WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrophobic ion interactions

  1. Specific ion effects on the hydrophobic interaction of benzene self-assembled monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobberschütz, Sören; Pedersen, Morten Rimmen; Hassenkam, Tue

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of aromatic compounds with various ions in aqueous solutions plays a role in a number of fields, as diverse as protein folding and enhanced oil recovery, among others. Therefore, we have investigated the effect of the four electrolytes, KCl, NaCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2, on the hydrophobic...... interaction of benzene self-assembled monolayers. Using the jump to contact phenomenon of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip as an indicator of attractive forces between the surfaces of a sample and the tip, we discovered lower frequencies in the snap in as well as narrower distributions for the snap...

  2. A control on hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between HEWL and metal Schiff-base complexes comprising of different metal ions and ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koley Seth, Banabithi; Ray, Aurkie; Basu, Samita, E-mail: samita.basu@saha.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    The structural effects of different copper(II) and nickel(II) Schiff base complexes on hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) have been investigated through steady state and time resolved absorption and fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The Schiff base ligands with N{sub 4} donor atoms show both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, however hydrophilic interaction prevails with ligands having N{sub 2}O{sub 2} donor atoms. Variation of metal ions from Cu{sup 2+} to Ni{sup 2+} with each type of Schiff base ligand increases the probability of hydrophilic over hydrophobic interactions, which supports their significance in regulating the binding affinity between HEWL and metal complexes. On photo-excitation the complexes comprising of Cu{sup 2+} ion instead of Ni{sup 2+} ion and ligands with N{sub 4} donor system rather than N{sub 2}O{sub 2} donor system, increases the probability of intersystem crossing to populate the corresponding triplet state as observed from laser flash photolysis study. The better binding affinity of nickel complexes with different selectivities compared to copper complexes towards HEWL emphasizes the potentiality of less explored nickel complexes in drug–protein interactions. - Highlights: • Ni{sup II} and Cu{sup II} -Schiff base complexes bind hen egg white lysozyme spontaneously. • Both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions are effective for N{sub 4} ligands. • For N{sub 2}O{sub 2} ligands the hydrophilic is predominant over hydrophobic interaction. • Binding affinity and selectivity of Ni{sup II}-complexes are better than Cu{sup II}-complexes. • Replacement of Cu{sup 2+} by Ni{sup 2+} in a ligand enhances chance of hydrophilic interaction.

  3. Recovery of infective virus particles in ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction monolith chromatography is influenced by particle charge and total-to-infective particle ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviben, Dora; Forcic, Dubravko; Ivancic-Jelecki, Jelena; Halassy, Beata; Brgles, Marija

    2017-06-01

    Viral particles are used in medical applications as vaccines or gene therapy vectors. In order to obtain product of high purity, potency and safety for medical use purification of virus particles is a prerequisite, and chromatography is gaining increased attention to meet this aim. Here, we report on the use of ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on monolithic columns for purification of mumps virus (MuV) and measles virus (MeV). Efficiency of the process was monitored by quantification of infective virus particles (by 50% cell culture infective dose assay) and total virus particles, and monitoring of their size (by Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis). Ion-exchange chromatography was shown to be inefficient for MuV and best results for MeV were obtained on QA column with recovery around 17%. Purification of MuV and MeV by hydrophobic interaction chromatography resulted in recoveries around 60%. Results showed that columns with small channels (d=1.4μm) are not suitable for MuV and MeV, although their size is below 400nm, whereas columns with large channels (6μm) showed to be efficient and recoveries independent on the flow rate up to 10mL/min. Heterogeneity of the virus suspension and its interday variability mostly regarding total-to-infective particle ratio was observed. Interestingly, a trend in recovery depending on the day of the harvest was also observed for both viruses, and it correlated with the total-to-infective particle ratio, indicating influence of the virus sample composition on the chromatography results. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces. PMID:26934646

  5. Tuning the hydrophobicity of mica surfaces by hyperthermal Ar ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Adrian; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Bald, Ilko; Dong Mingdong; Kingshott, Peter; Fritzsche, Monika; Facsko, Stefan; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    The hydrophobicity of surfaces has a strong influence on their interactions with biomolecules such as proteins. Therefore, for in vitro studies of bio-surface interactions model surfaces with tailored hydrophobicity are of utmost importance. Here, we present a method for tuning the hydrophobicity of atomically flat mica surfaces by hyperthermal Ar ion irradiation. Due to the sub-100 eV energies, only negligible roughening of the surface is observed at low ion fluences and also the chemical composition of the mica crystal remains almost undisturbed. However, the ion irradiation induces the preferential removal of the outermost layer of K + ions from the surface, leading to the exposure of the underlying aluminosilicate sheets which feature a large number of centers for C adsorption. The irradiated surface thus exhibits an enhanced chemical reactivity toward hydrocarbons, resulting in the adsorption of a thin hydrocarbon film from the environment. Aging these surfaces under ambient conditions leads to a continuous increase of their contact angle until a fully hydrophobic surface with a contact angle >80 deg. is obtained after a period of about 3 months. This method thus enables the fabrication of ultrasmooth biological model surfaces with precisely tailored hydrophobicity.

  6. Inverse colloidal crystal membranes for hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Anh T; Wang, Xinying; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Cong, Hailin; Luo, Yongli; Tang, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has gained interest due to its excellent performance in the purification of humanized monoclonal antibodies. The membrane material used in hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has typically been commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride. In this contribution, newly developed inverse colloidal crystal membranes that have uniform pores, high porosity and, therefore, high surface area for protein binding are used as hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography membranes for humanized monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G purification. The capacity of the inverse colloidal crystal membranes developed here is up to ten times greater than commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride membranes with a similar pore size. This work highlights the importance of developing uniform pore size high porosity membranes in order to maximize the capacity of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Ions-induced nanostructuration: effect of specific ionic adsorption on hydrophobic polymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siretanu, Igor; Chapel, Jean-Paul; Bastos-González, Delfi; Drummond, Carlos

    2013-06-06

    The effect of surface charges on the ionic distribution in close proximity to an interface has been extensively studied. On the contrary, the influence of ions (from dissolved salts) on deformable interfaces has been barely investigated. Ions can adsorb from aqueous solutions on hydrophobic surfaces, generating forces that can induce long-lasting deformation of glassy polymer films, a process called ion-induced polymer nanostructuration, IPN. We have found that this process is ion-specific; larger surface modifications are observed in the presence of water ions and hydrophobic and amphiphilic ions. Surface structuration is also observed in the presence of certain salts of lithium. We have used streaming potential and atomic force microscopy to study the effect of dissolved ions on the surface properties of polystyrene films, finding a good correlation between ionic adsorption and IPN. Our results also suggest that the presence of strongly hydrated lithium promotes the interaction of anions with polystyrene surfaces and more generally with hydrophobic polymer surfaces, triggering then the IPN process.

  8. Driving force for hydrophobic interaction at different length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangi, Ronen

    2011-03-17

    We study by molecular dynamics simulations the driving force for the hydrophobic interaction between graphene sheets of different sizes down to the atomic scale. Similar to the prediction by Lum, Chandler, and Weeks for hard-sphere solvation [J. Phys. Chem. B 1999, 103, 4570-4577], we find the driving force to be length-scale dependent, despite the fact that our model systems do not exhibit dewetting. For small hydrophobic solutes, the association is purely entropic, while enthalpy favors dissociation. The latter is demonstrated to arise from the enhancement of hydrogen bonding between the water molecules around small hydrophobes. On the other hand, the attraction between large graphene sheets is dominated by enthalpy which mainly originates from direct solute-solute interactions. The crossover length is found to be inside the range of 0.3-1.5 nm(2) of the surface area of the hydrophobe that is eliminated in the association process. In the large-scale regime, different thermodynamic properties are scalable with this change of surface area. In particular, upon dimerization, a total and a water-induced stabilization of approximately 65 and 12 kJ/mol/nm(2) are obtained, respectively, and on average around one hydrogen bond is gained per 1 nm(2) of graphene sheet association. Furthermore, the potential of mean force between the sheets is also scalable except for interplate distances smaller than 0.64 nm which corresponds to the region around the barrier for removing the last layer of water. It turns out that, as the surface area increases, the relative height of the barrier for association decreases and the range of attraction increases. It is also shown that, around small hydrophobic solutes, the lifetime of the hydrogen bonds is longer than in the bulk, while around large hydrophobes it is the same. Nevertheless, the rearrangement of the hydrogen-bond network for both length-scale regimes is slower than in bulk water. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Soft matter interactions at the molecular scale: interaction forces and energies between single hydrophobic model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Philipp; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2017-02-08

    In all realms of soft matter research a fundamental understanding of the structure/property relationships based on molecular interactions is crucial for developing a framework for the targeted design of soft materials. However, a molecular picture is often difficult to ascertain and yet essential for understanding the many different competing interactions at play, including entropies and cooperativities, hydration effects, and the enormous design space of soft matter. Here, we characterized for the first time the interaction between single hydrophobic molecules quantitatively using atomic force microscopy, and demonstrated that single molecular hydrophobic interaction free energies are dominated by the area of the smallest interacting hydrophobe. The interaction free energy amounts to 3-4 kT per hydrophobic unit. Also, we find that the transition state of the hydrophobic interactions is located at 3 Å with respect to the ground state, based on Bell-Evans theory. Our results provide a new path for understanding the nature of hydrophobic interactions at the single molecular scale. Our approach enables us to systematically vary hydrophobic and any other interaction type by utilizing peptide chemistry providing a strategic advancement to unravel molecular surface and soft matter interactions at the single molecular scale.

  10. The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.K.; Herberg, J.L.; Wu, Y.; Schwegler, E.; Mehta, A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

  11. Dewetting and Hydrophobic Interaction in Physical and Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Bruce J.; Weeks, John D.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2013-01-01

    Hydrophobicity manifests itself differently on large and small length scales. This review focuses on large length scale hydrophobicity, particularly on dewetting at single hydrophobic surfaces and drying in regions bounded on two or more sides by hydrophobic surfaces. We review applicable theories, simulations and experiments pertaining to large scale hydrophobicity in physical and biomoleclar systems and clarify some of the critical issues pertaining to this subject. Given space constraints, we could not review all of the significant and interesting work in this very active field. PMID:18928403

  12. A novel in situ hydrophobic ion paring (HIP) formulation strategy for clinical product selection of a nanoparticle drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Ho; Shin, Eyoung; Wang, Hong; Nolan, Jim; Low, Susan; Parsons, Donald; Zale, Stephen; Ashton, Susan; Ashford, Marianne; Ali, Mir; Thrasher, Daniel; Boylan, Nicholas; Troiano, Greg

    2016-05-10

    The present studies were aimed at formulating AZD2811-loaded polylactic acid-polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG) nanoparticles with adjustable release rates without altering the chemical structures of the polymer or active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). This was accomplished through the use of a hydrophobic ion pairing approach. A series of AZD2811-containing nanoparticles with a variety of hydrophobic counterions including oleic acid, 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, dioctylsulfosuccinic acid, and pamoic acid is described. The hydrophobicity of AZD2811 was increased through formation of ion pairs with these hydrophobic counterions, producing nanoparticles with exceptionally high drug loading-up to five fold higher encapsulation efficiency and drug loading compared to nanoparticles made without hydrophobic ion pairs. Furthermore, the rate at which the drug was released from the nanoparticles could be controlled by employing counterions with various hydrophobicities and structures, resulting in release half-lives ranging from about 2 to 120h using the same polymer, nanoparticle size, and nanoemulsion process. Process recipe variables affecting drug load and release rate were identified, including pH and molarity of quench buffer. Ion pair formation between AZD2811 and pamoic acid as a model counterion was investigated using solubility enhancement as well as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to demonstrate solution-state interactions. Further evidence for an ion pairing mechanism of controlled release was provided through the measurement of API and counterion release profiles using high-performance liquid chromatography, which had stoichiometric relationships. Finally, Raman spectra of an AZD2811-pamoate salt compared well with those of the formulated nanoparticles, while single components (AZD2811, pamoic acid) alone did not. A library of AZD2811 batches was created for analytical and preclinical characterization. Dramatically improved

  13. Hydrophobically modified polyelectrolytes : synthesis, properties and interactions with surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwkerk, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrophobically modified polyelectrolytes can form micelle-like aggregates, so-called microdomains, in aqueous solution. The hydrophobic side chains constitute the apolar inner part of these microdomains and the hydrophilic groups on the polyelectrolyte backbone are at the surface of the

  14. Hydrophobization of track membrane surface by ion-plasma sputtering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklin, I. E.; Khlebnikov, N. A.; Barashev, N. R.; Serkov, K. V.; Polyakov, E. V.; Zdorovets, M. V.; Borgekov, D. B.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Cholakh, S. O.; Kozlovskiy, A. L.

    2017-09-01

    This article reviews the possibility of applying inorganic coatings of metal compounds on PTM by ion-plasma sputtering. The main aim of this research is to increase the contact angle of PTM surfaces and to impart the properties of a hydrophobic material to it. After the modification, the initial contact angle increased from 70° to 120°.

  15. Automated Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography Column Selection for Use in Protein Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick J. M.; Stone, Orrin J.; Anderson, Michelle E.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to other chromatographic methods for purifying proteins (e.g. gel filtration, affinity, and ion exchange), hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) commonly requires experimental determination (referred to as screening or "scouting") in order to select the most suitable chromatographic medium for purifying a given protein 1. The method presented here describes an automated approach to scouting for an optimal HIC media to be used in protein purification. HIC separates proteins and other biomolecules from a crude lysate based on differences in hydrophobicity. Similar to affinity chromatography (AC) and ion exchange chromatography (IEX), HIC is capable of concentrating the protein of interest as it progresses through the chromatographic process. Proteins best suited for purification by HIC include those with hydrophobic surface regions and able to withstand exposure to salt concentrations in excess of 2 M ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4). HIC is often chosen as a purification method for proteins lacking an affinity tag, and thus unsuitable for AC, and when IEX fails to provide adequate purification. Hydrophobic moieties on the protein surface temporarily bind to a nonpolar ligand coupled to an inert, immobile matrix. The interaction between protein and ligand are highly dependent on the salt concentration of the buffer flowing through the chromatography column, with high ionic concentrations strengthening the protein-ligand interaction and making the protein immobile (i.e. bound inside the column) 2. As salt concentrations decrease, the protein-ligand interaction dissipates, the protein again becomes mobile and elutes from the column. Several HIC media are commercially available in pre-packed columns, each containing one of several hydrophobic ligands (e.g. S-butyl, butyl, octyl, and phenyl) cross-linked at varying densities to agarose beads of a specific diameter 3. Automated column scouting allows for an efficient approach for determining which HIC media

  16. Ion Transfer Voltammetry Associated with Two Polarizable Interfaces Within Water and Moderately Hydrophobic Ionic Liquid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical system composed of two polarizable interfaces (the metallic electrode|water and water|ionic liquid interfaces), namely two‐polarized‐interface (TPI) technique, has been proposed to explore the ion transfer processes between water and moderately hydrophobic ionic liquids (W...... to an extremely narrow polarized potential window (ppw) caused by these moderately hydrophobic ionic components. In this article, we show that TPI technique has virtually eliminated the ppw limitation based on a controlling step of concentration polarization at the electrode|water interface. With the aid...

  17. Premicellar interaction of PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers with partially hydrophobic alcohols: NMR study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kříž, Jaroslav; Dybal, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 5 (2013), s. 275-282 ISSN 0749-1581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/1657; GA ČR GA203/09/1478 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : pluronics * hydrophobic interaction * hydrophobic alcohols Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.559, year: 2013

  18. Molecular-scale hydrophobic interactions between hard-sphere reference solutes are attractive and endothermic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I; Holleran, Sinead A; Ashbaugh, Henry S; Pratt, Lawrence R

    2013-12-17

    The osmotic second virial coefficients, B2, for atomic-sized hard spheres in water are attractive (B2 attractive with increasing temperature (ΔB2/ΔT attractive and endothermic at moderate temperatures. Hydrophobic interactions between atomic-sized hard spheres in water are more attractive than predicted by the available statistical mechanical theory. These results constitute an initial step toward detailed molecular theory of additional intermolecular interaction features, specifically, attractive interactions associated with hydrophobic solutes.

  19. Femtosecond study of the effects of ions and hydrophobes on the dynamics of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Post, Sietse T; Tielrooij, Klaas-Jan; Hunger, Johannes; Backus, Ellen H G; Bakker, Huib J

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of ions and hydrophobic molecular groups on the orientational dynamics of water using THz dielectric relaxation (THz-DR) and polarization-resolved femtosecond infrared (fs-IR) pump-probe spectroscopy. We measure the dynamics of water in solutions of NaI, NaCl, CsCl, guanidinium chloride (GndCl) and tetramethyl guanidinium chloride (TMGndCl) of different the static dipoles of their surrounding water molecules. With fs-IR we find that concentrations. With THz-DR we observe that strongly hydrated cations align the OD groups that form hydrogen bonds to halide anions reorient with two distinct time constants of 2 +/- 0.3 ps and 9 +/- 1 ps. The fast process is assigned to a wobbling motion of the OD group that keeps the hydrogen bond with the anion intact. The amplitude of this wobbling motion depends on the nature of both the anion and the counter cation. The replacement of four of the six hydrogen atoms of the weakly hydrated cation guanidinium by hydrophobic methyl groups leads to an exceptionally strong slowing down of the water dynamics. Hydrophobic groups thus appear to have a much stronger effect on the dynamics of water than ions. These findings give new insights in the mechanism of protein denaturation by GndCl and TMGndCl.

  20. Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography for Bottom-Up Proteomics Analysis of Single Proteins and Protein Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackiewicz, Michal; Große-Hovest, Ludger; Alpert, Andrew J; Zarei, Mostafa; Dengjel, Jörn

    2017-06-02

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) is a robust standard analytical method to purify proteins while preserving their biological activity. It is widely used to study post-translational modifications of proteins and drug-protein interactions. In the current manuscript we employed HIC to separate proteins, followed by bottom-up LC-MS/MS experiments. We used this approach to fractionate antibody species followed by comprehensive peptide mapping as well as to study protein complexes in human cells. HIC-reversed-phase chromatography (RPC)-mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful alternative to fractionate proteins for bottom-up proteomics experiments making use of their distinct hydrophobic properties.

  1. Hydrophobic interactions between polymethacrylic acid and sodium laureth sulfate in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaremko, Z. M.; Fedushinskaya, L. B.; Burka, O. A.; Soltys, M. N.

    2014-09-01

    The role of hydrophobic interaction in the development of associative processes is demonstrated, based on the concentration dependences of the viscosity and pH of binary solutions of polymethacrylic acid as an anionic polyelectrolyte and sodium laureth sulfate as an anionic surfactant. It is found that the inflection point on the dependence of the difference between the pH values of binary solutions of polymethacrylic acid and sodium laureth sulfate on the polyelectrolyte concentration is a criterion for determining the predominant contribution from hydrophobic interaction, as is the inflection point on the dependence of pH of individual solutions of polymethacrylic acid on the polyelectrolyte concentration.

  2. Analysis of hydrophobic interactions of antagonists with the beta2-adrenergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoseletsky, V N; Pyrkov, T V; Efremov, R G

    2010-01-01

    The adrenergic receptors mediate a wide variety of physiological responses, including vasodilatation and vasoconstriction, heart rate modulation, and others. Beta-adrenergic antagonists ('beta-blockers') thus constitute a widely used class of drugs in cardiovascular medicine as well as in management of anxiety, migraine, and glaucoma. The importance of the hydrophobic effect has been evidenced for a wide range of beta-blocker properties. To better understand the role of the hydrophobic effect in recognition of beta-blockers by their receptor, we carried out a molecular docking study combined with an original approach to estimate receptor-ligand hydrophobic interactions. The proposed method is based on automatic detection of molecular fragments in ligands and the analysis of their interactions with receptors separately. A series of beta-blockers, based on phenylethanolamines and phenoxypropanolamines, were docked to the beta2-adrenoceptor binding site in the crystal structure. Hydrophobic complementarity between the ligand and the receptor was calculated using the PLATINUM web-server (http://model.nmr.ru/platinum). Based on the analysis of the hydrophobic match for molecular fragments of beta-blockers, we have developed a new scoring function which efficiently predicts dissociation constant (pKd) with strong correlations (r(2) approximately 0.8) with experimental data.

  3. Reference interaction site model with hydrophobicity induced density inhomogeneity: An analytical theory to compute solvation properties of large hydrophobic solutes in the mixture of polyatomic solvent molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Siqin; Sheong, Fu Kit; Huang, Xuhui

    2015-01-01

    Reference interaction site model (RISM) has recently become a popular approach in the study of thermodynamical and structural properties of the solvent around macromolecules. On the other hand, it was widely suggested that there exists water density depletion around large hydrophobic solutes (>1 nm), and this may pose a great challenge to the RISM theory. In this paper, we develop a new analytical theory, the Reference Interaction Site Model with Hydrophobicity induced density Inhomogeneity (RISM-HI), to compute solvent radial distribution function (RDF) around large hydrophobic solute in water as well as its mixture with other polyatomic organic solvents. To achieve this, we have explicitly considered the density inhomogeneity at the solute-solvent interface using the framework of the Yvon-Born-Green hierarchy, and the RISM theory is used to obtain the solute-solvent pair correlation. In order to efficiently solve the relevant equations while maintaining reasonable accuracy, we have also developed a new closure called the D2 closure. With this new theory, the solvent RDFs around a large hydrophobic particle in water and different water-acetonitrile mixtures could be computed, which agree well with the results of the molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we show that our RISM-HI theory can also efficiently compute the solvation free energy of solute with a wide range of hydrophobicity in various water-acetonitrile solvent mixtures with a reasonable accuracy. We anticipate that our theory could be widely applied to compute the thermodynamic and structural properties for the solvation of hydrophobic solute

  4. Immobilization of molecular cobalt electrocatalyst by hydrophobic interaction with hematite photoanode for highly stable oxygen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Joya, Khurram

    2015-07-15

    A unique modification of a hematite photoanode with perfluorinated Co-phthalocyanine (CoFPc) by strong binding associated with hydrophobic interaction is demonstrated. The resultant molecular electrocatalyst – hematite photoanode hybrid material showed significant onset shift and high stability for photoelectrochemical oxidation evolution reaction (OER).

  5. Immobilization of molecular cobalt electrocatalyst by hydrophobic interaction with hematite photoanode for highly stable oxygen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Joya, Khurram; Morlanes, Natalia; Maloney, Edward; Rodionov, Valentin; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    A unique modification of a hematite photoanode with perfluorinated Co-phthalocyanine (CoFPc) by strong binding associated with hydrophobic interaction is demonstrated. The resultant molecular electrocatalyst – hematite photoanode hybrid material showed significant onset shift and high stability for photoelectrochemical oxidation evolution reaction (OER).

  6. Ion mobilities and ion-atom interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatland, I.R.

    1982-01-01

    The techniques for measuring the mobilities of ions in gases, relating interaction potentials to mobilities, and determining potentials from experimental mobilities are reviewed. Applications are presented for positive alkali ions and negative halogen ions in inert gases. (Auth.)

  7. Synthesis of sponge-like hydrophobic NiBi_3 surface by 200 keV Ar ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Vantari; Datta, D.P.; Chatterjee, S.; Varma, S.; Kanjilal, D.; Sahoo, Pratap K.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A sponge-like hydrophobic NiBi_3 surface has been synthesized using 200 keV Ar ion implantation. • A competition between amorphization and re-crystallization was observed in the existing phases owing to comparable magnitudes of nuclear and electronic energy depositions. • The relation between hydrophobic nature and sponge-like NiBi_3 phase seems interesting, which is attributed to ion beam induced sputtering and mixing of the layers. - Abstract: Sponge-like nanostructures develop under Ar-ion implantation of a Ni–Bi bilayer with increasing ion fluence at room temperature. The surface morphology features different stages of evolution as a function of ion fluence, finally resulting in a planar surface at the highest fluence. Our investigations on the chemical composition reveal a spontaneous formation of NiBi_3 phase on the surface of the as deposited bilayer film. Interestingly, we observe a competition between crystallization and amorphization of the existing poly-crystalline phases as a function of the implanted fluence. Measurements of contact angle by sessile drop method clearly show the ion-fluence dependent hydrophobic nature of the nano-structured surfaces. The wettability has been correlated with the variation in roughness and composition of the implanted surface. In fact, our experimental results confirm dominant effect of ion-sputtering as well as ion-induced mixing at the bilayer interface in the evolution of the sponge-like surface.

  8. Synthesis of sponge-like hydrophobic NiBi{sub 3} surface by 200 keV Ar ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siva, Vantari; Datta, D.P. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, HBNI, Jatni 752050 (India); Chatterjee, S. [Colloids and Materials Chemistry Department, CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Acharya Vihar, Bhubaneswar 751 013 (India); Varma, S. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Sahoo, Pratap K., E-mail: pratap.sahoo@niser.ac.in [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, HBNI, Jatni 752050 (India)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • A sponge-like hydrophobic NiBi{sub 3} surface has been synthesized using 200 keV Ar ion implantation. • A competition between amorphization and re-crystallization was observed in the existing phases owing to comparable magnitudes of nuclear and electronic energy depositions. • The relation between hydrophobic nature and sponge-like NiBi{sub 3} phase seems interesting, which is attributed to ion beam induced sputtering and mixing of the layers. - Abstract: Sponge-like nanostructures develop under Ar-ion implantation of a Ni–Bi bilayer with increasing ion fluence at room temperature. The surface morphology features different stages of evolution as a function of ion fluence, finally resulting in a planar surface at the highest fluence. Our investigations on the chemical composition reveal a spontaneous formation of NiBi{sub 3} phase on the surface of the as deposited bilayer film. Interestingly, we observe a competition between crystallization and amorphization of the existing poly-crystalline phases as a function of the implanted fluence. Measurements of contact angle by sessile drop method clearly show the ion-fluence dependent hydrophobic nature of the nano-structured surfaces. The wettability has been correlated with the variation in roughness and composition of the implanted surface. In fact, our experimental results confirm dominant effect of ion-sputtering as well as ion-induced mixing at the bilayer interface in the evolution of the sponge-like surface.

  9. Molecular Theory and the Effects of Solute Attractive Forces on Hydrophobic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I; Rempe, Susan B; Asthagiri, D; Tan, L; Pratt, L R

    2016-03-03

    The role of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions is studied by coordinated development of theory and simulation results for Ar atoms in water. We present a concise derivation of the local molecular field (LMF) theory for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions, a derivation that clarifies the close relation of LMF theory to the EXP approximation applied to this problem long ago. The simulation results show that change from purely repulsive atomic solute interactions to include realistic attractive interactions diminishes the strength of hydrophobic bonds. For the Ar-Ar rdfs considered pointwise, the numerical results for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions are opposite in sign and larger in magnitude than predicted by LMF theory. That comparison is discussed from the point of view of quasichemical theory, and it is suggested that the first reason for this difference is the incomplete evaluation within LMF theory of the hydration energy of the Ar pair. With a recent suggestion for the system-size extrapolation of the required correlation function integrals, the Ar-Ar rdfs permit evaluation of osmotic second virial coefficients B2. Those B2's also show that incorporation of attractive interactions leads to more positive (repulsive) values. With attractive interactions in play, B2 can change from positive to negative values with increasing temperatures. This is consistent with the puzzling suggestions of decades ago that B2 ≈ 0 for intermediate cases of temperature or solute size. In all cases here, B2 becomes more attractive with increasing temperature.

  10. Electronic structures in ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical bond generated by the interaction between low energy ion and base was investigated by ab initio molecular orbital method. The effects of ion charge were studied by calculation of this method. When carbon ion approached to graphite base (C 24 H 12 ), the positive ion and the neutral atom covalently bonded, but the negative ion did not combine with it. When carbon ion was injected into h-BN base (B 12 N 12 H 12 , hexagonal system boron nitride), the positive ion and the neutron atom formed covalent bond and the van der Waals binding, and the negative ion interacted statically with it. (S.Y.)

  11. Thermodynamic Molecular Switch in Sequence-Specific Hydrophobic Interaction: Two Computational Models Compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Chun

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown in our published work the existence of a thermodynamic switch in biological systems wherein a change of sign in ΔCp°(Treaction leads to a true negative minimum in the Gibbs free energy change of reaction, and hence, a maximum in the related Keq. We have examined 35 pair-wise, sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions over the temperature range of 273–333 K, based on data reported by Nemethy and Scheraga in 1962. A closer look at a single example, the pair-wise hydrophobic interaction of leucine-isoleucine, will demonstrate the significant differences when the data are analyzed using the Nemethy-Scheraga model or treated by the Planck-Benzinger methodology which we have developed. The change in inherent chemical bond energy at 0 K, ΔH°(T0 is 7.53 kcal mol-1 compared with 2.4 kcal mol-1, while ‹ts› is 365 K as compared with 355 K, for the Nemethy-Scheraga and Planck-Benzinger model, respectively. At ‹tm›, the thermal agitation energy is about five times greater than ΔH°(T0 in the Planck-Benzinger model, that is 465 K compared to 497 K in the Nemethy-Scheraga model. The results imply that the negative Gibbs free energy minimum at a well-defined ‹ts›, where TΔS° = 0 at about 355 K, has its origin in the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions, which are highly dependent on details of molecular structure. The Nemethy-Scheraga model shows no evidence of the thermodynamic molecular switch that we have found to be a universal feature of biological interactions. The Planck-Benzinger method is the best known for evaluating the innate temperature-invariant enthalpy, ΔH°(T0, and provides for better understanding of the heat of reaction for biological molecules.

  12. Preferential hydrophobic interactions are responsible for a preference of D-amino acids in the aminoacylation of 5'-AMP with hydrophobic amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, J. C. Jr; Wickramasinghe, N. S.; Sabatini, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the chemistry of aminoacyl AMP to model reactions at the 3' terminus of aminoacyl tRNA for the purpose of understanding the origin of protein synthesis. The present studies relate to the D, L preference in the esterification of 5'-AMP. All N-acetyl amino acids we studied showed faster reaction of the D-isomer, with a generally decreasing preference for D-isomer as the hydrophobicity of the amino acid decreased. The beta-branched amino acids, Ile and Val, showed an extreme preference for D-isomer. Ac-Leu, the gamma-branched amino acid, showed a slightly low D/L ratio relative to its hydrophobicity. The molecular basis for these preferences for D-isomer is understandable in the light of our previous studies and seems to be due to preferential hydrophobic interaction of the D-isomer with adenine. The preference for hydrophobic D-amino acids can be decreased by addition of an organic solvent to the reaction medium. Conversely, peptidylation with Ac-PhePhe shows a preference for the LL isomer over the DD isomer.

  13. Different assembly of type IV collagen on hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrata alters endothelial cells interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NM Coelho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the structural role of type IV collagen (Col IV in the assembly of the basement membrane (BM and the perspective of mimicking its organization for vascular tissue engineering purposes, we studied the adsorption pattern of this protein on model hydrophilic (clean glass and hydrophobic trichloro(octadecylsilane (ODS surfaces known to strongly affect the behavior of other matrix proteins. The amount of fluorescently labeled Col IV was quantified showing saturation of the surface for concentration of the adsorbing solution of about 50μg/ml, but with approximately twice more adsorbed protein on ODS. AFM studies revealed a fine – nearly single molecular size – network arrangement of Col IV on hydrophilic glass, which turns into a prominent and growing polygonal network consisting of molecular aggregates on hydrophobic ODS. The protein layer forms within minutes in a concentration-dependent manner. We further found that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC attach less efficiently to the aggregated Col IV (on ODS, as judged by the significantly altered cell spreading, focal adhesions formation and the development of actin cytoskeleton. Conversely, the immunofluorescence studies for integrins revealed that the fine Col IV network formed on hydrophilic substrata is better recognized by the cells via both α1 and α2 heterodimers which support cellular interaction, apart from these on hydrophobic ODS where almost no clustering of integrins was observed.

  14. Interaction of langmuir and ion acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Jae

    1991-01-01

    Interaction of Langmuir and ion acoustic waves in a plasma is described by Landau-Ginzburg type of equation when the group velocity of the Langmuir wave is equal to the wave velocity of ion acoustic wave. (Author)

  15. Isolation of soy bean protein P34 from oil bodies using hydrophobic interaction chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Sewekow, E.; Keßler, L.; Seidel-Morgenstern, A.; Rothkoetter, H.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Soybeans play a prominent role in allergologic research due to the high incidence of allergic reactions. For detailed studies on specific proteins it is necessary to have access to a large amount of pure substance. Results In this contribution, a method for purifying soybean (Glycine max) protein P34 (also called Gly m Bd 30 K or Gly m 1) using hydrophobic interaction chromatography is presented. After screening experiments using 1 mL HiTrap columns, Butyl Sepharose 4 FF w...

  16. Characterization of Hydrophobic Interactions of Polymers with Water and Phospholipid Membranes Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenscko, Mihaela

    Polymers and lipid membranes are both essential soft materials. The structure and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of polymers, as well as the solvent they are embedded in, ultimately determines their size and shape. Understating the variation of shape of the polymer as well as its interactions with model biological membranes can assist in understanding the biocompatibility of the polymer itself. Computer simulations, in particular molecular dynamics, can aid in characterization of the interaction of polymers with solvent, as well as polymers with model membranes. In this thesis, molecular dynamics serve to describe polymer interactions with a solvent (water) and with a lipid membrane. To begin with, we characterize the hydrophobic collapse of single polystyrene chains in water using molecular dynamics simulations. Specifically, we calculate the potential of mean force for the collapse of a single polystyrene chain in water using metadynamics, comparing the results between all atomistic with coarse-grained molecular simulation. We next explore the scaling behavior of the collapsed globular shape at the minimum energy configuration, characterized by the radius of gyration, as a function of chain length. The exponent is close to one third, consistent with that predicted for a polymer chain in bad solvent. We also explore the scaling behavior of the Solvent Accessible Surface Area (SASA) as a function of chain length, finding a similar exponent for both all-atomistic and coarse-grained simulations. Furthermore, calculation of the local water density as a function of chain length near the minimum energy configuration suggests that intermediate chain lengths are more likely to form dewetted states, as compared to shorter or longer chain lengths. Next, in order to investigate the molecular interactions between single hydrophobic polymer chains and lipids in biological membranes and at lipid membrane/solvent interface, we perform a series of molecular dynamics simulations of

  17. Optimization of linear and branched alkane interactions with water to simulate hydrophobic hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.; Liu, Lixin; Surampudi, Lalitanand N.

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies of simple gas hydration have demonstrated that the accuracy of molecular simulations at capturing the thermodynamic signatures of hydrophobic hydration is linked both to the fidelity of the water model at replicating the experimental liquid density at ambient pressure and an accounting of polarization interactions between the solute and water. We extend those studies to examine alkane hydration using the transferable potentials for phase equilibria united-atom model for linear and branched alkanes, developed to reproduce alkane phase behavior, and the TIP4P/2005 model for water, which provides one of the best descriptions of liquid water for the available fixed-point charge models. Alkane site/water oxygen Lennard-Jones cross interactions were optimized to reproduce the experimental alkane hydration free energies over a range of temperatures. The optimized model reproduces the hydration free energies of the fitted alkanes with a root mean square difference between simulation and experiment of 0.06 kcal/mol over a wide temperature range, compared to 0.44 kcal/mol for the parent model. The optimized model accurately reproduces the temperature dependence of hydrophobic hydration, as characterized by the hydration enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities, as well as the pressure response, as characterized by partial molar volumes.

  18. Purification of tracer for somatomedin C radioimmunoassay by hydrophobic interaction chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, R.C.; Brown, A.S.

    1982-03-01

    A tracer for use in the somatomedin C radiommunoassay by hydrophobic interaction chromatography was purified. Material showing greatest immunoreactivity binds to Octyl Sepharose CL-4B (Pharmacia) in a buffer mixture consisting of 130 mL of acetonitrile and 870 mL of 0.1 mol/L NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/, pH 7.8, but is eluted by increasing the acetonitrile content to 180 mL/L. As compared with tracer purified by binding to specific antiserum in liquid phase, precipitating the complex with second antibody, and then dissociating by gel chromatography at acid pH, this tracer shows equal immunoreactivity against specific somatomedin C antiserum. Either preparation allows excellent discrimination between extracts of normal, acromegalic, and hypopituitary plasma samples; thus either is suitable for use in the somatomedin C radioimmunoassay. Tracer purification by hydrophobic interaction chromatography is rapid and inexpensive. It may be useful in preparing highly immunoreactive tracers for other peptide radioimmunoassays.

  19. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography in dual salt system increases protein binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senczuk, Anna M; Klinke, Ralph; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Vedantham, Ganesh; Yigzaw, Yinges

    2009-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) uses weakly hydrophobic resins and requires a salting-out salt to promote protein-resin interaction. The salting-out effects increase with protein and salt concentration. Dynamic binding capacity (DBC) is dependent on the binding constant, as well as on the flow characteristics during sample loading. DBC increases with the salt concentration but decreases with increasing flow rate. Dynamic and operational binding capacity have a major raw material cost/processing time impact on commercial scale production of monoclonal antibodies. In order to maximize DBC the highest salt concentration without causing precipitation is used. We report here a novel method to maintain protein solubility while increasing the DBC by using a combination of two salting-out salts (referred to as dual salt). In a series of experiments, we explored the dynamic capacity of a HIC resin (TosoBioscience Butyl 650M) with combinations of salts. Using a model antibody, we developed a system allowing us to increase the dynamic capacity up to twofold using the dual salt system over traditional, single salt system. We also investigated the application of this novel approach to several other proteins and salt combinations, and noted a similar protein solubility and DBC increase. The observed increase in DBC in the dual salt system was maintained at different linear flow rates and did not impact selectivity.

  20. Influence of mixed electrolytes and pH on adsorption of bovine serum albumin in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackemann, Eva; Hasse, Hans

    2017-10-27

    Using salt mixtures instead of single salts can be beneficial for hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The effect of electrolytes on the adsorption of proteins, however, depends on the pH. Little is known on that dependence for mixed electrolytes. Therefore, the effect of the pH on protein adsorption from aqueous solutions containing mixed salts is systematically studied in the present work for a model system: the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the mildly hydrophobic resin Toyopearl PPG-600M. The pH is adjusted to 4.0, 4.7 or 7.0 using 25mM sodium phosphate or sodium citrate buffer. Binary and ternary salt mixtures of sodium chloride, ammonium chloride, sodium sulfate and ammonium sulfate as well as the pure salts are used at overall ionic strengths between 1500 and 4200mM. The temperature is always 25°C. The influence of the mixed electrolytes on the adsorption behavior of BSA changes completely with varying pH. Positive as well as negative cooperative effects of the mixed electrolytes are observed. The results are analyzed using a mathematical model which was recently introduced by our group. In that model the influence of the electrolytes is described by a Taylor series expansion in the individual ion molarities. After suitable parametrization using a subset of the data determined in the present work, the model successfully predicts the influence of mixed electrolytes on the protein adsorption. Furthermore, results for BSA from the present study are compared to literature data for lysozyme, which are available for the same adsorbent, temperature and salts. By calculating the ratio of the loading of the adsorbent for both proteins particularly favorable separation conditions can be selected. Hence, a model-based optimization of solvents for protein separation is possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. MICROBIAL CELL-SURFACE HYDROPHOBICITY - THE INVOLVEMENT OF ELECTROSTATIC INTERACTIONS IN MICROBIAL ADHESION TO HYDROCARBONS (MATH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTSEMADOORNBUSCH, GI; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) is the most commonly used method to determine microbial cell surface hydrophobicity. Since, however, the assay is based on adhesion, it is questionable whether the results reflect only the cell surface hydrophobicity or an interplay of hydrophobicity and

  2. Gradient elution behavior of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography with U-shaped retention factor curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasy, Arch; Lomino, Joseph; Barker, Gregory; Khetan, Anurag; Carta, Giorgio

    2018-04-27

    Protein retention in hydrophobic interaction chromatography is described by the solvophobic theory as a function of the kosmostropic salt concentration. In general, an increase in salt concentration drives protein partitioning to the hydrophobic surface while a decrease reduces it. In some cases, however, protein retention also increases at low salt concentrations resulting in a U-shaped retention factor curve. During gradient elution the salt concentration is gradually decreased from a high value thereby reducing the retention factor and increasing the protein chromatographic velocity. For these conditions, a steep gradient can overtake the protein in the column, causing it to rebind. Two dynamic models, one based on the local equilibrium theory and the other based on the linear driving force approximation, are presented. We show that the normalized gradient slope determines whether the protein elutes in the gradient, partially elutes, or is trapped in the column. Experimental results are presented for two different monoclonal antibodies and for lysozyme on Capto Phenyl (High Sub) resin. One of the mAbs and lysozyme exhibit U-shaped retention factor curves and for each, we determine the critical gradient slope beyond which 100% recovery is no longer possible. Elution with a reverse gradient is also demonstrated at low salt concentrations for these proteins. Understanding this behavior has implications in the design of gradient elution since the gradient slope impacts protein recovery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The interaction between fluid flow and ultra-hydrophobic surface in mini channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasikova Darina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of liquid with ultra-hydrophobic surface is accompanied by creation of layer of air. The effect of the air film has a potential of use in industry in many applications. The quality of the surface is influenced by matrix roughness, the character of physical or chemical cover. There was developed a method for analysis of the liquid flow and the air film using the lighting in volume, visualization with CCD camera and long distance microscope, and optical filters. There were prepared four stainless steel samples of inner channel of dimensions (80 × 8 × 8 mm and initial surface roughness Ra 0.33, Ra 1.0, Ra 2.0, and Ra 2.2. The inner channel was treated with plasma and commercial hydrophobic coating Greblon (WEILBURGER Coatings GmbH. There was realized study focused on the liquid flow velocity profile close to the air film. There are present results for laminar, transient and turbulent flows. The study also estimated the air film thickness depending on the Re number. The knowledge of the air film behaviour helps applied suitable degree of processing and cover for the target application.

  4. The role of hydrophobic interactions in positioning of peripheral proteins in membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomize Mikhail A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three-dimensional (3D structures of numerous peripheral membrane proteins have been determined. Biological activity, stability, and conformations of these proteins depend on their spatial positions with respect to the lipid bilayer. However, these positions are usually undetermined. Results We report the first large-scale computational study of monotopic/peripheral proteins with known 3D structures. The optimal translational and rotational positions of 476 proteins are determined by minimizing energy of protein transfer from water to the lipid bilayer, which is approximated by a hydrocarbon slab with a decadiene-like polarity and interfacial regions characterized by water-permeation profiles. Predicted membrane-binding sites, protein tilt angles and membrane penetration depths are consistent with spin-labeling, chemical modification, fluorescence, NMR, mutagenesis, and other experimental studies of 53 peripheral proteins and peptides. Experimental membrane binding affinities of peripheral proteins were reproduced in cases that did not involve a helix-coil transition, specific binding of lipids, or a predominantly electrostatic association. Coordinates of all examined peripheral proteins and peptides with the calculated hydrophobic membrane boundaries, subcellular localization, topology, structural classification, and experimental references are available through the Orientations of Proteins in Membranes (OPM database. Conclusion Positions of diverse peripheral proteins and peptides in the lipid bilayer can be accurately predicted using their 3D structures that represent a proper membrane-bound conformation and oligomeric state, and have membrane binding elements present. The success of the implicit solvation model suggests that hydrophobic interactions are usually sufficient to determine the spatial position of a protein in the membrane, even when electrostatic interactions or specific binding of lipids are substantial. Our

  5. Robust cross-links in molluscan adhesive gels: testing for contributions from hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A M; Robinson, T M; Salt, M D; Hamilton, K S; Silvia, B E; Blasiak, R

    2009-02-01

    The cross-linking interactions that provide cohesive strength to molluscan adhesive gels were investigated. Metal-based interactions have been shown to play an important role in the glue of the slug Arion subfuscus (Draparnaud), but other types of interactions may also contribute to the glue's strength and their role has not been investigated. This study shows that treatments that normally disrupt hydrophobic or electrostatic interactions have little to no effect on the slug glue. High salt concentrations and non-ionic detergent do not affect the solubility of the proteins in the glue or the ability of the glue proteins to stiffen gels. In contrast, metal chelation markedly disrupts the gel. Experiments with gel filtration chromatography identify a 40 kDa protein that is a central component of the cross-links in the glue. This 40 kDa protein forms robust macromolecular aggregations that are stable even in the presence of high concentrations of salt, non-ionic detergent, urea or metal chelators. Metal chelation during glue secretion, however, may block some of these cross-links. Such robust, non-specific interactions in an aqueous environment are highly unusual for hydrogels and reflect an intriguing cross-linking mechanism.

  6. Construction of ion accelerator for ion-surface interaction research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Kenziro; Ohtsuka, Hidewo; Yamada, Rayji; Abe, Tetsuya; Sone, Kazuho

    1977-09-01

    A Cockcroft-Walton type ion accelerator for ion-surface interaction research was installed at Plasma Engineering Laboratory, Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research, JAERI, in March 1977. Its maximum accelerating voltage is 400 kV. The accelerator has some outstanding features compared with the conventional type. Described are setup of the accelerator specification of the major components, safety system and performance. (auth.)

  7. Hydrophobizing coatings for cultural heritage. A detailed study of resin/stone surface interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, P.; Cappelletti, G.; Cozzi, N.; Padeletti, G.; Kaciulis, S.; Brucale, M.; Merlini, M.

    2014-07-01

    Conservation of historical buildings is an important issue and the environmental conditions seriously affect the monument's stones. The protection of cultural heritage buildings and monuments by surface treatment with polymers is a common practice due to their ability to form a protective layer on the monument's surface as well as to control the transport of different fluids from the surface to the monument's interior. In this work, three different substrates were used: Carrara marble, Botticino limestone, and Angera stone. A commercially available Si-based resin (Alpha®SI30) was used as protective agent to improve the hydrophobicity features of the different tested materials. The surface properties of the coating and the relative interaction with the adopted stones were studied using different techniques such as contact angle measurements, electron microscope coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy.

  8. Numerical simulation of ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper, based on examples from the author's contribution, aims to illustrate the role of ballistic simulations of the interaction between an ion beam and a surface in the characterization of surface properties. Several aspects of the ion-surface interaction have been modelled to various levels of sophistication by computer simulation. Particular emphasis is given to the ion scattering in the impact mode, in the multiple scattering regime and at grazing incidence, as well as to the Auger emission resulting from electronic excitation. Some examples are then given in order to illustrate the use of the combination between simulation and experiment to study the ion-surface interaction and surface properties. Ion-induced Auger emission, the determination of potentials and of overlay structures are discusse. The possibility to tackle dynamical surface properties by menas of a combination between molecular dynamics, ballistic simulations and ion scattering measurements in then briefly discussed. (orig.)

  9. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M.; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target

  10. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Quistgaard, Esben M. [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordlund, Par [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Thanabalu, Thirumaran [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Torres, Jaume, E-mail: jtorres@ntu.edu.sg [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore)

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  11. Molecular-Level Thermodynamic Switch Controls Chemical Equilibrium in Sequence-Specific Hydrophobic Interaction of 35 Dipeptide Pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Paul W.

    2003-01-01

    Applying the Planck-Benzinger methodology, the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions of 35 dipeptide pairs were examined over a temperature range of 273–333 K, based on data reported by Nemethy and Scheraga in 1962. The hydrophobic interaction in these sequence-specific dipeptide pairs is highly similar in its thermodynamic behavior to that of other biological systems. The results imply that the negative Gibbs free energy change minimum at a well-defined stable temperature, 〈Ts〉, where t...

  12. Microphase Separation in Oil-Water Mixtures Containing Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tasios, Nikos; Samin, Sela; van Roij, Rene; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-01-01

    We develop a lattice-based Monte Carlo simulation method for charged mixtures capable of treating dielectric heterogeneities. Using this method, we study oil-water mixtures containing an antagonistic salt, with hydrophilic cations and hydrophobic anions. Our simulations reveal several phases with a

  13. Design and synthesis of an amphiphilic graft hydrogel having a hydrophobic domain formed by multiple interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitta, Kyohei [Department of Life and Functional Material Science, Graduate School of Natural Science, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Higashinada, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (DC1), Ichibancho, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8471 (Japan); Kimoto, Atsushi [Department of Chemistry of Functional Molecules, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Higashinada, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Watanabe, Junji, E-mail: junjiknd@konan-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry of Functional Molecules, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Higashinada, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    A novel hydrogel having hydrophobic oligo segments and hydrophilic poly(acrylamidoglycolic acid) (PAGA) as pH responsive polymer segments was designed and synthesized to be used as a soft biomaterial. Poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) as the side chain, for which the degrees of polymerization were 9, 19, and 49, and the composition ratios were 1, 5, and 10 mol%, was used as the oligo segment in the hydrogel. The swelling ratio of the hydrogel was investigated under various changes in conditions such as pH, temperature, and hydrogen bonding upon urea addition. Under pH 2–11 conditions, the graft gel reversibly swelled and shrank due to the effect of PAGA main chain. The interior morphology and skin layer of the hydrogel was observed by a scanning electron microscope. The hydrogel composed of PAGA as the hydrophilic polymer backbone had a sponge-like structure, with a pore size of approximately 100 μm. On the other hand, upon increasing the ratio of trimethylene carbonate (TMC) units in the hydrogel, the pores became smaller or disappeared. Moreover, thickness of the skin layer significantly increased with the swelling ratio depended on the incorporation ratios of the PTMC macromonomer. Molecular incorporation in the hydrogel was evaluated using a dye as a model drug molecule. These features would play an important role in drug loading. Increasing the ratio of TMC units favored the adsorption of the dye and activation of the incorporation behavior. - Highlights: • Hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction are dominant factor for forming hydrogels. • Hydrogel properties were tuned by changing in graft length and macromonomer content in feed. • The resulting graft gel could encapsulate and retain organic dye in the hydrogel. • Poly(trimethylene carbonate) segment in the hydrogel was dominant unit for hydrogel.

  14. Design and synthesis of an amphiphilic graft hydrogel having a hydrophobic domain formed by multiple interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Kyohei; Kimoto, Atsushi; Watanabe, Junji

    2016-01-01

    A novel hydrogel having hydrophobic oligo segments and hydrophilic poly(acrylamidoglycolic acid) (PAGA) as pH responsive polymer segments was designed and synthesized to be used as a soft biomaterial. Poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) as the side chain, for which the degrees of polymerization were 9, 19, and 49, and the composition ratios were 1, 5, and 10 mol%, was used as the oligo segment in the hydrogel. The swelling ratio of the hydrogel was investigated under various changes in conditions such as pH, temperature, and hydrogen bonding upon urea addition. Under pH 2–11 conditions, the graft gel reversibly swelled and shrank due to the effect of PAGA main chain. The interior morphology and skin layer of the hydrogel was observed by a scanning electron microscope. The hydrogel composed of PAGA as the hydrophilic polymer backbone had a sponge-like structure, with a pore size of approximately 100 μm. On the other hand, upon increasing the ratio of trimethylene carbonate (TMC) units in the hydrogel, the pores became smaller or disappeared. Moreover, thickness of the skin layer significantly increased with the swelling ratio depended on the incorporation ratios of the PTMC macromonomer. Molecular incorporation in the hydrogel was evaluated using a dye as a model drug molecule. These features would play an important role in drug loading. Increasing the ratio of TMC units favored the adsorption of the dye and activation of the incorporation behavior. - Highlights: • Hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction are dominant factor for forming hydrogels. • Hydrogel properties were tuned by changing in graft length and macromonomer content in feed. • The resulting graft gel could encapsulate and retain organic dye in the hydrogel. • Poly(trimethylene carbonate) segment in the hydrogel was dominant unit for hydrogel.

  15. Polymer-surfactant interactions studied by titration microcalorimetry : Influence of polymer hydrophobicity, electrostatic forces, and surfactant aggregational state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kevelam, J; van Breemen, J.F.L.; Blokzijl, W.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1996-01-01

    Isothermal titration microcalorimetry has been applied to investigate the interactions between hydrophobically-modified water-soluble polymers and surfactants. The following polymers were used in this study: poly(sodium acrylate-co-n-alkyl methacrylate) (A), where n-alkyl = C9H19, C12H25, and C18H37

  16. Interactions between nano-TiO{sub 2} and the oral cavity: Impact of nanomaterial surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teubl, Birgit J.; Schimpel, Christa [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); Leitinger, Gerd [Institute of Cell Biology, Histology and Embryology, Research Unit Electron Microscopic Techniques, Medical University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); Center for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); BioTechMed, Graz 8010 (Austria); Bauer, Bettina [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); Fröhlich, Eleonore [Center for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); BioTechMed, Graz 8010 (Austria); Zimmer, Andreas [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); BioTechMed, Graz 8010 (Austria); Roblegg, Eva, E-mail: eva.roblegg@uni-graz.at [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); BioTechMed, Graz 8010 (Austria)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • Hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic TiO{sub 2} NPs agglomerated under oral physiological conditions. • Particles penetrated the upper and lower buccal epithelium, independent on the degree of hydrophilicity. • Most of the hydrophobic particles were found in vesicular structures, while hydrophilic particles were freely distributed in the cytoplasm. • Hydrophilic particles had a higher potential to trigger toxic effects (e.g., ROS) than hydrophobic particles. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles are available in a variety of oral applications, such as food additives and cosmetic products. Thus, questions about their potential impact on the oro-gastrointestinal route rise. The oral cavity represents the first portal of entry and is known to rapidly interact with nanoparticles. Surface charge and size contribute actively to the particle–cell interactions, but the influence of surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity has never been shown before. This study addresses the biological impact of hydrophilic (NM 103, rutile, 20 nm) and hydrophobic (NM 104, rutile, 20 nm) TiO{sub 2} particles within the buccal mucosa. Particle characterization was addressed with dynamic light scattering and laser diffraction. Despite a high agglomeration tendency, 10% of the particles/agglomerates were present in the nanosized range and penetrated into the mucosa, independent of the surface properties. However, significant differences were observed in intracellular particle localization. NM 104 particles were found freely distributed in the cytoplasm, whereas their hydrophobic counterparts were engulfed in vesicular structures. Although cell viability/membrane integrity was not affected negatively, screening assays demonstrated that NM 104 particles showed a higher potential to decrease the physiological mitochondrial membrane potential than NM 103, resulting in a pronounced generation of reactive oxygen species.

  17. Interactions between nano-TiO2 and the oral cavity: Impact of nanomaterial surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teubl, Birgit J.; Schimpel, Christa; Leitinger, Gerd; Bauer, Bettina; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Zimmer, Andreas; Roblegg, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic TiO 2 NPs agglomerated under oral physiological conditions. • Particles penetrated the upper and lower buccal epithelium, independent on the degree of hydrophilicity. • Most of the hydrophobic particles were found in vesicular structures, while hydrophilic particles were freely distributed in the cytoplasm. • Hydrophilic particles had a higher potential to trigger toxic effects (e.g., ROS) than hydrophobic particles. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles are available in a variety of oral applications, such as food additives and cosmetic products. Thus, questions about their potential impact on the oro-gastrointestinal route rise. The oral cavity represents the first portal of entry and is known to rapidly interact with nanoparticles. Surface charge and size contribute actively to the particle–cell interactions, but the influence of surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity has never been shown before. This study addresses the biological impact of hydrophilic (NM 103, rutile, 20 nm) and hydrophobic (NM 104, rutile, 20 nm) TiO 2 particles within the buccal mucosa. Particle characterization was addressed with dynamic light scattering and laser diffraction. Despite a high agglomeration tendency, 10% of the particles/agglomerates were present in the nanosized range and penetrated into the mucosa, independent of the surface properties. However, significant differences were observed in intracellular particle localization. NM 104 particles were found freely distributed in the cytoplasm, whereas their hydrophobic counterparts were engulfed in vesicular structures. Although cell viability/membrane integrity was not affected negatively, screening assays demonstrated that NM 104 particles showed a higher potential to decrease the physiological mitochondrial membrane potential than NM 103, resulting in a pronounced generation of reactive oxygen species

  18. Preparation and purification of Flavobacterium heparinum chondroitinases AC and B by hydrophobic interaction chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguiar J.A.K.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavobacterium heparinum is a soil bacterium that produces several mucopolysaccharidases such as heparinase, heparitinases I and II, and chondroitinases AC, B, C and ABC. The purpose of the present study was to optimize the preparation of F. heparinum chondroitinases, which are very useful tools for the identification and structural characterization of chondroitin and dermatan sulfates. We observed that during the routine procedure for cell disruption (ultrasound, 100 kHz, 5 min some of the chondroitinase B activity was lost. Using milder conditions (2 min, most of the chondroitinase B and AC protein was solubilized and the enzyme activities were preserved. Tryptic soy broth without glucose was the best culture medium both for bacterial growth and enzyme induction. Chondroitinases AC and B were separated from each other and also from glucuronidases and sulfatases by hydrophobic interaction chromatography on HP Phenyl-Sepharose. A rapid method for screening of the column fractions was also developed based on the metachromatic shift of the color of dimethylmethylene blue.

  19. Isolation of soybean protein P34 from oil bodies using hydrophobic interaction chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidel-Morgenstern Andreas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soybeans play a prominent role in allergologic research due to the high incidence of allergic reactions. For detailed studies on specific proteins it is necessary to have access to a large amount of pure substance. Results In this contribution, a method for purifying soybean (Glycine max protein P34 (also called Gly m Bd 30 K or Gly m 1 using hydrophobic interaction chromatography is presented. After screening experiments using 1 mL HiTrap columns, Butyl Sepharose 4 FF was selected for further systematic investigations. With this stationary phase, suitable operation conditions for two-step gradient elution using ammonium sulphate were determined experimentally. The separation conditions obtained in a small column could be scaled up successfully to column volumes of 7.5 and 75 mL, allowing for high product purities of almost 100% with a yield of 27% for the chromatographic separation step. Conditions could be simplified further using a onestep gradient, which gave comparable purification in a shorter process time. The identity of the purified protein was verified using in-gel digestion and mass spectrometry as well as immunological techniques. Conclusion With the technique presented it is possible to produce, within a short timeframe, pure P34, suitable for further studies where an example antigen is needed.

  20. Structure dependent hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between nickel(II) Schiff base complexes and serum albumins: Spectroscopic and docking studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koley Seth, Banabithi; Ray, Aurkie; Banerjee, Mousumi; Bhattacharyya, Teerna [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay [Computational Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Basu, Samita, E-mail: samita.basu@saha.ac.in [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2016-03-15

    A systematic and comparative binding study between serum-albumins (SA) and a series of monomeric nickel(II)-Schiff-base-complexes (NSCs), which might be imperative to investigate the function of SA behind nickel allergy, has been carried out through docking and different spectroscopic techniques. The initial docking studies indicate structure-dependent selective hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions. The pyridine and phenyl containing NSCs, which are more aromatic, show better π–π staking compared to pyrrole one. Again all the NSCs bind with BSA though amino acid residues of IB domain affecting local environment of the Trp-134 surrounded by both hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues instead of the hydrophobically buried Trp-212. In HSA the hydophobically buried Trp-214 is influenced by NSCs. The experimental results nicely support the docking outcomes. The changes in Gibbs free energy, binding affinity and the nature of hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions of NSC–SA systems indicate greater accessibility of N{sub 2}O{sub 2} donor set complex compared to N{sub 4} one towards SA. Quantum chemical structure optimizations support the better planarity of NSC with N{sub 2}O{sub 2} which provides better binding. Therefore the structural variation of N{sub 2}O{sub 2} donor set complexes becomes much more useful compared to N{sub 4} one to search out the most compatible NSC towards SAs.

  1. The role of hydrophobic interactions for the formation of gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, R.H.; Wang, J.; Eriksson, J.C. [Virginia Polytech Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Center for Advanced Separation Technologies; Sum, A.K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The process of hydrate formation remains largely unexplained due to a lack of evidence for the water molecules around the hydrophobic solute such as methane, and the nucleation process leading to the clustering that induces hydrate growth. However, the water structure is known to play a major role in the mechanism for hydrate nucleation. This paper presented evidence that hydrophobic solutes promote the structuring of water. Water molecules at room temperature tend to form ice structures around the hydrocarbon chains of surfactant molecules dissolved in water. An atomic force microscope (AFM) was used in this study to measure the surface forces between thiolated gold surfaces. The purpose was to better understand the structure of the thin films of water between hydrophobic surfaces. The water molecules tended to reorganize themselves to form ordered structures, which may be related to the nucleation of hydrates. The entropy reduction associated with the ice structure can be considered as the net driving force for self-assembly. Recent studies have revealed that long-range attractive forces exist between hydrophobic surfaces, which are likely to result from structuring of the water molecules in the vicinity of the hydrophobic surfaces. Similarly, the hydrophobic nature of most gas hydrate formers may induce ordering of water molecules in the vicinity of dissolved solutes. It was concluded that the results of this study may be used to develop a new mechanism for the formation of gas hydrates, including methane. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Fabrication of Super-Hydrophobic Microchannels via Strain-Recovery Deformations of Polystyrene and Oxygen Reactive Ion Etch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Xiang, Mingming; Luo, Cheng

    2013-08-19

    In this article, we report a simple approach to generate micropillars (whose top portions are covered by sub-micron wrinkles) on the inner surfaces of polystyrene (PS) microchannels, as well as on the top surface of the PS substrate, based on strain-recovery deformations of the PS and oxygen reactive ion etch (ORIE). Using this approach, two types of micropillar-covered microchannels are fabricated. Their widths range from 118 μm to 132 μm, depths vary from 40 μm to 44 μm, and the inclined angles of their sidewalls are from 53° to 64°. The micropillars enable these microchannels to have super-hydrophobic properties. The contact angles observed on the channel-structured surfaces are above 162°, and the tilt angles to make water drops roll off from these channel-structured substrates can be as small as 1°.

  3. Fabrication of Super-Hydrophobic Microchannels via Strain-Recovery Deformations of Polystyrene and Oxygen Reactive Ion Etch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Chakraborty

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we report a simple approach to generate micropillars (whose top portions are covered by sub-micron wrinkles on the inner surfaces of polystyrene (PS microchannels, as well as on the top surface of the PS substrate, based on strain-recovery deformations of the PS and oxygen reactive ion etch (ORIE. Using this approach, two types of micropillar-covered microchannels are fabricated. Their widths range from 118 μm to 132 μm, depths vary from 40 μm to 44 μm, and the inclined angles of their sidewalls are from 53° to 64°. The micropillars enable these microchannels to have super-hydrophobic properties. The contact angles observed on the channel-structured surfaces are above 162°, and the tilt angles to make water drops roll off from these channel-structured substrates can be as small as 1°.

  4. Ion - biomolecule interactions and radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlathoelter, T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The biological effects of ionizing radiation in living cells are not a mere result of the direct impact of high energy quanta of radiation. Secondary particles such as low energy electrons, radicals and (multiply charged) ions are formed within the track. The interaction of these secondary particles with biologically relevant molecules is responsible for a large fraction of biological radiation damage to a cell, as well. Singly and multiply charged ions can be of importance as both, primary and secondary particles, and are known to cause severe biological damage. For instance, in heavy ion therapy and proton therapy the pronounced Bragg peak of fast (typically a few 100 MeV/u) ions in biological tissue is utilized. The Bragg peak is located at a depth, where the ions (mostly C q+ or protons) are slowed down to about 100 keV/u and have their maximum linear energy transfer (LET) to the medium. This depth is reasonably well defined and depends on the initial ion kinetic energy. Since the ions are rapidly stopped in this energy range, penetration beyond the Bragg peak is weak and it is thus possible to 'scan' the Bragg peak through a malignant tumour without excessive damage of the surrounding tissue by mere variation of the ion kinetic energy (i.e. the penetration depth). Severe biological damage is almost only possible, when the track of a primary quantum of ionizing radiation crosses the nucleus of a cell. Particularly the induction of double strand breaks of DNA or clustered DNA lesions is potentially lethal or mutagenic. A primary particle interacting with individual molecules within this environment leads to molecular excitation, ionization and fragmentation. In the process, the primary particle looses energy and slow secondary electrons and ions are formed, which might induce further damage. For a deep understanding of biological radiation damage on the level of individual molecules it is thus important to quantify excitation, ionization and

  5. Ion-materials interactions and their application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitlow, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of energetic ions and other charged particles with solid matter leads to a wealth of physical processes. This thesis comprises a collection of papers and an introductory commentary, which explore some aspects of how these interactions may be used for: (i) Characterisation of thin surface layers of material, (ii) characterisation of energetic charged particles, and (iii) modification of materials by ion bombardment. In (i) Elastic Recoil Detection using a detector system for measurement of Time of Flight and kinetic energy of recoiling target atoms has been developed as a quantitative method for elemental depth profiling of thin (0.5-1 μm) surface layers. This method has been applied to the study of reactions of metal/III-V structures, which are of importance for the semiconductor industry. (ii) MeV-ion - materials interactions have been used as the basis for developing Si p-i-n detectors for the CHICSi programme which will undertake experimental studies of heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies. This involved development and testing of extremely thin (10-12 μm) Si ΔE detectors for characterising light- and intermediate mass charged particles as well as calibration of Si p-i-n detectors and their susceptibility to radiation damage. (iii) Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) with resonant nuclear reactions has been used to study modification of material with ion beams. In the first study, the accumulation of fluorine in BF 2 + ion implanted WSi 2 solid diffusion sources was investigated. The second study investigated if there was a correlation between photoluminescence and segregation of hydrogen to buried heterojunctions in plasma-etched III-V quantum-well structures. The ion bombardment in this case was during etching in an Ar+CH 4 plasma using an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) source. (author)

  6. Diels-Alder reactions in water : Enforced hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    1995-01-01

    Second-order rate constants have been measured for the Diels-Alder (DA) reactions of cyclopentadiene with dienophiles of varying hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bond acceptor capacity in water, in a series of organic solvents and in alcohol-water mixtures. The intramolecular DA reaction of

  7. DIELS-ALDER REACTIONS IN WATER - ENFORCED HYDROPHOBIC INTERACTION AND HYDROGEN-BONDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    Second-order rate constants have been measured for the Diels-Alder (DA) reactions of cyclopentadiene with dienophiles of varying hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bond acceptor capacity in water, in a series of organic solvents and in alcohol-water mixtures. The intramolecular DA reaction of

  8. Interactions between nano-TiO2 and the oral cavity: impact of nanomaterial surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teubl, Birgit J; Schimpel, Christa; Leitinger, Gerd; Bauer, Bettina; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Zimmer, Andreas; Roblegg, Eva

    2015-04-09

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are available in a variety of oral applications, such as food additives and cosmetic products. Thus, questions about their potential impact on the oro-gastrointestinal route rise. The oral cavity represents the first portal of entry and is known to rapidly interact with nanoparticles. Surface charge and size contribute actively to the particle-cell interactions, but the influence of surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity has never been shown before. This study addresses the biological impact of hydrophilic (NM 103, rutile, 20 nm) and hydrophobic (NM 104, rutile, 20 nm) TiO2 particles within the buccal mucosa. Particle characterization was addressed with dynamic light scattering and laser diffraction. Despite a high agglomeration tendency, 10% of the particles/agglomerates were present in the nanosized range and penetrated into the mucosa, independent of the surface properties. However, significant differences were observed in intracellular particle localization. NM 104 particles were found freely distributed in the cytoplasm, whereas their hydrophobic counterparts were engulfed in vesicular structures. Although cell viability/membrane integrity was not affected negatively, screening assays demonstrated that NM 104 particles showed a higher potential to decrease the physiological mitochondrial membrane potential than NM 103, resulting in a pronounced generation of reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 3DRISM-HI-D2MSA: an improved analytic theory to compute solvent structure around hydrophobic solutes with proper treatment of solute–solvent electrostatic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Siqin; Zhu, Lizhe; Huang, Xuhui

    2018-04-01

    The 3D reference interaction site model (3DRISM) is a powerful tool to study the thermodynamic and structural properties of liquids. However, for hydrophobic solutes, the inhomogeneity of the solvent density around them poses a great challenge to the 3DRISM theory. To address this issue, we have previously introduced the hydrophobic-induced density inhomogeneity theory (HI) for purely hydrophobic solutes. To further consider the complex hydrophobic solutes containing partial charges, here we propose the D2MSA closure to incorporate the short-range and long-range interactions with the D2 closure and the mean spherical approximation, respectively. We demonstrate that our new theory can compute the solvent distributions around real hydrophobic solutes in water and complex organic solvents that agree well with the explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations.

  10. 3DRISM-HI-D2MSA: an improved analytic theory to compute solvent structure around hydrophobic solutes with proper treatment of solute–solvent electrostatic interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Siqin

    2017-12-22

    The 3D reference interaction site model (3DRISM) is a powerful tool to study the thermodynamic and structural properties of liquids. However, for hydrophobic solutes, the inhomogeneity of the solvent density around them poses a great challenge to the 3DRISM theory. To address this issue, we have previously introduced the hydrophobic-induced density inhomogeneity theory (HI) for purely hydrophobic solutes. To further consider the complex hydrophobic solutes containing partial charges, here we propose the D2MSA closure to incorporate the short-range and long-range interactions with the D2 closure and the mean spherical approximation, respectively. We demonstrate that our new theory can compute the solvent distributions around real hydrophobic solutes in water and complex organic solvents that agree well with the explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. 3DRISM-HI-D2MSA: an improved analytic theory to compute solvent structure around hydrophobic solutes with proper treatment of solute–solvent electrostatic interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Siqin; Zhu, Lizhe; Huang, Xuhui

    2017-01-01

    The 3D reference interaction site model (3DRISM) is a powerful tool to study the thermodynamic and structural properties of liquids. However, for hydrophobic solutes, the inhomogeneity of the solvent density around them poses a great challenge to the 3DRISM theory. To address this issue, we have previously introduced the hydrophobic-induced density inhomogeneity theory (HI) for purely hydrophobic solutes. To further consider the complex hydrophobic solutes containing partial charges, here we propose the D2MSA closure to incorporate the short-range and long-range interactions with the D2 closure and the mean spherical approximation, respectively. We demonstrate that our new theory can compute the solvent distributions around real hydrophobic solutes in water and complex organic solvents that agree well with the explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations.

  12. Preparation of a novel dual-function strong cation exchange/hydrophobic interaction chromatography stationary phase for protein separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kailou; Yang, Li; Wang, Xuejiao; Bai, Quan; Yang, Fan; Wang, Fei

    2012-08-30

    We have explored a novel dual-function stationary phase which combines both strong cation exchange (SCX) and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) characteristics. The novel dual-function stationary phase is based on porous and spherical silica gel functionalized with ligand containing sulfonic and benzyl groups capable of electrostatic and hydrophobic interaction functionalities, which displays HIC character in a high salt concentration, and IEC character in a low salt concentration in mobile phase employed. As a result, it can be employed to separate proteins with SCX and HIC modes, respectively. The resolution and selectivity of the dual-function stationary phase were evaluated under both HIC and SCX modes with standard proteins and can be comparable to that of conventional IEC and HIC columns. More than 96% of mass and bioactivity recoveries of proteins can be achieved in both HIC and SCX modes, respectively. The results indicated that the novel dual-function column could replace two individual SCX and HIC columns for protein separation. Mixed retention mechanism of proteins on this dual-function column based on stoichiometric displacement theory (SDT) in LC was investigated to find the optimal balance of the magnitude of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between protein and the ligand on the silica surface in order to obtain high resolution and selectivity for protein separation. In addition, the effects of the hydrophobicity of the ligand of the dual-function packings and pH of the mobile phase used on protein separation were also investigated in detail. The results show that the ligand with suitable hydrophobicity to match the electrostatic interaction is very important to prepare the dual-function stationary phase, and a better resolution and selectivity can be obtained at pH 6.5 in SCX mode. Therefore, the dual-function column can replace two individual SCX and HIC columns for protein separation and be used to set up two-dimensional liquid

  13. Ion-solid interactions for materials modification and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poker, D.B.; Ila, D.; Cheng, Y.T.; Harriott, L.R.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-01-01

    Topics ranged from the very fundamental ion-solid interactions to the highly device-oriented semiconductor applications. Highlights of the symposium featured in this volume include: nanocrystals in insulators, plasma immersion ion implantation. Focused ion beams, molecular dynamics simulations of ion-surface interactions, ion-beam mixing of insulators, GeV ion irradiation, electro-optical materials, polymers, tribological materials, and semiconductor processing. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume

  14. Ion interactions with solids and plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arista, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    The models developed for studying processing of energy losses in dense medium, in particular some recent results for atomic systems confined in solids and in partially degenerated medium are described. Applications of these models to some cases of ion interaction with thin metallic foils and with dense plasmas are described. The processes of excitation and energy losses in the case of a degenerated electron gas, and in the general case of a plasma with arbitrary degenerescency are considered. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. Relativistic ion acceleration by ultraintense laser interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, K.; Koga, J.K.; Nakagawa, K.

    2001-01-01

    There has been a great interest in relativistic particle generation by ultraintense laser interactions with matter. We propose the use of relativistically self-focused laser pulses for the acceleration of ions. Two dimensional PIC simulations are performed, which show the formation of a large positive electrostatic field near the front of a relativistically self-focused laser pulse. Several factors contribute to the acceleration including self-focusing distance, pulse depletion, and plasma density. Ultraintense laser-plasma interactions are capable of generating enormous electrostatic fields of ∼3 TV/m for acceleration of protons with relativistic energies exceeding 1 GeV

  16. Application of perfluorinated acids as ion-pairing reagents for reversed-phase chromatography and retention-hydrophobicity relationships studies of selected beta-blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flieger, J

    2010-01-22

    The addition of the homologous series of perfluorinated acids-trifluoroacetic acid (TFAA), pentafluoropropionic acid (PFPA), heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA) to mobile phases for reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) of beta-blockers was tested. Acidic modifiers were responsible for acidification of mobile phase (pH 3) ensuring the protonation of the beta-blockers and further ion pairs creation. The effect of the type and concentration of mobile phase additives on retention parameters, the efficiency of the peaks, their symmetry and separation selectivity of the beta-blockers mixture were all studied. It appeared that at increasing acid concentration, the retention factor, for all compounds investigated, increased to varying degrees. It should be stressed that the presence of acids more significantly affected the retention of the most hydrophobic beta-blockers. Differences in hydrophobicity of drugs can be maximized through variation of the hydrophobicity of additives. Thus, the relative increase in the retention depends on either concentration and hydrophobicity of the anionic mobile phase additive or hydrophobicity of analytes. According to QSRR (quantitative structure retention relationship) methodology, chromatographic lipophilicity parameters: isocratic log k and log k(w) values (extrapolated retention to pure water) were correlated with the molecular (log P(o/w)) and apparent (log P(app)) octanol-water partition coefficients obtained experimentally by countercurrent chromatography (CCC) or predicted by Pallas software. The obtained, satisfactory retention-hydrophobicity correlations indicate that, in the case of the basic drugs examined in RP-HPLC systems modified with perfluorinated acids, the retention is mainly governed by their hydrophobicity. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Fabrication of a novel hydrophobic/ion-exchange mixed-mode adsorbent for the dispersive solid-phase extraction of chlorophenols from environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Wei, Yinmao

    2016-08-01

    A novel mixed-mode adsorbent was prepared by functionalizing silica with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine and 3-phenoxybenzaldehyde as the main mixed-mode scaffold due to the presence of the plentiful amino groups and benzene rings in their molecules. The adsorption mechanism was probed with acidic, natural and basic compounds, and the mixed hydrophobic and ion-exchange interactions were found to be responsible for the adsorption of analytes. The suitability of dispersive solid-phase extraction was demonstrated in the determination of chlorophenols in environmental water. Several parameters, including sample pH, desorption solvent, ionic strength, adsorbent dose, and extraction time were optimized. Under the optimal extraction conditions, the proposed dispersive solid-phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography showed good linearity range and acceptable limits of detection (0.22∽0.54 ng/mL) for five chlorophenols. Notably, the higher extraction recoveries (88.7∽109.7%) for five chlorophenols were obtained with smaller adsorbent dose (10 mg) and shorter extraction time (15 min) compared with the reported methods. The proposed method might be potentially applied in the determination of trace chlorophenols in real water samples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Crystal nucleation initiated by transient ion-surface interactions at aerosol interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan D; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2017-07-01

    Particle collisions are a common occurrence in the atmosphere, but no empirical observations exist to fully predict the potential effects of these collisions on air quality and climate projections. The current consensus of heterogeneous crystal nucleation pathways relevant to the atmosphere dictates that collisions with amorphous particles have no effect on the crystallization relative humidity (RH) of aqueous inorganic aerosols because there is no stabilizing ion-surface interaction to facilitate the formation of crystal nuclei. In contrast to this view of heterogeneous nucleation, we report laboratory observations demonstrating that collisions with hydrophobic amorphous organic aerosols induced crystallization of aqueous inorganic microdroplets at high RH, the effect of which was correlated with destabilizing water-mediated ion-specific surface interactions. These same organic aerosols did not induce crystallization once internally mixed in the droplet, pointing toward a previously unconsidered transient ion-specific crystal nucleation pathway that can promote aerosol crystallization via particle collisions.

  19. Key aromatic/hydrophobic amino acids controlling a cross-amyloid peptide interaction versus amyloid self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakou, Maria; Hille, Kathleen; Kracklauer, Michael; Spanopoulou, Anna; Frost, Christina V; Malideli, Eleni; Yan, Li-Mei; Caporale, Andrea; Zacharias, Martin; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of the intrinsically disordered polypeptide islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), which is associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), with the Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide modulates their self-assembly into amyloid fibrils and may link the pathogeneses of these two cell-degenerative diseases. However, the molecular determinants of this interaction remain elusive. Using a systematic alanine scan approach, fluorescence spectroscopy, and other biophysical methods, including heterocomplex pulldown assays, far-UV CD spectroscopy, the thioflavin T binding assay, transmission EM, and molecular dynamics simulations, here we identified single aromatic/hydrophobic residues within the amyloid core IAPP region as hot spots or key residues of its cross-interaction with Aβ40(42) peptide. Importantly, we also find that none of these residues in isolation plays a key role in IAPP self-assembly, whereas simultaneous substitution of four aromatic/hydrophobic residues with Ala dramatically impairs both IAPP self-assembly and hetero-assembly with Aβ40(42). Furthermore, our experiments yielded several novel IAPP analogs, whose sequences are highly similar to that of IAPP but have distinct amyloid self- or cross-interaction potentials. The identified similarities and major differences controlling IAPP cross-peptide interaction with Aβ40(42) versus its amyloid self-assembly offer a molecular basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms. We propose that these insights will aid in designing intervention strategies and novel IAPP analogs for the management of type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, or other diseases related to IAPP dysfunction or cross-amyloid interactions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Ion-ion interaction and energy transfer of 4+ transuranium ions in cerium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, G.K.; Beitz, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamics of excited 5f electron states of the transuranium ions Cm 4+ and Bk 4+ in CeF 4 are compared. Based on time- and wavelength-resolved laser-induced fluorescence, excitation energy transfer processes have been probed. Depending on concentration and electronic energy level structure of the studied 4+ transuranium ion, the dominant energy transfer mechanisms were identified as cross relaxation, exciton-exciton annihilation, and trapping. Energy transfer rates derived from the fitting of the observed fluorescence decays to theoretical models, based on electric multipolar ion-ion interactions, are contrasted with prior studies of 4f states of 3+ lanthanide and 3d states of transition metal ions. 16 refs., 1 tab

  1. Basic atomic interactions of accelerated heavy ions in matter atomic interactions of heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstikhina, Inga; Winckler, Nicolas; Shevelko, Viacheslav

    2018-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the recent experimental and theoretical results on interactions of heavy ions with gaseous, solid and plasma targets from the perspective of atomic physics. The topics discussed comprise stopping power, multiple-electron loss and capture processes, equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state fractions in penetration of fast ion beams through matter including relativistic domain. It also addresses mean charge-states and equilibrium target thickness in ion-beam penetrations, isotope effects in low-energy electron capture, lifetimes of heavy ion beams, semi-empirical formulae for effective cross sections. The book is intended for researchers and graduate students working in atomic, plasma and accelerator physics.

  2. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ting; Lin, Zongwei; Ren, Jianwei; Yao, Peng; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Qunye

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs. Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye) could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela) and suspended cells (K562) even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein) to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it. These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results.

  3. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Lu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs.Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela and suspended cells (K562 even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it.These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results.

  4. Epitope mapping of imidazolium cations in ionic liquid-protein interactions unveils the balance between hydrophobicity and electrostatics towards protein destabilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Micael; Figueiredo, Angelo Miguel; Cabrita, Eurico J

    2014-11-14

    We investigated imidazolium-based ionic liquid (IL) interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) to discern the level of cation interactions towards protein stability. STD-NMR spectroscopy was used to observe the imidazolium IL protons involved in direct binding and to identify the interactions responsible for changes in Tm as accessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Cations influence protein stability less than anions but still significantly. It was found that longer alkyl side chains of imidazolium-based ILs (more hydrophobic) are associated with a higher destabilisation effect on HSA than short-alkyl groups (less hydrophobic). The reason for such destabilisation lies on the increased surface contact area of the cation with the protein, particularly on the hydrophobic contacts promoted by the terminus of the alkyl chain. The relevance of the hydrophobic contacts is clearly demonstrated by the introduction of a polar moiety in the alkyl chain: a methoxy or alcohol group. Such structural modification reduces the degree of hydrophobic contacts with HSA explaining the lesser extent of protein destabilisation when compared to longer alkyl side chain groups: above [C2mim](+). Competition STD-NMR experiments using [C2mim](+), [C4mim](+) and [C2OHmim](+) also validate the importance of the hydrophobic interactions. The combined effect of cation and anion interactions was explored using (35)Cl NMR. Such experiments show that the nature of the cation has no influence on the anion-protein contacts, still the nature of the anion modulates the cation-protein interaction. Herein we propose that more destabilising anions are likely to be a result of a partial contribution from the cation as a direct consequence of the different levels of interaction (cation-anion pair and cation-protein).

  5. The use of dielectric spectroscopy for the characterisation of the precipitation of hydrophobically modified poly(acrylic-acid) with divalent barium ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Vittrup; Keiding, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    The use of dielectric spectroscopy as a monitor for coagulation processes was investigated. Hydrophobically modified poly(acrylic-acid) polymers were used as model macromolecules and coagulated with barium ions. The coagulation process was quantified using a photometric dispersion analyser, thereby...... serving as a point of reference for the dielectric spectroscopy. It was found that the hydrophobic modification increased the dosage of barium needed to obtain complete coagulation, whereas the dosage required to initiate coagulation was lowered. The coagulation of the polymer samples caused...... the relaxation time of the measured dielectric dispersion to increase, and this parameter was found to be a good indicator of the formation of polymer aggregates. The magnitude of the dielectric dispersion decreased as a function of barium dosage, but when coagulation was initiated an increase was observed...

  6. Rational design of viscosity reducing mutants of a monoclonal antibody: hydrophobic versus electrostatic inter-molecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Pilarin; Li, Li; Kumar, Sandeep; Buck, Patrick M; Singh, Satish K; Goswami, Sumit; Balthazor, Bryan; Conley, Tami R; Sek, David; Allen, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    High viscosity of monoclonal antibody formulations at concentrations ≥100 mg/mL can impede their development as products suitable for subcutaneous delivery. The effects of hydrophobic and electrostatic intermolecular interactions on the solution behavior of MAB 1, which becomes unacceptably viscous at high concentrations, was studied by testing 5 single point mutants. The mutations were designed to reduce viscosity by disrupting either an aggregation prone region (APR), which also participates in 2 hydrophobic surface patches, or a negatively charged surface patch in the variable region. The disruption of an APR that lies at the interface of light and heavy chain variable domains, VH and VL, via L45K mutation destabilized MAB 1 and abolished antigen binding. However, mutation at the preceding residue (V44K), which also lies in the same APR, increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1 without sacrificing antigen binding or thermal stability. Neutralizing the negatively charged surface patch (E59Y) also increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1, but charge reversal at the same position (E59K/R) caused destabilization, decreased solubility and led to difficulties in sample manipulation that precluded their viscosity measurements at high concentrations. Both V44K and E59Y mutations showed similar increase in apparent solubility. However, the viscosity profile of E59Y was considerably better than that of the V44K, providing evidence that inter-molecular interactions in MAB 1 are electrostatically driven. In conclusion, neutralizing negatively charged surface patches may be more beneficial toward reducing viscosity of highly concentrated antibody solutions than charge reversal or aggregation prone motif disruption.

  7. Nuclear import of cutaneous beta genus HPV8 E7 oncoprotein is mediated by hydrophobic interactions between its zinc-binding domain and FG nucleoporins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onder, Zeynep; Moroianu, Junona, E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu

    2014-01-20

    We have previously discovered and characterized the nuclear import pathways for the E7 oncoproteins of mucosal alpha genus HPVs, type 16 and 11. Here we investigated the nuclear import of cutaneous beta genus HPV8 E7 protein using confocal microscopy after transfections of HeLa cells with EGFP-8E7 and mutant plasmids and nuclear import assays in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells. We determined that HPV8 E7 contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within its zinc-binding domain that mediates its nuclear import. Furthermore, we discovered that a mostly hydrophobic patch {sub 65}LRLFV{sub 69} within the zinc-binding domain is essential for the nuclear import and localization of HPV8 E7 via hydrophobic interactions with the FG nucleoporins Nup62 and Nup153. Substitution of the hydrophobic residues within the {sub 65}LRLFV{sub 69} patch to alanines, and not R66A mutation, disrupt the interactions between the 8E7 zinc-binding domain and Nup62 and Nup153 and consequently inhibit nuclear import of HPV8 E7. - Highlights: • HPV8 E7 has a cNLS within its zinc-binding domain that mediates its nuclear import. • Discovery of a hydrophobic patch that is critical for the nuclear import of HPV8 E7. • HPV8 E7 nuclear import is mediated by hydrophobic interactions with FG-Nups, Nup62 and Nup153.

  8. Hydrophobic environment is a key factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromiha, M Michael; Pathak, Manish C; Saraboji, Kadhirvel; Ortlund, Eric A; Gaucher, Eric A

    2013-04-01

    The stability of thermophilic proteins has been viewed from different perspectives and there is yet no unified principle to understand this stability. It would be valuable to reveal the most important interactions for designing thermostable proteins for such applications as industrial protein engineering. In this work, we have systematically analyzed the importance of various interactions by computing different parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, inter-residue interactions, ion-pairs and hydrogen bonds. The importance of each interaction has been determined by its predicted relative contribution in thermophiles versus the same contribution in mesophilic homologues based on a dataset of 373 protein families. We predict that hydrophobic environment is the major factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins and found that 80% of thermophilic proteins analyzed showed higher hydrophobicity than their mesophilic counterparts. Ion pairs, hydrogen bonds, and interaction energy are also important and favored in 68%, 50%, and 62% of thermophilic proteins, respectively. Interestingly, thermophilic proteins with decreased hydrophobic environments display a greater number of hydrogen bonds and/or ion pairs. The systematic elimination of mesophilic proteins based on surrounding hydrophobicity, interaction energy, and ion pairs/hydrogen bonds, led to correctly identifying 95% of the thermophilic proteins in our analyses. Our analysis was also applied to another, more refined set of 102 thermophilic-mesophilic pairs, which again identified hydrophobicity as a dominant property in 71% of the thermophilic proteins. Further, the notion of surrounding hydrophobicity, which characterizes the hydrophobic behavior of residues in a protein environment, has been applied to the three-dimensional structures of elongation factor-Tu proteins and we found that the thermophilic proteins are enriched with a hydrophobic environment. The results obtained in this work highlight the

  9. Surface modification of hydrophobic polymers for improvement of endothelial cell-surface interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, A.; Dekker, A.; Reitsma, K.; Beugeling, T.; Beugeling, T.; Bantjes, A.; Bantjes, A.; Feijen, Jan; Kirkpatrick, C.J.; van Aken, W.G.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study is to improve the interaction of endothelial cells with polymers used in vascular prostheses. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE; Teflon) films were treated by means of nitrogen and oxygen plasmas. Depending on the plasma exposure time, modified PTFE surfaces showed water-contact

  10. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-01

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented

  11. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  12. Effect of zinc insertion and hydrophobicity on the membrane interactions and PDT activity of porphyrin photosensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavani, Christiane; Uchoa, Adjaci F; Oliveira, Carla S; Iamamoto, Yassuko; Baptista, Maurício S

    2009-02-01

    A series of photosensitizers (PS), which are meso-substituted tetra-cationic porphyrins, was synthesized in order to study the role of amphiphilicity and zinc insertion in photodynamic therapy (PDT) efficacy. Several properties of the PS were evaluated and compared within the series including photophysical properties (absorption spectra, fluorescence quantum yield Phif, and singlet oxygen quantum yield PhiDelta), uptake by vesicles, mitochondria and HeLa cells, dark and phototoxicity in HeLa cells. The photophysical properties of all compounds are quite similar (Phifinteraction of the zinc-substituted porphyrins is attributed to a complexing effect with phosphate groups of the phospholipids. Zinc insertion was also shown to decrease the interaction with isolated mitochondria and with the mitochondria of HeLa cells, an effect that has been explained by the particular characteristics of the mitochondrial internal membrane. Phototoxicity was shown to increase proportionally with membrane binding efficiency, which is attributed to favorable membrane interactions which allow more efficient membrane photooxidation. For this series of compounds, photodynamic efficiency is directly proportional to the membrane binding and cell uptake, but it is not totally related to mitochondrial targeting.

  13. Interactions of heavy ions with biomolecules: a dynamical microscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fengshou; Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou

    2006-01-01

    The status of studying biology system therapy with X-rays, γ-rays, neutron, proton, and heavy ions is reviewed. The depth dose profile, called Bragg profile, makes heavy ion an ideal tool for radiotherapy. The physical process of therapy with heavy ions is analyzed and a 3-step interaction processes of heavy ions with biomolecules is proposed, that is, nuclear fragmentation in nuclear interaction, electron excitation in Coulomb interaction, and the biomolecules relaxation in surroundings, finally leads to a new structure of biomolecule. Since this physical process is the base of the following chemical process and biological process, a dynamical microscopic approach is strongly demanded to be built. (authors)

  14. Coumarins as new matrices for matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric analysis of hydrophobic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hang, E-mail: hangwang@sjtu.edu.cn [Instrumental Analysis Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Dai, Bona [Instrumental Analysis Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Bin [Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease Pathogenesis and Intervention of Hubei Province, College of Medicine, Hubei Polytechnic University, Huangshi, Hubei 435003 (China); Lu, Han [Department of Anesthesiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), 197, Rui Jin Er Road, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2015-07-02

    Highlights: • Coumarins were used as new MALDI matrices. • Coumarins were used for MALDI-FT ICR MS detection of hydrophobic compounds. • DCA had improvement in detection sensitivity, stability, selectivity and reproducibility. • DCA was applied to sterols detection in yeast cells. - Abstract: Hydrophobic compounds with hydroxyl, aldehyde or ketone groups are generally difficult to detect using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), because these compounds have low proton affinity and are poorly ionized by MALDI. Herein, coumarins have been used as new matrices for MALDI-MS analysis of a variety of hydrophobic compounds with low ionization efficiency, including steroids, coenzyme Q10, a cyclic lipopeptide and cholesterol oleate. Five coumarins, including coumarin, umbelliferone, esculetin, 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCA) and 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid (DCA), were compared with the conventional matrices of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). Coumarins with hydroxyl or carboxylic acid groups enabled detection. Taking DCA as an example, this matrix proved to be superior to DHB or CHCA in detection sensitivity, stability, spot-to-spot and sample-to-sample reproducibility, and accuracy. DCA increased the stability of the target compounds and decreased the loss of water. The [M + Na]{sup +} peaks were observed for all target compounds by adding NaCl as an additive, and the [M − H{sub 2}O + H]{sup +} and [M + H]{sup +} peaks decreased. DCA was selected for the identification of sterols in yeast cells, and thirteen sterols were detected by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT ICR) mass spectrometry. This work demonstrates the potential of DCA as a new matrix for detection of hydrophobic molecules by MALDI-MS and provides an alternative tool for screening sterols in antifungal research.

  15. Rice Starch Particle Interactions at Air/Aqueous Interfaces—Effect of Particle Hydrophobicity and Solution Ionic Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Cathy E.; Sato, Yu; Wiege, Berthold; Furikado, Ippei; Marefati, Ali; Nylander, Tommy; Kappl, Michael; Rayner, Marilyn

    2018-01-01

    Starch particles modified by esterification with dicarboxylic acids to give octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) starch is an approved food additive that can be used to stabilize oil in water emulsions used in foods and drinks. However, the effects of the OSA modification of the starch particle on the interfacial interactions are not fully understood. Here, we directly measured the packing of films of rice starch granules, i.e., the natural particle found inside the plant, at air/aqueous interfaces, and the interaction forces in that system as a function of the particle hydrophobicity and ionic strength, in order to gain insight on how starch particles can stabilize emulsions. This was achieved by using a combined Langmuir trough and optical microscope system, and the Monolayer Interaction Particle Apparatus. Native rice starch particles were seen to form large aggregates at air/water interfaces, causing films with large voids to be formed at the interface. The OSA modification of the rice starches particles decreased this aggregation. Increasing the degree of modification improved the particle packing within the film of particles at the air/water interface, due to the introduction of inter-particle electrostatic interactions within the film. The introduction of salt to the water phase caused the particles to aggregate and form holes within the film, due to the screening of the charged groups on the starch particles by the salt. The presence of these holes in the film decreased the stiffness of the films. The effect of the OSA modification was concluded to decrease the aggregation of the particles at an air/water interface. The presence of salts, however, caused the particles to aggregate, thereby reducing the strength of the interfacial film. PMID:29868551

  16. Coulomb interaction rules timescales in potassium ion channel tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De March, N.; Prado, S. D.; Brunnet, L. G.

    2018-06-01

    Assuming the selectivity filter of KcsA potassium ion channel may exhibit quantum coherence, we extend a previous model by Vaziri and Plenio (2010 New J. Phys. 12 085001) to take into account Coulomb repulsion between potassium ions. We show that typical ion transit timescales are determined by this interaction, which imposes optimal input/output parameter ranges. Also, as observed in other examples of quantum tunneling in biological systems, the addition of moderate noise helps coherent ion transport.

  17. Ion beam modification of solids ion-solid interaction and radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Wesch, Werner

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the method of ion beam modification of solids in realization, theory and applications in a comprehensive way. It provides a review of the physical basics of ion-solid interaction and on ion-beam induced structural modifications of solids. Ion beams are widely used to modify the physical properties of materials. A complete theory of ion stopping in matter and the calculation of the energy loss due to nuclear and electronic interactions are presented including the effect of ion channeling. To explain structural modifications due to high electronic excitations, different concepts are presented with special emphasis on the thermal spike model. Furthermore, general concepts of damage evolution as a function of ion mass, ion fluence, ion flux and temperature are described in detail and their limits and applicability are discussed. The effect of nuclear and electronic energy loss on structural modifications of solids such as damage formation, phase transitions and amorphization is reviewed for ins...

  18. Positron Interactions with Atoms and Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2012-01-01

    Dirac, in 1928, combining the ideas of quantum mechanics and the ideas of relativity invented the well-known relativistic wave equation. In his formulation, he predicted an antiparticle of the electron of spin n-bar/2. He thought that this particle must be a proton. Dirac published his interpretation in a paper 'A theory of electrons and protons.' It was shown later by the mathematician Hermann Weyl that the Dirac theory was completely symmetric between negative and positive particles and the positive particle must have the same mass as that of the electron. In his J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Prize Acceptance Speech, Dirac notes that 'Blackett was really the first person to obtain hard evidence for the existence of a positron but he was afraid to publish it. He wanted confirmation, he was really over cautious.' Positron, produced by the collision of cosmic rays in a cloud chamber, was detected experimentally by Anderson in 1932. His paper was published in Physical Review in 1933. The concept of the positron and its detection were the important discoveries of the 20th century. I have tried to discuss various processes involving interactions of positrons with atoms and ions. This includes scattering, bound states and resonances. It has not been possible to include the enormous work which has been carried out during the last 40 or 50 years in theory and measurements.

  19. Modulation and interactions of charged biomimetic membranes with bivalent ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazadi Badiambile, Adolphe

    The biological membrane of an eukaryotic cell is a two-dimensional structure of mostly phospholipids with embedded proteins. This two-dimensional structure plays many key roles in the life of a cell. Transmembrane proteins, for example, play the role of a gate for different ions (such as Ca2+). Also found are peripheral proteins that are used as enzymes for different purposes in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Phospholipids, in particular play three key roles. Firstly, some members of this group are used to store energy. Secondly, the hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties inherent to phospholipids enable them to be used as building blocks of the cell membrane by forming an asymmetric bilayer. This provides a shielding protection against the outer environment while at the same time keeping the organelles and cytosol from leaking out of the cell. Finally lipids are involved in regulating the aggregation of proteins in the membrane. In addition, some subspecies such as phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) are second messenger molecules in their own right, thus playing an important role in cellular signaling events. In my work presented in this thesis, I am focusing on the role of some phospholipids as signaling molecules and in particular the physicochemical underpinnings that could be used in their spatiotemporal organization in the cellular plasma membrane. I am specifically concerned with the important family of phosphatidylinositol lipids. PtdIns are very well known for their role as signaling molecules in numerous cell events. They are located in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane as well as part of the membrane of other organelles. Studies of these signaling molecules in their in vivo environment present many challenges: Firstly, the complexity of interactions due to the numerous entities present in eukaryotic cell membranes makes it difficult to establish clear cause and effect relationships. Secondly, due to their size, our inability to probe these

  20. Switchable Super-Hydrophilic/Hydrophobic Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) Film Surfaces on Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) Textured Si Wafer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwa-Min; Litao, Yao; Kim, Bonghwan

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a surface texturing process for pyramidal surface features along with an indium tin oxide (ITO) coating process to fabricate super-hydrophilic conductive surfaces. The contact angle of a water droplet was less than 5 degrees, which means that an extremely high wettability is achievable on super-hydrophilic surfaces. We have also fabricated a super-hydrophobic conductive surface using an additional coating of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) on the ITO layer coated on the textured Si surface; the ITO and PTFE films were deposited by using a conventional sputtering method. We found that a super-hydrophilic conductive surface is produced by ITO coated on the pyramidal Si surface (ITO/Si), with contact angles of approximately 0 degrees and a resistivity of 3 x 10(-4) Ω x cm. These values are highly dependent on the substrate temperature during the sputtering process. We also found that the super-hydrophobic conductive surface produced by the additional coating of PTFE on the pyramidal Si surface with an ITO layer (PTFE/ITO/Si) has a contact angle of almost 160 degrees and a resistivity of 3 x 10(-4) Ω x cm, with a reflectance lower than 9%. Therefore, these processes can be used to fabricate multifunctional features of ITO films for switchable super-hydrophilic and super-hydrophobic surfaces.

  1. Fast ion beam-laser interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.G.; Young, L.; Engstroem, L.; Hardis, J.E.; Somerville, L.P.; Ray, W.J.; Kurtz, C.

    1985-01-01

    The authors are using collinear laser excitation of fast ion beams to study a number of atomic structure problems. The problems include the determination of fine and hyperfine structure in light positive and negative ions, plus measurements of absolute wavelengths of light from two-electron ions. In addition the authors intend to use a similar experimental arrangement to study excitation and decay of high Rydberg states first in the absence of fields and then in crossed electric and magnetic fields

  2. Hydrophobic interaction between the SH2 domain and the kinase domain is required for the activation of Csk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Esa T; Gahmberg, Carl G

    2010-06-18

    The protein tyrosine kinase C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) is activated by the engagement of its Src homology (SH) 2 domain. However, the molecular mechanism required for this is not completely understood. The crystal structure of the active Csk indicates that Csk could be activated by contact between the SH2 domain and the beta3-alphaC loop in the N-terminal lobe of the kinase domain. To study the importance of this interaction for the SH2-domain-mediated activation of Csk, we mutated the amino acid residues forming the contacts between the SH2 domain and the beta3-alphaC loop. The mutation of the beta3-alphaC loop Ala228 to glycine and of the SH2 domain Tyr116, Tyr133, Leu138, and Leu149 to alanine resulted in the inability of the SH2 domain ligand to activate Csk. Furthermore, the overexpressed Csk mutants A228G, Y133A/Y116A, L138A, and L149A were unable to efficiently inactivate endogenous Src in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The results suggest that the SH2-domain-mediated activation of Csk is dependent on the binding of the beta3-alphaC loop Ala228 to the hydrophobic pocket formed by the side chains of Tyr116, Tyr133, Leu138, and Leu149 on the surface of the SH2 domain. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasma-surface interaction in negative hydrogen ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Motoi

    2018-05-01

    A negative hydrogen ion source delivers more beam current when Cs is introduced to the discharge, but a continuous operation of the source reduces the beam current until more Cs is added to the source. This behavior can be explained by adsorption and ion induced desorption of Cs atoms on the plasma grid surface of the ion source. The interaction between the ion source plasma and the plasma grid surface of a negative hydrogen ion source is discussed in correlation to the Cs consumption of the ion source. The results show that operation with deuterium instead of hydrogen should require more Cs consumption and the presence of medium mass impurities as well as ions of the source wall materials in the arc discharge enlarges the Cs removal rate during an ion source discharge.

  4. APIPIS: the Atomic Physics Ion-Photon Interaction System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Meron, M.; Kostroun, V.O.

    1985-01-01

    A proposed new facility for the study of highly charged heavy ions is described. The basic elements of APIPIS, the Atomic Physics Ion-Photon Interaction System, are: (1) a source of multiply-charged ions; (2) a linear accelerator; (3) a synchrotron storage ring; and (4) a source of high brightness x rays. The placement of a heavy ion storage ring at the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source will provide unique opportunities for the study of photo-excitation of heavy ions

  5. Calculation of ion storage in electron beams with account of ion-ion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perel'shtejn, Eh.A.; Shirkov, G.D.

    1979-01-01

    Ion storage in relativistic electron beams was calculated taking account of ion-ion charge exchange and ionization. The calculations were made for nitrogen ion storage from residual gas during the compression of electron rings in the adhezator of the JINR heavy ion accelerator. The calculations were made for rings of various parameters and for various pressures of the residual gas. The results are compared with analogous calculations made without account of ion-ion processes. It is shown that at heavy loading of a ring by ions ion-ion collisions play a significant part, and they should be taken into account while calculating ion storage

  6. Influence of nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions on double-layer capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Recently a Poisson-Helmholtz-Boltzmann (PHB) model [Bohinc , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.031130 85, 031130 (2012)] was developed by accounting for solvent-mediated nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions. Nonelectrostatic interactions are described by a Yukawa-like pair potential. In the present work, we modify the PHB model by adding steric effects (finite ion size) into the free energy to derive governing equations. The modified PHB model is capable of capturing both ion specificity and ion crowding. This modified model is then employed to study the capacitance of the double layer. More specifically, we focus on the influence of nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions on charging a double layer near a flat surface in the presence of steric effects. We numerically compute the differential capacitance as a function of the voltage under various conditions. At small voltages and low salt concentrations (dilute solution), we find out that the predictions from the modified PHB model are the same as those from the classical Poisson-Boltzmann theory, indicating that nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions and steric effects are negligible. At moderate voltages, nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions play an important role in determining the differential capacitance. Generally speaking, nonelectrostatic interactions decrease the capacitance because of additional nonelectrostatic repulsion among excess counterions inside the double layer. However, increasing the voltage gradually favors steric effects, which induce a condensed layer with crowding of counterions near the electrode. Accordingly, the predictions from the modified PHB model collapse onto those computed by the modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory considering steric effects alone. Finally, theoretical predictions are compared and favorably agree with experimental data, in particular, in concentrated solutions, leading one to conclude that the modified PHB model adequately predicts the diffuse

  7. The Role of Hydrophobicity and Surface Receptors at Hyphae of Lyophyllum sp. Strain Karsten in the Interaction with Burkholderia terrae BS001 – Implications for Interactions in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Taissa; Nazir, Rashid; Rozental, Sonia; dos Santos, Giulia M. P.; Calixto, Renata O. R.; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana; Wick, Lukas Y.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The soil bacterium Burkholderia terrae strain BS001 can interact with varying soil fungi, using mechanisms that range from the utilization of carbon/energy sources such as glycerol to the ability to reach novel territories in soil via co-migration with growing fungal mycelia. Here, we investigate the intrinsic properties of the B. terrae BS001 interaction with the basidiomycetous soil fungus Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten. In some experiments, the ascomycetous Trichoderma asperellum 302 was also used. The hyphae of Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten were largely hydrophilic on water-containing media versus hydrophobic when aerial, as evidenced by contact angle analyses (CA). Co-migration of B. terrae strain BS001 cells with the hyphae of the two fungi occurred preferentially along the - presumably hydrophilic - soil-dwelling hyphae, whereas aerial hyphae did not allow efficient migration, due to reduced thickness of their surrounding mucous films. Moreover, the cell numbers over the length of the hyphae in soil showed an uneven distribution, i.e., the CFU numbers increased from minima at the inoculation point to maximal numbers in the middle of the extended hyphae, then decreasing toward the terminal side. Microscopic analyses of the strain BS001 associations with the Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten hyphae in the microcosms confirmed the presence of B. terrae BS001 cells on the mucous matter that was present at the hyphal surfaces of the fungi used. Cell agglomerates were found to accumulate at defined sites on the hyphal surfaces, which were coined ‘fungal-interactive’ hot spots. Evidence was further obtained for the contention that receptors for a physical bacterium-fungus interaction occur at the Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten hyphal surface, in which the specific glycosphingolipid ceramide monohexoside (CMH) plays an important role. Thus, bacterial adherence may be mediated by heterogeneously distributed fungal-specific receptors, implying the CMH moieties. This

  8. The H2A-H2B dimeric kinetic intermediate is stabilized by widespread hydrophobic burial with few fully native interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyett, Paul J; Gloss, Lisa M

    2012-01-20

    The H2A-H2B histone heterodimer folds via monomeric and dimeric kinetic intermediates. Within ∼5 ms, the H2A and H2B polypeptides associate in a nearly diffusion limited reaction to form a dimeric ensemble, denoted I₂ and I₂*, the latter being a subpopulation characterized by a higher content of nonnative structure (NNS). The I₂ ensemble folds to the native heterodimer, N₂, through an observable, first-order kinetic phase. To determine the regions of structure in the I₂ ensemble, we characterized 26 Ala mutants of buried hydrophobic residues, spanning the three helices of the canonical histone folds of H2A and H2B and the H2B C-terminal helix. All but one targeted residue contributed significantly to the stability of I₂, the transition state and N₂; however, only residues in the hydrophobic core of the dimer interface perturbed the I₂* population. Destabilization of I₂* correlated with slower folding rates, implying that NNS is not a kinetic trap but rather accelerates folding. The pattern of Φ values indicated that residues forming intramolecular interactions in the peripheral helices contributed similar stability to I₂ and N₂, but residues involved in intermolecular interactions in the hydrophobic core are only partially folded in I₂. These findings suggest a dimerize-then-rearrange model. Residues throughout the histone fold contribute to the stability of I₂, but after the rapid dimerization reaction, the hydrophobic core of the dimer interface has few fully native interactions. In the transition state leading to N₂, more native-like interactions are developed and nonnative interactions are rearranged. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Two dimensional simulation of ion beam-plasm interaction | Echi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hybrid plasma simulation is a model in which different components of the plasma are treated differently. In this work the ions are treated as particles while the electrons are treated as a neutralizing background fluid through which electric signals may propagate. Deuterium ion beams incident on the tritium plasma interact ...

  10. Semi-Automated Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography Column Scouting Used in the Two-Step Purification of Recombinant Green Fluorescent Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) most commonly requires experimental determination (i.e., scouting) in order to select an optimal chromatographic medium for purifying a given target protein. Neither a two-step purification of untagged green fluorescent protein (GFP) from crude bacterial lysate using sequential HIC and size exclusion chromatography (SEC), nor HIC column scouting elution profiles of GFP, have been previously reported. Methods and Results Bacterial lysate expressing recombinant GFP was sequentially adsorbed to commercially available HIC columns containing butyl, octyl, and phenyl-based HIC ligands coupled to matrices of varying bead size. The lysate was fractionated using a linear ammonium phosphate salt gradient at constant pH. Collected HIC eluate fractions containing retained GFP were then pooled and further purified using high-resolution preparative SEC. Significant differences in presumptive GFP elution profiles were observed using in-line absorption spectrophotometry (A395) and post-run fluorimetry. SDS-PAGE and western blot demonstrated that fluorometric detection was the more accurate indicator of GFP elution in both HIC and SEC purification steps. Comparison of composite HIC column scouting data indicated that a phenyl ligand coupled to a 34 µm matrix produced the highest degree of target protein capture and separation. Conclusions Conducting two-step protein purification using the preferred HIC medium followed by SEC resulted in a final, concentrated product with >98% protein purity. In-line absorbance spectrophotometry was not as precise of an indicator of GFP elution as post-run fluorimetry. These findings demonstrate the importance of utilizing a combination of detection methods when evaluating purification strategies. GFP is a well-characterized model protein, used heavily in educational settings and by researchers with limited protein purification experience, and the data and strategies presented here may aid in

  11. Control activity of yeast geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase from dimer interface through H-bonds and hydrophobic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Kang; Teng, Kuo-Hsun; Lin, Sheng-Wei; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liang, Po-Huang

    2013-04-23

    Previously we showed that yeast geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) becomes an inactive monomer when the first N-terminal helix involved in dimerization is deleted. This raises questions regarding why dimerization is required for GGPPS activity and which amino acids in the dimer interface are essential for dimerization-mediated activity. According to the GGPPS crystal structure, three amino acids (N101, N104, and Y105) located in the helix F of one subunit are near the active site of the other subunit. As presented here, when these residues were replaced individually with Ala caused insignificant activity changes, N101A/Y105A and N101A/N104A but not N104A/Y105A showed remarkably decreased k(cat) values (200-250-fold). The triple mutant N101A/N104A/Y105A displayed no detectable activity, although dimer was retained in these mutants. Because N101 and Y105 form H-bonds with H139 and R140 in the other subunit, respectively, we generated H139A/R140A double mutant and found it was inactive and became monomeric. Therefore, the multiple mutations apparently influence the integrity of the catalytic site due to the missing H-bonding network. Moreover, Met111, also on the highly conserved helix F, was necessary for dimer formation and enzyme activity. When Met111 was replaced with Glu, the negative-charged repulsion converted half of the dimer into a monomer. In conclusion, the H-bonds mainly through N101 for maintaining substrate binding stability and the hydrophobic interaction of M111 in dimer interface are essential for activity of yeast GGPPS.

  12. Preparation of composite micro/nano structure on the silicon surface by reactive ion etching: Enhanced anti-reflective and hydrophobic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yu; Fan, Xiaoli; Chen, Jiajia; He, Siyu; Yi, Zao; Ye, Xin; Yi, Yougen

    2018-05-01

    A silicon substrate with micro-pyramid structure (black silicon) is prepared by wet chemical etching and then subjected to reactive ion etching (RIE) in the mixed gas condition of SF6, CHF3 and He. We systematically study the impacts of flow rates of SF6, CHF3 and He, the etching pressure and the etching time on the surface morphology and reflectivity through various characterizations. Meanwhile, we explore and obtain the optimal combination of parameters for the preparation of composite structure that match the RIE process based on the basis of micro-pyramid silicon substrate. The composite sample prepared under the optimum parameters exhibits excellent anti-reflective performance, hydrophobic, self-cleaning and anti-corrosive properties. Based on the above characteristics, the composite micro/nano structure can be applied to solar cells, photodetectors, LEDs, outdoor devices and other important fields.

  13. Metal ion interaction with phosphorylated tyrosine analogue monolayers on gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petoral, Rodrigo M; Björefors, Fredrik; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2006-11-23

    Phosphorylated tyrosine analogue molecules (pTyr-PT) were assembled onto gold substrates, and the resulting monolayers were used for metal ion interaction studies. The monolayers were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), both prior to and after exposure to metal ions. XPS verified the elemental composition of the molecular adsorbate and the presence of metal ions coordinated to the phosphate groups. Both the angle-dependent XPS and IRAS results were consistent with the change in the structural orientation of the pTyr-PT monolayer upon exposure to metal ions. The differential capacitance of the monolayers upon coordination of the metal ions was evaluated using EIS. These metal ions were found to significantly change the capacitance of the pTyr-PT monolayers in contrast to the nonphosphorylated tyrosine analogue (TPT). CV results showed reduced electrochemical blocking capabilities of the phosphorylated analogue monolayer when exposed to metal ions, supporting the change in the structure of the monolayer observed by XPS and IRAS. The largest change in the structure and interfacial capacitance was observed for aluminum ions, compared to calcium, magnesium, and chromium ions. This type of monolayer shows an excellent capability to coordinate metal ions and has a high potential for use as sensing layers in biochip applications to monitor the presence of metal ions.

  14. Ion-ion interactions in the denatured state contribute to the stabilization of CutA1 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yutani, Katsuhide; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Naitow, Hisashi; Joti, Yasumasa

    2018-05-16

    In order to elucidate features of the denatured state ensembles that exist in equilibrium with the native state under physiological conditions, we performed 1.4-μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at 400 K and 450 K using the monomer subunits of three CutA1 mutants from Escherichia coli: an SH-free mutant (Ec0SH) with denaturation temperature (T d ) = 85.6 °C, a hydrophobic mutant (Ec0VV) with T d  = 113.3 °C, and an ionic mutant (Ec0VV_6) with T d  = 136.8 °C. The occupancy of salt bridges by the six substituted charged residues in Ec0VV_6 was 140.1% at 300 K and 89.5% at 450 K, indicating that even in the denatured state, salt bridge occupancy was high, approximately 60% of that at 300 K. From these results, we can infer that proteins from hyperthermophiles with a high ratio of charged residues are stabilized by a decrease in conformational entropy due to ion-ion interactions in the denatured state. The mechanism must be comparable to the stabilization conferred by disulfide bonds within a protein. This suggests that introduction of charged residues, to promote formation of salt bridges in the denatured state, would be a simple way to rationally design stability-enhanced mutants.

  15. Nanoscale encapsulation: the structure of cations in hydrophobic microporous aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, S.R.; Yuchs, S.E.; Giaquinta, D.; Soderholm, L.; Song, Kang.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrophobic microporous aluminosilicates, created by organic surface modification of inherently hydrophilic materials such as zeolites and clays, are currently being investigated as storage media for hazardous cations. Use of organic monolayers to modify the surface of an aluminosilicate after introducing an ion into the zeolite/clay reduces the interaction of water with the material. Resulting systems are about 20 times more resistant to leaching of stored ion. XAS spectra from the encapsulated ion demonstrate that byproducts from the organic modifier can complex with the stored cation. This complexation can result in a decreased affinity of the cation for the aluminosilicate matrix. Changing the organic modifier eliminates this problem. XAS spectra also indicate that the reactivity and speciation of the encapsulated ion may change upon application of the hydrophobic layer

  16. Novel wave/ion beam interaction approach to isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.; Lowder, R.S.; Schwager, L.A.; Barr, W.L.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-02-01

    Numerical simulations and experimental studies have been made related to the possibility of employing an externally imposed electrostatic potential wave to separate isotopes. This wave/ion interaction is a sensitive function of the wave/ion difference velocity and for the appropriate wave amplitude and wave speed, a lighter faster isotope will be reflected by the wave to a higher energy while leaving heavier, slower isotopes virtually undisturbed in energy -- allowing subsequent ion separation by simple energy discrimination. In these experiments, a set of some 200 individual, electrodes, which surrounded a microamp beam of neon ions, was used to generate the wave. Measurements of the wave amplitudes needed for ion reflection and measurements of the final energies of those reflected ions are consistent with values expected from simple kinetic arguments and with the more detailed results of numeric simulations

  17. Light ions and ozone - generation and interactions with living organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriha, V.; Aubrecht, L.

    2005-01-01

    With directly in the living organism born ions exception, LNI coming through three phases: ionisation, attachment by the electronegative molecules and the clusters formation due to local electrostatic interactions. The quantitative analysis of physical parameters leads to conclusion that we cannot find any physical property (till known) explaining the positive affect of LNI on living organisms. Analysis of possible mechanism produces several hypotheses of LNI-organism interaction. A simplified semi-quantitative model of respiratory tract was developed for estimation of ions and ozone interaction with living organisms. A formation of oxygen radicals and products of their chain-reactions in intrinsic conditions is discussed

  18. Nuclear import of high risk HPV16 E7 oncoprotein is mediated by its zinc-binding domain via hydrophobic interactions with Nup62

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhard, Jeremy; Onder, Zeynep; Moroianu, Junona, E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu

    2013-11-15

    We previously discovered that nuclear import of high risk HPV16 E7 is mediated by a cNLS located within the zinc-binding domain via a pathway that is independent of karyopherins/importins (Angeline et al., 2003; Knapp et al., 2009). In this study we continued our characterization of the cNLS and nuclear import pathway of HPV16 E7. We find that an intact zinc-binding domain is essential for the cNLS function in mediating nuclear import of HPV16 E7. Mutagenesis of cysteine residues to alanine in each of the two CysXXCys motifs involved in zinc-binding changes the nuclear localization of the EGFP-16E7 and 2xEGFP-16E7 mutants. We further discover that a patch of hydrophobic residues, {sub 65}LRLCV{sub 69}, within the zinc-binding domain of HPV16 E7 mediates its nuclear import via hydrophobic interactions with the FG domain of the central channel nucleoporin Nup62. - Highlights: • An intact zinc-binding domain is essential for the nuclear localization of HPV16 E7. • Identification of a hydrophobic patch that is critical for the nuclear import of HPV16 E7. • HPV16 E7 interacts via its zinc-binding domain with the FG domain of Nup62.

  19. Hydrophobic Interactions Are a Key to MDM2 Inhibition by Polyphenols as Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and MM/PBSA Free Energy Calculations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Verma

    Full Text Available p53, a tumor suppressor protein, has been proven to regulate the cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA repair to prevent malignant transformation. MDM2 regulates activity of p53 and inhibits its binding to DNA. In the present study, we elucidated the MDM2 inhibition potential of polyphenols (Apigenin, Fisetin, Galangin and Luteolin by MD simulation and MM/PBSA free energy calculations. All polyphenols bind to hydrophobic groove of MDM2 and the binding was found to be stable throughout MD simulation. Luteolin showed the highest negative binding free energy value of -173.80 kJ/mol followed by Fisetin with value of -172.25 kJ/mol. It was found by free energy calculations, that hydrophobic interactions (vdW energy have major contribution in binding free energy.

  20. Hydrophobic ion pairing of a minocycline/Ca(2+)/AOT complex for preparation of drug-loaded PLGA nanoparticles with improved sustained release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmkvist, Alexander Dontsios; Friberg, Annika; Nilsson, Ulf J; Schouenborg, Jens

    2016-02-29

    Polymeric nanoparticles is an established and efficient means to achieve controlled release of drugs. Incorporation of minocycline, an antibiotic with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, into biodegradable nanoparticles may therefore provide an efficient means to combat foreign body reactions to implanted electrodes in the brain. However, minocycline is commonly associated with poor encapsulation efficiencies and/or fast release rates due to its high solubility in water. Moreover, minocycline is unstable under conditions of low and high pH, heat and exposure to light, which exacerbate the challenges of encapsulation. In this work drug loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by a modified emulsification-solvent-diffusion technique and characterized for size, drug encapsulation and in vitro drug release. A novel hydrophobic ion pair complex of minocycline, Ca(2+) ions and the anionic surfactant AOT was developed to protect minocycline from degradation and prolong its release. The optimized formulation resulted in particle sizes around 220 nm with an entrapment efficiency of 43% and showed drug release over 30 days in artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The present results constitute a substantial increase in release time compared to what has hitherto been achieved for minocycline and indicate that such particles might provide useful for sustained drug delivery in the CNS. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. New insights into the interactions between cork chemical components and pesticides. The contribution of π-π interactions, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivella, M À; Bazzicalupi, C; Bianchi, A; Fiol, N; Villaescusa, I

    2015-01-01

    The role of chemical components of cork in the sorption of several pesticides has been investigated. For this purpose raw cork and three cork extracted fractions (i.e. cork free of aliphatic extractives, cork free of all extractives and cork free of all extractives and suberin) were used as sorbent of three ionic pesticides (propazine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) and alachlor) and five non-ionic pesticides (chlorpyrifos, isoproturon, metamitron, methomyl and oxamyl) with a logKow within the range -0.47 to 4.92. The effect of cations on the ionic pesticides, propazine and 2,4-D sorption was also analyzed. Results indicated that the highest yields were obtained for chlorpyrifos and alachlor sorption onto raw cork (>55%). After removal of aliphatic extractives sorption of all pesticides increased that ranged from 3% for propazine to 31% for alachlor. In contrast, removal of phenolic extractives caused a sorption decrease. Low sorption yields were obtained for hydrophobic pesticides such as metamitron, oxamyl and methomyl (cork fractions and extremely low when using raw cork (cork toward aromatic pesticides. Results presented in this paper gain insights into the cork affinities for pesticides and the interactions involved in the sorption process and also enables to envisage sorption affinity of cork for other organic pollutants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of the ion beryllium surface interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, M.I.; Birukov, A.Yu.; Gureev, V.M.

    1995-01-01

    The self -sputtering yield of the Be was measured. The energy dependence of the Be self-sputtering yield agrees well with that calculated by W. Eckstein et. al. Below 770 K the self-sputtering yield is temperature independent; at T irr .> 870 K it increases sharply. Hot-pressed samples at 370 K were implanted with monoenergetic 5 keV hydrogen ions and with a stationary plasma (flux power ∼ 5 MW/m 2 ). The investigation of hydrogen behavior in beryllium shows that at low doses hydrogen is solved, but at doses ≥ 5x10 22 m -2 the bubbles and channels are formed. It results in hydrogen profile shift to the surface and decrease of its concentration. The sputtering results in further concentration decrease at doses > 10 25 m -2

  3. Ion-atom interactions probed by photofragment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, H.

    1984-01-01

    Photofragment spectroscopy studies energetic and dynamical properties of molecular states interacting with dissociation continuum. So far, data for eighteen diatomic molecular ions have been gathered by this technique. This paper is a review of these investigations, introduced by a discussion of the experimental methods used. The wealth of information accessible by ion photofragment spectroscopy challenges the experimentalist in the application of innovative techniques and the theoretician for less approximate accounts of the Hamiltonian. (Auth.)

  4. Interaction of energetic ions with high-density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gericke, D.O.; Edie, D.; Grinenko, A.; Vorberger, J.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The talk will review the importance of energetic ions in different inertial confinement fusion scenarios: i) heavy ion beams are very efficient drivers that can deliver the energy for compression in indirect as well as direct drive approaches; ii) the interaction of α-particles, that are created in a burning plasma, with the surrounding cold plasma is essential for creating a burn wave; iii) laser-produced ion beams are also a strong candidate to create the hot spot needed for fast ignition. In all applications the ions interact with dense matter that is characterized by strongly coupled ions and (possibly) partially degenerate electrons. Moreover, the coupling between beam ions and target electrons can be strong as well. Under these conditions, standard approaches for the beam-plasma interactions process are known to fail. The presentation will demonstrate how advanced models for the energy loss of ions in dense plasmas can resolve the issues mentioned above. These models are largely built on quantum kinetic theory that is able to describe degeneracy and strong coupling in a systematic way. In particular, strong interactions require a quantum description for electron-ion collisions in dense plasma environments, which is done by direct solutions of the Schroedinger equation. Degeneracy and collective excitations can be included via the Lenard-Balescu description where strong interactions may be included via a pseudo-potential approach. Finally, results are shown for all three fusion applications described above. The effects related to strong coupling and degeneracy mainly concern the end of the stopping range where the beam ion dose not have enough energy to excite all possible degrees of freedom and, thus, certain processes are frozen out. However, we also find a significant reduction of the range for swift heavy ions in the GeV-range when stopping in dense matter is considered. The stopping range of α-particles in the

  5. Nonlinear interaction of an ion flux with plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.A.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Pistunovich, V.I.; Soboleva, T.K.; Yushamanov, P.N.

    The present report discusses the interaction of an ion beam, formed during the charge exchange of injected neutral atoms, with a plasma. Methods of analytical study by means of quasi-linear equations as well as two-dimensional numerical modelling are used. It is shown that at a beam velocity U 0 /C/sub s/ approximately less than 1 / 2 , the relaxation process may be described by using the theory of quasi-linear relaxation of electron beams, at U 0 /C/sub s/ approximately greater than 10; one can neglect the slowing down of the ion beam and consider only the angular spread. An analytical dependence of the spread angle on time was obtained. On the basis of the ion beam relaxation theory evolved, experiments on charge exchange of plasma fluxes on a gas target are analyzed. It is shown that the anomalous scattering of the plasma flux observed in a series of experiments may be explained by the interaction of ions of the flux with ion-acoustic oscillations of the target plasma. Consideration of damping of ion-acoustic noise by the plasma electrons and ions leads to a limitation of the relaxation of the angular distribution function. The relationships obtained are in good agreement with the experimental results

  6. Interaction of the Yersinia pestis type III regulatory proteins LcrG and LcrV occurs at a hydrophobic interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilles Matthew L

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secretion of anti-host proteins by Yersinia pestis via a type III mechanism is not constitutive. The process is tightly regulated and secretion occurs only after an appropriate signal is received. The interaction of LcrG and LcrV has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in secretion control. Previous work has shown that when LcrG is incapable of interacting with LcrV, secretion of anti-host proteins is prevented. Therefore, an understanding of how LcrG interacts with LcrV is required to evaluate how this interaction regulates the type III secretion system of Y. pestis. Additionally, information about structure-function relationships within LcrG is necessary to fully understand the role of this key regulatory protein. Results In this study we demonstrate that the N-terminus of LcrG is required for interaction with LcrV. The interaction likely occurs within a predicted amphipathic coiled-coil domain within LcrG. Our results demonstrate that the hydrophobic face of the putative helix is required for LcrV interaction. Additionally, we demonstrate that the LcrG homolog, PcrG, is incapable of blocking type III secretion in Y. pestis. A genetic selection was utilized to obtain a PcrG variant capable of blocking secretion. This PcrG variant allowed us to locate a region of LcrG involved in secretion blocking. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that LcrG interacts with LcrV via hydrophobic interactions located in the N-terminus of LcrG within a predicted coiled-coil motif. We also obtained preliminary evidence that the secretion blocking activity of LcrG is located between amino acids 39 and 53.

  7. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Sepúlveda, Romina V.; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca2+ concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca2+ sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca2+, profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active–resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca2+ binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open–closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open–closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations. PMID:25548136

  8. Electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Hughes, I.G.; Overbury, S.H.; Robinson, M.T.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    The electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions will be discussed. The interactions lead to the emission of a significant number of electrons. Most of these electrons have energies below 30 eV. For incident ions with innershell vacancies the emission of Auger electrons that fill these vacancies has been found to occur mainly below the surface. We will present recently measured electron energy distributions which will be used to discuss the mechanisms that lead to the emission of Auger and of low-energy electrons

  9. Cation–Anion Interactions within the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere Revealed by Ion Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebala, Magdalena; Giambasu, George M.; Lipfert, Jan; Bisaria, Namita; Bonilla, Steve; Li, Guangchao; York, Darrin M.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The ion atmosphere is a critical structural, dynamic, and energetic component of nucleic acids that profoundly affects their interactions with proteins and ligands. Experimental methods that “count” the number of ions thermodynamically associated with the ion atmosphere allow dissection of energetic properties of the ion atmosphere, and thus provide direct comparison to theoretical results. Previous experiments have focused primarily on the cations that are attracted to nucleic acid polyanions, but have also showed that anions are excluded from the ion atmosphere. Herein, we have systematically explored the properties of anion exclusion, testing the zeroth-order model that anions of different identity are equally excluded due to electrostatic repulsion. Using a series of monovalent salts, we find, surprisingly, that the extent of anion exclusion and cation inclusion significantly depends on salt identity. The differences are prominent at higher concentrations and mirror trends in mean activity coefficients of the electrolyte solutions. Salts with lower activity coefficients exhibit greater accumulation of both cations and anions within the ion atmosphere, strongly suggesting that cation–anion correlation effects are present in the ion atmosphere and need to be accounted for to understand electrostatic interactions of nucleic acids. To test whether the effects of cation–anion correlations extend to nucleic acid kinetics and thermodynamics, we followed the folding of P4–P6, a domain of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, via single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer in solutions with different salts. Solutions of identical concentration but lower activity gave slower and less favorable folding. Our results reveal hitherto unknown properties of the ion atmosphere and suggest possible roles of oriented ion pairs or anion-bridged cations in the ion atmosphere for electrolyte solutions of salts with reduced activity. Consideration of these new

  10. Fundamentals of ion-solid interaction. A compact introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, Wolfhard

    2017-01-01

    Since Rutherford's famous paper which first described the scattering of α-particles in matter, the field of ion-solid interaction has matured by now during one entire century. First theoretical concepts addressing particle penetration of solids were given by Thomson and Bohr. Quantum theory entered the field in treatments of ion stopping by Born and Bethe. Still on classical grounds, transport theory was first introduced in a paper on multiple scattering by Bothe. The discovery of nuclear fission launched theoretical studies by Bohr on the scattering and stopping of fission products. A further milestone in the understanding of particle penetration phenomena is the 1948 paper by Bohr. On this basis, the theoretical understanding was enhanced in the early 1960's in particular by a series of papers by Lindhard. Simultaneously, an increasing amount of experimental studies on ion stopping and scattering were launched in connection with the development of ion acceleration devices and corresponding equipment for particle detection. During this period, also first computer simulation studies came up which later proved to be an utmost efficient tool for the description of collisional phenomena in ion-solid interaction. The relevance for numerous applications became evident, such as for the compositional and structural analysis of thin films and near-surface layers, for semiconductor technology, and nuclear fission and fusion technology. This caused increasing interest not only in the penetration and the scattering of the impinging ions, but also in the modification of the irradiated material due to ion implantation, radiation damage and surface erosion by sputtering. Consequently, ion-solid interaction established around 1970 internationally as a quickly expanding field at the intersection of solid-state physics and nuclear physics. Numerous reviews and textbooks are available which cover the fundamentals of ion-solid interaction. Torrens reviewed the knowledge about

  11. Fundamentals of ion-solid interaction. A compact introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Wolfhard [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research

    2017-09-01

    Since Rutherford's famous paper which first described the scattering of α-particles in matter, the field of ion-solid interaction has matured by now during one entire century. First theoretical concepts addressing particle penetration of solids were given by Thomson and Bohr. Quantum theory entered the field in treatments of ion stopping by Born and Bethe. Still on classical grounds, transport theory was first introduced in a paper on multiple scattering by Bothe. The discovery of nuclear fission launched theoretical studies by Bohr on the scattering and stopping of fission products. A further milestone in the understanding of particle penetration phenomena is the 1948 paper by Bohr. On this basis, the theoretical understanding was enhanced in the early 1960's in particular by a series of papers by Lindhard. Simultaneously, an increasing amount of experimental studies on ion stopping and scattering were launched in connection with the development of ion acceleration devices and corresponding equipment for particle detection. During this period, also first computer simulation studies came up which later proved to be an utmost efficient tool for the description of collisional phenomena in ion-solid interaction. The relevance for numerous applications became evident, such as for the compositional and structural analysis of thin films and near-surface layers, for semiconductor technology, and nuclear fission and fusion technology. This caused increasing interest not only in the penetration and the scattering of the impinging ions, but also in the modification of the irradiated material due to ion implantation, radiation damage and surface erosion by sputtering. Consequently, ion-solid interaction established around 1970 internationally as a quickly expanding field at the intersection of solid-state physics and nuclear physics. Numerous reviews and textbooks are available which cover the fundamentals of ion-solid interaction. Torrens reviewed the knowledge

  12. Double folded Yukawa interaction potential between two heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulgac, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Dumitrescu, O.

    1980-02-01

    A simple semi-analytical formula for the heavy ion interaction potential within the double-folding model approximation is obtained. The folded interaction is assumed to be expressed in Yukawa terms or the derivatives of them. The densities used can be both experimental or theoretical (of simple ''step-wise'', ''Fermi-Saxon-Woods'' or complicated ''shell model'' structure) densities. A way of inserting the exchange terms is discussed. Numerical calculations for some colliding partners are reported. (author)

  13. Ion Motion in a Plasma Interacting with Strong Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weingarten, A.; Grabowski, C.; Chakrabarti, N.; Maron, Y.; Fruchtmant, A.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of a plasma with strong magnetic fields takes place in many laboratory experiments and astrophysical plasmas. Applying a strong magnetic field to the plasma may result in plasma displacement, magnetization, or the formation of instabilities. Important phenomena in plasma, such as the energy transport and the momentum balance, take a different form in each case. We study this interaction in a plasma that carries a short-duration (80-ns) current pulse, generating a magnetic field of up to 17 kG. The evolution of the magnetic field, plasma density, ion velocities, and electric fields are determined before and during the current pulse. The dependence of the plasma limiting current on the plasma density and composition are studied and compared to theoretical models based on the different phenomena. When the plasma collisionality is low, three typical velocities should be taken into consideration: the proton and heavier-ion Alfven velocities (v A p and v A h , respectively) and the EMHD magnetic-field penetration velocity into the plasma (v EMHD ). If both Alfven velocities are larger than v EMHD the plasma is pushed ahead of the magnetic piston and the magnetic field energy is dissipated into ion kinetic energy. If v EMHD is the largest of three velocities, the plasma become magnetized and the ions acquire a small axial momentum only. Different ion species may drift in different directions along the current lines. In this case, the magnetic field energy is probably dissipated into electron thermal energy. When vs > V EMHD > vi, as in the case of one of our experiments, ion mass separation occurs. The protons are pushed ahead of the piston while the heavier-ions become magnetized. Since the plasma electrons are unmagnetized they cannot cross the piston, and the heavy ions are probably charge-neutralized by electrons originating from the cathode that are 'born' magnetized

  14. Interactions between electrons in the field of a positive ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heideman, A.G.M.; Eck, J. van.

    1976-01-01

    Recent studies on the (auto)ionization of atoms by means of electron-atom collisions reveal the existence of phenomena probably brought about by post-collision interactions in the vicinity of a positive ion. In this article, a review of the subject is given in relation to the research program of the Utrecht atomic physics group

  15. Four faces of the interaction between ions and aromatic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Dóra; Rovó, Petra; Jákli, Imre; Császár, Attila G; Perczel, András

    2017-07-15

    Non-covalent interactions between ions and aromatic rings play an important role in the stabilization of macromolecular complexes; of particular interest are peptides and proteins containing aromatic side chains (Phe, Trp, and Tyr) interacting with negatively (Asp and Glu) and positively (Arg and Lys) charged amino acid residues. The structures of the ion-aromatic-ring complexes are the result of an interaction between the large quadrupole moment of the ring and the charge of the ion. Four attractive interaction types are proposed to be distinguished based on the position of the ion with respect to the plane of the ring: perpendicular cation-π (CP ⊥ ), co-planar cation-π (CP ∥ ), perpendicular anion-π (AP ⊥ ), and co-planar anion-π (AP ∥ ). To understand more than the basic features of these four interaction types, a systematic, high-level quantum chemical study is performed, using the X -  + C 6 H 6 , M +  + C 6 H 6 , X -  + C 6 F 6 , and M +  + C 6 F 6 model systems with X -  = H - , F - , Cl - , HCOO - , CH 3 COO - and M +  = H + , Li + , Na + , NH4+, CH 3 NH3+, whereby C 6 H 6 and C 6 F 6 represent an electron-rich and an electron-deficient π system, respectively. Benchmark-quality interaction energies with small uncertainties, obtained via the so-called focal-point analysis (FPA) technique, are reported for the four interaction types. The computations reveal that the interactions lead to significant stabilization, and that the interaction energy order, given in kcal mol -1 in parentheses, is CP ⊥ (23-37) > AP ⊥ (14-21) > CP ∥ (9-22) > AP ∥ (6-16). A natural bond orbital analysis performed leads to a deeper qualitative understanding of the four interaction types. To facilitate the future quantum chemical characterization of ion-aromatic-ring interactions in large biomolecules, the performance of three density functional theory methods, B3LYP, BHandHLYP, and M06-2X, is tested against the FPA benchmarks

  16. INTERACTION OF NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTED FAST IONS WITH ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE FREQUENCY WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHOI, M.; CHAN, V.S.; CHIU, S.C.; OMELCHENKO, Y.A.; SENTOKU, Y.; STJOH, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    OAK B202 INTERACTION OF NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTED FAST IONS WITH CYCLOTRON RESONANCE FREQUENCY WAVES. Existing tokamaks such as DIII-D and future experiments like ITER employ both NB injection (NBI) and ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) for auxiliary heating and current drive. The presence of energetic particles produced by NBI can result in absorption of the Ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) power. ICRF can also interact with the energetic beam ions to alter the characteristics of NBI momentum deposition and resultant impact on current drive and plasma rotation. To study the synergism between NBI and ICRF, a simple physical model for the slowing-down of NB injected fast ions is implemented in a Monte-Carlo rf orbit code. This paper presents the first results. The velocity space distributions of energetic ions generated by ICRF and NBI are calculated and compared. The change in mechanical momentum of the beam and an estimate of its impact on the NB-driven current are presented and compared with ONETWO simulation results

  17. The role of the ion-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions in the formation of the two-ion average force interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ajrian, E A; Sidorenko, S N

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the ion-molecule and intermolecular interactions on the formation of inter-ion average force potentials is investigated within the framework of a classical ion-dipole model of electrolyte solutions. These potentials are shown to possess the Coulomb asymptotics at large distances while in the region of mean distances they reveal creation and disintegration of solvent-shared ion pairs. The calculation results provide a qualitatively authentic physical picture which is experimentally observed in strong electrolytes solutions. In particular, an increased interaction between an ion and a molecule enhances formation of ion pairs in which the ions are separated by one solvent molecule

  18. Interaction of ion clusters with fusion plasmas: Scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arista, N.R.; Bringa, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    The interaction between large ion clusters or very intense ion beams with fusion plasma is studied using the dielectric function formalism with appropriate quantum corrections. The contributions from individual and collective modes to the energy loss are calculated. The general properties of the interference effects are characterized in terms of the relevant parameters, and simple scaling laws are obtained. In particular, the conditions for a maximum enhancement in the energy deposition are derived. The study provides a unified view and a general formulation of collective effects in the energy loss for low and high velocities of the beam particles. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  19. Ion-ion and ion-solvent interactions in lithium imidazolide electrolytes studied by Raman spectroscopy and DFT models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheers, Johan; Niedzicki, Leszek; Zukowska, Grażyna Z; Johansson, Patrik; Wieczorek, Władysław; Jacobsson, Per

    2011-06-21

    Molecular level interactions are of crucial importance for the transport properties and overall performance of ion conducting electrolytes. In this work we explore ion-ion and ion-solvent interactions in liquid and solid polymer electrolytes of lithium 4,5-dicyano-(2-trifluoromethyl)imidazolide (LiTDI)-a promising salt for lithium battery applications-using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. High concentrations of ion associates are found in LiTDI:acetonitrile electrolytes, the vibrational signatures of which are transferable to PEO-based LiTDI electrolytes. The origins of the spectroscopic changes are interpreted by comparing experimental spectra with simulated Raman spectra of model structures. Simple ion pair models in vacuum identify the imidazole nitrogen atom of the TDI anion to be the most important coordination site for Li(+), however, including implicit or explicit solvent effects lead to qualitative changes in the coordination geometry and improved correlation of experimental and simulated Raman spectra. To model larger aggregates, solvent effects are found to be crucial, and we finally suggest possible triplet and dimer ionic structures in the investigated electrolytes. In addition, the effects of introducing water into the electrolytes-via a hydrate form of LiTDI-are discussed.

  20. Interaction between a hydrophobic rigid face and a flexible alkyl tail: Thermodynamics of self-assembling of sodium cholate and SDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Guangyue; Sheng, Jianhui; Wang, Yujie; Wu, Hui; Zhao, Yang; Zhuo, Kelei; Bastos, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Critical concentrations and enthalpy changes for stepwise aggregation are obtained by ITC. • ITC allowed the thermodynamic characterization for NaCA/SDS self-assembling. • Steroid face-to-alkyl chain hydrophobic interaction tends to be saturated at molar ratio 1:1.5. • Alkyl-steroid interaction favors micellization of NaCA/SDS and the mixture shows nonideal behavior. • Intermolecular interaction and excess enthalpies were discussed according to Rubingh’s model. - Abstract: The thermodynamics of molecular self-assembling of an anionic biosurfactant, sodium cholate (NaCA) and its mixtures with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous solution have been investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), along with fluorescence and conductivity measurements. Different critical concentrations were obtained by these three techniques – critical pre-micelle concentration (cmc_p_r_e) and critical micelle concentration (cmc) for pure NaCA, and critical micelle concentrations (cmc_m_i_x) for the mixed systems with differently initial SDS concentrations. Importantly, ITC allowed us to directly measure the enthalpy changes of pre-micelle formation (ΔH_p_r_e_m_i_c = (−0.28 ± 0.02) kJ·mol"−"1) and of micelle formation (ΔH_m_i_c = (−1.76 ± 0.05) kJ·mol"−"1) for pure NaCA as well as the enthalpies for micellization for the mixed systems NaCA/SDS. The non-ideality of the mixed surfactant solution was evaluated in terms of interaction parameters and excess enthalpies that were calculated in the light of Clint’s and Rubingh’s models. It was found that there is an obvious synergistic effect in the NaCA/SDS mixed system. From all these results we can ascribe the strong interaction between the same charge surfactants NaCA and SDS to the structural difference in their hydrophobic moieties. In fact, the flexible alkyl chains of SDS and the non-planar hydrophobic β-faces of NaCA tend to have a more compact packing than pure NaCA.

  1. Combined effects of potassium chloride and ethanol as mobile phase modulators on hydrophobic interaction and reversed-phase chromatography of three insulin variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Karolina; Frederiksen, Søren S; Degerman, Marcus; Breil, Martin P; Mollerup, Jørgen M; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-02-13

    The two main chromatographic modes based on hydrophobicity, hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and reversed-phase chromatography (RPC), are widely used for both analytical and preparative chromatography of proteins in the pharmaceutical industry. Despite the extensive application of these separation methods, and the vast amount of studies performed on HIC and RPC over the decades, the underlying phenomena remain elusive. As part of a systematic study of the influence of mobile phase modulators in hydrophobicity-based chromatography, we have investigated the effects of both KCl and ethanol on the retention of three insulin variants on two HIC adsorbents and two RPC adsorbents. The focus was on the linear adsorption range, separating the modulator effects from the capacity effects, but some complementary experiments at higher load were included to further investigate observed phenomena. The results show that the modulators have the same effect on the two RPC adsorbents in the linear range, indicating that the modulator concentration only affects the activity of the solute in the mobile phase, and not that of the solute-ligand complex, or that of the ligand. Unfortunately, the HIC adsorbents did not show the same behavior. However, the insulin variants displayed a strong tendency toward self-association on both HIC adsorbents; on one in particular. Since this causes peak fronting, the retention is affected, and this could probably explain the lack of congruity. This conclusion was supported by the results from the non-linear range experiments which were indicative of double-layer adsorption on the HIC adsorbents, while the RPC adsorbents gave the anticipated increased tailing at higher load. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mixed micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid and selected hydrophobic bile acids: interaction parameter, partition coefficient of nitrazepam and mixed micelles haemolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poša, Mihalj; Tepavčević, Vesna

    2011-09-01

    The formation of mixed micelles built of 7,12-dioxolithocholic and the following hydrophobic bile acids was examined by conductometric method: cholic (C), deoxycholic (D), chenodeoxycholic (CD), 12-oxolithocholic (12-oxoL), 7-oxolithocholic (7-oxoL), ursodeoxycholic (UD) and hiodeoxycholic (HD). Interaction parameter (β) in the studied binary mixed micelles had negative value, suggesting synergism between micelle building units. Based on β value, the hydrophobic bile acids formed two groups: group I (C, D and CD) and group II (12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD and HD). Bile acids from group II had more negative β values than bile acids from group I. Also, bile acids from group II formed intermolecular hydrogen bonds in aggregates with both smaller (2) and higher (4) aggregation numbers, according to the analysis of their stereochemical (conformational) structures and possible structures of mixed micelles built of these bile acids and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. Haemolytic potential and partition coefficient of nitrazepam were higher in mixed micelles built of the more hydrophobic bile acids (C, D, CD) and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid than in micelles built only of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. On the other hand, these mixed micelles still had lower values of haemolytic potential than micelles built of C, D or CD. The mixed micelles that included bile acids: 12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD or HD did not significantly differ from the micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid, observing the values of their haemolytic potential. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Native Hydrophobic Binding Interactions at the Transition State for Association between the TAZ1 Domain of CBP and the Disordered TAD-STAT2 Are Not a Requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Ida; Dogan, Jakob

    2017-08-15

    A significant fraction of the eukaryotic proteome consists of proteins that are either partially or completely disordered under native-like conditions. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are common in protein-protein interactions and are involved in numerous cellular processes. Although many proteins have been identified as disordered, much less is known about the binding mechanisms of the coupled binding and folding reactions involving IDPs. Here we have analyzed the rate-limiting transition state for binding between the TAZ1 domain of CREB binding protein and the intrinsically disordered transactivation domain of STAT2 (TAD-STAT2) by site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic experiments (Φ-value analysis) and found that the native protein-protein binding interface is not formed at the transition state for binding. Instead, native hydrophobic binding interactions form late, after the rate-limiting barrier has been crossed. The association rate constant in the absence of electrostatic enhancement was determined to be rather high. This is consistent with the Φ-value analysis, which showed that there are few or no obligatory native contacts. Also, linear free energy relationships clearly demonstrate that native interactions are cooperatively formed, a scenario that has usually been observed for proteins that fold according to the so-called nucleation-condensation mechanism. Thus, native hydrophobic binding interactions at the rate-limiting transition state for association between TAD-STAT2 and TAZ1 are not a requirement, which is generally in agreement with previous findings on other IDP systems and might be a common mechanism for IDPs.

  4. Tensor interaction in heavy-ion scattering. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, H.; Johnson, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Heidelberg shape-effect model for heavy-ion tensor interactions is reformulated and generalized using the Hooton-Johnson formulation. The generalized semiclassical model (the turning-point model) predicts that the components of the tensor analysing power anti Tsub(2q) have certain relations with each other for each type of tensor interaction (Tsub(R), Tsub(P) and Tsub(L) types). The predicted relations between the anti Tsub(2q) are very simple and have a direct connection with the properties of the tensor interaction at the turning point. The model predictions are satisfied in quantum-mechanical calculations for 7 Li and 23 Na elastic scattering from 58 Ni in the Fresnel-diffraction energy region. As a consequence of this model, it becomes possible to single out effects from a Tsub(P)- or Tsub(L)-type tensor interaction in polarized heavy-ion scattering. The presence of a Tsub(P)-type tensor interaction is suggested by measured anti T 20 /anti T 22 ratios for 7 Li + 58 Ni scattering. In the turning-point model the three types of tensor operator are not independent, and this is found to be true also in a quantum-mechanical calculation. The model also predicts relations between the components of higher-rank tensor analysing power in the presence of a higher-rank tensor interaction. The rank-3 tensor case is discussed in detail. (orig.)

  5. Transferability of polarizable models for ion-water electrostatic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masia, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Studies of ion-water systems at condensed phase and at interfaces have pointed out that molecular and ionic polarization plays an important role for many phenomena ranging from hydrogen bond dynamics to water interfaces' structure. Classical and ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations reveal that induced dipole moments at interfaces (e.g. air-water and water-protein) are usually high, hinting that polarizable models to be implemented in classical force fields should be very accurate in reproducing the electrostatic properties of the system. In this paper the electrostatic properties of three classical polarizable models for ion-water interaction are compared with ab initio results both at gas and condensed phase. For Li + - water and Cl - -water dimers the reproducibility of total dipole moments obtained with high level quantum chemical calculations is studied; for the same ions in liquid water, Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics simulations are used to compute the time evolution of ionic and molecular dipole moments, which are compared with the classical models. The PD2-H2O model developed by the author and coworkers [Masia et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2004, 121, 7362] together with the gaussian intermolecular damping for ion-water interaction [Masia et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 123, 164505] showed to be the fittest in reproducing the ab initio results from gas to condensed phase, allowing for force field transferability.

  6. ENERGETIC PHOTON AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS WITH POSITIVE IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaneuf, Ronald A. [UNR

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this research is a deeper understanding of the complex multi-electron interactions that govern inelastic processes involving positive ions in plasma environments, such as those occurring in stellar cares and atmospheres, x-ray lasers, thermonuclear fusion reactors and materials-processing discharges. In addition to precision data on ionic structure and transition probabilities, high resolution quantitative measurements of ionization test the theoretical methods that provide critical input to computer codes used for plasma modeling and photon opacity calculations. Steadily increasing computational power and a corresponding emphasis on simulations gives heightened relevance to precise and accurate benchmark data. Photons provide a highly selective probe of the internal electronic structure of atomic and molecular systems, and a powerful means to better understand more complex electron-ion interactions.

  7. Interaction of low-energy highly charged ions with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzel, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    The thesis presented herein deals with experimental studies of the interaction between highly charged ions and neutral matter at low collision energies. The energy range investigated is of great interest for the understanding of both charge exchange reactions between ions comprising the solar wind and various astrophysical gases, as well as the creation of near-surface nanostructures. Over the course of this thesis an experimental setup was constructed, capable of reducing the kinetic energy of incoming ions by two orders of magnitude and finally focussing the decelerated ion beam onto a solid or gaseous target. A coincidence method was employed for the simultaneous detection of photons emitted during the charge exchange process together with the corresponding projectile ions. In this manner, it was possible to separate reaction channels, whose superposition presumably propagated large uncertainties and systematic errors in previous measurements. This work has unveiled unexpectedly strong contributions of slow radiative decay channels and clear evidence of previously only postulated decay processes in charge exchange-induced X-ray spectra. (orig.)

  8. Defining process design space for a hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) purification step: application of quality by design (QbD) principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Canping; Flansburg, Lisa; Ghose, Sanchayita; Jorjorian, Paul; Shukla, Abhinav A

    2010-12-15

    The concept of design space has been taking root under the quality by design paradigm as a foundation of in-process control strategies for biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes. This paper outlines the development of a design space for a hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) process step. The design space included the impact of raw material lot-to-lot variability and variations in the feed stream from cell culture. A failure modes and effects analysis was employed as the basis for the process characterization exercise. During mapping of the process design space, the multi-dimensional combination of operational variables were studied to quantify the impact on process performance in terms of yield and product quality. Variability in resin hydrophobicity was found to have a significant influence on step yield and high-molecular weight aggregate clearance through the HIC step. A robust operating window was identified for this process step that enabled a higher step yield while ensuring acceptable product quality. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Deciphering the perturbation effect of urea on the supramolecular host-guest interaction of biologically active hydrophobic molecule inside the nanocavity of cyclodextrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maity, Banibrata; Chatterjee, Aninda; Ahmed, Sayeed Ashique; Seth, Debabrata, E-mail: debabrata@iitp.ac.in

    2017-03-15

    The present work articulates the supramolecular interaction and the formation of host-guest complex between the biologically active hydrophobic coumarin derivative and cyclodextrins by using several spectroscopic, calorimetric and microscopic techniques. All the studies clearly revealed that in presence of cyclodextrins (CDs), coumarin forms 1:1 stoichiometric complex. From all the study, we have found that with gradual increasing the cavity diameter of the hosts, the binding efficiency of the complexes gradually increases. The small population of the non emissive twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state of coumarin molecule turns into highly emissive in presence of γ-CD owing to its greater cavity diameter. The emissive TICT band is not found in β-CD complex due to its comparative small hydrophilic exterior and less polar environment. The present finding also interpret the perturbation effect of urea on host-guest complexes. In the presence of urea, the TICT emissive band of γ-CD is completely diminished. From, {sup 1}H NMR study it was observed that –NEt{sub 2} moiety of 7-DCCAE molecule is deeply buried inside the hydrophobic cavity of the CDs and forms host-guest complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurement also indicates the formation of 1:1 host-guest complexes.

  10. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-08-16

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high-power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. However, this mechanism is not ideal for creating the high-energy proton beams needed for future applications. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for exploring new regimes of ion acceleration. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we achieved a pure proton beam with evidence of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the possibility of transforming our liquid cryogenic

  11. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high-power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. However, this mechanism is not ideal for creating the high-energy proton beams needed for future applications. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for exploring new regimes of ion acceleration. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we achieved a pure proton beam with evidence of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the possibility of transforming our liquid cryogenic

  12. Screened ion-ion interaction in mercury-chain compounds: Single chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, M.M.; Griffin, A.

    1985-01-01

    At room temperature, the mercury chains in Hg/sub 3-delta/AsF 6 exhibit phonons characteristic of a one-dimensional lattice. We calculate the screening of the Hg ion-ion interaction in a single chain by electrons moving in a cylindrical potential of finite radius, within the random-phase approximation. The resulting Bohm-Staver-type expression for the phonon velocity is (Z 2 mN/sub I//MN/sub e/)/sup 1/2/v/sub F/, where Z is the Hg ionic charge and N/sub I/ (N/sub e/) is the number of ions (electrons) per unit length. Use of the Tomonaga-Luttinger solution for the electronic response function (keeping only the small-momentum scattering processes) just renormalizes the Fermi velocity in this expression

  13. Modelling interaction cross sections for intermediate and low energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toburen, L.H.; Shinpaugh, J.L.; Justiniano, E.L.B.

    2002-01-01

    When charged particles slow in tissue they undergo electron capture and loss processes than can have profound effects on subsequent interaction cross sections. Although a large amount of data exists for the interaction of bare charged particles with atoms and molecules, few experiments have been reported for these 'dressed' particles. Projectile electrons contribute to an impact-parameter-dependent screening of the projectile charge that precludes straightforward scaling of energy loss cross sections from those of bare charged particles. The objective of this work is to develop an analytical model for the energy-loss-dependent effects of screening on differential ionisation cross sections that can be used in track structure calculations for high LET ions. As a first step a model of differential ionisation cross sections for bare ions has been combined with a simple screening model to explore cross sections for intermediate and low energy dressed ions in collisions with atomic and molecular gas targets. The model is described briefly and preliminary results compared to measured electron energy spectra. (author)

  14. Divalent Ion Parameterization Strongly Affects Conformation and Interactions of an Anionic Biomimetic Polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, Michael D.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2016-03-10

    The description of peptides and the use of molecular dynamics simulations to refine structures and investigate the dynamics on an atomistic scale are well developed. Through a consensus in this community over multiple decades, parameters were developed for molecular interactions that only require the sequence of amino-acids and an initial guess for the three-dimensional structure. The recent discovery of peptoids will require a retooling of the currently available interaction potentials in order to have the same level of confidence in the predicted structures and pathways as there is presently in the peptide counterparts. Here we present modeling of peptoids using a combination of ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and atomistic resolution classical forcefield (FF) to span the relevant time and length scales. To properly account for the dominant forces that stabilize ordered structures of peptoids, namely steric-, electrostatic, and hydrophobic interactions mediated through sidechain-sidechain interactions in the FF model, those have to be first mapped out using high fidelity atomistic representations. A key feature here is not only to use gas phase quantum chemistry tools, but also account for solvation effects in the condensed phase through AIMD. One major challenge is to elucidate ion binding to charged or polar regions of the peptoid and its concomitant role in the creation of local order. Here, similar to proteins, a specific ion effect is observed suggesting that both the net charge and the precise chemical nature of the ion will need to be described. MDD was supported by MS3 (Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across Scales) Initiative at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Research was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. MDB acknowledges support from US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Material & Engineering. CJM acknowledges

  15. Hyperfine interaction studies with pulsed heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, P.

    1985-01-01

    Heavy-ion reactions using pulsed beams have had a strong impact on the study of hyperfine interactions. Unique advantages offered by this technique have considerably extended the scope, detail and systematic range of its applications beyond that possible with radioactivity or light-ion reaction. This survey will cover a brief description of the methodological aspects of the field and recent applications to selected problems in nuclear and solid state physiscs illustrating its role. These include measurements of nuclear magnetic and electric quadrupole moments of high spin isomers, measurements of hyperfine magnetic fields at impurities in 3d and rare-earths ferromagnetic hosts, studies of paramagnetic systems, especially those exhibiting valence instabilities, and investigations of electric field gradients of impurities in noncubic metals. Future prospects of this technique will be briefly assessed. (orig.)

  16. Defect-impurity interactions in ion-implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turos, A.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of defect-impurity interactions in metals is presented. When point defects become mobile they migrate towards the sinks and on the way can be captured by impurity atoms forming stable associations so-called complexes. In some metallic systems complexes can also be formed athermally during ion implantation by trapping point defects already in the collision cascade. An association of a point defect with an impurity atom leads to its displacement from the lattice site. The structure and stability of complexes are strongly temperature dependent. With increasing temperature they dissociate or grow by multiple defect trapping. The appearance of freely migrating point defects at elevated temperatures, due to ion bombardment or thermal annealing, causes via coupling with defect fluxes, important impurity redistribution. Because of the sensitivity of many metal-in-metal implanted systems to radiation damage the understanding of this processes is essential for a proper interpretation of the lattice occupancy measurements and the optimization of implantation conditions. (author)

  17. Resonance interaction of heavy ions in radar scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strutinskij, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Resonances on back angles in the process of scatterina of heavy ions are investigated. Comprehensive investigation into possible sources of irregular structure of angular distribution during elastic scattering (ES) on wide angles are compated with an experiment. The first source is a two-component interference and the second one is a resonance structure connected with the process of formation of definite nucleon states in strongly deformed intermediate nucleus. Comparison of radar cross section calculations (back scattering cross section) with angular ES distributions of hydrogen on silicon testifies a possibility to interpret an anomalous scattering on wide angles in some reactions with heavy ions as a result of modulation of partial amplitudes by resonances of the input state typein the initial state of interaction of two nuclei

  18. Influence of the interaction of ions-dust grains on ion acoustic wave and dust acoustic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Jianjun; Liu Jinyuan; Ma Tengcai

    2004-01-01

    Based on a set of hydrodynamic equations and a linear time-dependent perturbation theory, the influence of the interaction of ions-dust grains on ion acoustic wave IAW and dust acoustic wave DAW in dusty plasma is analyzed. The results show that the interaction makes IAW more stable and DAW less stable

  19. A simple model for low energy ion-solid interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohajerzadeh, S.; Selvakumar, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    A simple analytical model for ion-solid interactions, suitable for low energy beam depositions, is reported. An approximation for the nuclear stopping power is used to obtain the analytic solution for the deposited energy in the solid. The ratio of the deposited energy in the bulk to the energy deposited in the surface yields a ceiling for the beam energy above which more defects are generated in the bulk resulting in defective films. The numerical evaluations agree with the existing results in the literature. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  20. Study of highly charged ion production by electron cyclotron resonance ion source. Interactions of Argon 17+ ions with metallic surface at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, G.

    1992-04-01

    In this thesis divided in 2 parts, the author first presents the operating of MiniMafios 16/18 GHz ECR ion sources and methods of extracted multicharged ion identification and then, studies the highly charged ion interactions with a metallic surface and the formation of 'hollow atoms'. 556 figs., 17 tabs

  1. Twisted-Light-Ion Interaction: The Role of Longitudinal Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteiro, G. F.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand; Schmiegelow, Christian T.

    2017-12-01

    The propagation of light beams is well described using the paraxial approximation, where field components along the propagation direction are usually neglected. For strongly inhomogeneous or shaped light fields, however, this approximation may fail, leading to intriguing variations of the light-matter interaction. This is the case of twisted light having opposite orbital and spin angular momenta. We compare experimental data for the excitation of a quadrupole transition in a single trapped 40Ca+ ion from Schmiegelow et al. [Nat. Commun. 7, 12998 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms12998] with a complete model where longitudinal components of the electric field are taken into account. Our model matches the experimental data and excludes by 11 standard deviations the approximation of a complete transverse field. This demonstrates the relevance of all field components for the interaction of twisted light with matter.

  2. Thermodynamics of interactions between organic ammonium ions and sulfonatocalixarenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Lihua [Department of Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Guo Dongsheng [Department of Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Chen Yong [Department of Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Liu Yu [Department of Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)]. E-mail: yuliu@nankai.edu.cn

    2006-04-01

    Calorimetric titration and NMR experiments in aqueous phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at 298.15 K have been done to determine the binding mode, complex stability constants and thermodynamics ({delta}G{sup o}, {delta}H{sup o}, and T{delta}S{sup o}) for 1:1 inclusion complexation of water-soluble calix[n]arenesulfonates (CnAS, n = 4 and 6) and thiacalix[4]arene tetrasulfonate (TCAS) with acethylcholine, carnitine, betaine and benzyltrimethylammonium ion. The results show the inclusion complexations are driven by enthalpy ({delta}H{sup o} < 0), accompanied by negative entropic changes ({delta}S{sup o} < 0). The binding affinities (C4AS > C6AS > TCAS) are discussed from the viewpoint of CH-{pi}/{pi}-{pi} interactions, electrostatic interactions and size/shape-fit relationship between host and guest.

  3. Anisotropic exchange interaction for magnetic ion pairs in insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passeggi, M.C.G.

    1975-12-01

    The sources of possible contributions to the magnetic anisotropy for a pair of orbitally non degenerate magnetic ions are investigated. The problem being formulated with the help of the operator form of perturbation theory and irreducible tensor operators. Apart from the usual dipole-dipole effective interaction, mainly induced by the electronic spin-spin dipole coupling corrected by covalency, other mechanisms mediated by the spin-orbit coupling appear. These are a consequence of an appropriate description of the spin-orbit operators for a system which allows for delocalization of the magnetic electrons. A process similar to that known as pseudodipolar appears from contributions in which spin orbit combined with the Coulomb repulsion and with one-electron interactions (acting analogously as for the ''kinetic exchange'') produce compensating effects in third and fourth order, respectively. However, this effect does not appear to be describable in terms of the phenomenological exchange, as is usually assumed. (Passeggi, M.C.G.)

  4. Salt effects on hydrophobic interaction and charge screening in the folding of a negatively charged peptide to a coiled coil (leucine zipper).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelesarov, I; Dürr, E; Thomas, R M; Bosshard, H R

    1998-05-19

    The stability of a coiled coil or leucine zipper is controlled by hydrophobic interactions and electrostatic forces between the constituent helices. We have designed a 30-residue peptide with the repeating seven-residue pattern of a coiled coil, (abcdefg)n, and with Glu in positions e and g of each heptad. The glutamate side chains prevented folding at pH values above 6 because of electrostatic repulsion across the helix dimer interface as well as within the individual helices. Protonation of the carboxylates changed the conformation from a random coil monomer to a coiled coil dimer. Folding at alkaline pH where the peptide had a net charge of -7e was promoted by the addition of salts. The nature of the charge screening cation was less important than that of the anion. The high salt concentrations (>1 M) necessary to induce folding indicated that the salt-induced folding resulted from alterations in the protein-water interaction. Folding was promoted by the kosmotropic anions sulfate and fluoride and to a lesser extent by the weak kosmotrope formate, whereas chloride and the strong chaotrope perchlorate were ineffective. Kosmotropes are excluded from the protein surface, which is preferentially hydrated, and this promotes folding by strengthening hydrophobic interactions at the coiled coil interface. Although charge neutralization also contributed to folding, it was effective only when the screening cation was partnered by a good kosmotropic anion. Folding conformed to a two-state transition from random coil monomer to coiled coil dimer and was enthalpy driven and characterized by a change in the heat capacity of unfolding of 3.9 +/- 1.2 kJ mol-1 K-1. The rate of folding was analyzed by fluorescence stopped-flow measurements. Folding occurred in a biphasic reaction in which the rapid formation of an initial dimer (kf = 2 x 10(7) M-1 s-1) was followed by an equally rapid concentration-independent rearrangement to the folded dimer (k > 100 s-1).

  5. Biophysical aspects of heavy ion interactions in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wong, M.; Ludewigt, B.; Phillips, M.; Alpen, E.L.; Powers-Risius, P.; DeGuzman, R.J.; Townsend, L.W.; Wilson, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The biological effects of high energy, high charge nuclei (HZE particles) occupy a central role in the management of space radiation hazards due to galactic cosmic rays. For the energy range of interest, the mean free path for nuclear interactions of these heavy ions is comparable to the thickness of the material traversed, and a significant fraction of stopping particles will undergo a nuclear reaction with the nuclei of the stopping material. Transport methods for HZE particles are dependent on models of the interaction of man-made systems with the space environment to an even greater extent than methods used for other types of radiation. Hence, there is a major need to validate these transport codes by comparison with experimental data. The basic physical properties of HZE particles will be reviewed and illustrated with the results of nuclear fragmentation experiments performed with 670A MeV neon ions incident on a water absorber and with measurements of multiple Coulomb scattering of uranium beams in copper. Finally, the extent to which physical measurements yield radiobiological predictions is illustrated for the example of neon

  6. Interaction of relativistic H- ions with thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohagheghi, A.H.

    1990-09-01

    The response of relativistic H - ions to thin carbon foils was investigated for beam energies ranging from 226 MeV to 800 MeV. For the foil thicknesses we have studied, ranging from 15 to 300 μg/cm 2 , an appreciable fraction of the H - beam survives intact, some H - ions are stripped down to protons, and the remainder is distributed over the states of H 0 . This experiment is different from the low energy studies in that the projectile velocity is comparable to the speed of light, leading to an interaction time of typically less than a femtosecond. The present results challenge the theoretical understanding of the interaction mechanisms. An electron spectrometer was used to selectively field-ionize the Rydberg states, 9 < n < 17, at beam energies of 581 MeV and 800 MeV. The yield of low-lying states were measured by Doppler tuning a Nd:YAG laser to excite transitions to a Rydberg state which was then field-ionized and detected. A simple model is developed to fit the yield of each state as a function of foil thickness. The simple model is successful in predicting the general features of the yield data. However, the data are suggestive of a more complex structure in the yield curves. The yield of a given state depends strongly on the foil thickness, demonstrating that the excited states are formed during the passage of the ions through a foil. The optimum thickness to produce a given state increases with the principal quantum number of the state suggesting an excitation process which is at least pratially stepwise. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation are compared with the experimental data to estimate the distribution of the excited states coming out of a foil. The distributions of the excited states and their dependence on foil thickness are discussed

  7. Characterisation of nanomaterial hydrophobicity using engineered surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmet, Cloé; Valsesia, Andrea; Oddo, Arianna; Ceccone, Giacomo; Spampinato, Valentina; Rossi, François; Colpo, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.colpo@ec.europa.eu [Directorate Health, Consumer and Reference Materials, Consumer Products Safety Unit (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    Characterisation of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) is of outmost importance for the assessment of the potential risks arising from their extensive use. NMs display indeed a large variety of physico-chemical properties that drastically affect their interaction with biological systems. Among them, hydrophobicity is an important property that is nevertheless only slightly covered by the current physico-chemical characterisation techniques. In this work, we developed a method for the direct characterisation of NM hydrophobicity. The determination of the nanomaterial hydrophobic character is carried out by the direct measurement of the affinity of the NMs for different collectors. Each collector is an engineered surface designed in order to present specific surface charge and hydrophobicity degrees. Being thus characterised by a combination of surface energy components, the collectors enable the NM immobilisation with surface coverage in relation to their hydrophobicity. The experimental results are explained by using the extended DLVO theory, which takes into account the hydrophobic forces acting between NMs and collectors.

  8. Arginine side chain interactions and the role of arginine as a gating charge carrier in voltage sensitive ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Craig T.; Mason, Philip E.; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Dempsey, Christopher E.

    2016-02-01

    Gating charges in voltage-sensing domains (VSD) of voltage-sensitive ion channels and enzymes are carried on arginine side chains rather than lysine. This arginine preference may result from the unique hydration properties of the side chain guanidinium group which facilitates its movement through a hydrophobic plug that seals the center of the VSD, as suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. To test for side chain interactions implicit in this model we inspected interactions of the side chains of arginine and lysine with each of the 19 non-glycine amino acids in proteins in the protein data bank. The arginine guanidinium interacts with non-polar aromatic and aliphatic side chains above and below the guanidinium plane while hydrogen bonding with polar side chains is restricted to in-plane positions. In contrast, non-polar side chains interact largely with the aliphatic part of the lysine side chain. The hydration properties of arginine and lysine are strongly reflected in their respective interactions with non-polar and polar side chains as observed in protein structures and in molecular dynamics simulations, and likely underlie the preference for arginine as a mobile charge carrier in VSD.

  9. Cytokine–Ion Channel Interactions in Pulmonary Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Jürg; Hadizamani, Yalda; Borgmann, Michèle; Mohaupt, Markus; Männel, Daniela Narcissa; Moehrlen, Ueli; Lucas, Rudolf; Stammberger, Uz

    2018-01-01

    The lungs conceptually represent a sponge that is interposed in series in the bodies’ systemic circulation to take up oxygen and eliminate carbon dioxide. As such, it matches the huge surface areas of the alveolar epithelium to the pulmonary blood capillaries. The lung’s constant exposure to the exterior necessitates a competent immune system, as evidenced by the association of clinical immunodeficiencies with pulmonary infections. From the in utero to the postnatal and adult situation, there is an inherent vital need to manage alveolar fluid reabsorption, be it postnatally, or in case of hydrostatic or permeability edema. Whereas a wealth of literature exists on the physiological basis of fluid and solute reabsorption by ion channels and water pores, only sparse knowledge is available so far on pathological situations, such as in microbial infection, acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome, and in the pulmonary reimplantation response in transplanted lungs. The aim of this review is to discuss alveolar liquid clearance in a selection of lung injury models, thereby especially focusing on cytokines and mediators that modulate ion channels. Inflammation is characterized by complex and probably time-dependent co-signaling, interactions between the involved cell types, as well as by cell demise and barrier dysfunction, which may not uniquely determine a clinical picture. This review, therefore, aims to give integrative thoughts and wants to foster the unraveling of unmet needs in future research. PMID:29354115

  10. An Interaction of Rhamnolipids with Cu2+ Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Cieśla

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was focused on the description of interaction between Cu2+ ions and the 1:1 mono- and dirhamnolipid mixtures in the premicellar and aggregated state in water and 20 mM KCl solution at pH 5.5 and 6.0. The critical micelle concentration of biosurfactants was determined conductometrically and by the pH measurements. Hydrodynamic diameter and electrophoretic mobility were determined in micellar solutions using dynamic light scattering and laser Doppler electrophoresis, respectively. The copper immobilization by rhamnolipids, methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA was estimated potentiometrically for the Cu2+ to chelating agent molar ratio from 16:100 to 200:100. The degree of ion binding and the complex stability constant were calculated at a 1:1 metal to chelant molar ratio. The aggregates of rhamnolipids (diameter of 43–89 nm were negatively charged. Biosurfactants revealed the best chelating activities in premicellar solutions. For all chelants studied the degree of metal binding decreased with the increasing concentration of the systems. The presence of K+ lowered Cu2+ binding by rhamnolipids, but did not modify the complex stability significantly. Immobilization of Cu2+ by biosurfactants did not cause such an increase of acidification as that observed in MGDA and EDTA solutions. Rhamnolipids, even in the aggregated form, can be an alternative for the classic chelating agents.

  11. Heavy-ion interactions in relativistic mean-field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashdan, M.

    1996-01-01

    The interaction potential between spherical nuclei and the elastic scattering cross section are calculated within relativistic mean-field (linear and non-linear) models, using a generalized relativistic local density approximation. The nuclear densities are calculated self-consistently from the solution of the relativistic mean-field equations. It is found that both the linear and non-linear models predict the characteristic switching-over phenomenon of the heavy-ion nuclear potential, where the potential gets attraction with increasing energy up to some value where it reverses this behaviour. The non-linear NLC model predicts a deeper potential than the linear LW model. The elastic scattering cross section calculated within the non-linear NLC model is in better agreement with experiments than that calculated within the linear LW model. (orig.)

  12. Versatile computational capability for ion-solid interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, D.K.

    1976-01-01

    A two step calculating technique is used to determine the distribution of implanted ions in solids. First, the instantaneous ion depth distribution is determined at any given energy as the ions slow to a stop in the target material. Second, at each energy in the slowing-down process, the rate at which the ions deposit energy is determined

  13. Extended defects and hydrogen interactions in ion implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Sanjay

    The structural and electrical properties of extended defects generated because of ion implantation and the interaction of hydrogen with these defects have been studied in this work. Two distinct themes have been studied, the first where defects are a detrimental and the second where they are useful. In the first scenario, transient enhanced diffusion of boron has been studied and correlated with defect evolution studies due to silicon and argon ion implants. Spreading resistance profiles (SRP) correlated with deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements, reveal that a low anneal temperatures (TED at low anneal temperatures (550°C, the effect of hydrogen is lost, due to its out-diffusion. Moreover, due to catastrophic out-diffusion of hydrogen, additional damage is created resulting in deeper junctions in hydrogenated samples, compared to the non-hydrogenated ones. Comparing defect evolution due to Si and Ar ion implants at different anneal temperatures, while the type of defects is the same in the two cases, their (defect) dissolution occurs at lower anneal temperatures (˜850°C) for Si implants. Dissolution for Ar implants seems to occur at higher anneal temperatures. The difference has been attributed to the increased number of vacancies created by Ar to that of silicon implant. In second aspect, nano-cavity formation due to vacancy agglomeration has been studied by helium ion implantation and furnace anneal, where the effect of He dose, implant energy and anneal time have been processing parameters that have been varied. Cavities are formed only when the localized concentration of He is greater than 3 x 1020 cm-3. While at high implant doses, a continuous cavity layer is formed, at low implant doses a discontinuous layer is observed. The formation of cavities at low doses has been observed for the first time. Variation of anneal times reveal that cavities are initially facetted (for short anneal times) and tend to become spherical when annealed for

  14. Ion-molecule interactions in crossed-beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.G.

    1980-09-01

    Interactions of the ions N + , F + , and CO 2 + with H 2 and/or its isotopes were examined using the crossed-beam technique in the low ( + ( 3 P) + H 2 → NH + + H, complex formation dominates up to 1.9 eV and a substantial interaction occurs between all collision partners up to 3.6 eV. The distribution of N + scattered nonreactively from H 2 also showed a long-lived complex channel below 1.9 eV. The reaction F + ( 3 P) + H 2 →FH + + H proceeded by a direct reaction mechanism at 0.20 to 1.07 eV. The reaction CO 2 + + D 2 → DCO 2 + + D gives asymmetric product distributions at 0.27 eV and above, indicating a direct reaction mechanism. Results indicated that there are probably barriers in the exit channels for DCO 2 + , DCO + , and D 2 O + products. The electronic state distributions of the N + , F + , and CO 2 + beams was investigated using beam attenuation and total luminescence techniques

  15. Temperature Dependence of the Stability of Ion Pair Interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The occurrence of bridging water molecules between the ions ensures that the ions are not ... The structural features that render this thermostability ..... dehydrogenase single site mutant T198I from Thermus thermophilus with PDB ID 1BDM.

  16. Images of Complex Interactions of an Intense Ion Beam with Plasma Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam propagation in a background plasma is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because plasma electrons move in strong electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Computer simulation images of plasma interaction with an intense ion beam pulse are presented

  17. Effects on Ion Cyclotron Emission of the Orbit Topology Changes from the Wave-Particle Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellsten, T.; Holmstroem, K.; Johnson, T.; Bergkvist, T.; Laxaback, M.

    2006-01-01

    It is known that non-relaxed distribution functions can give rise to excitation of magnetosonic waves by ion cyclotron interactions when the distribution function increases with respect to the perpendicular velocity. We have found that in a toroidal plasma also collisional relaxed distribution functions of central peaked high-energy ions can destabilise magnetosonic eigenmodes by ion cyclotron interactions, due to the change in localisation of the orbits establishing inverted distribution functions with respect to energy along the characteristics describing the cyclotron interactions. This can take place by interactions with barely co-passing and marginally trapped high-energy ions at the plasma boundary. The interactions are enhanced by tangential interactions, which can also prevent the interactions to reach the stable part of the characteristics where they interact with more deeply trapped orbits. (author)

  18. The interaction of low energy ion beams with surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Armour, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Four of the most important physical processes which occur during ion plating and allied techniques (1) ion-induced (and energetic-atom-induced) desorption of adsorbed impurities from the substrate surface, (2) ion penetration and entrapment in the substrate and coating, (3) ion-induced sputtering of substrate and coating atoms and (4) recoil displacement of substrate and coating atoms leading to their intermixing. The ion and energetic atom energy range of importance is from thermal energies to the order of 1keV. Current understanding of these processes, supported by discussion of available experimental data, is reviewed. (Auth.)

  19. Heavy ion interactions in the TeV energy domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Stefan.

    1989-01-01

    Heavy-ion interactions at 60 and 200 A GeV have been studied at the CERN SPS. The energy flow in the pseudo-rapidity region >2.4 is studied with two sampling calorimeters in the WA80 experiment. It is concluded that the nuclear geometry plays an important role for energy flow in nucleus-nucleus collisions at these energies. The laser system for the gain control of the sampling calorimeters is described as well. A new emulsion technique for accurate angular measurements in the pseudo-rapidity region >1.3 used in the EMU01 experiment is described. With this technique the pseudo-rapidity distributions of relativistic singly charged particles are studied. The conclusion is that the geometry together with the fluctuations in participating nucleons, break-up of strings and decay of resonances can describe the obtained results. The standard emulsion technique is used to study the target fragmentation in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200 A GeV. It is found that a first order cascade correction alone is unable to explain the observed emulsion results on target related fragments. (author)

  20. Does an electronic continuum correction improve effective short-range ion-ion interactions in aqueous solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Ellen E.; van der Vegt, Nico F. A.

    2018-06-01

    Non-polarizable force fields for hydrated ions not always accurately describe short-range ion-ion interactions, frequently leading to artificial ion clustering in bulk aqueous solutions. This can be avoided by adjusting the nonbonded anion-cation or cation-water Lennard-Jones parameters. This approach has been successfully applied to different systems, but the parameterization is demanding owing to the necessity of separate investigations of each ion pair. Alternatively, polarization effects may effectively be accounted for using the electronic continuum correction (ECC) of Leontyev et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 8024 (2003)], which involves scaling the ionic charges with the inverse square-root of the water high-frequency dielectric permittivity. ECC has proven to perform well for monovalent salts as well as for divalent salts in water. Its performance, however, for multivalent salts with higher valency remains unexplored. The present work illustrates the applicability of the ECC model to trivalent K3PO4 and divalent K2HPO4 in water. We demonstrate that the ECC models, without additional tuning of force field parameters, provide an accurate description of water-mediated interactions between salt ions. This results in predictions of the osmotic coefficients of aqueous K3PO4 and K2HPO4 solutions in good agreement with experimental data. Analysis of ion pairing thermodynamics in terms of contact ion pair (CIP), solvent-separated ion pair, and double solvent-separated ion pair contributions shows that potassium-phosphate CIP formation is stronger with trivalent than with divalent phosphate ions.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrophobous ions at the liquid-liquid interfaces: case of dicarbollide anions as synergy agents and of ionic liquids as extracting medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrot, G.

    2008-01-01

    Based on molecular dynamics simulations, we first describe the distribution of dicarbollide salts (CCD - , Mn + ) in concentrated monophasic solutions (water, chloroform, octanol, nitrobenzene) and in the corresponding biphasic 'oil' - water solutions. We point to the importance of surface activity of the CCD - s and of their self-aggregation in water, with marked counterions effects, and we explain the synergistic effect of CCD - s in the Eu 3+ extraction by BTP ligands. In the second part of the thesis we report exploratory simulations on the extraction of Sr 2+ by 18-crown-6 to an hydrophobic ionic liquid ([BMI][PF6]), focusing on the liquid - liquid interface. Analogies and differences with a classical aqueous interface are outlined. (author)

  2. Extraction of highly charged ions from the Berlin Electron Beam Ion Trap for interactions with a gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.I.; Biedermann, C.; Radtke, R.; Fussmann, G.

    2006-01-01

    Highly charged ions are extracted from the Berlin Electron Beam Ion Trap for investigations of charge exchange with a gas target. The classical over-the-barrier model for slow highly charged ions describes this process, whereby one or more electrons are captured from the target into Rydberg states of the ion. The excited state relaxes via a radiative cascade of the electron to ground energy. The cascade spectra are characteristic of the capture state. We investigate x-ray photons emitted as a result of interactions between Ar 17+ ions at energies ≤5q keV with Ar atoms. Of particular interest is the velocity dependence of the angular momentum capture state l c

  3. Solvent effects on ion-receptor interactions in the presence of an external electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Martin; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2016-11-09

    In this work we investigated the influence of an external electric field on the arrangement of the solvent shells around ions interacting with a carbon-based receptor. Our survey reveals that the mechanism of interaction between a monoatomic ion and a π-type ion receptor varies by the variation in the solvent polarity, the nature of the ion, and the strength of the external field. The characteristics of the ion-surface interaction in nonpolar solvents are similar to those observed in a vacuum. However, in water, we identified two mechanisms. Soft and polarizable ions preferentially interact with the π-receptor. In contrast, two bonded states were found for hard ions. A fully solvated ion, weakly interacting with the receptor at weak field, and a strong π-complex at the strong-field regime were identified. An abrupt variation in the potential energy surface (PES) associated with the rearrangement of the solvation shell on the surface of the receptor induced by an external field was observed both in implicit and explicit solvent environments. The electric field at which the solvation shell breaks is proportional to the hardness of the ion as has been suggested recently based on experimental observations.

  4. Interaction of Hydroxyproline with Bivalent Metal Ions in Chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    The stability constants of the ML and ML2 complex species of some metal ions, namely beryllium(II) and cobalt(II), with hydroxyproline were ... metal ions have several significant applications in biological systems.3–20 Beryllium is one ... 1 filter paper for chromatography was used for the purpose of electrophoresis. An Elico ...

  5. An ion cooling and state characterization apparatus for studies of molecular ion dissociative interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Shihu; Vane, C R; Bannister, M E; Havener, C C; Meyer, F W; Krause, H F; Hettich, R L; Goeringer, D E; Van Berkel, G J

    2009-01-01

    An experimental capability is being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Multi-Charged Ion Research Facility (ORNL MIRF) to enable stored cooling and state characterization of molecular ions of essentially any mass. Ions selected from a variety of available sources are injected from the side into a 1.5 meter long electrostatic mirror trap, where excited internal states are cooled by radiative cooling. An electron beam target located near the middle of the ion-trap region, coupled with neutral fragment imaging detector systems at each end of the trap, permits state-specific studies of electron-molecular ion dissociation.

  6. Trajectory effects in multiply charged ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebius, H.; Huang, W.; Schuch, R.

    1999-01-01

    Ar ions of 4.3 keV q in were scattered at large angles (θ=75 degree sign ) from a clean oriented surface. By selecting Ar projectiles having a large ionization potential and by using a large scattering angle only ions scattered at the first atomic layer of the surface were detected. Scattered ion energy spectra show peaks of single scattering and double scattering of the Ar projectile ions from one or two surface Au atoms, and the distribution attributed to double collisions splits into two peaks when the scattering plane coincides with a crystallographic plane. Simulations with a MARLOWE code allowed for interpretation of the structure in the double collision peak by in-plane and zig-zag double collisions. Differences in the relative peak heights between the experiment and a MARLOWE simulation were partly explained by different neutralization probabilities with varying trajectories. Yield changes with increasing charge states show interesting possibilities for future experiments with highly charged ions

  7. Interactions of chlorphenesin and divalent metal ions with phosphodiesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelson, J; McMullen, J P

    1976-09-01

    Chlorphenesin inhibition of the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP by guinea-pig lung phosphodiesterase was reversed by the addition of exogenous magnesium ions. Chlorphenesin and theophylline inhibition of this enzyme was shown to be noncompetitive when the substrate concentration was low. Kinetic studies of the inhibition of beef heart phosphodiesterase by chlorphenesin and theophylline indicated that the substrate concentration was a factor in determining whether inhibition was competitive or noncompetitive. Calcium, cobalt and copper ions were inhibitory to guinea-pig lung phosphodiesterase. The inhibition due to chlorphenesin was partially reversed by low (40 mM or less) concentrations of barium ions; high concentrations of barium ions, or manganese ions, were inhibitory. The concentration of the divalent cation did not affect the type of inhibition that was observed.

  8. Observation of large-amplitude ion acoustic wave in microwave-plasma interaction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yugami, Noboru; Nishida, Yasushi

    1997-01-01

    Large amplitude ion acoustic wave, which is not satisfied with a linear dispersion relationship of ion acoustic wave, is observed in microwave-plasma interaction experiments. This ion acoustic wave is excited around critical density layer and begins to propagate to underdense region with a phase velocity one order faster than sound velocity C s , which is predicted by the linear theory, the phase velocity and the wave length of the wave decreases as it propagates. Finally, it converges to C s and strongly dumps. Diagnostic by the Faraday cup indicates that this ion acoustic wave is accompanied with a hot ion beam. (author)

  9. Ion acceleration from relativistic laser nano-target interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Laser-ion acceleration has been of particular interest over the last decade for fundamental as well as applied sciences. Remarkable progress has been made in realizing laser-driven accelerators that are cheap and very compact compared with conventional rf-accelerators. Proton and ion beams have been produced with particle energies of up to 50 MeV and several MeV/u, respectively, with outstanding properties in terms of transverse emittance and current. These beams typically exhibit an exponentially decaying energy distribution, but almost all advanced applications, such as oncology, proton imaging or fast ignition, require quasimonoenergetic beams with a low energy spread. The majority of the experiments investigated ion acceleration in the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) regime with comparably thick targets in the μm range. In this thesis ion acceleration is investigated from nm-scaled targets, which are partially produced at the University of Munich with thickness as low as 3 nm. Experiments have been carried out at LANL's Trident high-power and high-contrast laser (80 J, 500 fs, λ=1054 nm), where ion acceleration with these nano-targets occurs during the relativistic transparency of the target, in the so-called Breakout afterburner (BOA) regime. With a novel high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola and ion wide angle spectrometer, thickness dependencies of the ions angular distribution, particle number, average and maximum energy have been measured. Carbon C 6+ energies reached 650 MeV and 1 GeV for unheated and heated targets, respectively, and proton energies peaked at 75 MeV and 120 MeV for diamond and CH 2 targets. Experimental data is presented, where the conversion efficiency into carbon C 6+ (protons) is investigated and found to have an up to 10fold (5fold) increase over the TNSA regime. With circularly polarized laser light, quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions have been generated from the same nm-scaled foil targets at Trident with an

  10. Ion-surface interaction: simulation of plasma-wall interaction (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salou, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The wall materials of magnetic confinement in fusion machines are exposed to an aggressive environment; the reactor blanket is bombarded with a high flux of particles extracted from the plasma, leading to the sputtering of surface material. This sputtering causes wall erosion as well as plasma contamination problems. In order to control fusion reactions in complex reactors, it is thus imperative to well understand the plasma-wall interactions. This work proposes the study of the sputtering of fusion relevant materials. We propose to simulate the charged particles influx by few keV single-charged ion beams. This study is based on the catcher method; to avoid any problem of pollution (especially in the case of carbon) we designed a new setup allowing an in situ Auger electron spectroscopy analysis. The results provide the evolution of the angular distribution of the sputtering yield as a function of the ion mass (from helium to xenon) and its energy (from 3 keV to 9 keV). (author) [fr

  11. Students' Understanding of External Representations of the Potassium Ion Channel Protein, Part I: Affordances and Limitations of Ribbon Diagrams, Vines, and Hydrophobic/Polar Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    Research on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations. This project focuses on students' understanding of three external representations of the potassium ion channel protein. This is part I of a two-part study, which focuses on the affordances and…

  12. Origin of the correlation between the standard Gibbs energies of ion transfer from water to a hydrophobic ionic liquid and to a molecular solvent

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Langmaier, Jan; Záliš, Stanislav; Samec, Zdeněk; Bovtun, Viktor; Kempa, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, JAN 2013 (2013), s. 591-598 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/11/0707 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : ionic liquid s * cyclic voltammetry * standard Gibbs energy of ion transfer Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.086, year: 2013

  13. Interactions between poly(acrylic acid) and sodium dodecyl sulfate: isothermal titration calorimetric and surfactant ion-selective electrode studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Tam, K C

    2005-03-24

    Interaction between a monodispersed poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) (M(W) = 5670 g/mol, M(w)/M(n) = 1.02) with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), ion-selective electrode (ISE), and dynamic light scattering measurements. Contrary to previous studies, we report for the first time evidence of interaction between SDS and PAA when the degree of neutralization (alpha) of PAA is lower than 0.2. Hydrocarbon chains of SDS cooperatively bind to apolar segments of PAA driven by hydrophobic interaction. The interaction is both enthalpy and entropy favored (deltaH is negative but deltaS is positive). In 0.05 wt % PAA solution, the SDS concentration corresponding to the onset of binding (i.e., CAC) is approximately 2.4 mM and the saturation concentration (i.e., C(S)) is approximately 13.3 mM when alpha = 0. When PAA was neutralized and ionized, the binding was hindered by the enhanced electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged SDS and PAA chains and improved solubility of the polymer. With increasing alpha to 0.2, CAC increases to approximately 6.2 mM, C(S) drops to 8.6 mM, and the interaction is significantly weakened where the amount of bound SDS on PAA is reduced considerably. The values of CAC and C(S) derived from different techniques are in good agreement. The binding results in the formation of mixed micelles on apolar PAA coils, which then expands and dissociates into single PAA chains. The majority of unneutralized PAA molecules exist as single polymer chains stabilized by bound SDS micelles in solution after the saturation concentration.

  14. Ultra-relativistic ion acceleration in the laser-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yongsheng; Wang Naiyan; Tang Xiuzhang; Shi Yijin; Xueqing Yan

    2012-01-01

    An analytical relativistic model is proposed to describe the relativistic ion acceleration in the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with thin-foil plasmas. It is found that there is a critical value of the ion momentum to make sure that the ions are trapped by the light sail and accelerated in the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) region. If the initial ion momentum is smaller than the critical value, that is in the classical case of RPA, the potential has a deep well and traps the ions to be accelerated, as the same described before by simulation results [Eliasson et al., New J. Phys. 11, 073006 (2009)]. There is a new ion acceleration region different from RPA, called ultra-relativistic acceleration, if the ion momentum exceeds the critical value. In this case, ions will experience a potential downhill. The dependence of the ion momentum and the self-similar variable at the ion front on the acceleration time has been obtained. In the ultra-relativistic limit, the ion momentum at the ion front is proportional to t 4/5 , where t is the acceleration time. In our analytical hydrodynamical model, it is naturally predicted that the ion distribution from RPA is not monoenergetic, although the phase-stable acceleration mechanism is effective. The critical conditions of the laser and plasma parameters which identify the two acceleration modes have been achieved.

  15. Ultra-relativistic ion acceleration in the laser-plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yongsheng; Wang Naiyan; Tang Xiuzhang; Shi Yijin [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Xueqing Yan [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-09-15

    An analytical relativistic model is proposed to describe the relativistic ion acceleration in the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with thin-foil plasmas. It is found that there is a critical value of the ion momentum to make sure that the ions are trapped by the light sail and accelerated in the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) region. If the initial ion momentum is smaller than the critical value, that is in the classical case of RPA, the potential has a deep well and traps the ions to be accelerated, as the same described before by simulation results [Eliasson et al., New J. Phys. 11, 073006 (2009)]. There is a new ion acceleration region different from RPA, called ultra-relativistic acceleration, if the ion momentum exceeds the critical value. In this case, ions will experience a potential downhill. The dependence of the ion momentum and the self-similar variable at the ion front on the acceleration time has been obtained. In the ultra-relativistic limit, the ion momentum at the ion front is proportional to t{sup 4/5}, where t is the acceleration time. In our analytical hydrodynamical model, it is naturally predicted that the ion distribution from RPA is not monoenergetic, although the phase-stable acceleration mechanism is effective. The critical conditions of the laser and plasma parameters which identify the two acceleration modes have been achieved.

  16. Towards understanding hydrophobic recovery of plasma treated polymers: Storing in high polarity liquids suppresses hydrophobic recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Chaniel, Gilad; Grynyov, Roman

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of hydrophobic recovery was studied for cold air plasma treated polyethylene films. Plasma-treated polymer films were immersed into liquids with very different polarities such as ethanol, acetone, carbon tetrachloride, benzene and carbon disulphide. Hydrophobic recovery was studied by measurement of contact angles. Immersion into high polarity liquids slows markedly the hydrophobic recovery. We relate this slowing to dipole–dipole interaction of polar groups of the polymer with those of the liquids. This kind of interaction becomes decisive when polar groups of polymer chains are at least partially spatially fixed.

  17. Electron-Ion Beam Coupling Through Collective Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wheelock, Adrian; Cooke, David L; Gatsonis, Nikolaos A

    2006-01-01

    .... It is shown that Coulomb collisions, which can act to match velocities through strong ion-electron collisions between particles with low relative velocities, are far too slow to explain the phenomenon...

  18. Versatile computational capability for ion-solid interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, D.K.

    1976-01-01

    A computational technique for calculating distributions of particles, energy, and damage that result when solids are bombarded with ions is described. The technique can be applied to weapons and energy projects

  19. A 2-100 keV, UHV ion impact spectrometer for ion-solid interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, J.A. Van den; Armour, D.G.; Verheij, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    A 2 to 100 keV ion accelerator has been constructed as part of an ion impact spectrometer in which a number of analytical techniques have been combined to allow a comprehensive study of the interaction of low- and medium-energy ions with solids to be carried out under carefully controlled conditions. The overall requirements of the ion beam system in terms of ion species, beam purity, uniformity, energy spread and intensity were dictated by the interest in carrying out low-energy ion scattering, Rutherford back-scattering and thermal desorption experiments. The accelerator design utilises the principle of low-energy extraction and mass analysis, and post-acceleration up to the required high energy. The ions are produced in a duoplasmatron ion source and a parallel beam is obtained after mass selection, utilising a quadrupole triplet lens in conjunction with a 60 0 stigmatic focusing magnetic analyser. Proton and rare gas ion beams of 1 to 100 nA are routinely obtained on target. The 54 cm diameter, UHV target chamber is pumped by a 270 1 s -1 turbo-molecular pump in conjunction with an in-line titanium sublimator, and typical base pressures of 1 to 4 x 10 -11 Torr are achieved. The target is supported in a precision, three-axis goniometer and the detection system, at present comprising a 90 mm mean diameter hemispherical energy analyser and channel electron multiplier, is mounted on a two-axis manipulator. Preliminary measurements using the system have employed the low-energy ion scattering technique to study the oxidation of a Ni(110) surface. (author)

  20. Incident ion charge state dependence of electron emission during slow multicharged ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, I.G.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Overbury, S.H.; Robinson, M.T.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    Characteristic variations in the total electron yield γ as a function of crystal azimuthal orientation are reported for slow N 2+ , N 5+ and N 6+ ions incident on a Au(011) single crystal, together with measurements of γ as a function of incident ion velocity. Kinetic electron emission is shown to arise predominantly in close collisions between incident ions and target atoms, and potential electron emission is found to be essentially constant within our present velocity range. The incident ion charge state is shown to play no role in kinetic electron emission. Extremely fast neutralization times of the order of 10 - 15 secs are needed to explain the observations

  1. Cluster observations of trapped ions interacting with magnetosheath mirror modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soucek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mirror modes are among the most intense low frequency plasma wave phenomena observed in the magnetosheaths of magnetized planets. They appear as large amplitude non-propagating fluctuations in the magnetic field magnitude and plasma density. These structures are widely accepted to represent a non-linear stage of the mirror instability, dominant in plasmas with large ion beta and a significant ion temperature anisotropy T⊥/T∥>1. It has long been recognized that the mirror instability both in the linear and non-linear stage is a kinetic process and that the behavior of resonant particles at small parallel velocities is crucial for its development and saturation. While the dynamics of the instability and the effect of trapped particles have been studied extensively in theoretical models and numerical simulations, only spurious observations of the trapped ions were published to date. In this work we used data from the Cluster spacecraft to perform the first detailed experimental study of ion velocity distribution associated with mirror mode oscillations. We show a conclusive evidence for the predicted cooling of resonant ions at small parallel velocities and heating of trapped ions at intermediate pitch angles.

  2. Investigation of Ion-Solvent Interactions in Nonaqueous Electrolytes Using in Situ Liquid SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Su, Mao; Yu, Xiaofei; Zhou, Yufan; Wang, Jungang; Cao, Ruiguo; Xu, Wu; Wang, Chongmin; Baer, Donald R.; Borodin, Oleg; Xu, Kang; Wang, Yanting; Wang, Xue-Lin; Xu, Zhijie; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2018-02-06

    Ion-solvent interactions in non-aqueous electrolytes are of fundamental interest and practical importance, yet debates regarding ion preferential solvation and coordination numbers persist. In this work, in situ liquid SIMS was used to examine ion-solvent interactions in three representative electrolytes, i.e., lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) at 1.0 M in ethylene carbonate (EC)-dimethyl carbonate (DMC), and lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) at both low (1.0 M) and high (4.0 M) concentrations in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME). In the positive ion mode, solid molecular evidence strongly supports the preferential solvation of Li+ by EC. Besides, from the negative spectra, we also found that PF6- forms association with EC, which has been neglected by previous studies due to the relatively weak interaction. While in both LiFSI in DME electrolytes, no evidence shows that FSI- is associated with DME. Furthermore, strong salt ion cluster signals were observed in the 1.0 M LiPF6 in EC-DMC electrolyte, suggesting that a significant amount of Li+ ions stay in vicinity of anions. In sharp comparison, weak ion cluster signals were detected in dilute LiFSI in DME electrolyte, suggesting most ions are well separated, in agreement with our molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results. These findings indicate that with virtues of little bias on detecting positive and negative ions and the capability of directly analyzing concentrated electrolytes, in situ liquid SIMS is a powerful tool that can provide key evidence for improved understanding on the ion-solvent interactions in non-aqueous electrolytes. Therefore, we anticipate wide applications of in situ liquid SIMS on investigations of various ion-solvent interactions in the near future.

  3. Hypothetical interaction mechanisms for heavy-ion collisions between 20 and 50 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, C.; Dalili, D.; Lucas, R.

    1985-01-01

    A brief survey of some aspects of heavy-ion interaction mechanisms, at bombarding energies between 20 and 50 MeV/u is presented. The maximum energy content of a nuclear system, the most probable linear momentum transfer and the possible existence of a ''calefaction'' phenomenon in heavy-ion collisions have also been investigated

  4. Ion beam-plasma interactions. Final report, September 1, 1983-August 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGroot, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design experiments that model the fast ion plasma interaction region in a heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion (HIF) pellet. The effort consisted of (1) construction and testing of the experimental device and (2) preliminary experiments. The results of this work are reported

  5. Modelling the interaction of high energy ions with inert matter, living matter, and moving matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuve, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In this report for accreditation to supervise research (HDR), the author proposes a synthetic (and however relatively detailed) overview of his research works in the fields of physics and radiology. The first part addresses works in the field of interaction between ions and inert matter (Monte Carlo simulation of emission induced by ion-solid interaction, simulation by molecular dynamics of pulverization). The second part addresses the interaction between ions and living matter: research strategy, principle of the Local Effect Model (LEM) and influence of its main parameters, LEM experimental assessment, LEM theoretical analysis, role of the cell oxidizing and anti-oxidizing system. The next part addresses the interaction of ions with moving matter: research strategy, lung mechanics modelling and clinical assessments, chest wall mechanics, transformation of movements simulated in 4D scanner imagery

  6. The ion–aerosol interactions from the ion mobility and aerosol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-02-18

    aerosol interactions from the ion mobility and aerosol particle size distribution measurements on January 17 and February 18, 2005 at Maitri, Antarctica – A case study. Devendraa Siingh Vimlesh Pant A K Kamra. Volume 120 Issue 4 August ...

  7. Interaction of heavy ions with hot ionized matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Dietrich, K.G.; Laux, W.; Boggasch, E.; Mahrt-Olt, K.; Wahl, H.; Golubev, A.A.; Dubenkov, V.P.

    1991-01-01

    The energy loss of heavy ions in a hydrogen plasma has been measured in an energy range from 1.4 to 6 MeV/u. A z-pinch has been used as a plasma target with a maximum free electron density of 1.5x10 19 cm -3 . Our data show a strong enhancement of the stopping power of the plasma compared to that of a cold gas with equal density. Charge state analysis of the ions also show a higher charge state of the ions in the plasma target, relative to the cold hydrogen gas targets. A plasma lens effect of the high power z-pinch discharge was observed in our experiments. (orig.)

  8. Slow, target associated particles produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamovich, M I; Aggarwal, M M; Alexandrov, Y A; Andreeva, N P; Anson, Z V; Arora, R; Avetyan, F A; Badyal, S K; Basova, E; Bhalla, K B; Bhasin, A; Bhatia, V S; Bogdanov, V G; Bubnov, V I; Burnett, T H; Cai, X; Chasnikov, I Y; Chernova, L P; Chernyavsky, M M; Dressel, B; Eligbaeva, G Z; Eremenko, L E; Friedlander, E M; Gaitinov, A S; Ganssauge, E R; Garpman, S; Gerassimov, S G; Grote, J; Gulamov, K G; Gupta, S K; Gupta, V; Heckman, H H; Huang, H; Jakobsson, B; Judek, B; Kachroo, S; Kadyrov, F G; Kalyachkina, G S; Kanygina, E K; Karabova, M; Kaul, G L; Kaur, M; Kharlamov, S P; Koss, Y; Krasnov,; Kumar,; Lal, P; Larionova,; Lepetan,; Lindstrom,; Liu,; Lokanathan, S; Lord, J; Lukicheva, N S; Luo, S B; Mangotra, L K; Marutyan,; Maslennikova, N V; Mittra, I S; Mookerjee, S; Mueller, C; Nasrulaeva, H; Nasyrov, S H; Navotny, V S; Orlova, G I; Otterlund, I; Palsania, H S; Peresadko, N G; Petrov, N V; Plyushchev, V A; Qian, W Y; Raniwala,; EMU01 Collaboration

    1991-06-20

    The slow, target associated particles produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion interactions are a quantitative probe of the cascading processes in the spectator parts of the target nucleus. These processes are directly influenced by the proper timescale for the formation of hadronic matter. In this letter we show experimental data on singly and multiply charged particles, with velocities smaller than 0.7c, produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion interactions in nuclear emulsion. (orig.).

  9. Electronic excitation effects on secondary ion emission in highly charged ion-solid interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekioka, T.; Terasawa, M.; Mitamura, T.; Stoeckli, M.P.; Lehnert, U.; Fehrenbach, C.

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the secondary ion emission from the surface of conductive materials bombarded by highly charged heavy ions, we have done two types of experiments. First, we have measured the yield of the sputtered ions from the surface of solid targets of conductive materials (Al, Si, Ni, Cu) bombarded by Xe q+ (q=15-44) at 300 keV (v p =0.30 a.u) and at 1.0 MeV (v p =0.54 a.u). In view of the secondary ion yields as a function of the potential energy of the projectile, the increase rates below q=35, where the potential energy amounts to 25.5 keV, were rather moderate and showed a prominent increase above q=35. These phenomena were rather strong in the case of the metal targets. Second, we have measured the energy dependence of the yield of the sputtered ions from the surface of solid targets of conductive materials (C, Al) bombarded by Xe q+ (q=30,36,44) between 76 keV (v p =0.15 a.u) and 6.0 MeV (v p =1.3 a.u). A broad enhancement of the secondary ion yield has been found for Al target bombarded by Xe 44+ . From these experimental results, the electronic excitation effects in conductive materials for impact of slow highly charged heavy ions bearing high potential energy is discussed

  10. Heavy ion particle beam interaction with a hot ionized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dei-Cas, R.; Bardy, J.; Beuve, M.A.; Laget, J.P.; Menier, A.; Renaud, M.

    1983-03-01

    The present status of the experimental facility consisting of a heavy ion beam travelling through a laser created plasma target is described. Some aspects such as laser-tandem coupling, beam performances, constraints on the plasma parameter ranges, plasma and beam diagnostics are analyzed

  11. KX radiation of quasi-molecules in heavy ion interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaun, K.G.

    1976-01-01

    The object of investigation is the KX radiation of quasimolecules produced at collision of heavy ions with atoms. In collision, electron may change their states adiabatically and form, at sufficiently small distances R between nuclei, quasimolecular states, which transform, in the limiting case of R → 0, to the states of a quasiatom with an atomic number of Z = Z 1 + Z 2 , where Z 1 and Z 2 are the atomic numbers of the heavy ion and atom. The discussion is restricted to collision experiments of Z = Z 1 + Z 2 > 50. The obtained and published data on the systems Ni+Ni, Nb+Nb, Zr+Nb, La+La, La+Xe, Pb+Pb, and Bi+Bi are analyzed. At a sufficiently high ion energy, one observes an asymmetry of a quasimolecular spectrum, the asymmetry having maximum in the range of the characteristic KX energy of a quasiatom. Data on the absolute yield Y(Ksub(α)) of individual high-energy components of X-rays excited on collision of heavy ions are presented. A considerable drop in yield Y(Ksub(α)) with increasing Z is noted

  12. Electron emission during multicharged ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Meyer, F.W.; Zehner, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Recent measurements of electron spectra for slow multicharged N ion-surface collisions are presented. The emphasis is on potential emission, i.e. the electron emission related to the neutralization of the ions. When using N ions that carry a K shell vacancy into the collision, characteristic K Auger electron emission from the projectiles is observed, as well as, for specific surfaces, target atom Auger transitions (resulting from vacancy transfer). Measurements of the intensity of these Auger transitions as a function of the time the ions spend above the surface can serve as a useful probe of the timescales characterizing the relevant neutralization processes. This technique is elucidated with the help of some computer simulations. It is shown that neutralization timescales required in the atomic ladder picture, in which neutralization takes place by resonant capture followed by purely intra-atomic Auger transitions, are too long to explain our experimental results. The introduction of additional neutralization/de-excitation mechanisms in the simulations leads to much better agreement with the experiments

  13. Cluster observations of trapped ions interacting with magnetosheath mirror modes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, Jan; Escoubet, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, - (2011), s. 1049-1060 ISSN 0992-7689 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : mirror mode waves * trapped particles * magnetosheath ions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.842, year: 2011 http://www.ann-geophys.net/29/1049/2011/angeo-29-1049-2011.pdf

  14. Retention prediction and hydrophobicity estimation of weak acidic compounds by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using acetic and perchloric acids as ion suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shu-ying; Ming, Xin; Qi, Zheng-chun; Sheng, Dong; Lian, Hong-zhen

    2010-11-01

    Simple acids are usually applied to suppress the ionization of weakly ionizable acidic analytes in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The purpose of this study is to investigate the retention behavior of various weak acidic compounds (monoprotic, diprotic, triprotic, and tetraprotic acids) using acetic or perchloric acid as ion suppressor in a binary hydroorganic mobile phase. The apparent n-octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)") was proposed to calibrate the n-octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) of weak acidic compound. LogK(ow)" was found to have a better linear correlation with logk(w), the logarithm of the retention factor obtained by extrapolating to neat aqueous fraction of the mobile phase, for all weakly ionizable acidic compounds. This straightforward relationship offers a potential medium for direct measurement of K(ow) data of weak acidic analytes and can be used to predict retention behavior of these compounds in the ion suppression reversed-phase liquid chromatographic mode.

  15. Is Br2 hydration hydrophobic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Torres, A; Gamboa-Suárez, A; Bernal-Uruchurtu, M I

    2017-02-28

    The spectroscopic properties of bromine in aqueous systems suggest it can behave as either hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute. In small water clusters, the halogen bond and the hydrogen-halogen interaction are responsible for its specific way of binding. In water hydrates, it is efficiently hosted by two different cages forming the crystal structure and it has been frequently assumed that there is little or no interaction between the guest and the host. Bromine in liquid solution poses a challenging question due to its non-negligible solubility and the large blue shift measured in its absorption spectra. Using a refined semi-empirical force field, PM3-PIF, we performed a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study of bromine in liquid water. Here we present a detailed study in which we retrieved the most representative hydration structures in terms of the most frequent positions around bromine and the most common water orientations. Albeit being an approximate description of the total hydration phenomenon, it captures the contribution of the leading molecular interactions in form of the recurrent structures. Our findings confirm that the spectroscopic signature is mainly caused by the closest neighbors. The dynamics of the whole first hydration shell strongly suggests that the external molecules in that structure effectively isolate the bulk from the presence of bromine. The solvation structure fluctuates from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic-like environment along the studied trajectory.

  16. Interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with metal ions in micellar medium using fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujar, Varsha; Pundge, Vijaykumar; Ottoor, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Steady state and life time fluorescence spectroscopy have been employed to study the interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with biologically important metal ions i.e. Cu 2+ , Fe 2+ , Ni 2+ and Zn 2+ in various micellar media (anionic SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate), nonionic TX-100 (triton X-100) and cationic CTAB (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide)). It was observed that fluorescence properties of drug remain unaltered in the absence of micellar media with increasing concentration of metal ions. However, addition of Cu 2+ , Fe 2+ and Ni 2+ caused fluorescence quenching of amiloride in the presence of anionic micelle, SDS. Binding of drug with metal ions at the charged micellar interface could be the possible reason for this pH-dependent metal-mediated fluorescence quenching. There were no remarkable changes observed due to metal ions addition when drug was present in cationic and nonionic micellar medium. The binding constant and bimolecular quenching constant were evaluated and compared for the drug–metal complexes using Stern–Volmer equation and fluorescence lifetime values. - Highlights: • Interaction of amiloride with biologically important metal ions, Fe 2+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ and Zn 2+ . • Monitoring the interaction in various micelle at different pH by fluorescence spectroscopy. • Micelles acts as receptor, amiloride as transducer and metal ions as analyte in the present system. • Interaction study provides pH dependent quenching and binding mechanism of drug with metal ions

  17. Aqua-vanadyl ion interaction with Nafion® membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar eMurugesan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lack of comprehensive understanding about the interactions between Nafion membrane and battery electrolytes prevents the straightforward tailoring of optimal materials for redox flow battery applications. In this work, we analyzed the interaction between aqua-vanadyl cation and sulfonic sites within the pores of Nafion membranes using combined theoretical and experimental X-ray spectroscopic methods. Molecular level interactions namely solvent share and contact pair mechanisms are discussed based on Vanadium and Sulfur K-edge spectroscopic analysis.

  18. Ion beam profiling from the interaction with a freestanding 2D layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Shorubalko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen a great potential of the focused ion beam (FIB technology for the nanometer-scale patterning of a freestanding two-dimensional (2D layer. Experimentally determined sputtering yields of the perforation process can be quantitatively explained using the binary collision theory. The main peculiarity of the interaction between the ion beams and the suspended 2D material lies in the absence of collision cascades, featured by no interaction volume. Thus, the patterning resolution is directly set by the beam diameters. Here, we demonstrate pattern resolution beyond the beam size and precise profiling of the focused ion beams. We find out that FIB exposure time of individual pixels can influence the resultant pore diameter. In return, the pore dimension as a function of the exposure dose brings out the ion beam profiles. Using this method of determining an ion-beam point spread function, we verify a Gaussian profile of focused gallium ion beams. Graphene sputtering yield is extracted from the normalization of the measured Gaussian profiles, given a total beam current. Interestingly, profiling of unbeknown helium ion beams in this way results in asymmetry of the profile. Even triangular beam shapes are observed at certain helium FIB conditions, possibly attributable to the trimer nature of the beam source. Our method of profiling ion beams with 2D-layer perforation provides more information on ion beam profiles than the conventional sharp-edge scan method does.

  19. RKKY interaction between Ce ions in CexLa1-xB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlottmann, P.

    2000-01-01

    Ce ions in (Ce x La 1-x )B 6 have a Γ 8 ground multiplet, which is fourfold degenerate and has orbital and spin content. The interaction between Ce ions is of the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) type, which competes with the Kondo screening. The conduction states of the compound are described by three approximately ellipsoidal pockets centered at the X points of the cubic lattice. The RKKY interaction is calculated considering the interference of the three pockets. The interaction strength strongly depends on the relative position of the ions, as well as on the relative orientation of the line joining two ions to the cubic crystalline field axis. The sixteen states of a pair of Ce ions are split by the RKKY interaction into a singlet, a triplet, and a twelvefold degenerate level. The ground state is always either a singlet or a triplet, depending on the sign of the interaction. Using the exact Bethe ansatz solution of a model for a pair of interacting impurities with Γ 8 ground multiplet, we calculate the occupation of the levels, the magnetic-field susceptibility, the specific-heat γ coefficient, and the Wilson ratio for the ground state as a function of the ratio of the RKKY coupling strength to the Kondo temperature along the main crystallographic directions. As a consequence of the RKKY splitting a pair of impurities always has a quadrupolar moment. The implication of the interactions on the quadrupolar order of CeB 6 is also discussed

  20. Interaction of He+2 ions with hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afrosimov, V.V.; Leiko, G.A.; Panov, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    Cross sections for all elementary reactions involving a change in charge state in He +2 -H 2 collisions have been measured for He +2 kinetic energies in the range E=1.2--100 keV. Measurements were carried out by distinguishing an individual collision by a coincidence method and by simultaneously analyzing the charge states of the fast and slow particles. Furthermore, in the same event, the electronic states of the particles after the collision were determined by analyzing the kinetic energies of the resulting ions. The elementary reactions involving the formation of He + ions in the ground and excited states were studied. The reactions involving transitions in the hydrogen molecule to the 1ssigma/sub g/ and 2psigma/sub u/ states of H 2 + ions, and reactions in which wto protons are formed, were also studied. At E>15 keV, the largest cross section is that corresponding to one-electron capture: He +2 +H 2 →He + +H 2 + (this cross section is sigma=8.3 x 10 -16 cm 2 at E=50 keV). In this reaction, 90--98% of the He + ions are formed in excited states with principal quantum number n=2. At E + ion predominates, accompanied by the simultaneous dissociation of the H 2 + ion: He +2 +H 2 →He + (1s)+H + H+H0+e - . The cross section for this exothermic capture with dissociation (the energy released is ΔEapprox. =+36.3--3.8 eV) increases with decreasing energy E. At E>15 keV, an endothermic pathway is predominant: →He + (2s,2p)+H + +H+0+e - (the energy expended, ΔE, is more than 3.2 eV). The existence of two capture reactions with dissociation - exothermic and endothermic - leads to a minimum in the cross section for this reaction, at Eapprox. =15 keV. Ionization reactions and ionization with dissociation have the smallest cross sections

  1. Effects of hydrophobic drug-polyesteric core interactions on drug loading and release properties of poly(ethylene glycol)-polyester-poly(ethylene glycol) triblock core-shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoee, Sepideh; Hassanzadeh, Salman; Goliaie, Bahram

    2007-01-01

    BAB amphiphilic triblock copolymers consisting of poly(ethylene glycol) (B) (PEG) as the hydrophilic segment and different polyesters (A) as the hydrophobic block were prepared by a polycondensation reaction as efficient model core-shell nanoparticles to assay the effect of interactions between the hydrophobic drug and the polyesteric core in terms of drug loading content and release profile. PEG-poly(hexylene adipate)-PEG (PEG-PHA-PEG) and PEG-poly(butylene adipate)-PEG (PEG-PBA-PEG) to PEG-poly(ethylene adipate)-PEG (PEG-PEA-PEG) core-shell type nanoparticles entrapping quercetin (an anticarcinogenic, allergy inhibitor and antibacterial agent), were prepared by a nanoprecipitation method and characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. It was found that the obtained nanoparticles showed a smooth surface and spherical shape with controllable sizes in the range of 64-74 nm, while drug loading varied from 7.24% to 19% depending on the copolymer composition and the preparation conditions. The in vitro release behaviour exhibited a sustained release and was affected by the polymer-drug interactions. UV studies revealed the presence of hydrogen bonding as the main existing interaction between quercetin and polyesters in the nanosphere cores

  2. Novel lanthanide doped micro- and mesoporous solids. Characterization of ion-host-interactions, species distribution and luminescence properties using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessner, Andre

    2010-12-01

    easily accessible for water and thus show shorter luminescence decay times and a more symmetrical coordination sphere, which is mostly made up by water molecules. Another investigated aspect was the influence of surface modifications on the luminescence behavior of the lanthanide ions inside the material. Here we could show, that surface modifications hydrophobize the material and thus are able to protect the lanthanide ions from water, which is important for the conservation of the luminescence properties. Concerning the mesoporous silicates, again a heterogeneous distribution of the lanthanide ions in the pore system was found. A part of the lanthanide ions interacts with the pore wall, while the other part is located in the aqueous phase inside the pores. Surface modification led to a interaction of the lanthanide ions with the modification. This was reflected in the luminescence properties depending on the structure of the modification and the surface loading.

  3. A novel method to survey parameters of an ion beam and its interaction with a target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J. D.; Yang, Z.; Li, J.; Wang, X. H.; Wang, T.; Lan, C. H.; Dong, P.; Li, X.; He, J. L.; Zheng, L.; Liu, P.

    2017-09-01

    Beam profile and composition of the pulsed ion beam from a vacuum arc source are valuable information for designing a high-intensity deuterium-tritium neutron generator. Traditional methods are notoriously difficult to obtain the information at the same time. A novel off-line diagnostic method is presented, which can obtain the transverse beam profile with high resolution as well as species of the ions in the beam. The method is using a silicon target with high purity to interact with the ion beam, and then use secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyze the interaction zone of the target to get the beam information. More information on beam-target interaction could get simultaneously. Proof-of-principle simulation and experimental works have demonstrated this method is practical.

  4. The interaction of uranyl ions with inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienwald, B.; Heitmann, P.

    1978-01-01

    The interaction of uranyl ions with inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast was investigated by measurement of their effect on the protein fluorescence. Fluorescence titrations of the native enzyme with uranyl nitrate show that there is a specific binding of uranyl ions to the enzyme. It was deduced that each subunit of the enzyme binds one uranyl ion. The binding constant was estimated to be in the order of 10 7 M -1 . The enzyme which contains a small number of chemically modified carboxyl groups was not able to bind uranyl ions specifically. The modification of carboxyl groups was carried out by use of a water soluble carbodiimide and the nucleophilic reagent N-(2,4-dinitro-phenyl)-hexamethylenediamine. The substrate analogue calcium pyrophosphate displaced the uranyl ions from their binding sites at the enzyme From the results it is concluded that carboxyl groups of the active site are the ligands for the binding of uranyl ions. (author)

  5. Control of ion beam generation in intense short pulse laser target interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, T.; Izumiyama, T.; Barada, D.; Kawata, S.; Gu, Y.J.; Wang, W.M.; Ma, Y.Y.; Kong, Q.

    2013-01-01

    In intense laser plasma interaction, several issues still remain to be solved for future laser particle acceleration. In this paper we focus on a control of generation of high-energy ions. In this study, near-critical density plasmas are employed and are illuminated by high intensity short laser pulses; we have successfully generated high-energy ions, and also controlled ion energy and the ion energy spectrum by multiple-stages acceleration. We performed particle-in-cell simulations in this paper. The first near-critical plasma target is illuminated by a laser pulse, and the ions accelerated are transferred to the next target. The next identical target is also illuminated by another identical large pulse, and the ion beam introduced is further accelerated and controlled. In this study four stages are employed, and finally a few hundreds of MeV of protons are realized. A quasi-monoenergetic energy spectrum is also obtained. (author)

  6. Resonant interactions between cometary ions and low frequency electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1987-01-01

    The conditions for resonant wave amplification in a plasma with a ring-beam distribution which is intended to model pick-up ions in a cometary environment are investigated. The inclination between the interplanetary field and the solar wind is found to play a crucial role in governing both the resonant frequency and the growth rate of any unstable mode. It is suggested that the low-frequency MHD mode should experience the most rapid amplification for intermediate inclination. In the frame of the solar wind, such waves should propagate along the field in the direction upstream toward the sun with a phase speed lower than the beaming velocity of the pick-up ions. This mechanism may account for the presence of the interior MHD waves noted by satellites over a region surrounding comets Giacobini-Zinner and Halley.

  7. Theoretical investigation of electron-positive ion/atom interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Msezane, A.Z.

    1992-01-01

    Very brief summaries are given on three research topics. Electron impact elastic, excitation, and total cross sections for K were investigated by using elaborate Cl target wave functions in the close-coupling approximation. Photoionization cross sections from ground-state Na were calculated near the 2s 2 2p 5 3s and 2s2p 6 3s inner-shell thresholds; also, the photoionization cross sections of excited 3p 2 P o and 3d 2 D states were calculated with the R-matrix methodology near the 2s2p 6 3s thresholds. A numerical approach was developed to calculate the charge transfer matrix elements for ion-atom(ion) collisions; this was used for the proton-hydrogen collision problem as an illustration

  8. Electro-osmosis over inhomogeneously charged surfaces in presence of non-electrostatic ion-ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we attempt to bring out a generalized formulation for electro-osmotic flows over inhomogeneously charged surfaces in presence of non-electrostatic ion-ion interactions. To this end, we start with modified electro-chemical potential of the individual species and subsequently use it to derive modified Nernst-Planck equation accounting for the ionic fluxes generated because of the presence of non-electrostatic potential. We establish what we refer to as the Poisson-Helmholtz-Nernst-Planck equations, coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations, to describe the complete transport process. Our analysis shows that the presence of non-electrostatic interactions between the ions results in an excess body force on the fluid, and modifies the osmotic pressure as well, which has hitherto remained unexplored. We further apply our analysis to a simple geometry, in an effort to work out the Smoluchowski slip velocity for thin electrical double layer limits. To this end, we employ singular perturbation and develop a general framework for the asymptotic analysis. Our calculations reveal that the final expression for slip velocity remains the same as that without accounting for non-electrostatic interactions. However, the presence of non-electrostatic interactions along with ion specificity can significantly change the quantitative behavior of Smoluchowski slip velocity. We subsequently demonstrate that the presence of non-electrostatic interactions may significantly alter the effective interfacial potential, also termed as the "Zeta potential." Our analysis can potentially act as a guide towards the prediction and possibly quantitative determination of the implications associated with the existence of non-electrostatic potential, in an electrokinetic transport process.

  9. Products of tungstate ion interaction with primary aliphatic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Sejfullina, I.I.; Purich, A.N.; Babinets, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    Using the methods of conductometric titration, IR-spectroscopic and thermographic analyses precipitates formed in the process of interaction of diluted aqueous solutions of sodium tungstate with alcoholic solutions of dodecyl-, tetradecyl- and octadecylamine have been studied. It is shown that as a result of interaction tungstates of corresponding amines are formed. The structure and thermal stability of singled out products are determined

  10. Nonlinear effects in interactions of swift ions with solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, O.H.; Dorado, J.J.; Flores, F.

    1994-01-01

    The passage of a swift charged particle through a solid gives rise to a wake of induced electron density behind the particle. It is calculated for a proton penetrating an electron gas having the density of the valence electrons in gold, assuming linear response of the medium. The induced potential associated with the wake is responsible for the energy loss of the particle, and for many effects that have captured recent interest. These include, among others, vicinage effects on swift ion clusters, emission of electrons from bombarded solids, forces on swift ions near a surface, and energy shifts in electronic states of channeled ions. Furthermore, the wake has a determining influence on the spatial distribution, and character, of energy deposition in the medium. Previous theoretical studies of these phenomena have employed a linear wake, i.e., one that is proportional to the charge of the projectile, eZ. However, in most experiments that measure these effects, the conditions are such that the wake must include higher-order terms in Z. The purpose of this study is to analyze the nonlinear wake, to understand how the linear results must be revised

  11. Evaporation rate of water in hydrophobic confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumit; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2012-03-20

    The drying of hydrophobic cavities is believed to play an important role in biophysical phenomena such as the folding of globular proteins, the opening and closing of ligand-gated ion channels, and ligand binding to hydrophobic pockets. We use forward flux sampling, a molecular simulation technique, to compute the rate of capillary evaporation of water confined between two hydrophobic surfaces separated by nanoscopic gaps, as a function of gap, surface size, and temperature. Over the range of conditions investigated (gaps between 9 and 14 Å and surface areas between 1 and 9 nm(2)), the free energy barrier to evaporation scales linearly with the gap between hydrophobic surfaces, suggesting that line tension makes the predominant contribution to the free energy barrier. The exponential dependence of the evaporation rate on the gap between confining surfaces causes a 10 order-of-magnitude decrease in the rate when the gap increases from 9 to 14 Å. The computed free energy barriers are of the order of 50 kT and are predominantly enthalpic. Evaporation rates per unit area are found to be two orders of magnitude faster in confinement by the larger (9 nm(2)) than by the smaller (1 nm(2)) surfaces considered here, at otherwise identical conditions. We show that this rate enhancement is a consequence of the dependence of hydrophobic hydration on the size of solvated objects. For sufficiently large surfaces, the critical nucleus for the evaporation process is a gap-spanning vapor tube.

  12. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  13. Hydrophobic treatment of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, J. de; Polder, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the maintenance policy of the Dutch Ministry of Transport, Civil Engineering Division, hydrophobic treatment of concrete was considered as an additional protective measure against penetration of aggressive substances, for instance deicing salts in bridge decks. A set of tests was designed

  14. Structural Analysis of DNA Interactions with Magnesium Ion Studied by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ponkumar; P. Duraisamy; N. Iyandurai

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: In the present study, FT Raman spectroscopy had been used to extend our knowledge about Magnesium ion - DNA interactions at various volume ratios (1:50, 1:20, 1:10 and 1:5). Approach: The analysis of FT Raman data supported the existence of structural specificities in the interaction and also the stability of DNA secondary structure. Results: Results from the Raman spectra clearly indicate that the interaction of Magnesium ion with DNA is mainly through the phosphate groups...

  15. Argon ion beam interaction on polyethylene terephthalate surface by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    discharge treatment and laser irradiation are used. ... vation: where the interaction of plasma with the polymer involves both gas and surface .... that of metals [17]. ... with atmospheric constituents such as oxygen, water vapour and CO2 reduce ...

  16. ENDOR investigations of the Ce.sup.3+./sup. ions in YAG: Transferred hyperfine interaction with nearest aluminum ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Azamat, Dmitry; Badalyan, A. G.; Feng, D.H.; Lančok, Ján; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Dejneka, Alexandr; Baranov, P. G.; Yakovlev, D.R.; Bayer, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 24 (2017), s. 1-3, č. článku 243903. ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA ČR GA16-22092S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ENDOR * Ce 3+ ions in YAG * transferred hyperfine interactions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.068, year: 2016

  17. Interaction of an ion bunch with a plasma slab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasovitskiy, V. B., E-mail: krasovit@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Turikov, V. A. [Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Charge neutralization of a short ion bunch passing through a plasma slab is studied by means of numerical simulation. It is shown that a fraction of plasma electrons are trapped by the bunch under the action of the collective charge separation field. The accelerated electrons generated in this process excite beam−plasma instability, thereby violating the trapping conditions. The process of electron trapping is also strongly affected by the high-frequency electric field caused by plasma oscillations at the slab boundaries. It is examined how the degree of charge neutralization depends on the parameters of the bunch and plasma slab.

  18. A search for quarks produced in heavy-ion interactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to search for free fractional charges produced in 225~GeV/A heavy-ion collisions at the SPS. A tank of mercury placed in the NA38 beam stop will serve both as a production target and as an absorber to stop reaction products. Mercury from the tank will subsequently be distilled.\\\\ \\\\ This process will decrease the amount of mercury that has to be processed by a factor of about $10^{5}$. The concentrate will be searched for quarks using the proven SFSU automated Millikan apparatus.\\\\ \\\\ This experiment will be sensitive to about one quark produced per $2 \\times 10^{8}$ beam particles.

  19. Review: Milk Proteins as Nanocarrier Systems for Hydrophobic Nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpel, Florian; Schmitt, Joachim J

    2015-11-01

    Milk proteins and milk protein aggregates are among the most important nanovehicles in food technology. Milk proteins have various functional properties that facilitate their ability to carry hydrophobic nutraceutical substances. The main functional transport properties that were examined in the reviewed studies are binding of molecules or ions, surface activity, aggregation, gelation, and interaction with other polymers. Hydrophobic binding has been investigated using caseins and isolated β-casein as well as whey proteins. Surface activity of caseins has been used to create emulsion-based carrier systems. Furthermore, caseins are able to self-assemble into micelles, which can incorporate molecules. Gelation and interaction with other polymers can be used to encapsulate molecules into protein networks. The release of transported substances mainly depends on pH and swelling behavior of the proteins. The targeted use of nanocarrier systems requires specific knowledge about the binding mechanisms between the proteins and the carried substances in a certain food matrix. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Molecular microenvironments: Solvent interactions with nucleic acid bases and ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Pohorille, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of reconstructing plausible sequences of events in prebiotic molecular evolution is limited by the lack of fossil remains. However, with hindsight, one goal of molecular evolution was obvious: the development of molecular systems that became constituents of living systems. By understanding the interactions among molecules that are likely to have been present in the prebiotic environment, and that could have served as components in protobiotic molecular systems, plausible evolutionary sequences can be suggested. When stable aggregations of molecules form, a net decrease in free energy is observed in the system. Such changes occur when solvent molecules interact among themselves, as well as when they interact with organic species. A significant decrease in free energy, in systems of solvent and organic molecules, is due to entropy changes in the solvent. Entropy-driven interactioins played a major role in the organization of prebiotic systems, and understanding the energetics of them is essential to understanding molecular evolution.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrophobous ions at the liquid-liquid interfaces: case of dicarbollide anions as synergy agents and of ionic liquids as extracting medium; Simulations par dynamique moleculaire d'ions hydrophobes aux interfaces liquide - liquide: le cas des anions dicarbollides comme agents de synergie et celui des liquides ioniques comme milieu extractant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevrot, G

    2008-01-15

    Based on molecular dynamics simulations, we first describe the distribution of dicarbollide salts (CCD{sup -}, Mn{sup +}) in concentrated monophasic solutions (water, chloroform, octanol, nitrobenzene) and in the corresponding biphasic 'oil' - water solutions. We point to the importance of surface activity of the CCD{sup -}s and of their self-aggregation in water, with marked counterions effects, and we explain the synergistic effect of CCD{sup -}s in the Eu{sup 3+} extraction by BTP ligands. In the second part of the thesis we report exploratory simulations on the extraction of Sr{sup 2+} by 18-crown-6 to an hydrophobic ionic liquid ([BMI][PF6]), focusing on the liquid - liquid interface. Analogies and differences with a classical aqueous interface are outlined. (author)

  2. Interaction of supra-thermal ions with turbulence in a magnetized toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyushchev, G.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis addresses the interaction of a supra-thermal ion beam with turbulence in the simple magnetized toroidal plasma of TORPEX. The first part of the Thesis deals with the ohmic assisted discharges on TORPEX. The aim of these discharges is the investigation of the open to closed magnetic field line transition. The relevant magnetic diagnostics were developed. Ohmic assisted discharges with a maximum plasma current up to 1 kA are routinely obtained. The equilibrium conditions on the vacuum magnetic field configuration were investigated. In the second part of the Thesis, the design of the fast ion source and detector are discussed. The accelerating electric field needed for the fast ion source was optimized. The fast ion source was constructed and commissioned. To detect the fast ions a specially designed gridded energy analyzer was used. The electron energy distribution function was obtained to demonstrate the efficiency of the detector. The experiments with the fast ion beam were conducted in different plasma regions of TORPEX. In the third part of the Thesis, numerical simulations are used to interpret the measured fast ion beam behavior. It is shown that a simple single particle equation of motion explains the beam behavior in the experiments in the absence of plasma. To explain the fast ion beam experiments with the plasma a turbulent electric field must be used. The model that takes into account this turbulent electrical field qualitatively explains the shape of the fast ion current density profile in the different plasma regions of TORPEX. The vertically elongated fast ion current density profiles are explained by a spread in the fast ion velocity distribution. The theoretically predicted radial fast ion beam spreading due to the turbulent electric field was observed in the experiment. (author)

  3. Interactions of relativistic heavy ions in thick heavy element targets and some unresolved problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.; Ditlov, V.A.; Pozharova, E.A.; Smirnitskij, V.A.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions of relativistic heavy ions with total energies above 30 GeV in thick Cu and Pb targets (≥2 cm) have been studied with various techniques. Radiochemical irradiation experiments using thick Cu targets, both in a compact form or as diluted '2π-Cu targets' have been carried out with several relativistic heavy ions, such as 44 GeV 12 C (JINR, Dubna) and 72 GeV 40 Ar (LBL, Berkeley, USA). Neutron measuring experiments using thick targets irradiated with various relativistic heavy ions up to 44 GeV 12 C have been performed at JINR. In addition, the number of 'black prongs' in nuclear interactions (due to protons with energies less than 30 MeV and emitted from the target-like interaction partner at rest) produced with 72 GeV 22 Ne ions in nuclear emulsion plates has been measured in the first nuclear interaction of the primary 22 Ne ion and in the following second nuclear interaction of the secondary heavy (Z>1) ion. Some essential results have been obtained. 1) Spallation products produced by relativistic secondary fragments in interactions ([44 GeV 12 C or 72 GeV 40 Ar]+Cu) within thick copper yield less products close to the target and much more products far away from the target as compared to primary beam interactions. This applies also to secondary particles emitted into large angles (Θ>10deg). 2) The neutron production of 44 GeV 12 C within thick Cu and Pb targets is beyond the estimated yield as based on experiments with 12 GeV 12 C. These rather independent experimental results cannot be understood with well-accepted nuclear reaction models. They appear to present unresolved problems

  4. The fusion of heavy ions in an interaction potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper contains the problems connected with fusion processes in heavy ions collision. Results of experimental fusion data for reactions: 9 Be + 12 C, 6 Li + 28 Si, 9 Be + 28 Si, 12 C + 28 Si, 12 C + 16 O and 16 O + 16 O are presented. Comparison of measured fusion cross sections with predictions of the fusion potential model have been made. The validity of this model for both light systems, like 9 Be + 12 C and heavy systems, like 35 Cl + 62 Ni, have been discussed. In conclusion, it should be stated that fusion cross sections could be correctly predicted by the potential model with a potential describing the elastic scattering data. (author)

  5. Crystallographic studies of inter-atomic interactions and ion migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filsø, Mette Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    anvendt på kendte Li ionledere til anvendelse som elektroder i Li-ion batterier. Metoden valideres ved sammenligning med eksperiment og en række andre teoretiske metoder, og trods det simple beregningsprincip foreslår the Procrysal Analysis mange korrekte migrationsstier og estimerer den relative...... struktur, hvilket fører til en reversibel formindskelse af båndgabet og et betydeligt farveskift. For både TiS2, ZnSb og Zn4Sb3 blev der fundet faseovergange ved højt tryk: TiS2 omdannedes til et trefasesystem, som stadig er bliver undersøgt, mens ZnSb og Zn4Sb3 begge omdannedes til den samme, simple...

  6. Modelling RF-plasma interaction in ECR ion sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascali David

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes three-dimensional self-consistent numerical simulations of wave propagation in magnetoplasmas of Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS. Numerical results can give useful information on the distribution of the absorbed RF power and/or efficiency of RF heating, especially in the case of alternative schemes such as mode-conversion based heating scenarios. Ray-tracing approximation is allowed only for small wavelength compared to the system scale lengths: as a consequence, full-wave solutions of Maxwell-Vlasov equation must be taken into account in compact and strongly inhomogeneous ECRIS plasmas. This contribution presents a multi-scale temporal domains approach for simultaneously including RF dynamics and plasma kinetics in a “cold-plasma”, and some perspectives for “hot-plasma” implementation. The presented results rely with the attempt to establish a modal-conversion scenario of OXB-type in double frequency heating inside an ECRIS testbench.

  7. Manifestation of exchange effects in heavy-ion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igashov, S. Yu.; Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M.

    2011-01-01

    Three different approaches to taking into account exchange effects in heavy-ion collisions are studied. Within the first of them, the lowest eigenstates of the Hamiltonian are treated as forbidden states. In the second approach, the eigenstates of the normalization kernel of the resonating-group model that correspond to zero eigenvalues are treated as forbidden states. The third approach takes additionally into account semiforbidden states. The 16 O + 16 O system is considered. A hybrid approach that combines the methods of discrete and continuous mathematics is developed for calculating the widths of narrow resonance states. The resonance width calculated within the approach that takes into account semiforbidden states proves to be sharply different from the widths obtained within traditional approaches.

  8. Elementary processes in plasma-surface interactions with emphasis on ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalm, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    Elementary processes occurring at solid surfaces immersed in low pressure plasmas are reviewed. In particular mechanisms leading to anisotropic or directional etching are discussed. The crucial role of ion bombardment is emphasized. First a brief summary of the interaction of (excited) neutrals, ions and electrons with targets is given. Next various aspects of sputter-etching with noble gas and reactive ions are surveyed. Finally it will be argued that synergistic effects, invoked by ion bombardment of a surface under simultaneous exposure to a reactive gas flux, are foremost important in explaining anisotropic plasma etching. It is shown that the role of the ions is not merely to stimulate the chemical reaction path but rather that the active gas flow chemically enhances the sputtering. (author)

  9. Studies of Interactions of Positive Helium Ions with Small Neutrals at Temperatures Below 50K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Martin Michael

    1990-01-01

    Interactions of He^+ ions with small neutrals are important because of their fundamental nature and applicability to other areas of research. In the past, very little work has been done on such systems at very low temperatures (T Boehringer and Arnold (1986) and Johnsen, Chen, and Biondi (1980). A new method of detecting the ions in the trap was also developed and implemented. The Fourier Transform Ion Z-resonance (FTIZR) technique took advantage of an induced coherence in the oscillations of the ions in the trap. This method allowed for measurement of faster ion -neutral reactions. This method was demonstrated by studying the non -resonant charge transfer process ^3He ^+{+}^4He{toatop >=ts}^3He{+}^4He^+. These measurements confirmed that the forward reaction is endothermic by about 1.1 meV.

  10. Ion-solid interaction at low energies: principles and application of quantitative ISS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niehus, H.; Spitzl, R.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative surface analysis with low-energy (500-5000 eV) ion scattering spectroscopy is known to be difficult, most often because of strong charge transfer and multiple scattering effects occurring during ion-surface interaction. In order to avoid neutralization problems, either alkali primary ions or noble gas ions in combination with the detection of all scattered particles was applied. Multiple scattering occurs predominantly at forward scattering and might confound the analysis. Backward scattering (i.e. 180 o impact collision ion scattering) bypasses strongly the multiple scattering complication and has been used successfully for the analysis of a number of surface structures for metals, semiconductors and binary alloys. A simple triangulation concept gives access to mass-selective qualitative surface crystallography. Quantitative surface structures were determined by comparison with computer simulations. (author)

  11. Transport properties for some atom-ion interactions in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biolsi, L.; Holland, P.M.; Procter and Gamble Co., Cincinnati, OH)

    1985-01-01

    The thermal conductivity and viscosity for the N-N(+) and O-O(+) interactions have been calculated, using the kinetic theory of gases, from 500 K-20,000 K. Accurate spectroscopically determined potentials have been used for the calculations. The results are compared with previous results obtained using less accurate potentials. 62 references

  12. Interaction times for damped heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, W.U.; Birkelund, J.R.; Huizenga, J.R.; Wolf, K.L.; Viola, V.E. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Sticking and nonsticking models are used to calculate the angular-momentum-dependent interaction times for the reactions 165 Ho + 84 Kr, 209 Bi + 84 Kr, and 209 Bi + 136 Xe. The angular momenta and differential cross sections are plotted. Five references

  13. Interaction between crystal lattice and mobile ions in copper selenides studied by EXAFS spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asylgushina, G.N.; Bikkulova, N.N.; Titova, S.G.; Kochubey, D.I.

    2005-01-01

    Interaction between crystal lattice and mobile Cu ions has been studied in Cu 2- x Se in superionic and in normal state using EXAFS-spectroscopy. It has been found that the transition from normal to superionic state and change of mobile Cu ion concentration practically do not have an influence on local state of Cu atoms, but change of both these parameters is accompanied by a change of Se-sublattice state

  14. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I., E-mail: lotkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kashin, Oleg A., E-mail: okashin@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A., E-mail: yulia-k1970@mail.ru; Antonova, Larisa V., E-mail: antonova.la@mail.ru; Matveeva, Vera G., E-mail: matveeva-vg@mail.ru; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A., E-mail: sergeewa.ew@yandex.ru [Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, 650002 (Russian Federation); Kudryashov, Andrey N., E-mail: kudryashov@angioline.ru [Angioline Interventional Device Ltd, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture.

  15. Relativistic configuration-interaction calculation of the correlation energies of heliumlike ions. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, K.T.; Chen, M.H.; Johnson, W.R.

    1994-04-01

    A new relativistic configuration-interaction (CI) method using B-spline basis functions has been developed to study the correlation energies of two-electron heliumlike ions. Based on the relativistic no-pair Hamiltonian, the CI equation leads to a symmetric eigenvalue problem involving large, dense matrices. Davidson's method is used to obtain the lowest few eigenenergies and eigenfunctions. Results on transition energies and finite structure splittings for heliumlike ions are in very good agreement with experiment throughout the periodic table

  16. Fundamental aspects of laser and ion-beam interactions with solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.L.

    1982-01-01

    In the first part of the thesis laser-beam interactions with solid surfaces are discussed. In the second part ion-beam interactions with solid surfaces are discussed and mainly the mixing of atoms due to ion bombardment. A study of ion-beam mixing of Cu-Au and Cu-W systems is described in order to illustrate the mechanism for ion beam mixing. As Cu-Au are miscible whereas Cu-W systems are not, and both systems have comparable mass numbers, comparison provides a test for current theories on ion-beam mixing. The results of experiments where 300 keV Kr 4+ ion-bombardment at a dose of 5x10 15 cm -2 has been applied to initiate mixing of a single layer structure and sandwich samples for both systems are described. Room temperature irradiations with a dose of 5x10 15 cm -2 show that Cu-Au mix readily, whereas a small mixing effect is observed for Cu-W systems. A comparable amount of mixing for Cu-Au induced by laser or ion beams is found whereas no mixing of Cu-W induced by laser irradiation is observed, which is in agreement with the criteria for formation of metastable solid solutions due to pulsed laser treatment. (Auth.)

  17. Investigation of the mechanism of interaction of Lithium 6 ions on Beryllium 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coste, Mireille

    1962-01-01

    The objective of this research on the interaction of Lithium 6 and Beryllium 9 ions is to obtain new indications on the mode of interaction of these heavy ions, and on the configuration of target nuclei and projectile nuclei. In a first part, the author presents and describes the experimental conditions which comprise a Van de Graaff accelerator, a source, a stripper, and a target. He reports the study of α particles emitted by the reaction between the Lithium and Beryllium ions: description of the experimental installation (irradiation chamber and method), presentation and interpretation of experimental results. In the next part, he reports the study of Lithium 7 and Beryllium 10 nuclides emitted by disintegration of Beryllium 11: description of experimental conditions, variations of cross sections, variation of the cross section rate, and interpretation. The author then addresses the study of the intervention of the mode of interaction by 15 N compound nucleus in the reactions between lithium and beryllium ions: study of intensities of the different spectrum lines, measurement of the Doppler effect produced of the 479 keV line, interpretation of results. In conclusion, the author analyses the mechanism of interaction between lithium and beryllium ions, and discusses different theories: the Newns and Glendenning theories, and the Leigh theory

  18. Investigation of the beryllium ion-surface interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guseva, M.I. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Birukov, A.Yu. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Gureev, V.M. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Daneljan, L.S. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Korshunov, S.N. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Martynenko, Yu.V. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Moskovkin, P.S. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Sokolov, Yu.A. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Stoljarova, V.G. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Kulikauskas, V.S. [M.V. Lomonosov University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zatekin, V.V. [M.V. Lomonosov University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    The energy and temperature dependence of self-sputtering yields of beryllium were measured. The energy dependence of the beryllium self-sputtering yield agrees well with that calculated by Eckstein et al. Below 770 K the self-sputtering yields are temperature independent; at T{sub irr.}>870 K the yield increases steeply. Beryllium samples were implanted at 370 K with monoenergetic 5 keV hydrogen ions and with a stationary hydrogen plasma power flux of about 5 MW/m{sup 2}. In the fluence range of 5 x 10{sup 22}-1.5 x 10{sup 25} m{sup -2} the depth profile is shifted towards the surface with increasing fluence and the concentration of trapped hydrogen atoms is reduced from 3.3 x 10{sup 21} to 7.4 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -2}. About 95% of the trapped hydrogen is located within bubbles and only {proportional_to}5% is trapped as atoms. With increasing implantation fluence the bubbles coalesce, producing channels through which hydrogen escapes. (orig.).

  19. Experimental studies of ions and atoms interaction with insulating surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villette, J.

    2000-10-01

    Grazing collisions ( + , Ne + , Ne 0 , Na + on LiF (001) single crystal, an ionic insulator, are investigated by a time of flight technique. The incident beam is chopped and the scattered particles are collected on a position sensitive detector providing differential cross section while the time of flight gives the energy loss. Deflection plates allow the charge state analysis. Secondary electrons are detected in coincidence allowing direct measurements of electron emission yield, angular and energetic distribution through time of flight measurements. The target electronic structure characterized by a large band gap, governs the collisional processes: charge exchange, electronic excitations and electron emission. In particular, these studies show that the population of local target excitations surface excitons is the major contribution to the kinetic energy transfer (stopping power). Auger neutralization of Ne + and He + ions reveals the population of quasi-molecular excitons, an exciton bound on two holes. Referenced in the literature as trion. A direct energy balance determines the binding energy associated with these excited states of the surface. Besides these electronic energy loss processes, two nuclear energy loss mechanisms are characterized. These processes imply momentum transfer to individual target atoms during close binary collisions or, if the projectile is charged, to collective mode of optical phonons induced by the projectile coulomb field. The effect of the temperature on the scattering profile, the contribution of topological surface defects to the energy loss profile and to skipping motion on the surface are analyzed in view of classical trajectory simulations. (author)

  20. Interaction mean free path measurements for relativistic heavy ion fragments using CR39 plastic track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drechsel, H.; Brechtmann, C.; Dreute, J.; Sonntag, S.; Trakowski, W.; Beer, J.; Heinrich, W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment measuring the interaction mean free paths for charge changing nuclear collisions of relativistic heavy ion fragments. We use a stack of CR39 plastic nuclear track detectors that was irradiated with 1.8 GeV/nucleon 40 Ar ions at the Berkeley Bevalac. About 1.5 x 10 7 etch cones were measured in this experiment using an automatic measuring system. By tracing the etch cones over successive plastic foils the particle trajectories in the stack were reconstructed. For 14185 trajectories with 6444 nuclear collisions of fragments with charge 9-15 the interaction mean free path in the plastic was determined. (orig.)

  1. Interaction of aluminium(3) with uranyl ions in the course of joint hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusov, A.B.; Budantseva, N.A.; Fedoseev, A.M.; Astafurova, L.N.

    2001-01-01

    By means of spectrophotometry, luminescence and IR-spectroscopy one studied interaction of uranyl ions with Al 3+ ions in solutions at pH≥2 and in precipitates at pH≥5. It is shown that within 3-4 pH range the uranyl hydrolyzed forms interact with these of aluminium. Mixed hydroxoaquacomplexes are likely to be formed in solution with U:Al = 1:1 molar ratio. Large-size mixed polymers may be formed with pH increase. Varying of precipitation pH from 5 up to 14 does not minimize the importance of the oligomer mixed compounds for precipitation formation [ru

  2. Ions in solution basic principles of chemical interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, J

    1999-01-01

    This outline of the principles and chemical interactions in inorganic solution chemistry delivers a course module in an area of considerable complexity. Problems with solutions and tutorial hints to test comprehension have been added as a feature to check readers' understanding and assist self-study. Exercises and projects are also provided to help readers deepen and extend their knowledge and understanding. Inorganic solution chemistry is treated thoroughly Emphasis is placed upon NMR, UV-VIS, IR Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and such topics as acid-base behaviour, stability constants and kinetics.

  3. Phactr3/scapinin, a member of protein phosphatase 1 and actin regulator (phactr family, interacts with the plasma membrane via basic and hydrophobic residues in the N-terminus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Itoh

    Full Text Available Proteins that belong to the protein phosphatase 1 and actin regulator (phactr family are involved in cell motility and morphogenesis. However, the mechanisms that regulate the actin cytoskeleton are poorly understood. We have previously shown that phactr3, also known as scapinin, localizes to the plasma membrane, including lamellipodia and membrane ruffles. In the present study, experiments using deletion and point mutants showed that the basic and hydrophobic residues in the N-terminus play crucial roles in the localization to the plasma membrane. A BH analysis (http://helixweb.nih.gov/bhsearch is a program developed to identify membrane-binding domains that comprise basic and hydrophobic residues in membrane proteins. We applied this program to phactr3. The results of the BH plot analysis agreed with the experimentally determined region that is responsible for the localization of phactr3 to the plasma membrane. In vitro experiments showed that the N-terminal itself binds to liposomes and acidic phospholipids. In addition, we showed that the interaction with the plasma membrane via the N-terminal membrane-binding sequence is required for phactr3-induced morphological changes in Cos7 cells. The membrane-binding sequence in the N-terminus is highly conserved in all members of the phactr family. Our findings may provide a molecular basis for understanding the mechanisms that allow phactr proteins to regulate cell morphogenesis.

  4. Interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with metal ions in micellar medium using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gujar, Varsha; Pundge, Vijaykumar; Ottoor, Divya, E-mail: divya@chem.unipune.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    Steady state and life time fluorescence spectroscopy have been employed to study the interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with biologically important metal ions i.e. Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} in various micellar media (anionic SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate), nonionic TX-100 (triton X-100) and cationic CTAB (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide)). It was observed that fluorescence properties of drug remain unaltered in the absence of micellar media with increasing concentration of metal ions. However, addition of Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} caused fluorescence quenching of amiloride in the presence of anionic micelle, SDS. Binding of drug with metal ions at the charged micellar interface could be the possible reason for this pH-dependent metal-mediated fluorescence quenching. There were no remarkable changes observed due to metal ions addition when drug was present in cationic and nonionic micellar medium. The binding constant and bimolecular quenching constant were evaluated and compared for the drug–metal complexes using Stern–Volmer equation and fluorescence lifetime values. - Highlights: • Interaction of amiloride with biologically important metal ions, Fe{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. • Monitoring the interaction in various micelle at different pH by fluorescence spectroscopy. • Micelles acts as receptor, amiloride as transducer and metal ions as analyte in the present system. • Interaction study provides pH dependent quenching and binding mechanism of drug with metal ions.

  5. Insights into the Hendra virus NTAIL-XD complex: Evidence for a parallel organization of the helical MoRE at the XD surface stabilized by a combination of hydrophobic and polar interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erales, Jenny; Beltrandi, Matilde; Roche, Jennifer; Maté, Maria; Longhi, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    The Hendra virus is a member of the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. The nucleoprotein, which consists of a structured core and of a C-terminal intrinsically disordered domain (N(TAIL)), encapsidates the viral genome within a helical nucleocapsid. N(TAIL) partly protrudes from the surface of the nucleocapsid being thus capable of interacting with the C-terminal X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein. Interaction with XD implies a molecular recognition element (MoRE) that is located within N(TAIL) residues 470-490, and that undergoes α-helical folding. The MoRE has been proposed to be embedded in the hydrophobic groove delimited by helices α2 and α3 of XD, although experimental data could not discriminate between a parallel and an antiparallel orientation of the MoRE. Previous studies also showed that if the binding interface is enriched in hydrophobic residues, charged residues located close to the interface might play a role in complex formation. Here, we targeted for site directed mutagenesis two acidic and two basic residues within XD and N(TAIL). ITC studies showed that electrostatics plays a crucial role in complex formation and pointed a parallel orientation of the MoRE as more likely. Further support for a parallel orientation was afforded by SAXS studies that made use of two chimeric constructs in which XD and the MoRE were covalently linked to each other. Altogether, these studies unveiled the multiparametric nature of the interactions established within this complex and contribute to shed light onto the molecular features of protein interfaces involving intrinsically disordered regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Measuring baryon-(anti-)baryon interaction cross-sections with femtoscopy in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisiel, A.

    2016-12-15

    Two-particle correlations at low relative momentum (femtoscopy) are used to study the space-time dynamics of the source created in heavy-ion collisions. The same method can be used in a novel way to study the Final State Interaction potential for various particle pairs. The parameters are also directly related to the relevant interaction cross-sections. Of special interest are correlations of baryons, where the strong interaction often dominates. The femtoscopic technique offers a unique opportunity to study this interaction in such systems. In this work we discuss the similarities and differences of such measurement for baryon-baryon and baryon-antibaryon pairs.

  7. Atoms and Ions Interacting with Particles and Fields: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robicheaux, Francis [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2014-09-18

    This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms with particles and fields. The duration of the grant was the 10 year period from 8/2003 to 8/2013. All of the support from the grant was used to pay salaries of the PI, postdocs, graduate students, and undergraduates and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals. There were 65 peer reviewed publications over these 10 years with 8 of the publications in Physical Review Letters; all of the other articles were in respected peer reviewed journals (Physical Review A, New Journal of Physics, Journal of Physics B, ...). I will disuss the results for the periods of time relevant for each grant period.

  8. Proton-ion collisions: behind the scenes of an exotic interaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Protons to the right, ions to the left: the basic principle of proton-ion collisions at the LHC might seem straightforward. However, this is an almost unprecedented mode of collider operation, certainly unique at the energy provided by the LHC. In addition to being a remarkable technical achievement, this interaction between a proton and an ion can potentially contribute a lot to the understanding of the properties of matter in its primordial state.   Prior to last week, the LHC had only collided protons with protons and lead ions with lead ions. These were indeed the two operational schemes the LHC was designed for. However, since science can often evolve in directions that were not necessarily expected at the beginning of a project, over the years the scientific community has become more and more interested in the hybrid type of interaction – that between protons and ions. Last week’s collisions were only a test for the teams involved in the operation of the LHC, in prepara...

  9. Selective layer-free blood serum ionogram based on ion-specific interactions with a nanotransistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumarasamy, R.; Hartkamp, R.; Siboulet, B.; Dufrêche, J.-F.; Nishiguchi, K.; Fujiwara, A.; Clément, N.

    2018-05-01

    Despite being ubiquitous in the fields of chemistry and biology, the ion-specific effects of electrolytes pose major challenges for researchers. A lack of understanding about ion-specific surface interactions has hampered the development and application of materials for (bio-)chemical sensor applications. Here, we show that scaling a silicon nanotransistor sensor down to 25 nm provides a unique opportunity to understand and exploit ion-specific surface interactions, yielding a surface that is highly sensitive to cations and inert to pH. The unprecedented sensitivity of these devices to Na+ and divalent ions can be attributed to an overscreening effect via molecular dynamics. The surface potential of multi-ion solutions is well described by the sum of the electrochemical potentials of each cation, enabling selective measurements of a target ion concentration without requiring a selective organic layer. We use these features to construct a blood serum ionogram for Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, in an important step towards the development of a versatile, durable and mobile chemical or blood diagnostic tool.

  10. Applications of ion implantation for modifying the interactions between metals and hydrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musket, R. G.

    1989-04-01

    Ion implantations into metals have been shown recently to either reduce or enhance interactions with gaseous hydrogen. Published studies concerned with modifications of these interactions are reviewed and discussed in terms of the mechanisms postulated to explain the observed changes. The interactions are hydrogenation, hydrogen permeation, and hydrogen embrittlement. In particular, the results of the reviewed studies are (a) uranium hydriding suppressed by implantation of oxygen and carbon, (b) hydrogen gettered in iron and nickel using implantation of titanium, (c) hydriding of titanium catalyzed by implanted palladium, (d) tritium permeation of 304L stainless steel reduced using selective oxidation of implanted aluminum, and (e) hydrogen attack of a low-alloy steel accelerated by implantation of helium. These studies revealed ion implantation to be an effective method for modifying the interactions of hydrogen gas with metals.

  11. Applications of ion implantation for modifying the interactions between metals and hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musket, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Ion implantations into metals have been shown recently to either reduce or enhance interactions with gaseous hydrogen. Published studies concerned with modifications of these interactions are reviewed and discussed in terms of the mechanisms postulated to explain the observed changes. The interactions are hydrogenation, hydrogen permeation and hydrogen embrittlement. In particular, the results of the reviewed studies are 1. uranium hydriding suppressed by implantation of oxygen and carbon, 2. hydrogen gettered in iron and nickel using implantation of titanium, 3. hydriding of titanium catalyzed by implanted palladium, 4. tritium permeation of 304L stainless steel reduced using selective oxidation of implanted aluminum, and 5. hydrogen attack of a low-alloy steel accelerated by implantation of helium. These studies revealed ion implantation to be an effective method for modifying the interactions of hydrogen gas with metals. (orig.)

  12. FTIR spectroscopy structural analysis of the interaction between Lactobacillus kefir S-layers and metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbino, E.; Mobili, P.; Tymczyszyn, E.; Fausto, R.; Gómez-Zavaglia, A.

    2011-02-01

    FTIR spectroscopy was used to structurally characterize the interaction of S-layer proteins extracted from two strains of Lactobacillus kefir (the aggregating CIDCA 8348 and the non-aggregating JCM 5818) with metal ions (Cd +2, Zn +2, Pb +2 and Ni +2). The infrared spectra indicate that the metal/protein interaction occurs mainly through the carboxylate groups of the side chains of Asp and Glut residues, with some contribution of the NH groups belonging to the peptide backbone. The frequency separation between the νCOO - anti-symmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations in the spectra of the S-layers in presence of the metal ions was found to be ca. 190 cm -1 for S-layer CIDCA 8348 and ca. 170 cm -1 for JCM 5818, denoting an unidentate coordination in both cases. Changes in the secondary structures of the S-layers induced by the interaction with the metal ions were also noticed: a general trend to increase the amount of β-sheet structures and to reduce the amount of α-helices was observed. These changes allow the proteins to adjust their structure to the presence of the metal ions at minimum energy expense, and accordingly, these adjustments were found to be more important for the bigger ions.

  13. Production of ultrahigh ion current densities at skin-layer subrelativistic laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badziak, J [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Glowacz, S [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Jablonski, S [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Parys, P [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Wolowski, J [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Hora, H [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Krasa, J [Institute of Physics, ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Laska, L [Institute of Physics, ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Rohlena, K [Institute of Physics, ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2004-12-01

    Some applications of fast ions driven by a short ({<=}1 ps) laser pulse (e.g. fast ignition of ICF targets, x-ray laser pumping, laboratory astrophysics research or some nuclear physics experiments) require ion beams of picosecond (or shorter) time durations and of very high ion current densities ({approx}10{sup 10} A cm{sup -2} or higher). A possible way of producing ion beams with such extreme parameters is ballistic focusing of fast ions generated by a target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism at relativistic laser intensities. In this paper we discuss another method, where the production of short-pulse ion beams of ultrahigh current densities is possible in a planar geometry at subrelativistic laser intensities and at a low energy ({<=}1 J) of the laser pulse. This method-referred to as skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration (S-LPA)-uses strong ponderomotive forces induced at the skin-layer interaction of a short laser pulse with a proper preplasma layer in front of a solid target. The basic features of the high-current ion generation by S-LPA were investigated using a simplified theory, numerical hydrodynamic simulations and measurements. The experiments were performed with subjoule 1 ps laser pulses interacting with massive or thin foil targets at intensities of up to 2 x 10{sup 17} W cm{sup -2}. It was found that both in the backward and forward directions highly collimated high-density ion beams (plasma blocks) with current densities at the ion source (close to the target) approaching 10{sup 10} A cm{sup -2} are produced, in accordance with the theory and numerical calculations. These ion current densities were found to be comparable to (or even higher than) those estimated from recent short-pulse TNSA experiments with relativistic laser intensities. Apart from the simpler physics of the laser-plasma interaction, the advantage of the considered method is the low energy of the driving laser pulses allowing the production of ultrahigh

  14. Magnetic behavior of Van Vleck ions and an electron gas interacting by exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palermo, L.; Silva, X.A. da.

    1980-01-01

    The magnetic behavior of a model in which Van Vleck ions, under the action of a crystal field, interacting by exchange with an electron gas is investigated. The condition of onset of ferromagnetism and the behavior of the critical temperature, band and ionic magnetizations (and susceptibilities) versus temperature, as a function of the band width, exchange interaction and the crystal field splitting energy parameters are obtained within an approximation equivalent to a molecular field formulation. (Author) [pt

  15. Balancing the Interactions of Ions, Water, and DNA in the Drude Polarizable Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently we presented a first-generation all-atom Drude polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model, focusing on optimization of key dihedral angles followed by extensive validation of the force field parameters. Presently, we describe the procedure for balancing the electrostatic interactions between ions, water, and DNA as required for development of the Drude force field for DNA. The proper balance of these interactions is shown to impact DNA stability and...

  16. Ion sensing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard Harding; Martin, Glenn Brian

    2004-05-18

    The present invention allows the determination of trace levels of ionic substances in a sample solution (ions, metal ions, and other electrically charged molecules) by coupling a separation method, such as liquid chromatography, with ion selective electrodes (ISE) prepared so as to allow detection at activities below 10.sup.-6 M. The separation method distributes constituent molecules into fractions due to unique chemical and physical properties, such as charge, hydrophobicity, specific binding interactions, or movement in an electrical field. The separated fractions are detected by means of the ISE(s). These ISEs can be used singly or in an array. Accordingly, modifications in the ISEs are used to permit detection of low activities, specifically, below 10.sup.-6 M, by using low activities of the primary analyte (the molecular species which is specifically detected) in the inner filling solution of the ISE. Arrays constructed in various ways allow flow-through sensing for multiple ions.

  17. Wave–particle interactions in a resonant system of photons and ion-solvated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Eiji, E-mail: konishi.eiji.27c@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2017-02-26

    Highlights: • We consider a QED model of rotating water molecules with ion solvation effects. • The equations of motion are cast in terms of a conventional free electron laser. • We offer a new quantum coherence mechanism induced by collective instability. - Abstract: We investigate a laser model for a resonant system of photons and ion cluster-solvated rotating water molecules in which ions in the cluster are identical and have very low, non-relativistic velocities and direction of motion parallel to a static electric field induced in a single direction. This model combines Dicke superradiation with wave–particle interaction. As the result, we find that the equations of motion of the system are expressed in terms of a conventional free electron laser system. This result leads to a mechanism for dynamical coherence, induced by collective instability in the wave–particle interaction.

  18. 23Na-NMR-studies on the detection of the interaction of phospholipids with sodium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, K.; Pausch, R.; Frenzel, J.; Winkler, E.

    1975-01-01

    The 23 Na-NMR-relaxation times have been measured in different sonicated phospholipid dispersions in dependence on the NaCl concentration. In an egg lecithin dispersion and a DPPC dispersion the relaxation rates are independent of the sodium concentration. In both systems there is no interaction between sodium ions and phospholipids. However, in a phosphatidylethanolamine dispersion a concentration dependence may be observed. Its interpretation is only possible for a stoichiometric ratio of 3:1 of the lecithin-ion-complex. The association constant is found to be k=65,0 l/Mol. For the case of an equimolar egg lecithin/phosphatidylethanolamine dispersion a stronger interaction is measured. The addition of CaCl 2 results in a complete inhibition of the binding of sodium ions at phosphatidylethanolamine

  19. Spacecraft-plasma-debris interaction in an ion beam shepherd mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocki, Filippo; Merino, Mario; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a study of the interaction between a spacecraft, a plasma thruster plume and a free floating object, in the context of an active space debris removal mission based on the ion beam shepherd concept. The analysis is performed with the EP2PLUS hybrid code and includes the evaluation of the transferred force and torque to the target debris, its surface sputtering due to the impinging hypersonic ions, and the equivalent electric circuit of the spacecraft-plasma-debris interaction. The electric potential difference that builds up between the spacecraft and the debris, the ion backscattering and the backsputtering contamination of the shepherd satellite are evaluated for a nominal scenario. A sensitivity analysis is carried out to evaluate quantitatively the effects of electron thermodynamics, ambient plasma, heavy species collisions, and debris position.

  20. The operator technique in the theory of the rare earth ion interaction with ligand nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikeenok, O.A.; Eremin, M.V.; Khutsishvili, O.G.

    1986-01-01

    The tensor structure of the operator of rare earth ion interaction with nuclei of close ligands conditioned by virtual processes of charge transport is established. It is taken into account that virtual processes of electron transport from the ligand can take place to the non-filled 4f-, void 5d- and 6s- and preliminarily excited 5p-shells of the rare earth ion. Effects of 4f- and 5d-state mixing by the odd crystal field are considered for the first time. In contrast to the usual multipole-dipole interaction the given one is characterized by anomalously greater significance of highest multipole momenta of the rare earth ion and in the common case it does not have axial symmetry. The theory is compared with data on double electron-nuclear resonance and radiofrequency discrete saturation, taking CaF 2 :Ce 3+ impurity centers as an example

  1. Interaction of singly and multiply charged ions with a lithium-fluoride surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirtz, L.

    2001-10-01

    Charge transfer between slow ions and an ionic crystal surface still poses a considerable challenge to theory due to the intrinsic many-body character of the system. For the neutralization of multiply charged ions in front of metal surfaces, the Classical Over the Barrier (COB) model is a widely used tool. We present an extension of this model to ionic crystal surfaces where the localization of valence electrons at the anion sites and the lack of cylindrical symmetry of the ion-surface system impede a simple analytical estimate of electron transfer rates. We use a classical trajectory Monte Carlo approach to calculate electron transfer rates for different charge states of the projectile ion. With these rates we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the neutralization of slow Ne10+ ions in vertical incidence on an LiF surface. Capture of one or several electrons may lead to a local positive charge up of the surface. The projectile dynamics depends on the balance between the repulsion due to this charge and the attraction due to the self-image potential. In a simulation that treats electronic and nuclear dynamics simultaneously, we show that the image attraction dominates over the repulsive force. Backscattering of very slow multiply charged projectiles high above the surface without touching it ('trampoline effect') does not take place. Instead, the projectile ion penetrates into the surface or is reflected due to close binary collision with surface ions. The case of a singly charged ion in front of an LiF surface is within the reach of ab-initio calculations. We use a multi-configuration self consistent field (MCSCF) and a multi-reference configuration interaction (MR-CI) method to calculate adiabatic potential energy curves for a system consisting of the projectile ion and an embedded cluster of surface ions. With increasing cluster size, the energy levels of the embedded cluster converge towards the band structure of the infinitely extended solid. Due to

  2. Event Generators for Simulating Heavy Ion Interactions of Interest in Evaluating Risks in Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Pinsky, Lawrence; Andersen, Victor; Empl, Anton; Lee, Kerry; Smirmov, Georgi; Zapp, Neal; Ferrari, Alfredo; Tsoulou, Katerina; Roesler, Stefan; hide

    2005-01-01

    Simulating the Space Radiation environment with Monte Carlo Codes, such as FLUKA, requires the ability to model the interactions of heavy ions as they penetrate spacecraft and crew member's bodies. Monte-Carlo-type transport codes use total interaction cross sections to determine probabilistically when a particular type of interaction has occurred. Then, at that point, a distinct event generator is employed to determine separately the results of that interaction. The space radiation environment contains a full spectrum of radiation types, including relativistic nuclei, which are the most important component for the evaluation of crew doses. Interactions between incident protons with target nuclei in the spacecraft materials and crew member's bodies are well understood. However, the situation is substantially less comfortable for incident heavier nuclei (heavy ions). We have been engaged in developing several related heavy ion interaction models based on a Quantum Molecular Dynamics-type approach for energies up through about 5 GeV per nucleon (GeV/A) as part of a NASA Consortium that includes a parallel program of cross section measurements to guide and verify this code development.

  3. Heavy ion interactions of deformed nuclei. Progress report, May 1, 1984-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberacker, V.E.

    1984-11-01

    This progress report describes the main topics that were investigated during the reporting period: (a) a new microscopic approach to the calculation of heavy ion interaction potentials; (b) the dynamical orientation of deformed heavy nuclei near the distance of closest approach; and (c) the theory of Coulomb fission (project finished in Sept.)

  4. Getting the ion-protein interactions right in molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Mason, Philip E.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, Suppl 1 (2017), S66 ISSN 0175-7571. [IUPAB congress /19./ and EBSA congress /11./. 16.07.2017-20.07.2017, Edinburgh] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ion-protein interaction * molecular dynamics simulations * neutron scattering * insulin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  5. Chemotherapy drugs form ion pores in membranes due to physical interactions with lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad; Tseng, Chih-Yuan; Duszyk, Marek; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate the effects on membrane of the tubulin-binding chemotherapy drugs: thiocolchicoside and taxol. Electrophysiology recordings across lipid membranes in aqueous phases containing drugs were used to investigate the drug effects on membrane conductance. Molecular dynamics simulation of the chemotherapy drug-lipid complexes was used to elucidate the mechanism at an atomistic level. Both drugs are observed to induce stable ion-flowing pores across membranes. Discrete pore current-time plots exhibit triangular conductance events in contrast to rectangular ones found for ion channels. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that drugs and lipids experience electrostatic and van der Waals interactions for short periods of time when found within each other's proximity. The energies from these two interactions are found to be similar to the energies derived theoretically using the screened Coulomb and the van der Waals interactions between peptides and lipids due to mainly their charge properties while forming peptide-induced ion channels in lipid bilayers. Experimental and in silico studies together suggest that the chemotherapy drugs induce ion pores inside lipid membranes due to drug-lipid physical interactions. The findings reveal cytotoxic effects of drugs on the cell membrane, which may aid in novel drug development for treatment of cancer and other diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Nuclear interaction contribution to SEUs in heavy ion energy deposition in the ESA monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Bahamonde, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The effects of nuclear interactions inducing Single Event Upsets in ESA SEU monitor are explored for heavy ion beams of different energies. The experimental and simulated results are compared, the possible causes of disagreement are suggested as well as the future steps to take.

  7. How decays and final-state interactions affect velocity correlations in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieand, K.L.; Pratt, S.E.; Balantekin, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    We study rapidity correlations by calculating two-particle correlation functions and fractorial moments for a simple thermal model of ultrarelativistic-heavy-ion collisions. In this model correlations arise from decays of unstable hadrons and the final-state interactions of the measured particles. These correlations are shown to be similar but smaller than correlations due to phase separation. (orig.)

  8. Ab initio calculation atomics ground state wave function for interactions Ion- Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shojaee, F.; Bolori zadeh, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Ab initio calculation atomics ground state wave function for interactions Ion- Atom Atomic wave function expressed in a Slater - type basis obtained within Roothaan- Hartree - Fock for the ground state of the atoms He through B. The total energy is given for each atom.

  9. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between cell penetrating peptides and plasmid DNA are important for stable non-covalent complexation and intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhya, Archana; Sangave, Preeti C

    2016-10-01

    Cell penetrating peptides are useful tools for intracellular delivery of nucleic acids. Delivery of plasmid DNA, a large nucleic acid, poses a challenge for peptide mediated transport. The paper investigates and compares efficacy of five novel peptide designs for complexation of plasmid DNA and subsequent delivery into cells. The peptides were designed to contain reported DNA condensing agents and basic cell penetrating sequences, octa-arginine (R 8 ) and CHK 6 HC coupled to cell penetration accelerating peptides such as Bax inhibitory mutant peptide (KLPVM) and a peptide derived from the Kaposi fibroblast growth factor (kFGF) membrane translocating sequence. A tryptophan rich peptide, an analogue of Pep-3, flanked with CH 3 on either ends was also a part of the study. The peptides were analysed for plasmid DNA complexation, protection of peptide-plasmid DNA complexes against DNase I, serum components and competitive ligands by simple agarose gel electrophoresis techniques. Hemolysis of rat red blood corpuscles (RBCs) in the presence of the peptides was used as a measure of peptide cytotoxicity. Plasmid DNA delivery through the designed peptides was evaluated in two cell lines, human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and (NIH/3 T3) mouse embryonic fibroblasts via expression of the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene. The importance of hydrophobic sequences in addition to cationic sequences in peptides for non-covalent plasmid DNA complexation and delivery has been illustrated. An alternative to the employment of fatty acid moieties for enhanced gene transfer has been proposed. Comparison of peptides for plasmid DNA complexation and delivery of peptide-plasmid DNA complexes to cells estimated by expression of a reporter gene, SEAP. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The new view of hydrophobic free energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Robert L

    2013-04-17

    In the new view, hydrophobic free energy is measured by the work of solute transfer of hydrocarbon gases from vapor to aqueous solution. Reasons are given for believing that older values, measured by solute transfer from a reference solvent to water, are not quantitatively correct. The hydrophobic free energy from gas-liquid transfer is the sum of two opposing quantities, the cavity work (unfavorable) and the solute-solvent interaction energy (favorable). Values of the interaction energy have been found by simulation for linear alkanes and are used here to find the cavity work, which scales linearly with molar volume, not accessible surface area. The hydrophobic free energy is the dominant factor driving folding as judged by the heat capacity change for transfer, which agrees with values for solvating hydrocarbon gases. There is an apparent conflict with earlier values of hydrophobic free energy from studies of large-to-small mutations and an explanation is given. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Protein-induced bilayer Perturbations: Lipid ordering and hydrophobic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Laursen, Ib; Bohr, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    The host lipid bilayer is increasingly being recognized as an important non-specific regulator of membrane protein function. Despite considerable progress the interplay between hydrophobic coupling and lipid ordering is still elusive. We use electron spin resonance (ESR) to study the interaction...... between the model protein gramicidin and lipid bilayers of varying thickness. The free energy of the interaction is up to −6 kJ/mol; thus not strongly favored over lipid–lipid interactions. Incorporation of gramicidin results in increased order parameters with increased protein concentration...... and hydrophobic mismatch. Our findings also show that at high protein:lipid ratios the lipids are motionally restricted but not completely immobilized. Both exchange on and off rate values for the lipid ↔ gramicidin interaction are lowest at optimal hydrophobic matching. Hydrophobic mismatch of few Å results...

  12. Temperature effects on the hydrophobic force between two ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TUHIN SAMANTA

    2018-03-02

    Mar 2, 2018 ... We perform the molecular dynamics simulations to investigate ... molecular assemblies and in the formation of protein complexes.1–7 One of the important manifestations of the hydrophobic interactions is observed in oil-water.

  13. Electromagnetic Waves Dispersion and Interaction of an Annular Beam-Ion Channel System in Plasma Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixiong Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A linear theory for the electromagnetic properties and interactions of an annular beam-ion channel system in plasma waveguide is presented. The dispersion relations for two families of propagating modes, including the electrostatic and transverse magnetic modes, are derived. The dependencies of the dispersion behavior and interaction for different wave modes on the thickness of the annular beam and betatron oscillation frequency are studied in detail by numerical calculations. The results show that the inner and outer radii of the beam have different influences on propagation properties of the electrostatic and electromagnetic modes with different betatron oscillation parameters. In the weak ion channel situation, the two types of electrostatic waves, that is, space charge and betatron modes, have no interaction with the transverse magnetic modes. However, in the strong ion channel situation, the transverse magnetic modes will have two branches and a low frequency mode emerged as the new branch. In this case, compared with the solid beam case, the betatron modes not only can interact with the high frequency branch at small wavenumber but also can interact with the low frequency branch at large wavenumber.

  14. Cluster ion-surface interactions: from meV to MeV energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordlund, Kai; Meinander, Kristoffer; Jaervi, Tommi T.; Peltola, Jarkko; Samela, Juha [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    The nature of cluster ion-surface interactions changes dramatically with the kinetic energy of the incoming cluster species. In this talk I review some of our recent work on the nature of cluster-surface interactions spanning an energy range from a few MeV/cluster to about 1 MeV/cluster and cluster sizes in the range of 10 - 1000 atoms/cluster. In the energy range of a few MeV/cluster ion, the kinetic energy of the incoming ion is insignificant compared to the energy gained when the surface potential energy at the cluster-surface interface is released and partly translated into kinetic energy. Even in this energy regime I show that surprisingly drastic effects can occur. When the energy of the incoming cluster is raised to a few eV/atom, the kinetic energy of the incoming cluster starts to affect the deposition. It will cause the cluster to entirely reform on impact. When the energy is raised to the range of keV's/cluster, the clusters start to penetrate the sample, fairly similar to conventional ion implantation. However, in dense targets the cluster ions may stick close to each other long enough to cause a significant enhancement of the heat spike in the material. Finally, I show that at kinetic energies around 1 MeV/cluster the cluster enhancement of the heat spike may lead to dramatic surface effects.

  15. Three Dimensional Explicit Model for Cometary Tail Ions Interactions with Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bermani, M. J. F.; Alhamed, S. A.; Khalaf, S. Z.; Ali, H. Sh.; Selman, A. A.

    2009-06-01

    The different interactions between cometary tail and solar wind ions are studied in the present paper based on three-dimensional Lax explicit method. The model used in this research is based on the continuity equations describing the cometary tail-solar wind interactions. Three dimensional system was considered in this paper. Simulation of the physical system was achieved using computer code written using Matlab 7.0. The parameters studied here assumed Halley comet type and include the particle density rho, the particles velocity v, the magnetic field strength B, dynamic pressure p and internal energy E. The results of the present research showed that the interaction near the cometary nucleus is mainly affected by the new ions added to the plasma of the solar wind, which increases the average molecular weight and result in many unique characteristics of the cometary tail. These characteristics were explained in the presence of the IMF.

  16. Direct observation of interaction between plasma ions and grid-excited pulses in a Q-machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Michelsen, Poul

    1970-01-01

    The change in velocity-distribution function caused by interaction between ions and density pulses in a Q-machine is observed experimentally.......The change in velocity-distribution function caused by interaction between ions and density pulses in a Q-machine is observed experimentally....

  17. Potentiometric and spectroscopic study of the interaction of 3d transition metal ions with inositol hexakisphosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Nicolás; Macho, Israel; Gómez, Kerman; González, Gabriel; Kremer, Carlos; Torres, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Among myo-inositol phosphates, the most abundant in nature is the myo-inositol hexakisphosphate, InsP6. Although it is known to be vital to cell functioning, the biochemical research into its metabolism needs chemical and structural analysis of all the protonation, complexation and precipitation processes that it undergoes in the biological media. In view of its high negative charge at physiological level, our group has been leading a thorough research into the InsP6 chemical and structural behavior in the presence of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions essential for life. The aim of this article is to extend these studies, dealing with the chemical and structural features of the InsP6 interaction with biologically relevant 3d transition metal ions (Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)), in a non-interacting medium and under simulated physiological conditions. The metal-complex stability constants were determined by potentiometry, showing under ligand-excess conditions the formation of mononuclear species in different protonation states. Under metal ion excess, polymetallic species were detected for Fe(II), Fe(III), Zn(II) and Cu(II). Additionally, the 31P NMR and UV-vis spectroscopic studies provided interesting structural aspects of the strong metal ion-InsP6 interaction.

  18. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Cemil; Heyda, Jan; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  19. The interaction of a nanoscale coherent helium-ion probe with a crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alfonso, A.J.; Forbes, B.D.; Allen, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    Thickness fringing was recently observed in helium ion microscopy (HIM) when imaging magnesium oxide cubes using a 40 keV convergent probe in scanning transmission mode. Thickness fringing is also observed in electron microscopy and is due to quantum mechanical, coherent, multiple elastic scattering attenuated by inelastic phonon excitation (thermal scattering). A quantum mechanical model for elastic scattering and phonon excitation correctly models the thickness fringes formed by the helium ions. However, unlike the electron case, the signal in the diffraction plane is due mainly to the channeling of ions which have first undergone inelastic thermal scattering in the first few atomic layers so that the origin of the thickness fringes is not due to coherent interference effects. This quantum mechanical model affords insight into the interaction of a nanoscale, focused coherent ion probe with the specimen and allows us to elucidate precisely what is needed to achieve atomic resolution HIM. - Highlights: • Thickness fringing has recently been observed imaging MgO cubes using helium ion microscopy. • A quantum mechanical model for elastic scattering and phonon excitation models the fringes. • The signal is due mainly to the coherent scattering of ions after inelastic thermal scattering. • We elucidate precisely what is needed to achieve atomic resolution HIM

  20. Interactions in ion pairs of protic ionic liquids: Comparison with aprotic ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Shinoda, Wataru; Miran, Md. Shah; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    The stabilization energies for the formation (E form ) of 11 ion pairs of protic and aprotic ionic liquids were studied by MP2/6-311G ** level ab initio calculations to elucidate the difference between the interactions of ions in protic ionic liquids and those in aprotic ionic liquids. The interactions in the ion pairs of protic ionic liquids (diethylmethylammonium [dema] and dimethylpropylammonium [dmpa] based ionic liquids) are stronger than those of aprotic ionic liquids (ethyltrimethylammonium [etma] based ionic liquids). The E form for the [dema][CF 3 SO 3 ] and [dmpa][CF 3 SO 3 ] complexes (−95.6 and −96.4 kcal/mol, respectively) are significantly larger (more negative) than that for the [etma][CF 3 SO 3 ] complex (−81.0 kcal/mol). The same trend was observed for the calculations of ion pairs of the three cations with the Cl − , BF 4 − , TFSA − anions. The anion has contact with the N–H bond of the dema + or dmpa + cations in the most stable geometries of the dema + and dmpa + complexes. The optimized geometries, in which the anions locate on the counter side of the cations, are 11.0–18.0 kcal/mol less stable, which shows that the interactions in the ions pairs of protic ionic liquids have strong directionality. The E form for the less stable geometries for the dema + and dmpa + complexes are close to those for the most stable etma + complexes. The electrostatic interaction, which is the major source of the attraction in the ion pairs, is responsible for the directionality of the interactions and determining the magnitude of the interaction energy. Molecular dynamic simulations of the [dema][TFSA] and [dmpa][TFSA] ionic liquids show that the N–H bonds of the cations have contact with the negatively charged (oxygen and nitrogen) atoms of TFSA − anion, while the strong directionality of the interactions was not suggested from the simulation of the [etma][CF 3 SO 3 ] ionic liquid

  1. Molecular Studies of Complex Soil Organic Matter Interactions with Metal Ions and Mineral Surfaces using Classical Molecular Dynamics and Quantum Chemistry Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, A.; Govind, N.; Laskin, A.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral surfaces have been implicated as potential protectors of soil organic matter (SOM) against decomposition and ultimate mineralization to small molecules which can provide nutrients for plants and soil microbes and can also contribute to the Earth's elemental cycles. SOM is a complex mixture of organic molecules of biological origin at varying degrees of decomposition and can, itself, self-assemble in such a way as to expose some biomolecule types to biotic and abiotic attack while protecting other biomolecule types. The organization of SOM and SOM with mineral surfaces and solvated metal ions is driven by an interplay of van der Waals and electrostatic interactions leading to partitioning of hydrophilic (e.g. sugars) and hydrophobic (e.g., lipids) SOM components that can be bridged with amphiphilic molecules (e.g., proteins). Classical molecular dynamics simulations can shed light on assemblies of organic molecules alone or complexation with mineral surfaces. The role of chemical reactions is also an important consideration in potential chemical changes of the organic species such as oxidation/reduction, degradation, chemisorption to mineral surfaces, and complexation with solvated metal ions to form organometallic systems. For the study of chemical reactivity, quantum chemistry methods can be employed and combined with structural insight provided by classical MD simulations. Moreover, quantum chemistry can also simulate spectroscopic signatures based on chemical structure and is a valuable tool in interpreting spectra from, notably, x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). In this presentation, we will discuss our classical MD and quantum chemistry findings on a model SOM system interacting with mineral surfaces and solvated metal ions.

  2. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1

  3. Water on a Hydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Ryan; Zhu, Mengjue; Poynor, Adele

    2012-02-01

    Hydrophobicity, meaning literally fear of water, is exhibited on the surfaces of non-stick cooking pans and water resistant clothing, on the leaves of the lotus plan, or even during the protein folding process in our bodies. Hydrophobicity is directly measured by determining a contact angle between water and an objects surface. Associated with a hydrophobic surface is the depletion layer, a low density region approximately 0.2 nm thick. We study this region by comparing data found in lab using surface plasmon resonance techniques to theoretical calculations. Experiments use gold slides coated in ODT and Mercapto solutions to model both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces respectively.

  4. Investigation of ion acceleration mechanism through laser-matter interaction in femtosecond domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altana, C., E-mail: altana@lns.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Muoio, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore”, Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Tudisco, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Brandi, F. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cristoforetti, G. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Ferrara, P.; Fulgentini, L. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Giove, D. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Koester, P. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Labate, L. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); and others

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the ion acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in the femtosecond domain has been carried out at the ILIL facility at a laser intensity of up to 2×10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. A Thomson Parabola Spectrometer was used to identify different ion species and measure the energy spectra and the corresponding temperature parameters. We discuss the dependence of the protons spectra upon the structural characteristics of the targets (thickness and atomic mass) and the role of surface versus target bulk during acceleration process. - Highlights: • Ion acceleration mechanism in TNSA regime was investigated. • The energy spectra and the corresponding temperature parameters were measured. • Dependence of the spectra upon the target structural characteristics was discussed.

  5. Single Molecule Sensors to Study Hydrophobic Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Geisler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The nature and magnitude of the hydrophobic interaction is crucial for many technical and biological processes. In the current study a molecular probe was developed which consists of a single polymer that is bound onto the tip of an AFM cantilever in order to study these effects on the molecular scale. In the following, equilibrium forces are measured and factors of influence such as temperature, cosolvents and chemical composition are varied. Thereby, the system under investigation is so sma...

  6. Experiments on the interaction of heavy ions with dense plasma at GSI-Darmstadt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Geissel, M.; Roth, M.; Wetzler, H.; Seelig, W.; Iwase, O.; Spiller, P.; Bock, R.; Suess, W.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.

    1998-01-01

    One of the main objectives of the experimental plasma physics activities at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) are the interaction processes of heavy ions with dense ionized matter. Gas-discharge plasma targets were used for energy loss and charge state measurements in a regime of electron density and temperature up to 10 19 cm -3 and 20 eV, respectively. An improved model of the charge exchange processes in fully ionized hydrogen plasma, taking into account multiple excited electronic configurations which subsequently ionize, has removed the discrepancies of previous theoretical descriptions. The energy loss of the ion beam in partially ionized plasmas such as argon was found to agree very well with our simple theoretical model based on the modified Bethe-Bloch theory. A new setup with a 100 J/5 GW Nd-glass laser now provides access to density ranges up to 10 21 cm -3 and temperatures of up to 100 eV. First results of interaction experiments with laser-produced plasma are presented. To fully exploit the experimental possibilities of the new laser-plasma setup both improved charge state detection systems and better plasma diagnostics are indispensable. Present developments and future possibilities in these fields are presented. This paper summarizes the following contributions: Interaction of heavy-ion beams with laser plasma by C. Stoeckl et al. Energy loss of heavy ions in a laser-produced plasma by M. Roth et al. Charge state measurements of heavy ions passing a laser produced plasma with high time resolution by W. Suess et al. Plasma diagnostics for laser-produced plasma by O. Iwase et al. Future possibilities of plasma diagnostics at GSI by M. Geissel et al. (orig.)

  7. Non-Native Metal Ion Reveals the Role of Electrostatics in Synaptotagmin 1-Membrane Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, Sachin; Nyenhuis, Sarah B; Her, Bin; Srivastava, Atul K; Taylor, Alexander B; Hart, P John; Cafiso, David S; Igumenova, Tatyana I

    2017-06-27

    C2 domains are independently folded modules that often target their host proteins to anionic membranes in a Ca 2+ -dependent manner. In these cases, membrane association is triggered by Ca 2+ binding to the negatively charged loop region of the C2 domain. Here, we used a non-native metal ion, Cd 2+ , in lieu of Ca 2+ to gain insight into the contributions made by long-range Coulombic interactions and direct metal ion-lipid bridging to membrane binding. Using X-ray crystallography, NMR, Förster resonance energy transfer, and vesicle cosedimentation assays, we demonstrate that, although Cd 2+ binds to the loop region of C2A/B domains of synaptotagmin 1 with high affinity, long-range Coulombic interactions are too weak to support membrane binding of individual domains. We attribute this behavior to two factors: the stoichiometry of Cd 2+ binding to the loop regions of the C2A and C2B domains and the impaired ability of Cd 2+ to directly coordinate the lipids. In contrast, electron paramagnetic resonance experiments revealed that Cd 2+ does support membrane binding of the C2 domains in full-length synaptotagmin 1, where the high local lipid concentrations that result from membrane tethering can partially compensate for lack of a full complement of divalent metal ions and specific lipid coordination in Cd 2+ -complexed C2A/B domains. Our data suggest that long-range Coulombic interactions alone can drive the initial association of C2A/B with anionic membranes and that Ca 2+ further augments membrane binding by the formation of metal ion-lipid coordination bonds and additional Ca 2+ ion binding to the C2 domain loop regions.

  8. DFT study of the interaction between DOTA chelator and competitive alkali metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, E; Skelton, A A; Honarparvar, B

    2017-09-01

    1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetracetic acid (DOTA) is an important chelator for radiolabeling of pharmaceuticals. The ability of alkali metals found in the body to complex with DOTA and compete with radio metal ions can alter the radiolabeling process. Non-covalent interactions between DOTA complexed with alkali metals Li + , Na + , K + and Rb + , are investigated with density functional theory using B3LYP and ωB97XD functionals. Conformational possibilities of DOTA were explored with a varying number of carboxylic pendant arms of DOTA in close proximity to the ions. It is found that the case in which four arms of DOTA are interacting with ions is more stable than other conformations. The objective of this study is to explore the electronic structure properties upon complexation of alkali metals Li + Na + , K + and Rb + with a DOTA chelator. Interaction energies, relaxation energies, entropies, Gibbs free energies and enthalpies show that the stability of DOTA, complexed with alkali metals decreases down the group of the periodic table. Implicit water solvation affects the complexation of DOTA-ions leading to decreases in the stability of the complexes. NBO analysis through the natural population charges and the second order perturbation theory, revealed a charge transfer between DOTA and alkali metals. Conceptual DFT-based properties such as HOMO/LUMO energies, ΔE HOMO-LUMO and chemical hardness and softness indicated a decrease in the chemical stability of DOTA-alkali metal complexes down the alkali metal series. This study serves as a guide to researchers in the field of organometallic chelators, particularly, radiopharmaceuticals in finding the efficient optimal match between chelators and various metal ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental evidence of beam-foil plasma creation during ion-solid interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Prashant, E-mail: prashant@iuac.res.in; Nandi, Tapan [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2016-08-15

    Charge state evolution of the energetic projectile ions during the passage through thin carbon foils has been revisited using the X-ray spectroscopy technique. Contributions from the bulk and the solid surface in the charge changing processes have been segregated by measuring the charge state distribution of the projectile ions in the bulk of the target during the ion–solid interaction. Interestingly, the charge state distribution measured in the bulk exhibits Lorentzian profile in contrast to the well-known Gaussian structure observed using the electromagnetic methods and the theoretical predictions. The occurrence of such behavior is a direct consequence of the imbalance between charge changing processes, which has been seen in various cases of the laboratory plasma. It suggests that the ion-solid collisions constitute high-density, localized plasma in the bulk of the solid target, called the beam-foil plasma. This condensed beam-foil plasma is similar to the high-density solar and stellar plasma which may have practical implementations in various fields, in particular, plasma physics and nuclear astrophysics. The present work suggests further modification in the theoretical charge state distribution calculations by incorporating the plasma coupling effects during the ion–solid interactions. Moreover, the multi-electron capture from the target exit surface has been confirmed through comparison between experimentally measured and theoretically predicted values of the mean charge state of the projectile ions.

  10. Possible mechanisms for the interaction of polymeric composite resins with Cu(II) ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zahhhar, A.A.; Abdel-Aziz, H.M.; Siyam, T.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between the active groups of polymeric composite resins such as Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)-ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid disodium salt P(AM-AA)EDTANa 2 , Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)- montmorillonite P(AM-AA)-montmorillonite, and Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)-potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate P(AM-AA)-KNiHCF, with copper sulfate as a test ion has been studied. The spectroscopic studies show that the mechanism of interaction between polymeric composite resins and copper sulfate is a bond formation between the active groups of polymeric chains and copper ion. The bond formation depends on nature of polymeric chains. It was also found that the amide groups form complexes with hydrated cations, while carboxylate group interact by ion exchange mechanism through complex formation. Montmorillonite and hexacyanoferrate of the resins interact with metal ions by ion exchange mechanism

  11. Tarantula toxins use common surfaces for interacting with Kv and ASIC ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kanchan; Zamanian, Maryam; Bae, Chanhyung; Milescu, Mirela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Tilley, Drew C; Sack, Jon T; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Kim, Jae Il; Swartz, Kenton J

    2015-05-07

    Tarantula toxins that bind to voltage-sensing domains of voltage-activated ion channels are thought to partition into the membrane and bind to the channel within the bilayer. While no structures of a voltage-sensor toxin bound to a channel have been solved, a structural homolog, psalmotoxin (PcTx1), was recently crystalized in complex with the extracellular domain of an acid sensing ion channel (ASIC). In the present study we use spectroscopic, biophysical and computational approaches to compare membrane interaction properties and channel binding surfaces of PcTx1 with the voltage-sensor toxin guangxitoxin (GxTx-1E). Our results show that both types of tarantula toxins interact with membranes, but that voltage-sensor toxins partition deeper into the bilayer. In addition, our results suggest that tarantula toxins have evolved a similar concave surface for clamping onto α-helices that is effective in aqueous or lipidic physical environments.

  12. Interaction of low-energy highly charged ions with matter; Wechselwirkung niederenergetischer hochgeladener Ionen mit Materie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzel, Rainer

    2010-06-09

    The thesis presented herein deals with experimental studies of the interaction between highly charged ions and neutral matter at low collision energies. The energy range investigated is of great interest for the understanding of both charge exchange reactions between ions comprising the solar wind and various astrophysical gases, as well as the creation of near-surface nanostructures. Over the course of this thesis an experimental setup was constructed, capable of reducing the kinetic energy of incoming ions by two orders of magnitude and finally focussing the decelerated ion beam onto a solid or gaseous target. A coincidence method was employed for the simultaneous detection of photons emitted during the charge exchange process together with the corresponding projectile ions. In this manner, it was possible to separate reaction channels, whose superposition presumably propagated large uncertainties and systematic errors in previous measurements. This work has unveiled unexpectedly strong contributions of slow radiative decay channels and clear evidence of previously only postulated decay processes in charge exchange-induced X-ray spectra. (orig.)

  13. Kinetics of interaction from low-energy-ion bombardment of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of interaction from low energy oxygen ion bombardment of carbon and Teflon surfaces have been investigated. The surfaces were bombarded with 4.5 to 93 eV oxygen ions and emitted species were observed with a mass spectrometer. To obtain the kinetic information, the ion beam was square pulse modulated and reaction products were observed as a function of time. The kinetic information is contained in the response of the emitted species to the pulsed ion beam. Oxygen bombardment of carbon produced CO in three parallel branches with each following an adsorption-desorption process. The fast branch, with a rate constants of 12,000/sec, appeared to be sputter induced an was absent below about 19 eV. The medium and slow branches, with rate constants of 850/sec and 45/sec respectively, has little energy dependence and appeared to be due to chemical sputtering from two sites. The ratio of the fraction of the medium branch to that of the slow was constant at 1:3. The bombardment of Teflon produced CF in two parallel branches, with one following a series process and the other an adsorb-desorb process. The rate constant of the other branch were 22,000/sec and 7,000/sec and the rate constant of the other branch was 90/sec. The total signal fell monotonically with decreasing ion energy with the fraction for each branch holding constant at 71% for the series and 29% for the adsorb-desorb

  14. Interaction of heavy ions with matter. Progress report and summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boring, J.W.; Johnson, R.E.

    1976-07-01

    The processes that occur when a heavy atomic particle (ion, atom, etc.) interacts with matter, particularly the effects produced on biological systems, were investigated. Results of the investigations over a three year period are reviewed. Areas covered include: energy loss, straggling and stopping; projected ranges and first-order moments; damage cross section for inactivation of RNase; and spatial distribution of damage in RNase. History and objectives of the research program are included

  15. The hydrophobic effect: Molecular dynamics simulations of water confined between extended hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2004-01-01

    Structural and dynamic properties of water confined between two parallel, extended, either hydrophobic or hydrophilic crystalline surfaces of n-alkane C36H74 or n-alcohol C35H71OH, are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Electron density profiles, directly compared with corresponding......-correlation functions reveal that water molecules have characteristic diffusive behavior and orientational ordering due to the lack of hydrogen bonding interactions with the surface. These observations suggest that the altered dynamical properties of water in contact with extended hydrophobic surfaces together...... at both surfaces. The ordering is characteristically different between the surfaces and of longer range at the hydrophilic surface. Furthermore, the dynamic properties of water are different at the two surfaces and different from the bulk behavior. In particular, at the hydrophobic surface, time...

  16. Interchannel interactions in high-energetic radiationless transitions of neon-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, S.; Zschornack, G.; Musiol, G.; Soff, G.

    1990-07-01

    Relativistic K-LL Auger transition rates in intermediate coupling including interchannel interactions are presented for nine ions in the neon-isoelectronic sequence up to uranium. For neutral neon a comparison with experimental data is given. We demonstrate for the first time, that intercontinuum interactions result in a remarkable redistribution of individual transition rates even in high-energetic transitions. For instance, channel mixing shifts the K-L 1 L 1 rate by about 4% and the K-L 3 L 3 (J = 0) rate by about 11% in neon-like uranium, while total Auger rates are almost not affected. (orig.)

  17. Dynamically induced spin-dependent interaction in the elastic scattering of heavy-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, B.; Oertzen, W. von.

    1982-02-01

    Dynamical polarization effect in heavy-ion elastic scattering is investigated in the framework of the coupled-reaction-channel theory. By using the adiabatic approximation at low incident energies, this effect is expressed as a spin-orbit (L vector.S vector) interaction with a L vector and S vector independent radial function. The strength of the (L vector.S vector) interaction calculated for the 12 C + 13 C system is in the same order of magnitude as deduced from experiments and is about two orders of magnitude larger than that obtained from the folding model calculation. (author)

  18. The interactions of high-energy, highly charged Xe ions with buckyballs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Berry, H.G.; Cheng, S.

    1994-01-01

    Ionization and fragmentation have been measured for C 60 molecules bombarded by highly charged (up to 35+) xenon ions with energies ranging up to 625 MeV. The observed mass distribution of positively charged fragments is explained in terms of a theoretical model indicating that the total interaction cross section contains roughly equal contributions from (a) excitation of the giant plasmon resonance, and (b) large-energy-transfer processes that lead to multiple fragmentation of the molecule. Preliminary results of measurements on VUV photons emitted in these interactions are also presented

  19. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., ∼0.9 for 53 MeV B 4+ and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces

  20. Possible mechanisms for interaction of poly electrolytes with ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siyam, T.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between the active groups of water soluble poly electrolytes such as polyacrylamide 'neutral polymers PAM', poly sodium acrylate 'anionic polymer PAANA', polyacrylamide-diallyamine-hydrochloride 'cationic polymer PAM-DAA-HCl and polyacrylamide-diallylethylamine-hydrochloride 'cationic polymer PAM-DAEA-HCl' with copper sulphate has been carried out under different experimental conditions. Spectroscopic studies show that the mechanism of the flock formation due to interaction between the polymer and copper sulphate is a bond formation between the active group of polymeric chains and copper sulphate. This bond formation depends on the nature of polymer chain. It was also found that the amide groups form complexes with hydrated cations, while both carboxylate-and ammonium groups interact by ion-exchange mechanism. The same studies were applied on polyacrylamideacrylic acid resin 'PAM-AA' resin and copper sulphate. The obtained results show that the resin interacts by the same mechanism, where the amide groups form a complex with hydrated cations, while the carboxylic group interacts by ion-exchange mechanism. 1 fig., 1 tab

  1. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, Dan J.; Mattus, Catherine H.; Dole, Leslie Robert

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a 'primer' on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a 'bench-scale' laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the 'primer,' a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

  2. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  3. Motion of the plasma critical layer during relativistic-electron laser interaction with immobile and comoving ion plasma for ion acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahai, Aakash A.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the motion of the plasma critical layer by two different processes in the relativistic-electron laser-plasma interaction regime (a 0 >1). The differences are highlighted when the critical layer ions are stationary in contrast to when they move with it. Controlling the speed of the plasma critical layer in this regime is essential for creating low-β traveling acceleration structures of sufficient laser-excited potential for laser ion accelerators. In Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) scheme, the heavy plasma-ions are fixed and only trace-density light-ions are accelerated. The relativistic critical layer and the acceleration structure move longitudinally forward by laser inducing transparency through apparent relativistic increase in electron mass. In the Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) scheme, the whole plasma is longitudinally pushed forward under the action of the laser radiation pressure, possible only when plasma ions co-propagate with the laser front. In RPA, the acceleration structure velocity critically depends upon plasma-ion mass in addition to the laser intensity and plasma density. In RITA, mass of the heavy immobile plasma-ions does not affect the speed of the critical layer. Inertia of the bared immobile ions in RITA excites the charge separation potential, whereas RPA is not possible when ions are stationary

  4. Measurement of the magnetic interaction between two bound electrons of two separate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Navon, Nir; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-06-19

    Electrons have an intrinsic, indivisible, magnetic dipole aligned with their internal angular momentum (spin). The magnetic interaction between two electronic spins can therefore impose a change in their orientation. Similar dipolar magnetic interactions exist between other spin systems and have been studied experimentally. Examples include the interaction between an electron and its nucleus and the interaction between several multi-electron spin complexes. The challenge in observing such interactions for two electrons is twofold. First, at the atomic scale, where the coupling is relatively large, it is often dominated by the much larger Coulomb exchange counterpart. Second, on scales that are substantially larger than the atomic, the magnetic coupling is very weak and can be well below the ambient magnetic noise. Here we report the measurement of the magnetic interaction between the two ground-state spin-1/2 valence electrons of two (88)Sr(+) ions, co-trapped in an electric Paul trap. We varied the ion separation, d, between 2.18 and 2.76 micrometres and measured the electrons' weak, millihertz-scale, magnetic interaction as a function of distance, in the presence of magnetic noise that was six orders of magnitude larger than the magnetic fields the electrons apply on each other. The cooperative spin dynamics was kept coherent for 15 seconds, during which spin entanglement was generated, as verified by a negative measured value of -0.16 for the swap entanglement witness. The sensitivity necessary for this measurement was provided by restricting the spin evolution to a decoherence-free subspace that is immune to collective magnetic field noise. Our measurements show a d(-3.0(4)) distance dependence for the coupling, consistent with the inverse-cube law.

  5. Early time interaction of lithium ions with the solar wind in the AMPTE mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; Goodrich, C.C.; Mankofsky, A.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1986-01-01

    The early time interaction of an artificially injected lithium cloud with the solar wind is simulated with a one-dimensional hybrid code. Simulation results indicate that the lithium cloud presents an obstacle to the solar wind flow, forming a shock-like interaction region. Several notable features are found: (1) The magnetic field is enhanced up to a factor of about 6 followed by a magnetic cavity downstream. (2) Solar wind ions are slowed down inside the lithium cloud, with substantial upstream reflection. (3) Most of the lithium ions gradually pick up the velocity of the solar wind and move downstream. (4) Intense and short-wavelength electric fields exist ahead of the interaction region. (5) Strong electron heating occurs within the lithium clouds. (6) The convection electric field in the in the solar wind is modulated in the interaction region. The simulation results are in remarkable agreement with in situ spacecraft measurements made during lithium releases in the solar wind by the AMPTE (Active magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers) Program

  6. State-selective charge transfer and excitation in ion-ion interactions at intermediate and high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, R; Purkait, M

    2012-01-01

    Boundary Corrected Continuum Intermediate State (BCCIS) approximation and Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) methods are applied to calculate the charge transfer and excitation cross sections for ion-ion collisions.

  7. Interaction between counter-streaming ion-acoustic solitons and the Langmuir waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basovich, A.Ya.; Gromov, E.M.; Talanov, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction between strong counter-streaming ion-acoustic solitons and the Langmuir waves is considered. At first the Langmuir waves spectrum transformation by counter-streaming ion-acoustic solutions of a preset amplitude e has been found. An increase in the frequency and number of the Langmuir waves due to the Doppler effect in the course of multiple reflection from the f front soliton slope has been determined and the wave number range in which the confinement of the Langmuir waves by counter-streaning solitons is possible has s been found. It is shown that the time of the Langmuir wave transformation into the short-wave region under the effect of the counter-streaming soliton may y be short as compared with the time of the Langmuir wave diffusion into the Landau damping region under the effect of random fields of ion-acoustic waves. In the adiabatic fpproximation changes in the counter-streaming ion acoustic parameters of solitons owing to the Langmuir waves have been

  8. Thermodynamic approach of the poly-azine - f element ions interaction in aqueous conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miguirditchian, M.; Guillaumont, D.; Moisy, P.; Guillaneux, D.; Madic, C.

    2004-01-01

    2-Amino-4,6-di-(pyridine-2-yl)-1,3,5-triazine (Adptz) was considered as a model compound for selective aromatic nitrogen extractants (poly-azines) of minor actinides. Thermodynamic data ( ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 ) were systematically acquired for the complexation of lanthanide(III) ions as well as yttrium(III) and americium(III) in hydro-alcoholic medium. Two complementary experimental approaches were followed. Stability constants for the formation of the 1:1 complexes were evaluated from UV-visible spectrophotometry titration experiments, whereas enthalpies and entropies of reaction were obtained consistently from either temperature dependence experiments or micro-calorimetry. The interaction of Adptz with lanthanide(III) and yttrium(III) ions was found to be essentially ionic and dependent upon the hydration and size of the ion. As for americium(III) ion, stability constant and enthalpy of complexation was significantly larger. This was attributed to a partial electronic transfer from the ligand to empty orbitals of the cation. DFT calculations support this interpretation. (authors)

  9. Interaction of intersteller pick-up ions with the solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobius, E.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Scholer, M.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of interstellar pick-up ions with the solar wind is studied by comparing a model for the velocity distribution function of pick-up ions with actual measurements of He + ions in the solar wind. The model includes the effects of pitch-angle diffusion due to interplanetary Alfven waves, adiabatic deceleration in the expanding solar wind and the radial variation of the source function. It is demonstrated that the scattering mean free path is in the range ≤0.1 AU and that energy diffusion can be neglected as compared with adiabatic deceleration. The effects of adiabatic focusing, of the radial variation of the neutral density and of an variation of the solar wind velocity with distance from the Sun are investigated. With the correct choice of these parameters the authors can model the measured energy spectra of the pick-up ions does not vary with the solar wind velocity and the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field for a given local neutral gas density and ionization rate. Therefore, the comparison of the model distributions with the measurements leads to a quantitative determination of the local interstellar gas density

  10. Interaction of Fast Ions with Global Plasma Modes in the C-2 Field Reversed Configuration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Artem; Dettrick, Sean; Clary, Ryan; Korepanov, Sergey; Thompson, Matthew; Trask, Erik; Tuszewski, Michel

    2012-10-01

    A high-confinement operating regime [1] with plasma lifetimes significantly exceeding past empirical scaling laws was recently obtained by combining plasma gun edge biasing and tangential Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) in the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment [2, 3]. We present experimental and computational results on the interaction of fast ions with the n=2 rotational and n=1 wobble modes in the C-2 FRC. It is found that the n=2 mode is similar to quadrupole magnetic fields in its detrimental effect on the fast ion transport due to symmetry breaking. The plasma gun generates an inward radial electric field, thus stabilizing the n=2 rotational instability without applying the quadrupole magnetic fields. The resultant FRCs are nearly axisymmetric, which enables fast ion confinement. The NBI further suppresses the n=2 mode, improves the plasma confinement characteristics, and increases the plasma configuration lifetime [4]. The n=1 wobble mode has relatively little effect on the fast ion transport, likely due to the approximate axisymmetry about the displaced plasma column. [4pt] [1] M. Tuszewski et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012).[0pt] [2] M. Binderbauer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 045003 (2010).[0pt] [3] H.Y. Guo et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056110 (2011).[0pt] [4] M. Tuszewski et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056108 (2012)

  11. Reactivities of some thiol collectors and their interactions with Ag (+1) ion by molecular modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yekeler, Hulya; Yekeler, Meftuni

    2004-01-01

    The most commonly used collectors for sulfide minerals in the mining industry are the thiol collectors for the recovery of these minerals from their associated gangues by froth flotation. For this reason, a great deal of attention has been paid to understand the attachment mechanism of thiol collectors to metal sulfide surfaces. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/3-21G* and B3LYP/6-31++G** levels were employed to propose the flotation responses of these thiol collectors, namely, diethyl dithiocarbamate, ethyl dithiocarbamate, ethyl dithiocarbonate, ethyl trithiocarbonate and ethyl dithiophosphate ions, and to study the interaction energies of these collectors with Ag (+1) ion in connection to acanthite (Ag 2 S) mineral. The calculated interaction energies, ΔE, were interpreted in terms of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies of the isolated collector ions. The results show that the HOMOs are strongly localized to the sulfur atoms and the HOMO energies can be used as a reactivity descriptor for the flotation ability of the thiol collectors. Using the HOMO and ΔE energies, the reactivity order of the collectors is found to be (C 2 H 5 ) 2 NCS 2 - > C 2 H 5 NHCS 2 - > C 2 H 5 OCS 2 - > C 2 H 5 SCS 2 - > (C 2 H 5 O)(OH)PS 2 - . The theoretically obtained results are in good agreement with the experimental data reported

  12. Electron-electron interaction and transfer ionization in fast ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitkiv, A B

    2008-01-01

    Recently it was pointed out that electron capture occurring in fast ion-atom collisions can proceed via a mechanism which earlier was not considered. In the present paper we study this mechanism in more detail. Similarly as in radiative capture, where the electron transfer occurs due to the interaction with the radiation field and proceeds via emission of a photon, within this mechanism the electron capture is caused by the interaction with another atomic electron leading mainly to the emission of the latter. In contrast to the electron-electron Thomas capture, this electron-electron (E-E) mechanism is basically a first-order one having similarities to the kinematic and radiative capture channels. It also possesses important differences with the latter two. Leading to transfer ionization, this first-order capture mechanism results in the electron emission mainly in the direction opposite to the motion of the projectile ion. The same, although less pronounced, feature is also characteristic for the momenta of the target recoil ions produced via this mechanism. It is also shown that the action of the E-E mechanism is clearly seen in recent experimental data on the transfer ionization in fast proton-helium collisions.

  13. Molecular models of alginic acid: Interactions with calcium ions and calcite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Thomas D.; Cygan, Randall T.; Mitchell, Ralph

    2006-07-01

    Cation binding by polysaccharides is observed in many environments and is important for predictive environmental modeling, and numerous industrial and food technology applications. The complexities of these cation-organic interactions are well suited for predictive molecular modeling and the analysis of conformation and configuration of polysaccharides and their influence on cation binding. In this study, alginic acid was chosen as a model polymer system and representative disaccharide and polysaccharide subunits were developed. Molecular dynamics simulation of the torsion angles of the ether linkage between various monomeric subunits identified local and global energy minima for selected disaccharides. The simulations indicate stable disaccharide configurations and a common global energy minimum for all disaccharide models at Φ = 274 ± 7°, Ψ = 227 ± 5°, where Φ and Ψ are the torsion angles about the ether linkage. The ability of disaccharide subunits to bind calcium ions and to associate with the (101¯4) surface of calcite was also investigated. Molecular models of disaccharide interactions with calcite provide binding energy differences for conformations that are related to the proximity and residence densities of the electron-donating moieties with calcium ions on the calcite surface, which are controlled, in part, by the torsion of the ether linkage between monosaccharide units. Dynamically optimized configurations for polymer alginate models with calcium ions were also derived.

  14. Interaction of slow highly-charged ions with metals and insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Interaction of slow highly charged ions with insulator as well as metallic surfaces is discussed. In addition to the usual flat surface targets, studies with thin foils having a multitude of straight holes of ∼100 nm in diameter (micro-capillary foil) are introduced, which provide various unique information on the above surface interaction. In the case of an insulator micro-capillary foil, a so-called guiding effect was observed, where slow highly charged ions can transmit through the capillary tunnel keeping their initial charge state even when the capillary axis is tilted against the incident beam. A similar guiding effect has recently been found for slow highly-charged ions transmitted through a single tapered glass capillary. In both cases, the guiding effects are expected to be governed by a self-organized charging and discharging of the inner-wall of the insulator capillary. One of the prominent features of this guiding effect with the tapered capillary is the formation of a nano-size beam, which can be applied in various fields of science including surface nano-modification/analysis, nano-surgery of living cells, etc

  15. Coulombic interactions during advection-dominated transport of ions in porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Stolze, Lucien; Rolle, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    bench-scale experiments and numerical simulations. The investigation aims at quantifying the key role of small-scale electrostatic interactions in flow-through systems, especially when advection is the dominant mass-transfer process. Considering dilute solutions of strong electrolytes (e.g., MgCl2......Solute transport of charged species in porous media is significantly affected by the electrochemical migration term resulting from the charge-induced interactions among dissolved ions and with solid surfaces. Therefore, the characterization of such Coulombic interactions and their effect...... on multicomponent ionic transport is of critical importance for assessing the fate of charged solutes in porous media. In this work we present a detailed investigation of the electrochemical effects during conservative multicomponent ionic transport in homogeneous and heterogeneous domains by means of laboratory...

  16. Comments on the current status and possible future directions of research on heavy-ion interactions near the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satchler, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper contains comments on the current status and possible future directions of research on heavy-ion interactions near the Coulomb barrier. Fusion reactions, elastic and inelastic scattering and transfer reactions are discussed

  17. DNMR theory for ND+4ion. Pt. 1. Tunneling effects and first order approximations in quadrupole interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blicharski, J.S.; Lalowicz, Z.T.; Sobol, W.

    1978-01-01

    This work presents results of the calculations of shape of deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance for ND + 4 ion. Tunneling effect and quadrupole interaction influence considerably the line shape. (S.B.)

  18. Effects of the ion-solid interaction in glow discharge vapour deposition polymerization of pyromellitic dianhydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggioni, G.; Carturan, S.; Rigato, V.; Pieri, U.

    2000-01-01

    Low energy He ion bombardment of pyromellitic dianhydride monomer used in glow discharge vapour deposition polymerization (GDVDP) of polyimide coatings and its effects on the film deposition process have been studied. The sublimation of the monomer molecules and the simultaneous formation of a damaged, carbon-rich surface layer on the target are discussed from a theoretical point of view based on simulations of the ion-solid interaction. Optical emission and mass spectrometry have been used to analyse the species emitted from the target. In order to study the time evolution of the PMDA target damage, the deposition rate of monomer molecules has been monitored. FT-IR spectroscopy has been used to determine the molecular damaging of the target monomer and deposited films

  19. Study of electron vibrational interaction parameters in chlorophosphate activated with Eu2+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhoyar, Priyanka D.; Dhoble, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of theoretical study of photoluminescence of Eu 2+ ions activated chlorophosphate M 5.17 (PO 4 ) 3 Cl 5 :Eu 2+ with M = Ca, Sr and Ba estimating electron-vibrational interaction (EVI) parameters such as Huang–Rhys factor, effective phonon energy, Stokes shift and zero phonon line position. Validity of the calculated result was established by modeling the emission line which was found to be in good agreement with the measured photoluminescence spectrum of Eu 2+ doped chorophosphates. - Highlights: • The EVI parameters such as Huang–Rhys factor, effective phonon energy and zero phonon line position were estimated. • Eu 2+ ion emission observed in chlorophosphate. • Material analyzed in this work have intermediate Huang–Rhys factor, high Stokes shift and low effective phonon energy

  20. Comet 73P Measurements of Solar Wind Interactions, Cometary Ion Pickup, and Spatial Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J. A.; Lepri, S. T.; Rubin, M.; Combi, M. R.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2015-12-01

    Several fragments of Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 passed near the Earth following a 2006 disintegration episode. Unique measurements regarding the charge state composition and the elemental abundances of both cometary and heliospheric plasma were made during this time by both the ACE/SWICS and Wind/STICS sensors. As the solar wind passed through the neutral cometary coma, it experienced charge exchange that was observed as an increase in the ratio of He+/He++. In addition, particles originating from fragments trailing the major cometary objects were ionized and picked up by the solar wind. The cometary material can be identified by the concentrations of water-group pickup ions having a mass-per-charge ratio of 16-18 amu/e, indicating that these are actively sublimating fragments. Here we present an analysis of cometary composition, spatial distribution, directionality, and heliospheric interactions with a focus on Helium, Carbon (C/O), and water-group ions.

  1. Equilibrium studies on interactions of rare earth ions with phytic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, K.S.; Shah, S.A.; Aqra, F.M.A.M.; Tabassum, S.; Zaidi, S.A.A.; Benlian, D.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between phytic acid and trivalent rare earth metal ions, viz., Ce 3+ , Pr 3+ , Nd 3+ , Sm 3+ , Gd 3+ , Tb 3+ , Dy 3+ and HO 3+ has been investigated potentiometrically at 25degC. The proton-ligand stability constants (pK Y H ) of phytic acid and the stability constants (logK) of metal complexes formed in aqueous medium (μ = 0.1 M NaClO 4 ) have been evaluated. The results indicate that eight protons of phytic acid are highly acidic, two are weakly acidic and two very weakly acidic, titrable in the pH ranges 1.2-4.9, 5.0-8.15 and 8.3-11.0 respectively. The stability of each phytic acid-lanthanide ion complex decreases with an increase in pH and follows the usual trend through the series. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs

  2. Hylleraas-Configuration Interaction study of the 1S ground state of the negative Li ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, James S

    2017-12-28

    In a previous work Sims and Hagstrom [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 224312 (2014)] reported Hylleraas-Configuration Interaction (Hy-CI) method variational calculations for the neutral atom and positive ion 1 S ground states of the beryllium isoelectronic sequence. The Li - ion, nominally the first member of this series, has a decidedly different electronic structure. This paper reports the results of a large, comparable calculation for the Li - ground state to explore how well the Hy-CI method can represent the more diffuse L shell of Li - which is representative of the Be(2sns) excited states as well. The best non-relativistic energy obtained was -7.500 776 596 hartree, indicating that 10 - 20 nh accuracy is attainable in Hy-CI and that convergence of the r 12 r 34 double cusp is fast and that this correlation type can be accurately represented within the Hy-CI model.

  3. The interactions of high-energy, highly-charged ions with fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Berry, H.G.; Cheng, S.

    1996-01-01

    In 1985, Robert Curl and Richard Smalley discovered a new form of carbon, the fullerene, C 60 , which consists of 60 carbon atoms in a closed cage resembling a soccer ball. In 1990, Kritschmer et al. were able to make macroscopic quantities of fullerenes. This has generated intense activity to study the properties of fullerenes. One area of research involves collisions between fullerenes and atoms, ions or electrons. In this paper we describe experiments involving interactions between fullerenes and highly charged ions in which the center-of-mass energies exceed those used in other work by several orders of magnitude. The high values of projectile velocity and charge state result in excitation and decay processes differing significantly from those seen in studies 3 at lower energies. Our results are discussed in terms of theoretical models analogous to those used in nuclear physics and this provides an interesting demonstration of the unity of physics

  4. Decoupling of the hyperfine interactions in /sup 12/B ions by the external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, K; Tanihata, I; Kogo, S; Tanaka, M [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1976-11-01

    It is known that product nuclei /sup 12/B (Isup(..pi..) = 1/sup +/, Tsub(1/2) = 20 ms) by the /sup 11/B(d,p)/sup 12/B reaction are sizably oriented if one selects recoil nuclei at the incident deuteron energy and the recoil angle thetasub(R). The hyperfine interactions in recoil ions in flight in free space affect the nuclear orientation. In this experiment, the nuclear orientation in the recoil ions implanted into a stopper were measured as a function of strength of a static magnetic field applied in normal to the reaction plane. A thin single crystal of magnesium was used as the recoil stopper, of which the hexagonal c-axis was set in parallel to the external field.

  5. Transferred hyperfine interaction between the rare-earth ions and the fluorine nuclei in rare-earth trifluorides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P. E.; Nevald, Rolf; Guggenheim, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    The isotropic and anisotropic transferred hyperfine interactions between F ions in the two chemically inequivalent sites and the rare-earth ions (R) have been derived from 19F NMR measurements in the temperature region 100-300 K on single crystals of TbF3 and DyF3. The isotropic interactions are ...... to vary only slightly with temperature. They are further assigned to definite R's in the unit cell, which cannot be done from macroscopic magnetic measurements....

  6. Preliminary results of a broad beam RF ion source with electron plasma interaction. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelaziz, M E; Zakhary, S G; Ghanem, A A; Abdel-Ghaffar, A M [Ion Sources and Accelerators Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    A new design of a broad beam RF ion source is made to be capable to deliver wide and uniform beam with currents reaching (100 {mu} A up to 30 mA) at extraction voltages (200 V up to 2 kV). Its plasma intensifying system is made with the addition of electrons from an immersed filament in the discharge and axial magnetic field (70 up to 300 G). A uniform beam distribution is made with a planner graphite cathode which has a number of holes arranged to produce perveance matching with the normal Gaussian distribution of the beam density. These holes are arranged in a consequent orbits with equal distance between the adjacent holes in each orbit. These holes increase in diameter with increasing the orbit radius. This allows increasing the extracted ion currents at the source outer edges and decreases its value at the source inner region; producing wide and uniform beam which is suitable for material modifications. The beam profiles are traced with electromechanical scanner and X-Y recorder. The perveance matching is found to produce a beam uniformity of =66% of its width which reaches =6 cm. The variation of the output currents are with the variation of extraction voltages, magnetic field, discharge pressure and electron injection into the plasma. The extracted current increases with the increase of the discharge pressure, RF power and magnetic field intensity. The influence of electron plasma interaction is found to have a great effect on increasing the ion currents to about four times its value without electron interaction, however, this increase is limited due to presence of breakdown at V{sub ex} > 2 kV. The simple design of this source, its cleanness due to the use of pyrex discharge bottle, easy operation and maintenance adds other features to this broad beam type ion source which makes it suitable for metallurgical applications in broad beam accelerators. 6 figs.

  7. Interaction of d(10) metal ions with thioether ligands: a thermodynamic and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Andrea; Peralta, Elena; Valiente, Manuel; Tavagnacco, Claudio; Endrizzi, Francesco; Tolazzi, Marilena

    2013-05-07

    Thermodynamic parameters of complex formation between d(10) metal ions, such as Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Ag(+), and the macrocyclic thioether 1,4,7-trithiacyclononane ([9]AneS3) or the monodentate diethylsulfide (Et(2)S), in acetonitrile (AN) at 298.15 K, were studied by a systematic methodology including potentiometry, calorimetry and polarography. [9]AneS3 is able to form complexes with all the target cations, Et(2)S only reacts with Hg(2+) and Ag(+). Mononuclear ML(j) (j = 1, 2) complexes are formed with all the metal ions investigated, where the affinity order is Hg(2+) > Ag(+) > Cd(2+) ≈ Zn(2+) when L = [9]AneS3 and Hg(2+) > Ag(+) when L = Et(2)S. Enthalpy and entropy values are generally negative, as a consequence of both metal ion interactions with neutral ligands, the reagents' loss of degrees of freedom and the release of solvating molecules. DFT calculations on the complexes formed with [9]AneS3 in vacuum and in AN are also carried out, to correlate experimental and theoretical thermodynamic values and to highlight the interplay between the direct metal-thioether interaction and the solvation effects. Trends obtained for the stability constants and enthalpies of the 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 complexes in solvent well reproduce the experimental ones for all the divalent metal ion complexes with [9]AneS3 and indicate the release of 3 AN molecules in the formation of each consecutive octahedral complex. In addition, calculated and experimental values for Ag(+) complex formation in solution suggest that in AgL(2) species [9]AneS3 ligands are not both tridentate.

  8. Learning ion-solid interactions hands-on: An activity based, inquiry oriented, graduate course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Experimental work, using state of the art instrumentation, is integrated with lectures in a 'real life', learning by discovery approach, in the Ion-Solid Interactions graduate/undergraduate course offered by the Department of Physics of University of Central Florida. The lecture component of the course covers the underlying physical principles, and related scientific and technological applications, associated with the interaction of energetic ions with matter. In the experimental section the students form small groups and perform a variety of projects, experimental and computational, as part of a participative, inquiry oriented, learning process. In the most recent offering of the class, the students deposited a compound semiconductor thin film by dual-gun sputtering deposition, where each group aimed at a different stoichiometry of the same compound (Zn 1-x S x O y ). Then they analyzed the composition using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, measured electrical transport properties using Hall effect and conductivity measurements, and determined the band gap using spectrophotometry. Finally the groups shared their results and each wrote a 'journal-like' technical article describing the entire work. In a different assignment, each group also developed a Monte Carlo computer program ('TRIM-like') to simulate the penetration of ions into a solid, in ion implantation, calculating the stopping cross-sections with approximate models, taught in class, which can be analytically solved. The combination of classroom/laboratory activities is very well received by the students. They gain real life experience operating state of the art equipment, and working in teams, while performing research-like projects, and simultaneously they learn the theoretical foundations of the discipline

  9. Isospin effect of coulomb interaction on momentum dissipation in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianye; Guo Wenjun; Li Xiguo; Xing Yongzhong

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigate the isospin effect of Coulomb interaction on the momentum dissipation or nuclear stopping in the intermediate energy heavy ion collisions by using the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. The calculated results show that the Coulomb interaction induces obviously the reductions of the momentum dissipation. The authors also find that the variation amplitude of momentum dissipation induced by the Coulomb interaction depends sensitively on the form and strength of symmetry potential. However, the isospin effect of Coulomb interaction on the momentum dissipation is less than that induced by the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section. In this case, Coulomb interaction does not changes obviously the isospin effect of momentum dissipation induced by the in-medium two-body collision. In particular, the Coulomb interaction is preferable for standing up the isospin effect of in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section on the momentum dissipation and reducing the isospin effect of symmetry potential on it, which is important for obtaining the feature about the sensitive dependence of momentum dissipation on the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section and weakly on the symmetry potential. (author)

  10. Ion-nanostructure interaction. Comparing simulation and experiment towards surface structuring using nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland-Moritz, Henry

    2016-10-18

    Nanotechnology is a buzzword in context of the proceeding miniaturization of devices and their components. Nanoparticles (NPs) can nowadays easily be synthesized from different material compositions by different chemical and physical processes. However, most of these techniques work close to or at the thermal equilibrium. One subsequent approach to tune materials beyond equilibrium conditions is ion beam irradiation. An important effect of this approach is sputtering. Sputtering is enhanced in NPs compared to their bulk counterparts due to their large surface-to-volume ratio, especially when the ion range matches the NP size. In this work, the sputtering effects of Ar{sup +} and Ga{sup +} ion irradiated Au nanoparticles are investigated in detail by Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a variety of experiments. The sputtering of Ar{sup +} and Ga{sup +} irradiated Au NPs was investigated as a function of ion energy, NP size and impact parameter by the MC code iradina and MD code parcas. The simulation results are directly compared to experiments using high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of Au NPs on top of Si, whereat the sputter yields are significantly enhanced compared to the MC simulations. Additionally, the interaction of NPs and substrate were investigated by Rutherford backscatter spectrometry (RBS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A new MC code was developed to study the redeposition of sputtered atoms of Ga{sup +} irradiated Au NP arrays on neighboring NPs. The redeposition can lead to growth of NPs with diameters of 1 nm in vicinity of ∝50 nm NP. These simulations are directly compared to an in situ experiment. Nanostructures, spherical NPs as well as nanowires (NWs) are used as irradiation masks to structure lithium niobate (LNO) using the ion beam enhanced etching (IBEE) technique. The aspect ratio of the obtained structures can be enhanced by a second IBEE step

  11. Hydrophobic core substitutions in calbindin D9k

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Jönsson, M; Bifulco, G

    1998-01-01

    Hydrophobic core residues have a marked influence on the Ca2+-binding properties of calbindin D9k, even though there are no direct contacts between these residues and the bound Ca2+ ions. Eleven different mutants with substitutions in the hydrophobic core were produced, and their equilibrium Ca2+...... that the hydrophobic core residues promote Ca2+ binding both by contributing to the preformation of the Ca2+ sites in the apo state and by preferentially stabilizing the Ca2+-bound state.......Hydrophobic core residues have a marked influence on the Ca2+-binding properties of calbindin D9k, even though there are no direct contacts between these residues and the bound Ca2+ ions. Eleven different mutants with substitutions in the hydrophobic core were produced, and their equilibrium Ca2...... that the mutation causes only very minimal perturbations in the immediate vicinity of residue 61. Substitutions of alanines or glycines for bulky residues in the center of the core were found to have significant effects on both Ca2+ affinity and dissociation rates. These substitutions caused a reduction in affinity...

  12. Interaction of High Flash Point Electrolytes and PE-Based Separators for Li-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Andreas; Kaufmann, Christoph; Müller, Marcus; Hanemann, Thomas

    2015-08-27

    In this study, promising electrolytes for use in Li-ion batteries are studied in terms of interacting and wetting polyethylene (PE) and particle-coated PE separators. The electrolytes are characterized according to their physicochemical properties, where the flow characteristics and the surface tension are of particular interest for electrolyte-separator interactions. The viscosity of the electrolytes is determined to be in a range of η = 4-400 mPa∙s and surface tension is finely graduated in a range of γL = 23.3-38.1 mN∙m(-1). It is verified that the technique of drop shape analysis can only be used in a limited matter to prove the interaction, uptake and penetration of electrolytes by separators. Cell testing of Li|NMC half cells reveals that those cell results cannot be inevitably deduced from physicochemical electrolyte properties as well as contact angle analysis. On the other hand, techniques are more suitable which detect liquid penetration into the interior of the separator. It is expected that the results can help fundamental researchers as well as users of novel electrolytes in current-day Li-ion battery technologies for developing and using novel material combinations.

  13. Water structuring and hydroxide ion binding at the interface between water and hydrophobic walls of varying rigidity and van der waals interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vácha, Robert; Zangi, R.; Engberts, J. B. F. N.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 20 (2008), s. 7689-7692 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR(CZ) GD203/05/H001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : molecular dynamics * hydroxide * water interfaces Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.396, year: 2008

  14. Effect and interactions of commercial additives and chloride ion in copper electrowinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wenyuan

    This thesis is to understand and compare the effects and interactions of modified polysaccharide (HydroStar), polyacrylamide (Cyquest N-900) and chloride ion on copper electrowinning. A study of the nucleation and growth was conducted in a synthetic electrolyte (40 g/L Cu, 160 g/L H2SO 4, 20 mg/L Cl-) with the addition of HydroStar or Cyquest N-900 using potential step measurements. The current responses generated were compared to theoretical models of nucleation and growth mechanisms. The nucleation and growth mechanism changed as function of potential and the presence of organic additives. The nucleation and growth mechanisms were confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At low overpotentials, electrodeposition from the electrolyte without additives proceeded by progressive nucleation with three-dimensional (3-D) growth. The addition of HydroStar produced smaller nuclei and changed the mechanism to progressive nucleation and 2-D growth. Cyquest N-900 used there appeared to be progressive nucleation with 2-D growth and polarize the cathodes. In addition, instantaneous nucleation under diffusion control occurred at high overpotentials. Chloride ion and its interaction with HydroStar and Cyquest N-900 were further characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The trends observed from Nyquist plots and equivalent circuit models were consistent with the CV results. Chloride, on its own, depolarized copper electrodeposition, while chloride ion associated with Cyquest N-900 inhibited the reaction. It is proposed that Cl- acted as a bridging ligand between copper and Cyquest N-900. The addition of HydroStar depolarized copper deposition, but it did not interact with.

  15. Electrochemical and visco metric studies on some copolymer/ homopolymer poly electrolytes and transition metal ion interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajabi, F. H.; Frahani, B. V.

    2003-01-01

    Some random three-component copolymers have been prepared by condensing of formaldehyde with various aromatic amines. The compositions of the copolymers have been determined by known methods. selective complexation of copolymers have been carried out with PAA, PEI, PVP and some transition metal ions (e.g., Cu 2+ )by adding the components in various sequences. The relative complexation ability of different -NH 2 groups, associated with the various comonomer units, has been interpreted in terms of the these complexes has been studied by conductometry. potentiometry and viscometry techniques. A scheme has presented to explain the mode of interaction of the various components

  16. Evidence for strong Breit interaction in dielectronic recombination of highly charged heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Kavanagh, Anthony P; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A; Li, Yueming; Kato, Daiji; Currell, Fred J; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2008-02-22

    Resonant strengths have been measured for dielectronic recombination of Li-like iodine, holmium, and bismuth using an electron beam ion trap. By observing the atomic number dependence of the state-resolved resonant strength, clear experimental evidence has been obtained that the importance of the generalized Breit interaction (GBI) effect on dielectronic recombination increases as the atomic number increases. In particular, it has been shown that the GBI effect is exceptionally strong for the recombination through the resonant state [1s2s(2)2p(1/2)](1).

  17. Calculation of helium-like ion dipole susceptibility with account for electron interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal'chikov, V.G.; Tkachev, A.N.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical estimations of electron interaction effects are carried out for helium-like ions inserted in a homogeneous electric field. Statistical dipole polarizations and hyperpolarizations are calculated for the main state taking into account corrections of the first order to approximation of noninteracting electrons. Summation according to the full spectrum of intermediate states is carried out by the method of Coulomb-Green functions (CGF), that permitted to use analytical methods to calculate matrix elements of correlation diagrams. When calculating polarizations, relativistic corrections ∼(αZ) 2 , where α - the constant of a fine structure, Z-nucleus charge, are taken into account

  18. Near target residues from the peripheral interaction of relativistic heavy ions with bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleklett, K.; Morrissey, D.J.; Loveland, W.; Moody, K.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1979-01-01

    Isotopic distributions for the near target residues Au and Tl were measured radioanalytically for the reaction of 8.0-GeV 20 Ne ions with 209 Bi. The isotopic production cross section for Au and Tl isotopes were calculated by using a macroscopic abrasion-ablation model and a microscopic intranuclear cascade-evaporation model. The importance of the neutron skin in determining the yield of these products from the peripheral interactions was also explored in the framework of the macroscopic model. 3 figures

  19. Probing in-medium spin–orbit interaction with intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jun; Li, Bao-An

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating for the first time both the spin and isospin degrees of freedom explicitly in transport model simulations of intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions, we observe that a local spin polarization appears during collision process. Most interestingly, it is found that the nucleon spin up–down differential transverse flow is a sensitive probe of the spin–orbit interaction, providing a novel approach to probe both the density and isospin dependence of the in-medium spin–orbit coupling that is important for understanding the structure of rare isotopes and synthesis of superheavy elements

  20. Electron, ion and atomic beams interaction with solid high-molecular dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milyavskij, V V; Skvortsov, V A [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). High Energy Density Research Center

    1997-12-31

    A mathematical model was constructed and numerical investigation performed of the interaction between intense electron, ion and atomic beams and solid high-molecular dielectrics under various boundary conditions. The model is based on equations of the mechanics of continuum, electrodynamics and kinetics, describing the accumulation and relaxation of space charge and shock-wave processes, as well as the evolution of electric field in the sample. A semi-empirical procedure is proposed for the calculation of energy deposition by electron beam in a target in the presence of a non-uniform electric field. (author). 4 figs., 2 refs.

  1. Study on interaction of swift cluster ion beam with matter and irradiation effect (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yuichi; Shibata, Hiromi

    2010-07-01

    This review covers results of the 'Study of interaction on swift cluster ion beam with matter and irradiation effect' supported by the Interorganization Atomic Energy Research Program from 2006FY to 2008FY. It is composed of a research abstract for each sub-group with viewgraphs which were presented at the group meeting held on March 2009 or 'Meeting of High LET radiation -From fundamental study among physics, chemistry and biology to medical applications-' sponsored by Japan Society of Radiation Chemistry, cosponsored by this research group. (author)

  2. Λ flow in heavy-ion collisions: The role of final-state interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.Q.; Ko, C.M.

    1996-01-01

    Lambda flow in Ni+Ni collisions at SIS energies is studied in the relativistic transport model (RVUU 1.0). It is found that for primordial lambdas the flow is considerably weaker than proton flow. The inclusion of final-state interactions, especially the propagation of lambdas in the mean-field potential, brings the lambda flow close to that of protons. An accurate determination of the lambda flow in heavy-ion experiments is shown to be very useful for studying lambda properties in dense matter. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Interaction of slow and highly charged ions with surfaces: formation of hollow atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolterfoht, N; Grether, M; Spieler, A; Niemann, D [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin (Germany). Bereich Festkoerperphysik; Arnau, A

    1997-03-01

    The method of Auger spectroscopy was used to study the interaction of highly charged ions with Al and C surfaces. The formation of hollow Ne atoms in the first surface layers was evaluated by means of a Density Functional theory including non-linear screening effects. The time-dependent filling of the hollow atom was determined from a cascade model yielding information about the structure of the K-Auger spectra. Variation of total intensities of the L- and K-Auger peaks were interpreted by the cascade model in terms of attenuation effects on the electrons in the solid. (author)

  4. Hydrophobic interactions of phenoxazine modulators with bovine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    effect of the displacing activities of hydroxyzine and acetylsalicylic acid on the ... concentration of the drugs, higher numbers being obtained at higher drug ... derivatives4 and have been claimed to be nervous system depressants, in particular ...

  5. Analytical and Numerical Studies of the Complex Interaction of a Fast Ion Beam Pulse with a Background Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion beam pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, high energy physics, etc. Comprehensive analytical, numerical, and experimental studies are underway to investigate the complex interaction of a fast ion beam with a background plasma. The positively charged ion beam attracts plasma electrons, and as a result the plasma electrons have a tendency to neutralize the beam charge and current. A suite of particle-in-cell codes has been developed to study the propagation of an ion beam pulse through the background plasma. For quasi-steady-state propagation of the ion beam pulse, an analytical theory has been developed using the assumption of long charge bunches and conservation of generalized vorticity. The analytical results agree well with the results of the numerical simulations. The visualization of the data obtained in the numerical simulations shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry into and ex it from the plasma

  6. Influence of Hydrophobicity on Polyelectrolyte Complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadman, Kazi [Department; amp, Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Wang, Qifeng [Department; amp, Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Chen, Yaoyao [Department; amp, Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Keshavarz, Bavand [Department; Jiang, Zhang [X-ray; Shull, Kenneth R. [Department; amp, Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States

    2017-11-16

    Polyelectrolyte complexes are a fascinating class of soft materials that can span the full spectrum of mechanical properties from low viscosity fluids to glassy solids. This spectrum can be accessed by modulating the extent of electrostatic association in these complexes. However, to realize the full potential of polyelectrolyte complexes as functional materials their molecular level details need to be clearly correlated with their mechanical response. The present work demonstrates that by making simple amendments to the chain architecture it is possible to affect the salt responsiveness of polyelectrolyte complexes in a systematic manner. This is achieved by quaternizing poly(4-vinylpyridine) (QVP) with methyl, ethyl and propyl substituents– thereby increasing the hydrophobicity with increasing side chain length– and complexing them with a common anionic polyelectrolyte, poly(styrene sulfonate). The mechanical 1 ACS Paragon Plus Environment behavior of these complexes is compared to the more hydrophilic system of poly(styrene sulfonate) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium) by quantifying the swelling behavior in response to salt stimuli. More hydrophobic complexes are found to be more resistant to doping by salt, yet the mechanical properties of the complex remain contingent on the overall swelling ratio of the complex itself, following near universal swelling-modulus master curves that are quantified in this work. The rheological behavior of QVP complex coacervates are found to be approximately the same, only requiring higher salt concentrations to overcome strong hydrophobic interactions, demonstrating that hydrophobicity can be used as an important parameter for tuning the stability of polyelectrolyte complexes in general, while still preserving the ability to be processed “saloplastically”.

  7. Pre-compound emission in low-energy heavy-ion interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sharma Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental studies have shown the presence of pre-compound emission component in heavy ion reactions at low projectile energy ranging from 4 to 7 MeV/nucleons. In earlier measurements strength of the pre-compound component has been estimated from the difference in forward-backward distributions of emitted particles. Present measurement is a part of an ongoing program on the study of reaction dynamics of heavy ion interactions at low energies aimed at investigating the effect of momentum transfer in compound, precompound, complete and incomplete fusion processes in heavy ion reactions. In the present work on the basis of momentum transfer the measurement of the recoil range distributions of heavy residues has been used to decipher the components of compound and pre-compound emission processes in the fusion of 16O projectile with 159Tb and 169Tm targets. The analysis of recoil range distribution measurements show two distinct linear momentum transfer components corresponding to pre-compound and compound nucleus processes are involved. In order to obtain the mean input angular momentum associated with compound and pre-compound emission processes, an online measurement of the spin distributions of the residues has been performed. The analysis of spin distribution indicate that the mean input angular momentum associated with pre-compound products is found to be relatively lower than that associated with compound nucleus process. The pre-compound components obtained from the present analysis are consistent with those obtained from the analysis of excitation functions.

  8. Pre-compound emission in low-energy heavy-ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Shuaib, Mohd.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, Devendra P.; Unnati; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2017-11-01

    Recent experimental studies have shown the presence of pre-compound emission component in heavy ion reactions at low projectile energy ranging from 4 to 7 MeV/nucleons. In earlier measurements strength of the pre-compound component has been estimated from the difference in forward-backward distributions of emitted particles. Present measurement is a part of an ongoing program on the study of reaction dynamics of heavy ion interactions at low energies aimed at investigating the effect of momentum transfer in compound, precompound, complete and incomplete fusion processes in heavy ion reactions. In the present work on the basis of momentum transfer the measurement of the recoil range distributions of heavy residues has been used to decipher the components of compound and pre-compound emission processes in the fusion of 16O projectile with 159Tb and 169Tm targets. The analysis of recoil range distribution measurements show two distinct linear momentum transfer components corresponding to pre-compound and compound nucleus processes are involved. In order to obtain the mean input angular momentum associated with compound and pre-compound emission processes, an online measurement of the spin distributions of the residues has been performed. The analysis of spin distribution indicate that the mean input angular momentum associated with pre-compound products is found to be relatively lower than that associated with compound nucleus process. The pre-compound components obtained from the present analysis are consistent with those obtained from the analysis of excitation functions.

  9. Influence of electrolyte ion-solvent interactions on the performances of supercapacitors porous carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaux, C.; Matei Ghimbeu, C.; Dahbi, M.; Anouti, M.; Lemordant, D.; Béguin, F.; Vix-Guterl, C.; Raymundo-Piñero, E.

    2014-10-01

    The development of advanced and safe electrochemical supercapacitors or hybrid supercapacitors combining a battery electrode material such as graphite and a porous carbon electrode implies the use of new electrolytes containing a tetra-alkylammonium or lithium salt dissolved preferentially in a safe and environmentally friendly solvent such as alkylcarbonates. In those systems, the carbon porosity of the activated carbon electrode controls the electrochemical behavior of the whole device. In this work, it is demonstrated that electrolytes containing highly polarizing ions such as Li+ dissolved in polar solvents such as alkylcarbonates do not completely loss their solvation shell at the opposite of what is observed for poorly solvated cations like TEABF4. As a consequence, the optimal carbon pore size for obtaining the largest energy density, while keeping a high power density, is wider when strongly solvated cations, like Li+ are used than for conventional organic electrolytes using acetonitrile as solvent and TEA+ as salt cations. TEA+ cations are easily desolvated and hence are able to penetrate in small pores matching the dimensions of bare ions. The dissimilarity of behavior of alkylcarbonates and acetonitrile based electrolytes highlights the importance of ion-solvent interactions when searching the optimal porous texture for the electrode material.

  10. Solvation of positive ions in water: the dominant role of water-water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krekeler, Christian; Site, Luigi Delle

    2007-01-01

    Local polarization effects, induced by monovalent and divalent positive ions in water, influence (and in turn are influenced by) the large-scale structural properties of the solvent. Experiments can only distinguish this process of interplay in a generic qualitative way. Instead, first-principles calculations can address the question at both the electronic and atomistic scale, accounting for electronic polarization as well as geometrical conformations. For this reason we study the extension of the scales' interconnection by means of first-principle Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics applied to systems of different size. In this way we identify the general aspects dominating the physics of the first solvation shell and their connection to the effects related to the formation of the outer shells and eventually the bulk. We show that while the influence of the ions is extended to the first shell only, the water-water interaction is instead playing a dominant role even within the first shell independently of the size or the charge of the ion. (fast track communication)

  11. A selective chemosensor for fluoride ion and its interaction with Calf Thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Al Masum, Abdulla; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Islam, Md Maidul; Alam, Md Akhtarul; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2017-05-05

    The amido-Schiff base 1 (N 1 , N 3 -bis (2-nitrobenzylidene)benzene-1,3-dicabohydrazide) containing a CONH group and CHN linkage has been synthesized by the condensation between isophthalic acid dihydrazide and o-nitrobenzaldehyde. This molecule can act as a fluoride ion sensor with high selectivity and sensitivity. Presence of nitro group in the phenyl ring may be responsible for the detection of fluoride ion visually with a dramatic color change from colorless to deep red in aqueous dimethyl sulphoxide solution. This Schiff base can be used as test kit for sensing of fluoride ion in the solid state. Compound 1 can detect fluoride also in commercially available toothpaste. As the compound has adequate solubility in DMSO-water mixture (7:93, v/v) and having some hydrogen bond donor and acceptor centers, we have investigated its nature of binding with Calf Thymus-DNA (CT-DNA) using theoretical molecular modelling and other experimental methods like UV-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroic and thermal melting studies. Thermodynamic parameters have been obtained using the well known Van't Hoff's equation. From both theoretical and experimental findings it has been observed that it can interact effectively with CT-DNA with binding energy -7.55kcal/mol to -7.50kcal/mol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fast ions and hot electrons in the laser--plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitomer, S.J.; Jones, R.D.; Begay, F.; Ehler, A.W.; Kephart, J.F.; Kristal, R.

    1986-01-01

    Data on the emission of energetic ions produced in laser--matter interactions have been analyzed for a wide variety of laser wavelengths, energies, and pulse lengths. Strong correlation has been found between the bulk energy per AMU for fast ions measured by charge cups and the x-ray-determined hot electron temperature. Five theoretical models have been used to explain this correlation. The models include (1) a steady-state spherically symmetric fluid model with classical electron heat conduction, (2) a steady-state spherically symmetric fluid model with flux limited electron heat conduction, (3) a simple analytic model of an isothermal rarefaction followed by a free expansion, (4) the lasneX hydrodynamics code [Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 2, 85 (1975)], calculations employing a spherical expansion and simple initial conditions, and (5) the lasneX code with its full array of absorption, transport, and emission physics. The results obtained with these models are in good agreement with the experiments and indicate that the detailed shape of the correlation curve between mean fast ion energy and hot electron temperature is due to target surface impurities at the higher temperatures (higher laser intensities) and to the expansion of bulk target material at the lower temperatures (lower laser intensities)

  13. Study of the interaction between heavy ions and integrated circuits using a pulsed laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.; Fouillat, P.; Pouget, V.; Lapuyade, H.

    2002-01-01

    A new pulsed laser beam equipment dedicated to the characterization of integrated circuit is presented. Using ultra-short laser pulses is a convenient way to simulate experimentally the spatial environment of integrated circuits when interactions with heavy ions occur. This experimental set-up can be considered as a complementary tool for particle accelerators to evaluate the hardness assurance of integrated circuits for space applications. These particles generate temporally electrical disturbance called Single Event Effect (SEE). The theoretical approach of an equivalence between heavy ions and a laser pulses is discussed. The experimental set-up and some relevant operational methodologies are presented. Experimental results demonstrate that the induced electrical responses due to an heavy ion or a laser pulse are quite similar. Some sensitivity mappings of integrated circuits provided by this test bench illustrate the capabilities and the limitations of this laser-based technique. Contrary to the particle accelerators, it provides useful information concerning the spatial and temporal dependences of SEE mechanisms. (authors)

  14. The nuclear interaction analysis methods for diagnostics of high power ion beam technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryzhkov, V A; Grushin, I I; Remnev, G E [Nuclear Physics Inst., Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The complex of Nuclear Interaction Analysis Methods including charged particle activation analysis (CPAA and HIAA), spectrometry of ion induced gamma-emission (PIGE and HIIGE) , characteristic X-ray emission (PIXE), and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), have been used for diagnostics of the High Power Ion Beam (HPIB) assisted technologies. Accelerated ion beams from the EG-2.5 electrostatic generator and U-120 cyclotron were used for implementation of the techniques. The complex allows a lot of problems of elemental and isotopic analysis to be addressed. First, it is the determination of micro- and macrocomponents of modified materials; second, determination of surface density of thin films, multilayers and coatings, total surface gaseous contamination and amounts of the elements implanted in specimens; third, measurement of concentration depth profiles of the elements. Experiments have shown that the preferable application of nuclear analysis methods allows us to avoid the considerable errors arising when the concentration depth profiles of elements are measured by SIMS or AES in studies of mass transfer processes induced by HPIBs. (author). 1 tab., 2 figs., 3 refs.

  15. Magnetism of singlet - singlet ions interacting with an electron gas: application to PrAl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palermo, L.

    1986-01-01

    Various magnetic quantities are investigated for a system consisting of singlet-singlet ions interacting with an electron gas. In obtaining the magnetic state equations, the molecular field approximation is used. At T=0, an onset magnetic order condition in function of crystal field and exchange parameters and eletronic density of states at Fermi level is derived. A parametric study of the model is performed numerically. Main results are shown on diagrams. From the experimental data existent in the literature for magnetisation, susceptibility and magnetic specific heat of the PrAl 2 , a fitting with the model predictions is obtained using the following parameters: exchange interaction: 611meV; crystal field parameters: 2,5 meV; band with: 10 eV (of a rectangular density of states with 0,8 el/atom). (author) [pt

  16. Source Population and Acceleration Location of Suprathermal Heavy Ions in Corotating Interaction Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filwett, R. J.; Desai, M. I. [University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Dayeh, M. A.; Broiles, T. W. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2017-03-20

    We have analyzed the ∼20–320 keV nucleon{sup −1} suprathermal (ST) heavy ion abundances in 41 corotating interaction regions (CIRs) observed by the Wind spacecraft from 1995 January to 2008 December. Our results are: (1) the CIR Fe/CNO and NeS/CNO ratios vary with the sunspot number, with values being closer to average solar energetic particle event values during solar maxima and lower than nominal solar wind values during solar minima. The physical mechanism responsible for the depleted abundances during solar minimum remains an open question. (2) The Fe/CNO increases with energy in the 6 events that occurred during solar maximum, while no such trends are observed for the 35 events during solar minimum. (3) The Fe/CNO shows no correlation with the average solar wind speed. (4) The Fe/CNO is well correlated with the corresponding upstream ∼20–320 keV nucleon{sup −1} Fe/CNO and not with the solar wind Fe/O measured by ACE in 31 events. Using the correlations between the upstream ∼20–40 keV nucleon{sup −1} Fe/CNO and the ∼20–320 keV nucleon{sup −1} Fe/CNO in CIRs, we estimate that, on average, the ST particles traveled ∼2 au along the nominal Parker spiral field line, which corresponds to upper limits for the radial distance of the source or acceleration location of ∼1 au beyond Earth orbit. Our results are consistent with those obtained from recent surveys, and confirm that CIR ST heavy ions are accelerated more locally, and are at odds with the traditional viewpoint that CIR ions seen at 1 au are bulk solar wind ions accelerated between 3 and 5 au.

  17. Potential interaction between zinc ions and a cyclodextrin-based diclofenac formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Imad I; El-Sabawi, Dina; Abdel Jalil, Mariam

    2016-03-01

    Complexes of diclofenac sodium (DF-Na) with hydroxypropyl betacyclodextrin (HPβCD) were prepared by co-evaporation in a 1:1 ratio and characterized in light of previously reported data. Phase solubility diagrams were obtained for DF-Na with HPβCD in the presence and absence of zinc ions. Dissolution profiles were obtained for DF-Na and its HPβCD complex at acidic (pH 1.2) as well as in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8), in the presence and absence of zinc. HPβCD, as expected, was shown to improve the dissolution of DF-Na in acidic medium but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). The presence of zinc ions decreased the in vitro dissolution of DF-HPβCD complex in acidic medium (pH 1.2) but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). It was confirmed that the precipitate that was formed by zinc ions in the presence of HPβCD and DF-Na contained no cyclodextrin and most likely it was a mixture of the complexes: DF 2 -Zn and DF-Zn with some molecules of water. In vivo experiments on rats have shown that HPβCD has no statistically significant effect on absorption or bioavailability of DF-Na in spite of the observed improvement of its in vitro dissolution by HPβCD. Moreover, zinc ions were shown to decrease the absorption rate of DF-Na in rats model but did neither significantly alter the absorption nor bioavailability of DF-HPβCD complex. The zinc induced precipitates of DF were shown to have significantly different crystalline properties when HPβCD was present. Therefore, the pharmaceutical details of a DF-Na preparation should be considered when designing the formulation and predicting possible interaction between DF-Na (or other potential NSAIDs) and zinc metal.

  18. Elastic and radiative heavy quark interactions in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uphoff, Jan; Fochler, Oliver; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Elastic and radiative heavy quark interactions with light partons are studied with the partonic transport model named the Boltzmann approach to multiparton scatterings (BAMPSs). After calculating the cross section of radiative processes for finite masses in the improved Gunion–Bertsch approximation and verifying this calculation by comparing to the exact result, we study elastic and radiative heavy quark energy loss in a static medium of quarks and gluons. Furthermore, the full 3 + 1D space–time evolution of gluons, light quarks, and heavy quarks in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are calculated with BAMPS including elastic and radiative heavy flavor interactions. Treating light and heavy particles on the same footing in the same framework, we find that the experimentally measured nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons and D mesons at the LHC can be simultaneously described. In addition, we calculate the heavy flavor evolution with an improved screening procedure from hard-thermal-loop calculations and confront the results with experimental data of the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow of heavy flavor particles at the RHIC and the LHC. (paper)

  19. Intra-pulse transition between ion acceleration mechanisms in intense laser-foil interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padda, H.; King, M.; Gray, R. J.; Powell, H. W.; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, B.; Wilson, R.; Dance, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Butler, N. M. H.; Capdessus, R.; McKenna, P., E-mail: paul.mckenna@strath.ac.uk [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Stockhausen, L. C. [Centro de Laseres Pulsados (CLPU), Parque Cientifico, Calle del Adaja s/n. 37185 Villamayor, Salamanca (Spain); Carroll, D. C. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yuan, X. H. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of IFSA (CICIFSA), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Neely, D. [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Multiple ion acceleration mechanisms can occur when an ultrathin foil is irradiated with an intense laser pulse, with the dominant mechanism changing over the course of the interaction. Measurement of the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of energetic protons is used to investigate the transition from radiation pressure acceleration to transparency-driven processes. It is shown numerically that radiation pressure drives an increased expansion of the target ions within the spatial extent of the laser focal spot, which induces a radial deflection of relatively low energy sheath-accelerated protons to form an annular distribution. Through variation of the target foil thickness, the opening angle of the ring is shown to be correlated to the point in time transparency occurs during the interaction and is maximized when it occurs at the peak of the laser intensity profile. Corresponding experimental measurements of the ring size variation with target thickness exhibit the same trends and provide insight into the intra-pulse laser-plasma evolution.

  20. Reactivities of some thiol collectors and their interactions with Ag (+1) ion by molecular modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yekeler, Hulya; Yekeler, Meftuni

    2004-09-15

    The most commonly used collectors for sulfide minerals in the mining industry are the thiol collectors for the recovery of these minerals from their associated gangues by froth flotation. For this reason, a great deal of attention has been paid to understand the attachment mechanism of thiol collectors to metal sulfide surfaces. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/3-21G* and B3LYP/6-31++G** levels were employed to propose the flotation responses of these thiol collectors, namely, diethyl dithiocarbamate, ethyl dithiocarbamate, ethyl dithiocarbonate, ethyl trithiocarbonate and ethyl dithiophosphate ions, and to study the interaction energies of these collectors with Ag (+1) ion in connection to acanthite (Ag{sub 2}S) mineral. The calculated interaction energies, {delta}E, were interpreted in terms of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies of the isolated collector ions. The results show that the HOMOs are strongly localized to the sulfur atoms and the HOMO energies can be used as a reactivity descriptor for the flotation ability of the thiol collectors. Using the HOMO and {delta}E energies, the reactivity order of the collectors is found to be (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2}NCS{sub 2}{sup -} > C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NHCS{sub 2}{sup -} > C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OCS{sub 2}{sup -} > C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SCS{sub 2}{sup -} > (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O)(OH)PS{sub 2}{sup -}. The theoretically obtained results are in good agreement with the experimental data reported.

  1. Oblique Interaction of Dust-ion Acoustic Solitons with Superthermal Electrons in a Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Shahida; Mahmood, Shahzad; Adnan, Muhammad; Qamar, Anisa

    2018-01-01

    The oblique interaction between two dust-ion acoustic (DIA) solitons travelling in the opposite direction, in a collisionless magnetized plasma composed of dynamic ions, static dust (positive/negative) charged particles and interialess kappa distributed electrons is investigated. By employing extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) method, Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations are derived for the right and left moving low amplitude DIA solitons. Their trajectories and corresponding phase shifts before and after their interaction are also obtained. It is found that in negatively charged dusty plasma above the critical dust charged to ion density ratio the positive polarity pulse is formed, while below the critical dust charged density ratio the negative polarity pulse of DIA soliton exist. However it is found that only positive polarity pulse of DIA solitons exist for the positively charged dust particles case in a magnetized nonthermal plasma. The nonlinearity coefficient in the KdV equation vanishes for the negatively charged dusty plasma case for a particular set of parameters. Therefore, at critical plasma density composition for negatively charged dust particles case, the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equations having cubic nonlinearity coefficient of the DIA solitons, and their corresponding phase shifts are derived for the left and right moving solitons. The effects of the system parameters including the obliqueness of solitons propagation with respect to magnetic field direction, superthermality of electrons and concentration of positively/negatively static dust charged particles on the phase shifts of the colliding solitons are also discussed and presented numerically. The results are applicable to space magnetized dusty plasma regimes.

  2. Influence of hydrophobic modification in alginate-based hydrogels for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Soumitra

    Alginate has been exploited commercially for decades in foods, textiles, paper, pharmaceutical industries, and also as a detoxifier for removing heavy metals. Alginate is also popular in cell encapsulation because of its relatively mild gelation protocol and simple chemistry with which biological active entities can be immobilized. Surface modification of alginate gels has been explored to induce desired cell interactions with the gel matrix. These modifications alter the bulk properties, which strongly determine on how cells feel and response to the three-dimensional microenvironment. However, there is a need to develop strategies to engineer functionalities into bulk alginate hydrogels that not only preserve their inherent qualities but are also less toxic. In this thesis, our main focus was to optimize the mechanical properties of alginate-based hydrogels, and by doing so control the performance of the biomaterials. In the first scheme, we used alginate and hydrophobically modified ethyl hydroxy ethyl cellulose as components in interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) gels. The second network was used to control gelation time and rheological properties. We believe these experiments also may provide insight into the mechanical and structural properties of more complex biopolymer gels and naturally-occurring IPNs. Next, we worked on incorporating a hydrophobic moiety directly into the alginate chain, resulting in materials for extended release of hydrophobic drugs. We successfully synthesized hydrophobically modified alginate (HMA) by attaching octylamine groups onto the alginate backbone by standard carbodiimide based amide coupling reaction. Solubility of several model hydrophobic drugs in dilute HMA solutions was found to be increased by more than an order of magnitude. HMA hydrogels, prepared by crosslinking the alginate chains with calcium ions, were found to exhibit excellent mechanical properties (modulus ˜100 kPa) with release extended upto 5 days. Ability

  3. Accelerator-Based Studies of Heavy Ion Interactions Relevant to Space Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Zeitlin, C.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the effects of space radiation on the crews of long duration space missions must take into account the interactions of high energy atomic nuclei in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding and in the bodies of the astronauts. These heavy ions (i.e. heavier than hydrogen), while relatively small in number compared to the total galactic cosmic ray (GCR) charged particle flux, can produce disproportionately large effects by virtue of their high local energy deposition: a single traversal by a heavy charged particle can kill or, what may be worse, severely damage a cell. Research into the pertinent physics and biology of heavy ion interactions has consequently been assigned a high priority in a recent report by a task group of the National Research Council. Fragmentation of the incident heavy ions in shielding or in the human body will modify an initially well known radiation field and thereby complicate both spacecraft shielding design and the evaluation of potential radiation hazards. Since it is impractical to empirically test the radiation transport properties of each possible shielding material and configuration, a great deal of effort is going into the development of models of charged particle fragmentation and transport. Accurate nuclear fragmentation cross sections (probabilities), either in the form of measurements with thin targets or theoretical calculations, are needed for input to the transport models, and fluence measurements (numbers of fragments produced by interactions in thick targets) are needed both to validate the models and to test specific shielding materials and designs. Fluence data are also needed to characterize the incident radiation field in accelerator radiobiology experiments. For a number of years, nuclear fragmentation measurements at GCR-like energies have been carried out at heavy ion accelerators including the LBL Bevalac, Saturne (France), the Synchrophasotron and Nuklotron (Dubna, Russia), SIS-18 (GSI, Germany), the

  4. Oligopeptidase B from Serratia proteamaculans. III. Inhibition analysis. Specific interactions with metalloproteinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, A G; Khairullin, R F; Kolomijtseva, G Ya; Rumsh, L D

    2012-03-01

    Inhibition of the novel oligopeptidase B from Serratia proteamaculans (PSP) by basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, Zn2+ ions, and o- and m-phenanthroline was investigated. A pronounced effect of calcium ions on the interaction of PSP with inhibitors was demonstrated. Inversion voltamperometry and atomic absorption spectrometry revealed no zinc ions in the PSP molecule. Hydrophobic nature of the enzyme inhibition by o- and m-phenanthroline was established.

  5. Tri- and tetra-substituted cyclen based lanthanide(III) ion complexes as ribonuclease mimics: a study into the effect of log Ka, hydration and hydrophobicity on phosphodiester hydrolysis of the RNA-model 2-hydroxypropyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Ann-Marie; Plush, Sally E; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2015-05-28

    A series of tetra-substituted 'pseudo' dipeptide ligands of cyclen (1,4,7,10,-tetraazacyclododecane) and a tri-substituted 3'-pyridine ligand of cyclen, and the corresponding lanthanide(III) complexes were synthesised and characterised as metallo-ribonuclease mimics. All complexes were shown to promote hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond of 2-hydroxypropyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP, τ1/2 = 5.87 × 10(3) h), a well known RNA mimic. The La(III) and Eu(III) tri-substituted 3'-pyridine lanthanide(III) complexes being the most efficient in promoting such hydrolysis at pH 7.4 and at 37 °C; with τ1/2 = 1.67 h for La(III) and 1.74 h for Eu(III). The series was developed to provide the opportunity to investigate the consequences of altering the lanthanide(III) ion, coordination ability and hydrophobicity of a metallo-cavity on the rate of hydrolysis using the model phosphodiester, HPNP, at 37 °C. To further provide information on the role that the log Ka of the metal bound water plays in phosphodiester hydrolysis the protonation constants and the metal ion stability constants of both a tri and tetra-substituted 3'pyridine complex were determined. Our results highlighted several key features for the design of lanthanide(III) ribonucelase mimics; the presence of two metal bound water molecules are vital for pH dependent rate constants for Eu(III) complexes, optimal pH activity approximating physiological pH (∼7.4) may be achieved if the log Ka values for both MLOH and ML(OH)2 species occur in this region, small changes to hydrophobicity within the metallo cavity influence the rate of hydrolysis greatly and an amide adjacent to the metal ion capable of forming hydrogen bonds with the substrate is required for achieving fast hydrolysis.

  6. Fluoroalkyl and Alkyl Chains Have Similar Hydrophobicities in Binding to the “Hydrophobic Wall” of Carbonic Anhydrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Mecinovic; P Snyder; K Mirica; S Bai; E Mack; R Kwant; D Moustakas; A Heroux; G Whitesides

    2011-12-31

    entropic contributions to the hydrophobic effect in this representative system of protein and ligand: hydrophobic interactions, here, seem to comprise approximately equal contributions from enthalpy (plausibly from strengthening networks of hydrogen bonds among molecules of water) and entropy (from release of water from configurationally restricted positions).

  7. Preparation of inorganic hydrophobic catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong; Wang, Heyi; Du, Yang

    2009-04-01

    In order to catalyse the oxidation of tritium gas, two inorganic hydrophobic catalysts are prepared. Under room temperature, the catalysed oxidation ratio of 0.3%-1% (V/V) hydrogen gas in air is higher than 95%. Pt-II inorganic hydrophobic catalysts has obviously better catalysing ability than Pt-PTFE and lower ability than Pt-SDB in H 2 -HTO isotopic exchange, because the pressure resistence of Pt-II is much higher than Pt-SDB, it can be used to the CECE cell of heavy water detritium system. (authors)

  8. Particle emission induced by the interaction of highly charged slow Xe-ions with a SiO2 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiwietz, G.; Skogvall, B.; Schneider, D.; Clark, M.; DeWitt, D.; McDonald, J.

    1991-01-01

    Sputtering of surface atoms by low energy (a few keV) heavy ions is a commonly used technique in material science and applied physics. In general, sputtering occurs via nuclear energy transfer processes and is determined mainly by the atom-atom interaction potentials. In the energy range of interest these potentials depend only slightly on the charge state of one collision partner if the other is neutral. The development of new ion-sources, however, allows for the use of ions with charged states of q > 50. For these highly charged ions it is conceivable that electronic processes come into play as well. If, for example, the density of charged surface atoms exceeds a certain limit, then particle emission can occur via the electrostatic repulsion of target atoms, the so-called Coulomb explosion. Indications for such electronic effects have been found in a few investigations of ion-induced sputtering Si (q q+ ). However, the order of magnitude of this effect is not clear until now. In this work we present preliminary data on sputtering, ion backscattering, electron and photon emission from SiO 2 surface induced by incident Xe ions of very high charge states (q=30--50). The experiment was performed at the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a time-of-flight (TOF) ion analyzer-system from the Hahn-Meitner-Institute, Berlin

  9. Interactions of Native Cyclodextrins with Metal Ions and Inorganic Nanoparticles: Fertile Landscape for Chemistry and Materials Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochowicz, Daniel; Kornowicz, Arkadiusz; Lewiński, Janusz

    2017-11-22

    Readily available cyclodextrins (CDs) with an inherent hydrophobic internal cavity and hydrophilic external surface are macrocyclic entities that display a combination of molecular recognition and complexation properties with vital implications for host-guest supramolecular chemistry. While the host-guest chemistry of CDs has been widely recognized and led to their exploitation in a variety of important functions over the last five decades, these naturally occurring macrocyclic systems have emerged only recently as promising macrocyclic molecules to fabricate environmentally benign functional nanomaterials. This review surveys the development in the field paying special attention to the synthesis and emerging uses of various unmodified CD-metal complexes and CD-inorganic nanoparticle systems and identifies possible future directions. The association of a hydrophobic cavity of CDs with metal ions or various inorganic nanoparticles is a very appealing strategy for controlling the inorganic subunits properties in the very competitive water environment. In this review we provide the most prominent examples of unmodified CDs' inclusion complexes with organometallic guests and update the research in this field from the past decade. We discuss also the coordination flexibility of native CDs to metal ions in CD-based metal complexes and summarize the progress in the synthesis and characterization of CD-metal complexes and their use in catalysis and sensing as well as construction of molecular magnets. Then we provide a comprehensive overview of emerging applications of native CDs in materials science and nanotechnology. Remarkably, in the past few years CDs have appeared as attractive building units for the synthesis of carbohydrate metal-organic frameworks (CD-MOFs) in a combination of alkali-metal cations. The preparation of this new class of highly porous materials and their applications in the separation of small molecules, the loading of drug molecules, as well as

  10. Influence of the inter-ion interaction on the phase diagrams of the 1D Falicov-Kimball system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Z.; Lemański, R.

    2004-05-01

    A model of itinerant, spinless electrons interacting with ions via the on-site Coulomb potential U, modified by the inter-ionic nearest-neighbour interaction V, is studied on the one-dimensional infinite lattice. Only periodical configurations of the ions with a limited number of lattice sites in a unit cell and their mixtures are taken into account. Phases whose energies reach minimum values for given electron and ion chemical potentials are selected and depicted for a set of model parameters. Then the results are translated into the ion density-electron density canonical phase diagrams and summarized in the electrondensity-U plane. The diagrams clearly show how various kinds of charge ordering evolve with V, starting from V=0 case, that represents the standard Falicov-Kimball model discussed previously.

  11. Influence of the inter-ion interaction on the phase diagrams of the 1D Falicov-Kimball system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajek, Z.; Lemanski, R.

    2004-01-01

    A model of itinerant, spinless electrons interacting with ions via the on-site Coulomb potential U, modified by the inter-ionic nearest-neighbour interaction V, is studied on the one-dimensional infinite lattice. Only periodical configurations of the ions with a limited number of lattice sites in a unit cell and their mixtures are taken into account. Phases whose energies reach minimum values for given electron and ion chemical potentials are selected and depicted for a set of model parameters. Then the results are translated into the ion density-electron density canonical phase diagrams and summarized in the electron density-U plane. The diagrams clearly show how various kinds of charge ordering evolve with V, starting from V=0 case, that represents the standard Falicov-Kimball model discussed previously

  12. Influence of the inter-ion interaction on the phase diagrams of the 1D Falicov-Kimball system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajek, Z. E-mail: gajek@int.pan.wroc.pl; Lemanski, R

    2004-05-01

    A model of itinerant, spinless electrons interacting with ions via the on-site Coulomb potential U, modified by the inter-ionic nearest-neighbour interaction V, is studied on the one-dimensional infinite lattice. Only periodical configurations of the ions with a limited number of lattice sites in a unit cell and their mixtures are taken into account. Phases whose energies reach minimum values for given electron and ion chemical potentials are selected and depicted for a set of model parameters. Then the results are translated into the ion density-electron density canonical phase diagrams and summarized in the electron density-U plane. The diagrams clearly show how various kinds of charge ordering evolve with V, starting from V=0 case, that represents the standard Falicov-Kimball model discussed previously.

  13. Water flow in carbon-based nanoporous membranes impacted by interactions between hydrated ions and aromatic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Shi, Guosheng; Fang, Haiping

    2017-02-24

    Carbon-based nanoporous membranes, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene/graphene oxide and graphyne, have shown great potential in water desalination and purification, gas and ion separation, biosensors, and lithium-based batteries, etc. A deep understanding of the interaction between hydrated ions in an aqueous solution and the graphitic surface in systems composed of water, ions and a graphitic surface is essential for applications with carbon-based nanoporous membrane platforms. In this review, we describe the recent progress of the interaction between hydrated ions and aromatic ring structures on the carbon-based surface and its applications in the water flow in a carbon nanotube. We expect that these works can be extended to the understanding of water flow in other nanoporous membranes, such as nanoporous graphene, graphyne and stacked sheets of graphene oxide.

  14. Effects of copper ions on the characteristics of egg white gel induced by strong alkali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yaoyao; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Mingsheng; Chen, Zhangyi; Wang, Shuzhen; Tu, Yonggang

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of copper ions on egg white (EW) gel induced by strong alkali. Changes in gel characteristics were examined through texture profile analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical methods. The value of gel strength reached its maximum when 0.1% copper ions was added. However, the lowest cohesiveness values were observed at 0.1%. The springiness of gel without copper ions was significantly greater than the gel with copper ions added. SEM results illustrated that the low concentration of copper ions contributes to a dense and uniform gel network, and an open matrix was formed at 0.4%. The free and total sulphhydryl group content in the egg white protein gel significantly decreased with the increased copper. The increase of copper ions left the contents of ionic and hydrogen bonds basically unchanged, hydrophobic interaction presented an increasing trend, and the disulfide bond exhibited a completely opposite change. The change of surface hydrophobicity proved that the main binding force of copper induced gel was hydrophobic interaction. However, copper ions had no effect on the protein component of the gels. Generally, a low level of copper ions facilitates protein-protein association, which is involved in the characteristics of gels. Instead, high ionic strength had a negative effect on gels induced by strong alkali. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  15. Influence of nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaniwa, T., E-mail: taku@nirs.go.jp; Kanematsu, N. [Medical Physics Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tsuji, H.; Kamada, T. [Hospital, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning, the planar integrated dose (PID) measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling using the stopping power ratio. Since body tissues are chemically different from water, this dose calculation can be subject to errors, particularly due to differences in inelastic nuclear interactions. In recent studies, the authors proposed and validated a PID correction method for these errors. In the present study, the authors used this correction method to assess the influence of these nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in various clinical cases. Methods: Using 10–20 cases each of prostate, head and neck (HN), bone and soft tissue (BS), lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine neoplasms, the authors first used treatment plans for carbon-ion radiotherapy without nuclear interaction correction to derive uncorrected dose distributions. The authors then compared these distributions with recalculated distributions using the nuclear interaction correction (corrected dose distributions). Results: Median (25%/75% quartiles) differences between the target mean uncorrected doses and corrected doses were 0.2% (0.1%/0.2%), 0.0% (0.0%/0.0%), −0.3% (−0.4%/−0.2%), −0.1% (−0.2%/−0.1%), −0.1% (−0.2%/0.0%), −0.4% (−0.5%/−0.1%), and −0.3% (−0.4%/0.0%) for the prostate, HN, BS, lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine cases, respectively. The largest difference of −1.6% in target mean and −2.5% at maximum were observed in a uterine case. Conclusions: For most clinical cases, dose calculation errors due to the water nonequivalence of the tissues in nuclear interactions would be marginal compared to intrinsic uncertainties in treatment planning, patient setup, beam delivery, and clinical response. In some extreme cases, however, these errors can be substantial. Accordingly, this correction method should be routinely applied to treatment planning in clinical practice.

  16. Simulation of mode converted ion Bernstein wave - beam deuteron interactions on TFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Mark; Fisch, Nathaniel

    1998-11-01

    Experiments on TFTR have documented strong interactions between mode converted ion Bernstein waves (MCIBW) and beam deuterons(D. S. Darrow et al.), Nucl. Fusion 36, 509 (1996).^,(N. J. Fisch et al.), IAEA, Vol. 1, p. 271 (1996). This is of particular interest in the study of α channelling, since the most promising scenarios(M. C. Herrmann and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79), 1495 (1997). rely on a suitable combination of MCIBW and Alfvén eigenmodes to achieve the cooling of the α particles. Collisional effects, realistic wave fields, and a detailed model of the wave-particle interaction have been added to the Monte Carlo simulations which are used to simulate α channelling in order to model TFTR experiments(M. C. Herrmann, Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, 1998.). The results are found to be in qualitative agreement with the data. In addition, the simulation is used, in conjunction with the data, to demonstrate the existence of the k_\\|-flip of the MCIBW, and to infer a diffusion coefficient for the beam deuterons interacting with the wave. This diffusion coefficient significantly exceeds what would be expected on the basis of quasilinear theory with the fields specified by 1 D ray tracing of the MCIBW.

  17. A Comment on Interaction of Lower Hybrid Waves with the Current-Driven Ion-Acoustic Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrittwieser, R.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1985-01-01

    Majeski et al. (1984) have investigated the interaction between the current-driven 'ion-acoustic' instability and high frequency lower hybrid waves. The 'ion-acoustic' instability was excited by drawing an electron current through the plasma column of a single-ended Q-machine by means...... of a positively biased cold plate. Schmittwieser et al. do not believe that the observed instability is of the ion-acoustic type but that it is rather the so-called potential relaxation instability....

  18. Hydrophobic patches on protein surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijnzaad, P.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrophobicity is a prime determinant of the structure and function of proteins. It is the driving force behind the folding of soluble proteins, and when exposed on the surface, it is frequently involved in recognition and binding of ligands and other proteins. The energetic cost of

  19. A facile drug delivery system preparation through the interaction between drug and iron ion of transferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Lin; Liu, Jihua; Wei, Shaohua; Ge, Xuefeng; Zhou, Jiahong; Yu, Boyang; Shen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Many anticancer drugs have the capability to form stable complex with metal ions. Based on such property, a simple method to combine these drugs with transferrin, through the interaction between drug and Fe ion of transferrin, to improve their anticancer activity, is proposed. To demonstrate this technique, the complex of photosensitive anticancer drug hypocrellin A and transferrin was prepared by such facile method. The results indicated that the complex of hypocrellin A and transferrin can stabilize in aqueous solution. In vitro studies have demonstrated the superior cancer cell uptake ability of hypocrellin A–transferrin complex to the free hypocrellin A. Significant damage to such drug-impregnated tumor cells was observed upon irradiation and the cancer cells killing ability of hypocrellin A–transferrin was stronger than the free hypocrellin A within a certain range of concentrations. The above results demonstrated the validity and potential of our proposed strategy to prepare the drug delivery system of this type of anti-cancer drugs and transferrin

  20. Theory of modulational interaction of trapped ion convective cells and drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, V.D.; Diamond, P.H.; Lebedev, V.; Soloviev, G.; Shevchenko, V.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical and computational studies of the modulational interaction between trapped ion convective cells and short wavelength drift wave turbulence are discussed. These studies are motivated by the fact that cells and drift waves are expected to coexist in tokamaks so that: (a) cells strain and modulate drift waves, and (b) drift waves open-quote ride on close-quote a background of cells. The results of the authors' investigation indicate that: (1) (nonlinear) parametric growth rates of trapped ion convective cells can exceed linear predictions (for drift wave levels at the mixing length limit); (2) a set of coupled envelope equations, akin to the Zakharov equations from Langmuir turbulence, can be derived and used to predict the formation of a dipole pair of convective cells trapped by the drift wave envelope. This dipole pair is strongly anisotropic, due to the structure of the drift wave Reynolds stress which drives the cell flow. Numerical solutions of the envelope equations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, and indicate the persistence of the structure in time; (3) strong modulation and trapping of drift waves with k perpendicular ρ > 1 occurs. Extensions to magnetically sheared systems and the broader implications of this work as a paradigm for the dynamics of persistent structures in shearing flows are discussed

  1. Interaction of bilirubin with Ag and Au ions: green synthesis of bilirubin-stabilized nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Shashi P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiation and Photochemistry Division (India); Roy, Mainak [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Chemistry Division (India); Mukherjee, Poulomi [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Nuclear Agriculture and Biotechnology Division (India); Tyagi, A. K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Chemistry Division (India); Mukherjee, Tulsi [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Chemistry Group (India); Adhikari, Soumyakanti, E-mail: asoumya@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiation and Photochemistry Division (India)

    2012-07-15

    We report a simple green chemistry to synthesize and stabilize monodispersed silver and gold nanoparticles sols by reducing aqueous solution of the respective metal salts in the presence of bilirubin (BR). No additional capping agent was used in the process of stabilization of the nanoparticles. As a completely new finding, we have observed that BR known to be toxic at higher concentration in one hand and conversely an antioxidant at physiological concentration reduces these metal ions to form the respective metal nanoparticles. Moreover, BR and its oxidized products also serve as capping agents to the nanoparticles. The particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. BR and its oxidized products capped nanoparticles are stable for months. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the silver sol show the plasmon peak of symmetric spherical particles which was further reflected in the TEM images. The sizes of the silver particles were about 5 nm. These silver particles showed reasonably high antibacterial activity in Gram negative wild type E. coli. In the case of interaction of BR with gold ions, we could obtain cubic gold nanoparticles of average sizes 20-25 nm. Possible modes of anchorage of BR and/its oxidized products to silver nanoparticles were demonstrated by surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that in turn demonstrated the feasibility of using these nanoparticles as SERS substrates.

  2. Interaction of bilirubin with Ag and Au ions: green synthesis of bilirubin-stabilized nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shashi P.; Roy, Mainak; Mukherjee, Poulomi; Tyagi, A. K.; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Adhikari, Soumyakanti

    2012-07-01

    We report a simple green chemistry to synthesize and stabilize monodispersed silver and gold nanoparticles sols by reducing aqueous solution of the respective metal salts in the presence of bilirubin (BR). No additional capping agent was used in the process of stabilization of the nanoparticles. As a completely new finding, we have observed that BR known to be toxic at higher concentration in one hand and conversely an antioxidant at physiological concentration reduces these metal ions to form the respective metal nanoparticles. Moreover, BR and its oxidized products also serve as capping agents to the nanoparticles. The particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. BR and its oxidized products capped nanoparticles are stable for months. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the silver sol show the plasmon peak of symmetric spherical particles which was further reflected in the TEM images. The sizes of the silver particles were about 5 nm. These silver particles showed reasonably high antibacterial activity in Gram negative wild type E. coli. In the case of interaction of BR with gold ions, we could obtain cubic gold nanoparticles of average sizes 20-25 nm. Possible modes of anchorage of BR and/its oxidized products to silver nanoparticles were demonstrated by surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that in turn demonstrated the feasibility of using these nanoparticles as SERS substrates.

  3. A facile drug delivery system preparation through the interaction between drug and iron ion of transferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lin [Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory Biofunctional Materials, Key Laboratory of Applied Photochemistry, Analysis and Testing Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Liu, Jihua [China Pharmaceutical University, Department of Complex Prescription of TCM (China); Wei, Shaohua; Ge, Xuefeng; Zhou, Jiahong, E-mail: zhoujiahong@njnu.edu.cn [Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory Biofunctional Materials, Key Laboratory of Applied Photochemistry, Analysis and Testing Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Yu, Boyang, E-mail: boyangyu59@163.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Department of Complex Prescription of TCM (China); Shen, Jian [Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory Biofunctional Materials, Key Laboratory of Applied Photochemistry, Analysis and Testing Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China)

    2013-09-15

    Many anticancer drugs have the capability to form stable complex with metal ions. Based on such property, a simple method to combine these drugs with transferrin, through the interaction between drug and Fe ion of transferrin, to improve their anticancer activity, is proposed. To demonstrate this technique, the complex of photosensitive anticancer drug hypocrellin A and transferrin was prepared by such facile method. The results indicated that the complex of hypocrellin A and transferrin can stabilize in aqueous solution. In vitro studies have demonstrated the superior cancer cell uptake ability of hypocrellin A-transferrin complex to the free hypocrellin A. Significant damage to such drug-impregnated tumor cells was observed upon irradiation and the cancer cells killing ability of hypocrellin A-transferrin was stronger than the free hypocrellin A within a certain range of concentrations. The above results demonstrated the validity and potential of our proposed strategy to prepare the drug delivery system of this type of anti-cancer drugs and transferrin.

  4. Equilibrium studies on interactions of rare earth ions with phytic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqi, K S; Shah, S A; Aqra, F M.A.M.; Tabassum, S; Zaidi, S A.A. [Aligarh Muslim Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Benlian, D [Centre de St Jerome, Cedex (France). Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination

    1993-05-01

    The interaction between phytic acid and trivalent rare earth metal ions, viz., Ce[sup 3+], Pr[sup 3+], Nd[sup 3+], Sm[sup 3+], Gd[sup 3+], Tb[sup 3+], Dy[sup 3+] and HO[sup 3+] has been investigated potentiometrically at 25degC. The proton-ligand stability constants (pK[sub Y][sup H]) of phytic acid and the stability constants (logK) of metal complexes formed in aqueous medium ([mu] = 0.1 M NaClO[sub 4]) have been evaluated. The results indicate that eight protons of phytic acid are highly acidic, two are weakly acidic and two very weakly acidic, titrable in the pH ranges 1.2-4.9, 5.0-8.15 and 8.3-11.0 respectively. The stability of each phytic acid-lanthanide ion complex decreases with an increase in pH and follows the usual trend through the series. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Hadron production in relativistic heavy ion interactions and the search for the quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1989-12-01

    The course starts with an introduction, from the experimentalist's point of view, of the challenge of measuring Relativistic Heavy Ion interactions. A review of some theoretical predictions for the expected signatures of the quark gluon plasma will be made, with a purpose to understand how they relate to quantities which may be experimentally measured. A short exposition of experimental techniques and details is given including charged particles in matter, momentum resolution, kinematics and Lorentz Transformations, calorimetry. Principles of particle identification including magnetic spectrometers, time of flight measurement. Illustrations using the E802 spectrometer and other measured results. Resolution smearing of spectra, and binning effects. Parent to daughter effects in decay, with π 0 → γ γ as an example. The experimental situation from the known data in p -- p collisions and proton-nucleus reactions is reviewed and used as a basis for further discussions. The ''Cronin Effect'' and the ''Seagull Effect'' being two arcana worth noting. Then, selected experiments from the BNL and CERN heavy ion programs are discussed in detail. 118 refs., 45 figs

  6. Modeling the interaction of high power ion or electron beams with solid target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    Intense energy deposition on first wall materials and other components as a result of plasma disruptions in magnetic fusion devices are expected to cause melting and vaporization of these materials. The exact amount of vaporization losses and melt layer thickness are very important to fusion reactor design and lifetime. Experiments using ion or electron beams to simulate the disruption effects have different environments than the actual disruption conditions in fusion reactors. A model has been developed to accurately simulate the beam-target interactions so that the results from such experiments can be meaningful and useful to reactor design. This model includes a two dimensional solution of the heat conduction equation with moving boundaries. It is found that the vaporization and melting of the sample strongly depends on the characteristics of the beam spatial distribution, beam diameter, and on the power-time variation of the beam

  7. MeV ion beam interaction with polymer films containing cross-linking agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evelyn, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    Polymer films containing cross linking enhancers were irradiated with MeV alpha particles to determine the effects of MeV ion beam interaction on these materials. The contributed effects from the electronic and nuclear stopping powers were separated by irradiating stacked thin films of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS) and polyethersulfone (PES). This layered system allowed most of the effects of the electronic energy deposited to be experienced by the first layers and the last layers to receive most of the effects of the nuclear stopping power. RGA, Raman microprobe analysis, RBS and FTIR measured changes in the chemical structures of the irradiated films. The characterization resolved the effects of the stopping powers on the PVC, PS and PES and the results were compared with those from previously studied polymers that did not contain any cross linking agents

  8. Dynamics of Plasma-Surface Interactions using In-situ Ion Beam Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    The overall goal of this proposal was to develop an innovative experimental facility that would allow for the measurement of real-time response of a material surface to plasma bombardment by employing in-situ high-energy ion beam analysis. This facility was successfully developed and deployed at U. Wisconsin-Madison and was named DIONISOS (Dynamics of IONic Implantation and Sputtering on Surfaces). There were several major highlights to the DIONISOS research which we will briefly highlight below. The full technical details of the DIONISOS development, deployment and research results are contained in the Appendices which contain several peer-reviewed publications and a PhD thesis devoted to DIONISOS. The DIONISOS results on deuterium retention in molybdenum were chosen as an invited talk at the 2008 International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Toledo, Spain.

  9. Pressure ionization of dense plasmas in spherical ion-cell model with spin-orbit interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, K.; Blenski, T.; Takahashi, H.; Iguchi, T.; Nakazawa, M.

    1996-01-01

    We study the continuity of pressure of dense plasmas in pressure ionization in case where spin-orbit interactions are taken into account in calculations. Pressure is calculated using a stress-tensor pressure formula in the relativistically-corrected self-consistent field spherical ion-cell model (average-atom model). It appears that calculated pressure and electronic density distribution change continuously in pressure ionization if we take narrow shape resonances into account properly. This observation stresses the need of a coherent description of bound and free electrons. We also compare the results by the stress-tensor pressure formula with those by other pressure formulas. It appears that different pressure formulas give rather discrepant results in some cases. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  10. Interaction study of amino acids and the peptide aspartame with lanthanide (III) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carubelli, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    The interactions between the Nd(III) ion with the amino acids L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid and L-histidine and the peptide aspartame in aqueous solution were studied. The study was conducted by means of electronic spectroscopy with the Judd-Ofelt formalism for transition intensity parameters calculations. Several coordination compounds involving Nd(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) and the ligands L-histidine and aspartame were synthesized and characterized in the solid state. Mixed compounds involving Eu(III) and Tb(III) with the same ligands were synthesized and characterized also. The characterization were achieved by chemical analysis, melting points, vibrational spectroscopy (IR) and powder X-ray diffractometry. (author)

  11. Energy-level splitting of multicharged ions due to interaction with own radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajnutdinov, R.Kh.; Kalashnikov, K.K.

    1991-01-01

    The overlapping of the energy levels of He-like uranium states with identical principal quantum numbers is investigated. Results are presented of a numerical calculation of the states produced as a result of mixing of the 2s 1/2 8p 1/2 and 2p 1/2 8p 1/2 states and of the respective spectral lines. It is shown that the interaction between the ion and its own radiation field splits each of the overlapping energy levels into several sublevels. The sublevels are isolated from each to other such an extent that interference effects become insignificant. The shapes of the spectral lines differ pronouncedly from the Lorentz shape and many of the line are anomaously narrow

  12. Interaction of a finite-length ion beam with a background plasma: Reflected ions at the quasi-parallel bow shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onsager, T.G.; Winske, D.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    The coupling of a finite-length, field-aligned, ion beam with a uniform background plasma is investigated using one-dimensional hybrid computer simulations. The finite-length beam is used to study the interaction between the incident solar wind and ions reflected from the Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock, where the reflection process may vary with time. The coupling between the reflected ions and the solar wind is relevant to ion heating at the bow shock and possibly to the formation of hot, flow anomalies and re-formation of the shock itself. The authors find that although there are many similarities between the instabilities driven by the finite-length beam and those predicted by linear theory for an infinite, homogeneous beam, there are also some important differences. Consistent with linear theory, the waves which dominate the interaction are the electromagnetic right-hand polarized resonant and nonresonant modes. However, in addition to the instability growth rates, the length of time that the waves are in contact with the beam is also an important factor in determining which wave mode will dominate the interaction. Whereas linear theory predicts the nonresonant mode to have the larger growth rate for the parameters they investigate, with finite-length beam they find that both the nonresonant and resonant modes contribute to the interaction. They find that the interaction will result in strong coupling, where a significant fraction of the available free energy is converted into thermal energy in a short time, provided the beam is sufficiently dense or sufficiently long

  13. Ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, Geoffrey

    1975-01-01

    First, ion implantation in semiconductors is discussed: ion penetration, annealing of damage, gettering, ion implanted semiconductor devices, equipement requirements for ion implantation. The importance of channeling for ion implantation is studied. Then, some applications of ion implantation in metals are presented: study of the corrosion of metals and alloys; influence or ion implantation on the surface-friction and wear properties of metals; hyperfine interactions in implanted metals

  14. Sensing small neurotransmitter-enzyme interaction with nanoporous gated ion-sensitive field effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Alexandre; Stockmann, Regina; Jansen, Michael; Yegin, Ugur; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Mourzina, Yulia

    2012-01-15

    Ion-sensitive field effect transistors with gates having a high density of nanopores were fabricated and employed to sense the neurotransmitter dopamine with high selectivity and detectability at micromolar range. The nanoporous structure of the gates was produced by applying a relatively simple anodizing process, which yielded a porous alumina layer with pores exhibiting a mean diameter ranging from 20 to 35 nm. Gate-source voltages of the transistors demonstrated a pH-dependence that was linear over a wide range and could be understood as changes in surface charges during protonation and deprotonation. The large surface area provided by the pores allowed the physical immobilization of tyrosinase, which is an enzyme that oxidizes dopamine, on the gates of the transistors, and thus, changes the acid-base behavior on their surfaces. Concentration-dependent dopamine interacting with immobilized tyrosinase showed a linear dependence into a physiological range of interest for dopamine concentration in the changes of gate-source voltages. In comparison with previous approaches, a response time relatively fast for detecting dopamine was obtained. Additionally, selectivity assays for other neurotransmitters that are abundantly found in the brain were examined. These results demonstrate that the nanoporous structure of ion-sensitive field effect transistors can easily be used to immobilize specific enzyme that can readily and selectively detect small neurotransmitter molecule based on its acid-base interaction with the receptor. Therefore, it could serve as a technology platform for molecular studies of neurotransmitter-enzyme binding and drugs screening. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Copper(II) ions interactions in the systems with triamines and ATP. Potentiometric and spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, S K; Goslar, J; Bregier-Jarzebowska, R; Gasowska, A; Zalewska, A; Lomozik, L

    2017-12-01

    The mode of interaction and thermodynamic stability of complexes formed in binary and ternary Cu(II)/ATP/triamines systems were studied using potentiometric and spectroscopic (NMR, EPR, UV-Vis) methods. It was found that in binary metal-free systems ATP/H x PA species are formed (PA: Spd=spermidine or 3,3-tri=1,7-diamino-4-azaheptane) where the phosphate groups from nucleotides are preferred negative centers and protonated amine groups of amines are positive centers of reaction. In the ternary systems Cu/ATP/H x (PA) as well as Cu/(ATP)(PA) species are formed. The type of the formed Cu(II) complexes depends on pH of the solution. For a low pH value the complexation appears between Cu(II) and ATP molecules via oxygen atoms of phosphate groups. For a very high pH value, where ATP is hydrolyzed, the Cu(II) ions are bound to the nitrogen atoms of polyamine molecules. We did not detect any direct coordination of the N7 nitrogen atom of adenosine to Cu(II) ions. It means that the CuN7 interaction is an indirect type and can be due to noncovalent interplay including water molecule. EPR studies were performed at glassy state (77K) after a fast freezing both for binary and ternary systems. The glassy state EPR spectra do not reflect species identified in titration studies indicating significant effect of rapid temperature decrease on equilibrium of Cu(II) complexes. We propose the molecular structure of all the studied complexes at the glassy state deduced from EPR and optical spectroscopy results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A systematic study of actinide production from the interactions of heavy ions with sup 248 Cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyba, J.D.

    1990-09-07

    Production cross sections for heavy actinides produced from the interactions of {sup 12}C, {sup 31}P, {sup 40}Ar, and {sup 44}Ca ions with {sup 248}Cm were measured at energies ranging from 0.98 to 1.35 X Coulomb barrier. The recoiling reaction products were collected in copper or gold catcher foils located near the {sup 248}Cm target. Separate fractions of Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and Md were obtained from a radiochemical separation procedure. For the {sup 12}C system, a He/KCl jet was used to transport the recoiling No activities of interest to a rotating wheel system. The isotopic distributions of the actinide products were found to be essentially symmetric about the maximum with full-widths-at-half-maximum of approximately 2.5 mass units. Isotopic distributions of the {sup 12}C, {sup 31}P, {sup 40}Ar, and {sup 44}Ca systems were found to be very similar to the {sup 40,48}Ca systems studied previously. The maxima of the isotopic distributions generally occurred for those reaction channels which involved the exchange of the fewest number of nucleons between the target and projectile for which the calculated excitation energy was a positive quantity. Additionally, the maxima of the excitation functions occurred at those projectile energies which were consistent with the calculated reaction barriers based upon a binary reaction mechanism. The experimental data from the four systems investigated were compared to several models of heavy ion interactions including a damped reaction mechanism, compound nucleus formation and subsequent particle evaporation, and classical partial wave calculations for binary systems.

  17. Sugar-metal ion interactions: The coordination behavior of cesium ion with lactose, D-arabinose and L-arabinose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ye; Xue, Junhui; Wen, Xiaodong; Zhai, Yanjun; Yang, Limin; Xu, Yizhuang; Zhao, Guozhong; Kou, Kuan; Liu, Kexin; Chen, Jia'er; Wu, Jinguang

    2016-04-01

    The novel cesium chloride-lactose complex (CsCl·C12H22O10 (Cs-Lac), cesium chloride-D-arabinose and L-arabinose complexes (CsCl·C5H10O5, Cs-D-Ara and Cs-L-Ara) have been synthesized and characterized using X-ray diffraction, FTIR, FIR, THz and Raman spectroscopies. Cs+ is 9-coordinated to two chloride ions and seven hydroxyl groups from five lactose molecules in Cs-Lac. In the structures of CsCl-D-arabinose and CsCl-L-arabinose complexes, two kinds of Cs+ ions coexist in the structures. Cs1 is 10-coordinated with two chloride ions and eight hydroxyl groups from five arabinose molecule; Cs2 is 9-coordinated to three chloride ions and six hydroxyl groups from five arabinose molecules. Two coordination modes of arabinose coexist in the structures. α-D-arabinopyranose and α-L-arabinopyranose appear in the structures of Cs-D-Ara and Cs-L-Ara complexes. FTIR and Raman results indicate variations of hydrogen bonds and the conformation of the ligands after complexation. FIR and THz spectra also confirm the formation of Cs-complexes. Crystal structure, FTIR, FIR, THz and Raman spectra provide detailed information on the structure and coordination of hydroxyl groups to metal ions in the cesium chloride-lactose, cesium chloride-D- and L-arabinose complexes.

  18. CONCH: A Visual Basic program for interactive processing of ion-microprobe analytical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David R.

    2006-11-01

    A Visual Basic program for flexible, interactive processing of ion-microprobe data acquired for quantitative trace element, 26Al- 26Mg, 53Mn- 53Cr, 60Fe- 60Ni and U-Th-Pb geochronology applications is described. Default but editable run-tables enable software identification of secondary ion species analyzed and for characterization of the standard used. Counts obtained for each species may be displayed in plots against analysis time and edited interactively. Count outliers can be automatically identified via a set of editable count-rejection criteria and displayed for assessment. Standard analyses are distinguished from Unknowns by matching of the analysis label with a string specified in the Set-up dialog, and processed separately. A generalized routine writes background-corrected count rates, ratios and uncertainties, plus weighted means and uncertainties for Standards and Unknowns, to a spreadsheet that may be saved as a text-delimited file. Specialized routines process trace-element concentration, 26Al- 26Mg, 53Mn- 53Cr, 60Fe- 60Ni, and Th-U disequilibrium analysis types, and U-Th-Pb isotopic data obtained for zircon, titanite, perovskite, monazite, xenotime and baddeleyite. Correction to measured Pb-isotopic, Pb/U and Pb/Th ratios for the presence of common Pb may be made using measured 204Pb counts, or the 207Pb or 208Pb counts following subtraction from these of the radiogenic component. Common-Pb corrections may be made automatically, using a (user-specified) common-Pb isotopic composition appropriate for that on the sample surface, or for that incorporated within the mineral at the time of its crystallization, depending on whether the 204Pb count rate determined for the Unknown is substantially higher than the average 204Pb count rate for all session standards. Pb/U inter-element fractionation corrections are determined using an interactive log e-log e plot of common-Pb corrected 206Pb/ 238U ratios against any nominated fractionation-sensitive species pair

  19. Interaction of slow, highly charged ions with the surface of ionic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, Rene

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis the creation of permanent nanostructures induced by the impact of very slow (v≤5 x 10 5 m/s) highly charged (q≤40) ions on the ionic crystal surfaces of CaF 2 and KBr is investigated. The systematic analysis of the samples surfaces by means of atomic force microscopy supplies information on the influence of the potential as well as the kinetic projectile energy on the process of structure creation. The individual impact of highly charged ions on the KBr(001) surface can initiate the creation of mono-atomic deep pit-like structures -nanopits- with a lateral size of a few 10 nm. The volume of these pits and the corresponding number of sputtered secondary particles show a linear dependence on the projectiles potential energy. For the onset of pit formation a kinetic energy dependent threshold in the potential energy E grenz pot (E kin ) could be identified. Based on the defect-mediated desorption by electrons and by including effects of defect agglomeration a consistent model for the process of pit formation was drawn. In this work the recently discovered creation of hillock-like structures by impact of highly charged ions on CaF 2 (111) surfaces could be verified for lowest kinetic energies (E kin ≤150 eV x q). For the first time the potential energy of impinging projectiles could be identified to be exclusively responsible for the creation of nanostructures. Furthermore, a shift of potential energy threshold for hillock formation was observed for very small projectile velocities. Within the framework of cooperation with the Vienna University of Technology simulations based on the inelastic thermal spike model were performed, which allowed to interlink the individual hillock formation with a local melting of the ionic lattice. The essential influence of electron emission during the interaction of the highly charged ions with the surface on the process of nanostructuring was taken into consideration by complementary investigations of the secondary

  20. Chemical composition of sublates (difficultly soluble substances) which form on interaction of polyvalent metal ions with potassium alkylcarboxylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Skryleva, T.L.; Sazonova, V.F.

    1996-01-01

    The pH value is considered for its effect on chemical composition of sublates which form on interaction of fatty acid collectors (potassium alkylcarboxylate) with polyvalent ions of Ni, An, Cu and Be. It is shown that interaction of these ions with fatty acid collectors in weakly acid, neutral and weakly alkaline solutions is accompanied by formation of medium soaps. Acid soaps are formed in more acid solutions, while in more alkaline-basic soaps. Domains of stability for medium soaps of Ni, Zn, Cu and Be are determined. 17 refs.; 4 figs

  1. Calculation of the real part of the interaction potential between two heavy ions in the sudden approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, H.; Ngo, C.

    1980-04-01

    We have calculated the interaction potential between two heavy ions using the energy density formalism and Fermi distributions for the nuclear densities. The experimental fusion barriers are rather well reproduced. The conditions for the observation of fusion between two heavy ions is discussed. As far as the nuclear part of the interaction potential is concerned, the proximity scaling is investigated in details. It is found that the proximity theorem is satisfied to a good extent. However, as far as the neutron excess is concerned, a disagreement with the proximity potential is observed

  2. An interactive, multitask computer system for heavy-ion physics research with the spin spectrometer: [Progress report, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    The scope of this proposal is to assemble an interactive off-line data analysis system based on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer interfaced with an array processor, which is capable of meeting the needs of modern heavy-ion physics experiments involving data of large dimensionality as created in the Spin Spectrometer at the Holifield Heavy-ion Research Facility, to adapt the existing PDP 11 software for the Spin Spectrometer for this computer system in a form completely compatible with other laboratories with VAX 11 computers, and to develop new general and efficient software for automatic but fully interactive data analysis making use of an attach array processor

  3. Precision Tests of the Electroweak Interaction using Trapped Atoms and Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melconian, Daniel George [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-06-21

    The objective of the proposed research is to study fundamental aspects of the electroweak interaction via precision measurements in beta decay to test our current understanding of fundamental particles and forces as contained in the so-called "Standard Model" of particle physics. By comparing elegant experiments to rigorous theoretical predictions, we will either confirm the Standard Model to a higher degree and rule out models which seek to extend it, or find evidence of new physics and help guide theorists in developing the New Standard Model. The use of ion and neutral atom traps at radioactive ion beam facilities has opened up a new vista in precision low-energy nuclear physics experiments. Traps provide an ideal source of decaying atoms: they can be extremely cold (~1 mK); they are compact (~1 mm^3); and perhaps most importantly, the daughter particles escape with negligible distortions to their momenta in a scattering-free, open environment. The project is taking advantage of these technologies and applying them to precision beta-decay studies at radioactive beam facilities. The program consists of two complementary efforts: 1) Ion traps are an extremely versatile tool for purifying, cooling and bunching low-energy beams of short-lived nuclei. A large-bore (210~mm) superconducting 7-Tesla solenoid is at the heart of a Penning trap system for which there is a dedicated beamline at T-REX, the upgraded radioactive beam facility at the Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University. In addition to providing a general-purpose decay station, the flagship program for this system is measuring the ft-values and beta-neutrino correlation parameters from isospin T=2 superallowed beta-delayed proton decays, complimenting and expanding the already strong program in fundamental interactions at the Institute. 2) A magneto-optical trap is being used at the TRIUMF Neutral Atom Trap facility to observe the (un)polarized angular distribution parameters of isotopes of potassium. We

  4. Interaction of Ions with Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Carbide (MXene) Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chang

    transport of ions, which enhanced the ion storage capabilities. After cation intercalation, size occupation of ions caused the expansion of MXene interlayer, while electrostatic attraction between negative MXene and cations caused contraction. Due to the narrow 2D nanochannels between MXene layers, the Ti3C2Tx membranes showed high selectivity towards metal cations and dye cations of different sizes and charges, as ion separation membranes. Additionally, MXene membranes with abundant water between layers showed fast water flux. By applying positive voltage on the Ti3C2Tx membranes, the salt (NaCl and MgSO4) permeation was accelerated, while negative voltage decelerated the permeation. In addition, Ti3C 2Tx MXene membranes as thin as 100 nm showed high rejection (over 98 %) of methylene blue dye molecules, with fast water flow through the membranes. Completion of this work opened several paths to modify and enhance the MXene films' properties, and shed light on the ions' interaction with MXenes for related applications with voltage applied or not.

  5. Nuclear interactions of high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wefel, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    This program was established for the purpose of studying projectile fragmentation; (1) as a function of energy, focusing first on the intermediate energy region, < 1 GeV/nucleon, where there have been few previous measurements and no systematic studies, and (2) as a function of projectile mass, starting with light beams and proceeding to species as heavy as nickel (and possibly beyond). The intermediate energy region is important as the transition between the lower energy data, where the interaction appears to be dominated by collective effects and the decay of excited nuclei, and the highest energy results, where nucleon-nucleon interactions are fundamental, ''limiting fragmentation'' applies, and the nucleus may well break-up before any de-excitation. The mass dependence of projectile fragmentation is largely unknown since most detailed work has involved light ion beams. Nuclear structure effects, for example, may well be quite prominent for heavier beams. Furthermore, the nuclear excitation functions for the production of different fragment isotopes have immediate application to the astrophysical interpretation of existing isotopic datasets obtained from balloon and satellite measurements of galactic cosmic rays

  6. Two-particle versus three-particle interactions in single ionization of helium by ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, M; Moshammer, R; Fischer, D; Ullrich, J

    2004-01-01

    We have performed kinematically complete experiments on single ionization of He by 100 MeV amu -1 C 6+ and 3.6 MeV amu -1 Au 24,53+ impact. By analysing doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) as a function of the momenta of all two-particle sub-systems we studied the importance of two-particle interactions. Furthermore, presenting the squared momenta of all three collision fragments simultaneously in a Dalitz plot, we evaluated the role of three-particle interactions. Finally, both for the DDCS and the Dalitz plots the corresponding correlation function was analysed. While the absolute cross sections confirm that ionization predominantly leads to a momentum exchange between the electron and the recoil-ion, the correlation function reveals strong correlations between the particles of any two-particle sub-system. Three-particle correlations, which are not accounted for by perturbative calculations, are quite significant as well, at least for certain kinematic conditions

  7. Are N-methyl groups of Tetramethylurea (TMU) Hydrophobic? A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of three dimensional tetrahedral H-bond network to two dimensional zig-zag chain-like structure often found in alcohols. A comparison to ... All these results indicate hydrophobic interaction-induced aggregation of TMU in dilute aqueous solutions which .... off by gently blowing hot air around the outer surface of the cuvette.

  8. Transparent Hydrophobic Coating by Sol Gel Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hamzah Harun; Nik Ghazali Nik Salleh; Mahathir Mohamed; Mohd Sofian Alias

    2016-01-01

    Transparent hydrophobic coating of inorganic based tetra orthosilicate (TEOS) was prepared by sol gel method by varying fluoroalkylsilane (FAS) content which works as hydrophobic agent. Surface contact angle, transmittance degree and surface morphology were characterized for each sample. All samples show good transparency which was confirmed by UV visible spectroscopy. The hydrophobicity obtained increases with FAS content indicates that FAS is best candidate to induce hydrophobicity for inorganic coating. (author)

  9. Heavy-ion interactions of deformed nuclei. Progress report and final report, January 1, 1985-December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberacker, V.E.

    1985-09-01

    This Progress Report describes the main topics that were investigated during the reporting period: (1) a new microscopic approach (many-body theory with two-center shell model basis) to the calculation of heavy-ion interaction potentials, primarily for heavy systems; (2) dynamic alignment of deformed nuclei during heavy-ion collisions; (3) the role of shell effects, static deformation and dynamic alignment in heavy-ion fusion reactions; (4) giant nuclear quasimolecules and the positron problem. The proposed research has direct relevance to experimental programs supported by DOE, e.g. the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) at Oak Ridge, the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory, the Double MP Tandem at Brookhaven and some of the smaller University-based accelerators. A discussion of a review article on Coulomb fission is presented. 36 refs., 7 figs

  10. Ion Selectivity Mechanism in a Bacterial Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hailong; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    The proton-gated ion channel from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) is a prokaryotic homolog of the eukaryotic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) that responds to the binding of neurotransmitter acetylcholine and mediates fast signal transmission. Recent emergence of a high resolution crystal structure of GLIC captured in a potentially open state allowed detailed, atomic-level insight into ion conduction and selectivity mechanisms in these channels. Herein, we have examined the barriers to ion conduction and origins of ion selectivity in the GLIC channel by the construction of potential of mean force (PMF) profiles for sodium and chloride ions inside the transmembrane region. Our calculations reveal that the GLIC channel is open for a sodium ion to transport, but presents a ∼10 kcal/mol free energy barrier for a chloride ion, which arises primarily from the unfavorable interactions with a ring of negatively charged glutamate residues (E-2) at the intracellular end and a ring of hydrophobic residues (I9) in the middle of the transmembrane domain. Our collective findings further suggest that the charge selection mechanism can, to a large extent, be attributed to the narrow intracellular end and a ring of glutamate residues in this position their strong negative electrostatics and ability to bind cations. By contrast, E19 at the extracellular entrance only plays a minor role in ion selectivity of GLIC. In addition to electrostatics, both ion hydration and protein dynamics are found to be crucial for ion conduction as well, which explains why a chloride ion experiences a much greater barrier than a sodium ion in the hydrophobic region of the pore.

  11. Medium-energy electrons and heavy ions in Jupiter's magnetosphere - Effects of lower hybrid wave-particle interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    A theory of medium-energy (about keV) electrons and heavy ions in Jupiter's magnetosphere is presented. Lower hybrid waves are generated by the combined effects of a ring instability of neutral wind pickup ions and the modified two-stream instability associated with transport of cool Iogenic plasma. The quasi-linear energy diffusion coefficient for lower hybrid wave-particle interactions is evaluated, and several solutions to the diffusion equation are given. Calculations based on measured wave properties show that the noise substantially modifies the particle distribution functions. The effects are to accelerate superthermal ions and electrons to keV energies and to thermalize the pickup ions on time scales comparable to the particle residence time. The S(2+)/S(+) ratio at medium energies is a measure of the relative contribution from Iogenic thermal plasma and neutral wind ions, and this important quantity should be determined from future measurements. The theory also predicts a preferential acceleration of heavy ions with an accleration time that scales inversely with the root of the ion mass. Electrons accelerated by the process contribute to further reionization of the neutral wind by electron impact, thus providing a possible confirmation of Alfven's critical velocity effect in the Jovian magnetosphere.

  12. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Product. Amorphous fumed hydrophobic silica or precipitated hydrophobic silica (CAS Reg. No. 68611-0944... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophobic silicas. 584.700 Section 584.700 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE IN FEED AND...

  13. Hydrophobic Calcium Carbonate for Cement Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi B. Atla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a novel way to generate a highly effective hydrophobic cement surface via a carbonation route using sodium stearate. Carbonation reaction was carried out at different temperatures to investigate the hydrophobicity and morphology of the calcium carbonate formed with this process. With increasing temperatures, the particles changed from irregular shapes to more uniform rod-like structures and then aggregated to form a plate-like formation. The contact angle against water was found to increase with increasing temperature; after 90 °C there was no further increase. The maximum contact angle of 129° was obtained at the temperature of 60 °C. It was also found that carbonation increased the micro hardness of the cement material. The micro hardness was found to be dependent on the morphology of the CaCO3 particles. The rod like structures which caused increased mineral filler produced a material with enhanced strength. The 13C cross polarization magic-angle spinning NMR spectra gave plausible explanation of the interaction of organic-inorganic moieties.

  14. Rheological Properties in Aqueous Solution for Hydrophobically Modified Polyacrylamides Prepared in Inverse Emulsion Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Carro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverse emulsion polymerization technique was employed to synthesize hydrophobically modified polyacrylamide polymers with hydrophobe contents near to feed composition. Three different structures were obtained: multisticker, telechelic, and combined. N-Dimethyl-acrylamide (DMAM, n-dodecylacrylamide (DAM, and n-hexadecylacrylamide (HDAM were used as hydrophobic comonomers. The effect of the hydrophobe length of comonomer, the initial monomer, and surfactant concentrations on shear viscosity was studied. Results show that the molecular weight of copolymer increases with initial monomer concentration and by increasing emulsifier concentration it remained almost constant. Shear viscosity measurements results show that the length of the hydrophobic comonomer augments the hydrophobic interactions causing an increase in viscosity and that the polymer thickening ability is higher for combined polymers.

  15. Improved gel electrophoresis matrix for hydrophobic protein separation and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarski, Caroline; Fillet, Marianne; Rolando, Christian

    2011-03-01

    We propose an improved acrylamide gel for the separation of hydrophobic proteins. The separation strategy is based on the incorporation of N-alkylated and N,N'-dialkylated acrylamide monomers in the gel composition in order to increase hydrophobic interactions between the gel matrix and the membrane proteins. Focusing on the most efficient monomer, N,N'-dimethylacrylamide, the potentiality of the new matrix was evaluated on membrane proteins of the human colon HCT-116 cell line. Protein analysis was performed using an adapted analytical strategy based on FT-ICR tandem mass spectrometry. As a result of this comparative study, including advanced reproducibility experiments, more hydrophobic proteins were identified in the new gel (average GRAVY: -0.085) than in the classical gel (average GRAVY: -0.411). Highly hydrophobic peptides were identified reaching a GRAVY value up to 1.450, therefore indicating their probable locations in the membrane. Focusing on predicted transmembrane domains, it can be pointed out that 27 proteins were identified in the hydrophobic gel containing up to 11 transmembrane domains; in the classical gel, only 5 proteins containing 1 transmembrane domain were successfully identified. For example, multiple ionic channels and receptors were characterized in the hydrophobic gel such as the sodium/potassium channel and the glutamate or the transferrin receptors whereas they are traditionally detected using specific enrichment techniques such as immunoprecipitation. In total, membrane proteins identified in the classical gel are well documented in the literature, while most of the membrane proteins only identified on the hydrophobic gel have rarely or never been described using a proteomic-based approach. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Super-Hydrophobic Green Corrosion Inhibitor On Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, H.; Ismail, A.; Ahmad, S.; Soon, C. F.

    2017-06-01

    There are many examples of organic coatings used for corrosion protection. In particular, hydrophobic and super-hydrophobic coatings are shown to give good protection because of their enhanced ability to slow down transport of water and ions through the coating. The purpose of this research is to develop water repellent coating to avoid direct contact between metal and environment corrosive and mitigate corrosion attack at pipeline system. This water repellent characteristic on super-hydrophobic coating was coated by electrodeposition method. Wettability of carbon steel with super-hydrophobic coating (cerium chloride and myristic acid) and oxidized surface was investigated through contact angle and inhibitor performance test. The inhibitor performance was studied in 25% tannin acid corrosion test at 30°C and 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl). The water contact angle test was determined by placing a 4-μL water droplet of distilled water. It shows that the wettability of contact angle super-hydrophobic with an angle of 151.60° at zero minute can be classified as super-hydrophobic characteristic. By added tannin acid as inhibitor the corrosion protection on carbon steel becomes more consistent. This reveals that the ability of the coating to withstand with the corrosion attack in the seawater at different period of immersions. The results elucidate that the weight loss increased as the time of exposure increased. However, the corrosion rates for uncoated carbon steel is high compared to coated carbon steel. As a conclusion, from both samples it can be seen that the coated carbon steel has less corrosion rated compared to uncoated carbon steel and addition of inhibitor to the seawater provides more protection to resist corrosion attack on carbon steel.

  17. The ion–aerosol interactions from the ion mobility and aerosol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-05-21

    May 21, 2011 ... On these days mobility spectra showed two modes, ... together with the formation of multiple charged ions are proposed to result in the light and heavy large ion modes. Growth of ..... day and minimum during the night hours.

  18. Exploring Ion-Ion Interactions in Aqueous Solutions by a Combination of Molecular Dynamics and Neutron Scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohagen, Miriam; Pluhařová, E.; Mason, Philip E.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 9 (2015), s. 1563-1567 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ion pairing * molecular dynamics * neutron scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 8.539, year: 2015 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.jpclett.5b00060

  19. The study of the ion-crystal interaction by using the blocking technique for scattered recoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamyan, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on the orientation effects observed in the fast heavy ion irradiated diamond, Si and Ge crystals by recording recoil nuclei. The volume capture of medium-weight nuclei to channeling has first been revealed and studied. Ion damaging power is systematized and the anomalously low damaging power is Xe ions is established. 18 refs.; 9 figs

  20. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian S; Dueholm, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    The success of Pseudomonas species as opportunistic pathogens derives in great part from their ability to form stable biofilms that offer protection against chemical and mechanical attack. The extracellular matrix of biofilms contains numerous biomolecules, and it has recently been discovered...... that in Pseudomonas one of the components includes β-sheet rich amyloid fibrils (functional amyloid) produced by the fap operon. However, the role of the functional amyloid within the biofilm has not yet been investigated in detail. Here we investigate how the fap-based amyloid produced by Pseudomonas affects biofilm...... hydrophobicity and mechanical properties. Using atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy, we show that the amyloid renders individual cells more resistant to drying and alters their interactions with hydrophobic probes. Importantly, amyloid makes Pseudomonas more hydrophobic and increases biofilm...

  1. A study of effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some vitamins for electron, H, He and C ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükyıldız, M.

    2017-09-01

    The radiological properties of some vitamins such as Retinol, Beta-carotene, Riboflavin, Niacin, Niacinamide, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine, Pyridoxamine, Pyridoxal, Biotin, Folic acid, Ascorbic acid, Cholecalciferol, Alpha-tocopherol, Gamma-tocopherol, Phylloquinone have been investigated with respect to total electron interaction and some heavy charged particle interaction as means of effective atomic numbers (Z_{eff}) and electron densities (N_{eff}) for the first time. Calculations were performed for total electron interaction and heavy ions such as H, He and C ion interactions in the energy region 10keV-10MeV by using a logarithmic interpolation method. Variations in Z_{eff}'s and N_{eff}'s of given vitamins have been studied according to the energy of electron or heavy charged particles, and significant variations have been observed for all types of interaction in the given energy region. The maximum values of Z_{eff} have been found in the different energy regions for different interactions remarkably and variations in N_{eff} seem approximately to be the same with variation in Z_{eff} for the given vitamins as expected. Z_{eff} values of some vitamins were plotted together and compared with each other for electron, H, He and C interactions and the ratios of Z_{eff}/ have been changed in the range of 0.25-0.36, 0.20-0.36, 0.22-0.35 and 0.20-0.35 for electron, H, He and C interactions, respectively.

  2. Experimental study of interactions of highly charged ions with atoms at keV energies: Progress report for period May 15, 1985-February 15, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostroun, V.O.

    1987-01-01

    Interest in interactions of low energy highly charged ions with electrons, atoms or ions is due to their importance to controlled thermonuclear fusion research and the interesting nature of the fundamental processes involved. Studies of such interactions have long been hampered by a lack of suitable ions sources. A superconducting solenoid, cryogenic Electron Beam Ion Source, CEBIS, has been constructed at Cornell University to produce low energy very highly charged ions. At present, using a pulsed 0.5A,8.5 keV electron beam, the source is capable of producing highly charged ions of C,N,O, including bare nuclei, and ions of Ar up to charge state 11 + in 1 millisecond of confinement time. The source is being used in experiments to investigate charge transfer and accompanying processes in low energy, highly charged ion-atom collisions

  3. Characterization of the plasma-switch interaction in the LBL HIF ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewett, D.W.; Rutkowski, H.L.

    1990-01-01

    A new way to characterize the performance of the LBL HIF ion source has been found. In the LBL source, ions are drawn from an arc-generated plasma reservoir in which the electrons are confined by a negative-biased ''switch'' mesh. Stagnation of the plasma is prevented by absorption of the excess ion flow on this mesh. The ion beam is generated by an external negative voltage that provides Child-Langmuir extraction of the ions through the switch mesh. We elucidate the physics requirements of the source and deduce switch mesh parameters needed for successful operation. 2 refs., 2 figs

  4. Hydrophobic-Core Microcapsules and Their Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M. (Inventor); Li, Wenyan (Inventor); Buhrow, Jerry W. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic-core microcapsules and methods of their formation are provided. A hydrophobic-core microcapsule may include a shell that encapsulates a hydrophobic substance with a core substance, such as dye, corrosion indicator, corrosion inhibitor, and/or healing agent, dissolved or dispersed therein. The hydrophobic-core microcapsules may be formed from an emulsion having hydrophobic-phase droplets, e.g., containing the core substance and shell-forming compound, dispersed in a hydrophilic phase. The shells of the microcapsules may be capable of being broken down in response to being contacted by an alkali, e.g., produced during corrosion, contacting the shell.

  5. Multiply charged ions of the oxygen - produced at interaction of laser radiation with two-element solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedilov, M.R.; Bedilov, R.M.; Kamalova, J.O.; Davletov, I.Yu.; Matnazarov, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The interest to study of the oxygen multiply charged ions spectra produced at interaction laser radiation with one and two-element solids, is associate with possibility of creating laser and inertial thermonuclear syntheses, effective sources of multiply charged ions and nuclei atoms elements, plasma lasers, lasers on multiply charged transition, design of radiation-resistant materials and others. The present time many works is devoted to multiply charged ions, obtained from one element targets. Experimental results of study charge and energy spectra multiply charged ions of the oxygen, formed at interaction laser radiation with one and two-element solids are given in this work. Our experiments, we used installation, which is described in [1]. Neodymium laser had following parameters: wavelength 1.06 μm; intensity q = (0.1 h 1000) GW/sm 2 ; angle of incidence = 180. Were study one element Al, and two-element Al 2 O 3 , Y 2 O 3 targets by a diameter of 10 mm and thickness of 3 mm. Analysis obtained charge and energy spectra of multiply charged ions one (Al) and two-element (Al 2 O 3 , Y 2 O 3 ) targets depending on intensity of laser radiation and targets components reveal the following: - maximal charge number one element target (Al) at q 500 GW/sm 2 is equal Z max = 6 and all peaks corresponding to charge numbers Z = 1 - 6 well resolved, but two-element targets (Al 2 O 3 ) Z max ions Al decrease before 3. Also it is necessary to note that, Z max ions of the oxygen depend on target components. In case Al 2 O 3 and Y 2 O 3 maximal charge number of oxygen ions are equal Z max = 6 and 3, accordingly; - obtained charge and energy spectra of oxygen ions being included in two-element targets, are indicative of that, general regularities of the change Z max , E max and structures charge and energy spectra depending on q laser are saved. However they hang by target components; - common features and some differences of energy spectra multiply charged oxygen ions

  6. Study of the interaction of potassium ion channel protein with micelle by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, Anil; Talukdar, Keka

    2018-04-01

    Ion channels are proteins forming pore inside the body of all living organisms. This potassium ion channel known as KcsA channel and it is found in the each cell and nervous system. Flow of various ions is regulated by the function of the ion channels. The nerve ion channel protein with protein data bank entry 1BL8, which is basically an ion channel protein in Streptomyces Lividans and which is taken up to form micelle-protein system and the system is analyzed by using molecular dynamics simulation. Firstly, ion channel pore is engineered by CHARMM potential and then Micelle-protein system is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation. For some specific micelle concentration, the protein unfolding is observed.

  7. Ion Acceleration from the Interaction of Ultra-Intense Lasers with Solid Foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M

    2004-01-01

    The discovery that ultra-intense laser pulses (I > 10 18 W/cm 2 ) can produce short pulse, high energy proton beams has renewed interest in the fundamental mechanisms that govern particle acceleration from laser-solid interactions. Experiments have shown that protons present as hydrocarbon contaminants on laser targets can be accelerated up to energies > 50 MeV. Different theoretical models that explain the observed results have been proposed. One model describes a front-surface acceleration mechanism based on the ponderomotive potential of the laser pulse. At high intensities (I > 10 18 W/cm 2 ), the quiver energy of an electron oscillating in the electric field of the laser pulse exceeds the electron rest mass, requiring the consideration of relativistic effects. The relativistically correct ponderomotive potential is given by U p = ([1 + Iλ 2 /1.3 x 10 18 ] 1/2 - 1) m o c 2 , where Iλ 2 is the irradiance in W (micro)m 2 /cm 2 and m o c 2 is the electron rest mass. At laser irradiance of Iλ 2 ∼ 10 20 W (micro)m 2 /cm 2 , the ponderomotive potential can be of order several MeV. A few recent experiments--discussed in Chapter 3 of this thesis--consider this ponderomotive potential sufficiently strong to accelerate protons from the front surface of the target to energies up to tens of MeV. Another model, known as Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA), describes the mechanism as an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the laser target. According to the TNSA model, relativistic hot electrons created at the laser-solid interaction penetrate the foil where a few escape to infinity. The remaining hot electrons are retained by the target potential and establish an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the target. In this thesis we present several experiments that study the accelerated ions by affecting the contamination layer from which they originate. Radiative heating was employed as a method of removing contamination from palladium targets doped

  8. Modeling the Electrostatics of Hollow Shell Suspensions: Ion Distribution, Pair Interactions, and Many-Body Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallez, Yannick; Meireles, Martine

    2016-10-11

    Electrostatic interactions play a key role in hollow shell suspensions as they determine their structure, stability, thermodynamics, and rheology and also the loading capacity of small charged species for nanoreservoir applications. In this work, fast, reliable modeling strategies aimed at predicting the electrostatics of hollow shells for one, two, and many colloids are proposed and validated. The electrostatic potential inside and outside a hollow shell with a finite thickness and a specific permittivity is determined analytically in the Debye-Hückel (DH) limit. An expression for the interaction potential between two such hollow shells is then derived and validated numerically. It follows a classical Yukawa form with an effective charge depending on the shell geometry, permittivity, and inner and outer surface charge densities. The predictions of the Ornstein-Zernike (OZ) equation with this pair potential to determine equations of state are then evaluated by comparison to results obtained with a Brownian dynamics algorithm coupled to the resolution of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann and Laplace equations (PB-BD simulations). The OZ equation based on the DLVO-like potential performs very well in the dilute regime as expected, but also quite well, and more surprisingly, in the concentrated regime in which full spheres exhibit significant many-body effects. These effects are shown to vanish for shells with small thickness and high permittivity. For highly charged hollow shells, we propose and validate a charge renormalization procedure. Finally, using PB-BD simulations, we show that the cell model predicts the ion distribution inside and outside hollow shells accurately in both electrostatically dilute and concentrated suspensions. We then determine the shell loading capacity as a function of salt concentration, volume fraction, and surface charge density for nanoreservoir applications such as drug delivery, sensing, or smart coatings.

  9. 5f state interaction with inner coordination sphere ligands: einsteinium 3+ ion fluorescence in aqueous and organic phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitz, J.V.; Wester, D.W.; Williams, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction between 5f electron states of einsteinium 3+ ion and coordinated ligands in solution has been probed using laser-induced fluorescence. Aquo einsteinium 3+ ion was observed to fluoresce from its first excited J = 5 state in a broad-band peaking at 9260 wavenumbers. The observed fluorescence lifetimes were 1.05 microseconds and 2.78 microseconds in H 2 O and D 2 O (99+ % D atom), respectively. The non-radiative decay rates derived from the lifetime data are compared with previously reported data for Cm, Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy aquo 3+ ions. The 5f actinide states exhibit substantially greater non-radiative decay rates than do lanthanide 4f states of similar energy gap. This provides evidence that actinide 5f electrons interact more strongly with their inner coordination sphere than do lanthanide ion 4f electrons. The fluorescence lifetime of einsteinium 3+ ion complexed with 1 formal di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophosphoric acid in h-heptane was 2.34 microseconds. 3 figures, 1 table

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on microscopic and phenomenological studies of the interactions between light-heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The workshop 'Microscopic and Phenomenological Studies of the Interactions between Light-Heavy Ions' was held at Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo from Dec. 24 to Dec. 26, 1991. The workshop included 1) studies of the nucleus-nucleus interactions of the systems as 16 O- 16 O, 16 O- 15 N, etc., or the studies of the elastic and inelastic scatterings and the transfer reactions in such systems, 2) structure and reactions of neutron-rich nuclei, 3) microscopic derivation of the effective two-nucleon interactions, 4) development of the methods of techniques applied to the heavier systems. (author)

  11. Interaction of ions, atoms, and small molecules with quantized vortex lines in superfluid (4)He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, David; Eloranta, Jussi; Williams, Gary A

    2015-02-14

    The interaction of a number of impurities (H2, Ag, Cu, Ag2, Cu2, Li, He3 (+), He(*) ((3)S), He2 (∗) ((3)Σu), and e(-)) with quantized rectilinear vortex lines in superfluid (4)He is calculated by using the Orsay-Trento density functional theory (DFT) method at 0 K. The Donnelly-Parks (DP) potential function binding ions to the vortex is combined with DFT data, yielding the impurity radius as well as the vortex line core parameter. The vortex core parameter at 0 K (0.74 Å) obtained either directly from the vortex line geometry or through the DP potential fitting is smaller than previously suggested but is compatible with the value obtained from re-analysis of the Rayfield-Reif experiment. All of the impurities have significantly higher binding energies to vortex lines below 1 K than the available thermal energy, where the thermally assisted escape process becomes exponentially negligible. Even at higher temperatures 1.5-2.0 K, the trapping times for larger metal clusters are sufficiently long that the previously observed metal nanowire assembly in superfluid helium can take place at vortex lines. The binding energy of the electron bubble is predicted to decrease as a function of both temperature and pressure, which allows adjusting the trap depth for either permanent trapping or to allow thermally assisted escape. Finally, a new scheme for determining the trapping of impurities on vortex lines by optical absorption spectroscopy is outlined and demonstrated for He(*).

  12. Measurement of distance parameter using semiclassical model in various heavy ion interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, Tabassum [Department of Physics, Gomal University D.I. Khan (Pakistan); Khan, E U [Department of Physics, CIIT, Islamabad (Pakistan); Baluch, J J [Department of Environmental Sciences, CIIT, Abbottabad (Pakistan); Qureshi, I E [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 1114, Islamabad (Pakistan); Sajid, M; Shahzad, M I; Khan, H A [Physics Research Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-08-15

    The technique of solid state nuclear track detection was employed to collect data of elastic scattering as well as inelastic reaction channel. The elastic data of the reactions {sup 238}U+{sup 209}Bi, {sup 238}U+{sup 197}Au, {sup 208}Pb+{sup 197}Au and {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au were used to calculate the experimental elastic scattering cross-sections for various angular bins. The ratio of these cross-sections to Rutherford/Mott cross-sections were plotted with respect to distance d({theta}). Distance parameter d{sub 0} in all four reactions was obtained from the discontinuity of the slope following the method suggested in the semiclassical model. Partial reaction cross-sections were also obtained from the inelastic binary as well as multiprong events in the heavy ion interactions of {sup 208}Pb+{sup 197}Au and {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au both at 11.67 MeV/u beam energy. The higher values of partial cross-sections of two prong inelastic events as compared with {sigma}{sub 3} and {sigma}{sub 4} have been attributed to the emission of intermediate mass fragments in both the reactions.

  13. Temperature effects on the interaction mechanisms between the europium (III) and uranyl ions and zirconium diphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finck, N.

    2006-10-01

    Temperature should remain higher than 25 C in the near field environment of a nuclear waste repository for thousands years. In this context, the aim of this work is to study the temperature influence on the interaction mechanisms between europium (III) and uranyl ions and zirconium diphosphate, as well as the influence of a complexing medium (nitrate) on the sorption of the lanthanide. The experimental definition of the equilibria was achieved by combining a structural investigation with the macroscopic sorption data. Surface complexes were characterized at all temperatures (25 C to 90 C) by TRLFS experiments carried out on dry and in situ samples using an oven. This characterization was completed by XPS experiments carried out at 25 C on samples prepared at 25 C and 90 C. The reaction constants (surface hydration and cations sorption) were obtained by simulating the experimental data with the constant capacitance surface complexation model. The reaction constants temperature dependency allowed one to characterize thermodynamically the different reactions by application of the van't Hoff relation. The validity of this law was tested by performing microcalorimetric measurements of the sorption heat for both cations. (author)

  14. The influence of salt chaotropicity, column hydrophobicity and analytes' molecular properties on the retention of pramipexole and its impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemić, Ana; Kalinić, Marko; Erić, Slavica; Malenović, Anđelija; Medenica, Mirjana

    2015-03-20

    The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of the chaotropic salts of different position in Hofmeister series (CF3COONa, NaClO4, NaPF6) added to the mobile phase with the stationary phases of different hydrophobicity (C8 and C18 XTerra(®) columns), as well as their common influence on the retention behavior of pramipexole and its structurally related impurities. The extended thermodynamic approach enabled the understanding of the underlying separation mechanism. Comparing six different column-salt systems it was observed that general system hydrophobicity presented by salt chaotropicity and column hydrophobicity favors stationary phase ion-pairing over the ion-pair formation in the eluent. Further, an attempt was made to describe the influence of analytes' nature on their retention behavior in such chromatographic systems. An analysis is performed in order to select and elucidate the molecular descriptors (electrostatical, quantum-chemical, geometrical, topological, and constitutional) that best explain the experimental evidence and findings obtained by the thermodynamic approach. The results of this analysis suggest that analytes' charge distribution and its complementarity to the structure of the electric double layer formed on the surface of the stationary phase upon the addition of chaotropic additives can be useful for understanding the differences in retention of structurally related analytes. These findings provide a novel understanding of the interactions between all the components of the chromatographic system containing chaotropic additive and a good basis for further investigations suggesting the development of generally applicable predictors in structure-retention relationship studies in related chromatographic systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Soil-modified carbon paste electrode: a useful tool in environmental assessment of heavy metal ion binding interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svegl, I G; Ogorevc, B

    2000-08-01

    Carbon paste electrodes (CPEs) modified with different soils in their native form were prepared to create a soil-like solid phase suitable for application in studies of heavy metal ion uptake and binding interactions. The preparation of CPEs modified with five different soils was examined and their heavy metal ion uptake behavior investigated using a model Cu(II) aqueous solution. Metal ions were accumulated under open circuit conditions and were determined after a medium exchange using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry, applying preelectrolysis at -0.7 V. The soil-modified CPE accumulation behavior, including the linearity of the current response versus Cu(II) concentration, the influence of the pH on the solution, and the uptake kinetics, was thoroughly investigated. The correlation between the soil-modified CPE uptake capability and the standard soil parameters, such as ion exchange capacity, soil pH, organic matter and clay content, were evaluated for all five examined soils. The influence of selected endogenous cations (K(I), Ca(II), Fe(III)) on the transfer of Cu(II) ions from a solution to the simulated soil solid phase was examined and is discussed. Preliminary examinations of the soil-modified CPE uptake behavior with some exogenous heavy metal ions of strong environmental interest (Pb(II), Hg(II), Cd(II) and Ag(I)) are also presented. This work demonstrates some attractive possibilities for the application of a soil-modified CPE in studying soil-heavy metal ion binding interactions, with a further potential use as a new environmental sensor appropriate for fist on-site testing of polluted soils.

  16. Interaction of an ultra-intense laser pulse with a dense plasma: heating and transport of electrons and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toupin, Catherine

    1999-01-01

    This work was aimed at characterizing the acceleration and transport of the plasma electrons and ions during the interaction of an ultra-intense laser pulse with a dense plasma. Our main tool was numerical simulation with kinetic particle-in-cell codes. During the interaction, the target surface electrons are accelerated up to high energies inward the target. The electron acceleration mechanisms are proved to strongly depend on the density profile deformation due to the ion motion. This motion has been studied as well and different acceleration mechanisms have been identified: pushing in of the target surface by the laser ponderomotive pressure, acceleration by an electrostatic shock or by breaking of an ion acoustic wave, acceleration by the space charge force induced by radial expulsion of the electrons out of a channel drilled in a slightly overcritical plasma. The electrons and ions accelerated at the target surface penetrate inward the target and interact with it. The competition between the focussing due to the self-generated magnetic field, driven by the very important electron current, and the scattering induced by collisions has been analyzed. In a homogeneous, hot plasma, the existence of an optimum current for which the propagation length without scattering is maximum, has been demonstrated. The electron drag-back effect of the axial electric field is also proved to be more significant than the friction due to collisions. By penetrating into the target, the accelerated ions can produce neutrons if the target is deuterated. A strong correlation between the ion acceleration mechanisms and the angle and energy distributions of the produced neutrons has been underlined. (author) [fr

  17. Plasma ion emission from high intensity picosecond laser pulse interactions with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fews, A.P.; Norreys, P.A.; Beg, F.N.; Bell, A.R.; Dangor, A.E.; Danson, C.N.; Lee, P.; Rose, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The fast ion emission from high intensity, picosecond laser plasmas has been measured to give the characteristic ion energy and the amount of laser energy transferred to ions with energies ≥100 keV/nucleon as a function of incident intensity. The characteristic ion energy varies from 0.2 to 1.3 MeV over the range 2.0x10 17 --2.0x10 18 W cm -2 . Ten percent of the laser energy is transferred into MeV ions at 2.0x10 18 W cm -2 . Calculations of stopping power in high density materials are presented that show that fast ions cannot be ignored in modeling fast ignitor schemes

  18. Power-law distributions for a trapped ion interacting with a classical buffer gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Ralph G

    2009-02-13

    Classical collisions with an ideal gas generate non-Maxwellian distribution functions for a single ion in a radio frequency ion trap. The distributions have power-law tails whose exponent depends on the ratio of buffer gas to ion mass. This provides a statistical explanation for the previously observed transition from cooling to heating. Monte Carlo results approximate a Tsallis distribution over a wide range of parameters and have ab initio agreement with experiment.

  19. Influence of the Coulomb interaction in the final state on the cross section of single-electron capture by fast ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, N.V.; Teplova, Ya.A.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that the Coulomb interaction of ions in the final state must be taken into account in the estimation of the cross section of electron capture by fast ions. The cross section of electron capture decreases considerably, and the dependence of the cross section on the collision energy becomes close to the experimental one if the interaction of charged particles after collision is taken into account. -- Highlights: → Coulomb interaction of ions in the final state must be taken into account. → This interaction leads to a considerable decrease in the cross section. → The dependence on energy close to the experimental one.

  20. Laser Giant Ion Source and the Prepulse Effects for Picosecond Interaction for High Gain Laser Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Woryna, E.; Boody, F.P.; Hoepfl, R.; Jungwirth, K.; Ullschmied, J.; Kralikova, B.; Krasa, J.; Laska, L.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Perina, V.

    2003-01-01

    By studying laser driven ion sources which produce giant ion emission current densities exceeding the few mA/cm2 of classical ion sources (MEVVA or ECR) by more than six orders of magnitude, we unexpectedly measured an anomalous low ion energy with ps laser pulses.The emission is basically different from that with the fastest ion energies in the MeV to GeV range due to relativistic self focusing and from the second fastest ion group due to quiver-thermalization processes. We report on specifically designed experiments with gold targets where 0.5 ns laser pulses produce MeV Au-ions in accordance with relativistic self focusing in strong contrast to ps pulses where a 400 times higher intensity from TW pulses is needed to arrive at the same ion energies. These can be explained by a basically new model without self-focusing as a skin layer effect where the absence of a prepulse is essential. This has consequences for the application of laser driven ion sources and may improve the hitherto highest published laser fusion gains with 50 TW-ps laser pulses without the usual spherical precompression

  1. Experimental apparatus to investigate interactions of low energy ions with solid surfaces, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukakoshi, Osamu; Narusawa, Tadashi; Mizuno, Masayasu; Sone, Kazuho; Ohtsuka, Hidewo.

    1975-12-01

    Experimental apparatus to study the surface phenomena has been designed, which is intended to solve the vacuum wall problems in future thermonuclear fusion reactors and large experimental tokamak devices. An ion source and the beam transport optics are provided for bombarding solid target surface with an ion beam of energy from 0.1 to 6 keV. Measuring instruments include an ion energy analyser, a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an Auger electron spectrometer, an electro-micro-balance, a neutral particle energy spectrometer and its calibration system. Pumping system consists of oil-free ultrahigh vacuum pumps. Various kinds of experiments will be carried out by using the apparatus: 1) sputtering by low energy ion bombardment, 2) re-emission of the incident particles during and after ion bombardment, 3) release of adsorbed and occluded gases in the solids by ion bombardment, and 4) backscattering of fast ions. The combinations of measuring instruments for each experiment and their relative positions in the vacuum chamber are described through detailed drawings. The fundamental aspect in design of the ion beam transport optics for a low energy ion beam which can no longer neglect the space charge effect is also discussed. (auth.)

  2. Comprehensive analysis of pharmaceutical products using simultaneous mixed-mode (ion-exchange/reversed-phase) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, Artaches A; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Soisungnoen, Phimpha; Burakham, Rodjana; Srijaranai, Supalax; Paull, Brett

    2014-08-01

    Liquid chromatographic assays were developed using a mixed-mode column coupled in sequence with a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column to allow the simultaneous comprehensive analysis of inorganic/organic anions and cations, active pharmaceutical ingredients, and excipients (carbohydrates). The approach utilized dual sample injection and valve-mediated column switching and was based upon a single high-performance liquid chromatography gradient pump. The separation consisted of three distinct sequential separation mechanisms, namely, (i) ion-exchange, (ii) mixed-mode interactions under an applied dual gradient (reversed-phase/ion-exchange), and (iii) hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Upon first injection, the Scherzo SS C18 column (Imtakt) provided resolution of inorganic anions and cations under isocratic conditions, followed by a dual organic/salt gradient to elute active pharmaceutical ingredients and their respective organic counterions and potential degradants. At the top of the mixed-mode gradient (high acetonitrile content), the mobile phase flow was switched to a preconditioned hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column, and the standard/sample was reinjected for the separation of hydrophilic carbohydrates, some of which are commonly known excipients in drug formulations. The approach afforded reproducible separation and resolution of up to 23 chemically diverse solutes in a single run. The method was applied to investigate the composition of commercial cough syrups (Robitussin®), allowing resolution and determination of inorganic ions, active pharmaceutical ingredients, excipients, and numerous well-resolved unknown peaks. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Distinct interactions of Na+ and Ca2+ ions with the selectivity filter of the bacterial sodium channel NaVAb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Song; Zangerl, Eva-Maria; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ca 2+ translocates slowly in the filter, due to lack of “loose” knock-on mechanism. ► Identification of a high affinity binding site in Na V Ab selectivity filter. ► Changes of EEEE locus triggered by electrostatic interactions with Ca 2+ ions. -- Abstract: Rapid and selective ion transport is essential for the generation and regulation of electrical signaling pathways in living organisms. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to investigate how the bacterial sodium channel Na V Ab (Arcobacter butzleri) differentiates between Na + and Ca 2+ ions. Multiple nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations revealed distinct binding patterns for these two cations in the selectivity filter and suggested a high affinity calcium binding site formed by backbone atoms of residues Leu-176 and Thr-175 (S CEN ) in the sodium channel selectivity filter

  4. Properties of ammonium ion-water clusters: analyses of structure evolution, noncovalent interactions, and temperature and humidity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shi-Tu; Jiang, Shuai; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Xu, Kang-Ming; Wen, Hui; Zhu, Yu-Peng; Huang, Wei

    2015-03-26

    Although ammonium ion-water clusters are abundant in the biosphere, some information regarding these clusters, such as their growth route, the influence of temperature and humidity, and the concentrations of various hydrated clusters, is lacking. In this study, theoretical calculations are performed on ammonium ion-water clusters. These theoretical calculations are focused on determining the following characteristics: (1) the pattern of cluster growth; (2) the percentages of clusters of the same size at different temperatures and humidities; (3) the distributions of different isomers for the same size clusters at different temperatures; (4) the relative strengths of the noncovalent interactions for clusters of different sizes. The results suggest that the dipole moment may be very significant for the ammonium ion-water system, and some new stable isomers were found. The nucleation of ammonium ions and water molecules is favorable at low temperatures; thus, the clusters observed at high altitudes might not be present at low altitudes. High humidity can contribute to the formation of large ammonium ion-water clusters, whereas the formation of small clusters may be favorable under low-humidity conditions. The potential energy surfaces (PES) of these different sized clusters are complicated and differ according to the distribution of isomers at different temperatures. Some similar structures are observed between NH4(+)(H2O)n and M(H2O)n (where M represents an alkali metal ion or water molecule); when n = 8, the clusters begin to form the closed-cage geometry. As the cluster size increases, these interactions become progressively weaker. The successive binding energy at the DF-MP2-F12/VDZ-F12 level is better than that at the PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) level and is consistent with the experimentally determined values.

  5. Spin-flip and spin orbit interactions in heavy ion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bybell, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    The role of spin orbit forces in heavy ion reactions is not completely understood. Experimental data is scarce for these systems but the data that does exist indicates a stronger spin orbit force than predicted by the folding models. The spin-flip probability of non-spin zero projectiles is one technique used for these measurements and is often taken as a direct indicator of a spin orbit interaction. This work measures the projectile spin-flip probability for three inelastic reactions; 13 C + 24 Mg, E/sub cm/ = 22.7 MeV; 13 C + 12 C, E/sub cm/ = 17.3 MeV; and 6 Li + 12 C, E/sub cm/ = 15.2 MeV, all leading to the first J/sup π/ = 2 + state of the target. The technique of particle-γ angular correlations was used for measuring the final state density matrix elements, of which the absolute value M = 1 magnetic substate population is equivalent to the spin-flip probability. The method was explored in detail and found to be sensitive to spin-flip probabilities smaller than 1%. The technique was also found to be a good indicator of the reaction mechanism involved. Nonzero and occasionally large spin-flip probabilities were observed in all systems, much larger than the folding model predictions. Information was obtained on the non-spin-flip density matrix elements. In the 13 C + 24 Mg reaction, these were found to agree with calculations when the finite size of the particle detector is included

  6. Structure-volume relationships: singular volume effects produced by cupric ion-globular protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, S; Shinaberry, G; Heck, E L; Squire, W

    1980-08-05

    The nature of the volume isotherms produced by the coordination of Cu(II) with ovalbumin and bovine serum albumin differs substantially from the adsorption isotherms produced by these systems. Whereas there was increased binding of Cu(II) associated with a pH increase from pH 5.3 to pH 7.4, the volume isotherms for these systems did not exhibit this type of pH dependence. The volume changes were determined at 30.0 +/- 0.001 degrees C with microdilatometers which could be read to 0.01 muL. The binding isotherms for ovalbumin at pH 5.3 and 7.4 and for bovine serum albumin at pH 5.3 was resolved by a Scatchard plot to yield the appropriate thermodynamic parameters. An algorithm was derived to calculate the distribution of the individual PMi complexes, i.e., PMi-1 + M in equilibrium (Ki) PMi where i equals 1, 2, 3, ..., n moles of cation, M, bound per mole of protein, P, for the above systems. The volume isotherms were then resolved in terms of the constituent delta Vi terms, i.e., the volume change produced by the formation of the individual PMi complexes. These values were verified by an independent graphical differentiation procedure. The coordination of Cu(II) to BSA at pH 7.4 produced a cooperative adsorption isotherm which was not amenable to a Scatchard analysis. The resultant anomalous volume isotherm was resolved into a component related to Cu(II)-site interaction and a negative volume effect attributable to a conformational change induced by complex formation. This structural transition which occurs at physiological pH may constitute a control mechanism for regulating the serum level of Cu(II) and possibly other divalent ions.

  7. Chemical Interaction between U(VI) and Eu(III) ions on a Silica Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. K.; Cha, W. S.; Cho, H. R.; Im, H. J.; Jung, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the chemical behavior of actinide in groundwater flow is important for assessing the possibility of its migration with water flow in the radioactive waste disposal site. Precipitation/ dissolution in groundwater and adsorption/desorption onto a geological solid surface would determine its migration. The sorption in a geochemical system was expected to be a reaction on a naturally equilibrated surface. However, the construction of a waste disposal facility could disturb this equilibrium state, induce a new reaction environment and affect a nanoscopic surface reaction of actinide. Uranium is ubiquitous in the natural environment and a representative element in a nuclear fuel cycle and in a high level radioactive waste. In oxic environments, it is typically present as uranyl oxocation (UO 2 2+ ), which is easily adsorbed and thereby removed from a solution in the near neutral pH range. This adsorption would form a new surface condition to give an unexpected adsorption behavior for other actinide ions. Eu(III) frequently is used as a chemical analogue of Am(III) and Cm(III) in migration chemistry. The adsorption phenomena has been interpreted with the help of a SCM(surface complexation model). Some spectroscopic techniques such as EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance), IR (InfraRed), EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) and TRLFS (Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy) have been used for the identification of a modeled adsorbing species. In the case of fluorescence elements, TRLFS has advantages over other techniques for its high sensitivity being proportional to laser source intensity and good selectivity depending on specific transition and lifetime. This technique can be applied to a species on a solid surface not absorbing light such as silica. U(VI) and Eu(III) have fluorescente properties reflecting their coordination structure. In this study, the interaction between U(VI) and Eu(III) on a silica surface was studied by a

  8. Fluorescent derivatives of nucleotides. Metal ion interactions and pH dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderkooi, J M; Weiss, C J; Woodrow, G V

    1979-02-01

    The fluorescence parameters of ethenoadenosine derivatives are influenced by metal cations and pH, as summarized here. The pH profile of ethenoadenosine determined by fluorescence intensity gives a normal titration curve and is not affected by ionic strength. In contrast, the pH titration curves of etheno-ATP, etheno ADP, and etheno AMP depend upon ionic strength. At high ionic strength normal curves are obtained, whereas at low ionic strength anomalies are obtained; this suggests that the phosphates can interact with the ring, possibly by hydrogen binding to the ring nitrogens. The room temperature fluorescence of ethenoadenosine occurs from the base form, although excitation of either the acid or base forms can contribute to the emission. This result can be explained if the excited state pK is lower than the ground state pK, and if deprotonation occurs within the time scale of the excited state. At low pH values the fluorescence lifetime of the base form is dependent upon the buffer concentration, indicating that the reverse reaction, protonation, occurs. The affinity constants for the binding of metals to the ethenoadenosine phosphates resemble those for the corresponding adenosine phosphates. Ni(II) and Co(II) are more effective than Mn(II) in quenching the fluorescence of ethenoadenosine phosphates; this result is predicted by Förster's theory for energy transfer based upon the overlap between donor emission spectrum and acceptor absorption spectrum. The diamagnetic ions Mg(II), Ca(II), and Zn(II) do not appear to affect the fluorescence of the ethenoadenosine phosphates directly, but rather to affect the conformation of the molecule, thereby affecting the quantum yield.

  9. Phosphorus-defect interactions during thermal annealing of ion implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Patrick Henry

    Ion implantation of dopant atoms into silicon generates nonequilibrium levels of crystal defects that can lead to the detrimental effects of transient enhanced diffusion (TED), incomplete dopant activation, and p-n junction leakage. In order to control these effects, it is vital to have a clear understanding of dopant-defect interactions and develop models that account for these interactions. This research focuses on experimentally investigating and modeling the clustering of phosphorus dopant atoms with silicon interstitials. Damage recovery of 40keV Si+ implants in phosphorus doped wells is experimentally analyzed. The effects of background phosphorus concentration, self implant dose, and anneal temperature are investigated. Phosphorus concentrations ranging from 2.0 x 1017 to 4.0 x 1019 cm-3 and Si+ doses ranging from 5.0 x 1013 cm-2 to 2.0 x 1014 cm-2 are studied during 650-800°C anneals. A dramatic reduction in the number of interstitials bound in {311} defects with increasing phosphorus background concentration is observed. It is suggested that the reduction of interstitials in {311} defects at high phosphorus concentrations is due to the formation of phosphorus-interstitial clusters (PICs). The critical concentration for clustering (approximately 1.0 x 1019 cm-3 at 750°C) is strongly temperature dependent and in close agreement with the kink concentration of phosphorus diffusion. Information gained from these "well experiments" is applied to the study of direct phosphorus implantation. An experimental study is conducted on 40keV phosphorus implanted to a dose of 1.0 x 1014 cm-2 during 650-800°C anneals. Electrically inactive PICs are shown to form at concentrations below the solid solubility limit due to high interstitial supersaturations. Data useful for developing a model to accurately predict phosphorus diffusion under nonequilibrium conditions are extracted from the experimental results. A cluster-mediated diffusion model is developed using the

  10. Understanding the interactions of phosphonate-based flame-retarding additives with graphitic anode for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Jinkui; Ma, Peng; Yang, Hanxi; Lu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Diethyl ethylphosphonate (DEEP) and dimethyl methylphosphonate are tested as flame retardants for lithium ion batteries. •The DMMP shows a destructive reaction with graphitic anode while DEEP shows a self-reduction mechanism. •DEEP is reported for the first time as flame-retardant additive for lithium ion batteries and demonstrates a much better compatibility with graphitic anode. -- Abstract: The compatibility with graphitic anode has been one key problem in developing flame-retarding additives for lithium ion batteries. To understand the interactions between flame-retarding additives and graphitic anode, two phosphonate esters (dimethyl methylphosphonate DMMP and diethyl ethylphosphonate DEEP) are selected and characterized as flame retardant addtives. DEEP is reported as a flame-retarding additive for the first time. Their interactions with graphite anode are characterized via current-static charge–discharge, ex-situ XRD, FE-SEM and AC impedance. The results reveal that the two phosphonate esters demonstrate different reaction mechanisms with graphitic anode, which result in different anode compatibility. These findings may be useful for designing better flame-retarding additives for lithium ion batteries

  11. Importance of the ion-pair interactions in the OPEP coarse-grained force field: parametrization and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpone, Fabio; Nguyen, Phuong H; Kalimeri, Maria; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2013-10-08

    We have derived new effective interactions that improve the description of ion-pairs in the OPEP coarse-grained force field without introducing explicit electrostatic terms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion method was used to extract these potentials from all atom simulations by targeting the radial distribution function of the distance between the center of mass of the side-chains. The new potentials have been tested on several systems that differ in structural properties, thermodynamic stabilities and number of ion-pairs. Our modeling, by refining the packing of the charged amino-acids, impacts the stability of secondary structure motifs and the population of intermediate states during temperature folding/unfolding; it also improves the aggregation propensity of peptides. The new version of the OPEP force field has the potentiality to describe more realistically a large spectrum of situations where salt-bridges are key interactions.

  12. Information entropy of a time-dependent three-level trapped ion interacting with a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aty, Mahmoud

    2005-01-01

    Trapped and laser-cooled ions are increasingly used for a variety of modern high-precision experiments, frequency standard applications and quantum information processing. Therefore, in this communication we present a comprehensive analysis of the pattern of information entropy arising in the time evolution of an ion interacting with a laser field. A general analytic approach is proposed for a three-level trapped-ion system in the presence of the time-dependent couplings. By working out an exact analytic solution, we conclusively analyse the general properties of the von Neumann entropy and quantum information entropy. It is shown that the information entropy is affected strongly by the time-dependent coupling and exhibits long time periodic oscillations. This feature attributed to the fact that in the time-dependent region Rabi oscillation is time dependent. Using parameters corresponding to a specific three-level ionic system, a single beryllium ion in a RF-(Paul) trap, we obtain illustrative examples of some novel aspects of this system in the dynamical evolution. Our results establish an explicit relation between the exact information entropy and the entanglement between the multi-level ion and the laser field. We show that different nonclassical effects arise in the dynamics of the ionic population inversion, depending on the initial states of the vibrational motion/field and on the values of Lamb-Dicke parameter η

  13. A Statistical Thermodynamic Model for Ligands Interacting With Ion Channels: Theoretical Model and Experimental Validation of the KCNQ2 Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Bai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are important therapeutic targets, and their pharmacology is becoming increasingly important. However, knowledge of the mechanism of interaction of the activators and ion channels is still limited due to the complexity of the mechanisms. A statistical thermodynamic model has been developed in this study to characterize the cooperative binding of activators to ion channels. By fitting experimental concentration-response data, the model gives eight parameters for revealing the mechanism of an activator potentiating an ion channel, i.e., the binding affinity (KA, the binding cooperative coefficients for two to four activator molecules interacting with one channel (γ, μ, and ν, and the channel conductance coefficients for four activator binding configurations of the channel (a, b, c, and d. Values for the model parameters and the mechanism underlying the interaction of ztz240, a proven KCNQ2 activator, with the wild-type channel have been obtained and revealed by fitting the concentration-response data of this activator potentiating the outward current amplitudes of KCNQ2. With these parameters, our model predicted an unexpected bi-sigmoid concentration-response curve of ztz240 activation of the WT-F137A mutant heteromeric channel that was in good agreement with the experimental data determined in parallel in this study, lending credence to the assumptions on which the model is based and to the model itself. Our model can provide a better fit to the measured data than the Hill equation and estimates the binding affinity, as well as the cooperative coefficients for the binding of activators and conductance coefficients for binding states, which validates its use in studying ligand-channel interaction mechanisms.

  14. High-energy neutron yields in interactions of carbon ions with 114Sn and 124Sn nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, M.B.; Gavrilov, B.P.; Kovalenko, S.S.; Kozulin, Eh.M.; Mozhaev, A.N.; Oganesyan, Yu.Ts.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.Eh.

    1984-01-01

    The measurements of the yields of neutrons (energy more than 5 MeV) emitted in the interactions of carbon-12 ions (9 MeV/nucl.) with nuclei of two tin isotopes are conducted. The results obtained prove the effect of nucleon composition of a nucleus on the process of formation of high-energy neutrons. To clarify the concrete interaction mechanism it is necessary to perform systematic research for a number of isotopes differing in the relation of the number of neutrons and protons and binding energies of the last neutron

  15. Experimental study of interactions of highly charged ions with atoms at keV energies. Progress report, February 16, 1993--April 15, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostroun, V.O.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental study of low energy, highly charged ions with other atomic species requires an advanced ion source such as an electron beam ion source, EBIS or an electron cyclotron ion source, ECRIS. Five years ago we finished the design and construction of the Cornell superconducting solenoid, cryogenic EBIS (CEBIS). Since then, this source has been in continuous operation in a program whose main purpose is the experimental study of interactions of highly charged ions with atoms at keV energies. This progress report for the period February 16, 1993 to April 15, 1994 describes the work accomplished during this time in the form of short abstracts

  16. Experimental studies of ions and atoms interaction with insulating surface; Etude experimentale de l'interaction rasante d'atomes et d'ions sur des surfaces isolantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villette, J

    2000-10-15

    Grazing collisions (<3 deg.) of keV ions and atoms: H{sup +}, Ne{sup +}, Ne{sup 0}, Na{sup +} on LiF (001) single crystal, an ionic insulator, are investigated by a time of flight technique. The incident beam is chopped and the scattered particles are collected on a position sensitive detector providing differential cross section while the time of flight gives the energy loss. Deflection plates allow the charge state analysis. Secondary electrons are detected in coincidence allowing direct measurements of electron emission yield, angular and energetic distribution through time of flight measurements. The target electronic structure characterized by a large band gap, governs the collisional processes: charge exchange, electronic excitations and electron emission. In particular, these studies show that the population of local target excitations surface excitons is the major contribution to the kinetic energy transfer (stopping power). Auger neutralization of Ne{sup +} and He{sup +} ions reveals the population of quasi-molecular excitons, an exciton bound on two holes. Referenced in the literature as trion. A direct energy balance determines the binding energy associated with these excited states of the surface. Besides these electronic energy loss processes, two nuclear energy loss mechanisms are characterized. These processes imply momentum transfer to individual target atoms during close binary collisions or, if the projectile is charged, to collective mode of optical phonons induced by the projectile coulomb field. The effect of the temperature on the scattering profile, the contribution of topological surface defects to the energy loss profile and to skipping motion on the surface are analyzed in view of classical trajectory simulations. (author)

  17. Toward engineering intra-receptor interactions into bis(crown ethers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Martin R; Kubik, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    A synthetic receptor was designed in which cooperative binding of two crown ether moieties to an alkali metal ion simultaneously causes two hydrophobic substituents not involved in direct host-guest interactions to converge. Hydrophobic interactions between these substituents can be expected to contribute to the overall complex stability. Independent binding studies involving two diastereoisomers of this bis(crown ether), one in which intra-receptor interactions between the substituents are potentially possible and one in which they are not, using isothermal titration calorimetry showed that both isomers bind potassium ions in different solvent mixtures with the same overall affinity. Profound differences were observed for each isomer, however, in the enthalpies and entropies of binding, which are consistent with intra-receptor interactions in one compound. These interactions are counteracted by enthalpy-entropy compensation so that no overall improvement in cation affinity could be observed.

  18. Non-resonant, diffusive interaction of superthermal ions with the sawtooth instability during ICRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaros, Avrilios

    2000-01-01

    A new interpretation is proposed for the well-known observation of sawteeth stabilization, during ICRH at JET and TFTR. It is shown that the radial fluxes of superthermal and thermal ions across the q=1 surface, exchange a finite amount of power with the m=1 internal kink mode (associated with the sawtooth instability) which is suppressed. The dominant contribution to this effect in the present theory is provided by the passing ions, which experience (due to the fluctuations) a much faster (than the trapped ions) radial diffusion. (author)

  19. Interaction of heavy ions beams with hot and dense plasmas. Application to inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, Gilles

    1987-01-01

    The subject of this work is the variation with time, on one of the energy and charge state of an heavy ion beam which through a plasma, and on another side, of a target used in ion inertial confinement fusion. We take in account projectile excitation, and higher order corrections to the Born stopping power formula are calculated. Comparison with experimental results in gas and solid are good. In hot plasma case, non-equilibrium charge states are described. We present an hydrodynamic simulation code of one dimension and three temperatures. We show that the shortening of the heavy ions beams with temperature reinforces the radiative transfer importance. (author) [fr

  20. Observation of the charge neutrality of the ions from target short-pulse laser interaction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuike, Kazuhito

    2003-01-01

    Intended to simulate the early stage of the plasma (preformed plasma) formation in the higher (10 20 W cm -2 ) intensity experiments (in which the plasma density profile rules laser absorption thus conversion efficiency from laser into hot electrons, ions and x-rays) experiments using solid target were done under a peak intensity (main laser pulse) of up to ∼10 15 W cm -2 and pre-pulse and pedestal intensity of ∼10 3 times lower than main pulse. With pedestal, significant enhancement of laser absorption was observed with pedestal condition. Charge neutralization of the ions from the plasma was measured by biased charge collectors. Earlier part of the ion were almost un-neutralized in with or without pedestal condition, and the later part of the ions (≤ few keV) were partially neutralized (≥40%). These not-perfect charge neutralization results is different from the longer nano-seconds pulse experimental results. (author)

  1. The interaction of actinide and lanthanide ions with hemoglobin and its relevance to human and environmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit, E-mail: amitk@barc.gov.in [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ali, Manjoor [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ningthoujam, Raghumani S. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Gaikwad, Pallavi [Department of Zoology, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007, Mumbai (India); Kumar, Mukesh [Solid State, Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Nath, Bimalendu B. [Department of Zoology, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007, Mumbai (India); Pandey, Badri N. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The sites of Ln and An interaction in Hb depend upon their charge-to-ionic-radii ratio. • Th(IV), Ce(IV) and U(VI) altered structure and oxygen-binding of Hb. • Spectroscopic studies determined binding characteristics of actinides. • Metal–Hb interaction was tested in an environmentally-important aquatic midge, Chironomus. - Abstract: Due to increasing use of lanthanides/actinides in nuclear and civil applications, understanding the impact of these metal ions on human health and environment is a growing concern. Hemoglobin (Hb), which occurs in all the kingdom of living organism, is the most abundant protein in human blood. In present study, effect of lanthanides and actinides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] on the structure and function of Hb has been investigated. Results showed that these metal ions, except Ce(IV) interacted with carbonyl and amide groups of Hb, which resulted in the loss of its alpha-helix conformation. However, beyond 75 μM, these ions affected heme moiety. Metal–heme interaction was found to affect oxygen-binding of Hb, which seems to be governed by their closeness with the charge-to-ionic-radius ratio of iron(III). Consistently, Ce(IV) being closest to iron(III), exhibited a greater effect on heme. Binding constant and binding stoichiometry of Th(IV) were higher than that of U(VI). Experiments using aquatic midge Chironomus (possessing human homologous Hb) and human blood, further validated metal–Hb interaction and associated toxicity. Thus, present study provides a biochemical basis to understand the actinide/lanthanide-induced interference in heme, which may have significant implications for the medical and environmental management of lanthanides/actinides toxicity.

  2. The interaction of actinide and lanthanide ions with hemoglobin and its relevance to human and environmental toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Amit; Ali, Manjoor; Ningthoujam, Raghumani S.; Gaikwad, Pallavi; Kumar, Mukesh; Nath, Bimalendu B.; Pandey, Badri N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The sites of Ln and An interaction in Hb depend upon their charge-to-ionic-radii ratio. • Th(IV), Ce(IV) and U(VI) altered structure and oxygen-binding of Hb. • Spectroscopic studies determined binding characteristics of actinides. • Metal–Hb interaction was tested in an environmentally-important aquatic midge, Chironomus. - Abstract: Due to increasing use of lanthanides/actinides in nuclear and civil applications, understanding the impact of these metal ions on human health and environment is a growing concern. Hemoglobin (Hb), which occurs in all the kingdom of living organism, is the most abundant protein in human blood. In present study, effect of lanthanides and actinides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] on the structure and function of Hb has been investigated. Results showed that these metal ions, except Ce(IV) interacted with carbonyl and amide groups of Hb, which resulted in the loss of its alpha-helix conformation. However, beyond 75 μM, these ions affected heme moiety. Metal–heme interaction was found to affect oxygen-binding of Hb, which seems to be governed by their closeness with the charge-to-ionic-radius ratio of iron(III). Consistently, Ce(IV) being closest to iron(III), exhibited a greater effect on heme. Binding constant and binding stoichiometry of Th(IV) were higher than that of U(VI). Experiments using aquatic midge Chironomus (possessing human homologous Hb) and human blood, further validated metal–Hb interaction and associated toxicity. Thus, present study provides a biochemical basis to understand the actinide/lanthanide-induced interference in heme, which may have significant implications for the medical and environmental management of lanthanides/actinides toxicity.

  3. Understanding interaction of curcumin and metal ions on electrode surfaces using EDXRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Daisy; Kumar, K. Krishna; Narayanan, S. Sriman

    2018-04-01

    A chemically modified electrode was developed for determination of metal ions (Cd, Pb, Zn, Co, Hg). The modifier used for the study was Curcumin. Curcumin acts as a complexing agent at the surface of the electrode for preconcentration of metal ions from electrolyte to electrode surface and stripped back to electrolyte during analysis. EDXRF was used to analyze these electrodes and it was concluded that the PCR modified electrode favored effective chelation for lead and mercury.

  4. Nanocarriers from GRAS Zein Proteins to Encapsulate Hydrophobic Actives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissmueller, Nikolas T; Lu, Hoang D; Hurley, Amanda; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2016-11-14

    One factor limiting the expansion of nanomedicines has been the high cost of the materials and processes required for their production. We present a continuous, scalable, low cost nanoencapsulation process, Flash Nanoprecipitation (FNP) that enables the production of nanocarriers (NCs) with a narrow size distribution using zein corn proteins. Zein is a low cost, GRAS protein (having the FDA status of "Generally Regarded as Safe") currently used in food applications, which acts as an effective encapsulant for hydrophobic compounds using FNP. The four-stream FNP configuration allows the encapsulation of very hydrophobic compounds in a way that is not possible with previous precipitation processes. We present the encapsulation of several model active compounds with as high as 45 wt % drug loading with respect to zein concentration into ∼100 nm nanocarriers. Three examples are presented: (1) the pro-drug antioxidant, vitamin E-acetate, (2) an anticholera quorum-sensing modulator CAI-1 ((S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one; CAI-1 that reduces Vibrio cholerae virulence by modulating cellular communication), and (3) hydrophobic fluorescent dyes with a range of hydrophobicities. The specific interaction between zein and the milk protein, sodium caseinate, provides stabilization of the NCs in PBS, LB medium, and in pH 2 solutions. The stability and size changes in the three media provide information on the mechanism of assembly of the zein/active/casein NC.

  5. Targeting of the hydrophobic metabolome by pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, J Bernd; Kaloyanova, Dora V; Strating, Jeroen R P; van Hellemond, Jaap J; van der Schaar, Hilde M; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Brouwers, Jos F

    2015-05-01

    The hydrophobic molecules of the metabolome - also named the lipidome - constitute a major part of the entire metabolome. Novel technologies show the existence of a staggering number of individual lipid species, the biological functions of which are, with the exception of only a few lipid species, unknown. Much can be learned from pathogens that have evolved to take advantage of the complexity of the lipidome to escape the immune system of the host organism and to allow their survival and replication. Different types of pathogens target different lipids as shown in interaction maps, allowing visualization of differences between different types of pathogens. Bacterial and viral pathogens target predominantly structural and signaling lipids to alter the cellular phenotype of the host cell. Fungal and parasitic pathogens have complex lipidomes themselves and target predominantly the release of polyunsaturated fatty acids from the host cell lipidome, resulting in the generation of eicosanoids by either the host cell or the pathogen. Thus, whereas viruses and bacteria induce predominantly alterations in lipid metabolites at the host cell level, eukaryotic pathogens focus on interference with lipid metabolites affecting systemic inflammatory reactions that are part of the immune system. A better understanding of the interplay between host-pathogen interactions will not only help elucidate the fundamental role of lipid species in cellular physiology, but will also aid in the generation of novel therapeutic drugs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Role of the Water–Metal Ion Bridge in Mediating Interactions between Quinolones and Escherichia coli Topoisomerase IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Although quinolones have been in clinical use for decades, the mechanism underlying drug activity and resistance has remained elusive. However, recent studies indicate that clinically relevant quinolones interact with Bacillus anthracis (Gram-positive) topoisomerase IV through a critical water–metal ion bridge and that the most common quinolone resistance mutations decrease drug activity by disrupting this bridge. As a first step toward determining whether the water–metal ion bridge is a general mechanism of quinolone–topoisomerase interaction, we characterized drug interactions with wild-type Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) topoisomerase IV and a series of ParC enzymes with mutations (S80L, S80I, S80F, and E84K) in the predicted bridge-anchoring residues. Results strongly suggest that the water–metal ion bridge is essential for quinolone activity against E. coli topoisomerase IV. Although the bridge represents a common and critical mechanism that underlies broad-spectrum quinolone function, it appears to play different roles in B. anthracis and E. coli topoisomerase IV. The water–metal ion bridge is the most important binding contact of clinically relevant quinolones with the Gram-positive enzyme. However, it primarily acts to properly align clinically relevant quinolones with E. coli topoisomerase IV. Finally, even though ciprofloxacin is unable to increase levels of DNA cleavage mediated by several of the Ser80 and Glu84 mutant E. coli enzymes, the drug still retains the ability to inhibit the overall catalytic activity of these topoisomerase IV proteins. Inhibition parallels drug binding, suggesting that the presence of the drug in the active site is sufficient to diminish DNA relaxation rates. PMID:25115926

  7. Interaction of a dinoflagellate neurotoxin with voltage-activated ion channels in a marine diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Sheila A; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Taylor, Alison R

    2018-01-01

    The potent neurotoxins produced by the harmful algal bloom species Karenia brevis are activators of sodium voltage-gated channels (VGC) in animals, resulting in altered channel kinetics and membrane hyperexcitability. Recent biophysical and genomic evidence supports widespread presence of homologous sodium (Na + ) and calcium (Ca 2+ ) permeable VGCs in unicellular algae, including marine phytoplankton. We therefore hypothesized that VGCs of these phytoplankton may be an allelopathic target for waterborne neurotoxins produced by K. brevis blooms that could lead to ion channel dysfunction and disruption of signaling in a similar manner to animal Na + VGCs. We examined the interaction of brevetoxin-3 (PbTx-3), a K. brevis neurotoxin, with the Na + /Ca 2+ VGC of the non-toxic diatom Odontella sinensi s using electrophysiology. Single electrode current- and voltage- clamp recordings from O. sinensis in the presence of PbTx-3 were used to examine the toxin's effect on voltage gated Na + /Ca 2+ currents. In silico analysis was used to identify the putative PbTx binding site in the diatoms. We identified Na + /Ca 2+ VCG homologs from the transcriptomes and genomes of 12 diatoms, including three transcripts from O. sinensis and aligned them with site-5 of Na + VGCs, previously identified as the PbTx binding site in animals. Up to 1 µM PbTx had no effect on diatom resting membrane potential or membrane excitability. The kinetics of fast inward Na + /Ca 2+ currents that underlie diatom action potentials were also unaffected. However, the peak inward current was inhibited by 33%, delayed outward current was inhibited by 25%, and reversal potential of the currents shifted positive, indicating a change in permeability of the underlying channels. Sequence analysis showed a lack of conservation of the PbTx binding site in diatom VGC homologs, many of which share molecular features more similar to single-domain bacterial Na + /Ca 2+ VGCs than the 4-domain eukaryote channels

  8. Incorporating water-release and lateral protein interactions in modeling equilibrium adsorption for ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrash, Marvin E; Pinto, Neville G

    2006-09-08

    The equilibrium adsorption of two albumin proteins on a commercial ion exchanger has been studied using a colloidal model. The model accounts for electrostatic and van der Waals forces between proteins and the ion exchanger surface, the energy of interaction between adsorbed proteins, and the contribution of entropy from water-release accompanying protein adsorption. Protein-surface interactions were calculated using methods previously reported in the literature. Lateral interactions between adsorbed proteins were experimentally measured with microcalorimetry. Water-release was estimated by applying the preferential interaction approach to chromatographic retention data. The adsorption of ovalbumin and bovine serum albumin on an anion exchanger at solution pH>pI of protein was measured. The experimental isotherms have been modeled from the linear region to saturation, and the influence of three modulating alkali chlorides on capacity has been evaluated. The heat of adsorption is endothermic for all cases studied, despite the fact that the net charge on the protein is opposite that of the adsorbing surface. Strong repulsive forces between adsorbed proteins underlie the endothermic heat of adsorption, and these forces intensify with protein loading. It was found that the driving force for adsorption is the entropy increase due to the release of water from the protein and adsorbent surfaces. It is shown that the colloidal model predicts protein adsorption capacity in both the linear and non-linear isotherm regions, and can account for the effects of modulating salt.

  9. Durability of hydrophobic treatment of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, J. de; Polder, R.B.; Borsje, H.

    1998-01-01

    The subject of this study was the performance of hydrophobic treatment to protect concrete against chloride penetration from de-icing salts. Hydrophobic treatment makes a concrete surface absorb less water and less chloride. Test methods and requirements for commercial products were established. In

  10. Durability of hydrophobic treatment of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, J. de; Polder, R.B.; Borsje, H.

    1998-01-01

    The subject of this study was the performance of hydrophobic treatment to protect concrete against chloride penetration from de-icing salts. Hydrophobic treatment makes a concrete surface absorb less water and less chloride. Several types of tests were carried out to study the performance of

  11. Photophysical studies of the interactions of poly(amidoamine) generation zero (PAMAM G0) with copper and zinc ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Cabaña, Z.E.; Valdés, O.; Vergara, C.E.; Camarada, M.B.; Nachtigall, F.M.; González-Nilo, F.D.; Santos, Leonardo S.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the photophysical behavior of poly(amidoamine) generation zero (PAMAM G0) in the presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions in aqueous solutions using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Theoretical and experimental results confirmed the presence of a strong covalent metal–ligand interaction between PAMAM G0 and copper ion that favored the formation of a ligand–metal charge transfer band coordination complex. In the case of Zn(II), no complex formation with PAMAM G0 was registered. Structure analysis identified the presence of aggregate like PAMAM G0–Zn moieties that generated an enhancement in the fluorescence emission of PAMAM G0. - Highlights: • Photophysical behavior of PAMAM G0 dendrimer with Cu and Zn ions was studied. • Strong covalent metal–ligand interaction was confirmed between PAMAM G0–Cu(II). • No complex formation with PAMAM G0 was registered in the case of Zn(II). • Dendrimer aggregate generated an enhancement in fluorescence emission

  12. Photophysical studies of the interactions of poly(amidoamine) generation zero (PAMAM G0) with copper and zinc ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Cabaña, Z.E. [Laboratory of Asymmetric Synthesis, Chemistry Institute of Natural Resources, University of Talca (Chile); Valdés, O. [Nanobiotechnology Division at University of Talca, Fraunhofer Chile Research Foundation – Center for Systems Biotechnology, FCR-CSB, P.O. Box 747 Talca (Chile); Vergara, C.E. [Laboratory of Asymmetric Synthesis, Chemistry Institute of Natural Resources, University of Talca (Chile); Camarada, M.B. [Universidad Andrés Bello, Facultad de Biología, Center for Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology (CBIB), República 239, Santiago (Chile); Fundación Fraunhofer Chile Research, M. Sánchez Fontecilla 310 piso 14, Las Condes (Chile); Nachtigall, F.M. [Nanobiotechnology Division at University of Talca, Fraunhofer Chile Research Foundation – Center for Systems Biotechnology, FCR-CSB, P.O. Box 747 Talca (Chile); González-Nilo, F.D. [Universidad Andrés Bello, Facultad de Biología, Center for Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology (CBIB), República 239, Santiago (Chile); Fundación Fraunhofer Chile Research, M. Sánchez Fontecilla 310 piso 14, Las Condes (Chile); Santos, Leonardo S., E-mail: lssantos@utalca.cl [Laboratory of Asymmetric Synthesis, Chemistry Institute of Natural Resources, University of Talca (Chile); Nanobiotechnology Division at University of Talca, Fraunhofer Chile Research Foundation – Center for Systems Biotechnology, FCR-CSB, P.O. Box 747 Talca (Chile)

    2015-08-15

    This study reports the photophysical behavior of poly(amidoamine) generation zero (PAMAM G0) in the presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions in aqueous solutions using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Theoretical and experimental results confirmed the presence of a strong covalent metal–ligand interaction between PAMAM G0 and copper ion that favored the formation of a ligand–metal charge transfer band coordination complex. In the case of Zn(II), no complex formation with PAMAM G0 was registered. Structure analysis identified the presence of aggregate like PAMAM G0–Zn moieties that generated an enhancement in the fluorescence emission of PAMAM G0. - Highlights: • Photophysical behavior of PAMAM G0 dendrimer with Cu and Zn ions was studied. • Strong covalent metal–ligand interaction was confirmed between PAMAM G0–Cu(II). • No complex formation with PAMAM G0 was registered in the case of Zn(II). • Dendrimer aggregate generated an enhancement in fluorescence emission.

  13. Computational simulation of electron and ion beams interaction with solid high-molecular dielectrics and inorganic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milyavskiy, V.V.

    1998-01-01

    Numerical investigation of interaction of electron beams (with the energy within the limits 100 keV--20 MeV) and ion beams (with the energy over the range 1 keV--50 MeV) with solid high-molecular dielectrics and inorganic glasses is performed. Note that the problem of interaction of electron beams with glass optical covers is especially interesting in connection with the problem of radiation protection of solar power elements on cosmic satellites and stations. For computational simulation of the above-mentioned processes a mathematical model was developed, describing the propagation of particle beams through the sample thickness, the accumulation and relaxation of volume charge and shock-wave processes, as well as the evolution of electric field in the sample. The calculation of energy deposition by electron beam in a target in the presence of nonuniform electric field was calculated with the assistance of the semiempirical procedure, formerly proposed by author of this work. Propagation of the low energy ions through the sample thickness was simulated using Pearson IV distribution. Damage distribution, ionization distribution and range distribution was taken into account. Propagation of high energy ions was calculated in the approximation of continuous deceleration. For description of hydrodynamic processes the system of equations of continuum mechanics in elastic-plastic approximation and the wide-range equation of state were used

  14. The mobility of Li+ and K+ ions in helium and argon at 294 and 80 K and derived interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassidy, R.A.; Elford, M.T.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis of mobility data is a valuable technique for deriving ion-atom interaction potentials or testing at initio potentials particularly at relatively large internuclear separations. In order to obtain the most complete information on the long range part of the potential it is necessary to have mobility data at sufficiently low gas temperatures and small values of E/N that the mobility is determined only by the dipole polarization force. Although this condition can be reasonably well met at room temperature for gases of high polarizability, this is not the case for ions in helium and in particular for the most well studied case, that of Li + in helium. The prime purpose of the present measurements was to obtain low temperature data for Li + in helium in order to determine more accurately the attractive long range tail of the potential. The measurements were also extended to argon to demonstrate the effect of the polarizability on the derivation of potentials. The mobility measurements were made using a drift tube-mass spectrometer system employing the Bradbury-Nielsen time of flight technique. Measurements were performed at 294 K and 80 K. The 'three temperature' theory of Lin, Viehland and Mason was used to fit interaction potentials to the present data. Detailed comparisons are made here only for the case of Li + ions in helium. The new data for 80 K provide additional information on the potential at internuclear separations which cover the range to 5 A. (Authors)

  15. Dynamics of Wetting of Ultra Hydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan; Kavehpour, Pirouz; Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Controlling the surface wettability of hydrophobic and super hydrophobic surfaces has extensive industrial applications ranging from coating, painting and printing technology and waterproof clothing to efficiency increase in power and water plants. This requires enhancing the knowledge about the dynamics of wetting on these hydrophobic surfaces. We have done experimental investigation on the dynamics of wetting on hydrophobic surfaces by looking deeply in to the dependency of the dynamic contact angles both advancing and receding on the velocity of the three-phase boundary (Solid/Liquid/Gas interface) using the Wilhelmy plate method with different ultra-hydrophobic surfaces. Several fluids with different surface tension and viscosity are used to study the effect of physical properties of liquids on the governing laws.

  16. Three Dimensional Simulation of Ion Thruster Plume-Spacecraft Interaction Based on a Graphic Processor Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Junxue; Xie Kan; Qiu Qian; Tang Haibin; Li Juan; Tian Huabing

    2013-01-01

    Based on the three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) method and Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), a parallel particle simulation code combined with a graphic processor unit (GPU) has been developed for the simulation of charge-exchange (CEX) xenon ions in the plume of an ion thruster. Using the proposed technique, the potential and CEX plasma distribution are calculated for the ion thruster plume surrounding the DS1 spacecraft at different thrust levels. The simulation results are in good agreement with measured CEX ion parameters reported in literature, and the GPU's results are equal to a CPU's. Compared with a single CPU Intel Core 2 E6300, 16-processor GPU NVIDIA GeForce 9400 GT indicates a speedup factor of 3.6 when the total macro particle number is 1.1×10 6 . The simulation results also reveal how the back flow CEX plasma affects the spacecraft floating potential, which indicates that the plume of the ion thruster is indeed able to alleviate the extreme negative floating potentials of spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit

  17. Novel lanthanide doped micro- and mesoporous solids. Characterization of ion-host-interactions, species distribution and luminescence properties using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy; Neuartige Lanthanoid-dotierte mikro- und mesoporoese Feststoffe. Charakterisierung von Ion-Wirt-Wechselwirkungen, Speziesverteilung und Lumineszenzeigenschaften mittels zeitaufgeloester Lumineszenzspektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessner, Andre

    2010-12-15

    mesopores. Lanthanide ions located here, are easily accessible for water and thus show shorter luminescence decay times and a more symmetrical coordination sphere, which is mostly made up by water molecules. Another investigated aspect was the influence of surface modifications on the luminescence behavior of the lanthanide ions inside the material. Here we could show, that surface modifications hydrophobize the material and thus are able to protect the lanthanide ions from water, which is important for the conservation of the luminescence properties. Concerning the mesoporous silicates, again a heterogeneous distribution of the lanthanide ions in the pore system was found. A part of the lanthanide ions interacts with the pore wall, while the other part is located in the aqueous phase inside the pores. Surface modification led to a interaction of the lanthanide ions with the modification. This was reflected in the luminescence properties depending on the structure of the modification and the surface loading.

  18. Surface Electrical Potentials of Root Cell Plasma Membranes: Implications for Ion Interactions, Rhizotoxicity, and Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Min Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many crop plants are exposed to heavy metals and other metals that may intoxicate the crop plants themselves or consumers of the plants. The rhizotoxicity of heavy metals is influenced strongly by the root cell plasma membrane (PM surface’s electrical potential (ψ0. The usually negative ψ0 is created by negatively charged constituents of the PM. Cations in the rooting medium are attracted to the PM surface and anions are repelled. Addition of ameliorating cations (e.g., Ca2+ and Mg2+ to the rooting medium reduces the effectiveness of cationic toxicants (e.g., Cu2+ and Pb2+ and increases the effectiveness of anionic toxicants (e.g., SeO42− and H2AsO4−. Root growth responses to ions are better correlated with ion activities at PM surfaces ({IZ}0 than with activities in the bulk-phase medium ({IZ}b (IZ denotes an ion with charge Z. Therefore, electrostatic effects play a role in heavy metal toxicity that may exceed the role of site-specific competition between toxicants and ameliorants. Furthermore, ψ0 controls the transport of ions across the PM by influencing both {IZ}0 and the electrical potential difference across the PM from the outer surface to the inner surface (Em,surf. Em,surf is a component of the driving force for ion fluxes across the PM and controls ion-channel voltage gating. Incorporation of {IZ}0 and Em,surf into quantitative models for root metal toxicity and uptake improves risk assessments of toxic metals in the environment. These risk assessments will improve further with future research on the application of electrostatic theory to heavy metal phytotoxicity in natural soils and aquatic environments.

  19. Investigation of interaction between the Pt(II) ions and aminosilane-modified silica surface in heterogeneous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Waldemar; Gąsowska, Anna; Kirszensztejn, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    UV-vis spectroscopy measurements confirmed the reaction in heterogeneous system between Pt(II) ions and ethylenediamine type ligand, n-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane, immobilized at the silica surface. The formation of complexes is a consequence of interaction between the amine groups from the ligand grafted onto SiO2 and ions of platinum. A potentiometric titration technique was to determine the stability constants of complexes of Pt(II) with immobilized insoluble ligand (SG-L), on the silica gel. The results show the formation of three surface complexes of the same type (PtHSG-L, Pt(HSG-L)2, PtSG-L) with SG-L ligand, in a wide range of pH for different Debye length. The concentration distribution of the complexes in a heterogeneous system is evaluated.

  20. Interaction of Cr (III), Ni (II), Pb (II) with DTPA complexes of essential metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulzar, S.; Zahida; Maqsood, T.; Naqvi, R.R.

    2002-01-01

    With the increase of anthropogenic activities in the environment, heavy metal toxicity (Chromium, Nickel and Lead) is more common now. DTPA (diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) a polyamino carboxylic acid is widely used to form hydrophilic and stable complexes with most of the metal ions. In this spectrophotometric study, concentration of Cr(III), Ni(II) and Pb(II) (toxic metal ions) exchanged with Fe(III), Zn(II) and Ca(II) from their DTPA complexes were estimated at pH 4,7 and 9. Concentration of added metal was varied from 1-4 times to that of complexed metal. (author)