the development from egg to adult as well as their physico-chemical properties to assess how these aspects may contribute to the success of the antimicrobial strategy. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS we show that larvae start sanitizing their food as soon as they have entered their host to feed on its tissue. Subsequently, they impregnate the cockroach carcass with antimicrobials to create a hygienic substrate for cocoon spinning inside the host. Finally, the antimicrobials are incorporated into the cocoon. The antimicrobial profiles on cockroach and wasp cocoon differed markedly. While micromolide persisted on the cockroaches until emergence of the wasps, solid-phase microextraction sampling and GC/MS analysis revealed that (R-(--mellein vaporized from the cockroaches and accumulated in the enclosed nest. In microbial challenge assays (R-(--mellein in the headspace of parasitized cockroaches inhibited growth of entomopathogenic and opportunistic microbes (Serratia marcescens, Aspergillus sydowii, Metarhizium brunneum. We conclude that, in addition to food sanitation, A. compressa larvae enclose themselves in two defensive walls by impregnating the cocoon and the cockroach cuticle with antimicrobials. On top of that, they use vaporous (R-(--mellein to sanitize the nest by fumigation. This multifaceted antimicrobial defense strategy involving the spatially and temporally coordinated deployment of several antimicrobials in solution and vapor form has apparently evolved to reliably protect the larvae themselves and their food against a broad range of antagonistic microbes.

  1. The Attraction of Lepidoptera to flowering plants also attractive to parasitoids (Diptera, Hymenoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowering plants added to agricultural environments can provide food, shelter and alternative hosts for natural enemies and so increase crop yields. However, these same resources might be exploited by certain pests. Twelve species of plants, many of them Florida-native or established, known to attra...

  2. [Trichogramma species (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) parasitoids of Lepidopteran eggs in Lara State, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, José; Vásquez, Carlos; Pérez B, Nieves L; Valera, Neicy; Ríos, Yolmar; Arrieche, Norayda; Querino, Ranyse B

    2007-01-01

    This work was conducted to determine the occurrence of Trichogramma wasp species in Lara State, Venezuela. Lepidopteran egg samples collected from various crop leaves were observed daily under laboratory conditions for emergence of Trichogramma species adult wasps. Trichogramma were also obtained from traps containing eggs from the hosts Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) and Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). In the laboratory, specimens of Trichogramma species were mounted on microscope slides to show male genitalia and other morphological characters used for its identification. Trichogramma atopovirilia Oatman y Platner emerged from S. frugiperda eggs collected in a cornfield at La Palomera, Humocaro Alto and at El Parchal, Humocaro Bajo, Municipio Morán. T. atopovirilia also emerged from S. frugiperda eggs collected in a cornfield at Sabana Grande and from S. cerealella eggs used as traps in a pepper culture at Tintinal, Municipio Andrés Eloy Blanco. T. exiguum Pinto y Platner emerged from S. frugiperda eggs used as traps or collected in cornfield at Totumito and at La Palomera, Humocaro Alto. T. pretiosum Riley emerged from Phthorimaea operculella Zeller eggs collected on stored potatoes at Monte Carmelo, Sanare. The identification of Trichogramma species in Lara State would be useful in the development of biological control programs for lepidopteran pests.

  3. New record and new associations of two leaf miner parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae from Iran

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    Žikić V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two braconid species were reared on leaf miners collected from the vicinity of Shahin Dezh, West Azerbaijan province (northwest of Iran. Apanteles corvinus Reinhard was reared on Leucoptera malifoliella (Costa (Lepidoptera: Lyonetidae on apple and Protapanteles liparidis (Bouchй was reared on Phyllonorycter populifoliella (Treitschke on Populus. This is the first report of A. corvinus from Iran and of the new trophic association of P. liparidis with poplar leaf miner, P. populifoliella.

  4. A new species of Symbra (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae, Heimbrinae from dry forest in Brazil and new occurrence records for other Heimbrinae Uma nova espécie de Symbra (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae, Heimbrinae de uma área de Caatinga e novos registros de ocorrência de outros Heimbrinae

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    Daniell Rodrigo Rodrigues Fernandes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The geographic ranges of Heimbra opaca (Ashmead, 1894, H. bicolor Subba Rao, 1978 and H. parallela Stage & Snelling, 1986 are extended based on study of material deposited in the entomological collections of the Laboratório de Sistemática e Bioecologia de Parasitoides e Predadores da APTA (Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil of the Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (Brasília, DF, Brazil. Symbra potiguara Perioto & Fernandes sp. nov. (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae is described, illustrated and compared with S. cordobensis Stage & Snelling, 1986, the single species previously known for this genus. A key to the genera of Heimbrinae and to the species of Symbra is provided.Os limites geográficos de Heimbra opaca (Ashmead, 1894, H. bicolor Subba Rao, 1978 e H. parallela Stage & Snelling, 1986 são estendidos com base no material examinado das coleções entomológicas do Laboratório de Sistemática e Bioecologia de Parasitoides e Predadores da APTA (Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil e do Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (Brasília, DF, Brasil. Symbra potiguara Perioto & Fernandes sp. nov. (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae é descrita, ilustrada e comparada com a única espécie conhecida desse gênero, S. cordobensis Stage & Snelling, 1986. Uma chave para os gêneros de Heimbrinae e para as espécies de Symbra é fornecida.

  5. A new species of Symbra (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae, Heimbrinae from dry forest in Brazil and new occurrence records for other Heimbrinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniell Rodrigo Rodrigues Fernandes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The geographic ranges of Heimbra opaca (Ashmead, 1894, H. bicolor Subba Rao, 1978 and H. parallela Stage & Snelling, 1986 are extended based on study of material deposited in the entomological collections of the Laboratório de Sistemática e Bioecologia de Parasitoides e Predadores da APTA (Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil of the Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (Brasília, DF, Brazil. Symbra potiguara Perioto & Fernandes sp. nov. (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae is described, illustrated and compared with S. cordobensis Stage & Snelling, 1986, the single species previously known for this genus. A key to the genera of Heimbrinae and to the species of Symbra is provided.

  6. First remarks on the nesting biology of Hypodynerus andeus (Packard (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Eumeninae in the Azapa valley, northern Chile

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    Felipe Méndez-Abarca

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available First remarks on the nesting biology of Hypodynerus andeus (Packard (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Eumeninae in the Azapa valley, northern Chile. Some aspects about the nesting biology of the potter wasp Hypodynerus andeus (Packard, 1869 are reported for the first time. Observations were carried out at the Azapa valley, coastal desert of northern Chile. A total of sixty nests were collected and examined, each composed by 1-14 cells, most of them found attached to concrete lamp posts. The only preys recorded in the cells were Geometridae (Lepidoptera caterpillars and the presence of the parasitoid Anthrax sp. (Diptera, Bombyliidae was also recorded. A number of arthropods belonging to different groups, mainly spiders, were found occupying empty nests.

  7. Records of Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae in Northwestern Argentina Presencia de Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae en el noroeste argentino

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    Marcelo J. Lizondo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Tamarixia radiata Waterston (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae is reported for the first time in Northwestern Argentina.La presencia de Tamarixia radiata Waterston (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae fue detectada por primera vez en el noroeste argentino.

  8. Effects of host(Boettcherisca peregrina)copper exposure on development, reproduction and vitellogenesis of the ectoparastic wasp,Nasonia vitripennis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong-Yin Ye; Sheng-Zhang Dong; Hui Dong; Cui Hu; Zhi-Cheng Shen; Jia-An Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Effects of copper(Cu)accumulation by the flesh fly Boettcherisca peregrina(R-D.)(Diptera:Sarcophagidae)on the ectoparasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis(Walker)(Hymenoptera:Pteromalidae)were investigated experimentally by exposing host larvae to contaminated diets with fmal Cu concentrations of 400 μg/g and 800 μg/g diet flesh weight (DFW),respectively.Results showed that Cu can be transferred along food chains to secondary consumers(parasitoids)in small amounts,resulting in negative effects on parasitoid growth and development(body weight and developmental durationl as well as fecundity(number of offspring per female).Copper exposure also inhibited vitellogenesis of parasitoids from Cu-contaminated host pupae.It is suggested that the decreased fecundity and inhibition of Vitellogenesis of N.vitripennis resulted from poor host nutritional state rather than from direct effects of Cu stress.

  9. Host-parasite interactions between whiteflies and their parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Dale B; Gerling, Dan; Blackburn, Michael B; Hu, Jing S

    2005-12-01

    There is relatively little information available concerning the physiological and biochemical interactions between whiteflies and their parasitoids. In this report, we describe interactions between aphelinid parasitoids and their aleyrodid hosts that we have observed in four host-parasite systems: Bemisia tabaci/Encarsia formosa, Trialeurodes vaporariorum/E. formosa, B. tabaci/Eretmocerus mundus, and T. lauri/Encarsia scapeata. In the absence of reported polydnavirus and teratocytes, these parasitoids probably inject and/or produce compounds that interfere with the host immune response and also manipulate host development to suit their own needs. In addition, parasitoids must coordinate their own development with that of their host. Although eggs are deposited under all four instars of B. tabaci, Eretmocerus larvae only penetrate 4th instar B. tabaci nymphs. A pre-penetrating E. mundus first instar was capable of inducing permanent developmental arrest in its host, and upon penetration stimulated its host to produce a capsule (epidermal in origin) in which the parasitoid larva developed. T. vaporariorum and B. tabaci parasitized by E. formosa initiated adult development, and, on occasion, produced abnormal adult wings and eyes. In these systems, the site of parasitoid oviposition depended on the host species, occurring within or pressing into the ventral ganglion in T. vaporariorum and at various locations in B. tabaci. E. formosa's final larval molt is cued by the initiation of adult development in its host. In the T. lauri-E. scapeata system, both the host whitefly and the female parasitoid diapause during most of the year, i.e., from June until the middle of February (T. lauri) or from May until the end of December (E. scapeata). It appears that the growth and development of the insects are directed by the appearance of new, young foliage on Arbutus andrachne, the host tree. When adult female parasitoids emerged in the spring, they laid unfertilized male

  10. Gonatocerus Nees (Hymenoptera, Mymaridae no centro do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil: Novos registros e chave de identificação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Rauber

    2016-08-01

    Abstract. Among the species of Hymenoptera, the parasitoids represent an important element of Neotropical fauna for his role in population control agricultural pests in biological control programs. Members of Mymaridae are idiobiont parasitoids of insect eggs. Mimarides of Gonatocerini have great agricultural importance, because some species are used in biological control of Proconiini (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae. Currently have 14 known genera. The necessity of taxonomic works at the species level has prevented their application in biological control programs in tobacco. With that, the objective of this study was to identify parasitoid wasps of Gonatocerini deposited in the Entomological Collection of Santa Cruz do Sul (CESC, collected through entomological traps of Malaise and Pitfall in tobacco crops with organic and conventional management systems and, subsequently develop an identification key to the species found. It were identified 698 individuals in 21 different species, belonging to four genera of Gonatocerini, being Gonatocerus hasthe largest number of individuals, with 475, followed by Cosmocomoidea, with 141, Lymaenon, with 72 and Tanyxiphium, with only 10 individuals, where 84% were collected in organic cultivation of crops and only 16% in conventional management. The most abundant species was Gonatocerus granulosus (Ogloblin, 1959, with 252 individuals. Of the 21 species found, 13 still lack record for Brazil.

  11. Dirhinus texanus (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) from Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, L.L.; Gates, M.W.; Graham, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    We collected a Dirhinus texanus (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) in Salt Creek Canyon, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah. This is the first record for D. texanus in Utah. Copyright ?? 2011 BioOne All rights reserved.

  12. Worldwide distribution of Syllophopsis sechellensis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James K Wetterer; Mostafa R Sharaf

    2017-01-01

    Syllophopsis sechellensis (Emery) (formerly Monomorium sechellense) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is a small, inconspicuous ant species, native to the Old World tropics, but has spread by human commerce to other parts of the world...

  13. Parasitoids of Diptera collected in traps of different colors from Southern of Goias State / Parasitóides de Diptera coletados em armadilhas de diferentes cores no Sul do estado de Goiás

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    Gefferson José Silva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to report parasitoids of Diptera collected in traps of different colors in the south of Goias state. Twelve traps two as of each color were used, painted yellow, black, red, white, green and blue were used two as of each color. The pupae were obtained by the flotation method. They were individually placed in gelatin capsules until the emergency of the adult flies or their parasitoids. Between March and December 2006, 17 parasitoid specimens were collected from the yellow trap, 15 from the blue trap, 12 from the white trap, 37 from the black trap, one from the green trap and three from the red trap. The parasitoids did not present any preference for any of the trap colors (F=0.772; P=0.58. The most frequently collected parasitoid species was Brachymeria podagrica (Fabricius, 1789 (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae, with 80.0%.O objetivo desse estudo foi descrever os parasitóides de Diptera coletados em armadilhas de diferentes cores no sul do estado de Goiás. Foram utilizadas 12 armadilhas duas de cada tipo pintadas de amarelo preto, vermelho, branco, verde e azul. As pupas dos dípteros foram isoladas pelo método de flutuação, individualizadas em cápsulas de gelatina até a emergência dos parasitóides. Foram coletados no período de março a dezembro de 2006, 17 exemplares de parasitóides na armadilha amarela, 15 na armadilha azul, 12 na armadilha branca, 37 na armadilha preta, um exemplar na armadilha verde e três na armadilha vermelha. Os parasitóides não apresentaram atração por nenhuma das cores das armadilhas (F= 0,772; P=0,58. A espécie de parasitóide mais freqüente foi Brachymeria podagrica (Fabricius, 1789 (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae com 80,0%.

  14. Study on the parasitoids of Pissodes nitidus Roel.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A systematic observation and intensive study on the parasitoids of Pissodes nitidus were made in Langxiang and Xin'qing Forestry Bureau in Xiaoing'an Mountain area in 1996-1999, including the diagnosis, life history, biological characteristics of Eurytoma sp. and parasitoid complex of Pissodes nitidus. There were about 70 species of parasitoids on Pissodes nitidus, including Eurytomidae, Ichneumonidae and Braconidae etc. Among them, Eurytoma sp. is a dominant species and a braconid, Ipobracon sp. is a subdominant species, and they play an important role in controlling the pest.

  15. The Parasitoid Factor in the Virulence and Spread of Lepidopteran Baculoviruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. E. Cossentine

    2009-01-01

    Insect parasitoids and baculoviruses play important roles in the natural and strategic biological control of insects. The two parasites are frequent competitors within common hosts and much research has focused on the negative impact that baculoviral host infections have on parasitoids. This review summarizes the impacts that parasitoids may have on the virulence and spread of lepidopteran baculoviruses. By changing host behavior and development, parasitoids have been shown to decrease baculovirus virulence and productivity within parasitized baculovirus-susceptible hosts; however, studies of the tools used by hymenopteran parasitoids to overcome their hosts' immune systems, suggest that parasitoids may, in some cases, facilitate baculoviral infections in less susceptible hosts. Laboratory and field research have demonstrated that parasitoids can mechanically transmit bacuioviruses between insects, and in this way, increase the efficacy of the viruses. Instances of new, more virulent isolates of baculoviruses have been recorded from specifically parasitoid-targeted hosts suggesting other possible benefits from the transmission or activation of baculoviruses by parasitoids.

  16. Impact of change in winter strategy of one parasitoid species on the diversity and function of a guild of parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Thiago Oliveira; Krespi, Liliane; Bonnardot, Valérie; van Baaren, Joan; Outreman, Yannick

    2016-03-01

    The rise of temperatures may enable species to increase their activities during winter periods and to occupy new areas. In winter, resource density is low for most species and an increased number of active consumers during this season may produce heightened competitive pressure. In Western France, the aphid parasitoid species Aphidius avenae Haliday has been known to adopt a winter diapausing strategy adjacent to newly sown cereal crops, until recent reports of active winter populations in cereal crops. We investigate how the addition of this species to the winter guild of parasitoids may change the structure of the aphid-parasitoid food web and the host-exploitation strategies of previously occurring parasitoids. We showed that in winter, Aphidius avenae was mostly associated with two aphid species, Sitobion avenae Fabricius and Metopolophium dirhodum Walker, while the generalist species Aphidius rhopalosiphi was restricted to the aphid species Rhopalosiphum padi L. in the presence of Aphidius avenae. Due to this new competition, winter food webs present a higher degree of compartmentalization and lower proportional similarity index values than spring ones. Parasitoid and aphid abundances responded significantly to changes in daily high temperatures, suggesting that the host-parasitoid community structure can be partly predicted by climate. This study demonstrates how a change in the winter strategy of one species of a guild can modify complex interspecific relationships in host-parasitoid systems.

  17. Parasitoids as biological control agents of thrips pests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, A.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: Thysanoptera, Frankliniella occidentalis, Hymenoptera, Ceranisus menes, Ceranisus americensis, biological controlThe thesis presented here is the result of a joint European Research project "Biological Control of Thrips Pests". Specific aims of the project were to collect, evaluate, mass

  18. Do biopesticides affect the demographic traits of a parasitoid wasp and its biocontrol services through sublethal effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Biondi

    Full Text Available Pesticide risk assessments are usually based on short-term acute toxicity tests, while longer-term population dynamic related traits, critical to the success of biological control and Integrated Pest Management (IPM programs, are often overlooked. This is increasingly important with respect to new biopesticides that frequently cause no short-term acute effects, but that can induce multiple physiological and behavioral sublethal effects, leading to a decrease in population growth and ecosystem services. In this study we assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of six biopesticides [abamectin, azadirachtin, Bacillus thuringiensis, borax plus citrus oil (Prev-Am®, emamectin benzoate, and spinosad], used in tomato crops to control the invasive pest Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae, on adults and pupae of the parasitoid Bracon nigricans (Hymenoptera: Braconidae. Data on female survival and production of female offspring were used to calculate population growth indexes as a measure of population recovery after pesticide exposure. Spinosad caused 100% and 80% mortality in exposed adults (even 10 d after the treatment and pupae, respectively. Although most of the biopesticides had low levels of acute toxicity, multiple sublethal effects were observed. The biocontrol activity of both females that survived 1-h and 10-d old residues, and females that emerged from topically treated pupae was significantly affected by the application of the neurotoxic insecticides emamectin benzoate and abamectin. Furthermore, very low B. nigricans demographic growth indices were estimated for these two insecticides, indicating potential local extinction of the wasp populations. Among the tested products, Bt proved to be the safest for B. nigricans adults and pupae. Our findings emphasize that acute toxicity assessment alone cannot fully predict the actual impact of pesticides on non-target parasitoids. Thus, sublethal effects related to the species specific life

  19. Diversity of Anastrepha spp. (Diptera: Tephritidae) and associated braconid parasitoids from native and exotic hosts in southeastern Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Janisete G; Dutra, Vivian S; Santos, Mirian S; Silva, Nívea M O; Vidal, Daniela B; Nink, Ricardo A; Guimarães, Jorge A; Araujo, Elton L

    2010-10-01

    We documented fruit fly-host associations and infestation rates over 5 yr in the state of Bahia, Brazil, by systematically collecting native and introduced fruits in backyard and commercial orchards, experimental stations, and patches of native vegetation. Fruit were collected in multiple sites in the southern and southernmost regions of Bahia. A total of 942.22 kg from 27 fruit species in 15 plant families was collected throughout this study. Of these, 15 plant species from six families were infested by Anastrepha species. A total of 11,614 fruit flies was reared from the fruit (5,178 females and 6,436 males). No specimens of Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) were recovered. Eleven Anastrepha species were recovered from the collected fruit: Anastrepha antunesi Lima (0.04%), Anastrepha distincta Greene (0.1%), Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) (53.5%), Anastrepha leptozona Hendel (4.5%), Anastrepha manihoti Lima (0.1%), Anastrepha montei Lima (1.0%), Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart) (33.0%), Anastrepha pickeli Lima (2.0%), Anastrepha serpentina (Wiedemann) (1.0%), Anastrepha sororcula Zucchi (3.0%), and Anastrepha zenildae Zucchi (1.8%). We recovered 1,265 parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from Anastrepha pupae. Three species of braconids were found to parasitize larvae of nine Anastrepha species. The most common parasitoid species recovered was Doryctobracon areolatus (Szépligeti) (81.7%), followed by Utetes anastrephae (Viereck) (12.2%) and Asobara anastrephae (Muesebeck) (6.1%). We report A. fraterculus infesting Malay apple Syzygium malaccense (L.) Merr. & L. M. Perry and A. fraterculus, A. sororcula, and A. zenildae infesting araza Eugenia stipitata McVaugh for the first time in Brazil.

  20. Nymphal and adult performance of Euschistus heros (Fabr.) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), as a potential alternative host for egg parasitoids multiplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Wilsimar A.A. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Zoologia; Correa-Ferreira, Beatriz S. [EMBRAPA, Londrina, PR (Brazil). Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Soja

    2001-12-15

    This research aimed to evaluate the potential of Euschistus heros (Fabr.) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) as host for multiplication of egg parasitoids, by determining the nymphal and adult performance of E. heros from laboratory and the field, comparing with Nezara viridula (L.) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), under mass conditions. One hundred eggs of E. heros and N. viridula were placed among the leaves of soybean plants contained in cages (50x50x70 cm) and observation were made until adult emergence. The nymphs fed on soybean pods, dry soybean and peanuts seeds. The number of nymphs that reached adulthood and the development time were calculated. The survivorship and reproduction performance of laboratory and field populations of E. heros and N. viridula were evaluated during 13 weeks in February-May 1999. The number of eggs produced by 100 pairs of stink bugs per cage containing the same diet was recorded. Nymphal development time of E. heros and N. viridula was 33.0 and 34.0 days and 65.0% and 71.3% of nymphs reached adulthood, respectively. Adults of E. heros reared under laboratory conditions produced 2.5 times more eggs (5547.0 eggs/cage) than those collected in the field (2262.7 eggs/cage). The adult field population of E. heros had reduced reproduction and longevity due to parasitism by Hexacladia smithii Ash. (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae). The N. viridula adults collected in the field produced 1.7 times more eggs (6304.9 eggs/cage) than those reared in the laboratory (3609.2 eggs/cage). E. heros laboratory reared is a promising host for egg parasitoids multiplication when compared with N. viridula collected in the field. (author)

  1. Effects of Kaolin on Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and Its Compatibility With the Natural Enemy, Trichogramma cacoeciae (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Christina E; López-Olguín, Jesús F; Pérez-Moreno, Ignacio; Marco-Mancebón, Vicente

    2016-04-01

    Lobesia botrana (Denis and Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is an important grapevine pest in Europe recently encountered in America. Trichogramma cacoeciae Marchal (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) is amongst the most effective parasitoids for Lepidopteran species. Studies to evaluate the effect of kaolin, an inert, nontoxic mineral, on oviposition, egg hatch, and neonate mortality of these species were carried out. Efficacy on L. botrana neonate larvae, oviposition, and egg hatch was evaluated. Effects of kaolin on parasitism and emergence of T. cacoeciae from L. botrana and Ephestia kuehniella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) eggs were also evaluated. Lobesia botrana egg hatch and oviposition rates were reduced, and neonate larvae mortality was significantly greater in kaolin-treated arenas and when included in synthetic neonate larvae diet. Kaolin had no effect on T. cacoeciae parasitism in both hosts. There was only a slight but statistically insignificant effect on T. cacoeciae progeny emergence from L. botrana eggs and no effect from E. kuehniella. The results involving reductions in L. botrana oviposition and egg hatch and increase in larval mortality with kaolin suggest this compound may contribute to reduction in population densities and can be considered in rational integrated pest management strategies for L. botrana. Due to the laboratory results presented on parasitoid emergence, even though field bioassays would give a more exhaustive evaluation, it appears kaolin can be compatible with T. cacoeciae in L. botrana management.

  2. Sexual dimorphism in antennal morphology and sensilla ultrastructure of a pupal endoparasitoid Tetrastichus howardi (Olliff) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua; Zheng, Lixia; Liao, Yonglin; Wu, Weijian

    2016-05-01

    Tetrastichus howardi (Olliff) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a pupal parasitoid of a great number of Lepidoptera pests, has a great potential for biological control. To investigate the olfactory system of this parasitoid, we examined the morphology and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla of both male and female T. howardi using scanning and transmission electron microscopic techniques. Antennae of male and female T. howardi were geniculate in shape, which consisted of scape, pedicel and flagellum with 5 and 4 flagellomeres, respectively. The sexual differences were recorded in the types, structure, distribution and abundance of antennal sensilla of T. howardi. Fourteen morphologically distinct types of antennal sensilla were found on the female antennae, while seventeen on the male antennae. They were: multiporous plate sensilla (MPS1-4), chaetica sensilla (CH1-3), multiporous trichodea sensilla (MTS), aporous trichodea sensilla (ATS1-5), multiporous grooved peg sensilla (MGPS), coeloconic sensilla (COS), campaniform sensilla (CAS), terminal finger-like hairy sensilla (TFI), cuticular pore (CP), and ventral sensory plaque (VSP). MPS4, ATS (3-5), and VSP only occurred on the male antennae, while MPS2 and MPS3 only on the female antennae. The MPSs, MTS, MGPS, TFI, and CP may function as olfactory sensilla involving in detecting odor stimuli whereas the ATSs, CHs, and CAS may serve as mechanoreceptors. COS were presumed to play a role as chemo-, thermo- or hygro-receptor. The results could facilitate future studies on the biology of olfaction in T. howardi.

  3. Occurrence and biology of Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802) (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae) parasitising different species of Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) in Neotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R B; Cruz, I; Figueiredo, M L C; Pereira, A G; Penteado-Dias, A M

    2012-02-01

    Surveys on Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) in Sete Lagoas city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, indicated the parasitism of adults of the species Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, 1775, Eriopis connexa (Germar, 1824) and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866), by Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802) (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae). Since then, the parasitoid have been maintained in its original hosts at the Insect Rearing Laboratory - LACRI of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Institution - Embrapa Milho e Sorgo. Besides the citation of occurrence in Brazil, this work also indicates the parasitoid preference for C. maculata (70% of parasitism), followed by O. v-nigrum (43.3% of parasitism) and E. connexa (36.7% of parasitism). Total life cycle of D. coccinellae was longer on C. maculata (32.4 ± 0.48 days), compared to O. v-nigrum (29.5 ± 0.49 days) and E. connexa (27.8 ± 0.4 days). Due to the relatively high percentage of field parasitism, D. coccinellae can reduce the efficiency of biological pest control by Coccinellidae predators especially in the case of C. maculata.

  4. Occurrence and biology of Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802 (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae parasitising different species of Coccinellidae (Coleoptera in Neotropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RB Silva

    Full Text Available Surveys on Coccinellidae (Coleoptera in Sete Lagoas city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, indicated the parasitism of adults of the species Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, 1775, Eriopis connexa (Germar, 1824 and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866, by Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802 (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae. Since then, the parasitoid have been maintained in its original hosts at the Insect Rearing Laboratory - LACRI of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Institution - Embrapa Milho e Sorgo. Besides the citation of occurrence in Brazil, this work also indicates the parasitoid preference for C. maculata (70% of parasitism, followed by O. v-nigrum (43.3% of parasitism and E. connexa (36.7% of parasitism. Total life cycle of D. coccinellae was longer on C. maculata (32.4 ± 0.48 days, compared to O. v-nigrum (29.5 ± 0.49 days and E. connexa (27.8 ± 0.4 days. Due to the relatively high percentage of field parasitism, D. coccinellae can reduce the efficiency of biological pest control by Coccinellidae predators especially in the case of C. maculata.

  5. Intraspecific competition between adult females of the hyperparasitoid Trichomalopsis apanteloctena (Hymenoptera: Chelonidae), for domination of Cotesia kariyai (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) cocoons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakamatsu, Y.; Harvey, J.A.; Tanaka, T.

    2009-01-01

    The development of parasitoid wasps is dependent on the finite resources contained in a single item of resource (=host) that is frequently not much larger than the adult parasitoid. When the costs of egg production are high, and host distribution is highly aggregated, parasitoid females may spend pr

  6. Seletividade de herbicidas registrados para a cultura do milho aos estádios imaturos de Trichogramma pretiosum (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae Selectivity of herbicides registered for corn at the immature stages of Trichogramma pretio sum (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.J Stefanello Jr

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O controle químico tem sido um dos métodos mais utilizados para o manejo de plantas daninhas na cultura do milho, no entanto o uso de herbicidas pode ocasionar efeitos adversos aos insetos benéficos, como os parasitoides de ovos. Nesse sentido, foi avaliada a seletividade de 12 herbicidas registrados para a cultura do milho para as fases imaturas de Trichogramma pretiosum em condições de laboratório (temperatura de 25±1 ºC, umidade relativa de 70±10% e fotofase de 14 horas. Os herbicidas foram diluídos em um volume proporcional a 200 L de água por hectare e pulverizados sobre ovos de lepidóptero contendo formas imaturas do parasitoide em seu interior, nas fases de ovo-larva, pré-pupa e pupa. Avaliou-se, então, a porcentagem de emergência dos parasitoides e, em função da comparação com a testemunha, classificaram-se os herbicidas em inócuo (classe 1, 99%. Os herbicidas Agrisato 480 SL, Finale, Glifos, Glifosato Nortox, Gliz 480 SL, Polaris, Roundup Original, Roundup Transorb, Roundup WG, Trop e Zapp Qi foram inócuos (classe 1 às diferentes fases imaturas de T. pretiosum e são considerados seletivos ao parasitoide. Gramoxone 200, embora tenha sido inócuo para as fases de ovo-larva e pré-pupa, foi considerado levemente nocivo (classe 2 para a fase de pupa. Nesse sentido, para melhor compatibilização do manejo químico das plantas daninhas e controle biológico de insetos, sugere-se que sejam utilizados, sempre que possível, aqueles herbicidas que permitem maior sobrevivência de T. pretiosum.- Chemical control has been one of the most widely used methods for weed mana gement in corn. However, the use of herbicides can cause adverse effects on beneficial insects, such as egg parasitoids. Thus, this work aimed to evaluate the selectivity of 12 herbicides regis tered for corn at the immature stages of Trichogramma pretiosum Riley, 1879 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae under laboratory conditions (temperature 25±1 o C

  7. Parasitoid complex of Zygaena filipendulae L. (Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žikić V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Caterpillars of Zygaena filipendulae Linnaeus were sampled during May and June in the Sićevo Gorge in southern Serbia. All parasitized larvae were found on grey elm trees (Ulmus canescens. During the short period before metamorphosis of Z. filipendulae, we found the whole specter of parasitoid wasps: Cotesia zygaenarum Marshall (Braconidae, Gelis agilis (Fabricius and Mesochorus velox Holmgren (Ichneumonidae, Elasmus platyedrae Ferrière and Pediobius sp. (Eulophidae, Eupelmus vesicularis (Retzius (Eupelmidae and Brachymeria tibialis (Walker (Chalcididae. Beside hymenopteran parasitoids, we found parasitoid flies from the family Tachinidae, Phryxe nemea (Meigen (Diptera. All 46 observed Z. filipendulae larvae found on grey elm trees were parasitized, but three pupae were found directly on Lotus corniculatus. Two species are newly reported as parasitoids of Z. filipendulae: E. platyedrae and Eupelmus vesicularis and three species (G. agilis, M. velox and E. platyedrae are new to the fauna of Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43001

  8. Sublethal and transgenerational effects of insecticides in developing Trichogramma galloi (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) : toxicity of insecticides to Trichogramma galloi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Mariana Abreu; Moscardini, Valéria Fonseca; da Costa Gontijo, Pablo; Carvalho, Geraldo Andrade; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Lopes; de Oliveira, Harley Nonato

    2014-10-01

    This study assessed the transgenerational effects of insecticides in developing Trichogramma galloi (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae). Laboratory bioassays were performed in which five insecticides were sprayed on egg-larval, pre-pupal and pupal stages of the parasitoid. The interaction between insecticides and development stages of the parasitoid was not significant for the rate of F0 emergence. All insecticides significantly reduced the emergence of wasps, with the lowest emergence observed when they were applied to the pupal stage. For the sex ratio, only spinosad applied to the pre-pupal stage and triflumuron applied on the egg-larval and pre-pupal stages did not differ from the controls. Triflumuron applied to pre-pupae did not lead to any difference in the parasitism rate of the treated generation (F0) when compared to the control. There were no significant differences among survival curves for females of F0 when all insecticides were sprayed on the egg-larval stage. Both concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam reduced female pre-pupal survival, and all treatments reduced female pupal survival. In addition, we observed a transgenerational effect of the insecticides on emergence and sex ratio of next generation (F1). Lambda-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam (Min) applied to the pre-pupae and pupae, the maximum rate of the same insecticides applied to the egg-larvae and pre-pupae, and spinosad applied to pre-pupae all significantly reduced the adults emergence of T. galloi F1 generation. Only triflumuron did not alter the F1 sex ratio. These bioassays provide a basis for better understanding the effects of insecticide use on beneficial parasitoids.

  9. Low Temperature Storage of Telenomus remus (Nixon) (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) and its Factitious Host Corcyra cephalonica (Stainton) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, A P; Bueno, A F; Pomari-Fernandes, A; Grande, M L M; Bortolotto, O C; Silva, D M

    2017-04-01

    We conducted three bioassays to evaluate the effect of low-temperature storage of eggs (host) and pupae and adults (parasitoid) on the biology and parasitism capacity of the egg parasitoid Telenomus remus (Nixon) (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae). Viable stored Corcyra cephalonica (Stainton) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) eggs were parasitized to the same degree or even higher than fresh eggs when stored until 14 days at 5°C or until 21 days at 10°C. In contrast, the percentage of parasitized sterilized eggs was equal to the control only when stored for 7 and 14 days. Survival of T. remus pupae declined with storage time at both studied temperatures (5 and 10°C). However, after 7 days of storage, survival of pupae was still 86.3 and 64.9% at 10 and 5°C, respectively. The number of adult male survivors remained similar until the fourth storage day at both 5 and 10°C. In contrast, female survival did not differ until day 8 at 10°C or day 6 at 5°C. Parasitism capacity of stored adults was not altered by storage compared with the control. Therefore, we conclude that the maximal storage time at 10°C is 21 days for viable C. cephalonica eggs and 7 days for T. remus pupae, while parasitoid adults should not be stored for more than 4 days at either 5 or 10°C.

  10. Influence of host preference, mating, and release density on the parasitism of Telenomus remus (Nixon (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula de Queiroz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We evaluated the influence of host preference, mating, and release density on Telenomus remus (Nixon, 1937 (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae parasitizing eggs of Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith, 1797 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae. First, we tested host preference of T. remus (free choice test offered a choice between eggs of Corcyra cephalonica (Stainton, 1865 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae and S. frugiperda. Parasitism capacity and host preference (S. frugiperda of T. remus reared on either of the two hosts did not differ. Secondly, we evaluated the influence of mating behavior of T. remus females on its parasitism. Only the offspring sex ratio differed between treatments, indicating that the species reproduces by parthenogenesis of the arrhenotoky type. Finally, we evaluated the influence of release density on T. remus parasitism. This was tested by releasing different numbers of the parasitoid per S. frugiperda egg using T. remus reared for different numbers of generations on C. cephalonica eggs. The regression analysis between percentage of parasitism and density of released T. remus females showed a quadratic effect for all tested parasitoid generations (F35, F40, and F45 with maximum parasitism from 65.07% to 71.69%. Our results allow the conclusion that (a T. remus prefers S. frugiperda eggs, regardless of the host on which this parasitoid was reared, showing no preimaginal conditioning; (b Mating does not affect the number of eggs parasitized by T. remus or the development of its offspring; and (c The optimal T. remus release density when reared on C. cephalonica is between 0.133 and 0.150 females/S. frugiperda.

  11. Herbicidas e Reguladores de Crescimento de Plantas Utilizados na Cana-de-Açúcar e sua Ação sobre Adultos de Trichogramma galloi Zucchi (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Antigo

    2016-04-01

    Herbicides and Plant Growth Regulators Used in SUGARCANE and their Action on Adult Trichogramma galloi Zucchi (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae Abstract. During crop sugarcane management, several used pesticides can affect the performance of parasitoids, natural enemies of sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharallis (Fabricius and consequently the biological control ofit. Thus, the objective was to evaluate in laboratory the effect of herbicides and plant growth regulators used in the sugarcane crops on survival and parasitism in adults of the eggs parasitoids, Trichogramma galloi Zucchi. The products tested were the herbicides Clomazone and Diuron + Hexazinone, and the plant regulators Sulfometuron-methyl and Trinexapac-ethyl, all in the higher recommended dosages for sugarcane. The eggs of D. saccharalis were immersed during 5 seconds in chemical solutions and, after dry for 1 hour, offered to T. galloi females with 20 repetitions. We evaluated the mortality and number of eggs parasitized by the F0 generation of T. galloi, as well as the emergence of the F1. The products were classified by their toxicity, according to the percentage of reduction in the survival, parasitism and emergence of the parasitoid. In relation to the survival of adult T. galloi, the number of eggs parasitized by F0 as well as the percentage of F1 emergence, clomazone and trinexapac-ethyl were classified as slightly harmful. Diuron+hexazinone and sulfometuron-methyl were harmless in all parameters, except for parasitism, where diuron+hexazinone was classified as slightly harmful. We conclude that clomazone, diuron+hexazinone, trinexapac-ethyl and sulfometuron-methyl, are harmless or slightly harmful the survival and parasitism (F0 of T. galloi adults and emergence (F1 of this parasitoid in the laboratory.

  12. Biology of the introduced biocontrol agent Microctonus hyperodae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and its host Listronotus bonariensis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in northern New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Gary M

    2013-10-01

    The South American weevil Listronotus bonariensis (Kuschel) is an important pest of pastures in New Zealand. As a component of management strategies for this pest, the South American parasitoid Microctonus hyperodae Loan (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) was released in northern New Zealand during 1991 as a biological control agent. Over the subsequent 5-6 yr, the reproductive biology of M. hyperodae and its relationship to, and effects on, the reproductive phenology and fitness of L. bonariensis were studied at three sites. M. hyperodae was first recovered in the field in December 1991. Subsequently, the incidence of parasitism in L. bonariensis increased to seasonal maxima of 75-90%. There was variable synchrony between parasitoid generations and the two generations of its host, leading to marked seasonal variation in rates of parasitism and parasitoid abundance. Despite marked inter-year variation, abundance of host adult and egg populations declined in the presence of parasitoids. Parasitized host females had lower ovarian maturity scores, had lower egg loads, and exhibited less investment in wing muscle development than females that had escaped parasitism. There was almost complete elimination of egg maturation in parasitized females and these hosts contributed little to population recruitment. Rate of buildup and seasonal maxima in parasitism, frequency of superparasitism, adult abundances, and wing muscle development in adult L. bonariensis varied among the three sites in a manner that was only partially related to climate differences across the 1.83° gradient of latitude. Site effects were weak to absent in measures of reproductive condition in L. bonariensis females.

  13. Seletividade de produtos naturais comerciais a Trichogramma pretiosum (Riley, 1879 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Luckmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A seletividade de produtos naturais a parasitoides é pouco conhecida. Em vista disso, este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a seletividade de produtos naturais comerciais a Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae. Os produtos utilizados foram Baicao®, Orobor® e Topneem®, nas concentrações recomendadas pelos fabricantes, e pulverizados sobre cartelas contendo ovos esterilizados de Anagasta kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae. Teste com chance de escolha para parasitismo foi realizado, confinando-se uma fêmea de T. pretiosum com duas cartelas, uma pulverizada com o produto e outra considerada testemunha, avaliando-se a percentagem de parasitismo. O teste sem chance de escolha consistiu na pulverização dos tratamentos, em cartelas, previamente ou posteriormente ao parasitismo. Em ambos os testes, avaliaram-se o número de ovos parasitados, a percentagem de emergência e a longevidade de adultos. No teste com chance de escolha, os produtos Topneem® e Baicao® provocaram redução do parasitismo de T. pretiosum. No teste sem chance de escolha, Baicao®, pulverizado previamente sobre cartelas contendo ovos de A. kuehniella, interferiu negativamente na emergência de T. pretiosum. Houve redução do número de ovos parasitados quando Baicao® foi pulverizado no tratamento pré-parasitismo. Orobor® é seletivo a T. pretiosum nas condições de realização do experimento e não afetou negativamente os parâmetros avaliados. Baicao® não foi seletivo para T. pretiosum, afetou a maioria dos parâmetros avaliados e foi classificado como levemente nocivo quanto à toxicidade aos adultos do parasitoide, em condições de laboratório.

  14. Acute toxicities and sublethal effects of some conventional insecticides on Trichogramma chilonis (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Sen; He, Yu-Rong; Guo, Xiang-Ling; Luo, Yong-Li

    2012-08-01

    The acute toxicity of 10 conventional insecticides to adult of Trichogramma chilonis Ishii (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) was bioassayed by membrane method, and then their sublethal effects on the parasitoid were evaluated in the laboratory. Based on sublethal concentration (LC30) values at 8 h after treatment, we determined that adult T. chilonis were the most susceptible to chlorfenapyr, followed by fipronil, spinosad, avermectins, beta-cypermethrin, and cartap, with lethal concentration (LC)30 values of 0.3133, 0.3269, 1.5408, 3.2961, 6.1469, and 9.021 mg/liter, respectively. The field-recommended concentrations of chlorfluazuron, indoxacarb, Bacillus thuringiensis, and tebufenozide caused Cartap and spinosad also reduced longevity (8 and 7.9 d) and fecundity (110.77 and 117.2) of treated adults, but cartap enhanced the female percentage of F1 offspring (61.6%), resulting a statistical higher R0, r(m), and lambda of treated T. chilonis. In contrast, chlorfluazuron and tebufenozide increased longevity (16.4 and 15.4 d) and fecundity (248 and 256.9) of treated adults but slightly decreased the female percentage of F1 offspring (31.4 and 38.1%). Although chlorfenapyr showed no adverse influence on longevity and fecundity, it remarkably reduced the female percentage of F1 offspring (13.5%), leading to a lower R0, r(m), and lambda of treated T. chilonis. Indoxacarb, B. thuringiensis, and beta-cypermethrin had no obvious sublethal effects on the longevity and fecundity of treated adults. Based on these results, we consider B. thuringienesis, chlorfluazuron, indoxacarb, beta-cypermethrin, and tebufenozide safe to T. chilonis, suggesting that these insecticides are compatible with this parasitoid when being used in the field. However, fipronil, chlorfenapyr, spinosad, and avermectins were very harmful to T. chilonis. Timing of application of these insecticides was critical.

  15. Effects of rearing host species on the host-feeding capacity and parasitism of the whitefly parasitoid Encarsia formosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peng; Ruan, Changchun; Zang, Liansheng; Wan, Fanghao; Liu, Linzhou

    2014-01-01

    Parasitoids of the Encarsia genus (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) are important biological control agents against whiteflies. Some of the species in this genus not only parasitize their hosts, but also kill them through host feeding. The whitefly parasitoid, Encarsia formosa Gahan, was examined to determine whether the rearing host species affects its subsequent host-feeding capacity and parasitism. E. formosa wasps were reared on Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) 'Q', and their subsequent host-feeding capacity and parasitism of T. vaporariorum and B. tabaci were examined. E. formosa reared on T. vaporariorum were significantly larger in body size than those reared on B. tabaci, but these wasps killed a similar number of whitefly nymphs by host feeding when they attacked the same host species on which they were reared. Regardless of the species on which it was reared, E. formosa fed significantly more on the B. tabaci nymphs than on the T. vaporariorum nymphs. The number of whitefly nymphs parasitized by E. formosa differed between the wasps reared on T. vaporariorum and those reared on B. tabaci depending on which whitefly species was offered as a host. In addition, the wasps reared on T. vaporariorum parasitized significantly more on T. vaporariorum than those reared on B. tabaci. The wasps reared on B. tabaci, however, parasitized similar numbers of whiteflies of both host species. The results indicated that the host-feeding capacity of E. formosa was affected more by the host species attacked than by the rearing host species, but the parasitism was affected by the host species attacked and the rearing host species. Generally, E. formosa reared on T. vaporariorum killed more T. vaporariorum nymphs by parasitism and host feeding than those reared on B. tabaci. Additionally, a similar number of B. tabaci nymphs were killed by parasitism and host feeding regardless of the rearing host species. Currently

  16. Functional and evolutionary insights from the genomes of three parasitoid Nasonia species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werren, John H.; Richards, Stephen; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Niehuis, Oliver; Gadau, Juergen; Colbourne, John K.; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Desplan, Claude; Elsik, Christine G.; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J. P.; Kitts, Paul; Lynch, Jeremy A.; Murphy, Terence; Oliveira, Deodoro C. S. G.; Smith, Christopher D.; van de Zande, Louis; Worley, Kim C.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Aerts, Maarten; Albert, Stefan; Anaya, Victor H.; Anzola, Juan M.; Barchuk, Angel R.; Behura, Susanta K.; Bera, Agata N.; Berenbaum, May R.; Bertossa, Rinaldo C.; Bitondi, Marcia M. G.; Bordenstein, Seth R.; Bork, Peer; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Brunain, Marleen; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Chaboub, Lesley; Chacko, Joseph; Chavez, Dean; Childers, Christopher P.; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Clark, Michael E.; Claudianos, Charles; Clinton, Rochelle A.; Cree, Andrew G.; Cristino, Alexandre S.; Dang, Phat M.; Darby, Alistair C.; de Graaf, Dirk C.; Devreese, Bart; Dinh, Huyen H.; Edwards, Rachel; Elango, Navin; Elhaik, Eran; Ermolaeva, Olga; Evans, Jay D.; Foret, Sylvain; Fowler, Gerald R.; Gerlach, Daniel; Gibson, Joshua D.; Gilbert, Donald G.; Graur, Dan; Grunder, Stefan; Hagen, Darren E.; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Hultmark, Dan; Hunter, Henry C.; Jhangian, Shalini N.; Jiang, Huaiyang; Johnson, Reed M.; Jones, Andrew K.; Junier, Thomas; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko; Kamping, Albert; Kapustin, Yuri; Kechavarzi, Bobak; Kim, Jaebum; Kim, Jay; Kiryutin, Boris; Koevoets, Tosca; Kovar, Christie L.; Kriventseva, Evgenia V.; Kucharski, Robert; Lee, Heewook; Lee, Sandra L.; Lees, Kristin; Lewis, Lora R.; Loehlin, David W.; Logsdon, John M.; Lopez, Jacqueline A.; Lozado, Ryan J.; Maglott, Donna; Maleszka, Ryszard; Mayampurath, Anoop; Mazur, Danielle J.; McClure, Marcella A.; Moore, Andrew D.; Morgan, Margaret B.; Muller, Jean; Munoz-Torres, Monica C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Nazareth, Lynne V.; Neupert, Susanne; Nguyen, Ngoc B.; Nunes, Francis M. F.; Oakeshott, John G.; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O.; Pannebakker, Bart A.; Pejaver, Vikas R.; Peng, Zuogang; Pratt, Stephen C.; Predel, Reinhard; Pu, Ling-Ling; Ranson, Hilary; Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Reese, Justin T.; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Riddle, Megan; Robertson, Il High M.; Romero-Severson, Jeanne; Rosenberg, Miriam; Sackton, Timothy B.; Sattelle, David B.; Schluens, Helge; Schmitt, Thomas; Schneider, Martina; Schueler, Andreas; Schurko, Andrew M.; Shuker, David M.; Simoes, Zila L. P.; Sinha, Saurabh; Smith, Zachary; Solovyev, Victor; Souvorov, Alexandre; Springauf, Andreas; Stafflinger, Elisabeth; Stage, Deborah E.; Stanke, Mario; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Telschow, Arndt; Trent, Carol; Vattathil, Selina; Verhulst, Eveline C.; Viljakainen, Lumi; Wanner, Kevin W.; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Whitfield, James B.; Wilkes, Timothy E.; Williamson, Michael; Willis, Judith H.; Wolschin, Florian; Wyder, Stefan; Yamada, Takuji; Yi, Soojin V.; Zecher, Courtney N.; Zhang, Lan; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    We report here genome sequences and comparative analyses of three closely related parasitoid wasps: Nasonia vitripennis, N. giraulti, and N. longicornis. Parasitoids are important regulators of arthropod populations, including major agricultural pests and disease vectors, and Nasonia is an emerging

  17. Community composition and species richness of parasitoids infesting Yponomeuta species in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleary, Daniel F.R.

    2004-01-01

    Parasitoid assemblages infesting Yponomeuta species in the Netherlands were investigated. Parasitoid species richness and community composition were related to host species, habitat, temporal and spatial variation. Both community structure and species richness did not differ among habitats. There

  18. Functional and evolutionary insights from the genomes of three parasitoid Nasonia species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werren, John H.; Richards, Stephen; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Niehuis, Oliver; Gadau, Juergen; Colbourne, John K.; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Desplan, Claude; Elsik, Christine G.; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J. P.; Kitts, Paul; Lynch, Jeremy A.; Murphy, Terence; Oliveira, Deodoro C. S. G.; Smith, Christopher D.; van de Zande, Louis; Worley, Kim C.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Aerts, Maarten; Albert, Stefan; Anaya, Victor H.; Anzola, Juan M.; Barchuk, Angel R.; Behura, Susanta K.; Bera, Agata N.; Berenbaum, May R.; Bertossa, Rinaldo C.; Bitondi, Marcia M. G.; Bordenstein, Seth R.; Bork, Peer; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Brunain, Marleen; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Chaboub, Lesley; Chacko, Joseph; Chavez, Dean; Childers, Christopher P.; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Clark, Michael E.; Claudianos, Charles; Clinton, Rochelle A.; Cree, Andrew G.; Cristino, Alexandre S.; Dang, Phat M.; Darby, Alistair C.; de Graaf, Dirk C.; Devreese, Bart; Dinh, Huyen H.; Edwards, Rachel; Elango, Navin; Elhaik, Eran; Ermolaeva, Olga; Evans, Jay D.; Foret, Sylvain; Fowler, Gerald R.; Gerlach, Daniel; Gibson, Joshua D.; Gilbert, Donald G.; Graur, Dan; Grunder, Stefan; Hagen, Darren E.; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Hultmark, Dan; Hunter, Henry C.; Jhangian, Shalini N.; Jiang, Huaiyang; Johnson, Reed M.; Jones, Andrew K.; Junier, Thomas; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko; Kamping, Albert; Kapustin, Yuri; Kechavarzi, Bobak; Kim, Jaebum; Kim, Jay; Kiryutin, Boris; Koevoets, Tosca; Kovar, Christie L.; Kriventseva, Evgenia V.; Kucharski, Robert; Lee, Heewook; Lee, Sandra L.; Lees, Kristin; Lewis, Lora R.; Loehlin, David W.; Logsdon, John M.; Lopez, Jacqueline A.; Lozado, Ryan J.; Maglott, Donna; Maleszka, Ryszard; Mayampurath, Anoop; Mazur, Danielle J.; McClure, Marcella A.; Moore, Andrew D.; Morgan, Margaret B.; Muller, Jean; Munoz-Torres, Monica C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Nazareth, Lynne V.; Neupert, Susanne; Nguyen, Ngoc B.; Nunes, Francis M. F.; Oakeshott, John G.; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O.; Pannebakker, Bart A.; Pejaver, Vikas R.; Peng, Zuogang; Pratt, Stephen C.; Predel, Reinhard; Pu, Ling-Ling; Ranson, Hilary; Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Reese, Justin T.; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Riddle, Megan; Robertson, Il High M.; Romero-Severson, Jeanne; Rosenberg, Miriam; Sackton, Timothy B.; Sattelle, David B.; Schluens, Helge; Schmitt, Thomas; Schneider, Martina; Schueler, Andreas; Schurko, Andrew M.; Shuker, David M.; Simoes, Zila L. P.; Sinha, Saurabh; Smith, Zachary; Solovyev, Victor; Souvorov, Alexandre; Springauf, Andreas; Stafflinger, Elisabeth; Stage, Deborah E.; Stanke, Mario; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Telschow, Arndt; Trent, Carol; Vattathil, Selina; Verhulst, Eveline C.; Viljakainen, Lumi; Wanner, Kevin W.; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Whitfield, James B.; Wilkes, Timothy E.; Williamson, Michael; Willis, Judith H.; Wolschin, Florian; Wyder, Stefan; Yamada, Takuji; Yi, Soojin V.; Zecher, Courtney N.; Zhang, Lan; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    We report here genome sequences and comparative analyses of three closely related parasitoid wasps: Nasonia vitripennis, N. giraulti, and N. longicornis. Parasitoids are important regulators of arthropod populations, including major agricultural pests and disease vectors, and Nasonia is an emerging

  19. Whole Genome Sequencing of the Braconid Parasitoid Wasp Fopius arisanus, an Important Biocontrol Agent of Pest Tepritid Fruit Flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Geib

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The braconid wasp Fopius arisanus (Sonan is an important biological control agent of tropical and subtropical pest fruit flies, including two important global pests, the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata, and the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis. The goal of this study was to develop foundational genomic resources for this species to provide tools that can be used to answer questions exploring the multitrophic interactions between the host and parasitoid in this important research system. Here, we present a whole genome assembly of F. arisanus, derived from a pool of haploid offspring from a single unmated female. The genome is ∼154 Mb in size, with a N50 contig and scaffold size of 51,867 bp and 0.98 Mb, respectively. Utilizing existing RNA-Seq data for this species, as well as publicly available peptide sequences from related Hymenoptera, a high quality gene annotation set, which includes 10,991 protein coding genes, was generated. Prior to this assembly submission, no RefSeq proteins were present for this species. Parasitic wasps play an important role in a diverse ecosystem as well as a role in biological control of agricultural pests. This whole genome assembly and annotation data represents the first genome-scale assembly for this species or any closely related Opiine, and are publicly available in the National Center for Biotechnology Information Genome and RefSeq databases, providing a much needed genomic resource for this hymenopteran group.

  20. Morphology, ultrastructure, and probable functions of the sense organs on the ovipositor stylets of the hymenoptran parasitoid, Venturia canescens (Gravenhorst).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Zahid Ali

    2012-07-01

    To help understand the mechanism of host discrimination during oviposition of a parasitoid wasp, Venturia canescens (Gravenhorst) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), the ultrastructure and morphology of the sense organs on the dorsal and ventral stylets of the ovipositor were examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Ovipositor stylets were scanned for sense organs, because only unsheathed ovipositors are used for probing, stabbing, and host discrimination. Five types of sensilla and secretary pores were identified. Based on their pattern of innervation, the surface-dome and pitted-dome sensilla were thought to have a gustatory function and, thus, are the best candidates for host-discrimination. The arrangements of dendrites of type I and type II campaniform sensilla suggested that these acted as pressure- and mechano-receptors, respectively. Coeloconic sensilla might act as thermo-hygroreceptors, whilst secretary pores might provide lubrication during the process of stabbing for oviposition. Surface-dome sensilla were the most numerous type found followed by secretary pores, pitted-dome sensilla, and coeloconic sensilla. Almost all the sensilla and secretary pores were more numerous on the dorsal than on the ventral stylets, and the maximum number of these sensilla and secretary pores occurred on the distal end of the ovipositor stylets and decreased toward the proximal end. The surface-dome sensilla and secretary pores occurred in alternate rows while the pitted-dome sensilla were scattered all over the surface of the ovipositor stylets, especially on the sides of the stylets.

  1. Host specificity and temporal and seasonal shifts in host preference of a web-spider parasitoid Zatypota percontatoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenko, Stanislav; Michalková, Veronika; Zwakhals, Kees; Pekár, Stano

    2011-01-01

    Current knowledge about polysphinctine parasite wasps' interactions with their spider hosts is very fragmented and incomplete. This study presents the host specificity of Zatypota percontatoria (Müller) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) and its adaptation to varying host availability. Two years of field observations show that Z. percontatoria is a stenophagous parasitoid that parasitizes only five closely related web-building spiders of the family Theridiidae (Araneae). Within the Theridiidae it attacks only species belonging to a small group of species, here called the "Theridion" group. These hosts have a similar biology, but are available at different levels of abundance and at different sizes over the season. Laboratory experiments showed that this wasp species ignores linyphiid, araneid or dictynid spiders and accepts only theridiid spiders of the "Theridion" group. In the field study, wasp females preferred older juvenile and sub-adult female spider instars with intermediate body size. Only 5% of the parasitized spiders were males. Parasitism in the natural population of theridiid spiders was on average 1.3%. Parasitism was most frequent on two species, Theridion varians Hahn in 2007 and Neottiura bimaculata Linnaeus in 2008. The parasitization rate was positively correlated with spider abundance. The wasp responded adaptively to seasonal changes in host abundance and host body size and shifted host preference according to the availability of suitable hosts during, as well as between, seasons. In spring and summer the highest percentage of parasitism was on T. varians and in autumn it was on N. bimaculata.

  2. Gut sugar analysis in field-caught parasitoids: adapting methods originally developed for biting flies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimpel, G.E.; Lee, J.E.; Wu, Z.; Weiser, L.; Wäckers, F.L.; Jervis, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to determine the presence and identity of sugars in the guts of adult parasitoids in the field would aid researchers in addressing long-standing problems in parasitoid ecology. Until very recently, however, gut sugar analyses have not been carried out on parasitoids. This is despite the

  3. HPLC sugar analysis reveals the nutritional state and the feeding history of parasitoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steppuhn, A.; Wäckers, F.L.

    2004-01-01

    1. Adult parasitoids depend on sugar-rich foods such as nectar and honeydew to meet their energy requirements. Many laboratory studies have established fitness benefits of sugar feeding for parasitoids. 2. Nevertheless, we know little about the nutritional ecology of parasitoids in the field,

  4. Fertility life table of Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson) (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae) in Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch) and Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera, Aphididae); Tabela de vida de fertilidade de Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson) (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae) em Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch) e Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera, Aphididae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Robson Jose da; Bueno, Vanda Helena Paes; Silva, Diego Bastos [Universidade Federal de Lavras (UFLA), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia. Lab. de Controle Biologico], e-mail: ecosbio@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: vhpbueno@ufla.br; Sampaio, Marcus Vinicius [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Umuarama, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Agrarias], e-mail: mvsampaio@iciag.ufu.br

    2008-07-01

    Fertility life table of Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson) (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae) in Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch) and Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera, Aphididae). The evaluation of the growth potential of Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson) is important for its use in biological control programs of aphids. This work aimed to evaluate the fertility life table of L. testaceipes in Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch) and Aphis gossypii Glover. To determine the immature mortality, development and the sex ratio of the parasitoid, 12 females parasitoid, and 480 nymphs of each aphids were used. To evaluate the longevity and fertility 15 female parasitoid were used. Nymphs of each aphid (3 day old) were offered for each parasitoid female daily, until the female died, being 300 (first day); 250 (second day); 200 (third day); 150 (fourth day) and 50 nymphs in the other days. L. testaceipes showed immature mortality rates of 5.6 % in R. maidis and 9.2 % in A. gossypii. The development time of L. testaceipes in R. maidis and A. gossypii was 10.2 and 10.1 days, and the sex ratio of 0.71 and 0.66, respectively. The female of L. testaceipes had a fecundity of 498.8 eggs in R. maidis and 327.8 eggs in A. gossypii. The growth parameters the L. testaceipes in R. maidis and A. gossypii were, respectively R{sub o}= 205.38 and 164.08 females; r{sub m}= 0.449 and 0.431 females/females/day; {lambda}= 1.57 and 1.54 females/day; T= 11.86 and 11.83 days and TD= 10.78 and 11.27 days. L. testaceipes showed great growth potential on both aphid hosts. R. maidis could be a suitable host for proposals of mass-rearing and open rearing system using L. testaceipes. (author)

  5. Foraging behaviour at the fourth tropic level: a comparative study of host location in aphid hyperparasitoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenhuis, R.; Vet, L.E.M.; Boivin, G.; Brodeur, J.

    2005-01-01

    In studies of foraging behaviour in a multitrophic context, the fourth trophic level has generally been ignored. We used four aphid hyperparasitoid species: Dendrocerus carpenteri (Curtis) (Hymenoptera: Megaspilidae), Asaphes suspensus Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), Alloxysta victrix (Westwood)

  6. Foraging behaviour at the fourth tropic level: a comparative study of host location in aphid hyperparasitoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenhuis, R.; Vet, L.E.M.; Boivin, G.; Brodeur, J.

    2005-01-01

    In studies of foraging behaviour in a multitrophic context, the fourth trophic level has generally been ignored. We used four aphid hyperparasitoid species: Dendrocerus carpenteri (Curtis) (Hymenoptera: Megaspilidae), Asaphes suspensus Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), Alloxysta victrix (Westwood)

  7. Foraging behaviour at the fourth trophic level: a comparative study of host location in aphid hyperparasitoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenhuis, R.; Vet, L.E.M.; Boivin, G.; Brodeur, J.

    2005-01-01

    In studies of foraging behaviour in a multitrophic context, the fourth trophic level has generally been ignored. We used four aphid hyperparasitoid species: Dendrocerus carpenteri (Curtis) (Hymenoptera: Megaspilidae), Asaphes suspensus Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), Alloxysta victrix (Westwood)

  8. Occurrence of Dinarmus basalis in Callosobruchus analis in stored soybean in São Paulo, Brazil Ocorrência de Dinarmus basalis (Rondani em Callosobruchus analis (F. em soja armazenada em São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valmir Antonio Costa

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Callosobruchus analis (F. is considered an important pest in several countries in Africa, Asia and Oceania. It has been observed infesting seeds belonging to 15 Leguminosae genera, including peanut, bean, chickpea, pea, cowpea, and soybean. One of its main natural enemies is the parasitoid Dinarmus basalis (Rondani (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, whose control efficiency has already been demonstrated in several studies. This paper records the occurrence of C. analis and its parasitoid, D. basalis, in stored soybean of the state of São Paulo, Brazil.Callosobruchus analis (F. é uma praga de expressão econômica em diversos países da África, Ásia e Oceania. Já foi observado infestando sementes de espécies de leguminosas pertencentes a 15 gêneros, incluindo-se culturas como amendoim, grão-de-bico, feijão, ervilha, caupi e soja. Um de seus inimigos naturais mais importantes é o parasitóide Dinarmus basalis (Rondani (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, cuja eficiência de controle já foi demonstrada em vários estudos. Neste trabalho registra-se a ocorrência de C. analis e de seu parasitóide, D. basalis, em grãos armazenados de soja no estado de São Paulo.

  9. First record of the genus Venanus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae in Mesoamerica, with the description of two new species from Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Fernandez-Triana

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The New World genus Venanus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae is a small group of parasitoid wasps that includes two Nearctic and seven Neotropical species. Here two additional species, authored by Fernández-Triana & Whitfield, are described from Costa Rica: V. johnnyrosalesi sp. n. from Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG and V. randallgarciai sp. n. from Area de Conservación Cordillera Volcanica Central. They represent the first record of the genus for Mesoamerica. A previous key to all known Venanus (Whitfield et al. 2011 is modified to include the new species. The Costa Rican species were collected at altitudes of 1,400–1,460 m, but nothing is known of their biology. DNA barcodes were obtained for both species and are included as part of the description along with extensive photos. This paper is part of a series inventorying the diversity of Microgastrinae in ACG.

  10. First record of the genus Venanus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae) in Mesoamerica, with the description of two new species from Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Triana, Jose L; Whitfield, James B; Smith, M Alex; Hallwachs, Winnie; Janzen, Daniel H

    2014-01-01

    The New World genus Venanus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae) is a small group of parasitoid wasps that includes two Nearctic and seven Neotropical species. Here two additional species, authored by Fernández-Triana & Whitfield, are described from Costa Rica: V.johnnyrosalesi sp. n. from Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG) and V.randallgarciai sp. n. from Area de Conservación Cordillera Volcanica Central. They represent the first record of the genus for Mesoamerica. A previous key to all known Venanus (Whitfield et al. 2011) is modified to include the new species. The Costa Rican species were collected at altitudes of 1,400-1,460 m, but nothing is known of their biology. DNA barcodes were obtained for both species and are included as part of the description along with extensive photos. This paper is part of a series inventorying the diversity of Microgastrinae in ACG.

  11. Parasitóides de lepidópteros minadores presentes em plantas de crescimento espontâneo em pomar orgânicos de citrus montenegro - RS Parasitoids of leafmining lepidoptera in spontaneous growth plants in an organic citrus orchard in montenegro, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Pereira dos Santos

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivos verificar se Phyllocnistis citrella ataca plantas de crescimento espontâneo, presentes em pomar de citros orgânicos, identificar nestas plantas outros lepidópteros minadores e seus parasitóides, e verificar se estes parasitóides são os mesmos relatados para P. citrella. O trabalho foi conduzido no município de Montenegro-RS, em um pomar orgânico do híbrido 'Murcott' (Citrus sinensis x C. reticulata. Realizaram-se amostragens quinzenais, de maio de 2003 a maio de 2004, coletando-se, em cada ocasião, todas as folhas com minas contidas na área delimitada por um aro de 0,28 m², que era jogado nas linhas e nas entrelinhas de 30 árvores sorteadas. O material coletado foi levado ao laboratório para triagem. Durante o estudo, foram registradas 11 espécies de lepidópteros minadores e 12 espécies de microimenópteros parasitóides. Alguns gêneros identificados neste estudo já haviam sido relatados em várias regiões do mundo com espécies parasitando P. citrella, tais como Chrysocharis, Closterocerus, Sympiesis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae e Bracon (Hymenoptera: Braconidae.This work aimed to check if Phyllocnistis citrella attacks spontaneous growth plants present in an organic citrus orchard, to identify in these plants other leafmining Lepidoptera and its parasitoids, and to verify if the parasitoids species are the same ones reported for P. citrella. The work was conducted in Montenegro, RS, in an organic orchard of the hybrid 'Murcott' (Citrus sinensis x C. reticulata. Samplings were taken every other week, from May 2003 to May 2004, with a ring of 0.28 m² being randomly thrown in the lines and interlines of 30 trees. All the plants with mines inside of the ring were collected. The screening of the material was made in laboratory. Eleven species of leafmining Lepidoptera and 12 species of microhymenopteran parasitoids were found. Some genera identified that this study had been already reported in

  12. Host specialisation and competition asymmetry in coleopteran parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bili, Mikaël; Cortesero, A M; Outreman, Y; Poinsot, D

    2016-09-01

    When specialists and generalists compete for a limited resource, specialists are more constrained because they are less likely to find an alternative resource. In parasitoids with overlapping host ranges, asymmetric competition should therefore exist where specialists are more likely to win the host in a contest. Competition between parasitoids has been studied mostly in hymenopterans. In hymenopteran parasitoid wasps, females must reach the host to lay their eggs and can thus strongly influence the outcome of competition between future offspring by killing eggs or larvae of competitors. We studied competition between the free-ranging larvae of two sympatric coleopteran parasitoid rove beetles (one specialist, Aleochara bilineata and a generalist, Aleochara bipustulata) with overlapping host ranges competing in agricultural fields for pupae of the cabbage root fly. In these species, females lay their eggs in the soil, then first instars find the host where they will develop as solitary parasitoids and deal with potential competitors. Because adult longevity and fecundity favour the generalist, we postulated that first instars of the specialist would be superior larval competitors. Accordingly, we studied the outcome of encounters between first instars of the two species provided with a single host. Irrespective of its release prior to or simultaneously with its generalist competitor, the larva of the specialist most often won. Moreover, specialist larvae still won half of the encounters when generalist larvae were given a 24-h advantage. This might explain the coexistence of the two species in the field.

  13. Selectivity of Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) on adults of Cotesia flavipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Camila; Loureiro, Elisângela De Souza; Pereira, Fabricio Fagundes; Kassab, Samir Oliveira; Costa, Daniele Perassa; Barbosa, Rogério Hidalgo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding mortality patterns and interactions between entomopathogenic fun