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Sample records for hydrophobic azo dyes

  1. Anaerobic azo dye reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der F.P.

    2002-01-01

    Azo dyes, aromatic moieties linked together by azo (-N=N-) chromophores, represent the largest class of dyes used in textile-processing and other industries. The release of these compounds into the environment is undesirable, not only because of their colour, but also

  2. Role of surfactant derived intermediates in the efficacy and mechanism for radiation chemical degradation of a hydrophobic azo dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Laboni; Chatterjee, Suchandra; Naik, Devidas B; Adhikari, Soumyakanti

    2015-11-15

    A combined methodology involving gamma and pulse radiolysis, product analysis and toxicity studies has been adopted to comprehend the degradation process of a model hydrophobic azo dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol, emphasizing the role of the surfactant, which is an integral part of textile waste. Two new and important findings are underlined in this article. The first is the direct attestation of the hydrazyl radical-parent adduct, formed in the reaction of the dye with e(-)aq followed by protonation and subsequent addition to the unreacted dye molecule. This has been confirmed from concentration dependent studies. Secondly, we have clearly shown that in the reaction of hydroxyl radical with the dye in Triton X-100 media, the initially produced TX radicals cause reductive degradation of the dye. Identification and detailed analysis of HPLC and GCMS data reveals that similar products are formed in both the reactions of e(-)aq and OH radicals. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of 10(-4)moldm(-3) dye was found to be reduced significantly after irradiation. Thus, the present study not only depicts new pathways for the degradation of hydrophobic azo dye, but also demonstrates the role of a surfactant in the entire process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of surfactant derived intermediates in the efficacy and mechanism for radiation chemical degradation of a hydrophobic azo dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Laboni [Radiation & Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Chatterjee, Suchandra [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Naik, Devidas B. [Radiation & Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Adhikari, Soumyakanti, E-mail: asoumya@barc.gov.in [Radiation & Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Demonstration of the role of surfactant in the degradation of the hydrophobic dye. • First direct observation of the formation of “hydrazyl radical-parent” adduct. • Similar products obtained in the reaction of e{sup −}{sub aq} and ·OH radical in TX-100 medium. • Significant reduction in cytotoxicity of irradiated dye in aqueous–organic medium. • New mechanistic pathway could be delineated. - Abstract: A combined methodology involving gamma and pulse radiolysis, product analysis and toxicity studies has been adopted to comprehend the degradation process of a model hydrophobic azo dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol, emphasizing the role of the surfactant, which is an integral part of textile waste. Two new and important findings are underlined in this article. The first is the direct attestation of the hydrazyl radical-parent adduct, formed in the reaction of the dye with e{sup −}{sub aq} followed by protonation and subsequent addition to the unreacted dye molecule. This has been confirmed from concentration dependent studies. Secondly, we have clearly shown that in the reaction of hydroxyl radical with the dye in Triton X-100 media, the initially produced TX radicals cause reductive degradation of the dye. Identification and detailed analysis of HPLC and GCMS data reveals that similar products are formed in both the reactions of e{sup −}{sub aq} and ·OH radicals. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of 10{sup −4} mol dm{sup −3} dye was found to be reduced significantly after irradiation. Thus, the present study not only depicts new pathways for the degradation of hydrophobic azo dye, but also demonstrates the role of a surfactant in the entire process.

  4. Azo dyes and human health: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King-Thom

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic azo dyes are widely used in industries. Gerhardt Domagk discovered that the antimicrobial effect of red azo dye Prontosil was caused by the reductively cleaved (azo reduction) product sulfanilamide. The significance of azo reduction is thus revealed. Azo reduction can be accomplished by human intestinal microflora, skin microflora, environmental microorganisms, to a lesser extent by human liver azoreductase, and by nonbiological means. Some azo dyes can be carcinogenic without being cleaved into aromatic amines. However, the carcinogenicity of many azo dyes is due to their cleaved product such as benzidine. Benzidine induces various human and animal tumors. Another azo dye component, p-phenylenediamine, is a contact allergen. Many azo dyes and their reductively cleaved products as well as chemically related aromatic amines are reported to affect human health, causing allergies and other human maladies.

  5. Synthesis of azo pyridone dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijin Dušan Ž.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 50% of all colorants which are used nowdays are azo dyes and pigments, and among them arylazo pyridone dyes (and pigments have became of interest in last several decades due to the high molar extinction coefficient, and the medium to high light and wet fastness properties. They find application generally as disperse dyes. The importance of disperse dyes increased in the 1970s and 1980s due to the use of polyester and nylon as the main synthetic fibers. Also, disperse dyes were used rapidly since 1970 in inks for the heat-transfer printing of polyester. The main synthetic route for the preparation of azo dyes is coupling reaction between an aromatic diazo compound and a coupling component. Of all dyes manufactured, about 60% are produced by this reaction. Arylazo pyridone dyes can be prepared from pyridone moiety as a coupling component, where substituent can be on nitrogen, and diazonim salts which can be derived from different substituted anilines or other heterocyclic derivatives. In addition, arylazo dyes containing pyridone ring can be prepared from arylazo diketones or arylazo ketoesters (obtained by coupling β-diketones or β-ketoesters with diazonim salts by condensation with cyanoacetamide. Disazo dyes can be prepared by tetrazotizing a dianiline and coupling it with a pyridone or by diazotizing aniline and coupling it with a dipyridone. Trisazo dyes can be also prepared by diazotizing of aniline and coupling it with a tripyridone or by hexazotizing a trianiline and coupling it with a pyridone. The main goal of this paper is to give a brief review on the synthesis of arylazo pyridone dyes due to the lack of such reviews. In addition, some properties of arylazo pyridone dyes as light fastness and azo-hydrazon tautomerism are disccused.

  6. Azo-hydrazone tautomerism of aryl azo pyridone dyes

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    Mirković Jelena M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last three or four decades disperse dyes derived from pyridones (in particular azo pyridone dyes have gained in importance, and are widely used in various fields. These compounds have excellent coloration properties, and are suitable for the dyeing of polyester fabrics. Basic features of these dyes are simplicity of their synthesis by diazotation and azo coupling. They generally have high molar extinction coefficient with medium to high light and wet fastness. The absorption maxima of these dyes show their visible absorption wavelength ranging from yellow to orange, which can be attributed to poorly delocalized electrons in the pyridone ring. However, there are several dyes with deep colors such as red or violet. Pyridone dyes with alkyl and aryl groups in ortho position to azo group show 2-pyridone/2-hydroxypyridine tautomerism, while those containing OH and NHR groups conjugated with the azo group show azo-hydrazone tautomerism. Determining azo-hydrazone tautomerism could be therefore interesting, since the tautomers have different physico-chemical properties and most importantly different coloration. The literature on azo-hydrazone tautomerism, determination of equilibrium position, and investigation of substituent and solvent influence on tautomerism has been summarized in the presented review. The general conclusion is that the equilibrium between two tautomers is influenced by the structure of the compounds and by the solvents used. The tautomeric behavior patterns of the arylazo pyridone dyes in the reviewed literature has been studied using various instrumental techniques, including FT-IR, UV-vis, and NMR spectroscopy. The quantum chemical calculations related to the azo-hydrazon tautomerism have also been included. A large number of pyridone dyes exist in hydrazone form in solid state, while in solvents there is a mixture of tautomers. In addition, the X-ray single-crystal diffraction data analysis of some commercial pyridone

  7. Binding of Sudan II and IV to lecithin liposomes and E. coli membranes: insights into the toxicity of hydrophobic azo dyes

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    Zhao Jian-Fu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sudan red compounds are hydrophobic azo dyes, still used as food additives in some countries. However, they have been shown to be unsafe, causing tumors in the liver and urinary bladder in rats. They have been classified as category 3 human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. A number of hypotheses that could explain the mechanism of carcinogenesis have been proposed for dyes similar to the Sudan red compounds. Traditionally, investigations of the membrane toxicity of organic substances have focused on hydrocarbons, e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, and DDT. In contrast to hydrocarbons, Sudan red compounds contain azo and hydroxy groups, which can form hydrogen bonds with the polar head groups of membrane phospholipids. Thus, entry may be impeded. They could have different toxicities from other lipophilic hydrocarbons. The available data show that because these compounds are lipophilic, interactions with hydrophobic parts of the cell are important for their toxicity. Lipophilic compounds accumulate in the membrane, causing expansion of the membrane surface area, inhibition of primary ion pumps and increased proton permeability. Results This work investigated the interactions of the amphiphilic compounds Sudan II and IV with lecithin liposomes and live Escherichia coli (E. coli. Sudan II and IV binding to lecithin liposomes and live E. coli corresponds to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. In the Sudan red compounds – lecithin liposome solutions, the binding ratio of Sudan II to lecithin is 1/31 and that of Sudan IV to 1/314. The binding constant of the Sudan II-lecithin complex is 1.75 × 104 and that of the Sudan IV-lecithin complex 2.92 × 105. Besides, the influences of pH, electrolyte and temperature were investigated and analyzed quantitatively. In the Sudan red compounds – E.coli mixture, the binding ratios of Sudan II and Sudan IV to E.coli membrane phospholipid are 1/29 and 1

  8. Binding of Sudan II and IV to lecithin liposomes and E. coli membranes: insights into the toxicity of hydrophobic azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Gao, Hong-Wen; Ren, Jiao-Rong; Chen, Ling; Li, Yu-Cheng; Zhao, Jian-Fu; Zhao, He-Ping; Yuan, Yuan

    2007-03-27

    Sudan red compounds are hydrophobic azo dyes, still used as food additives in some countries. However, they have been shown to be unsafe, causing tumors in the liver and urinary bladder in rats. They have been classified as category 3 human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. A number of hypotheses that could explain the mechanism of carcinogenesis have been proposed for dyes similar to the Sudan red compounds. Traditionally, investigations of the membrane toxicity of organic substances have focused on hydrocarbons, e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and DDT. In contrast to hydrocarbons, Sudan red compounds contain azo and hydroxy groups, which can form hydrogen bonds with the polar head groups of membrane phospholipids. Thus, entry may be impeded. They could have different toxicities from other lipophilic hydrocarbons. The available data show that because these compounds are lipophilic, interactions with hydrophobic parts of the cell are important for their toxicity. Lipophilic compounds accumulate in the membrane, causing expansion of the membrane surface area, inhibition of primary ion pumps and increased proton permeability. This work investigated the interactions of the amphiphilic compounds Sudan II and IV with lecithin liposomes and live Escherichia coli (E. coli). Sudan II and IV binding to lecithin liposomes and live E. coli corresponds to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. In the Sudan red compounds--lecithin liposome solutions, the binding ratio of Sudan II to lecithin is 1/31 and that of Sudan IV to 1/314. The binding constant of the Sudan II-lecithin complex is 1.75 x 104 and that of the Sudan IV-lecithin complex 2.92 x 105. Besides, the influences of pH, electrolyte and temperature were investigated and analyzed quantitatively. In the Sudan red compounds--E.coli mixture, the binding ratios of Sudan II and Sudan IV to E.coli membrane phospholipid are 1/29 and 1/114. The binding constants of the Sudan II--and Sudan

  9. Binding of Sudan II and IV to lecithin liposomes and E. coli membranes: insights into the toxicity of hydrophobic azo dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Gao, Hong-Wen; Ren, Jiao-Rong; Chen, Ling; Li, Yu-Cheng; Zhao, Jian-Fu; Zhao, He-Ping; Yuan, Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Background Sudan red compounds are hydrophobic azo dyes, still used as food additives in some countries. However, they have been shown to be unsafe, causing tumors in the liver and urinary bladder in rats. They have been classified as category 3 human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. A number of hypotheses that could explain the mechanism of carcinogenesis have been proposed for dyes similar to the Sudan red compounds. Traditionally, investigations of the membrane toxicity of organic substances have focused on hydrocarbons, e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and DDT. In contrast to hydrocarbons, Sudan red compounds contain azo and hydroxy groups, which can form hydrogen bonds with the polar head groups of membrane phospholipids. Thus, entry may be impeded. They could have different toxicities from other lipophilic hydrocarbons. The available data show that because these compounds are lipophilic, interactions with hydrophobic parts of the cell are important for their toxicity. Lipophilic compounds accumulate in the membrane, causing expansion of the membrane surface area, inhibition of primary ion pumps and increased proton permeability. Results This work investigated the interactions of the amphiphilic compounds Sudan II and IV with lecithin liposomes and live Escherichia coli (E. coli). Sudan II and IV binding to lecithin liposomes and live E. coli corresponds to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. In the Sudan red compounds – lecithin liposome solutions, the binding ratio of Sudan II to lecithin is 1/31 and that of Sudan IV to 1/314. The binding constant of the Sudan II-lecithin complex is 1.75 × 104 and that of the Sudan IV-lecithin complex 2.92 × 105. Besides, the influences of pH, electrolyte and temperature were investigated and analyzed quantitatively. In the Sudan red compounds – E.coli mixture, the binding ratios of Sudan II and Sudan IV to E.coli membrane phospholipid are 1/29 and 1/114. The binding constants

  10. Novel Strategy for Tracking the Microbial Degradation of Azo Dyes with Different Polarities in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Xu, Meiying; Chen, Xingjuan; Yang, Yonggang; Wang, Haiji; Sun, Guoping

    2015-10-06

    Direct visualization evidence is important for understanding the microbial degradation mechanisms. To track the microbial degradation pathways of azo dyes with different polar characterizations, sensors based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from 1,8-naphthalimide to azo dyes were synthesized, in which the quenched fluorescence will recover when the azo bond was cleaved. In living cells, the sensor-tracking experiment showed that the low polarity and hydrophobic azo dye can be taken up into the cells and reduced inside the cells, whereas the high polarity and hydrophilic azo dye can be reduced only outside the cells because of the selective permeability of the cell membranes. These results indicated that there were two different bacterial degradation pathways available for different polarity azo dyes. To our knowledge, no fluorescent sensor has yet been designed for illuminating the microbial degradation mechanisms of organic pollutants with different characteristics.

  11. Chlorine disinfection of dye wastewater: Implications for a commercial azo dye mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacchi, Francine Inforcato; Albuquerque, Anjaina Fernandes; Vendemiatti, Josiane Aparecida; Morales, Daniel Alexandre [Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Limeira, SP, 13484-332 (Brazil); Ormond, Alexandra B.; Freeman, Harold S. [Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8301 (United States); Zocolo, Guilherme Juliao; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho, Instituto de Quimica de Araraquara, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Umbuzeiro, Gisela, E-mail: giselau@ft.unicamp.br [Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Limeira, SP, 13484-332 (Brazil)

    2013-01-01

    Azo dyes, the most widely used family of synthetic dyes, are often employed as colorants in areas such as textiles, plastics, foods/drugs/cosmetics, and electronics. Following their use in industrial applications, azo dyes have been found in effluents and various receiving waters. Chemical treatment of effluents containing azo dyes includes disinfection using chlorine, which can generate compounds of varying eco/genotoxicity. Among the widely known commercial azo dyes for synthetic fibers is C.I. Disperse Red 1. While this dye is known to exist as a complex mixture, reports of eco/genotoxicity involve the purified form. Bearing in mind the potential for adverse synergistic effects arising from exposures to chemical mixtures, the aim of the present study was to characterize the components of commercial Disperse Red 1 and its chlorine-mediated decoloration products and to evaluate their ecotoxicity and mutagenicity. In conducting the present study, Disperse Red 1 was treated with chlorine gas, and the solution obtained was analyzed with the aid of LC-ESI-MS/MS to identify the components present, and then evaluated for ecotoxicity and mutagenicity, using Daphnia similis and Salmonella/microsome assays, respectively. The results of this study indicated that chlorination of Disperse Red 1 produced four chlorinated aromatic compounds as the main products and that the degradation products were more ecotoxic than the parent dye. These results suggest that a disinfection process using chlorine should be avoided for effluents containing hydrophobic azo dyes such commercial Disperse Red 1. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aqueous solutions of Disperse Red 1 were treated with chlorine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The chlorination products of Disperse Red 1 were identified using LC-ESI-MS/MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daphnia and Salmonella/microsome were employed for eco/genotoxicity testing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The chlorinated dye was more mutagenic

  12. Integrated and sequential anaerobic/aerobic biodegradation of azo dyes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, N.G.C.

    2001-01-01

    Azo dyes constitute a major class of environmental pollutants accounting for 60 to 70% of all dyes and pigments used. These compounds are characterized by aromatic moieties linked together with azo groups (-N=N-). The release of azo dyes into the environment is a concern due to coloration

  13. 40 CFR 721.5917 - Phenyl azo dye (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phenyl azo dye (generic). 721.5917... Substances § 721.5917 Phenyl azo dye (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a phenyl azo dye (PMN P-02-17) is subject to...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4594 - Substituted azo metal complex dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted azo metal complex dye. 721... Substances § 721.4594 Substituted azo metal complex dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted azo metal complex...

  15. Re-evaluation of azo dyes as food additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pratt, Iona; Larsen, John Christian; Mortensen, Alicja

    2013-01-01

    Aryl azo compounds are widely used as colorants (azo dyes) in a wide range of products including textiles, leather, paper, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and food.As part of its systematic re-evaluation of food additives, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has carried out new risk assessments...... of allazo dyes permitted in food. EFSA has also evaluated a number of azo dyes found illegally in food in recent years, including Sudan dyes, Para Red and Orange II. The re-evaluation of all food colours, including the azo dyes,was considered high priority (i) because colorants were among the first...

  16. Degradation of azo dyes by environmental microorganisms and helminths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingthom Chung; Stevens, S.E. Jr. (Memphis State Univ., TN (United States). Dept. of Biology)

    1993-11-01

    The degradation of azo dyes by environmental microorganisms, fungi, and helminths is reviewed. Azo dyes are used in a wide variety of products and can be found in the effluent of most sewage treatment facilities. Substantial quantities of these dyes have been deposited in the environment, particularly in streams and rivers. Azo dyes were shown to affect microbial activities and microbial population sizes in the sediments and in the water columns of aquatic habitats. Only a few aerobic bacteria have been found to reduce azo dyes under aerobic conditions, and little is known about the process. A substantial number of anaerobic bacteria capable of azo dye reduction have been reported. The enzyme responsible for azo dye reduction has been partially purified, and characterization of the enzyme is proceeding. The nematode Ascaris lumbricoides and the cestode Moniezia expanza have been reported to reduce azo dyes anaerobically. Recently the fungus Phanerochaete chrysoporium was reported to mineralize azo dyes via a peroxidation-mediated pathway. A possible degradation pathway for the mineralization of azo dye is proposed and future research needs are discussed.

  17. 40 CFR 721.9717 - Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye... Substances § 721.9717 Azo monochloro triazine reactive dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reactive dye (PMN P-96-238) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  18. Molecular dynamics study of biodegradation of azo dyes via their interactions with AzrC azoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghshenas, Hamed; Kay, Maryam; Dehghanian, Fariba; Tavakol, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Azo dyes are one of the most important class of dyes, which have been widely used in industries. Because of the environmental pollution of azo dyes, many studies have been performed to study their biodegradation using bacterial systems. In present work, the AzrC of mesophilic gram-positive Bacillus sp. B29 has been considered to study its interaction with five common azo dyes (orange G, acid red 88, Sudan I, orange I, and methyl red). The molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to study the interaction between AzrC and azo dyes. The trajectory was confirmed using root mean square deviation and the root mean square fluctuation analyses. Then, the hydrogen bond and alanine scanning analyses were performed to reveal active site residues. Phe105 (A), Phe125 (B), Phe172 (B), and Pro132 (B) have been found as the most important hydrophobic residues whereas Asn104 (A), Tyr127 (B), and Asn187 (A) have key role in making hydrogen bond. The results of molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area calculations proved that the hydrophobic azo dyes like Acid red 88 binds more tightly to the AzrC protein. The calculated data suggested MR A 121 (B) I as a potential candidate for improving the AzrC-MR interactions.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of textile azo dyes derivatives of methoxyphenols

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.; Queiroz, Maria João R.P.

    1999-01-01

    Azo dyes are used extensively in the textile and dyestuff industries and effluents from these industrial processes are usually resistant to biological treatment. Textile azo dyes with bioaccessible groups such as guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and 2,6--dimethoxyphenol, for lignin-degrading fungus were synthesized using aminobenzoic and aminosulfonic acids as diazocomponents.

  20. Biodegradation of textile Azo Dyes by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.; Santos, Isabel M.; Queiroz, Maria João R.P.; Lima, Nelson

    1998-01-01

    Azo dyes are used extensively in the textile and dyestuff industries and effluents from these industrial processes are usually resistant to biological treatment. Textile azo dyes with bioaccessible groups such as guaiacol and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, for lignin-degrading fungus as P. chrysosporium were synthesised.

  1. An Interdisciplinary Experiment: Azo-Dye Metabolism by "Staphylococcus Aureus"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklesby, Kayleigh; Smith, Robert; Sharp, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    An interdisciplinary and engaging practical is detailed which offers great versatility in the study of a qualitative and quantitative metabolism of azo-dyes by "Staphylococcus aureus". This practical has broad scope for adaptation in the number and depth of variables to allow a focused practical experiment or small research project. Azo-dyes are…

  2. Decolorization of azo dyes by Geobacter metallireducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Chen, Congcong; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Geobacter metallireducens was found to be capable of decolorizing several azo dyes with different structures to various extents. Pyruvate, ethanol, acetate, propionate, and benzoate could support 66.3 ± 2.6-93.7 ± 2.1 % decolorization of 0.1 mM acid red 27 (AR27) in 40 h. The dependence of the specific decolorization rate on AR27 concentration (25 to 800 μM) followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (K m = 186.9 ± 1.4 μΜ, V max = 0.65 ± 0.02 μmol mg protein(-1) h(-1)). Enhanced AR27 decolorization was observed with the increase of cell concentrations ranging from 7.5 to 45 mgL(-1). AR27 decolorization by G. metallireducens was retarded by the presence of goethite, which competed electrons with AR27 and was reduced to Fe(II). The addition of low concentrations of humic acid (1-100 mgL(-1)) or 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (0.5-50 μM) could improve the decolorization performance of G. metallireducens. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis suggested reductive pathway to be responsible for decolorization. This was the first study on azo dye decolorization by Geobacter strain and might improve our understanding of natural attenuation and bioremediation of environments polluted by azo dyes.

  3. Toxicological significance of azo dye metabolism by human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinhui; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 0.7 million tons of azo dyes are synthesized each year. Azo dyes are composed of one or more R₁-N=N-R₂ linkages. Studies have shown that both mammalian and microbial azoreductases cleave the azo bonds of the dyes to form compounds that are potentially genotoxic. The human gastrointestinal tract harbors a diverse microbiota comprised of at least several thousand species. Both water-soluble and water-insoluble azo dyes can be reduced by intestinal bacteria. Some of the metabolites produced by intestinal microbiota have been shown to be carcinogenic to humans although the parent azo dyes may not be classified as being carcinogenic. Azoreductase activity is commonly found in intestinal bacteria. Three types of azoreductases have been characterized in bacteria. They are flavin dependent NADH preferred azoreductase, flavin dependent NADPH preferred azoreductase, and flavin free NADPH preferred azoreductase. This review highlights how azo dyes are metabolized by intestinal bacteria, mechanisms of azo reduction, and the potential contribution in the carcinogenesis/mutagenesis of the reduction of the azo dyes by intestinal microbiota.

  4. Characterization of the decolorizing activity of azo dyes by Bacillus subtilis azoreductase AzoR1

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    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The product of the Bacillus subtilis gene azoR1 is annotated as a putative azoreductase, production of which isinduced in response to thiol-reactive compounds. Here we report on the decolorization of four azo dyes by azoreductaseactivity. The ability of overexpressed AzoR1 strain ORB7106 to catalyze decolorization of azo dyes was investigated on agarplates and in liquid cultures. The decolorization efficacy of a mutant, ORB7106, which has lost negative control of azoR1expression, was significantly better than the parental strain (JH642, providing evidence that the azoR1 gene product isan azoreductase with the ability to decolorize azo dyes. ORB7106 showed 40-98% azo dye decolorization within 48 h. Thebacterium exhibited a remarkable color removal capability over a wide range of Methyl Red concentrations (10-200 mg l-1, pH(5-9 and temperatures (25-45°C. A significant increase in the decolorization activity was observed after induction of AzoR1production. The results suggested that AzoR1 production could be induced by Methyl Red. The decolorizing activity isprimarily associated with the cytosolic fraction and requires NADH as a cofactor.

  5. Effects of reduction products of ortho-hydroxyl substituted azo dyes on biodecolorization of azo dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Guangfei [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education, School of Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road No. 2, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang Jing, E-mail: wangjingbio@yahoo.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education, School of Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road No. 2, Dalian 116024 (China); Lu Hong; Jin Ruofei; Zhou Jiti; Zhang Long [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education, School of Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road No. 2, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2009-11-15

    The mediated effects of reduction products of some ortho-hydroxyl substituted azo dyes on biodecolorization were investigated. The results indicated that the addition of reduction products could effectively accelerate dye decolorization by Shigella sp. QRZ-1. The best accelerating effect was obtained with the addition of reduction products of Acid Red 14 (AR14), resulting in an over 3-fold increase in decolorization efficiency of many azo dyes. In sequencing batch reactor experiments, the accelerating effect of reduction products of AR14 was more obvious (1.5-fold) during the startup of the system. When the dye concentration was increased to 500 mg L{sup -1}, the accelerated decolorization efficiency was still maintained around 95%. The presence of AR14 in the feed enhanced the decolorization performance of anaerobic sludge, indicating that the strategy may be beneficial for practical application. 1-Naphthol-2-amino-4-sulfonic acid, which is one of the reduction products of AR14, may function as redox mediator to speed up azo dye biodecolorization.

  6. Adsorption of azo dyes on polymer materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panić Vesna V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of polymeric adsorbents for the removal of azo dyes from solution has been reviewed. Adsorption techniques are widely used to remove certain classes of pollutants from waters, especially those which are not easily biodegradable. The removal of azo dyes as pollutants from wastewaters of textile, paper, printing, leather, pharmaceutical and other industries has been addressed by the researchers. The wider use of already available adsorbents is restricted due to their high costs which lead to investigation and development of new materials that can be cheaper, eficient and easy regenerated. The aim of this article is to present to the readers the widespread investigations in recent years of synthetic and natural polymers as adsorbents and potential replacement of conventional adsorbents. This review presents only the data obtained using raw, hydrogel, grafted and crosslinked forms of synthetic and nature based polymers, and the discussion is limited to these polymer-based materials and their adsorption properties. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43009 i br. 172062.

  7. A New Generation of Glycoconjugated Azo Dyes Based on Aminosugars

    OpenAIRE

    Guazzelli, Lorenzo; Catelani, Giorgio; D’Andrea, Felicia

    2015-01-01

    The third generation of glycoconjugated azo dyes (GADs) was prepared linking monoazo dyes to 6-amino-6-deoxy-d-galactose or 6′amino-6′-deoxylactose through mixed amido-ester connections. The complementary conjugation reactions were studied using the succinyl derivative of either the acetal protected aminosugar or the azo dye. Target “naturalized” GADs were obtained after acid hydrolysis of the acetal protecting groups present on the sugar moiety.

  8. A New Generation of Glycoconjugated Azo Dyes Based on Aminosugars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Guazzelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The third generation of glycoconjugated azo dyes (GADs was prepared linking monoazo dyes to 6-amino-6-deoxy-d-galactose or 6′amino-6′-deoxylactose through mixed amido-ester connections. The complementary conjugation reactions were studied using the succinyl derivative of either the acetal protected aminosugar or the azo dye. Target “naturalized” GADs were obtained after acid hydrolysis of the acetal protecting groups present on the sugar moiety.

  9. Effect of dye structure and redox mediators on anaerobic azo and anthraquinone dye reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Carantino Costa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the biological decolourisation of dyes with different molecular structures. The kinetic constant values (k1 achieved with azo dye Reactive Red 120 were 7.6 and 10.1 times higher in the presence of RM (redox mediators AQDS and riboflavin, respectively, than the assays lacking RM. The kinetic constant achieved with the azo dye Congo Red was 42 times higher than that obtained with the anthraquinone dye Reactive Blue 4. The effect of RM on dye reduction was more evident for azo dyes resistant to reductive processes, and ineffective for anthraquinone dyes because of the structural stability of the latter.

  10. Biodegradation of azo dyes by genetically engineered azoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yan, Bin; Zhou, Ji-Ti; Bao, Yong-Ming; Lu, Hong; Yuan, Xiao-Dong

    2005-01-01

    A azoreductase gene with 537 bp was obtained by PCR amplification from Rhodobacter sphaeroides AS1.1737. The enzyme, with a molecular weight of 18.7 kD, was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli and its biodegradation characteristics for azo dyes were investigated. Furthermore, the reaction kinetics and mechanism of azo dyes catalyzed by the genetically engineered azoreductase were studied in detail. The presence of a hydrazo-intermediate was identified, which provided a convincing evidence for the assumption that azo dyes were degraded via an incomplete reduction stage.

  11. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  12. Modification of azo dyes by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Díaz, I M; McFeeters, R F

    2009-08-01

    The ability of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei to modify the azo dye, tartrazine, was recently documented as the result of the investigation on red coloured spoilage in acidified cucumbers. Fourteen other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were screened for their capability to modify the food colouring tartrazine and other azo dyes of relevance for the textile industry. Most LAB modified tartrazine under anaerobic conditions, but not under aerobic conditions in modified chemically defined media. Microbial growth was not affected by the presence of the azo dyes in the culture medium. The product of the tartrazine modification by LAB was identified as a molecule 111 daltons larger than its precursor by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. This product had a purple colour under aerobic conditions and was colourless under anaerobic conditions. It absorbed light at 361 and 553 nm. LAB are capable of anabolizing azo dyes only under anaerobic conditions. IMPACT AND SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY: Although micro-organisms capable of reducing the azo bond on multiple dyes have been known for decades, this is the first report of anabolism of azo dyes by food related micro-organisms, such as LAB.

  13. Effect of cooperative hydrogen bonding in Azo-Hydrazone Tautomerism of Azo Dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Özen, Alimet Sema; Ozen, Alimet Sema; Doruker, Pemra; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2007-01-01

    Azo-hydrazone tautomerism in azo dyes has been modeled by using density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. The most stable tautomer was determined both for model compounds and for azo dyes Acid Orange 7 and Solvent Yellow 14. The effects of the sulfonate group substitution and the replacement of the phenyl group with naphthyl on the tautomer stability and on the behavior in solvent have been discussed. Intramolecular hydrogen bond energies have been estimated f...

  14. Microbial fuel cell with an azo-dye-feeding cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Liang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). Guangzhou Inst. of Geochemistry; Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou (China). Guangdon Key Lab. of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control; Graduate Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Li, Fang-bai [Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou (China). Guangdon Key Lab. of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control; Feng, Chun-hua [South China Univ. of Technology, Guangzhou (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Li, Xiang-zhong [Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ., Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Civil and Structural Engineering

    2009-11-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were constructed using azo dyes as the cathode oxidants to accept the electrons produced from the respiration of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain L17 in the anode. Experimental results showed that a methyl orange (MO)-feeding MFC produced a comparable performance against that of an air-based one at pH 3.0 and that azo dyes including MO, Orange I, and Orange II could be successfully degraded in such cathodes. The reaction rate constant ({kappa}) of azo dye reduction was positively correlated with the power output which was highly dependent on the catholyte pH and the dye molecular structure. When pH was varied from 3.0 to 9.0, the k value in relation to MO degradation decreased from 0.298 to 0.016 {mu}mol min{sup -1}, and the maximum power density decreased from 34.77 to 1.51 mW m{sup -2}. The performances of the MFC fed with different azo dyes can be ranked from good to poor as MO > Orange I > Orange II. Furthermore, the cyclic voltammograms of azo dyes disclosed that the pH and the dye structure determined their redox potentials. A higher redox potential corresponded to a higher reaction rate. (orig.)

  15. Growth and physiology of Clostridium perfringens wild-type and ΔazoC knockout: an azo dye exposure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a strictly anaerobic micro-organism and inhabitant of the human intestine, has been shown to produce the azoreductase enzyme AzoC, an NAD(P)H-dependent flavin oxidoreductase. This enzyme reduces azo dyes to aromatic amines, which are carcinogenic in nature. A significant amount of work has been completed that focuses on the activity of this enzyme; however, few studies have been completed that focus on the physiology of azo dye reduction. Dye reduction studies coupled with C. perfringens growth studies in the presence of ten different azo dyes and in media of varying complexities were completed to compare the growth rates and dye-reducing activity of C. perfringens WT cells, a C. perfringens ΔazoC knockout, and Bifidobacterium infantis, a non-azoreductase-producing control bacterium. The presence of azo dyes significantly increased the generation time of C. perfringens in rich medium, an effect that was not seen in minimal medium. In addition, azo dye reduction studies with the ΔazoC knockout suggested the presence of additional functional azoreductases in this medically important bacterium. Overall, this study addresses a major gap in the literature by providing the first look, to our knowledge, at the complex physiology of C. perfringens upon azo dye exposure and the effect that both azo dyes and the azoreductase enzyme have on growth.

  16. Aerobic decolourization of two reactive azo dyes under varying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacillus cereus isolated from dye industrial waste, that is, effluent and soil samples was screened for its ability to decolourize two reactive azo dye – cibacron black PSG and cibacron red P4B under aerobic conditions at pH 7 and incubated at 35°C over a five day period. Different carbon and nitrogen sources were used for ...

  17. Detection of azo dyes and aromatic amines in women undergarment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2016-07-28

    Women are exposed to several chemical additives including azo dyes that exist in textile materials, which are a potential health hazard for consumers. Our objective was to analyze suspected carcinogenic azo dyes and their degradation aromatic amines in women underwear panties using a fast and simple method for quantification. Here, we evaluated 120 different samples of women underwear for their potential release of aromatic amines to the skin. Seventy-four samples yielded low level mixtures of aromatic amines; however eighteen samples were found to produce greater than 200 mg/kg (ppm) of aromatic amines. Azo dyes in these 18 samples were extracted from the fabrics and analyzed by reverse phase thin layer chromatography in tandem with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Eleven azo dyes were identified based on their mass spectral data and the chemical structure of the aromatic amine produced from these samples. We demonstrate that planar chromatography and mass spectrometry can be really helpful in confirming the identity of the azo dyes, offering highly relevant molecular information of the responsible compounds in the fabrics. With the growing concern about the consumer goods, analysis of aromatic amines in garments has become a highly important issue.

  18. Detoxification of azo dyes by bacterial oxidoreductase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Shahid; Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq; Crowley, David E

    2016-08-01

    Azo dyes and their intermediate degradation products are common contaminants of soil and groundwater in developing countries where textile and leather dye products are produced. The toxicity of azo dyes is primarily associated with their molecular structure, substitution groups and reactivity. To avoid contamination of natural resources and to minimize risk to human health, this wastewater requires treatment in an environmentally safe manner. This manuscript critically reviews biological treatment systems and the role of bacterial reductive and oxidative enzymes/processes in the bioremediation of dye-polluted wastewaters. Many studies have shown that a variety of culturable bacteria have efficient enzymatic systems that can carry out complete mineralization of dye chemicals and their metabolites (aromatic compounds) over a wide range of environmental conditions. Complete mineralization of azo dyes generally involves a two-step process requiring initial anaerobic treatment for decolorization, followed by an oxidative process that results in degradation of the toxic intermediates that are formed during the first step. Molecular studies have revealed that the first reductive process can be carried out by two classes of enzymes involving flavin-dependent and flavin-free azoreductases under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions. The second step that is carried out by oxidative enzymes that primarily involves broad specificity peroxidases, laccases and tyrosinases. This review focuses, in particular, on the characterization of these enzymes with respect to their enzyme kinetics and the environmental conditions that are necessary for bioreactor systems to treat azo dyes contained in wastewater.

  19. Biosorption of Azo dyes by spent Rhizopus arrhizus biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Neeta A.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, spent Rhizopus arrhizus biomass was used for the removal of six azo dyes from aqueous solutions. The dye removal capacity of the biomass was evaluated by conducting batch tests as a function of contact time, biomass dosage, pH and initial dye concentrations. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted well with the experimental data with correlation coefficients greater than 0.999, suggesting that chemisorptions might be the rate limiting step. The equilibrium sorption data showed good fit to the Langmuir isotherm model. Among the six dyes tested, the maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for fast red A and metanil yellow was found to be 108.8 and 128.5 mg/g, respectively. These encouraging results suggest that dead Rhizopus arrhizus biomass could be a potential biomaterial for the removal of azo dyes from aqueous dye solution.

  20. Dyeing of hydrophobic fabrics with disperse dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VITHAL SOMA PATEL

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of disperse dyes has been synthesized by diazotisation of 2,6-dibromo-4-nitroaniline and coupled with various N-arylmaleimides. The dyes were characterized by IR spectral studies, visible absorption spectroscopy and elemental analysis. All the dyes were applied as disperse dyes on nylon, cellulose triacetate and polyester fabrics. These dyeswere found to give yellowish orange to deep brown shades with very good depth, levelness and brightness on different fabrics. The percentage dye bath exhaustion and fixation on fabrics were found to be very good. The light, washing, rubbing, perspiration and sublimation fastness properties of the dyed fabrics were found to be good to excellent.

  1. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN P-95-633...

  2. Reduction of the azo dye Mordant Orange 1 by methanogenic granular sludge exposed to oxygen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, N.C.G.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Integration of anaerobic and aerobic conditions in a single bioreactor is a good strategy for the complete mineralization of azo dyes. In order for this strategy to work, azo dye reduction should occur in biofilms exposed to oxygen. Therefore, the effect of oxygen on the azo dye reduction by

  3. Optical characterization of heterocyclic azo dyes containing polymers thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkowska-Zielinska, B.; Skowronski, L.; Biitseva, A.; Grabowski, A.; Naparty, M. K.; Smokal, V.; Kysil, A.; Krupka, O.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we present the optical properties of heterocyclic azo dyes containing polymers thin films. From spectroscopic ellipsometry combined with transmittance measurements we estimated the absorption coefficients, refractive indices and optical energy band gaps of studied compounds. One can notice that the optical properties of azo dyes polymers strongly depend on the type of substitution in the azobenzene moiety. The different substitution pattern in azobenzene moiety leads to a change in the value of refractive index and red shifts in the absorption spectrum. We also found that different polymer systems (such as guest-host system or side-chain) result in changes of the optical properties (such as the values of refractive index, optical energy band gap) of azo dyes.

  4. FATE OF WATER SOLUBLE AZO DYES IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine the partitioning of water soluble azo dyes in the activated sludge process (ASP). Azo dyes are of concern because some of the dyes, dye precursors , and/or their degradation products such as aromatic amines (which are also dye precurso...

  5. Azo dye reduction by mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Madrid, de M.P.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.; Cervantes, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of the azo dye model compounds Reactive Red 2 (RR2) and Reactive Orange 14 (RO14) by mesophilic (30 C) and thermophilic (55 C) anaerobic consortia was studied in batch assays. The contribution of fermentative and methanogenic microorganisms in both temperatures was evaluated in the

  6. Decolorization of Azo Dyes by Pycnoporus sanguineus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User1

    Decolorization of azo dyes by Pycnoporus sanguineus and Trametes membranacea. Da Paz, E. S. L.1*, Paz Júnior, F. B.2, Neto, B. B.3 and Cavalcanti, M. A. Q.4. 1School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil. 2Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology, Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil.

  7. Decolorization of the azo dye reactive black 5 using laccase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laccase mediator system (LMS) has been widely used in various fields. In this study, we tested the capacity of LMS in the decolorization of a recalcitrant azo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5). Both acetosyringone and syringaldehyde demonstrated high mediating ability for RB5 decolorization and acetosyringone was proved to ...

  8. FACILE SYNTHESIS OF 1-NAPHTHOL AZO DYES WITH NANO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT. Nano-silica supported periodic acid (nano-SPIA) has been utilized as a heterogeneous reagent for a highly efficient and one pot synthesis of azo dyes based on 1-naphthol under solvent-free conditions at room temperature. This method has some advantages, the reaction workup is very easy and the catalyst ...

  9. Textile azo dye degradation by Candida rugosa INCQS 71011 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Textile azo dye degradation by Candida rugosa INCQS 71011 isolated from a non-impacted area in Semi-Arid Region of Brazilian Northeast. Carlos Roberto S. do Nascimento, Marília M. Nishikawa, Aline B. M. Vaz, Carlos Augusto Rosa, Manuela da Silva ...

  10. Detoxification of azo dyes in the context of environmental processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Deepak; Mishra, Vandana; Sharma, Radhey Shyam

    2016-07-01

    Azo dyes account for >70% of the global industrial demand (∼9 million tons). Owing to their genotoxic/carcinogenic potential, the annual disposal of ∼4,500,000 tons of dyes and/or degraded products is an environmental and socio-economic concern. In comparison to physico-chemical methods, microbe-mediated dye degradation is considered to be low-input, cost-effective and environmentally-safe. However, under different environmental conditions, interactions of chemically diverse dyes with metabolically diverse microbes produce metabolites of varying toxicity. In addition, majority of studies on microbial dye-degradation focus on decolorization with least attention towards detoxification. Therefore, the environmental significance of microbial dye detoxification research of past >3 decades is critically evaluated with reference to dye structure and the possible influence of microbial interactions in different environments. In the absence of ecosystem-based studies, the results of laboratory-based studies on dye degradation, metabolite production and their genotoxic impact on model organisms are used to predict the possible fate and consequences of azo dyes/metabolites in the environment. In such studies, the predominance of fewer numbers of toxicological assays that too at lower levels of biological organization (molecular/cellular/organismic) suggests its limited ecological significance. Based on critical evaluation of these studies the recommendations on inclusion of multilevel approach (assessment at multiple levels of biological organization), multispecies microcosm approach and native species approach in conjunction with identification of dye metabolites have been made for future studies. Such studies will bridge the gap between the fundamental knowledge on dye-microbe-environment interactions and its application to combat dye-induced environmental toxicity. Thus an environmental perspective on dye toxicity in the background of dye structure and effects of

  11. Anaerobic/aerobic treatment of selected azo dyes in wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshadri, S.; Bishop, P.L. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering); Agha, A.M. (Univ. of Aleppo (Syrian Arab Republic). Faculty of Civil Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Azo dyes represent the largest class of dyes in use today. Current environmental concern with these dyes revolves around the potential carcinogenic health risk presented by these dyes or their intermediate biodegradation products when exposed to microflora in the human digestive tract. These dyes may build up in the environment, since many wastewater treatment plants allow these dyes to pass through the system virtually untreated. The initial step in the degradation of these dyes is the cleavage of the Azo bond. This cleavage is often impossible under aerobic conditions, but has been readily demonstrated under anaerobic conditions. The focus of the study was to determine the feasibility of using an anaerobic fluidized-bed reactor to accomplish this cleavage. The effects of typical process variables such as hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent dye concentration levels, and degree of bed fluidization on removal efficiencies were also studied. The four dyes selected for this study were Acid-Orange 7, Acid-Orange 8, Acid-Orange 10, and Acid-Red 14. The effectiveness of using a bench-scale-activated sludge reactor as a sequenced second stage was also examined. Results indicate that nearly complete cleavage of the Azo bond is easily accomplished for each of the four dyes under hydraulic retention times of either 12 or 24 h. Initial results indicate, though, that aromatic amine by-products remain. The sequenced second stage was able to remove the remaining Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) load to acceptable levels. Work is presently underway to determine the face of the anaerobic by-products in the aerobic second stage.

  12. Mg-based amorphous alloys for decolorization of azo dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changqin; Zhu, Zhengwang; Zhang, Haifeng

    The authors recently found that Mg-based amorphous ribbons had a prominent effect on the decolorization of azo dyes. Direct Blue 2B and Acid Orange II solutions of 100 mg/L could be decolorized nearly completely by the ribbons within 30 min. Decolorization mechanism was discussed briefly, and kinetic analysis based on the experimental data indicated that physical adsorption and reductive degradation for the azo dye solutions mediated by Mg63Cu16.8Ag11.2Er9 amorphous ribbons could proceed in an elegant and rapid manner. This new finding seems attractive, valuable and promising for the raw effluent generated by textile dye manufacturing company in the future.

  13. Solubilization of Hydrophobic Dyes in Surfactant Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Tehrani-Bagha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of surfactants for solubilization of hydrophobic organic dyes (mainly solvent and disperse dyes has been reviewed. The effect of parameters such as the chemical structures of the surfactant and the dye, addition of salt and of polyelectrolytes, pH, and temperature on dye solubilization has been discussed. Surfactant self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution and below the concentration where this occurs—the critical micelle concentration (CMC—there is no solubilization. Above the CMC, the amount of solubilized dye increases linearly with the increase in surfactant concentration. It is demonstrated that different surfactants work best for different dyes. In general, nonionic surfactants have higher solubilization power than anionic and cationic surfactants. It is likely that the reason for the good performance of nonionic surfactants is that they allow dyes to be accommodated not only in the inner, hydrocarbon part of the micelle but also in the headgroup shell. It is demonstrated that the location of a dye in a surfactant micelle can be assessed from the absorption spectrum of the dye-containing micellar solution.

  14. Non-classical azoreductase secretion in Clostridium perfringens in response to sulfonated azo dye exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a strictly anaerobic microorganism and inhabitant of the human intestine, has been shown to produce an azoreductase enzyme (AzoC), an NADH-dependent flavin oxidoreductase. This enzyme reduces azo dyes into aromatic amines, which can be carcinogenic. A significant amount of work has been completed on the activity of AzoC. Despite this, much is still unknown, including whether azoreduction of these dyes occurs intracellularly or extracellulary. A physiological study of C. perfringens involving the effect of azo dye exposure was completed to answer this question. Through exposure studies, azo dyes were found to cause cytoplasmic protein release, including AzoC, from C. perfringens in dividing and non-dividing cells. Sulfonation (negative charge) of azo dyes proved to be the key to facilitating protein release of AzoC and was found to be azo-dye-concentration-dependent. Additionally, AzoC was found to localize to the Gram-positive periplasmic region. Using a ΔazoC knockout mutant, the presence of additional azoreductases in C. perfringens was suggested. These results support the notion that the azoreduction of these dyes may occur extracellularly for the commensal C. perfringens in the intestine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The contribution of biotic and abiotic processes during azo dye reduction in anaerobic sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der F.P.; Bisschops, I.A.E.; Blanchard, V.G.; Bouwman, R.H.M.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Azo dye reduction results from a combination of biotic and abiotic processes during the anaerobic treatment of dye containing effluents. Biotic processes are due to enzymatic reactions whereas the chemical reaction is due to sulfide. In this research, the relative impact of the different azo dye

  16. Isolation and screening of azo dye decolorizing bacterial isolates from dye-contaminated textile wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Mahmood

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are released into wastewater streams without any pretreatment and pollute water and soilenvironments. To prevent contamination of our vulnerable resources, removal of these dye pollutants is of greatimportance. For this purpose, wastewater samples were collected from dye-contaminated sites of Faisalabad. About200 bacterial isolates were isolated through enrichment and then tested for their potential to remove RemazolBlack-B azo dye in liquid medium. Five bacterial isolates capable of degrading Remazol Black-B azo dye efficientlywere screened through experimentation on modified mineral salt medium. Isolate SS1 (collected from wastewater ofSupreme Textile Industry was able to completely remove the Remazol Black-B dye from the liquid medium in 18 h.Further, the isolate showed the best performance at the dye concentration of 100 mg L-1 medium (pH 7 and attemperature 35oC. Similarly, yeast extract proved to be the best carbon source for decolorization purpose. Theresults imply that the isolate SS1 could be used for the removal of the reactive dyes from textile effluents.

  17. Dye-sensitized solar cell based on AZO/Ag/AZO multilayer transparent conductive oxide film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Jin-He; Li, Ying [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai 200072 (China); Duong, Thanh-Tung; Choi, Hyung-Jin [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daeduk Science Town, 305-764 Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Soon-Gil, E-mail: sgyoon@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daeduk Science Town, 305-764 Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► AZO/Ag/AZO (AAA) multilayer was used for working electrode of DSSC cell. ► The 100 nm-thick Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} layer showed a good blocking effect. ► The DSSC cell by AAA TCO material showed the highest efficiency of about 3.25%. -- Abstract: Niobium-doped TiO{sub 2} blocking layer and Al-doped ZnO (AZO)/Ag/AZO (AAA) TCO layers were grown onto glass substrate using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and direct current (dc)/radio-frequency (rf) sputtering at room temperature, respectively for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. The 100 nm-thick NTO layer showed a blocking effect for the oxygen diffusion into AAA layer and for the recombination of the electrons. The DSSC cell composed of the NTO (100 nm)/AAA (400 nm) showed the highest photo-electrical efficiency of about 3.25%. An insertion of aluminum foil between serrated clip and AAA (100 nm) TCO improved a photo-conversion efficiency of the DSSC.

  18. Oxidative degradation of azo dyes using tourmaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuiping; Zhang, Yanwei; Yu, Li; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Sun, Hongwen

    2013-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the catalyzed degradation ability of tourmaline on the dyes methylene blue (MB), rhodamine B (RhB), and congo red (CR) at different pH values. Interestingly, tourmaline strongly adsorbed anionic dyes, but it did not adsorb cationic dyes. When H₂O₂ was introduced into the tourmaline-dye systems, the degradation percentage for CR catalysis by tourmaline was lower than the percentage of adsorption, whereas the opposite was true for MB and RhB systems. Notably, the catalyzed degradation decreased from 100% to 45% for MB, 100% to 15% for RhB and 100% to 25% for CR as the pH increased from 3.0 to 10.0, respectively, which was much greater than the degradation obtained for previously reported materials at pH values ranging from 4.0 to 10.0. Tourmaline catalytically degraded the dyes over a broad range of pH values, which was attributed to tourmaline automatically adjusting the pH of the dye solutions to approximately 5.5 from an initial range of 4.2-10.0. An electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping technique observed peroxyl (ROO·) and alkoxy (RO·) or alkyl (R·) radicals originated from the attack of ·OH radicals and O₂(·-) radicals, indicating that these radicals were involved in the catalyzed degradation of MB. Importantly, four intermediate products of MB at m/z 383, 316, 203 and 181 were observed by LC/MS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Simultaneous chromate reduction and azo dye decolourization by Brevibacterium casei: azo dye as electron donor for chromate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tsz Wai; Cai, Qinhong; Wong, Chong-Kim; Chow, Alex T; Wong, Po-Keung

    2010-10-15

    Chromate [Cr(VI)] and azo dyes are common pollutants which may co-exist in some industrial effluents. Hence studies of biological treatment of industrial wastewater should include investigation of the co-removal of these two pollutants. Brevibacterium casei, which can reduce Cr(VI) in the presence of the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) under nutrient-limiting condition, was isolated from a sewage sludge sample of a dyeing factory. Response surface methodology, which is commonly used to optimize growth conditions for food microorganisms to maximize product(s) yield, was used to determine the optimal conditions for chromate reduction and dye decolourization by B. casei. The optimal conditions were 0.24 g/L glucose, 3.0 g/L (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and 0.2 g/L peptone at pH 7 and 35 degrees C. The predicted maximum chromate reduction efficiencies and dye decolourization were 83.4+/-0.6 and 40.7+/-1.7%, respectively. A new mechanism was proposed for chromate reduction coupling with AO7 decolourization by B. casei. Under nutrient-limiting condition, AO7 was used as an e(-) donor by the reduction enzyme(s) of B. casei for the reduction of Cr(VI). The resulted Cr(III) then complexed with the oxidized AO7 to form a purple coloured intermediate. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Simultaneous chromate reduction and azo dye decolourization by Brevibacterium casei: Azo dye as electron donor for chromate reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Tsz Wai; Cai Qinhong [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Wong, Chong-Kim [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Environmental Science Programme, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Chow, Alex T. [Department of Biosystems Engineering, Clemson University, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Clemson University, SC 29634 (United States); Wong, Po-Keung, E-mail: pkwong@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Environmental Science Programme, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong)

    2010-10-15

    Chromate [Cr(VI)] and azo dyes are common pollutants which may co-exist in some industrial effluents. Hence studies of biological treatment of industrial wastewater should include investigation of the co-removal of these two pollutants. Brevibacterium casei, which can reduce Cr(VI) in the presence of the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) under nutrient-limiting condition, was isolated from a sewage sludge sample of a dyeing factory. Response surface methodology, which is commonly used to optimize growth conditions for food microorganisms to maximize product(s) yield, was used to determine the optimal conditions for chromate reduction and dye decolourization by B. casei. The optimal conditions were 0.24 g/L glucose, 3.0 g/L (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.2 g/L peptone at pH 7 and 35 deg. C. The predicted maximum chromate reduction efficiencies and dye decolourization were 83.4 {+-} 0.6 and 40.7 {+-} 1.7%, respectively. A new mechanism was proposed for chromate reduction coupling with AO7 decolourization by B. casei. Under nutrient-limiting condition, AO7 was used as an e{sup -} donor by the reduction enzyme(s) of B. casei for the reduction of Cr(VI). The resulted Cr(III) then complexed with the oxidized AO7 to form a purple coloured intermediate.

  1. Abatement of Azo Dye from Wastewater Using Bimetal-Chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Ghorban; Farjadfard, Sima

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new adsorbent, bimetallic chitosan particle (BCP) that is successfully synthesized and applied to remove the orange II dye from wastewater. The effects of pH, BCP quantity, and contact time are initially verified on the basis of the percentage of orange II removed from the wastewater. Experimental data reveal that the Cu/Mg bimetal and chitosan have a synergistic effect on the adsorption process of the adsorbate, where the dye adsorption by Cu/Mg bimetal, chitosan alone, and bimetal-chitosan is 10, 49, and 99.5%, respectively. The time required for the complete decolorization of orange II by 1 mg/L of BCP is 10 min. The Langmuir model is the best fit for the experimental data, which attains a maximum adsorption capacity of 384.6 mg/g. The consideration of the kinetic behavior indicates that the adsorption of orange II onto the BCP fits best with the pseudo-second-order and Elovich models. Further, the simulated azo dye wastewater can be effectively treated using a relatively low quantity of the adsorbent, 1 mg/L, within a short reaction time of 20 min. Overall, the use of BCP can be considered a promising method for eliminating the azo dye from wastewater effectively. PMID:24348163

  2. Abatement of Azo Dye from Wastewater Using Bimetal-Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorban Asgari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new adsorbent, bimetallic chitosan particle (BCP that is successfully synthesized and applied to remove the orange II dye from wastewater. The effects of pH, BCP quantity, and contact time are initially verified on the basis of the percentage of orange II removed from the wastewater. Experimental data reveal that the Cu/Mg bimetal and chitosan have a synergistic effect on the adsorption process of the adsorbate, where the dye adsorption by Cu/Mg bimetal, chitosan alone, and bimetal-chitosan is 10, 49, and 99.5%, respectively. The time required for the complete decolorization of orange II by 1 mg/L of BCP is 10 min. The Langmuir model is the best fit for the experimental data, which attains a maximum adsorption capacity of 384.6 mg/g. The consideration of the kinetic behavior indicates that the adsorption of orange II onto the BCP fits best with the pseudo-second-order and Elovich models. Further, the simulated azo dye wastewater can be effectively treated using a relatively low quantity of the adsorbent, 1 mg/L, within a short reaction time of 20 min. Overall, the use of BCP can be considered a promising method for eliminating the azo dye from wastewater effectively.

  3. Equilibrium and thermodynamics of azo dyes biosorption onto Spirulina platensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Dotto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium and thermodynamics of azo dye (tartrazine and allura red biosorption onto Spirulina platensis biomass were investigated. The equilibrium curves were obtained at 298, 308, 318 and 328 K, and four isotherm models were fitted the experimental data. Biosorption thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS were estimated. The results showed that the biosorption was favored by a temperature decrease. For both dyes, the Sips model was the best to represent the equilibrium experimental data (R²>0.99 and ARE<5.0% and the maximum biosorption capacities were 363.2 and 468.7 mg g-1 for tartrazine and allura red, respectively, obtained at 298 K. The negative values of ΔG and ΔH showed that the biosorption of both dyes was spontaneous, favorable and exothermic. The positive values of ΔS suggested that the system disorder increases during the biosorption process.

  4. Evaluation of biodecolorization of the textile azo dye by halophilic archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Selseleh Hassan-Kiadehi

    2017-09-01

    Discussion and conclusion: In conclusion, our results indicate that halophilic archaea have very high potential to decolorize azo dyes. Regarding high amounts of salts in textile wastewaters, using such microorganisms which can tolerate the harsh environment in order to decolorize azo dyes, could be a new approach in this field.

  5. Azo Dye Biodecolorization Enhanced by Echinodontium taxodii Cultured with Lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jing; Yu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulose facilitates the fungal oxidization of recalcitrant organic pollutants through the extracellular ligninolytic enzymes induced by lignin in wood or other plant tissues. However, available information on this phenomenon is insufficient. Free radical chain reactions during lignin metabolism are important in xenobiotic removal. Thus, the effect of lignin on azo dye decolorization in vivo by Echinodontium taxodii was evaluated. In the presence of lignin, optimum decolorization percentages for Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R, Direct Red 5B, Direct Black 38, and Direct Black 22 were 91.75% (control, 65.96%), 76.89% (control, 43.78%), 43.44% (control, 17.02%), and 44.75% (control, 12.16%), respectively, in the submerged cultures. Laccase was the most important enzyme during biodecolorization. Aside from the stimulating of laccase activity, lignin might be degraded by E. taxodii, and then these degraded low-molecular-weight metabolites could act as redox mediators promoting decolorization of azo dyes. The relationship between laccase and lignin degradation was investigated through decolorization tests in vitro with purified enzyme and dozens of aromatics, which can be derivatives of lignin and can function as laccase mediators or inducers. Dyes were decolorized at triple or even higher rates in certain laccase–aromatic systems at chemical concentrations as low as 10 µM. PMID:25285777

  6. Photoluminescence analysis of self induced planer alignment in azo dye dispersed nematic liquid crystal complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rishi, E-mail: kkraina@gmail.com; Sood, Srishti, E-mail: kkraina@gmail.com; Raina, K. K., E-mail: kkraina@gmail.com [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India)

    2014-04-24

    We have developed azo dye doped nematic liquid crystal complex for advanced photonic liquid crystal display technology aspects. Disperse orange azo dye self introduced planer alignment in the nematic liquid crystal without any surface anchoring treatment. Planer alignment was characterized by optical polarizing microscopy. The electro-optical switching response of dye disperse planer aligned nematic cell was investigated as a function of applied voltage with the help of photoluminescence spectrophotometer for the tuning of photoluminescence contrast.

  7. Study on the photoreductive decolorization of azo dyes by sulfite aqua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Hu, Wenna; Liu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the decolorization of a series of azo dyes by sulfite aqua was studied under UV light irradiation and in the dark, respectively. Soluble azo dyes were easily decolorized with high decolorization efficiency under UV light irradiation, while their decolorization efficiency was much lower in the dark. The ultraviolet light is of the utmost importance for the rapid decolorization of azo dyes. As for the 10 mg/L Methyl Orange and Congo Red exposed to UV light, the decolorization efficiency reaches up to 95.9% in 10 min and 95.8% in 20 min, using 1.0 g/L and 8.0 g/L sodium sulfite, respectively. Whereas, for the same concentration of azo dyes and sodium sulfite, the decolorization efficiency of Methyl Orange and Congo Red is only 13.8% and 25.6%, respectively, even if they are laid in the dark with sodium sulfite for 48 h. The decolorization process of Methyl Orange and Congo Red follows the first order rate kinetics. The location of absorption peak in the visible region is blue-shifted in the course of the reaction. It is proposed that the decolorization of azo dyes is a reduction reaction. The chromophore of azo dye reacts with hydrogen and results in their decolorization. The possible mechanisms of the reductive decolorization of azo dyes were also discussed.

  8. Occurrence of azo food dyes and their effects on cellular inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Latasha; Loong, Claudine; Ho, Xing Lin; Raman, Muhammed Faiz B; Suan, Melissa Yue Tian; Loke, Wai Mun

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence of five azo food dyes-tartrazine, sunset yellow, carmoisine, allura red, and ponceau 4 R-in the food supply chain of Singapore and their effects on the in vitro synthesis of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and F2-isoprostanes. Trained personnel recorded the names of foods and beverages sold in a local supermarket that contained at least one of the five azo dyes. The occurrence of the azo dyes in the local food supply was computed. The synthesis of LTB4 and F2-isoprostanes from freshly isolated blood neutrophils were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Of the 1681 processed food items, 194 (11.54%) contained at least one of the five azo dyes. Tartrazine was most prevalent in food and beverage products sold in Singapore, followed by allura red, sunset yellow, ponceau 4 R, and carmoisine. The five azo dyes augmented the in vitro synthesis of LTB4 and F2-isoprostanes from blood neutrophils. Tartrazine was significantly more potent in increasing LTB4 synthesis than the other dyes, which exhibited similar potencies. The five food dyes increased the formation of F2-isoprostanes from blood neutrophils at all tested concentrations. The high prevalence of azo dyes in the food supply of Singapore and their ability to elicit proinflammatory responses in vitro suggest a potential health risk to the local population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of nitrate on anaerobic azo dye reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirik, Kevser; Kitiş, Mehmet; Çinar, Özer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of nitrate on anaerobic color removal efficiencies. For this aim, anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) fed with a simulated textile effluent including Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R azo dye was operated with a total cycle time of 12 h, including anaerobic (6 h) and aerobic cycles (6 h). Microorganism grown under anaerobic phase of the reactor was exposed to different amounts of competitive electron acceptor (nitrate) and performance of the system was determined by monitoring color removal efficiency, nitrate removal, nitrite formation and removal, oxidation reduction potential, color removal rate, chemical oxygen demand (COD), specific anaerobic enzyme (azo reductase) and aerobic enzyme (catechol 1,2 dioxygenase), and formation and removal of aromatic amines. Variations of population dynamics of microorganisms exposed to various amount of nitrate were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). It was found that nitrate has adverse effect on anaerobic color removal efficiency and color removal was achieved after denitrification process was completed. It was found that nitrate stimulates the COD removal efficiency and accelerates the COD removal in the first hour of anaerobic phase. About 90 % total COD removal efficiencies were achieved in which microorganism exposed to increasing amount of nitrate. Population dynamics of microorganisms exposed to various amount of nitrate were changed and diversity was increased.

  10. REDUCTION OF AZO DYES WITH ZERO-VALENT IRON. (R827117)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reduction of azo dyes by zero-valent iron metal (Fe0) at pH 7.0 in 10 mM HEPES buffer was studied in aqueous, anaerobic batch systems. Orange II was reduced by cleavage of the azo linkage, as evidenced by the production of sulfanilic acid (a substituted ani...

  11. THE MUTAGENICITY OF METALLIZED AND UNMETALLIZED AZO AND FORMAZAN DYES IN THE SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mutagenicity of metallized and unmetallized azo and formazan dyes in the Salmonella mutagenicityLaura. C. Edwards', Harold S. Freeman'*, and Larry D. Claxton2AbstractIn previous papers, the synthesis and chemical properties of iron complexed azo and formazan d...

  12. Enhancement of oxyanion and diatrizoate reduction kinetics using selected azo dyes on Pd-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Danmeng; Chaplin, Brian P; Shapley, John R; Menendez, Nathaniel P; McCalman, Dorrell C; Schneider, William F; Werth, Charles J

    2010-03-01

    Azo dyes are widespread pollutants and potential cocontaminants for nitrate; we evaluated their effect on catalytic reduction of a suite of oxyanions, diatrizoate, and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). The azo dye methyl orange significantly enhanced (less than or equal to a factor of 5.24) the catalytic reduction kinetics of nitrate, nitrite, bromate, perchlorate, chlorate, and diatrizoate with several different Pd-based catalysts; NDMA reduction was not enhanced. Nitrate was selected as a probe contaminant, and a variety of azo dyes (methyl orange, methyl red, fast yellow AB, metanil yellow, acid orange 7, congo red, eriochrome black T, acid red 27, acid yellow 11, and acid yellow 17) were evaluated for their ability to enhance reduction. Hydrogenation energies of azo dyes were calculated using density functional theory and a volcano relationship between hydrogenation energies and reduction rate enhancement was observed. A kinetic model based on Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) theory matched the volcano relationship and suggests sorbed azo dyes enhance reduction kinetics through hydrogen atom shuttling between reduced azo dyes (i.e., hydrazo dyes) and oxyanions or diatrizoate. This is the first research that has identified this synergetic effect, and it has implications for designing more efficient catalysts and reducing Pd costs in water treatment systems.

  13. Differential catalytic action of Brevibacillus laterosporus on two dissimilar azo dyes Remazol red and Rubine GFL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurade, Mayur B; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Tamboli, Dhawal P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2013-02-01

    This comparative study disclosed the diverse catalytic activities of Brevibacillus laterosporus on two different azo dyes. It decolorized 100% of Remazol red and 95% of Rubine GFL within 30 and 48 h respectively, under static condition at 50 mg l⁻¹ dye concentration. Significant increase was observed in azo reductase, NADH-DCIP reductase, veratryl alcohol oxidase and tyrosinase in cells obtained after decolorization of Remazol red; whereas these values were much different with complete inhibition of azo reductase during decolorization of Rubine GFL. The plausible pathway of dye degradation obtained from Gas chromatography-Mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) data confirmed the different metabolic fate of these structurally unidentical dyes. FTIR and HPTLC analysis of extracted metabolites confirmed the biodegradation, while phytotoxicity study assured the detoxification of both the dyes studied. The results obtained in this study suggests, i) sulpho and hydroxyl group present at ortho position to azo group stimulated reduction of azo bond by azo reductase in Remazol red, ii) the same reduction was totally hampered due to presence of ethyl-amino propanenitrile group at para position to azo group in Rubine GFL. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Binding patterns and structure-affinity relationships of food azo dyes with lysozyme: a multitechnique approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Ding, Fei; Peng, Yu-Kui; Jiang, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Li

    2013-12-18

    Food dyes serve to beguile consumers: they are often used to imitate the presence of healthful, colorful food produce such as fruits and vegetables. But considering the hurtful impact of these chemicals on the human body, it is time to thoroughly uncover the toxicity of these food dyes at the molecular level. In the present contribution, we have examined the molecular reactions of protein lysozyme with model food azo compound Color Index (C.I.) Acid Red 2 and its analogues C.I. Acid Orange 52, Solvent Yellow 2, and the core structure of azobenzene using a combination of biophysical methods at physiological conditions. Fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), time-resolved fluorescence, UV-vis absorption as well as computer-aided molecular modeling were used to analyze food dye affinity, binding mode, energy transfer, and the effects of food dye complexation on lysozyme stability and conformation. Fluorescence emission spectra indicate complex formation at 10(-5) M dye concentration, and this corroborates time-resolved fluorescence results showing the diminution in the tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence mainly via a static type (KSV = 1.505 × 10(4) M(-1)) and Förster energy transfer. Structural analysis displayed the participation of several amino acid residues in food dye protein adducts, with hydrogen bonds, π-π and cation-π interactions, but the conformation of lysozyme was unchanged in the process, as derived from fluorescence emission, far-UV CD, and synchronous fluorescence spectra. The overall affinity of food dye is 10(4) M(-1) and there exists only one kind of binding domain in protein for food dye. These data are consistent with hydrophobic probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) displacement, and molecular modeling manifesting the food dye binding patch was near to Trp-62 and Trp-63 residues of lysozyme. On the basis of the computational analyses, we determine that the type of substituent on the azobenzene structure has a powerful influence on the

  15. A REVIEW ON EFFICACIOUS METHODS TO DECOLORIZE REACTIVE AZO DYE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesan Vijayaraghavan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the intensive review of reactive azo dye, Reactive Black 5. Various physicochemical methods namely photo catalysis, electrochemical, adsorption, hydrolysis and biological methods like microbial degradation, biosorption and bioaccumulation have been analyzed thoroughly along with the merits and demerits of each method. Among these various methods, biological treatment methods are found to be the best for decolorization of Reactive Black 5. With respect to dye biosorption, microbial biomass (bacteria, fungi, microalgae, etc, and outperformed macroscopic materials (seaweeds, crab shell, etc. are used for decolorization process. The use of living organisms may not be an option for the continuous treatment of highly toxic organic/inorganic contaminants. Once the toxicant concentration becomes too high or the process operated for a long time, the amount of toxicant accumulated will reach saturation. Beyond this point, an organism's metabolism may be interrupted, resulting in death of the organism. This scenario is not existed in the case of dead biomass, which is flexible to environmental conditions and toxicant concentrations. Thus, owing to its favorable characteristics, biosorption has received much attention in recent years.

  16. Evaluation of metabolism of azo dyes and their effects on Staphylococcus aureus metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinchun; Jin, Jinshan; Beger, Richard D; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2017-10-01

    Dyes containing one or more azo linkages are widely applied in cosmetics, tattooing, food and drinks, pharmaceuticals, printing inks, plastics, leather, as well as paper industries. Previously we reported that bacteria living on human skin have the ability to reduce some azo dyes to aromatic amines, which raises potential safety concerns regarding human dermal exposure to azo dyes such as those in tattoo ink and cosmetic colorant formulations. To comprehensively investigate azo dye-induced toxicity by skin bacteria activation, it is very critical to understand the mechanism of metabolism of the azo dyes at the systems biology level. In this study, an LC/MS-based metabolomics approach was employed to globally investigate metabolism of azo dyes by Staphylococcus aureus as well as their effects on the metabolome of the bacterium. Growth of S. aureus in the presence of Sudan III or Orange II was not affected during the incubation period. Metabolomics results showed that Sudan III was metabolized to 4-(phenyldiazenyl) aniline (48%), 1-[(4-aminophenyl) diazenyl]-2-naphthol (4%) and eicosenoic acid Sudan III (0.9%). These findings indicated that the azo bond close to naphthalene group of Sudan III was preferentially cleaved compared with the other azo bond. The metabolite from Orange II was identified as 4-aminobenzene sulfonic acid (35%). A much higher amount of Orange II (~90×) was detected in the cell pellets from the active viable cells compared with those from boiled cells incubated with the same concentration of Orange II. This finding suggests that Orange II was primarily transported into the S. aureus cells for metabolism, instead of the theory that the azo dye metabolism occurs extracellularly. In addition, the metabolomics results showed that Sudan III affected energy pathways of the S. aureus cells, while Orange II had less noticeable effects on the cells. In summary, this study provided novel information regarding azo dye metabolism by the skin bacterium, the

  17. Thermally stable water insoluble azo-azomethine dyes: synthesis, characterization and solvatochromic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Rezaeian, Khatereh

    2012-11-01

    Six new water insoluble azo-azomethine dyes have been synthesized via condensation reaction of α,α'-bis(o-aminophenylthio)-1,2-xylene with substituted azo-coupled salicylaldehyde. The condensation reaction provides the expected bis-iminated azo-azomethine dyes in good yields, ranging from 59% to 90%. The dyes have been characterized by IR, UV-Vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopic methods as well as elemental analysis. The thermal behavior of the prepared dyes has been determined using thermogravimetry technique. Furthermore, the effect of various organic solvents with different polarities on the UV-Vis spectra of the dyes has been also studied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A spectral approach to determine location and orientation of azo dyes within surfactant aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karukstis, Kerry K; Litz, Jonathan P; Garber, Matthew B; Angell, Laura M; Korir, George K

    2010-04-01

    The UV-vis absorption properties of azo dyes are known to exhibit a variation with the polarity and acidity of the dye environment. The spectral properties of a series of anionic azo dyes were characterized to further probe the interaction of these dyes with two types of surfactant aggregates: (1) the spherical micelles formed in aqueous solution by alkyltrimethylammonium bromide (C(n)TAB) surfactants with n=10-16 and (2) the unilamellar vesicles spontaneously formed in water from binary mixtures of the oppositely-charged double-tailed surfactants cationic didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) and anionic sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT or AOT). The observed dye spectra reflect the solvatochromic behavior of the dyes and suggest the location and orientation of the dye within the surfactant aggregates. Deconvolution of the overall spectra into sums of Gaussian curves more readily displays any contributions of tautomeric forms of the azo dyes resulting from intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The rich variation in UV/vis absorption properties of these anionic azo dyes supports their use as sensitive tools to explore the nanostructures of surfactant aggregates. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The non-enzymatic reduction of azo dyes by flavin and nicotinamide cofactors under varying conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2013-10-01

    Azo dyes are ubiquitous in products and often become environmental pollutants due to their anthropogenic nature. Azoreductases are enzymes which are present within many bacteria and are capable of breaking down the azo dyes via reduction of the azo bond. Often, though, carcinogenic aromatic amines are formed as metabolites and are of concern to humans. Azoreductases function via an oxidation-reduction reaction and require cofactors (a nicotinamide cofactor and sometimes a flavin cofactor) to perform their function. Non-enzymatic reduction of azo dyes in the absence of an azoreductase enzyme has been suggested in previous studies, but has never been studied in detail in terms of varying cofactor combinations, different oxygen states or pHs, nor has the enzymatic reduction been compared to azoreduction in terms of dye reduction or metabolites produced, which was the aim of this study. Reduction of azo dyes by different cofactor combinations was found to occur under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and under physiologically-relevant pHs to produce the same metabolites as an azoreductase. Our results show that, in some cases, the non-enzymatic reduction by the cofactors was found to be equal to that seen with the azoreductase, suggesting that all dye reduction in these cases is due to the cofactors themselves. This study details the importance of the use of a cofactor-only control when studying azoreductase enzymes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Preparation of ZnO Photocatalyst for the Efficient and Rapid Photocatalytic Degradation of Azo Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Wu, Zhansheng; Liu, Dandan; Gao, Zhenzhen

    2017-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) photocatalysts were synthesized by sol-gel method using zinc acetate as precursor for degradation of azo dyes under UV irradiation. The resultant samples were characterized by different techniques, such as XRD, SEM, and EDX. The influence of preparation conditions such as calcination temperature and composite ratio on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) was investigated. ZnO prepared with a composite ratio of 4:1 and calcination temperature of 400 °C exhibited 99.70% removal rate for MO. The effect of operation parameters on the degradation was also studied. Results showed that the removal rate of azo dyes increased with the increased dosage of catalyst and decreased initial concentration of azo dyes and the acidic condition is favorable for degradation. Furthermore, the kinetics and scavengers of the reactive species during the degradation were also investigated. It was found that the degradation of azo dyes fitted the first-order kinetics and superoxide ions were the main species. The proposed photocatalyst can efficiently and rapidly degrade azo dyes; thus, this economical and environment-friendly photocatalyst can be applied to the treatment of wastewater contaminated with synthetic dyes.

  1. Structure and Second Harmonic Generation of Langmuir-Blodgett Films of Two Chiral Amphiphilic Azo Dyes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoondorp, Monique A.; Schouten, Arend Jan; Hulshof, Johannes; Feringa, Ben L.

    1993-01-01

    The properties and structure of Langmuir-Blodgett films of two new amphiphilic nonlinear optical dyes containing stereogenic (chiral) centers were studied. The dye molecule 4-[[4’-[(3R)-palmitoylpyrrolidin-1-yl]phenyl]azo]-3-nitrobenzoic acid (KZ16) forms homogeneous structures in the plane of the

  2. Nano-Sized Zero Valent Iron and Covalent Organic Polymer Composites for Azo Dye Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.; Byun, Jeehye; Hwang, Yuhoon

    2014-01-01

    Having superior reductive properties and large surface areas, nanosized zero valent iron (nZVI) is ideal for the degradation of chemicals such as azo dyes and trichloroethylene (TCE). However, immobilization of nZVI is a key parameter in its effectiveness as a chemical degradation agent...... contaminant removal. Composites of nZVI impregnated within COPs of high surface areas exhibit effective ability to degrade azo dyes, up to 95%, over a 30-minute reaction period. Dye decolorization results were designated a precursor for effectiveness of pollutant decontamination; pollutants ranging...

  3. Synthesis and characterization of high wash fastness novel azo reactive dyes incorporating aromatic bridged diamines

    OpenAIRE

    Aamer Saeed; Ghulam Shabir

    2018-01-01

    A new series of azo reactive dyes containing free chlorine atoms have been synthesized. The synthetic methodology involves the diazotization of 4′4-diamino diphenylamine-2-sulfonic acid (2) followed by azo coupling with 1-amino-8-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid (3) in alkaline medium to yield intermediate dye (4). Condensation of the latter with 1,3,5-trichlorotriazine afforded the cyanurated dye (5). A number of novel bis aromatic diamines (1a–j) were separately synthesized as bridging groups a...

  4. Kinetics of azoreductase and assessment of toxicity of metabolic products from azo dyes by Pseudomonas luteola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, T L

    2001-01-01

    This is a continuous study on a decolorization strain, Pseudomonas luteola, which involves treating seven azo dyes with different structures. This study focuses mainly on determining both the mechanism of decolorization by P. luteola and the activity of azoreductase from P. luteola as well as identifying and assessing the toxicity of metabolic products of azo dyes. The growth of P. luteola reached the stationary phase after shaking incubation for 24 hours. Then, while being kept static, the color of seven tested azo dyes (100 mg/l) could be removed. The proportion of color removal was between 59-99%, which figure is related to the structure of the dye. Monoazo dyes (RP2B, V2RP and Red 22) showed the fastest rate of decolorization, i.e. from 0.23-0.44 mg dye-mg cell-1 hr-1. P. luteola could remove the color of V2RP and a leather dye at a concentration of 200 mg/l, and as to the rest of the azo dyes, it could remove at a concentration of up to 100 mg/l. Decolorization of RP2B and Red 22 required activation energy of 7.00 J/mol and 6.63 J/mole, respectively, indicating that it was easier for azoreductase to decolorize structurally simple dyes. The kinetics of azoreductase towards seven azo dyes suggested a competitive inhibition model be applied. Microtox was used to analyze the toxicity of the metabolic products of azo dyes. EC50 showed differences in toxicity before and after the azo dyes had been metabolized. Analysis revealed significant differences between the results obtained by EC50 with Blue 15 and those obtained with the leather dye, indicating that the toxicities of the metabolic products were increased. The differences obtained by EC50 with Red 22, RP2P and V2RP were small, and Black 22 showed no such difference. Sulfanic acid and orthanilic acid may be the intermediate products of Violet 9 and RP2B, respectively. However, according to FT-IR analysis, aromatic amines were present in the metabolic product.

  5. Crystal structures, solvatochromisms and DFT computations of three disperse azo dyes having the same azobenzene skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hui-Fen; Tao, Tao; Feng, Ya-Nan; Wang, Yin-Ge; Huang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Three disperse azo dyes having the same 4-nitrobenzene/azo/4-aminobenzene skeleton but different color have been structurally and spectrally characterized and compared in this paper. X-ray single-crystal diffraction analysis of compound 3 reveals that it has a planar molecular conformation between the azo and the nitrobenzene units. However, severely twisted aminoazobenzene structures in compounds 1 and 2 are observed because of the steric hindrance effect of ortho chloro and bromo groups. Electronic spectra of 1-3 are closely related to their molecular structures, which demonstrate that the presence of different substituted groups and the spatial crowding effect in the aminoazobenzene backbone leads to the significant alterations of bathochromic and hypochromatic shifts. In addition, theoretic computational studies as well as solvatochromisms for three azo dyes have been included.

  6. Use of titanium dioxide photocatalysis on the remediation of model textile wastewaters containing azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggioro, Enrico Mendes; Oliveira, Anabela Sousa; Pavesi, Thelma; Maia, Cátia Gil; Ferreira, Luis Filipe Vieira; Moreira, Josino Costa

    2011-12-14

    The photocatalytic degradation of two commercial textile azo dyes, namely C.I Reactive Black 5 and C.I Reactive Red 239, has been studied. TiO(2) P25 Degussa was used as catalyst and photodegradation was carried out in aqueous solution under artificial irradiation with a 125 W mercury vapor lamp. The effects of the amount of TiO(2) used, UV-light irradiation time, pH of the solution under treatment, initial concentration of the azo dye and addition of different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide were investigated. The effect of the simultaneous photodegradation of the two azo dyes was also investigated and we observed that the degradation rates achieved in mono and bi-component systems were identical. The repeatability of photocatalytic activity of the photocatalyst was also tested. After five cycles of TiO(2) reuse the rate of colour lost was still 77% of the initial rate. The degradation was followed monitoring the change of azo dye concentration by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Results show that the use of an efficient photocatalyst and the adequate selection of optimal operational parameters may easily lead to a complete decolorization of the aqueous solutions of both azo dyes.

  7. Decolorization of azo dyes by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in the presence of humic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiujuan; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong

    2011-07-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on azo dye decolorization by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were studied. It was found that HA species isolated from different sources could all accelerate the decolorization of Acid Red 27 (AR27). Anoxic and anaerobic conditions were required for the enhancement of azo dye decolorization by HA. In the presence of 50 mg DOC L⁻¹ Aldrich HA, 15-29% increases in decolorization efficiencies of azo dyes with different structures were achieved in 11 h. The enhancing effects increased with the increase of HA concentrations ranging from 25 to 150 mg DOC L⁻¹, and the decolorization rates were directly proportional to the HA concentrations when they were below 100 mg DOC L⁻¹. Lactate and formate were good electron donors for AR27 decolorization in the presence of HA. Both nitrate (0.1-3.0 mM) and nitrite (0.3-1.2 mM) inhibited AR27 decolorization in the presence of HA, and negligible decolorization was observed before their removal. Soluble FeCl₃ could accelerate the decolorization process in the presence of HA, whereas insoluble hematite could not. These findings may affect the understanding of bioremediation of azo dye-polluted environments and help improve the treatment of azo dye wastewaters.

  8. Electrolysis within anaerobic bioreactors stimulates breakdown of toxic products from azo dye treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazza, Sávia; Guzman, Juan J L; Angenent, Largus T

    2015-04-01

    Azo dyes are the most widely used coloring agents in the textile industry, but are difficult to treat. When textile effluents are discharged into waterways, azo dyes and their degradation products are known to be environmentally toxic. An electrochemical system consisting of a graphite-plate anode and a stainless-steel mesh cathode was placed into a lab-scale anaerobic bioreactor to evaluate the removal of an azo dye (Direct Black 22) from synthetic textile wastewater. At applied potentials of 2.5 and 3.0 V when water electrolysis occurs, no improvement in azo dye removal efficiency was observed compared to the control reactor (an integrated system with electrodes but without an applied potential). However, applying such electric potentials produces oxygen via electrolysis and promoted the aerobic degradation of aromatic amines, which are toxic, intermediate products of anaerobic azo dye degradation. The removal of these amines indicates a decrease in overall toxicity of the effluent from a single-stage anaerobic bioreactor, which warrants further optimization in anaerobic digestion.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF DIFFERENT REDUCING AGENTS OF AZO DYES FROM TEXTILE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VARZARU Elena

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxicology of textiles is a subject of increasing interest, because of the presence of dangerous compounds in clothes generated from dyeing and finishing processes. In order to protect human health, numerous regulations (Oeko Tex Standard 100, REACH Regulation limit the presence of dangerous chemicals, such as aromatic amines, generated by reductive cleavage of azo dyes, by no more than 30 mg/kg of textile material. The objective of this work was to investigate different methods of azo dyes reduction from colored textile specimens, in order to determine the procedure with the highest selectivity and sensibility. Aromatic amines are generated by chemical degradation achieved by the cleavage of the azo linkage using reducing agents.Different alternatives to sodium dithionite, reducing agent recommended by standard method ISO/FDIS 14362-1 were tested, such as: sodium sulfite and tin chloride. Also, xylene extraction, the common procedure for synthetic fibers was also performed for cotton, dyed with azo dye Direct Blue 6, in order to assess the reliability of common simultaneously extraction and reduction of direct dyes from natural fibres. Sodium ditionite remains the popular choice for reducing agent, since it provides efficient cleavage of azo linkage, generating specifically carcinogenic amines. Both liquid and gas chromatography analytical techniques were used for precise quantitative determination of generated compounds.

  10. Azo-sulforhodamine dyes: a novel class of broad spectrum dark quenchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    A rapid access to a novel class of water-soluble dark quencher dyes was achieved using an azo-coupling reaction between a fluorescent primary arylamine derived from a sulforhodamine 101 scaffold and a tertiary aniline equipped with different bioconjugatable groups. The thus obtained nonfluorescent azo-sulforhodamine hybrids display a broad quenching range spanning the visible to NIR regions. This was demonstrated through the preparation and enzymatic activation of FRET-based fluorogenic substrates of urokinase.

  11. Biodegradation of azo dyes in cocultures of anaerobic granular sludge with aerobic aromatic amine degrading enrichment cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, N.C.G.; Prenefeta-Boldú, F.X.; Opsteeg, J.L.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    A prerequisite for the mineralization (complete biodegradation) of many azo dyes is a combination of reductive and oxidative steps. In this study, the biodegradation of two azo dyes, 4-phenylazophenol (4-PAP) and Mordant Yellow 10 (4-sulfophenylazo-salicylic acid; MY10), was evaluated in batch

  12. Excellent capability in degrading azo dyes by MgZn-based metallic glass powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Qiang; Liu, Yan-Hui; Chen, Ming-Wei; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V; Inoue, Akihisa; Perepezko, John H

    2012-01-01

    The lack of new functional applications for metallic glasses hampers further development of these fascinating materials. In this letter, we report for the first time that the MgZn-based metallic glass powders have excellent functional ability in degrading azo dyes which are typical organic water pollutants. Their azo dye degradation efficiency is about 1000 times higher than that of commercial crystalline Fe powders, and 20 times higher than the Mg-Zn alloy crystalline counterparts. The high Zn content in the amorphous Mg-based alloy enables a greater corrosion resistance in water and higher reaction efficiency with azo dye compared to crystalline Mg. Even under complex environmental conditions, the MgZn-based metallic glass powders retain high reaction efficiency. Our work opens up a new opportunity for functional applications of metallic glasses.

  13. Evidence for direct-acting oxidative genotoxicity by reduction products of azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, E A; Chipman, J K; Forsythe, S J

    1994-01-01

    The intestinal flora forms a complex ecosystem that metabolizes dietary and endogenous nutrients under primarily anaerobic conditions. The ingestion of azo dyes has been proposed as one source of potential genotoxic agents. Many intestinal bacteria are able to reduce the azo bond (termed azofission), which liberates the substituted naphthol compounds. The standard Ames test has not demonstrated mutagenicity either by various common food colorings or by their reduced end products in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. In contrast, genetic toxicity was demonstrated in the Escherichia coli differential kill assay and in S. typhimurium TA102 for the reduced dyes. The superoxide free radical was produced by the azo dyes only after reduction by the intestinal bacteria Enterococcus faecalis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. PMID:7889833

  14. [Azo dyes, their environmental effects, and defining a strategy for their biodegradation and detoxification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudelj, Ivana; Hrenović, Jasna; Dragičević, Tibela Landeka; Delaš, Frane; Soljan, Vice; Gudelj, Hrvoje

    2011-03-01

    Intense industrial development has been accompanied by the production of wastewaters of very complex content, which pose a serious hazard to the environment, put at risk sustainable development, and call for new treatment technologies that would more effectively address the issue. One particular challenge in terms of science and technology is how to biodegrade xenobiotics such as azo dyes, which practically do not degrade under natural environmental conditions. These compounds tend to bioaccumulate in the environment, and have allergenic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, and teratogenic properties for humans. Removal of azo dyes from effluents is mostly based on physical-chemical methods. These methods are often very costly and limited, as they accumulate concentrated sludge, which also poses a significant secondary disposal problem, or produce toxic end-products. Biotechnological approach may offer alternative, lowcost biological treatment systems that can completely biodegrade and detoxify even the hard-to-biodegrade azo dyes.

  15. Methods for the analysis of azo dyes employed in food industry--A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamjala, Karthik; Nainar, Meyyanathan Subramania; Ramisetti, Nageswara Rao

    2016-02-01

    A wide variety of azo dyes are generally added for coloring food products not only to make them visually aesthetic but also to reinstate the original appearance lost during the production process. However, many countries in the world have banned the use of most of the azo dyes in food and their usage is highly regulated by domestic and export food supplies. The regulatory authorities and food analysts adopt highly sensitive and selective analytical methods for monitoring as well as assuring the quality and safety of food products. The present manuscript presents a comprehensive review of various analytical techniques used in the analysis of azo dyes employed in food industries of different parts of the world. A brief description on the use of different extraction methods such as liquid-liquid, solid phase and membrane extraction has also been presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Spectrophotometric determination of persulfate by oxidative decolorization of azo dyes for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yaobin; Zhu, Lihua; Yan, Jingchun; Xiang, Qingqing; Tang, Heqing

    2011-11-01

    Persulfate can efficiently decolorize azo dyes through oxidizing these compounds, which enabled us to develop a method of rapid spectrophotometric determination of persulfate for monitoring the wastewater treatment on the basis of the oxidation decolorization of azo dyes. Four azo dyes with different molecular structures were investigated as probes, and the influences of operation parameters including reaction time, solution pH, initial dye concentration, and initial concentration of activator Fe(2+) were checked on the determination of persulfate. Under optimum conditions, the decolorization degree of the dyes responded linearly with persulfate concentration for all the four azo dyes, and the linear range and detection limit were found to be 2.0-150 μmol L(-1) and 0.62 μmol L(-1) for rhodamine B, 2.0-100 μmol L(-1) and 0.42 μmol L(-1) for methylene blue, 4.0-150 μmol L(-1) and 0.50 μmol L(-1) for methyl violet, and 20-150 μmol L(-1) and 8.1 μmol L(-1) for orange II. A persulfate treatment of a spiked wastewater sample was satisfactorily monitored with the new method.

  17. Decolorization of azo dyes by marine Shewanella strains under saline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Meng, Xianming; Fu, Shiang Q; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong

    2013-05-01

    Azo dye decolorization was studied with Shewanella strains under saline conditions. Growing cells of Shewanella algae and Shewanella marisflavi isolated from marine environments demonstrated better azo dye decolorization capacities than the other three strains from non-saline sources. Cell suspensions of S. algae and S. marisflavi could decolorize single or mixed azo dyes with different structures. Decolorization kinetics were described with Michaelis-Menton equation, which indicated better decolorization performance of S. algae over S. marisflavi. Lactate and formate were identified as efficient electron donors for amaranth decolorization by the two strains. S. algae and S. marisflavi could decolorize amaranth at up to 100 g L(-1) NaCl or Na2SO4. However, extremely low concentration of NaNO3 exerted strong inhibition on decolorization. Both strains could remove the color and COD of textile effluent during sequential anaerobic-aerobic incubation. Lower concentrations of NaCl (20-30 g L(-1)) stimulated the activities of azoreductase, laccase, and NADH-DCIP reductase. The decolorization intermediates were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Decolorization metabolites of amaranth were less toxic than original dye. These findings improved our knowledge of azo-dye-decolorizing Shewanella species and provided efficient candidates for the treatment of dye-polluted saline wastewaters.

  18. Reduction and partial degradation mechanisms of naphthylaminesulfonic azo dye amaranth by Shewanella decolorationis S12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yiguo; Guo, Jun; Xu, Zhicheng; Mo, Cuiyun; Xu, Meiying; Sun, Guoping

    2007-06-01

    Reduction and biodegradation mechanisms of naphthylaminesulfonic azo dye amaranth using a newly isolated Shewanella decolorationis strain S12 were investigated. Under anaerobic conditions, amaranth was reduced by strain S12, and a stoichiometric amount of two reduction products RP-1 and RP-2 were generated. UV/visible spectrophotometric and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that RP-1 and RP-2 were 1-aminenaphthylene -4-sulfonic acid and 1-aminenaphthylene-2-hydroxy-3, 6-disulfonic acid. The result strongly supports a mechanism of azo dye reduction by the process via the reductive cleavage of the azo bond to form corresponding aromatic amines. The result of HPLC analyses revealed that these aromatic amines were not able to be mineralized by strain S12 under anaerobic conditions. But after re-aeration of the decolorized culture, RP-2 was mineralized completely by this microorganism, but the consumption of RP-1 was not observed. Ames test showed that amaranth had mutagenic but no cytotoxic potential. The mutagenic potential was relieved after the anaerobic treatment with strain S12 as the mutagenic effect of the two reduction products from amaranth was not detected by Ames test. Thus, the ability of strain S12 to reduce and partially mineralize the naphthylaminesulfonic azo dye efficiently was demonstrated, which can potentially be used to biodegrade and detoxify wastewater containing azo dyes using an alternating anaerobic/aerobic treatment procedure.

  19. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of organic azo dyes by using strength of nonlinearity parameter and Z-scan technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motiei, H.; Jafari, A.; Naderali, R.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, two chemically synthesized organic azo dyes, 2-(2,5-Dichloro-phenyazo)-5,5-dimethyl-cyclohexane-1,3-dione (azo dye (i)) and 5,5-Dimethyl-2-tolylazo-cyclohexane-1,3-dione (azo dye (ii)), have been studied from optical Kerr nonlinearity point of view. These materials were characterized by Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Experiments were performed using a continous wave diode-pumped laser at 532 nm wavelength in three intensities of the laser beam. Nonlinear absorption (β), refractive index (n2) and third-order susceptibility (χ (3)) of dyes, were calculated. Nonlinear absorption coefficient of dyes have been calculated from two methods; 1) using theoretical fits and experimental data in the Z-scan technique, 2) using the strength of nonlinearity curves. The values of β obtained from both of the methods were approximately the same. The results demonstrated that azo dye (ii) displays better nonlinearity and has a lower two-photon absorption threshold than azo dye (i). Calculated parameter related to strength of nonlinearity for azo dye (ii) was higher than azo dye (i), It may be due to presence of methyl in azo dye (ii) instead of chlorine in azo dye (i). Furthermore, The measured values of third order susceptibility of azo dyes were from the order of 10-9 esu . These azo dyes can be suitable candidate for optical switching devices.

  20. Adsorption of direct black-38 azo dye on p-tert-butylcalix[6]arene immobilized material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Afzal Kamboh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrates the adsorption of the direct black-38 (DB-38 azo dye on potential and newly synthesized p-tert-butylcalix[6]arene based silica resin (4. Resin 4 was synthesized via the modification of pure silica 1 as 2 followed by the immobilization of p-tert-butylcalix[6]arene (3 onto modified silica (2. It was characterized by using different analytical techniques such as FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA. The effect of adsorbent dosage, pH and the electrolyte effect on the removal of the DB-38 azo dye were evaluated through batch wise adsorption experiments. Maximum adsorption of 91% was achieved at pH 9.0. The textile wastewater samples were used to ensure the field applicability of the newly synthesized adsorbent 4 for the treatment of dye contaminated effluents. All results regarding the removal of the DB-38 azo dye from the aqueous environment prop up resin 4 as an effective adsorbent and it was found that resin 4 has high adsorption efficiency toward the DB-38 azo dye at a wide range of pH as compared to 1 and 2.

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural studies of new azo dyes metal chelates derivated from 1-phenil-azo-2-naphthol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Gilson Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando C.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, experimental techniques such as Raman and infrared vibrational analysis and X-ray crystal diffraction were used to characterize three new azo chelate dyes derived from 1-phenyl-azo-2-naphthol (Sudan I) and its analogue 1-(xylylphenylazo)-2-naphthol (Sudan II) with metal ions. The Raman and infrared spectroscopic analysis have also provided useful information concerning the coordination and formation of the molecular complexes through their main bands. In the vibrational spectra, the fingerprint bands, such as the ones at 1369/1368/1359 cm-1 assigned to [ν(CC) + δ(CH)], ν(Cdbnd N)], 1351/1352/1338 cm-1 assigned to [δ(CH)] and 816/824/813 cm-1 assigned to [ω(CH)] respectively for the SD1Cu, SD1Co and SD2Ni, can be used to characterize such compounds.

  2. Evidence for significantly enhancing reduction of Azo dyes in Escherichia coli by expressed cytoplasmic Azoreductase (AzoA) of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, J; Heinze, T M; Xu, H; Cerniglia, C E; Chen, H

    2010-05-01

    Although cytoplasmic azoreductases have been purified and characterized from various bacteria, little evidence demonstrating that these azoreductases are directly involved in azo dye reduction in vivo is known. In order to evaluate the contribution of the enzyme to azo dye reduction in vivo, experiments were conducted to determine the effect of a recombinant cytoplasmic azoreductase (AzoA) from Enterococcus faecalis expressed in Escherichia coli on the rate of metabolism of Methyl Red, Ponceau BS and Orange II. The intact cells that contained IPTG induced AzoA had a higher rate of dye reduction with increases of 2 (Methyl Red), 4 (Ponceau BS) and 2.6 (Orange II)-fold compared to noninduced cells, respectively. Metabolites of Methyl Red isolated from induced cultures were identified as N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and 2-aminobenzoic acid through liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) analyses. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that AzoA from Ent. faecalis is capable of increasing the reduction of azo dyes in intact E. coli cells and that cytoplasmic azoreductase is involved in bacterial dye degradation in vivo.

  3. Accelerated decolorization of reactive azo dyes under saline conditions by bacteria isolated from Arabian seawater sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Azeem; Kausar, Farzana; Arshad, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq; Ahmed, Iftikhar

    2012-12-01

    Presence of huge amount of salts in the wastewater of textile dyeing industry is one of the major limiting factors in the development of an effective biotreatment system for the removal of azo dyes from textile effluents. Bacterial spp. capable of thriving under high salt conditions could be employed for the treatment of saline dyecontaminated textile wastewaters. The present study was aimed at isolating the most efficient bacterial strains capable of decolorizing azo dyes under high saline conditions. Fiftyeight bacterial strains were isolated from seawater, seawater sediment, and saline soil, using mineral salt medium enriched with 100 mg l−1 Reactive Black-5 azo dye and 50 g NaCl l−1 salt concentration. Bacterial strains KS23 (Psychrobacter alimentarius) and KS26 (Staphylococcus equorum) isolated from seawater sediment were able to decolorize three reactive dyes including Reactive Black 5, Reactive Golden Ovifix, and Reactive Blue BRS very efficiently in liquid medium over a wide range of salt concentration (0-100 g NaCl l)⁻¹. Time required for complete decolorization of 100 mg dye l ⁻¹ varied with the type of dye and salt concentration. In general, there was an inverse linear relationship between the velocity of the decolorization reaction (V) and salt concentration. This study suggested that bacteria isolated from saline conditions such as seawater sediment could be used in designing a bioreactor for the treatment of textile effluent containing high concentration of salts.

  4. Effects of chloride ions on bleaching of azo dyes by Co2+/oxone reagent: kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Yuan, Ruixia; Guo, Yaoguang; Xu, Lei; Liu, Jianshe

    2011-06-15

    Orange II (Org II), one of the most common used azo dyes, was taken as a model to investigate the effects of chloride ion on dye decoloration in cobalt/peroxymonosulfate (Co/PMS) system. A significant decrease in the rate of Org II decoloration was observed upon addition of Cl(-) (0.05-10mM), but further addition of Cl(-) (>50mM) apparently accelerated dyes degradation. This dual effect of chloride on dyes bleaching was also observed as other halide ions (e.g. Br(-), I(-)) or other azo dyes were present in Co/PMS system. In the Co-free PMS solutions, the observed first-order rate constant always exponentially increased with the chloride content. The reactive chlorine species generated from chloride oxidation by PMS should be responsible for this non-radical mechanism for dye decoloration, however, these rapid decoloration of Org II as chloride ion was present, did not readily lead to much mineralization. Therefore, this finding may have significant technical implications for utilizing Co/PMS regent to detoxify chloride-rich azo dyes wastewater. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Using protein nanofibrils to remove azo dyes from aqueous solution by the coagulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshedi, Dina; Mohammadi, Zeinab; Akbar Boojar, Masoud Mashhadi; Aliakbari, Farhang

    2013-12-01

    The ever-increasing applications of hazardous azo dyes as industrialized coloring agents have led to serious remediation challenges. In this study, proteinaceous nanofibrils were examined as coagulants for decolorization of azo dyes in aqueous solutions. The results provided some insight regarding the mechanism of dye removal. The strength of nanofibrils to remove dyes from solution was evaluated by remediation of acid red 88, Bismarck brown R, direct violet 51, reactive black 5, and Congo red. However, the efficiency of nanofibrils to coagulate with different dyes was variable (60-98%) and dependent on the structures of dyes and the physicochemical conditions of the solutions. Increasing the temperature or ionic strength declined the coagulation time and induced the rate of dye removal. Changing pH had contradictory effects on the dye removal efficiency which was more affected by the chemical structure of the dye rather than the change in stability of the coagulant. The efficiency of nanofibrils to remove dyes was more than that of charcoal, which is considered as one of the most common substances used for azo dye remediation which may be due to its well dispersion in the aqueous solutions, and slower rates of the coagulation than that of the adsorption process. Furthermore, cytotoxicity was not detected after treating cell cultures with the decolorized solutions. Accordingly, by integrating biological and biophysicochemical processes, proteinaceous nanofibrils can be promising candidates for treatment of colored wastewaters. Ease of production, proper and quick dispersion in water, without the production of dangerous dye by-products and derivatives, are some of the main advantages of nanofibrils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibitory effect of azo dyes on ammoni-n oxidation by nitrtosomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential inhibitory effect of five azo dyes on ammonia-N oxidation was investigated. Ammonia-N oxidation was inhibited by the dyes: Mordant Black 17, Direct Red 2, Reactive Red 4, Reactive Yellow 2 and Direct Blue 14 at the concentrations (0.01mgL-1 to 100mgL-1) tested. Inhibition of ammonia-N oxidation ...

  7. Evaluation of impact of exposure of Sudan azo dyes and their metabolites on human intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongmiao; Feng, Jinhui; He, Gui-Xin; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2012-08-01

    Sudan azo dyes are banned for food usage in most countries, but they are illegally used to maintain or enhance the color of food products due to low cost, bright staining, and wide availability of the dyes. In this report, we examined the toxic effects of these azo dyes and their potential reduction metabolites on 11 prevalent human intestinal bacterial strains. Among the tested bacteria, cell growth of 2, 3, 5, 5, and 1 strains was inhibited by Sudan I, II, III, IV, and Para Red, respectively. At the tested concentration of 100 μM, Sudan I and II inhibited growth of Clostridium perfringens and Lactobacillus rhamnosus with decrease of growth rates from 14 to 47%. Sudan II also affected growth of Enterococcus faecalis. Growth of Bifidobacterium catenulatum, C. perfringens, E. faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Peptostreptococcus magnus was affected by Sudan III and IV with decrease in growth rates from 11 to 67%. C. perfringens was the only strain in which growth was affected by Para Red with 47 and 26% growth decreases at 6 and 10 h, respectively. 1-Amino-2-naphthol, a common metabolite of the dyes, was capable of inhibiting growth of most of the tested bacteria with inhibition rates from 8 to 46%. However, the other metabolites of the dyes had no effect on growth of the bacterial strains. The dyes and their metabolites had less effect on cell viability than on cell growth of the tested bacterial strains. Clostridium indolis and Clostridium ramosum were the only two strains with about a 10 % decrease in cell viability in the presence of Sudan azo dyes. The present results suggested that Sudan azo dyes and their metabolites potentially affect the human intestinal bacterial ecology by selectively inhibiting some bacterial species, which may have an adverse effect on human health. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. EFFECT OF AZO DYES ON GROWTH AND METABOLISM OF NEUROSPORA CRASSA I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobb, Dolores; Liebes, Dorothy; Salzberg, David A.

    1962-01-01

    Bobb, Dolores (Palo Alto Medical Research Foundation, Palo Alto, Calif.), Dorothy Liebes, and David A. Salzberg. Effect of azo dyes on growth and metabolism of Neurospora crassa. I. Relative resistance of Neurospora strains to azo dye inhibition. J. Bacteriol. 84:242–249. 1962.—Under conditions where growth factors were not limiting, 3′-methyl-4-monoaminoazobenzene, a rat hepatocarcinogen, inhibited growth of six Neurospora strains studied. The strains could be divided into three groups with regard to sensitivity. A wild-type and a leucine-requiring mutant were the most resistant, and the riboflavine-deficient strain, 51602, showed greatest susceptibility. Results suggested a possible correlation between the inhibition of strain 51602 and the ability of the mutant to synthesize riboflavine from its precursors. Inhibition was not dependent on the utilization of externally supplied riboflavine. The azo dye inhibition of all strains resulted primarily in a prolonged lag phase, although growth rates were affected to some degree. Spore germination did not appear to be retarded. A dose-response curve was developed to measure quantitatively the growth inhibition by azo dyes; it was based on the time required for inhibited and control cultures to reach identical growth weights. PMID:13870285

  9. Evaluating role of immobilized periphyton in bioremediation of azo dye amaranth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Sadaf; Faheem, Muhammad; Ali, Naeem; Kerr, Philip G; Wu, Yonghong

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioremediation capabilities of three kinds of periphyton (i.e. epiphyton, metaphyton and epilithon) immobilized in bioreactors to decolorize and biodegrade the sulphonated azo dye, amaranth. Results showed that periphyton dominated by phyla including Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Complete removal of dye was shown by all the biofilms periphyton (epiphyton showed highest removal efficacy) over a range of initial concentrations (50-500mgL-1) within 84h at pH 7 and 30°C. Biodegradation of amaranth was confirmed through FTIR and HPLC and the biodegradation pathways were detected by GC-MS/MS analysis. The azo bonds in the amaranth were successfully broken by periphyton and amaranth was converted to non-toxic, aliphatic compounds including isobutene, acetyl acetate and ethyl acetate. The results showed the potential application of immobilized periphyton at industrial scale for the removal of azo dyes from wastewater containing azo dye amaranth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reductive decolourisation of azo dyes by mesophilic and thermophilic methanogenic consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervantes, F.J.; Santos, dos A.B.; Madrid, de M.P.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of acidogenic bacteria and methanogenic archaea on the reductive decolourisation of azo dyes was assessed in anaerobic granular sludge. Acidogenic bacteria appeared to play an important role in the decolourising processes when glucose was provided as an electron donor; whereas

  11. DEVELOPING AZO AND FORMAZAN DYES BASED ON ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS: SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractIn previous papers, the synthesis and chemical properties of iron-complexed azo and formazan dyes were reported. In this regard, it was shown that in certain cases iron could be substituted for the traditionally used metals, chromium and cobalt, without having an adve...

  12. Toxic Effect Of Azo Dyes On Nitrite-N Utilization By Nitrobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The toxicity of five azo dyes (toxicants) on Nitrobacter was investigated. The index for toxicity was inhibition of rate of nitrite-N utilization. The rate of nitrite-N utilization decreased with increase in concentration of each toxicant at specific exposure time. However, stimulation of utilization was obtained at low concentrations ...

  13. Cancer risk assessment of azo dyes and aromatic amines from garment and footwear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeilmaker MJ; Kroese ED; Haperen P van; Veen MP van; Bremmer HJ; Kranen HJ van; Wouters MFA; Janus J; LBM

    1999-01-01

    A quantitative assessment was performed to estimate the cancer risk to individuals wearing garment and footwear coloured with azo dyes. Basically, the risk assessment consists of both a comparison of the (estimated) level of aromatic amines which, during the wearing of garment and footwear, enters

  14. Thermal Behaviour of Some Azo Dyes Containing Sterically Hindered and Water-Soluble Groups

    OpenAIRE

    KOCAOKUTGEN, Hasan; HEREN, Zerrin

    1998-01-01

    Thermal behaviour of six azo dyes containing steric hindered groups such as tert-butyl, sec-butyl and isopropyl, were investigated by means of thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG). The thermal decomposition points and amount of volatile pyrolysis products, were determined in nitrogen atmosphere using TG, DTA and DTG curves.

  15. Facile synthesis of 1-naphthol azo dyes with nano SiO 2 /HIO 4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nano-silica supported periodic acid (nano-SPIA) has been utilized as a heterogeneous reagent for a highly efficient and one pot synthesis of azo dyes based on 1-naphthol under solvent-free conditions at room temperature. This method has some advantages, the reaction workup is very easy and the catalyst can be easily ...

  16. Photocatalytic oxidation of a reactive azo dye and evaluation of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the photocatalytic oxidation of a reactive azo dye and determine the improvement in the biodegradability when photocatalytic oxidation was used as a pretreatment step prior to biological treatment. The results obtained from the experiments adding H2O2/TiO2 show that the ...

  17. Some heterocyclic azo dyes derived from thiazolyl derivatives; synthesis; substituent effects and solvatochromic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanbakhsh, M R; Mohammadi, A; Abbasnia, M

    2010-12-01

    A series of azo disperse dyes were synthesized by coupling reaction of N,N-diethylaniline, 2-anilinoethanol and N-phenyl-2,2'-iminodiethanol with diazotized aminothiazolyl derivatives as diazo components. These dyes have been prepared in good yields, and were characterized by UV-Vis, FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopic techniques. The effects of solvent polarity and various pH on dyes in the visible absorption spectra were evaluated. All dyes exhibit an excellent correlation coefficient (r>0.92) for the linear solvation energy relationship with π* values calculated by Kamlet et al. The influence of the pH on the dyes with electron-donating group implied that these dyes exist in acid-base equilibrium in acidic environment. The effect of substituents of both coupler and diazo component on the color of dyes was investigated as well. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Diphenyl (4′-(Aryldiazenylbiphenyl-4-ylamino(pyridin-3-ylmethylphosphonates as Azo Disperse Dyes for Dyeing Polyester Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. Abdel-Megeed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diphenyl (4′-aminobiphenyl-4-ylamino(pyridin-3-ylmethylphosphonate (1 was synthesized in 88% yield from reaction of pyridine-3-carboxaldehyde with benzidine and triphenylphosphite in the presence of titanium tetrachloride as a catalyst. Diazotization of 1 gave the corresponding diazonium salt 2 which was coupled with several hydroxyl or amino compounds to give the corresponding azo dyes 3–8 in 82–88% yields after crystallization. The dyes produced were applied to polyesters as disperse dyes and their fastness properties were elevated.

  19. An experimental study on relationship between hammett substituent constant and electronic absorption wavelength of some azo dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Sidir, Yadigar Gülseven; Sidir, Isa; Berber, Halil; Tasal, Erol

    2011-01-01

    In this study, absorption spectra of sixteen azo dyes have been recorded in various solvents. These azo dyes have substituents such as OH, SO3H, Cl, I, NO2, C2H5 and OCH3 in different positions of phenyl ring. There is a shift in ?max whose amount is dependent upon the type and position of substituent on the ring. The effects of substituent on the absorption spectra of azo dyes are interpreted by correlation of absorption maximum wavelengths (nm) with the hammett substituent parameters. Charg...

  20. All-optical switchable holographic Fresnel lens based on azo-dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jashnsaz, Hossein; Nataj, Nahid Hosain; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Khabbazi, Amir

    2011-08-01

    Fabrication of an all-optical switchable holographic liquid crystal (LC) Fresnel lens based on azo-dye-doped polymer-dispersed LCs is reported using a Michelson interferometer. It is found that, upon circularly polarized photoirradiation, the diffraction efficiency of the fabricated Fresnel lens was increased significantly in a reversible manner. We believe this is due to the anisotropy induced by reorientation of the LC molecules coupled with azo-dye molecule orientation due to trans-cis-trans photoisomerization, which modulates the refractive index of the LC-rich regions. We also studied the effect of azo dye on the polarization dependency of the fabricated lens.

  1. Analysis of water-soluble azo dyes in soft drinks by high resolution UPLC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Yang, J L; Li, J H; Li, X L; Li, J; Lu, X Y; Shen, J Z; Wang, Y W; Zhang, Z H

    2011-10-01

    An UPLC-Orbitrap MS system was exploited to develop and validate a method for the simultaneous determination of 11 water-soluble azo dyes (Acid Yellow 17, Acid Red 14, Acid Red 26, Acid Red 73, Acid Orange 52, Acid Orange 7, Acid Orange 12, Acid Yellow 36, Acid Orange 5, Acid Red 88 and Acid Red 9) in soft drinks. Three pairs of isomers and four disulphonated azo dyes were among a total of 11 water-soluble azo dyes obtained and purified using an SPE cartridge. They were well separated using optimized UPLC conditions with a RP18 column and a MS detector with a compatible mobile phase system. All these dyes were detected by the Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer in negative ion mode. HCD tandem MS fragment ions are first reported in this paper, and these fragment ions can be used for identification of isomers of azo dyes. According to SANCO/10684/2009, one quasi-molecular ion in full scan mode as quantification ion and one or two HCD tandem MS fragment ions as identification ions are required for compound confirmation. Matrix-matched calibration was employed for quantification. The linear matrix-matched calibration for the 11 dyes was in the range 5-200 ng g(-1) with correlation coefficients (r) of 0.9939-0.9988. Recoveries were 68.9-110.8% with coefficients of variation of 0.9-12.0%. Depending on the dye and matrix involved, the LODs were between 1.0 and 3.2 ng g(-1) and LOQs were between 5.2 and 9.8 ng g(-1).

  2. Novel push-pull heterocyclic azo disperse dyes containing piperazine moiety: Synthesis, spectral properties, antioxidant activity and dyeing performance on polyester fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Asadollah; Khalili, Behzad; Tahavor, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Six novel push-pull azo disperse dyes were synthesized via classical azo coupling reaction using 2-amino-thiazolyl derivatives as the diazo components and 1-(4-bromobenzyl)-4-phenylpiperazine as a key coupling intermediate. The structures of the dyes and synthesized intermediate were confirmed by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and UV-vis analyses. The solvatochromic behavior of the dyes was studied in a set of 10 solvents of different polarity and considerable results were obtained. The prepared heterocyclic azo dyes were applied for dyeing polyester fibers and their dyeing properties were studied. The fastness properties of the dyed fabrics such as wash, light and rubbing fastness degrees were measured by standard methods. Investigation of antioxidant activity of compounds was carried out by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) method. The synthesized dyes exhibited significant antioxidant activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbial fuel cells for azo dye treatment with electricity generation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Komal; Subramanian, Sindhu; Basu, Suddhasatwa

    2013-03-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) has great potential for treating wastewater containing azo dyes for decolourization, and simultaneous production of electricity with the help of microorganisms as biocatalysts. The concept of MFC has been already well established for the production of electricity; however, not much work has been published regarding dye decolourization with simultaneous electricity generation using MFCs. This paper reviews the performance limitations, future prospects, and improvements in technology in terms of commercial viability of azo dye decolourization with electricity generation in MFC. The major limitation identified is the high cost of cathode catalyst. Therefore, there is need of developing inexpensive cathode catalysts. Biocathode is one such option. Moreover, enhanced performance can be obtained by photo-assisted electrochemical process like rutile coated cathode. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microbial fuel cell-photoelectrocatalytic cell combined system for the removal of azo dye wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xizi; Pan, Qinrong; Wang, Chuqiao; Wang, Hui; Li, Hua; Li, Xianning

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a novel parallel circuit microbial fuel cell-photoelectrocatalytic cell (MFC-PEC) combined system was established to enhance azo dye removal. Results showed that this system had synergistic effects compared with the MFC alone. In the MFC part, a 56% decrease in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 85% decolorization were achieved, and further reduced by 25% and 12% in the PEC part where titania nanotube functioned as the photoelectrode. For one thing, the PEC raised the maximum current of the MFC by 14.2%, which facilitated COD removal and decolorization in the MFC and promoted adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level of anode microorganisms, for another, this system significantly increased the dye removal in the PEC. Besides, cyclic voltammograms illustrated intermediate products degradation in this system. Hence, the system achieved marked deep decolorization and rapid toxic intermediate products degradation of high concentration azo dyes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mono azo dyes derived from 5-nitroanthranilic acid: Synthesis, absorption properties and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak Atay, Çiğdem; Gökalp, Merve; Kart, Sevgi Özdemir; Tilki, Tahir

    2017-08-01

    Four new azo dyes: 2-[(3,5-diamino-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)diazenyl]-5-nitrobenzoic acid (A), 2-[(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)diazenyl]-5-nitrobenzoic acid (B), 2-[(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)diazenyl]-5-nitrobenzoic acid (C) and 2-[(5-amino-3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)diazenyl]-5-nitrobenzoic acid (D) which have the same 4-nitrobenzene/azo/pyrazole skeleton and different substituted groups are synthesized in this work. The structures and spectroscopic properties of these new azo dyes are characterized by using spectroscopic methods such as FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-vis. Their solvatochromic properties in chloroform, acetic acid, methanol, dimethylformamide (DMF) and dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) are studied. Moreover, molecular structures and some spectroscopic properties of azo dyes are investigated by utilizing the quantum computational chemistry method based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) employing B3LYP hybrid functional level with 6-31G(d) basis set. It is seen that experimental and theoretical results are compatible with each other.

  6. Reduction of azo dyes by flavin reductase from Citrobacter freundii A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Firdaus Abdul-Wahab

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrobacter freundii A1 isolated from a sewage treatment facility was demonstrated to be able to effectively decolorize azo dyes as pure and mixed culture. This study reports on the investigation on the enzymatic systems involved. An assay performed suggested the possible involvement of flavin reductase (Fre as an azo reductase. A heterologouslyexpressed recombinant Fre from C. freundii A1 was used to investigate its involvement in the azo reduction process. Three model dyes were used, namely Acid Red 27 (AR27, Direct Blue 15 (DB15 and Reactive Black 5 (RB5. AR27 was found to be reduced the fastest by Fre, followed by RB5, and lastly DB15. Redox mediators nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and riboflavin enhance the reduction, suggesting the redox activity of the enzyme. The rate and extent of reduction of the model dyes correlate well with the reduction potentials (Ep. The data presented here strongly suggest that Fre is one of the enzymes responsible for azo reduction in C. freundii A1, acting via an oxidation-reduction reaction.

  7. Effect of Azo Dyes on the Thermal Degradation of Post-consumer Polyester Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Dan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermogravimetric analysis(TGA and pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS investigations were carried out on the thermal degradation of white and red post-consumer polyester fabrics. The results show that red PET fabrics which was dyed with C.I. Disperse red 167 for its typical azo structure exhibits larger activation energy compared with white PET. The addition of azo dyes displays an inhibiting effect on the deep pyrolysis and the formation of biphenyl and bis(2-hydroxybutyl terephthalate produced by the free radical mechanism.

  8. Hollow Palladium Nanoparticles Facilitated Biodegradation of an Azo Dye by Electrically Active Biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Kalathil, Shafeer

    2016-08-04

    Dye wastewater severely threatens the environment due to its hazardous and toxic effects. Although many methods are available to degrade dyes, most of them are far from satisfactory. The proposed research provides a green and sustainable approach to degrade an azo dye, methyl orange, by electrically active biofilms (EABs) in the presence of solid and hollow palladium (Pd) nanoparticles. The EABs acted as the electron generator while nanoparticles functioned as the electron carrier agents to enhance degradation rate of the dye by breaking the kinetic barrier. The hollow Pd nanoparticles showed better performance than the solid Pd nanoparticles on the dye degradation, possibly due to high specific surface area and cage effect. The hollow cavities provided by the nanoparticles acted as the reaction centers for the dye degradation.

  9. Aerobic decolourization of two reactive azo dyes under varying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... colourants; they are usually not easily biodegraded. Dye colours are visible in water at concentration as low as 1 mg/L, whereas textile processing waste water, normally contain more than 10-200 mg/L dye concentration, resulting in aesthetic problems (O'Neil et al., 1999). The toxicity of dye industrial waste ...

  10. Aerobic decolourization of two reactive azo dyes under varying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... Key words: Bioremediation, decolourization, textile dye, Bacillus cereus. INTRODUCTION. Dyes are organic chemical compounds, which impart colour to other materials by saturating them in aqueous solution. Synthetic dyes have a wide application in the food, pharmaceutical, textile, leather, cosmetics ...

  11. High-throughput screening of PLGA thin films utilizing hydrophobic fluorescent dyes for hydrophobic drug compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Terry W J; Huang, Charlotte L; Kumar, Saranya; Widjaja, Effendi; Chiang Boey, Freddy Yin; Loo, Joachim S C; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2011-10-01

    Hydrophobic, antirestenotic drugs such as paclitaxel (PCTX) and rapamycin are often incorporated into thin film coatings for local delivery using implantable medical devices and polymers such as drug-eluting stents and balloons. Selecting the optimum coating formulation through screening the release profile of these drugs in thin films is time consuming and labor intensive. We describe here a high-throughput assay utilizing three model hydrophobic fluorescent compounds: fluorescein diacetate (FDAc), coumarin-6, and rhodamine 6G that were incorporated into poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and PLGA-polyethylene glycol films. Raman microscopy determined the hydrophobic fluorescent dye distribution within the PLGA thin films in comparison with that of PCTX. Their subsequent release was screened in a high-throughput assay and directly compared with HPLC quantification of PCTX release. It was observed that PCTX controlled-release kinetics could be mimicked by a hydrophobic dye that had similar octanol-water partition coefficient values and homogeneous dissolution in a PLGA matrix as the drug. In particular, FDAc was found to be the optimal hydrophobic dye at modeling the burst release as well as the total amount of PCTX released over a period of 30 days. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Synthesis and investigation of antimicrobial activity and spectrophotometric and dyeing properties of some novel azo disperse dyes based on naphthalimides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaki, Hanieh; Gharanjig, Kamaladin; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel disperse dyes containing azo group were synthesized through a diazotization and coupling process. The 4-amino-N-2-aminomethylpyridine-1,8-naphthalimide was diazotized by nitrosylsulphuric acid and coupled with various aromatic amines such as N,N-diethylaniline, N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, and 2-methylindole. Chemical structures of the synthesized dyes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR), carbon nuclear magnetic resonance ((13) C NMR), elemental analysis, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectroscopy. The spectrophotometric data of all dyes were evaluated in various solvents with different polarity. Eventually, the dyes were applied on polyamide fabrics in order to investigate their dyeing properties. The fastness properties of the dyed fabrics such as wash, light, and rubbing fastness degrees were measured by standard methods. Moreover, the color gamut of the synthesized dyes was measured on polyamide fabrics. Results indicated that some of the synthesized dyes were able to dye polyamide fabrics with deep shades. They had very good wash and rubbing fastness degrees and moderate-to-good light fastness on polyamide fabrics. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the synthesized dyes were evaluated in soluble state and on the dyed fabrics. The results indicated that dye 2 containing N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline as coupler had the highest activity against all the bacteria and fungi used. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of high wash fastness novel azo reactive dyes incorporating aromatic bridged diamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamer Saeed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A new series of azo reactive dyes containing free chlorine atoms have been synthesized. The synthetic methodology involves the diazotization of 4′4-diamino diphenylamine-2-sulfonic acid (2 followed by azo coupling with 1-amino-8-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid (3 in alkaline medium to yield intermediate dye (4. Condensation of the latter with 1,3,5-trichlorotriazine afforded the cyanurated dye (5. A number of novel bis aromatic diamines (1a–j were separately synthesized as bridging groups and were coupled with cyanurated dye (5 at room temperature to provide the target dyes designated as S1–S10 containing triazine and linker in a single molecule. The structures of newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by analytical data and spectroscopic techniques. The synthesized dyes were applied on cotton fibers to assess their light fastness, wash fastness and rubbing fastness and were found to possess medium to high fastness values in different dyes.

  14. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile azo dyes by bacterial consortium under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Release of textile azo dyes to the environment is an issue of health concern while the use of microorganisms has proved to be the best option for remediation. Thus, in the present study, a bacterial consortium consisting of Providencia rettgeri strain HSL1 and Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 has been investigated for degradation and detoxification of structurally different azo dyes. The consortium showed 98-99 % decolorization of all the selected azo dyes viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO 16), Disperse Red 78 (DR 78) and Direct Red 81 (DR 81) within 12 to 30 h at 100 mg L-1 concentration at 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic, sequential aerobic/microaerophilic and microaerophilic/aerobic processes. However, decolorization under microaerophilic conditions viz. RB 5 (0.26 mM), RO 16 (0.18 mM), DR 78 (0.20 mM) and DR 81 (0.23 mM) and sequential aerobic/microaerophilic processes viz. RB 5 (0.08 mM), RO 16 (0.06 mM), DR 78 (0.07 mM) and DR 81 (0.09 mM) resulted into the formation of aromatic amines. In distinction, sequential microaerophilic/ aerobic process doesn’t show the formation of amines. Additionally, 62-72 % reduction in total organic carbon content was observed in all the dyes decolorized broths under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggesting the efficacy of method in mineralization of dyes. Notable induction within the levels of azoreductase and NADH-DCIP reductase (97 and 229 % for RB 5, 55 and 160 % for RO 16, 63 and 196 % for DR 78, 108 and 258 % for DR 81) observed under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggested their critical involvements in the initial breakdown of azo bonds, whereas, a slight increase in the levels of laccase and veratryl alcohol oxidase confirmed subsequent oxidation of formed amines. Also, the acute toxicity assay with Daphnia magna revealed the nontoxic nature of the dye-degraded metabolites under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes. As biodegradation under sequential microaerophilic

  15. Research on Synthesis of New Azo Calix[4]arene and its Dyeing Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Jun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the raw materials of calix[4]arene, benzocaine, tricaine and procaine hydrochloride, three new azo calix[4]arene derivatives—6a, 6b and 6c are synthesized by diazotization–coupling reaction of an aromatic amine, with its yield of 83%, 81% and 83% respectively. The structural characterization is in a way of IR, 1H NMR and elemental analysis. This paper investigates the spectral properties of azo calix[4]arene derivatives under different solution pH conditions through the UV–visible spectroscopy, and researches the dyeing properties through the dyeing curve, color yield test and fastness test. The results show that, with the increase of pH value, the azo calix[4]arene derivatives—6a, 6b and 6c form azo–hydrazone tautomeric isomers with the maximum absorption peak redshift; the dyeing effect of the compound is good, of which the dye–uptake rate of the compound 6a is as high as 78%; the surface depth of color yield is 2.798, and the dry and wet rubbing fastness and the soaping fastness are respectively 4, which is a better disperse dye.

  16. The Comparative Study on the Rapid Decolorization of Azo, Anthraquinone and Triphenylmethane Dyes by Anaerobic Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daizong Cui

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An anaerobic sludge (AS, capable of decolorizing a variety of synthetic dyes, was acclimated and is reported here. The sludge presented a much better dye decolorizing ability than that of different individual strains. A broad spectrum of dyes could be decolorized by the sludge. Continuous decolorization tests showed that the sludge exhibited the ability to decolorize repeated additions of dye. The chemical oxygen demand (COD removal rate of the dye wastewater reached 52% after 12 h of incubation. Polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE profiles revealed that the microbial community changed as a result of varying initial concentrations of dyes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that microbial populations in the sludge belonged to the phyla Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi and Proteobacteria. The degradation products of the three types of dye were identified. For azo dyes, the anaerobic sludge converted Methyl Orange to N,N-dimethylbenzene-1,4-diamine and 4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid; for triphenylmethane dyes, after Malachite Green was decolorized, the analyzed products were found to be a mixture of N,N-dimethylbenzenamine, 3-dimethyl-aminophenol and 4-dimethylaminobenzophenone; for anthraquinone dyes, two products (acetophenone and 2-methylbenzoic acid were observed after Reactive Blue 19 decolorization. Together, these results suggest that the anaerobic sludge has promising potential for use in the treatment of industrial wastewater containing various types of dyes.

  17. Dyeing of Polyester with Disperse Dyes: Part 2. Synthesis and Dyeing Characteristics of Some Azo Disperse Dyes for Polyester Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alya M. Al-Etaibi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to utilize carrier for accelerating the rate of dyeing not only to enhance dyeing of polyester fabrics dyed with disperse dyes 3a,b, but also to save energy. Both the color strength expressed as dye uptake and the fastness properties of the dyed fabrics were evaluated.

  18. Dyeing of Polyester with Disperse Dyes: Part 2. Synthesis and Dyeing Characteristics of Some Azo Disperse Dyes for Polyester Fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Etaibi, Alya M; Alnassar, Huda S; El-Apasery, Morsy Ahmed

    2016-06-29

    The goal of this study was to utilize carrier for accelerating the rate of dyeing not only to enhance dyeing of polyester fabrics dyed with disperse dyes 3a,b, but also to save energy. Both the color strength expressed as dye uptake and the fastness properties of the dyed fabrics were evaluated.

  19. Synthesis and antitumor evaluation of thiophene based azo dyes incorporating pyrazolone moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa A. Gouda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of thiophene incorporating pyrazolone moieties 5a–f and 6a–c were synthesized via diazo coupling of diazonium salt of 3-substituted-2-amino-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophenes 1a–c with 3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5(4H-one, 3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5(4H-one or 3-amino-1H-pyrazol-5(4H-one, respectively. Newly synthesized dyes were applied to polyester fabric as disperse dyes in which their color measurements and fastness properties were evaluated. These dyes showed generally red to blue shifted color with high extinction coefficient in comparison with aniline-based azo dyes. The antitumor activity of the synthesized dyes was evaluated. The results showed clearly that most of them exhibited good activity and compounds 5c and 5d exhibited moderate activity.

  20. The effect of cyclic anaerobic-aerobic conditions on biodegradation of azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaşar, Semra; Cirik, Kevser; Cinar, Ozer

    2012-03-01

    The effect of cyclic anaerobic-aerobic conditions on the biodegradative capability of the mixed microbial culture for the azo dye Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R (RBV-5R) was investigated in the sequencing batch reactor (SBR) fed with a synthetic textile wastewater. The SBR had a 12-h cycle time with anaerobic-aerobic periods of 3/9, 6/6 and 9/3 h. General SBR performance was assessed by measurement of catabolic enzymes (catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, azo reductase), chemical oxygen demand (COD), color and amount of aromatic amines. In this study, under steady-state conditions, the anaerobic period of the cyclic SBR was found to allow the reductive decolorization of azo dye. Longer anaerobic periods resulted in higher color removal efficiencies, approximately 71% for the 3-h, 87% for 6-h and 92% for the 9-h duration. Total COD removal efficiencies were over 84% under each of the cyclic conditions and increased as the length of the anaerobic period was increased; however, the highest color removal rate was attained for the cycle with the shortest anaerobic period of 3 h. During the decolorization of RBV-5R, two sulfonated aromatic amines (benzene based and naphthalene based) were formed. Additionally, anaerobic azo reductase enzyme was found to be positively affected with the increasing duration of the anaerobic period; however; it was vice versa for the aerobic catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23DO) enzyme.

  1. Incorporation of Kojic Acid-Azo Dyes on TiO2 Thin Films for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolynne Zie Wei Sie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitization of heavy metal free organic dyes onto TiO2 thin films has gained much attention in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. A series of new kojic acid based organic dyes KA1–4 were synthesized via nucleophilic substitution of azobenzene bearing different vinyl chains A1–4 with kojyl chloride 4. Azo dyes KA1–4 were characterized for photophysical properties employing absorption spectrometry and photovoltaic characteristic in TiO2 thin film. The presence of vinyl chain in A1–4 improved the photovoltaic performance from 0.20 to 0.60%. The introduction of kojic acid obtained from sago waste further increases the efficiency to 0.82–1.54%. Based on photovoltaic performance, KA4 achieved the highest solar to electrical energy conversion efficiency (η = 1.54% in the series.

  2. utilisation of azo and triphenylmethane dyes as sole source of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the treatment of dye wastewater. Key words: Bacillus sp, primary biodegradation, methyl orange, malachite green. INTRODUCTION. Synthetic dyes are extensively used in the textile, food, cosmetics, pharmaceutical, paper, leather, photographic and aquaculture industries (Schnick,. 1988; Chen et al., 1999). The main ...

  3. Adsorption studies of cationic, anionic and azo-dyes via monodispersed Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ganga Ram; Saharan, Priya; Kumar, Arun; Mehta, S K; Mor, Suman; Umar, Ahmad

    2013-05-01

    The present paper reports the applicability of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as an adsorbent for the removal of three dyes viz. Acridine orange (cationic dye), Comassie Brilliant Blue R-250 (anionic dye) and Congo red (azo dye) from their aqueous solution. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via simple chemical precipitation method using CTAB, as surfactant. The as-prepared nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their morphological, structural and optical properties by using transmission electron microscopy X-ray diffraction and UV-visible spectroscopic measurements. The dye removal efficiency of Fe3O4 NPs have been determined by investigating several factors such as effect of pH, amount of adsorbent dose and effect of contact time on different dye concentrations. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms have also been studied to explain the interaction of dyes. The experimental data indicate that the adsorption rate follows pseudo- second-order kinetics for the removal of all the three dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles and the adsorbed dyes were desorbed. The identities of recovered nanoparticles as well as the three dyes have been found, as same and were reused.

  4. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Trichoderma sp. WL-Go for azo dyes decolorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Shen, Wenli; Pei, Xiaofang; Ma, Fang; You, Shengnan; Li, Shuzhen; Wang, Jingwei; Zhou, Jiti

    2017-06-01

    Developing an eco-friendly approach for metallic nanoparticles synthesis is important in current nanotechnology research. In this study, green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was carried out by a newly isolated strain Trichoderma sp. WL-Go. UV-vis spectra of AuNPs showed a surface plasmon resonance peak at 550nm, and transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the AuNPs were of varied shape with well dispersibility. The optimal conditions for AuNPs synthesis were HAuCl4 1.0mmol/L, biomass 0.5g and pH7-11. Moreover, the bio-AuNPs could efficiently catalyze the decolorization of various azo dyes. This research provided a new microbial resource candidate for green synthesis of AuNPs and demonstrated the potential application of bio-AuNPs for azo dye decolorization. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Fluorescent Sensing of Chlorophenols in Water Using an Azo Dye Modified β-Cyclodextrin Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncube, Phendukani; Krause, Rui W.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    2011-01-01

    A water soluble azo dye modified β-cyclodextrin polymer 4 was synthesized and used as a chemosensor for the detection of chlorinated phenols, model chlorinated by-products (CBPs) of water treatment for drinking purposes. The characterization of the intermediates and the azo dye modified β-CD polymer was done by UV/Vis Spectrophotometry, FT-IR and 1H-NMR spectroscopies. The chlorophenols were capable of quenching the fluorescence of the polymer. The polymer showed greater sensitivity towards 2,4-dichlorophenol, with a sensitivity factor of 0.35 compared to 0.05 and 0.12 for phenol and 4-chlorophenol, respectively. The stability constants (Ks) of the pollutants were also determined by the Benesi-Hildebrand method to be 2.104 × 103 M−1 for 2,4-dichlorophenol and 1.120 × 102 M−1 for 4-chlorophenol. PMID:22163864

  6. Nanocrystalline CeO2-δ as effective adsorbent of azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomić, Nataša M; Dohčević-Mitrović, Zorana D; Paunović, Novica M; Mijin, Dušan Ž; Radić, Nenad D; Grbić, Boško V; Aškrabić, Sonja M; Babić, Biljana M; Bajuk-Bogdanović, Danica V

    2014-10-07

    Ultrafine CeO2-δ nanopowder, prepared by a simple and cost-effective self-propagating room temperature synthesis method (SPRT), showed high adsorption capability for removal of different azo dyes. Batch type of adsorption experiments with fixed initial pH value were conducted for the removal of Reactive Orange 16 (RO16), Methyl Orange (MO), and Mordant Blue 9 (MB9). The equilibrium adsorption data were evaluated using Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The Langmuir model slightly better describes isotherm data for RO16 and MO, whereas the Freundlich model was found to best fit the isotherm data for MB9 over the whole concentration range. The maximum adsorption capacities, determined from isotherm data for MO, MB9, and RO16 were 113, 101, and 91 mg g(-1) respectively. The adsorption process follows the pseudo-second-order kinetic model indicating the coexistence of chemisorption and physisorption. The mechanism of azo dye adsorption is also discussed.

  7. A New Nano Silica Gel Supported by Thionyl Chloride as a Solid Acid for the Efficient Diazotization of Aniline Derivatives: Application and Synthesis of Azo Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mirjalili

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new nano silicagel supported by thionyl chloride as a solid acid was synthesized and used as a increasing the production yield of dye to affect the efficient diazotization of arylamines. The diazonium salts thus obtained were coupled, using standard experimental procedures, to anilines and naphthols to afford the requisite azo dyes in good yield. The diazotization and subsequent azo-coupling generated the related azo dyes at low temperature in short reaction times with a simple experimental procedure.

  8. Microbiological, histological, and biochemical evidence for the adverse effects of food azo dyes on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbanna, Khaled; Sarhan, Osama Mohamed; Khider, Manal; Elmogy, Mohamed; Abulreesh, Hussein Hasan; Shaaban, Mohamed Rabie

    2017-07-01

    In this study, 120 lactic acid bacterial strains from different fermented dairy products as well as 10 bacterial intestinal isolates were evaluated for in vitro and in vivo degradation of various food azo dyes. Of these isolates, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains 13 and 100 and the intestinal isolates Ent2 and Eco5 exhibited 96-98% degradation of the tested food azo dyes within 5-6 hours. High performance liquid chromatography mass spectra of sunset yellow (E110) and carmoisine (E122) anaerobic degradation products by the intestinal isolates showed that they were structurally related to toxic aromatic amines. For an in vivo study, eight groups of rats were treated for 90 days with either the food azo dyes or their degradation products. All groups were kept for a further 30 days as recovery period and then dissected at 120 days. Hematological, histopathological, and protein markers were assessed. Rats treated with either E110/E122 or their degradation products exhibited highly significant changes in red blood cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and white blood cell count. In addition, alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, amylase, total bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, glucose, total protein, and globulins were significantly increased. Furthermore, marked histopathological alterations in the liver, kidney, spleen, and small intestine were observed. Significant decreases in inflammation and a noticeable improvement in the liver, kidney, spleen, and small intestine of rats treated with LAB and food azo dyes simultaneously were observed. Finally, these results provide a reliable basis for not only a better understanding of the histological and biochemical effects of food additives, but also for early diagnostics. In addition, LAB strains 13 and 100 may play an important role as potential probiotics in food and dairy technology as a probiotic lactic

  9. Microbiological, histological, and biochemical evidence for the adverse effects of food azo dyes on rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Elbanna

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 120 lactic acid bacterial strains from different fermented dairy products as well as 10 bacterial intestinal isolates were evaluated for in vitro and in vivo degradation of various food azo dyes. Of these isolates, lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains 13 and 100 and the intestinal isolates Ent2 and Eco5 exhibited 96–98% degradation of the tested food azo dyes within 5–6 hours. High performance liquid chromatography mass spectra of sunset yellow (E110 and carmoisine (E122 anaerobic degradation products by the intestinal isolates showed that they were structurally related to toxic aromatic amines. For an in vivo study, eight groups of rats were treated for 90 days with either the food azo dyes or their degradation products. All groups were kept for a further 30 days as recovery period and then dissected at 120 days. Hematological, histopathological, and protein markers were assessed. Rats treated with either E110/E122 or their degradation products exhibited highly significant changes in red blood cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and white blood cell count. In addition, alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, amylase, total bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, glucose, total protein, and globulins were significantly increased. Furthermore, marked histopathological alterations in the liver, kidney, spleen, and small intestine were observed. Significant decreases in inflammation and a noticeable improvement in the liver, kidney, spleen, and small intestine of rats treated with LAB and food azo dyes simultaneously were observed. Finally, these results provide a reliable basis for not only a better understanding of the histological and biochemical effects of food additives, but also for early diagnostics. In addition, LAB strains 13 and 100 may play an important role as potential probiotics in food and dairy technology as a

  10. Treatment of azo dye Acid Orange 52 using ozonation and completed-mixed activated sludge process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, C. Z. A.; Fahmi; Ong, S. A.; Ahmad, R.; Sabri, S. N.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, the characteristic of colour and COD removal of azo dye Acid Orange 52 (AO52) by ozonation, in combination with complete-mixed activated sludge process (CMAS) was evaluated. The experimentation was arranged in two phases: during the first one, only ozonation was performed, while, during the second phase, it was integrated with CMAS. The performance of colour and COD concentration of AO52 with and without CMAS treatment, is compared and evaluated. From the results, it is obvious that high decolourization from the start of CMAS was contributed from the pre-treatments. The colour removal was due to the fact that ozonation able to cleave the azo bonds that represent colour. Thus, CMAS without pre-treatment are unable to decolourize the dyes sufficiently. 59.6% COD was removed from the first-stage, while merely 9.8% COD fraction removed from the subsequence second-stage CMAS. It is suggested that the rapid COD removal without ozonation are due to activated sludge adsorption processes. The decreased of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) affected the CMAS performances, as the biomass decreased due to lack of nutrient for activated sludge microorganisms to multiply. Results from pre-ozonation alone contributed more than 50% of total COD removal, which indicated that at higher ozone dosage, tend to mineralize azo dye. Thus, ozonation not oxidized the dye though complete mineralization that produce carbon dioxide and water. However, it is a potential process for enhancing colour removal and biodegradability of dye-containing wastewater, once the appropriate ozonation time is determined. Therefore, the role of ozonation seems to break down the dye molecules and created ozonation by-product that is easily biodegraded in the subsequent biological treatment.

  11. DFT Study of the Structure, Reactivity, Natural Bond Orbital and Hyperpolarizability of Thiazole Azo Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman I. Osman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structure, reactivity, natural bond orbital (NBO, linear and nonlinear optical (NLO properties of three thiazole azo dyes (A, B and C were monitored by applying B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and ωB97XD functionals with 6-311++G** and aug-cc-pvdz basis sets. The geometrical parameters,dipolemoments,HOMO-LUMO(highest occupied molecular orbital,lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy gaps, absorption wavelengths and total hyperpolarizabilities were investigated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 chloroform (CHCl3, dichloromethane (CH2Cl2 and dimethlysulphoxide (DMSO. The donor methoxyphenyl group deviates from planarity with the thiazole azo moiety by ca. 38◦; while the acceptor dicyanovinyl, indandione and dicyanovinylindanone groups diverge by ca. 6◦. The HOMOs for the three dyes are identical. They spread over the methoxyphenyl donor moiety, the thiazole and benzene rings as π-bonding orbitals. The LUMOs are shaped up by the nature of the acceptor moieties. The LUMOs of the A, B and C dyes extend over the indandione, malononitrile and dicyanovinylindanone acceptor moieties, respectively, as π-antibonding orbitals. The HOMO-LUMO splittings showed that Dye C is much more reactive than dyes A and B. Compared to dyes A and B, Dye C yielded a longer maximum absorption wavelength because of the stabilization of its LUMOs relative to those of the other two. The three dyes show solvatochromism accompanied by significant increases in hyperpolarizability. The enhancement of the total hyperpolarizability of C compared to those of A and B is due to the cumulative action of the long π-conjugation of the indanone ring and the stronger electron-withdrawing ability of the dicyanovinyl moiety that form the dicyanovinylindanone acceptor group. These findings are facilitated by a natural bond orbital (NBO technique. The very high total hyperpolarizabilities of the three dyes define their potent nonlinear optical (NLO behaviour.

  12. DFT Study of the Structure, Reactivity, Natural Bond Orbital and Hyperpolarizability of Thiazole Azo Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Osman I

    2017-02-01

    The structure, reactivity, natural bond orbital (NBO), linear and nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of three thiazole azo dyes (A, B and C) were monitored by applying B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and ωB97XD functionals with 6-311++G** and aug-cc-pvdz basis sets. The geometrical parameters,dipolemoments,HOMO-LUMO(highest occupied molecular orbital,lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) energy gaps, absorption wavelengths and total hyperpolarizabilities were investigated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) chloroform (CHCl3), dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) and dimethlysulphoxide (DMSO). The donor methoxyphenyl group deviates from planarity with the thiazole azo moiety by ca. 38◦; while the acceptor dicyanovinyl, indandione and dicyanovinylindanone groups diverge by ca. 6◦. The HOMOs for the three dyes are identical. They spread over the methoxyphenyl donor moiety, the thiazole and benzene rings as π-bonding orbitals. The LUMOs are shaped up by the nature of the acceptor moieties. The LUMOs of the A, B and C dyes extend over the indandione, malononitrile and dicyanovinylindanone acceptor moieties, respectively, as π-antibonding orbitals. The HOMO-LUMO splittings showed that Dye C is much more reactive than dyes A and B. Compared to dyes A and B, Dye C yielded a longer maximum absorption wavelength because of the stabilization of its LUMOs relative to those of the other two. The three dyes show solvatochromism accompanied by significant increases in hyperpolarizability. The enhancement of the total hyperpolarizability of C compared to those of A and B is due to the cumulative action of the long π-conjugation of the indanone ring and the stronger electron-withdrawing ability of the dicyanovinyl moiety that form the dicyanovinylindanone acceptor group. These findings are facilitated by a natural bond orbital (NBO) technique. The very high total hyperpolarizabilities of the three dyes define their potent nonlinear optical (NLO) behaviour.

  13. Degradation of disperse azo dyes from waters by solar photoelectro-Fenton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, Ricardo [Departamento de Ciencias del Ambiente, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACh, Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Garcia-Segura, Sergi [Laboratori d' Electroquimica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Quimica Fisica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ureta-Zanartu, M.S. [Departamento de Ciencias del Ambiente, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACh, Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Brillas, Enric, E-mail: brillas@ub.edu [Laboratori d' Electroquimica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Quimica Fisica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Reactive azo dyes are almost totally mineralized by solar photoelectro-Fenton. > The process yields high current efficiencies and low energy consumptions. > It is more efficient and inexpensive by decreasing current and increasing dye content. > Nitrate ions are the main inorganic ions released during the mineralization process. > The process is also effective for the remediation of textile dyeing solutions. - Abstract: Solutions of the azo dyes Disperse Red 1 (DR1) and Disperse Yellow 3 (DY3), commonly used in the Chilean textile industry, in 0.1 mol dm{sup -3} Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.5 mmol dm{sup -3} Fe{sup 2+} of pH 3.0 were comparatively degraded by electro-Fenton (EF) and solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) using a 2.5 dm{sup 3} recirculation flow plant containing a BDD/air-diffusion cell coupled with a solar photoreactor. Organics were oxidized in EF with hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between electrogenerated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and added Fe{sup 2+}. The oxidizing power of SPEF was enhanced by the additional production of hydroxyl radicals from the photolysis of Fe(III) hydrated species and the photodecomposition of Fe(III) complexes with intermediates by UV light of solar irradiation. Total decolorization, complete dye removal and almost overall mineralization for both dye solutions were only achieved using the most potent SPEF process, yielding higher current efficiencies and lower energy consumptions than EF. Final carboxylic acids like pyruvic, acetic, oxalic and oxamic were detected during the SPEF treatments. NO{sub 3}{sup -} ion was released as inorganic ion. The use of a solution pH of 2.0-3.0 at 50 mA cm{sup -2} was found preferable for SPEF. Synthetic textile dyeing solutions containing the dyes were treated under these conditions yielding lower decolorization rate, slower dye removal and smaller mineralization degree than only using 0.1 mol dm{sup -3} Na

  14. Simultaneous chromate reduction and azo dye decolourization by Lactobacillus paracase CL1107 isolated from deep sea sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guangdao; Wang, Wei; Liu, Guoguang

    2015-07-01

    Lactobacillus paracase CL1107 capable of removing toxic chromium (Cr(VI)) and Acid Black (ATT) azo dye simultaneously was isolated from deep sea sediment of the North Atlantic. CL1107 exhibited appreciable dye-Cr(VI) bioremoval ability in the pH range from 5 to 7, temperature 25-35 °C and NaCl 0-6% under aerobic conditions. The maximum removal values of Cr(VI) (95.8%) and dye (92.3%) were obtained in the media including only Cr(VI) or dye at initial concentration of 100 mg/L. In the experiments for the simultaneous treatment of both pollutants, the reduction of Cr(VI) and dye was 58.5% and 51.9%, respectively. The azo dye and Cr(VI) reductive activities in strain CL1107 were located in the cell free extract and cell debris, respectively. The mechanisms of azo dye and Cr(VI) reduction were found to be enzyme-mediated. In the treatment of saline tannery wastewater, decolourization of about 76% and 63% Cr(VI) reduction of were achieved. Furthermore, Azo dyes, Cr(VI) and wastewater showed reduced toxicity toward Artemia salina after treatment. These results demonstrate the potential of CL1107 in bioremediation of dye or/and Cr(VI) contamination in salt environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Removal of anionic azo dyes from aqueous solution by functional ionic liquid cross-linked polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Hejun [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Ministry of Education, Jinan 250100 (China); Chemical Synthesis and Pollution Control Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637000 (China); Kan, Taotao [CNOOC Energy Technology and Services-oilfield Technology Services Co., Tanggu, Tianjin 300452 (China); Zhao, Siyuan; Qian, Yixia; Cheng, Xiyuan; Wu, Wenli [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang, Xiaodong [Shandong Provincial Analysis and Test Center, Jinan 250100 (China); Zheng, Liqiang, E-mail: lqzheng@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Ministry of Education, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic of adsorption of dyes onto PDVB-IL was investigated. • PDVB-IL has a high adsorption capacity to treat dyes solution. • Higher adsorption capacity is due to the functional groups of PDVB-IL. • Molecular structure of dyes influences the adsorption capacity. -- Abstract: A novel functional ionic liquid based cross-linked polymer (PDVB-IL) was synthesized from 1-aminoethyl-3-vinylimidazolium chloride and divinylbenzene for use as an adsorbent. The physicochemical properties of PDVB-IL were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The adsorptive capacity was investigated using anionic azo dyes of orange II, sunset yellow FCF, and amaranth as adsorbates. The maximum adsorption capacity could reach 925.09, 734.62, and 547.17 mg/g for orange II, sunset yellow FCF and amaranth at 25 °C, respectively, which are much better than most of the other adsorbents reported earlier. The effect of pH value was investigated in the range of 1–8. The result shows that a low pH value is found to favor the adsorption of those anionic azo dyes. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms are well fitted by a pseudo second-order model and Langmuir model, respectively. The adsorption process is found to be dominated by physisorption. The introduction of functional ionic liquid moieties into cross-linked poly(divinylbenzene) polymer constitutes a new and efficient kind of adsorbent.

  16. Decolorization of Remazol Black-B azo dye in soil by fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeem Khalid*, Sadia Batool, Muhammad Tariq Siddique, Zilli Huma Nazli, Riffat Bibi, Shahid Mahmood and Muhammad Arshad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Textile industry is known to release huge amount of dyes in the water and soil environments during the dyeingprocess. The present study was planned with the aim to remove azo dye toxicants from the soil using fungal strains.The fungi were isolated by using Remazol Black-B azo dye as the sole source of C and N. Ten isolates were initiallyselected for testing their decolorization potential in the liquid medium. Three most effective strains were used tostudy the decolorization of Remazol Black-B in soil. The strain S4 was found to be very effective in removing thedye Remazol Black-B from liquid medium as well as in soil suspension. More than 95% decolorization by the strainS4 was observed in soil under optimal incubation conditions. Overall, the dye decolorization was maximum at 100mg dye kg-1 soil at pH 7-8 under static conditions. Glucose, moisture and aeration also affected the decolorizationefficacy of the fungal strain in soil. This study implies that fungi could be used for bioremediation of dyecontaminatedsites.

  17. Synthesis, Characterization and Reactivity of Nanostructured Zero-Valent Iron Particles for Degradation of Azo Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Ivan; Levina, Vera; Leybo, Denis; Masov, Vsevolod; Tagirov, Marat; Kuznetsov, Denis

    Nanostructured zero-valent iron (NSZVI) particles were synthesized by the method of ferric ion reduction with sodium borohydride with subsequent drying and passivation at room temperature in technical grade nitrogen. The obtained sample was characterized by means of X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering studies. The prepared NSZVI particles represent 100-200nm aggregates, which consist of 20-30nm iron nanoparticles in zero-valent oxidation state covered by thin oxide shell. The reactivity of the NSZVI sample, as the removal efficiency of refractory azo dyes, was investigated in this study. Two azo dye compounds, namely, orange G and methyl orange, are commonly detected in waste water of textile production. Experimental variables such as NSZVI dosage, initial dye concentration and solution pH were investigated. The kinetic rates of degradation of both dyes by NSZVI increased with the decrease of solution pH from 10 to 3 and with the increase of NSZVI dosage, but decreased with the increase of initial dye concentration. The removal efficiencies achieved for both orange G and methyl orange were higher than 90% after 80min of treatment.

  18. Decolorization of direct poly azo dye with nanophotocatalytic UV/NiO process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Assadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of the present study is to investigate the efficiency of ultraviolet/ nickel oxide (UV/NiO system as one form of advanced oxidation processes (AOP for decolorization of red poly azo. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted as a laboratory scale in a batch mode. Ultraviolet radiation was provided by a low pressure (11 W UV lamp. Effects of various factors including pH, different irradiation durations, different concentration of nickel oxide, and initial dye concentration were evaluated. Results: The results of the UV/NiO system′s assessment showed that UV light alone cannot remove DR 80 dye. Nickel oxide is an effective catalyst in the decolorization of dye with the nanophotocatalytic process. The decolorization efficiency increases with decreasing pH value and the optimum pH value is 4. Fainally, the highest removal efficiency achieved by UV/NiO process for DR 80 dye with concentrations of 25 mg/l and 50 mg/l was 94.3% and 82.2%, respectively. UV/NiO-based decolorization process follows pseudo-second-order reaction kinetics. Conclusions: From the findings of the present study, it can be concluded that UV/NiO process is an effective technique for decolorization of poly azo dye, DR 80, in aqueous solutions.

  19. Biodecolorization of textile azo dye using Bacillus sp. strain CH12 isolated from alkaline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadie, Awoke; Tizazu, Samson; Melese, Meseretu; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao; Xia, Siqing

    2017-09-01

    Textile azo dye decolorizing bacteria were isolated from alkaline Lakes Abaya and Chamo using Reactive Red 239 (RR239) dye. Through subsequent screening process, strain CH12 was selected to investigate the effects of nutrient supplement, DO, pH, temperature, dye concentration and types on decolorization. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain CH12 was identified as Bacillus sp. Decolorization efficiencies were significantly enhanced with carbon (≥98%) and organic nitrogen (∼100%) supplements. Complete decolorization was also observed under anoxic and anaerobic conditions, and at the temperature of 30 °C and the pH of 10. However, the azo dye decolorization efficiency of strain CH12 was significantly reduced when NaNO3 (1-8%) was supplemented or under aerobic culturing condition (≤6%), indicating that RR239 was less preferred electron acceptor. Overall, strain CH12 can be a promising candidate for decolorization applications due to its potential to effectively decolorize higher RR239 concentrations (50-250 mg/L) and six additional dyes.

  20. Biodecolorization of textile azo dye using Bacillus sp. strain CH12 isolated from alkaline lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awoke Guadie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Textile azo dye decolorizing bacteria were isolated from alkaline Lakes Abaya and Chamo using Reactive Red 239 (RR239 dye. Through subsequent screening process, strain CH12 was selected to investigate the effects of nutrient supplement, DO, pH, temperature, dye concentration and types on decolorization. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain CH12 was identified as Bacillus sp. Decolorization efficiencies were significantly enhanced with carbon (≥98% and organic nitrogen (∼100% supplements. Complete decolorization was also observed under anoxic and anaerobic conditions, and at the temperature of 30 °C and the pH of 10. However, the azo dye decolorization efficiency of strain CH12 was significantly reduced when NaNO3 (1–8% was supplemented or under aerobic culturing condition (≤6%, indicating that RR239 was less preferred electron acceptor. Overall, strain CH12 can be a promising candidate for decolorization applications due to its potential to effectively decolorize higher RR239 concentrations (50−250 mg/L and six additional dyes.

  1. Decolouration of azo dyes by Phanerochaete chrysosporium immobilised into alginate beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enayatzamir, Kheirghadam; Alikhani, Hossein A; Yakhchali, Bagher; Tabandeh, Fatemeh; Rodríguez-Couto, Susana

    2010-01-01

    Because of high discharged volumes and effluent composition, wastewater from the textile industry can be considered as the most polluting amongst all industrial sectors, thus greatly requiring appropriate treatment technologies. Although some abiotic methods for the reduction of several dyes exist, these require highly expensive catalysts and reagents. Biotechnological approaches were proven to be potentially effective in the treatment of this pollution source in an eco-efficient manner. The white-rot fungi are, so far, the most efficient microorganisms in degrading synthetic dyes. This white-rot fungi's property is due to the production of extracellular lignin-modifying enzymes, which are able to degrade a wide range of xenobiotic compounds because of their low substrate specificity. In this paper, we studied the ability of the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium immobilised into Ca-alginate beads to decolourise different recalcitrant azo dyes such as Direct Violet 51 (DV), Reactive Black 5 (RB), Ponceau Xylidine (PX) and Bismark Brown R (BB) in successive batch cultures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on the immobilisation of P. chrysosporium into Ca-alginate beads for its application in dye decolouration. P. chrysosporium was immobilised into Ca-alginate beads using a method of gel recoating to minimise cellular leaking. The immobilised fungus was transferred to 250-ml Erlenmeyer flasks containing 50 ml of growth medium and incubated on an orbital shaker at 150 rpm and 30 degrees C for 7 days. The ratio of beads/medium used was 10% (w/v). The dyes were added into the culture flasks when MnP production started (50 U l(-1)), which corresponded with the seventh cultivation day. MnP activity and dye decolouration were measured spectrophotometrically. The dyes DV, RB and PX were almost totally decolourised at the end of each batch during the course of three successive batches. However, the dye BB was more resistant to decolouration and

  2. Decolorization of Textile Dyes and Degradation of Mono-Azo Dye Amaranth by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCIM 2890.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodake, Gajanan; Jadhav, Umesh; Tamboli, Dhawal; Kagalkar, Anuradha; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCIM 2890 (A. caloaceticus) was found to decolorize 20 different textile dyes of various classes. Decolorization of an azo dye amaranth was observed effectively (91%) at static anoxic condition, whereas agitated culture grew well but showed less decolorization (68%) within 48 h of incubation. Induction of intracellular and extracellular lignin peroxidase, intracellular laccase, dichlorophenol indophenol (DCIP) reductase and riboflavin reductase represented their involvement in the biodegradation of amaranth. The products obtained after degradation of Amaranth were characterized as naphthalene sulfamide, hydroxyl naphthalene diazonium and naphthalene diazonium. The germination and growth of Sorghum vulgare and Phaseolus mungo seeds, and the growth of E. coli and Bacillus substilis were not inhibited by the metabolic products of the dye.

  3. Biomineralization of azo dye bearing wastewater in periodic discontinuous batch reactor: Effect of microaerophilic conditions on treatment efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh Kumar, A; Nagendranatha Reddy, C; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-01-01

    The present study illustrates the influence of microaerophilic condition on periodic discontinuous batch reactor (PDBR) operation in treating azo dye containing wastewater. The process performance was evaluated with the function of various dye load operations (50-750 mg/l) by keeping the organic load (1.6 kg COD/m(3)-day) constant. Initially, lower dye operation (50mg dye/l) resulted in higher dye [45 mg dye/l (90%)] and COD [SDR: 1.29 kg COD/m(3)-day (92%)] removal efficiencies. Higher dye load operation (750 mg dye/l) also showed non-inhibitory performance with respect to dye [600 mg dye/l (80%)] and COD [1.25 kg COD/m(3)-day (80%)] removal efficiencies. Increment in dye load showed increment in azo reductase and dehydrogenase activities (39.6 U; 4.96 μg/ml; 750 mg/l). UV-Vis spectroscopy (200-800 nm), FTIR and (1)H NMR studies revealed the disappearance of azo bond (-NN-). First derivative cyclic voltammogram supported the involvement of various membrane bound redox shuttlers, viz., cytochrome-C, cytochrome-bc1 and flavoproteins (FAD (H)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. STRUCTURE AND 2ND-HARMONIC GENERATION OF LANGMUIR-BLODGETT-FILMS OF 2 CHIRAL AMPHIPHILIC AZO DYES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOONDORP, MA; SCHOUTEN, AJ; HULSHOF, JBE; FERINGA, BL

    The properties and structure of Langmuir-Blodgett films of two new amphiphilic nonlinear optical dyes containing stereogenic (chiral) centers were studied. The dye molecule 4-[[4'-[(3R)-palmitoylpyrrolidin-1-yl]phenyl]azo]-3-nitrobenzoic acid (KZ16) forms homogeneous structures in the plane of the

  5. The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Cervantes, F.J.; Madrid, de M.P.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium was studied. Additionally, the effects of different electron-donating substrates and the redox mediator riboflavin on dye reduction were assessed by using either a

  6. Kinetic of Azo Dyes Decolourization by Enterobacteriaceae Species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The method “Intact cell assay” was adopted to assess the influencing factors on the process of decolourization ability of the enterobacteriaceaea specie isolates under predisposed environment. Taken into account several ingredient are added individually as well in combinations in the assay reaction. Values of dye ...

  7. Decolorization of azo dyes by Pycnoporus sanguineus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present work, decolorization of dyes Orange II and Black V by the fungi Pycnoporus sanguineus and Trametes membranacea was assessed at six, 12 and 18 days, through fractional design, with a total of 16 trials, statistically represented by 26-2. The fungi were grown in Erlenmeyer flasks containing the malt and King ...

  8. Synthesis of magnetic biocomposite for efficient adsorption of azo dye from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivashankar, R; Sathya, A B; Krishnakumar, Uma; Sivasubramanian, V

    2015-11-01

    A novel magnetic biocomposite was synthesized using metal chlorides and aquatic macrophytes by co-precipitation method. The resulting product, magnetic biocomposite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The adsorption performance of the magnetic biocomposite was tested with removal of Metanil Yellow dye from aqueous solution. The effect of influencing parameters such as initial dye concentration, solution pH and agitation were investigated. The equilibrium isotherm was well described by the Langmuir model with the with maximum adsorption capacity of 90.91mg/g. Adsorption kinetics experiments were carried out and the data were well fitted by a pseudo-second-order equation. The results revealed that the magnetic biocomposite could efficiently adsorb the azo dyes from aqueous solution, and the spent adsorbents could be recovered completely by magnetic separation process. Therefore, the prepared magnetic biocomposite could thus be used as promising adsorbent for the removal of azo dyes from polluted water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolism of the benzidine-based azo dye Direct Black 38 by human intestinal microbiota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, B.W.; Cerniglia, C.E.; Federle, T.W.

    1985-07-01

    Benzidine-based azo dyes are proven mutagens and have been linked to bladder cancer. Previous studies have indicated that their initial reduction is the result of the azo reductase activity of the intestinal microbiota. Metabolism of the benzidine-based dye Direct Black 38 was examined by using a semicontinuous culture system that simulates the lumen of the human large intestine. The system was inoculated with freshly voided feces, and an active flora was maintained as evidenced by volatile fatty acid and gas production. Within 7 days after exposure to the dye, the following metabolites were isolated and identified by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry: benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl, monoacetylbenzidine, and acetylaminobiphenyl. Benzidine reached its peak level after 24 h, accounting for 39.1% of the added dye. Its level began to decline, and by day 7 the predominant metabolite was acetylaminobiphenyl, which accounted for 51.1% of the parent compound. Formation of the deaminated and N-acetylated analogs of benzidine, which have enhanced mutagenicity and lipophilicity, previously has not been attributed to the intestinal microbiota.

  10. Properties of purified Orange II azoreductase, the enzyme initiating azo dye degradation by Pseudomonas KF46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, T; Kulla, H G; Leisinger, T

    1982-12-01

    Orange II azoreductase [NAD(P)H: 1-(4'-sulfophenylazo)-2-naphthol oxidoreductase], an enzyme catalyzing the reductive cleavage of the azo bridge of Orange II and related dyes, was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from Pseudomonas species, strain KF46. This organism utilized carboxy-Orange II [1-(4'-carboxyphenylazo)-2-naphthol] but not Orange II as the sole source of carbon, energy, and nitrogen. Orange II azoreductase was induced 80-fold by both Orange II and carboxy-Orange II. With two successive runs of affinity chromatography using two chromatographic media with different triazinyl dyes as ligands, the enzyme was purified 120-fold with 43% yield. The purified enzyme is a monomer with a molecular weight of 30,000. Its Km values were 1.5 microM for both Orange II and carboxy-Orange II, 5 microM for NADPH, and 180 microM for NADH. A survey of the efficiency of various Orange dyes as substrates for Orange II azoreductase showed that: (a) a hydroxy group in the 2-position of the naphthol ring is required; (b) charged groups in proximity to the azo group hinder the reaction; (c) a second polar substituent on the dye molecule impedes the reaction; (d) electron-withdrawing groups on the phenyl ring accelerate the reaction.

  11. Adsorption of the reactive azo dyes onto NH4Cl-induced activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakine Shekoohiyan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of NH4Cl-induced activated carbon (NAC was examined in order to adsorb RR198, an azo reactive model dye, from an aqueous solution. Methods: The effects of pH (3 to 10, adsorbent dose (0.1 to 1.2 g/L, dye concentration and contact time on the adsorption efficiency were investigated. Results: The results showed that the removal of dye was highest at a solution pH of 7 and a powder dose of 1.1 g/L. The 85.9%, 72.6% and 65.4% removal of RR198 was obtained for a concentration of 25, 50 and 100 mg/L, respectively, at a relatively short contact time of 30 minutes, and at optimum pH and NAC concentrations of 1 g/L. The experimental data for kinetic analysis illustrated a best fit to the pseudo-second-order model. The study data on equilibrium were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin–Radushkevich models; the Langmuir equation provided the best fit for the data. Conclusion: Therefore, the NAC appears to be an efficient and appropriate adsorbent for the removal of reactive azo dyes from waste streams.

  12. Inhibitory effect and mechanism of azo dyes on anaerobic methanogenic wastewater treatment: Can redox mediator remediate the inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ruobin; Chen, Xiaoguang; Luo, Ying; Ma, Puyue; Ni, Shengsheng; Xiang, Xinyi; Li, Gang

    2016-11-01

    Inhibitory effect of azo dyes on anaerobic methanogenic wastewater treatment (AMWT) has been studied mainly focusing on biological toxicity in the batch test with simulated sole co-substrate. Detailed information on inhibitory effect and mechanism of azo dyes during the long-term operation with real complex co-substrate is limited. Moreover, whether redox mediator (RM) could remediate the inhibition is still unclear in previous studies, especially under the complex scenario. In this study, the real textile wastewater with alternative concentrations of azo dyes (0-600 mg/L) were used to operate a lab-scale high-rate anaerobic methanogenic bioreactor for 127 days, and 50 μM anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) as RM was added at the last period of operation. Azo dyes with concentration of 600 mg/L could cause significant inhibition on overall (decolorizing and methanogenic) performance of AMWT. Specific methanogenic activity assays showed that acetoclastic methanogens was more susceptible to high concentration azo dyes than hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The spatial distribution of extracellular polymeric substance in the anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) showed that the high biological toxicity of azo dyes was mainly attributed to enrichment effect in tightly bound-EPS (TB-EPS). The channels of AGS was clogged by azo dyes, which was evidenced by the hard release of aromatic amines in EPSs as well as decreased porosity of AGS and scanning electron microscope images. Meanwhile, the settling ability, particle size and strength of AGS all deteriorated after azo dyes concentration exceeded 450 mg/L. The dosing of AQS could mostly remediate overall performance of the bioreactor even if the recovery of acetoclastic methanogens was slow. However, except for the porosity with a part of recovery, physical characteristics of AGS hardly recovered, and washout of sludge from the bioreactor was still happening. It suggested that additional attention should be paid to prevent sludge

  13. Differential gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus exposed to Orange II and Sudan III azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongmiao; Xu, Joshua; Kweon, Oh-Gew; Zou, Wen; Feng, Jinhui; He, Gui-Xin; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2015-05-01

    We previously demonstrated the effects of azo dyes and their reduction metabolites on bacterial cell growth and cell viability. In this report, the effects of Orange II and Sudan III on gene expression profiling in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC BAA 1556 were analyzed using microarray and quantitative RT-PCR technology. Upon exposure to 6 μg/ml Orange II for 18 h, 21 genes were found to be differently expressed. Among them, 8 and 13 genes were up- and down-regulated, respectively. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve stress response caused by drug metabolism, oxidation, and alkaline shock indicating that S. aureus could adapt to Orange II exposure through a balance between up and down regulated gene expression. Whereas, after exposure to 6 μg/ml Sudan III for 18 h, 57 genes were differentially expressed. In which, 51 genes were up-regulated and 6 were down-regulated. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve in cell wall/membrane biogenesis and biosynthesis, nutrient uptake, transport and metabolite, and stress response, suggesting that Sudan III damages the bacterial cell wall or/and membrane due to binding of the dye. Further analysis indicated that all differentially expressed genes encoded membrane proteins were up-regulated and most of them serve as transporters. The result suggested that these genes might contribute to survival, persistence and growth in the presence of Sudan III. Only one gene msrA, which plays an important role in oxidative stress resistance, was found to be down-regulated after exposure to both Orange II and Sudan III. The present results suggested that both these two azo dyes can cause stress in S. aureus and the response of the bacterium to the stress is mainly related to characteristics of the azo dyes.

  14. Optical characterization of azo dye-based electro-optic polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferm, Paul M.; Horn, Keith A.; Beeson, Karl W.; McFarland, Michael J.; Schwind, David R.; Yardley, James T.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the photochemistry and optical properties of an azo dye-based electro- optic (EO) copolymer, methacrylate-bound Disperse Red 1/methylmethacrylate (MA1). We present a complete picture of the optical properties of the copolymer at wavelengths ranging from 200 nm to 1800 nm with detection sensitivity over 6 orders of magnitude. We describe intrinsic measurements of absorption loss and also describe how temperature and radiation affect absorption loss. Photochemical investigations reveal details concerning photodelineation of waveguides in MA1. Irreversible photodegradation of the azo chromophore proceeds with both visible and ultra-violet radiation and a quantum yield of 2 X 10-5 is found for 475 nm radiation in MA1.

  15. Effect of temperature on the photoalignment of azo dyes in thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulich, V. S.; Murauski, An. A.; Muravsky, Al. A.; Agabekov, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    The temperature dependences of the induced dichroic ratios (DRs) of azo dyes after their photoalignment in thin films 80 to 200 nm thick are studied. It is found that the DR values of layers containing dyes of the benzeneazodiphenyl series fall from 6.0 to 1.6 as the temperature rises from 60 to 130°C, respectively. A reduction in induced DR as the temperature rises (from 20 to 100°C) is also observed for the thin films of the dyes of benzeneazo-5,5'-dioxodibenzothiophene group. The absence of induced DR after irradiation with polarized light at 100°C indicates there is no alignment of molecules at this temperature.

  16. Adsorption of azo dyes from aqueous solution by the hybrid MOFs/GO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Shi, Zhennan; Zhu, Hongyang; Hong, Wei; Xie, Fengwei; Sun, Keke

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a hybrid of chromium(III) terephthalate metal organic framework (MIL-101) and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized and its performance in the removal of azo dyes (Amaranth, Sunset Yellow, and Carmine) from water was evaluated. The adsorption for azo dyes on MIL-101/GO was compared with that of MIL-101, and it was found that the addition of GO enhanced the stability of MIL-101 in water and increased the adsorption capacity. The maximum adsorption capacities of MIL-101/GO were 111.01 mg g(-1) for Amaranth, 81.28 mg g(-1) for Sunset Yellow, and 77.61 mg g(-1) for Carmine. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated, showing that the adsorption fits the Freundlich isotherm and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The recyclability of MIL-101/GO was shown by the regeneration by acetone. The high adsorption capability and excellent reusability make MIL-101/GO a competent adsorbent for the removal dyes from aqueous solution.

  17. Statistical optimization of synthetic azo dye (orange II) degradation by azoreductase from Pseudomonas oleovorans PAMD_1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranganathan, V; Kanimozhi, A M; Palvannan, T

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas oleovorans PAMD_1 produced an intracellular azoreductase as the more prominent enzyme that reduces the azo bridge during the azo dye decolorization process. In order to optimize the expression of azoreductase, statistically based experiments were applied. Eleven significant factors were screened on decolorization activity using Plackett-Burman design. Dye, NADH, glucose, and peptone were identified as having highest positive influence on the decolorization activity. Central composite design of response surface methodology was employed for the concerted effect of these four factors on decolorization activity. This method showed that the optimum medium containing dye (200 mg L(-1)), NADH (1.14 mM), glucose (2.07 g L(-1)), and peptone (6.44 g L(-1)) for the decolorization of Orange II up to 87% in 48 hr. The applied methodology was validated through the adequacy and accuracy of the overall experiments, and the results proved that the applied methods were most effective. Further, the enzyme was purified ninefold with 16% yield by anion-exchange chromatography and a specific activity of 26 U mg(-1). The purified enzyme with a molecular mass of 29,000 Da gave a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel, and the degradation products sulfanilic acid and 1-amino-2-napthol of Orange II by azoreductase were analyzed by using an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer and hish-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  18. PHOTOCATALYTIC DEGRADATION OF YELLOW ALIZARIN AZO DYE IN THE PRESENCE OFTIO2SUSPENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S ALIOUCHE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work involves the prospects of the kinetics study for photocatalyticdecolorization of an azo dye (Alizarin yellow in aqueous solution with TiO2 Degussa P25 as photocatalyst in slurry form using UV-A light at 365nm.The results showed that the adsorption of alizarin yellow on TiO2 P25 was found negligible and discoloration of this dye by TiO2/UV system is much faster than with direct UV photolysis. Additionally, the effects of various parameters such as initial dye concentration, catalyst dosage,H2O2 concentration, addition of alcohols and presence of inorganic salts on decolorization have been investigated. The removal rate of Alizarin yellow indicated an inverse dependence on the initial dye concentration. The optimal content of the catalyst was 1 g.L-1. The disappearance kinetics was strongly enhanced in the presence of electron acceptors such as H2O2.However,the presence in the reacting system of Cl-, SO42- (Addition of dye assisting chemicals such as Cl- and SO42-inhibits the dye removal rate. The study of the effect of different type of TiO2 on the decolorization reveals the following order of efficiency: TiO2- P25> TiO2Tiona PC.

  19. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using bacterial exopolysaccharide and its application for degradation of azo-dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnashanmugam Saravanan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the synthesis and characterization of exopolysaccharide-stabilized sliver nanoparticles (AgNPs was carried out for the degradation of industrial textile dyes. Characterization of AgNPs was done using surface plasmon spectra using UV–Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The morphological nature of AgNPs was determined through transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM, which indicated that the AgNPs were spherical in shape, with an average size of 35 nm. The thermal behaviour of AgNPs revealed that it is stable up to 437.1 °C and the required energy is 808.2J/g in TGA-DTA analysis. Ability of EPS stabilized AgNPs for degradation of azo dyes such as Methyl orange (MO and Congo red (CR showed that EPS stabilized AgNPs were found to be efficient in facilitating the degradation process of industrial textile dyes. The electron transfer takes place from reducing agent to dye molecule via nanoparticles, resulting in the destruction of the dye chromophore structure. This makes EPS-AgNPs a suitable, cheap and environment friendly candidate for biodegradation of harmful textile dyes.

  20. High cell density cultivation of six fungal strains efficient in azo dye bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Rahim, Wafaa M; Mostafa, Enas M; Moawad, Hassan

    2016-12-01

    This work aims at optimizing the high cell density fungal cultivation for producing large quantities of fungal biomass to be used in azo dye residues bioremediation. In our previous studies the efficacy of using certain fungal strains to decolorize a range of commercial textile dyes of different structures (azo, disazo) were investigated. Several promising fungal strains belonging to Aspergillus tubigenesis, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, and Aspergillus fumigates demonstrated high capacity in decolorizing various azo dyes. This study focuses on the high cell density cultivation of the fungal strains identified as potential bioremediation agents. The study includes the optimization of all parameters involved in bioprocess development for high cell density cultivation of six promising fungal strains. The growth of the fungal strains was tested on the sucrose medium in 7 l-fermenter. The growth of these fungal strains having the capacity to accumulate large quantities of biomass was also tested in medium containing molasses as a cheap substrate. The residual molasses, biomass dry weight and protein content of the six fungal strains showed that the strains 20 and 2 were marked by the highest protein content. In this study a comparative analysis between the results of dry weight, residual molasses and protein content of geowth of the strains 20, 5 and 2 under uncontrolled and controlled pH of media in batch fermentation was studied to follow the accumulation of biomass and protein production in the growth media. The results indicate that the dry weight accumulated by strains No. 20, 5 and 2 grown on molasses was better than those of strains grown on sucrose. Fungal strain No. 5 had the highest biomass dry weight accumulation. The study shows that the molasses as cheaper sugar sources were better than sucrose for growing fungal biomass.

  1. High cell density cultivation of six fungal strains efficient in azo dye bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa M. Abd El-Rahim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at optimizing the high cell density fungal cultivation for producing large quantities of fungal biomass to be used in azo dye residues bioremediation. In our previous studies the efficacy of using certain fungal strains to decolorize a range of commercial textile dyes of different structures (azo, disazo were investigated. Several promising fungal strains belonging to Aspergillus tubigenesis, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, and Aspergillus fumigates demonstrated high capacity in decolorizing various azo dyes. This study focuses on the high cell density cultivation of the fungal strains identified as potential bioremediation agents. The study includes the optimization of all parameters involved in bioprocess development for high cell density cultivation of six promising fungal strains. The growth of the fungal strains was tested on the sucrose medium in 7 l-fermenter. The growth of these fungal strains having the capacity to accumulate large quantities of biomass was also tested in medium containing molasses as a cheap substrate. The residual molasses, biomass dry weight and protein content of the six fungal strains showed that the strains 20 and 2 were marked by the highest protein content. In this study a comparative analysis between the results of dry weight, residual molasses and protein content of geowth of the strains 20, 5 and 2 under uncontrolled and controlled pH of media in batch fermentation was studied to follow the accumulation of biomass and protein production in the growth media. The results indicate that the dry weight accumulated by strains No. 20, 5 and 2 grown on molasses was better than those of strains grown on sucrose. Fungal strain No. 5 had the highest biomass dry weight accumulation. The study shows that the molasses as cheaper sugar sources were better than sucrose for growing fungal biomass.

  2. Polarization tunable circular Dammann grating generated from azo-dye doped nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, D.; Dai, H. T.; Sun, X. W.

    2011-03-01

    A polarization tunable circular Dammann grating (CDG) was generated from an azo-dye (Methyl Red from Aldrich) doped liquid crystal (LC, E7 from Merck) cell. A simple multi-exposure photo-aligned process, based on cell assembled with non-rubbing glass substrates, was used to fabricate the binary phase liquid crystal CDG zone plane consisted of even zone with homogenous LC structure and odd zone with TN LC structure. Different twist angle of fabricated TN structure for odd zone can be obtained by adjusting photo exposure intensity or time. CDG with equal-intensity rings was produced through a Fourier-transform and then captured by a charge-coupled-device in our experiment. The maximum 0th and 1st diffraction orders of obtained CDG can be separated achieved by rotating the analyzer's polarization direction. If the chosen analyzer's direction leads to a zero phase difference of output light from even and odd zones, the maximum 0th diffraction order will be achieved, in contrast, if the chosen analyzer's direction leads to a π phase difference of output light from even and odd zones, the maximum 1st diffraction order will be produced. The TN structure of azo-dye doped liquid crystal cell fabricated by photo alignment technique provides a new method to generate CDG with polarization-dependent property. A broad wavelength band of lasers used to generate CDG, if far away from MR azo-dye absorption peak, expands the device's application range and shows a great advantage comparing to previously reported CDG fabricated by fixed materials, where only one fixed working wavelength is allowed.

  3. Decolorization of anthraquinone dye intermediate and its accelerating effect on reduction of azo acid dyes by Sphingomonas xenophaga in anaerobic-aerobic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Jing; Ai, Haixin; Zheng, Chunli; Yang, Yusuo

    2008-09-01

    Decolorization of 1-aminoanthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid (ASA-2) and its accelerating effect on the reduction of azo acid dyes by Sphingomonas xenophaga QYY were investigated. The study showed that ASA-2 could be efficiently decolorized by strain QYY under aerobic conditions according to the analysis of total organic carbon removal and UV-VIS spectra changes. Moreover, strain QYY was able to reduce azo acid dyes under anaerobic conditions. The effects of various operating conditions such as carbon sources, temperature, and pH on the reduction rate were studied. It was demonstrated that ASA-2 used as a redox mediator could accelerate the reduction process. Consequently the reduction of azo acid dyes mediated by ASA-2 and the decolorization of ASA-2 with strain QYY could be achieved in an anaerobic-aerobic process.

  4. Heterogenous Photocatalysis Treatement of Azo Dye Methyl Orange by Nano Composite Tio2/Diatomite

    OpenAIRE

    Rachida Cherrak; Mohammed Hadjel; Noureddine Benderdouche

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the removal of an azo dye methyl orange (MeO) by dioxide titanium supported on the surface of diatomite, as a new nano-composite by an advanced oxidation method as heterogeneous Photocatalysis. The titanium oxide (Degussa-25) was immobilized on the powder of diatomaceous earth with a very simple method and low expensive. Diatomite used in this study has porosity more 72%; was thermal activated at temperatures of 800 ° c and 900 ° c and 1000 ° C for 2 h a...

  5. Preparation of ZnO Photocatalyst for the Efficient and Rapid Photocatalytic Degradation of Azo Dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Wu, Zhansheng; Liu, Dandan; Gao, Zhenzhen

    2017-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) photocatalysts were synthesized by sol?gel method using zinc acetate as precursor for degradation of azo dyes under UV irradiation. The resultant samples were characterized by different techniques, such as XRD, SEM, and EDX. The influence of preparation conditions such as calcination temperature and composite ratio on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) was investigated. ZnO prepared with a composite ratio of 4:1 and calcination temperature of 400??C exhibited 99.70% remova...

  6. New 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes. Part I: synthesis, characterization and spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Erfantalab, Malihe

    2012-02-01

    Four new 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes were synthesized via condensation of 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole with azo-coupled o-vanillin precursors. The prepared dyes were characterized by IR, UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopic methods as well as elemental analyses. Thermal properties of the prepared dyes were examined by thermogravimetric analysis. Results indicated that the framework of the dyes was stable up to 225 °C. Also, the influence of various factors including time and mixed DMSO/EtOH solution on UV-vis spectra of the dyes were investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A biosorption isotherm model for the removal of reactive azo dyes by inactivated mycelia of Cunninghamella elegans UCP542.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrósio, Sandra T; Vilar, José C; Silva, Carlos A Alves da; Okada, Kaoru; Nascimento, Aline E; Longo, Ricardo L; Campos-Takaki, Galba M

    2012-01-04

    The biosorption of three reactive azo dyes (red, black and orange II) found in textile effluents by inactive mycelium of Cunninghamella elegans has been investigated. It was found that after 120 hours of contact the adsorption led to 70%, 85%, 93% and 88% removal of reactive orange II, reactive black, reactive red and a mixture of them, respectively. The mycelium surface was found to be selective towards the azo dyes in the following order: reactive red > reactive black > orange II. Dye removal from a mixture solution resulted in 48.4 mg/g retention by mycelium and indicated a competition amongst the dyes for the cellular surface. A Freundlich adsorption isotherm model exhibited a better fit, thus suggesting the presence of heterogeneous binding sites. Electrondense deposits observed on the mycelium ultrastructure suggest that the dyes are mainly retained under the cellular surface of the inactive biomass of C. elegans.

  8. A Biosorption Isotherm Model for the Removal of Reactive Azo Dyes by Inactivated Mycelia of Cunninghamella elegans UCP542

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galba M. Campos-Takaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biosorption of three reactive azo dyes (red, black and orange II found in textile effluents by inactive mycelium of Cunninghamella elegans has been investigated. It was found that after 120 hours of contact the adsorption led to 70%, 85%, 93% and 88% removal of reactive orange II, reactive black, reactive red and a mixture of them, respectively. The mycelium surface was found to be selective towards the azo dyes in the following order: reactive red > reactive black > orange II. Dye removal from a mixture solution resulted in 48.4 mg/g retention by mycelium and indicated a competition amongst the dyes for the cellular surface. A Freundlich adsorption isotherm model exhibited a better fit, thus suggesting the presence of heterogeneous binding sites. Electrondense deposits observed on the mycelium ultrastructure suggest that the dyes are mainly retained under the cellular surface of the inactive biomass of C. elegans.

  9. Radiolysis of Reactive Azo Dyes in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustin N.M. Bagyo

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of radiation on aerated reactive dye solutions i.e Cibacron Violet, Cibacron Orange and Cibacron Yellow solutions have been studied. Parameters analysis were the change of pH after radiation, the change of absorption, degradation products and effects of pH on the radiolysis. The uv-vis absorption of solutions were observed before and after irradiation. pH variation was done from pHs 3, 5, 7, 9 and 12. Irradiation was done at doses of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 kGy with dose rate of 5 kGy/h and was determined by a Fricke dosimeter. HPLC with UV detector was used to analyze the degradation products. Oxalic acid was the main degradation product and small amount of succinic acid was also detected.

  10. Effects of Orange II and Sudan III azo dyes and their metabolites on Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongmiao; Feng, Jinhui; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2011-10-01

    Azo dyes are widely used in the plastic, paper, cosmetics, food, and pharmaceutical industries. Some metabolites of these dyes are potentially genotoxic. The toxic effects of azo dyes and their potential reduction metabolites on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC BAA 1556 were studied. When the cultures were incubated with 6, 18, and 36 μg/ml of Orange II and Sudan III for 48 h, 76.3, 68.5, and 61.7% of Orange II and 97.8, 93.9, and 75.8% of Sudan III were reduced by the bacterium, respectively. In the presence of 36 μg/ml Sudan III, the cell viability of the bacterium decreased to 61.9% after 48 h of incubation, whereas the cell viability of the control culture without the dye was 71.5%. Moreover, the optical density of the bacterial cultures at 10 h decreased from 0.74 to 0.55, indicating that Sudan III is able to inhibit growth of the bacterium. However, Orange II had no significant effects on either cell growth or cell viability of the bacterium at the tested concentrations. 1-Amino-2-naphthol, a metabolite common to Orange II and Sudan III, was capable of inhibiting cell growth of the bacterium at 1 μg/ml and completely stopped bacterial cell growth at 24-48 μg/ml. On the other hand, the other metabolites of Orange II and Sudan III, namely sulfanilic acid, p-phenylenediamine, and aniline, showed no significant effects on cell growth. p-Phenylenediamine exhibited a synergistic effect with 1-amino-2-naphthol on cell growth inhibition. All of the dye metabolites had no significant effects on cell viability of the bacterium.

  11. Rapid degradation of azo dye methyl orange using hollow cobalt nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yingying; Mathew, Iswarya; Cui, Qingzhou; Clay, Molly; Gao, Fan; Zhang, Xiaoqi Jackie; Gu, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    A rapid and efficient method for methyl orange degradation using hollow cobalt (Co) nanoparticles is reported. Hollow Co nanoparticles were fabricated by a galvanic replacement reaction using aluminum (Al) nanoparticles as the template material. The methyl orange degradation characteristics were investigated by measuring the time dependent UV-Vis absorption of the dye solution, which showed a very fast degradation rate under acidic conditions. At an initial methyl orange concentration of 100 mg/L (pH = 2.5) and Co nanoparticle dosage of 0.5 g/L, the azo dye degradation efficiency reached up to 99% within 4 min, and the degradation constant rate was up to 2.444 min(-1), which is the highest value among other studies. A comparison of the decolorization rates at similar conditions with several other azo dyes, including Congo red, Amaranth, and Orange G, showed that the dye with a simpler structure and lower molecular mass decolorized considerably faster than the ones having a more complicated structure (higher molecular mass). The methyl orange degradation was also conducted using hollow nickel (Ni) nanoparticles and commercially available solid spherical Co and Ni nanoparticles. The results showed that Co-based nanoparticles outperformed Ni-based nanoparticles, with the hollow Co nanoparticles exhibiting the fastest degradation rate. Using the hollow Co nanoparticles is a very promising approach for the remediation of methyl orange dye containing wastewater due to the fast degradation rate and high degradation efficiency. In addition, these hollow Co nanoparticles are easily recycled because of their magnetic property. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Heterogeneous fenton degradation of azo dyes catalyzed by modified polyacrylonitrile fiber fe complexes: QSPR (quantitative structure peorperty relationship) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Dong, Yongchun; Ding, Zhizhong

    2013-07-01

    The amidoximated polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber Fe complexes were prepared and used as the heterogeneous Fenton catalysts for the degradation of 28 anionic water soluble azo dyes in water under visible irradiation. The multiple linear regression (MLR) method was employed to develop the quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) model equations for the decoloration and mineralization of azo dyes. Moreover, the predictive ability of the QSPR model equations was assessed using Leave-one-out (LOO) and cross-validation (CV) methods. Additionally, the effect of Fe content of catalyst and the sodium chloride in water on QSPR model equations were also investigated. The results indicated that the heterogeneous photo-Fenton degradation of the azo dyes with different structures was conducted in the presence of the amidoximated PAN fiber Fe complex. The QSPR model equations for the dye decoloration and mineralization were successfully developed using MLR technique. MW/S (molecular weight divided by the number of sulphonate groups) and NN=N (the number of azo linkage) are considered as the most important determining factor for the dye degradation and mineralization, and there is a significant negative correlation between MW/S or NN=N and degradation percentage or total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Moreover, LOO and CV analysis suggested that the obtained QSPR model equations have the better prediction ability. The variation in Fe content of catalyst and the addition of sodium chloride did not alter the nature of the QSPR model equations.

  13. Case study of the sonochemical decolouration of textile azo dye Reactive Black 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajnhandl, Simona [University of Maribor, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Smetanova 17, 2000 Maribor (Slovenia)]. E-mail: simona.vajnhandl@uni-mb.si; Le Marechal, Alenka Majcen [University of Maribor, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Smetanova 17, 2000 Maribor (Slovenia)

    2007-03-06

    The decolouration and mineralization of reactive dye C.I. Reactive Black 5, a well-known representative of non-biodegradable azo dyes, by means of ultrasonic irradiation at 20, 279 and 817 kHz has been investigated with emphasis on the effect of various parameters on decolouration and degradation efficiency. Characterization of the used ultrasound systems was performed using calorimetric measurements and oxidative species monitoring using Fricke and iodine dosimeter. Experiments were carried out with low frequency probe type, and a high-frequency plate type transducer at 50, 100 and 150 W of acoustic power and within the 5-300 mg/L initial dye concentration range. Decolouration, as well as radical production, increased with increasing frequency, acoustic power, and irradiation time. Any increase in initial dye concentration results in decreased decolouration rates. Sonochemical decolouration was substantially depressed by the addition of 2-methyl-2-propanol as a radical scavenger, which suggests radical-induced reactions in the solution. Acute toxicity to marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri was tested before and after ultrasound irradiation. Under the conditions employed in this study, no toxic compounds were detected after 6 h of irradiation. Mineralization of the dye was followed by TOC measurements. Relatively low degradation efficiency (50% after 6 h of treatment) indicates that ultrasound is rather inefficient in overall degradation, when used alone.

  14. Novel Photocatalytic Membrane Reactor with TiO2 Nanotubes for Azo Dye Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel photocatalytic membrane reactor (PMR with TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs has been designed and applied in azo dye wastewater treatment. Prepared by hydrothermal method, the TNTs with length of 30–80 nm and diameter of 10 nm had good photocatalytic activity. The result showed that the optimal pH value was 4.5 and catalyst loading of this reaction system was 0.5g/L. The decolorization rate of X-3B with application of TNTs was up to 94.6% after 75min of irradiation. In the combined process, the PES ultrafiltration membrane was adopted to separate and recover the nano catalysts for reuse. The retention rate of TNTs in PMR system reached 100%. All these showed that TNTs photocatalysis integrated with ultrafiltration was capable of removing X-3B dye effectively and simultaneous separating TNTs photocatalysts successfully.

  15. Isolation, Screening and Development of Local Bacterial Consortia With Azo Dyes Decolourising Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijah, O.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 1540 bacterial isolates were isolated and screened for their ability to degrade selected azo dyes. Of these, nine isolates were chosen for further studies based on their ability to degrade a wide spectrum of dyes efficiently and rapidly. Several microbial consortia were developed and tested for their effectiveness. Overall the consortia were able to degrade 70 - 100% colour within 72 hours compared to 60 – 97% colour removed by individual isolates. A microbial consortium labelled C15 showed good growth in agitation culture but the colour removal was best in static culture with 80 - 100% colour removed in less than 72 hours. Based on the 16S rRNA sequencing, two of the bacterial isolates in C15 belong to the Chryseobacterium genus while the other one belongs to Flavobacterium genus.

  16. Mineralization of Azo Dye Using Combined Photo-Fenton and Photocatalytic Processes under Visible Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma K. Kuriechen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Visible-light-assisted photodegradation of an azo dye, Reactive Red 180 (RR180, in the presence of nitrogen-doped TiO2 (N-TiO2 has been studied. The photodegradation of RR180 is evaluated through decolorization studies and total organic carbon analysis. The efficacy of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, potassium peroxomonosulfate (oxone or PMS, and potassium peroxodisulfate (PDS in improving the photodegradation of the dye in the N-TiO2-RR180 system is also examined. The effect of combining photo-Fenton-like reaction with N-TiO2-mediated photodegradation of RR180 under visible light has been investigated. The photoactivity of N-TiO2-RR180-Fe3+/Cu2+-oxidant systems is compared with the individual techniques of photocatalysis and photo-Fenton-like reactions. The coupled system possesses superior photomineralization ability towards the abatement of RR180.

  17. Activated carbon fiber for heterogeneous activation of persulfate: implication for the decolorization of azo dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiabin; Hong, Wei; Huang, Tianyin; Zhang, Liming; Li, Wenwei; Wang, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) was used as a green catalyst to activate persulfate (PS) for oxidative decolorization of azo dye. ACF demonstrated a higher activity than activated carbon (AC) to activate PS to decolorize Orange G (OG). The decolorization efficiency of OG increased as ACF loading, PS dosage, and temperature increased. OG decolorization followed a pseudo first-order kinetics, and the activation energy was 40.902 kJ/mol. pH had no apparent effect on OG decolorization. Radical quenching experiments with various radical scavengers (e.g., alcohols, phenol) showed that radical-induced decolorization of OG took place on the surface of ACF, and both SO4 (·-) and HO· were responsible for OG decolorization. The impact of inorganic salts was also evaluated because they are important compositions of dye wastewater. Cl(-) and SO4 (2-) exhibited a promoting effect on OG decolorization, and the accelerating rate increased with elevating dosage of ions. Addition of Cl(-) and SO4 (2-) could increase the adsorption of OG on ACF surface, thus favorable for OG decolorization caused by the surface-bound SO4 (·-) and HO·. Conversely, HCO3 (-) and humic acid (HA) slightly inhibited OG decolorization. The azo band and naphthalene ring on OG were remarkably destructed to other intermediates and finally mineralized to CO2 and H2O.

  18. Reductive-degradation of carcinogenic azo dyes using Anacardium occidentale testa derived silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Atchudan, Raji; Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan; Lee, Yong Rok

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, reductive-degradation of azo dyes such as congo red (CR) and methyl orange (MO) was manifested using Anacardium occidentale testa derived silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a catalyst. The formation of highly stable AgNPs were visually confirmed by the appearance of yellow color and further substantiated by the existence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak around 425nm. The effect of A. occidentale concentration, reaction time and pH in the formations of AgNPs was corroborated by UV-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic results proved that phytoconstituents of A. occidentale testa acts as a capping agent and thereby protects the AgNPs from aggregation. The crystalline nature of the AgNPs was validated from the XRD patterns. The average size of synthesized AgNPs was 25nm, with distorted spherical shape was ascribed from the high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HR-TEM) images. Due to the high stability of the as-synthesized AgNPs, they were utilized for the degradation of carcinogenic azo dyes such as CR and MO using NaBH4 and its catalytic activity was studied via UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results proved that extraordinary catalytic activity of synthesized AgNPs towards the reductive-degradation of both CR and MO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Removal of anionic azo dyes from aqueous solution by functional ionic liquid cross-linked polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hejun; Kan, Taotao; Zhao, Siyuan; Qian, Yixia; Cheng, Xiyuan; Wu, Wenli; Wang, Xiaodong; Zheng, Liqiang

    2013-10-15

    A novel functional ionic liquid based cross-linked polymer (PDVB-IL) was synthesized from 1-aminoethyl-3-vinylimidazolium chloride and divinylbenzene for use as an adsorbent. The physicochemical properties of PDVB-IL were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The adsorptive capacity was investigated using anionic azo dyes of orange II, sunset yellow FCF, and amaranth as adsorbates. The maximum adsorption capacity could reach 925.09, 734.62, and 547.17 mg/g for orange II, sunset yellow FCF and amaranth at 25°C, respectively, which are much better than most of the other adsorbents reported earlier. The effect of pH value was investigated in the range of 1-8. The result shows that a low pH value is found to favor the adsorption of those anionic azo dyes. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms are well fitted by a pseudo second-order model and Langmuir model, respectively. The adsorption process is found to be dominated by physisorption. The introduction of functional ionic liquid moieties into cross-linked poly(divinylbenzene) polymer constitutes a new and efficient kind of adsorbent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reduction of azo dyes and nitroaromatic compounds by bacterial enzymes from the human intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, F; Cerniglia, C E

    1995-01-01

    Several anaerobic bacteria from the human intestinal tract are capable of reducing azo dyes and nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the corresponding aromatic amines with enzymes that have azoreductase and nitroreductase activities. The majority of bacteria with these activities belong to the genera Clostridium and Eubacterium. The azoreductases and nitroreductases from three Clostridium strains and one Eubacterium strain were studied. Both enzymes were produced constitutively in each of the bacteria; the enzymes from various bacteria had different electrophoretic mobilities. The azoreductases from all of the bacteria had immunological homology, as was evident from the cross-reactivity of an antibody raised against the azoreductase of C. perfringens with azoreductases from other bacteria. Comparison of azoreductases and nitroreductases showed that they both had identical electrophoretic mobilities on polyacrylamide gels and reacted with the antibody against the azoreductase from C. perfringens. Furthermore, the nitroaromatic compounds competitively inhibited the azoreductase activity. The data indicate that the reduction of both nitroaromatic compounds and azo dyes may be carried out by the same enzyme, which is possibly a flavin adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase that is synthesized throughout the cell and not associated with any organized subcellular structure. Images Figure 1. PMID:8565901

  1. Decolorization of azo dye reactive black B by Bacillus cereus strain HJ-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chien-Sen; Hung, Chih-Hsin; Chao, Sung-Lin

    2013-02-01

    Reactive black B (RBB) is a group of azo dyes that are widely used in the textile industry. In this study, a new microbial strain was isolated from azo dye contaminated river sediment which is capable of degrading RBB. The strain was identified as Bacillus cereus strain HJ-1 by 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis. The optimal conditions for RBB decolorization by B. cereus strain HJ-1 are: 25°C, pH 8, 1 CMC of triton X-100, 0.15 g L(-1) of added yeast extract, 0.125 g L(-1) of added glucose and static culture. Then the toxicity of RBB on the green algae Chlorella vulgaris was determined. The results showed that the median effective concentration (EC(50)) of RBB for C. vulgaris is 48 mg L(-1) and toxicity will really decrease after decolorization. In the end, B. cereus strain HJ-1 was amended into the origin river sediment and analyzed the whole microbial community structure of river sediment samples by PCR-DGGE technique. The result showed that B. cereus strain HJ-1 could survive in the river sediment after 12 d of incubation. Based on this work, we hope that these findings could provide some useful information for applying the decolorization of RBB in our environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced sonocatalytic degradation of azo dyes by Au/TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifeng; Zhao, Dan; Ma, Wanhong; Chen, Chuncheng; Zhao, Jincai

    2008-08-15

    Au-loaded TiO2 (Au/TiO2) has been reported for the first time as a sonocatalyst. It was found that the catalyst Au/TiO2, with a low Au loading 0.5 wt % and under common and commercial frequency (40 kHz) ultrasonic irradiation, greatly accelerated both the discoloration and total organic carbon (TOC) removal of azo dyes such as orange II (Org II), ethyl orange (EO), and acid red G (ARG), as compared to bare TiO2 and nano-Au catalyst. About 80% TOC removal was achieved after complete discoloration of 2.5 x 10(-4) M Org II. H2O2 and H2 formation as well as their accumulation was greatly enhanced due to Au loading on TiO2. Both oxidative and reductive degradation intermediates have been detected, and thus the mechanism involves both enhanced oxidation and enhanced reduction via the accelerated formation of active *OH and *H radicals due to Au loading on TiO2, which is supported by electron spin resonance (EPR) and other evidence. The study provides an admirable way to raise the efficiency of sonication and to treat azo dye-containing wastewaters with sonocatalytic processes.

  3. Reduction of azo dyes and nitroaromatic compounds by bacterial enzymes from the human intestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafii, F.; Cerniglia, C.E. [Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Several anaerobic bacteria from the human intestinal tract are capable of reducing azo dyes and nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the corresponding aromatic amines with enzymes that have azoreductase and nitroreductase activities. The majority of bacteria with these activities belong to the genera Clostridium and Eubacterium. The azoreductases and nitroreductases from three Clostridium strains and one Eubacterium strain were studied. Both enzymes were produced constitutively in each of the bacteria; the enzymes from various bacteria had different electrophoretic mobilities. The azoreductases from all of the bacteria had immunological homology, as was evident from the cross-reactivity of an antibody raised against the azoreductase of C perfringens with azoreductases from other bacteria. Comparison of azoreductases and nitroreductases showed that they both had identical electrophoretic mobilities on polyacrylamide gels and reacted with the antibody against the azoreductase from C. perfringens. Furthermore, the nitroaromatic compounds competitively inhibited the azoreductase activity. The data indicate that the reduction of both nitroaromatic compounds and azo dyes may be carried out by the same enzyme, which is possibly a flavin adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase that is synthesized throughout the cell and not associated with any organized subcellular structure. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. A built-in zero valent iron anaerobic reactor to enhance treatment of azo dye wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Jing, Yanwen; Quan, Xie; Liu, Yiwen; Onu, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Waste scrap iron was packed into an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor to form a zero valent iron (ZVI) - UASB reactor system for treatment of azo dye wastewater. The ZVI acted as a reductant to decrease ORP in the reactor by more than 40 mv and functioned as an acid buffer to increase the pH in the reactor from 5.44 to 6.29, both of which improved the performance of the anaerobic reactor. As a result, the removal of color and COD in this reactor was 91.7% and 53%, respectively, which was significantly higher than that of a reference UASB reactor without ZVI. The UV-visible spectrum demonstrated that absorption bands of the azo dye from the ZVI-UASB reactor were substantially reduced. The ZVI promoted methanogenesis, which was confirmed by an increase in CH(4) content in the biogas from 47.9% to 64.8%. The ZVI bed was protected well from rusting, which allowed it to function stably. The effluent could be further purified only by pH adjustment because the Fe(2+) released from ZVI served as a flocculent.

  5. Salicylic acid as a tridentate anchoring group for azo-bridged zinc porphyrin in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Faliang; Jiang, Xu; Li, Bo; Jing, Huanwang; Zhu, Zhenping

    2013-12-11

    Two series dyes of azo-bridged zinc porphyrins have been devised, synthesized, and performed in dye-sensitized solar cells, in which salicylic acids and azo groups were introduced as a new anchoring group and π-conjugated bridge via a simple synthetic procedure. The representation of the new dyes has been investigated by optical, photovoltaic, and electrochemical means. The photoelectric conversion efficiency of their DSSC devices has been improved compared with other DSSC devices sensitized by symmetrical porphyrin dyes. The results revealed that tridentate binding modes between salicylic acid and TiO2 nanoparticles could enhance the efficiency of electron injection. The binding modes between salicylic acid and TiO2 nanoparticles may play a crucial role in the photovoltaic performance of DSSCs.

  6. Removal of Azo Dye from Synthetic Wastewater Using Immobilized Nano-Diatomite Within Calcium Alginate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Khodabandelou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The presence of organic dyes, discharged by textile industries, in aqueous environments can cause detrimental effects on aquatic life and subsequently human health. Therefore, the decolorization of aquatic environments is mandatory to protect the environment. For this reason, in the present study, nano-sized diatomite was immobilized within calcium alginate as a nanocomposite adsorbent for removing organic azo dye (Direct blue 15 from aqueous solutions.  Methods: First of all, Iranian diatomite was grinded in a planetary ball mill equipped with tungsten carbide cup for 20 h to achieve nanoparticles of the diatomite. For the immobilization of nanostructured diatomite, a 2% sodium alginate solution was used. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR spectroscopy were used to characterize immobilized nano-diatomite. Fifty milliliter Erlenmeyer flasks were used as batch flow mode experimental reactors. Working solutions were prepared by the dilution of stock solution (1 g/L to desired concentrations. The effect of different operational parameters including contact time, initial pH, adsorbent dosage and initial dye concentration along with kinetic and isotherm of the adsorption were evaluated. After each experiment, the residual concentration of the dyes was measured spectrophotometrically. Results: As results, the adsorption of organic dye increased with increasing contact time and adsorbent dosage, while increasing initial dye concentrations resulted in decreasing the adsorption. The adsorption of DB-15 was favored at basic PH. The immobilization of diatomite led to enhancing the adsorption of  DB-15 compared to diatomite alone. According to the obtained correlation coefficient, the adsorption of DB-15 obeyed pseudo-second order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity of diatomite/alginate nanocomposite for the adsorption of DB-15 were found

  7. Synthesis of MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles for azo dye degradation by catalytic ozonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manivel, Arumugam; Lee, Gang-Juan [Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Feng Chia University, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chin-Yi [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jing-Heng; Ma, Shih-Hsin [Department of Photonics, Feng Chia University, Taiwan (China); Horng, Tzzy-Leng [Department of Applied Mathematics, Taiwan (China); Wu, Jerry J., E-mail: jjwu@fcu.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Feng Chia University, Taiwan (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of one-dimensional MoO{sub 3} nanostructures using hydrothermal, microwave, and sonochemical methods. • Sonochemical synthesized MoO{sub 3} presents the best efficiency for the dye removal by catalytic ozonation. • Efficient environmental remediation process. - Abstract: One-dimensional molybdenum trioxide nanostructures were prepared in three different approaches, including thermal, microwave, and sonochemical methods. The physicochemical properties of the obtained MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles were investigated by diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. Among the methods as investigated, sonochemical synthesis gave well-dispersed fine MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles compared with the other approaches. All the synthesized MoO{sub 3} nanostructures were examined for the catalytic ozonation to degrade azo dye in aqueous environment. Different performances were obtained for the catalyst prepared in different methods and the catalytic efficiencies were found to be the order of sonochemical, microwave, and then thermal methods. The sonochemical MoO{sub 3} catalyst allowed the total dye removal within 20 min and its good performance was justified according to their higher surface area with higher number of active sites that provide effective dye interaction for better degradation.

  8. Statistical optimization, interaction analysis and desorption studies for the azo dyes adsorption onto chitosan films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rêgo, T V; Cadaval, T R S; Dotto, G L; Pinto, L A A

    2013-12-01

    Chitosan films (CF) were applied to remove azo dyes (tartrazine and amaranth) from aqueous solutions by adsorption. CF were prepared by casting technique and characterized. Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the adsorption process as a function of pH (2, 3 and 4) and CF concentration (100, 150 and 200 mg L(-1)). The possible interactions CF-dyes were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dispersive energy X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and color parameters. Adsorption-desorption cycles were also performed. The more appropriate conditions for the adsorption of both dyes were pH of 2 and CF concentration of 100 mg L(-1). Under these conditions, the tartrazine and amaranth adsorption capacities were 413.8 and 278.3 mg g(-1), respectively. The interactions between the CF protonated amino groups and anionic form of the dyes at pH 2 were confirmed. Desorption experiments showed that the CF can keep its adsorption capacity maximum for two cycles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Physical-chemical characterization of the textile dye Azo Ab52 degradation by corona plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, A.; Torres-Arenas, A. J.; Vergara-Sánchez, J.; Torres, C.; Reyes, P. G.; Martínez, H.; Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo

    2017-10-01

    This work characterizes the degradation of the textile dye azo Acid Black 52 by measuring several physical and chemical parameters. A corona plasma was created at atmospheric pressure and applied on the liquid-air interface of water samples containing the dye. 1.0 mM of ferrous sulfate (FeSO4) was added to 1.0 mM dye solution, for a total volume of 250 mL. For each treatment, a number of parameters were quantified. These were voltage, current, temperature, loss of volume, pH, electrical conductivity, concentration, optical mission spectra, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), and the removal ratio. Because of the increase in the sample temperature, the volume lost by evaporation was explored. The results show that the efficiency of the dye degradation by plasma is a function of treatment time. Moreover, the reactive concentration of FeSO4 and the exposition time of the plasma were varied at a constant volume, leading to the determination of the concentrations and optimal times. Considering the degradation and removal parameters, at the maximum treated time of 80 min, it found that COD was of 96.36%, TOC of 93.93%, and the removal ratio of 97.47%.

  10. Yeast extract promotes decolorization of azo dyes by stimulating azoreductase activity in Shewanella sp. strain IFN4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad; Negm, Fayek; Khalid, Azeem; Shaharoona, Baby; Hussain, Sabir; Mahmood Nadeem, Sajid; Crowley, David E

    2016-02-01

    Biological treatment of azo dyes commonly requires a combined anaerobic-aerobic process in which initial decolorization is achieved by reductive cleavage of azo bonds on the parent molecule. The present study was conducted to examine the relative importance of co-substrates for driving reductive decolorization of azo dyes by Shewanella sp. strain IFN4 using whole cells and enzyme assays. Results showed that the dye decolorization by strain IFN4 was faster in medium containing 1gL(-1) yeast extract (YE) as compared to nine other co-substrates. Moreover, only YE stimulated azoreductase activity (increased from 1.32 to 4.19U/mg protein). Increasing the level of YE up to 8gL(-)(1) resulted into 81% decolorization of the dye in 1h along with an increase in azoreductase activity up to 6.16U/mg protein. Among the components of YE, only riboflavin stimulated the decolorization process as well as enzyme activity. Moreover, strain IFN4 demonstrated flavin reductase activity, and a significant correlation (r(2)=0.98) between flavin reduction and dye reduction by this strain emphasized the involvement of flavin compounds in the decolorization process. The results of this study show that YE serves both as a source of reducing equivalents and an electron shuttle for catalyzing dye reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Decolourization of azo dye methyl red by Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 463.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, J P; Parshetti, G K; Kalme, S D; Govindwar, S P

    2007-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 463 decolourizes toxic azo dye, methyl red by degradation process. Methyl red (100mgl(-1)) is degraded completely within 16min in plain distilled water under static anoxic condition, at the room temperature. Effect of physicochemical parameters (pH of medium, composition of medium, concentration of cells, concentration of dye, temperature and agitation) on methyl red decolourization focused the optimal condition required for decolourization. Biodegradation (fate of metabolism) of methyl red in plain distilled water was found to be pH dependent. Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae could degrade methyl red efficiently up to 10 cycles in plain distilled water. Analysis of samples extracted with ethyl acetate from decolourized culture flasks in plain distilled water (pH 6.5) and at pH 9 using UV-VIS, TLC, HPLC and FTIR confirm biodegradation of methyl red into several different metabolites. A study of the enzymes responsible for the biodegradation of methyl red in the control and cells obtained after decolourization in plain distilled water (pH 6.5) and at pH 9 showed different levels of the activities of laccase, lignin peroxidase, NADH-DCIP reductase, azoreductase, tyrosinase and aminopyrine N-demethylase. A significant increase in the activities of lignin peroxidase and NADH-DCIP reductase was observed in the cells obtained after decolourization in plain distilled water (pH 6.5), however cells obtained at pH 9 shows increased activities of azoreductase, tyrosinase, lignin peroxidase and NADH-DCIP reductase. High efficiency to decolourize methyl red in plain distilled water and low requirement of environmental conditions enables this yeast to be used in biological treatment of industrial effluent containing azo dye, methyl red.

  12. In-situ formation and immobilization of biogenic nanopalladium into anaerobic granular sludge enhances azo dyes degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiangchun; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Hengduo

    2015-07-01

    Azo dyes are toxic and recalcitrant wastewater pollutants. An innovative technology based on biogenic nanopalladium (Bio-Pd) supported anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) was developed for azo dyes reduction. In-situ formation of Bio-Pd in the AGS was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The Pd associated AGS (Pd-AGS) showed enhanced decolorization rates to the three azo dyes of Congo Red, Evans Blue and Orange II, with the degradation kinetic constants increased by 2.3-10 fold compared to the control AGS in the presence of electron donor formate. Impacts of different electron donors on Orange II decolorization were further investigated. Results showed that formic acid, formate, acetate, glucose, ethanol and lactate could serve as electron and hydrogen donors to stimulate Orange II decolorization by the Pd-AGS, and their activities followed the order: formic acid > formate > ethanol > glucose > lactate > acetate. Most of the Bio-Pd was bound with microbes in the AGS with a small fraction in the extracellular polymer substances (EPS). Transmission Electronic Microscopy analysis revealed that the Bio-Pd formed in the periplasmic space, cytoplasm and on the cell walls of bacteria. This study provides a new concept for azo dye reduction, which couples sludge microbial degradation ability with Bio-Pd catalytic ability via in-situ formation and immobilization of Bio-Pd into AGS, and offers an alternative for the current azo dye treatment technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduction of azo dyes by redox mediators originating in the naphthalenesulfonic acid degradation pathway of Sphingomonas sp. strain BN6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, A; Klein, J; Kudlich, M; Stolz, A; Knackmuss, H J; Mattes, R

    1997-01-01

    The anaerobic reduction of azo dyes by Sphingomonas sp. strain BN6 was analyzed. Aerobic conversion of 2-naphthalenesulfonate (2NS) by cells of strain BN6 stimulated the subsequent anaerobic reduction of the sulfonated azo dye amaranth at least 10-fold. In contrast, in crude extracts, the azo reductase activity was not stimulated. A mutant of strain BN6 which was not able to metabolize 2NS showed increased amaranth reduction rates only when the cells were resuspended in the culture supernatant of 2NS-grown BN6 wild-type cells. The same increase could be observed with different bacterial strains. This suggested the presence of an extracellular factor which was formed during the degradation of 2NS by strain BN6. The addition of 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene, the first intermediate of the degradation pathway of 2NS, or its decomposition products to cell suspensions of the mutant of strain BN6 (2NS-) increased the activity of amaranth reduction. The presence of bacterial cells was needed to maintain the reduction process. Thus, the decomposition products of 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene are suggested to act as redox mediators which are able to anaerobically shuttle reduction equivalents from the cells to the extracellular azo dye. PMID:9293019

  14. Linearly and circularly polarized laser photoinduced molecular order in azo dye doped polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Bendaoud

    2017-03-01

    Photo-induced behavior of Azo Disperse one (AZD1) doped Poly(Methyl MethAcrylate) (PMMA) using both linear and circular polarized light is studied. The anisotropy is not erased by the circular polarization light. The circular polarization light combined with relatively long lifetime of the cis state in azo dye doped polymers activate all transverse directions of the angular hole burning through the spot in the film inducing anisotropy. Under circular polarized light, there is no orientation perpendicularly to the helex described by the rotating electric field vector, trans molecules reorients in the propagation direction of the pump beam. The polarization state of the probe beam after propagation through the pumped spot depends strongly on the angle of incidence of both pump and probe beams on the input face. In the case where circular polarized pump and probe beams are under the same angle of incidence, the probe beam "sees" anisotropic film as if it is isotropic. Results of this work shows the possibility to reorient azobenzene-type molecules in two orthogonal directions using alternately linearly and circularly polarized beams.

  15. Linearly and circularly polarized laser photoinduced molecular order in azo dye doped polymer films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Bendaoud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Photo-induced behavior of Azo Disperse one (AZD1 doped Poly(Methyl MethAcrylate (PMMA using both linear and circular polarized light is studied. The anisotropy is not erased by the circular polarization light. The circular polarization light combined with relatively long lifetime of the cis state in azo dye doped polymers activate all transverse directions of the angular hole burning through the spot in the film inducing anisotropy. Under circular polarized light, there is no orientation perpendicularly to the helex described by the rotating electric field vector, trans molecules reorients in the propagation direction of the pump beam. The polarization state of the probe beam after propagation through the pumped spot depends strongly on the angle of incidence of both pump and probe beams on the input face. In the case where circular polarized pump and probe beams are under the same angle of incidence, the probe beam “sees” anisotropic film as if it is isotropic. Results of this work shows the possibility to reorient azobenzene-type molecules in two orthogonal directions using alternately linearly and circularly polarized beams.

  16. Decolorization of azo dyes Orange G using hydrodynamic cavitation coupled with heterogeneous Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Meiqiang; Su, Jie; Zhu, Yizu; Wei, Xiaoqing; Jin, Micong; Zhang, Haojie; Dong, Chunying; Wei, Zongsu

    2016-01-01

    The present work demonstrates the application of the combination of hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) and the heterogeneous Fenton process (HF, Fe(0)/H2O2) for the decolorization of azo dye Orange G (OG). The effects of main affecting operation conditions such as the inlet fluid pressure, initial concentration of OG, H2O2 and zero valent iron (ZVI), the fixed position of ZVI, and medium pH on decolorization efficiency were discussed with guidelines for selection of optimum parameters. The results revealed that the acidic conditions are preferred for OG decolorizaiton. The decolorization rate increased with increasing H2O2 and ZVI concentration and decreased with increasing OG initial concentration. Besides, the decolorization rate was strongly dependent on the fixed position of ZVI. The analysis results of degradation products using liquid chromatography-ESI-TOF mass spectrometry revealed that the degradation mechanism of OG proceeds mainly via reductive cleavage of the azo linkage due to the attack of hydroxyl radical. The present work has conclusively established that the combination of HC and HF can be more energy efficient and gives higher decolorization rate of OG as compared with HC and HF alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Enzyme-mediated bacterial biodegradation of an azo dye (C.I. Acid blue 113): reuse of treated dye wastewater in post-tanning operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilvelan, T; Kanagaraj, J; Panda, R C

    2014-11-01

    "Dyeing" is a common practice used to color the hides during the post-tanning operations in leather processing generating plenty of wastewater. The waste stream containing dye as pollutant is severely harmful to living beings. An azo dye (C.I. Acid Blue 113) has been biodegraded effectively by bacterial culture mediated with azoreductase enzyme to reduce the pollution load in the present investigation. The maximum rate of dye degradation was found to be 96 ± 4 and 92 ± 4 % for the initial concentrations of 100 and 200 mg/l, respectively. The enzyme activity was measured using NADH as a substrate. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis was confirmed that the transformation of azo linkage could be transformed into N2 or NH3 or incorporated into complete biomass. Breaking down of dye molecules to various metabolites (such as aniline, naphthalene-1,4-diamine, 3-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 8-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 5,8-diaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) was confirmed by gas chromatography and mass spectra (GC-MS) and mass (electrospray ionization (ESI)) spectra analysis. The treated wastewater could be reused for dyeing operation in the leather processing, and the properties of produced leather were evaluated by conventional methods that revealed to have improved dye penetration into the grain layer of experimental leather sample and resulted in high levelness of dyeing, which helps to obtain the desired smoothness and soft leather properties.

  18. Effect of redox mediator, AQDS, on the decolourisation of a reactive azo dye containing triazine group in a thermophilic anaerobic EGSB reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezerra Dos Santos, A.; Cervantes-Carillo, F.J.; Yaya Beas, R.E.; Lier, van J.B.

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of thermophilic (55 degreesC) anaerobic treatment applied to colour removal of a triazine contained reactive azo dye was investigated in two 0.531 expanded granular sludge blanket (EGSB) reactors in parallel at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 h. Generally, this group of azo

  19. Azo-dyes photocatalytic degradation in aqueous suspension of TiO2 under solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augugliaro, Vincenzo; Baiocchi, Claudio; Prevot, Alessandra Bianco; García-López, Elisa; Loddo, Vittorio; Malato, Sixto; Marcí, Giuseppe; Palmisano, Leonardo; Pazzi, Marco; Pramauro, Edmondo

    2002-12-01

    The photodegradation of two common and very stable azo-dyes, i.e. methyl-orange (C14H14N3SO3Na) and orange II (C16H11N2SO4Na), is reported. The photocatalytic oxidation was carried out in aqueous suspensions of polycrystalline TiO2 irradiated by sunlight. Compound parabolic collectors, installed at the "Plataforma Solar de Almería" (PSA, Spain) were used as the photoreactors and two identical reacting systems allowed to perform photoreactivity runs for the two dyes at the same time and under the same irradiation conditions. The disappearance of colour and substrates together with the abatement of total organic carbon content was monitored. The main sulfonate-containing intermediates were found to be in lower number in respect to those obtained under artificial irradiation. In particular there were no more evidence of the presence of hydroxylated transients. The dependence of dye photooxidation rate on: (i) substrate concentration; (ii) catalyst amount; and (iii) initial pH was investigated. The influence of the presence of strong oxidant species (H2O2, S2O8(2-)) and some ions (Cl-, SO4(2-)) on the process was also studied.

  20. Removal of azo dye acid orange 7 using aerobic membrane bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Konsowa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory scale aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR using a submerged microfiltration (MF; hollow-fiber membrane was used for treating wastewater polluted with azo dye acid orange 7 (AO7. Initial dye concentrations studied were from 50 to 400 mg/l with a COD ranging from 95 to 550 mg O2/l and hydraulic retention times (HRT 4, 6, 8 and 24 h. Results showed that the biological process was responsible for almost 60–80% of COD removal and almost all the removal of AO7 color. Membrane microfiltration merely balanced the unstable biological treatment of COD and demonstrated almost no contribution to AO7 color removal. Trans-membrane pressure (TMP increased with time, and with the increase of dye concentration reaching a maximum of 4.175 psi. Scanning electron microscope (SEM images of the membrane’s filament were taken and compared with a SEM image of a virgin membrane; clear deformation in membrane’s pore structure could be noticed as well as scale formation on the outer surface of filaments, foulants were determined using the energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX.

  1. Citric Acid Fuctionalized Magnetic Ferrite Nanoparticles for Photocatalytic Degradation of Azo Dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahto, Triveni Kumar; Roy, Anurag; Sahoo, Banalata; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In this study different magnetic ferrite nanoparticles (MFe2O4, where M = Fe, Mn, Zn) were synthesized through an aqueous coprecipitation method and then functionalized with citric acid for the degradation of azo dye present in industrial waste water. Here we evaluated the role of citric acid for photocatalytic application. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the catalytic activity in degradation of methyl orange (MO) was evaluated. The rate of MO degradation in different magnetic systems was determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The effect of active parameters (pH, initial MO concentration and effect of sunlight) on degradation performance was investigated. For the first time, citric acid chemistry is successfully exploited to develop a photocatalyst that can successfully degrade the dyes. This citric acid functionalized magnetic ferrite nanoparticles are very much effective for photocalytic degradation of dye and also these can be recollected with the help of permanent magnet for successive uses.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of changes induced by solvent and substituent in electronic absorption spectra of some azo disperse dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Asadollah; Yazdanbakhsh, Mohammad Reza; Farahnak, Lahya

    2012-04-01

    Five azo disperse dyes were prepared by diazotizing 4'-aminoacetophenone and p-anisidine and coupling with varies N-alkylated aromatic amines. Characterization of the dyes was carried out by using UV-vis, FTIR and 1H NMR spectroscopic techniques. The electronic absorption spectra of dyes are determined at room temperature in fifteen solvents with different polarities. The solvent dependent maximum absorption band shifts, were investigated using dielectric constant (ɛ), refractive index (n) and Kamlet-Taft polarity parameters (hydrogen bond donating ability (α), hydrogen bond accepting ability (β) and dipolarity/polarizability polarity scale (π*)). Acceptable agreement was found between the maximum absorption band of dyes and solvent polarity parameters especially with π*. The effect of substituents of coupler and/or diazo component on the color of dyes was investigated. The effects of acid and base on the visible absorption maxima of the dyes are also reported. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of in vitro efficacy for decolorization and degradation of commercial azo dye RB-B by Morganella sp. HK-1 isolated from dye contaminated industrial landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Hilor; Soni, Dhaval; Chauhan, Kishor

    2014-06-01

    Reactive Black-B (RB-B) - one of the multi-sulphonated reactive azo dye - is being used extensively in textile as well as paper industries. Reactive azo dyes comprise of a significant group of synthetic compounds categorized as xenobiotics and its abatement from the environment still remains a challenge. In the present study, a newly isolated indigenous bacterial strain Morganella sp. HK-1 was exploited for its ability to decolorize and degrade RB-B dye. The isolate completely degraded RB-B (20 g L(-1)) within 24h under static conditions. Furthermore, the visible and FTIR spectral analysis established the bio-degradation of RB-B. The degraded metabolites of RB-B by Morganella sp. HK-1 were identified by GC-MS analysis as disodium 3,4,6-triamino-5-hydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulfonate, 4-aminophenylsulfonylethyl hydrogen sulfate, naphthalene-1-ol, aniline and benzene. Based on this information, a putative pathway of degradation of RB-B by Morganella sp. HK-1 has been proposed. This study is the first report on elucidation of mechanism of bacterial degradation of RB-B dye. Furthermore, phytotoxicity, genotoxicity and aquatic acute toxicity studies of the parent dye and the bio-degraded dye products revealed drastic reduction in the toxicity of metabolites as compared to the parent dye. This implies that the biotreatment of the dye is of non-toxic nature. This study thus indicates the effectiveness of Morganella sp. HK-1 for the treatment of textile effluents containing sulphonated azo dyes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Study on photocatalytic decomposition of azo-dyes by ZnO/carbon nanotubes composites by UV-Vis spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Song, Xiao-jie; Wei, Xian-wen

    2007-12-01

    ZnO/carbon nanotubes composites were prepared by hydrothermal treatment of the mixture of zinc nitrate and acid-treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes and characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The TEM image indicated that ZnO nanoparticles with a diameter about 28 nm covered the carbon nanotubes. The XRD pattern shows that ZnO nanoparticles attached to the MWNTs exhibit a hexagonal phase. The diffraction peaks can be assigned to (100), (002), (101), (102), (110), (103), (200), (112) and (201) planes of the crystalline ZnO, respectively. The average size of the crystalline ZnO, calculated from the half-width of the (100) diffraction peak by the Scherrer equation, is 27.8 nm, which accords with the TEM observation. The ZnO/carbon nanotubes composites were used as a photocatalyst under sunlight for the decomposition of azo-dye, which was studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The effects of the illumination time, catalyst amount, initial dye concentration and the different structures of the dye on the photocatalytic process were investigated. It was noted that the intensity of the absorption peak corresponding to the azo-dye decreased rapidly at 400 nm during the photolysis process and the decomposition of azo-dye was a quasi-first order reaction. The decomposition rates for azo-dyes such as acid orange, Acid bright red, Acid light yellow are 0.09, 0.28 and 0.22 mg x L(-1) x min(-1), respectively, which maybe resulted from their different functional groups. It can be stated that the complete removal of color, after selection of optimum operation parameters, can be achieved in relatively short time by using ZnO/carbon nanotubes composites. After recycling 5 times, the catalyst still has more than 50% efficiency.

  5. Acceleration of azo dye decolorization by using quinone reductase activity of azoreductase and quinone redox mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Mi; Lu, Hong; Jin, Ruofei

    2009-06-01

    This study demonstrated the effective application of intracellular azoreductase in mediated decolorization of azo dyes. Using the quinone reductase activity of overexpressed azoreductase AZR and quinone redox mediators, the decolorization performance of the recombinant strain Escherichia coli YB was significantly enhanced. In the presence of 0.2 mM lawsone, 75% acid red 27 (1 mM) was decolorized by E. coli YB in only 2 h, which was the highest bacterial decolorization rate ever reported. Compared to lawsone, menadione was a less effective redox mediator. Glucose was found to be the best carbon source for mediated decolorization by E. coli YB. The recombinant strain could complete four rounds of mediated decolorization repeatedly in 12 h. In addition, a 10-min pre-incubation of E. coli JM109 and activated sludge with 2-methylhydroquinone resulted in great improvement of mediated decolorization performance, which may be applied in practical treatment.

  6. Circular dichroism of surface complexes based on quantum dots and azo dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundelev, Evgeny V; Orlova, Anna O; Maslov, Vladimir G; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V

    2018-03-01

    Chiral properties of surface complexes based on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) azo dye were investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The use of L-, D-cysteine (Lcys, Dcys) capping ligands allowed us to obtain water-soluble chiral QD-PAN complexes. The characterization of the complexes was performed by UV-vis, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. Quantum chemical TDDFT calculated CD spectra reproduced the experimentally observed sign patterns, which originate from binding Lcys or Dcys and PAN molecules to the same Zn atom on the QD surface. The resulting complex is characterized by a large circular dichroism in comparison with an ordinary QD chirality induced by cysteine molecules. The pattern of CD signal is the same for Lcys and Dcys ligands in chiral QD-PAN complex. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Interaction between azo dye Acid Red 14 and pepsin by multispectral methods and docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ludan; Guo, Ronghui; Sun, Qiaomei; Lan, Jianwu; Li, Hui

    2017-11-01

    The interaction of synthetic azo dye Acid Red 14 with pepsin was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism and molecular docking. Results from the fluorescence spectroscopy show that Acid Red 14 has a strong capability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of pepsin with static quenching. Binding constant, number of the binding sites and thermodynamic parameters were measured at different temperatures. The result indicates that Acid Red 14 interact with pepsin spontaneously by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism spectra reveal that Acid Red 14 could slightly change the structure of pepsin. The hydrogen bond is formed between Acid Red 14 and Tyr-189 and Thr-218 residues of pepsin. Furthermore, the binding between Acid Red 14 and pepsin inhibits pepsin activity. The study can provide a way to analyze the biological safety of Acid Red 14 on digestive proteases or other proteins. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Optical properties of voltage sensitive hemicyanine dyes of variable hydrophobicity confined within surfactant micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Kashif; Naseem, Bushra; Shah, S. S.; Shah, Syed W. H.

    2017-11-01

    The optical properties of amphiphilic hemicyanine dyes with variable hydrophobicity, confined within anionic micelles of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDDBS) have been studied by UV–visible absorption spectroscopy. The confinement constant, K conf has been determined for each entrapped dye. The ion-pair formation between dye and surfactant causes a decline in electronic transition energy (ΔE T) when dye alkyl chains are smaller due to stabilization of both the ground and excited state. ΔE T values gradually increase with increase in dye hydrophobicity that hampers the electrostatic interaction with dialkylammonium moiety and consequently excited state stabilization is compromised. The average number of dye molecules trapped in a single micelle was also determined. The negative values of Gibbs free energy indicate that the dye entrapment within micelles is energetically favored. These findings have significance for developing functional materials with peculiar luminescent properties, especially for more effective probing of complex biological systems.

  9. Direct laser interference patterning of polystyrene films doped with azo dyes, using 355 nm laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broglia, M.F. [Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Departamento de Química, Ruta 36 km 601, Río Cuarto, Córdoba 5800 (Argentina); Saarland University, Department of Materials Science, Campus, D-66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Suarez, S.; Soldera, F.; Mücklich, F. [Saarland University, Department of Materials Science, Campus, D-66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Barbero, C.A.; Bellingeri, R.; Alustiza, F. [Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Departamento de Química, Ruta 36 km 601, Río Cuarto, Córdoba 5800 (Argentina); Acevedo, D., E-mail: dacevedo@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Departamento de Química, Ruta 36 km 601, Río Cuarto, Córdoba 5800 (Argentina)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • We describe the first use of Direct Laser Interference Patterning on PS at 355 nm. . • The structured areas of regular lines are produced in several square millimeters. • The method, Direct Laser Interference Patterning (DLIP) uses a single laser pulse. • DLIP is applied at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. • DLIP is easier to use than other lithographic techniques. • The topography contrasts with the usual Polystyrene ablation at lower wavelengths. - Abstract: The generation of line-like periodic patterns by direct laser interference patterning (DLIP) of polystyrene films (PS) at a wavelength of 355 nm has been investigated. No structuration is achieved in plain PS due to the weak absorption of the polymer at 355 nm. On the other hand, patterning is achieved on films doped (PSd) with an azo dye (2-anisidine → 2-anisidine) which is incorporated in the polymer solution used for film preparation. Periodic micro-structures are generated. DLIP on PSd results in the swelling of the surface at low fluences, while at high laser intensities it causes the ablation of the regions at the interference maxima positions. The results contrast with the usual process of DLIP on PS (at shorter wavelengths, like 266 nm) where only ablation is detected. The results suggest that decomposition of the azo dye is the driving force of the patterning which therefore differ from the patterning obtained when plain PS is irradiated with laser light able to be absorbed by the aromatic ring in PS (e.g. 266 nm). The biocompatibility of these materials and adhesion of cells was tested, the data from in vitro assays shows that fibroblast cells are attached and proliferate extensively on the PSd films.

  10. The accelerating effect and mechanism of a newly functional bio-carrier modified by redox mediators for the azo dyes decolorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianbo; Kang, Li; Lian, Jing; Yang, Jingliang; Yan, Bin; Li, Zaixing; Liu, Chun; Yue, Lin

    2010-11-01

    In this study, a functional bio-carrier modified by redox meditors was developed as a redox mediator for application in azo dye decolorization processes. Its accelerating effect and mechanism for azo dyes decolorization were also examined. The decolorization rates of 10 azo dyes were enhanced about 1.5-3 fold by the functional bio-carrier modified with disperse turquoise blue S-GL, and the ORP value during the acid red GR decolorization process was changed to a more negative value of 20-25 mV. Non-dissolved redox mediator on the functional bio-carrier played a similar role as NADH during the azo dyes decolorization process. At the same time, the functional bio-carrier exhibited good reusability and the combinational technology of the redox mediator and bio-carrier was a great improvement of the redox mediator application and represents a new bio-treatment concept.

  11. Selective recognition and discrimination of water-soluble azo dyes by a seven-channel molecularly imprinted polymer sensor array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zerong; Lu, Yi; Zhang, Mingliang; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2014-10-01

    A seven-channel molecularly imprinted polymer sensor array was prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and nitrogen physisorption studies. The results revealed that the imprinted polymers have distinct-binding affinities from those of structurally similar azo dyes. Analysis of the UV-Vis spectral response patterns of the seven dye analytes against the imprinted polymer array suggested that the different selectivity patterns of the array were closely connected to the imprinting process. To evaluate the effectiveness of the array format, the binding of a series of analytes was individually measured for each of the seven polymers, made with different templates (including one control polymer synthesized without the use of a template). The response patterns of the array to the selected azo dyes were processed by canonical discriminant analysis. The results showed that the molecularly imprinted array was able to discriminate each analyte with 100% accuracy. Moreover, the azo dyes in two real samples, spiked chrysoidin in smoked bean curd extract and Fanta lime soda (containing tartrazine), were successfully classified by the array. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Determination of genotoxic potential by comparison of structurally related azo dyes using DNA repair-deficient DT40 mutant panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooka, Masato; Kobayashi, Koji; Abe, Takuya; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Hada, Masahiko; Takeda, Shunichi; Hirota, Kouji

    2016-12-01

    Azo dyes, including Sudan I, Orange II and Orange G, are industrial dyes that are assumed to have genotoxic potential. However, neither the type of DNA damage induced nor the structural features responsible for toxicity have been determined. We used a panel of DNA-repair-pathway-deficient mutants generated from chicken DT40 cells to evaluate the ability of these azo dyes to induce DNA damage and to identify the type of DNA damage induced. We compared the structurally related azo dyes Sudan I, Orange II and Orange G to identify the structural features responsible for genotoxicity. Compared with wild type cells, the double-strand break repair defective RAD54-/-/KU70-/- cells were significantly more sensitive to Sudan I, but not to Orange II or Orange G. The quantum-chemical calculations revealed that Sudan I, but not Orange II or Orange G, has a complete planar aromatic ring structure. These suggest that the planar feature of Sudan I is critical to the inducing of double-strand breaks. In summary, we used a DNA-repair mutant panel in combination with quantum-chemical calculations to provide a clue to the chemical structure responsible for genotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic polarization holography. 1. Dynamic polarization-sensitive materials on the basis of azo-dye-containing polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilosanidze, Barbara; Kakauridze, George; Chaganava, Irakli

    2009-04-01

    The theoretical and experimental investigation of the kinetics of photoanisotropy induction in polarization-sensitive media with significant dark relaxation on the basis of azo dyes in polymer matrices is considered. For improving dynamic characteristics of polarization-sensitive materials, new azo dye N,N-dimethyl-4((4-nitrophenyl)diazenyl)aniline has been specially synthesized, and the kinetics of photoanisotropy induction and relaxation in materials on the basis of this dye has been compared with materials on the basis of Dimethyl Yellow. It is shown that spectral sensitivity of the material with new azo dye is in the range of 470-520 nm, the working range is both in the visible and in the infrared range (from 520 nm at least up to 3400 nm), the maximum meaning of effective anisotropy is 38% (Deltan approximately 0.022), and the time of photoanisotropy inducing and erasing is approximately 18 ms. It is shown that, if we confine ourselves to meanings of effective anisotropy of approximately 1-2% (Deltan approximately 0.007), the time of inducing/erasing will be of the order of microseconds. The use of such dynamic polarization-sensitive materials gives the possibility of a new direction--dynamic polarization holography to be developed that combines the possibilities of both dynamic and polarization holography and that opens new prospects for applications.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Paracoccus sp. GSM2 Capable of Degrading Textile Azo Dye Reactive Violet 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bheemaraddi, Mallikarjun C.; Shivannavar, Channappa T.; Gaddad, Subhashchandra M.

    2014-01-01

    A potential bacterial strain GSM2, capable of degrading an azo dye Reactive Violet 5 as a sole source of carbon, was isolated from textile mill effluent from Solapur, India. The 16S rDNA sequence and phenotypic characteristics indicated an isolated organism as Paracoccus sp. GSM2. This strain exhibited complete decolorization of Reactive Violet 5 (100 mg/L) within 16 h, while maximally it could decolorize 800 mg/L of dye within 38 h with 73% decolorization under static condition. For color removal, the most suitable pH and temperature were pH 6.0–9.0 and 25–40°C, respectively. The isolate was able to decolorize more than 70% of five structurally different azo dyes within 38 h. The isolate is salt tolerant as it can bring out more than 90% decolorization up to a salt concentration of 2% (w/v). UV-Visible absorption spectra before and after decolorization suggested that decolorization was due to biodegradation and was further confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. Overall results indicate the effectiveness of the strain GSM2 explored for the treatment of textile industry effluents containing various azo dyes. To our knowledge, this could be the first report on biodegradation of Reactive Violet 5 by Paracoccus sp. GSM2. PMID:24883397

  15. Recycling food waste to clean water: the use of a biodigester's residual liquid inoculum (RLI) to decolourise textile azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maganha de Almeida, A C; Backhaus, J; Corso, C R

    2018-01-01

    A residual liquid inoculum (RLI) was used to decolourise solutions of Acid Yellow 25 (AY25) and Direct Violet 51 (DV51) azo dyes. The RLI was obtained through anaerobic digestion of food waste from a university restaurant. The concentration of bacteria in the RLI was 8.45 × 10 7 CFU mL -1 . Dye solutions (50 μg mL -1 ) were inoculated with the RLI (20% v/v) and incubated at room temperature. The decolourisation studies took place at microaerophilic and in-batch conditions and at pH = 2.50. Initially, the dyes were taken up from solution by biosorption; maximum colour removal was achieved after 3 hours of incubation, with 88.66% for AY25 and 77.65% of DV51. At prolonged incubation times (3-96 hours) decolourisation was mainly attributed to biodegradation of the azo solutions, with breakage of the azo bond, as detected by UV-VIS spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis. Analysis of UV-VIS absorption rates of dyes showed, however, that AY25 was more readily biodegradable whereas DV51 was more recalcitrant to the action of the RLI.

  16. Preparation and identification of some metal complexes with new heterocyclic azo dye ligand 2-[2-- (1- Hydroxy -4- Chloro phenyl) azo ]- imidazole and their spectral and thermal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adilee, Khalid; Kyhoiesh, Hussein A. K.

    2017-06-01

    The preparation and spectral identification of metal complexes for Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) ions with new heterocyclic azo dye as ligand 2-[2-- (1- Hydroxy - 4- Chloro phenyl) azo ]- imidazole (HClPAI) were prepared by reacting adizonium chloride salt solution of 2-amino -4- chloro phenol with imidazole in alkaline ethanolic solution. Azo dye ligand and their metal complexes have been characterized by analytical data, 1H NMR, Mass spectrum, Infrared, Electronic spectral data, XRD, SEM, thermal analysis (TG-DSC-DTG), magnetic susceptibility and molar conductance. The elemental analysis of the metal complexes confirm the stoichiometry of the type [M(L)2] Cl where M = Cr(III), Fe(III), Co(II) and [M(L)2] where M = Mn(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hg(II) and L = azo dye ligand. Molar conductance measurements for prepared metal complexes showed 1:1 electrolyte for Cr(III), Fe(III) and Co(III) ions and non-electrolyte the rest metal complexes. The data show that the azo dye ligand behaves a tridentate and coordinates to the metal ion via nitrogen atom of azo group which is the farthest of imidazole molecule, nitrogen atom of azomethine group of heterocyclic imidazole ring and phenolic oxygen. Octahedral environment is suggested for all metal complexes.

  17. Synthesis and Evaluation of Changes Induced by Solvent and Substituent in Electronic Absorption Spectra of New Azo Disperse Dyes Containig Barbiturate Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooshang Hamidian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Six azo disperse dyes were prepared by diazotizing 4-amino hippuric acid and coupled with barbituric acid and 2-thiobarbituric acid. Then, the products were reacted with aromatic aldehyde, sodium acetate, and acetic anhydride, and oxazolone derivatives were formed. Characterization of the dyes was carried out by using UV-Vis, FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR, and mass spectroscopic techniques. The solvatochromic behavior of azo disperse dyes was evaluated in various solvents. The effects of substituents of aromatic aldehyde, barbiturate, and thiobarbiturate ring on the color of dyes were investigated.

  18. Treatment of Sulfonated Azo Dye Reactive Red 198 by UV/H2O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson P. Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available UV/H2O2 system was tested on the color removal of sulfonated azo dye Reactive Red 198 (RR, which is widely used in textile process. The effects of hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature, pH, and the in-line addition of hydrogen peroxide on high color and chemical oxygen demand (COD removals were investigated. The kinetic of dye decolorization was also determined. The results showed that 2% H2O2 decreased the process efficiency, while 1% H2O2 solution led to a better performance of the system. Despite the fact that the pH increase had small effect on color removal, it affects positively COD removals. The same behavior was found for temperature increase. A high temperature resulted in a slight decrease in color removal and a sharp decrease for COD removal. In addition the H2O2 in-line provided a small improvement in both color and COD removals. UV/1% H2O2 treatment was the most efficient, the good performance was linked to higher amount of hydroxyl radicals formed.

  19. Photolytic degradation of organic azo dye in aqueous solution using Xe-excimer lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X; Zhu, S; Hou, H

    2006-02-01

    The photodegradation of organic azo dye C.I. Food Yellow 4 (FY-4) in aqueous solution was achieved, without the addition of oxidants, by 172 nm vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation emitted from the planar Xe-excimer lamp. The degradation was mainly attributed to the impact of HO radicals produced by water absorbing VUV radiation. The dye decolorization followed pseudo-first order kinetics. The initial quantum yields of FY-4 decolorization in O2-saturated solution and N2-saturated solution were respectively 0.151 +/- 0.003 and 0.103 +/- 0.002. Dissolved oxygen in the solution contributed to the increase of the decolorization rate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate while KCI added as HO radical scavenger decreased the efficiency of the decolorization and COD removal. It was found from the change of the UV-Vis spectra that the degradation of FY-4 was accompanied by both the cleavage of chromophoric group and the opening of aromatic ring. Major intermediates detected were aromatic compounds, some low molecular weight by-products and several organic acids and inorganic ions.

  20. Conducting polypyrrole films as a potential tool for electrochemical treatment of azo dyes in textile wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Md Mominul; Smith, Warren T; Wong, Danny K Y

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate conducting polypyrrole films as a potential green technology for electrochemical treatment of azo dyes in wastewaters using Acid Red 1 as a model analyte. These films were synthesised by anodically polymerising pyrrole in the presence of Acid Red 1 as a supporting electrolyte. In this way, the anionic Acid Red 1 is electrostatically attracted to the cationic polypyrrole backbone formed to maintain electroneutrality, and is thus entrapped in the film. These Acid Red 1-entrapped polypyrrole films were characterised by electrochemical, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Based on a two-level factorial design, the solution pH, Acid Red 1 concentration and polymerisation duration were identified as significant parameters affecting the entrapment efficiency. The entrapment process will potentially aid in decolourising Acid Red 1-containing wastewaters. Similarly, in a cathodic process, electrons are supplied to neutralise the polypyrrole backbone, liberating Acid Red 1 into a solution. In this work, following an entrapment duration of 480 min in 2000 mg L(-1) Acid Red 1, we estimated 21% of the dye was liberated after a reduction period of 240 min. This allows the recovery of Acid Red 1 for recycling purposes. A distinctive advantage of this electrochemical Acid Red 1 treatment, compared to many other techniques, is that no known toxic by-products are generated in the treatment. Therefore, conducting polypyrrole films can potentially be applied as an environmentally friendly treatment method for textile effluents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced degradation of azo dye by a stacked microbial fuel cell-biofilm electrode reactor coupled system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xian; Wang, Hui; Li, Xiao-Qi; Fang, Zhou; Li, Xian-Ning

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a microbial fuel cell (MFC)-biofilm electrode reactor (BER) coupled system was established for degradation of the azo dye Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B. In this system, electrical energy generated by the MFC degrades the azo dye in the BER without the need for an external power supply, and the effluent from the BER was used as the inflow for the MFC, with further degradation. The results indicated that the X-3B removal efficiency was 29.87% higher using this coupled system than in a control group. Moreover, a method was developed to prevent voltage reversal in stacked MFCs. Current was the key factor influencing removal efficiency in the BER. The X-3B degradation pathway and the types and transfer processes of intermediate products were further explored in our system coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Polarization-independent holographic gratings based on azo-dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Andy Ying-Guey; Chen, Che-Chang; Cheng, Ko-Ting; Liu, Cheng-Kai; Chen, Wei-Ko

    2010-01-10

    We demonstrate polarization-independent holographic gratings (PIHGs) based on azo-dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films. The PIHGs are recorded by irradiation under an intensity-modulated interference field, generated by two linearly polarized green optical beams, and by simultaneously applying a suitable AC voltage to the sample. The photoexcited azo dyes are adsorbed onto the UV-cured polymer film with their long axes parallel to the normal of the substrate. When the applied voltage is switched off, the PIHGs are generated with periodic modulation of liquid-crystal structures with transparently homeotropic and randomly scattered alignments. Additionally, the generated PIHGs can be completely switched off by an applied voltage.

  3. TiO2-assisted photoisomerization of azo dyes using self-assembled monolayers: case study on para-methyl red towards solar-cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M

    2014-03-12

    The optical and electronic properties of a TiO2 nanoparticle-assisted photo-isomerizable surface, prepared by an azo dye/TiO2 nanocomposite film, are examined experimentally and computationally. The azo dye, para-methyl red, undergoes photoisomerization at room temperature, catalyzed by the TiO2 nanoparticle supports, while it exhibits negligible photoisomerization in solvents under otherwise identical conditions. Density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory are employed to explain the origin of this photoisomerization in these dye···TiO2 nanoparticle self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The device performance of these SAMs when embedded into dye-sensitized solar cells is used to further elucidate the nature of this azo dye photoisomerization and relate it to the ensuing optoelectronic properties.

  4. BF3.SiO2: an efficient catalyst for the synthesis of azo dyes at room temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Bi Fatemeh Mirjalili

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A rapid one-pot method has been developed for the synthesis of azo dyes via ‎sequential diazotization–diazo coupling of aromatic amines with coupling agents at room ‎temperature in the presence of BF3.SiO2 as acidic catalyst. The obtained aryl diazonium salts bearing silica supported boron tri-flouride counter ion‎ was sufficiently stable to be kept at room ‎temperature in the dry state.‎

  5. Functional group influences on the reactive azo dye decolorization performance by electrochemical oxidation and electro-Fenton technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Soares, Izabelle Cristina; da Silva, Djalma Ribeiro; do Nascimento, José Heriberto Oliveira; Garcia-Segura, Sergi; Martínez-Huitle, Carlos Alberto

    2017-11-01

    Electrochemical water treatment technologies are highly promising to achieve complete decolorization of dyebath effluents, as demonstrated by several studies reported in the literature. However, these works are focused on the treatment of one model pollutant and generalize the performances of the processes which are not transposable since they depend on the pollutant treated. Thus, in the present study, we evaluate, for the first time, the influence of different functional groups that modify the dye structure on the electrochemical process decolorization performance. The textile azo dyes Reactive Orange 16, Reactive Violet 4, Reactive Red 228, and Reactive Black 5 have been selected because they present the same molecular basis structure with different functional groups. The results demonstrate that the functional groups that reduce the nucleophilicity of the pollutant hinder the electrophilic attack of electrogenerated hydroxyl radical. Thereby, the overall decolorization efficiency is consequently reduced as well as the decolorization rate. Moreover, the presence of an additional chromophore azo bond in the molecule enhances the recalcitrant character of the azo dyes as pollutants. The formation of a larger and more stable conjugated π system increases the activation energy required for the electrophyilic attack of (•)OH, affecting the performance of electrochemical technologies on effluent decolorization.

  6. Genotoxic and carcinogenic products arising from reductive transformations of the azo dye, Disperse Yellow 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Vimal K; Shirin, Salma; Aman, Ahmed M; de Solla, Shane R; Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Langlois, Valerie S

    2016-03-01

    Selected aromatic azo and benzidine based dyes are priority compounds under the Government of Canada's Chemical Management Plan (CMP) for environmental risk assessments. Organic compounds undergo chemical and biological transformations when they interact with environmental matrices and biotic species; identifying the transformation products is thus a critical component of the risk assessment process. Here, we used zero valent iron (ZVI) to initiate the reduction of the diazo compound dye Disperse Yellow 7 (DY 7). Using state-of-the-art accurate mass Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-QToF-MS), four transformation products were conclusively identified, while a fifth product was tentatively ascertained. The conclusively established transformation products included p-phenylenediamine (p-PDA, a known genotoxin), 4-aminoazobenzene (4-AAB, a category 2 carcinogen) and 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP, a category 1 human carcinogen). 4-ABP is thought to form via a benzidine rearrangement; this is the first report of DY 7 undergoing a benzidine rearrangement. Given the importance of reduction processes in the metabolism of organic contaminants by aquatic species, we used LC-MS/MS to analyze sediment samples that had been generated previously upon exposure of Western clawed frogs (Silurana tropicalis) to DY 7 (at exposure levels where cellular stress was observed in S. tropicalis). We found p-PDA, 4-AAB, and 4-ABP were present in all exposures, but not in any of the sediment controls, demonstrating that upon release of DY 7 to the aquatic environment, sediment dwelling organisms will metabolize DY 7 to generate known (and suspected) human carcinogens, including through a previously unreported in vivo benzidine rearrangement to produce 4-ABP. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Conducting polypyrrole films as a potential tool for electrochemical treatment of azo dyes in textile wastewaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Md. Mominul [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Smith, Warren T. [Samadha Pacifica Pty Ltd, Woonona, NSW 2517 (Australia); Wong, Danny K.Y., E-mail: Danny.Wong@mq.edu.au [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Anion exchange property of polypyrrole films exploited in developing a treatment method for Acid Red 1. • An environmentally friendly treatment method for Acid Red 1 without generating any toxic by-products. • Acid Red 1 is anodically entrapped and cathodically liberated at polypyrrole films. • Analytical characteristics of Acid Red 1-entrapped polypyrrole films. - Abstract: In this paper, we demonstrate conducting polypyrrole films as a potential green technology for electrochemical treatment of azo dyes in wastewaters using Acid Red 1 as a model analyte. These films were synthesised by anodically polymerising pyrrole in the presence of Acid Red 1 as a supporting electrolyte. In this way, the anionic Acid Red 1 is electrostatically attracted to the cationic polypyrrole backbone formed to maintain electroneutrality, and is thus entrapped in the film. These Acid Red 1-entrapped polypyrrole films were characterised by electrochemical, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Based on a two-level factorial design, the solution pH, Acid Red 1 concentration and polymerisation duration were identified as significant parameters affecting the entrapment efficiency. The entrapment process will potentially aid in decolourising Acid Red 1-containing wastewaters. Similarly, in a cathodic process, electrons are supplied to neutralise the polypyrrole backbone, liberating Acid Red 1 into a solution. In this work, following an entrapment duration of 480 min in 2000 mg L{sup −1} Acid Red 1, we estimated 21% of the dye was liberated after a reduction period of 240 min. This allows the recovery of Acid Red 1 for recycling purposes. A distinctive advantage of this electrochemical Acid Red 1 treatment, compared to many other techniques, is that no known toxic by-products are generated in the treatment. Therefore, conducting polypyrrole films can potentially be applied as an environmentally friendly treatment method for textile effluents.

  8. Magnetically Recyclable Fe3O4@His@Cu Nanocatalyst for Degradation of Azo Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtan, U; Amir, Md; Baykal, A; Sözeri, H; Toprak, M S

    2016-03-01

    Fe3O4@His@Cu magnetic recyclable nanocatalyst (MRCs) was synthesized by reflux method using L-histidine as linker. The composition, structure and magnetic property of the product were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). Powder XRD, FT-IR and EDAX results confirmed that the as-synthesized products has Fe3O4 with spinel structure and Cu nanoparticles with moderate crystallinity without any other impurities. The surface of the Fe3O4@His nanocomposite was covered by tiny Cu nanoparticles. We examine the catalytic activity of Fe3O4@His@Cu MRCs for the degradation of two azo dyes, methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB) as well as their mixture. The reusability of the nanocatalyst was good and sustained even after 3 cycles. Therefore this innovated Fe3O4@His@Cu MRCs has a potential to be used for purification of waste water.

  9. Anion recognition ability of a novel azo dye derived from 4-hydroxycoumarin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandel, Madhurya; Roy, Sutapa Mondal; Sharma, Darshna [Department of Applied Chemistry, SV National Institute of Technology, Surat, Gujarat (India); Sahoo, Suban K., E-mail: suban_sahoo@rediffmail.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, SV National Institute of Technology, Surat, Gujarat (India); Patel, Amit; Kumari, Premlata [Department of Applied Chemistry, SV National Institute of Technology, Surat, Gujarat (India); Dhale, Ranu S. [School of Chemical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar, Odisha (India); Ashok, Kumar S.K. [School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Nandre, Jitendra P.; Patil, Umesh D. [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-10-15

    The anion recognition ability of a novel azo dye derived from 4-hydroxycuomarin (L) was investigated by experimental (UV–vis, fluorescence and {sup 1}H NMR) and theoretical [(B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)] methods. Among the surveyed anions, the receptor L showed both naked-eye detectable color and spectral changes in the presence of F{sup −}, AcO{sup −} and H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup −} due to the formation of hydrogen bonding complexes followed by deprotonation between these anions and L. - Highlights: • Anion recognition ability of an easy-to-prepare coumarin derivative L was reported. • L showed both naked-eye and spectral responses towards AcO{sup −}, F{sup −} and H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup −}. • Deprotonation mechanism was proposed for the observed spectral responses. • L showed selective ratiometric fluorescence ‘turn-on’ responses towards AcO{sup −} and F{sup −}.

  10. Green synthesis of palladium nanoparticles with carboxymethyl cellulose for degradation of azo-dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gang; Li, Yun; Wang, Zhengdong; Liu, Huihong, E-mail: huihongliu@126.com

    2017-02-01

    Palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) were synthesized through friendly environmental method using PdCl{sub 2} and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in an aqueous solution (pH 6) at controlled water bath (80 °C) for 30 min. CMC functioned as both reducing and stabilizing agent. The characterization through high resolution-transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) and X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF) inferred that the as-synthesized PdNPs were spherical in shape with a face cubic crystal (FCC) structure. The results from dynamic light scattering (DLS) suggested the PdNPs had the narrow size distribution with an average size of 2.5 nm. The negative zeta potential (−52.6 mV) kept the as-synthesized PdNPs stable more than one year. The PdNPs showed the excellent catalytic activity by reducing degradation of azo-dyes, such as p-Aminoazobenzene, acid red 66, acid orange 7, scarlet 3G and reactive yellow 179, in the present of sodium borohydride. - Highlights: • Green synthesis of palladium nanoparticles using carboxymethyl cellulose. • The synthesis of palladium nanoparticles were performed easily. • Carboxymethyl cellulose acts as both reducing and stabilization agents. • The as-synthesized palladium nanoparticles show excellent catalytic activity.

  11. Efficiency of Polymeric Membrane Graphene Oxide-TiO2 for Removal of Azo Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Dadvar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving the desired standard of drinking water quality has been one of the concerns across water treatment plants in the developing countries. Processes such as grid chamber, coagulation, sedimentation, clarification, filtration, and disinfection are typically used in water purification plants. Among these methods, unit filtration which employs polymers is one of the new technologies. There have been many studies about the use of semiconductive TiO2 with graphene oxide (GO on the base of different polymeric membranes for the removal of azo dyes, especially methylene blue (MB. Polymeric GO-TiO2 membranes have high photocatalytic, antifouling property and permeate the flux removal of organic pollutants. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of different polymeric membranes such as anionic perfluorinated polymer (Nafion, cellulose acetate, polycarbonate (PC, polysulfone fluoride (PSF, and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF. The result of this study showed that the GO-TiO2 membrane can be used in the field of water treatment and will be used for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs from wastewater.

  12. Evaluation of integrated anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactor for degradation of azo dye methyl orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, V; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian

    2013-09-01

    This study was to investigate the mineralization of wastewater containing methyl orange (MO) in integrated anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactor with coconut fiber as bio-material. Different aeration periods (3h in phase 1 and 2; 3, 6 and 15 h in phase 3; 24 h in phase 4 and 5) in aerobic chamber were studied with different MO concentration 50, 100, 200, 200 and 300 mg/L as influent from phase 1-5. The color removals estimated from the standard curve of dye versus optical density at its maximum absorption wavelength were 97%, 96%, 97%, 97%, and 96% and COD removals were 75%, 72%, 63%, 81%, and 73% in phase 1-5, respectively. The MO decolorization and COD degradation followed first-order kinetic model and second-order kinetic model, respectively. GC-MS analysis indicated the symmetrical cleavage of azo bond and the reduction in aromatic peak ensured the partial mineralization of MO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Can nitro groups really anchor onto TiO2? Case study of dye-to-TiO2 adsorption using azo dyes with NO2 substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M

    2016-07-28

    The nitro group has recently been suggested as a new type of anchor for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and has shown promising optoelectronic properties. Considering the excellent electron withdrawing ability of the nitro group and wider materials selection brought about by this substituent, it is helpful to evaluate the interfacial structures and photophysics of more organic dyes where NO2 poses as the dye-to-TiO2 anchor. A computational study on a family of azo dyes bearing a nitro group is presented, where the effect of certain side groups on their optical properties is examined. Both isolated dye molecules and dye/TiO2 nanocomposites are studied via density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory, with complementary experimental UV/vis absorption spectroscopy and photovoltaic device testing. Results demonstrate that these nitro-containing dyes prefer a monodentate anchoring mode on a TiO2 cluster. These nitro dyes reveal weak, but non-negligible, adsorption onto TiO2; yet, very low photovoltaic performance once incorporated into a DSSC device. This poor delivery of nitro groups as DSSC anchors is ostensibly inconsistent with previous findings; but is rationalized via the "auxiliary anchor" concept.

  14. Transport behaviors of anionic azo dyes at interface between surfactant-modified flax shives and aqueous solution: Synchrotron infrared and adsorption studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenxia [MOE Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Systems Optimization, Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainability Research, UR-NCEPU, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); Huang, Guohe, E-mail: huang@iseis.org [MOE Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Systems Optimization, Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainability Research, UR-NCEPU, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); An, Chunjiang; Xin, Xiaying [Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainable Communities, University of Regina, Regina, S4S 0A2 (Canada); Zhang, Yan [MOE Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Systems Optimization, Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainability Research, UR-NCEPU, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); Liu, Xia [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, S7N 2V3 (Canada)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Surfactant modified flax shives for removing anionic azo dyes. • The equilibrium and kinetic studies for the adsorption of anionic azo dyes. • The migration patterns of dye pollutants at flax shive-water interface. • New insights from synchrotron infrared-assisted characterization. • Potential as biomass adsorbent for the removal of dyes from wastewater. - Abstract: From the viewpoint of sustainability, biomass adsorbent has a high potential in pollution control and there is an emerging interest to investigate the behaviors of pollutants at the interface between biomass adsorbent and solution. This study investigated the performance of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactant-modified flax shives (MFS) for removal of anionic azo dyes from aqueous solution. The equilibrium and kinetic analysis for the adsorption of Acid Orange 7 (AO-7), Acid Red 18 (AR-18) and Acid Black 1 (AB-1) on MFS were conducted. The surface of MFS was characterized by synchrotron infrared and SEM analysis. The absorbed amount of three anionic azo dyes varied with the change of adsorbent dosage, pH and ionic strength. The adsorption isotherm data well fit to the Langmuir model. The adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics and the liquid film diffusion models. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of three anionic azo dyes was spontaneous. The adsorption of AR-18 and AB-1 onto MFS was endothermic while the adsorption of AO-7 was exothermic. The results can help better understand the behaviors of organic pollutants at biomass adsorbent-water interface. They also present the potential of using MFS as a suitable adsorbent for the removal of anionic azo dyes from wastewater.

  15. Bioconjugatable azo-based dark-quencher dyes: synthesis and application to protease-activatable far-red fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Massif, Cédrik; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2013-01-28

    We describe the efficient synthesis and one-step derivatization of novel, nonfluorescent azo dyes based on the Black Hole Quencher-3 (BHQ-3) scaffold. These dyes were equipped with various reactive and/or bioconjugatable groups (azido, α-iodoacetyl, ketone, terminal alkyne, vicinal diol). The azido derivative was found to be highly reactive in the context of copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reactions and allowed easy synthetic access to the first water-soluble (sulfonated derivative) and aldehyde-modified BHQ-3 dyes, the direct preparation of which failed by means of conventional azo-coupling reactions. The aldehyde- and α-iodoacetyl-containing fluorescence quenchers were readily conjugated to aminooxy- and cysteine-containing peptides by the formation of a stable oxime or thioether linkage, respectively. Further fluorescent labeling of the resultant peptide conjugates with red- or far-red-emitting rhodamine or cyanine dyes through sequential and/or one-pot bioconjugations, led to novel Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based probes suitable for the in vivo detection and imaging of urokinase plasminogen activator, a key protease in cancer invasion and metastasis. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Molecular characterization of a novel thermal stable reductase capable of decoloration of both azo and triphenylmethane dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fen; Ding, Haitao; Shao, Lida; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding a putative triphenylmethane reductase (TMR)-like protein derived from Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-Y593 (named as GtAZR) was synthesized, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and extensively characterized for the first time. The recombinant GtAZR displayed its maximum activity at pH 5.5 and 40 °C. GtAZR was stable at temperatures below 65 °C. It also exhibited a broad pH stability and retained more than 90% of its initial activities in pH range of 4.5-10.5 after incubating in various buffers for 1 h. Moreover, GtAZR showed significant stability against metal ions and organic solvents. GtAZR displayed broad substrate spectrum toward both azo and triphenylmethane dyes. As a sequence and structural TMR-like protein, GtAZR was characterized as an azoreductase biochemically due to its high specificity for azo dye rather than triphenylmethane dye. Molecular docking and mutagenesis analysis revealed that amino acids Asp-79 and Thr-80 are responsible for its azoreductase activity, which eliminated the steric hindrance caused by His-77 and Tyr-78 at the correspond sites in other structural homologous triphenylmethane reductase. The robust stability and substrate promiscuity of GtAZR made it a promising candidate for practical removal of mixed dye wastewater.

  17. Evaluating the effectiveness of marine actinobacterial extract and its mediated titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the degradation of azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyaragini, S; Veena, S; Swetha, D; Karthik, L; Kumar, G; Bhaskara Rao, K V

    2014-04-01

    Aim of the present study was to synthesize titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) from marine actinobacteria and to develop an eco-friendly azo-dye degradation method. A total of five actinobacterial isolates were isolated from Chennai marine sediments, Tamilnadu, India and analyzed for the synthesis of TiO2 NPs using titanium hydroxide. Among these, the isolate PSV 3 showed positive results for the synthesis of TiO2 NPs, which was confirmed by UV analysis. Further characterization of the synthesized TiO2 NPs was done using XRD, AFM and FT-IR analysis. Actinobacterial crude extract and synthesized TiO2 NPs was found efficient in degrading azo dye such as Acid Red 79 (AR-79) and Acid Red 80 (AR-80). Degradation percentage was found to be 81% for AR-79, 83% for AR-80 using actinobacterial crude extract and 84% for AR-79, 85% for AR-80 using TiO2 NPs. Immobilized actinobacterial cells showed 88% for AR-79 and 81% for AR-80, dye degrading capacity. Degraded components were characterized by FT-IR and GC-MS analysis. The phytotoxicity test with 500 μg/mL of untreated dye showed remarkable phenotypic as well as cellular damage to Tagetes erecta plant. Comparatively no such damage was observed on plants by degraded dye components. In biotoxicity assay, treated dyes showed less toxic effect as compared to the untreated dyes. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Decolorization of textile azo dye and Congo red by an isolated strain of the dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium Shewanella xiamenensis BC01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, I-Son; Chen, Tingting; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Xia; Ni, Chao; Sun, Dongzhe

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella xiamenensis BC01 (SXM) was isolated from sediment collected off Xiamen, China and was identified based on the phylogenetic tree of 16S rRNA sequences and the gyrB gene. This strain showed high activity in the decolorization of textile azo dyes, especially methyl orange, reactive red 198, and recalcitrant dye Congo red, decolorizing at rates of 96.2, 93.0, and 87.5%, respectively. SXM had the best performance for the specific decolorization rate (SDR) of azo dyes compared to Proteus hauseri ZMd44 and Aeromonas hydrophila NIU01 strains and had an SDR similar to Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Congo red decolorization. Luria-Bertani medium was the optimal culture medium for SXM, as it reached a density of 4.69 g-DCW L(-1) at 16 h. A mediator (manganese) significantly enhanced the biodegradation and flocculation of Congo red. Further analysis with UV-VIS, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrated that Congo red was cleaved at the azo bond, producing 4,4'-diamino-1,1'-biphenyl and 1,2'-diamino naphthalene 4-sulfonic acid. Finally, SEM results revealed that nanowires exist between the bacteria, indicating that SXM degradation of the azo dyes was coupled with electron transfer through the nanowires. The purpose of this work is to explore the utilization of a novel, dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium in the treatment of wastewater containing azo dyes.

  19. Degradation process analysis of the azo dyes by catalytic wet air oxidation with catalyst CuO/γ-Al2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Li; Ma, Hongrui; Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Three azo dyes (Methyl Orange, Direct Brown and Direct Green) were treated by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) with the catalysts CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) prepared by consecutive impregnation. The relationship of decolorization extent, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal extent and total organic carbon (TOC) in dye solution were investigated. The results indicated that the CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalyst had excellent catalytic activity in treating azo dyes. Almost 99% of color and 70% of TOC were removed in 2h. The high removal extent of color and TOC indicated that the CWAO obtained perfect decomposition for pollutants. The degradation pathway of azo dyes was analyzed by UV-Vis, FTIR and MS. According to the examined results, the hydroxyl ((·)OH) radicals induced strong oxidizing effects in the target solution and destroyed the chromophoric groups of azo-benzene conjugated of the molecular structure. Considering characteristics of the dye structure, the azo bond (-N=N-) would first be attacked by the hydroxyl radical and other free radicals. With the continuous oxidization and the long reaction time at high temperature, these intermediates could be oxidized to the final oxidation products, such as water and carbon dioxide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biodegradation of azo dyes acid red 183, direct blue 15 and direct red 75 by the isolate Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroj, Samta; Kumar, Karunesh; Pareek, Nidhi; Prasad, R; Singh, R P

    2014-07-01

    Soils contaminated with dyes were collected and screened for obtaining potential fungal strains for the degradation of azo dyes. A strain that demonstrated broad spectrum ability for catabolizing different azo dyes viz. Acid Red 183 (AR 183), Direct Blue 15 (DB 15) and Direct Red 75 (DR 75) at 100 mg L(-1) concentration was subsequently identified as Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3 based on 18S and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA gene sequence analysis. The strain has shown remarkably higher levels of degradation (95-100%) for almost all the dyes within 120 h at 30°C at pH 7.0. Notable levels of manganese peroxidase (659.4 ± 20 UL(-1)) during dye decolorization indicated the involvement of this enzyme in the decolorization process. The dyes following decolorization were catabolized as evident by spectroscopic analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. FACTORS AFFECTING THE REMOVAL OF A BASIC AND AN AZO DYE FROM ARTIFICIAL SOLUTIONS BY ADSORPTION USING ACTIVATED CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Albroomi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Decolourisation of wastewater, particularly from textile industries, is one of the major environmental concerns these days. Current methods for removing dyes from wastewater are costly and cannot effectively be used to treat wide range of such wastewater. This work describes the use of commercial available granular activated carbon (GAC as an efficient adsorbent material for dyes removal. Aqueous solutions of various basic dye Methylene Blue (MB and azo-dye Tartrazine with concentrations 5-20 mg l–1 and 10-100 mg l–1, respectively, were shaken with certain amount of GAC to determine the adsorption capacity and removal efficiencies. The effects of adsorbent dose, initial pH, initial dye concentration, agitation speed and contact time on dyes removal efficiencies have been studied. Maximum dye concentration was removed from the solution within 60-90 min after the beginning of every experiment. Adsorption parameters were found to fit well into Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms models with correlation coefficient (R2 > 0.99 in the concentration range of MB and TZ studied.

  2. Semiconductor-mediated photocatalysed degradation of two selected azo dye derivatives, amaranth and bismarck brown in aqueous suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, M Abu; Faisal, M; Muneer, M

    2005-12-09

    Semiconductor-mediated photocatalysed degradation of two selected azo dye derivatives such as amaranth (1) and bismarck brown (2) has been investigated in aqueous suspension by monitoring the change in substrate concentration employing UV spectroscopic analysis technique as a function of irradiation time. The degradation was studied under different conditions such as types of TiO(2), pH, substrate concentration, catalyst concentration, and in the presence of electron acceptors such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), potassium bromate (KBrO(3)) and ammonium persulphate (NH(4))(2)S(2)O(8) besides air. The degradation rates were found to be strongly influenced by all the above parameters. The photocatalyst Degussa P25 showed comparatively highest photocatalytic activity. The dye derivative, bismarck brown (2) was found to degrade faster than amaranth dye (1).

  3. Azo dyes and the blood-brain barrier: Robert Aird's novel concept in chronic neurological disease (1903-2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladin, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    The well-established medical involvement of derivatives of the azo dye industry lent credibility to the 1935 announcement by Stanley Cobb of the use of vital brilliant red dye as an anticonvulsant. Although in the fullness of time clinical experience would discard this concept, nevertheless it was to give rise to Robert Aird who posited that the mechanism of action of this dye was due to its ability to decrease the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. In a very prolonged exploration of this concept, Aird concluded that blood-brain barrier permeability underlay the causation of a long list of chronic neurological conditions--a concept that was eventually abandoned. This article examines the details and the effects of this concept and its impact upon neurology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Degradation of azo dye methyl red by alkaliphilic, halotolerant Nesterenkonia lacusekhoensis EMLA3: application in alkaline and salt-rich dyeing effluent treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amrik; Goyal, Nidhi; Gupta, Anshu

    2017-05-01

    Effluents from textile industries are highly colored due to vast use of various azo dyes and color is the first visual indicator of pollution. Biological treatment of textile effluent is often hampered due to the alkaline pH and high salinity; a common characteristic of many textile industrial wastewaters. Considering this, the present study explores the potential of a newly isolated halotolerant and alkaliphilic bacterium Nesterenkonia lacusekhoensis EMLA3 for degradation of methyl red (MR) dye under alkaline condition. Strain EMLA3 showed 97% degradation of 50 mg L-1 MR after 16 h at initial pH of 11.5 in nutrient medium. Dye degradation by the isolate is supported by the formation of low-molecular weight metabolites as divulge through GC-MS & FTIR studies Optimum dye degradation was observed in the pH range of 8.0-11.5 and temperature range of 30-35 °C. Significant MR degrading activity of the strain could be achieved in the presence of very high salt level (100-120 g L-1 NaCl) and in co-presence of different heavy metals. Application of strain to alkaline pH, salt, and heavy metals laden-textile effluent resulted in overall 83% dye removal from the effluent after 120 h of treatment under static condition. Furthermore, the property of microbe to drop-down the pH of wastewater from 11.5 to 8.60 after treatment also lowers the need of additional neutralization treatment. The entire study thus comes out with novel application of N. lacusekhoensis-a less explored extremophilic bacterium-for treatment of alkaline and salt-rich azo dye-containing wastewaters.

  5. Bismuth Basic Nitrate as a Novel Adsorbent for Azo Dye Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth basic nitrate (BBN and its TiO2-Ag modified sorbent, PTBA were successfully synthesized via a precipitation method. The structural characteristics of prepared sorbents were determined through different analytical techniques. The potential use of prepared sorbents for organic compounds' removal was evaluated using Methyl Orange and Sunset Yellow dyes as model pollutants in aqueous solutions. The experimental results showed that the presence of TiO2 and Ag particles during the crystal growth of bismuth basic nitrate has an effect on the crystal structure, point of zero charge (pHpzc, pore volume and diameter. The lower binding energy of Ti 2p core level peak indicates the octahedral coordination of TiO2 particles on the PTBA surface. The alteration of hydrophilic-hydrophobic characteristics of sorbent's surface improves the adsorptive performance of the modified sorbent and provides an efficient route for organic contaminants' removal from aqueous solutions.

  6. Decolorization and biogas production by an anaerobic consortium: effect of different azo dyes and quinoid redox mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L H; Valdez-Espinoza, R; García-Reyes, R B; Olivo-Alanis, D; Garza-González, M T; Meza-Escalante, E R; Gortáres-Moroyoqui, P

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of azo dyes and quinoid compounds on an anaerobic consortium was evaluated during a decolorization process and biogas production. In addition, the impact of quinoid compounds such as lawsone (LAW) and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) on the rate of decolorization of Direct Blue 71 (DB71) was assessed. The anaerobic consortium was not completely inhibited under all tested dye concentrations (0.1-2 mmol l(-1)), evidenced by an active decolorization process and biogas production. The presence of quinoid compounds at different concentrations (4, 8, and 12 mmol l(-1)) also inhibited biogas production compared to the control incubated without the quinoid compounds. In summary, the anaerobic consortium was affected to a greater extent by increasing the quantity of azo dyes or quinoid compounds. Nevertheless, at a lower concentration (1 mmol l(-1)) of quinoid compounds, the anaerobic consortium effectively decolorized 2 mmol l(-1) of DB71, increasing up to 5.2- and 20.4-fold the rate of decolorization with AQDS and LAW, respectively, compared to the control lacking quinoid compounds.

  7. Novel bio-electro-Fenton technology for azo dye wastewater treatment using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohu; Jin, Xiangdan; Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-03-01

    Development of sustainable technologies for treatment of azo dyes containing wastewaters has long been of great interest. In this study, we proposed an innovative concept of using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC) based Fenton process to treat azo dye wastewater. In such MREC-Fenton integrated process, the production of H2O2 which is the key reactant of fenton-reaction was driven by the electrons harvested from the exoelectrogens and salinity-gradient between sea water and fresh water in MREC. Complete decolorization and mineralization of 400mgL-1 Orange G was achieved with apparent first order rate constants of 1.15±0.06 and 0.26±0.03h-1, respectively. Furthermore, the initial concentration of orange G, initial solution pH, catholyte concentration, high and low concentration salt water flow rate and air flow rate were all found to significantly affect the dye degradation. This study provides an efficient and cost-effective system for the degradation of non-biodegradable pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficient treatment of azo dye containing wastewater in a hybrid acidogenic bioreactor stimulated by biocatalyzed electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Cheng; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Wang, Shu-Sen; Cui, Dan; Han, Jing-Long; Hu, Ya-Ping; Su, Shi-Gang; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel scaled-up hybrid acidogenic bioreactor (HAB) was designed and adopted to evaluate the performance of azo dye (acid red G, ARG) containing wastewater treatment. Principally, HAB is an acidogenic bioreactor coupled with a biocatalyzed electrolysis module. The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and ARG loading rate on the performance of HAB were investigated. In addition, the influent was switched from synthetic wastewater to domestic wastewater to examine the key parameters for the application of HAB. The results showed that the introduction of the biocatalyzed electrolysis module could enhance anoxic decolorization and COD (chemical oxygen demand) removal. The combined process of HAB-CASS presented superior performance compared to a control system without biocatalyzed electrolysis (AB-CASS). When the influent was switched to domestic wastewater, with an environment having more balanced nutrients and diverse organic matters, the ARG, COD and nitrogen removal efficiencies of HAB-CASS were further improved, reaching 73.3%±2.5%, 86.2%±3.8% and 93.5%±1.6% at HRT of 6 hr, respectively, which were much higher than those of AB-CASS (61.1%±4.7%, 75.4%±5.0% and 82.1%±2.1%, respectively). Moreover, larger TCV/TV (total cathode volume/total volume) for HAB led to higher current and ARG removal. The ARG removal efficiency and current at TCV/TV of 0.15 were 39.2%±3.7% and 28.30±1.48 mA, respectively. They were significantly increased to 62.1%±2.0% and 34.55±0.83 mA at TCV/TV of 0.25. These results show that HAB system could be used to effectively treat real wastewater. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Photocatalytic degradation of an azo-dye on TiO2/activated carbon composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriantsiferana, C; Mohamed, E F; Delmas, H

    2014-01-01

    A sequential adsorption/photocatalytic regeneration process to remove tartrazine, an azo-dye in aqueous solution, has been investigated. The aim ofthis work was to compare the effectiveness of an adsorbent/photocatalyst composite-TiO2 deposited onto activated carbon (AC) - and a simple mixture of powders of TiO2 and AC in same proportion. The composite was an innovative material as the photocatalyst, TiO2, was deposited on the porous surface ofa microporous-AC using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition in fluidized bed. The sequential process was composed of two-batch step cycles: every cycle alternated a step of adsorption and a step of photocatalytic oxidation under ultra-violet (365 nm), at 25 degreeC and atmospheric pressure. Both steps, adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation, have been investigated during four cycles. For both materials, the cumulated amounts adsorbed during four cycles corresponded to nearly twice the maximum adsorption capacities qmax proving the photocatalytic oxidation to regenerate the adsorbent. Concerning photocatalytic oxidation, the degree of mineralization was higher with the TiO2/AC composite: for each cycle, the value of the total organic carbon removal was 25% higher than that obtained with the mixture powder. These better photocatalytic performances involved better regeneration than higher adsorbed amounts for cycles 2, 3 and 4. Better performances with this promising material - TiO2 deposited onto AC - compared with TiO2 powder could be explained by the vicinity of photocatalytic and AC adsorption sites.

  10. Biological degradation of anthroquinone and azo dyes by a novel laccase from Lentinus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-An; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Su, Yu-Chang; Jiang, Zhi-Bing; Chen, Chin-Wen; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2012-05-01

    This study identifies a new fungal strain, Lentinus sp., that can produce extracellular forms of laccases with an activity of approximately 58 300 U/L. A purified laccase (designated lcc3) was identified by LC-ESI MS/MS as an N-linkage glycosylated protein. The isolated lcc3 cDNA is composed of 1563 bp encoding for a polypeptide of 521 amino acid residues with 4 putative Cu binding regions. Kinetic analyses revealed that the specific activity, k(cat), K(m), and k(cat)/K(m) of lcc3 at pH 2.5 and 70 °C with 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) used as a substrate was 2047 U mg(-1), 2017 s(-1), 8.4 μM, and 240 s(-1) μM(-1), respectively. Lcc3 is stable at pH 6.0-10.0 and has a midpoint temperature (T(m)) of 77.1 °C. We observed 97% decolorization efficiency on Acid Blue 80, 88% on RBBR, and 61% on Acid Red 37 by lcc3. Structural modeling analysis showed that five, four, and three hydrogen bonds can be formed between Acid Blue 80 and Arg(178), Arg(182), or Asn(358); between RBBR and His(132), Ser(134), or Asp(482); and between Acid Red 37 and Arg(178), respectively. Notably, Lentinus lcc3 efficiently reversed the toxicity of anthraquinone and azo dyes on rice seed germination and decolorized industrial textile effluent, suggesting the enzyme may be valuable for bioremediation. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  11. Enhanced bio-decolorization of azo dyes by co-immobilized quinone-reducing consortium and anthraquinone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, YY; Zhang, Yifeng; Wang, J

    2009-01-01

    exhibited good catalytic activity and increased the decolorization rate for many kinds of azo dyes. The reusability of the co-immobilized beads was evaluated with repeated-batch decolorization experiments. After ten repeated experiments, the decolorization rate of co-immobilized beads retained over 92.......8% of their original value. Furthermore, acclimatized quinone-reducing consortium was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rDNA gene sequencing to get the complete picture of its diversity. This study explored a great improvement of conventional treatment system and the new bio...

  12. Synthesis and Spectral Characterization of Praseodymium(III Complex with New Amino Acid-Based Azo Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Praseodymium (Pr (III complex has been synthesized and characterized by using a new amino acid-based (leucine azo dye such as N,N-dimethylazoleucine (L1 and 1,10 phenanthroline (L2. Reaction of Pr(III ion with L1 and L2 in 1 : 2 : 1 ratio in alcoholic medium has been carried out with general formula [Pr(L12(L2(H2O2]. Elemental analysis, comparative FT-IR, and 1HNMR spectral studies of Pr(III complex with ligands have been shown in this paper.

  13. Synthesis, structural characterization and tautomeric properties of some novel bis-azo dyes derived from 5-arylidene-2,4-thiazolidinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Asadollah; Safarnejad, Mastaneh

    2014-05-21

    Nine new bis-azo dyes derived from 5-arylidene-2,4-thiazolidinone have been synthesized in two steps using Knoevenagel condensation and diazotization-coupling reaction. The structures of the compounds were confirmed by UV-vis, IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques. The spectral characterizations demonstrate that there is an equilibrium between the azo (T1) and hydrazine (T2 and T3) tautomers for all prepared dyes in solutions. In addition, the solvatochromic behavior of the prepared dyes was evaluated using polarity/polarizability parameter (π(*)) in various solvents. The UV-vis absorption spectra of dyes show a bathochromic shift with increasing polarity and base strength of the solvents. Finally, the effects of acid and base on the UV-vis absorption spectra of the dyes with different substituent in diazo component are reported. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. New 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes. Part II: synthesis, characterization, electrochemical properties and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Erfantalab, Malihe; Bayat, Atena; Babaei, Ali; Sohrabi, Masoud

    2012-11-01

    A new series of monoiminated 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes have been synthesized via condensation reaction of 4-amino-3-methyl-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole with various substituted azo-coupled salicylaldehyde. The dyes have been characterized by using FT-IR, UV-Vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopic methods as well as elemental analysis. The electrochemical behavior of the dyes has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry in DMSO at five different scan rates. Solvatochromic behavior of the dyes has been also investigated in four organic solvents with different polarities. Furthermore, the (1)H chemical shielding of the dyes were studied by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method at the level of density functional theory (DFT). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hepatotoxicity assessment of the azo dyes disperse orange 1 (DO1), disperse red 1 (DR1) and disperse red 13 (DR13) in HEPG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Elisa R A; Li, Zhaohui; Boubriak, Olga; de Oliveira, Danielle P

    2012-01-01

    During the dyeing process in baths approximately 10 to 15% of the dyes used are lost and reach industrial effluents, thus polluting the environment. Studies showed that some classes of dyes, mainly azo dyes and their by-products, exert adverse effects on humans and local biota, since the wastewater treatment systems and water treatment plants were found to be ineffective in removing the color and reducing toxicity of some dyes. In the present study, the toxicity of the azo dyes disperse orange 1 (DO1), disperse red 1 (DR1), and disperse red 13 (DR13) was evaluated in HepG2 cells grown in monolayers or in three dimensional (3D) culture. Hepatotoxicity of the dyes was measured using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) and cell counting kit 8 (CCK-8) assays after 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation of cells with 3 different concentrations of the azo dyes. The dye DO1 only reduced the mitochondrial activity in HepG2 cells grown in a monolayer after 72 h incubation, while the dye DR1 showed this deleterious effect in both monolayer and 3D culture. In contrast, dye DR13 decreased the mitochondrial activity after 24, 48, and 72 h of exposure in both monolayer and 3D culture. With respect to dehydrogenase activity, only the dye DR13 diminished the activity of this enzyme after 72 h of exposure in both monolayer and 3D culture. Our results clearly demonstrated that exposure to the studied dyes induced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells.

  16. Aerobic decolorization and degradation of azo dyes by growing cells of a newly isolated yeast Candida tropicalis TL-F1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liang; Ning, Shuxiang; Zhang, Xuwang; Shi, Shengnan

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the decolorization and degradation of azo dyes by growing cells of a new yeast strain TL-F1 which was isolated from the sea mud. Strain TL-F1 was identified as Candida tropicalis on the basis of 28S rDNA analysis. Various azo dyes (20mg/L) were efficiently decolorized through aerobic degradation. Meantime, the effects of different parameters on both decolorization of Acid Brilliant Scarlet GR and growth of strain TL-F1 were investigated. Furthermore, possible degradation pathway of the dye GR was proposed through analysis of metabolic products using UV-Vis spectroscopy and HPLC-MS methods. As far as it is known, it is the first systematic research on a C. tropicalis strain which is capable of efficiently decolorizing various azo dyes under aerobic condition. This work provides a potentially useful microbial strain TL-F1 for treatment of azo dye contaminated wastewater. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Decolorization and detoxification of Synozol red HF-6BN azo dye, by Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Ilyas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation the fungi, Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. were employed for decolorization of Synazol red HF-6BN. Decolorization study showed that Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. were able to decolorize 88% and 96% Synazol red 6BN, respectively, in 24 days. It was also studied that 86% and 90% Synazol red containing of dye effluent was decolorized by Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. after 28 days of incubation at room temperature. A fungal-based protein with relative molecular mass of 70 kDa was partially purified and examined for enzymatic characteristics. The enzyme exhibited highest activity at temperature ranging from 40-50[degree sign]C and at pH=6.0. The enzyme activity was enhanced in the presence of metal cations. High performance liquid chromatography analysis confirmed that these fungal strains are capable to degrade Synazol red dye into metabolites. No zones of inhibition on agar plates and growth of Vigna radiata in the presence of dye extracted sample, indicated that the fungal degraded dye metabolites are nontoxic to beneficial micro-flora and plant growth. Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. have promising potential in color removal from textile wastewater-containing azo dyes.

  18. Improved photostability of hydrophobic natural dye incorporated in organo-modified hydrotalcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Yoshiumi; Asai, Saeko; Shibata, Masashi; Fukuhara, Choji; Maeda, Yasuhisa; Tomita, Yasumasa; Kobayashi, Kenkichiro

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene and annatto extract are typical carotenoids used as safe colorants for foods. However, the instability against irradiation limits their wide use. The improvement of stability was investigated by the intercalation of dye into the interlayer space of the anion-exchangeable clay, hydrotalcite. A hydrophobic environment was constructed in the interlayer space of the hydrotalcite by its modification with anionic surfactants (dodecyl sulfate and dodecylbenzene sulfonate). The lipophilic β-carotene and annatto dye were successfully incorporated into the organo-modified hydrotalcite, and the incorporated dyes exhibited improved photostability under visible irradiation from a 100 W halogen lamp (190 klux) in the air. The effect of the stabilization on the anionic annatto dye was higher by the incorporation in the modified hydrotalcite than that in the modified cation exchangeable clay, suggesting that the polarity of the clay sheet had some influence on the stabilization of the incorporated dye. The stabilization effect of β-carotene was not so significant as that of the annatto dye, because sufficient intercalation of non-polar β-carotene might require stronger hydrophobic environment. The π-π interaction between the β-carotene and the benzene ring of dodecylbenzene sulfonate was found to contribute to the stability enhancement.

  19. Complex formation, thermal behavior and stability competition between Cu(II) ion and Cu(0) nanoparticles with some new azo dyes. Antioxidant and in vitro cytotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, M; El-Sayed, Y S; El-Baradie, K Y; Fahmy, R M

    2013-04-15

    Four triazole and thiadiazole-based azo chromophores namely [(E)-4-((1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)diazenyl)benzene-1,3-diol.(HL(1)), (E)-4-((5-(methylthio)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)diazenyl)benzene-1,3-diol.(HL(2)), (E)-4-((1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)diazenyl)benzene-1,3-diol.(HL(3)) and (E)-4-((5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)diazenyl)benzene-1,3-diol.(HL(4))] were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis as well as mass spectroscopy. Cu(II) complexes of the investigated azo dyes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, electronic and ESR spectra, magnetic susceptibility and thermogravimetric analyses. The bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes. The mode of interaction of the azodyes to copper nanoparticles was described as coordination mode of charged dye molecules on the colloidal Cu(0) surface through anchoring OH(-) group. The apparent association constants of the colloidal copper nanoparticles azodye complexes in solution were evaluated using the spectral method and compared with the formation constant of the Cu(II) azo complexes. The antitumor and antioxidant activities of the synthesized azo dyes and their Cu(II) azo complexes have been evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Deciphering effects of functional groups and electron density on azo dyes degradation by graphene loaded TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qian [College of Chemical Engineering, HuaQiao University, Xiamen 361021 (China); Liang, Xiao [School of Environment and Architecture, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Chen, Bor-Yann [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National I-Lan University, 26047, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chang-Tang, E-mail: ctchang@niu.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering, National I-Lan University, 26047, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The degradation pathways of RB5, RB171 and RR198 have been identified. • The favorable bond to be broken under photo degradation was deciphered in this research. • The breakages of the bonds were due to the electron density changes around the bonds. • The hydroxyl radicals as the main oxidized species were confirmed by positive hole trapper and ESR. - Abstract: This study tended to decipher the mechanism of photo degradation of azo dyes, which bond was favorable to be broken for application of wastewater decolorization. That is, from chemical structure perspective, the critical substituents to affect electron donor/acceptor for dye degradation would be identified in this research. The model reactive blacks (RB5), reactive blue 171 (RB171) and reactive red 198 (RR198) were degraded by graphene loaded TiO{sub 2}, indicating how the electron withdrawing and releasing groups affect azo dye degradability. The byproducts and intermediate products were analyzed by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis), gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and ion chromatography (IC). Furthermore, the radicals involved in the reaction were found by electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR) to confirm the main oxidized species of hydroxyl radicals rather than the light generated positive holes. The finding revealed that the breakages of the bonds were due to the electron density changes around the bonds. This principle can be applicable not only for RB5 degradation, but also for reactive blue 171 (RB171), reactive red 198 (RR198) and some other textile dyes.

  1. Determination of Aromatic Amines Released from Azo Dyes in Paper Packaging by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Bian, Zhaoyang; Li, Zhonghao; Fan, Ziyan; Wang, Ying; Liu, ShanShan; Deng, Huimin; Tang, Gangling

    2016-09-01

    An LC-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) method for the determination of 21 kinds of carcinogenic aromatic amines released from azo dyes in food wrappers was used in this research. Sodium dithionite was added to a citric acid buffer medium to reduce and decompose possible azo dyes. The extract was analyzed after liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and dispersive SPE (d-SPE). The conditions for chromatographic separation, mass spectrum, LLE, and d-SPE were optimized. Under optimal conditions, the LOD was in the range of 0.13-0.35 mg/kg and LOQ in the range of 0.38-1.05 mg/kg, with the addition of standard recoveries of most aromatic amines being ≥80% and RSDs ≤10%. The recoveries for 2,4-diaminotoluene and 2,4-diaminoanisole were significantly lower, being ≤40%. The method was successfully used to analyze 30 practical samples, and the results showed that it is user-friendly, with high sensitivity, rapid control, and low matrix interference.

  2. Mineralization of reactive azo dyes present in simulated textile waste water using down flow microaerophilic fixed film bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balapure, Kshama; Bhatt, Nikhil; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-01-01

    The present research emphasizes on degradation of azo dyes from simulated textile wastewater using down flow microaerophilic fixed film reactor. Degradation of simulated textile wastewater (COD 7200mg/L and dye concentration 300mg/L) was studied in a microaerophilic fixed film reactor using pumice stone as a support material under varying hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR). The intense metabolic activity of the inoculated bacterial consortium in the reactor led to 97.5% COD reduction and 99.5% decolorization of simulated wastewater operated under OLR of 7.2kgCODm(3)/d and 24h of HRT. FTIR, (1)H NMR and GC-MS studies revealed the formation of lower molecular weight aliphatic compounds under 24h of HRT, leading to complete mineralization of simulated wastewater. The detection of oxido-reductive enzyme activities suggested the enzymatic reduction of azo bonds prior to mineralization. Toxicity studies indicated that microbial treatment favors detoxification of simulated wastewater. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. CYP-450 isoenzymes catalyze the generation of hazardous aromatic amines after reaction with the azo dye Sudan III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Thalita Boldrin; Lizier, Thiago M; Assis, Marilda das Dores; Zanoni, Maria Valnice B; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma

    2013-07-01

    This work describes the mutagenic response of Sudan III, an adulterant food dye, using Salmonella typhimurium assay and the generation of hazardous aromatic amines after different oxidation methods of this azo dye. For that, we used metabolic activation by S9, catalytic oxidation by ironporphyrin and electrochemistry oxidation in order to simulate endogenous oxidation conditions. The oxidation reactions promoted discoloration from 65% to 95% of Sudan III at 1 × 10(-4)molL(-1) and generation of 7.6 × 10(-7)molL(-1) to 0.31 × 10(-4)molL(-1) of aniline, o-anisidine, 2-methoxi-5-methylaniline, 4-aminobiphenyl, 4,4'-oxydianiline; 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane and 2,6-dimethylaniline. The results were confirmed by LC-MS-MS experiments. We also correlate the mutagenic effects of Sudan III using S. typhimurium with the strain TA1535 in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation (S9) with the metabolization products of this compound. Our findings clearly indicate that aromatic amines are formed due to oxidative reactions that can be promoted by hepatic cells, after the ingestion of Sudan III. Considering that, the use of azo compounds as food dyestuffs should be carefully controlled. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute and subchronic toxicity of metal complex azo acid dye and anionic surfactant oil on fish Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amwele, Hilma Rantilla; Papirom, Pittaya; Chukanhom, Kanit; Beamish, Fredrick Henry William; Petkam, Rakpong

    2015-01-01

    The acute toxicity study of metal complex dark green azo acid dye, anionic surfactant oil and their mixture determined the 96 hr LC50, and fish behaviours. Subchronic toxicity determined haematology parameters and concentrations of copper and chromium in blood. The 96 hr LC50 was determined by probit analysis and subchronic toxicity was conducted in 90 days. No mortalities were observed in control and anionic surfactant oil treatments. The 96 hr LC50 value of mixture was 26.7 mg I(-1) (95% CL = 20.7 - 46.8) and that of metal complex dark green azo acid dye was not met as the percentage of dead was below 50% of tested organisms. In a treatment of anionic surfactant oil and that of mixture observed behaviours were respiration response, uncoordinated movement, loss of equilibrium, erratic posture and loss of responsiveness. Subchronic toxicity indicated fluctuations in number of erythrocytes, leukocytes and thrombocytes in all chemical treatments. Erythrocyte morphology such as anisocytosis, erythrocytes hypertrophy, karyolysis, cytoplasm vacuolation, ghost cell were observed in fish blood in all chemical treatments. An inverse relation was observed between total copper and chromium concentration in blood. However, the toxicity effect was chemical dose dependent and length of exposure.

  5. Degradation of a model azo dye in submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baêta, B E L; Luna, H J; Sanson, A L; Silva, S Q; Aquino, S F

    2013-10-15

    This work investigated the anaerobic degradation of the model azo dye Remazol Yellow Gold RNL in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) and two submerged anaerobic membrane (SAMBR) bioreactors, one of which (SAMBR-1) was operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC) in its interior. The reactors were operated at 35 °C with a hydraulic retention time of 24 h in three operational phases, aimed to assess the effect of external sources of carbon (glucose) or redox mediator (yeast extract) on the removal or color and organic matter. The results showed that removal efficiencies of COD (73-94%) and color (90-94%) were higher for SAMBR-1 when compared to SAMBR-2 (operated without PAC) and UASB reactors. In addition, the presence of PAC in SAMBR-1 increased reactor stability, thereby leading to a lower accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The microfiltration membrane was responsible for an additional removal of ~50% of soluble residual COD in the form of VFA, thus improving permeate quality. On its turn, PAC exhibited the ability to adsorb byproducts (aromatic amines) of azo dye degradation as well as to act as source of immobilized redox mediator (quinone groups on its surface), thereby enhancing color removal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Microbial diversity in a continuous system based on rice husks for biodegradation of the azo dyes Reactive Red 2 and Reactive Black 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forss, Jörgen; Pinhassi, Jarone; Lindh, Markus; Welander, Ulrika

    2013-02-01

    In the present study the degradation of two common azo dyes used in dye houses today, Reactive Black 5 and Reactive Red 2 was evaluated in biofilters. In two experiments, bioreactors performed over 80% decolorization at a hydraulic retention time of only 28.4h with little production of metabolites. Molecular analyses showed a diverse and dynamic bacterial community composition in the bioreactors, including members of the Bacteroidetes, Acinetobacter (Gammaproteobacteria) and Clostridium (Firmicutes) that possess the capacity to reduce azo dyes. Collectively, the results indicate that the development of mixed bacterial communities from natural biomaterials contributes to an efficient and robust degradation performance in bioreactors even at high concentration of dyes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of non-regulated aromatic amines of toxicological concern which can be cleaved from azo dyes used in clothing textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüschweiler, Beat J; Küng, Simon; Bürgi, Daniel; Muralt, Lorenz; Nyfeler, Erich

    2014-07-01

    Azo dyes in textiles may release aromatic amines after enzymatic cleavage by skin bacteria or after dermal absorption and metabolism in the human body. From the 896 azo dyes with known chemical structure in the available textile dyes database, 426 azo dyes (48%) can generate one or more of the 22 regulated aromatic amines in the European Union in Annex XVII of REACH. Another 470 azo dyes (52%) can be cleaved into exclusively non-regulated aromatic amines. In this study, a search for publicly available toxicity data on non-regulated aromatic amines was performed. For a considerable percentage of non-regulated aromatic amines, the toxicity database was found to be insufficient or non-existent. 62 non-regulated aromatic amines with available toxicity data were prioritized by expert judgment with objective criteria according to their potential for carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, and/or skin sensitization. To investigate the occurrence of azo dye cleavage products, 153 random samples of clothing textiles were taken from Swiss retail outlets and analyzed for 22 high priority non-regulated aromatic amines of toxicological concern. Eight of these 22 non-regulated aromatic amines of concern could be detected in 17% of the textile samples. In 9% of the samples, one or more of the aromatic amines of concern could be detected in concentrations >30 mg/kg, in 8% of the samples between 5 and 30 mg/kg. The highest measured concentration was 622 mg/kg textile. There is an obvious need to assess consumer health risks for these non-regulated aromatic amines and to fill this gap in the regulation of clothing textiles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Chlorination treatment of aqueous samples reduces, but does not eliminate, the mutagenic effect of the azo dyes Disperse Red 1, Disperse Red 13 and Disperse Orange 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, G A R; Ferraz, E R A; Chequer, F M D; Grando, M D; Angeli, J P F; Tsuboy, M S; Marcarini, J C; Mantovani, M S; Osugi, M E; Lizier, T M; Zanoni, M V B; Oliveira, D P

    2010-12-21

    The treatment of textile effluents by the conventional method based on activated sludge followed by a chlorination step is not usually an effective method to remove azo dyes, and can generate products more mutagenic than the untreated dyes. The present work evaluated the efficiency of conventional chlorination to remove the genotoxicity/mutagenicity of the azo dyes Disperse Red 1, Disperse Orange 1, and Disperse Red 13 from aqueous solutions. The comet and micronucleus assays with HepG2 cells and the Salmonella mutagenicity assay were used. The degradation of the dye molecules after the same treatment was also evaluated, using ultraviolet and visible absorption spectrum measurements (UV-vis), high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a diode-array detector (HPLC-DAD), and total organic carbon removal (TOC) analysis. The comet assay showed that the three dyes studied induced damage in the DNA of the HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. After chlorination, these dyes remained genotoxic, although with a lower damage index (DI). The micronucleus test showed that the mutagenic activity of the dyes investigated was completely removed by chlorination, under the conditions tested. The Salmonella assay showed that chlorination reduced the mutagenicity of all three dyes in strain YG1041, but increased the mutagenicity of Disperse Red 1 and Disperse Orange 1 in strain TA98. With respect to chemical analysis, all the solutions showed rapid discoloration and a reduction in the absorbance bands characteristic of the chromophore group of each dye. However, the TOC was not completely removed, showing that chlorination of these dyes is not efficient in mineralizing them. It was concluded that conventional chlorination should be used with caution for the treatment of aqueous samples contaminated with azo dyes. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Reductive decolorization of the azo dye RR2 in the absence and presence of redox mediator and the electrons acceptor nitrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauna, C.H.D.; Mota, S.; Santos, dos A.B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aimed at evaluating the effect of nitrate on anaerobic azo dye reduction by using mesophilic bioreactors, in the absence and in the presence of redox mediators. Two anaerobic bioreactors were operated in parallel with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of ten hours; ethanol was used as

  10. Transport behaviors of anionic azo dyes at interface between surfactant-modified flax shives and aqueous solution: Synchrotron infrared and adsorption studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenxia; Huang, Guohe; An, Chunjiang; Xin, Xiaying; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Xia

    2017-05-01

    From the viewpoint of sustainability, biomass adsorbent has a high potential in pollution control and there is an emerging interest to investigate the behaviors of pollutants at the interface between biomass adsorbent and solution. This study investigated the performance of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactant-modified flax shives (MFS) for removal of anionic azo dyes from aqueous solution. The equilibrium and kinetic analysis for the adsorption of Acid Orange 7 (AO-7), Acid Red 18 (AR-18) and Acid Black 1 (AB-1) on MFS were conducted. The surface of MFS was characterized by synchrotron infrared and SEM analysis. The absorbed amount of three anionic azo dyes varied with the change of adsorbent dosage, pH and ionic strength. The adsorption isotherm data well fit to the Langmuir model. The adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics and the liquid film diffusion models. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of three anionic azo dyes was spontaneous. The adsorption of AR-18 and AB-1 onto MFS was endothermic while the adsorption of AO-7 was exothermic. The results can help better understand the behaviors of organic pollutants at biomass adsorbent-water interface. They also present the potential of using MFS as a suitable adsorbent for the removal of anionic azo dyes from wastewater.

  11. Cancer risk assessment of azo dyes and aromatic amines from tattoo bands, folders of paper, toys, bed clothes, watch straps and ink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeilmaker MJ; Kranen HJ van; Veen MP van; Janus J; LBM

    2000-01-01

    A quantitative assessment was performed to estimate the cancer risk to individuals using tattoo bands, folders of paper, toys, bed clothes, watch straps and ink which are coloured with azo dyes. In these products benzidine and the benzidine related amines o-anisidine, 2,4-toluenediamine,

  12. Biosurfactant production from Pseudomonas taiwanensis L1011 and its application in accelerating the chemical and biological decolorization of azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cong; You, Yanting; Zhao, Ruofei; Sun, Di; Zhang, Peng; Jiang, Jihong; Zhu, Aihua; Liu, Weijie

    2017-11-01

    Dye dispersion and the interaction efficiency between azoreductases and dye molecules are rate-limiting steps for the decolorization of azo dyes. In this study, a biosurfactant-producing strain, Pseudomonas taiwanensis L1011, was isolated from crude oil. To increase the yield of the biosurfactant BS-L1011 from P. taiwanensis L1011, culture conditions were optimized including temperature, initial pH, carbon source, nitrogen source and C/N ratio. A maximum yield of 1.12g/L of BS-L1011 was obtained using D-mannitol as carbon source and yeast extract/urea as compound nitrogen source with C/N ratio of 10/4, pH 7.0 and 28°C. BS-L1011 exhibited a low critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 10.5mg/L and was able to reduce the surface tension of water to 25.8±0.1 mN/m. BS-L1011 was stable over a wide range of temperatures, pH values and salt concentrations. The biosurfactant is reported for the first time to accelerate chemical decolorization of Congo red by sodium hypochlorite, and biological decolorization of Amaranth by Bacillus circulans BWL1061, thus showing a potential in the treatment of dyeing wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Decolorization and degradation of xenobiotic azo dye Reactive Yellow-84A and textile effluent by Galactomyces geotrichum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindwar, Sanjay P; Kurade, Mayur B; Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kabra, Akhil N; Kim, Pil Joo; Waghmode, Tatoba R

    2014-08-01

    Galactomyces geotrichum MTCC 1360 exhibited 86% decolorization of azo dye Reactive Yellow-84A (50mgL(-1)) within 30h at 30°C and pH 7.0 under static condition. Examination of azoreductase, laccase and tyrosinase enzyme activities confirmed their prominent role in Reactive Yellow-84A degradation. Considerable reduction of COD (73%) and TOC (62%) during degradation of the dye was indicative of conversion of complex dye into simple products, which were further analyzed by HPLC, FTIR, GC-MS and HPTLC. The degradation products were identified as 4(5-hydroxy, 4-amino cyclopentane) sulfobenzene and 4(5-hydroxy cyclopentane) sulfobenzene by GC-MS. In addition, when G. geotrichum was applied to decolorize textile effluent, it showed 85% of true color removal (ADMI removal) within 72h, along with a significant reduction in TOC and COD. Phytotoxicity studies revealed the less toxic nature of degraded Reactive Yellow-84A as compared to original dye. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Degradation efficiency and mechanism of azo dye RR2 by a novel ozone aerated internal micro-electrolysis filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Bing; Dong, Wen-Yi; Sun, Fei-Yun; Yang, Wei; Dong, Jiao

    2014-07-15

    A newly designed ozone aerated internal micro-electrolysis filter (OIEF) was developed to investigate its degradation efficiencies and correlated reaction mechanisms of RR2 dye. Complete decolorization and 82% TOC removal efficiency were stably achieved in OIEF process. Based on the comprehensive experimental results, an empirical equation was proposed to illustrate the effects of initial dye concentration and ozone dosage rate on color removal. The results indicated that OIEF process could be operated at wide pH range without significant treatment efficiencies change, while the optimum pH for RR2 dye degradation was 9.0. There were 15, 8 and 6 kinds of identified intermediates during ozonation, IE and OIEF treatment processes, respectively. Less identified intermediates and their lower concentrations in OIEF may attribute to its rather excellent mineralization performance. It was found that ozonation, Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) catalyzed ozonation, the redox reactions of electro-reduction and electro-oxidation are the most important mechanisms in OIEF process. The catalytic effect of Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) would induce mutual conversion between dissolved Fe(2+) and Fe(3+), and then decrease the dissolution rate of ZVI. The excellent treatment performance proved that the OIEF process is one promising technology applied for reactive azo dyes and other refractory wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical investigations of substituent effects on the azo-hydrazone tautomerism and acid-base properties of arylazo pyridone dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostanić, J; Mijin, D; Ušćumlić, G; Jovanović, D M; Zlatar, M; Lončarević, D

    2014-04-05

    A series of 5-(4-substituted arylazo)-6-hydroxy-4-methyl-3-cyano-2-pyridone dyes was synthesized and the structure of the dyes was confirmed by UV-Vis, FT-IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques. The azo-hydrazone tautomeric equilibrium was found to depend on the substituents as well as on the acidity and basicity of the media. Ionization constant, pKa, of the dyes was determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy and correlated with the Hammett substituent constants, σp and σI. The interpretation of the effect of different substituent in phenyl ring of arylazo pyridone dyes on their spectroscopic and structural properties was based on quantum chemical calculations performed by the density functional theory (DFT/M06-2X) method. The DFT calculations confirmed the existence of two forms in water solution: hydrazone form in acidic and neutral media and anionic form in basic media. The different contribution of azo and hydrazone canonical forms of anionic form is observed for dyes with electron-donating and dyes with electron-withdrawing groups. The dependence of absorption spectra and determined pKa values to the substituent type seems to be mostly due to azo/hydrazone canonical structure ratio in their anionic form. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Simultaneous Decolorization and Biohydrogen Production from Xylose by Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 in the Presence of Azo Dyes with Sulfonate and Carboxyl Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Cao, Ming-Yue; Wang, Peng-Tao; Wang, Shi; Yue, Ying-Rong; Yuan, Wen-Duo; Qiao, Wei-Chuan; Wang, Fei; Song, Xin

    2017-05-15

    Biohydrogen production from the pulp and paper effluent containing rich lignocellulosic material could be achieved by the fermentation process. Xylose, an important hemicellulose hydrolysis product, is used less efficiently as a substrate for biohydrogen production. Moreover, azo dyes are usually added to fabricate anticounterfeiting paper, which further increases the complexity of wastewater. This study reports that xylose could serve as the sole carbon source for a pure culture of Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 to achieve simultaneous decolorization and biohydrogen production. With 2 g liter-1 of xylose as the substrate, a maximum xylose utilization rate (URxyl) and a hydrogen molar yield (HMY) of 93.99% and 0.259 mol of H2 mol of xylose-1, respectively, were obtained. Biohydrogen kinetics and electron equivalent (e- equiv) balance calculations indicated that methyl red (MR) penetrates and intracellularly inhibits both the pentose phosphate pathway and pyruvate fermentation pathway, while methyl orange (MO) acted independently of the glycolysis and biohydrogen pathway. The data demonstrate that biohydrogen pathways in the presence of azo dyes with sulfonate and carboxyl groups were different, but the azo dyes could be completely reduced during the biohydrogen production period in the presence of MO or MR. The feasibility of hydrogen production from industrial pulp and paper effluent by the strain if the xylose is sufficient was also proved and was not affected by toxic substances which usually exist in such wastewater, except for chlorophenol. This study offers a promising energy-recycling strategy for treating pulp and paper wastewaters, especially for those containing azo dyes.IMPORTANCE The pulp and paper industry is a major industry in many developing countries, and the global market of pulp and paper wastewater treatment is expected to increase by 60% between 2012 and 2020. Such wastewater contains large amounts of refractory contaminants, such as lignin, whose

  17. Toxicity of the azo dyes Acid Red 97 and Bismarck Brown Y to Western clawed frog (Silurana tropicalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Jeriel J; Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Norman, Grant; de Solla, Shane R; Langlois, Valérie S

    2014-03-01

    Azo compounds are used in a variety of industrial applications, such as textile colorant. Azo dyes have been found to contaminate aquatic environments and it has been shown that these compounds could potentially be toxic or induce endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms. However, there are few data available on the toxicity of these dyes, specifically Acid Red 97 (AR97) and Bismarck Brown Y (BBY). The aim of this study was to determine the toxicity and the endocrine-disrupting properties of AR97 and BBY in frogs. As fugacity modeling predicted that both compounds would sorb to sediment, sediment exposures were performed using a geometric range of concentrations (0, 1, 10, 100 and 1,000 ppm). Both AR97 and BBY dyes were not lethal to Silurana tropicalis embryos; however, BBY significantly induced malformations. Gene expression analysis of oxidative stress and mutagen-related genes was performed in BBY-treated larvae. There were significant two-fold increases of the tumor-suppressing protein p53 and heat shock protein 70 mRNA at 1,000 ppm suggesting that BBY induces cellular stress in early S. tropicalis development. Transcripts of the heat shock protein 90 did not change. Furthermore, reproductive-related genes were assessed and a 2.1-fold change was observed in the mRNA of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein while steroid 5 alpha-reductase type 2 and androgen receptor transcript levels did not vary among treatments. In conclusion, high concentrations of BBY lead to increased developmental defects in frog embryogenesis and early larval development.

  18. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Nico-Ag magnetically recyclable nanocatalyst for azo dyes reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtan, U., E-mail: ukurtan@fatih.edu.tr; Amir, Md.; Baykal, A.

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Nico@Ag magnetic recyclable nanocatalyst (MRC) is more effective for the reduction of azo dyes consisting of MB and MO. • It could be reused several times without significant loss in catalytic activity. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Nico@Ag (MRCs) has been successively used for colour reduction of MO, MB, EY, RhB and their mixtures. - Abstract: In this study, we report the successful synthesis of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Nico-Ag nanocomposite as magnetically recyclable nanocatalyst (MRCs) via reflux process at 80 °C for 5 h followed by reduction of Ag{sup +}. FeCl{sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O, FeCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O, AgNO{sub 3} as starting reactants and nicotinic acid as linker. The structure, morphology, thermal behaviour and magnetic properties of the product were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX), thermal gravimetry (TG) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), respectively. The catalytic activity of product for various azo dyes such as methylene blue (MB), methyl orange (MO), Rhodamine B (RhB) and eosin Y (EY) and their double mixtures were studied. It was found that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Nico-Ag MRCs is an efficient catalyst and can also rapidly separated from the reaction medium using magnet without considerable loss in its catalytic activity and used several times. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Nico-Ag MRCs has potential for the treatment of industrial dye pollutants.

  19. Batch and fixed-bed adsorption of tartrazine azo-dye onto activated carbon prepared from apricot stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albroomi, H. I.; Elsayed, M. A.; Baraka, A.; Abdelmaged, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    This work describes the potential of utilizing prepared activated carbon from apricot stones as an efficient adsorbent material for tartrazine (TZ) azo-dye removal in a batch and dynamic adsorption system. The results revealed that activated carbons with well-developed surface area (774 m2/g) and pore volume (1.26 cm3/g) can be manufactured from apricot stones by H3PO4 activation. In batch experiments, effects of the parameters such as initial dye concentration and temperature on the removal of the dye were studied. Equilibrium was achieved in 120 min. Adsorption capacity was found to be dependent on the initial concentration of dye solution, and maximum adsorption was found to be 76 mg/g at 100 mg/L of TZ. The adsorption capacity at equilibrium ( q e) increased from 22.6 to 76 mg/g with an increase in the initial dye concentrations from 25 to 100 mg/L. The thermodynamic parameters such as change in free energy (Δ G 0), enthalpy (Δ H 0) and entropy (Δ S 0) were determined and the positive value of (Δ H) 78.1 (K J mol-1) revealed that adsorption efficiency increased with an increase in the process temperature. In fixed-bed column experiments, the effect of selected operating parameters such as bed depth, flow rate and initial dye concentration on the adsorption capacity was evaluated. Increase in bed height of adsorption columns leads to an extension of breakthrough point as well as the exhaustion time of adsorbent. However, the maximum adsorption capacities decrease with increases of flow rate. The breakthrough data fitted well to bed depth service time and Thomas models with high coefficient of determination, R 2 ≥ 94.

  20. Research on Synthesis of New Azo Calix[4]arene and its Dyeing Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Tang Jun; Sun Yu; Li Lingling; Xu Zhen; Lv Zaosheng

    2015-01-01

    With the raw materials of calix[4]arene, benzocaine, tricaine and procaine hydrochloride, three new azo calix[4]arene derivatives—6a, 6b and 6c are synthesized by diazotization–coupling reaction of an aromatic amine, with its yield of 83%, 81% and 83% respectively. The structural characterization is in a way of IR, 1H NMR and elemental analysis. This paper investigates the spectral properties of azo calix[4]arene derivatives under different solution pH conditions through the UV–visible spectr...

  1. Conjugated iminopyridine based Azo dye derivatives with efficient charge transfer for third order nonlinearities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerasidou, A. P.; Khammar, F.; Iliopoulos, K.; Ayadi, A.; El-Ghayoury, A.; Zouari, N.; Mhiri, T.; Sahraoui, B.

    2014-03-01

    The third order nonlinearities of two azobenzene-iminopyridine molecular systems have been investigated employing the Z-scan technique at 532 nm, 30 ps. The objective of the work has been to study and to compare the nonlinearity of two iminopyridine based ligands substituted with one (NO2AzoIminoPy, A) and two azobenzene units ((NO2Azo)2IminoPy, B). The ligand B exhibits an extended conjugated structure and higher charge transfer within the molecule. Our results show high dependence of the nonlinearity on both the conjugation length within the molecule and on the number of the electron accepting units.

  2. Photocatalytic degradation of three azo dyes using immobilized TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on glass plates activated by UV light irradiation: Influence of dye molecular structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khataee, A.R., E-mail: a_khataee@tabrizu.ac.ir [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique, CNRS, Nancy Universite, ENSIC, 1, rue Grandville, BP 20451, F-54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Pons, M.N., E-mail: Marie-Noelle.Pons@ensic.inpl-nancy.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique, CNRS, Nancy Universite, ENSIC, 1, rue Grandville, BP 20451, F-54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Zahraa, O., E-mail: Orfan.Zahraa@ensic.inpl-nancy.fr [Departement de Chimie-Physique des Reactions, INPL, Nancy Universite, ENSIC, 1, rue Grandville, BP 451, F-54001 Nancy Cedex (France)

    2009-08-30

    In order to discuss the effect of chemical structure on photocatalysis efficiency, the photocatalytic degradation of three commercial textile dyes (C.I. Acid Orange 10 (AO10), C.I. Acid Orange 12 (AO12) and C.I. Acid Orange 8 (AO8)) with different structure and different substitute groups has been investigated using supported TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst under UV light irradiation. All the experiments were performed in a circulation photochemical reactor equipped with a 15-W UV lamp emitted around 365 nm. The investigated photocatalyst was industrial Millennium PC-500 (crystallites mean size 5-10 nm) immobilized on glass plates by a heat attachment method. SEM images of the immobilized TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles showed the good coating on the plates, after repeating the deposition procedure three times. Our results indicated that the photocatalytic decolorization kinetics of the dyes were in the order of AO10 > AO12 > AO8. Photocatalytic mineralization of the dyes was monitored by total organic carbon (TOC) decrease, changes in UV-vis spectra and ammonium ion formation. The dye solutions could be completely decolorized and effectively mineralized, with an average overall TOC removal larger than 94% for a photocatalytic reaction time of 6 h. The nitrogen-to-nitrogen double bond of the azo dyes was transformed predominantly into NH{sub 4}{sup +} ion. The kinetic of photocatalytic decolorization of the dyes was found to follow a first-order rate law. The photocatalysis efficiency was evaluated by figure-of-merit electrical energy per order (E{sub EO}).

  3. Novel hydrophobic ionic liquids electrolyte based on cyclic sulfonium used in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Lei; Pan, Xu; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Changneng; Fang, Xiaqin; Chen, Shuanghong; Dai, Songyuan [Key Lab of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2011-01-15

    A novel series of hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquids based on six cyclic sulfonium cations were first time synthesized and applied in dye-sensitized solar cells as pure solvents for electrolyte system. The chronoamperograms result showed that the length of substituent on sulfonium cations could inhibit the I{sub 3}{sup -} diffusion and the five-ring structure of sulfonium was benefit for fast triiodide ion diffusion. The electrochemical impendence spectra measurement of dye-sensitized solar cells with these ionic liquid electrolytes was carried out and the result indicated that the cations' structure had indeed influence on the cells' performance especially for the fill factor, which was further proved by the measurement result of I-V curves of these dye-sensitized solar cells. The conclusion was obtained that the electron exchange reaction on Pt counter electrode/electrolyte interface dominated the cells' performance for these ionic liquid electrolyte-based DSCs. (author)

  4. Alterations in the skin of Labeo rohita exposed to an azo dye, Eriochrome black T: a histopathological and enzyme biochemical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ayan; Verma, Neeraj; Mistri, Arup; Ranjan, Brijesh; Nigam, Ashwini Kumar; Kumari, Usha; Mittal, Swati; Mittal, Ajay Kumar

    2017-03-01

    Histopathological changes and alterations in the activity of certain metabolic and antioxidant enzymes were analyzed in the head skin of Labeo rohita, exposed to sublethal test concentrations of the azo dye, Eriochrome black T for 4 days, using 24 h renewal bioassay method. Hypertrophied epithelial cells, increased density of mucous goblet cells, and profuse mucous secretion at the surface were considered to protect the skin from toxic impact of the azo dye. Degenerative changes including vacuolization, shrinkage, decrease in dimension, and density of club cells with simultaneous release of their contents in the intercellular spaces were associated to plug them, preventing indiscriminate entry of foreign matter. On exposure of fish to the dye, significant decline in the activity of enzymes-alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, carboxylesterase, succinate dehydrogenase, catalase, and peroxidase-was associated with the binding of dye to the enzymes. Gradual increase in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase was considered to reflect a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. On transfer of azo dye exposed fish to freshwater, skin gradually recovers and, by 8 days, density and area of mucous goblet cells, club cells, and activity of the enzymes appear similar to that of controls. Alteration in histopathology and enzyme activity could be considered beneficial tool in monitoring environmental toxicity, valuable in the sustenance of fish populations.

  5. A highly efficient single chambered up-flow membrane-less microbial fuel cell for treatment of azo dye Acid Orange 7-containing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thung, Wei-Eng; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Ridwan, Fahmi; Oon, Yoong-Ling; Oon, Yoong-Sin; Lehl, Harvinder Kaur

    2015-12-01

    Single chambered up-flow membrane-less microbial fuel cell (UFML MFC) was developed to study the feasibility of the bioreactor for decolorization of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and electricity generation simultaneously. The performance of UFML MFC was evaluated in terms of voltage output, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color removal efficiency by varying the concentration of AO7 in synthetic wastewater. The results shown the voltage generation and COD removal efficiency decreased as the initial AO7 concentration increased; this indicates there is electron competition between anode and azo dye. Furthermore, there was a phenomenon of further decolorization at cathode region which indicates the oxygen and azo dye are both compete as electron acceptor. Based on the UV-visible spectra analysis, the breakdown of the azo bond and naphthalene compound in AO7 were confirmed. These findings show the capability of integrated UFML MFC in azo dye wastewater treatment and simultaneous electricity generation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Low-temperature-fabricated ZnO, AZO, and SnO2 nanoparticle-based dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Hee; Park, Cheolmin; Choi, WonKook; Cho, Sungjae; Moon, ByungJoon; Son, Dong Ick

    2014-11-01

    The authors investigated the microstructural and the electrical properties of ZnO, AZO, and SnO2 based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) fabricated using a low-temperature-processed (200 °C) dye-sensitized ZnO, AZO, and SnO2 nanoparticle thin film and a Pt catalyst deposited on ITO/glass by RF magnetron sputtering. A hydropolymer containing PEG (poly ethylene glycol) and PEO (poly ethylene oxide) is used to make uniformly-distributed ZnO, AZO, and SnO2 nanoparticle layer which forms a nano porous ZnO, AZO, and SnO2 network after heat treatment. The layer is then dye sensitized and sandwiched between two electrodes in an electrolyte to make a DSSC device. The highest measured parameters, the short-circuit current density ( J sc ), the open circuit potential ( V oc ), the fill factor (FF), and power conversion efficiency ( η), of the DSSC fabricated wander optimized conditions were observed to be 5.10 mA/cm2, 0.61 V, 0.46, and 1.43%, respectively.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of simple naked-eye colorimetric chemosensors for anions based on azo dye-thiosemicarbazones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchatawedchakoon, Widchaya; Sangsuwan, Withsakorn; Kruanetr, Senee; Sakee, Uthai

    2014-03-01

    A series of novel, highly selective azo dye-thiosemicarbazones based anion sensors (3e-f) have been synthesized from the condensation reaction between thiosemicarbazide and six different azo salicylaldehydes. The structure of the sensors was confirmed by spectroscopic methods. The selectivity and sensitivity in the recognition for acetate anion over other anions such as fluoride, chloride, iodide and dihydrogenphosphate anions were determined by naked-eyes and UV-vis spectra. The color of the solution containing sensor had an obvious change from light yellow to orange only after the addition of acetate anion in aqueous solution (water/dimethylsulfoxide, 7:3, v/v) while other anions did not cause obvious color change. The anion recognition property of the receptor via proton-transfer is monitored by UV-vis titration and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Under condition in aqueous solution of sensor 3e (water/dimethylsulfoxide, 7:3, v/v), linearity range for the quantification of acetate anion was 1-22 μM and limit of detection (LOD) of acetate anion was 0.71 μM.

  8. Enhanced removal of azo dye using modified PAN nanofibrous membrane Fe complexes with adsorption/visible-driven photocatalysis bifunctional roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu; Dong, Yongchun; Kang, Weimin; Cheng, Bowen; Cui, Guixin

    2017-05-01

    A series of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibrous membrane Fe complexes as the Fenton heterogeneous catalysts were fabricated through surface modification with different ratio of hydrazine hydrate (HH) and hydroxylamine (HA) and subsequent coordination with Fe3+ ions for the synergistic removal of a typical azo dye, Reactive Red 195 (RR 195) via adsorption and visible-driven photocatalytic oxidation. Effect of molar ratio of HH and HA on surface structure characteristics of the resulting complexes were examined. Their adsorptive or photocatalytic activity was also compared by changing molar ratio of HH and HA. The results indicated that three PAN nanofibrous membrane Fe complexes prepared with simultaneous modification of HA and HH exhibited much higher adsorption and visible photocatalytic activities than the complex modified solely with HA or HH due to their distinctive surface structures containing more active sites. Their adsorption and visible photocatalytic kinetics of RR 195 followed pseudo-second-order model equation. Their high photocatalytic rate constant and large amount of dye adsorption were regarded as the main reasons for better dye removal efficiency and durability in cyclic reuse by means of the synergistic adsorption-photocatalysis process.

  9. Simultaneous determination of ten illegal azo dyes in feed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piątkowska Marta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The paper presents the method of simultaneous determination of 10 illegal azo dyes in feed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry technique. Material and Methods: The dyes were extracted with hexane, evaporated to dryness, and analysed. Separation was achieved in 7 min in a gradient elution using acetonitrile (A and 0.1% formic acid (B as a mobile phase. Results: The validation results showed the repeatability of the method, which was evaluated at three levels (50, 500, and 5,000 μg/kg. All the matrix calibration curves for the working ranges were linear (R2 0.9904 to 1.0, the repeatability was between 2.1% and 24%, and recoveries ranged from 77.9% to 120%. The LOD and LOQ were at 1-2 and 5-10 μg/kg for different dyes, respectively. Furthermore, the method was applied in the homogeneity tests of the in-house prepared feed containing Sudan I at the levels of 0.5, 5, and 50 mg/kg. Conclusions: A sensitive, selective, and fast multiresidue method was successfully developed and validated. Its robustness was confirmed by the analysis of an experimental feed containing Sudan I.

  10. Synthesis and Application of Azo Disperse Reactive Dyes derived from p-Aminobenzaldehyde

    OpenAIRE

    Iyabo Fasansi; Kasali Ademola Bello; Mohammed Kabir Yakubu

    2017-01-01

    Disperse reactive dyes were synthesized by diazotizing p-aminobenzaldehyde and coupling with different substituted pyridones and 2-naphthol. The dyeing performance of the dyes was assessed on polyester, nylon, cotton and wool fabrics. The dyes obtained gave various shades of yellow with good depth, brightness and leveling properties on the fabrics. The dyed fabric showed fairly good to very good light fastness and very good to excellent fastness to washing, hot pressing and rubbing. The dyeba...

  11. Synthesis and spectroscopic properties of new azo dyes derived from 3-ethylthio-5-cyanomethyl-4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sheikh, Mariam; Medrasi, Hanadi Y; Sadek, Kamal Usef; Mekheimer, Ramadan Ahmed

    2014-03-07

    New 1,2,4-triazole colorants were obtained, in high yields, by coupling 3-ethylthio-5-cyanomethyl-4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole (1) with diazotized aniline derivatives 2, 4 and 6. The azo dyes prepared in this work may exist in three tautomeric forms. We found that the tautomerism is influenced mainly by the nature of substituent at the para position of the aniline coupling component. This tautomerisation was observed in the NMR spectra of the dyes. The dyes were characterized by IR, ¹H-NMR, ¹³C-NMR and MS spectroscopic techniques.

  12. Synthesis, dyeing performance on polyester fiber and antimicrobial studies of some novel pyrazolotriazine and pyrazolyl pyrazolone azo dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala F. Rizk

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available 5-Amino-4-heterylazo-3-phenyl-1H-pyrazoles (2a–d were diazotized and coupled with malononitrile to give pyrazoloazo malononitrile which by heating in glacial acetic acid gave novel pyrazolo[5,1-c][1,2,4]triazine dyes (3a–d. Also, some diazopyrazolyl pyrazolone dyes (4a–h were synthesized by diazotization of 2a–d and coupled with some pyrazolone derivatives. The structure of the synthesized dyes was determined by elemental analysis and spectral data. All the synthesized compounds were applied as disperse dyes and their dyeing performance on polyester fabric was studied. The fastness and colorimetric properties were measured. The results revealed that the monoazo dyes have good fastness and good to moderate affinity to polyester fabric than diazo dyes. In addition, the synthesized dyes were screened for their antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Gram positive, Bacillus subtitles, Escherichia coli (Gram negative and Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger (Fungi. The results revealed that most of the prepared dyes have high antibacterial activity.

  13. ANALYSIS OF ANIONIC METALLIZED AZO AND FORMAZAN DYES BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry was applied to the separation of several anionic dyes containing copper(II), chromium(III), or cobalt(III) as part of the dye molecule. The dyes were separated using a 110 cmX50 mu m uncoated fused-silica capillary and a 5 mM ammonium a...

  14. Rapid isolation of a facultative anaerobic electrochemically active bacterium capable of oxidizing acetate for electrogenesis and azo dyes reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nan; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-05-01

    In this study, 27 strains of electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) were rapidly isolated and their capabilities of extracellular electron transfer were identified using a photometric method based on WO3 nanoclusters. These strains caused color change of WO3 from white to blue in a 24-well agar plate within 40 h. Most of the isolated EAB strains belonged to the genera of Aeromonas and Shewanella. One isolate, Pantoea agglomerans S5-44, was identified as an EAB that can utilize acetate as the carbon source to produce electricity and reduce azo dyes under anaerobic conditions. The results confirmed the capability of P. agglomerans S5-44 for extracellular electron transfer. The isolation of this acetate-utilizing, facultative EBA reveals the metabolic diversity of environmental bacteria. Such strains have great potential for environmental applications, especially at interfaces of aerobic and anaerobic environments, where acetate is the main available carbon source.

  15. Facile synthesis of 1-naphthol azo dyes with nano SiO2/HIO4 under solvent-free conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Pourali

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nano-silica supported periodic acid (nano-SPIA has been utilized as a heterogeneous reagent for a highly efficient and one pot synthesis of azo dyes based on 1-naphthol under solvent-free conditions at room temperature. This method has some advantages, the reaction workup is very easy and the catalyst can be easily separated from the reaction mixture and one-pot procedure. The related products have been obtained in good to excellent yields, high purity and short reaction times. The structures of the products have been characterized by several techniques using UV-Vis, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectra.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v27i3.13

  16. Highly Efficient Catalysis of Azo Dyes Using Recyclable Silver Nanoparticles Immobilized on Tannic Acid-Grafted Eggshell Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Liang, Miao; Liu, Mingyue; Su, Rongxin; Wang, Mengfan; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a facile one-step synthesis of a novel nanocomposite catalytic film was developed based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) immobilized in tannic acid-modified eggshell membrane (Tan-ESM). Tannic acid, as a typical plant polyphenol from oak wood, was first grafted onto ESM fibers to serve as both the reductant and the stabilizer during the synthesis of AgNPs. The morphology, constitution, and thermal stability of the resulting AgNPs@Tan-ESM composites were fully characterized to explain the excellent catalytic efficiency of AgNPs@Tan-ESM composites. These composite catalysts were applied to the degradation of azo dyes which exhibited the high catalytic activity toward Congo red and methyl orange according to the kinetic curves. More importantly, they can be easily recovered and reused for many times because of their good stability.

  17. Photo-Fenton oxidation of azo dye Reactive Black B using an immobilized iron oxide as heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Ho, Chien-Hung; Huang, Yao-Hui

    2013-04-01

    The heterogeneous oxidation of azo dye Reactive Black B (RBB) by the photo-Fenton system catalyzed with an immobilized iron oxide, B1 (supported with SiO2 grain), was investigated. Reactive Black B oxidation was carried out in an expended-bed reactor in which the effect of B1 dosage on the decolorization and degradation of RBB was examined. Through pseudo-first-order kinetic studies, decolorization was found to be faster than degradation with a fixed rate constant ratio. By determining the iron dissolution from B1, RBB oxidation was supposed to mainly occur on the B1 surface, which catalyzed the generation of hydroxyl radicals in the photo-Fenton reaction. Accordingly, the efficiency of photo-Fenton could reach 100% and 91.2% of decolorization and degradation, respectively, in 300 minutes.

  18. Effect of food azo dye tartrazine on learning and memory functions in mice and rats, and the possible mechanisms involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yonglin; Li, Chunmei; Shen, Jingyu; Yin, Huaxian; An, Xiulin; Jin, Haizhu

    2011-08-01

    Tartrazine is an artificial azo dye commonly used in human food and pharmaceutical products. The present study was conducted to evaluate the toxic effect of tartrazine on the learning and memory functions in mice and rats. Animals were administered different doses of tartrazine for a period of 30 d and were evaluated by open-field test, step-through test, and Morris water maze test, respectively. Furthermore, the biomarkers of the oxidative stress and pathohistology were also measured to explore the possible mechanisms involved. The results indicated that tartrazine extract significantly enhanced active behavioral response to the open field, increased the escape latency in Morris water maze test and decreased the retention latency in step-through tests. The decline in the activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) as well as a rise in the level of malonaldehyde (MDA) were observed in the brain of tartrazine-treated rats, and these changes were associated with the brain from oxidative damage. The dose levels of tartrazine in the present study produced a few adverse effects in learning and memory functions in animals. The mechanisms might be attributed to promoting lipid peroxidation products and reactive oxygen species, inhibiting endogenous antioxidant defense enzymes and the brain tissue damage. Tartrazine is an artificial azo dye commonly used in human food and pharmaceutical products. Since the last assessment carried out by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives in 1964, many new studies have been conducted. However, there is a little information about the effects on learning and memory performance. The present study was conducted to evaluate the toxic effect of tartrazine on the learning and memory functions in animals and its possible mechanism involved. Based on our results, we believe that more extensive assessment of food additives in current use is warranted. © 2011 Institute of Food

  19. Spectrophotometric determination of sildenafil citrate in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation using some chromotropic acid azo dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Y. M.; El-Hawary, W. F.; Youssef, A. F. A.; Senosy, A. R.

    2010-04-01

    Two simple and highly sensitive spectrophotometric methods were developed for the quantitative determination of the drug sildenafil citrate (SC), Viagra, in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulations, through ion-associate formation reactions (method A) with mono-chromotropic acid azo dyes, chromotrope 2B (I) and chromotrope 2R (II) and ion-pair reactions (method B) with bi-chromotropic acid azo dyes, 3-phenylazo-6-o-carboxyphenylazo-chromotropic acid (III), bis-3,6-(o-hydroxyphenylazo)-chromotropic acid (IV), bis-3,6-(p-N,N-dimethylphenylazo)-chromotropic acid (V) and 3-phenylazo-6-o-hydroxyphenylazo-chromotorpic acid (VI). The reaction products, extractable in methylene chloride, were quantitatively measured at 540, 520, 540, 570, 600 and 575 nm using reagents, I-VI, respectively. The reaction conditions were studied and optimized. Beer's plots were linear in the concentration ranges 3.3-87.0, 3.3-96.0, 5.0-115.0, 2.5-125.0, 8.3-166.7 and 0.8-15.0 μg mL -1 with corresponding molar absorptivities 1.02 × 10 4, 8.34 × 10 3, 6.86 × 10 3, 5.42 × 10 3, 3.35 × 10 3 and 2.32 × 10 4 L mol -1 cm -1 using reagents I-VI, respectively. The limits of detection and Sandell's sensitivities were calculated. The methods were successfully applied to the analysis of commercial tablets (Vigoran) and the recovery study reveals that there is no interference from the common excipients that are present in tablets. Statistical comparison of the results was performed with regard to accuracy and precision using Student's t- and F-tests at 95% confidence level. There is no significant difference between the reported and proposed methods with regard to accuracy and precision.

  20. Kinetics and Equilibrium Studies on Adsorption of Acid Red 18 (Azo-Dye Using Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shirmardi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are one of the synthetic dyes that are used in many textile industries. Adsorption is one of the most effective techniques for removal of dye-contaminated wastewater. In this work, efficiency of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs as an adsorbent for removal of Acid Red 18 (azo-dye from aqueous solution was determined. The parameters affecting the adsorption process such as contact time, pH, adsorbent dosage, and initial dye concentration were studied. Experimental results have shown by increasing the adsorbent dosage, the rate of dye removal was increased, but the amount of adsorbed dyes per mass unit of MWCNTs was declined. pH as one of the most important influencing factors on the adsorption process was evaluated. The best pH for adsorption process was acidic pH of about 3. To describe the equilibrium of adsorption, the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms were used. The Langmuir isotherm (R2=0.985 was the best fitted for experimental data with maximum adsorption capacity of 166.67 mg/g. A higher correlation value of the kinetic's model was observed close to pseudo second order (R2=0.999 compared to other kinetic models.

  1. Low-Cost Biodegradation and Detoxification of Textile Azo Dye C.I. Reactive Blue 172 by Providencia rettgeri Strain HSL1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Lade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study focuses on exploitation of agricultural waste wheat bran (WB as growth medium for degradation of textile azo dye C.I. Reactive Blue 172 (RB 172 using a single bacterium P. rettgeri strain HSL1 (GenBank accession number JX853768.1. The bacterium was found to completely decolorize 50 mg L−1 of dye RB 172 within 20 h at 30 ± 0.2°C under microaerophilic incubation conditions. Additionally, significant reduction in COD (85% and TOC (52% contents of dye decolorized medium was observed which suggested its mineralization. Induction in the activities of azoreductase (159% and NADH-DCIP reductase (88% provided an evidence for reductive cleavage of dye RB 172. The HPLC, FTIR, and GC-MS analysis of decolorized products confirmed the degradation of dye into various metabolites. The proposed metabolic pathway for biodegradation of RB 172 has been elucidated which showed the formation of 2 intermediate metabolites, namely, 4-(ethenylsulfonyl aniline and 1-amino-1-(4-aminophenyl propan-2-one. The acute and phytotoxicity evaluation of degraded metabolites suggests that bacterial strain favors the detoxification of dye RB 172. Thus, WB could be utilized as a low-cost growth medium for the enrichment of bacteria and their further use for biodegradation of azo dyes and its derivatives containing wastes into nontoxic form.

  2. Simultaneous decolorization of sulfonated azo dyes and reduction of hexavalent chromium under high salt condition by a newly isolated salt-tolerant strain Bacillus circulans BWL1061.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weijie; Liu, Cong; Liu, Liang; You, Yanting; Jiang, Jihong; Zhou, Zhengkun; Dong, Zhen

    2017-07-01

    The co-existence of dyes, Cr(VI) and high concentration of salt in dyeing wastewater causes serious and complex environmental problems. In this study, a salt-tolerant strain Bacillus circulans BWL1061 was reported to simultaneously remove 50mg/L methyl orange and 50mg/L Cr(VI) under the anaerobic condition with 60g/L NaCl. During the decolorization process, the Cr(VI) reduction occurred preferentially over the dye decolorization due to the dominate utilization of electron by Cr(VI). The analysis of enzyme activities suggested that azoreductase, NADH-DCIP reductase, and laccase were associated with decolorization of methyl orange. A possible degradation pathway was proposed based on the metabolites analysis. The decolorization of methyl orange is involved in the symmetric cleavage of azo bond, which formed N,N-dimethyl p-phenylenediamine and 4-amino sulfonic acid, or the asymmetric cleavage of azo bond, which formed 4-(dimethylamino) phenol and 4-diazenylbenzene sulfonic acid. Phytotoxicity assays showed that strain BWL1061 could decrease the toxicity of methyl orange to Triticum aestivum, Pogostemon cablin and Isatis indigotica Fort during the decolorization process. In this study, Bacillus circulans is reported for the first time that could simultaneously remove azo dyes and Cr (VI) under high salt condition. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Effect of electrode position on azo dye removal in an up-flow hybrid anaerobic digestion reactor with built-in bioelectrochemical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Min-Hua; Cui, Dan; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Liang, Bin; Wang, Ai-Jie; Cheng, Hao-Yi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, two modes of hybrid anaerobic digestion (AD) bioreactor with built-in BESs (electrodes installed in liquid phase (R1) and sludge phase (R2)) were tested for identifying the effect of electrodes position on azo dye wastewater treatment. Alizarin yellow R (AYR) was used as a model dye. Decolorization efficiency of R1 was 90.41 ± 6.20% at influent loading rate of 800 g-AYR/ m3·d, which was 39% higher than that of R2. The contribution of bioelectrochemical reduction to AYR decolorization (16.23 ± 1.86% for R1 versus 22.24 ± 2.14% for R2) implied that although azo dye was mainly removed in sludge zone, BES further improved the effluent quality, especially for R1 where electrodes were installed in liquid phase. The microbial communities in the electrode biofilms (dominant by Enterobacter) and sludge (dominant by Enterococcus) were well distinguished in R1, but they were similar in R2. These results suggest that electrodes installed in liquid phase in the anaerobic hybrid system are more efficient than that in sludge phase for azo dye removal, which give great inspirations for the application of AD-BES hybrid process for various refractory wastewaters treatment.

  4. Variation in Optoelectronic Properties of Azo Dye-Sensitized TiO 2 Semiconductor Interfaces with Different Adsorption Anchors: Carboxylate, Sulfonate, Hydroxyl and Pyridyl Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Dai, Chencheng

    2014-05-28

    The optoelectronic properties of four azo dye-sensitized TiO2 interfaces are systematically studied as a function of a changing dye anchoring group: carboxylate, sulfonate, hydroxyl, and pyridyl. The variation in optoelectronic properties of the free dyes and those in dye/TiO 2 nanocomposites are studied both experimentally and computationally, in the context of prospective dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. Experimental UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and DSSC device performance testing reveal a strong dependence on the nature of the anchor of the optoelectronic properties of these dyes, both in solution and as dye/TiO2 nanocomposites. First-principles calculations on both an isolated dye/TiO2 cluster model (using localized basis sets) and each dye modeled onto the surface of a 2D periodic TiO2 nanostructure (using plane wave basis sets) are presented. Detailed examination of these experimental and computational results, in terms of light harvesting, electron conversion and photovoltaic device performance characteristics, indicates that carboxylate is the best anchoring group, and hydroxyl is the worst, whereas sulfonate and pyridyl groups exhibit competing potential. Different sensitization solvents are found to affect critically the extent of dye adsorption achieved in the dye-sensitization of the TiO2 semiconductor, especially where the anchor is a pyridyl group.

  5. Variation in optoelectronic properties of azo dye-sensitized TiO2 semiconductor interfaces with different adsorption anchors: carboxylate, sulfonate, hydroxyl and pyridyl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M; Dai, Chencheng

    2014-05-28

    The optoelectronic properties of four azo dye-sensitized TiO2 interfaces are systematically studied as a function of a changing dye anchoring group: carboxylate, sulfonate, hydroxyl, and pyridyl. The variation in optoelectronic properties of the free dyes and those in dye/TiO2 nanocomposites are studied both experimentally and computationally, in the context of prospective dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. Experimental UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and DSSC device performance testing reveal a strong dependence on the nature of the anchor of the optoelectronic properties of these dyes, both in solution and as dye/TiO2 nanocomposites. First-principles calculations on both an isolated dye/TiO2 cluster model (using localized basis sets) and each dye modeled onto the surface of a 2D periodic TiO2 nanostructure (using plane wave basis sets) are presented. Detailed examination of these experimental and computational results, in terms of light harvesting, electron conversion and photovoltaic device performance characteristics, indicates that carboxylate is the best anchoring group, and hydroxyl is the worst, whereas sulfonate and pyridyl groups exhibit competing potential. Different sensitization solvents are found to affect critically the extent of dye adsorption achieved in the dye-sensitization of the TiO2 semiconductor, especially where the anchor is a pyridyl group.

  6. Azo dye removal in a membrane-free up-flow biocatalyzed electrolysis reactor coupled with an aerobic bio-contact oxidation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Dan; Guo, Yu-Qi; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Liang, Bin; Kong, Fan-Ying [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 202 Haihe Road, Harbin 150090 (China); Lee, Hyung-Sool [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Wang, Ai-Jie, E-mail: waj0578@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 202 Haihe Road, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A membrane-free up-flow biocatalyzed electrolysis reactor coupled with an aerobic bio-contact oxidation reactor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alizarin Yellow R as the mode of azo dyes was efficiently converted to p-phenylenediamine (PPD) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPD and 5-ASA were further oxidized in a bio-contact oxidation reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism of UBER for azo dye removal was discussed. - Abstract: Azo dyes that consist of a large quantity of dye wastewater are toxic and persistent to biodegradation, while they should be removed before being discharged to water body. In this study, Alizarin Yellow R (AYR) as a model azo dye was decolorized in a combined bio-system of membrane-free, continuous up-flow bio-catalyzed electrolysis reactor (UBER) and subsequent aerobic bio-contact oxidation reactor (ABOR). With the supply of external power source 0.5 V in the UBER, AYR decolorization efficiency increased up to 94.8 {+-} 1.5%. Products formation efficiencies of p-phenylenediamine (PPD) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) were above 90% and 60%, respectively. Electron recovery efficiency based on AYR removal in cathode zone was nearly 100% at HRTs longer than 6 h. Relatively high concentration of AYR accumulated at higher AYR loading rates (>780 g m{sup -3} d{sup -1}) likely inhibited acetate oxidation of anode-respiring bacteria on the anode, which decreased current density in the UBER; optimal AYR loading rate for the UBER was 680 g m{sup -3} d{sup -1} (HRT 2.5 h). The subsequent ABOR further improved effluent quality. Overall the Chroma decreased from 320 times to 80 times in the combined bio-system to meet the textile wastewater discharge standard II in China.

  7. Synthesized TiO2/ZSM-5 composites used for the photocatalytic degradation of azo dye: Intermediates, reaction pathway, mechanism and bio-toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kefu; Hu, Xin-Yan; Chen, Bor-Yann; Hsueh, Chung-Chuan; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jiajie; Lin, Yu-Jung; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a one-step solid dispersion method was used to synthesize titanium dioxide (TiO2)/Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) composites with substantially reduced time and energy consumption. A degradation efficiency of more than 95% was achieved within 10 min using 50% PTZ (synthesized TiO2/ZSM-5 composites with TiO2 contents of 50 wt% loaded on ZSM-5) at pH 7 and 25 °C. The possible degradation pathway of azo-dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) was investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography (IC). The bonds between the N atoms and naphthalene groups are likely attacked first and cleaved by hydroxyl radicals, ultimately resulting in the decolorization and mineralization of the azo dye. A comparative assessment of the characteristics of abiotic and biotic dye decolorization was completed. In addition, the toxicity effects of the degradation intermediates of azo-dye RB5 on cellular respiratory activity were analyzed. The bio-toxicity results showed that the decay rate constants of CO2 production from the azo-dye RB5 samples at different degradation times increased initially and subsequently decreased, indicating that intermediates of higher toxicity could adhere to the catalyst surface and gradually destroyed by further photocatalytic oxidation. Additionally, EDTA (hole scavengers) and t-BuOH (radical scavengers) were used to detect the main active oxidative species in the system. The results showed that the hydroxyl radicals are the main oxidation species in the photocatalytic process.

  8. Kinetics of decolorization of azo dye by bipolar pulsed barrier discharge in a three-phase discharge plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ruobing [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)]. E-mail: zrbingdut@163.com; Zhang Chi [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Cheng Xingxin [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Wang Liming [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Wu Yan [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Guan Zhicheng [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2007-04-02

    Removal of amaranth, a commercial synthetic azo dye widely used in the dye and food industry, was examined as a possible remediation technology for treating dye-contaminated water. Effects of various parameters such as gas flow rate, solution conductivity, pulse repetition frequency, etc., on decolorization kinetics were investigated. Experimental results show that an aqueous solution of 24 mg/l dye is 81.24% decolorized following 30 min plasma treatment for a 50 kV voltage and 0.75 m{sup 3}/h gas flow rate. Decolorization reaction of amaranth in the plasma reactor is a pseudo first order reaction. Rate constant (k) of decolorization increases quickly with increasing the applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency and the gas flow rate. However, when the applied voltage is beyond 50 kV and increases further, increase rate of k decreases. In addition, k decreases quickly when the solution conductivity increases from 200 to 1481 {mu}S/cm. The decolorization reaction has a high rate constant (k = 0.0269 min{sup -1}) when the solution pH is beyond 10. Rate constant k decreases with the decrease of pH and reaches minimum at a pH of about 5 (k {sub min} = 0.01603 min{sup -1}), then increases to 0.02105 min{sup -1} when pH decreases to 3.07. About 15% of the initial TOC can be degraded only in about 120 min non-thermal plasma treatment.

  9. Bioelectricity Generation and Bioremediation of an Azo-Dye in a Microbial Fuel Cell Coupled Activated Sludge Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Danish Khan

    Full Text Available Simultaneous bioelectricity generation and dye degradation was achieved in the present study by using a combined anaerobic-aerobic process. The anaerobic system was a typical single chambered microbial fuel cell (SMFC which utilizes acid navy blue r (ANB dye along with glucose as growth substrate to generate electricity. Four different concentrations of ANB (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm were tested in the SMFC and the degradation products were further treated in an activated sludge post treatment process. The dye decolorization followed pseudo first order kinetics while the negative values of the thermodynamic parameter ∆G (change in Gibbs free energy shows that the reaction proceeds with a net decrease in the free energy of the system. The coulombic efficiency (CE and power density (PD attained peak values at 10.36% and 2,236 mW/m2 respectively for 200 ppm of ANB. A further increase in ANB concentrations results in lowering of cell potential (and PD values owing to microbial inhibition at higher concentrations of toxic substrates. Cyclic voltammetry studies revealed a perfect redox reaction was taking place in the SMFC. The pH, temperature and conductivity remain 7.5-8.0, 27(±2°C and 10.6-18.2 mS/cm throughout the operation. The biodegradation pathway was studied by the gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy technique, suggested the preferential cleavage of the azo bond as the initial step resulting in to aromatic amines. Thus, a combined anaerobic-aerobic process using SMFC coupled with activated sludge process can be a viable option for effective degradation of complex dye substrates along with energy (bioelectricity recovery.

  10. Monopolar Electro-Coagulation Process for Azo Dye C.I. Acid Red 18 Removal from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Azarian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The discharge of wastewaters containing an untreated dye results in aesthetic problems and an increase in gases solubility, which causes light transmission inhibition into water bodies. In spite of advantages of physicochemical and biological methods, these processes produce huge amounts of sludge, toxic by-products and require several oxidant chemicals. By contrast, electrochemical processes because of their high versatility, high efficiency and eco-friendly properties are more acceptable. In the present study, the removal of azo dye Acid Red 18 and chemical oxygen demand (COD from synthetic wastewater by monopolar (EC process was investigated and key parameters such as operating time, current density (CD, initial pH and energy, and electrode consumption were optimized. It was found that the process had a very good efficiency in the removal of both COD and color; for the iron electrode, the maximum amounts of color and COD removal were 99.5% and 59.0%, respectively. An operating time of 45 min, pH of 7 and CD of 1.2 mA/cm2 was selected as the optimized condition. The optimization of variables is extremely crucial as it results in a decrease in costs, energy and electrode consumption. Overall, the iron electrode used less energy than the aluminum electrode and was more acceptable for use in this process due to economical reasons. The findings of UV/vis spectra illustrated that the structures of this dye were removed by the process. In comparison with traditional methods such as aerobic and anaerobic systems, the EC process is a suitable alternative for the treatment of wastewaters containing dye pollutants.

  11. Degradation of industrial azo dye in aqueous solution by heterogeneous Fenton process (fly ash/H2O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bečelić-Tomin Milena R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities and efficiency of heterogeneous Fenton process with the use of fly ash from thermal power plants Kolubara, Serbia, as the catalyst in the degradation of industrial azo dye Zetanyl Rosso B-NG. The effects of various experimental parameters such as pH, temperature, concentration of fly ash, the initial concentration of H2O2 and initial concentration of dye on the kinetics and efficiency of decolorization were investigated. Simultaneous leaching of iron from fly ash was monitored. The optimum conditions had been determined, and it was found that decolorization efficiency obtained after 150 min of reaction, was about 98.9%. The optimal parameters were: initial pH = 3; [H2O2]0 = 6 mM; dosage of fly ash = 0.1g/l (for dye concentration of 100 mg/l; temperature = 22 °C. The effectiveness of the applied treatment for mineralization of dye solution was investigated, under optimal conditions determined by the examination of various factors influencing the decolorization process at the specified contact time. The maximum achieved reduction of total organic carbon content was 96.5%. The results indicate that the reuse of fly ash as the catalyst support in •OH production in this process achieves significant efficiency in terms of decolorization, 94.4% and mineralization, 89.6%. Futhermore, fly ash showed adequate stability during the reaction (low iron leaching, concentrations under optimal reaction condition were about 2 mg/l.

  12. Synthesis, dyeing performance on polyester fiber and antimicrobial studies of some novel pyrazolotriazine and pyrazolyl pyrazolone azo dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Rizk, Hala F.; Ibrahim, Seham A.; El-Borai, Mohammed A.

    2014-01-01

    5-Amino-4-heterylazo-3-phenyl-1H-pyrazoles (2a–d) were diazotized and coupled with malononitrile to give pyrazoloazo malononitrile which by heating in glacial acetic acid gave novel pyrazolo[5,1-c][1,2,4]triazine dyes (3a–d). Also, some diazopyrazolyl pyrazolone dyes (4a–h) were synthesized by diazotization of 2a–d and coupled with some pyrazolone derivatives. The structure of the synthesized dyes was determined by elemental analysis and spectral data. All the synthesized compounds were appli...

  13. Aerobic biodegradation of Azo dye by Bacillus cohnii MTCC 3616; an obligately alkaliphilic bacterium and toxicity evaluation of metabolites by different bioassay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, A S Arun; Rao, K V Bhaskara

    2013-08-01

    An obligate alkaliphilic bacterium Bacillus cohnii MTCC 3616 aerobically decolorized a textile azo dye Direct Red-22 (5,000 mg l⁻¹) with 95 % efficiency at 37 °C and pH 9 in 4 h under static conditions. The decolorization of Direct Red-22 (DR-22) was possible through a broad pH (7-11), temperature (10-45 °C), salinity (1-7 %), and dye concentration (5-10 g l⁻¹) range. Decolorization of dye was assessed by UV-vis spectrophotometer with reduction of peak intensity at 549 nm (λ(max)). Biodegradation of dye was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The FTIR spectrum revealed that B. cohnii specifically targeted azo bond (N=N) at 1,614.42 cm⁻¹ to break down Direct Red-22. Formation of metabolites with different retention times in HPLC analysis further confirmed the degradation of dye. The phytotoxicity test with 5,000 mg l⁻¹ of untreated dye showed 80 % germination inhibition in Vigna mungo, 70 % in Sorghum bicolor and 80 % in Vigna radiata. No germination inhibition was noticed in all three plants by DR-22 metabolites at 5,000 mg l⁻¹. Biotoxicity test with Artemia salina proved the lethality of the azo dye at LC₅₀ of 4 and 8 % for degraded metabolites by causing death of its nauplii compared to its less toxic-degraded metabolites. Bioaccumulation of dye was observed in the mid-gut of A. salina. The cytogenotoxicity assay on the meristematic root tip cells of Allium cepa further confirmed the cytotoxic nature of azo dye (DR-22) with decrease in mitotic index (0.5 % at 500 ppm) and increase in aberrant index (4.56 %) over 4-h exposure period. Genotoxic damages (lagging chromosome, metaphase cluster, chromosome bridges, and dye accumulation in cytoplasm) were noticed at different stages of cell cycle. The degraded metabolites had negligible cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.

  14. Synthesis and Application of Azo Disperse Reactive Dyes derived from p-Aminobenzaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyabo Fasansi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Disperse reactive dyes were synthesized by diazotizing p-aminobenzaldehyde and coupling with different substituted pyridones and 2-naphthol. The dyeing performance of the dyes was assessed on polyester, nylon, cotton and wool fabrics. The dyes obtained gave various shades of yellow with good depth, brightness and leveling properties on the fabrics. The dyed fabric showed fairly good to very good light fastness and very good to excellent fastness to washing, hot pressing and rubbing. The dyebath exhaustion on the polyester, nylon, wool and cotton fabrics was found to be very good and fixation on wool was better than on cotton fabric.

  15. Low-temperature-fabricated ZnO, AZO, and SnO{sub 2} nanoparticle-based dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hong Hee; Park, Cheolmin; Choi, Wonkook; Cho, Sungjae; Moon, Byungjoon; Son, Dongick [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The authors investigated the microstructural and the electrical properties of ZnO, AZO, and SnO{sub 2} based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) fabricated using a low-temperature-processed (200 .deg. C) dyesensitized ZnO, AZO, and SnO{sub 2} nanoparticle thin film and a Pt catalyst deposited on ITO/glass by RF magnetron sputtering. A hydropolymer containing PEG (poly ethylene glycol) and PEO (poly ethylene oxide) is used to make uniformly-distributed ZnO, AZO, and SnO{sub 2} nanoparticle layer which forms a nano porous ZnO, AZO, and SnO{sub 2} network after heat treatment. The layer is then dye sensitized and sandwiched between two electrodes in an electrolyte to make a DSSC device. The highest measured parameters, the short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}), the open circuit potential (V{sub oc}), the fill factor (FF), and power conversion efficiency (η), of the DSSC fabricated wander optimized conditions were observed to be 5.10 mA/cm{sup 2}, 0.61 V, 0.46, and 1.43%, respectively.

  16. Synthesized TiO{sub 2}/ZSM-5 composites used for the photocatalytic degradation of azo dye: Intermediates, reaction pathway, mechanism and bio-toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Kefu; Hu, Xin-Yan [College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Chen, Bor-Yann; Hsueh, Chung-Chuan [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National I-Lan University, I-Lan, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Qian [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jiajie; Lin, Yu-Jung [College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Chang, Chang-Tang, E-mail: ctchang73222@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Engineering, National I-Lan University, I-Lan, Taiwan (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The major photo-catalytic degradation pathway of azo-dye was elaborated according to the identification of by-products from GC–MS and IC analysis. • Comparative assessment on characteristics of abiotic and biotic dye decolorization was analyzed. • EDTA (hole scavengers) and t-BuOH (radical scavengers) were used to determine the main active oxidative species in the system. • The toxicity effects of degradation intermediates of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) on the cellular respiratory activity were assessed. - Abstract: In this study, a one-step solid dispersion method was used to synthesize titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2})/Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) composites with substantially reduced time and energy consumption. A degradation efficiency of more than 95% was achieved within 10 min using 50% PTZ (synthesized TiO{sub 2}/ZSM-5 composites with TiO{sub 2} contents of 50 wt% loaded on ZSM-5) at pH 7 and 25 °C. The possible degradation pathway of azo-dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) was investigated using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and ion chromatography (IC). The bonds between the N atoms and naphthalene groups are likely attacked first and cleaved by hydroxyl radicals, ultimately resulting in the decolorization and mineralization of the azo dye. A comparative assessment of the characteristics of abiotic and biotic dye decolorization was completed. In addition, the toxicity effects of the degradation intermediates of azo-dye RB5 on cellular respiratory activity were analyzed. The bio-toxicity results showed that the decay rate constants of CO{sub 2} production from the azo-dye RB5 samples at different degradation times increased initially and subsequently decreased, indicating that intermediates of higher toxicity could adhere to the catalyst surface and gradually destroyed by further photocatalytic oxidation. Additionally, EDTA (hole scavengers) and t-BuOH (radical scavengers) were used to detect the main active oxidative species in the system

  17. Enhanced degradation of azo dye by nanoporous-copper-decorated Mg–Cu–Y metallic glass powder through dealloying pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xuekun; Li, Ran, E-mail: liran@buaa.edu.cn; Zong, Jingzhen; Zhang, Ying; Li, Haifei; Zhang, Tao, E-mail: zhangtao@buaa.edu.cn

    2014-06-01

    A controllable uniform nanoporous copper (NPC) layer was synthesized on the surface of the ball-milled powder of Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 25}Y{sub 10} metallic glass by dealloying. The morphology, the elemental surface composition and the phase structure of the powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry, respectively. The composite powder with a core–shell structure shows higher degradation efficiency of the azo dye of Direct Blue 6 than the untreated powder and the pure NPC. The improved performance can be attributed to the strong synergistic effect between the NPC layer and the metallic glass matrix, because the nanoporous structure provides large surface area for the adsorption of the dye molecules and three-dimensional diffusion channels of reaction masses, as well as the dissolution acceleration of the active atoms through local galvanic cell reaction. This tunable pretreatment is a promising surface activation method for novel chemical applications of metallic glasses.

  18. Adsorption of Azo-Dye Orange II from Aqueous Solutions Using a Metal-Organic Framework Material: Iron- Benzenetricarboxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Elizabeth Rojas; Medina, Ricardo López; Lozano, Marcos May; Hernández Pérez, Isaías; Valero, Maria J; Franco, Ana M Maubert

    2014-12-12

    A Metal-Organic Framework (MOF), iron-benzenetricarboxylate (Fe(BTC)), has been studied for the adsorptive removal of azo-dye Orange II from aqueous solutions, where the effect of various parameters was tested and isotherm and kinetic models were suggested. The adsorption capacities of Fe(BTC) were much higher than those of an activated carbon. The experimental data can be best described by the Langmuir isotherm model (R² > 0.997) and revealed the ability of Fe(BTC) to adsorb 435 mg of Orange II per gram of adsorbent at the optimal conditions. The kinetics of Orange II adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating the coexistence of physisorption and chemisorption, with intra-particle diffusion being the rate controlling step. The thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption of Orange II was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic process (-25.53 kJ·mol-1). The high recovery of the dye showed that Fe(BTC) can be employed as an effective and reusable adsorbent for the removal of Orange II from aqueous solutions and showed the economic interest of this adsorbent material for environmental purposes.

  19. Adsorption of Azo-Dye Orange II from Aqueous Solutions Using a Metal-Organic Framework Material: Iron- Benzenetricarboxylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Rojas García

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A Metal-Organic Framework (MOF, iron-benzenetricarboxylate (Fe(BTC, has been studied for the adsorptive removal of azo-dye Orange II from aqueous solutions, where the effect of various parameters was tested and isotherm and kinetic models were suggested. The adsorption capacities of Fe(BTC were much higher than those of an activated carbon. The experimental data can be best described by the Langmuir isotherm model (R2 > 0.997 and revealed the ability of Fe(BTC to adsorb 435 mg of Orange II per gram of adsorbent at the optimal conditions. The kinetics of Orange II adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating the coexistence of physisorption and chemisorption, with intra-particle diffusion being the rate controlling step. The thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption of Orange II was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic process (−25.53 kJ·mol−1. The high recovery of the dye showed that Fe(BTC can be employed as an effective and reusable adsorbent for the removal of Orange II from aqueous solutions and showed the economic interest of this adsorbent material for environmental purposes.

  20. Adsorption of heavy metal ions and azo dyes by crosslinked nanochelating resins based on poly(methylmethacrylate-co-maleic anhydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghaemy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chelating resins are suitable materials for the removal of heavy metals in water treatments. A copolymer, Poly(MMA-co-MA, was synthesized by radical polymerization of maleic anhydride (MA and methyl methacrylate (MMA, characterized and transformed into multifunctional nanochelating resin beads (80–150 nm via hydrolysis, grafting and crosslink reactions. The resin beads were characterized by swelling studies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The main purpose of this work was to determine the adsorption capacity of the prepared resins (swelling ratio ~55% towards metal ions such as Hg2+, Cd2+, Cu2+ from water at three different pH values (3, 6 and 9. Variations in pH and types of metal ions have not significantly affected the chelation capacity of these resins. The maximum chelation capacity of one of the prepared resin beads (Co-g-AP3 for Hg2+ was 63, 85.8 and 71.14 mg/g at pH 3, 6 and 9, respectively. Approximately 96% of the metal ions could be desorbed from the resin. Adsorption capacity of these resins towards three commercial synthetic azo dyes was also investigated. The maximum adsorption of dye AY42 was 91% for the resin Co-g-AP3 at room temperature. This insures the applicability of the synthesized resins for industrial applications.

  1. Adsorption of anionic azo-dyes from aqueous solutions onto graphene oxide: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konicki, Wojciech; Aleksandrzak, Małgorzata; Moszyński, Dariusz; Mijowska, Ewa

    2017-06-15

    In the present study, graphene oxide (GO) was used for the adsorption of anionic azo-dyes such as Acid Orange 8 (AO8) and Direct Red 23 (DR23) from aqueous solutions. GO was characterized by Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and zeta potential measurements. The influence of dye initial concentration, temperature and pH on AO8 and DR23 adsorption onto GO was investigated. Equilibrium data were analyzed by model equations such as Langmuir Freundlich, Temkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Redlich-Peterson isotherms and were best represented by Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson isotherm model. Kinetic adsorption data were analyzed using the pseudo-first-order kinetic model, the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the intraparticle diffusion model. The adsorption kinetics well fitted using a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamics parameters, ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°, were calculated, indicating that the adsorption of AO8 and DR23 onto GO was spontaneous process. The adsorption process of AO8 onto GO was exothermic, while the adsorption of DR23 onto GO was endothermic in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhancement of the optical response in a biodegradable polymer/azo-dye film by the addition of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Costanzo, Guadalupe; Ribba, Laura; Goyanes, Silvia; Ledesma, Silvia

    2014-04-01

    A new biodegradable photoresponsive material was developed using poly(lactic acid) (PLA) as the matrix material and Disperse Orange 3 (DO3) as photoisomerizable azo-dye. It was observed that the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) leads to a new phenomenon consisting of an enhancement of the optical anisotropy in a wide range of temperatures. In particular, the optical anisotropy increases 100% at room temperature. Moreover, the material containing MWCNTs shows a faster optical response that is evidenced as an increase in the growth rate of optical anisotropy. Spectroscopic data is provided to study the interaction among DO3, MWCNTs and PLA. The enhancement of optical anisotropy obtained with the addition of MWCNTs was related to the glass transition temperature (Tg) of each material. Maximum optical anisotropy was obtained 15 °C below the Tg for both materials. Results are interpreted in terms of the interactions among DO3, MWCNTs and PLA and the packing density of the dye into the polymer chains. In memory of Professor Iñaki Mondragon.

  3. Optimization of the azo dye Procion Red H-EXL degradation by Fenton's reagent using experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Carmen S D; Madeira, Luis M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2009-05-30

    Chemical oxidation by Fenton's reagent of a reactive azo dye (Procion Deep Red H-EXL gran) solution has been optimized making use of the experimental design methodology. The variables considered for the oxidative process optimization were the temperature and the initial concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous ion, for a dye concentration of 100mg/L at pH 3.5, the latter being fixed after some preliminary runs. Experiments were carried out according to a central composite design approach. The methodology employed allowed to evaluate and identify the effects and interactions of the considered variables with statistical meaning in the process response, i.e., in the total organic carbon (TOC) reduction after 120 min of reaction. A quadratic model with good adherence to the experimental data in the domain analysed was developed, which was used to plot the response surface curves and to perform process optimization. It was concluded that temperature and ferrous ion concentration are the only variables that affect TOC removal, and due to the cross-interactions, the effect of each variable depends on the value of the other one, thus affecting positively or negatively the process response.

  4. Decolourization and degradation of azo Dye, Synozol Red HF6BN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The observation of no zones of inhibition on agar plates and growth of Vigna radiata in the presence of dye extracted sample indicated that the fungal degraded dye metabolites are nontoxic to beneficial micro-flora and plant growth. Therefore, P. ostreatus has promising potential in colour removal from textile wastewater ...

  5. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies for removal of acid azo dyes by aniline formaldehyde condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terangpi, Praisy; Chakraborty, Saswati

    2017-11-01

    Adsorption of two acid dyes named Acid orange 8 (AO8) and Acid violet 7 (AV7) by amine based polymer aniline formaldehyde condensate (AFC) was studied. Adsorption of both dyes was favored at acidic pH. Electrostatic attraction between protonated amine group (NH3 +) of AFC and anionic sulfonate group (SO3 -) of dye molecule along with hydrogen bond formation and interaction between aromatic group of dye and AFC were responsible mechanisms for dye uptake. Isotherm of AO8 was Type I and followed Langmuir isotherm model. AV7 isotherm on AFC was of Type III and followed Freundlich model. Kinetics study showed that external mass transfer was the rate limiting step followed by intraparticle diffusion. Maximum adsorption capacities of AO8 and AV7 were observed as 164 and 68 mg/g. AO8 dye being smaller in molecular size was adsorbed more due to higher diffusion rate and higher dye: AFC ratio, which enhanced the interaction between dye and polymer.

  6. Remediation of azo dyes by using household used black tea as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... Key words: Dyes, adsorption, black tea, removal, impregnates. INTRODUCTION. Dyes are major ingredients of our everyday life. They are use in different industries like textile, paper, plastic, petro- leum, food, paint, leather industry, drugs for photody- namic therapy against cancer and as a food colors.

  7. Encapsulation of hydrophobic dyes in polystyrene micro- and nanoparticles via swelling procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, Thomas; Würth, Christian; Hoffmann, Katrin; Hübner, Martin; Panne, Ulrich; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2011-05-01

    Aiming at the derivation of a generalized procedure for the straightforward preparation of particles fluorescing in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral region, different swelling procedures for the loading of the hydrophobic polarity-probe Nile Red into nano- and micrometer sized polystyrene particles were studied and compared with respect to the optical properties of the resulting particles. The effect of the amount of incorporated dye on the spectroscopic properties of the particles was investigated for differently sized beads with different surface chemistries, i.e., non-functionalized, amino-modified and PEG-grafted surfaces. Moreover, photostability and leaking studies were performed. The main criterion for the optimization of the dye loading procedures was a high and thermally and photochemically stable fluorescence output of the particles for the future application of these systems as fluorescent labels. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

  8. A comparative study of selected disperse azo dye derivatives based on spectroscopic (FT-IR, NMR and UV-Vis) and nonlinear optical behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Mehmet; Coruh, Ali; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2014-03-25

    In the present work, a combined experimental and quantum chemical study on ground state equilibrium structure, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of selected disperse azo dye molecules are reported. The vibrational transitions were identified based on the recorded FT-IR spectra in the range of 4000-400 cm(-1) for solid state, simulated IR spectra and total energy distribution (TED) of vibrational modes. The chemical shifts were determined from the results of observed (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra in chloroform and dimethylsulfoxide solution. The DFT/gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) methodology was applied to predict the magnetic properties. Electronic properties were carried out by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TD-DFT/CIS approach. The nonlinear optical (NLO) features were addressed theoretically. A detailed description of spectroscopic and NLO behaviors of studied disperse azo dyes was reported with the help of comparison of experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhancement of photoinduced hydrogen production from irradiated Pt/TiO{sub 2} suspensions with simultaneous degradation of azo-dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patsoura, Alexia; Kondarides, Dimitris I.; Verykios, Xenophon E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2006-05-02

    The production of hydrogen from aqueous Pt/TiO{sub 2} suspensions illuminated with UV-vis light has been examined in the absence and in presence of azo-dyes in solution. The effects of operational variables, including dye concentration, solution pH and temperature, on the rate of hydrogen production were investigated. It has been found that deposition of Pt (0.5wt.%) on the semiconductor surface results in an increase of the H{sub 2} production rate, which goes through a maximum with time of irradiation and then drops to steady-state values comparable to those obtained over bare TiO{sub 2}. Both, maximum and steady-state rates obtained over Pt/TiO{sub 2} suspensions were found to increase with increasing solution pH and temperature. Addition of small quantities of azo-dyes in solution results in significantly enhanced rates of H{sub 2} production for a period which depends on dye concentration, solution pH and, to a lesser extent, solution temperature. It is proposed that the dye acts as a scavenger of photogenerated oxidizing species while it is degraded toward CO{sub 2} and inorganic ions. When complete mineralization is achieved, oxygen can no longer be removed from the photocatalyst surface and the rate drops to steady-state values, comparable to those obtained in the absence of azo-dye in solution. The amount of additional H{sub 2} produced is directly proportional to the amount of dye added in the solution. The rate increases with increasing solution pH, where dye degradation is faster, indicating that the process is limited by the rate of consumption of photogenerated oxygen. It is concluded that, under certain experimental conditions, it is possible to obtain significantly enhanced rates of photoinduced hydrogen production from Pt/TiO{sub 2} suspensions with simultaneous mineralization of azo-dyes. The process could be used for combined production of fuel H{sub 2} and degradation of organic pollutants present in water. (author)

  10. Bioremoval of the azo dye Congo Red by the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zamora, Miriam; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Montes-Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2015-07-01

    Discharge of dye-containing wastewater by the textile industry can adversely affect aquatic ecosystems and human health. Bioremoval is an alternative to industrial processes for detoxifying water contaminated with dyes. In this work, active and inactive biomass of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was assayed for the ability to remove Congo Red (CR) dye from aqueous solutions. Through biosorption and biodegradation processes, Chlorella vulgaris was able to remove 83 and 58 % of dye at concentrations of 5 and 25 mg L(-1), respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity at equilibrium was 200 mg g(-1). The Langmuir model best described the experimental equilibrium data. The acute toxicity test (48 h) with two species of cladocerans indicated that the toxicity of the dye in the effluent was significantly decreased compared to the initial concentrations in the influent. Daphnia magna was the species less sensitive to dye (EC50 = 17.0 mg L(-1)), followed by Ceriodaphnia dubia (EC50 = 3.32 mg L(-1)). These results show that Chlorella vulgaris significantly reduced the dye concentration and toxicity. Therefore, this method may be a viable option for the treatment of this type of effluent.

  11. Photocatalytic Removal of Azo Dye and Anthraquinone DyeUsing TiO2 Immobilised on Ceramic Tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Palanisamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 immobilized on different supports; cement and ceramic tile, was studied to decolorize two commercial dyes. The catalyst was immobilised by two different techniques, namely, slurry method on ceramic tile and powder scattering on cement. The degradation of the dyes was carried out using UV and solar irradiation. The comparative efficiency of the catalyst immobilised on two different supports was determined. The photodegradation process was monitored by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The catalyst immobilised on ceramic tile was found to be better than the catalyst immobilised on cement. Experimental results showed that both illumination and the catalyst were necessary for the degradation of the dyes and UV irradiation is more efficient compared to solar irradiation.

  12. Structure and reactivity of thiazolium azo dyes: UV-visible, resonance Raman, NMR, and computational studies of the reaction mechanism in alkaline solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Laurence C; Batchelor, Stephen N; Moore, John N

    2013-03-07

    UV-visible absorption, resonance Raman, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, allied with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, have been used to study the structure, bonding, and alkaline hydrolysis mechanism of the cationic thiazloium azo dye, 2-[2-[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]diazenyl]-3-methyl-thiazolium (1a), along with a series of six related dyes with different 4-dialkylamino groups and/or other phenyl ring substituents (2a-c, 3a-c) and the related isothiazolium azo dye, 5-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]diazenyl]-2-methyl-isothiazolium (4). These diazahemicyanine dyes are calculated to have a similar low-energy structure that is cis, trans at the (iso)thiazolium-azo group, and for which the calculated Raman spectra provide a good match with the experimental data; the calculations on these structures are used to assign and discuss the transitions giving rise to the experimental spectra, and to consider the bonding and its variation between the dyes. UV-visible, Raman, and NMR spectra recorded from minutes to several weeks after raising the pH of an aqueous solution of 1a to ca. 11.5 show that the dominant initial step in the reaction is loss of diethylamine to produce a quinonimine (ca. hours), with subsequent reactions occurring on longer time scales (ca. days to weeks); kinetic analyses give a rate constant of 2.6 × 10(-2) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) for reaction of 1a with OH(-). UV-visible spectra recorded on raising the pH of the other dyes in solution show similar changes that are attributed to the same general reaction mechanism, but with different rate constants for which the dependence on structure is discussed.

  13. Protective role of Spirulina feed in a freshwater fish (Poecilia reticulata Peters) exposed to an azo dye-methyl red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shweta; Sharma, Subhasini; Sharma, K P

    2005-12-01

    Acute toxicity of an azo dye-methyl red (5-40 ppm) was examined under starving conditions, on two groups of Poecilia reticulata--a freshwater fish, fed on different diets prior to their exposure to dye. Besides natural feed, fish of group-1 also received Spirulina feed for one month (feed population), whereas those of group-2 received only natural feed (non-feed population). The mortality data revealed non-feed population to be more tolerant to feed stress during acute toxicity study, whereas feed population exhibited better tolerance to the combined stress of both feed and methyl red; especially at higher concentrations of the latter. RBCs in methyl red treatments acquired different shapes (poikilocytosis) and an increase in their size (anisocytosis) was also noticed. Percentage of such abnormal RBCs was almost equal in both feed and non-feed populations, except at a lower concentration (5 ppm), at which percentage of poikilocytic RBCs was lesser in the feed population. RBC counts in the control non-feed fish (34.5 x 10(4)/mm3) were significantly lower than control feed population (50.0 x 10(4) /mm3). Their number decreased with an increase in methyl red concentrations in non-feed population (9-26%), but percent reduction in RBC counts was almost similar (20-26%) at various concentrations of methyl red (5-30 ppm) in the feed population. Despite reduction in RBC counts, feed population did not suffer from anemia in methyl red treatments, as evident by their RBC counts which were almost equal to control fish of non-feed population. The results suggest that Spirulina feed improves tolerance of test organism towards methyl red manifested by noticeable reduction in the cytotoxic effects on RBCs and a lower mortality rate at higher concentrations of dye.

  14. Photooxidation processes for an azo dye in aqueous media: modeling of degradation kinetic and ecological parameters evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusic, Hrvoje; Juretic, Daria; Koprivanac, Natalija; Marin, Vedrana; Božić, Ana Lončarić

    2011-01-30

    Three photooxidation processes, UV/H(2)O(2), UV/S(2)O(8)(2-) and UV/O(3) were applied to the treatment of model wastewater containing non-biodegradable organic pollutant, azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7). Dye degradation was monitored using UV/VIS and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis, determining decolorization, the degradation/formation of naphthalene and benzene structured AO7 by-products, and the mineralization of model wastewater. The water quality during the treatment was evaluated on the bases of ecological parameters: chemical (COD) and biochemical (BOD(5)) oxygen demand and toxicity on Vibrio fischeri determining the EC(50) value. The main goals of the study were to develop an appropriate mathematic model (MM) predicting the behavior of the systems under investigation, and to evaluate the toxicity and biodegradability of the model wastewater during treatments. MM developed showed a high accuracy in predicting the degradation of AO7 when considering the following observed parameters: decolorization, formation/degradation of by-products and mineralization. Good agreement of the data predicted and the empirically obtained was confirmed by calculated standard deviations. The biodegradability of model wastewater was significantly improved by three processes after mineralizing a half of the initially present organic content. The toxicity AO7 model wastewater was decreased as well. The differences in monitored ecological parameters during the treatment indicated the formation of different by-products of dye degradation regarding the oxidant type applied. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential plant growth-promoting strain Bacillus sp. SR-2-1/1 decolorized azo dyes through NADH-ubiquinone:oxidoreductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Shahid, Muhammad; Hussain, Sabir; Shahzad, Tanvir; Tahir, Muhammad; Ijaz, Muhammad; Hussain, Athar; Mahmood, Khalid; Imran, Muhammad; Babar, Shahid Ali Khan

    2017-07-01

    In this study, a bacterial strain SR-2-1/1 was isolated from textile wastewater-irrigated soil for its concurrent potential of plant growth promotion and azo-dye decolorization. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence confirmed its identity as Bacillus sp. The strain tolerated high concentrations (i.e. up to 1000mgL-1) of metals (Ni2+, Cd2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Cr6+) and efficiently decolorized the azo dyes (i.e. reactive black-5, reactive red-120, direct blue-1 and congo red). It also demonstrated considerable in vitro phosphate solubilizing and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase abilities at high metal and salt levels. Bioinformatics analysis of its 537bp azoreductase gene and deduced protein revealed that it decolorized azo dyes through NADH-ubiquinone:oxidoreductase enzyme activity. The deduced protein was predicted structurally and functionally different to those of its closely related database proteins. Thus, the strain SR-2-1/1 is a powerful bioinoculant for bioremediation of textile wastewater contaminated soils in addition to stimulation of plant growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. UV-visible-DAD and 1H-NMR spectroscopy data fusion for studying the photodegradation process of azo-dyes using MCR-ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Cristina; Pilar Callao, M; Larrechi, M Soledad

    2013-12-15

    The photodegradation process of three azo-dyes - Acid Orange 61, Acid Red 97 and Acid Brown 425 - was monitored simultaneously by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy with diode array detector (UV-vis-DAD) and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR). Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) was applied to obtain the concentration and spectral profile of the chemical compounds involved in the process. The analysis of the H-NMR data suggests there are more intermediate compounds than those obtained with the UV-vis-DAD data. The fusion of UV-vis-DAD and the (1)H-NMR signal before the multivariate analysis provides better results than when only one of the two detector signals was used. It was concluded that three degradation products were present in the medium when the three azo-dyes had practically degraded. This study is the first application of UV-vis-DAD and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy data fusion in this field and illustrates its potential as a quick method for evaluating the evolution of the azo-dye photodegradation process. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Photocatalytic activity against azo dye and cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cell lines of zirconium oxide nanoparticle mediated using leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Saraswathi, V; Santhakumar, K

    2017-04-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are gaining interest in recent years. The present paper explains about the green synthesis of zirconium oxide nanoparticles (ZrO NPs) mediated from the leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa. The prepared ZrO NPs were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). The photocatalytic activity of ZrO NPs was studied for azo dye by exposing to sunlight. The azo dye was degraded up to 94.58%. Also the ZrO NPs were studied for in vitro cytotoxicity activity against breast cancer cell lines-MCF-7 and evaluated by MTT assay. The cell morphological changes were recorded by light microscope. The cells viability was seen at 500μg/mL when compared against control. Hence the research highlights, that the method was simple, eco-friendly towards environment by phytoremediation activity of the azo dye and cytotoxicity activity against MCF-7 cell lines. Hence the present paper may help to further explore the metal nanoparticle for its potential applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Periphyton biofilms: A novel and natural biological system for the effective removal of sulphonated azo dye methyl orange by synergistic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Sadaf; Faheem, Muhammad; Ali, Naeem; Kerr, Philip G; Wu, Yonghong

    2017-01-01

    Due to their large scale use, azo dyes are adversely affecting aquatic fauna and flora as well as humans. The persistent nature of sulphonated azo dyes makes them potential ecotoxic hazards. The aim of the present study was to employ a proficient, locally available biomaterial, viz. periphyton (i.e. epiphyton, epilithon or metaphyton), for removal of the azo dye, methyl orange (MO). Results showed that the periphytic biofilms are capable of completely removing comparatively high concentrations (up to 500 mg L -1 ) of MO from wastewater. The removal of MO occurs by a synergistic mechanism involving bioadsorption and biodegradation processes. The adsorption of MO by periphyton can be described by pseudo-second order kinetics. Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models as well as Langmuir equations fit well to the MO adsorption process. FTIR analysis of MO and its metabolites demonstrated biotransformation into simpler compounds within 72 h. GC-MS/MS analysis showed the conversion of MO into simpler compounds such as phenol, ethyl acetate and acetyl acetate. The results indicated that periphyton is a promising biomaterial for the complete removal of MO from wastewater and that the treatment process has the potential for in situ removal of MO at contaminated sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of artificial wastewater containing two azo textile dyes by vertical-flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Amjad; Scholz, Miklas

    2017-12-21

    The release of untreated dye textile wastewater into receiving streams is unacceptable not only for aesthetic reasons and its negative impacts on aquatic life but also because numerous dyes are toxic and carcinogenic to humans. Strategies, as of now, used for treating textile wastewaters have technical and economical restrictions. The greater part of the physico-chemical methods, which are used to treat this kind of wastewater, are costly, produce large amounts of sludge and are wasteful concerning some soluble dyes. In contrast, biological treatments such as constructed wetlands are cheaper than the traditional methods, environmental friendly and do not produce large amounts of sludge. Synthetic wastewater containing Acid Blue 113 (AB113) and Basic Red 46 (BR46) has been added to laboratory-scale vertical-flow construction wetland systems, which have been planted with Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. (common reed). The concentrations 7 and 208 mg/l were applied for each dye at the hydraulic contact times of 48 and 96 h. Concerning the low concentrations of BR46 and AB113, the unplanted wetlands are associated with significant (ρ < 0.05) reduction performances, if compared with planted wetlands concerning the removal of dyes. For the high concentrations of AB113, BR46 and a mixture of both of them, wetlands with long contact times were significantly (ρ < 0.05) better than wetlands that had short contact times in terms of dye, colour and chemical oxygen demand reductions. Regarding nitrate nitrogen (NO 3 -N), the reduction percentage rates of AB113, BR46 and a mixture dye of both of them were between 85 and 100%. For low and high inflow dye concentrations, best removals were generally recorded for spring and summer, respectively.

  20. Decolorization of reactive azo dyes by Cunninghamella elegans UCP 542 under co-metabolic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrósio, S T; Campos-Takaki, G M

    2004-01-01

    The inappropriate disposal of dyes in wastewater constitutes an environmental problem and can cause damage to the ecosystem. Alternative treatments have been reported that fungi are particularly effective in the decolorization of textile effluents. The decolorization of dyes with different molecular structures by Cunninghamella elegans was evaluated under several media conditions. The decolorization procedures consisted of adding 72 h of mycelium into the culture medium containing either orange or reactive black or reactive red or a mixture of these dyes in the presence or absence of sucrose and/or peptone. The decolorization profile was highly dependent upon the incubation time, the molecular structure of the dye and presence or absence of co-substrates. The presence of sucrose or both sucrose and peptone significantly increased the decolorization of the solutions, however, the presence of only the nitrogen source suppressed it. The ultraviolet spectra of the solutions before and after decolorization suggested the occurrence of biodegradation in addition to the biosorption of the dyes. All tested dyes, except for the reactive black, caused inhibition of respiration of Escherichia coli, which suggested that toxic metabolites were produced.

  1. Solar photocatalytic degradation of mono azo methyl orange and diazo reactive green 19 in single and binary dye solutions: adsorbability vs photodegradation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Soon-An; Min, Ohm-Mar; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of adsorbability and number of sulfonate group on solar photocatalytic degradation of mono azo methyl orange (MO) and diazo Reactive Green 19 (RG19) in single and binary dye solutions. The adsorption capacity of MO and RG19 onto the TiO₂ was 16.9 and 26.8 mg/g, respectively, in single dye solution, and reduced to 5.0 and 23.1 mg/g, respectively, in the binary dye solution. The data obtained for photocatalytic degradation of MO and RG19 in single and binary dye solution were well fitted with the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model. The pseudo-first-order rate constants of diazo RG19 were significant higher than the mono azo MO either in single or binary dye solutions. The higher number of sulfonate group in RG19 contributed to better adsorption capacity onto the surface of TiO₂ than MO indicating greater photocatalytic degradation rate.

  2. Comparison of three combined sequencing batch reactor followed by enhanced Fenton process for an azo dye degradation: Bio-decolorization kinetics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, A; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Maknoon, R; Kowsari, E

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this research was to compare three combined sequencing batch reactor (SBR) - Fenton processes as post-treatment for the treatment of azo dye Acid Red 18 (AR18). Three combined treatment systems (CTS1, CTS2 and CTS3) were operated to investigate the biomass concentration, COD removal, AR18 dye decolorization and kinetics study. The MLSS concentration of CTS2 reached 7200 mg/L due to the use of external feeding in the SBR reactor of CTS2. The COD concentration remained 273 mg/L and 95 mg/L (initial COD=3270 mg/L) at the end of alternating anaerobic-aerobic SBR with external feeding (An-A MSBR) and CTS2, respectively, resulting in almost 65% of Fenton process efficiency. The dye concentration of 500 mg/L was finally reduced to less than 10mg/L in all systems indicating almost complete AR18 decolorization, which was also confirmed by UV-vis analysis. The dye was removed following two successive parts as parts 1 and 2 with pseudo zero-order and pseudo first-order kinetics, respectively, in all CTSs. Higher intermediate metabolites degradation was obtained using HPLC analysis in CTS2. Accordingly, a combined treatment system can be proposed as an appropriate and environmentally-friendly system for the treatment of the azo dye AR18 in wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel 2-phenyl-3-{4’-[N-(4”-aminophenylcarbamoyl]-phenyl}-quinazoline-4(3Hone-6-sulphonic acidbased mono azo reactive dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIVYESH R. PATEL

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of new heterocyclic mono azo reactive dyes 7a–m were prepared by diazotization of 2-phenyl-3-{4’-[N-(4”-aminophenylcarbamoyl]-phenyl}-quinazoline-4(3H-one-6-sulphonic acid (3 and coupling with various cyanurated coupling components 6a–m and their dyeing performance on silk, wool and cotton fibres was assessed. These dyes were found to give a variety of colour shades with very good depth and levelness on the fibres. All the compounds were identified by conventional method (IR and 1H-NMR and elemental analyses. The percentage dye bath exhaustion on different fibres was reasonably good and acceptable. The dyed fibre showed moderate to very good fastness to light, washing and rubbing.

  4. Effect of an azo dye on the performance of an aerobic granular sludge sequencing batch reactor treating a simulated textile wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franca, Rita D G; Vieira, Anabela; Mata, Ana M T; Carvalho, Gilda S; Pinheiro, Helena M; Lourenço, Nídia D

    2015-11-15

    This study analyzed the effect of an azo dye (Acid Red 14) on the performance of an aerobic granular sludge (AGS) sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system operated with 6-h anaerobic-aerobic cycles for the treatment of a synthetic textile wastewater. In this sense, two SBRs inoculated with AGS from a domestic wastewater treatment plant were run in parallel, being one supplied with the dye and the other used as a dye-free control. The AGS successfully adapted to the new hydrodynamic conditions forming smaller, denser granules in both reactors, with optimal sludge volume index values of 19 and 17 mL g(-1) after 5-min and 30-min settling, respectively. As a result, high biomass concentration levels and sludge age values were registered, up to 13 gTSS L(-1) and 40 days, respectively, when deliberate biomass wastage was limited to the sampling needs. Stable dye removal yields above 90% were attained during the anaerobic reaction phase, confirmed by the formation of one of the aromatic amines arising from azo bond reduction. The control of the sludge retention time (SRT) to 15 days triggered a 30% reduction in the biodecolorization yield. However, the increase of the SRT values back to levels above 25 days reverted this effect and also promoted the complete bioconversion of the identified aromatic amine during the aerobic reaction phase. The dye and its breakdown products did not negatively affect the treatment performance, as organic load removal yields higher than 80% were attained in both reactors, up to 77% occurring in the anaerobic phase. These high anaerobic organic removal levels were correlated to an increase of Defluviicoccus-related glycogen accumulating organisms in the biomass. Also, the capacity of the system to deal with shocks of high dye concentration and organic load was successfully demonstrated. Granule breakup after long-term operation only occurred in the dye-free control SBR, suggesting that the azo dye plays an important role in improving granule

  5. Comparative study of toxicity of azo dye Procion Red MX-5B following biosorption and biodegradation treatments with the fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, E J R; Corso, C R

    2014-10-01

    Azo dyes are an important class of environmental contaminants and are characterized by the presence of one or more azo bonds (-N=N-) in their molecular structure. Effluents containing these compounds resist many types of treatments due to their molecular complexity. Therefore, alternative treatments, such as biosorption and biodegradation, have been widely studied to solve the problems caused by these substances, such as their harmful effects on the environment and organisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate biosorption and biodegradation of the azo dye Procion Red MX-5B in solutions with the filamentous fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus. Decolorization tests were performed, followed by acute toxicity tests using Lactuca sativa seeds and Artemia salina larvae. Thirty percent dye removal of the solutions was achieved after 3 h of biosorption. UV-Vis spectroscopy revealed that removal of the dye molecules occurred without major molecular changes. The acute toxicity tests confirmed lack of molecular degradation following biosorption with A. niger, as toxicity to L. sativa seed reduced from 5% to 0%. For A. salina larvae, the solutions were nontoxic before and after treatment. In the biodegradation study with the fungus A. terreus, UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy revealed molecular degradation and the formation of secondary metabolites, such as primary and secondary amines. The biodegradation of the dye molecules was evaluated after 24, 240 and 336 h of treatment. The fungal biomass demonstrated considerable affinity for Procion Red MX-5B, achieving approximately 100% decolorization of the solutions by the end of treatment. However, the solutions resulting from this treatment exhibited a significant increase in toxicity, inhibiting the growth of L. sativa seeds by 43% and leading to a 100% mortality rate among the A. salina larvae. Based on the present findings, biodegradation was effective in the decolorization of the samples, but generated

  6. Characterization of azo dyes on Pt and Pt/polyaniline/dispersed Pt electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, J.; Fernandez, J.; Rio, A.I. del; Bonastre, J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Textil y Papelera, EPS de Alcoy, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell s/n, 03801 Alcoy (Spain); Cases, F., E-mail: fjcases@txp.upv.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Textil y Papelera, EPS de Alcoy, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell s/n, 03801 Alcoy (Spain)

    2012-06-15

    The electrochemical characterization of two organic dyes (amaranth and procion orange MX-2R) has been performed on Pt electrodes and Pt electrodes coated with polyaniline and dispersed Pt. Electrodes with different Pt loads have been synthesized and characterized obtaining that a load of 300 {mu}g cm{sup -2} was the optimum one. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to observe the distribution and morphology of the Pt nanoparticles. The electroactivity of the electrodes has also been characterized by means of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The chemical characterization of Pt dispersed Pani coated Pt electrodes (Pt-Pani-Pt) was performed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical characterization of the dyes has been performed by means of cyclic voltammetry. Voltammograms have shown that the presence of the dyes diminishes characteristic Pt oxidation and reduction peaks. However, redox processes due to the dyes, appeared in the voltammograms. The different species responsible of these redox processes were generated in the vicinity of the electrode and were not adsorbed on the electrode surface since after stirring, the different redox processes disappeared. Characterization with different scan rates showed that redox processes of both dyes were controlled by diffusion.

  7. Degradation of azo dye Procion Red MX-5B by photocatalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, C M; Cheng, M Y; Yu, J C; Wong, P K

    2002-02-01

    The photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of a monoazo dye Procion Red MX-5B under various physico-chemical conditions was investigated. Degradation of the dye by PCO was enhanced by augmentation in UV intensity, titanium dioxide and hydrogen peroxide concentrations but was inhibited by increase in initial dye concentration. The PCO process was affected by pH in a peculiar way. In the presence of 100 mg/l of TiO2 and the absence of H2O2, the highest reaction rate was observed when the initial pH was 10. With 500 mg/l of TiO2 and 10 mM of H2O2, the reaction was the fastest at initial pH of 3-5. The optimal conditions for the degradation of the dye, at an UV intensity of 17 mW/cm2, were determined to be: TiO2 concentration, 500 mg/l; initial H2O2 concentration, 10 mM; initial pH, 5.0. Monitoring of TOC loss showed that the dye was mineralized by 90% within 80 min under these conditions. Nevertheless, the persistence of a low level of TOC indicated that mineralization was not complete and dead-end product(s) which was (were) resistant to PCO might have accumulated.

  8. ELIMINATION OF DIRECT AZO DYE RED 80 IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY HETEROGENEOUS PHOTOCATALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Said Alahiane*, Asma Sennaoui, Samir Qourzal, Fatima Sakr, Ali Assabbane

    2017-01-01

    The photoelimination, at ambient temperature, of aqueous solutions of Direct Red 80 dye (DR 80) in the presence of TiO2 and ZnO catalystshas been studied in the presence of UV radiation generated by an artificial light source.We have determined the influence of several physico-chemical parameters (the mass of the catalyst, the initial concentration of dye and the initial pH of the solution) which govern the kinetics of degradation of this pollutant in order to be in optimum conditions.The cat...

  9. ENHANCING THE EFFICIENCY OF AZO-BASED DYE SENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS BY SURFACE TREATMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    JEANINA LUNGU; ADRIAN GEORGESCU; ANCA DUMBRAVA

    2015-01-01

    We studied the conductive glass and/or the semiconductor surface treatments with aluminum ions as a technique to enhance the characteristics of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on Al-doped ZnO. The aluminum ions were deposited on the surfaces using aluminum isopropoxide as precursor, by an easy and efficient method. We measured the characteristics of the dye sensitized solar cells based on pre- and/or post-treated electrodes. Our study showed a clear enhancement of cells efficiencies ...

  10. In silico identification of catalytic residues in azobenzene reductase from Bacillus subtilis and its docking studies with azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, K; Shanthi, V; Sethumadhavan, Rao

    2009-12-01

    Prediction of catalytic residues of an enzyme molecule is of great importance for a range of applications including molecular docking, drug design, structural identification and comparison of binding sites. Over the last decades, many studies have been conducted to identify the enzyme catalytic site. But, the catalytic residues of the azobenzene reductase from bacillus subtilis are still unknown. Investigation shows that under anaerobic conditions, azo dyes can be reduced by this enzyme and other environmental microorganisms to colorless amines, which may be toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic to humans and animals. To assess and estimate the toxicity, it is essential to identify the catalytic residues of this enzyme. The computational methods developed that address this issue are few. In this approach, we identify the catalytic residues of azobenzene reductase from bacillus subtilis, which were then analyzed in terms of properties including function, conservation, hydrogen bonding, B-factor, solvent accessibility, and flexibility. The results indicate that, Lys (83) and Tyr (74) play an important role as catalytic site residues in the azobenzene reductase from bacillus subtilis. It is hoped that this information will provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in catalysis and a heuristic basis for predicting the catalytic residues in enzymes of unknown function. In this study, our approach mainly looks for a better understanding of the biodegradation of the Sudan I, Sudan II, Sudan III and Sudan IV dyes mediated by azobenzene reductase from bacillus subtilis. Further more, the catalytic site residues information is essential for understanding and altering substrate specificity and for the design of enzyme inhibitors.

  11. Performance of a newly isolated salt-tolerant yeast strain Pichia occidentalis G1 for degrading and detoxifying azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li; Shao, Yifan; Ning, Shuxiang; Tan, Liang

    2017-06-01

    A salt-tolerant yeast named G1 which could decolorize various azo dyes was recently isolated and identified as Pichia occidentalis. Systematic researches on characterization, degradation pathway, detoxification effects and enzymes analysis of this yeast were done. The results showed that the optimal metabolism and growth parameters for strain G1 were: 2.0gL-1 glucose, 0.6gL-1 ammonium sulfate, 0.08gL-1 yeast extract, 30gL-1 NaCl, 160rmin-1, 30°C and pH 5.0. More than 98% of 50mgL-1 Acid Red B (ARB) could be decolorized within 16h under the optimal conditions. Additionally, strain G1 degraded and obviously detoxified ARB through a possible pathway successively consisting of decolorization, deamination/desulfonation and TCA cycle processes. Moreover, NADH-DCIP reductase was estimated as the key reductase for decolorization and ligninases including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase were important oxidoreductases for further degradation of decolorization intermediates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Electrical Stimulation on the Degradation of Azo Dye in Three-Dimensional Biofilm Electrode Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Cao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional biofilm electrode reactors (3D-BERs were constructed to degrade the azo dye Reactive Brilliant Red (RBR X-3B. The 3D-BERs with different influent concentrations and external voltages were individually studied to investigate their influence on the removal of X-3B. Experimental results showed that 3D-BERs have good X-3B removal efficiency; even when the influent concentration was 800 mg/L, removal efficiency of 73.4% was still achieved. In addition, the X-3B removal efficiency stabilized shortly after the influent concentration increased. In 3D-BERs, the average X-3B removal efficiency increased from 52.8% to 85.4% when the external voltage rose from 0 to 2 V. We further identified the intermediate products via UV-Vis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analyses, and discussed the potential mechanism of degradation. After the conjugate structure of X-3B was destroyed, all of the substances generated mainly consisted of lower-molecular-weight organics.

  13. Azo dyes wastewater treatment and simultaneous electricity generation in a novel process of electrolysis cell combined with microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Haiming; Wang, Yan

    2017-07-01

    A new process of electrolysis cell (EC) coupled with microbial fuel cell (MFC) was developed here and its feasibility in methyl red (MR) wastewater treatment and simultaneous electricity generation was assessed. Results indicate that an excellent MR removal and electricity production performance was achieved, where the decolorization and COD removal efficiencies were 100% and 89.3%, respectively and a 0.56V of cell voltage output was generated. Electrolysis voltage showed a positive influence on decolorization rate (DR) but also cause a rapid decrease in current efficiency (CE). Although a low COD removal rate of 38.5% was found in EC system, biodegradability of MR solution was significantly enhanced, where the averaged DR was 85.6%. Importantly, COD removal rate in EC-MFC integrated process had a 50.8% improvement compared with the single EC system. The results obtained here would be beneficial to provide a prospective alternative for azo dyes wastewater treatment and power production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a polyoxometallate-based photocatalyst assembled with cucurbit[6]uril via hydrogen bonds for azo dyes degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Minna [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, the Chinese Academy of Science, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Lin Jingxiang; Lue Jian; You Yanglijun; Liu Tianfu [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Science, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Cao Rong, E-mail: rcao@fjirsm.ac.cn [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Science, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel photocatalyst assembled from {alpha}-Keggin type polyoxometallate and macrocycle cucurbit[6]uril via hydrogen bonding has been synthesized and exhibits good photocatalytic activity towards azo dyes degradation. - Abstract: A water insoluble cucurbit[6]uril-polyoxometallates (CB[6]-POMs) composite assembled from {alpha}-Keggin type polysilicontungstate anions and macrocycle cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) via hydrogen bonding has been synthesized as visible light active photocatalyst. The physical and photocatalytic properties of such photocatalyst have been fully characterized by PXRD, FTIR, TG, XPS, and UV/vis diffuse reflectance spectra. The catalyst shows a good photocatalytic activity towards the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible light irradiation and displays good reproducibility of photocatalytic degradation by a simple recycled procedure without obvious loss in catalytic activity, which is of great significance for practical use of the photocatalyst. In the photodegradation process, the {l_brace}Ni-CB[6]{r_brace}{sub n} chain of the photocatalyst acts as sensitizer and can be induced by visible light, meanwhile the POMs chain of the photocatalyst acts as electron acceptor and deposits the electron in its LUMO. The effects of various experimental parameters and the proposed mechanisms are discussed in detail.

  15. Preparation, characterization of a ceria loaded carbon nanotubes nanocomposites photocatalyst and degradation of azo dye Acid Orange 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Tao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A ceria loaded carbon nanotubes (CeO2/CNTs nanocomposites photocatalyst was prepared by chemical precipitation, and the preparation conditions were optimized using an orthogonal experiment method. HR-TEM, XRD, UV-Vis/DRS, TGA and XPS were used to characterize the photocatalyst. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption was employed to determine the BET specific surface area. The results indicated that the photocatalyst has no obvious impurities. CeO2 was dispersed on the carbon nanotubes with a good loading effect and high loading efficiency without agglomeration. The catalyst exhibits a strong ability to absorb light in the ultraviolet region and some ability to absorb light in the visible light region. The CeO2/CNTs nanocomposites photocatalyst was used to degrade azo dye Acid Orange 7 (40 mg/L. The optical decolorization rate was 66.58% after xenon lamp irradiation for 4 h, which is better than that of commercial CeO2 (43.13%. The results suggested that CeO2 loading on CNTs not only enhanced the optical decolorization rate but also accelerated the separation of CeO2/CNTs and water.

  16. Enhancement of azo dye Acid Orange 7 removal in newly developed horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Heng-Chong; Lim, Poh-Eng; Seng, Chye-Eng; Mohd Nawi, Mohd Asri; Adnan, Rohana

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal subsurface-flow (HSF) constructed wetland incorporating baffles was developed to facilitate upflow and downflow conditions so that the treatment of pollutants could be achieved under multiple aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions sequentially in the same wetland bed. The performances of the baffled and conventional HSF constructed wetlands, planted and unplanted, in the removal of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) were compared at the hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 5, 3 and 2 days when treating domestic wastewater spiked with AO7 concentration of 300 mg/L. The planted baffled unit was found to achieve 100%, 83% and 69% AO7 removal against 73%, 46% and 30% for the conventional unit at HRT of 5, 3 and 2 days, respectively. Longer flow path provided by baffled wetland units allowed more contact of the wastewater with the rhizomes, microbes and micro-aerobic zones resulting in relatively higher oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and enhanced performance as kinetic studies revealed faster AO7 biodegradation rate under aerobic condition. In addition, complete mineralization of AO7 was achieved in planted baffled wetland unit due to the availability of a combination of aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Plant-mediated synthesis of silver-nanocomposite as novel effective azo dye adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satapathy, Mantosh Kumar; Banerjee, Priya; Das, Papita

    2015-01-01

    Toxicity of textile effluent is a globally alarming issue nowadays. In order to address this problem, a cost-effective and environment-friendly technique for adsorption of toxic dyes has been introduced in this research. Firstly in this study, green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) having antibacterial efficacy, had been carried out using leaf extracts of Azadirachta indica as reducing as well as capping agent. This research idea was further extended for the development and application of a novel method of preparation of silver-nanocomposite using synthesized microwave-assisted AgNPs with soil as a novel nanocomposite to adsorb hazardous dyes. However, this nanocomposite was found to possess higher efficiency and adsorption capacity in comparison to soil as adsorbent for the removal of crystal violet dye under same experimental conditions. Additionally, it was also observed that use of this Ag-nanocomposite as adsorbent helped in achieving about 97.2 % removal of crystal violet dye from the effluent solution.

  18. THE CONTRIBUTION OF AZO DYES TO THE MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY OF THE CRISTAIS RIVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    To verify if compounds within the discharge of a dye processing plant were contributing to the mutagenicity repeatedly found in the Cristais River, Sao Paulo, Brazil, we chemically characterized the treated industrial effluent, raw and treated water, and the sludge produced by a ...

  19. AZO DYES ARE MAJOR CONTRIBUTORS TO THE MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY DETECTED IN THE CRISTAIS RIVER WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine if compounds from a dye processing plant were contributing to the mutagenicity repeatedly found in the Cristais River, Sao Paulo, Brazil, we chemically characterized the treated industrial effluent, raw and treated water, and the sludge produced by a Drinking Water T...

  20. Photocatalytic oxidation of a reactive azo dye and evaluation of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driniev

    2004-07-03

    Jul 3, 2004 ... The degradability of selected amines which are detected in textile industry wastewaters has been investigated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions as ... The dye solution contained in a flask was placed on a magnetic stirrer to keep the catalyst powder suspended. An Osram-Vitaluks. UV-lamp with a ...

  1. Remediation of azo dyes by using household used black tea as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study used black tea and its impregnates were used as an adsorbents for the removal of textile dyes such as methylene blue and malachite green. The impregnation technique was adopted for the preparation of metal impregnates. The present study shows that used black tea and its impregnate exhibit ...

  2. Remediation of azo dyes by using household used black tea as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... In the present study used black tea and its impregnates were used as an adsorbents for the removal of textile dyes such as methylene blue and malachite green. The impregnation technique was adopted for the preparation of metal impregnates. The present study shows that used black tea and its ...

  3. 454-Pyrosequencing analysis of highly adapted azo dye-degrading microbial communities in a two-stage anaerobic-aerobic bioreactor treating textile effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köchling, Thorsten; Ferraz, Antônio Djalma Nunes; Florencio, Lourdinha; Kato, Mario Takayuki; Gavazza, Sávia

    2017-03-01

    Azo dyes, which are widely used in the textile industry, exhibit significant toxic characteristics for the environment and the human population. Sequential anaerobic-aerobic reactor systems are efficient for the degradation of dyes and the mineralization of intermediate compounds; however, little is known about the composition of the microbial communities responsible for dye degradation in these systems. 454-Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was employed to assess the bacterial biodiversity and composition of a two-stage (anaerobic-aerobic) pilot-scale reactor that treats effluent from a denim factory. The anaerobic reactor was inoculated with anaerobic sludge from a domestic sewage treatment plant. Due to the selective composition of the textile wastewater, after 210 days of operation, the anaerobic reactor was dominated by the single genus Clostridium, affiliated with the Firmicutes phylum. The aerobic biofilter harbored a diverse bacterial community. The most abundant phylum in the aerobic biofilter was Proteobacteria, which was primarily represented by the Gamma, Delta and Epsilon classes followed by Firmicutes and other phyla. Several bacterial genera were identified that most likely played an essential role in azo dye degradation in the investigated system.

  4. Spectroscopic, thermal, catalytic and biological studies of Cu(II) azo dye complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sonbati, A. Z.; Diab, M. A.; El-Bindary, A. A.; Shoair, A. F.; Hussein, M. A.; El-Boz, R. A.

    2017-08-01

    New complexes of copper(II) with azo compounds of 5-amino-2-(aryl diazenyl)phenol (HLn) are prepared and investigated by elemental analyses, molar conductance, IR, 1H NMR, UV-Visible, mass, ESR spectra, magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermal analyses. The complexes have a square planar structure and general formula [Cu(Ln)(OAc)]H2O. Study the catalytic activities of Cu(II) complexes toward oxidation of benzyl alcohol derivatives to carbonyl compounds were tested using H2O2 as the oxidant. The intrinsic binding constants (Kb) of the ligands (HLn) and Cu(II) complexes (1-4) with CT-DNA are determined. The formed compounds have been tested for biological activity of antioxidants, antibacterial against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and yeast Candida albicans. Antibiotic (Ampicillin) and antifungal against (Colitrimazole) and cytotoxic compounds HL1, HL2, HL3 and complex (1) showed moderate to good activity against S. aureus, E. coli and Candida albicans, and also to be moderate on antioxidants and toxic substances. Molecular docking is used to predict the binding between the ligands with the receptor of breast cancer (2a91).

  5. Application of Acidic Treated Pumice as an Adsorbent for the Removal of Azo Dye from Aqueous Solutions:kinetic, Equilibrium and Thermodynamic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saied Bashiri

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Colored effluents are one of the important environment pollution sources since they contain unused dye compounds which are toxic and less-biodegradable. In this work removal of Acid Red 14 and Acid Red 18 azo dyes was investigated by acidic treated pumice stone as anefficient adsorbent at various experimental conditions. Removal of dye increased with increase in contact time and initial dye concentration, while decreased for increment in solution temperature and pH. Results of the equilibrium study showed that the removal ofAR14 and AR18 followed Freundlich (r2>0.99 and Langmuir (r2>0.99 isotherm models.Maximum sorption capacities were 3.1 and 29.7 mg/g for AR 14 and AR18, namely significantly higher than those reported in the literature, even for activated carbon. Fitting of experimental data onto kinetic models showed the relevance of the pseudo-second order (r2>0.99 and intra-particle diffusion (r2>0.98 models for AR14 and AR18, respectively. For both dyes, the values of external mass transfer coefficient decreased for increasing initial dye concentrations, showing increasing external mass transfer resistance at solid/liquid layer.Desorption experiments confirmed the relevance of pumice stone for dye removal, since the pH regeneration method showed 86% and 89 % regeneration for AR14 and AR18,respectively.

  6. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Harshad; Govindwar, Sanjay; Paul, Diby

    2015-01-01

    A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB) medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR) was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF). Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L−1) within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI) removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50%) was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L−1) and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50%) at 35 and 20 mL·h−l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%), COD (85 and 83%) and BOD (79 and 78%) of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents. PMID:26086710

  7. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Lade

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF. Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L−1 within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50% was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L−1 and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50% at 35 and 20 mL·h−l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%, COD (85 and 83% and BOD (79 and 78% of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents.

  8. ENHANCING THE EFFICIENCY OF AZO-BASED DYE SENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS BY SURFACE TREATMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JEANINA LUNGU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We studied the conductive glass and/or the semiconductor surface treatments with aluminum ions as a technique to enhance the characteristics of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs based on Al-doped ZnO. The aluminum ions were deposited on the surfaces using aluminum isopropoxide as precursor, by an easy and efficient method. We measured the characteristics of the dye sensitized solar cells based on pre- and/or post-treated electrodes. Our study showed a clear enhancement of cells efficiencies for the DSSCs based on Al(III pre-treated electrodes (i.e. a percentage increase of almost 18 % and also a smaller improvement in the efficiencies of DSSCs based on Al(III post-treated photoelectrodes (i.e. a percentage increase of almost 10 %, giving a overall enhance of about 21 % reported to the untreated photoelectrode based DSSC.

  9. Decolorization and detoxification of sulfonated azo dye methyl orange by Kocuria rosea MTCC 1532.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshetti, G K; Telke, A A; Kalyani, D C; Govindwar, S P

    2010-04-15

    Kocuria rosea (MTCC 1532) showed 100% decolorization of methyl orange (50 mg l(-1)) under static condition. The optimum pH and temperature for dye decolorization was 6.8 and 30 degrees C, respectively. The K. rosea (MTCC 1532) showed maximum decolorization of methyl orange when growth medium containing yeast extract as compared to other substrates. The culture exhibited significant ability to decolorize repeated additions of dye, with reduction in time up to 12 h at eighth dye aliquot addition. Significant induction of reductases (NADH-DCIP reductase and azoreductase) suggests its involvement in decolorization of methyl orange. The metabolites formed after decolorization of methyl orange, such as 4-amino sulfonic acid and N,N'-dimethyl p-phenyldiamine were characterized using FTIR and MS. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity study showed the methyl orange was toxic and metabolites obtained after its decolorization was nontoxic for experimental plants (Triticum aestivum and Phaseolus mungo) and bacteria (K. rosea, Pseudomonas aurugenosa and Azatobacter vinelandii). 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of three combined sequencing batch reactor followed by enhanced Fenton process for an azo dye degradation: Bio-decolorization kinetics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azizi, A., E-mail: armina_84@yahoo.com [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Hafez Ave., Tehran15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alavi Moghaddam, M.R., E-mail: alavim@yahoo.com [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Hafez Ave., Tehran15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maknoon, R., E-mail: rmaknoon@yahoo.com [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Hafez Ave., Tehran15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kowsari, E., E-mail: kowsarie@aut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Hafez Ave., Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Three combined advanced SBR and enhanced Fenton process as post treatment was compared. • Higher biomass concentration, dye, COD and metabolites removal was presented together. • Pseudo zero and pseudo first-order bio-decolorization kinetics were observed in all SBRs. • High reduction of AR18 to intermediate metabolites was monitored by HPLC. - Abstract: The purpose of this research was to compare three combined sequencing batch reactor (SBR) – Fenton processes as post-treatment for the treatment of azo dye Acid Red 18 (AR18). Three combined treatment systems (CTS1, CTS2 and CTS3) were operated to investigate the biomass concentration, COD removal, AR18 dye decolorization and kinetics study. The MLSS concentration of CTS2 reached 7200 mg/L due to the use of external feeding in the SBR reactor of CTS2. The COD concentration remained 273 mg/L and 95 mg/L (initial COD = 3270 mg/L) at the end of alternating anaerobic–aerobic SBR with external feeding (An-A MSBR) and CTS2, respectively, resulting in almost 65% of Fenton process efficiency. The dye concentration of 500 mg/L was finally reduced to less than 10 mg/L in all systems indicating almost complete AR18 decolorization, which was also confirmed by UV–vis analysis. The dye was removed following two successive parts as parts 1 and 2 with pseudo zero-order and pseudo first-order kinetics, respectively, in all CTSs. Higher intermediate metabolites degradation was obtained using HPLC analysis in CTS2. Accordingly, a combined treatment system can be proposed as an appropriate and environmentally-friendly system for the treatment of the azo dye AR18 in wastewater.

  11. Enhancing the electrochemical oxidation of acid-yellow 36 azo dye using boron-doped diamond electrodes by addition of ferrous ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villanueva-Rodriguez, M.; Hernandez-Ramirez, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Av. Universidad s/n, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, NL. 66400 (Mexico); Peralta-Hernandez, J.M., E-mail: jperalta@fcq.uanl.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Av. Universidad s/n, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, NL. 66400 (Mexico); Bandala, Erick R.; Quiroz-Alfaro, Marco A. [Universidad de Las Americas - Puebla, Escuela de Ingenieria y Ciencias, Sta. Catarina Martir - Cholula, Puebla 72820 (Mexico)

    2009-08-15

    This work shows preliminary results on the electrochemical oxidation process (EOP) using boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode for acidic yellow 36 oxidation, a common azo dye used in textile industry. The study is centred in the synergetic effect of ferrous ions and hydroxyl free radicals for improving discoloration of azo dye. The assays were carried out in a typical glass cell under potentiostatic conditions. On experimental conditions, the EOP was able to partially remove the dye from the reaction mixture. The reaction rate increased significantly by addition of Fe{sup 2+} (1 mM as ferrous sulphate) to the system and by (assumed) generation of ferrate ion [Fe(VI)] over BDD electrode. Ferrate is considered as a highly oxidizing reagent capable of removing the colorant from the reaction mixture, in synergistic action with the hydroxyl radicals produced on the BDD surface. Further increases in the Fe{sup 2+} concentration lead to depletion of the reaction rate probably due to the hydroxyl radical scavenging effect of Fe{sup 2+} excess in the system.

  12. Removal of COD and color from Direct Blue 71 azo dye wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nese Ertugay

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, degradation of Direct Blue 71 (DB71 by Fenton’s oxidation process was investigated. The effect of initial pH, dosages of Fe2+ and H2O2, dye concentration and temperature on the color and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD removal was studied in a batch reactor. The optimal conditions for the decolorization and COD removal of DB71 were determined as pH = 3.0, Fe2+ = 3 mg L−1 and H2O2 = 125 mg L−1. Under the optimal conditions 94% color and 50.7% COD removal efficiency of the dye in 100 mg L−1 aqueous solution were achieved after 20 min of reaction. Results indicated that the removal efficiency was strongly dependent on initial pH, initial concentration of Fenton’s reagents, initial DB71 concentration and reaction temperature. Additionally increasing the reaction temperature from 20 to 60 °C showed a positive effect on the decolorization efficiency of DB71. The experimental data were analyzed using the first and second-order and Behnajady–Modirshahla–Ghanbery (BMG kinetic models. BMG model provides the best correlation of the data. The present study can provide guidance to relational industry operators and planners to effectively treat the DB71 contaminated wastewater by Fenton’s oxidation process.

  13. Biodecolorization of a food azo dye by the deep sea Dermacoccus abyssi MT1.1(T) strain from the Mariana Trench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Weeranuch; Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote; Martins, Lígia O; Ngiwsara, Lukana; Sakairi, Nobuo; Pathom-aree, Wasu; Okuyama, Masayuki; Mori, Haruhide; Kimura, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the characterization of the ability of Dermacoccus spp. isolated from the deepest point of the world's oceans for azo dye decolorization. A detailed investigation of Dermacoccus abyssi MT1.1(T) with respect to the azoreductase activity and enzymatic mechanism as well as the potential role of the bacterial strain for biocleaning of industrial dye baths is reported. Resting cells with oxygen-insensitive azoreductase resulted in the rapid decolorization of the polysulfonated dye Brilliant Black BN (BBN) which is a common food colorant. The highest specific decolorization rate (vs) was found at 50 °C with a moderately thermal tolerance for over 1 h. Kinetic analysis showed the high rates and strong affinity of the enzymatic system for the dye with a Vmax = 137 mg/g cell/h and a Km = 19 mg/L. The degradation of BBN produces an initial orange intermediate, 8-amino-5-((4-sulfonatophenyl)diazenyl)naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid, identified by mass spectrometry which is later converted to 4-aminobenzene sulfonic acid. Nearly 80% of the maximum vs is possible achieved in resting cell treatment with the salinity increased up to 5.0% NaCl in reaction media. Therefore, this bacterial system has potential for dye decolorization bioprocesses occurring at high temperature and salt concentrations e.g. for cleaning dye-containing saline wastewaters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Iron promotion of the TiO{sub 2} photosensitization process towards the photocatalytic oxidation of azo dyes under solar-simulated light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Camilo A.; Centeno, Aristobulo [Centro de Investigaciones en Catalisis (CICAT), Escuela de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS), A.A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Giraldo, Sonia A., E-mail: sgiraldo@uis.edu.co [Centro de Investigaciones en Catalisis (CICAT), Escuela de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS), A.A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2011-10-03

    Highlights: {yields} Azo dye photooxidation occurs under strict combination of ultraviolet and visible irradiation of Fe-TiO{sub 2}. {yields} Fe{sup 3+} enhances the TiO{sub 2} photooxidation of azo dyes while decreases that of phenol. {yields} UV irradiation leads to a decrease in photooxidation activity of Fe-TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts. - Abstract: The photocatalytic oxidation of the azo dye Orange-II (Or-II) using Fe loaded TiO{sub 2} (Fe-TiO{sub 2}) was studied under ultraviolet (UV), visible (vis) and simultaneous UV-vis irradiations using a solar light simulator. Photocatalysts were characterized by means of XRD, SEM-EDX, FTIR and DRS. Fe{sup 3+} species, identified in XPS analyses, were responsible of the increased absorption of visible light. Moreover, DRS analyses showed a decrease in the bandgap due to Fe{sup 3+} loading. Photocatalystic tests proved that Fe modification enhanced the TiO{sub 2} photocatalytic activity towards Or-II photodegradation under simultaneous UV-vis irradiation. Even so, the performance of the Fe-TiO{sub 2} samples towards the photodegradation of phenol, under UV irradiation, was lower than TiO{sub 2} suggesting the recombination of the UV photogenerated electron-hole pair. Therefore, results evidence a Fe{sup 3+} promotion of the electron caption in the photosensitization process of TiO{sub 2} by Or-II acting as a sensitizer. Such process leads to the Or-II photooxidation under UV-vis irradiation by losing energy in electron transferring processes to sensitize TiO{sub 2}, and, the formation of reactive oxygen species promoted by the injected electron to the TiO{sub 2} conduction band.

  15. Enhanced azo dye removal in a continuously operated up-flow anaerobic filter packed with henna plant biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jingang, E-mail: hjg@hdu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wu, Mengke; Chen, Jianjun; Liu, Xiuyan; Chen, Tingting [Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Wen, Yue [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Tang, Junhong; Xie, Zhengmiao [Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Henna stem mixed with ceramic media in UAF enhanced the removal of AO7. • Bio-reduction was the main AO7 removal pathway in henna-added UAF. • Adsorption and endogenous reduction were the main removal pathways in the control. • Henna played a multiple role in providing electron donors and redox mediator. - Abstract: Effects of henna plant biomass (stem) packed in an up-flow anaerobic bio-filter (UAF) on an azo dye (AO7) removal were investigated. AO7 removal, sulfanilic acid (SA) formation, and pseudo first-order kinetic constants for these reactions (k{sub AO7} and k{sub SA}) were higher in the henna-added UAF (R2) than in the control UAF without henna (R1). The maximum k{sub AO7} in R1 and R2 were 0.0345 and 0.2024 cm{sup −1}, respectively, on day 18; the corresponding molar ratios of SA formation to AO7 removal were 0.582 and 0.990. Adsorption and endogenous bio-reduction were the main AO7 removal pathways in R1, while in R2 bio-reduction was the dominant. Organics in henna could be released and fermented to volatile fatty acids, acting as effective electron donors for AO7 reduction, which was accelerated by soluble and/or fixed lawsone. Afterwards, the removal process weakened over time, indicating the demand of electron donation and lawsone-releasing during the long-term operation of UAF.

  16. Facile synthesis of 1-naphthol azo dyes with nano SiO2/HIO4 under solvent-free conditions

    OpenAIRE

    A.R. Pourali; A. Bamoniri; S.M.R. Nazifi

    2013-01-01

    Nano-silica supported periodic acid (nano-SPIA) has been utilized as a heterogeneous reagent for a highly efficient and one pot synthesis of azo dyes based on 1-naphthol under solvent-free conditions at room temperature. This method has some advantages, the reaction workup is very easy and the catalyst can be easily separated from the reaction mixture and one-pot procedure. The related products have been obtained in good to excellent yields, high purity and short reaction times. The structure...

  17. Enzymes oxidizing the azo dye 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol (Sudan I) and their contribution to its genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiborova, Marie; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Frei, Eva; Hodek, Petr; Martinek, Vaclav

    2014-01-01

    Sudan I [1-(phenylazo)-2-naphthol, C.I. Solvent Yellow 14] is an industrial dye, which was found as a contaminant in numerous foods in several European countries. Because Sudan I has been assigned by the IARC as a Category 3 carcinogen, the European Union decreed that it cannot be utilized as food colorant in any European country. Sudan I induces the malignancies in liver and urinary bladder of rats and mice. This carcinogen has also been found to be a potent mutagen, contact allergen and sensitizer, and exhibits clastogenic properties. The oxidation of Sudan I increases its toxic effects and leads to covalent adducts in DNA. Identification of enzymatic systems that contribute to Sudan I oxidative metabolism to reactive intermediates generating such covalent DNA adducts on the one hand, and to the detoxification of this carcinogen on the other, is necessary to evaluate susceptibility to this toxicant. This review summarizes the identification of such enzymes and the molecular mechanisms of oxidation reactions elucidated to date. Human and animal cytochrome P450 (CYP) and peroxidases are capable of oxidizing Sudan I. Of the CYP enzymes, CYP1A1 is most important both in Sudan I detoxification and its bio-activation. Ring-hydroxylated metabolites and a dimer of this carcinogen were found as detoxification products of Sudan I generated with CYPs and peroxidases, respectively. Oxidative bio-activation of this azo dye catalyzed by CYPs and peroxidases leads to generation of proximate genotoxic metabolites (the CYP-catalyzed formation of the benzenediazonium cation and the peroxidase-mediated generation of one-electron oxidation products), which covalently modify DNA both in vitro and in vivo. The predominant DNA adduct generated with the benzenediazonium cation was characterized to be 8-(phenylazo)guanine. The Sudan I radical species mediated by peroxidases reacts with the -NH2 group in (deoxy)guanosine, generating the 4-[(deoxy)guanosin-N(2)-yl]Sudan I product. Sudan I

  18. Fenton oxidative decolorization of the azo dye Direct Blue 15 in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jian-Hui; Shi, Shao-Hui; Lee, Yi-Fan

    2009-01-01

    and kinetic of the DB15 were studied, the operating parameters were preferred by changing one factor at one time while the other parameters were kept constant. The optimal conditions for the decolorization of DB15 were determined as pH=4.0, [H2O2] = 2.8x10(-3) mol/L, H2O2/Fe2+ ratio = 100: 1, H2O2/dye ratio...... the reaction temperature from 20 to 40 degrees C showed a positive effect on the decolorization efficiency of DB15. The present study can provide guidance to relational industry operators and planners to effectively treat the DB15 contaminated wastewater by Fenton oxidation process. (C) 2009 Elsevier B. V. All...

  19. Photocatalytic degradation of AZO dyes by supported TiO2 + UV in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C; Wang, L; Kong, L; Yang, X; Wang, L; Zheng, S; Chen, F; MaiZhi, F; Zong, H

    2000-08-01

    The photocatalytic degradation performance of photocatalysts TiO2 supported on 13-X, Na-Y, 4A zeolites with different loading content was evaluated using the photocatalytic oxidation of dyes direct fast scarlet 4BS and acid red 3B in aqueous medium. The results showed that the best reaction dosage of TiO2-zeolite catalysts is about 2 g/l and the photocatalytic kinetics follows first order for all supported catalysts. The photocatalytic activity order of the three series catalysts is 13X type >Y type >4A type. The physical state of titanium dioxide on the supports is evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET, and FTIR.

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic and TD-DFT quantum mechanical study of azo-azomethine dyes. A laser induced trans-cis-trans photoisomerization cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Anton; Kostadinov, Anton; Ivanov, Deyan; Dimov, Deyan; Stoyanov, Simeon; Nedelchev, Lian; Nazarova, Dimana; Yancheva, Denitsa

    2018-03-05

    This paper describes the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and quantum mechanical calculations of three azo-azomethine dyes. The dyes were synthesized via condensation reaction between 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde and three different 4-aminobenzene azo dyes. Quantum chemical calculations on the optimized molecular geometry and electron densities of the trans (E) and cis (Z) isomers and their vibrational frequencies have been computed by using DFT/B3LYP density-functional theory with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in vacuo. The thermodynamic parameters such as total electronic energy E (RB3LYP), enthalpy H298 (sum of electronic and thermal enthalpies), free Gibbs energy G298 (sum of electronic and thermal free Gibbs energies) and dipole moment μ were computed for trans (E) and cis (Z) isomers in order to estimate the ΔEtrans→cis, Δμtrans→cis,ΔHtrans→cis, ΔGtrans→cis and ΔStrans→cis values. After molecular geometry optimization the electronic spectra have been obtained by TD-DFT calculations at same basis set and correlated with the spectra of vapour deposited nanosized films of the dyes. The NBO analysis was performed in order to understand the intramolecular charge transfer and energy of resonance stabilization. Solvatochromism was investigated by UV-VIS spectroscopy in five different organic solvents with increasing polarity. The dynamic photoisomerization experiments have been performed in DMF by pump lasers λ=355nm (mostly E→Z) and λ=491nm (mostly Z→E) in spectral region 300nm - 800nm at equal concentrations and times of illumination in order to investigate the photodynamical trans-cis-trans properties of the CHN and NN chromophore groups of the dyes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Descoloração redutiva de corantes azo e o efeito de mediadores redox na presença do aceptor de elétrons sulfato Reductive decolourisation of azo dyes and the effect of redox mediators in the presence of the electron acceptor sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Carantino Costa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of sulphate and the redox mediator Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS on the decolorization of the azo dyes Congo Red (CR and Reactive Black 5 (RB5. In anaerobic reactors free of extra sulphate dosage, the color removal efficiency decreased drastically when the external electron donor ethanol was removed. In presence of an extra dosage of sulphate, CR decolourisations were 47.8% (free of AQDS and 96.5% (supplemented with AQDS. The decolourisations achieved in both reactors with RB5 were lower than the ones found with CR. Finally, the biogenic sulphide contribution on azo dye reduction was negligiable.

  2. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of small-azo-dyes as potent Vesicular Glutamate Transporters inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre-Besse, Franck-Cyril; Poirel, Odile; Bersot, Tiphaine; Kim-Grellier, Elodie; Daumas, Stephanie; El Mestikawy, Salah; Acher, Francine C; Pietrancosta, Nicolas

    2014-05-06

    Vesicular Glutamate Transporters (VGLUTs) allow the loading of presynapic glutamate vesicles and thus play a critical role in glutamatergic synaptic transmission. VGLUTs have proved to be involved in several major neuropathologies and directly correlated to clinical dementia in Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease. Accordingly VGLUT represent a key biological target or biomarker for neuropathology treatment or diagnostic. Yet, despite the pivotal role of VGLUTs, their pharmacology appears quite limited. Known competitive inhibitors are restricted to some dyes as Trypan Blue (TB) and glutamate mimics. This lack of pharmacological tools has heavily hampered VGLUT investigations. Here we report a rapid access to small molecules that combine benefits of TB and dicarboxylic quinolines (DCQs). Their ability to block vesicular glutamate uptake was evaluated. Several compounds displayed low micromolar inhibitory potency when size related compounds are thirty to forty times less potent (i.e. DCQ). We then confirmed the VGLUT selectivity by measuring the effect of the series on vesicular monoamine transport and on metabotropic glutamate receptor activity. These inhibitors are synthesized in only two steps and count among the best pharmacological tools for VGLUTs studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Highly efficient visible light mediated azo dye degradation through barium titanate decorated reduced graphene oxide sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Monisha; Kushwaha, H. S.; Vaish, Rahul

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates BaTiO3 decorated reduced graphene oxide sheets as a potential visible light active catalyst for dye degradation (Rhodamine B). The composites were prepared through conventional hydrothermal synthesis technique using hydrazine as a reducing agent. A number of techniques have been employed to affirm the morphology, composition and photocatalytic properties of the composites; these include UV-visible spectrophotoscopy that assisted in quantifying the concentration difference of Rhodamine B. The phase homogeneity of the composites was examined through x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was employed to confirm the orientation of the BaTiO3 particles over the reduced graphene oxide sheets. Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra assisted in determining the surface structure and excited state of the catalyst. Fourier transformed-infrared (FTIR) spectra investigated the vibrations and adsorption peak of the composites, thereby ascertaining the formation of reduced graphene oxide. In addition, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) demonstrated an enhanced absorption in the visible region. The experimental investigations revealed that graphene oxide acted as charge collector and simultaneously facilitated surface adsorption and photo-sensitization. It could be deduced that BaTiO3-reduced graphene oxide composites are of significant interest the field of water purification through solar photocatalysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Treatment of a non-azo dye aqueous solution by CWAO in continuous reactor using a Ni catalyst derived from hydrotalcite-like precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallet, Ana, E-mail: avallet@quim.ucm.es [Grupo de Catalisis y Procesos de Separacion (CyPS), Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Besson, Michele, E-mail: michele.besson@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr [IRCELYON, Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l' environnement de Lyon, UMR5256 CNRS-Universite Lyon1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, F-69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ovejero, Gabriel; Garcia, Juan [Grupo de Catalisis y Procesos de Separacion (CyPS), Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni supported over hydrotalcite calcined precursors as catalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic wet air oxidation in trickle bed reactor for Basic Yellow 11 removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dye removal depends on temperature, initial dye concentration and flow rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst proved to be stable and efficient for the dye degradation. - Abstract: Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of a Basic Yellow 11 (BY11) aqueous solution, chosen as a model of a hardly biodegradable non-azo dye was carried out in a continuous-flow trickle-bed reactor, using nickel supported over hydrotalcite precursor calcined at 550 Degree-Sign C. An increase in the reaction temperature (120-180 Degree-Sign C), and a decrease in dye concentration (1000-3000 ppm) or liquid flow rate (0.1-0.7 mL min{sup -1}) enhanced the CWAO performance in a 30 and 19% for the variation of the temperature and concentration respectively. After a small leaching observed within the first hours, the catalyst proved to be very stable during the 65-day reaction. The CWAO process was found to be very efficient, achieving BY11 conversion up to 95% and TOC conversion up to 85% at 0.1 mL min{sup -1} and 180 Degree-Sign C under 5 MPa air.

  5. Z-scan measurements of the third-order optical nonlinearities and vibrational spectral studies by DFT computations on azo dye 1-(2-Methylphenylazo)-2-napthol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenath, M. C.; Mathew, S.; Hubert Joe, I.; Rastogi, V. K.

    2017-12-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of azo dye 1-(2-Methylphenylazo)-2-napthol have been studied. The complete vibrational features and electronic absorption spectra of the title compound were analyzed by FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-visible spectra combined with density functional theory and time-dependent density functional computations respectively. Nonlinear optical behavior was investigated by calculating the second-order hyperpolarizablity at DFT level. Third-order nonlinear optical parameters of 1-(2-Methylphenylazo)-2-napthol were measured using closed and open aperture Z-scan technique. The Z-scan result confirms, the dye exhibit self-focusing effect and the sign of the refractive nonlinearity is positive. The nonlinear refractive index (n2), nonlinear absorption coefficient (β), real and imaginary parts of third-order susceptibility (χ (3)) and second-order hyperpolarizability (γ) are calculated. The calculated results indicated that 1-(2-Methylphenylazo)-2-napthol have potential applications in optoelectronics and photonics.

  6. Application of activated carbon derived from 'waste' bamboo culms for the adsorption of azo disperse dye: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianggui

    2012-07-15

    The utilization of activated carbon derived from 'waste' bamboo culms (BAC) for the removal of Disperse Red 167 (DR167), an azo disperse dye, was investigated. Studies of the properties of the adsorbent, the effect of contact time, the initial pH of the solution, the initial concentration of the dye solution and temperature indicated that a low initial pH or concentration of dye solution favors the adsorption process; temperature exerts a greater effect on the removal of azo disperse red 167 dye from aqueous solution. Kinetic and isotherm data were fitted to five non-linear kinetic and nine non-linear isotherm equations. In addition, the fits were evaluated in terms of the non-linear coefficient, Chi-square test, Marquardt's percent standard deviation error function and small-sample-corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc) methodology. The results showed that the AICc analysis was the best statistical tool for analyzing the data, the intra-particle diffusion and the pseudo-first-order models played important roles in the controlling rate step, and the Temkin equation best described the BAC isotherm data. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous, endothermic, entropy-increasing and physical process. Two types of commercial activated carbon, Filtrasorb 400 and Filtrasorb (F400 and F300), were used as contrast adsorbents. The contrast experiments revealed that BAC exhibits similar properties to F400 and F300. The utilization of bamboo wastes as carbon precursors is feasible. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of the treatment performance of lab-scaled vertical flow constructed wetlands in removal of organic compounds, color and nutrients in azo dye-containing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogdu, Gamze; Yalcuk, Arda

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the treatment performance of vertical flow intermittent feeding constructed wetland (VFCW) in removal of organic pollution, nutrients and color in azo-dye containing wastewater. The systems consisted of PVC reactors, some filling materials such as gravel, sand and zeolite and wetland plants including Typha angustifolia and Canna indica. The average treatment efficiency of the systems for COD, color, sulphate, NH4-N, and PO4-P were in the range of 57-63%, 94-99%, 44-48%, 39-44%, and 84-88%, respectively among the VFCW reactors. It is concluded that VFCW reactor system can effectively be used in the treatment of dye-rich wastewater, especially for the removal of color and in the reduction of COD. Biofilm formation and cleavage of azo bonds could be observed by SEM and FTIR results, respectively. Almost similar NH4-N and PO4-P removal were obtained in all reactors by using same amount of zeolite media.

  8. Aerobic decolorization, degradation and detoxification of azo dyes by a newly isolated salt-tolerant yeast Scheffersomyces spartinae TLHS-SF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liang; He, Muyang; Song, Li; Fu, Xinmei; Shi, Shengnan

    2016-03-01

    Isolation, identification and characterization of a salt-tolerant yeast capable of degrading and detoxifying azo dyes were investigated in this study. Possible degradation pathway of Acid Scarlet 3R was proposed through analyzing metabolic intermediates using UV-Vis and HPLC-MS methods. Furthermore, the Microtox test was performed to evaluate the acute toxicity of the dye before and after biodegradation. The results showed that a salt-tolerant yeast named TLHS-SF1 was isolated and identified as Scheffersomyces spartinae basing on 26S rDNA analysis. The optimal decolorization and growth parameters were: sucrose 2 g L(-1), (NH4)2SO4 0.6 g L(-1), yeast extract 0.08 g L(-1), NaCl ⩽ 30 g L(-1), 160 rmin(-1), 30 °C and pH 5.0-6.0. More than 90% of 80 mg L(-1) 3R could be decolorized within 16 h under the optimal conditions. 3R was possibly degraded successively through azo-reduction, deamination and desulfonation pathways, and its acute toxicity obviously decreased by strain TLHS-SF1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Purification and characterization of laccase produced by a white rot fungus Pleurotus sajor-caju under submerged culture condition and its potential in decolorization of azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Arulmani, Manavalan; Nam, In-Hyun; Kim, Young-Mo; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Kalaichelvan, P Thangavelu

    2006-10-01

    An extracellular laccase was isolated and purified from Pleurotus sajor-caju grown in submerged culture in a bioreactor, and used to investigate its ability to decolorize three azo dyes. The extracellular laccase production was enhanced up to 2.5-fold in the medium amended with xylidine (1 mM). Purification was carried out using ammonium sulfate (70% w/v), DEAE-cellulose, and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The enzyme was purified up to 10.3-fold from the initial protein preparation with an overall yield of 53%. The purified laccase was monomeric with an apparent molecular mass of 61.0 kDa. The purified enzyme exerted its optimal activity with 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS) and oxidized various lignin-related phenols. The catalytic efficiencies kcat/Km determined for ABTS and syringaldazine were 9.2x10(5) and 8.7x10(5), respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for the purified enzyme was 5.0 and 40 degrees C, respectively. Sodium azide completely inhibited the laccase activity. The absorption spectrum revealed type 1 and type 3 copper signals. The purified enzyme decolorized azo dyes such as acid red 18, acid Black 1, and direct blue 71 up to 90, 87, and 72%, respectively. Decolorization ability of P. sajor-caju laccase suggests that this enzyme could be used for decolorization of industrial effluents.

  10. Microextraction by packed sorbent and salting-out-assisted liquid-liquid extraction for the determination of aromatic amines formed from azo dyes in textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Miguel del Nogal; Santos, Patricia Martín; Sappó, Cristina Pérez; Pavón, José Luis Pérez; Cordero, Bernardo Moreno

    2014-02-01

    EU legislation prohibits the use of certain azo dyes which, on reduction, form any of 22 aromatic amines listed in Regulation (EC) 1907/2006 at concentrations above the threshold limit of 30 mg Kg(-1). Two different extraction techniques for the determination of aromatic amines formed from azo dyes in textiles in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) are described. The first one is based on microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) and the other approach involves salting-out-assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE). The influence of several parameters on the efficiency of the extraction using MEPS (sorbent material, sample volume, elution solvent, elution volume and washing steps, among others) and SALLE (extraction volume and amount of salt) were investigated. In addition, chromatographic separation was optimized and quadrupole mass spectrometry was evaluated using the synchronous SIM/scan data acquisition mode. The repeatability (n=8, S/N=3) of the methods, calculated as the relative standard deviation (RSD) was below 15 and 11% for all compounds when MEPS and SALLE were used, respectively. Standard additions procedure was used to quantify the aromatic amines in the textil samples. The detection limits in the samples for both methods were lower than the maximum value allowed by legislation. The results obtained in the analysis of textiles revealed the presence of o-anisidine, p-chloroaniline, 4-chloro-o-toluidine, 2-naphthylamine and 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine in some of them. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Photocatalytic Degradation of Anionic Azo Dyes Acid Orange 7 and Acid Red 88 in Aqueous Solutions Using TiO2-containing Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Bahram

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The photocatalytic degradation of two anionic azo dyes Acid Red88 (AR 88 and Acid Orange 7 (AO7 was investigated in aqueous solution using a TiO2-containing hydrogel and UV light. The pH-sensitive hydrogel poly (styrene-alt-maleic anhydride (PSMA, was synthesized and crosslinked in the presence of melamine and TiO2 nanoparticles which results in entrapment of TiO‌2 into the melamine-grafted PSMA (M-g-PSMA hydrogel. Potential application of this nanocomposite for removal of azo dyes from wastewater was studied and the effective parameters on degradation process including time, initial pH value of the solutions, temperature and amount of added nanocomposite were optimized. The optimized values for effective parameters are as follows: time: 30 min, initial pH of the solutions: 5.23 for AO7 and 5.3 for AR88, temperature: 24 ºC and amount of added nanocomposite: 250 mg. Results showed that in optimum experimental conditions the removal percentages are about %94 for AR88 and %71 for AO7 indicating good removal performance toward the method whilst pH-sensitivity of the nanocomposite facilitates retrieval of nanocatalyst at the end of the reaction.

  12. The influence of Triton X-100 surfactant on the morphology and properties of zinc sulfide nanoparticles for applications in azo dyes degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumbrava, Anca, E-mail: adumbrava@univ-ovidius.ro [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ovidius University of Constanta, 124 Mamaia Blvd., Constanta 900527 (Romania); Berger, Daniela, E-mail: danaberger01@yahoo.com [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Polizu Street 1-7, Bucharest 011061 (Romania); Prodan, Gabriel [Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Ovidius University of Constanta, 124 Mamaia Blvd., Constanta 900527 (Romania); Matei, Cristian [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Polizu Street 1-7, Bucharest 011061 (Romania); Moscalu, Florin [Department of Physics, Ovidius University of Constanta, 124 Mamaia Blvd., Constanta 900527 (Romania); Diacon, Aurel [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Department of Bioresources and Polymer Science, Polizu Street 1-7, Bucharest 011061 (Romania)

    2017-06-01

    Herein we report the synthesis, by two different routes, of ZnS nanoparticles capped with Triton X-100 (TX), which were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, high resolution electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and surface area measurements. The TX-capped ZnS nanopowders have a very good photocatalytic activity and high specific surface area, depending on the synthesis route; e.g. an azo dye solution is almost complete photobleached in only 60 min (a photocatalytic activity of 97.79%) using TX-capped ZnS nanopowder, with specific surface area of 191 m{sup 2}/g, and further a photocatalytic activity of 99.75% was achieved in 120 min. Based on the photocatalytic results, the ZnS nanopowders can be considered suitable catalysts for a green, very efficient and quick strategy for removing of organic pollutants from wastewaters. - Highlights: • Triton X-100 was used as surfactant in ZnS nanopowders synthesis by two methods. • Triton X-capped ZnS nanoparticles with high specific surface area were synthesized. • A very high capacity for bleaching an azo dye solution was evidenced. • Some of ZnS powders properties were crucially modified by the synthesis technique.

  13. Role of pH in the Aqueous Phase Reactivity of Zerovalent Iron Nanoparticles with Acid Orange 7, a Model Molecule of Azo Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Freyria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of both pH and surface oxidation of nanoparticles is studied on the interaction between a commercial slurry of Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron (NZVI and the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7. NZVI is a reducing agent used for the degradation of several pollutants, including azo dyes: during pollutant degradation, it undergoes progressive oxidation and dissolution. Though it is generally acknowledged that NZVI consists of core-shell nanoparticles, where the core of metallic iron is covered by FexOy shell, it still remains a poorly defined system. In this work, the solid fraction recovered by filtration and drying was characterized by means of XRD diffraction with Rietveld refinement, N2 isotherms at 77 K, FE-SEM and TEM observation, EDX analysis, and IR spectroscopy. Powders were obtained from both the parent slurry and the same slurry pretreated with HCl in order to remove FexOy shell, finally reactivating the nanoparticles. The aforementioned physicochemical characterization allowed figuring out some correlations between the properties of the studied nanomaterial and the processes occurring when it is in contact with AO7 in aqueous phase. The type of interaction occurring within the NZVI/AO7 system (adsorption and type of redox reactions strongly depends not only on the pH of the starting solution, but also on the surface oxidation of the nanoparticles.

  14. Novel amphiphilic polymeric ionic liquid-solid phase micro-extraction membrane for the preconcentration of aniline as degradation product of azo dye Orange G under sonication by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mei-Qiang; Wei, Xiao-Qing; Du, Chun-Hui; Ma, Xu-Ming; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2014-07-04

    A novel amphiphilic polymeric ionic liquid membrane containing a hydrophilic bromide anion and a hydrophobic carbonyl group was synthesized in dimethylformamide (DMF) systems using the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium bromide (BVImBr) and the methylmethacrylate (MMA) as monomers. The prepared amphiphilic ploy-methylmethacrylate-1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium bromide (MMA-BVImBr) was characterized by a scanning electron microscope and an infrared spectrum instrument. The results of solid-phase micro-extraction membrane (SPMM) experiments showed that the adsorption capacity of membrane was about 0.76μgμg(-1) for aniline. Based on this, a sensitive method for the determination of trace aniline, as a degradation product of azo dye Orange G under sonication, was developed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The calibration curve showed a good linearity ranging from 0.5 to 10.0μgL(-1) with a correlation coefficient value of 0.9998. The limit of quantification was 0.5μgL(-1). The recoveries ranged from 90.6% to 96.1%. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were less than 8.3% and 10.9%. The developed SPMM-LC-MS/MS method was used successfully for preconcentration of trace aniline produced during the sonication of Orange G solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of different redox mediators during thermophilic azo dye reduction by anaerobic granular sludge and comparative study between mesophilic (30C) and thermophilic (55C) treatments for decolourisation of textile wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezerra Dos Santos, A.; Bisschops, I.A.E.; Cervantes, F.J.; Lier, van J.B.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of different redox mediators on colour removal of azo dye model compounds and textile wastewater by thermophilic anaerobic granular sludge (55 C) was investigated in batch assays. Additionally, a comparative study between mesophilic (30 C) and thermophilic (55 C) colour removal was

  16. Heterogeneous photo-Fenton-like catalysts Cu2V2O7 and Cr2V4O13 for an efficient removal of azo dye in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Kalal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the degradation of non-biodegradable azo-dye (Evans blue by the heterogeneous photo-Fenton-like process using copper pyrovanadate (Cu2V2O7 and chromium tetravanadate (Cr2V4O13 as catalysts, which have been prepared by wet chemical method. These catalysts were characterized by different techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. The effect of various parameters such as initial pH, concentration of dye, amount of catalyst, amount of H2O2, and light intensity on the reaction rate has also been studied. Photodegradation efficiency was found 77.78 and 79% for copper pyrovanadate (Cu2V2O7 and chromium tetravanadate (Cr2V4O13, respectively. A tentative mechanism involving ·OH radicals as an oxidant for the degradation of dye has also been proposed. The observations revealed that the rate of photo-Fenton-like degradation of dye follows pseudo-first-order kinetics.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and degradation activity of Methyl orange Azo dye using synthesized CuO/α-Fe2O3 nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehdipour Ghazi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the photo-degradation of methyl orange (MO as a type of azo dye using a CuO/α-Fe2O3 nanocomposite. A CuO/α-Fe2O3 powder with a crystalline size in the range of 27-49 nm was successfully prepared using simple co-precipitation along with a sonication method. The characterization of the synthesized sample was done via XRD, FE-SEM, EDS, FTIR and DRS analyses. The Tauc equation revealed that the band gap of the nano composite in the direct mood was 2.05 ev, which is in the visible light range. The effect of operating factors containing dye concentration, photocatalyst dosage and pH on dye degradation efficiency was measured. Response Surface Method (RSM was employed to specify the parameter effects. The photocatalytic activity of the CuO/α-Fe2O3 nanocomposite was evaluated by degradation of MO under visible light irradiation. The results showed that the pH value played a very effective role in the dye degradation process efficiency. Also, the photocatalytic degradation of MO obtained was equal to 88.47% in the optimal values.

  18. Adsorption mechanism and kinetics of azo dye chemicals on oxide nanotubes: a case study using porous CeO{sub 2} nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Junshu; Wang, Jinshu, E-mail: wangjsh@bjut.edu.cn; Du, Yucheng; Li, Hongyi; Jia, Xinjian [Beijing University of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-07-15

    Metal oxide nanotubes are believed to be promising materials with adsorption functionality for water purification due to their synergistic effect of the overall microscale morphology for easy separation and nanoscale surface characters providing enough surface active absorption sites. This work shows the synthesis of uniform hierarchical porous CeO{sub 2} nanotubes via nanowire-directed templating method and describes the adsorption behavior of CeO{sub 2} nanotubes for a typical azo dye Congo red which has resistance to oxidation and decoloration in natural conditions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra provided the evidence that Congo red was successfully coated on the surface of CeO{sub 2} nanotubes by both bidentate-type bridge link of Ce{sup 4+} cations from sulfonate SO{sub 3}{sup −} groups and the electrostatic attraction between the protonated surface generated by oxygen vacancies and dissociated sulfonate groups. The adsorption kinetic data fitted well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation, whereas the Langmuir isotherm equation exhibited better correlation with the experimental data. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity from the isothermal model was 362.32 mg/g. In addition, the prepared CeO{sub 2} nanotubes exhibited good recyclability and reusability as highly efficient adsorbents for Congo red removal after regeneration. These favorable performances enable the obtained CeO{sub 2} nanotubes to be promising materials for dye removal from aqueous solution.Graphical AbstractCeO{sub 2} nanotubes composed of crystallized nanoparticles exhibit well adsorption ability for a typical azo dye Congo red.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial studies of 2-{(E)-[(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)imino]methyl}-4-[(E)-phenyldiazenyl]phenol as a novel azo-azomethine dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, Muhammet; Kurtoglu, Nurcan; Gümüşsu, Özkan; Tutak, Mustafa; McKee, Vickie; Karakaş, Duran; Kurtoglu, Mukerrem

    2013-12-01

    A novel dye, 2-{(E)-[(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)imino]methyl}-4-[(E)-phenyldiazenyl]phenol dye was synthesized by the condensation reaction of 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-phenyldiazenyl]benzaldehyde with 2-amino-4-methylphenol in methanol. The title dye was characterized by its melting point, elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H, 13C NMR and mass spectroscopic studies. Molecular structure of the title dye was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction study. X-ray data showed that the dye crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c with cell parameters a = 18.541(2) Å, b = 4.7091(5) Å, c = 20.586(2) Å, V = 1761.5(3) Å3 and Z = 4. The title dye adopts azo-enamine tautomer in the solid state. The molecules crystallises as dimers assembled by two molecules of methanol via intermolecular hydrogen bonding resulting in R64(18) hydrogen bonding motif. Additionally, there is an intramolecular keto-amine hydrogen bond (NH⋯O) with a distance of 2.6172(17) Å. Optimized structures of the three possible tautomers of the compound were obtained using B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p), 6-31G and 3-21G basis sets in the gas phase. Thermal properties of the prepared dye were examined by thermogravimetric analysis and results indicated that the framework of the dye is stable up to 172 °C. Furthermore, the pathogenic activities of the synthesized dye were tested in vitro against the sensitive organisms, Bacillus cereous (ATCC 33019) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) as gram positive bacteria, Escherichia coli (ATCC 11229), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 13883) as gram negative bacteria and the results are discussed. The results indicated that the prepared dye had antibacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and Bacillus cereuss), but it exhibited no activity against gram-negative bacteria (E. coli and K. pneumoniae).

  20. Removal of Azo Dyes (Violet B and Violet 5R from Aqueous Solution Using New Activated Carbon Developed from Orange Peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Hashemian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon developed from agricultural waste orange peel (COP was prepared. COP was characterized using Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and BET. COP has surface area and mean pore diameter of 225.6 m2 g−1 and 22.40 nm, respectively. The removal of violet B (VB and violet 5R (V5R from aqueous solutions by COP was investigated. The effect of operational parameters such as contact time, pH, initial dye concentration, and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption of dyes was investigated. Maximum dye was removed within 30 min of contact time at pH > 7. Two common models, the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, were used to investigate the interaction of dye and COPs. The isotherm evaluations revealed that the Langmuir model provides better fit to the experimental data than the Freundlich model. The adsorption of VB and V5R onto COP was followed by pseudo-second-order kinetic model with a good correlation (R2>0.99. Activation energies 5.47 and 29.7 KJ mol−1 were determined for violet B and violet 5R, respectively. The rate of adsorption of violet 5R was faster than that of violet B (kV5R>kVB. The prepared COP could thus be used as promising adsorbent for removal of organic dyes, especially azo dye, from polluted water. The solid COP could be conveniently regenerated after adsorption.

  1. Azo dyes degradation using TiO2-Pt/graphene oxide and TiO2-Pt/reduced graphene oxide photocatalysts under UV and natural sunlight irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu, Marcela-Corina; Coros, Maria; Pogacean, Florina; Magerusan, Lidia; Socaci, Crina; Turza, Alexandru; Pruneanu, Stela

    2017-08-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of azo dyes with different structures (amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine) using TiO2-Pt nanoparticles (TPt), TiO2-Pt/graphene oxide (TPt-GO) and TiO2-Pt/reduced graphene oxide (TPt-rGO) composites were investigated in the presence of UV and natural sunlight irradiation. The composites were prepared by a combined chemical-thermal method and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Infrared (FTIR) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The modification of TiO2-Pt with graphene oxide shifted its optical absorption edge towards the visible region and increased its photocatalytic activity under UV and natural sunlight irradiation. The efficiency of catalysts on azo dyes degradation (in similar conditions) reached high values (above 99%) under sunlight conditions, proving the remarkable photocatalytic activities of obtained composites. TPt-GO nanocomposite exhibited higher photoactivity than TPt or TPt-rGO, demonstrating degradation efficiencies of 99.56% for amaranth, 99.15% for sunset yellow and 96.23% for tartrazine. The dye photodegradation process follows a pseudo-first-order kinetic with respect to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction mechanism. A direct dependence between azo dyes degradation rate and chemical structure of dyes has been observed.

  2. Optical, thermal and combustion properties of self-colored polyamide nanocomposites reinforced with azo dye surface modified ZnO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibeygi, Mohsen; Shabanian, Meisam; Omidi-Ghallemohamadi, Mehrdad; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali

    2017-09-01

    New self-colored aromatic-polyamide (PA) nanocomposites containing azo and naphthalene chromophores were prepared with azo-dye surface-modified ZnO nanoparticles (SMZnO) using solution method in dimethylformamide. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results showed the uniform distribution for ZnO nanoparticles in the PA matrix. The UV-vis spectra of PA/ZnO nanocomposites (PANC) showed a blue shift as well as reduction in absorbance intensities and the photoluminescence studies revealed that the increasing intensities of the violet emission in SMZnO loading. From thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), the temperature at 10% mass loss (T10) increased from 291.8 °C to 387.6 °C for PANC containing 8 mass% of SMZnO, as well as the char yield enhanced significantly, which was about 23.5% higher than the neat PA. The peak heat release rate resulted from microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC), by 8 mass% loading of SMZnO, decreased about 56.9% lower than the neat PA.

  3. Preparation and Photovoltaic Properties of Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Using ZnO Nanorods Stacking Films on AZO Substrate as Photoanode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Wang, Xina; Liu, Rong; Wang, Hao

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional stacking of ZnO nanorods on conducting aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) glass were studied as efficient photoanodes of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). By changing hydrothermal growth time and cycle times, the thickness of ZnO nanorods stacking films varied from 30 µm to 64 µm, and its influence on the energetic conversion efficiency of the DSSCs based on the stacking films photoanodes was investigated. The loading density of N719 on the surface of ZnO nanorods was studied to increase the efficiency of the cells. Annealing experiments showed that the AZO substrates remained good conductors until heated above 350 °C. A photoelectric conversion efficiency as high as ~2.0% together with ISC of ~9.5 mA/cm2, VOC of ~0.5 V and FF of ~41.4% was achieved for the DSSC using 50 µm-thick film stacking by ZnO nanorods as photoanode and N719 as sensitizer under illumination of AM1.5G solar light (power density of 100 mW/cm2). A charge separation and transfer mechanism was proposed for the ZnO nanorods stacking electrode-based DSSCs.

  4. Photo-reductive decolorization of an azo dye by natural sphalerite: Case study of a new type of visible light-sensitized photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yan [Key Laboratory of Orogenic Belts and Crustal Evolution, School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Yiheyuan Road 5, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Lu Anhuai, E-mail: ahlu@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Orogenic Belts and Crustal Evolution, School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Yiheyuan Road 5, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Jin Song [Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); MWH Americas, 3665 JFK Parkway, Suite 206, Fort Collins, CO 80525 (United States); Wang Changqiu [Key Laboratory of Orogenic Belts and Crustal Evolution, School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Yiheyuan Road 5, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2009-10-15

    Natural sphalerite, which represents a new class of mineral-based catalyst, was characterized and investigated for photo-reduction of an azo dye methyl orange (MO) under visible light. After 2 h of visible light irradiation, a complete decolorization of the MO solution was achieved. The degradation rate was related to the pH conditions. Spectra from FT-IR analysis indicate an initial adsorption of MO to sphalerite via its sulfonate group. Further reduction of the adsorbed MO by sphalerite under light irradiation led to the destruction of the azo structure, as indicated by the results from UV-vis, FT-IR and ESI-MS analyses. The visible light-induced photocatalytic reductive activity of natural sphalerite was mainly attributed to the distribution of foreign metal atoms in its crystal lattice, which reduces the intrinsic bandgap of sphalerite and also broadens its spectra responding range. In addition, the high conduction band potential of natural sphalerite may also enhance the photo-reduction of MO.

  5. New 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dye. Part III: Synthesis, characterization, thermal property, spectrophotometric and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfantalab, Malihe; Khanmohammadi, Hamid

    2014-05-05

    A new 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine compound, H2L, has been prepared by condensation reaction of 1-(3-formyl-4-hydroxyphenylazo)-4-ethylbenzene with prepared triazole-based diamine. The structure of H2L was characterized by using FT-IR, UV-Vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopic methods as well as elemental analysis. Hard model chemometrics method has been used to determine the formation constants of zinc(II), copper(II), nickel(II) and cobalt(II) complexes of H2L in DMSO by UV-Vis spectrophotometric method. Solvatochromic behavior of the dye has been also investigated in some organic solvents with different polarities. Thermal properties of the prepared dye was examined by thermogravimetric analysis. Results indicated that the framework of the dye was stable up to 245 °C. Furthermore,(1)H chemical shifts and UV-Vis of H2L were studied by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO), continuous set of gauge transformations (CSGT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) methods respectively at the level of density functional theory using B3LYP/6-311+G(d) basis sets in DMSO. The computational data are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Degradation of Amaranth azo dye in water by heterogeneous photo-Fenton process using FeWO4 catalyst prepared by microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz Severo, Eric; Anchieta, Chayene Gonçalves; Foletto, Vitória Segabinazzi; Kuhn, Raquel Cristine; Collazzo, Gabriela Carvalho; Mazutti, Marcio Antonio; Foletto, Edson Luiz

    2016-01-01

    FeWO4 particles were synthesized by a simple, rapid and facile microwave technique and their catalytic properties in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction were evaluated. This material was employed in the degradation of Amaranth azo dye. Individual and interactive effects of operational parameters such as pH, dye concentration and H2O2 dosage on the decolorization efficiency of Amaranth dye were evaluated by 2(3) central composite design. According to characterization techniques, a porous material and a well-crystallized phase of FeWO4 oxide were obtained. Regarding the photo-Fenton reaction assays, up to 97% color and 58% organic carbon removal were achieved in the best experimental conditions. In addition, the photo-Fenton process maintained treatment efficiency over five catalyst reuse cycles to indicate the durability of the FeWO4 catalyst. In summary, the results reveal that the synthesized FeWO4 material is a promising catalyst for wastewater treatment by heterogeneous photo-Fenton process.

  7. Specific ion effect on the surface properties of Ag/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite and its influence on photocatalytic efficiency towards azo dye degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthakur, Priyakshree; Boruah, Purna K.; Hussain, Najrul; Silla, Yumnam; Das, Manash R.

    2017-11-01

    The surface property of a catalyst is influenced by the presence of different inorganic ions as well as pH of the medium. Ag/reduced graphene oxide (Ag/rGO) nanocomposite was synthesized by adopting simple solution chemistry technique using simple ultrasonication process. The influence of the specific anions like Cl-, Br-, NO3-, SO42-, CH3COO- as well as cations like Na+, NH4+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions on the surface charge (zeta potential) of the nanocomposite and their effect on the photocatalytic degradation efficiency towards azo dye degradation in aqueous medium was studied. We found that the catalytic property of the nanocomposite is significantly influenced by its surface property which is a function of pH of the medium and the different inorganic ions present in the system.

  8. Hydraulic retention time influence on azo dye and sulfate removal during the sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment of real textile wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, F M; Florêncio, L; Kato, M T; Santa-Cruz, P A; Gavazza, S

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, we evaluate the behavior of real textile wastewater treatment using a system composed of two sequential pilot-scale reactors (anaerobic followed by aerobic) during 622 days. The work focused on the competition between color and sulfate removal processes, when the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was increased in the anaerobic/aerobic reactors from 16/12 hours in phase I (PI) to 4/3 days in phase II (PII). The organic matter was successfully removed in both phases through the system, and the highest efficiency (75%) was achieved in PII. The increase in the HRT did not improve azo dye degradation under anaerobic conditions. Instead, it favored sulfate reduction, which removal efficiency increased from 26% in PI to 75% in PII. Aromatic amines were detected in the anaerobic reactor effluent and removed in the aerobic reactor.

  9. Evaluation of anaerobic sludge volume for improving azo dye decolorization in a hybrid anaerobic reactor with built-in bioelectrochemical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Min-Hua; Cui, Dan; Gao, Lei; Wang, Ai-Jie; Cheng, Hao-Yi

    2017-02-01

    A hybrid anaerobic reactor with built-in bioelectrochemical system (BES) has been verified for efficiently treating mixed azo dye wastewater, yet still facing many challenges, such as uncertain reactor construction and insufficient electron donors. In this study, an up-flow hybrid anaerobic reactor with built-in BES was developed for acid orange 7 (AO7) containing wastewater treatment. Cathode and real domestic wastewater both served as electron donor for driving azo dye decolorization. The decolorization efficiency (DE) of AO7 (200 mg/L) in the hybrid reactor was 80.34 ± 2.11% with volume ratio between anaerobic sludge and cathode (VRslu:cat) of 0.5:1 and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6 h, which was 15.79% higher than that in BES without sludge zone. DE was improved to 86.02 ± 1.49% with VRslu:cat increased to 1:1. Further increase in the VRslu:cat to 1.5:1 and 2:1, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was continuously improved to 28.78 ± 1.96 and 32.19 ± 0.62%, but there was no obvious DE elevation (slightly increased to 87.62 ± 2.50 and 90.13 ± 3.10%). BES presented efficient electron utilization, the electron usage ratios (EURs) in which fluctuated between 11.02 and 13.06 mol e(-)/mol AO7. It was less than half of that in sludge zone of 24.73-32.06 mol e(-)/mol AO7. The present work optimized the volume ratio between anaerobic sludge and cathode that would be meaningful for the practical application of this hybrid system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Further treatment of decolorization liquid of azo dye coupled with increased power production using microbial fuel cell equipped with an aerobic biocathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Bi, Zhe; Hou, Bin; Cao, Yun-qing; Hu, Yong-you

    2011-01-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) incorporating a recently developed aerobic biocathode is designed and demonstrated. The aerobic biocathode MFC is able to further treat the liquid containing decolorization products of active brilliant red X-3B (ABRX3), a respective azo dye, and also provides increased power production. Batch test results showed that 24.8% of COD was removed from the decolorization liquid of ABRX3 (DL) by the biocathode within 12 h. Metabolism-dependent biodegradation of aniline-like compound might be mainly responsible for the decrease of overall COD. Glucose is not necessary in this process and contributes little to the COD removal of the DL. The similar COD removal rate observed under closed circuit condition (500 Ω) and opened circuit condition indicated that the current had an insignificant effect on the degradation of the DL. Addition of the DL to the biocathode resulted in an almost 150% increase in open cycle potential (OCP) of the cathode accompanied by a 73% increase in stable voltage output from 0.33 V to 0.57 V and a 300% increase in maximum power density from 50.74 mW/m(2) to 213.93 mW/m(2). Cyclic voltammetry indicated that the decolorization products of the ABRX3 contained in the DL play a role as redox mediator for facilitating electron transfer from the cathode to the oxygen. This study demonstrated for the first time that MFC equipped with an aerobic biocathode can be successfully applied to further treatment of effluent from an anaerobic system used to decolorize azo dye, providing both cost savings and high power output. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Degradation of a textile reactive azo dye by a combined biological-photocatalytic process: Candida tropicalis Jks2 -Tio2/Uv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narjes Jafari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the decolorization and degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5 azo dye was investigated by biological, photocatalytic (UV/TiO2 and combined processes.Application of Candida tropicalis JKS2 in treatment of the synthetic medium containing RB5 indicated complete decolorization of the dye with 200 mg/L in less than 24 h. Degradation ofthe aromatic rings, resulting from the destruction of the dye, did not occur during the biological treatment. Mineralization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution was obtained after 80 min by photocatalytic process (in presence of 0.2 g/L TiO2. COD (chemical oxygen demand wasnot detectable after complete decolorization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution. However,photocatalytic process was not effective in the removal of the dye at high concentrations (≥200 mg/L. With 200 mg/L concentration, 74.9% of decolorization was achieved after 4 hillumination under photocatalytic process and the absorbance peak in UV region (attributed to aromatic rings was not completely removed. A two-step treatment process, namely,biological treatment by yeast followed by photocatalytic degradation, was also assessed. In the combined process (with 200 mg/L RB5, absorbance peak in UV region significantly disappeared after 2 h illumination and about 60 % COD removal was achieved in the biological step. It is suggested that the combined process is more effective than the biological and photocatalytic treatments in the remediation of aromatic rings.

  12. An integrated (electro- and bio-oxidation) approach for remediation of industrial wastewater containing azo-dyes: Understanding the degradation mechanism and toxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravind, Priyadharshini, E-mail: priya.bdu07@gmail.com [Corrosion and Materials Protection Division (CMPD), CSIR—Central electrochemical research institute (CECRI), Karaikudi 630 003 (India); Selvaraj, Hosimin [Corrosion and Materials Protection Division (CMPD), CSIR—Central electrochemical research institute (CECRI), Karaikudi 630 003 (India); Ferro, Sergio [Ecas4 Australia, Unit 8, 1 London Road, Mile End, South Australia 5031 (Australia); Sundaram, Maruthamuthu [Corrosion and Materials Protection Division (CMPD), CSIR—Central electrochemical research institute (CECRI), Karaikudi 630 003 (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Firstly, the mediated electro-oxidation allows rapid discoloration of the effluent. • Cost effective sunlight-mediated removal of bio-toxic active chlorine species. • Electrochemical pretreatment enhances the biodegradability of textile wastewater. • About 90% COD removal was achieved by a subsequent biodegradation. • By-products from degradation of dyes have shown to be ecofriendly and non-toxic. - Abstract: A hybrid approach for the remediation of recalcitrant dye wastewater is proposed. The chlorine-mediated electrochemical oxidation of real textile effluents and synthetic samples (using Ti/IrO{sub 2}-RuO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} anodes), lead to discoloration by 92% and 89%, respectively, in 100 min, without significant mineralization. The remediation was obtained through biodegradation, after removing the residual bio-toxic active chlorine species via sunlight exposition. Results show that the electrochemical discoloration enhances the effluent biodegradability with about 90% COD removal employing acclimatized naphthalene-degrading bacterial consortia, within 144 h. Based on results obtained through FT-IR and GC–MS, it is likely that azo group stripping and oxidative cleavage of dyes occur due to the nucleophilic attack of active chlorine species during electro-oxidation. This leads to generation of aromatic intermediates which are further desulfonated, deaminated or oxidized only at their functional groups. These aromatic intermediates were mineralized into simpler organic acids and aldehydes by bacterial consortia. Phyto-toxicity trials on Vigna radiata confirmed the toxic nature of the untreated dye solutions. An increase in root and shoot development was observed with the electrochemically treated solutions, the same was higher in case of bio-treated solutions. Overall, obtained results confirm the capability of the proposed hybrid oxidation scheme for the remediation of textile wastewater.

  13. Degradation of a textile reactive azo dye by a combined biological-photocatalytic process: Candida tropicalis Jks2 -Tio2/Uv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Narjes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, the decolorization and degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5 azo dye was investigated by biological, photocatalytic (UV/TiO2 and combined processes. Application of Candida tropicalis JKS2 in treatment of the synthetic medium containing RB5 indicated complete decolorization of the dye with 200 mg/L in less than 24 h. Degradation of the aromatic rings, resulting from the destruction of the dye, did not occur during the biological treatment. Mineralization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution was obtained after 80 min by photocatalytic process (in presence of 0.2 g/L TiO2. COD (chemical oxygen demand was not detectable after complete decolorization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution. However, photocatalytic process was not effective in the removal of the dye at high concentrations (≥200 mg/L. With 200 mg/L concentration, 74.9% of decolorization was achieved after 4 h illumination under photocatalytic process and the absorbance peak in UV region (attributed to aromatic rings was not completely removed. A two-step treatment process, namely, biological treatment by yeast followed by photocatalytic degradation, was also assessed. In the combined process (with 200 mg/L RB5, absorbance peak in UV region significantly disappeared after 2 h illumination and about 60% COD removal was achieved in the biological step. It is suggested that the combined process is more effective than the biological and photocatalytic treatments in the remediation of aromatic rings.

  14. Impacto dos mediadores redox na remoção de cor de corantes azo e antraquinônico por lodo granular anaeróbio sob condições mesofílicas e termofílicas Impact of redox mediators on colour removal of azo and anthraquinone dyes by anaerobic granular sludge under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Bezerra dos Santos

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigou-se o efeito de diferentes mediadores redox (MR na remoção de cor de corantes azo e antraquinônico pelo uso de lodo granular anaeróbio sob condições mesofílicas (30ºC e termofílicas (55ºC. Comprovou-se em experimento em batelada que a adição de concentrações catalíticas de MR pode ter um efeito marcante nas taxas de descoloração do corante azo Reactive Red 2 (RR2, mas o mesmo comportamento não pode ser obtido com o corante antraquinônico Reactive Blue 5 (RB5. Entretanto, com ambos os corantes, o simples aumento da temperatura de incubação para condições termofílicas fez acelerar consideravelmente os processos de descoloração, comparados com condições mesofílicas. Por exemplo, a constante de primeira ordem "k" da redução dos corantes RR2 e RB5, foi aumentada em 6,2 e 11 vezes, respectivamente, à 55ºC quando comparado com 30ºC. Por fim, comprovou-se em experimentos de fluxo contínuo, a boa performance do tratamento termofílico na descoloração redutiva de corantes azo.The effect of different redox mediators (RM on colour removal of azo and anthraquinone dyes was investigated with anaerobic granular sludge under mesophilic (30ºC and thermophilic (55ºC conditions. Batch experiments revealed that an addition of catalytic concentrations of RM provided a remarkable effect on the decolourisation rates of the azo dye Reactive Red 2 (RR2, but the same effect could not be obtained with the anthraquinone dye Reactive Blue 5 (RB5. Nevertheless, for both dyes, the temperature increase to thermophilic conditions was an effective strategy to considerably accelerate the decolourisation process compared to mesophilic conditions. For instance, the first-order rate constant "k" of RR2 and RB5 reduction, was increased in 6.2 and 11-fold, respectively, at 55ºC in comparison with 30ºC. Such an effect of the temperature on the reductive decolourisation of azo dye was also verified in continuous flow experiments.

  15. The Orange Side of Disperse Red 1: Humidity-Driven Color Switching in Supramolecular Azo-Polymer Materials Based on Reversible Dye Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoelch, Simon; Vapaavuori, Jaana; Rollet, Frédéric-Guillaume; Barrett, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Humidity detection, and the quest for low-cost facile humidity-sensitive indicator materials is of great interest for many fields, including semi-conductor processing, food transport and storage, and pharmaceuticals. Ideal humidity-detection materials for a these applications might be based on simple clear optical readout with no power supply, i.e.: a clear color change observed by the naked eye of any untrained observer, since it doesn't require any extra instrumentation or interpretation. Here, the introduction of a synthesis-free one-step procedure, based on physical mixing of easily available commercial materials, for producing a humidity memory material which can be easily painted onto a wide variety of surfaces and undergoes a remarkable color change (approximately 100 nm blue-shift of λMAX ) upon exposure to various thresholds of levels of ambient humidity is reported. This strong color change, easily visible to as a red-to-orange color switch, is locked in until inspection, but can then be restored reversibly if desired, after moderate heating. By taking advantage of spontaneously-forming reversible 'soft' supramolecular bonds between a red-colored azo dye and a host polymer matrix, a reversible dye 'migration' aggregation appearing orange, and dis-aggregation back to red can be achieved, to function as the sensor. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. INVESTIGATION OF UV/TiO2-ZnO-Co PHOTOCATALITIC DEGRADATION OF AZO DYE (REACTIVE RED 120 BY RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHSEN MANSOURI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs are the most attractive methods to degrade diferent organic pollutants. The AOPs have grown extensively because water quality control and regulations have become very strict in many countries. Optimizing the photocatalytic degradation of azo dye (Reactive Red 120 was our goal of research for applying the experimental design methodology. pH (X1, concentration of dye (X2 and TiO2-ZnO-Co nanoparticles volume (X3 in reactions were described mathematically as the function of parameters and were designed by using response surface methodology (RSM. Results were in agreement with empirical values and the sensitivity analysis showed above parameters as the most efficient variables in decolorization efficiency. Analysis of variance (ANOVA revealed highly determination coefficient value (R2 = 0.9996 and adjusted-R2 = 0.999 and satisfactory prediction second-order regression model. The desirable quantities were obtained at the pH = 7, TiO2-ZnO-Co concentration = 0.1 g·L-1, and the initial Reactive Red 120 (RR 120 concentration = 16.4 mg·L-1. Finally, kinetics reaction of degradtion RR 120 was carried in the optimum conditions.

  17. Improved Biodegradation of Synthetic Azo Dye by Anionic Cross-Linking of Chloroperoxidase on ZnO/SiO2 Nanocomposite Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xinyu; Li, Saisai; Long, Nengbing; Zhang, Ruifeng

    2017-09-20

    A novel ZnO nanowire/macroporous SiO2 composite was used as a support to immobilize chloroperoxidase (CPO) by in situ cross-linking method. An anionic bi-epoxy compound was synthesized and used as a long-chained anionic cross-linker, and it was adsorbed on the surface of ZnO nanowires through static interaction before reaction with CPO, creating a new approach to change the structure, property, and catalytic performance of the produced cross-linking enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) of CPO. The immobilized CPO showed high activity in the decolorization of three azo dyes. The effect of various conditions such as the loading amount of CPO, solution pH, temperature, and dye concentration was optimized on the decolorization. Under optimized conditions, the decolorization percentage of Acid Blue 113, Direct Black 38, and Acid Black 10 BX reached as high as 95.4, 92.3, and 89.1%, respectively. The immobilized CPO exhibited much better thermostability and resistance to pH inactivation than free CPO. The storage stability and reusability were greatly improved through the immobilization. It was found from the decolorization of Acid Blue 113 that 83.6% of initial activity retained after incubation at 4 °C for 60 days and that 80.9% of decolorization efficiency retained after 12 cycles of reuses.

  18. Potentials of high-temperature anaerobic treatment and redox mediators for the reductive decolorization of azo dyes from textile wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Cervantes, F.J.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The discharge of dye-colored wastewaters in surface water represents a serious environmental problem because it may decrease the water transparency, therefore having an effect on photosynthesis, and a public health concern because dyes and their reducing products are carcinogenic. In recent years,

  19. The interaction and photostability of some xanthenes and selected azo sensitizing dyes with TiO2 nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. EL Mekkawi

    2005-01-01

    photostability in the presence of the electrolyte (I3−/I−, which is attributed to fast regeneration of the neutral dye via the redox couple of the electrolyte. Furthermore, photocurrent action spectrum of the fabricated and tested DSC shows the origin of photoelectric output to be optical absorption of the dye used.

  20. New self-assembled material based on Ru nanoparticles and 4-sulfocalix[4]arene as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for reduction of brilliant yellow azo dye in water: a new model catalytic reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambabu, Darsi; Pradeep, Chullikkattil P.; Dhir, Abhimanew, E-mail: abhimanew@iitmandi.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology (India)

    2016-12-15

    New self-assembled material (Ru@SC) with ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) and 4-sulfocalix[4]arene (SC) is synthesized in water at room temperature. Ru@SC is characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, FT-IR, powder x-ray diffraction, TEM and SEM analysis. The size of Ru nanoparticles in the self-assembly is approximately 5 nm. The self-assembled material Ru@SC shows an efficient catalytic reduction of toxic ‘brilliant yellow’ (BY) azo dye. The reduced amine products were successfully separated and confirmed by single-crystal XRD, NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Ru@SC showed a better catalytic activity in comparison with commercial catalysts Ru/C (ruthenium on charcoal 5 %) and Pd/C (palladium on charcoal 5 and 10 %). The catalyst also showed a promising recyclability and heterogeneous nature as a catalyst for reduction of ‘BY’ azo dye.

  1. Photo-electrochemical studies of chemically deposited nanocrystalline meso-porous n-type TiO2 thin films for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) using simple synthesized azo dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezema, C. G.; Nwanya, A. C.; Ezema, B. E.; Patil, B. H.; Bulakhe, R. N.; Ukoha, P. O.; Lokhande, C. D.; Maaza, Malik; Ezema, Fabian I.

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films were deposited by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method onto fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrate at room temperature (300 K). Titanium trichloride and sodium hydroxide were used as cationic and anionic sources, respectively. The as-deposited and annealed films were characterized for structural, morphological, optical, electrical and wettability properties. The photoelectrochemical study of TiO2 sensitized with a laboratory synthesized organic dye (azo) was evaluated in the polyiodide electrolyte at 40 mW cm-2 light illumination intensity. The photovoltaic characteristics show a fill factor of 0.24 and solar conversion efficiency value of 0.032 % for a TiO2 thickness of 0.96 µm as compared to efficiency of 0.014 % for rose Bengal of the same thickness.

  2. Photo degradation of methyl orange an azo dye by advanced Fenton process using zero valent metallic iron: influence of various reaction parameters and its degradation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomathi Devi, L; Girish Kumar, S; Mohan Reddy, K; Munikrishnappa, C

    2009-05-30

    Advanced Fenton process (AFP) using zero valent metallic iron (ZVMI) is studied as a potential technique to degrade the azo dye in the aqueous medium. The influence of various reaction parameters like effect of iron dosage, concentration of H(2)O(2)/ammonium per sulfate (APS), initial dye concentration, effect of pH and the influence of radical scavenger are studied and optimum conditions are reported. The degradation rate decreased at higher iron dosages and also at higher oxidant concentrations due to the surface precipitation which deactivates the iron surface. The rate constant for the processes Fe(0)/UV and Fe(0)/APS/UV is twice compared to their respective Fe(0)/dark and Fe(0)/APS/dark processes. The rate constant for Fe(0)/H(2)O(2)/UV process is four times higher than Fe(0)/H(2)O(2)/dark process. The increase in the efficiency of Fe(0)/UV process is attributed to the cleavage of stable iron complexes which produces Fe(2+) ions that participates in cyclic Fenton mechanism for the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The increase in the efficiency of Fe(0)/APS/UV or H(2)O(2) compared to dark process is due to continuous generation of hydroxyl radicals and also due to the frequent photo reduction of Fe(3+) ions to Fe(2+) ions. Though H(2)O(2) is a better oxidant than APS in all respects, but it is more susceptible to deactivation by hydroxyl radical scavengers. The decrease in the rate constant in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavenger is more for H(2)O(2) than APS. Iron powder retains its recycling efficiency better in the presence of H(2)O(2) than APS. The decrease in the degradation rate in the presence of APS as an oxidant is due to the fact that generation of free radicals on iron surface is slower compared to H(2)O(2). Also, the excess acidity provided by APS retards the degradation rate as excess H(+) ions acts as hydroxyl radical scavenger. The degradation of Methyl Orange (MO) using Fe(0) is an acid driven process shows higher efficiency at pH 3. The

  3. STUDI DEGRADASI ZAT PEWARNA AZO, METIL ORANYE MENGGUNAKAN FERRAT (FeO42-)

    OpenAIRE

    Dian Windy Dwiasi; Mardiyah Kurniasih

    2008-01-01

    Synthesis of ferrate and its application to azo dyes degradation have been investigated. The synthesis was carried out by reacting Fe(NO3)3 solution with NaOCl in alkaline condition. Oxidation reaction of azo dyes was carried out by adjusting the molar ratio of ferrate to azo dyes. When ferrate reacted with azo dyes, its absorbance was monitored using UV-Vis spectrophotometer at pH condition that had been optimized. Kinetics study for azo dyes degradation was carried out at the absorbance max...

  4. Environmental assessment of the degradation potential of mushroom fruit bodies of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P. Kumm. towards synthetic azo dyes and contaminating effluents collected from textile industries in Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Prasanna, Apoorva; Manjunath, Sirisha P; Karanth, Soujanya S; Nazre, Ambika

    2016-02-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P. Kumm. is one of the edible mushrooms currently gaining attention as environmental restorer. The present study explores the potential of P. ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P. Kumm. in degradation of textile dyes and effluents. The mushroom cultivation was carried out using paddy bed as substrate. The fully grown mushroom fruit bodies were used as a bioremediation agent against two industrially important azo dyes such as nylon blue and cotton yellow and few effluents collected from various textile industries in Karnataka, India. The ideal growth parameters such as temperature, pH, and dye concentrations for effective degradation were carried out. One of the main enzymes, laccase, responsible for biodegradation, was partially characterized. The degradation was found to be ideal at pH 3.0 and temperature at 26-28 °C. This study demonstrated a percentage degradation of 78.10, 90.81, 82.5, and 64.88 for dye samples such as nylon blue (50 ppm), cotton yellow (350 ppm), KSIC effluents, and Ramanagar effluents at 28 °C within 15th days respectively in comparison with other temperature conditions. Similarly, a percentage degradation of 35.99, 33.33, 76.13 and 25.8 for nylon blue (50 ppm), cotton yellow (350 ppm), Karnataka Silk Industries Corporation (KSIC) effluents and Ramnagar effluents were observed at pH 3.0 within 15 days, respectively (p azo dyes and textile effluents which are harmful to the ecosystem.

  5. Enhanced solar light photodegradation of brilliant black bis-azo dye in aqueous solution by F, Sm3+ codoped TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukonza, Sabastian S.; Nxumalo, Edward N.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Mishra, Ajay K.

    2017-05-01

    This research focuses on improving the photocatalytic efficiency of TiO2 during the photo-mineralisation of brilliant black (BN) bis-azo dye pollutant in aqueous solution. This was achieved by improving the visible light activity of TiO2 photocatalyst semiconductor through co-doping of fluorine (F) and trivalent samarium ions (Sm3+) into a TiO2 matrix using a modified sol-gel synthesis method. Structural, morphological, and textural properties were evaluated using ultra-violet /visible spectroscopy (UV-visible), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). Photocatalytic and degradation efficiencies were assessed by decolourisation of BN dye in aqueous solution. Complete degradation of BN was attained after an irradiation time of 3 h using F, Sm3+-TiO2 (0.6% Sm3+) compared to 73.4% achieved using pristine TiO2. Pseudo first order kinetics rate constants (Ka) were 2.73×10-2 and 6.6×10-3 min-1 for Sm3+-TiO2 (0.6%Sm3+) and pristine TiO2, respectively, which translates to a remarkably high enhancement factor of 4. The results obtained established that doping of TiO2 by F and Sm3+ enhances the photocatalytic performance of TiO2 during solar light radiation which enables the utilisation of freely available and clean solar energy.

  6. Electrode and azo dye decolorization performance in microbial-fuel-cell-coupled constructed wetlands with different electrode size during long-term wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhou; Cao, Xian; Li, Xuexiao; Wang, Hui; Li, Xianning

    2017-08-01

    Microbial-fuel-cell-coupled constructed wetlands (CW-MFCs) with various cathode layers were used for long-term azo dye wastewater treatment. Their performance was assessed using cathode diameters ranging from 20 to 27.5cm and the influence of plants at the cathode was also examined. Bioelectricity generation, ABRX3 decolorization, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal performances first increased and then decreased with increasing cathode diameter. The CW-MFCs with larger cathodes had an anoxic region at the cathode where ABRX3 was decolorized. This phenomenon has not been reported in previous research on MFCs using traditional air cathodes. Anode performance was influenced by the cathode. The CW-MFC with a cathode diameter of 25cm showed the best electrode performance, and the highest voltage and power density were 560mV and 0.88W/m3, respectively. The highest ABRX3 decolorization and COD removal volumes were 271.53mg/L and 312.17mg/L, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Microwave-enhanced UV/H2O2 degradation of an azo dye (tartrazine): optimization, colour removal, mineralization and ecotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolin, Fernanda; Nascimento, Ulisses Magalhães; Azevedo, Eduardo Bessa

    2013-01-01

    This study optimizes two factors, pH and initial [H2O2], in the ultraviolet (UV)/H2O2/microwave (MW) process through experimental design and assesses the effect of MWs on the colour removal of an azo-dye (tartrazine) solution that was favoured by an acidic pH. The estimated optimal conditions were: initial [H2O2] = 2.0 mmol L(-1) and pH = 2.6, at 30 +/- 2 degrees C. We obtained colour removals of approximately 92% in 24 min of irradiation (EDL, 244.2 W), following zero order kinetics: k = (3.9 +/- 0.52) x 10(-2) a.u. min(-1) and R2 = 0.989. Chemical and biological oxygen demand were significantly removed. On the other hand, the carbon content, biodegradability and ecotoxicity (Lactuca sativa) remained approximately the same. The UV/H2O2/MW process was shown to be eight times faster than other tested processes (MW, H2O2, H2O2/MW, and UV/MW).

  8. Liquid-phase non-thermal plasma-prepared N-doped TiO(2) for azo dye degradation with the catalyst separation system by ceramic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsu-Hui; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Cheng, Yi-Wen; Tseng, Wei-Lun; Wang, Yi-Hui

    2010-01-01

    This study strived to improve the photocatalytic activity by using liquid-phase non-thermal plasma (LPNTP) technology for preparing N-doping TiO(2) as well as to separate/recover the N-dope TiO(2) particles by using ceramic ultrafiltration membrane process. The yellow color N-doped TiO(2) photocatalysts, obtained through the LPNTP process, were characterized with UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). The UV-Vis spectrum of N-doped TiO(2) showed that the absorption band was shifted to 439 nm and the band gap was reduced to 2.82 eV. The structure analysis of XRD spectra showed that the peak positions and the crystal structure remained unchanged as anatase after plasma-treating at 13.5 W for 40 min. The photocatalytic activity of N-doped TiO(2) was evaluated by azo dyes under visible light, and 63% of them was degraded after 16 hours in a continuous-flow photocatalytic system. For membrane separation/recover system, the recovery efficiency reached 99.5% after the ultrafiltration had been carried out for 90 min, and the result indicated that the photocatalyst was able to be separated/recovered completely.

  9. Effects of co-substrate and biomass acclimation concentration on the bioregeneration of azo dye-loaded mono-amine modified silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amrani, Waheeba A; Lim, P E; Seng, C E; Wan Ngah, W S

    2013-09-01

    Bioregeneration of mono-amine modified silica gel (MAMS) adsorbent loaded with Acid Orange 7 (AO7), Acid Yellow 9 (AY9) and Acid Red 14 (AR14), respectively, was investigated under two different operational conditions, namely absence/presence of sucrose/bacto-peptone as the co-substrate and different biomass acclimation concentrations. The results revealed that the AY9- and AR14-loaded MAMS adsorbents could almost be completely bioregenerated but only in the presence of co-substrate whereas the bioregeneration of AO7-loaded MAMS could achieve up to 71% in the absence of the co-substrate. These differences could be related to the structural properties of the investigated azo dyes. In addition, the results showed that the bioregeneration duration of AO7-loaded MAMS could be progressively shortened by using biomass acclimated to increasingly higher AO7 concentration. However, the bioregeneration efficiencies were found to be relatively unchanged under different biomass acclimation concentrations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of food azo dyes tartrazine and carmoisine on biochemical parameters related to renal, hepatic function and oxidative stress biomarkers in young male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, K A; Abdel Hameid, H; Abd Elsttar, A H

    2010-10-01

    Tartrazine and carmoisine are an organic azo dyes widely used in food products, drugs and cosmetics. The present study conducted to evaluate the toxic effect of these coloring food additives; on renal, hepatic function, lipid profile, blood glucose, body-weight gain and biomarkers of oxidative stress in tissue. Tartrazine and carmoisine were administered orally in two doses, one low and the other high dose for 30 days followed by serum and tissue sample collection for determination of ALT, AST, ALP, urea, creatinine, total protein, albumin, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose in serum and estimation of GSH, catalase, SOD and MDA in liver tissue in male albino rat. Our data showed a significant increase in ALT, AST, ALP, urea, creatinine total protein and albumin in serum of rats dosed with tartrazine and carmoisine compared to control rats and these significant change were more apparent in high doses than low, GSH, SOD and Catalase were decreased and MDA increased in tissue homogenate in rats consumed high tartrazine and both doses of carmoisine. We concluded that tartrazine and carmoisine affect adversely and alter biochemical markers in vital organs e.g. liver and kidney not only at higher doses but also at low doses. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Induction of NAD(P)H:quinone reductase in murine hepatoma cells by phenolic antioxidants, azo dyes, and other chemoprotectors: a model system for the study of anticarcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Long, M J; Prochaska, H J; Talalay, P

    1986-01-01

    Exposure of murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells to a variety of chemical agents known to protect animals against the neoplastic, mutagenic, and other toxic effects of chemical carcinogens results in dose- and time-dependent inductions of NAD(P)H:quinone reductase (EC 1.6.99.2). This enzyme protects against quinone toxicity by promoting obligatory two-electron reductions that divert quinones from oxidative cycling or direct interactions with critical nucleophiles. Quinone reductase levels are stable in culture, are easily measured, and are useful markers for the inductive effects of chemoprotective agents. The Hepa 1c1c7 system responds to chemoprotective compounds such as phenolic antioxidants (e.g., BHA [3(2)-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole], BHT (3,5-ditert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene), and tert-butylhydroquinone), lipophilic azo dyes belonging to the 1,1'-azonaphthalene, Sudan I (1-phenylazo-2-naphthol), and Sudan III [1-(4-phenylazophenylazo)-2-naphthol] families, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, coumarin and various other lactones, flavonoids, and certain sulfur compounds (e.g., benzylisothiocyanate, dithiolthiones, and dithiocarbamates), all of which are recognized enzyme inducers and chemoprotectors in vivo. Quinone reductase induction in Hepa 1c1c7 cells therefore provides a simple, versatile, and reliable system for the evaluation of the potency, kinetics, and mechanism of action of anticarcinogens. PMID:3080750

  12. Multilayered particle-packed column: Evaluation and comparison with monolithic and core-shell particle columns for the determination of red azo dyes in Sequential Injection Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocholouš, Petr; Gil, Renato; Acebal, Carolina C; Kubala, Viktor; Šatínský, Dalibor; Solich, Petr

    2017-03-01

    A recently presented new type of "multilayered" organic-inorganic hybrid silica particle packed column YMC-Triart C18 (50 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) was used for the development of a sequential injection chromatography method for determination of five azo dyes (Sudan I, Sudan II, Sudan III, Sudan orange G, and para red) in selected food seasonings. The use of a novel sorbent brings attractive features, reduced backpressure, and broader chemical stability together with high separation performance, which are discussed and compared with that of three types of columns typically used in medium-pressure flow chromatography techniques (classic monolithic, narrow monolithic, and core-shell particle columns). The separation was performed in gradient elution mode created by the zone mixing of two mobile phases (acetonitrile/water 90:10, 1.5 mL + acetonitrile/water 100:0, 2.3 mL) at a flow rate of 0.60 mL/min and time of analysis <9.5 min. The spectrophotometric detection wavelengths were set to 400, 480, and 500 nm. The high performance of the developed method with multilayered particle column was well documented and the results indicate a broad capability of sequential injection chromatography. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Hydrophobic cyanine dye-doped micelles for optical in vivo imaging of plasma leakage and vascular disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botz, Bálint; Bölcskei, Kata; Kemény, Ágnes; Sándor, Zoltán; Tékus, Valéria; Sétáló, György, Jr.; Csepregi, Janka; Mócsai, Attila; Pintér, Erika; Kollár, László; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2015-01-01

    Vascular leakage is an important feature of various disease conditions. In vivo optical imaging provides a great opportunity for the evaluation of this phenomenon. In the present study, we focus on the development and validation of a near-infrared (NIR) imaging formula to allow reliable, cost-efficient evaluation of vascular leakage in diverse species using the existing small-animal fluorescence imaging technology. IR-676, a moderately hydrophobic NIR cyanine dye, was doped into self-assembling aqueous micelles using a widely employed and safe nonionic emulsifier (Kolliphor HS 15), and was tested in several acute and chronic inflammatory disease models in both mice and rats. The imaging formula is stable and exerts no acute toxic effects in vitro. It accumulated specifically in the inflamed regions in all models, which could be demonstrated by both conventional epifluorescence imaging, and fluorescence tomography both as a standalone technique and also by merging it with computed tomography scans. Ex vivo verification of dye accumulation by confocal fluorescence microscopy was also possible. The present formula allows sensitive and specific detection of inflammatory plasma leakage in diverse models. Its potential for imaging larger animals was also demonstrated. IR-676-doped micelles offer an excellent opportunity to image inflammatory vascular leakage in various models and species.

  14. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles with antimicrobial and azo dye (Congo red) degradation properties using Amaranthus gangeticus Linn leaf extract

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolya, Haradhan; Maiti, Parthapratim; Pandey, Akhil; Tripathy, Tridib

    2015-01-01

    ...) using an aqueous solution of silver nitrate and Amaranthus gangeticus Linn (Chinese spinach) leaf extract. The synthesized AgNPs which are to be used as an antimicrobial and Congo red dye is to be used as a toxic-degrading...

  15. Enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability of alumina supported hematite for azo-dye degradation in aerated aqueous suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Sheng, Jiayi; Wang, Yan; Xu, Yiming

    2013-06-15

    Silica supported hematite (Fe2O3/silica) that is more active but less stable than the supported hematite for organic photodegradation in aqueous solution has been reported. In this work, we report on alumina supported hematite (Fe2O3/alumina) with significantly improved activity and stability. The catalysts were prepared by mixing alumina with a pre-made colloidal iron oxide at various loading (0-100 wt %), followed by sintering at different temperatures (200-900 °C). Solid characterization with X-ray diffraction and N2 adsorption showed that hematite particles were small in size, and large in surface area, as compared with the unsupported hematite prepared in parallel. The catalyst activity was evaluated with anionic Orange II as a model substrate, and the reaction was carried out in aerated aqueous suspension under light irradiation at wavelengths longer than 320 nm. As the Fe2O3 loading on alumina or the catalyst sintering temperature increased, the apparent rate constant of dye degradation increased, and then decreased. The maximum rate of dye degradation was obtained with 25 wt % Fe2O3/alumina, sintered at 400 °C. Moreover, five consecutive experiments for dye photodegradation showed that Fe2O3/alumina was much more stable than Fe2O3/silica, due to alumina that has a positively charged surface and thus facilitates the dissolved iron species back onto iron oxide. The higher activity of Fe2O3/alumina than Fe2O3/silica and bare hematite is ascribed to the combined effect between the reduced particle size of hematite and the enhanced surface adsorption of dye on the catalyst. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biotechnological strategies for phytoremediation of the sulfonated azo dye Direct Red 5B using Blumea malcolmii Hook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagalkar, Anuradha N; Jagtap, Umesh B; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Bapat, Vishwas A; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2009-09-01

    Tissue cultured shrub plants of Blumea malcolmii were found to decolorize Malachite green, Red HE8B, Methyl orange, Reactive Red 2 and Direct Red 5B at 20 mg L(-1) concentration to varying extent within three days. A significant induction in the activities of lignin peroxidase, tyrosinase, DCIP (2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol) reductase, azoreductase and riboflavin reductase in the roots was observed during the decolorization of Direct Red 5B, which indicated their crucial role in the metabolism of the dye. HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) analysis of the samples before and after decolorization of the dye confirmed the phytotransformation of Direct Red 5B. The GC-MS (Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy) analysis of the products led us to the identification of three metabolites formed after phytotransformation of the dye as 4-(4-amino-phenylazo)-benzene sulfonic acid, 3-amino-7-carboxyamino-4-hydroxy-naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid and 7-carboxyamino-naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid.

  17. Synthesis, structural characterization of nano ZnTiO3 ceramic: An effective azo dye adsorbent and antibacterial agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Raveendra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline meta-zinc titanate (ZnTiO3 ceramic was prepared using a self-propagating solution combustion synthesis (SCS for the first time using urea as fuel. The product was calcined at 800 °C for 2 h to improve the crystallinity. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy were used to characterize the final product. PXRD results show that the ilmenite type rhombohedral structure was formed when the sample was calcined at 800 °C for 2 h. Adsorption experiments were performed with cationic malachite green (MG dye. ∼96% dye was adsorbed onto nanocrystalline ZnTiO3 ceramic at pH 9 for 30 min of the contact time. The optimum adsorbent dose was found to be 0.45 g/L of dye. Langmuir–Hinshelwood model was used to study adsorption kinetics and first order kinetic model best describes the MG adsorption on ZnTiO3. Antibacterial activity was investigated against gram negative Klebsiella aerogenes, Pseudomonas desmolyticum, Escherichia coli, and gram positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria by agar well diffusion method. Nanocrystalline ZnTiO3 ceramic showed significant effect on all the four bacterial strains at the concentration of 1000 and 1500 μg per well.

  18. Treatment of a simulated textile wastewater containing the Reactive Orange 16 azo dye by a combination of ozonation and moving-bed biofilm reactor: evaluating the performance, toxicity, and oxidation by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Francine D; Bassin, João Paulo; Dezotti, Márcia

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an aqueous solution containing the azo dye Reactive Orange 16 (RO16) was subjected to two sequential treatment processes, namely: ozonation and biological treatment in a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR). The most appropriate ozonation pretreatment conditions for the biological process and the toxicity of the by-products resulting from RO16 ozone oxidation were evaluated. The results showed that more than 97 % of color removal from the dye solutions with RO16 concentrations ranging from 25 to 100 mg/L was observed in 5 min of ozone exposure. However, the maximum total organic carbon removal achieved by ozonation was only 48 %, indicating partial mineralization of the dye. Eleven intermediate organic compounds resulting from ozone treatment of RO16 solution were identified by LC/MS analyses at different contact times. The toxicity of the dye-containing solution decreased after 2 min of ozonation, but increased at longer contact times. The results further demonstrated that the ozonolysis products did not affect the performance of the subsequent MBBR, which achieved an average chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonium removal of 93 ± 1 and 97 ± 2 %, respectively. A second MBBR system fed with non-ozonated dye-containing wastewater was run in parallel for comparison purposes. This reactor also showed an appreciable COD (90 ± 1 %) and ammonium removal (97 ± 2 %), but was not effective in removing color, which remained practically invariable over the system. The use of short ozonation times (5 min) and a compact MBBR has shown to be effective for the treatment of the simulated textile wastewater containing the RO16 azo dye.

  19. Synthesis and investigation of thermal properties of vanadyl complexes with azo-containing Schiff-base dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ali Salih Al-Hamdani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Azo-Schiff base compounds (L1 and L2 have been synthesized from the reaction of m-hydroxy benzoic acid with 1,5-dimethyl-3-[2-(5-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl-ethylimino]-2-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-4-ylamine and with 3-[2-(1H-indol-3-yl-ethylimino]-1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-4-ylamine. The free ligands and their complexes were characterized based on elemental analysis, determination of metal, molar conductivity, (1H, 13C NMR, UV–vis, FT-IR, mass spectra and thermal analysis (TGA. The molar conductance data revealed that all the complexes are non-electrolytes. The study of complex formation via molar ratio in DMF solution has been investigated and results were consistent to those found in the solid complexes with a ratio of (M:L as (1:1. Moreover, the thermodynamic activation parameters, such as ΔE∗, ΔH∗, ΔS∗, ΔG∗and K are calculated from the TGA curves using Coats–Redfern method. Hyper Chem-6 program has been used to predict the structural geometries of compounds in gas phase. The heat of formation (ΔHf° and binding energy (ΔEb at 298 K for the free ligands and their vanadyl complexes were calculated by PM3 method. The synthesized ligands and their metal complexes were screened for their biological activity against bacterial species, two Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus and two Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  20. Modeling of Reactive Blue 19 azo dye removal from colored textile wastewater using L-arginine-functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles: Optimization, reusability, kinetic and equilibrium studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalvand, Arash; Nabizadeh, Ramin [Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reza Ganjali, Mohammad [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Molecular-Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoobi, Mehdi [Medical Biomaterials Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 14176 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nazmara, Shahrokh [Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hossein Mahvi, Amir, E-mail: ahmahvi@yahoo.com [Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center for Solid Waste Research, Institute for Environmental Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); National Institute of Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    This study aimed to investigate the removal of Reactive Blue 19 from colored wastewater using Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles modified with L-arginine (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@L-arginine). In order to investigate the effect of independent variables on dye removal and determining the optimum condition, the Box–Behnken Design (BBD) under Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was employed. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@L-arginine nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. Applying Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@L-arginine nanoparticles for dye removal showed that; by increasing adsorbent dose and decreasing pH, dye concentration, and ionic strength dye removal has been increased. In the optimum condition, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@L-arginine nanoparticles were able to remove dye as high as 96.34% at an initial dye concentration of 50 mg/L, adsorbent dose of 0.74 g/L, and pH 3. The findings indicated that dye removal followed pseudo-second-order kinetic (R{sup 2}=0.999) and Freundlich isotherm (R{sup 2}=0.989). Based on the obtained results, as an efficient and reusable adsorbent, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@L-arginine nanoparticles can be successfully applied for dye removal from colored wastewater. - Highlights: • The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@L-arginine removed RB 19 azo dye from wastewater efficiently. • BBD under RSM was used to analyze and optimize the adsorption process. • pH was the most influential parameter in dye removal.

  1. Synthesis, Characterization, and Biological Activity of 5-Phenyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-amine Incorporated Azo Dye Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnagiri T. Keerthi Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 5-Phenyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-amine has been synthesized by single step reaction. A series of heterocyclic azodyes were synthesized by diazotisation of 5-phenyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-amine by nitrosyl sulphuric acid followed by coupling with different coupling compounds such as 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2,6-diaminopyridine, 2-naphthol, N,N-dimethyl aniline, resorcinol, and 4,6-dihydroxypyrimidine. The dyes were characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H-NMR, 13C NMR, and elemental analysis. The synthesized compounds were also screened for biological activity.

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, and Biological Activity of 5-Phenyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-amine Incorporated Azo Dye Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Chinnagiri T. Keerthi Kumar; Jathi Keshavayya; Tantry N. Rajesh; Sanehalli K. Peethambar; Angadi R. Shoukat Ali

    2013-01-01

    5-Phenyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-amine has been synthesized by single step reaction. A series of heterocyclic azodyes were synthesized by diazotisation of 5-phenyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-amine by nitrosyl sulphuric acid followed by coupling with different coupling compounds such as 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2,6-diaminopyridine, 2-naphthol, N,N-dimethyl aniline, resorcinol, and 4,6-dihydroxypyrimidine. The dyes were characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H-NMR, 13C NMR, and elemental analysis. The synthesized compo...

  3. Structure-performance relationship for a family of disperse azo dyes having the same D-π-A 4-nitro-4'-amino-azobenzene skeleton: structures, solvatochromism and DFT computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tao; Wang, Yin-Ge; Dai, Yuan; Qian, Hui-Fen; Huang, Wei

    2015-02-05

    A combinational study of structural chemistry and dyestuff chemistry has been carried out to reveal the structure-performance relationship for eight disperse azo dyes by comparing their structures, electronic spectra, solvatochromism and theoretic computations. All eight structural analogues have the same 4-nitro-4'-amino-azobenzene donor-π-acceptor skeleton but different substituted groups, namely, R1 and R2 in ring A, R3, R4 and R5 in Ring B. X-ray single-crystal diffraction analyses indicate that four azo dyes have severely twisted aminoazobenzene structures because of the steric hindrance of ortho dichloro/dibromo radicals of 4-nitrobenzene moiety, while the other four dyes show essentially planar conformation due to the ortho monosubstituted 4-nitrobenzene amine and 4'-amino-azobenzene units. It is noted that the electronic spectra are closely related to their molecular structures, where the presence of different auxochrome groups and the spatial crowding effects in the aminoazobenzene backbone lead to significant alterations of the bathochromic and hypsochromic shifts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Decolorization characteristics of a newly isolated salt-tolerant Bacillus sp. strain and its application for azo dye-containing wastewater in immobilized form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Tang, Qing-Wen; Li, Jia; Xie, Tian; Liu, Chang; Cao, Ming-Yue; Zhang, Rui-Chang; Wang, Shi; Hu, Jin-Mei; Qiao, Wei-Chuan; Li, Wen-Wei; Ruan, Hong-Hua

    2015-11-01

    Strain CICC 23870 capable of decolorization of various azo dyes under high saline conditions was isolated from saline-alkali soil. The oxygen-insensitive azoreductase in crude extracts exhibited a wide substrate adaptively in the presence of NADH as a cofactor. The decolorization process by free cells followed first-order kinetics, with a high Methyl Orange (MO) tolerance concentration up to 100 mg l(-1) estimated by Haldane model. The average decolorization rate of free cell system was 26.30 mg g(-1) h(-1) at initial MO concentration of 32.7 mg l(-1). However, the values for the systems of immobilized cells (4 mm) in alginate, alginate and nano-TiO2, and alginate and powered activated carbon (PAC) were 6.83, 4.64, and 11.34 mg g(-1) h(-1), respectively. The effective diffusion factors in the tree different matrices were calculated by diffusion-based mathematic model. The diffusion step controls the overall decolorization rate, and the effective diffusion coefficients varied with internal structure of the bead matrices. The diffusion coefficients were increased from 4.98 × 10(-9) to 2.25 × 10(-8) cm(2) s(-1) when PAC was added, but decreased to 6.62 × 10(-10) cm(2) s(-1) when nano-TiO2 was added. The immobilized matrices could be reused for at least three cycles but with a decreased decolorization rate, possibly due to the breakage of beads at the end of each cycle, which led to the loss of immobilized bacteria.

  5. Multi-scale biomarker evaluation of the toxicity of a commercial azo dye (Disperse Red 1) in an animal model, the freshwater cnidarian Hydra attenuata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Laetitia; Pech, Nicolas; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela; Moreau, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Acute (24 h, 48 h, 72 h) and chronic (7 days) tests have been performed to evaluate the effects of the commercial azo dye Disperse Red 1 (DR1) using various biomarkers in the freshwater invertebrate Hydra attenuata. Morphological changes have been selected to calculate ecotoxicological thresholds for sublethal and lethal DR1 concentrations. A multinomial logistic model showed that the probability of each morphological stage occurrence was function of concentration, time and interaction between both. Results of oxidative balance parameter measurements (72 h and 7 days) suggest that polyps set up defense mechanisms to limit lipid peroxidation caused by DR1. DR1 exposure at hormetic concentrations induces increase of asexual reproductive rates. This result suggests (1) an impact on the fitness-related phenotypical traits and (2) trade-offs between reproduction and maintenance to allow the population to survive harsher conditions. Changes in serotonin immuno-labeling in polyps showing alterations in feeding behavior suggest that chronic DR1 exposure impaired neuronal processes related to ingesting behavior in H. attenuata. This ecotoxicity study sheds light on the possible serotonin function in Hydra model and reports for the first time that serotonin could play a significant role in feeding behavior. This study used a multi-scale biomarker approach investigating biochemical, morphological, reproductive and behavioral endpoints in Hydra attenuata. This organism is proposed for a pertinent animal model to assess ecotoxicological impact of pollutant mixtures in freshwater environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biofilm inhibition formation of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutans, photocatalytic activity of azo dye and GC-MS analysis of leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Saraswathi, V; Kamarudheen, Neethu; Bhaskara Rao, K V; Santhakumar, K

    2017-04-01

    The investigation was conducted to analyse the bioactive compounds from the leaf extracts of L. speciosa by GC-MS. The extracts were screened for antibacterial and antibiofilm activities against potential clinical strains. The bioactive compounds from the leaves of L. speciosa were extracted by soxhlet continuous extraction method and their chemical composition was analysed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS). The antibacterial activity was evaluated against clinical strain like Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, P. aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi by well diffusion technique. We also screened for antibacterial property against common food borne pathogens namely Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus at varied concentration 250μml-1 to 1000μml-1. Thereafter antibiofilm assay was carried out at from 250 to 1000μg/ml against P. aeruginosa (high biofilm forming pathogen) clinical strain by cover slip technique and the morphology of the pathogen was observed using Scanning Electron Microscopy-(SEM). It was observed that diverse class of secondary metabolites were found by GC-MS analysis for all the extracts upon the continuous extraction. It was found that only minimum inhibition was seen in alcoholic extract for antibacterial activity, whereas all other extracts showed negligible activity. P. aeruginosa biofilm inhibited to 93.0±2% and 91±2% at higher concentration (1000μg/ml) for methanolic and ethanolic extract respectively. Absence of extracellular matrix structure and the surface cracking of biofilm were viewed by SEM, which confirmed the antibiofilm activity. Hence this study reveals that L. speciosa showed significant antibiofilm activity against P. aeruginosa due to the phytoconstituents present in the leaf extracts which was well documented in the alcoholic extracts by GC-MS analysis. The methanolic and ethanolic extract showed good photocatalytic activity of 77.44% and 96.66% against azo dye degradation respectively. Further

  7. Nonlinear regression analysis of kinetics of the photocatalytic decolorization of an azo dye in aqueous TiO2 slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnajady, Mohammad A; Modirshahla, Nasser

    2006-11-01

    The kinetics of decolorization of an anionic monoazo dye of acid class named C.I. Acid Red 27 (AR27) was investigated in the UV/TiO2 process with nonlinear regression analysis. The experimental results indicated that the kinetics of decolorization of AR27 in this process fit well by pseudo-first order kinetics. With nonlinear regression analysis a model was developed for pseudo-first order rate constant (k(ap,UV/TiO2)) as a function of operational parameters such as TiO2 dosage, initial concentration of AR27, concentration of O2 and UV-light intensity (I0) as following: k(ap,UV/TiO2) = 0.0025 [TiO2](0.65) [AR27]0(-0.96) [O2](0.16)I0. This rate expression can be used for predicting k(ap,UV/TiO2) at different conditions.

  8. Novel bio-electro-Fenton technology for azo dye wastewater treatment using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Jin, Xiangdan; Zhao, Nannan

    2017-01-01

    was achieved with apparent first order rate constants of 1.15 ± 0.06 and 0.26 ± 0.03 h-1, respectively. Furthermore, the initial concentration of orange G, initial solution pH, catholyte concentration, high and low concentration salt water flow rate and air flow rate were all found to significantly affect....... In such MREC-Fenton integrated process, the production of H2O2 which is the key reactant of fenton-reaction was driven by the electrons harvested from the exoelectrogens and salinity-gradient between sea water and fresh water in MREC. Complete decolorization and mineralization of 400 mg L-1 Orange G...... the dye degradation. This study provides an efficient and cost-effective system for the degradation of non-biodegradable pollutants....

  9. Application of the mixture design to optimise the formulation of active consortia to decolorize azo-dye methyl red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayed, Lamia; Harbi, Besma; Cheref, Abdelkrim; Bakhrouf, Amina; Achour, Sami

    2010-01-01

    With the aid of analysis software (Minitab 14.0), the formulation of pure culture in Mineral Salts Medium (MSM) can be optimized for several responses and the best formulation can be obtained. The influence of the different mixtures of three strains in the pure culture in MSM on the flavor components in decolorization of Methyl Red (with initial total cell density fixed at OD600 = 1 and in addition of 750 ppm of dye) was studied using equilateral triangle diagram and mixture experimental design to assess color and COD removal during species evolution. The regression model on microorganism composition and main metabolites was established. The results suggested that the highest predictable specific decolorization rate and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) were 77.97 and 93.77%. Based on these, the response values that satisfied all expectations were optimized, and the optimal composition of the mixed consortium for the dedolorization and COD removal were (Sphingomonas paucimobilis 45.20%, Bacillus sp 61.94% and Staphylococcus epidermidis 80.00%) and (Sphingomonas paucimobilis 77.03%, Bacillus sp 86.42% and Staphylococcus epidermidis 71.74%) respectively. Very high regression coefficient between the variables and the responses: decolorization and COD removal were respectively R(2)=0.96 and 0.81 indicated excellent evaluation of experimental data by polynomial regression model.

  10. Facile Preparation of Phosphotungstic Acid-Impregnated Yeast Hybrid Microspheres and Their Photocatalytic Performance for Decolorization of Azo Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphotungstic acid (HPW-impregnated yeast hybrid microspheres were prepared by impregnation-adsorption technique through tuning pH of the aqueous yeast suspensions. The obtained products were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC, and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis, respectively. FE-SEM and EDS ascertain that the HPW has been effectively introduced onto the surface of yeast, and the resulting samples retain ellipsoid shape, with the uniform size (length 4.5 ± 0.2 μm, width 3.0 ± 0.3 μm and good monodispersion. XRD pattern indicates that the main crystal structure of as-synthesized HPW@yeast microsphere is Keggin structure. TG-DTA states that the HPW in composites has better thermal stability than pure HPW. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR elucidates that the functional groups or chemical bonds inherited from the pristine yeast cell were critical to the assembling of the composites. UV-Vis shows that the obtained samples have a good responding to UV light. The settling ability indicates that the hybrid microspheres possess an excellent suspension performance. In the test of catalytic activity, the HPW@yeast microsphere exhibits a high photocatalytic activity for the decoloration of Methylene blue and Congo red dye aqueous solutions, and there are a few activity losses after four cycles of uses.

  11. Accelerated azo dye degradation and concurrent hydrogen production in the single-chamber photocatalytic microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yanping; Zhang, Renduo; Yu, Zebin; Huang, Lirong; Liu, Yuxin; Zhou, Zili

    2017-01-01

    The single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell constructed with a TiO 2 -coated photocathode, termed photocatalytic microbial electrolysis cell (PMEC), was developed to accelerate methyl orange (MO) degradation and concurrent hydrogen (H 2 ) recovery under UV irradiation. Results showed that faster MO decolorization rates were achieved from the PMEC compared with those without UV irradiation or with open circuit. With increase of MO concentrations (acetate as co-substrate) from 50 to 300mg/L at an applied voltage of 0.8V, decolorization efficiencies decreased from 98% to 76% within 12h, and cyclic H 2 production declined from 113 to 68mL. As the possible mechanism of MO degradation, bioelectrochemical reduction, co-metabolism reduction, and photocatalysis were involved; and degradation intermediates (mainly sulfanilic acid and N,N-dimethylaniline) were further degraded by OH generated from photocatalysis. This makes MO mineralization be possible in the single-chamber PMEC. Hence, the PMEC is a promising system for dyeing wastewater treatment and simultaneous H 2 production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. CaSnO 3 obtained by modified Pechini method applied in the photocatalytic degradation of an azo dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Lucena

    Full Text Available Abstract Pure forms of alkaline-earth stannates with perovskite structure (ASnO3, A= Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+ have been used as photocatalysts. In this work, CaSnO3 perovskite sample was synthesized by a modified Pechini method at 800 ºC and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, UV-visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The photocatalytic degradation of remazol golden yellow (RNL dye under UV radiation was evaluated. The XRD pattern showed that the synthesis method favored the orthorhombic CaSnO3 crystallization. According to the Raman spectrum, a material with high short-range order was obtained despite of the relatively low synthesis temperature, compared to the solid-state reaction one. The highest photocatalytic activity was attained at pH 3, which presented 51% discoloration and improved activity of 35% compared to discoloration solely due to adsorption (absence of radiation. The point of zero charge (PZC and the photocatalytic results indicated that a direct mechanism prevailed at pH 3, whereas an indirect mechanism prevailed at pH 6.

  13. INVESTIGATION OF THE NON THERMAL PLASMA-BASED ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS FOR REMOVAL OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN AZO DYES SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tota Pirdo Kasih

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the development of non thermal plasma-based AOPs for removal of organic contaminants in wastewater treatment. The plasma itself is generated based on point-to-point geometry under organic solution and can generate hydroxyl radicals, ozone, peroxide and other radicals as the basic species to destruct organic contaminants. Electrical diagnostic in the form of voltage and current waveform was investigated through the variation of time during the formation of plasma channeling. The evolutions of plasma channeling with its physical phenomena were also discussed. The relationship between the electrodes distance towards applied voltage to sustain the plasma were also studied. It was found that the mineralization have occurred during plasma treatment to transform the harmful functional group in organic dye solution into harmless species. Simultaneously, the decoloration process by using this submerged plasma treatment system is able to change the orange color of methyl orange solution into clearly transparent water in 30 minutes. The present findings may provide the plasma-based advanced oxidation process as a promising chemical-free and cost competitive AOP process application on specially the waste water treatment in textile industry.

  14. Central composite design for the optimization of removal of the azo dye, methyl orange, from waste water using fenton reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azami Mahsa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the degradation of Methyl Orange, using Fenton reaction was studied and optimized using central composite design as a response surface methodology. The effects of various experimental parameters in this reaction were investigated using central composite design. 28 experiments, with 4 factors and 5 levels for each factor were designed. These factors (or variables were: initial concentration of Fe (II, initial concentration of H2O2, initial concentration of oxalate and the reaction time. A full-quadratic polynomial equation between the percentage of dye degradation (as a response and the studied parameters was established. After removing the non-significant variables from the model, response surface method was used to obtain the optimum conditions. The optimum ranges of variables were: 0.25 - 0.35 mM for initial concentration of Fe (II, 5-17 mM for initial concentration of H2O2, 4-9 mM for initial concentration of oxalate, and 50-80 min for the reaction time. Also the results of extra experiments showed that these optimized values can be used for real samples and yield to a high value for the response.

  15. Cancer risk assessment of azo dyes and aromatic amines from tattoo bands, folders of paper, toys, bed clothes, watch straps and ink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeilmaker MJ; van Kranen HJ; van Veen MP; Janus J; LBM

    2000-01-01

    Dit rapport beschrijft een schatting voor het risico op kanker dat verbonden is aan het gebruik van tatoe bandjes, kinderspeelpapier, speelgoed, beddengoed, lederen horlogebandjes en inkt waarin kankerverwekkende azo kleurstoffen aangetroffen zijn. In genoemde producten zijn benzidine en de

  16. Rapid degradation of azo dye Direct Black BN by magnetic MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC under microwave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jia; Yang, Shaogui, E-mail: yangsg@nju.edu.cn; Li, Na; Meng, Lingjun; Wang, Fei; He, Huan; Sun, Cheng

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC was first successfully synthesized. • MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC attained the maximum absorbing value of 13.32 dB at 2.57 GHz, which reached extremely high RL value at low frequency range. • Fast decolorization and high TOC removal of azo dye Direct Black BN with complicated structure could occur with MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC under MW radiation. • MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC had better MW absorbing property and higher MW catalytic activity than MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC under the same condition. • MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC was of practical use in the wastewater treatment. - Abstract: A novel microwave (MW) catalyst, MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} loaded on SiC (MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC), was successfully synthesized by sol-gel method, and pure MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was used as reference. The MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption analyzer (BET specific surface area), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electromagnetic parameters of the prepared catalysts were measured by vector network analyzer. The reflection loss (RL) based on the electromagnetic parameters calculated in Matlab showed MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC attained the maximum absorbing value of 13.32 dB at 2.57 GHz, which reached extremely high RL value at low frequency range, revealing the excellent MW absorption property of MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC. MW-induced degradation of Direct Black BN (DB BN) over as-synthesized MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC indicated that degradation efficiency of DB BN (20 mg L{sup −1}) in 5 min reached 96.5%, the corresponding TOC removal was 65%, and the toxicity of DB BN after degradation by MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC obviously decreased. The good stability and applicability of MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC on the degradation process were also discovered. Moreover, the ionic chromatogram during degradation

  17. Synthesis of a novel magnetic Fe3O4/γ-Al2O3 hybrid composite using electrode-alternation technique for the removal of an azo dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Choi, Brian Hyun; Ahn, Kyu-Hong; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2017-11-01

    A novel magnetic adsorbent of Fe3O4/γ-Al2O3 hybrid composite (denoted as M-Fe/Al-H) was developed electrochemically via a sequential application of iron and aluminum electrodes in a one-pot fashion, which called here as electrode-alternation technique, followed by pyrolysis. Physical and chemical properties of the prepared adsorbents were characterized and their feasibility towards the removal of di-anionic azo dye Acid Black 1 (AB1) was assessed. Textural and structural characterization revealed that the prepared M-Fe/Al-H possesses superior properties than those of M-Fe (sole usage of iron electrode), which may improve the adsorption capacity. Kinetics revealed that the adsorption equilibrium was reached within 12 h with approximately 90% of the equilibrium adsorption capacity within the first 3 h. Comprehensive analysis using the pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models indicated that the dominant mechanism of the reaction is film diffusion with intraparticle diffusion being the rate determining step. The adsorption equilibrium isotherm data were best represented by the Sips isotherm model, which found to be approximately 1501, 1786, and 1959 mg/g at 283, 293, and 303 K, respectively. The exceptional performance as well as its ease of separation allows M-Fe/Al-H to be a promising candidate as an effective for azo dye removal from various aqueous medium.

  18. Evaluation of the adsorbent properties of a zeolite rock modified for the removal of the azo dyes as water pollutants; Evaluacion de las propiedades adsorbentes de una roca zeolitica modificada para la remocion de colorantes azoicos como contaminantes del agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres P, J

    2005-07-01

    At the moment some investigations which make reference to the removal of dyes for diverse adsorbent materials; as well as the factors that influence in the sorption process, considering the type so much of dye as those characteristics of the adsorbent material. In this work were investigated those adsorbent properties of a zeolite rock coming from San Luis Potosi State for the removal of azo dyes, using as peculiar cases the Red 40 (Red Allura) and the Yellow 5 (Tartrazine); for it were determined kinetic parameters and the sorption isotherms, as well as the sorption mechanisms involved in each case, between the dyes and the zeolite rock. In this work also it was considered the characterization before and after to removal of color from the water, through advanced analytical techniques such as the scanning electron microscopy of high vacuum (SEM), elementary microanalysis (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental part of the work fundamentally consisted, in the conditioning with a NaCl solution and later on the modification with HDTMA-Br of the natural zeolite rock, for then to put it in contact with solutions of the dyes R-40 and A-5, varying so much the contact times as the concentrations; the quantification of sodium in the liquid phase after the modification of the zeolite rock to determine the capacity of external cation exchange (CICE) it was carried out by means of the atomic absorption spectroscopy technique (EAA), and the quantification of the surfactant and the dyes in the liquid phase, it was carried out by means of the UV-vis spectrophotometry technique. It was found that the kinetic model that better it describes the process of sorption of R-40 and A-5 for the modified zeolite rock with HDTMA-Br, leaving of monocomponent and bi component solutions, it is the pseudo- second order. Inside of the obtained results for the sorption isotherms, as much the dye R-40 as the dye A-5 its presented a better adjustment to the Langmuir model. In what refers

  19. Enzymatic reduction of azo and indigoid compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricelius, S; Held, C; Murkovic, M; Bozic, M; Kokol, V; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Guebitz, G M

    2007-11-01

    A customer- and environment-friendly method for the decolorization azo dyes was developed. Azoreductases could be used both to bleach hair dyed with azo dyes and to reduce dyes in vat dyeing of textiles. A new reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent azoreductase of Bacillus cereus, which showed high potential for reduction of these dyes, was purified using a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography and had a molecular mass of 21.5 kDa. The optimum pH of the azoreductase depended on the substrate and was within the range of pH 6 to 7, while the maximum temperature was reached at 40 degrees C. Oxygen was shown to be an alternative electron acceptor to azo compounds and must therefore be excluded during enzymatic dye reduction. Biotransformation of the azo dyes Flame Orange and Ruby Red was studied in more detail using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry (MS). Reduction of the azo bonds leads to cleavage of the dyes resulting in the cleavage product 2-amino-1,3 dimethylimidazolium and N approximately 1 approximately ,N approximately 1 approximately -dimethyl-1,4-benzenediamine for Ruby Red, while only the first was detected for Flame Orange because of MS instability of the expected 1,4-benzenediamine. The azoreductase was also found to reduce vat dyes like Indigo Carmine (C.I. Acid Blue 74). Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as an oxidizing agent was used to reoxidize the dye into the initial form. The reduction and oxidation mechanism of Indigo Carmine was studied using UV-visible spectroscopy.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of novel liquid-crystalline azo-dyes bearing two amino-nitro substituted azobenzene units and a well-defined, oligo(ethylene glycol) spacer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caicedo, Carolina [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivera, Ernesto, E-mail: riverage@iim.unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Valdez-Hernandez, Yazmin; Carreon-Castro, Maria del Pilar [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {yields} Novel dyes containing azobenzene and oligo(ethylene glycol) were synthesized. {yields} Absorption spectra of RED-PEG dyes in CHCl{sub 3} showed {lambda}{sub max} = 440-480 nm. {yields} Absorption spectra of RED-PEG dyes in film revealed the formation of H-aggregates. {yields} Their liquid-crystalline behaviour was confirmed by light polarized microscopy. {yields} These liquid-crystalline dyes can form Langmuir films on the air-water interface. - Abstract: Four novel liquid-crystalline azo-dyes bearing two amino-nitro substituted azobenzene units linked by a well-defined oligo(ethylene glycol) spacer (DIRED-PEG series): (E)-N,N'-(2,2'-oxybis(ethane-2,1-diyl))bis(N-methyl-4-((E)-(4-nitrophenyl) diazenyl) benzenamine) (DIRED-PEG-2), (E)-N,N'-(2,2'-(ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy)) bis(ethane-2,1-diyl)) bis(N-methyl-4-((E)-(4-nitrophenyl) diazenyl) benzenamine) (DIRED-PEG-3), (E)-N,N'-(2,2'-(2,2'-oxybis (ethane-2,1-diyl) bis(oxy)) bis(ethane-2,1-diyl)) bis(N-methyl-4-((E)-(4-nitrophenyl) diazenyl) benzenamine) (DIRED-PEG-4) and N1,N17-dimethyl-N1,N17-bis (4-((E)-(4-nitrophenyl) diazenyl) phenyl)-3,6,9,12,15-pentaoxaheptadecane-1,17-diamine (DIRED-PEG-6) have been synthesized. These dyes were fully characterized by FTIR, {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopies, and their thermal and optical properties were studied. Besides, the liquid-crystalline behaviour of these compounds was monitored in function of the temperature by light polarized microscopy. Finally, Langmuir films were prepared with these dyes.

  1. Photoelectrocatalysis based on Ti/TiO2 nanotubes removes toxic properties of the azo dyes Disperse Red 1, Disperse Red 13 and Disperse Orange 1 from aqueous chloride samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, E R A; Oliveira, G A R; Grando, M D; Lizier, T M; Zanoni, M V B; Oliveira, D P

    2013-07-30

    This work describes the efficiency of photoelectrocatalysis based on Ti/TiO2 nanotubes in the degradation of the azo dyes Disperse Red 1, Disperse Red 13 and Disperse Orange 1 and to remove their toxic properties, as an alternative method for the treatment of effluents and water. For this purpose, the discoloration rate, total organic carbon (TOC) removal, and genotoxic, cytotoxic and mutagenic responses were determined, using the comet, micronucleus and cytotoxicity assays in HepG2 cells and the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. In a previous study it was found that the surfactant Emulsogen could contribute to the low mineralization of the dyes (60% after 4 h of treatment), which, in turn, seems to account for the mutagenicity of the products generated. Thus this surfactant was not added to the chloride medium in order to avoid this interference. The photoelectrocatalytic method presented rapid discoloration and the TOC reduction was ≥87% after 240 min of treatment, showing that photoelectrocatalysis is able to mineralize the dyes tested. The method was also efficient in removing the mutagenic activity and cytotoxic effects of these three dyes. Thus it was concluded that photoelectrocatalysis was a promising method for the treatment of aqueous samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Understanding the degradation of Congo red and bacterial diversity in an air-cathode microbial fuel cell being evaluated for simultaneous azo dye removal from wastewater and bioelectricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Li, Youming; Hu, Yongyou; Hou, Bin; Zhang, Yaping; Li, Sizhe

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the mechanism of Congo red degradation and bacterial diversity in a single-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) incorporating a microfiltration membrane and air-cathode. The MFC was operated continuously for more than 4 months using a mixture of Congo red and glucose as fuel. We demonstrated that the Congo red azo bonds were reduced at the anode to form aromatic amines. This is consistent with the known mechanism of anaerobic biodegradation of azo dyes. The MFC developed a less dense biofilm at the anode in the presence of Congo red compared to its absence indicating that Congo red degradation negatively affected biofilm formation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and direct 16S ribosomal DNA gene nucleotide sequencing revealed that the microbial communities differed depending on whether Congo red was present in the MFC. Geobacter-like species known to generate electricity were detected in the presence or absence of Congo red. In contrast, Azospirillum, Methylobacterium, Rhodobacter, Desulfovibrio, Trichococcus, and Bacteroides species were only detected in its presence. These species were most likely responsible for degrading Congo red.

  3. Decolourisation Capabilities of Ligninolytic Enzymes Produced by Marasmius cladophyllus UMAS MS8 on Remazol Brilliant Blue R and Other Azo Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngieng Ngui Sing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marasmius cladophyllus was examined for its ability to degradatively decolourise the recalcitrant dye Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR and screened for the production of ligninolytic enzymes using specific substrates. Monitoring dye decolourisation by the decrease in absorbance ratio of A592/A500 shows that the decolourisation of RBBR dye was associated with the dye degradation. Marasmius cladophyllus produces laccase and lignin peroxidase in glucose minimal liquid medium containing RBBR. Both enzyme activities were increased, with laccase activity recorded 70 times higher reaching up to 390 U L−1 on day 12. Further in vitro RBBR dye decolourisation using the culture medium shows that laccase activity was correlated with the dye decolourisation. Fresh RBBR dye continuously supplemented into the decolourised culture medium was further decolourised much faster in the subsequent round of the RBBR dye decolourisation. In vitro dye decolourisation using the crude laccase not only decolourised 76% of RBBR dye in just 19 hours but also decolourised 54% of Orange G and 33% of Congo red at the same period of time without the use of any exogenous mediator. This rapid dye decolourisation ability of the enzymes produced by M. cladophyllus thus suggested its possible application in the bioremediation of dye containing wastewater.

  4. Decolourisation Capabilities of Ligninolytic Enzymes Produced by Marasmius cladophyllus UMAS MS8 on Remazol Brilliant Blue R and Other Azo Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Ngieng Ngui; Husaini, Ahmad; Zulkharnain, Azham; Roslan, Hairul Azman

    2017-01-01

    Marasmius cladophyllus was examined for its ability to degradatively decolourise the recalcitrant dye Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) and screened for the production of ligninolytic enzymes using specific substrates. Monitoring dye decolourisation by the decrease in absorbance ratio of A592/A500 shows that the decolourisation of RBBR dye was associated with the dye degradation. Marasmius cladophyllus produces laccase and lignin peroxidase in glucose minimal liquid medium containing RBBR. Both enzyme activities were increased, with laccase activity recorded 70 times higher reaching up to 390 U L-1 on day 12. Further in vitro RBBR dye decolourisation using the culture medium shows that laccase activity was correlated with the dye decolourisation. Fresh RBBR dye continuously supplemented into the decolourised culture medium was further decolourised much faster in the subsequent round of the RBBR dye decolourisation. In vitro dye decolourisation using the crude laccase not only decolourised 76% of RBBR dye in just 19 hours but also decolourised 54% of Orange G and 33% of Congo red at the same period of time without the use of any exogenous mediator. This rapid dye decolourisation ability of the enzymes produced by M. cladophyllus thus suggested its possible application in the bioremediation of dye containing wastewater.

  5. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of toxicity and genotoxicity of the reactive azo dyes Remazol Black B and Remazol Orange 3R and effectiveness of electron beam irradiation in the reduction of color and toxic effects; Avaliacao da toxicidade e genotoxicidade dos corantes azo reativos Remazol Preto B e Remazol Alaranjado 3R e da eficacia da radiacao com feixe de eletrons na reducao da cor e efeitos toxicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, Alessandro de Sa

    2011-07-01

    The textile industries play an important role in national and global economy. But, their activities are considered potentially polluting. The use of large volumes of water and the production of colored wastewater with high organic matter are among the main issues raised, especially during the stage of dyeing and washing of the textile process. The reactive azo dyes are the main colors used in the industry for dyeing of cotton in Brazil and worldwide. Because of its low setting and variations in the fiber production process, about 30% of the initial concentration used in the dyeing baths are lost and will compose the final effluent. These compounds have a low biodegradability, are highly soluble in water and therefore are not completely removed by conventional biological processes. In addition, other processes do not promote degradation but the transference to solid environment. The dyes discarded without treatment in the water body can cause aesthetic modifications, alter photosynthesis and gas solubility, as well as being toxic and genotoxic. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate the toxicity and genotoxicity of two reactive azo dyes (Remazol Black B - RPB and Remazol Orange 3R - R3AR) and the percentage of color and toxicity reduction after the use of electron beam radiation. The acute toxicity assays performed with Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia similis and Biomphalaria glabrata showed different response patterns for dyes. The different chemical forms of dyes were slightly toxic to Vibrio fischeri and only the RPB dye (vinylsulphone) was toxic (EC50{sub 15min} = 6,23 mg L-1). In tests with Daphnia similis, the dye RPB was slightly toxic in its pattern form, sulphatoethylsulphone, (CE50{sub 48h} = 91,25 mg L{sup -1}) and showed no toxicity in other chemical forms. However, the RA3R dye was toxic to the dafnids and the vinylsulphone form very toxic (EC50{sub 48h} = 0,54 mg L-1). No toxicity was observed in Biomphalaria glabrata assays. Chronic toxicity was

  7. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin

    2016-07-25

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR), and acid yellow 36 (AY) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane–dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye–dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment.

  8. Descoloração de efluentes aquosos sintéticos e têxtil contendo corantes índigo e azo via processos Fenton e foto-assistidos (UV e UV/H2O2 Decolorization of synthetic and laundry wastewater containing indigo and azo dyes by the Fenton, photolytic and UV/H2O2 processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno César Barroso Salgado

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho, processos de oxidação avançada, Fe2+/H2O2 e UV/H2O2, e de fotólise (UV foram empregados na descoloração de dois efluentes sintéticos, contendo corantes tipo índigo e azo, e de um efluente de lavanderia industrial. Experimentalmente, soluções em concentração de 20 mg/L dos corantes índigo carmim e vermelho congo, respectivamente 43 µmol/L e 29 µmol/L, e o efluente têxtil (pH = 3 foram submetidos a diferentes condições oxidantes sob temperatura ambiente (27 ºC. As remoções de cor e de DQO foram avaliadas em cada sistema oxidativo estudado. Em geral, os resultados obtidos mostraram que os processos utilizados são muito promissores na descoloração dos efluentes. A descoloração completa das soluções foi alcançada nos processos Fenton e com UV/H2O2. Estudos cinéticos revelam que a taxa de descoloração em meio aquoso segue uma cinética de pseudo-primeira ordem em relação à concentração do corante.In the present work, advanced oxidation processes, Fe2+/H2O2 and UV/H2O2, and direct photolysis (UV light have been applied in the decolorization of two synthetic wastewater containing indigo and azo dyes and laundry effluent. Individual aqueous solutions containing 20 mg/L indigo carmine and congo red dyes (43 µmol/L and 29 µmol/L, respectively and textile laundry wastewater at pH 3 were subjected to different experimental conditions in the oxidation reactions at room temperature (27 ºC. Color and COD removals were evaluated for each oxidation systems. The results showed that the utilized processes are able to successfully decolorize the wastewaters. Complete bleaching was achieved by Fenton and UV/H2O2. Also, kinetics investigations revealed that the decolorization follows pseudo-first order kinetic with respect to the dye concentration.