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Sample records for hydrogen fluoride samples

  1. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ammonium hydrogen fluoride samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Capdevila, C.; Alduan, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    The quantitative spectrographic trace determination of Al, B, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb and Si in ammonium hydrogen fluoride samples is considered. 10 A dc arc excitation and graphite electrodes with crate either 4.5 mm or 8 mm deep are employed. A comparison of various matrices such as graphite, gallium oxide, germanium oxide, magnesium oxide and zinc oxide, in the ratios 1:1 and 1:3, as well as a mixture 50% graphite - 50% zinc oxide in the ratio 1:1 is included. Zinc oxide in the ratio 1:1 and 4x8 mm craters show the best over-all results. (author)

  2. The sampling of hydrogen fluoride in air with impregnated filter paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huygen, C.

    1963-01-01

    A method isproposed for the quantitative collection of hydrogen fluoride in air by drawing a known quantity of the air through filter paper impregnated with solutions of potassium hydroxide and glycerol or triethanolamine. Somu possibilities and limitations of the method are discussed.

  3. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned in...

  4. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1972-06-26

    It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

  5. Effects of hydrogen fluoride on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazoe, F

    1970-07-15

    Symptoms of fluorosis in plants are chlorotic markings around the tip or edges of young leaves. Examples of damage to plants and livestock by fluorides are listed, including the retarded growth of silkworms fed on mulberry leaves polluted by more than 30 ppm fluorides. Plants can be classified into six groups according to their resistance to hydrogen fluoride. Threshold values of the fluoride concentration range from 5-10 ppb for the plants. Gladiolus is normally employed as a plant indicator for hydrogen fluoride and silkworms as indicator insects. The relationship between plant damage by fluorides and exposure time, density, soil, fertilizer, meteorology and location are examined. Several preventive measures are listed, including the spraying of water or lime on plant leaves. It is concluded that the establishment of an environmental standard is difficult because of the extremely high sensitivity of the plants to the gas. 8 references.

  6. Acute toxicity of uranium hexafluoride, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) released into the atmosphere will react rapidly with moisture in the air to form the hydrolysis products uranyl fluoride (UO 2 F 2 ) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Uranium compounds such as UF 6 and UO 2 F 2 exhibit both chemical toxicity and radiological effects, while HF exhibits only chemical toxicity. This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing the human health consequences of a known acute exposure to a mixture of UF 6 , UO 2 F 2 , and HF. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Unusual hydrogen bonding in L-cysteine hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, V S; Ghazaryan, V V; Boldyreva, E V; Petrosyan, A M

    2015-08-01

    L-Cysteine hydrogen fluoride, or bis(L-cysteinium) difluoride-L-cysteine-hydrogen fluoride (1/1/1), 2C3H8NO2S(+)·2F(-)·C3H7NO2S·HF or L-Cys(+)(L-Cys···L-Cys(+))F(-)(F(-)...H-F), provides the first example of a structure with cations of the 'triglycine sulfate' type, i.e. A(+)(A···A(+)) (where A and A(+) are the zwitterionic and cationic states of an amino acid, respectively), without a doubly charged counter-ion. The salt crystallizes in the monoclinic system with the space group P2(1). The dimeric (L-Cys···L-Cys(+)) cation and the dimeric (F(-)···H-F) anion are formed via strong O-H···O or F-H···F hydrogen bonds, respectively, with very short O···O [2.4438 (19) Å] and F···F distances [2.2676 (17) Å]. The F···F distance is significantly shorter than in solid hydrogen fluoride. Additionally, there is another very short hydrogen bond, of O-H···F type, formed by a L-cysteinium cation and a fluoride ion. The corresponding O···F distance of 2.3412 (19) Å seems to be the shortest among O-H···F and F-H···O hydrogen bonds known to date. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction study was complemented by IR spectroscopy. Of special interest was the spectral region of vibrations related to the above-mentioned hydrogen bonds.

  8. Development of a hydrogen fluoride laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, P.

    1974-01-01

    A hydrogen fluoride laser with variable pulse width (9 to 25 ns) was developed for measurements of shortlived dense plasmas. This multi-line laser with lambda approximately 2.9 μm operates without an optical pulse cutting system. Peak power of the pulses is about 400 kW. Measurements concerning dependence of FWHA, peak power and energy yield were carried out. Combined with an amplifier of 1 m length, peak power up to 13 MW and energies up to 0.5 J are attained. With this system, time dependence of the power amplification in the amplifier was tested for various gas mixtures. Furthermore preliminary measurements with time-resolved schlieren interferometry with this system are discussed. A plasma focus device was used as test object. (orig.) [de

  9. The uptake of hydrogen fluoride by a forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model of hydrogen fluoride (HF) deposition and accumulation of fluoride in a Eucalyptus rostrata forest has been developed. The model is based on tree physiology and meteorological principles. The data base for the model was derived from a literature survey of the physiological characteristics of E. rostrata and similar eucalyptus species and from current knowledge of meteorological processes in plant canopies

  10. Quantitative infrared analysis of hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuta, D.M.

    1997-04-01

    This work was performed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant where hydrogen fluoride is produced upon the hydrolysis of UF 6 . This poses a problem for in this setting and a method for determining the mole percent concentration was desired. HF has been considered to be a non-ideal gas for many years. D. F. Smith utilized complex equations in his HF studies in the 1950s. We have evaluated HF behavior as a function of pressure from three different perspectives. (1) Absorbance at 3877 cm -1 as a function of pressure for 100% HF. (2) Absorbance at 3877 cm -1 as a function of increasing partial pressure HF. Total pressure = 300 mm HgA maintained with nitrogen. (3) Absorbance at 3877 cm -1 for constant partial pressure HF. Total pressure is increased to greater than 800 mm HgA with nitrogen. These experiments have shown that at partial pressures up to 35mm HgA, HIF follows the ideal gas law. The absorbance at 3877 cm -1 can be quantitatively analyzed via infrared methods

  11. Formation of hydrogen fluoride by gamma and beta sterilisation in medical devices containing perfluoroheptane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuendorf, Josef; Kremer, Stefan; Grueger, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Infusion of hexadecafluoroheptane, a liquid perfluorocarbon released from repaired Althane dialysers was found to be the most probable reason for the deaths of 53 dialysis patients reported in the year 2001. This study focuses on toxic decomposition products generated due to gamma and beta sterilisation of hexadecafluoroheptane. The responsible dialysers were sterilised with a maximum dose of 45 kGy gamma irradiation. We investigated the influence of both 20-500 kGy gamma and beta irradiation on perfluoroheptane. Analysis of the irradiated samples verified the decomposition of perfluoroheptane in dependence on the dose of irradiation. Beta irradiation resulted in a higher degree of decomposition than the same dose of gamma irradiation. As decomposition products, hydrogen fluoride, CO 2 , and one saturated fluorinated hydrocarbon which could not be analysed exactly were identified. Even at 20 kGy gamma irradiation hydrogen fluoride was detectable. Our results provide evidence that hydrogen fluoride is generated as a highly toxic decomposition product when perfluoroheptane is sterilised with gamma irradiation as it was applied on the affected dialysers. There is no evidence of other toxic degradation products especially perfluoroisobutylene. Therefore, hydrogen fluoride or the dissociated fluoride ions might act as a toxic agent when medical devices containing liquid perfluorocarbons are sterilised by irradiation

  12. Corrosion resistant materials for fluorine and hydrogen fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauffe, K.

    1984-12-01

    Aluminum and Duralumin are resistant against fluorine and hydrogen fluoride up to 600 and 700 K, respectively. The resistance of nickel and its alloys, particularly monel, against fluorine and hydrogen fluoride is fairly good up to 900 and 800 K. During the attack of nickel-chromium alloys by fluorine between 1000 and 1300 K, it appears an inner fluorination similarly to the inner oxidation. The resistance of titanium in water-free liquid fluorine at lower temperatures with <0,3 mm.a/sup -1/ is comparable to that of nickel and monel. However, the corrosion of titanium in gaseous fluorine amounts at 377 K only 0,0082 mm.a/sup -1/. In spite of their limited resistance against fluorine and hydrogen fluoride, very pure molybdenum and tungsten are employed as construction materials in the rocket technology because of their large strength at high temperatures if fluorine-hydrogen and fluorine-hydrazine flames are used. Lanthanum and calcium borides are only little attacked by fluorine hydrazine flames between 1400 and 1800 K; they are superior to all special grade alloys. The same is true in a lower temperature region (290-400 K) with fluorcarbon resins. Organic materials substitute in increasing extent metal alloys and non-metal inorganic materials.

  13. Corrosion resistant materials for fluorine and hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauffe, K.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum and Duralumin are resistant against fluorine and hydrogen fluoride up to 600 and 700 K, respectively. The resistance of nickel and its alloys, particularly monel, against fluorine and hydrogen fluoride is fairly good up to 900 and 800 K. During the attack of nickel-chromium alloys by fluorine between 1000 and 1300 K, it appears an inner fluorination similarly to the inner oxidation. The resistance of titanium in water-free liquid fluorine at lower temperatures with -1 is comparable to that of nickel and monel. However, the corrosion of titanium in gaseous fluorine amounts at 377 K only 0,0082 mm.a -1 . In spite of their limited resistance against fluorine and hydrogen fluoride, very pure molybdenum and tungsten are employed as construction materials in the rocket technology because of their large strength at high temperatures if fluorine-hydrogen and fluorine-hydrazine flames are used. Lanthanum and calcium borides are only little attacked by fluorine hydrazine flames between 1400 and 1800 K; they are superior to all special grade alloys. The same is true in a lower temperature region (290-400 K) with fluorcarbon resins. Organic materials substitute in increasing extent metal alloys and non-metal inorganic materials. (orig.) [de

  14. Removal of hydrogen fluoride from uranium plant emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramani, M.P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium production technology involves the use of hydrogen fluoride at various stages. It is used in the production of uranium tetrafluoride as well as for the production of fluorine for the conversion of tetrafluoride to hexafluoride in isotopic enrichment plants. The sources of HF pollution in the industry, besides accidental spillages and leakages, are the final off-gases from the UF 4 production process or from the hydrogen reduction of hexafluoride (where such process is adopted), venting of tanks and reactors containing HF, safety pressure rupture discs as well as dust collection and ventilation systems

  15. Evaluation of cryolite from pitinga (Amazonas-Brazil as a source of hydrogen fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica F. Paulino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the use of cryolite from the Pitinga Mine (Amazonas state, Brazil as raw material in hydrogen fluoride production. Samples were initially characterized by chemical and mineralogical analyses. They presented low silica content (< 4 wt.%. After milling, cryolite samples were digested with concentrated sulfuric acid under stirring (200 rpm and variable temperature, time and liquid to solid ratio conditions. Under the best experimental conditions (140 °C, 3-5 h, 96 wt.% of fluorine was recovered as hydrogen fluoride. The application of a 23 full factorial design showed that temperature and reaction time were relevant parameters during leaching, whereas liquid to solid ratio was not statistically significant.

  16. Theory of nuclear quadrupole interactions in solid hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, N.S.; Sahoo, N.; Das, T.P.; Kelires, P.C.

    1990-01-01

    The nuclear quadrupole interaction of 19 F * (I=5/2) nucleus in solid hydrogen fluoride has been studied using the Hartree Fock cluster technique to understand the influence of both intrachain hydrogen bonding effects and the weak interchain interaction. On the basis of our investigations, the 34.04 MHz coupling constant observed by TDPAD measurements has been ascribed to the bulk solid while the observed 40.13 MHz coupling constant is suggested as arising from a small two- or three-molecule cluster produced during the proton irradiation process. Two alternate explanations are offered for the origin of coupling constants close to 40 MHz in a number of solid hydrocarbons containing hydrogen and fluorine ligands. (orig.)

  17. Hydrogen permeation through Flinabe fluoride molten salts for blanket candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiumi, Ryosuke, E-mail: r.nishiumi@aees.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fukada, Satoshi; Nakamura, Akira; Katayama, Kazunari

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • H{sub 2} diffusivity, solubility and permeability in Flinabe as T breeder are determined. • Effects in composition differences among Flibe, Fnabe and Flinabe are compared. • Changes of pressure dependence of Flinabe permeation rate are clarified. - Abstract: Fluoride molten salt Flibe (2LiF + BeF{sub 2}) is a promising candidate for the liquid blanket of a nuclear fusion reactor, because of its large advantages of tritium breeding ratio and heat-transfer fluid. Since its melting point is higher than other liquid candidates, another new fluoride molten salt Flinabe (LiF + NaF + BeF{sub 2}) is recently focused on because of its lower melting point while holding proper breeding properties. In this experiment, hydrogen permeation behavior through the three molten salts of Flibe (2LiF + BeF{sub 2}), Fnabe (NaF + BeF{sub 2}) and Flinabe are investigated in order to clarify the effects of their compositions on hydrogen transfer properties. After making up any of the three molten salts and purifying it using HF, hydrogen permeability, diffusivity and solubility of the molten salts are determined experimentally by using a system composed of tertiary cylindrical tubes. Close agreement is obtained between experimental data and analytical solutions. H{sub 2} permeability, diffusivity and solubility are correlated as a function of temperature and are compared among the three molten salts.

  18. Toxicity levels to humans during acute exposure to hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halton, D.M.; Dranitsaris, P.; Baynes, C.J.

    1984-11-01

    A literature review was conducted of the acute toxicity of hydrogen fluoride (HF) with emphasis on the effects of inhalation of gaseous HF. The data and findings of the relevant references were summarized under four categories: animal studies, controlled human studies, community exposure and industrial exposure. These were critically reviewed and then lethal concentration-time relationships were developed for humans, corresponding to LCsub(LO), LCsub(10) and LCsub(50) levels. The effects of age, health and other physiological variables on the sensitivity to HF were discussed, as well as antagonistic and synergistic effects with other substances

  19. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Saurabh [Akvo Foundation (Netherlands); Krishnan, Sunderrajan [INREM Foundation (India); Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep [Akvo Foundation (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0–2 mg l{sup −1}. Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field. - Highlights: • Fluoride is an inorganic pollutant in ground water, affecting human health. • A colorimetric method for measurement of fluoride in drinking water with smartphone • Measurement is by mixing water with zirconyl xylenol orange complex reagent. • Results are comparable with laboratory-based ion selective fluoride electrode method.

  20. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Saurabh; Krishnan, Sunderrajan; Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0–2 mg l"−"1. Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field. - Highlights: • Fluoride is an inorganic pollutant in ground water, affecting human health. • A colorimetric method for measurement of fluoride in drinking water with smartphone • Measurement is by mixing water with zirconyl xylenol orange complex reagent. • Results are comparable with laboratory-based ion selective fluoride electrode method.

  1. Method to separate off hydrogen fluoride from a uranium hexafluoride-hydrogen fluoride mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfistermeister, M.; Jokar, J.

    1979-01-01

    There have been sofar difficulties involved in separating off HF when purifying UF 6 . According to the invention, this can be achieved without great expenditure if one adds a perfluorated amine or derivative of it to the UF 6 -HF mixture. The UF 6 can be separated by simple distillation or sublimation from the hardly-volatile formed tri-(perfluoro-butyl) ammonium fluoride. The adduct formed can be easily split again with NaOH so that the amine can be recycled without loss. (UWI) [de

  2. Method to separate hydrogen fluoride from an uranium hexafluoride-hydrogen fluoride mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfistermeister, M.; Jokar, J.

    1978-01-01

    It is difficult to separate off HF in the purification of UF 6 from additional compounds. According to the invention, it is possible without too greater effort to form the hardly volatile tri-(perfluorobutyl)-ammonium fluoride by adding a perfluorate amine or a derivate of it, and then to separate off the UF 6 from the adduct by simple distillation or sublimation. The adduct can be easily split again with NaOH, so that the amine can be used again without loss. (RW) [de

  3. Microscopic dynamics and relaxation processes in liquid hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, R.; Giura, P.; Monaco, G.; Sette, F.; Fioretto, D.; Ruocco, G.

    2004-01-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering and Brillouin light scattering measurements of the dynamic structure factor of liquid hydrogen fluoride have been performed in the temperature range T=214-283 K. The data, analyzed using a viscoelastic model with a two time-scale memory function, show a positive dispersion of the sound velocity c(Q) between the low frequency value c 0 (Q) and the high frequency value c ∞α (Q). This finding confirms the existence of a structural (α) relaxation directly related to the dynamical organization of the hydrogen bonds network of the system. The activation energy E a of the process has been extracted by the analysis of the temperature behavior of the relaxation time τ α (T) that follows an Arrhenius law. The obtained value for E a , when compared with that observed in another hydrogen bond liquid as water, suggests that the main parameter governing the α-relaxation process is the number of hydrogen bonds per molecule

  4. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  5. Chromosomal changes in maize induced by hydrogen fluoride gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, A H

    1970-01-01

    Maize seedlings were fumigated in growth chambers with hydrogen fluoride at a concentration of about 3 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/. The experiment was run for 10 days, with the first group of treated plants removed from the chambers after 4 days and then at intervals of 2 days. Microsporocyte smears from the treated plants revealed chromosomal aberrations that included asynaptic regions, translocations, inversions, and bridges plus fragments or fragments by themselves. It is believed that these abnormalities were due to the physiological effect of HF causing the chromosomes to become sticky and/or to the occurrence of chromatid breakage followed by reunion to sticky and/or to the occurrence of chromatid breakage followed by reunion to form structural changes. These findings indicate that HF is a mutagenic agent.

  6. Infrared analysis of hydrogen fluoride in uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwada, Ken; Soga, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Matae; Tsujimura, Shigeo

    1975-01-01

    Quantitative analysis by infrared technique was made on hydrogen fluoride (HF) contained in uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ). It was found that, among the vibration-rotation bands, the R(1)-, R(2)-, P(2)- and P(3)-branches having relatively large absorbances are convenient for the analysis of HF. Upon comparing the calibration curves of pure HF with the HF absorbances observed in the presence of UF 6 (approx. 70--100 Torr), N 2 (approx. 100 Torr) and Ar(approx. 100 Torr) gases, it was observed that the first-mentioned calibration curve could be applied to the analysis of HF when mixed with other substances, as in the latter cases. The detectable limits of HF pressure, using a infrared cell of 10cm path length, were 0.5--1 Torr at room temperature. (auth.)

  7. Effects of atmospheric hydrogen fluoride upon Drosophila melanogaster. I. Differential genotyptic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerdes, R A; Smith, J D; Applegate, H G

    1971-01-01

    Four inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster were exposed to various concentrations of gaseous hydrogen fluoride for a period of six weeks. The effects upon the viability of these populations were predominantly linear with respect to fluoride concentration over the range tested. Differential responses of the inbred lines were interpreted to mean that tolerance to fluoride contamination is influenced by genotype. 4 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  8. Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalescence® ... Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen ... and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose ...

  9. Heterogeneous catalysis in fluoride melts - reduction of uranium(V) by hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelmers, A D; Bennett, M R [Oak Ridge National Lab., Tenn. (USA)

    1976-01-01

    A necessary step in fuel reprocessing for the Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor is the reduction of pentavalent uranium to tetravalent uranium by hydrogen gas. The pentavalent uranium is dissolved in a mixed fluoride melt. Results are presented which show that the hydrogen reduction is rate limited, possibly due to the dissociation of hydrogen molecules to yield active hydrogen atoms; and that by the application of platinum catalysts a 10- to 100-fold increase in the reaction rate can be achieved.

  10. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of hydrogen fluoride at several thermodynamic states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreitmeir, M.; Bertagnolli, H.; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen fluoride is a simple but interesting system for studies of the influence of hydrogen bonds on physical properties. We have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of HF at several thermodynamic states, where we examine the microscopic structure of the liquid as well...

  11. Study of the behaviour of some heavy elements in solvents containing hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnero, M.

    1967-01-01

    The anhydrous liquid mixtures: dinitrogen tetroxide-hydrogen fluoride and antimony pentafluoride-hydrogen fluoride were studied as solvents for heavy elements interesting nuclear energy: uranium, thorium, zirconium and for some of their compounds. For N 2 O 4 -HF mixtures, electric conductivity measurements and liquid phase infrared spectra were also obtained. Uranium and zirconium tetrafluoride are much more soluble in N 2 O 4 -HF mixtures than in pure hydrogen fluoride. Uranium dissolved in these mixtures is pentavalent. In SbF 5 -HF mixtures, uranium dissolves with hydrogen evolution and becomes trivalent. The solid compound resulting from the dissolution is a fluoro-antimonate: U(SbF 6 ) 3 . (author) [fr

  12. Thermodynamics of the conversion of calcium and magnesium fluorides to the parent metal oxides and hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, M.H.; Axler, K.M.

    1997-02-01

    The authors have used thermodynamic modeling to examine the reaction of calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) and magnesium fluoride (MgF 2 ) with water (H 2 O) at elevated temperatures. The calculated, equilibrium composition corresponds to the global free-energy minimum for the system. Optimum, predicted reaction temperatures and reactant mole ratios are reported for the recovery of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a valuable industrial feedstock. Complete conversion of MgF 2 is found at 1,000 C and a ratio of 40 moles of H 2 O per 1 mole of MgF 2 . For CaF 2 , temperatures as high as 1,400 C are required for complete conversion at a corresponding mole ratio of 40 moles of H 2 O per 1 mole of CaF 2 . The authors discuss the presence of minor chemical constituents as well as the stability of various potential container materials for the pyrohydrolysis reactions at elevated temperatures. CaF 2 and MgF 2 slags are available as wastes at former uranium production facilities within the Department of Energy Complex and other facilities regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Recovery of HF from these wastes is an example of environmental remediation at such facilities

  13. Corrosion and hydrogen absorption of commercially pure zirconium in acid fluoride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Ken’ichi; Yamada, Daisuke; Sakai, Jun’ichi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Zirconium corrodes and absorbs hydrogen in acid fluoride solutions. •Hydrogen thermal desorption is observed at 300–700 °C. •The resistance to hydrogen absorption of zirconium is higher than that of titanium. -- Abstract: The corrosion and hydrogen absorption of commercially pure zirconium have been investigated in acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) solutions. Upon immersion in 2.0% APF solution of pH 5.0 at 25 °C, a granular corrosion product (Na 3 ZrF 7 ) deposits over the entire side surface of the specimen, thereby inhibiting further corrosion. In 0.2% APF solution, marked corrosion is observed from the early stage of immersion; no deposition of the corrosion product is observed by scanning electron microscopy. A substantial amount of hydrogen absorption is confirmed in both APF solutions by hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. The amount of absorbed hydrogen of the specimen immersed in the 2.0% APF solution is smaller than that in the 0.2% APF solution in the early stage of immersion. The hydrogen absorption behavior is not always consistent with the corrosion behavior. Hydrogen thermal desorption occurs in the temperature range of 300–700 °C for the specimen without the corrosion product. Under the same immersion conditions, the amount of absorbed hydrogen in commercially pure zirconium is smaller than that in commercially pure titanium as reported previously. The present results suggest that commercially pure zirconium, compared with commercially pure titanium, is highly resistant to hydrogen absorption, although corrosion occurs in fluoride solutions

  14. Hydrogen gas sample environment for TOSCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibble, Mark G; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J; Goodway, Chris M; Evans, Beth E; Kirichek, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    The idea of using hydrogen as a fuel has gained immense popularity over many years. Hydrogen is abundant, can be produced from renewable resources and is not a greenhouse gas. However development of hydrogen based technology is impossible without understanding of physical and chemical processes that involve hydrogen sometime in extreme conditions such as high pressure or low and high temperatures. Neutron spectroscopy allows measurement of a hydrogen atom motion in variety of samples. Here we describe and discuss a sample environment kit developed for hydrogen gas experiment in a broad range of pressure up to 7 kbar and temperatures from 4 K to 473 K. We also describe para-hydrogen rig which produces para-hydrogen gas required for studying the rotational line of molecular hydrogen

  15. The Effects of Water Spray Cooling in Conjunction with Halogenated Extinguishants on Hydrogen Fluoride Generation and Decay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burch, Ian

    2007-01-01

    The halogenated extinguishants Halon 1301, HFC-227ea (FM200) and NAF-S-III used within Royal Australian Navy vessels for total flooding fire suppression applications have hydrogen fluoride (HF) toxicity concerns...

  16. Environmental monitoring of fluoride emissions using precipitation, dust, plant and soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzaring, J.; Hrenn, H.; Schumm, C.; Klumpp, A.; Fangmeier, A.

    2006-01-01

    A pollution gradient was observed in precipitation, plants and soils sampled at different locations around a fluoride producing chemical plant in Germany. In all samples the influence of emissions was discernible up to a distance of 500 m from the plant. However, fluoride concentrations in plant bioindicators (leaves of birch and black berry) and in bulk precipitation showed a more pronounced relationship with the distance from the source than fluoride concentrations in soil. Vegetables sampled in the vicinity of the plant also had elevated concentrations of fluoride, but only the consumption of larger quantities of this material would lead to exceedances of recommended daily F-intake. The present study did not indicate the existence of low phytotoxicity thresholds for fluoride in the plant species used in the study. Even at very high fluoride concentrations in leaf tissue (963 ppm) plants did not show injury due to HF. Dust sampling downwind of the chemical plant confirmed that particulate fluoride was of minor importance in the study area. - A pronounced pollution gradient was observed in precipitation, plants and soils sampled at different locations around a fluoride emitting chemical plant in Germany

  17. Calculation of the electronic structure and contact hyperfine parameters of interstitial hydrogen in alkaline - earth fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.E.M.C. de.

    1976-01-01

    The electronic structure of the interstitial hydrogen atom in alkaline-earth fluorides has been studied using the self-consistent-field multiple-scattering Xα method. In the calculations a cluster constituted by the hydrogen atom and its first anion and cation neighbors has been used. The contact parameters with the proton and the fluorine nuclei have been evaluated. The agreement obtained with the experimental results is in general good and indicates that this method is also appropriate to study defects in ionic crystals. (author) [pt

  18. Catalase and sodium fluoride mediated rehabilitation of enamel bleached with 37% hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching agents bring about a range of unwanted changes in the physical structure of enamel which needs to be restored qualitatively and timely. Catalase being an antioxidant ensures the effective removal of free radicals and improvement in fluoride mediated remineralization from the enamel microstructure which if retained may harm the integrity and affect the hardness of enamel. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted incisors were sectioned to 6 slabs which were divided into 5 groups: Group A, control; Group B, treatment with 37% hydrogen peroxide (HP; Group C, treatment with 37% HP and catalase, Group D, treatment with 37% HP and 5% sodium fluoride application, Group E, treatment with 37% HP followed by catalase and 5% sodium fluoride. Scanning electron microscope and microhardness analysis were done for all slabs. One-way ANOVA test was applied among different groups. Results: Vicker′s microhardness number (VHN of Group B and C was significantly lower. No significant difference between VHN of Group B and C. VHN of Group D was significantly higher than Group A, B, and C; but significantly lower than Group E. VHN of Group E was significantly higher than any other experimental group. One-way ANOVA revealed a highly significant P value (P = 0.0001 and so Tukey′s post-hoc Test for the group comparisons was employed. Conclusion: Subsequent treatment of bleached enamel with catalase and fluoride varnish separately results in repairing and significantly increasing the microhardness.

  19. A rapid method for the determination on fluoride in geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josephson, M.; Cook, E.B.T.; Dixon, K.

    1977-01-01

    An account is given of a rapid procedure for the determination by use of the specific-ion electrode of fluoride in geological samples. The sample is fused with sodium hydroxide in a nickel crucible in a muffle furnace. The melt is leached with water, a buffer solution of ammonium citrate is added, and the fluoride activity is measured with a specific-ion electrode. All operations are carried out in the crucible, making possible approximately 100 determinations a day. The precision of the method is approximately 10 per cent at a fluoride concentration of 500 p.p.m., which is acceptable for geological-survey work [af

  20. Detailed kinetic and heat transport model for the hydrolysis of lignocellulose by anhydrous hydrogen fluoride vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rorrer, G.L.; Mohring, W.R.; Lamport, D.T.A.; Hawley, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Anhydrous Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) vapor at ambient conditions efficiently and rapidly hydrolyzed lignocellulose to glucose and lignin. The unsteady-state reaction of HF vapor with a single lignocellulose chip was mathematically modeled under conditions where external and internal mass-transfer resistances were minimized. The model incorporated physical adsorption of HF vapor onto the lignocellulosic matrix and solvolysis of cellulose to glucosyl fluoride by adsorbed HF into the differential material and energy balance expressions. Model predictions for the temperature distribution and global glucose yield in the HF-reacting lignocellulose chip as a function of reaction time and HF vapor stream temperature agreed reasonably with the complimentary experimental data. The model correctly predicted that even when mass-transfer resistances for the reaction of HF vapor with a single lignocellulose chip are minimized, external and internal heat-transfer resistances are still significant.

  1. Resistance of HEPA filter separator materials to humid air--hydrogen fluoride--fluorine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, C.W.; Petit, G.S.; Woodfin, S.B.

    1977-01-01

    The U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) is interested in the development of a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter that is resistant to such corrosive reagents as hydrogen fluoride (HF) and fluorine (F 2 ) in air environments of normal relative humidity (about 50% RH). Several types of separator materials are used in the fabrication of commercial filters. The basic types of separator materials are asbestos, Kraft paper, plastic, and aluminum. At the request of the ERDA Division of Operational Safety, the different types of separator materials have been evaluated for their resistance to corrosive attack by HF and F 2 . The separator materials were dynamically tested in the 4-stage multiunit tester located in the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant laboratories. This is the system previously used in the evaluation of the Herty Foundation filter paper samples. Concurrent with the testing of filter media for its resistance to HF and F 2 , another component of the completed filter, the separator, was tested. All samples were exposed to a constant air flow (50% RH) of 32 liters/min, at 100 0 F, containing 900 ppM HF and 300 ppM F 2 . Exposure periods varied from 2 to 1000 h; however, the longer exposures were made only on the stronger candidates. Test results show the plastic and aluminum separator materials to be superior to the other types in resistance to HF and F 2 . The asbestos separators disintegrated after a relatively short exposure time; the Kraft paper types were the next weakest. The Clear Plastic S was the best performer of the plastics tested

  2. Accumulation of fluoride by plants and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njenga, L.W.; Kariuki, D.N.

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride in plant and vegetable samples has been determined using ion selective electrode. The analysis was carried out after ashing the sample on an open flame, adding perchloric acid and allowing the hydrogen fluoride to diffuse into sodium hydroxide layer.The results obtained show that kale and pumpkins can accumulate more than ten times their normal values of fluoride while plants were found to accumulate upto 100μg/g fluoride when exposed to highlevels of fluoride in water or soil. (author)

  3. Measurement of the deuterium concentration in water samples using a CW chemical deuterium fluoride laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trautmann, M.

    1979-10-01

    In this study a new method for the determination of the deuterium content in water samples is described. The absorption of the radiation of a CW deuterium fluoride laser by the isotope HDO in the water vapor of the sample is measured by means of an optoacoustic detector (spectrophone). Thereby advantage is taken of the fact that H 2 O hardly absorbs the laser radiation and that D 2 O only exists in negligible concentrations. The isotope ratio of hydrogen can be calculated from the measured relative concentration of HDO. In the course of this investigation the relative absorption cross sections of HDO for the different laser lines were determined. It was thereby established that there exists a very good coincidence of an HDO absorption line with the 2P2 laser line. Using a very sensitive nonresonant spectrophone the relative concentration of HDO in natural water samples could be determined with an accuracy of about 10%. The experiments also demonstrated that with appropriate improvements made to the apparatus and using a second spectrophone as a reference it should be possible to increase this accuracy to 0,1%. (orig.)

  4. Effects of hydrogen fluoride and wounding on respiratory enzymes in soybean leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C J; Miller, G W; Welkie, G W

    1966-01-01

    Soybeans (Glycine max, merr, Var. Hawkeye) were cultured in Hoagland's solution and fumigated with hydrogen fluoride (ca. 100 ppb). After 24, 96 and 144 hr of fumigation, the enzyme activities of cytochrome oxidase, peroxidase, catalase, polyphenol oxidase, ascorbic acid oxidase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were assayed in leaves from fumigated and control plants. The total oxygen uptake after each time of treatment was measured. The effect of mechanically wounding the tissue on the above enzymes was determined by rubbing with carborundum. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity from fumigated leaves showed an average increase of 5 to 22 times that of the control. Cytochrome oxidase, peroxidase and catalase activities were markedly stimulated by fluoride fumigation. Polyphenol oxidase activity was suppressed throughout the fumigation period. Ascorbic acid oxidase was stimulated at the initial state, then showed a steady decrease in activity. In vitro tests revealed that ascorbic acid oxidase and peroxidase were very sensitive to fluoride ions. Polyphenol oxidase was only slightly inhibited by 10/sup -2/M KF solution. Cytochrome oxidase and catalase were not affected by KF up to 10/sup -2/M. Total respiration throughout the treatment period showed an accelerated rate. All enzymes studied were stimulated by wounding. The effect of HF on respiration and specific enzymes is discussed in terms of direct effects and injury. 48 references, 8 tables.

  5. Ionic liquid and solid HF equivalent amine-poly(hydrogen fluoride) complexes effecting efficient environmentally friendly isobutane-isobutylene alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, George A; Mathew, Thomas; Goeppert, Alain; Török, Béla; Bucsi, Imre; Li, Xing-Ya; Wang, Qi; Marinez, Eric R; Batamack, Patrice; Aniszfeld, Robert; Prakash, G K Surya

    2005-04-27

    Isoparaffin-olefin alkylation was investigated using liquid as well as solid onium poly(hydrogen fluoride) catalysts. These new immobilized anhydrous HF catalysts contain varied amines and nitrogen-containing polymers as complexing agents. The liquid poly(hydrogen fluoride) complexes of amines are typical ionic liquids, which are convenient media and serve as HF equivalent catalysts with decreased volatility for isoparaffin-olefin alkylation. Polymeric solid amine:poly(hydrogen fluoride) complexes are excellent solid HF equivalents for similar alkylation acid catalysis. Isobutane-isobutylene or 2-butene alkylation gave excellent yields of high octane alkylates (up to RON = 94). Apart from their excellent catalytic performance, the new catalyst systems significantly reduce environmental hazards due to the low volatility of complexed HF. They represent a new, "green" class of catalyst systems for alkylation reactions, maintaining activity of HF while minimizing its environmental hazards.

  6. HERSCHEL/HIFI OBSERVATIONS OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE TOWARD SAGITTARIUS B2(M)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monje, R. R.; Emprechtinger, M.; Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Bergin, E. A.; Bell, T. A.; Neufeld, D. A.; Sonnentrucker, P.

    2011-01-01

    Herschel/HIFI observations have revealed the presence of widespread absorption by hydrogen fluoride (HF) J = 1-0 rotational transition, toward a number of Galactic sources. We present observations of HF J = 1-0 toward the high-mass star-forming region Sagittarius B2(M). The spectrum obtained shows a complex pattern of absorption, with numerous features covering a wide range of local standard of rest velocities (-130 to 100 km -1 ). An analysis of this absorption yields HF abundances relative to H 2 of ∼1.3 x 10 -8 , in most velocity intervals. This result is in good agreement with estimates from chemical models, which predict that HF should be the main reservoir of gas-phase fluorine under a wide variety of interstellar conditions. Interestingly, we also find velocity intervals in which the HF spectrum shows strong absorption features that are not present, or are very weak, in spectra of other molecules, such as 13 CO (1-0) and CS (2-1). HF absorption reveals components of diffuse clouds with small extinction that can be studied for the first time. Another interesting observation is that water is significantly more abundant than hydrogen fluoride over a wide range of velocities toward Sagittarius B2(M), in contrast to the remarkably constant H 2 O/HF abundance ratio with average value close to unity measured toward other Galactic sources.

  7. Formation of H a - hydrogen centers upon additive coloration of alkaline-earth fluoride crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzhabov, E. A.; Egranov, A. V.; Shendrik, R. Yu.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanism of coloration of alkaline-earth fluoride crystals CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2 in calcium vapors in an autoclave with a cold zone is studied. It was found that the pressure in the autoclave upon constant evacuation by a vacuum pump within the temperature range of 500-800°C increases due to evaporation of metal calcium. In addition to the optical-absorption bands of color centers in the additively colored undoped crystals or to the bands of divalent ions in the crystals doped with rare-earth Sm, Yb, and Tm elements, there appear intense bands in the vacuum ultraviolet region at 7.7, 7.0, and 6.025 eV in CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2, respectively. These bands belong to the Ha - hydrogen centers. The formation of hydrogen centers is also confirmed by the appearance of the EPR signal of interstitial hydrogen atoms after X-ray irradiation of the additively colored crystals. Grinding of the outer edges of the colored crystals leads to a decrease in the hydrogen absorption-band intensity with depth to complete disappearance. The rate of hydrogen penetration inside the crystal is lower than the corresponding rate of color centers (anion vacancies) by a factor of tens. The visible color density of the outer regions of the hydrogen-containing crystals is several times lower than that of the inner region due to the competition between the color centers and hydrogen centers.

  8. A Comparison of Fluoride Uptake by Sound Enamel Following Application of Sodium Fluoride Mouthrinses and APF Gels Produced in Iran with Standardized Foreign Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kowsari

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this investigation is to compare the extent of fluoride uptake by sound enamel following application of two commercial mouthrinses containing sodium fluoride (0.2% and a topical gel containing APF (1.23% produced in Iran with those of foreign standardized ones. Sixty extracted premolars were used. Each tooth was divided into two lingual and buccal halves, one half as control, the other one as experimental. Enamel biopsy technique (two- step acid etching was used to determine the concentration of fluoride and calcium in each sample. For data comparison and fluoride uptake estimation, the depths of layers with the use of linear regression analysis were standardized to 25 and 50um. The analysis showed that in Iranian mouthrinse no. 1, there is linear correlation between fluoride concentration and enamel depth, in both control and experimental group at the first and second layers, while, in other groups, this correlation was observed just at the first layer (superficial enamel layer. The greatest fluoride uptake was seen at Iranian mouthrinse no.2 and the least was seen at foreign mouthrinse no. 3. From among two APF gels, the greatest uptake was observed at gel no. 1 (Iranian. The results showed that all three Iranian products increase fluoride content of enamel, moreover the level of fluoride uptake, while applying Iranian products, in comparison with foreign ones, shows considerable increase.

  9. Hydrogen fluoride effects on local mung bean and maize cereal crops from peri-urban brick kilns in south asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, M.N.; Ahmad, S.S.; Zia, A.; Iqbal, M.S.; Shah, H.; Mian, A.A.; Shah, R.U.

    2014-01-01

    Increased urbanisation throughout South Asia has increased the number and output of the brick kilns that typically surround major cities, but the environmental and health impacts of their atmospheric emissions are poorly understood in Pakistan. We report the negative effects of hydrogen fluoride

  10. Hydrogen fluoride (HF) substance flow analysis for safe and sustainable chemical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junbeum; Hwang, Yongwoo; Yoo, Mijin; Chen, Sha; Lee, Ik-Mo

    2017-11-01

    In this study, the chemical substance flow of hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, HF) in domestic chemical industries in 2014 was analyzed in order to provide a basic material and information for the establishment of organized management system to ensure safety during HF applications. A total of 44,751 tons of HF was made by four domestic companies (in 2014); import amount was 95,984 tons in 2014 while 21,579 tons of HF was imported in 2005. The export amount of HF was 2180 tons, of which 2074 ton (China, 1422 tons, U.S. 524 tons, and Malaysia, 128 tons) was exported for the manufacturing of semiconductors. Based on the export and import amounts, it can be inferred that HF was used for manufacturing semiconductors. The industries applications of 161,123 tons of HF were as follows: manufacturing of basic inorganic chemical substance (27,937 tons), manufacturing of other chemical products such as detergents (28,208 tons), manufacturing of flat display (24,896 tons), and manufacturing of glass container package (22,002 tons). In this study, an analysis of the chemical substance flow showed that HF was mainly used in the semiconductor industry as well as glass container manufacturing. Combined with other risk management tools and approaches in the chemical industry, the chemical substance flow analysis (CSFA) can be a useful tool and method for assessment and management. The current CSFA results provide useful information for policy making in the chemical industry and national systems. Graphical abstract Hydrogen fluoride chemical substance flows in 2014 in South Korea.

  11. Absorption, distribution and excretion of inhaled hydrogen fluoride in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Rats were subjected to whole body HF exposure for 6 hrs or to nose-only HF exposure for 1 hr. Total and/or ionic fluoride concentrations in selected tissues were determined at various times following exposure. In rats sacrificed 6 hrs after whole body exposure, dose-dependent increases in lung, plasma, and kidney total and ionic fluoride concentration occurred. Rats excreted more fluoride in the urine after whole body exposure than could be explained by the amount of HF inhaled. Considerable evidence suggests that airborne HF deposits on fur and is then ingested due to preening activity. Urinary fluoride excretion was increased by nose-only exposure. The urinary fluoride excretion accounted for approximately twice the fluoride estimated to be inhaled during exposure. Tissue fluoride concentrations were elevated immediately after nose-only exposure. Fluoride concentrations in lung and kidney returned to control levels within 12 hrs. Plasma fluoride concentration was slightly elevated 24 hrs after the start of the 1 hr exposure but was at control levels at 96 hrs. Immediately following nose-only exposure, lung ionic fluoride concentrations were less than plasma ionic fluoride concentrations suggesting that the fluoride in the lung had reached that site via plasma transport rather than by inhalation. A dose-dependent increase in plasma ionic fluoride concentration occurred after upper respiratory tract HF exposure providing strong evidence that fluoride is absorbed systemically from that site. The plasma ionic fluoride concentration after upper respiratory tract exposure was of sufficient magnitude to account for the plasma fluoride concentrations observed in intact nose-only exposed rats. (ERB)

  12. Time-resolved output spectrum from a hydrogen fluoride laser using mixtures of SF6 and HI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, N.R.

    1975-01-01

    The time-resolved spectrum from a transverse-discharge hydrogen fluoride (HF) laser using a mixture of SF 6 and HI is reported. Because this spectrum matches that from a high-pressure H 2 -F 2 laser, and because the SF 6 -HI mixture is chemically stable, this laser should be a suitable and convenient source for probing H 2 -F 2 amplifiers

  13. Hydrogen fluoride damage to vegetation from peri-urban brick kilns in Asia: A growing but unrecognised problem?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Nauman; Berg, Leon J.L. van den; Shah, Hamid Ullah; Masood, Tariq; Büker, Patrick; Emberson, Lisa; Ashmore, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The rapid urbanisation of many cities in south and south-east Asia has increased the demand for bricks, which are typically supplied from brick kilns in peri-urban areas. We report visible foliar damage to mango, apricot and plum trees in the vicinity of traditional Bull’s Trench brick kilns in Peshawar, Pakistan. Visible injury symptoms, hydrogen fluoride concentrations in air, and foliar fluoride concentrations were all greater in the vicinity of brick kilns than at more distant sites, indicating that fluoride emissions from brick kilns were the main cause of damage. Interviews with local farmers established the significant impact of this damage on their livelihoods. Since poorly regulated brick kilns are often found close to important peri-urban agricultural areas, we suggest that this may be a growing but unrecognised environmental problem in regions of Asia where emission control in brick kilns has not been improved. - Highlights: ► Demand for bricks is increasing in many parts of Asia. ► Fluoride emissions from brick kilns may pose a threat to peri-urban agriculture. ► We found extensive injury to fruit orchards close to brick kilns in Peshawar. ► Local farmers suffered large economic losses but did not identify brick kilns as a cause of this. ► The extent of crop damage from brick kilns with poor emission control in the region may not be fully recognised. - Hydrogen fluoride emissions from brick kilns may cause extensive but unrecognised damage to peri-urban crops in Asia.

  14. Statistical analysis of fluoride levels in human urine and drinking water samples of fluorinated area of punjab (pakistan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, M.; Zaman, W.U.; Rehman, R.; Ahmad, B.; Ahmad, M.; Ali, S.; Murtaza, S

    2013-01-01

    Increasing fluoride levels in drinking water of fluorinated areas of world leading to fluorosis. For bio-monitoring of fluorosis patients, fluoride levels were determined in drinking water and human urine samples of different individuals having dental fluorosis and bony deformities from fluorotic area of Punjab (Sham Ki Bhatiyan, Pakistan) and then compared with reference samples of non fluorotic area (Queens Road, Lahore, Pakistan) using ion selective electrode methodology. Fluoride levels in fluorinated area differ significantly from control group (p < 0.05). In drinking water and human urine samples, fluoride levels in fluorinated areas were: 136.192 +- 67.836 and 94.484 +- 36.572 micro molL/sup -1/ respectively, whereas in control samples, fluoride concentrations were: 19.306 +- 2.109 and 47.154 +- 22.685 micro molL/sup -1/ in water and urine samples correspondingly. Pearson's correlation data pointed out the fact that that human urine and water fluoride concentrations have a significant positive dose response relationship with the prevalence of dental and skeletal fluorosis in fluorotic areas having higher fluoride levels in drinking water. (author)

  15. Toxicity levels to humans during acute exposure to hydrogen fluoride - An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halton, D M

    1995-09-01

    In March 1993, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) commissioned and update of a 1984 review on the acute toxicity of hydrogen fluoride (HF). The study places particular emphasis on the effects of inhalation of gaseous HF and is divided into two main parts: a literature review and a lethal concentration (LC) estimation. The literature review summarizes data under four categories: animal studies, controlled human studies, community exposure, and industrial exposure. Data in these areas were critically reviewed for their relevance to lethal concentrations at LC{sub LO}, LC{sub 10} and LC{sub 50} levels that were derived in the 1984 report. In the last ten years, only one relevant animal study has been published. No new controlled human studies were found but a community exposure incident was reported. There were three new industrial/accidental exposures reported since 1984. Evaluation of new data does not change the lethal concentration estimates made in the 1984 report, but does indicate the absence of appropriate models to estimate the lethality of irritant and corrosive gases. In the last 10 years, much literature on the evaluation of major hazards has been published and suggests that such assessments are of growing political, economic and social importance. Numerous articles have been published on the acute toxicity of HF from skin contact and chronic toxicity from repeated airborne exposure. These publications offer important insights into the nature of HF toxicity. Several avenues of investigative research are suggested. (author). 55 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Toxicity levels to humans during acute exposure to hydrogen fluoride - An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halton, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    In March 1993, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) commissioned and update of a 1984 review on the acute toxicity of hydrogen fluoride (HF). The study places particular emphasis on the effects of inhalation of gaseous HF and is divided into two main parts: a literature review and a lethal concentration (LC) estimation. The literature review summarizes data under four categories: animal studies, controlled human studies, community exposure, and industrial exposure. Data in these areas were critically reviewed for their relevance to lethal concentrations at LC LO , LC 10 and LC 50 levels that were derived in the 1984 report. In the last ten years, only one relevant animal study has been published. No new controlled human studies were found but a community exposure incident was reported. There were three new industrial/accidental exposures reported since 1984. Evaluation of new data does not change the lethal concentration estimates made in the 1984 report, but does indicate the absence of appropriate models to estimate the lethality of irritant and corrosive gases. In the last 10 years, much literature on the evaluation of major hazards has been published and suggests that such assessments are of growing political, economic and social importance. Numerous articles have been published on the acute toxicity of HF from skin contact and chronic toxicity from repeated airborne exposure. These publications offer important insights into the nature of HF toxicity. Several avenues of investigative research are suggested. (author). 55 refs., 4 tabs

  17. Fluoride concentrations in soils, vegetation samples and soil fauna in the direct vicinity of a pollution source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.; Ottow, J.C.G.; Breimer, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Fluoride analyses CF t = total F; F w = water soluble F and F HCI HCI-extractable F) of different soils, vegetation samples and soil fauna (Helix pomatia, Lumbricus spp., arthropodes) in a locally polluted area (for nearly 65 years) clearly revealed an F-accumulation in top soil, vegetation and animals. Based on 1N HCI-extractable fluoride, two contamination zones around the emitting industry could be identified. In the calcareous soils, leaching of fluoride seems to be insignificant because of a strong immobilization as CaF 2 . A highly significant correlation between the F HCI content of soils and Lumbricus spp. (with and without gut content) or Helix pomatia shells was found. Fluoride concentrations in washed leaves of Hedera helix and in decaying grass reached levels of 306 and 997 μgF/g respectively. Saprophagous soil arthropods contained high fluoride levels, up to 732 μgF/g in Armadillidium vulgare. (orig.)

  18. Fluoride analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C S

    1963-01-01

    The methods and procedures for the detection and estimation of fluoride are varied and numerous. The problems of sampling, contamination, and loss in sampling waters, plant and animal tissues and atmospheres are discussed, along with brief descriptors of methods most commonly used. Techniques for separating fluorides from matrixes are discussed, as well as gravimetric, calorimetric, and spectrophotometric analytical techniques.

  19. DFT study of the interaction between 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazole-5-one and hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Guoyong; Xu Lina; Hu Xingen; Li Xinhua

    2008-01-01

    Three fully optimized geometries of 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one-hydrogen fluoride (NTO-HF) complexes have been obtained with density functional theory (DFT) method at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level. The intermolecular interaction energy is calculated with zero point energy (ZPE) correction and basis set superposition error (BSSE) correction. The greatest corrected intermolecular interaction of the NTO-HF complexes is -34.155 kJ/mol. Electrons in complex systems transfer from NTO to HF. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis is performed to reveal the origin of the interaction. The strong hydrogen bonds contribute to the interaction energies dominantly. Frequency calculations are carried out on each optimized structure, and their IR spectra are discussed. Vibrational analysis show that there are large red-shifts for H-X (X = N and F) stretching vibrational frequencies in the NTO and hydrogen fluoride complexes. The changes of thermodynamic properties from the monomer to complexes with the temperature ranging from 200 K to 1500 K have been obtained using the statistical thermodynamic method. It is found that two of three NTO-HF complexes can be produced spontaneously from NTO and HF at room temperature

  20. DFT study of the interaction between 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazole-5-one and hydrogen fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Guoyong [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Xu Lina [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China)], E-mail: ahxulina@sohu.com; Hu Xingen; Li Xinhua [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2008-12-15

    Three fully optimized geometries of 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one-hydrogen fluoride (NTO-HF) complexes have been obtained with density functional theory (DFT) method at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level. The intermolecular interaction energy is calculated with zero point energy (ZPE) correction and basis set superposition error (BSSE) correction. The greatest corrected intermolecular interaction of the NTO-HF complexes is -34.155 kJ/mol. Electrons in complex systems transfer from NTO to HF. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis is performed to reveal the origin of the interaction. The strong hydrogen bonds contribute to the interaction energies dominantly. Frequency calculations are carried out on each optimized structure, and their IR spectra are discussed. Vibrational analysis show that there are large red-shifts for H-X (X = N and F) stretching vibrational frequencies in the NTO and hydrogen fluoride complexes. The changes of thermodynamic properties from the monomer to complexes with the temperature ranging from 200 K to 1500 K have been obtained using the statistical thermodynamic method. It is found that two of three NTO-HF complexes can be produced spontaneously from NTO and HF at room temperature.

  1. Friedel-Crafts reaction of benzyl fluorides: selective activation of C-F bonds as enabled by hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pier Alexandre; Benhassine, Yasmine; Desroches, Justine; Paquin, Jean-François

    2014-12-08

    A Friedel-Crafts benzylation of arenes with benzyl fluorides has been developed. The reaction produces 1,1-diaryl alkanes in good yield under mild conditions without the need for a transition metal or a strong Lewis acid. A mechanism involving activation of the C-F bond through hydrogen bonding is proposed. This mode of activation enables the selective reaction of benzylic C-F bonds in the presence of other benzylic leaving groups. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Effects of hydrogen fluoride fumigation of bean plants on the growth, development, and reproduction of the Mexican bean beetle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, L H; McCune, D C; Mancini, J F; van Leuken, P

    1973-01-01

    The growth and behavior of Mexican bean beetle populations on control and hydrogen fluoride-fumigated bean plants (P. vulgaris L.) were investigated to assess the effects of such fumigation on beetle growth, development and reproduction. Beetles that were cultured on HF-fumigated plants were generally lighter than controls, although the occurrence and magnitude of this effect depended upon stage of development, age, and sex of the adult beetle and the number of generations of culture on HF-fumigated plants. A consistently decreased mass of larvae cultured on HF-fumigated tissue pupated and enclosed three to six days later than controls, and the adults commenced reproductive activity with the same lag in time. Beetles cultured on the fumigated plants also contained greater amounts of fluoride than the controls, and the fluoride content of females was greater than that of males on both HF-fumigated and control plants. Beetles raised on fumigated plants laid fewer egg masses and fewer eggs per mass, although when the first generation was repeated at a later date there was no significant effect. Feeding activity was reduced in both larval and adult stages in beetles cultured on the fumigated plants, and adults showed less flight activity than controls. A difference in color of the elytra was also noted; beetles on HF-fumigated plants were paler than controls.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3  7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Crossett Hydrogen Sulfide Air Sampling Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of the EPA’s hydrogen sulfide air monitoring conducted along Georgia Pacific’s wastewater treatment system and in surrounding Crossett, AR, neighborhoods in 2017.

  5. Fluoride sample matrices and reaction cells — new capabilities for isotope measurements in accelerator mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliades J.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new techniques, which extend the range of elements that can be analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS, and which increase its isobar selection capabilities, have been recently introduced. The first consists of embedding the sample material in a fluoride matrix (e.g. PbF2, which facilitates the production, in the ion source, of fluoride molecular anions that include the isotope of interest. In addition to forming anions with large electron binding energies and thereby increasing the range of analysable elements, in many cases by selection of a molecular form with a particular number of fluorine atoms, some isobar discrimination can be obtained. The second technique, for the significant reduction of atomic isobar interferences, is used following mass selection of the rare isotope. It consists of the deceleration, cooling and reaction of the rare mass beam with a gas, selected so that unwanted isobars are greatly attenuated in comparison with the isotope of interest. Proof of principle measurements for the analysis of 36C1 and 41Ca have provided encouraging results and work is proceeding on the integration of these techniques in a new AMS system planned for installation in late 2012 at the University of Ottawa.

  6. Enabling nucleophilic substitution reactions of activated alkyl fluorides through hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pier Alexandre; Pomarole, Julien; Thérien, Marie-Ève; Benhassine, Yasmine; Beaulieu, Samuel; Legault, Claude Y; Paquin, Jean-François

    2013-05-03

    It was discovered that the presence of water as a cosolvent enables the reaction of activated alkyl fluorides for bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reactions. DFT calculations show that activation proceeds through stabilization of the transition structure by a stronger F···H2O interaction and diminishing C-F bond elongation, and not simple transition state electrostatic stabilization. Overall, the findings put forward a distinct strategy for C-F bond activation through H-bonding.

  7. A separation process for hydrogen fluoride from its mixtures with 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-chloroethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galland, J.M.; Perdriau, R.; Rouzies, D.

    1994-03-11

    When decanting the mixture of hydrogen fluoride (HF) and 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-chloroethane (F133a) at a temperature between -40 deg C and -10 deg C, a lower organic phase, poor in HF, and a superior phase, rich in HF, are obtained (the reaction may be activated with trichlorethylen); the superior phase can be directly recycled in the fluorination reactor or distilled in order to separate the HF-F133a azeotrope (the head), which is sent back to the decanter, and a quasi-pure HF (the ends). The lower phase distillation produces HF-F133a (head) and a mixture of F133a and trichlorethylen (ends); this mixture is then distilled and pure F133a is separated from trichlorethylen. 9 p., 2 fig.

  8. Energy-momentum spectroscopy of the outervalence 3 {sigma} and 1{pi} states of hydrogen fluoride: a reanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, R.; McCarthy, I.E.; Weigold, E.; Brunger, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    We highlight and examine in detail a discrepancy that exists between the results of various single-channel and multiparameter electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) studies into the outervalence states of hydrogen fluoride (HF). In an attempt to elucidate the nature of this problem and the disagreement that exists between the best available theoretical momentum distributions (MDs), as calculated in the plane-wave-impulse-approximation with wavefunctions at the near-Hartree-Fock limit, and the most accurate experimental MDs, we have adapted a method, originally applied to extract atomic orbital information from Compton profiles to our 3{sigma} and 1{pi} experimental MDs. In addition we have also applied this technique to the 2s and 2p orbitals of neon, which is isoelectronic with HF, with the ramifications of the results of this investigation to HF also being outlined. (authors). 17 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  9. A theoretical study of the hydrogen bonding between the vic-, cis- and trans-C 2H 2F 2 isomers and hydrogen fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Victor H.; da Silva, João Bosco P.; Ramos, Mozart N.

    2009-04-01

    MP2/6-31++G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) theoretical calculations have been employed to investigate the hydrogen bonding formation involving the vic-, cis- and trans-C 2H 2F 2 isomers and hydrogen fluoride. Our calculations have revealed for each isomer the preferential existence of two possible hydrogen-bonded complexes: a non-cyclic complex and a cyclic complex. For all the three isomers the binding energies for the non-cyclic and cyclic hydrogen complexes are essentially equal using both the MP2 and B3LYP calculations, being that the cyclic structure is slightly more stable. For instance, the binding energies including BSSE and ZPE corrections for the non-cyclic and cyclic structures of cis-C 2H 2F···HF are 8.7 and 9.0 kJ mol -1, respectively, using B3LYP calculations. The cyclic complex formation reduces the polarity, in contrast to what occurs with the non-cyclic complex. This result is more accentuated in vic-C 2H 2F 2···HF. In this latter, Δ μ(cyclic) is -3.07 D, whereas Δ μ(non-cyclic) is +1.92 D using B3LYP calculations. Their corresponding MP2 values are +0.44 D and -1.89 D, respectively. As expected, the complexation produces an H sbnd F stretching frequency downward shift, whereas its IR intensity is enhanced. On the other hand, the vibrational modes of the vic-, cis- and trans-C 2H 2F 2 isomers are little affected by complexation. The new vibrational modes due to hydrogen bonding formation show several interesting features, in particular the HF bending modes which are pure rotations in the free molecule.

  10. Metal-Free Catalytic Asymmetric Fluorination of Keto Esters Using a Combination of Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) and Oxidant: Experiment and Computation

    KAUST Repository

    Pluta, Roman

    2018-02-09

    A chiral iodoarene organocatalyst for the catalytic asymmetric fluorination has been developed. The catalyst was used in the asymmetric fluorination of carbonyl compounds, providing the products with a quaternary stereocenter with high enantioselectivities. Chiral hypervalent iodine difluoride intermediates were generated in situ by treatment of the catalyst with an oxidant and hydrogen fluoride as fluoride source. As such, the α-fluorination of a carbonyl compound was achieved with a nucleophilic fluorine source. A combined computational and experimental approach provided insight into the reaction mechanism and the origin of enantioselectivity.

  11. Metal-Free Catalytic Asymmetric Fluorination of Keto Esters Using a Combination of Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) and Oxidant: Experiment and Computation

    KAUST Repository

    Pluta, Roman; Krach, Patricia E.; Cavallo, Luigi; Falivene, Laura; Rueping, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    A chiral iodoarene organocatalyst for the catalytic asymmetric fluorination has been developed. The catalyst was used in the asymmetric fluorination of carbonyl compounds, providing the products with a quaternary stereocenter with high enantioselectivities. Chiral hypervalent iodine difluoride intermediates were generated in situ by treatment of the catalyst with an oxidant and hydrogen fluoride as fluoride source. As such, the α-fluorination of a carbonyl compound was achieved with a nucleophilic fluorine source. A combined computational and experimental approach provided insight into the reaction mechanism and the origin of enantioselectivity.

  12. Time and temperature affect glycolysis in blood samples regardless of fluoride-based preservatives: a potential underestimation of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Mary; Daly, Niamh; O'Kelly, Ruth; Turner, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    Background The inhibition of glycolysis prior to glucose measurement is an important consideration when interpreting glucose tolerance tests. This is particularly important in gestational diabetes mellitus where prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential. A study was planned to investigate the effect of preservatives and temperature on glycolysis. Methods Blood samples for glucose were obtained from consented females. Lithium heparin and fluoride-EDTA samples transported rapidly in ice slurry to the laboratory were analysed for glucose concentration and then held either in ice slurry or at room temperature for varying time intervals. Paired fluoride-citrate samples were received at room temperature and held at room temperature, with analysis at similar time intervals. Results No significant difference was noted between mean glucose concentrations when comparing different sample types received in ice slurry. The mean glucose concentrations decreased significantly for both sets of samples when held at room temperature (0.4 mmol/L) and in ice slurry (0.2 mmol/L). A review of patient glucose tolerance tests reported in our hospital indicated that 17.8% exceeded the recommended diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus. It was predicted that if the results of fasting samples were revised to reflect the effect of glycolysis at room temperature, the adjusted diagnostic rate could increase to 35.3%. Conclusion Preanalytical handling of blood samples for glucose analysis is vital. Fluoride-EDTA is an imperfect antiglycolytic, even when the samples are transported and analysed rapidly provides such optimal conditions. The use of fluoride-citrate tubes may offer a viable alternative in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus.

  13. Acetal Resins, Acrylic & Modacrylic Fibers, Carbon Black, Hydrogen Fluoride, Polycarbonate, Ethylene, Spandex & Cyanide Chemical Manufacturing: NESHAP for Source Categories, Generic Maximum Achievable Control Technology Standards (40 CFR 63, Subpart YY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the NESHAP for GMACT for acetal resins, hydrogen fluoride, polycarbonate, ethylene production and cyanide chemicals. Find the rule history information, federal register citations, legal authority, rule summary, and additional resources

  14. Rapid Sampling of Hydrogen Bond Networks for Computational Protein Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Jack B; Boyken, Scott E; Baker, David; Kuhlman, Brian

    2018-05-08

    Hydrogen bond networks play a critical role in determining the stability and specificity of biomolecular complexes, and the ability to design such networks is important for engineering novel structures, interactions, and enzymes. One key feature of hydrogen bond networks that makes them difficult to rationally engineer is that they are highly cooperative and are not energetically favorable until the hydrogen bonding potential has been satisfied for all buried polar groups in the network. Existing computational methods for protein design are ill-equipped for creating these highly cooperative networks because they rely on energy functions and sampling strategies that are focused on pairwise interactions. To enable the design of complex hydrogen bond networks, we have developed a new sampling protocol in the molecular modeling program Rosetta that explicitly searches for sets of amino acid mutations that can form self-contained hydrogen bond networks. For a given set of designable residues, the protocol often identifies many alternative sets of mutations/networks, and we show that it can readily be applied to large sets of residues at protein-protein interfaces or in the interior of proteins. The protocol builds on a recently developed method in Rosetta for designing hydrogen bond networks that has been experimentally validated for small symmetric systems but was not extensible to many larger protein structures and complexes. The sampling protocol we describe here not only recapitulates previously validated designs with performance improvements but also yields viable hydrogen bond networks for cases where the previous method fails, such as the design of large, asymmetric interfaces relevant to engineering protein-based therapeutics.

  15. Fluoridated Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Fluoridated Water On This Page What is fluoride, and where is it found? What is water fluoridation? When did water fluoridation begin in the ...

  16. Comparison of concentrations of drugs between blood samples with and without fluoride additive-important findings for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedfeld, Christopher; Krueger, Julia; Skopp, Gisela; Musshoff, Frank

    2018-02-17

    Fluoride is a common stabilizing agent in forensic toxicology to avoid the frequent problem of degradation of drugs in blood samples especially described for cocaine. In cases only samples with addition of fluoride are available, it is a crucial question if also concentrations of common drugs other than cocaine (amphetamines, opiates and cannabinoids) are affected by fluoride. So far, there are only rare literature data available on discrepant results especially for Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In this study, comparative analysis of positive tested paired routine plasma/serum samples (n = 375), collected at the same time point (one device with and one without fluoride), was carried out with special focus on cannabinoids. Samples were measured with validated routine liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods for THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (THC-OH), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, morphine, codeine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine, and results were statistically evaluated. Beside the expected stabilization effect on cocaine and the consequently reduced concentration of ecgonine methyl ester in fluoride samples, benzoylecgonine was elevated compared to respective samples without fluoride. Most importantly, new findings were significantly reduced mean concentrations of THC (- 17%), THC-OH (- 17%), and THC-COOH (- 22%) in fluoride samples. Mean amphetamine concentration was significantly higher in samples with the additive (+ 6%). For the other amphetamine type of drugs as well as for morphine and codeine, no significant differences could be seen. Whenever specified thresholds have been set, such as in most European countries, the use of different blood sample systems may result in a motorist being differently charged or prosecuted. The findings will support forensic toxicologists at the

  17. Interface passivation and trap reduction via hydrogen fluoride for molybdenum disulfide on silicon oxide back-gate transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaoqiao; San Yip, Pak; Tang, Chak Wah; Lau, Kei May; Li, Qiang

    2018-04-01

    Layered semiconductor molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has recently emerged as a promising material for flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices because of its finite bandgap and high degree of gate control. Here, we report a hydrogen fluoride (HF) passivation technique for improving the carrier mobility and interface quality of chemical vapor deposited monolayer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate. After passivation, the fabricated MoS2 back-gate transistors demonstrate a more than double improvement in average electron mobility, a reduced gate hysteresis gap of 3 V, and a low interface trapped charge density of ˜5.8 × 1011 cm-2. The improvements are attributed to the satisfied interface dangling bonds, thus a reduction of interface trap states and trapped charges. Surface x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and first-principles simulation were performed to verify the HF passivation effect. The results here highlight the necessity of a MoS2/dielectric passivation strategy and provides a viable route for enhancing the performance of MoS2 nano-electronic devices.

  18. Trapping and stabilization of hydrogen atoms in intracrystalline voids. Defected calcium fluorides and Y zeolite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iton, L.E.; Turkevich, J.

    1978-01-01

    Using EPR spectroscopy, it has been established that H. atoms are absorbed from the gas phase when CaF 2 powder is exposed to H 2 gas in which a microwave discharge is sustained, being trapped in sites that provide unusual thermal stability. The disposition of the trapped atoms is determined by the occluded water content of the CaF 2 . For ultrapure CaF 2 , atoms are trapped in interstitial sites having A 0 = 1463 MHz; for increasing water content, two types of trapped H. atoms are discriminated, with preferential trapping in void sites (external to the regular fluorite lattice) that are associated with the H 2 O impurity. Characterization of these ''extra-lattice'' H. (and D.) atoms is presented, and their EPR parameters and behavior are discussed in detail. Failure to effect H.-D. atom exchange with D 2 gas suggests that atoms are not stabilized on the CaF 2 surface. H. atoms are trapped exclusively in ''extra-lattice'' sites when the water-containing CaF 2 is γ irradiated at 77 or 298 K indicating that the scission product atoms do not escape from the precursor void region into the regular lattice. It is concluded that the thermal stability of the ''extra-lattice'' atoms, like that of the interstitial atoms, is determined ultimately by the high activation energy for diffusion of the H. atom through the CaF 2 lattice. For comparison, results obtained from H. atoms trapped in γ-irradiated rare earth ion-exchanged Y zeolites are presented and discussed also; these ''surface'' trapped atoms do not exhibit great thermalstability. Distinctions in the H. atom formation mechanisms between the fluorides and the zeolites were deduced from the accompanying paramagnetic species formed. The intracavity electric fields in the Y zeolites have been estimated from the H. atoms hfsc contractions, and are found to be very high, about 1 V/A

  19. Results of EDS uranium samples characterization after hydrogen loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicea, D.; Dash, J.

    2003-01-01

    Several experiments of loading natural uranium foils with hydrogen were done. Electrolysis was used for loading hydrogen into uranium, because it is the most efficient way for H loading. The composition of the surface and near surface of the samples was determined using an Oxford EDS spectrometer on a Scanning Electron Microscope, manufactured by ISI. Images were taken with several magnifications up to 3.4KX. Results reveal that when low current density was used, the surface patterns changed from granules on the surface having a typical size of 2-4 microns to pits under the surface having a typical size under one micron. When high current density was used the surface changed and presented deep fissures. The deep fissures are the result of the mechanical strain induced by the lattice expansion caused by hydrogen absorption. The surface composition was determined before and after hydrogen loading. Uranium, thorium platinum and carbon concentration were measured. Experiments suggest that the amount of thorium increases on the uranium sample with the total electric charge transported through electrolyte. Carbon concentration was found to decrease on the surface of the sample as the total electric charge transported through electrolyte increased. Platinum is used in electrolysis experiment as anode primarily because it does not dissolve in electrolyte and therefore it is not electro-deposited on the cathode surface. The results of the platinum concentration measurements on the surface of the samples we loaded with hydrogen reveal that the platinum concentration increased dramatically as the current density increased and that created platinum spots on the cathode surface. Work is in progress on the subject. (authors)

  20. Focus on Fluoride and Fluorosis by Studying the Ground Water Quality in some Villages of Nalgonda, Nalgonda District, Andhra Pradesh

    OpenAIRE

    , Ishrath Aish; , B.L.P. Babu; , K. Sreenu

    2011-01-01

    The fluoride content of ground water was determined in eight villages of Shalsher vagu, Nalgonda district, Andhra Pradesh, where it is the only source for drinking water. Various water quality parameters such as Hydrogen potential, Electrical conductivity, Total dissolved solids, Total hardness, Total Alkalies and Fluoride were determined. The results indicated considerable variations among the analysed samples with respect to the above parameters the concentration of Fluoride in groundwater ...

  1. Effectivity of fluoride treatment on hydrogen and corrosion product generation in temporal implants for different magnesium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad, Javier; Arruebarrena, Gurutze; Marco, Iñigo; Hurtado, Iñaki; Sáenz de Argandoña, Eneko

    2013-12-01

    The increasing interest on magnesium alloys relies on their biocompatibility, bioabsorbility and especially on their mechanical properties. Due to these characteristics, magnesium alloys are becoming a promising solution to be used, as temporary implants. However, magnesium alloys must overcome their poor corrosion resistance. This article analyses the corrosion behaviour in phosphate-buffered saline solution of three commercial magnesium alloys (AZ31B, WE43 and ZM21) as well as the influence of fluoride treatment on their corrosion behaviour. It is shown that the corrosion rate of all the alloys is decreased by fluoride treatment. However, fluoride treatment affects each alloy differently.

  2. Hydrogen and fluorine in the surfaces of lunar samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leich, D.A.; Goldberg, R.H.; Burnett, D.S.; Tombrello, T.A.

    1974-04-01

    The resonant nuclear reaction F-19 (p, alpha gamma)O-16 was used to perform depth sensitive analyses for both fluorine and hydrogen in lunar samples. The resonance at 0.83 MeV (center-of-mass) in this reaction was applied to the measurement of the distribution of trapped solar protons in lunar samples to depths of about 1 / 2 micrometer. These results are interpreted in terms of terrestrial H 2 O surface contamination and a redistribution of the implanted solar H which has been influenced by heavy radiation damage in the surface region. Results are also presented for an experiment to test the penetration of H 2 O into laboratory glass samples which have been irradiated with O-16 to simulate the radiation damaged surfaces of lunar glasses. Fluorine determinations were performed in a 1 pm surface layer on lunar samples using the same F-19(alpha gamma)O-16 resonance. The data are discussed from the standpoint of lunar fluorine and Teflon contamination. (U.S.)

  3. Effects of microstructures on hydrogen induced cracking of electrochemically hydrogenated double notched tensile sample of 4340 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sk, Mobbassar Hassan, E-mail: Skmobba@qu.edu.qa [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Overfelt, Ruel A. [Materials Research and Education Center, Materials Engineer, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Abdullah, Aboubakr M. [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar)

    2016-04-06

    Quantitative fractographic characteristics of 4340 steel is demonstrated for a grain size range of 10−100 µm and hardness range of 41–52 HRC. Double-notched tensile samples were electrochemically charged in-situ with hydrogen in 0.5 m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+5 mg/l As{sub 2}O{sub 3} solution for 0–40 min charging time. Hydrogen induced fracture initiations were analyzed by novel metallographic investigation of the “unbroken” notch while the overall fractographic behaviors were examined by the scanning electron microscopic imaging of the fracture surfaces of the actually broken notch. Effect of hydrogen was predominantly manifested as intergranular fracture for the harder samples and quasi-cleavage fracture for the softer counterparts. 10–40 µm samples showed the maximum intensity of the hydrogen induced fracture features (intergranular and/or quasi-cleavage) close to the notch which gradually reduced with increasing distance from the notch. The largest grained samples (100 µm) however showed brittle behavior even in absence of hydrogen with similar intensity of percent fracture features at all distance from the notch, while presence of hydrogen intensified the overall percent brittle fractures with their intensities being highest close to the notch. Finally, the brittle fracture characteristics of the hydrogen embrittled samples were shown to be distinguishably different from that of the liquid nitrogen treated samples of same grain sizes and hardnesses.

  4. Geochemical characterization of fluoride in water, table salt, active sediment, rock and soil samples, and its possible relationship with the prevalence of enamel fluorosis in children in four municipalities of the department of Huila (Colombia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignon, Stefania; Opazo-Gutiérrez, Mario Omar; Velásquez-Riaño, Möritz; Orjuela-Osorio, Iván Rodrigo; Avila, Viviana; Martinez-Mier, Esperanza Angeles; González-Carrera, María Clara; Ruiz-Carrizosa, Jaime Alberto; Silva-Hermida, Blanca Cecilia

    2017-06-01

    Fluoride is an element that affects teeth and bone formation in animals and humans. Though the use of systemic fluoride is an evidence-based caries preventive measure, excessive ingestion can impair tooth development, mainly the mineralization of tooth enamel, leading to a condition known as enamel fluorosis. In this study, we investigated the geochemical characterization of fluoride in water, table salt, active sediment, rock and soil samples in four endemic enamel fluorosis sentinel municipalities of the department of Huila, Colombia (Pitalito, Altamira, El Agrado and Rivera), and its possible relationship with the prevalence of enamel fluorosis in children. The concentration of fluoride in drinking water, table salt, active sediment, rock, and soil was evaluated by means of an ion selective electrode and the geochemical analyses were performed using X-ray fluorescence. Geochemical analysis revealed fluoride concentrations under 15 mg/kg in active sediment, rock and soil samples, not indicative of a significant delivery to the watersheds studied. The concentration of fluoride in table salt was found to be under the inferior limit (less than 180 μg/g) established by the Colombian regulations. Likewise, exposure doses for fluoride water intake did not exceed the recommended total dose for all ages from 6 months. Although the evidence does not point out at rocks, soils, fluoride-bearing minerals, fluoridated salt and water, the hypothesis of these elements as responsible of the current prevalence of enamel fluorosis cannot be discarded since, aqueducts might have undergone significant changes overtime.

  5. Potentiometric chip-based multipumping flow system for the simultaneous determination of fluoride, chloride, pH, and redox potential in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chango, Gabriela; Palacio, Edwin; Cerdà, Víctor

    2018-08-15

    A simple potentiometric chip-based multipumping flow system (MPFS) has been developed for the simultaneous determination of fluoride, chloride, pH, and redox potential in water samples. The proposed system was developed by using a poly(methyl methacrylate) chip microfluidic-conductor using the advantages of flow techniques with potentiometric detection. For this purpose, an automatic system has been designed and built by optimizing the variables involved in the process, such as: pH, ionic strength, stirring and sample volume. This system was applied successfully to water samples getting a versatile system with an analysis frequency of 12 samples per hour. Good correlation between chloride and fluoride concentration measured with ISE and ionic chromatography technique suggests satisfactory reliability of the system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Application of the Fluoride Reactivation Process to the Detection of Sarin and Soman Nerve Agent Exposures in Biological Samples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, T. K; Capacio, B. R; Smith, J. R; Whalley, C. E; Korte, W. D

    2004-01-01

    The fluoride reactivation process was evaluated for measuring the level of sarin or soman nerve agents reactivated from substrates in plasma and tissue from in vivo exposed guinea pigs (Cava porcellus...

  7. A pyrolysis/gas chromatographic method for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, R. H.; Bustin, R.; Gibson, E. K.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples. The sample is heated under vacuum after which the evolved gases are separated by gas chromatography with a helium ionization detector. The system is calibrated by injecting known amounts of hydrogen, as determined manometrically. The method, which is rapid and reliable, was checked for a variety of lunar soils; the limit of detection is about 10 ng of hydrogen.

  8. No Calcium-Fluoride-Like Deposits Detected in Plaque Shortly after a Sodium Fluoride Mouthrinse

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, G.L.; Tenuta, L.M.A.; Schumacher, G.E.; Chow, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    Plaque ‘calcium-fluoride-like’ (CaF2-like) and fluoride deposits held by biological/bacterial calcium fluoride (Ca-F) bonds appear to be the source of cariostatic concentrations of fluoride in plaque fluid. The aim of this study was to quantify the amounts of plaque fluoride held in these reservoirs after a sodium fluoride rinse. 30 and 60 min after a 228 μg/g fluoride rinse, plaque samples were collected from 11 volunteers. Each sample was homogenized, split into 2 aliquots (aliquots 1 and 2...

  9. A method of estimating hydrogen in solid and liquid samples by means of neutron thermalisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.H.; Sanders, J.E.

    1967-06-01

    The count-rate of a cadmium-covered Pu239 fission chamber placed in a reactor neutron flux increases when a hydrogen-containing material is inserted due to the thermalisation of epicadmium neutrons. This effect forms the basis of a non-destructive method of estimating hydrogen in solid or liquid samples, and trial experiments to demonstrate the principles have been made. The sensitivity is such that hydrogen down to 10 p.p.m. in a typical metal should be detected. A useful feature of the method is its very low response to elements other than hydrogen. (author)

  10. Influence of sample geometry and microstructure on the hydrogen induced cracking characteristics under uniaxial load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laureys, A., E-mail: aurelie.laureys@ugent.be [Department of Materials, Textiles and Chemical Engineering, Ghent University (UGent), Tech Lane Ghent Science Park - Campus A, Technologie park 903, B-9052 Gent (Belgium); Depover, T., E-mail: tom.depover@ugent.be [Department of Materials, Textiles and Chemical Engineering, Ghent University (UGent), Tech Lane Ghent Science Park - Campus A, Technologie park 903, B-9052 Gent (Belgium); Petrov, R., E-mail: roumen.petrov@ugent.be [Department of Materials, Textiles and Chemical Engineering, Ghent University (UGent), Tech Lane Ghent Science Park - Campus A, Technologie park 903, B-9052 Gent (Belgium); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Verbeken, K., E-mail: kim.verbeken@ugent.be [Department of Materials, Textiles and Chemical Engineering, Ghent University (UGent), Tech Lane Ghent Science Park - Campus A, Technologie park 903, B-9052 Gent (Belgium)

    2017-04-06

    The present work evaluates hydrogen induced cracking in a TRIP (transformation induced plasticity) assisted steel and pure iron. The goal of this work is to understand the effect of the macroscopic stress distribution in the material on the hydrogen induced cracking phenomenon. Additionally, the effect of a complex multiphase microstructure on the characteristics of hydrogen induced cracking was investigated by comparing results for TRIP-assisted steel and pure iron as reference material. Tensile tests on notched and unnotched samples combined with in-situ electrochemical hydrogen charging were conducted. Tests were performed until the tensile strength was reached and until fracture. The resulting hydrogen induced cracks were studied by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Hydrogen induced cracks showed a typical S-shape and crack propagation was mainly transgranular, independently of the presence of a notch or the material's microstructure. This was also the case for the V-shaped secondary crack network and resulting stepped crack morphology characteristic for hydrogen induced damage. These observations indicate that the stress state surrounding the crack tip has a very large impact on the hydrogen induced cracking characteristics. The use of a notch or the presence of a different microstructure did not influence the overall hydrogen induced cracking features, but did change the kinetics of the hydrogen induced cracking process.

  11. Influence of sample geometry and microstructure on the hydrogen induced cracking characteristics under uniaxial load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laureys, A.; Depover, T.; Petrov, R.; Verbeken, K.

    2017-01-01

    The present work evaluates hydrogen induced cracking in a TRIP (transformation induced plasticity) assisted steel and pure iron. The goal of this work is to understand the effect of the macroscopic stress distribution in the material on the hydrogen induced cracking phenomenon. Additionally, the effect of a complex multiphase microstructure on the characteristics of hydrogen induced cracking was investigated by comparing results for TRIP-assisted steel and pure iron as reference material. Tensile tests on notched and unnotched samples combined with in-situ electrochemical hydrogen charging were conducted. Tests were performed until the tensile strength was reached and until fracture. The resulting hydrogen induced cracks were studied by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Hydrogen induced cracks showed a typical S-shape and crack propagation was mainly transgranular, independently of the presence of a notch or the material's microstructure. This was also the case for the V-shaped secondary crack network and resulting stepped crack morphology characteristic for hydrogen induced damage. These observations indicate that the stress state surrounding the crack tip has a very large impact on the hydrogen induced cracking characteristics. The use of a notch or the presence of a different microstructure did not influence the overall hydrogen induced cracking features, but did change the kinetics of the hydrogen induced cracking process.

  12. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed chemical processing systems at Building 9212, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is located within the Y-12 Plant on DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The proposed replacement system would be based upon modern design criteria and safety analyses. The replacement AHF supply and distribution system equipment would be located on the existing Dock 8/8A at Building 9212. Utilities would be extended to the dock to service the process equipment. The following process equipment modules would be prefabricated for installation at the modified dock: an AHF cylinder enclosure, an AHF supply manifold and vaporizer module, an AHF sump tank and transfer skid, and an AHF supply off-gas scrubber assembly module. The fluidized-bed reactor system would be constructed in an area adjacent to the existing system in Building 9212. The replacement equipment would consist of a new reduction fluidized-bed reactor, a hydrofluorination fluidized-bed reactor, and associated air emission control equipment. The no-action alternative, which is the continued operation of the existing AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems, was also evaluated

  13. Study of the behaviour of some heavy elements in solvents containing hydrogen fluoride; Etude du comportement de quelques elements lourds dans des solvants a base d'acide fluorhydrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarnero, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-01-01

    The anhydrous liquid mixtures: dinitrogen tetroxide-hydrogen fluoride and antimony pentafluoride-hydrogen fluoride were studied as solvents for heavy elements interesting nuclear energy: uranium, thorium, zirconium and for some of their compounds. For N{sub 2}O{sub 4}-HF mixtures, electric conductivity measurements and liquid phase infrared spectra were also obtained. Uranium and zirconium tetrafluoride are much more soluble in N{sub 2}O{sub 4}-HF mixtures than in pure hydrogen fluoride. Uranium dissolved in these mixtures is pentavalent. In SbF{sub 5}-HF mixtures, uranium dissolves with hydrogen evolution and becomes trivalent. The solid compound resulting from the dissolution is a fluoro-antimonate: U(SbF{sub 6}){sub 3}. (author) [French] On a etudie les melanges liquides anhydres: peroxyde d'azote-acide fluorhydrique et pentafluorure d'antimoine-acide fluorhydrique comme solvants d'elements lourds interessant l'energie nucleaire: uranium, thorium, zirconium et de quelques uns de leurs composes. Pour les melanges N{sub 2}O{sub 4}-HF on a egalement effectue des mesures de conductivite electrique, ainsi que des spectres d'absorption infrarouge en phase liquide. Le tetrafluorure d'uranium et le tetrafluorure de zirconium sont beaucoup plus solubles dans les melanges N{sub 2}O{sub 4}-HF que dans l'acide fluorhydrique. L'uranium dissous dans ces melanges est a l'etat pentavalent. Dans les melanges SbF{sub 5}-HF l'uranium se dissout avec degagement d'hydrogene et passe a l'etat trivalent. Le compose solide resultant de la dissolution est un fluoantimoniate: U(SbF{sub 6}){sub 3}. (auteur)

  14. Fluoridation Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... return on investment for community water fluoridation (including productivity losses) ranged from $4 in small communities of ... National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ...

  15. Hydrogen concentration determination in pressure tube samples using differential scanning calorimetry (dsc)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, R.; Mincu, M.

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are widely used as a structural material in nuclear reactors. It is known that zirconium based cladding alloys absorb hydrogen as a result of service in a pressurized water reactor. Hydrogen absorbed (during operation of the reactor) in the zirconium alloy, out of which the pressure tube is made, is one of the major factors determining the life time of the pressure tube. For monitoring the hydrides, samples of the pressure tube are periodically taken and analyzed. At normal reactor operating temperature, hydrogen has limited solubility in the zirconium lattice and precipitates out of solid solution as zirconium hydride when the solid solubility is exceeded. As a consequences material characterization of Zr-2.5Nb CANDU pressure tubes is required after manufacturing but also during the operation to assess its structural integrity and to predict its behavior until the next in-service inspection. Hydrogen and deuterium concentration determination is one of the most important parameters to be evaluated during the experimental tests. Hydrogen present in zirconium alloys has a strong effect of weakening. Following the zirconium-hydrogen reaction, the resulting zirconium hydride precipitates in the mass of material. Weakening of the material, due to the presence of 10 ppm of precipitated hydrogen significantly affects some of its properties. The concentration of hydrogen in a sample can be determined by several methods, one of them being the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The principle of the method consists in measuring the difference between the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a sample and a reference to a certain value. The experiments were made using a TA Instruments DSC Q2000 calorimeter. This paper contains experimental work for hydrogen concentration determination by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) method. Also, the reproducibility and accuracy of the method used at INR Pitesti are presented. (authors)

  16. Multi-saline sample distillation apparatus for hydrogen isotope analyses : design and accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Afifa Afifi

    1981-01-01

    A distillation apparatus for saline water samples was designed and tested. Six samples may be distilled simultaneously. The temperature was maintained at 400 C to ensure complete dehydration of the precipitating salts. Consequently, the error in the measured ratio of stable hydrogen isotopes resulting from incomplete dehydration of hydrated salts during distillation was eliminated. (USGS)

  17. Effects of fluorides on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazoe, F

    1975-11-01

    Fluorine compounds known to be air pollutants, such as hydrogen fluoride and silicon tetrachloride, are highly poisonous to plants even at ppm - ppb levels. As solid microparticles, acidic sodium fluoride and cryolite cause problems by adhering to plant leaves and absorbing into plant bodies. Plants are classified by their susceptibility to hydrogen fluoride: gladiolus, apricot, buckwheat, turnip and Vaccinium vitis-idaea are most susceptible showing slight injury at less than 5 ppb for 7-9 days; maize, pepper, and dahlia are fairly susceptible, followed by azalea, rose, lilac, and alfalfa, then by oak and tomato. Gladiolus is used as an indicator plant. The exposure factor for one species was known. The symptoms of plants exposed to gaseous fluorine compounds are described in detail at various concentrations. The causal mechanism of the injuries due to fluorine compounds is described in detail, with the method of determining the fluorine content of plant parts. 7 references.

  18. Retention and variability of hydrogen (H2) samples stored in plastic syringes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1987-01-01

    The utility of two brands of 20 ml plastic syringes for storage of hydrogen (H2) samples as obtained in H2 breath tests were studied. Plastipak syringes were found to be significantly better with regard to the stability of the H2 concentration and the variability between the H2 samples. Storage...... of the H2 samples in Plastipak syringes at 5 degrees C significantly improved the H2 retention, whereas refrigeration of H2 samples stored in Once syringes did not reduce H2 loss. Storage of H2 samples in refrigerated plastic syringes is efficient and reliable for several days if syringes with minimal...... sample variation are used....

  19. Scandium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnikov, P.; Nalin, M.; Messaddeq, Y.

    1997-01-01

    A new modification of scandium fluoride has been synthesised. The compound is deficient in fluorine, with the composition ScF 2.76 . It belongs to the tetragonal system, lattice parameters being a=3.792 and c=6.740 A and may be obtained at low temperatures by the decomposition of the precursor NH 4 ScF 4 . The reaction is topotactic, tetragonal parameters of the precursor are a=4.021 and c=6.744 A. Structural relationships with various fluorides and ammonium aminofluorides are discussed. This synthesis route with IR-assisted decomposition should be considered as a soft-chemistry approach. (orig.)

  20. Development of a new method for hydrogen isotope analysis of trace hydrocarbons in natural gas samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibin Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new method had been developed for the analysis of hydrogen isotopic composition of trace hydrocarbons in natural gas samples by using solid phase microextraction (SPME combined with gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS. In this study, the SPME technique had been initially introduced to achieve the enrichment of trace content of hydrocarbons with low abundance and coupled to GC/IRMS for hydrogen isotopic analysis. The main parameters, including the equilibration time, extraction temperature, and the fiber type, were systematically optimized. The results not only demonstrated that high extraction yield was true but also shows that the hydrogen isotopic fractionation was not observed during the extraction process, when the SPME device fitted with polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene/carbon molecular sieve (PDMS/DVB/CAR fiber. The applications of SPME-GC/IRMS method were evaluated by using natural gas samples collected from different sedimentary basins; the standard deviation (SD was better than 4‰ for reproducible measurements; and also, the hydrogen isotope values from C1 to C9 can be obtained with satisfying repeatability. The SPME-GC/IRMS method fitted with PDMS/DVB/CAR fiber is well suited for the preconcentration of trace hydrocarbons, and provides a reliable hydrogen isotopic analysis for trace hydrocarbons in natural gas samples.

  1. Alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lencova Erika

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The knowledge of background alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children is of utmost importance for introducing optimal and safe caries preventive measures for both individuals and communities. The aim of this study was to assess the daily fluoride intake analyzing duplicate samples of food and beverages. An attempt was made to calculate the daily intake of fluoride from food and swallowed toothpaste. Methods Daily alimentary fluoride intake was measured in a group of 36 children with an average age of 4.75 years and an average weight of 20.69 kg at baseline, by means of a double plate method. This was repeated after six months. Parents recorded their child's diet over 24 hours and collected duplicated portions of food and beverages received by children during this period. Pooled samples of food and beverages were weighed and solid food samples were homogenized. Fluoride was quantitatively extracted from solid food samples by a microdiffusion method using hexadecyldisiloxane and perchloric acid. The content of fluoride extracted from solid food samples, as well as fluoride in beverages, was measured potentiometrically by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results Average daily fluoride intake at baseline was 0.389 (SD 0.054 mg per day. Six months later it was 0.378 (SD 0.084 mg per day which represents 0.020 (SD 0.010 and 0.018 (SD 0.008 mg of fluoride respectively calculated per kg bw/day. When adding the values of unwanted fluoride intake from the toothpaste shown in the literature (0.17-1.21 mg per day the estimate of the total daily intake of fluoride amounted to 0.554-1.594 mg/day and recalculated to the child's body weight to 0.027-0.077 mg/kg bw/day. Conclusions In the children studied, observed daily fluoride intake reached the threshold for safe fluoride intake. When adding the potential fluoride intake from swallowed toothpaste, alimentary intake reached the optimum range for daily fluoride intake

  2. A hydrogen leak-tight, transparent cryogenic sample container for ultracold-neutron transmission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döge, Stefan; Hingerl, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    The improvement of the number of extractable ultracold neutrons (UCNs) from converters based on solid deuterium (sD2) crystals requires a good understanding of the UCN transport and how the crystal's morphology influences its transparency to the UCNs. Measurements of the UCN transmission through cryogenic liquids and solids of interest, such as hydrogen (H2) and deuterium (D2), require sample containers with thin, highly polished and optically transparent windows and a well defined sample thickness. One of the most difficult sealing problems is that of light gases like hydrogen and helium at low temperatures against high vacuum. Here we report on the design of a sample container with two 1 mm thin amorphous silica windows cold-welded to aluminum clamps using indium wire gaskets, in order to form a simple, reusable, and hydrogen-tight cryogenic seal. The container meets the above-mentioned requirements and withstands up to 2 bar hydrogen gas pressure against isolation vacuum in the range of 10-5 to 10-7 mbar at temperatures down to 4.5 K. Additionally, photographs of the crystallization process are shown and discussed.

  3. A hydrogen leak-tight, transparent cryogenic sample container for ultracold-neutron transmission measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döge, Stefan; Hingerl, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    The improvement of the number of extractable ultracold neutrons (UCNs) from converters based on solid deuterium (sD 2 ) crystals requires a good understanding of the UCN transport and how the crystal's morphology influences its transparency to the UCNs. Measurements of the UCN transmission through cryogenic liquids and solids of interest, such as hydrogen (H 2 ) and deuterium (D 2 ), require sample containers with thin, highly polished and optically transparent windows and a well defined sample thickness. One of the most difficult sealing problems is that of light gases like hydrogen and helium at low temperatures against high vacuum. Here we report on the design of a sample container with two 1 mm thin amorphous silica windows cold-welded to aluminum clamps using indium wire gaskets, in order to form a simple, reusable, and hydrogen-tight cryogenic seal. The container meets the above-mentioned requirements and withstands up to 2 bar hydrogen gas pressure against isolation vacuum in the range of 10 -5 to 10 -7 mbar at temperatures down to 4.5 K. Additionally, photographs of the crystallization process are shown and discussed.

  4. Chromatographic enrichment of isotopes in hydrogen and water samples on palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, B.M.; Polevoi, A.S.; Perevezentsev, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    Data on the isotopic enrichment of hydrogen and water samples by chromatography on palladium have been analyzed. Experimental data on the effect of temperature, hydrogen flow, volume of the enriched fraction, and length of the chromatographic column on the degree of separation attainable in the column have been obtained. It has been shown that the maximum separation achievable (regardless of the type of the isotope mixture) at 273 K falls with increase of hydrogen flow and volume of the enriched gas fraction recoverable from the column. A separation degree of ∼ 1040 has been achieved for a mixture of protium and deuterium in a 10-mm wide and 0.6-m long chromatographic column packed with palladium black with a grain size of 0.2-0.5 mm at 273 K and a specific hydrogen flow of 1.22 mole/m 2 x sec. For a protium-tritium mixture a separation degree of ∼ 90 has been reached in a similar column at 273 K and a specific hydrogen flow of 0.4 mole/m 2 x sec

  5. Hydrogen determination using secondary processes of recoil proton interaction with sample material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muminov, V.A.; Khajdarov, R.A.; Navalikhin, L.V.; Pardaev, Eh.

    1980-01-01

    Possibilities of hydrogen content determination in different materials according to secondary processes of interaction of recoil protons(irradiation in the field of fast neutrons) with sample material resulting in the appearance of characteristic X-ray irradiation are studied. Excitated irradiation is recorded with a detector placed in the protective screen and located at a certain distance from the object analyzed and neutron source. The method is tested taking as an example analysis of bromine-containing samples (30% Br, 0.5% H) and tungsten dioxide. The determination limit of hydrogen content constitutes 0.05% at confidence coefficient of 0.9. Neutron flux constituted 10 3 neutrons/cm 2 xs, the time of measurement being 15-20 minutes, the distance from the sample to the detector being 12-15 cm [ru

  6. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Private Wells Infant Formula Fluorosis Public Health Service Recommendation Water Operators & Engineers Water Fluoridation Additives Shortages of Fluoridation Additives Drinking Water Pipe Systems CDC-Sponsored Water Fluoridation Training Links to Other ...

  7. Other Fluoride Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Private Wells Infant Formula Fluorosis Public Health Service Recommendation Water Operators & Engineers Water Fluoridation Additives Shortages of Fluoridation Additives Drinking Water Pipe Systems CDC-Sponsored Water Fluoridation Training Links to Other ...

  8. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ammonium hydrogen fluoride samples. II. Study of the behaviour of the added matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alduan, F. A.; Roca, M.; Capdevila, C.

    1979-01-01

    In order to account for the variations In the shape of the excitation-volatilization' curves and the values of the line intensities of the different impurities determined in ammonium bifluoride, the behaviour of the added matrices (graphite, 63203, GeO 2 , MgO and ZnO) has been considered. With this aim the influence of the added matrices on the are discharge parameters (temperature and electronic concentration) and on the exhaustion rate of the electrode load as a function of the excitation time has been studied. On the other hand, the curve of variation of the line intensity of the metallic component of each matrix versus time has been obtained and the residues in the electrode cavity have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. (Author) 7 refs

  9. Spectrographic determination of impurities in amonium hydrogen fluoride samples. II. Study of the behaviour the added matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alduan, F.A.; Capdevila, C; Roca, M.

    1979-01-01

    In order to account for the variations in the shape of the excitation-volatilization curves and the values of the line intensities of the different impurities determined in ammonium bifluoride, the behaviour of the added matrices (graphite, Ga 2 O 3 , GeO 2 , MgO and ZnO) has been considered. With this aim the influence of the added matrices on the arc discharge parameters (temperature and electronic concentration) and on the exhaustation rate of the electrode load as a function of the excitation time has been studied. On the other hand, the curve of variation of the line intensity of the metallic component of each matrix versus time has been obtained and the residues in the electrode cavity have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. (author)

  10. Air exposure and sample storage time influence on hydrogen release from tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshkunov, K.A., E-mail: moshkunov@gmail.co [National Research Nuclear University ' MEPhI' , Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Schmid, K.; Mayer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kurnaev, V.A.; Gasparyan, Yu.M. [National Research Nuclear University ' MEPhI' , Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-30

    In investigations of hydrogen retention in first wall components the influence of the conditions of the implanted target storage prior to analysis and the storage time is often neglected. Therefore we have performed a dedicated set of experiments. The release of hydrogen from samples exposed to ambient air after irradiation was compared to samples kept in vacuum. For air exposed samples significant amounts of HDO and D{sub 2}O are detected during TDS. Additional experiments have shown that heavy water is formed by recombination of releasing D and H atoms with O on the W surface. This water formation can alter hydrogen retention results significantly, in particular - for low retention cases. In addition to the influence of ambient air exposure also the influence of storage time in vacuum was investigated. After implantation at 300 K the samples were stored in vacuum for up to 1 week during which the retained amount decreased significantly. The subsequently measured TDS spectra showed that D was lost from both the high and low energy peaks during storage at ambient temperature of {approx}300 K. An attempt to simulate this release from both peaks during room temperature storage by TMAP 7 calculations showed that this effect cannot be explained by conventional diffusion/trapping models.

  11. Air exposure and sample storage time influence on hydrogen release from tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshkunov, K.A.; Schmid, K.; Mayer, M.; Kurnaev, V.A.; Gasparyan, Yu.M.

    2010-01-01

    In investigations of hydrogen retention in first wall components the influence of the conditions of the implanted target storage prior to analysis and the storage time is often neglected. Therefore we have performed a dedicated set of experiments. The release of hydrogen from samples exposed to ambient air after irradiation was compared to samples kept in vacuum. For air exposed samples significant amounts of HDO and D 2 O are detected during TDS. Additional experiments have shown that heavy water is formed by recombination of releasing D and H atoms with O on the W surface. This water formation can alter hydrogen retention results significantly, in particular - for low retention cases. In addition to the influence of ambient air exposure also the influence of storage time in vacuum was investigated. After implantation at 300 K the samples were stored in vacuum for up to 1 week during which the retained amount decreased significantly. The subsequently measured TDS spectra showed that D was lost from both the high and low energy peaks during storage at ambient temperature of ∼300 K. An attempt to simulate this release from both peaks during room temperature storage by TMAP 7 calculations showed that this effect cannot be explained by conventional diffusion/trapping models.

  12. Air exposure and sample storage time influence on hydrogen release from tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkunov, K. A.; Schmid, K.; Mayer, M.; Kurnaev, V. A.; Gasparyan, Yu. M.

    2010-09-01

    In investigations of hydrogen retention in first wall components the influence of the conditions of the implanted target storage prior to analysis and the storage time is often neglected. Therefore we have performed a dedicated set of experiments. The release of hydrogen from samples exposed to ambient air after irradiation was compared to samples kept in vacuum. For air exposed samples significant amounts of HDO and D 2O are detected during TDS. Additional experiments have shown that heavy water is formed by recombination of releasing D and H atoms with O on the W surface. This water formation can alter hydrogen retention results significantly, in particular - for low retention cases. In addition to the influence of ambient air exposure also the influence of storage time in vacuum was investigated. After implantation at 300 K the samples were stored in vacuum for up to 1 week during which the retained amount decreased significantly. The subsequently measured TDS spectra showed that D was lost from both the high and low energy peaks during storage at ambient temperature of ˜300 K. An attempt to simulate this release from both peaks during room temperature storage by TMAP 7 calculations showed that this effect cannot be explained by conventional diffusion/trapping models.

  13. AMORE-HX: a multidimensional optimization of radial enhanced NMR-sampled hydrogen exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gledhill, John M.; Walters, Benjamin T.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2009-01-01

    The Cartesian sampled three-dimensional HNCO experiment is inherently limited in time resolution and sensitivity for the real time measurement of protein hydrogen exchange. This is largely overcome by use of the radial HNCO experiment that employs the use of optimized sampling angles. The significant practical limitation presented by use of three-dimensional data is the large data storage and processing requirements necessary and is largely overcome by taking advantage of the inherent capabilities of the 2D-FT to process selective frequency space without artifact or limitation. Decomposition of angle spectra into positive and negative ridge components provides increased resolution and allows statistical averaging of intensity and therefore increased precision. Strategies for averaging ridge cross sections within and between angle spectra are developed to allow further statistical approaches for increasing the precision of measured hydrogen occupancy. Intensity artifacts potentially introduced by over-pulsing are effectively eliminated by use of the BEST approach

  14. Fluoride absorption: independence from plasma fluoride levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitford, G.M.; Williams, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The concept that there are physiologic mechanisms to homeostatically regulate plasma fluoride concentrations has been supported by results in the literature suggesting an inverse relationship between plasma fluoride levels and the absorption of the ion from the gastrointestinal tract of the rat. The validity of the relationship was questioned because of possible problems in the experimental design. The present work used four different methods to evaluate the effect of plasma fluoride levels on the absorption of the ion in rats: (i) the percentage of the daily fluoride intake that was excreted in the urine; (ii) the concentration of fluoride in femur epiphyses; (iii) the net areas under the time-plasma fluoride concentration curves after intragastric fluoride doses; and (iv) the residual amounts or fluoride in the gastrointestinal tracts after the intragastric fluoride doses. None of these methods indicated that plasma fluoride levels influence the rate or the degree or fluoride absorption. It was concluded that, unless extremely high plasma fluoride levels are involved (pharmacologic or toxic doses), the absorption of the ion is independent of plasma levels. The results provide further evidence that plasma fluoride concentrations are not homeostatically regulated

  15. Fluoride levels in commercially available rice in Ethiopia | Tegegne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alkaline fusion was used for sample preparation of six varieties for both the raw rice and rice cooked with tap water and fluoridated water. Fluoride levels ranged from 0.1-5.5 mg/kg in raw rice sample. Rice which was cooked with different fluoride levels of water showed increment depending on the method of cooking.

  16. Groundwater fluoride enrichment in an active rift setting: Central Kenya Rift case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaka, Lydia A., E-mail: lydiaolaka@gmail.com [Department of Geology, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi (Kenya); Wilke, Franziska D.H. [Geoforschungs Zentrum, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Olago, Daniel O.; Odada, Eric O. [Department of Geology, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi (Kenya); Mulch, Andreas [Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Senckenberganlage 25, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Institut für Geowissenschaften, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Altenhöferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Musolff, Andreas [UFZ-Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Hydrogeology, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater is used extensively in the Central Kenya Rift for domestic and agricultural demands. In these active rift settings groundwater can exhibit high fluoride levels. In order to address water security and reduce human exposure to high fluoride in drinking water, knowledge of the source and geochemical processes of enrichment are required. A study was therefore carried out within the Naivasha catchment (Kenya) to understand the genesis, enrichment and seasonal variations of fluoride in the groundwater. Rocks, rain, surface and groundwater sources were sampled for hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations, the data was statistically and geospatially analyzed. Water sources have variable fluoride concentrations between 0.02–75 mg/L. 73% exceed the health limit (1.5 mg/L) in both dry and wet seasons. F{sup −} concentrations in rivers are lower (0.2–9.2 mg/L) than groundwater (0.09 to 43.6 mg/L) while saline lake waters have the highest concentrations (0.27–75 mg/L). The higher values are confined to elevations below 2000 masl. Oxygen (δ{sup 18}O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic values range from − 6.2 to + 5.8‰ and − 31.3 to + 33.3‰, respectively, they are also highly variable in the rift floor where they attain maximum values. Fluoride base levels in the precursor vitreous volcanic rocks are higher (between 3750–6000 ppm) in minerals such as cordierite and muscovite while secondary minerals like illite and kaolinite have lower remnant fluoride (< 1000 ppm). Thus, geochemical F{sup −} enrichment in regional groundwater is mainly due to a) rock alteration, i.e. through long residence times and natural discharge and/or enhanced leakages of deep seated geothermal water reservoirs, b) secondary concentration fortification of natural reservoirs through evaporation, through reduced recharge and/or enhanced abstraction and c) through additional enrichment of fluoride after volcanic emissions. The findings are useful to help improve water management

  17. MStern Blotting–High Throughput Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Membrane-Based Proteomic Sample Preparation for 96-Well Plates*

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Sebastian T.; Ahmed, Saima; Muntel, Jan; Cuevas Polo, Nerea; Bachur, Richard; Kentsis, Alex; Steen, Judith; Steen, Hanno

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 96-well plate compatible membrane-based proteomic sample processing method, which enables the complete processing of 96 samples (or multiples thereof) within a single workday. This method uses a large-pore hydrophobic PVDF membrane that efficiently adsorbs proteins, resulting in fast liquid transfer through the membrane and significantly reduced sample processing times. Low liquid transfer speeds have prevented the useful 96-well plate implementation of FASP as a widely used mem...

  18. Urinary fluoride output in children following the use of a dual-fluoride varnish formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Polido Kaneshiro Olympio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the bioavailability of fluoride after topical application of a dual-fluoride varnish commercially available in Brazil, when compared to DuraphatTM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The urinary fluoride output was evaluated in seven 5-year-old children after application of the fluoride varnishes, in two different phases. In the first phase (I, children received topical application of the fluoride varnish Duofluorid XII (2.92% fluorine, calcium fluoride + 2.71% fluorine, sodium fluoride, FGM TM. After 1-month interval (phase II, the same amount (0.2 mL of the fluoride varnish Duraphat (2.26% fluorine, sodium fluoride, ColgateTM was applied. Before each application all the volunteers brushed their teeth with placebo dentifrice for 7 days. Urinary collections were carried out 24 h prior up to 48 h after the applications. Fluoride intake from the diet was also estimated. Fluoride concentration in diet samples and urine was analyzed with the fluoride ion-specific electrode and a miniature calomel reference electrode coupled to a potentiometer. Data were tested by ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (p<0.05. RESULTS: There were significant differences in the urinary fluoride output between phases I and II. The use of Duofluorid XII did not significantly increase the urinary fluoride output, when compared to baseline levels. The application of Duraphat caused a transitory increase in the urinary fluoride output, returning to baseline levels 48 h after its use. CONCLUSIONS: The tested varnish formulation, which has been shown to be effective in in vitro studies, also can be considered safe.

  19. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit shell carbon: A calcium-rich promising adsorbent for fluoride removal from groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivasankar, V.; Rajkumar, S.; Murugesh, S.; Darchen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The carbonization of Tamarind fruit shell improved its defluoridation efficiency. ► Calcium carbonate particles were involved in the defluoridation process. ► Adsorbent dose, pH, and fluoride concentration showed significant effects. ► Maximum adsorption of fluoride was achieved at pH 7–8. ► Prepared carbons were efficient in treating three natural waters. - Abstract: Tamarindus indica fruit shells (TIFSs) are naturally calcium rich compounds. They were impregnated with ammonium carbonate and then carbonized, leading to ammonium carbonate activated ACA-TIFS carbon. The resulting materials and carbon arising from virgin fruit shells V-TIFS were characterized and assayed as adsorbent for the removal of fluoride anions from groundwater. The fluoride scavenging ability of TIFS carbons was due to naturally dispersed calcium compounds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that TIFS carbon contained a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate. Batch studies on the fluoride removal efficiency of TIFS carbons with respect to contact time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, and co-ion interference were conducted. Applicability of various kinetic models (viz., pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich) and sorption isotherms were tested for batch techniques. The fluoride removal capacity of TIFS carbons was found to be 91% and 83% at a pH of 7.05 for V-TIFS and ACA-TIFS carbons, respectively. The practical applicability of TIFS carbons using groundwater samples was approved. The fluoride removal was greater in groundwater without hydrogen carbonate ions than those containing these ions. The characterizations of fluoride unloaded and loaded TIFS carbons were done by SEM and XRD studies.

  20. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  1. Two-dimensional gas chromatography-online hydrogenation for improved characterization of petrochemical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, H; Bekker, R; Govender, A; Rohwer, E

    2016-05-06

    The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process produces a variety of hydrocarbons over a wide carbon number range and during subsequent product workup a large variety of synthetic fuels and chemicals are produced. The complexity of the product slate obtained from this process is well documented and the high temperature FT (HT-FT) process products are spread over gas, oil and water phases. The characterization of these phases is very challenging even when using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). Despite the increase in separation power, peak co-elution still occurs when samples containing isomeric compounds are analysed by comprehensive two dimensional GC. The separation of isomeric compounds with the same double bond equivalents is especially difficult since these compounds elute in a similar position on the GC×GC chromatogram and have identical molecular masses and similar fragmentation patterns in their electron ionization (EI) mass spectra. On-line hydrogenation after GC×GC separation is a possible way to distinguish between these isomeric compounds since the number of rings and alkene double bonds can be determined from the mass spectra of the compounds before and after hydrogenation. This paper describes development of a GC×GC method with post column hydrogenation for the determination of the backbone of cyclic/olefinic structures enabling us to differentiate between classes like dienes and cyclic olefins in complex petrochemical streams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. MStern Blotting-High Throughput Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Membrane-Based Proteomic Sample Preparation for 96-Well Plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sebastian T; Ahmed, Saima; Muntel, Jan; Cuevas Polo, Nerea; Bachur, Richard; Kentsis, Alex; Steen, Judith; Steen, Hanno

    2015-10-01

    We describe a 96-well plate compatible membrane-based proteomic sample processing method, which enables the complete processing of 96 samples (or multiples thereof) within a single workday. This method uses a large-pore hydrophobic PVDF membrane that efficiently adsorbs proteins, resulting in fast liquid transfer through the membrane and significantly reduced sample processing times. Low liquid transfer speeds have prevented the useful 96-well plate implementation of FASP as a widely used membrane-based proteomic sample processing method. We validated our approach on whole-cell lysate and urine and cerebrospinal fluid as clinically relevant body fluids. Without compromising peptide and protein identification, our method uses a vacuum manifold and circumvents the need for digest desalting, making our processing method compatible with standard liquid handling robots. In summary, our new method maintains the strengths of FASP and simultaneously overcomes one of the major limitations of FASP without compromising protein identification and quantification. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Laser Spectroscopic Analysis of Liquid Water Samples for Stable Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are tracers of choice for water cycle processes in hydrological, atmospheric and ecological studies. The use of isotopes has been limited to some extent because of the relatively high cost of isotope ratio mass spectrometers and the need for specialized operational skills. Here, the results of performance testing of a recently developed laser spectroscopic instrument for measuring stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of water samples are described, along with a procedure for instrument installation and operation. Over the last four years, the IAEA Water Resources Programme conducted prototype and production model testing of these instruments and this publication is the outcome of those efforts. One of the main missions of the IAEA is to promote the use of peaceful applications of isotope and nuclear methods in Member States and this publication is intended to facilitate the use of laser absorption based instruments for hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope analyses of liquid water samples for hydrological and other studies. The instrument uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy to measure absolute abundances of 2 HHO, HH 18 O, and HHO via laser absorption. Test results using a number of natural and synthetic water standards and samples with a large range of isotope values demonstrate adequate precision and accuracy (e.g. precisions of 1 per mille for δ 2 H and 0.2 per mille for δ 18 O). The laser instrument has much lower initial and maintenance costs than mass spectrometers and is substantially easier to operate. Thus, these instruments have the potential to bring about a paradigm shift in isotope applications by enabling researchers in all fields to measure isotope ratios by themselves. The appendix contains a detailed procedure for the installation and operation of the instrument. Using the procedure, new users should be able to install the instrument in less than two hours. It also provides step

  4. Gravimetric and volumetric approaches adapted for hydrogen sorption measurements with in situ conditioning on small sorbent samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, E.; Chahine, R.; Tessier, A.; Bose, T.K.

    2005-01-01

    We present high sensitivity (0 to 1 bar, 295 K) gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen sorption measurement systems adapted for in situ sample conditioning at high temperature and high vacuum. These systems are designed especially for experiments on sorbents available in small masses (mg) and requiring thorough degassing prior to sorption measurements. Uncertainty analysis from instrumental specifications and hydrogen absorption measurements on palladium are presented. The gravimetric and volumetric systems yield cross-checkable results within about 0.05 wt % on samples weighing from (3 to 25) mg. Hydrogen storage capacities of single-walled carbon nanotubes measured at 1 bar and 295 K with both systems are presented

  5. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  6. Fluoride varnish or fluoride mouth rinse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, M K; Klausen, BJ; Twetman, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In many Danish communities, school-based fluoride programs are offered to children with high caries risk in adjunct to tooth brushing. The purpose of this field trial was to compare the caries-preventive effectiveness of two different fluoride programs in 6-12 year olds. BASIC RESEARCH...... different schools were enrolled after informed consent and their class unit was randomly allocated to one of two fluoride programs. INTERVENTIONS: One group received a semi-annual fluoride varnish applications (FV) and the other group continued with an existing program with fluoride mouth rinses once per...... in caries development over two years among children participating in a school-based fluoride varnish or mouth rinse program....

  7. Biomonitoring Equivalents for interpretation of urinary fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, L L; Hays, S M; Vezina, A; Deveau, M; St-Amand, A; Nong, A

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to fluoride is widespread due to its natural occurrence in the environment and addition to drinking water and dental products for the prevention of dental caries. The potential health risks of excess fluoride exposure include aesthetically unacceptable dental fluorosis (tooth mottling) and increased skeletal fragility. Numerous organizations have conducted risk assessments and set guidance values to represent maximum recommended exposure levels as well as recommended adequate intake levels based on potential public health benefits of fluoride exposure. Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) are estimates of the average biomarker concentrations corresponding to such exposure guidance values. The literature on daily urinary fluoride excretion rates as a function of daily fluoride exposure was reviewed and BE values corresponding to the available US and Canadian exposure guidance values were derived for fluoride in urine. The derived BE values range from 1.1 to 2.1mg/L (1.2-2.5μg/g creatinine). Concentrations of fluoride in single urinary spot samples from individuals, even under exposure conditions consistent with the exposure guidance values, may vary from the predicted average concentrations by several-fold due to within- and across-individual variation in urinary flow and creatinine excretion rates and due to the rapid elimination kinetics of fluoride. Thus, the BE values are most appropriately applied to screen population central tendency estimates for biomarker concentrations rather than interpretation of individual spot sample concentrations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Fluoride exposure and indicators of thyroid functioning in the Canadian population: implications for community water fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, Amanda M; Hosein, F Shaun; Quiñonez, Carlos; McLaren, Lindsay

    2017-10-01

    There are concerns that altered thyroid functioning could be the result of ingesting too much fluoride. Community water fluoridation (CWF) is an important source of fluoride exposure. Our objectives were to examine the association between fluoride exposure and (1) diagnosis of a thyroid condition and (2) indicators of thyroid functioning among a national population-based sample of Canadians. We analysed data from Cycles 2 and 3 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). Logistic regression was used to assess associations between fluoride from urine and tap water samples and the diagnosis of a thyroid condition. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between fluoride exposure and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level (low/normal/high). Other available variables permitted additional exploratory analyses among the subset of participants for whom we could discern some fluoride exposure from drinking water and/or dental products. There was no evidence of a relationship between fluoride exposure (from urine and tap water) and the diagnosis of a thyroid condition. There was no statistically significant association between fluoride exposure and abnormal (low or high) TSH levels relative to normal TSH levels. Rerunning the models with the sample constrained to the subset of participants for whom we could discern some source(s) of fluoride exposure from drinking water and/or dental products revealed no significant associations. These analyses suggest that, at the population level, fluoride exposure is not associated with impaired thyroid functioning in a time and place where multiple sources of fluoride exposure, including CWF, exist. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Observations related to hydrogen in powder and single crystal samples of YB2Cu3O7-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porath, D.; Grayevsky, A.; Kaplan, N.; Shaltiel, D.; Yaron, U.; Walker, E.

    1994-01-01

    New observations related to hydrogenation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO) are reported: (a) The effects of sample preparation on the H concentration in ''uncharged'' YBCO samples is investigated, and it is shown through nuclear magnetic resonance measurements that samples of YBCO prepared by ''standard'' solid-state reaction procedures may contain ab initio up to 0.2 atoms formula -1 of hydrogen. (b) It is demonstrated that one may introduce up to 0.3 atoms formula -1 into single crystal samples of YBCO without destroying the macroscopic crystal. The significance of the above observations is discussed briefly. (orig.)

  10. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  11. Correlation among fluoride and metals in irrigation water and soils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correlation among fluoride and metals in irrigation water and soils of Ethiopian Rift Valley. ... The fluoride concentrations in water samples were found in the range of 0.14-8.0 mg/L which is below the WHO limit of fluoride concentration for irrigation (less than 10 mg/L). ... KEY WORDS: Fluoride, Metals, Water, Soil, Ethiopia.

  12. Calcium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.W.; Nestor, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    A new process for producing large, single, oriented crystals of calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) has been developed which overcomes the limitations of current growing methods. This process has been reduced to practice and has yielded oriented crystals 17.5 x 17.5 x 5 cm 3 . Currently nearing completion is a system for producing 35 x 35 x 7.5 cm 3 single crystals. A scale up to one-meter-square is considered feasible. This crystal growing process makes possible the fabrication of very large CaF 2 windows. Suitability for very high power lasers, however, requires attention to properties beyond mere size. A process to generate higher purity growth stock (starting material) was also developed. The additional purification of the growth stock contributes to lower bulk absorption, the absence of color centers and increased radiation hardness. Also identified were several specific impurities which correlate with radiation hardness. A correlation was found between color centers induced by laser radiation and ionizing radiation. Other CaF 2 crystal properties such as tensile strength, absorption and laser damage thresholds were studied and are discussed

  13. Water fluoridation in 40 Brazilian cities: 7 year analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzely Adas Saliba MOIMAZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Fluoride levels in the public water supplies of 40 Brazilian cities were analyzed and classified on the basis of risk/benefit balance. Material and Methods Samples were collected monthly over a seven-year period from three sites for each water supply source. The samples were analyzed in duplicate in the laboratory of the Center for Research in Public Health - UNESP using an ion analyzer coupled to a fluoride-specific electrode. Results A total of 19,533 samples were analyzed, of which 18,847 were artificially fluoridated and 686 were not artificially fluoridated. In samples from cities performing water fluoridation, 51.57% (n=9,720 had fluoride levels in the range of 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L; 30.53% (n=5,754 were below 0.55 mg F/L and 17.90% (n=3,373 were above 0.84 mg F/L (maximum concentration=6.96 mg F/L. Most of the cities performing fluoridation that had a majority of samples with fluoride levels above the recommended parameter had deep wells and more than one source of water supply. There was some variability in the fluoride levels of samples from the same site and between collection sites in the same city. Conclusions The majority of samples from cities performing fluoridation had fluoride levels within the range that provides the best combination of risks and benefits, minimizing the risk of dental fluorosis while preventing dental caries. The conduction of studies about water distribution systems is suggested in cities with high natural fluoride concentrations in order to optimize the use of natural fluoride for fluoridation costs and avoid the risk of dental fluorosis.

  14. Acid demineralization susceptibility of dental enamel submitted to different bleaching techniques and fluoridation regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomão, Dlf; Santos, Dm; Nogueira, Rd; Palma-Dibb, Rg; Geraldo-Martins, Vr

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the acid demineralization susceptibility of bleached dental enamel submitted to different fluoride regimens. One hundred bovine enamel blocks (6×6×3 mm) were randomly divided into 10 groups (n=10). Groups 1 and 2 received no bleaching. Groups 3 to 6 were submitted to an at-home bleaching technique using 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP; G3 and G4) or 10% carbamide peroxide (CP; G5 and G6). Groups 7 to 10 were submitted to an in-office bleaching technique using 35% HP (G7 and G8) or 35% CP (G9 and G10). During bleaching, a daily fluoridation regimen of 0.05% sodium fluoride (NaF) solution was performed on groups 3, 5, 7, and 9, while weekly fluoridation with a 2% NaF gel was performed on groups 4, 6, 8, and 10. The samples in groups 2 to 10 were pH cycled for 14 consecutive days. The samples from all groups were then assessed by cross-sectional Knoop microhardness at different depths from the outer enamel surface. The average Knoop hardness numbers (KHNs) were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The comparison between groups 1 and 2 showed that the demineralization method was effective. The comparison among groups 2 to 6 showed the same susceptibility to acid demineralization, regardless of the fluoridation method used. However, the samples from groups 8 and 10 showed more susceptibility to acid demineralization when compared with group 2 (penamel to acid demineralization. However, the use of 35% HP and 35% CP must be associated with a daily fluoridation regimen, otherwise the in-office bleaching makes the bleached enamel more susceptible to acid demineralization.

  15. Story of Fluoridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Info Health Topics Fluoride Share The Story of Fluoridation It started as an observation, that ... this time using photospectrographic analysis, a more sophisticated technology than that used by McKay. Churchill asked an ...

  16. Fluoride in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - fluoride ... bones and teeth. Too much fluoride in the diet is very rare. Rarely, infants who get too ... of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods from the ...

  17. No calcium-fluoride-like deposits detected in plaque shortly after a sodium fluoride mouthrinse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, G L; Tenuta, L M A; Schumacher, G E; Chow, L C

    2010-01-01

    Plaque 'calcium-fluoride-like' (CaF(2)-like) and fluoride deposits held by biological/bacterial calcium fluoride (Ca-F) bonds appear to be the source of cariostatic concentrations of fluoride in plaque fluid. The aim of this study was to quantify the amounts of plaque fluoride held in these reservoirs after a sodium fluoride rinse. 30 and 60 min after a 228 microg/g fluoride rinse, plaque samples were collected from 11 volunteers. Each sample was homogenized, split into 2 aliquots (aliquots 1 and 2), centrifuged, and the recovered plaque fluid combined and analyzed using microelectrodes. The plaque mass from aliquot 1 was retained. The plaque mass from aliquot 2 was extracted several times with a solution having the same fluoride, calcium and pH as the plaque fluid in order to extract the plaque CaF(2)-like deposits. The total fluoride in both aliquots was then determined. In a second experiment, the extraction completeness was examined by applying the above procedure to in vitro precipitates containing known amounts of CaF(2)-like deposits. Nearly identical fluoride concentrations were found in both plaque aliquots. The extraction of the CaF(2)-like precipitates formed in vitro removed more than 80% of these deposits. The results suggest that either CaF(2)-like deposits were not formed in plaque or, if these deposits had been formed, they were rapidly lost. The inability to form persistent amounts of CaF(2)-like deposits in plaque may account for the relatively rapid loss of plaque fluid fluoride after the use of conventional fluoride dentifrices or rinses. (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Fluoride metabolism in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, R; Shorthouse, M

    1964-04-04

    Grass seedlings exposed to inorganic fluoride solutions do not take up appreciable amounts of fluoride until concentrations of more than 1.0 mM (19 p.p.m.) are used. No formation of organic fluoride has been found, even with exposure to 15.75 mM fluoride, indicating that there is no formation of fluoroacetate or similar compounds. 8 references, 2 tables.

  19. Determination of the hydrogen content of oil samples from Nigeria using an Am-Be neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonah, S.A.; Elegba, S.B.; Zakari, I.I.

    1998-01-01

    A 5 Ci Am-Be neutron source-based facility, which utilises the principles of thermal neutron reflection technique in combination with foil activation method, has been used to determine the total hydrogen content of commercial oil samples from Nigeria. With an established detection limit of 0.25 H w% for oil matrix of volume 600-ml, the total hydrogen contents of the samples were found to be in the range of 11.11-14.22 H w%. The facility is economical and suitable for the determination of moisture in solid samples. A brief description of the ongoing projects and future plans concerning the CRP are enumerated. (author)

  20. Estimation of atmospheric fluoride by limed filter papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.R.

    1988-09-01

    The limed filter paper method of static sampling of atmospheric fluoride is reviewed in this report. Use of the technique, in conjunction with precise measurement of the absorbed fluoride and calibration with dynamic air sampling techniques, to estimate atmospheric fluoride levels, is considered to give only qualitative data (± 50%). The limed filter paper method is site specific due to variations in meteorological conditions. Its main value is to indicate seasonal and annual trends in fluoride exposure of vegetation. Subject to these considerations, the lower and upper limits of atmospheric fluoride exposure and the applicability to atmospheric fluoride estimation under routine or emergency fluoride release conditions are discussed, with special emphasis on the limiting factors

  1. High-pressure hydrogen respiration in hydrothermal vent samples from the deep biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Smith, D.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Cultivation of organisms from the deep biosphere has met with many challenges, chief among them the ability to replicate this extreme environment in a laboratory setting. The maintenance of in situ pressure levels, carbon sources, and gas concentrations are important, intertwined factors which may all affect the growth of subsurface microorganisms. Hydrogen in particular is of great importance in hydrothermal systems, but in situ hydrogen concentrations are largely disregarded in attempts to culture from these sites. Using modified Hungate-type culture tubes (Bowles et al. 2011) within pressure-retaining vessels, which allow for the dissolution of higher concentrations of gas than is possible with other culturing methods, we have incubated hydrothermal chimney and hydrothermally-altered rock samples from the Lost City and Mid-Cayman Rise hydrothermal vent fields. Hydrogen concentrations up to 15 mmol/kg have been reported from Lost City (Kelley et al. 2005), but data are not yet available from the recently-discovered Mid-Cayman site, and the elevated concentration of 30 mmol/kg is being used in all incubations. We are using a variety of media types to enrich for various metabolic pathways including iron and sulfur reduction under anoxic or microaerophilic conditions. Incubations are being carried out at atmospheric (0.1 MPa), in situ (9, 23, or 50 MPa, depending on site), and elevated (50 MPa) pressure levels. Microbial cell concentrations, taxonomic diversity, and metabolic activities are being monitored during the course of these experiments. These experiments will provide insight into the relationships between microbial activities, pressure, and gas concentrations typical of deep biosphere environments. Results will inform further culturing studies from both fresh and archived samples. References cited: Bowles, M.W., Samarkin, V.A., Joye, S.B. 2011. Improved measurement of microbial activity in deep-sea sediments at in situ pressure and methane concentration

  2. Multi-saline sample distillation apparatus for hydrogen isotope analyses: design and accuracy. Water-resources investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.A.

    1981-04-01

    A distillation apparatus for saline water samples was designed and tested. Six samples may be distilled simultaneously. The temperature was maintained at 400 degrees C to ensure complete dehydration of the precipitating salts. Consequently, the error in the measured ratio of stable hydrogen isotopes resulting from incomplete dehydration of hydrated salts during distillation was eliminated

  3. Hydrogen, carbon and oxygen determination in proxy material samples using a LaBr3:Ce detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, A.A.; Al-Matouq, Faris A.; Khiari, F.Z.; Isab, A.A.; Raashid, M.; Khateeb-ur-Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen, carbon and oxygen concentrations were measured in caffeine, urea, ammonium acetate and melamine bulk samples via 14 MeV neutron inelastic scattering using a LaBr 3 :Ce detector. The samples tested herein represent drugs, explosives and benign materials, respectively. Despite its intrinsic activity, the LaBr 3 :Ce detector performed well in detecting the hydrogen, carbon and oxygen elements. Because 5.1 MeV nitrogen gamma rays interfere with silicon and calcium prompt gamma rays from the room background, the nitrogen peak was not detected in the samples. An excellent agreement was observed between the experimental and theoretical yields of 2.22, 4.43 and 6.13 MeV gamma rays from the analyzed samples as a function of H, C and O concentrations, respectively. Within statistical errors, the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen elements in the tested materials were consistent with previously reported MDC values for these elements measured in hydrocarbon samples. - Highlights: • Hydrogen, carbon and oxygen concentration measurement in bulk samples using 14 MeV neutrons induced prompt gamma rays. • Prompt gamma analysis of narcotics and explosive proxy materials e.g. ammonium acetate, caffeine, urea and melamine Bulk samples. • Prompt gamma detection using large cylindrical 76×76 mm 2 (diameter x height ) LaBr 3 :Ce detector. • Carbon/oxygen elemental ratio measurement from explosive and narcotics proxy material samples

  4. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Šárka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Vazdar, M.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 22 (2014), 22D516 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : fluorescence sfifts * Cationic lipids * Hydrogen bond networks Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  5. Analysis of the interactions between difluoroacetylene and one or two hydrogen fluoride molecules based on calculated spin–spin coupling constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Provasi, Patricio F.; Caputo, María Cristina; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical study of FCCF:(HF)n complexes, with n = 1 and 2, has been carried out by means of ab initio computational methods. Two types of complexes are formed: those with FH···p interactions and those with FH···FC hydrogen bonds. The indirect spin–spin coupling constants have been calculated ...

  6. A modified FOX-1 method for Micro-determination of hydrogen peroxide in honey samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Wang, Meng; Cheng, Ni; Xue, Xiaofeng; Wu, Liming; Cao, Wei

    2017-12-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) is a major antibacterial activity-associated biomarker in honey. Measurement of endogenous H 2 O 2 in honey is of great value in prediction of the H 2 O 2 -depended antibacterial activity and characterization or selection of honey samples for their use as an antibacterial agent or natural food preservative. Considering current methods for H 2 O 2 determination are either time-consuming or complicated with their high-cost, a study was conducted to modify and validate the spectrophotometry-based ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX-1) method for micro-determination of H 2 O 2 in honey samples. The result suggested that the proposed FOX-1 method is fast, sensitive, precise and repeatable. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of a total of 35 honey samples from 5 floral origins and 33 geographical origins. The proposed method is low-cost and easy-to-run, and it can be considered by researchers and industry for routine analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A high precision mass spectrometer for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.S.; Prahallada Rao, B.S.; Handu, V.K.; Satam, J.V.

    1979-01-01

    A high precision mass spectrometer with two ion collector assemblies and direct on line reduction facility (with uranium at 700 0 C) for water samples for hydrogen isotopic analysis has been designed and developed. The ion source particularly gives high sensitivity and at the same tike limits the H 3 + ions to a minimum. A digital ratiometer with a H 2 + compensator has also been developed. The overall precision obtained on the spectrometer is 0.07% 2sub(sigmasub(10)) value. Typical results on the performance of the spectrometer, which is working since a year and a half are given. Possible methods of extending the ranges of concentration the spectrometer can handle, both on lower and higher sides are discussed. Problems of memory between samples are briefly listed. A multiple inlet system to overcome these problems is suggested. This will also enable faster analysis when samples of highly varying concentrations are to be analyzed. A few probable areas in which the spectrometer will be shortly put to use are given. (auth.)

  8. Fluoride releasing and enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets by fluoride-releasing composite containing nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary A S; Morais, Weslanny A; Passos, Vanara F; Lima, Juliana P M; Rodrigues, Lidiany K A

    2014-05-01

    Fluoride-containing materials have been suggested to control enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets during the treatment with fixed appliances. The improvement of their properties has been made through innovations, such as the application of nanotechnology by incorporation of nanofillers. This in vitro study evaluated the capacity of fluoride releasing and enamel demineralization inhibition of fluoride-releasing nanofilled cement around orthodontic brackets using an artificial caries biofilm model. Forty bovine enamel discs were selected by evaluating surface microhardness and randomized into four groups (n = 10): non-fluoride-releasing microfilled composite, fluoride-releasing microfilled composite, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGI), and fluoride-releasing nanofilled composite (FN). After brackets bonding in each disc, the specimens were subjected to a cariogenic challenge through a Streptococcus mutans biofilm model. After the experimental period, the biofilm formed around the brackets was collected for fluoride analysis and the mineral loss around the brackets was determined by integrated demineralization via cross-sectional microhardness measurement at 20 and 70 μm from the bracket margin. Additionally, samples of each group were subjected to energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis examined under a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). ANOVA followed by Tukey test were applied for fluoride concentration and mineral loss data, respectively. At both distances, only RMGI statistically differed from the other groups presenting the lowest demineralization, although there was a trend to a lower demineralization of enamel around brackets in FN group. Similar condition was found to fluoride concentration and EDX/SEM analysis. Under the cariogenic exposure condition of this study, the fluoride-releasing nanofilled material had similar performance to fluoride-releasing microfilled materials. The presence of nanofillers in the fluoride

  9. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  10. Diethylenetriaminium hexafluoridotitanate(IV fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lhoste

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, (C6H21N4[TiF6]F, was synthesized by the reaction of TiO2, tris(2-aminoethylamine, HF and ethanol at 463 K in a microwave oven. The crystal structure consists of two crystallographically independent [TiF6]2− anions, two fluoride anions and two triply-protonated tris(2-aminoethylamine cations. The Ti atoms are coordinated by six F atoms within slightly distorted octahedra. The anions and cations are connected by intermolecular N—H...F hydrogen bonds.

  11. A Windows-95 based DAS software for the determination of chloride and fluoride in MOX fuel samples by pyrohydrolysis-ISE method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindan, R; Kulkarni, Atul; Sivashankaran, G; Raul, Seema; Behere, P G; Mallik, G K; Bhargava, V K; Kamath, H S [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India)

    1999-01-01

    A Windows-95 based Data Acquisition System (DAS) software has been developed to determine chloride and fluoride in MOX (Mixed Oxide) fuel pellets by pyrohydrolysis followed by Ion Selective Electrodes (ISE). The DAS software controls the furnace remotely and acquires data related to ion-85 ion analyser through RS-232C serial port. This results in ease of operation of furnace during pyrohydrolysis and storage of measured data from ion-85 ion analyser for future use. (author) 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Identification of V-type nerve agents in vapor samples using a field-portable capillary gas chromatography/membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry instrument with Tri-Bed concentrator and fluoridating conversion tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrui, Y; Nagoya, T; Kurimata, N; Sodeyama, M; Seto, Y

    2017-07-01

    A field-portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system (Hapsite ER) was evaluated for the detection of nonvolatile V-type nerve agents (VX and Russian VX (RVX)) in the vapor phase. The Hapsite ER system consists of a Tri-Bed concentrator gas sampler, a nonpolar low thermal-mass capillary GC column and a hydrophobic membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer evacuated by a non-evaporative getter pump. The GC-MS system was attached to a VX-G fluoridating conversion tube containing silver nitrate and potassium fluoride. Sample vapors of VX and RVX were converted into O-ethyl methylphosphonofluoridate (EtGB) and O-isobutyl methylphosphonofluoridate (iBuGB), respectively. These fluoridated derivatives were detected within 10 min. No compounds were detected when the VX and RVX samples were analyzed without the conversion tube. A vapor sample of tabun (GA) was analyzed, in which GA and O-ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidofluoridate were detected. The molar recovery percentages of EtGB and iBuGB from VX and RVX vapors varied from 0.3 to 17%, which was attributed to variations in the vaporization efficiency of the glass vapor container. The conversion efficiencies of the VX-G conversion tube for VX and RVX to their phosphonate derivatives were estimated to be 40%. VX and RVX vapors were detected at concentrations as low as 0.3 mg m -3 . Gasoline vapor was found to interfere with the analyses of VX and RVX. In the presence of 160 mg m -3 gasoline, the detection limits of VX and RVX vapor were increased to 20 mg m -3 . Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Risk perception, psychological heuristics and the water fluoridation controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, Andrea M L; Kiss, Simon J

    2015-04-29

    Increasingly, support for water fluoridation has come under attack. We seek an explanation, focusing on the case of Waterloo, Ontario, where a 2010 referendum overturned its water fluoridation program. In particular, we test whether individuals perceive the risks of water fluoridation based not on 'hard' scientific evidence but on heuristics and cultural norms. A sample of 376 residents in Waterloo were surveyed in June 2012 using random digit dialing. We use factor analysis, OLS regression, as well as t-tests to evaluate a survey experiment to test the credibility hypothesis. Perceptions of fluoride as a risk are lower among those who perceive fluoride's benefits (B = .473, p < 0.001) and those whose cultural view is 'egalitarian' (B = .156, p < 0.05). The experiment shows a lower level of perception of fluoride's benefits among respondents who are told that water fluoridation is opposed by a national advocacy group (Group A) compared to those who are told that the government and the World Health Organization support fluoridation (Group B) (t = 1.6547, p < 0.05), as well as compared to the control group (t = 1.8913, p < 0.05). There is no difference between Group B and the control, possibly because people's already general support for fluoridation is less prone to change when told that other public organizations also support fluoridation. Public health officials should take into account cultural norms and perceptions when individuals in a community appear to rise up against water fluoridation, with implications for other public health controversies.

  14. Fabrication of a novel electrochemical sensor for determination of hydrogen peroxide in different fruit juice samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Nasirizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 sensor is fabricated based on a multiwalled carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNT-GCE and reactive blue 19 (RB. The charge transfer coefficient, α, and the charge transfer rate constant, ks, of RB adsorbed on MWCNT-GCE were calculated and found to be 0.44 ± 0.01 Hz and 1.9 ± 0.05 Hz, respectively. The catalysis of the electroreduction of H2O2 by RB-MWCNT-GCE is described. The RB-MWCNT-GCE shows a dramatic increase in the peak current and a decrease in the overvoltage of H2O2 electroreduction in comparison with that seen at an RB modified GCE, MWCNT modified GCE, and activated GCE. The kinetic parameters such as α and the heterogeneous rate constant, k', for the reduction of H2O2 at RB-MWCNT-GCE surface were determined using cyclic voltammetry. The detection limit of 0.27μM and three linear calibration ranges were obtained for H2O2 determination at the RB-MWCNT-GCE surface using an amperometry method. In addition, using the newly developed sensor, H2O2 was determined in real samples with satisfactory results.

  15. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  16. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Private Wells Infant Formula Fluorosis Public Health Service Recommendation Water Operators & Engineers Water Fluoridation Additives Shortages of Fluoridation Additives Drinking Water Pipe Systems CDC-Sponsored Water Fluoridation Training Links to Other ...

  17. Fluoride release, recharge and flexural properties of polymethylmethacrylate containing fluoridated glass fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bakri, I A; Swain, M V; Naoum, S J; Al-Omari, W M; Martin, E; Ellakwa, A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fluoridated glass fillers on fluoride release, recharge and the flexural properties of modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Specimens of PMMA denture base material with various loading of fluoridated glass fillers (0%, 1%, 2.5%, 5% and 10% by weight) were prepared. Flexural properties were evaluated on rectangular specimens (n = 10) aged in deionized water after 24 hours, 1 and 3 months. Disc specimens (n = 10) were aged for 43 days in deionized water and lactic acid (pH 4.0) and fluoride release was measured at numerous intervals. After ageing, specimens were recharged and fluoride re-release was recorded at 1, 3 and 7 days after recharge. Samples containing 2.5%, 5% and 10% glass fillers showed significantly (p glass fillers specimens. All experimental specimens exhibited fluoride release in both media. The flexural strength of specimens decreased in proportion to the percentage filler inclusion with the modulus of elasticity values remaining within ISO Standard 1567. The modified PMMA with fluoridated glass fillers has the ability to release and re-release fluoride ion. Flexural strength decreased as glass filler uploading increased. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  18. Method for identifying particulate fluoride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufts, B J

    1960-01-01

    A method is described for identifying particulates containing fluorides and other complex fluorine compounds such as fluorosilicate in samples collected on membrane filters. The filter is treated with lead chloride to precipitate lead chlorofluoride at each fluoride-containing spot. This microspot is identified by examination in a light microscope. Sulfate and phosphate, which also precipitate if present, can be distinguished and do not interfere. Calibrations are given for the fluorides and the more insoluble salts, relating the original particle size to the reaction site size. Thus, the mass of the particles can be calculated. Results of some field tests in an area of fluoride pollution are given, and compared with standard testing procedures.

  19. Hydrogen, carbon and oxygen determination in proxy material samples using a LaBr3:Ce detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Al-Matouq, Faris A; Khiari, F Z; Isab, A A; Raashid, M; Khateeb-ur-Rehman

    2013-08-01

    Hydrogen, carbon and oxygen concentrations were measured in caffeine, urea, ammonium acetate and melamine bulk samples via 14 MeV neutron inelastic scattering using a LaBr3:Ce detector. The samples tested herein represent drugs, explosives and benign materials, respectively. Despite its intrinsic activity, the LaBr3:Ce detector performed well in detecting the hydrogen, carbon and oxygen elements. Because 5.1 MeV nitrogen gamma rays interfere with silicon and calcium prompt gamma rays from the room background, the nitrogen peak was not detected in the samples. An excellent agreement was observed between the experimental and theoretical yields of 2.22, 4.43 and 6.13 MeV gamma rays from the analyzed samples as a function of H, C and O concentrations, respectively. Within statistical errors, the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen elements in the tested materials were consistent with previously reported MDC values for these elements measured in hydrocarbon samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Well Waters Fluoride in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISI Ogbu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal fluoride levels in drinking water have been associated with adverse health effects. To determine the fluoride content of well waters in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria, water samples from 50 artisan wells chosen by multistage sampling procedure from the 5 zones of Enugu municipality were analyzed in duplicates for their fluoride content. The zonal mean values were 0.60, 0.70, 0.62, 0.62, and 0.63 mg/L for Abakpa Nike, Achara Layout, Obiagu/ Ogui, Trans Ekulu and Uwani, respectively (p<0.05. The mean value for the whole city was 0.63 mg/L. Although, the mean level of fluoride recorded in this study is currently within safe limits (1.5 mg/L, WHO 2011, it is important to monitor continuously the fluoride content of well waters in the municipality in view of the increasing industrial activities going on in the city and heavy reliance on well water for domestic purposes and the widespread use of consumer products containing fluoride.

  1. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse......, moderate for fluoride gel and very low for acidulated fluoride foam. No conclusions could be drawn on the cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: This review, covering the recent decade, has further substantiated the evidence for a caries-preventive effect of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride gel and foam...

  2. Laboratory investigations into the potential anticaries efficacy of fluoride varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Frank; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Martinez-Mier, Esperanza Angeles; Zero, Domenick T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential anticaries efficacy of fluoride varnishes (FVs) by studying their ability to reharden and deliver fluoride to carious lesions and to release fluoride into saliva. Enamel carious lesions were created and allocated to 24 groups (11 FVs with two FV incubation times and two control groups) based on Knoop microhardness test values. FVs were applied to lesions, which were incubated in artificial saliva for two or six hours, with saliva being renewed hourly. FV was removed and lesions were remineralized in artificial saliva for 22 hours. Microhardness was measured and enamel fluoride uptake (EFU) was determined. Saliva samples (six-hour groups) were analyzed to determine fluoride release characteristics. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance. FVs differed considerably in their ability to reharden and deliver fluoride to carious lesions and in their fluoride release characteristics. Little consistency was found between investigated study variables for virtually all tested FVs. For example, a particular FV showed the highest EFU and fluoride release values but the lowest rehardening value. A longer FV contact time led to increased EFU for five of the 11 FVs. Some FVs delivered more fluoride to lesions in two hours than others did in six hours. Fluoride varnishes differ greatly in their in vitro anticaries efficacy.

  3. Probability of foliar injury for Acer sp. based on foliar fluoride concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Andrew M; Dixon, Murray J; Terry, Debbie T; Todd, Aaron K; Luciani, Michael A; Williamson, Michele L; Roszak, Danuta S; Farias, Kim A

    2016-12-01

    Fluoride is considered one of the most phytotoxic elements to plants, and indicative fluoride injury has been associated over a wide range of foliar fluoride concentrations. The aim of this study was to determine the probability of indicative foliar fluoride injury based on Acer sp. foliar fluoride concentrations using a logistic regression model. Foliage from Acer nedundo, Acer saccharinum, Acer saccharum and Acer platanoides was collected along a distance gradient from three separate brick manufacturing facilities in southern Ontario as part of a long-term monitoring programme between 1995 and 2014. Hydrogen fluoride is the major emission source associated with the manufacturing facilities resulting with highly elevated foliar fluoride close to the facilities and decreasing with distance. Consistent with other studies, indicative fluoride injury was observed over a wide range of foliar concentrations (9.9-480.0 μg F -  g -1 ). The logistic regression model was statistically significant for the Acer sp. group, A. negundo and A. saccharinum; consequently, A. negundo being the most sensitive species among the group. In addition, A. saccharum and A. platanoides were not statistically significant within the model. We are unaware of published foliar fluoride values for Acer sp. within Canada, and this research provides policy maker and scientist with probabilities of indicative foliar injury for common urban Acer sp. trees that can help guide decisions about emissions controls. Further research should focus on mechanisms driving indicative fluoride injury over wide ranging foliar fluoride concentrations and help determine foliar fluoride thresholds for damage.

  4. Biochemical studies on the effect of fluoride on higher plants. II. The effect of fluoride on sucrose-synthesizing enzymes from higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S F; Miller, G W

    1963-01-01

    A study was initiated to characterize the properties of partially purified phosphoglucomutase, uridine diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylase and uridine diphosphate glucose-fructose transglucosyalse, from various plant sources, with respect to activation by metal ions and inhibition by fluoride. Of the three enzymes studied, only phosphoglucomutase was very sensitive to fluoride. It is likely that the inhibition of sucrose synthesis in fluoride-fumigated plants might be due to the inhibition of phosphoglucomutase, which plays an important role in carbohydrate metabolism. However, at present, there is insufficient evidence to show the inhibition of phosphoglucomutase in vivo by fumigation with hydrogen fluoride.

  5. Emissions of fluorides from welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pągowska, Emilia; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2015-11-01

    The levels of fluoride airborne particulates emitted from welding processes were investigated. They were sampled with the patented IOM Sampler, developed by J. H. Vincent and D. Mark at the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), personal inhalable sampler for simultaneous collection of the inhalable and respirable size fractions. Ion chromatography with conductometric detection was used for quantitative analysis. The efficiency of fluoride extraction from the cellulose filter of the IOM sampler was examined using the standard sample of urban air particle matter SRM-1648a. The best results for extraction were obtained when water and the anionic surfactant N-Cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used in an ultrasonic bath. The limits of detection and quantification for the whole procedure were 8μg/L and 24μg/L, respectively. The linear range of calibration was 0.01-10mg/L, which corresponds to 0.0001-0.1mg of fluorides per m(3) in collection of a 20L air sample. The concentration of fluorides in the respirable fraction of collected air samples was in the range of 0.20-1.82mg/m(3), while the inhalable fraction contained 0.23-1.96mg/m(3) of fluorides during an eight-hour working day in the welding room. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. The Effect of Calcium Pre-Rinse on Salivary Fluoride After 900 ppm Fluoride Mouthwash: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Ramazani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Calcium fluoride deposit during fluoride application. Uptake and retention of fluoride by saliva depends generally on the concentration of calcium. In this study, the ef-fect of calcium pre-rinse on salivary fluoride concentration after a 900 ppm fluoride mouthwash was investigated.Materials and Methods: This cross-over double-blind randomized clinical trial was con-ducted in a girls' dormitory in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, southeast Iran. In this study, 42 female dental students were chosen using simple randomization. During the first phase, 21 subjects (group A used fluoride rinse (F regimen and the remaining (group B used calcium pre-rinse followed immediately by fluoride rinse (Ca + F regi-men. In the second phase, participants rinsed using the mouthwashes not previously used. Prior to each phase prophylaxis was performed and no fluoridated product was used dur-ing a two-week interval between the phases. Salivary samples were taken immediately be-fore (baseline, 1 and 12 hours after rinsing. The salivary fluoride concentration was de-termined using fluoride sensitive electrode. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for sta-tistical analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05.Results: There was significant difference between fluoride concentrations at different time points (P< 0.001. Significant differences were observed when the different time points of two regimens were examined. In contrast to this, the baseline before using F regimen and the baseline before using Ca + F regimen did not show any significance (P= 0.070.Conclusion: Pre-rinsing with calcium before fluoride is recommended because of signifi-cant increases in salivary fluoride concentration.

  7. Fluoride varnishes and enamel caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, Hugo de

    1987-01-01

    Topical fluoride applications have the aim of increasing the fluoride uptake in enamel and consequently reducing caries. In the early ‘60s fluoride varnishes were introduced because they had a long contact period with the enamel which resulted in a higher fluoride uptake than from other topical

  8. Atmospheric fluoride levels in some Ontario peach orchards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drowley, W B; Rayner, A C; Jephcott, C M

    1963-10-01

    As a result of suture injury to peaches, a survey was taken to determine monthly atmospheric fluoride levels in the soft fruit-growing area of the Niagara Peninsula of Ontario. Although the injury was confined to a few orchards, it was found necessary to locate stations for fluoride sampling over a wide area. The limed-paper candle method was used for fluoride collection. Unwashed and washed peach leaves were analyzed for fluoride content. Fluoride was separated from all samples by the Willard-Winter distillation procedure and estimated colorimetrically. It was found that a general background level of atmospheric fluoride existed in the whole surveyed area and that the levels were highest in and near the area of peach injury. The fluoride content of peach leaves was also highest in this area. The coincidence of high fluoride levels and suture injury to peaches suggests that atmospheric fluoride was the causal agent. When lime sprays were applied to peach trees in the damaged area, a reduction in the incidence of suture injury was observed.

  9. Reaction path sampling of the reaction between iron(II) and hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, B.; Baerends, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    Previously, we have studied the coordination and dissociation of hydrogen peroxide with iron(II) in aqueous solution by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics at room temperature. We presented a few illustrative reaction events, in which the ferryl ion ([Fe(IV)O

  10. The sampling of hydrogen sulfide in air with impregnated filter paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huygen, C.

    1964-01-01

    A method is proposed for the quantitative collection of hydrogen sulfide in air on impregnated filter paper. An aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide, potassium zincate and glycerol is used as impregnating fluid. The stability of the collected sulfide and the efficiency of collection at different

  11. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Kata Rošin-Grget; Kristina Peroš; Ivana Šutej; Krešimir Bašić

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F–) into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard t...

  12. Magnetic interactions through fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Sigrist, Marc; Weihe, Høgni

    2014-01-01

    support the parameter values and resolve |E| ≈ 0.04 cm(-1). The exchange coupling constant (J) is 1 order of magnitude smaller than that found in comparable systems with linear oxide bridging but comparable to typical magnitudes through cyanide, thus underlining the potential of fluoride complexes......The nature of the magnetic interaction through fluoride in a simple, dinuclear manganese(III) complex (1), bridged by a single fluoride ion in a perfectly linear fashion, is established by experiment and density functional theory. The magnitude of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction...

  13. Measurement of fluoride in bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mernagh, J.R.; Harrision, J.E.; Hancock, R.; McNeill, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    The fluorine concentration in bone biopsy samples was measured by neutron activation analysis. The fluorine content was expressed in terms of the calcium content. Samples were irradiated in a reactor to induce the 19 F(n,γ) 20 F and 48 Ca(n,γ) 49 Ca reactions and after rapid transport from the reactor the resulting activities were measured with a Ge(Li) detector. Reproducibility was better than 10% for the F/Ca ratio. The detection limit for F is 50 μg. This nondestructive technique will be used to assess the effect of fluoride therapy on bone metabolism of patients with idiopathic osteoporosis. (author)

  14. Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) in hydrogenated samples for TNSA laser irradiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, Mariapompea

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2016), s. 10-16 ISSN 0142-2421 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : ERDA * RBS * TNSA * hydrogen and deuterium * proton acceleration Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.132, year: 2016

  15. Preparation of bromine fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domange, Pr; Duflo, J.

    1958-05-01

    This note addresses the preparation of bromine fluoride. It indicates the implemented process for the reaction, used products (fluorine and bromine), and column characteristics. It describes the operating mode. Apparatus drawing is provided

  16. Four-sample lactose hydrogen breath test for diagnosis of lactose malabsorption in irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Feng; Fox, Mark; Chu, Hua; Zheng, Xia; Long, Yan-Qin; Pohl, Daniel; Fried, Michael; Dai, Ning

    2015-06-28

    To validate 4-sample lactose hydrogen breath testing (4SLHBT) compared to standard 13-sample LHBT in the clinical setting. Irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea (IBS-D) and healthy volunteers (HVs) were enrolled and received a 10 g, 20 g, or 40 g dose lactose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) in a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial. The lactase gene promoter region was sequenced. Breath samples and symptoms were acquired at baseline and every 15 min for 3 h (13 measurements). The detection rates of lactose malabsorption (LM) and lactose intolerance (LI) for a 4SLHBT that acquired four measurements at 0, 90, 120, and 180 min from the same data set were compared with the results of standard LHBT. Sixty IBS-D patients and 60 HVs were studied. The genotype in all participants was C/C-13910. LM and LI detection rates increased with lactose dose from 10 g, 20 g to 40 g in both groups (P lactose doses in both groups. Reducing the number of measurements from 13 to 4 samples did not significantly impact on the accuracy of LHBT in health and IBS-D. 4SLHBT is a valid test for assessment of LM and LI in clinical practice.

  17. Toxic fluoride gas emissions from lithium-ion battery fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Petra; Blomqvist, Per; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2017-08-30

    Lithium-ion battery fires generate intense heat and considerable amounts of gas and smoke. Although the emission of toxic gases can be a larger threat than the heat, the knowledge of such emissions is limited. This paper presents quantitative measurements of heat release and fluoride gas emissions during battery fires for seven different types of commercial lithium-ion batteries. The results have been validated using two independent measurement techniques and show that large amounts of hydrogen fluoride (HF) may be generated, ranging between 20 and 200 mg/Wh of nominal battery energy capacity. In addition, 15-22 mg/Wh of another potentially toxic gas, phosphoryl fluoride (POF 3 ), was measured in some of the fire tests. Gas emissions when using water mist as extinguishing agent were also investigated. Fluoride gas emission can pose a serious toxic threat and the results are crucial findings for risk assessment and management, especially for large Li-ion battery packs.

  18. Effect of exercise on fluoride metabolism in adult humans: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V Zohoori, Fatemeh; Innerd, Alison; Azevedo, Liane B; Whitford, Gary M; Maguire, Anne

    2015-11-19

    An understanding of all aspects of fluoride metabolism is critical to identify its biological effects and avoid fluoride toxicity in humans. Fluoride metabolism and subsequently its body retention may be affected by physiological responses to acute exercise. This pilot study investigated the effect of exercise on plasma fluoride concentration, urinary fluoride excretion and fluoride renal clearance following no exercise and three exercise intensity conditions in nine healthy adults after taking a 1-mg Fluoride tablet. After no, light, moderate and vigorous exercise, respectively, the mean (SD) baseline-adjusted i) plasma fluoride concentration was 9.6(6.3), 11.4(6.3), 15.6(7.7) and 14.9(10.0) ng/ml; ii) rate of urinary fluoride excretion over 0-8 h was 46(15), 44(22), 34(17) and 36(17) μg/h; and iii) rate of fluoride renal clearance was 26.5(9.0), 27.2(30.4), 13.1(20.4) and 18.3(34.9) ml/min. The observed trend of a rise in plasma fluoride concentration and decline in rate of fluoride renal clearance with increasing exercise intensity needs to be investigated in a larger trial. This study, which provides the first data on the effect of exercise with different intensities on fluoride metabolism in humans, informs sample size planning for any subsequent definitive trial, by providing a robust estimate of the variability of the effect.

  19. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014. Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  20. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014 Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  1. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kata Rošin-Grget

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F– into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard tissue. The source of this fluoride could either be fluorapatite (formed due to the incorporation of fluoride into enamel or calcium fluoride (CaF2-like precipitates, which are formed on the enamel and in the plaque after application of topical fluoride. Calcium fluoride deposits are protected from rapid dissolution by a phosphate –protein coating of salivary origin. At lower pH, the coating is lost and an increased dissolution rate of calcium fluoride occurs. The CaF2, therefore, act as an efficient source of free fluoride ions during the cariogenic challenge. The current evidence indicates that fluoride has a direct and indirect effect on bacterial cells, although the in vivo implications of this are still not clear. Conclusion. A better understanding of the mechanisms of the action of fluoride is very important for caries prevention and control. The effectiveness of fluoride as a cariostatic agent depends on the availability of free fluoride in plaque during cariogenic challenge, i.e. during acid production. Thus, a constant supply of low levels of fluoride in biofilm/saliva/dental interference is considered the most beneficial in preventing dental caries.

  2. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rošin-Grget, Kata; Peroš, Kristina; Sutej, Ivana; Bašić, Krešimir

    2013-11-01

    This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F-) into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard tissue. The source of this fluoride could either be fluorapatite (formed due to the incorporation of fluoride into enamel) or calcium fluoride (CaF2)-like precipitates, which are formed on the enamel and in the plaque after application of topical fluoride. Calcium fluoride deposits are protected from rapid dissolution by a phosphate -protein coating of salivary origin. At lower pH, the coating is lost and an increased dissolution rate of calcium fluoride occurs. The CaF2, therefore, act as an efficient source of free fluoride ions during the cariogenic challenge. The current evidence indicates that fluoride has a direct and indirect effect on bacterial cells, although the in vivo implications of this are still not clear. A better understanding of the mechanisms of the action of fluoride is very important for caries prevention and control. The effectiveness of fluoride as a cariostatic agent depends on the availability of free fluoride in plaque during cariogenic challenge, i.e. during acid production. Thus, a constant supply of low levels of fluoride in biofilm/saliva/dental interference is considered the most beneficial in preventing dental caries. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  3. Fabrication of a novel electrochemical sensor for determination of hydrogen peroxide in different fruit juice samples

    OpenAIRE

    Nasirizadeh, Navid; Shekari, Zahra; Nazari, Ali; Tabatabaee, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    A new hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor is fabricated based on a multiwalled carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNT-GCE) and reactive blue 19 (RB). The charge transfer coefficient, α, and the charge transfer rate constant, ks, of RB adsorbed on MWCNT-GCE were calculated and found to be 0.44 ± 0.01 Hz and 1.9 ± 0.05 Hz, respectively. The catalysis of the electroreduction of H2O2 by RB-MWCNT-GCE is described. The RB-MWCNT-GCE shows a dramatic increase in the peak current and a de...

  4. Fabrication of dense panels in lithium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farcy, P.; Roger, J.; Pointud, R.

    1958-04-01

    The authors report a study aimed at the fabrication of large and dense lithium fluoride panels. This sintered lithium fluoride is then supposed to be used for the construction of barriers of protection against a flow of thermal neutrons. They briefly present the raw material which is used under the form of chamotte obtained through a pre-sintering process which is also described. Grain size measurements and sample preparation are indicated. Shaping, drying, and thermal treatment are briefly described, and characteristics of the sintered product are indicated

  5. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO 4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO 2 F 2 . Studies on the effect of added LiNO 3 or Na 2 WO 4 ·2H 2 O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF 6 content of WF 6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF 6

  6. Preparation of uranium ingots from double fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Boulbin, E.

    1967-05-01

    A simple method has been developed for the preparation of uranium double fluorides and has given a new impetus to the study of the reduction of these compounds with a view to obtaining very pure uranium ingots. This reduction can be carried out using calcium or magnesium as the reducing agent, this latter metal being very interesting from the practical point of view. A comparative study of the heat balances of the reduction processes for the double fluorides and for uranium tetrafluoride has shown that reduction of the double fluorides is possible. The exact experimental conditions for these reductions have been determined. Our study has shown in particular that the reduction of the double salt UF 4 , CaF 2 by magnesium leads to the production of small (20 to 500 g) samples of high-purity uranium with a yield of 99 per cent. (author) [fr

  7. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk of tooth decay" on the label. The Controversy Over Fluoride Opponents of water fluoridation have questioned ... Us Contact Us Partners Editorial Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit ...

  8. Comparative exploration of hydrogen sulfide and water transmembrane free energy surfaces via orthogonal space tempering free energy sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chao; Aitchison, Erick W; Wu, Dongsheng; Zheng, Lianqing; Cheng, Xiaolin; Yang, Wei

    2016-03-05

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S), a commonly known toxic gas compound, possesses unique chemical features that allow this small solute molecule to quickly diffuse through cell membranes. Taking advantage of the recent orthogonal space tempering (OST) method, we comparatively mapped the transmembrane free energy landscapes of H2 S and its structural analogue, water (H2 O), seeking to decipher the molecular determinants that govern their drastically different permeabilities. As revealed by our OST sampling results, in contrast to the highly polar water solute, hydrogen sulfide is evidently amphipathic, and thus inside membrane is favorably localized at the interfacial region, that is, the interface between the polar head-group and nonpolar acyl chain regions. Because the membrane binding affinity of H2 S is mainly governed by its small hydrophobic moiety and the barrier height inbetween the interfacial region and the membrane center is largely determined by its moderate polarity, the transmembrane free energy barriers to encounter by this toxic molecule are very small. Moreover when H2 S diffuses from the bulk solution to the membrane center, the above two effects nearly cancel each other, so as to lead to a negligible free energy difference. This study not only explains why H2 S can quickly pass through cell membranes but also provides a practical illustration on how to use the OST free energy sampling method to conveniently analyze complex molecular processes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Fluorides in groundwater and its impact on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shailaja, K; Johnson, Mary Esther Cynthia

    2007-04-01

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring toxic mineral present in drinking water and causes yellowing of teeth, tooth problems etc. Fluorspar, Cryolite and Fluorapatite are the naturally occurring minerals, from which fluoride finds its path to groundwater through infiltration. In the present study two groundwater samples, Station I and Station II at Hyderabad megacity, the capital of Andhra Pradesh were investigated for one year from January 2001 to December 2001. The average fluoride values were 1.37 mg/l at Station I and 0.91 mg/l at Station II. The permissible limit given by BIS (1983) 0.6-1.2 mg/l and WHO (1984) 1.5 mg/l for fluoride in drinking water. The groundwaters at Station I exceeded the limit while at Station II it was within the limits. The study indicated that fluoride content of 0.5 mg/l is sufficient to cause yellowing of teeth and dental problems.

  10. Fluoride resistance in Streptococcus mutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Fluoride has been used as the most effective anti-caries agent for over five decades. It functions not only on the dental hard tissues, but also as an antimicrobial agent. It is known that oral bacteria are able to develop resistance to fluoride, which may affect the effectiveness of fluoride in

  11. Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lockner, Frida; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy and safety of combined use of topical fluoride products are essential issues that must be monitored. AIM: To assess urinary excretion of fluoride after application of two different dental varnishes containing 2.26% fluoride in 3- to 4-year-old children and to compare...... the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste. DESIGN: Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste....... After a 1-week run-in period, 0.1 mL of the two fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Profluorid Varnish) was topically applied in a randomized order. Baseline and experimental urine was collected during 6-h periods. The fluoride content was determined with an ion-sensitive electrode. RESULTS...

  12. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, F

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the in vitro fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions. Poly(methyl methacrylate) blocks (Perspex, n=3 per group) were painted with 80 ± 5 mg fluoride varnish (n=10) and placed into artificial saliva for 30 min. Then, blocks were placed into either 1% citric acid (pH 2.27) or 0.3% citric acid (pH 3.75) solutions (n=3 per solution and varnish) for 30 min with the solutions being replaced every 5 min. Saliva and acid solutions were analyzed for fluoride content. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA (varnish, solution, time). The three-way interaction was significant (p>0.0001). Fluoride release and release patterns varied considerably between varnishes. Fluoride release in saliva varied by a factor of more than 10 between varnishes. Some varnishes (CavityShield, Nupro, ProFluorid, Vanish) showed higher fluoride release in saliva than during the first 5 min of acid exposure, whereas other varnishes (Acclean, Enamel-Pro, MI Varnish, Vella) showed the opposite behavior. There was little difference between acidic solutions. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes varies considerably and also depends on the dissolution medium. Bearing in mind the limitations of laboratory research, the consumption of acidic drinks after fluoride varnish application should be avoided to optimize the benefit/risk ratio.

  13. Teor de fluoretos em infusões de chá verde (Camellia sinensis Fluoride content in green tea infusions (Camellia sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Reto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the influence of green tea consumption on fluoride ingestion. The extraction conditions of fluorides from green tea infusions were defined and nine brands of green tea available in Portugal were analyzed. The quantification of fluorides in the green tea was preceded by the implementation and validation of the potentiometric method (commercial fluoride selective electrode. The concentration of fluorides in the samples ranged from 0. 8 to 2. 0 mg L-1.

  14. Defects study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon samples and their relation with the substrate and deposition conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwich, R.

    2009-07-01

    The goal of this work is to study the properties of the defects aiming to explore the types of defects and the effect of various deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, the kind of the substrate, gas pressure and deposition rate. Two kinds of samples have been used; The first one was a series of Schottky diodes, and the second one a series of solar cells (p-i-n junction) deposited on crystalline silicon or on corning glass substrates with different deposition parameters. The deposition parameters were chosen to obtain materials whose their structures varying from amorphous to microcrystalline silicon including polymorphous silicon. Our results show that the polymorphous silicon samples deposited at high deposition rates present the best photovoltaic properties in comparison with those deposited at low rates. Also we found that the defects concentration in high deposition rate samples is less at least by two orders than that obtained in low deposition rate polymorphous, microcrystalline and amorphous samples. This study shows also that there is no effect of the substrate, or the thin films of highly doped amorphous silicon deposited on the substrate, on the creation and properties of these defects. Finally, different experimental methods have been used; a comparison between their results has been presented. (author)

  15. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meublat, L.

    1989-10-01

    The synthesis of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states was attempted from dioxide RuO 2 and tetroxide RuO 4 . Three fluorinating agents were used: fluorine, chlorine trifluoride and krypton difluoride. The reactions were achieved in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride at room temperature. Thus, the reaction of RuO 4 with CIF 3 enabled us to prepare chloryl hexafluororuthenate (V), CIO 2 + RuF 6 - , a new compound well identified by vibrational spectroscopy (infra-red and Raman), the structure of which was determined. The reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 4 gave the oxide tetrafluoride RuOF 4 , the previously published syntheses and properties of which were not in agreement with each other. This compound was definitely characterized here by chemical analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The product of thermal decomposition (70 0 C) of RuOF 4 is presumably RuF 4 since only oxygen is liberated during this decomposition. At last, the reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 2 probably leads to the formation of the new oxide fluoride RuO 2 F 4 . Indeed, no oxygen is given off during this reaction, the chemical analysis of the red-orange coloured solid residue is almost in agreement with the one proposed and its infra-red absorption spectrum indicates the presence of ruthenium-oxygen and ruthenium-terminal and bridging fluorine bonds [fr

  16. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meublat, L.

    1989-01-01

    The synthesis of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states was attempted from dioxide RuO 2 and tetroxide RuO 4 . Three fluorinating agents were used: fluorine, chlorine trifluoride and krypton difluoride. The reactions were achieved in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride at room temperature. Thus, the reaction of RuO 4 with CIF 3 enabled us to prepare chloryl hexafluororuthenate (V), ClO 2 + RuF 6 - , a new compound well idendified by vibrational spectroscopy (infra-red and Raman), the structure of which was determined. The reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 4 gave the oxide tetrafluoride RuOF 4 , the previously published syntheses and properties of which were not in agreement with each other. This compound was definitely characterized here by chemical analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The product of thermal decomposition (70 0 C) of RuOF 4 is presumably RuF 4 since only oxygen is liberated during this decomposition. At last, the reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 2 probably leads to the formation of the new oxide fluoride RuO 2 F 4 . Indeed, no oxygen is given off during this reaction, the chemical analysis of the red-orange coloured solid residue is almost in agreement with the one proposed and its infra-red absorption spectrum indicates the presence of ruthenium-oxygen and ruthenium-terminal and bridging fluorine bonds [fr

  17. Effect of fluoride pretreatment on the solubility of synthetic carbonated apatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, A B; Zhuang, H; Baig, A A; Higuchi, W I

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to address the following question: How is the solubility of fluoride-pretreated carbonated apatite (CAP) in aqueous acidic media related to the equilibrium solution fluoride and/or the CAP adsorbed fluoride levels? A CAP sample prepared by a precipitation method at 70 degrees C containing approximately 6% carbonate was fluoride-treated (F adsorption from neutral aqueous solutions) to yield a approximately 1000 ppm F CAP and a approximately 3300 ppm F CAP. Metastable equilibrium solubility distributions were determined in acetate buffers at pH 5.0. Solution fluoride, calcium, phosphate, and pH were determined from the equilibrated solutions. The equilibrium solution fluoride levels were extremely low, e.g., as low as approximately 0.10 ppb to approximately 0.30 ppb at 50% dissolved for the two CAP preparations. The approximately 3300 ppm F CAP yielded a lower solubility than the approximately 1000 ppm F CAP (shift in the mean pKHAP value of 1.5-2 units). This can be attributed to the lower solution F(-) for the sample containing approximately 1000 ppm fluoride compared with the approximately 3300 ppm fluoride-containing CAP. These important findings suggest that a fluoride treatment simply may provide an adsorption fluoride depot for subsequent release, providing a solution fluoride effect upon the CAP solubility and not necessarily any intrinsic alteration of the mineral solubility.

  18. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p......H and available fluoride concentration with equilibrium being achieved within 24 h. A site activation process involving the uptake of fluoride was also observed at the initial stages of sorption. This behaviour was attributed to a layer expansion process of the clay during sorption. The maximum fluoride sorption...... capacity was found to be 18.3 meq/100 g at pH 6 and 8.6 meq/100 g at pH 7. A competitive Langmuir sorption isotherm where sorption is dependant on both pH and fluoride concentration is employed to characterise the experimental sorption and desorption data. The sorption and desorption isotherms revealed...

  20. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of ‘Fluoride and Oral Health’ has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fl uoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published...

  1. New efficient hydrogen process production from organosilane hydrogen carriers derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunel, Jean Michel [Unite URMITE, UMR 6236 CNRS, Faculte de Medecine et de Pharmacie, Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille 05 (France)

    2010-04-15

    While the source of hydrogen constitutes a significant scientific challenge, addressing issues of hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery is equally important. None of the current hydrogen storage options, liquefied or high pressure H{sub 2} gas, metal hydrides, etc.. satisfy criteria of size, costs, kinetics, and safety for use in transportation. In this context, we have discovered a methodology for the production of hydrogen on demand, in high yield, under kinetic control, from organosilane hydrogen carriers derivatives and methanol as co-reagent under mild conditions catalyzed by a cheap ammonium fluoride salt. Finally, the silicon by-products can be efficiently recycle leading to an environmentally friendly source of energy. (author)

  2. Bleaching Gels Containing Calcium and Fluoride: Effect on Enamel Erosion Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra B. Borges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP bleaching gel modified or not by the addition of calcium and fluoride on enamel susceptibility to erosion. Bovine enamel samples (3 mm in diameter were divided into four groups (n=15 according to the bleaching agent: control—without bleaching (C; 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP; 35% HP with the addition of 2% calcium gluconate (HP + Ca; 35% HP with the addition of 0.6% sodium fluoride (HP + F. The bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface for 40 min, and the specimens were subjected to erosive challenge with Sprite Zero and remineralization with artificial saliva for 5 days. Enamel wear was assessed using profilometry. The data were analyzed by ANOVA/ Tukey’s test (P<0.05. There were significant differences among the groups (P=0.009. The most enamel wear was seen for C (3.37±0.80 μm, followed by HP (2.89 ± 0.98 μm and HP + F (2.72 ± 0.64 μm. HP + Ca (2.31 ± 0.92 μm was the only group able to significantly reduce enamel erosion compared to C. The application of HP bleaching agent did not increase the enamel susceptibility to erosion. However, the addition of calcium gluconate to the HP gel resulted in reduced susceptibility of the enamel to erosion.

  3. [The effect of fluoride-containing tooth paste on dental plaque and on fluoride level in the mouth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomori, H

    1989-01-01

    Various kinds of fluoride have been used for a long time and there are many reports concerning fluorides and their effects. Recently, the caries-inhibiting action of fluoride-containing tooth paste has been given much attention. In this study, I tried to clarify the residual time and amount of fluoride derived from the fluoride-containing tooth paste in the mouth, as well as to assess possible variation in bacterial composition in the dental plaque bacteriologically and biochemically. In the study on the fluoride clearance from the mouth, both 1.0 g and 0.5 g of paste showed the same reduction rates; and about an 80% reduction was recognized between the value at 3 minutes and that at 30 minutes, and about a 40% reduction from the 30-minute to the 60-minute interval. Next, a study on the variation in plaque bacteria was carried out. The total number of the CFU on each plate was not different between samples obtained before and after the use of the tooth paste; moreover, no difference was noted between aerobic and anaerobic culture. However, when plaque before and after brushing with fluoride-containing tooth paste were cultured in 10% sucrose solution, the differences of acid production such as lactic acid, acetic acid, and formic acid were demonstrated. Namely, these acid productions were inhibited after the use of fluoride, especially lactic acid was strongly inhibited. On the other hand, when Str. mutans from the plaque obtained after the use of fluoride-containing tooth paste was cultured in fluoride-free BHI broth, the inhibition of acid from carbohydrates was not shown clearly.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Sources of fluoride pollution in Kasur district, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.H.; Haq, M.M.I.

    2005-01-01

    Serious bone problems were reported in certain localities in Pakistan due to contamination of drinking water by fluoride pollution. Against WHO recommended threshold limit of 0.7 mg/L, about 40 mg/L of fluoride is determined by ion chromatographic technique of HPLC. The compositions of pollutants were investigated in the present study by examination the chemical and mineralogical studies of water and soil samples. It is found that main problem in Manga Mandi area of District Kasur, was caused due to the decomposition of phosphorus containing minerals in soil under acidic conditions. The other sources of fluoride contamination in different areas of Pakistan is being investigated. (author)

  5. Spectrophotometric determination of fluorides in water with Hach equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta L, E.

    1994-11-01

    The spectrophotometric method for the determination of the fluoride ion in water, demineralized water, raw waters, laundry waters and waters treated with ion exchange resins , using the technique and the SPADNS coloring indicated in the operation manual of the Hach equipment is described. This method covers the determination of the fluoride ion in the range from 0 to 2 mg/l on 25 ml. of radioactive base sample. These limits can be variable if the size of the used aliquot one is changed for the final determination of the fluoride ion. (Author)

  6. Fluoride exposure of East African consumers using alkaline salt deposits known as magadi (trona) as a food preparation aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joan Maj; Dahi, E.

    2002-01-01

    that the fluoride content varied significantly even for magadi originating from the individual lake, e. g. the fluoride content in magadi from Lake Magadi was between 0.1 and 8.7 mg g(-1). In a lump of magadi originating from Lake Magadi, it was found that the fluoride content in 20 smaller part samples was subject...

  7. Letter Report: Stable Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotope Analysis of B-Complex Perched Water Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moran, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nims, Megan K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saunders, Danielle L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-13

    Fine-grained sediments associated with the Cold Creek Unit at Hanford have caused the formation of a perched water aquifer in the deep vadose zone at the B Complex area, which includes waste sites in the 200-DV-1 Operable Unit and the single-shell tank farms in Waste Management Area B-BX-BY. High levels of contaminants, such as uranium, technetium-99, and nitrate, make this aquifer a continuing source of contamination for the groundwater located a few meters below the perched zone. Analysis of deuterium (2H) and 18-oxygen (18O) of nine perched water samples from three different wells was performed. Samples represent time points from hydraulic tests performed on the perched aquifer using the three wells. The isotope analyses showed that the perched water had δ2H and δ18O ratios consistent with the regional meteoric water line, indicating that local precipitation events at the Hanford site likely account for recharge of the perched water aquifer. Data from the isotope analysis can be used along with pumping and recovery data to help understand the perched water dynamics related to aquifer size and hydraulic control of the aquifer in the future.

  8. Industrial fluoride pollution: chronic fluoride poisoning in Cornwall Island cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krook, L.; Maylin, G.A.

    1979-04-01

    An aluminum plant on the south bank of the St. Lawrence River, southwest of Cornwall Island, Ontario, Canada, has emitted 0.816 metric tons of fluoride daily since 1973. Considerably higher amounts were emitted from 1959 to 1973. The plant was designated as the major source of fluoride emissions impacting on Cornwall Island. Cattle located on this island showed signs of chronic fluoride poisoning. This poisoning was manifested clinically by stunted growth and dental fluorosis to a degree of severe interference with drinking and mastication. This Cornwall Island herds study indicates that the established tolerance level of fluoride for performance of dairy and beef cattle is not valid since the tolerance level was set based on experiments with healthy calves which were exposed to dietary fluoride from 3 to 4 months of age and not on cattle which were chronically exposed to fluoride from conception to death. 56 references.

  9. Fluoride in the drinking water of Pakistan and the possible risk of crippling fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Tahir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To explore the possibility of fluoride toxicity, 747 water samples were collected from surface water and groundwater sources of 16 major cities of Pakistan, adopting a uniform sampling design with distribution of samples: Lahore (79, Kasur (46, Faisalabad (30, Khushab (50, Chakwal (51, Mianwali (30, Jhelum (53, Bahawalpur (60, Karachi (60, Mirpur Khas (55, Peshawar (38, Risalpur (35, Quetta (81, Ziarat (21, Loralai (21, and Mastung (37. Comparison of analytical findings with WHO Guidelines of Drinking Water for Fluoride (i.e., 1.5 ppm has concluded that 16% of the monitored water sources have fluoride concentration beyond the permissible safe limit of 1.5 mg L−1 falling in the concentration range of 1.6–25 mg L−1. The highest fluoride contamination (22% is detected in the Balochistan province followed by 19% in Punjab province. Comparatively higher fluoride levels of > 20% in the groundwater sources like hand pumps supported the possibility of increased groundwater contamination as excessive fluoride concentrations are expected to come from calcium-poor aquifers and in areas where fluoride-bearing minerals are common or where cation exchange of sodium for calcium occurs. Field observations have also indicated the prevalence of fluoride-associated health implications in the study areas with excessive fluoride in water sources. Findings of this study have provided bidirectional vision for the epidemiological investigations as well as to mitigate the issues in the affected vicinities of fluoride-rich areas.

  10. Histopathological changes of renal tissue following sodium fluoride administration in two consecutive generations of mice. Correlation with the urinary elimination of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimcevici Poesina, Nicoleta; Bălălău, Cristian; Nimigean, Vanda Roxana; Nimigean, Victor; Ion, Ion; Baconi, Daniela; Bârcă, Maria; Băran Poesina, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the toxic effects (evaluated as histopathological changes) of sodium fluoride on the kidney in two consecutive generations of NMRI mice. An attempt to correlate the toxicity with the urinary elimination of fluoride has been made, as urinary fluoride excretion has been widely used as an indicator of fluoride intake and exposure. Six mixed (males and females) animal groups have been constituted by dividing the populations of mice derived from pregnant females (named "mothers" 0.5 mg sodium fluoride) treated with 0.5 mg sodium fluoride by daily gavage and pregnant females (named "mothers" 0.25 mg sodium fluoride) treated with 0.25 mg sodium fluoride by daily gavage; three types of sodium fluoride treatments were administrated: homeopathic, allopathic-homeopathic and allopathic. When the animals reached the adulthood, by randomization, they were selected in pairs for giving birth to the second generation of mice. No treatments were administrated to the second generation of mice; thus, the urinary elimination of fluoride in the second generation is attributed to exposure at sodium fluoride before birth. The administration of sodium fluoride to the first generation (F1) is realized until the mice reached the adulthood. For the first generation, the urine was collected at three times, every three weeks: at the age of four weeks, seven weeks and 11 weeks; single sampling urine, at the age of four weeks, has been conducted for the second generation. The urine samples have been analyzed using the ion selective electrode method for fluoride. For the histopathological examination, the animals were killed by cervical dislocation; the kidneys were collected in a 10% formalin solution. The preparation of samples for optical microscopy was realized with Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. The results indicate that the elimination of fluoride was similar (at the second evaluation, at 7-week-old of the first generation) for the both generations

  11. Bone fluoride determination for clinical investigation of osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, S.S.; McNeill, K.G.; Hitchman, A.J.W.; Mernagh, J.R.; Lin, S.C.; Harrison, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium fluoride is the therapeutic agent known to stimulate bone growth with net increase in bone mineral mass in patients afflicted with osteoporosis, a common crippling bone disease. In order to study the effect of sodium fluoride treatment, a method of analysis for fluoride in bone has been developed using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The technique proved to be simple, fast, reliable and non-destructive. Thus the sample, often bone biopsy specimen, is available, after fluoride analysis, for further histological studies. NAA was used to analyze both fluoride and calcium in the bone and the results expressed as F/Ca ratio was meaningful since it normalizes the fluoride to bone mineral mass which is the important factor in this study. Four years of fluoride treatment of osteoporotics showed significant increase of bone mass (up to 30%) in several patients. These increases were associated with histological bone picture of fluorosis. In the case of patients with renal osteodystrophy, there was evidence that fluorosis contributes to the bone disease. 3 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  12. Spatial distribution mapping of drinking water fluoride levels in Karnataka, India: fluoride-related health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Chitta R; Shahnawaz, Khijmatgar; Kumari, Divya; Chowdhury, Avidyuti; Bedi, Raman; Lynch, Edward; Harding, Stewart; Grootveld, Martin

    2016-11-01

    (1) To estimate the concentrations of fluoride in drinking water throughout different zones and districts of the state of Karnataka. (2) To investigate the variation of fluoride concentration in drinking water from different sources, and its relationships to daily temperature and rainfall status in the regional districts. (3) To develop an updated fluoride concentration intensity map of the state of Karnataka, and to evaluate these data in the context of fluoride-related health effects such as fluorosis and their prevalence. Aqueous standard solutions of 10, 100 and 1,000 ppm fluoride (F - ) were prepared with analytical grade Na + /F - and a buffer; TISAB II was incorporated in both calibration standard and analysis solutions in order to remove the potentially interfering effects of trace metal ions. This analysis was performed using an ion-selective electrode (ISE), and mean determination readings for n = 5 samples collected at each Karnataka water source were recorded. The F - concentration in drinking water in Karnataka state was found to vary substantially, with the highest mean values recorded being in the north-eastern zone (1.61 ppm), and the lowest in the south-western one (only 0.41 ppm). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that there were very highly significant 'between-zone' and 'between-districts-within-zones' sources of variation (p water source F - levels within this state. The southern part of Karnataka has low levels of F - in its drinking water, and may require fluoridation treatment in order to mitigate for dental caries and further ailments related to fluoride deficiency. However, districts within the north-eastern region have contrastingly high levels of fluoride, an observation which has been linked to dental and skeletal fluorosis. This highlights a major requirement for interventional actions in order to ensure maintenance of the recommended range of fluoride concentrations (0.8-1.5 ppm) in Karnataka's drinking water

  13. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Vineet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralization of bone and teeth. At high levels it has been known to cause dental and skeletal fluorosis. There are suggested effects of very high levels of fluoride on various body organs and genetic material. The purpose of this paper is to review the various aspects of fluoride and its importance in human life.

  14. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Vineet; Bhatnagar, Maheep

    2009-01-01

    Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralization of bone and teeth. At high levels it has been known to cause dental and skeletal fluorosis. There are suggested effects of very high levels of fluoride on various body organs and genetic material. The purpose of this paper is to review the various aspects of fluoride and its importance in human life.

  15. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.L.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag formed in the production of metallic uranium by the reduction of depleted uranium tetrafluoride with metallic magnesium in a retort wherein the slag contains the free metals magnesium and uranium and also oxides and fluorides of the metals. The slag having a radioactivity level of at least about 7,000 rhoCi/gm. The method comprises the steps of: grinding the slag to a median particle size of about 200 microns; contacting the ground slag in a reaction zone with an acid having a strength of from about 0.5 to 1.5 N for a time of from about 4 to about 20 hours in the presence of a catalytic amount of iron; removing the liquid product; treating the particulate solid product; repeating the last two steps at least one more time to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 rhoCi/gm

  16. On-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples using elemental chromium: An extension for high temperature elemental-analyzer techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Gilevska, Tetyana; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Meijer, Harro A.J.; Brand, Willi A.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature conversion (HTC) technique using an elemental analyzer with a glassy carbon tube and filling (temperature conversion/elemental analysis, TC/EA) is a widely used method for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water and many solid and liquid organic samples with analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method may produce inaccurate δ2H results, with values deviating by more than 20 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1‰) from the true value for some materials. We show that a single-oven, chromium-filled elemental analyzer coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability for hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic substances (Cr-EA method). Hot chromium maximizes the yield of molecular hydrogen in a helium carrier gas by irreversibly and quantitatively scavenging all reactive elements except hydrogen. In contrast, under TC/EA conditions, heteroelements like nitrogen or chlorine (and other halogens) can form hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen chloride (HCl) and this can cause isotopic fractionation. The Cr-EA technique thus expands the analytical possibilities for on-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples significantly. This method yielded reproducibility values (1-sigma) for δ2H measurements on water and caffeine samples of better than 1.0 and 0.5 mUr, respectively. To overcome handling problems with water as the principal calibration anchor for hydrogen isotopic measurements, we have employed an effective and simple strategy using reference waters or other liquids sealed in silver-tube segments. These crimped silver tubes can be employed in both the Cr-EA and TC/EA techniques. They simplify considerably the normalization of hydrogen-isotope measurement data to the VSMOW-SLAP (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water-Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, and their use improves accuracy of the data by eliminating evaporative loss and associated isotopic fractionation while

  17. On-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples using elemental chromium: an extension for high temperature elemental-analyzer techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Gilevska, Tetyana; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Meijer, Harro A J; Brand, Willi A; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature conversion (HTC) technique using an elemental analyzer with a glassy carbon tube and filling (temperature conversion/elemental analysis, TC/EA) is a widely used method for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water and many solid and liquid organic samples with analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method may produce inaccurate δ(2)H results, with values deviating by more than 20 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1‰) from the true value for some materials. We show that a single-oven, chromium-filled elemental analyzer coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability for hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic substances (Cr-EA method). Hot chromium maximizes the yield of molecular hydrogen in a helium carrier gas by irreversibly and quantitatively scavenging all reactive elements except hydrogen. In contrast, under TC/EA conditions, heteroelements like nitrogen or chlorine (and other halogens) can form hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen chloride (HCl) and this can cause isotopic fractionation. The Cr-EA technique thus expands the analytical possibilities for on-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples significantly. This method yielded reproducibility values (1-sigma) for δ(2)H measurements on water and caffeine samples of better than 1.0 and 0.5 mUr, respectively. To overcome handling problems with water as the principal calibration anchor for hydrogen isotopic measurements, we have employed an effective and simple strategy using reference waters or other liquids sealed in silver-tube segments. These crimped silver tubes can be employed in both the Cr-EA and TC/EA techniques. They simplify considerably the normalization of hydrogen-isotope measurement data to the VSMOW-SLAP (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water-Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, and their use improves accuracy of the data by eliminating evaporative loss and associated isotopic fractionation while

  18. The effect of water purification systems on fluoride content of drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of different water purification systems on the fluoride content of drinking water and to compare the efficacy of these water purification systems in reducing the fluoride content. Materials and Methods: Five different water purification systems were tested in this study. They were reverse osmosis, distillation, activated carbon, Reviva ® , and candle filter. The water samples in the study were of two types, viz, borewell water and tap water, these being commonly used by the people of Davangere City, Karnataka. The samples were collected before and after purification, and fluoride analysis was done using fluoride ion-specific electrode. Results: The results showed that the systems based on reverse osmosis, viz, reverse osmosis system and Reviva ® showed maximum reduction in fluoride levels, the former proving to be more effective than the latter; followed by distillation and the activated carbon system, with the least reduction being brought about by candle filter. The amount of fluoride removed by the purification system varied between the system and from one source of water to the other. Interpretation and Conclusion: Considering the beneficial effects of fluoride on caries prevention; when drinking water is subjected to water purification systems that reduce fluoride significantly below the optimal level, fluoride supplementation may be necessary. The efficacy of systems based on reverse osmosis in reducing the fluoride content of water indicates their potential for use as defluoridation devices.

  19. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar Vineet; Bhatnagar Maheep

    2009-01-01

    Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralizat...

  20. Level of Fluoride in Soil, Grain and Water in Jalgaon District, Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rahul Gaybarao; Dodamani, Arun Suresh; Vishwakarma, Prashanth; Jadhav, Harish Chaitram; Khairnar, Mahesh Ravindra; Deshmukh, Manjiri Abhay; Wadgave, Umesh

    2017-02-01

    Fluoride has an influence on both oral as well as systemic health. The major source of fluoride to body is through drinking water as well as through diet. Staple diet mainly depends on local environmental factors, food grains grown locally, its availability etc. Determination of fluoride level in these food grains is important. So, estimation of the amount of fluoride in grains and its relation to the sources of fluoride used for their cultivation viz., soil and water is important. To estimate the relation of fluoride concentration in grains (Jowar) with respect to that of soil and water used for their cultivation. Fifteen samples each of soil, water and grains were collected using standardized method from the same farm fields of randomly selected villages of Jalgaon district. Fluoride ion concentration was determined in laboratory using SPADNS technique. Mean difference in fluoride levels in between the groups were analyzed using ANOVA and Post-Hoc Tukey test. Linear regression method was applied to analyse the association of the fluoride content of grain with water and soil. There was a significant difference in between mean fluoride levels of soil and water (pwater and grain was found to be non significant (p=0.591). Also fluoride levels in all the three groups showed significant association with each other. Fluoride level of soil, grains and water should be adjusted to an optimum level. Soil has positive correlation with respect to uptake of fluoride by Jowar grains. So, Jowar grains with optimum fluoride content should be made available in the commercial markets so that oral and general health can be benefitted.

  1. Sequential enzymatic derivatization coupled with online microdialysis sampling for simultaneous profiling of mouse tumor extracellular hydrogen peroxide, lactate, and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Cheng-Kuan; Tseng, Po-Jen; Chiu, Hsien-Ting; Del Vall, Andrea; Huang, Yu-Fen; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2017-03-01

    Probing tumor extracellular metabolites is a vitally important issue in current cancer biology. In this study an analytical system was constructed for the in vivo monitoring of mouse tumor extracellular hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), lactate, and glucose by means of microdialysis (MD) sampling and fluorescence determination in conjunction with a smart sequential enzymatic derivatization scheme-involving a loading sequence of fluorogenic reagent/horseradish peroxidase, microdialysate, lactate oxidase, pyruvate, and glucose oxidase-for step-by-step determination of sampled H 2 O 2 , lactate, and glucose in mouse tumor microdialysate. After optimization of the overall experimental parameters, the system's detection limit reached as low as 0.002 mM for H 2 O 2 , 0.058 mM for lactate, and 0.055 mM for glucose, based on 3 μL of microdialysate, suggesting great potential for determining tumor extracellular concentrations of lactate and glucose. Spike analyses of offline-collected mouse tumor microdialysate and monitoring of the basal concentrations of mouse tumor extracellular H 2 O 2 , lactate, and glucose, as well as those after imparting metabolic disturbance through intra-tumor administration of a glucose solution through a prior-implanted cannula, were conducted to demonstrate the system's applicability. Our results evidently indicate that hyphenation of an MD sampling device with an optimized sequential enzymatic derivatization scheme and a fluorescence spectrometer can be used successfully for multi-analyte monitoring of tumor extracellular metabolites in living animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of fluoride source in ground water using petrographic studies in Dashtestan area, south of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaleb-Looie, Sedigheh; Moore, Farid, ,, Dr.

    2010-05-01

    The groundwater occurs in Dashtestan area, contains a high level of fluoride. Since groundwater is vastly used for drinking and irrigation purposes, the local residents are at high risk of fluoride toxicity, as already evidenced by the occurrence of dental Fluorosis in many residents. 35 surface and groundwater samples were collected in September, 2009. The results show that in 23 samples the fluoride concentration is above the permissible level (1.5ppm). Petrographic study of lithological units in the catchment area indicates that mica minerals are the most probable source of fluoride content in the study area.

  3. An Investigation of Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water of Sanganer Tehsil, Jaipur District, Rajasthan, India and Defluoridation from Plant Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Arif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty water samples of 20 villages of Sanganer tehsil, Jaipur district were analyzed for determining fluoride ion concentrations. High fluoride containing regions were identified on the basis of fluoride levels of the water samples and also on the prevalence rate of dental and skeletal fluorosis of the study area. Fluoride maps, which distinguish the regions containing the water sources of different ranges of fluoride ion concentrations, were also prepared by isopleth’s technique, a statistical method. Water samples containing high fluoride levels were defluoridated with low-cost materials prepared from plant byproducts. These materials successfully decrease the fluoride ions concentration to an acceptable limit (from 0.5 to 1.5 mg/L without disturbing drinking water quality standards.

  4. Dynamics of ligand exchange and association processes in solutions of transition 3d-metal fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazmutdinova, G.A.; Shtyrlin, V.G.; Zakharov, A.V.; Sal'nikov, Yu.I.

    1993-01-01

    By 19 NMR in combination with ESR spectroscopy rate constants and activation parameters of fluoride-ion exchange reactions in solutions of VOF 5 3- and FeF 6 3- complexes were determined. Associative character of the studied reactions of ligand exchange is shown. Dependence of fluoride complex reactivity on the charge, electron structure of the central ion and formation of hydrogen bonds of coordinated F - ions with solvent molecules was demonstrated. Stability constants, rates of formation and dissociation of intercomplex associates in fluoride solutions were ascertained

  5. Determination of zirconium by fluoride ion selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanty, B.N.; Sonar, V.R.; Gaikwad, R.; Raul, S.; Das, D.K.; Prakash, A.; Afzal, Md.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Zirconium is used in a wide range of applications including nuclear clad, catalytic converters, surgical appliances, metallurgical furnaces, superconductors, ceramics, lamp filaments, anti corrosive alloys and photographical purposes. Irradiation testing of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr fuel pins has also demonstrated their feasibility as fuel in liquid metal reactors. Different methods that are employed for the determination of zirconium are spectrophotometry, potentiometry, neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometry. Ion-selective electrode (ISE), selective to zirconium ion has been studied for the direct potentiometric measurements of zirconium ions in various samples. In the present work, an indirect method has been employed for the determination of zirconium in zirconium nitrate sample using fluoride ion selective electrode. This method is based on the addition of known excess amount of fluoride ion to react with the zirconium ion to produce zirconium tetra fluoride at about pH 2-3, followed by determination of residual fluoride ion selective electrode. The residual fluoride ion concentrations were determined from the electrode potential data using calibration plot. Subsequently, zirconium ion concentrations were determined from the concentration of consumed fluoride ions. A precision of about 2% (RSD) with the mean recovery of more than 94% has been achieved for the determination of zirconium at the concentration of 4.40 X 10 -3 moles lit -1

  6. Tissue distributions of fluoride and its toxicity in the gills of a freshwater teleost, Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jinling; Chen, Jianjie; Wang, Jundong; Wu, Xiangtian; Li, Yundong; Xie, Lingtian

    2013-04-15

    Fish take up fluoride directly from water and are susceptible to fluoride contamination of their environment. In this study, we examined the tissue distributions of fluoride and its toxicity in the gills of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) chronically exposed to fluoride. Carp were exposed to a range of aqueous fluoride (35-124 mg/L) and sampled at 30, 60 and 90 days. The accumulation of fluoride in the tissues increased with the level and duration of exposure. Steady state was not achieved under the experimental conditions. The gills accumulated the highest levels of fluoride followed by the liver>brain>kidney>muscle>intestine. A dose-dependent inhibition was observed for the enzyme activities of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase in the gills after the fish were exposed for 90 days. Also, accumulation of fluoride was associated with the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and a dose-dependent stimulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the gill tissues, suggesting that fluoride promoted oxidative stress in the fish. Microscopic examinations revealed injuries to gill tissues and chloride cells, with the severity of injury increasing with exposure concentration. These results suggest that chronic exposure to elevated concentrations of fluoride may induce toxicity in the common carp. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of fluoride toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Olivier; Arreola-Mendoza, Laura; Del Razo, Luz María

    2010-11-05

    Halfway through the twentieth century, fluoride piqued the interest of toxicologists due to its deleterious effects at high concentrations in human populations suffering from fluorosis and in in vivo experimental models. Until the 1990s, the toxicity of fluoride was largely ignored due to its "good reputation" for preventing caries via topical application and in dental toothpastes. However, in the last decade, interest in its undesirable effects has resurfaced due to the awareness that this element interacts with cellular systems even at low doses. In recent years, several investigations demonstrated that fluoride can induce oxidative stress and modulate intracellular redox homeostasis, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content, as well as alter gene expression and cause apoptosis. Genes modulated by fluoride include those related to the stress response, metabolic enzymes, the cell cycle, cell-cell communications and signal transduction. The primary purpose of this review is to examine recent findings from our group and others that focus on the molecular mechanisms of the action of inorganic fluoride in several cellular processes with respect to potential physiological and toxicological implications. This review presents an overview of the current research on the molecular aspects of fluoride exposure with emphasis on biological targets and their possible mechanisms of involvement in fluoride cytotoxicity. The goal of this review is to enhance understanding of the mechanisms by which fluoride affects cells, with an emphasis on tissue-specific events in humans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sustainable approach for recycling waste lamb and chicken bones for fluoride removal from water followed by reusing fluoride-bearing waste in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Zainab Z; AbdelKareem, Hala N

    2015-11-01

    Sustainable management of waste materials is an attractive approach for modern societies. In this study, recycling of raw waste lamb and chicken bones for defluoridation of water has been estimated. The effects of several experimental parameters including contact time, pH, bone dose, fluoride initial concentration, bone grains size, agitation rate, and the effect of co-existing anions in actual samples of wastewater were studied for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions. Results indicated excellent fluoride removal efficiency up to 99.4% and 99.8% using lamb and chicken bones, respectively at fluoride initial concentration of 10 mg F/L and 120 min contact time. Maximum fluoride uptake was obtained at neutral pH range 6-7. Fluoride removal kinetic was well described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Both, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models could fit the experimental data well with correlation coefficient values >0.99 suggesting favorable conditions of the process. Furthermore, for complete sustainable management of waste bones, the resulted fluoride-bearing sludge was reused in concrete mixes to partially replace sand. Tests of the mechanical properties of fluoride sludge-modified concrete mixes indicated a potential environmentally friendly approach to dispose fluoride sludge in concrete and simultaneously enhance concrete properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Study on the preparation and stability of uranium carbide samples for the determination of oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen by fusion under high vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Garcia, M.

    1966-01-01

    In view of the high reactivity of uranium carbide, the method employed for the preparation of the sample for the analysis of its gas content: oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen, has a decisive influence on the analytical results. The variation in the O 2 , H 2 and N 2 content of the uranium carbide has been studied in this paper with the methods utilized for the sample preparation (grinding and cutting). (Author) 9 refs

  10. Groundwater fluoride contamination and its possible health implications in Indi taluk of Vijayapura District (Karnataka State), India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugran, Vidyavati; Desai, Naveen N; Chakraborti, Dipankar; Masali, Kallappa A; Mantur, Prakash; Kulkarni, Shreepad; Deshmukh, Niranjan; Chadchan, Kailash S; Das, Swastika N; Tanksali, Anuradha S; Arwikar, Asha S; Guggarigoudar, Suresh P; Vallabha, Tejaswini; Patil, Shailaja S; Das, Kusal K

    2017-10-01

    Groundwater fluoride concentration and fluoride-related health problems were studied in twenty-two villages of Indi taluk of Vijayapura district, Karnataka, India. Present study (2015) was also used to compare groundwater fluoride concentration in same 22 villages with previous government report (2000). Groundwater fluoride concentrations of 62 bore wells of 22 villages were analyzed by using an ion-sensitive electrode. A total of 660 adults and 600 children were screened for fluorosis symptoms and signs. Sixty clinically suspected fluorosis patients' urine samples were further analyzed for fluoride. The mean value (1.22 ± 0.75 mg/L) of fluoride concentration of 62 bore wells and 54.83 % bore wells with ≥1.0 mg/L of fluoride concentrations in Indi taluk indicates higher than the permissible limit of drinking water fluoride concentration recommended for India. Clinical symptoms like arthritis, joint pains, gastrointestinal discomfort and lower limb deformities with high urinary fluoride concentrations in some subjects suggest fluorosis. Results also showed an increase in groundwater fluoride concentration of the same 22 villages between previous and present study. Preliminary arthritis symptom of the villagers could be due to drinking fluoride-contaminated water. Increase in fluoride concentration with time to the bore wells definitely indicates future danger.

  11. The determination of small amounts of fluoride in uranium compounds by use of an ion-selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, B.M.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of fluoride in uranium metal and oxide at levels from 16 p.p.m. upwards. Uranium is separated from fluoride by extraction into a solution of di(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in carbon tetrachloride. The fluoride remaining in the aqueous phase is determined by potentiometric measurement with an ion-selective electrode. A correction is made for the fluoride lost during the dissolution or extraction step, or both, which is based on a determination of the apparent loss of fluoride on spiked samples that are taken through the whole procedure [af

  12. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF STRONTIUM FLUORIDE POWDERS ACTIVATED BY NEODYMIUM FLUORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kuznetsov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Study. The paper deals with preparation processes of ultradisperse, homogeneous powder Sr1-хNdхF2+х (х= 0.003-0.2, with use of ammonium fluoride as the fluorinating agent taken over 114-120 % from stoichiometry. Method. Nitrate of strontium, neodymium nitrate hexahydrate, with the content equal to 99. 99 % of the basic substance and ammonium fluoride were used as the source of substances. Activated powders of strontium fluoride were obtained by the method of deposition from aqueous solutions by washing the precipitate with a solution of ammonium fluoride, taken over 114 - 120% from stoichiometry. The washed precipitate was centrifuged for 5-7 min, dried in the air at 30-350 C. Heat treatment of the dried precipitate was carried out in two stages: the first stage at the temperature of 200- 2500 C for 0.5-1 hour, the second one at 550- 6000 C for 2-3 hours. X-ray analysis of the synthesized samples was carried out on a Bruker D8 Advance diffractometer, radiation Cu K. The size and shape measuring of the particles of activated strontium fluoride was carried out by means of electron microscope Carl Zeiss NVision 40. The content of neodymium in activated powders of strontium fluoride was determined by the method of spectral emission analysis on the device LEA - S500. Chemical analysis for determination of ammonium ion (NH4+ content in the obtained samples was performed by the method of Kjeldahl. Calculations of lattice parameters, size of coherent scattering regions and the values of micro-deformations were carried out by TOPAS program. Main Results. Preparation processes of ultradisperse, homogeneous powder Sr1-хNdхF2+х (х= 0.003-0.2, with use of ammonium fluoride as the fluorinating agent taken over 114-120 % from stoichiometry, provides obtaining the firm solution Sr1-x-yNdx(NH4yF2+x-y of the cubic fluorite structure. It has been found out that the morphology and size of the resulting product depend on the quantity of

  13. Fluor determination by alkaline hydrolysis of the uranium and thorium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina Gomez, L.; Gasco Sanchez, L.

    1961-01-01

    The alkaline hydrolysis of the uranium and thorium fluorides is studded and a new method for the determination of the fluoride, on the basis of a indirect volumetric titration with standard soda, is proposed. The compounds that may influence the hydrolysis of the uranium fluoride and that may be occasionally found in it as impurities are also studied. the method can be applied to the uranium fluoride except when there is a great quantity of F 2 UO 2 or UO 3 present in the sample. (Author) 20 refs

  14. Growth of fluoride treated Kalanchoe pinnata plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H N; Applegate, H G

    1962-01-01

    Kalanchoe pinnata plants can absorb fluoride through roots. The absorption is related to the amount of fluoride applied to the soil. There appeared to be a relationship between the amount of fluoride adsorbed and the subsequent growth of the plants. Plants which adsorbed the largest amounts of fluoride had the greatest increase in growth.

  15. Monitoring of fluoride and iodide levels in drinking water using ion selective electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Viqar-Un-Nisa; Hussain, M.; Tanwir, R.; Qureshi, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Fluoride and iodide, the most important constituents of drinking water are essential as well as toxic depending on their levels. For their analysis in water mostly ion-selective electrodes, spectrophotometry, titrimetry and coulometry etc; have been used and literature has been briefly reviewed. Ion-selective electrodes offer an efficient method for the measurement of the two halides and were mostly used during this work. Fabrication of these electrodes is briefly described. Comparison of results obtained by ion selective electrode and coulometry is given. Recoveries of the added fluoride ions from the samples were good. A large number of water samples from Rawalpindi-Islamabad area were analyzed for fluoride and iodide. Levels of fluoride and iodide from two main water reservoirs of Rawalpindi and Islamabad are reported before and after treatment. Both surface and ground water samples were analyzed and results are compared and discussed. Some samples from northern areas were also analyzed for iodide and fluoride and compared. Intake of fluoride and iodide from water of different areas is also compared. Water samples, which caused bone deformation in certain areas in Punjab due to excess fluoride, were also analyzed for fluoride and results are presented. (author)

  16. Development of technology and equipment for manufacturing fluorides rare-earths via non-aqueous method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatalov, V.V.; Kozlov, O.I.; Machirev, V.P.; Zvonarev, E.N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The works on technology and equipment for rare earths (RE) fluorides are very scarce. Presently RE-fluorides are manufactured by various methods. Conventionally they can be divided into two main groups. The first group comprises methods based on precipitation of fluorides from soluble salts of corresponding metals by fluohydric acid (aqueous methods) with following thermal decomposition of aquatic fluorides obtained until anhydric state is reached. The second group (called dry, gaseous or non-aqueous) comprises methods based on direct fluorizating (by fluorine hydride, fluor or other fluorating agents) have several important advantages compared to the aqueous methods: the fluorides obtained are anhydrous; the operations of fluoride precipitation, washing, decantation, filtration are excluded as well as their drying and calcination. The process of calcination is, as a rule, accompanied by pyrohydrolysis. The products manufactured by precipitation are inferior to those obtained by the non-aqueous technique. The world production practice uses both groups of methods. Nevertheless, the method of gaseous hydrofluorination is preferable. In all non-aqueous processes the initial materials are oxides RE which interact with gaseous fluorine hydride. The initial materials - oxides are obtained by thermal decomposition of carbonates, hydroxides, oxalates and so on. One of the best type of apparatus for thermal decomposition processes is a horizontal ring shaped vibrating apparatus with direct heating. The RE - fluorides is synthesized by way of RE-oxide interacting with hydrogen fluoride at 200-550 deg C in single continuous operation: (RE) 2 O 3 + 6 HF → 2 (RE)F 3 + 3 H 2 0 The apparatus consists of a nickel horizontal two tube screw. Reaction time is varied from 2 to 6 hours; the productivity of reactor is defined by feed screw rotation and initial material bulk density. Hydrogen fluoride was passing the reactor opposite to the solid phase. The degree

  17. Direct photometric determination of fluorides in potassium chloride and iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedkova, V.P.; Savvin, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to apply the technique of determining fluorides with xylenol orange and sulfochlorophenol S as being the most sensitive in the analysis of of fiber optics. It is known that an increase of the sensitivity of the determination can be achieved on increasing the sample size of the substance to be analyzed, and the length of the absorbing layer. However, a high salt background may have a strong influence on the course of the reaction, and a supplementary of this effect is mad. Potassium chloride and iodide were selected as model compounds. A direct photometric procedure is proposed for determining fluorides in the samples, with a determination limit of 5 x 10 -6 %. Such a low determination limit is achieved by increasing the sample weight to 3 g, by increasing the length of the absorbing layer in the cell to 50 mm, and by using a highly sensitive reaction for determining fluorides with zirconium and xylenol orange

  18. FLUORIDE TOXICITY – A HARSH REALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Bandlapalli Pavani; Mandava Ragini; David Banji; Otilia J F Banji; N Gouri Pratusha

    2011-01-01

    There are many incidents of fluoride toxicity whether it is acute or chronic. Fluoride toxicity is an environmental hazard which arises from the upper layers of geological crust and is dissolved in water. Prolonged drinking of such water causes chronic fluoride toxicity. Use of fluoride containing compounds for various purposes such as dental products, metal, glass, refrigerator and chemical industries act as a source of fluoride poisoning and increase the risk of toxicity. This review reflec...

  19. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed. copyright American Institute of Physics 1995

  20. Strontium-90 fluoride data sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a compilation of available data and appropriate literature references on the properties of strontium-90 fluoride and nonradioactive strontium fluoride. The objective of the document is to compile in a single source pertinent data to assist potential users in the development, licensing, and use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/-fueled radioisotope heat sources for terrestrial power conversion and thermal applications. The report is an update of the Strontium-90 Fluoride Data Sheet (BNWL-2284) originally issued in April 1977.

  1. Assessment of fluoride contaminations in groundwater of hard rock aquifers in Madurai district, Tamil Nadu (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thivya, C.; Chidambaram, S.; Rao, M. S.; Thilagavathi, R.; Prasanna, M. V.; Manikandan, S.

    2017-05-01

    The fluoride contamination in drinking water is already gone to the alarming level and it needs the immediate involvement and attention of all people to solve this problem. Fluoride problem is higher in hard rock terrains in worldwide and Madurai is such type of hard rock region. Totally 54 samples were collected from the Madurai district of Tamilnadu with respect to lithology. The samples collected were analysed for major cations and anions using standard procedures. The higher concentration of fluoride is noted in the Charnockite rock types of northern part of the study area. 20 % of samples are below 0.5 ppm and 6 % of samples are above 1.5 ppm exceeding the permissible limit. The affinity between the pH and fluoride ions in groundwater suggests that dissolution of fluoride bearing minerals in groundwater. The higher concentration of fluoride ions are observed in the lower EC concentration. The isotopic study suggests that fluoride is geogenic in nature. In factor scores, fluoride is noted in association with pH which indicates the dissolution process.

  2. Terrestrial bryophytes as indicators of fluoride emission from a phosphorus plant, Long Harbour, Newfoundland, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, B.A.; Thompson, L.K.; Sidhu, S.S.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the effects of fluoride emissions (HF, SiF/sub 4/) on certain species of bryophytes was carried out in the vicinity of an industrial palnt producing elemental phosphorus at Long Harbour, Nfld. Damage symptoms varied from mild phyllid chlorosis (yellowing) to severe browning of up to 95% of the phyllids. Polytrichum commune Hedw. was the main bryophyte species used in the survey. Random collections from 45 sample sites were analysed for total fluoride. The fluoride concentrations in phyllid tissue ranged from a high of 6066 ppm (dry weight) at a distance of 1 km northeast of the emission source to 44 ppm (dry weight) 11.7 km northeast of the emission source in the direction of the prevailing wind. Control samples were obtained from similar sites in areas far removed from the industrial plant and contained, on average, 11.3 ppm (dry weight). The concentration of fluoride in the bryophyte phyllid tissue was inversely correlated with distance from the emission source, in the direction of the prevailing wind. The severity of acropetal scorching was found to be correlated with the concentration of fluoride in the bryophyte phyllid tissue, and in addition, samples high in fluoride had fewer sporophytes. Fluoride concentrations in bryophyte tissue are compared with concentrations of fluoride in the needles of balsam fir, Abies Balsamea I., in four damage zones, and also with available and total fluoride in soil humus and concentrations of fluoride in air. The total area affected by fluoride emissions was increased using bryophytes as the pollution indicator species, especially in areas far from the industrial plant.

  3. Association between Urine Fluoride and Dental Fluorosis as a Toxicity Factor in a Rural Community in the State of San Luis Potosi

    OpenAIRE

    Jarquín-Yañez, Lizet; Mejía-Saavedra, José de Jesús; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Gaona, Enrique; Rocha-Amador, Diana Olivia; López-Guzmán, Olga Dania; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate urine fluoride concentration as a toxicity factor in a rural community in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Materials and Methods. A sample of 111 children exposed to high concentrations of fluoride in drinking water (4.13?mg/L) was evaluated. Fluoride exposure was determined by measuring urine fluoride concentration using the potentiometric method with an ion selective electrode. The diagnosis of dental fluorosis was performed by clinica...

  4. Risk Assessment Study of Fluoride Salts: Probability-Impact Matrix of Renal and Hepatic Toxicity Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Kan; Ueno, Takaaki; Ito, Yuichi; Dote, Tomotaro; Yokoyama, Hirotaka; Kono, Koichi; Tamaki, Junko

    2016-09-01

    The present risk assessment study of fluoride salts was conducted by oral administration of three different doses of sodium and potassium fluorides (NaF, KF) and zinc fluoride tetrahydrate (ZnF2 •4H2O) to male Wistar rats. The rats were divided into control and nine experimental groups, to which oral injections of 0.5 mL distilled water and 0.5 mL of fluoride solutions, respectively, were given. The dosage of fluoride compounds was adjusted to contain 2.1 mg (low-dose group, LG), 4.3 mg (mid-dose group, MG), and 5.4 mg fluoride per 200 g rat body weight (high-dose group, HG) corresponding to 5, 10, and 12.5 % of LD50 values for NaF. The 24-h urine volume, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and creatinine clearance (Ccr) were measured as markers of possible acute renal impact. The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were determined in serum samples as markers of acute hepatic impact. The levels of serum and urinary fluoride were determined to evaluate fluoride bioavailability. The results reveal that higher doses of NaF, KF, and ZnF2 induced renal damage as indicated by higher urinary NAG (p fluoride is a potential, dose-dependent risk factor of renal tubular damage.

  5. Beryllium production using beryllium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, Carlos Henrique

    1993-01-01

    This work presents the beryllium production by thermal decomposition of the ammonium beryllium fluoride, followed by magnesium reduction, obtained in the small pilot plant of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission - Nuclear Engineering Institute

  6. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    DenBesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2–3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enam...

  7. Determination of fluoride in spices using microwave induced oxygen combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Šucman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine is essential in human and/or animal nutrition; therefore, so it is important to know its concentration in a diet. One of the possible sources of fluorine for humans is spice, containing various amounts of this trace element. This work describes the method for fluoride determination in various kinds ofspices using microwave-supported sample preparation in high pressure oxygen atmosphere followed by potentiometry with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. Parameters of the microwave device for combustion procedure were checked and optimized in order to find settings ensuring complete sample combustion and/or absorption of the analyte in the absorption solution. For the ion-selective electrode measurement, the technique of standard straight line was chosen. Concentrations of fluorides in spices and spice blends under investigation ranged from 3.15 mg·kg-1 to 26.08 mg·kg-1. In order to check the accuracy of the method Certified Reference Material Fluoride in Vegetation NIST 2695 was used and a good agreement between certified and found values was found. The precision expressed as the relative standard deviation ranged from 0.6% to 5.0%. The method is fast, accurate and reliable for this kind of analysis. In recent literature data on fluoride concentrations in spices and/or spice blends have not been found.

  8. Fluoride in groundwater: toxicological exposure and remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, S K; Singh, R K; Damodaran, T; Mishra, V K; Sharma, D K; Rai, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride is a chemical element that is found most frequently in groundwater and has become one of the most important toxicological environmental hazards globally. The occurrence of fluoride in groundwater is due to weathering and leaching of fluoride-bearing minerals from rocks and sediments. Fluoride when ingested in small quantities (dental health by reducing dental caries, whereas higher concentrations (>1.5 mg/L) may cause fluorosis. It is estimated that about 200 million people, from among 25 nations the world over, may suffer from fluorosis and the causes have been ascribed to fluoride contamination in groundwater including India. High fluoride occurrence in groundwaters is expected from sodium bicarbonate-type water, which is calcium deficient. The alkalinity of water also helps in mobilizing fluoride from fluorite (CaF2). Fluoride exposure in humans is related to (1) fluoride concentration in drinking water, (2) duration of consumption, and (3) climate of the area. In hotter climates where water consumption is greater, exposure doses of fluoride need to be modified based on mean fluoride intake. Various cost-effective and simple procedures for water defluoridation techniques are already known, but the benefits of such techniques have not reached the rural affected population due to limitations. Therefore, there is a need to develop workable strategies to provide fluoride-safe drinking water to rural communities. The study investigated the geochemistry and occurrence of fluoride and its contamination in groundwater, human exposure, various adverse health effects, and possible remedial measures from fluoride toxicity effects.

  9. Geochemical evaluation of fluoride contamination of groundwater in the Thoothukudi District of Tamilnadu, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaraja, C.; Chidambaram, S.; Anandhan, P.; Prasanna, M. V.; Thivya, C.; Thilagavathi, R.; Sarathidasan, J.

    2014-09-01

    Fluoride is a chemical element that has been shown to cause significant effects on human health through drinking water. Different forms of fluoride exposure are of importance and have shown to affect the body's fluoride content and thus increasing the risks of fluoride-prone diseases. Fluoride has beneficial effects on teeth; however, low concentrations of fluoride intensify the risk of tooth decay. Fluoride can also be quite detrimental at higher concentrations at skeletal fluorosis. The Thoothukudi District is a hard rock and alluvial plain marked as one of the Fluoride-increase area in Tamilnadu due to occurrence of various rock types including fluoride-bearing minerals. The F- content of groundwater can thus originate from the dissolution of Fluoride-bearing minerals in the bed rock. Hundred representative groundwater samples from Thoothukudi District were collected during two different seasons. Samples were analysed for F-, other major cations and anions. The study area is chiefly composed of hornblende biotite gneiss, charnockite, alluvio marine, fluvial marine and granite with small patches of quartzite and sandstone. Higher concentration of fluoride is observed during pre-monsoon (3.3 mg l-1) compared to the post-monsoon (2.4 mg l-1) due to the dilution effect. Spatial distribution and factor score show that higher concentrations of F- are noted in the north and central part of the study area owing to lithology. Bicarbonate is well correlated with F- which explains that both ions were derived from the weathering. While F- has a very weak correlation with pH which may be due to the increase of alkalinity resulting from the increase of carbonate and bicarbonate ions.

  10. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  11. Method for the determination of lignin content of a sample by flash pyrolysis in an atmosphere of hydrogen or helium and method therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy (Inventor); Kwack, Eug Y. (Inventor); Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The lignin content of wood, paper pulp or other material containing lignin (such as filter paper soaked in black liquor) is more readily determined by flash pyrolysis of the sample at approximately 550.degree. C. in a reducing atmosphere of hydrogen or in an inert atmosphere of helium followed by a rapid analysis of the product gas by a mass spectrometer. The heated pyrolysis unit as fabricated comprises a small platinum cup welded to an electrically-heated stainless steel ribbon with control means for programmed short duration (1.5 sec, approximately) heating and means for continuous flow of hydrogen or helium. The pyrolysis products enter an electron-ionization mode mass spectrometer for spectral evaluation. Lignin content is obtained from certain ratios of integrated ion currents of many mass spectral lines, the ratios being linearly related to the Kappa number of Klason lignin.

  12. Influence of the Relative Enamel Abrasivity (REA) of Toothpastes on the Uptake of KOH-soluble and Structurally Bound Fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmazi, Valbona; Sener, Beatrice; Attin, Thomas; Imfeld, Thomas; Wegehaupt, Florian J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the influence of the relative enamel abrasivity (REA) of fluoridated toothpaste on the uptake of KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride into enamel. Bovine enamel samples were randomly allocated to 6 groups (n=36 per group). Groups A to C were treated with sodium fluoride (NaF) toothpastes and groups D to F with amine fluoride (AmF) toothpastes (1500 ppm F each). The REA in groups A and D was 2, in groups B and E it was 6 and in groups C and F it was 9. Twice a day, 18 samples of each group were immersed for 2 min in a slurry (toothpaste:artificial saliva=1:3), while the remaining samples were brushed with the respective slurry (2.5 N force; 60 strokes/min; 2 min). All samples were stored at 37°C and 100% humidity. After five days, the amount of KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride was determined and statistically compared by Scheffe's post-hoc tests. REA value and mode of application (immersion or brushing) had no significant influence on the amount of either kind of fluoride from NaF toothpastes. Only for the NaF toothpaste with REA 6 was the amount of KOH-soluble fluoride significantly higher after brushing. With AmF toothpastes, KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride concentrations were significantly higher when the samples were brushed. Furthermore, in the REA-2 group, the amounts of KOH-soluble fluoride (brushed or immersed) and structurally bound fluoride (brushed) were significantly higher than in the other groups. The REA dependency of KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride was found only for the AmF toothpastes. Using AmF toothpaste, the mode of application influenced the uptake of KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride into enamel.

  13. Chronic fluoride toxicity: dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denbesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2-3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface. With more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the dose-related decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffle-ended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As further

  14. Acute toxicity of ingested fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Gary Milton

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the characteristics and treatment of acute fluoride toxicity as well as the most common sources of overexposure, the doses that cause acute toxicity, and factors that can influence the clinical outcome. Cases of serious systemic toxicity and fatalities due to acute exposures are now rare, but overexposures causing toxic signs and symptoms are not. The clinical course of systemic toxicity from ingested fluoride begins with gastric signs and symptoms, and can develop with alarming rapidity. Treatment involves minimizing absorption by administering a solution containing calcium, monitoring and managing plasma calcium and potassium concentrations, acid-base status, and supporting vital functions. Approximately 30,000 calls to US poison control centers concerning acute exposures in children are made each year, most of which involve temporary gastrointestinal effects, but others require medical treatment. The most common sources of acute overexposures today are dental products - particularly dentifrices because of their relatively high fluoride concentrations, pleasant flavors, and their presence in non-secure locations in most homes. For example, ingestion of only 1.8 ounces of a standard fluoridated dentifrice (900-1,100 mg/kg) by a 10-kg child delivers enough fluoride to reach the 'probably toxic dose' (5 mg/kg body weight). Factors that may influence the clinical course of an overexposure include the chemical compound (e.g. NaF, MFP, etc.), the age and acid-base status of the individual, and the elapsed time between exposure and the initiation of treatment. While fluoride has well-established beneficial dental effects and cases of serious toxicity are now rare, the potential for toxicity requires that fluoride-containing materials be handled and stored with the respect they deserve. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Root caries prevention via sodium fluoride, chlorhexidine and silver diamine fluoride in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göstemeyer, Gerd; Kohls, Anna; Paris, Sebastian; Schwendicke, Falk

    2018-01-31

    Uncertainty exists as to how to best prevent root caries development. The aim of the present study was to compare sodium fluoride (NaF), chlorhexidine (CHX) and silver diamine fluoride (SDF) varnishes (V) and rinses (R) regarding their caries preventive effect in an artificial caries biofilm model. 140 bovine root dentin samples were cut, polished and embedded. Samples were allocated to seven treatment groups (n = 20/group): Four varnishes (applied once prior biofilm challenge): 38% SDF (SDFV), 35% CHX-varnish (CHXV), 22,600 ppm NaF-varnish (NaFV), placebo-varnish (PV); two rinses (applied once daily during biofilm challenge): 500 ppm NaF solution (NaFR), 0.1% CHX solution (CHXR); one untreated group. Caries was induced in a multi-station, continuous-culture Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) biofilm model. Bacteria were inoculated 1 × daily, while 2% sucrose was supplied 8 ×/day followed by artificial saliva for 10 min. After 12 days, mineral loss (ΔZ) was measured in the effect area and adjacent to the varnished areas. Bacterial counts were assessed on de-Man-Rogosa-Sharpe agar. ΔZ was significantly lower in the NaFR group compared with all other groups. Varnishes did not significantly prevent mineral loss in adjacent areas. None of the agents had a significant antimicrobial effect on LGG. Regular fluoride rinses showed highest root caries-preventive effect.

  16. Determination of fluoride in drainage by ion electrode method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terakado, Shigeru; Ochiai, Ken-ichi; Motoyama, Shigeji; Tsutsumi, Ken-ichi

    1975-01-01

    The fluoride ion selective electrode method for rapidly and precisely determining fluoride in drainage was studied. This method enables the analysis of the samples with fluoride concentration above 0.1 mg/l in about five minutes. Six buffer solutions were selected to compare the masking effect against aluminum. Solution A is TISAB made by dissolving 57 ml of gracial acetic acid and 10 g of sodium chloride in 500 ml of water, thereafter adjusting pH to 5.5 and diluting to 1 liter with water. Solution B is phosphoric acid solution (17 M/L). Solution C is 3 M ammonium phosphate dibasic aqueous solution. Solution D is 1 M sodium citrate aqueous solution adjusted to pH 6 with hydrochloric acid. Solution E is 0.5 M sodium phosphate dibasic aqueous solution. Solution F is 2 M ammonium phosphate monobasic aqueous solution. As a result of studying the effect of coexisting elements, the buffer solutions A,B,E and F were greatly influenced by the coexistence of aluminum, while C and D show remarkable masking effect against aluminum. The amount of interfering ions in normal drainage is so small that no problem is anticipated for D. When fluoride recovery treatment is performed, it is important in dilution measurement to confirm whether the measured values are accurate or not, because there are high and low concentrations of fluoride at the same potential. (Iwakiri, K.)

  17. Taurine Ameliorates Renal Oxidative Damage and Thyroid Dysfunction in Rats Chronically Exposed to Fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedara, Isaac A; Ojuade, Temini Jesu D; Olabiyi, Bolanle F; Idris, Umar F; Onibiyo, Esther M; Ajeigbe, Olufunke F; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2017-02-01

    Excessive exposure to fluoride poses several detrimental effects to human health particularly the kidney which is a major organ involved in its elimination from the body. The influence of taurine on fluoride-induced renal toxicity was investigated in a co-exposure paradigm for 45 days using five groups of eight rats each. Group I rats received normal drinking water alone, group II rats were exposed to sodium fluoride (NaF) in drinking water at 15 mg/L alone, group III received taurine alone at a dose of 200 mg/kg group IV rats were co-administered with NaF and taurine (100 mg/kg), while group V rats were co-administered with NaF and taurine (200 mg/kg). Administration of taurine significantly reversed the fluoride-mediated decrease in absolute weight and organo-somatic index of the kidney in the exposed rats. Taurine significantly prevented fluoride-induced elevation in plasma urea and creatinine levels in the exposed rats. Moreover, taurine restored fluoride-mediated decrease in the circulatory concentrations of triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and the ratio of triiodothyronine to thyroxine. Taurine ameliorated fluoride-mediated decrease in renal antioxidant status by significantly enhancing the antioxidant enzyme activities as well as glutathione level in the exposed rats. Additionally, taurine inhibited fluoride-induced renal oxidative damage by markedly decreasing the hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde levels as well as improved the kidney architecture in the treated rats. Collectively, taurine protected against fluoride-induced renal toxicity via enhancement of thyroid gland function, renal antioxidant status, and histology in rats.

  18. Radiation-induced crosslinking of poly(vinylidene fluoride)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, Keizo

    1977-07-01

    The factors influencing radiation-induced crosslinking efficiency of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVdF) have been studied. Results of the basic research on irradiation conditions (dose rate and atmosphere) and initial physical properties of PVdF (structure of molecular chain and molecular mobility of chain segment) showed that crosslinking efficiency is raised in irradiation at high temperature above 50 0 C under vacuum in the presence of an absorbent for the evolved hydrogen fluoride. The crosslinking reaction is also accelerated with irregular molecular structure such as head-to-head bond in main chain. High crosslinking efficiency is obtained by addition of a polyfunctional monomer having good solubility with PVdF. Mechanical properties of PVdF, the strength at high temperature near the melting point in particular, are improved by crosslinking in the presence of a polyfunctional monomer. (auth.)

  19. Matrix supported tailored polymer for solid phase extraction of fluoride from variety of aqueous streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Neha; Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Wagh, D.N.; Das, Sadananda; Pandey, Ashok K.; Kumar, Sangita D.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Th complexed with poly (bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl]phosphate) as tailored polymer membranes. ► Membranes offered high capacity and selectivity for fluoride in aqueous media. ► Quantitative uptake (80 ± 5%) of fluoride. ► Fast sorption kinetics. ► Reusability of polymer membranes. - Abstract: Fluoride related health hazards (fluorosis) are a major environmental problem in many regions of the world. It affects teeth; skeleton and its accumulation over a long period can lead to changes in the DNA structure. It is thus absolutely essential to bring down the fluoride levels to acceptable limits. Here, we present a new inorganic–organic hybrid polymer sorbent having tailored fixed-sites for fluoride sorption. The matrix supported poly (bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl]phosphate) was prepared by photo-initiator induced graft-polymerization in fibrous and microporous (sheet) host poly(propylene) substrates. These substrates were conditioned for selective fluoride sorption by forming thorium complex with phosphate groups on bis[2-methacryloyloxy)-ethyl] phosphate (MEP). These tailored sorbents were studied for their selectivity towards fluoride in aqueous media having different chemical conditions. The fibrous sorbent was found to take up fluoride with a faster rate (15 min for ≈76% sorption) than the sheet sorbent. But, the fluoride loading capacity of sheet sorbent (4320 mg kg −1 ), was higher than fibrous and any other sorbent reported in the literature so far. The sorbent developed in the present work was found to be reusable after desorption of fluoride using NaOH solution. It was tested for solid phase extraction of fluoride from natural water samples.

  20. Fluoride level in saliva after bonding orthodontic brackets with a fluoride containing adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Arends, J; Helseth, H; Dijkman, G; vanderKuijl, M

    The fluoride level in saliva is considered an important parameter in caries prevention. Elevation of the salivary fluoride level by a fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding adhesive would most likely be beneficial in the prevention of enamel caries. In this study, the fluoride level in saliva was

  1. Oral microflora in preschool children attending a fluoride varnish program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Maria; Grindefjord, Margaret; Dahllöf, Göran

    2016-01-01

    hundred seven 3-year-old children were enrolled from a cohort of 3403 preschool children taking part in a community based oral health project. Two hundred sixty-three of them had attended caries-preventive program with semi-annual applications of a fluoride varnish since the age of 1 year (test group......BACKGROUND: To compare the oral microflora in preschool children attending a fluoride varnish program with a reference group receiving a standard oral health program without fluoride varnish applications. A second aim was to relate the microbial composition to the caries prevalence. METHODS: Five......) while 237 had received standard preventive care (reference group). Oral samples were collected with a sterile swab and analysed with checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization using 12 pre-determined bacterial probes. Caries and background data were collected from clinical examinations and questionnaires...

  2. Development of multifunctional chitosan beads for fluoride removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Natrayasamy [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624 302, Tamilnadu (India); Sairam Sundaram, C. [Department of Science and Humanities, Karaikal Polytechnic College, Karaikal 609 609, Puducherry (India); Meenakshi, S., E-mail: drs_meena@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624 302, Tamilnadu (India)

    2009-08-15

    Chitosan beads (CB) which have negligible defluoridation capacity (DC) have been chemically modified by introducing multifunctional groups, viz., NH{sub 3}{sup +} and COOH groups by means of protonation and carboxylation in order to utilize both amine and hydroxyl groups for fluoride removal. The protonated cum carboxylated chitosan beads (PCCB) showed a maximum DC of 1800 mg F{sup -}/kg whereas raw chitosan beads displayed only 52 mg F{sup -}/kg. Sorption process was found to be independent of pH and slightly influenced in the presence of other common anions. The fluoride sorption on modified forms was reasonably explained by Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. The sorbents were characterised by FTIR and SEM with EDAX analysis. The sorption process follows pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models. The suitability of PCCB has been tested with field sample collected from a nearby fluoride endemic area.

  3. Evaluation of the precision in fluoride determination in uranium concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, Helena E. Leonhardt; Rocha, Zildete; Mata, Maria Olivia Cintra

    1995-01-01

    The fluoride in uranium concentrate is previously separated by steam distillation and then determined by direct potentiometric with an ion-select electrode. The potential of all ion-specific electrodes is a logarithmic function of the concentration of the ion to which the electrode in question responds. This relationship is expressed by the Nernst equation. A calibration curve, potential (mV) versus standard fluoride concentration is established and then the sample concentration is determined by interpolation. A least squares curve-fitting procedure has been used to determine the parameters of this calibration curve equation. Using these parameters are determined the standard deviation, the confidence limits and the precision of the fluoride concentrations. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. Urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after intake of fluoridated milk and use of fluoride-containing toothpaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, M; Twetman, S; Hultgren Talvilahti, A

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after drinking fluoridated milk with 0.185 mg F and 0.375 mg F and to study the impact of use of fluoride toothpaste. Basic research design: Double-blind cross-over study. Participants: Nine healthy children, 2.5-4.5 years...

  5. Water Fluoridation Reporting System (Public Water Systems)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS) has been developed to provide tools to assist states in managing fluoridation programs. WFRS is designed to track all...

  6. ADSORPTIVE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE FROM WATER USING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Currently available treatment methods for removal of excess fluoride from water are broadly divided into three ... the application of nanoparticles as sorbents for fluoride removal. Sundaram [26] studied the ... Characterization of adsorbent.

  7. Formation and transformation of the radiation-induced nearsurface color centers in sodium and lithium fluorides nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, A. N.; Kalinov, V. S.; Radkevich, A. V.; Runets, L. P.; Stupak, A. P.; Voitovich, A. P.

    2017-11-01

    Near-surface color centers in sodium fluoride nanocrystals have been formed. At pre-irradiation annealing of sodium and lithium fluorides samples at temperatures of 623 K and above, the near-surface color centers in them have not been found after γ-irradiation. Annealing lithium fluoride nanocrystals with the near-surface defects leads to their transformation into bulk ones of the same composition.

  8. Fluoride concentration level in rural area in Poldasht city and daily fluoride intake based on drinking water consumption with temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Yousefi, Mahmood; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2017-08-01

    Long-term exposure to high level of fluoride can caused several adverse effects on human health including dental and skeletal fluorosis. We investigated all the drinking water source located in rural areas of Poldasht city, west Azerbaijan Province, North West Iran between 2014 and 2015. Fluoride concentration of water samples was measured by SPADNS method. We found that in the villages of Poldasht the average of fluoride concentration in drinking water sources (well, and the river) was in the range mg/l 0.28-10.23. The average daily received per 2 l of drinking water is in the range mg/l 0.7-16.6 per day per person. Drinking water demands cause fluorosis in the villages around the area residents and based on the findings of this study writers are announced suggestions below in order to take care of the health of area residents.

  9. Mus musculus bone fluoride concentration as a useful biomarker for risk assessment of skeletal fluorosis in volcanic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares, Diana; Camarinho, Ricardo; Garcia, Patrícia Ventura; Rodrigues, Armindo Dos Santos

    2018-08-01

    Fluoride is often found in elevated concentrations in volcanic areas due to the release of magmatic fluorine as hydrogen fluorine through volcanic degassing. The exposure to high levels of fluoride can affect the processes of bone formation and resorption causing skeletal fluorosis, a pathology that can easily be mistaken for other skeletal diseases. In this study, we aimed to determine if fluoride concentration in the femoral bone of wild populations of the house mouse (Mus musculus) is a good biomarker of exposure to active volcanic environments naturally enriched in fluoride, allowing their use in biomonitoring programs. The fluoride concentration of the whole femoral bone of 9 mice from Furnas (5 males and 4 females) and 33 mice from Rabo de Peixe (16 males and 17 females) was measured by the potentiometric method with a fluoride ion selective electrode. Fluoride in bones was significantly higher in the mice from Furnas when compared with the mice from Rabo de Peixe (616.5 ± 129.3 μg F/g vs. 253.8 ± 10.5 μg F/g). Accumulation rates were also significantly higher in the mice collected in Furnas when compared with Rabo de Peixe individuals (3.84 ± 0.52 μg F/day vs. 1.22 ± 0.06 μg F/day). The results demonstrate a significant association between exposure to fluoride in the active volcanic environment and fluoride content in bone, revealing that bone fluoride concentration is a suitable biomarker of chronic environmental exposure to fluoride. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of fluoride ions in water by condutometric titration with lanthanum nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    An alternative method for determining fluoride ions in drinking water by condutometric titration using La(NO 3 ) 3 as titrant is presented. The method is based on previous separation of fluoride from sample by distillation at 135 0 C. The pH of the distillated is adjusted between 5,5 - 6,0; ethanol is adicioned in 50% titrating the resultant solution with La(NO 3 ) 3 . In these conditions, fluoride ions are determined with accuracy respectively, 5% and 4%. Natural samples of drinking water were analysed by this method and by the ion selective method, with agreement among the results. (author) [pt

  11. Photosynthesis of ammonium uranous fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Fekey, S.A.; Zaki, M.R.; Farah, M.Y.

    1975-01-01

    This study pertains to utilisation of solar energy for ethanol photosynthesis of ammonium uranous fluoride, that satisfies nuclear specifications needed for calcio- or magnesiothermy. Insolation in autumn using 4-10% ethanol in 5-20 g uranium/litre at initial pH 3.25 gave practically 99.8% yield in two hours, independant of 1.0 to 2.0 stoichiometric NH 4 F. With ultraviolet light, the yield varied between 30 and 60%, even after four hours irradiation. Stirring and heating to 60 0 C raised the tap density of the dried double fluorides from 1.48 at 30 0 C, to 1.85 g/cm 3 at 60 0 C. The texture increased also in fineness to 100% 50μ aggregates. The powders satisfy nuclear purity specifications. Thermograms indicated preferential decomposition of double fluoride at 375 0 C in controlled atmosphere to obtain nuclear pure anhydrous uranium tetrafluoride

  12. Effect of Resveratrol on Hematological and Biochemical Alterations in Rats Exposed to Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurgül Atmaca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the protective effects of resveratrol on hematological and biochemical changes induced by fluoride in rats. A total of 28 rats were divided into 4 groups: control, resveratrol, fluoride, and fluoride/resveratrol (n=7 each, for a total of 21 days of treatment. Blood samples were taken and hematological and biochemical parameters were measured. Compared to the control group, the fluoride-treated group showed significant differences in several hematological parameters, including decreases in WBC, RBC, and PLT counts and neutrophil ratio. The group that received resveratrol alone showed a decrease in WBC count compared to the control group. Furthermore, in comparison to the control group, the fluoride group showed significantly increased ALT enzyme activity and decreased inorganic phosphorus level. The hematological and biochemical parameters in the fluoride + resveratrol treated group were similar to control group. In the fluoride + resveratrol group, resveratrol restored the changes observed following fluoride treatment, including decreased counts of WBC, RBC, and PLT, decreased neutrophil ratio and inorganic phosphorus levels, and elevated ALT enzyme activity. The present study showed that fluoride caused adverse effects in rats and that resveratrol reduced hematological and biochemical alterations produced by fluoride exposure.

  13. Lichens as indicators of fluoride emission from a phosphorus plant, Long Harbour, Newfoundland, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, B.A.; Thompson, L.K.

    1980-01-01

    Fluoride concentrations in the terrestrial lichens Cladina rangiferina (L.) Harm. and Cladina stellaris (Opiz.) Brodo. were correlated inversely with distance from an industrial plant producing elemental phosphorus at Long Harbour, Nfld., in the direction (NE) of the prevailing wind. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 2830 ppm dry weight in a severely damaged area close to the emission source to 15.5 ppm (dry weight) 12 km NE of the industrial plant. Control samples from unpolluted areas had an average fluoride content of 6.4 ppm dry weight. The minimum observed damage symptoms occurred when these lichens had a fluoride content of 25 ppm dry weight. Damage symptoms included discolouration and structure loss. Discolouration effects were not as pronounced as observed on Abies balsamea (L.) Mill. or on Polytrichum commune (Hedw.) but combined with structure loss allowed the degree of damage to be readily identified in the field. Fluoride concentrations in these terrestrial lichens are compared with levels in soil humus, A. balsamea and some terrestrial bryophytes in four damage zones. The lichen tissue had, on average, twice as much fluoride as occurred in soil humus from the same site and about one half the amount of fluoride found in the terrestrial bryophyte P. commune. The effects of fluoride emissions on the epiphytic lichens Hypogymnia physodes (L.) W. Wats. and Alectoria sarmentosa (Ach.) Ach. in this area are also discussed.

  14. The effects of water filtration systems on fluoride: Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, M D; Grimm, S E; Banks, K; Henley, G

    2000-01-01

    According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), approximately one in eight Americans is exposed to potentially harmful microbes, pesticides, lead, or radioactive radon whenever they drink a glass of tap water or take a shower. One reason for this exposure is that the water plants are aging or ill equipped to process the huge amounts of raw sewage and agricultural pollutants that are still being discharged into our drinking-water sources. Other compounds such as fluoride and chloride have been added to the community water supplies for health benefits. Water filtration systems are becoming more popular as people become concerned with pollutants in the public water supply and questions are being raised as to whether fluoride is affected by these filters. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the efficacy of three types of water filtration systems and to determine their impact on fluoride content of the water in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. One sample of water was collected daily for fourteen days, from one location. The sample was divided to use as a control and the test samples which were processed through various filter systems. With the use of a fluoride ion specific electrode, the fluoride concentration level was tested in all samples in order to determine the percentage of fluoride removed. This study was intended to prove that the water filtration systems did not affect the advantage offered by optimum water fluoride levels. The experimental samples were ascertained and compared to the control group, resulting in three of the four carbon filters showing statistically significant amounts of fluoride removed from the water. Both Reverse Osmosis and Distillation, as expected, removed the fluoride at a high rate.

  15. Effect of Fluoride Mouthrinse and Toothpaste on Number of Streptococcal Colony Forming Units of Dental Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SE Jabbarifar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frequent topical fluoride therapy through toothpaste, mouthrinse, professional gels and solutions causes decrease in incidence, pause and repair of dental caries in the enamel. These mechanisms are done through penetration of fluoride ions (F- and their replacement with hydroxyl ions (OH- of hydroxyappatite of enamel, interfere with microbial metabolism of dental plaque and bacteriostatic effect on some cariogenic bacterial strains such as streptococci. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of fluoride mouthrinse and toothpaste on the number of streptococcal colony forming units of dental plaque. Methods: 62 children with 6-7 years old were put in two groups. Samples of dental plaque from each group were collected both before and after use of the fluoride mouthrinse and or toothpaste. The samples were cultured on blood agar to find the number of streptococcal colony forming units (CFU. The mean colony forming unit was compared inter and intra groups before and after application of Fluoride products. Results: The streptococcal CFU of dental plaque before and after use of the mouthrinse and toothpaste respectively was (1240±1367, 1253±1341.5 and (551±716, 898±1151. Statistically, the streptococcal CFU in each group before and after use of the toothpaste and mouthrinse was significantly different. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated that the fluoride toothpaste and mouthrinse reduce number of streptococcal colony forming units of dental plaque. Also this reduction was not depended on level of (F- Ions, sort of vehicle of fluoride and frequent application of the fluoride mouthrinse and toothpaste. Keywords: fluoride mouthrinse, fluoride toothpaste, colony forming unit (CFU, streptococcus

  16. Effect of CO2 Laser and Fluoride Varnish Application on Microhardness of Enamel Surface Around Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Majid; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Farhadian, Nasrin; Jamalian, Seyed Farzad; Akbarzadeh, Mahdi; Momeni, Mohammadali; Basamtabar, Masome

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Orthodontic treatment has many advantages such as esthetic improvement and self-esteem enhancement; yet it has some disadvantages such as increasing the risk of formation of white spot lesions, because it makes oral hygiene more difficult. It is rational to implement procedures to prevent these lesions. The present study was aimed to assess the effect of CO 2 laser and fluoride varnish on the surface of the enamel surface microhardness around the orthodontic braces. Methods: Eighty extracted premolar teeth were selected, scaled, polished with nonfluoridated pumic and metal brackets were bonded to them. Then, they were randomly allocated to 5 groups: control (neither fluoride nor laser is used on enamel surfaces), fluoride (4 minutes fluoride varnish treatment of the enamel surfaces), CO 2 laser (10.6 µm CO 2 laser irradiation of the teeth), laserfluoride (fluoride application after laser irradiation) and fluoride-laser (fluoride was applied and then teeth were irradiated with laser). After surface treatment around brackets on enamel, the samples were stored in 0.1% thymol for less than 5 days and then they were exposed to a 10-day microbiological caries model. Microhardness values of enamel were evaluated with Vickers test. One sample of each group (5 teeth from 80 samples) was prepared for SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and the data from 75 remaining teeth were analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests (α =0.05). Results: Microhardness mean values from high to low were as follow: fluoride-laser, laser-fluoride, laser, fluoride and control. Microhardness in fluoride-laser group was significantly higher compared with that of the control group. Distribution adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were significantly different between groups and most of bond failures occurred at the enamel-adhesive interface in groups 2 to 5 and at the adhesive-bracket interface in the control group. Conclusion: Combination of fluoride varnish and

  17. SBIR-Long fluoride fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Raymond E.; Vacha, Lubos J.

    1987-08-01

    This report summarizes results obtained under a program aimed at developing new techniques for fabricating long lengths of heavy metal fluoride glass (HMFG) optical fiber. A new method for overcladding conventional HMFG preforms with a low melting oxide glass was developed, and improvements in the rotational casting method were made to increase preform length. The resulting composite glass canes consist of a fluoride glass overcoat layer to enhance strength and chemical durability. To show feasibility, prototype optical fiber preforms up to 1.6 cm in diameter with lengths of 22 cm were fabricated. These were drawn into optical fibers with lengths up to 900 meters.

  18. Experimental facilities for research of properties and behaviour of fluoride salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosnedl, P.; Jilek, M.; Kroc, V.; Pedal, L.; Valenta, V.; Vodicka, J.

    1999-01-01

    SKODA JS s.r.o. (Czech leading nuclear technology manufacturer) prepared and manufactured experimental loops for research and verification of properties and behaviour of fluoride salts for primary and secondary circuit, construction materials and ADTT systems technological components for the operation in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc fluorine chemistry laboratory. This paper presents charts and experimental program for molten fluoride salts experimental loops with natural circulation. Further on, the paper describes extension of the loops for research with forced circulation and next works for steam generator model verification and connection with the loop of Energovyzkum Brno. The loops are designed and constructed to obtain a sufficient amount of experience on ADTT technology. The research and utilisation program covers questions of corrosion and intergranular corrosion of structural materials, research of material properties and welding, research of fluoride fluid properties, measuring of thermo-hydraulic properties of molten salt fluoride fluids, heat transfer and hydraulics, development and tests of some plant components (steam generators, heat exchangers, pumps, valves) and other engineering issues. Two electrolyzers have been manufactured for the research of fuel/coolant fluoride salts mixture purification. One for the production of hydrogen fluoride, and the other for the research of salts purification. (author)

  19. Silver diamine fluoride: a caries "silver-fluoride bullet".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, A; Stamford, T C M; Niederman, R

    2009-02-01

    The antimicrobial use of silver compounds pivots on the 100-year-old application of silver nitrate, silver foil, and silver sutures for the prevention and treatment of ocular, surgical, and dental infections. Ag(+) kills pathogenic organisms at concentrations of linings, water purification systems, hospital gowns, and caries prevention. To distill the current best evidence relative to caries, this systematic review asked: Will silver diamine fluoride (SDF) more effectively prevent caries than fluoride varnish? A five-database search, reference review, and hand search identified 99 human clinical trials in three languages published between 1966 and 2006. Dual review for controlled clinical trials with the patient as the unit of observation, and excluding cross-sectional, animal, in vitro studies, and opinions, identified 2 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. The trials indicated that SDF's lowest prevented fractions for caries arrest and caries prevention were 96.1% and 70.3%, respectively. In contrast, fluoride varnish's highest prevented fractions for caries arrest and caries prevention were 21.3% and 55.7%, respectively. Similarly, SDF's highest numbers needed to treat for caries arrest and caries prevention were 0.8 (95% CI=0.5-1.0) and 0.9 (95% CI=0.4-1.1), respectively. For fluoride varnish, the lowest numbers needed to treat for caries arrest and prevention were 3.7 (95% CI=3.4-3.9) and 1.1 (95% CI=0.7-1.4), respectively. Adverse events were monitored, with no significant differences between control and experimental groups. These promising results suggest that SDF is more effective than fluoride varnish, and may be a valuable caries-preventive intervention. As well, the availability of a safe, effective, efficient, and equitable caries-preventive agent appears to meet the criteria of both the WHO Millennium Goals and the US Institute of Medicine's criteria for 21st century medical care.

  20. Toxic effects of fluoride on organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Huan; Chen, Liang; Kong, Ming; Qiu, Lipeng; Lü, Peng; Wu, Peng; Yang, Yanhua; Chen, Keping

    2018-04-01

    Accumulation of excess fluoride in the environment poses serious health risks to plants, animals, and humans. This endangers human health, affects organism growth and development, and negatively impacts the food chain, thereby affecting ecological balance. In recent years, numerous studies focused on the molecular mechanisms associated with fluoride toxicity. These studies have demonstrated that fluoride can induce oxidative stress, regulate intracellular redox homeostasis, and lead to mitochondrial damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress and alter gene expression. This paper reviews the present research on the potential adverse effects of overdose fluoride on various organisms and aims to improve our understanding of fluoride toxicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fluoridated elastomers: effect on the microbiology of plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Philip E; Douglas, C W Ian; Martin, Michael V

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fluoridated elastomeric ligatures on the microbiology of local dental plaque in vivo. This randomized, prospective, longitudinal, clinical trial had a split-mouth crossover design. The subjects were 30 patients at the beginning of their treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances in the orthodontic departments of the Liverpool and the Sheffield dental hospitals in the United Kingdom. The study consisted of 2 experimental periods of 6 weeks with a washout period between. Fluoridated elastomers were randomly allocated at the first visit to be placed around brackets on tooth numbers 12, 11, 33 or 22, 21, 43. Nonfluoridated elastomers were placed on the contralateral teeth. Standard nonantibacterial fluoridated toothpaste and mouthwash were supplied. After 6 weeks (visit 2), the elastomers were removed, placed in transport media, and plated on agar within 2 hours. Nonfluoridated elastomers were placed on all brackets for 1 visit to allow for a washout period. At visit 3, fluoridated elastomers were placed on the teeth contralateral to those that received them at visit 1. At visit 4, the procedures at visit 2 were repeated. Samples were collected on visits 2 and 4. A logistic regression was performed, with the presence or absence of streptococcal or anaerobic growth as the dependent variable. A mixed-effects analysis of variance was carried out with the percentage of streptococcal or anaerobic bacterial count as the dependent variable. The only significant independent variables were the subject variable (P =bacterial count and the visit variable for the percentage of streptococcal count (P =fluoridated or nonfluoridated elastomers was not significant for percentage of either streptococcal (P =.288) or anaerobic count (P =.230). Fluoridated elastomers are not effective at reducing local streptococcal or anaerobic bacterial growth after a clinically relevant time in the mouth.

  2. Fluoride Concentration in Water, Cow Milk and Cow Urine from Smallholder Dairy Farms in Kiambu- Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gikunju, J.K.; Maitho, T.E.; Kyule, M.N.; Mitema, E.S.; Mugera, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Kiambu district is situated in central part of Kenya. most of the available land is suitable for agricultural use. majority of the farmers are small scale or subsistence farmers and they are involve in a variety of livestock activities e.g. dairy production, pig production and others in combination or as separate operations. excessive fluoride ingestion can cause specific dental and skeletal lesions and in severe cases adversely influence the health and productivity performance of domestic animals.therefore a study was designed to investigate the levels of flouride in urine, milk and water samples from small scale dairy farms in Kiambu. Water, cow urine and milk samples were collected in clean plastic containers from 84 small scale farms belonging to 6 dairy farmers co-operative societies (DFCs). The DFCs in this study were Kiambaa, Lari, Nderi, Kikuyu, Chania and Limuru. The fluoride concentration in water milk and urine were analysed using the potentiometric method of fluoride ion specific electrode. overall urine contained the highest fluoride concentration while milk contained the lowest fluoride levels. Fluoride levels in water, milk and urine were significantly different, (P>0.05). The mean fluoride concentration in water from all societies was 0.29 ppm while the mean fluoride concentration in milk 0.05 ppm. urine samples had the highest fluoride concentration, (1.5 ppm). The cooperative specific mean fluoride concentrations arranged in descending order were as follow: Nderi (2.8 ppm), Kikuyu (2.4 ppm), Kiambaa(1.9 ppm), Chania (1.6 ppm), Limuru (1.3 ppm) and Lari (1.0 ppm). The maximum fluoride concentration encountered in water in this study was 3.4 ppm, however adverse productivity has been reported in dairy animals consuming as low as 2.15 ppm in drinking water. The mean milk production in in kilograms per day per cow ranged from 2.5 to 6.9 when all six dairy co-operative societies were taken into consideration. this is far below the expected production

  3. Fluoride release and recharge behavior of a nano-filled resin-modified glass ionomer compared with that of other fluoride releasing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumita B; Oxman, Joe D; Falsafi, Afshin; Ton, Tiffany T

    2011-12-01

    To compare the long-term fluoride release kinetics of a novel nano-filled two-paste resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI), Ketac Nano (KN) with that of two powder-liquid resin-modified glass-ionomers, Fuji II LC (FLC) and Vitremer (VT) and one conventional glass-ionomer, Fuji IX (FIX). Fluoride release was measured in vitro using ion-selective electrodes. Kinetic analysis was done using regression analysis and compared with existing models for GIs and compomers. In a separate experiment the samples of KN and two conventional glass-ionomers, FIX and Ketac Molar (KM) were subjected to a treatment with external fluoride source (Oral-B Neutra-Foam) after 3 months of fluoride release and the recharge behavior studied for an additional 7-day period. The cumulative amount of fluoride released from KN, VT and FLC and the release profiles were statistically similar but greater than that for FIX at P coating of KN with its primer and of DY with its adhesive did not significantly alter the fluoride release behavior of the respective materials. The overall rate for KN was significantly higher than for the compomer DY. DY showed a linear rate of release vs. t and no burst effect as expected for compomers. The nanoionomer KN showed fluoride recharge behavior similar to the conventional glass ionomers FIX and KM. Thus, it was concluded that the new RMGI KN exhibits fluoride ion release behavior similar to typical conventional and RMGIs and that the primer does not impede the release of fluoride.

  4. The influence of lifelong exposure to environmental fluoride on bone quality in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachra, Debbie

    The objective of this study was to determine if lifelong exposure to environmental sources of fluoride (including fluoridated water) had an effect on bone quality in humans. Ninety-two femoral heads were obtained from individuals undergoing total hip arthroplasty in regions with and without fluoridated water (Toronto and Montreal, respectively), so that the donors would have had a wide range of fluoride exposure. As the samples were obtained at surgery, the femoral heads were affected by osteoarthritis (75), osteoporosis (9) and other diseases. The fluoride content of cancellous bone was assessed by instrumental neutron activation analysis. A number of contributors to bone quality were assessed. The compressive and torsional mechanical properties were measured for cancellous cores excised from the centre of the femoral head. The architecture was assessed by image analysis of an x-ray of a 5 mm thick coronal section of the femoral head, as well as of histological sections taken from the superior (weightbearing) and the inferior (nonweightbearing) surface of the femoral head. The degree of mineralization was measured using backscattered electron imaging and microhardness, again at the superior and the inferior surface. Femoral heads from Toronto donors had a greater mean fluoride content than those from Montreal donors (1033 +/- 438 ppm vs. 643 +/- 220 ppm). However, the fluoride content of the Toronto donors ranged approximately twelve-fold (192--2264 ppm) and entirely contained the range of Montreal donors. Therefore, fluoridated water exposure is not the only determinant of fluoride content. The logarithm of the bone fluoride content increased with age. No substantive effect of fluoride, independent of age, was observed for the mechanical properties. Similarly, at the inferior surface, the architecture was affected by age but not by fluoride incorporation but the degree of mineralization was not affected by either. However, the degree of mineralization (measured

  5. Hydrogen sulfide measurement by headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS): application to gaseous samples and gas dissolved in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, Vincent; Giuliani, Nicole; Palmiere, Cristian; Maujean, Géraldine; Augsburger, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to present a new headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method applicable to the routine determination of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) concentrations in biological and gaseous samples. The primary analytical drawback of the GC/MS methods for H(2)S measurement discussed in the literature was the absence of a specific H(2)S internal standard required to perform quantification. Although a deuterated hydrogen sulfide (D(2)S) standard is currently available, this standard is not often used because this standard is expensive and is only available in the gas phase. As an alternative approach, D(2)S can be generated in situ by reacting deuterated chloride with sodium sulfide; however, this technique can lead to low recovery yield and potential isotopic fractionation. Therefore, N(2)O was chosen for use as an internal standard. This method allows precise measurements of H(2)S concentrations in biological and gaseous samples. Therefore, a full validation using accuracy profile based on the β-expectation tolerance interval is presented. Finally, this method was applied to quantify H(2)S in an actual case of H(2)S fatal intoxication. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. On the Adsorption of Some Anionic Collectors on Fluoride Minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Emil

    1973-01-01

    Test flotations have been carried out in a small apparatus under standardized conditions in order to determine the dependence of the flotation yield on the reagent concentration for certain minerals and anionic collectors. The results suggest that a special adsorption mechanism is operating...... in the case of fluoride minerals, and a theory is presented which involves the joint action of ionic and hydrogen bonds. A precondition is the compatibility of the crystal geometry with the configuration of the polar group of the collector molecules....

  7. Chemical treatment of ammonium fluoride solution in uranium reconversion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Frajndlich, E.U. de.

    1992-01-01

    A chemical procedure is described for the treatment of the filtrate, produced from the transformation of uranium hexafluoride (U F 6 ) into ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC). This filtrate is an intermediate product in the U F 6 to uranium dioxide (U O 2 ) reconversion process. The described procedure recovers uranium as ammonium peroxide fluoro uranate (APOFU) by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), and as later step, its calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) co-precipitation. The recovered uranium is recycled to the AUC production plant. (author)

  8. Fluoride remediation using floating macrophytes

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    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Six aquatic macrophytes, such as Pistia stratiotes, Ceratophyllum demersum, Nymphoides indica, Lemna major, Azolla pinnata,and Eichhornia crassipes were considered for remove fluoride from aqueous solution. Five different concentrations (10, 30, 50, and 100 ppm of fluoride solution were taken in 1 L plastic container. Fixed weight (20 g of macrophytes along with 500 ml fluoride solution was taken in each plastic container for 72 hours observation. Results demonstrated all the macrophytes show highest fluoride removal during 24 h to 48 h, but after 72 h their efficiency reduced drastically. The species N. indica showed better removal efficiency than other experimental macrophytes. In general, pigment measurement data indicated higher concentration at 72 h. However, Pistia sp. showed higher concentration of pigmentation at intermediate time interval (48 h. Higher level of dry weight to fresh weight ratio was recorded for L. major and A. pinnata at all concentrations, excepting at 10 ppm. In addition, all macrophytes showed lower RGR at higher concentration. Isotherm study indicated that macrophyte C. demersum is a good fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm whereas L. major with Langmuir isotherm during 24 hours.

  9. Fluoride, boron and nitrate toxicity in ground water of northwest Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Veena; Kumar, Mukesh; Sharma, Mukesh; Yadav, B S

    2010-02-01

    The study was carried out to access the fluoride, boron, and nitrate concentrations in ground water samples of different villages in Indira Gandhi, Bhakra, and Gang canal catchment area of northwest Rajasthan, India. Rural population, in the study site, is using groundwater for drinking and irrigation purposes, without any quality test of water. All water samples (including canal water) were contaminated with fluoride. Fluoride, boron, and nitrate were observed in the ranges of 0.50-8.50, 0.0-7.73, and 0.0-278.68 mg/l, respectively. Most of the water samples were in the categories of fluoride 1.50 mg/l, of boron 2.0-4.0 mg/l, and of nitrate availability of these compounds in groundwater was due to natural reasons and by the use of chemical fertilizers.

  10. Chemical resistivity of self-assembled monolayer covalently attached to silicon substrate to hydrofluoric acid and ammonium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, N.; Youda, S.; Hayashi, K.; Sugimura, H.; Takai, O.

    2003-06-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were prepared on hydrogen-terminated silicon substrates through chemical vapor deposition using 1-hexadecene (HD) as a precursor. The HD-SAMs prepared in an atmosphere under a reduced pressure (≈50 Pa) showed better chemical resistivities to hydrofluoric acid and ammonium fluoride (NH 4F) solutions than that of an organosilane SAM formed on oxide-covered silicon substrates. The surface covered with the HD-SAM was micro-patterned by vacuum ultraviolet photolithography and consequently divided into two areas terminated with HD-SAM or silicon dioxide. This micro-patterned sample was immersed in a 40 vol.% NH 4F aqueous solution. Surface images obtained by an optical microscopy clearly show that the micro-patterns of HD-SAM/silicon dioxide were successfully transferred into the silicon substrate.

  11. Dipotassium hydrogencarbonate fluoride monohydrate

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    Volker Kahlenberg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of the title compound, K2(HCO3F·H2O, were obtained as a secondary product after performing flux synthesis experiments aimed at the preparation of potassium rare earth silicates. The basic building unit of the structure is an [(HCO3(H2OF]2− zigzag chain running parallel to [001]. Both types of anions as well as the water molecules reside on mirror planes perpendicular to [010] at y = 0.25 and y = 0.75, respectively. Linkage between the different constituents of the chains is provided by O—H...O and O—H...F hydrogen bonding. The K+ cations are located between the chains and are coordinated by two F and five O atoms in form of a distorted monocapped trigonal prism.

  12. Preparation and chemical crystallographic study of new hydrides and hydro-fluorides of ionic character; Preparation et etude cristallochimique de nouveaux hydrures et fluorohydrures a caractere ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyung-Ho

    1988-07-22

    Within the context of a growing interest in the study of reversible hydrides with the perspective of their application in hydrogen storage, this research thesis more particularly addressed the case of ternary hydrides and fluorides, and of hydro-fluorides. The author reports the development of a method of preparation of alkaline hydrides, of alkaline earth hydrides and of europium hydride, and then the elaboration of ternary hydrides. He addresses the preparation of caesium fluorides and of calcium or nickel fluorides, of Europium fluorides, and of ternary fluorides. Then, he addresses the preparation of hydro-fluorides (caesium, calcium, europium fluorides, and caesium and nickel fluorides). The author presents the various experimental techniques: chemical analysis, radio-crystallographic analysis, volumetric mass density measurement, magnetic measurements, ionic conductivity measurements, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance. He reports the crystallographic study of some ternary alkaline and alkaline-earth hydrides (KH-MgH{sub 2}, RbH-CaH{sub 2}, CsH-CaH{sub 2}, RbH-MgH{sub 2} and CsH-MgH{sub 2}) and of some hydro-fluorides (CsCaF{sub 2}H, EuF{sub 2}H, CsNiF{sub 2}H) [French] Dans une premiere partie, de nouveaux hydrures ternaires ont ete prepares et caracterises. Les systemes etudies sont AH-MH 2 (A = K, Rb, Cs et M = Mg, Ca). Dans les systemes AH-MgH 2 l'evolution structurale a ete discutee en fonction du caractere iono-covalent de la liaison magnesium-hydrogene. Dans une deuxieme partie, plusieurs nouveaux fluorohydrures ont ete mis en evidence. L'effet de la substitution de l'hydrogene au fluor dans ces phases a ete etudiee en utilisant la RMN, la spectroscopie Moessbauer, la conductivite ionique et les mesures magnetiques.

  13. Characterization and corrosion property of nano-rod-like HA on fluoride coating supported on Mg-Zn-Ca alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yashan; Zhu, Shijie; Wang, Liguo; Chang, Lei; Yan, Bingbing; Song, Xiaozhe; Guan, Shaokang

    2017-06-01

    The poor corrosion resistance of biodegradable magnesium alloys is the dominant factor that limits their clinical application. In this study, to deal with this challenge, fluoride coating was prepared on Mg-Zn-Ca alloy as the inner coating and then hydroxyapatite (HA) coating as the outer coating was deposited on fluoride coating by pulse reverse current electrodeposition (PRC-HA/MgF 2 ). As a comparative study, the microstructure and corrosion properties of the composite coating with the outer coating fabricated by traditional constant current electrodeposition (TED-HA/MgF 2 ) were also investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the coatings show that the morphology of PRC-HA/MgF 2 coating is dense and uniform, and presents nano-rod-like structure. Compared with that of TED-HA/MgF 2 , the corrosion current density of Mg alloy coated with PRC-HA/MgF 2 coatings decreases from 5.72 × 10 -5 A/cm 2 to 4.32 × 10 -7 A/cm 2 , and the corrosion resistance increases by almost two orders of magnitude. In immersion tests, samples coated with PRC-HA/MgF 2 coating always show the lowest hydrogen evolution amount, and could induce deposition of the hexagonal structure-apatite on the surface rapidly. The results show that the corrosion resistance and the bioactivity of the coatings have been improved by adopting double-pulse current mode in the process of preparing HA on fluoride coating, and the PRC-HA/MgF 2 coating is worth of further investigation.

  14. Modified zirconium-eriochrome cyanine R determination of fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, L.L.

    1957-01-01

    The Eriochrome Cyanine R method for determining fluoride in natural water has been modified to provide a single, stable reagent solution, eliminate interference from oxidizing agents, extend the concentration range to 3 p.p.m., and extend the phosphate tolerance. Temperature effect was minimized; sulfate error was eliminated by precipitation. The procedure is sufficiently tolerant to interferences found in natural and polluted waters to permit the elimination of prior distillation for most samples. The method has been applied to 500 samples.

  15. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  16. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadi Zenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP paste, casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion.Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10 of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPP-ACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean microhardness value (MMV had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027. The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (P<0.001.Conclusion: All the remineralizing agents were effective for rehardening the enamel after microabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential.Keywords: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate nanocomplex; Enamel Microabrasion; Hardness; Sodium Fluoride

  17. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry study of the protective effects of fluoride varnish and gel on enamel erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho Filho, Antonio Carlos Belfort; Sanches, Roberto Pizarro; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva

    2011-09-01

    Dental erosion is a risk factor for dental health, introduced by today's lifestyle. Topical fluoride applications in the form of varnishes and gel may lead to deposition of fluoride on enamel. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the effect of two fluoride varnishes and one fluoride gel on the dissolution of bovine enamel by acids. Enamel samples (72) were divided (n = 8): artificial saliva (control-G1), Pepsi Twist® (G2), orange juice (G3), Duraphat® + Pepsi Twist® (G4), Duraphat® + orange juice (G5), Duofluorid® + Pepsi Twist® (G6), Duofluorid® + orange juice (G7), fluoride gel + Pepsi Twist® (G8), and fluoride gel + orange juice (G9). Fluoride gel was applied for 4 min and the varnishes were applied and removed after 6 h. The samples were submitted to six cycles (demineralization: Pepsi Twist® or orange juice, 10 min; remineralization: saliva, 1 h). Samples were analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (144 line-scanning). The amount of Ca and P decreased significantly in the samples of G2 and G3, and the Ca/P ratio decreased in G3. Mineral gain (Ca) was greater in G9 samples than in G4 > G3 > G5 > G1, and (P) greater in G7 samples than in G9 > G4-6 > G2-3. The protective effect of Duofluorid® was significantly lower than fluoride gel against orange juice. The fluoride varnishes can interfere positively with the dissolution of dental enamel in the presence of acidic beverages. Fluoride gel showed the best protection level to extrinsic erosion with low costs. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Topographic assessment of human enamel surface treated with different topical sodium fluoride agents: Scanning electron microscope consideration

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    Gurlal Singh Brar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuous balanced demineralization and remineralization are natural dynamic processes in enamel. If the balance is interrupted and demineralization process dominates, it may eventually lead to the development of carious lesions in enamel and dentine. Fluoride helps control decay by enhancing remineralization and altering the structure of the tooth, making the surface less soluble. Methodology: One hundred and twenty sound human permanent incisors randomly and equally distributed into six groups as follows: Group I - Control, II - Sodium fluoride solution, III - Sodium fluoride gel, IV - Sodium fluoride varnish, V - Clinpro Tooth Crème (3M ESPE, and VI-GC Tooth Mousse Plus or MI Paste Plus. The samples were kept in artificial saliva for 12 months, and the topical fluoride agents were applied to the respective sample groups as per the manufacturer instructions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM evaluation of all the samples after 6 and 12 months was made. Results: Morphological changes on the enamel surface after application of fluoride in SEM revealed the presence of globular precipitate in all treated samples. Amorphous, globular, and crystalline structures were seen on the enamel surface of the treated samples. Clear differences were observed between the treated and untreated samples. Conclusion: Globular structures consisting of amorphous CaF2precipitates, which acted as a fluoride reservoir, were observed on the enamel surface after action of different sodium fluoride agents. CPP-ACPF (Tooth Mousse and Tricalcium phosphate with fluoride (Clinpro tooth crème are excellent delivery vehicles available in a slow release amorphous form to localize fluoride at the tooth surface.

  19. Urinary fluoride excretion by children 4-6 years old in a south Texas community

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    Ramon J. Baez

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated urinary fluoride excretion by school children 4-6 years old who were living in a south Texas rural community that had concentrations of fluoride in drinking water supplies generally around the optimal level. We took supervised collections of urine samples in the morning and afternoon at school, and parents of the participating students collected nocturnal samples. We recorded the beginning and end times of the three collection periods and then determined the urinary volume and urinary flow for each of the periods. We measured urinary fluoride concentrations and calculated the urinary excretion rate per hour. The children had breakfast and lunch provided at the school, where the drinking water contained 1.0-1.3 milligrams/liter (mg/L fluoride. Fluoride concentrations in the tested household water supplies, from wells, ranged from 0.1 to 3.2 mg/L fluoride. The children's average urinary fluoride concentrations found for the day were similar to those for the night, with means ranging from 1.26 mg/L to 1.42 mg/L. Average excretion was 36.4 µg/h in the morning, 45.6 µg/h in the afternoon, and 17.5 µg/h at night. The lower nocturnal excretion rates are easily explained by low urinary flow at night. Based on the 15 hours of urine collected, the extrapolated 24-hour fluoride excretion was 749 µg. In conjunction with similar studies, the data from this study will help in developing upper limits for urinary fluoride excretion that are appropriate for avoiding unsightly fluorosis while providing optimal protection against dental decay.

  20. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D; Davis, Jared H; Gordon, Patricia B; Breaker, Ronald R; Strobel, Scott A

    2013-11-19

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, (18)F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions.

  1. Lithological Influences on Occurrence of High-Fluoride Waters in The Central Kenya Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaka, L. A.; Musolff, A.; Mulch, A.; Olago, D.; Odada, E. O.

    2013-12-01

    Within the East African rift, groundwater recharge results from the complex interplay of geology, land cover, geomorphology, climate and on going volcano-tectonic processes across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. The interrelationships between these factors create complex patterns of water availability, reliability and quality. The hydrochemical evolution of the waters is further complex due to the different climatic regimes and geothermal processes going on in this area. High fluoridic waters within the rift have been reported by few studies, while dental fluorosis is high among the inhabitants of the rift. The natural sources of fluoride in waters can be from weathering of fluorine bearing minerals in rocks, volcanic or fumarolic activities. Fluoride concentration in water depends on a number of factors including pH, temperature, time of water-rock formation contact and geochemical processes. Knowledge of the sources and dispersion of fluoride in both surface and groundwaters within the central Kenya rift and seasonal variations between wet and dry seasons is still poor. The Central Kenya rift is marked by active tectonics, volcanic activity and fumarolic activity, the rocks are majorly volcanics: rhyolites, tuffs, basalts, phonolites, ashes and agglomerates some are highly fractured. Major NW-SE faults bound the rift escarpment while the rift floor is marked by N-S striking faults We combine petrographic, hydrochemistry and structural information to determine the sources and enrichment pathways of high fluoridic waters within the Naivasha catchment. A total of 120 water samples for both the dry season (January-February2012) and after wet season (June-July 2013) from springs, rivers, lakes, hand dug wells, fumaroles and boreholes within the Naivasha catchment are collected and analysed for fluoride, physicochemical parameters and stable isotopes (δ2 H, δ18 O) in order to determine the origin and evolution of the waters. Additionally, 30 soil and

  2. Implementing a geographical information system to assess endemic fluoride areas in Lamphun, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerawasttanasiri, Nonthaphat; Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Pingchai, Wichain; Nimchareon, Yuwaree; Sriwichai, Sangworn

    2018-01-01

    Many studies have shown that fluoride can cross the placenta and that exposure to high fluoride during pregnancy may result in premature birth and/or a low birth weight. Lamphun is one of six provinces in Thailand where natural water fluoride (WF) concentrations >10.0 mg/L were found, and it was also found that >50% of households used water with high fluoride levels. Nevertheless, geographical information system (GIS) and maps of endemic fluoride areas are lacking. We aimed to measure the fluoride level of village water supplies to assess endemic fluoride areas and present GIS with maps in Google Maps. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from July 2016 to January 2017. Purpose sampling was used to identify villages of districts with WF >10.0 mg/L in the Mueang Lamphun, Pasang, and Ban Thi districts. Water samples were collected with the geolocation measured by Smart System Info. Fluoride was analyzed with an ion-selective electrode instrument using a total ionic strength adjustment buffer. WF >0.70 mg/L was used to identify unsafe drinking water and areas with high endemic fluoride levels. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the findings, and MS Excel was used to create the GIS database. Maps were created in Google Earth and presented in Google Maps. We found that WF concentrations ranged between 0.10-13.60 mg/L. Forty-four percent (n=439) of samples were at unsafe levels (>0.70 mg/L), and. 54% (n=303) of villages and 46% (n=79,807) of households used the unsafe drinking water. Fifty percent (n=26) of subdistricts were classified as being endemic fluoride areas. Five subdistricts were endemic fluoride areas, and in those, there were two subdistricts in which every household used unsafe drinking water. These findings show the distribution of endemic fluoride areas and unsafe drinking water in Lamphun. This is useful for health policy authorities, local governments, and villagers and enables collaboration to resolve these issues. The GIS data are

  3. THE USE OF FLUORIDE CONTAINING MINERAL WATER IN WORT PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunka Yonkova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to study the quality of wort produced using fluoride containing mineral water. The results show that the mineral water has a negative impact on the enzymatic destruction of starch, proteins, color intensity and pH of the wort. The changes of pH during mashing process using tap and mineral water was studied. The lower acidity of wort obtained using mineral water didn’t change during the brewing process. The fluoride content of beer is lower than 5 mg.L-1 when wort is produced using mineral and tap water in 1:1 ratio and citric acid for pH correction. At the same time, the final degree of fermentation, α-amine nitrogen content and the intensity of color of produced wort are close to the control sample. The changes in fluoride ion concentration are monitored using ion-selective potentiometry. The fluoride content is decreased from 5.7 to 4.75 mg.L-1, the most intense change is observed during the mashing process.

  4. Evaluation of exposure to fluoride in child population of North Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, René Antonio; Calatayud, Marta; Devesa, Vicenta; Vélez, Dinoraz

    2017-09-01

    Fluoride is an important element for humans. It inhibits initiation and progression of dental caries and stimulates bone formation. However, excessive intake may lead to the appearance of dental and/or skeletal fluorosis and a decrease in intellectual coefficient in child populations. This study evaluates exposure to fluoride in the child population of Chaco province (Argentina) by analysis of drinking water, food and its bioaccessible fraction (quantity of fluoride solubilised by gastrointestinal digestion and available for intestinal absorption) and urine as a biomarker of internal dose. The concentration of fluoride in drinking water varied between 0.050 and 4.6 mg L -1 , and 80% of the samples exceeded the WHO drinking-water guideline value (1.5 mg L -1 ). Fluoride concentrations in food ranged between 0.80 and 3.0 mg kg -1 fresh weight (fw), being lower in bioaccessible fraction (0.43-1.9 mg kg -1 , fw). On the basis of the consumption data declared for the young child population, fluoride intake varies between 4.1 and 6.5 mg day -1 , greater than the level recommended for this age group. Moreover, in some cases, concentrations of fluoride found in urine (0.62-8.9 mg L -1 ) exceeded those reported in areas with declared fluorosis. All data obtained show the worrying situation of child population in this area of Argentina.

  5. Organoboron compounds as Lewis acid receptors of fluoride ions in polymeric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jańczyk, Martyna; Adamczyk-Woźniak, Agnieszka; Sporzyński, Andrzej; Wróblewski, Wojciech

    2012-07-06

    Newly synthesized organoboron compounds - 4-octyloxyphenylboronic acid (OPBA) and pinacol ester of 2,4,6-trifluorophenylboronic acid (PE-PBA) - were applied as Lewis acid receptors of fluoride anions. Despite enhanced selectivity, the polymer membrane electrodes containing the lipophilic receptor OPBA exhibited non-Nernstian slopes of the responses toward fluoride ions in acidic conditions. Such behavior was explained by the lability of the B-O bond in the boronic acids, and the OH(-)/F(-) exchange at higher fluoride content in the sample solution. In consequence, the stoichiometry of the OPBA-fluoride complexes in the membrane could vary during the calibration, changing the equilibrium concentration of the primary anion in membrane and providing super-Nernstian responses. The proposed mechanism was supported by (19)F NMR studies, which indicated that the fluoride complexation proceeds more effectively in acidic solution leading mainly to PhBF(3)(-) species. Finally, the performances of the membranes based on the phenylboronic acid pinacol ester, with a more stable B-O bond, were tested. As it was expected, Nernstian fluoride responses were recorded for such membranes with worsened fluoride selectivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Removal of Fluoride from Drinking Water Using Modified Immobilized Activated Alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneeza Rafique

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the removal of fluoride from drinking water using modified immobilized activated alumina (MIAA prepared by sol-gel method. The modification was done by adding a specific amount of alum during the sol formation step. The fluoride removal efficiency of MIAA was 1.35 times higher as compared to normal immobilized activated alumina. A batch adsorption study was performed as a function of adsorbent dose, contact time, stirring rate, and initial fluoride concentration. More than 90% removal of fluoride was achieved within 60 minutes of contact time. The adsorption potential of MIAA was compared with activated charcoal which showed that the removal efficiency was about 10% more than the activated charcoal. Both the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms fitted well for the fluoride adsorption on MIAA with the regression coefficient R2 of 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. MIAA can both be regenerated thermally and chemically. Adsorption experiments using MIAA were employed on real drinking water samples from a fluoride affected area. The study showed that modified immobilized activated alumina is an effective adsorbent for fluoride removal.

  7. Hydrogeochemistry of high-fluoride groundwater at Yuncheng Basin, northern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chengcheng; Gao, Xubo; Wang, Yanxin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogeochemical and environmental isotope methods were integrated to delineate the spatial distribution and enrichment of fluoride in groundwater at Yuncheng Basin in northern China. One hundred groundwater samples and 10 Quaternary sediment samples were collected from the Basin. Over 69% of the shallow groundwater (with a F − concentration of up to 14.1 mg/L), 44% of groundwater samples from the intermediate and 31% from the deep aquifers had F − concentrations above the WHO provisional drinking water guideline of 1.5 mg/L. Groundwater with high F − concentrations displayed a distinctive major ion chemistry: Na-rich and Ca-poor with a high pH value and high HCO 3 − content. Hydrochemical diagrams and profiles and hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions indicate that variations in the major ion chemistry and pH are controlled by mineral dissolution, cation exchange and evaporation in the aquifer systems, which are important for F − mobilization as well. Leakage of shallow groundwater and/or evaporite (gypsum and mirabilite) dissolution may be the major sources for F − in groundwater of the intermediate and deep aquifers. - Highlights: • High-F − groundwater widely occurs in Yuncheng Basin of northern China. • High-F − groundwater is Na and HCO 3 -rich and Ca-poor, with high pH. • Major hydrogeochemical processes are mineral dissolution, ion exchange and evaporation. • Shallow groundwater leakage/evaporite dissolution may cause F enrichment in lower aquifers

  8. Comparative Analysis of Fluoride Concentrations in Groundwaters in Northern and Southern Ghana: Implications for the Contaminant Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkari, Emmanuel Daanoba; Zango, Musah Saeed; Korboe, Harriet Mateko

    2018-04-01

    Bongo and Sekyere South districts, both in the northern and southern parts of Ghana, respectively, have high populations living in rural areas and most of them use groundwater for drinking purposes. The groundwater in these areas is prone to contamination from natural and/or artificial sources. Therefore this study aims; (1) to present a comparative analysis of the fluoride concentration in groundwater samples from Bongo and Sekyere South districts and the associated groundwater-rock interaction that may be the cause for the varied fluoride concentrations, (2) to determine the leaching potential of fluoride from the host rocks as the possible mechanism for groundwater contamination. Sixty (60) groundwater samples from active pumping wells and twelve (12) rock samples from outcrops were collected from various communities in the two districts for fluoride concentration and mineralogical analysis. Based on the variations in fluoride concentration, fluoride spatial distribution maps were prepared using empirical Bayesian kriging interpolation method and analysed by means of hierarchical cluster analysis. The fluoride concentration in Bongo district varies between 1.71 and 4.0 mg/L, whereas that in Sekyere South district changes from 0.3 to 0.8 mg/L. From the mineralogical studies, biotite has the highest percentage in the Bongo district and has positive correlation with fluoride concentration in the analysed water samples than in the Sekyere South district. The elevated fluoride concentration in the Bongo district relative to the Sekyere South district is due to the dissolution of biotite in the groundwater and the sufficient groundwater-rock interaction since the water samples are mainly sourced from deeper boreholes. This high fluoride concentration has resulted in a plethora of reported cases of dental fluorosis and other health-related issues in Bongo.

  9. Estimation of Fluoride Concentration of Various Citrus and Non-Citrus Fruits Commonly Consumed and Commercially Available in Mathura City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Anand Ingle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since fluoride is available from various sources, the total ingestion of fluoride by a person should be estimated taking into consideration the fluoride consumed from all the sources including fruits. There are very few epidemiological studies carried out associated with fluoride estimation in fruit samplesand especially in the Indian scenario Objective: To estimate and compare the fluoride concentration of different commercially available citrus and non-citrus fruits in Mathura city. Materials & Method: Fifteen different types of fruits commercially available and consumed by people ofMathura City were collected. Out of the 15 fruit samples 5 were citrus fruits and 10 were non-citrus fruits. The fluoride estimation of fruit samples was done at Central Laboratory,Lucknow. Juices of all 15 fruit samples were prepared, from each sample 10 ml of juice was measured and fluoride testing of each sample was carried out by using Orion 4 star -ion electrode analyzer. The collected data was analyzed using the statistical software program SPSS, version 17. Results: The fluoride concentration in citrus fruits ranged from 0.04ppm (Orange to 0.08 ppm (Tomato while in non-citrus fruits it ranged from 0.04ppm (chikoo to 0.18 ppm (Guava. No significant difference was observed between the mean fluoride concentration of citrus and non citrus fruits. Conclusions: Both citrus and non citrus fruits have fluorides. Guava was found to have the maximumamount of fluoridecontent (0.18 ppm among both the citrus and non citrus fruits.

  10. Diffusion of hydrogen in yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobyov, V.V.; Ryabchikov, L.N.

    1966-01-01

    In this work the diffusion coefficients of hydrogen in yttrium were determined from the rate at which the hydrogen was released from yttrium samples under a vacuum at temperatures of 450 to 850 0 C and from the quantity of hydrogen retained by yttrium at hydrogen pressures below 5 x 10 - 4 mm Hg in the same temperature range

  11. Study of the thermoluminescence properties and kinetics of local natural calcium fluoride in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarie, K.A.

    2006-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of local natural calcium fluoride that show light yellowish appearance obtained from a fluoride mine west of Saudi Arabia have been studied. TL glow peaks were observed at 160, 260 and 334 degree C. Thermal treatment and fading effects had been studied. The TL response was observed to increase with increasing dose, as expected, over the dose range used. The kinetic parameters were calculated to satisfy the feasibility of using the present sample as gamma -ray dosimetry

  12. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  13. Groundwater fluoride contamination: A reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Banerjee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution of fluorite (CaF2 and/or fluorapatite (FAP [Ca5(PO43F], pulled by calcite precipitation, is thought to be the dominant mechanism responsible for groundwater fluoride (F− contamination. Here, one dimensional reactive–transport models are developed to test this mechanism using the published dissolution and precipitation rate kinetics for the mineral pair FAP and calcite. Simulation results correctly show positive correlation between the aqueous concentrations of F− and CO32− and negative correlation between F− and Ca2+. Results also show that precipitation of calcite, contrary to the present understanding, slows down the FAP dissolution by 106 orders of magnitude compared to the FAP dissolution by hydrolysis. For appreciable amount of fluoride contamination rock–water interaction time must be long and of order 106 years.

  14. Fluoride Removal from pretreated Photovoltaic Wastewater by Electrocoagulation: An Investigation of The Effect of Operational Parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Drouiche, Nadjib; Aoudj, Saleh; Lounici, Hakim; Drouiche, M.; Ouslimane, Tarik; Ghaffour, Norredine

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, application of electrocoagulation using common iron electrode to a simulated photovoltaic wastewater after precipitation with lime (Ca(OH)2) was investigated. Electrocoagulation process delivers the coagulant in situ as the sacrificial anode corrodes, while the simultaneous evolution of hydrogen at the cathode allows pollutant removal by flotation. Several working parameters, such as initial pH, applied potential and distance between the electrodes, were studied in an attempt to achieve higher fluoride removal efficiency. The optimum conditions for the process were identified as pH = 6, the distance between electrodes = 1 and an applied potential of 30 V. Furthermore fluoride removal is under the direct discharge standards.Results showed high effectivenessof the electrocoagulation method in removing fluoride from aqueous solutions.

  15. Fluoride Removal from pretreated Photovoltaic Wastewater by Electrocoagulation: An Investigation of The Effect of Operational Parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Drouiche, Nadjib

    2012-03-20

    In this paper, application of electrocoagulation using common iron electrode to a simulated photovoltaic wastewater after precipitation with lime (Ca(OH)2) was investigated. Electrocoagulation process delivers the coagulant in situ as the sacrificial anode corrodes, while the simultaneous evolution of hydrogen at the cathode allows pollutant removal by flotation. Several working parameters, such as initial pH, applied potential and distance between the electrodes, were studied in an attempt to achieve higher fluoride removal efficiency. The optimum conditions for the process were identified as pH = 6, the distance between electrodes = 1 and an applied potential of 30 V. Furthermore fluoride removal is under the direct discharge standards.Results showed high effectivenessof the electrocoagulation method in removing fluoride from aqueous solutions.

  16. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF 4 and UF 6 , including UF 4 (solid and gas), U 4 F 17 (solid), U 2 F 9 (solid), UF 5 (solid and gas), U 2 F 10 (gas), and UF 6 (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior

  17. Protective effect of fluoride varnish and fluoride gel on enamel erosion: roughness, SEM-EDS, and µ-EDXRF studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; De Carvalho Filho, Antonio Carlos Belfort

    2015-03-01

    The effects of fluoride treatment on bovine enamel subjected to acid erosion were studied by roughness (Ra) measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and microenergy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF). Enamel samples (63) were divided into nine groups (n = 7): artificial saliva (AS), Pepsi Twist(®) (PT), orange juice (OJ), Duraphat(®)  + Pepsi Twist(®) (DPH/PT), Duraphat(®)  + orange juice (DPH/OJ), Duofluorid(®)  + Pepsi Twist(®) (DUO/PT), Duofluorid(®)  + orange juice (DUO/OJ), fluoride gel + Pepsi Twist(®) (FG/PT), and fluoride gel + orange juice (FG/OJ). Fluoride was applied and the samples were submitted to six cycles (demineralization: Pepsi Twist(®) or orange juice, 10 min; remineralization: saliva, 1 h). The enamel surface in depth was exposed and 63 line-scan maps were performed. The elemental analysis by EDS revealed that only fluoride treated groups had any detectable fluorine after erosion cycles (DPH/PT: 3.50 wt%; DPH/OJ: 3.37 wt%; DUO/PT: 2.69 wt%; DUO/OJ: 3.54 wt%; FG/PT: 2.17 wt%; FG/OJ: 2.77 wt%). PT treatment resulted in significantly higher Ra values than the artificial saliva (P < 0.001). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of fluoride protected enamel showed areas with some globular structures or a residual layer of varnish. The enamel thickness was significantly lower in PT (0.63 ± 0.087 mm) than in DPH/PT (0.87 ± 0.16 mm) and DUO/PT (0.92 ± 0.14 mm) groups (P < 0.01). Fluoride treatments protected enamel without Ra increase and loss of enamel tissue. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Further results on cerium fluoride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.; Auffray, E.; Aziz, T.; Baccaro, S.; Banerjee, S.; Bareyre, P.; Barone, L.E.; Borgia, B.; Boutet, D.; Burq, J.P.; Chemarin, M.; Chipaux, R.; Dafinei, I.; D'Atanasio, P.; De Notaristefani, F.; Dezillie, B.; Dujardin, C.; Dutta, S.; Faure, J.L.; Fay, J.; Ferrere, D.; Francescangeli, O.; Fuchs, B.A.; Ganguli, S.N.; Gillespie, G.; Goyot, M.; Gupta, S.K.; Gurtu, A.; Heck, J.; Herve, A.; Hillemanns, H.; Holdener, F.; Ille, B.; Joensson, L.; Kierstead, J.; Krenz, W.; Kway, W.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lebeau, M.; Lebrun, P.; Lecoq, P.; Lemoigne, Y.; Loomis, G.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Madjar, N.; Majni, G.; El Mamouni, H.; Mangla, S.; Mares, J.A.; Martin, J.P.; Mattioli, M.; Mauger, G.J.; Mazumdar, K.; Mengucci, P.; Merlo, J.P.; Moine, B.; Nikl, N.; Pansart, J.P.; Pedrini, C.; Poinsignon, J.; Polak, K.; Raghavan, R.; Rebourgeard, P.; Rinaldi, D.; Rosa, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Sahuc, P.; Samsonov, V.; Sarkar, S.; Schegelski, V.; Schmitz, D.; Schneegans, M.; Seliverstov, D.; Stoll, S.; Sudhakar, K.; Svensson, A.; Tonwar, S.C.; Topa, V.; Vialle, J.P.; Vivargent, M.; Wallraff, W.; Weber, M.J.; Winter, N.; Woody, C.; Wuest, C.R.; Yanovski, V.

    1993-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the properties of cerium fluoride monocrystals has been performed by the 'Crystal Clear' collaboration in view of a possible use of such crystals for the construction of high precision electromagnetic calorimeters for the future generation of high luminosity accelerators. A large sample of different crystals grown by several producers has been studied. The spectroscopic characteristics, the transmission, luminescence and excitation spectra and the decay time curves are analysed. The light yield of the different crystals is measured with photomultipliers and Si photodiodes and compared to reference standards like BGO and NaI(Tl). The radiation damage behaviour is then presented for γ and neutron irradiations, at different doses and dose rates, including thermal and optical bleaching. (orig.)

  19. Association of Hypertension, Body Mass Index, and Waist Circumference with Fluoride Intake; Water Drinking in Residents of Fluoride Endemic Areas, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mahmood; Yaseri, Mehdi; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Hooshmand, Elham; Jalilzadeh, Mohsen; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar

    2018-03-14

    Hypertension is becoming a global epidemic for both rural and urban populations; it is a major public health challenge in Iran. Fluoride can be a risk factor for hypertension. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted in two study areas to assess the relation of fluoride with blood pressure prevalence, BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) among different age groups in both sexes. The mean value of fluoride concentration in the drinking water from the four study villages varied from 0.68 to 10.30 mg/L. The overall prevalence of HTN and prehypertension in all subjects was 40.7%. The prevalence of isolated systolic hypertension, isolated diastolic hypertension, systolic-diastolic hypertension, and prehypertension in the total sample population was 1.15, 0.28, 9.53, and 29.76%, respectively. The odd ratio of hypertension in residents who drank water with high fluoride levels was higher than that in residents who drank water with lower level of fluoride (OR 2.3, 1.03-5.14). Logistic regression results showed that age (P water (P = 0.041) had a significant relationship with increased blood pressure. There were no statistically significant correlations between fluoride and BMI, hip circumference, and waist to hip ratio (WHR). The findings of this study are important for health care personnel and policymakers.

  20. Fluoride removal from aqueous solution by pumice: case study on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    conditions, the fluoride removal efficiency from Kuhbonan water by 2.8 mg/L fluoride was 74.64%. Eventually ... industrial wastewater containing fluoride is a key ..... solution using silica ceramic: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies.

  1. Purification process of uranium hexafluoride containing traces of plutonium fluoride and/or neptunium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, J.; Bethuel, L.; Carles, M.

    1983-01-01

    In this process impure uranium hexafluoride is contacted with a metallic fluoride chosen in the group containing lead fluoride PbF 2 , uranium fluorides UFsub(4+x) (0 3 at a temperature such as plutonium and/or neptunium are reduced and pure uranium hexafluoride is recovered. Application is made to uranium hexafluoride purification in spent fuel reprocessing [fr

  2. Parental preference for fluoride varnish: a new concept in a rapidly developing nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jama, Hibaq A; Siddiqui, Faisal J; Elsiddig, Sohair A; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate parental preference for fluoride varnish in a country where the average percentage of dental caries in young children is up to ~73%. Consequently, the aim of this study, despite being a pilot, was to create a nationwide project in the State of Qatar to promote oral health in children. A cross-sectional perspective study was conducted at Hamad Medical Corporation in Qatar. Parents of children aged ≤5 years were offered an interview survey. A total of 200 questionnaires were completed (response rate =100%). The study was conducted between December 1, 2014 and March 30, 2015, and included all children aged >1 year and parents' knowledge and awareness of dental health, we found that >90% of families were aware that dental health affects the health of the whole body. The study showed that ~70% of parents were not aware of the existence of fluoride varnish, but would allow a health provider to apply fluoride varnish. Furthermore, ~80% of parents would not stop brushing their child's teeth and would not skip dentist appointments if varnish was to be applied. Approximately 40% of parents conveyed some concerns regarding the safety of fluoride varnish, despite being considered as a new concept. The main concern was that the child might swallow some of the fluoride. Another important concern expressed by parents was the availability of the fluoride varnish in all clinics. The robust positive attitude of parents in this sample suggests that introducing fluoride varnish is feasible and acceptable in our community. Actions to augment fluoride varnish acceptability in the developing world, such as focusing on safety, could be important in the disseminated implementation of fluoride varnish.

  3. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, M; Todolí, J L; Hidalgo, M; Iglesias, M

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S(2-)) at low levels (microgL(-1)) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H(2)S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H(2)S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H(2)S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5microgL(-1) to 25mgL(-1) of sulfide. Detection limits of 5microgL(-1) and 6microgL(-1) were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters.

  4. Fluoride ions vs removal technologies: A study

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Jagvir; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Literature reported that drinking water is a precious and scarce resource and it has to be protected and kept free from any kind of contamination. Further, it has to be used carefully without wasting. Literature also reported that fluoride bearing rocks are abundant in India, as a result, fluoride leaches out and contaminates the adjacent water and soil resources. A high concentration of fluoride ions in ground water increases up to more than 30 mg/L. This high concentration of fluoride ions ...

  5. Hydrogen molecules and hydrogen-related defects in crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukata, N.; Sasaki, S.; Murakami, K.; Ishioka, K.; Nakamura, K. G.; Kitajima, M.; Fujimura, S.; Kikuchi, J.; Haneda, H.

    1997-09-01

    We have found that hydrogen exists in molecular form in crystalline silicon treated with hydrogen atoms in the downstream of a hydrogen plasma. The vibrational Raman line of hydrogen molecules is observed at 4158 cm-1 for silicon samples hydrogenated between 180 and 500 °C. The assignment of the Raman line is confirmed by its isotope shift to 2990 cm-1 for silicon treated with deuterium atoms. The Raman intensity has a maximum for hydrogenation at 400 °C. The vibrational Raman line of the hydrogen molecules is broad and asymmetric. It consists of at least two components, possibly arising from hydrogen molecules in different occupation sites in crystalline silicon. The rotational Raman line of hydrogen molecules is observed at 590 cm-1. The Raman band of Si-H stretching is observed for hydrogenation temperatures between 100 and 500 °C and the intensity has a maximum for hydrogenation at 250 °C.

  6. Gramicidin D enhances the antibacterial activity of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, James W.; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride is a toxic anion found in many natural environments. One of the major bacterial defenses against fluoride is the cell envelope, which limits passage of the membrane-impermeant fluoride anion. Accordingly, compounds that enhance the permeability of bacterial membranes to fluoride should also enhance fluoride toxicity. In this study, we demonstrate that the pore-forming antibiotic gramicidin D increases fluoride uptake in B. subtilis and that the antibacterial activity of this compound...

  7. Estimation of fluoride concentration in drinking water and common beverages in United Arab Emirates (UAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Tarun; Abu Fanas, Salem; Akbar, Madiha; Eddin, Jamal; Adnan, Mohamad

    2017-07-01

    To assess fluoride concentration in drinking water which include tap water of 4 emirates - Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah and Ajman plus bottled water, commonly available soft drinks & juices in United Arab Emirates. Five different samples of tap water collected from each of the four emirates of UAE: Ajman, Sharjah, Abu Dhabi and Dubai; twenty-two brands of bottled water and fifteen brands of popular cold beverages, purchased from different supermarkets in U.A.E were tested using ion selective electrode method and the fluoride concentration was determined. The mean fluoride content of tap water samples was 0.14 mg F/L with a range of 0.04-0.3 mg F/L; with Ajman tap water samples showing the highest mean fluoride content of 0.3 mg F/L. The mean fluoride content for both bottled drinking water and beverages was 0.07 mg F/L with a range of 0.02-0.50 mg F/L and 0.04-0.1 mg F/L respectively. Majority (68.2%) of the bottled water are produced locally within U.A.E while a few (31.8%) are imported. The tap water, bottled water and beverages available in U.A.E show varying concentrations of fluoride, however none showed the optimal level necessary to prevent dental caries. Dental professionals in U.A.E should be aware of the fluoride concentrations before prescribing fluoride supplements to children.

  8. Stabilization of fluoroindate glasses by magnesium fluoride and other heavy metal fluorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Costa

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Their extended transparency in the IR makes them attractive for use as optical fibers for CO laser power delivery and optical amplification. This paper firstly describes the spectacular stabilizing effect of MgF2 on the binary system InF3-BaF2. The investigation of the InF3-BaF2-MgF2 system led to samples up to 5mm in thickness. Further optimization of this system was achieved by incorporation of limited amounts of other fluorides and resulted in increased resistence to devitrification. The second approach of this work was concerned to the investigation of the pseudo-ternary system InF3-GdF3-GaF3 at constant concentrations of ZnF2-SrF2-BaF2-NaF. Several compositions were studied in this system. The samples presented a better thermal stability when compared to other families of fluoride glasses. Therefore, these glasses seem to be very promising for the fabrication of special optical fibers. Thermal data are reported.

  9. Detection of trace fluoride in serum and urine by online membrane-based distillation coupled with ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Chaoyan; Guo, Dandan; Wang, Nani; Wu, Shuchao; Zhang, Peimin; Zhu, Yan

    2017-06-02

    An online membrane-based distillation (MBD) coupled with ion chromatography (IC) method was proposed for automatic detection of trace fluoride (F - ) in serum and urine samples. The system consisted of a sample vessel, a lab-made membrane module and an ion chromatograph. Hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) hollow fiber membrane was used in MBD which was directly performed in serum and urine samples to eliminate the matrix interferences and enrich fluoride, while enabling automation. The determination of fluoride in biological samples was carried out by IC with suppressed conductometric detection. The proposed method feasibly determined trace fluoride in serum and urine matrices with the optimized parameters, such as acid concentration, distillation temperature, and distillation time, etc. Fluoride exhibited satisfactory linearity in the range of 0.01-5.0mg/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9992. The limit of detection (LOD, S/N=3) and limit of quantification (LOQ, S/N=10) were 0.78μg/L and 2.61μg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations of peak area and peak height were all less than 5.15%. The developed method was validated for the determination of fluoride in serum and urine with good spiked recoveries ranging between 97.1-101.9%. This method also can be proposed as a suitable alternative for the analysis of fluoride in other complex biological samples. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. "Effect of nano-filled surface coating agent on fluoride release from conventional glass ionomer cement: an in vitro trial".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S; Nandlal, B

    2013-01-01

    To overcome the drawbacks of glass ionomer cement of sensitivity to initial desiccation and moisture contamination the use of surface coating agent is recommended. The search in this area led to invent of use of nanofillers in surface coating agent, but its effect on fluoride release is not clear. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the fluoride release from conventional glass ionomer cement with and without surface coating agent. This in vitro study comprised of total 80 samples (40 samples of each with and without surface coating). Specimens were prepared, G coat plus was applied and light cured. Fluoride release of the sample was measured every 24 h for 7 days and weekly from 7th to 21 st day using Sension4 pH/ISE/MV Meter. Descriptive Statistics, Repeated Measure ANOVA, Paired Sample t-test, Independent Sample t-test, Scheffe post hoc test. Mean values clearly reveal a significant decrease in the fluoride release from day 1 to day 21 for both groups. Non-coated group released significantly more fluoride than surface coated group (Pagent will reduce the amount of fluoride released into oral environment as compared to non-coated group and at the same time releasing fluoride into surrounding cavity walls to create zones of inhibition into the cavity floor to help internal remineralization.

  11. Fluoride barriers in Nb/Pb Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, H.; Tanabe, K.; Michikami, O.; Igarashi, M.; Beasley, M. R.

    1985-03-01

    Josephson tunnel junctions are fabricated using a new class of artificial barriers, metal fluorides (Al fluoride and Zr fluoride). These fluoride barriers are deposited on the surface of a Nb base electrode, which are previously cleaned using a CF4 cleaning process, and covered by a Pb counterelectrode. The junctions with both Al fluoride and Zr fluoride barriers exhibit good tunneling characteristics and have low specific capacitance. In the case of Zr fluoride, it is observed that reasonable resistances are obtained even at thickness greater than 100 A. This phenomenon might be explained by tunneling via localized states in Zr fluoride.

  12. Fluoride absorption from the rat urinary bladder: a pH-dependent event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitford, G.M.; Pashley, D.H.; Reynolds, K.E.

    1977-01-01

    Urinary bladder absorption of stable and radiofluoride was studied as a function of pH in anesthetized rats to further evaluate the influence of pH gradients on fluoride transport. Buffered pH values and stable fluoride concentrations ranged from 1.85 to 7.90 and from 0.012 to 8.81 mM, respectively. [ 14 C]inulin served as a marker for solute concentration changes due to water migration or dilution. The results indicate that bladder fluoride absorption is inversely related to pH over the 1.85 to 5.50 range. Mean, 15-min radiofluoride absorption values of 70 percent at pH 1.85, 37 percent at pH 3.95, and 5 percent at pH 5.50 were observed. These fractional absorption values were not significantly influenced by carrier fluoride concentration, the buffers used, or the presence of urine. Above pH 5.50, pH-independent absorption occurs to a slight extent. The results are consistent with a first-order absorptive process which occurs by the nonionic diffusion of hydrogen fluoride

  13. The effect of fluoride on the scavenging of organophosphates by human butyrylcholinesterase in buffer solutions and human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashani, Yacov; Segev, Omri; Balan, Ayala

    2004-01-01

    Fluoride ion is a reversible inhibitor of human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) that is a viable drug candidate against organophosphates (OPs) toxicity. Since large numbers of communities in many countries are occasionally exposed to relatively high amount of fluoride, its effect on the kinetics of inhibition of HuBChE by OPs was investigated. In saline phosphate, pH 7.4, fluoride in the lower millimolar range significantly slowed the inhibition of HuBChE by paraoxon, DFP, echothiophate, soman, sarin, and VX. The kinetics of the inhibition was found consistent with the formation of a reversible fluoride-HuBChE complex that is at least 25-fold less active towards phosphorylation or phosphonylation than the free enzyme. Heat inactivation experiments indicate that the binding of fluoride to HuBChE probably involves enhanced cross-domain interaction via hydrogen bonds formation that may decrease enzyme activity. In spite of distinct structural differences among the OP used, the dissociation constants of the fluoride-HuBChE reversible complex varied over a narrow range (K F , 0.31-0.70 mM); however, K F in human plasma increased to 2.75-3.40 mM. 19 F-NMR spectroscopy revealed that fluoride ion is complexed to plasma components, an observation that explains in part the apparent increase in K F . Results suggest that an estimate of the relative decrease in the rate of OPs sequestration in presence of fluoride can be obtained from the fraction of the free HuBChE (1 + [F]/K F ) -1 . Considering K F values in human plasma, it is concluded that the scavenging efficacy of OPs by HuBChE is not compromised by the normal concentration range of circulating fluoride ions

  14. γ-Aminobutyric acid ameliorates fluoride-induced hypothyroidism in male Kunming mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoyue; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Yu, Huahua; Li, Pengcheng

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the protective effects of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a non-protein amino acid and anti-oxidant, against fluoride-induced hypothyroidism in mice. Light microscope sample preparation technique and TEM sample preparation technique were used to assay thyroid microstructure and ultrastructure; enzyme immunoassay method was used to assay hormone and protein levels; immunohistochemical staining method was used to assay apoptosis of thyroid follicular epithelium cells. Subacute injection of sodium fluoride (NaF) decreased blood T4, T3 and thyroid hormone-binding globulin (TBG) levels to 33.98 μg/l, 3 2.8 ng/ml and 11.67 ng/ml, respectively. In addition, fluoride intoxication induced structural abnormalities in thyroid follicles. Our results showed that treatment of fluoride-exposed mice with GABA appreciably decreased metabolic toxicity induced by fluoride and restored the microstructural and ultrastructural organisation of the thyroid gland towards normalcy. Compared with the negative control group, GABA treatment groups showed significantly upregulated T4, T3 and TBG levels (42.34 μg/l, 6.54 ng/ml and 18.78 ng/ml, respectively; Plevel and apoptosis inhibition in thyroid follicular epithelial cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to establish the therapeutic efficacy of GABA as a natural antioxidant in inducing thyroprotection against fluoride-induced toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The efficacy of amine fluoride/stannous fluoride in the suppression of morning breath odour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirynen, Marc; Avontroodt, Pieter; Soers, Catherine; Zhao, Hong; Pauwels, Martine; Coucke, Wim; van Steenberghe, Daniel

    2002-10-01

    Breath odour is a complaint encountered worldwide, often linked to microbial overload in the oral cavity. This double blind, crossover, randomised study assessed the efficacy of several antiseptic mouthrinses or slurry vs. a control solution in the prevention of morning bad breath during an experimental period of 7 days without mechanical plaque control. Sixteen dental students with a healthy periodontium abolished, after a thorough professional cleaning, all means of mechanical plaque control during five experimental periods of 7 days, interleaved by washout periods of at least 3 weeks. During each experimental period, as the only oral hygiene measure, the students rinsed twice a day with one of the following formulations (in a randomised order): a 0.2% chlorhexidine-alcohol mouthrinse (CHX-Alc), a 0.05% CHX + 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride + 0.14% zinc lactate mouthrinse (CHX-CPC-Zn), an amine fluoride/stannous fluoride (125 ppm F-/125 ppm F-) containing mouthrinse (AmF/SnF2Mr), a slurry of a tooth paste (AmF/SnF2Sl) containing amine fluoride (350 ppm F-) and stannous fluoride (1050 ppm F-) and a placebo solution (placebo). At days 0, 3 and 7, morning breath was scored via VSC level measurements of the mouth air, and organoleptic ratings of the mouth air and tongue coating. At the same visits both the degree of gingival inflammation and the de novo plaque formation were rated. At the end of each period a questionnaire for subjective ratings was completed and microbiological samples were taken from the tongue dorsum, the saliva and the supragingival plaque for anaerobic and aerobic culturing. Although oral hygiene during the experimental periods was limited to rinsing, bad breath parameters systematically improved (P bacterial load (aerobic & anaerobic) in the saliva (>or= 0.5 log reduction with a superiority (P bacterial load on the tongue dorsum could only be detected for the CHX-Alc solution (0.5 log). The antibacterial effect of the placebo solution and the

  16. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cunningham, Richard Burns [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peretz, Fred J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels

  17. FLUORIDE LEVELS IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE RICE IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    2013-05-05

    May 5, 2013 ... Rice is one of the commonly consumed cereals for more than half of the ... also used as flour, for making rice wine, as ingredient for beer and liquor, ... Fluoride is a necessary element to human health, and a moderate amount of fluoride intake ... For Ethiopian red rice (ERR) Fogera was selected to collect.

  18. Fluoride ions vs removal technologies: A study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagvir Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Literature reported that drinking water is a precious and scarce resource and it has to be protected and kept free from any kind of contamination. Further, it has to be used carefully without wasting. Literature also reported that fluoride bearing rocks are abundant in India, as a result, fluoride leaches out and contaminates the adjacent water and soil resources. A high concentration of fluoride ions in ground water increases up to more than 30 mg/L. This high concentration of fluoride ions causes many harmful and dangerous effects on our datum. Fluoride ions in larger quantities i.e. 20–80 mg/day taken over a period of 10–20 years result in crippling and skeletal fluorosis, severely damaging the bone. In the present scenario, there is a continuously increasing worldwide concern for the development of fluoride treatment technologies. Possibilities of reducing the high fluorine content in groundwater are by defluorination process/dilution with the surface water which is a very simple technique but the addition of Ca2+ ions to a solution in contact with fluorite when experimented in distilled water caused an appreciable decrease in fluoride concentration. In this review article, we emphasized the relationship between high concentrations of fluoride ions and their compounds and their health impact.

  19. Pulsed hydrogen fluoride laser oscillator-amplifier experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    Pulsed HF chemical laser oscillator energies were scaled from millijoules to several kilojoules over the period 1970-1974, reaching approximately 10 J with SF 6 and transverse discharges, and using electron-beam initiation and elemental F 2 above 1000J. This demonstrated scalability to large energy with acceptable electrical efficiency is only one prerequisite for application of this gas laser in fusion; equally important matters are achievement of focusable, approximately 1 ns pulses, couplable to light-element targets, all from an affordable system. Exploratory MOPA experiments are reported which address control of HF laser beam focusability and pulse duration, using SF 6 -based experimental oscillator--amplifier sequences and Pockels' cell switching. Simultaneous multiline lasing with 2.6 less than or equal to lambda less than or equal to 3.1 μm and high specific gain and energy density are particularly important factors encountered with HF, where amplifier pumping and lasing occur in a substantially cw temporal relationship, even in less than 100 ns bursts. Time-resolved SF 6 --HI oscillator spectra contain 27 simultaneous lines from six vibrational bands. An apertured, SF 6 -hydrocarbon pin-discharge oscillator generates approximately 10 mJ of TEM 00 radiation, which is amplified to approximately 1 J in approximately 150 ns by a TEA amplifier and p []opagated tens of meters. A three-stage system coupling these elements through an approximately 1 ns electrooptic gate to a greater than 10 J, e-beam energized amplifier is under development. (auth)

  20. Reactivity of aminodeoxyalditols and derivatives in hydrogen fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Jens Chr.

    to the corresponding 2,5-anhydrides were achieved. These compounds can be recognized as muscarine analogues or precursors. The general mechanism of the reactions was evaluated by 13C NMR spectroscopic studies of the acyloxonium ion intermediates.A series of 1-deoxy-1-trifluoroacetamido-hexitols was prepared...

  1. Hydrogen fluoride capture by imidazolium acetate ionic liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-04-01

    Extraction of hydrofluoric acid (HF) from oils is a drastically important problem in petroleum industry, since HF causes quick corrosion of pipe lines and brings severe health problems to humanity. Some ionic liquids (ILs) constitute promising scavenger agents thanks to strong binding to polar compounds and tunability. PM7-MD simulations and hybrid density functional theory are employed here to consider HF capture ability of ILs. Discussing the effects and impacts of the cation and the anion separately and together, we evaluate performance of imidazolium acetate and outline systematic search guidelines for efficient adsorption and extraction of HF.

  2. An enhanced hydrogen adsorption enthalpy for fluoride intercalated graphite compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hansong; Sha, Xianwei; Chen, Liang; Cooper, Alan C; Foo, Maw-Lin; Lau, Garret C; Bailey, Wade H; Pez, Guido P

    2009-12-16

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study on H(2) physisorption in partially fluorinated graphite. This material, first predicted computationally using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and subsequently synthesized and characterized experimentally, represents a novel class of "acceptor type" graphite intercalated compounds that exhibit significantly higher isosteric heat of adsorption for H(2) at near ambient temperatures than previously demonstrated for commonly available porous carbon-based materials. The unusually strong interaction arises from the semi-ionic nature of the C-F bonds. Although a high H(2) storage capacity (>4 wt %) at room temperature is predicted not to be feasible due to the low heat of adsorption, enhanced storage properties can be envisaged by doping the graphitic host with appropriate species to promote higher levels of charge transfer from graphene to F(-) anions.

  3. Reaction of hydroborate anions with liquid hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V.V.; Myakishev, K.G.

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of anhydrous liquid HF with salts of the decahydro-closodecarborate (2) ion B 10 H 10 2- at room temperature or a decreased temperature leads to the formation of complex mixtures of high-molecular boranes with yields of 88 to 92 %. This solid, yellow, nonvolatile product contains traces of B 10 H 14 and B 18 H 22 . The average molecular masses of the borane mixtures obtained are in the range of 438 - 992. The complex composition of the mixtures was confirmed by thin-layer chromatography on silica gel. The IR and NMR spectra of the products are presented. The possible mechanism of the reaction between HF and B 10 H 10 2- with the formation of higher boron hydrides is discussed. Salts of B 12 H 10 2- and B 10 Cl 10 2- do not react with HF; KBF 4 and CsB 9 H 14 are decomposed by HF with the formation of MBF 4

  4. Electrochemistry of acid-base reactions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, J.P.; Devynck, J.; Tremillon, B.

    1975-01-01

    Electrochemical studies were made in following media: water-HF mixtures, anhydrous HF and KF solutions in HF, solutions of the SbF5 type in HF. The acidity level of these solutions was evaluated using the R(H) functions based on the strehlow hypotheses. From the pH measurement in anhydrous HF, it was possible to get acid-base titration curves and pH buffers. The behavior of quinones in anhydrous HF is presented [fr

  5. Quantification of trace level of fluoride content in uranium oxide produced by deconversion of HEX gas by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnikrishnan, E.K.; Padmakumar, P.R.; Shanmugavelu, P.; Sudhakar, T.M.; Bhowmik, A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride content in nuclear fuel is detrimental due to its corrosion behavior with cladding material. It is essential to monitor and control the fluoride concentration in nuclear material at various processing stages. Deconversion of upgraded HEX gas is carried out to produce uranium oxide. The performance of the deconversion process of HEX gas is evaluated for which trace level of fluoride concentration accompanying uranium oxide is considered as a marker. An analytical method has been developed for testing the uranium oxide produced from deconversion process of HEX gas. The method involves sample pretreatment followed by analysis using ion chromatography. The test method was validated for its performance using in house synthetic uranyl fluoride (UO 2 F 2 ) standard solutions prepared with different level of fluoride content. The results are in agreement with the expected values with the recovery in the range of 80-95%. This method has been successfully implemented for routine analysis of samples at our lab. Since UO 2 F 2 reference material is not available to validate this method, in house UO 2 F 2 standards were prepared from U 3 O 8 prepared from nuclear grade uranyl nitrate solution. UO 2 F 2 standards were prepared by converting U 3 O 8 to UO 2 F 2 by the addition of HF followed by H 2 O 2 at 200°C on a hot plate. The entire yellow colored UO 2 F 2 was dissolved in nano pure water and recrystallised several times to ensure that all free HF is removed. The crystals dried in air oven at 120° for three hours. Samples containing 1000 mg kg -1 fluoride prepared from this UO 2 F 2 , and subsequently from this sample containing 5 mg kg -1 to 35 mg kg -1 fluoride samples were prepared and analysed against fluoride CRM and the fluoride concentration obtained was analysed

  6. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF/sub 4/ and UF/sub 6/, including UF/sub 4/ (solid and gas), U/sub 4/F/sub 17/ (solid), U/sub 2/F/sub 9/ (solid), UF/sub 5/ (solid and gas), U/sub 2/F/sub 10/ (gas), and UF/sub 6/ (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior.

  7. Niobium electrodeposition from molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium electrodeposition from molten alkali fluorides has been studied aiming the application of this technic to the processes of electrorefining and galvanotechnic of this metal. The effects of current density, temperature, niobium concentration in the bath, electrolysis time, substrate nature, ratio between anodic and cathodic areas, electrodes separation and the purity of anodes were investigated in relation to the cathodic current efficiency, electrorefining, electroplating and properties of the deposit and the electrolytic solution. The work also gives the results of the conctruction and operation of a pilot plant for refractory metals electrodeposition and shows the electrorefining and electroplating compared to those obtained at the laboratory scale. (author) [pt

  8. Determination of Fluoride in Different Toothpaste Formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamau, N.G.; Njoroge, M.; Njau, M.

    1998-01-01

    Fluoride ion selective electrode was used to determine fluoride ion concentrations in seven brands of toothpaste. These were the only available formulations found in Kenya. The brands were classified into three groups-fluoridated, non fluoridated or not indicated. However, there was no independent indication of their quantitative composition. The analysed brands had fluoride content between 0.0033% and 0.096%. These values compared favourably with those obtained elsewhere. The calculated lowest limit of detection (LLD) was 0.01 ppmF- . The mean calibration curve gave a slope of of -50.0mV. which was not significantly different from the theoretical value of 5.88mV at 23 degrees celsius at 95% confidence level

  9. Inhibition of cellular oxidation by fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borei, H

    1945-01-01

    An attempt has been made to investigate the inhibition by fluoride of the oxidative processes which occur in the cell by way of the cytochrome oxidase-cytochrome system. Some chemical and physical properties of the fluoride ion are discussed, together with certain quantitative methods for the determination of fluoride. An exhaustive review of the literature concerning the effect of fluoride on enzymic processes has been compiled. The experiments have shown that the point of the attack by fluoride is to be found among the cytochromes. The inhibitory mechanism appears to be such that the haemoprotein is prevented from taking part in the preceding and succeeding links in the reaction chain. The blocking action leaves the prosthetic group of the haemoprotein completely unchanged. The experimental results indicate the formation of a fluorophosphoprotein complex, analogous to that found in the case of enolase. Magnesium may possibly play a part in this process.

  10. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Todoli, J.L. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Hidalgo, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Iglesias, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain)], E-mail: monica.iglesias@udg.es

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S{sup 2-}) at low levels ({mu}g L{sup -1}) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H{sub 2}S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669 nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H{sub 2}S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H{sub 2}S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} to 25 mg L{sup -1} of sulfide. Detection limits of 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 6 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters.

  11. Modification of hydrogen determinator for total hydrogen analysis in irradiated zircaloy cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soon Dal; Choi, Kwnag Soon; Kim, Jong Goo; Joe, Kih Soo; Kim, Won Ho

    1999-01-01

    A hydrogen determinator was modified and installed in the glove box to analyse total hydrogen content in irradiated zircaloy tube. The analysis method of hydrogen is Inert Gas Fusion(IGF)-Thermal Conductivity Detection(TCD). The hydrogen recoveries of no tin method using Ti and Zr matrix standards, respectively, were available within 3 μg of hydrogen. Also the smaller size of sample showed the better hydrogen recovery. It was found that the hydrogen standard of Ti matrix is available to hydrogen analysis in zircaloy sample. The mean radioactivity of irradiated zircaloy sample was 10 mR/hr and hydrogen concentration was 130 ppm

  12. Arrest of Root Carious Lesions via Sodium Fluoride, Chlorhexidine and Silver Diamine Fluoride In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Göstemeyer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the root carious lesion arrest of chlorhexidine (CHX and silver diamine fluoride (SDF varnishes and/or sodium fluoride rinses (NaF in vitro. Background: Effective and easily applicable interventions for treating root carious lesions are needed, as these lesions are highly prevalent amongst elderly individuals. Methods: In 100 bovine dentin samples, artificial root carious lesions were induced using acetic acid and a continuous-culture Lactobacillus rhamnosus biofilm model. One quarter of each induced lesion was excavated and baseline dentinal bacterial counts assessed as Colony-Forming-Units (CFU per mg. Samples were allocated to one of four treatments (n = 25/group: (1 untreated control; (2 38% SDF or (3 35% CHX varnish, each applied once, plus 500 ppm daily NaF rinse in the subsequent lesion progression phase; and (4 daily NaF rinses only. Samples were re-transferred to the biofilm model and submitted to a cariogenic challenge. After six days, another quarter of each lesion was used to assess bacterial counts and the remaining sample was used to assess integrated mineral loss (ΔZ using microradiography. Results: ΔZ did not differ significantly between control (median (25th/75th percentiles: 9082 (7859/9782 vol % × µm, NaF (6704 (4507/9574 and SDF 7206 (5389/8082 (p < 0.05/Kruskal–Wallis test. CHX significantly reduced ΔZ (3385 (2447/4496 compared with all other groups (p < 0.05. Bacterial numbers did not differ significantly between control (1451 (875/2644 CFU/µg and NaF (750 (260/1401 (p > 0.05. SDF reduced bacterial counts (360 (136/1166 significantly compared with control (p < 0.05. CHX reduced bacterial counts (190 (73/517 significantly compared with NaF and control (p < 0.05. Conclusion: CHX varnish plus regular NaF rinses arrested root carious lesions most successfully.

  13. The influence of salivary variables on fluoride retention in dental plaque exposed to a mineral-enriching solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, K; Nakagaki, H; Arai, K; Pearce, E I F

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine interindividual differences in salivary variables related to plaque accumulation and to estimate their influence on the fluoride retention in plaque in vivo by a mineral-enriching solution. Two saliva samples were taken from 10 subjects, once after brushing and once after 24 h without brushing. Calcium, phosphate and monofluorophosphatase (MFPase) activity in the saliva samples were determined. The salivary flow rate and the debris index were also recorded. After plaque had formed over 3 days within in situ plaque-generating devices, subjects were instructed to rinse with a mineral-enriching mouthrinse three times a day on 4 consecutive days. Plaque exposed to distilled water plus flavoring agents served as a control. Fluoride-free dentifrice was used during the experimental period. Twenty-four hours after the last rinsing, the samples were removed from the mouth, and fluoride and mineral distributions in plaque analyzed using a method previously reported by the authors. Salivary flow, MFPase activity and calcium concentration in saliva were significantly higher after 24 h of plaque accumulation. Rinsing with the mineral-enriching solution produced retention of fluoride and phosphate in the outer and middle layers of plaque. Salivary calcium concentration had a direct effect on fluoride uptake in plaque, but no obvious relationship was found between other salivary variables and the plaque fluoride retention. The salivary calcium effect may be due to enhanced bacterial cell wall binding of fluoride via calcium bridging. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Mesoporous zeolite and zeotype single crystals synthesized in fluoride media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Kresten; Kustova, Marina; Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs

    2007-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a series of new mesoporous zeolite and zeotype materials made available by combining new and improved procedures for directly introducing carbon into reaction mixtures with the fluoride route for conventional zeolite synthesis. The mesoporous...... materials were all prepared by hydrothermal crystallization of gels adsorbed on carbon matrices which were subsequently removed by combustion. The procedures presented here resulted in mesoporous zeolite and zeotypes materials with MFI, MEL, BEA, AFI and CHA framework structures. All samples were...... characterized by XRPD, SEM, TEM and N-2 physisorption measurements. For the zeolite materials it A as found that mesoporous MFI and MEL structured single crystals could indeed be crystallized from fluoride media using an improved carbon-templating approach. More importantly, it was found that mesoporous BEA...

  15. Determination of boron, silica, fluoride, MBAS, phenols, cyanide and sulphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.

    1982-01-01

    This study forms part of the NIWR's series of interlaboratory comparison studies involving southern African laboratories engaged in water and wastewater analysis, and is concerned with the analysis of synthetic water samples by 31 laboratories for boron, silica, fluoride, methylene blue active substances (MBAS), phenols, cyanide and sulphide. The results obtained are evaluated and discussed. Recognised standard methods, or modifications of these methods, were used for most of the determinations. Results from the boron, silica and fluoride determinations showed, in general, acceptable accuracy and precision. Results from the MBAS, phenols, cyanide and sulphide determinations were, however, somewhat widespread, and illustrated the difficulty in obtaining reliable results from the measurement of relatively low levels of these determinands

  16. Hexamethyldisilazane Removal with Mesoporous Materials Prepared from Calcium Fluoride Sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Ching-Yang; Lin, Min-Fa; Nguyen, Nhat-Thien; Tsai, Hsiao-Hsin; Chang, Luh-Maan; Chen, Po-Han; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2018-05-01

    A large amount of calcium fluoride sludge is generated by the semiconductor industry every year. It also requires a high amount of fuel consumption using rotor concentrators and thermal oxidizers to treat VOCs. The mesoporous adsorbent prepared by calcium fluoride sludge was used for VOCs treatment. The semiconductor industry employs HMDS to promote the adhesion of photo-resistant material to oxide(s) due to the formation of silicon dioxide, which blocks porous adsorbents. The adsorption of HMDS (Hexamethyldisiloxane) was tested with mesoporous silica materials synthesized from calcium fluoride (CF-MCM). The resulting samples were characterized by XRD, XRF, FTIR, N2-adsorption-desorption techniques. The prepared samples possessed high specific surface area, large pore volume and large pore diameter. The crystal patterns of CF-MCM were similar with Mobil composite matter (MCM-41) from TEM image. The adsorption capacity of HMDS with CF-MCM was 40 and 80 mg g-1, respectively, under 100 and 500 ppm HMDS. The effects of operation parameters, such as contact time and mixture concentration, on the performance of CF-MCM were also discussed in this study.

  17. TEM analysis of the microstructure in TiF3-catalyzed and pure MgH2 during the hydrogen storage cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danaie, Mohsen; Mitlin, David

    2012-01-01

    We utilized transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, with a cryogenically cooled sample stage, to detail the microstructure of partially transformed pure and titanium fluoride-catalyzed magnesium hydride powder during hydrogenation cycling. The TiF 3 -catalyzed MgH 2 powder demonstrated excellent hydrogen storage kinetics at various temperatures, whereas the uncatalyzed MgH 2 showed significant degradation in both kinetics and capacity. TEM analysis on the partially hydrogen absorbed and partially desorbed pure Mg(MgH 2 ) revealed a large fraction of particles that were either not transformed at all or were completely transformed. On the other hand, in the MgH 2 +TiF 3 system it was much easier to identify regions with both the hydride and the metal phase coexisting in the same particle. This enabled us to establish the metal hydride orientation relationship (OR) during hydrogen absorption. The OR was determined to be (1 1 0)MgH 2 || (−1 1 0 −1)Mg and [−1 1 1]MgH 2 || [0 1 −1 1]Mg. During absorption the number density of the hydride nuclei does not show a dramatic increase due the presence of TiF 3 . Conversely, during desorption the TiF 3 catalyst substantially increases the number of the newly formed Mg crystallites, which display a strong texture correlation with respect to the parent MgH 2 phase. Titanium fluoride also promotes extensive twinning in the hydride phase.

  18. Fluor determination by alkaline hydrolysis of the uranium and thorium fluorides; Determinacion de fluor por hidrolisis alcalina en fluoruros de uranio y torio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrachina Gomez, L; Gasco Sanchez, L

    1961-07-01

    The alkaline hydrolysis of the uranium and thorium fluorides is studded and a new method for the determination of the fluoride, on the basis of a indirect volumetric titration with standard soda, is proposed. The compounds that may influence the hydrolysis of the uranium fluoride and that may be occasionally found in it as impurities are also studied. the method can be applied to the uranium fluoride except when there is a great quantity of F{sub 2}UO{sub 2} or UO{sub 3} present in the sample. (Author) 20 refs.

  19. The in vitro effect of fluoridated milk in a bacterial biofilm--enamel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Wolfgang H; Forer, Stefan; Heesen, Joerg; Yudovich, Keren; Steinberg, Doron; Gaengler, Peter

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of milk and fluoridated milk on bacterially induced caries-like lesions. Extracted impacted human molars were cut in half and covered with a varnish leaving a 4*4 mm window. The samples were coated with biofilm of S. sobrinus and were further divided into three experimental groups of S. sobrinus, S. sobrinus and milk and S. sobrinus and fluoridated milk. As negative controls served teeth incubated in saline. Of twenty tooth halves serial ground sections were cut through the lesions and investigated with polarization light microscopy (PLM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX element analysis. The PLM photographs were used for 3D reconstruction, volumetric assessment and determination of the extension of the lesion zones. Of eight tooth halves the biofilm on the enamel surface was studied with SEM and EDX element analysis. Volumetric assessment showed a statistically significant difference in the volume of the body of the lesion and the translucent zone between the milk group and fluoridated milk group. Quantitative element analysis demonstrated significant differences between sound enamel and the superficial layer in the fluoridated milk group. The biofilm on the enamel surface showed an increased Ca content in the milk group and fluoridated milk group. Milk as a common nutrient seems to play a complex role in in-vitro biofilm--enamel interactions stimulating bacterial demineralization on one hand, and, as effective fluoride carrier, inhibits caries-like demineralization.

  20. The occurrence and geochemistry of fluoride in some natural waters of Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaciri, S. J.; Davies, T. C.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years the acquisition of considerable additional data on the hydrogeochemical behaviour of fluoride in natural waters of Kenya has been made possible by extensive surface-water and groundwater sampling campaigns as well as by improvements in analytical techniques. Ultimately, the principal source of fluoride relates to emissions from volcanic activity associated with the East African Rift System. Through various intermediate steps, but also directly, fluoride passes into the natural water system and components of the food chain. Ingestion by man is mainly through drinking water and other beverages. River waters in Kenya generally have a fluoride concentration lower than the recommended level (1.3 ppm) for potable water, thus promoting susceptibility to dental caries. Groundwaters and lake waters show considerably higher fluoride contents, resulting in the widespread incidence of fluorosis in areas where groundwater is the major source of drinking water, and lake fish is a regular component of the diet. This paper presents a synthesis of the data so far obtained on the sources and distribution of fluoride in the hydrological system of Kenya, examines the extent of fluorine toxicity and puts forward recommendations to combat or minimise the problem.

  1. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ammonium hydrogen fluoride samples. II. Study of the behaviour of the added matrices; Determinacion espectrografica de impurezas en bibluoruro amonico. II. Estudio del comportamiento de las matrices adicionadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduan, F. A.; Roca, M.; Capdevila, C.

    1979-07-01

    In order to account for the variations In the shape of the excitation-volatilization' curves and the values of the line intensities of the different impurities determined in ammonium bifluoride, the behaviour of the added matrices (graphite, 63203, GeO{sub 2}, MgO and ZnO) has been considered. With this aim the influence of the added matrices on the are discharge parameters (temperature and electronic concentration) and on the exhaustion rate of the electrode load as a function of the excitation time has been studied. On the other hand, the curve of variation of the line intensity of the metallic component of each matrix versus time has been obtained and the residues in the electrode cavity have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. (Author) 7 refs.

  2. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ammonium hydrogen fluoride samples. II. Study of the behaviour of the added matrices; Determinacion espectrografica de impurezas en bibluoruro amonico. II. Estudio del comportamiento de las matrices adicionadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduan, F A; Roca, M; Capdevila, C

    1979-07-01

    In order to account for the variations In the shape of the excitation-volatilization' curves and the values of the line intensities of the different impurities determined in ammonium bifluoride, the behaviour of the added matrices (graphite, 63203, GeO{sub 2}, MgO and ZnO) has been considered. With this aim the influence of the added matrices on the are discharge parameters (temperature and electronic concentration) and on the exhaustion rate of the electrode load as a function of the excitation time has been studied. On the other hand, the curve of variation of the line intensity of the metallic component of each matrix versus time has been obtained and the residues in the electrode cavity have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. (Author) 7 refs.

  3. [The effect of alternating administration of aluminum chloride and sodium fluoride in drinking water on the concentration of fluoride in serum and its content in bones of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubkowska, Anna; Chlubek, Dariusz; Machoy-Mokrzyniska, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Fluorine and aluminum remain a very interesting research topic due to equivocal and relatively unknown toxic action, role in the etiology of various diseases, and interactions of both elements. Fluorine and aluminum compounds are absorbed by organisms through the gastric and respiratory systems, although the latter route operates only at very high concentrations in air. Chronic exposure to fluorine and aluminum leads to accumulation of both elements, especially in bones and teeth, but also in lung, brain, kidney, and liver. Organisms excrete these elements with urine, faeces, and to a minor extent with sweat and bile. In the light of reports suggesting that aluminum has protective properties against fluorine toxicity during exposure to both elements, we decided to examine the effect of alternating doses of aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride in drinking water on rats. Four female groups received: I--100 ppm fluorine ions during one month; II--100 ppm fluorine ions alternating every two days with 300 ppm aluminum ions during one month; III--100 ppm fluoride ions during four months; IV--100 ppm fluorine ions alternating every two days with 300 ppm aluminum ions during four months. The respective male groups called IA, IIA, IIIA, and IVA were treated identically. Subsequently, the animals were anesthetized and sacrificed. Blood was sampled from the heart and the right femur was removed for fluorine determination. Fluorine content in the femur and serum was determined with an ion-selective electrode (Orion). The results were analyzed statistically (Statistica 6). We observed higher fluoride concentrations in serum as compared with control values in all groups of female and male rats exposed to sodium fluoride only. Longer exposure time (4 months) did not result in further increase in serum fluoride concentration. However, longer exposure increased fluoride accumulation in the femur (p Fluorine content in the femur of rats exposed to NaF and AlCI3 for four months was

  4. Studies on the comparative effect of sodium fluoride on collagen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fluoride is an essential element for the normal development and growth of human beings. The main source of fluoride for humans is the intake of groundwater. At high levels, fluoride causes dental and skeletal fluorosis. In this study, control and sodium fluoride (NaF) treated groups of rats had significant (p < 0.05) higher ...

  5. Graphene Oxide Directed One-Step Synthesis of Flowerlike Graphene@HKUST-1 for Enzyme-Free Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide in Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingxiang; Yang, Yizhen; Gao, Feng; Ni, Jiancong; Zhang, Yanhui; Lin, Zhenyu

    2016-11-30

    A novel metal-organic framework (MOF)-based electroactive nanocomposite containing graphene fragments and HKUST-1 was synthesized via a facile one-step solvothermal method using graphene oxide (GO), benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (BTC), and copper nitrate (Cu(NO 3 ) 2 ) as the raw materials. The morphology and structure characterization revealed that the GO could induce the transformation of HKUST-1 from octahedral structure to the hierarchical flower shape as an effective structure-directing agent. Also, it is interesting to find out that the GO was torn into small fragments to participate in the formation of HKUST-1 and then transformed into the reduction form during the solvothermal reaction process, which dramatically increased the surface area, electronic conductivity, and redox-activity of the material. Electrochemical assays showed that the synergy of graphene and HKUST-1 in the nanocomposite leaded to high electrocatalysis, fast response, and excellent selectivity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). Based on these remarkable advantages, satisfactory results were obtained when the nanocomposite was used as a sensing material for electrochemical determination of H 2 O 2 in the complex biological samples such as human serum and living Raw 264.7 cell fluids.

  6. Evaluation of toxic action of fluorides on agricultural plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grishko

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of potassium fluoride, sodium fluoride and ammonium fluoride for pea, maize, oat and onion was studied. It was found that the level of the toxic influence had grown with increase of fluoride concentration in the media of growth (from 5 to 100 mg of F–/l. By increase of the toxic influence the agricultural crops are disposed in the following row: oat < onion < maize < pea. Ammonium fluoride demonstrates lesser toxicity, than potassium and sodium fluorides. Under low concentrations of fluoride compounds (5 and 10 mg of F–/l stimulation of roots growth is noted only for the oat.

  7. Distribution and migration mechanism of fluoride in groundwater in the Manas River Basin, Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yalei; Jin, Menggui; Ma, Bin; Wang, Jianjun

    2018-04-01

    Elevated fluoride (F) concentration in groundwater is posing a public health risk in the Manas River Basin (MRB), Northwest China. Based on the characterization of regional groundwater flow, 90 groundwater samples from aquifers were analyzed, along with top-soil leachate and pore-water samples from aquitards. Stable oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen isotopes, radiocarbon and hydrochemical analyses of the groundwater and pore-water samples were conducted to trace groundwater hydrological and hydrochemical processes and thereby understand the distribution and migration mechanism of F. The groundwater is recharged by meteoric precipitation through vapor condensation processes in the Tianshan Mountains. The F concentration in groundwater samples from this basin ranged from 0.11 to 48.15 mg/L (mean 2.56 mg/L). In 37 of the 90 groundwater samples, the F concentrations were above the safe level for drinking water. The F concentrations progressively increased with the residence time and well depths in the northwest of the alluvial-fluvial plain, where groundwater is overexploited for agricultural and domestic use. Positive correlations between F and sodium (Na)/calcium (Ca) indicate that the enrichment and migration of F are influenced by cation exchange processes under high-Na and alkaline pH conditions. The relationships between δ18O and F and chloride (Cl) concentrations were nonlinear due to leaching and mixing processes. This shows that vertical leaching by irrigation return flow and mixing with pore water are the dominant processes driving the migration of F in the groundwater flow system of MRB, in addition to geochemical processes.

  8. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  9. Physiologic conditions affect toxicity of ingested industrial fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerheber, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  10. Current status of fluoride volatility method development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlir, J.; Marecek, M.; Skarohlid, J. [UJV - Nuclear Research Institute, Research Centre Rez, CZ-250 68 Husinec - Rez 130 (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-01

    The Fluoride Volatility Method is based on a separation process, which comes out from the specific property of uranium, neptunium and plutonium to form volatile hexafluorides whereas most of fission products (mainly lanthanides) and higher transplutonium elements (americium, curium) present in irradiated fuel form nonvolatile tri-fluorides. Fluoride Volatility Method itself is based on direct fluorination of the spent fuel, but before the fluorination step, the removal of cladding material and subsequent transformation of the fuel into a powdered form with a suitable grain size have to be done. The fluorination is made with fluorine gas in a flame fluorination reactor, where the volatile fluorides (mostly UF{sub 6}) are separated from the non-volatile ones (trivalent minor actinides and majority of fission products). The subsequent operations necessary for partitioning of volatile fluorides are the condensation and evaporation of volatile fluorides, the thermal decomposition of PuF{sub 6} and the finally distillation and sorption used for the purification of uranium product. The Fluoride Volatility Method is considered to be a promising advanced pyrochemical reprocessing technology, which can mainly be used for the reprocessing of oxide spent fuels coming from future GEN IV fast reactors.

  11. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  12. Relationship between water, urine and serum fluoride and fluorosis in school children of Jhajjar District, Haryana, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Lata, Suman; Yadav, Jyoti; Yadav, J. P.

    2017-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the relationship between fluoride in water, urine and serum and dental fluorosis. The fluoride level in water and urine were measured spectrophotometrically by using acid zirconyl and SPADNS reagents, while the fluoride level in serum was determined by ion selective electrode meter. Dental fluorosis survey was conducted with the help of Performa prescribed by Rajiv Gandhi Drinking Water Mission and the use of Tooth Surface Index for Fluorosis. Mean fluoride values in water samples of Jhajjar City and Dadanpur and Dariyapur villages of Jhajjar District were measured to be 2.17 (range from 1.92 to 2.60 mg/L), 2.81 (range from 2.53 to 3.14 mg/L) and 2.22 mg/L (range from 1.63 to 3.33 mg/L), respectively. The mean fluoride values in the urine samples of children were found to be 1.51 (range from 0.05 to 2.64 mg/L), 1.71 (range from 0.69 to 2.80 mg/L) and 1.45 mg/L (range from 0.31 to 2.50 mg/L) at Jhajjar City and Dadanpur and Dariyapur sites, respectively. Serum fluoride was detected in the blood samples of children, who have high urinary fluoride at these three sites. The mean serum fluoride level was reported to be 0.15, 0.34 and 0.17 mg/L, respectively. A total of 842 children were also analyzed for dental fluorosis. The mean values of fluorosis-affected children in Jhajjar, Dadanpur and Dariyapur were 51.90, 94.63 and 36.84 %, respectively. A significantly positive correlation between water, urine, serum fluoride concentration and fluorosis was seen.

  13. Synthesis of pillar and microsphere-like magnesium oxide particles and their fluoride adsorption performance in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Gool; Ha, Jong-Wook; Sohn, Eun-Ho; Park, In Jun; Lee, Soo-Bok [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    We synthesized pillar and microsphere-like MgO particles and their fluoride removal performance. Samples of MgO were synthesized by calcination of precursors derived from MgCO{sub 3}·3H{sub 2}O and characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms. The fluoride removal performance of the MgO samples was investigated in terms of adsorption kinetics and adsorption equilibrium. The effects of pH and the presence of other anions on the fluoride adsorption were also considered. The adsorption capacities of pillar and microsphere-like MgO particles were 151.51 and 166.66mg/g, respectively. The pH of the aqueous solutions did not significantly affect the fluoride adsorption at pH 9 or lower. Except for phosphate, the effect of co-existing anions on fluoride adsorption was not considerable. Fluoride removal occurred through the substitution of hydroxyl groups on the surface of MgO with fluorides.

  14. Health risk assessment to fluoride in drinking water of rural residents living in the Poldasht city, Northwest of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mahmood; Ghoochani, Mahboobeh; Hossein Mahvi, Amir

    2018-02-01

    This study analyzes the concentrations and health risks of fluoride in 112 drinking water samples collected from 28 villages of the Poldasht city, West Azerbaijan province in Iran. Results indicated that fluoride content in drinking water ranged from0.27 to 10.3mgL -1 (average 1.70mgL -1 ). The 57% of samples analyzed exceeded the limit set for fluoride in drinking water. Based on findings from health risk assessment this study, the highest fluoride exposure for different regions of Poldasht city was observed in young consumers, children and teenager's groups. Also, most of the rural residents suffered from fluoride contaminated drinking water. The calculated HQ value was > 1 for all groups of residents in Agh otlogh and Sari soo areas. Therefore, it is imperative to take measures to reduce fluoride concentration in drinking water and control of fluorosis. Action should be implemented to enhance monitoring of fluoride levels to avoid the potential risk to the population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of fluoride in drinking water on children′s intelligence in high and low fluoride areas of Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansa Kundu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fluoride is one of the indispensable elements for the living being. However, the intake of F above the threshold level can affect the central nervous system even before causing dental or skeletal fluorosis. Aim: The aim was to assess the effect of fluoride in drinking water on the intelligence quotient (IQ of 8-12 years old school going children residing in high and low Fluoride (F areas of Delhi. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 school children were selected, 100 from low F area and 100 from high F area. The IQ of the children was assessed using Ravens Standardized Progressive Matrices Test. Information for each child′s sociodemographic data, mother′s diet during pregnancy, duration of residency in the village, source of drinking water, and duration of drinking water from the source was entered on a specially designed proforma from mothers of children. Height and weight were also recorded for each child to assess the nutritional status. Independent t-test and Chi-square test was used to compare mean IQ scores in high and low fluoridated areas. Pearson′s correlation and multivariate linear regression were used to appraise the issue of all the study variables on IQ. Results: Comparison of mean IQ of children in both high (76.20 ± 19.10 and low F (85.80 ± 18.85 areas showed a significant difference (P = 0.013. Multiple regression analysis between child IQ and all other independent variables revealed that mother′s diet during pregnancy (P = 0.001 along with F in drinking water (P = 0.017 were the independent variables with the greatest explanatory power for child IQ variance (r2 = 0.417 without interaction with other variables. Conclusion: Fluoride in the drinking water was significantly related with the IQ of children. Along with fluoride, mother′s diet during pregnancy was also found to be significantly related with IQ of children. Researches in the same field are further advocated with large sample size and over a

  16. Application of Titanium Compounds to Reduce Fluoride Ion in Water Resources with High Fluoride Ion Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Riahi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes studies on the sorption of fluoride ions from water by titanium compounds used in water treatment to reduce fluoride content in water resources. There are different methods of reducing fluoride ion in water, each associated with specific problems such as secondary contamination, environmental contamination, high costs, or the need for primary and secondary treatment. In this study, application of titanium sulfate and Metatitanic acid produced from titanium ore concentrate (ileminite is investigated in the removal of fluoride ion and the possibility of complete purification of fluorine containing wastewater is examined to determine the optimal conditions. Metatitanic acid has a great sorption property for fluoride ion. Also titanium sulfate is a suitable and more effective material for this purpose. Efficiency of this material in reducing fluoride ion content is 99.9% and it is possible to refresh sorbet material for reuse without problems arising from Ti+4 ion contamination.

  17. New Insight on the Response of Bacteria to Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Breaker, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    Fluoride has been used for decades to prevent caries and it is well established that this anion can inhibit the growth of bacteria. However, the precise effects that fluoride has on bacteria and the mechanisms that bacteria use to overcome fluoride toxicity have largely remained unexplored. Recently, my laboratory reported the discovery of biological systems that bacteria use to sense fluoride and reduce fluoride toxicity. These sensors and their associated genes are very widespread in biolog...

  18. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity ...

  19. Potential fluoride toxicity from oral medicaments: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Rizwan Ullah; Muhammad Sohail Zafar; Nazish Shahani

    2017-01-01

    The beneficial effects of fluoride on human oral health are well studied. There are numerous studies demonstrating that a small amount of fluoride delivered to the oral cavity decreases the prevalence of dental decay and results in stronger teeth and bones. However, ingestion of fluoride more than the recommended limit leads to toxicity and adverse effects. In order to update our understanding of fluoride and its potential toxicity, we have described the mechanisms of fluoride metabolism, tox...

  20. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B.; Zholobak, Nadezhda M.; Baranchikov, Alexander E.; Ryabova, Anastasia V.; Ivanov, Vladimir K.

    2015-01-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF 3 :Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF 3 nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF 3 and CeF 3 :Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF 3 nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H 2 O 2 . • CeF 3 and CeF 3 :Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus

  1. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B.; Zholobak, Nadezhda M. [Zabolotny Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv D0368 (Ukraine); Baranchikov, Alexander E. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ryabova, Anastasia V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Vladimir K., E-mail: van@igic.ras.ru [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus.

  2. Hydrogen molecules and hydrogen-related defects in crystalline silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Fukata, N.; Sasak, S.; Murakami, K.; Ishioka, K.; Nakamura, K. G.; Kitajima, M.; Fujimura, S.; Kikuchi, J.; Haneda, H.

    1997-01-01

    We have found that hydrogen exists in molecular form in crystalline silicon treated with hydrogen atoms in the downstream of a hydrogen plasma. The vibrational Raman line of hydrogen molecules is observed at 4158cm-1 for silicon samples hydrogenated between 180 and 500 °C. The assignment of the Raman line is confirmed by its isotope shift to 2990cm-1 for silicon treated with deuterium atoms. The Raman intensity has a maximum for hydrogenation at 400 °C. The vibrational Raman line of the hydro...

  3. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D.; Davis, Jared H.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Breaker, Ronald R.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Although fluoride is plentiful in the environment and is commonly used at high concentrations in oral hygiene products, little has been known about how biological systems overcome the toxic effects of this anion. We demonstrate that a protein called FEX in many fungi is essential for cell survival in the presence of high fluoride concentrations. The protein is required for the rapid expulsion of cytoplasmic fluoride, indicating that many eukaryotic species that carry FEX genes likely avoid fl...

  4. Drinking Water Fluoride Levels for a City in Northern Mexico (Durango Determined Using a Direct Electrochemical Method and Their Potential Effects on Oral Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Molina Frechero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is ingested primarily through consuming drinking water. When drinking water contains fluoride concentrations >0.7 parts per million (ppm, consuming such water can be toxic to the human body; this toxicity is called “fluorosis.” Therefore, it is critical to determine the fluoride concentrations in drinking water. The objective of this study was to determine the fluoride concentration in the drinking water of the city of Durango. The wells that supply the drinking water distribution system for the city of Durango were studied. One hundred eighty-nine (189 water samples were analyzed, and the fluoride concentration in each sample was quantified as established by the law NMX-AA-077-SCFI-2001. The fluoride concentrations in such samples varied between 2.22 and 7.23 ppm with a 4.313 ± 1.318 ppm mean concentration. The highest values were observed in the northern area of the city, with a 5.001 ± 2.669 ppm mean value. The samples produced values that exceeded the national standard for fluoride in drinking water. Chronic exposure to fluoride at such concentrations produces harmful health effects, the first sign of which is dental fluorosis. Therefore, it is essential that the government authorities implement water defluoridation programs and take preventative measures to reduce the ingestion of this toxic halogen.

  5. Drinking Water Fluoride Levels for a City in Northern Mexico (Durango) Determined Using a Direct Electrochemical Method and Their Potential Effects on Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Frechero, Nelly; Sánchez Pérez, Leonor; Castañeda Castaneira, Enrique; Oropeza Oropeza, Anastasio; Gaona, Enrique; Salas Pacheco, José; Bologna Molina, Ronell

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride is ingested primarily through consuming drinking water. When drinking water contains fluoride concentrations >0.7 parts per million (ppm), consuming such water can be toxic to the human body; this toxicity is called “fluorosis.” Therefore, it is critical to determine the fluoride concentrations in drinking water. The objective of this study was to determine the fluoride concentration in the drinking water of the city of Durango. The wells that supply the drinking water distribution system for the city of Durango were studied. One hundred eighty-nine (189) water samples were analyzed, and the fluoride concentration in each sample was quantified as established by the law NMX-AA-077-SCFI-2001. The fluoride concentrations in such samples varied between 2.22 and 7.23 ppm with a 4.313 ± 1.318 ppm mean concentration. The highest values were observed in the northern area of the city, with a 5.001 ± 2.669 ppm mean value. The samples produced values that exceeded the national standard for fluoride in drinking water. Chronic exposure to fluoride at such concentrations produces harmful health effects, the first sign of which is dental fluorosis. Therefore, it is essential that the government authorities implement water defluoridation programs and take preventative measures to reduce the ingestion of this toxic halogen. PMID:24348140

  6. Drinking water fluoride levels for a city in northern Mexico (durango) determined using a direct electrochemical method and their potential effects on oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Frechero, Nelly; Sánchez Pérez, Leonor; Castañeda Castaneira, Enrique; Oropeza Oropeza, Anastasio; Gaona, Enrique; Salas Pacheco, José; Bologna Molina, Ronell

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride is ingested primarily through consuming drinking water. When drinking water contains fluoride concentrations>0.7 parts per million (ppm), consuming such water can be toxic to the human body; this toxicity is called "fluorosis." Therefore, it is critical to determine the fluoride concentrations in drinking water. The objective of this study was to determine the fluoride concentration in the drinking water of the city of Durango. The wells that supply the drinking water distribution system for the city of Durango were studied. One hundred eighty-nine (189) water samples were analyzed, and the fluoride concentration in each sample was quantified as established by the law NMX-AA-077-SCFI-2001. The fluoride concentrations in such samples varied between 2.22 and 7.23 ppm with a 4.313±1.318 ppm mean concentration. The highest values were observed in the northern area of the city, with a 5.001±2.669 ppm mean value. The samples produced values that exceeded the national standard for fluoride in drinking water. Chronic exposure to fluoride at such concentrations produces harmful health effects, the first sign of which is dental fluorosis. Therefore, it is essential that the government authorities implement water defluoridation programs and take preventative measures to reduce the ingestion of this toxic halogen.

  7. Enriched fluoride sorption using alumina/chitosan composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Natrayasamy, E-mail: natrayasamy_viswanathan@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Anna University Tiruchirappalli - Dindigul Campus, Dindigul 624 622, Tamil Nadu (India); Meenakshi, S., E-mail: drs_meena@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624 302, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2010-06-15

    Alumina possesses an appreciable defluoridation capacity (DC) of 1566 mg F{sup -}/kg. In order to improve its DC, it is aimed to prepare alumina polymeric composites using the chitosan. Alumina/chitosan (AlCs) composite was prepared by incorporating alumina particles in the chitosan polymeric matrix, which can be made into any desired form viz., beads, candles and membranes. AlCs composite displayed a maximum DC of 3809 mg F{sup -}/kg than the alumina and chitosan (52 mg F{sup -}/kg). The fluoride removal studies were carried out in batch mode to optimize the equilibrium parameters viz., contact time, pH, co-anions and temperature. The equilibrium data was fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms to find the best fit for the sorption process. The calculated values of thermodynamic parameters indicate the nature of sorption. The surface characterisation of the sorbent was performed by FTIR, AFM and SEM with EDAX analysis. A possible mechanism of fluoride sorption by AlCs composite has been proposed. Suitability of AlCs composite at field conditions was tested with a field sample taken from a nearby fluoride-endemic village. This work provides a potential platform for the development of defluoridation technology.

  8. Fluoride toothpaste utilization behaviour among preschool children in Perlis, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, H L; Zainudin, I S; Jaafar, N

    2009-12-01

    Very mild fluorosis is quite prevalent in children and one of the sources may be attributed to poor fluoride toothpaste utilization habits. To investigate the frequency of toothbrushing, parental supervision, the person who usually applied the toothpaste, toothpaste swallowing and spitting habits, size of toothbrush, type of toothpaste used and amount of toothpaste used by shape and weight. Observational cross-sectional study of a representative random sample of 373 children aged 5-6 year-old. The children were interviewed using a structured close ended questionnaire. Direct observations were made on their toothpaste dispensing habit during a toothbrushing exercise. All children reported practising toothbrushing with 90% on a daily basis. Almost all used fluoridated toothpaste (91.4%). About one-half (50.7%) reported that their parents never supervised them. More than one-third of children used adult toothpaste and 60.1% of the toothpaste was flavoured. Most (92%) used toothbrush meant for children. About 40% applied a pea-sized amount of toothpaste. The mean weight of toothpaste applied was 0.43 g (SID + 0.35 g). The majority used the recommended child-sized toothbrush and toothpaste that contained fluoride but less than one-half of the parents supervised their children. Most children used flavoured children's toothpaste but a sizable proportion used toothpastes meant for adults. The amount applied by shape and weight exceeded the amount recommended by experts.

  9. Recovery of agricultural odors and odorous compounds from polyvinyl fluoride film bags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate sampling methods are necessary when quantifying odor and volatile organic compound emissions at agricultural facilities. The commonly accepted methodology in the U.S. has been to collect odor samples in polyvinyl fluoride bags (PVF, brand name Tedlar®) and, subsequently, analyze with human ...

  10. Comparison of storage stability of odorous VOCs in polyester aluminum and polyvinyl fluoride tedlar bags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole air sampling using containers such as flexible bags or rigid canisters is commonly used to collect samples of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in air. The objective of this study was to compare the stability of polyester aluminum (PEA) and polyvinyl fluoride (PVF, brand name Tedlar®) bags for ...

  11. Spectrophotometric determination of fluorides in water with Hach equipment; Determinacion espectrofotometrica de fluoruros en aguas con equipo Hach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta L, E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: eal@nuclear.inin.mx

    1994-11-15

    The spectrophotometric method for the determination of the fluoride ion in water, demineralized water, raw waters, laundry waters and waters treated with ion exchange resins , using the technique and the SPADNS coloring indicated in the operation manual of the Hach equipment is described. This method covers the determination of the fluoride ion in the range from 0 to 2 mg/l on 25 ml. of radioactive base sample. These limits can be variable if the size of the used aliquot one is changed for the final determination of the fluoride ion. (Author)

  12. Influence of Surfactants and Fluoride against Enamel Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Rayssa Ferreira; Ávila, Daniele Mara da Silva; Miyamoto, Karen Mayumi; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2018-06-06

    This study investigated the effect of surfactants associated with sodium fluoride (NaF) on enamel erosion prevention, using an erosion-remineralization in vitro model. Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), polysorbate 20 (P20), and cocoamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) were tested, at concentrations of 1.0 and 1.5%, and associated or not with NaF (275 ppm). The control groups were distilled water and the NaF solution. Bovine enamel samples (n = 12) were prepared and submitted to a 5-day cycling model: acid challenge (0.3% citric acid, pH 2.6, 4×/day), human saliva (2 h, 4×/day), and the treatment solutions (2 min, 2×/day). The protective potential of the agents against initial erosion was assessed by microhardness and the surface loss by profilometry. Enamel surface wettability was determined by goniometry, protein adsorption was measured by spectroscopy (FTIR), and the KOH-soluble fluoride was quantified. Goniometry showed that SLS and CAPB increased enamel wettability. No differences were found among the surfactants regarding protein adsorption. Microhardness showed that SLS reduced NaF protection. P20 (1 and 1.5%) and CAPB 1.5% presented a protective effect, but lower than the NaF solution. Profilometry showed that CAPB protected enamel, but no agent associated with NaF promoted a higher protection than the NaF solution alone. KOH-soluble fluoride analysis showed that all surfactants reduced the fluoride adsorption on the enamel surface. Therefore, the surfactants tested (except for P20) changed the enamel surface energy. The SLS decreased the protective potential of NaF on initial erosion, but no tested agent interfered with the protective effect of NaF on enamel erosive wear. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  14. Fluoride release and surface roughness of a new glass ionomer cement: glass carbomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Maria Condeixa de França LOPES

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study analyzed the fluoride release/recharge and surface roughness of glass carbomer compared to other encapsulated glass ionomer cements (GICs. Material and method The GICs tested were Glass Fill® (GC-GCP Dental, Riva Self Cure® (RS-SDI, Riva Light Cure® (RL-SDI, Equia Fil® (EF-GC Europe. The composite resin Luna® (LU-SDI was used as control. Five samples of each material were prepared and kept in a humidifier for 24 hours (37 °C, 100% relative humidity. Fluoride release was measured in two times: before (T1: days 1, 2, 7, 14 and after topical application of fluoride (T2: days 15, 16, 21 and 28. The surface roughness was also measured in both times (T1: days 1 and 14; T2: days 15 and 28. All samples were submitted to a single topical application of acidulated fluoride phosphate (Fluor Care - FGM. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures and Tukey's post-test (p <0.05 were used in the statistical analysis. Result Equia Fil presented the highest fluoride release in both evaluation periods, with a higher release in T1 (p <0.05. The other materials tested, including glass carbomer presented similar release in both periods (T1 and T2. Regarding surface roughness, no significant differences were observed in the interaction between the material × time factors (T1 and T2 (p=0.966. Conclusion The GICs tested presented fluoride release and recharge ability and showed no surface roughness increase by topical application of fluoride.

  15. Hydrogen production from microbial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of fluoride treated rat bone provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms of fluoride toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yan; Zeng, Beibei; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Yanli; Wang, Nanlan; Wu, Yanqiu; Zhao, Danqing; Zhao, Yuxi; Iqbal, Javed; Shen, Liming

    2018-07-01

    Long-term excessive intake of fluoride (F) could lead to chronic fluorosis. To explore the underlying molecular mechanisms, present study is designed to elucidate the effect of fluoride on proteome expression of bone in sodium fluoride (NaF)-treated SD rats. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was used to determine the severity of osteofluorosis, and bone samples were submitted for iTRAQ analysis. The results showed that the cortical thickness and trabecular area of femur bone in medium- and high-dose groups were higher than in control group. Contrary to this, trabecular area was reduced in the low-dose group, indicating that the bone mass was increased in medium- and high-dose groups, and decreased in the low-dose group. Thirteen (13), 35, and 34 differentially expressed proteins were identified in low-, medium-, and high-dose group, respectively. The medium- and high-dose groups shared a more similar protein expression pattern. These proteins were mainly associated with collagen metabolism, proteoglycans (PGs), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), etc. The results suggested that the effect of NaF on SD rats is in a dose-dependent manner. Some key proteins found here may be involved in affecting the bone tissues and bone marrow or muscle, and account for the complex pathology and clinical symptoms of fluorosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors affecting fluoride and natural organic matter (NOM) removal from natural waters in Tanzania by nanofiltration/reverse osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Junjie; Schäfer, Andrea I

    2015-09-15

    This study examined the feasibility of nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) in treating challenging natural tropical waters containing high fluoride and natural organic matter (NOM). A total of 166 water samples were collected from 120 sources within northern Tanzania over a period of 16 months. Chemical analysis showed that 81% of the samples have fluoride levels exceeding the WHO drinking guideline of 1.5mg/L. The highest fluoride levels were detected in waters characterized by high ionic strength, high inorganic carbon and on some occasions high total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations. Bench-scale experiments with 22 representative waters (selected based on fluoride concentration, salinity, origin and in some instances organic matter) and 6 NF/RO membranes revealed that ionic strength and recovery affected fluoride retention and permeate flux. This is predominantly due to osmotic pressure and hence the variation of diffusion/convection contributes to fluoride transport. Different membranes had distinct fluoride removal capacities, showing different raw water concentration treatability limits regarding the WHO guideline compliance. BW30, BW30-LE and NF90 membranes had a feed concentration limit of 30-40 mg/L at 50% recovery. NOM retention was independent of water matrices but is governed predominantly by size exclusion. NOM was observed to have a positive impact on fluoride removal. Several mechanisms could contribute but further studies are required before a conclusion could be drawn. In summary, NF/RO membranes were proved to remove both fluoride and NOM reliably even from the most challenging Tanzanian waters, increasing the available drinking water sources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. In Vitro Comparison of the Effects of Diode Laser and CO2 Laser on Topical Fluoride Uptake in Primary Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Fotuhi Ardakani, Faezeh; Sorouri, Milad

    2015-08-01

    Fluoride therapy is important for control and prevention of dental caries. Laser irradiation can increase fluoride uptake especially when combined with topical fluoride application. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of CO2 and diode lasers on enamel fluoride uptake in primary teeth. Forty human primary molars were randomly assigned to four groups (n=10). The roots were removed and the crowns were sectioned mesiodistally into buccal and lingual halves as the experimental and control groups. All samples were treated with 5% sodium fluoride (NaF) varnish. The experimental samples in the four groups were irradiated with 5 or 7W diode or 1 or 2W CO2 laser for 15 seconds and were compared with the controls in terms of fluoride uptake, which was determined using an ion selective electrode after acid dissolution of the specimens. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16 using ANOVA treating the control measurements as covariates. The estimated amount of fluoride uptake was 59.5± 16.31 ppm, 66.5± 14.9 ppm, 78.6± 12.43 ppm and 90.4± 11.51 ppm for 5W and 7 W diode and 1W and 2 W CO2 lasers, respectively, which were significantly greater than the values in the conventional topical fluoridation group (Pdiode laser and 1W CO2 laser, 5W and 7W diode laser, or 1W and 2W CO2 laser in this regard. The results showed that enamel surface irradiation by CO2 and diode lasers increases the fluoride uptake.

  19. Assessment of Fluoride Concentration of Soil and Vegetables in Vicinity of Zinc Smelter, Debari, Udaipur, Rajasthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Nagesh; Jain, Sandeep; Asawa, Kailash; Tak, Mridula; Shinde, Kushal; Singh, Anukriti; Gandhi, Neha; Gupta, Vivek Vardhan

    2015-10-01

    As of late, natural contamination has stimulated as a reaction of mechanical and other human exercises. In India, with the expanding industrialization, numerous unsafe substances are utilized or are discharged amid generation as cleans, exhaust, vapours and gasses. These substances at last are blended in the earth and causes health hazards. To determine concentration of fluoride in soils and vegetables grown in the vicinity of Zinc Smelter, Debari, Udaipur, Rajasthan. Samples of vegetables and soil were collected from areas situated at 0, 1, 2, 5, and 10 km distance from the zinc smelter, Debari. Three samples of vegetables (i.e. Cabbage, Onion and Tomato) and 3 samples of soil {one sample from the upper layer of soil (i.e. 0 to 20 cm) and one from the deep layer (i.e. 20 - 40 cm)} at each distance were collected. The soil and vegetable samples were sealed in clean polythene bags and transported to the laboratory for analysis. One sample each of water and fertilizer from each distance were also collected. The mean fluoride concentration in the vegetables grown varied between 0.36 ± 0.69 to 0.71 ± 0.90 ppm. The fluoride concentration in fertilizer and water sample from various distances was found to be in the range of 1.4 - 1.5 ppm and 1.8 - 1.9 ppm respectively. The fluoride content of soil and vegetables was found to be higher in places near to the zinc smelter.

  20. Removal of fluoride from aqueous nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruett, D.J.; Howerton, W.B.; Mailen, J.C.

    1981-06-01

    Several methods for removing fluoride from aqueous nitric acid were investigated and compared with the frequently used aluminum nitrate-calcium nitrate (Ca 2+ -Al 3+ ) chemical trap-distillation system. Zirconium oxynitrate solutions were found to be superior in preventing volatilization of fluoride during distillation of the nitric acid, producing decontamination factors (DFs) on the order of 2 x 10 3 (vs approx. 500 for the Ca 2+ -Al 3+ system). Several other metal nitrate systems were tested, but they were less effective. Alumina and zirconia columns proved highly effective in removing HF from HF-HNO 3 vapors distilled through the columns; fluoride DFs on the order of 10 6 and 10 4 , respectively, were obtained. A silica gel column was very effective in adsorbing HF from HF-HNO 3 solutions, producing a fluoride DF of approx. 10 4

  1. Spectrophotometric determination of fluoride with alizarin complexone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczenko, Z; Lenarczyk, L [Politechnika Warszawska (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    The modification of direct spectrophotometric method of fluoride determination by alizarin complexone has been developed. It was shown that the lanthanum alizarin complexone chelate is more convenient than that of cerium (3). The influence of acetone, dioxane and dimethyl sulphoxide in water solution on the increase of sensitivity of the method and the rate of colour reaction has been determined. The optimal pH ranges for the reaction with lanthanum and cerium (3) have been estimated. Some amines having a large molecule are useful for extraction of blue fluoride complex with isobutanol. Dioctylamine was applied in a new extraction spectrophotometric procedure of fluoride determination. Conditions in reagent have been established. Both variants of the method have been applied to the fluoride determination in several chemicals. The obtained results show a good precision and accuracy.

  2. Manufacture of high purity metal fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant has been developing technologies of many kinds since the early forties. The primary purpose of this R and D was to reduce the amount of electrical power and capital expense associated with the enrichment of uranium in the 235 isotope. One area that has received a lot of attention is the chemistry of fluorine and metal fluorides. The producing facility at ORGDP is a chemical pilot plant which has been used through the years to demonstrate new processes. Presently existing in this facility are: absorption columns which have been used to remove trace quantities of krypton and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur from gas streams; a flame reactor that is being used to reduce isotopically altered sulfur hexafluoride for conversion to SO 2 which will be used in acid rain studies; an environmental hold system in which methods were developed to remove or neutralize environmental insulting compounds; a fluid bed reactor, and of course the tungsten hexafluoride process. A rhenium hexafluoride facility is also located in the pilot plant. It is basically the same as the tungsten line with three small muffles being used in place of the large WF6 reactor. The product from each process is heated and transferred to approved 5-inch shipping cylinders and transported to the analytical chemistry laboratory for sampling and analysis. These cylinders must be used for shipment and may require modification of the customer facility to accommodate them. Liquid samples are obtained from the product cylinders and a visual examination of the samples for color and melting temperature provides a good indication of the conversion. X-ray fluorescence is utilized to determine the amount of tungsten and the percent conversion to the hexafluoride is calculated from the weighed sample. Infrared in addition to mass spectrometer analyses are performed to verify the findings. The material is then analyzed by spectrographic methods for contaminants

  3. Fluoride method for silicon determination i silicovadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarnitskaya, N.N.; Sergeev, K.I.; Shamraj, Z.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    The method used was based on formation of a silicon-potassium fluoride-sodium sediment in strongly acid medium in the presence of excess potassium chloride which decreased the sediment solubility. The sediment was dissolved in hot water to titrate the resultant hydrofluoric acid with a caustic potash solution in the presence of phenolphthalein. Gravity hydrochloric and volumetric fluoride methods were used to compare the results of silicon estimation

  4. Fluoride removal from water by nano filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejaoui, Imen; Mnif, Amine; Hamrouni, Bechir

    2009-01-01

    As any oligo element, fluoride is necessary and beneficial for human health to low concentrations, but an excess amount of fluoride ions in drinking water has been known to cause undesirable effects, especially tooth and bones fluoro sis. The maximum acceptable concentration of fluoride in drinking water was fixed by the World Health Organization according to the climate in the range of 1 mg.L -1 to 1,2 mg.L -1 . Many methods have been used to remove fluoride from water such as precipitation, adsorption, electrocoagulation and membrane processes. Technologies using membrane processes are being used in many applications, particularly for brackish water desalination. Nano filtration seems to be the best process for a good selective defluorination of fluorinated waters. The main objective of this work was to investigate the retention of fluoride anions by nano filtration. The first part of this study deals with the characterisation of the NF HL2514TF membrane. The influence of various experimental parameters such as initial fluoride content, feed pressure, permeate flux, ionic strength, type of cation associated to fluoride and pH were studied in the second part. Results show that the retention order for the salts tested was TR(Na 2 SO 4 ) > TR(CaCl 2 ) > TR(NaCl), showing a retention sequence inversely proportional to the salt diffusion coefficients in water. It was also shown that charge effects could not be neglected, and a titration experiments confirmed that the NF membrane carry a surplus of negatively charged groups. Fluoride retention exceeds 60 pour cent, and increases with increasing concentration, where the rejection mechanism is related to the dielectric effects. Speigler-Kedem model was applied to experimental results in the aim to determine phenomenological parametersσand P s respectively, the reflexion coefficient of the membrane and the solute permeability of ions. The convective and diffusive parts of the mass transfer were quantified with

  5. Recovery of fluoride ion selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, R.P.G.

    1988-01-01

    A recovery procedure of fluoride ion selective electrode based upon the body radiography of inactive electrode and introduction of suitable internal regeneration solution, is developed. The recovered electrode was tested in standard solutions of fluoride ions (10 sup5) to 10 -1M showing as good performance as the new one. The fluor determination by potentiometric measurements with selective electrode is used in nuclear fuel cycle for quality control of thorium and uranium mixed oxide pellets and pellets of uranium dioxides. (author) [pt

  6. A selective chemosensor for fluoride ion and its interaction with Calf Thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Al Masum, Abdulla; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Islam, Md Maidul; Alam, Md Akhtarul; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2017-05-05

    The amido-Schiff base 1 (N 1 , N 3 -bis (2-nitrobenzylidene)benzene-1,3-dicabohydrazide) containing a CONH group and CHN linkage has been synthesized by the condensation between isophthalic acid dihydrazide and o-nitrobenzaldehyde. This molecule can act as a fluoride ion sensor with high selectivity and sensitivity. Presence of nitro group in the phenyl ring may be responsible for the detection of fluoride ion visually with a dramatic color change from colorless to deep red in aqueous dimethyl sulphoxide solution. This Schiff base can be used as test kit for sensing of fluoride ion in the solid state. Compound 1 can detect fluoride also in commercially available toothpaste. As the compound has adequate solubility in DMSO-water mixture (7:93, v/v) and having some hydrogen bond donor and acceptor centers, we have investigated its nature of binding with Calf Thymus-DNA (CT-DNA) using theoretical molecular modelling and other experimental methods like UV-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroic and thermal melting studies. Thermodynamic parameters have been obtained using the well known Van't Hoff's equation. From both theoretical and experimental findings it has been observed that it can interact effectively with CT-DNA with binding energy -7.55kcal/mol to -7.50kcal/mol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Influence of water fluoride exposure on sex hormone binding globulin and testosterone in adult male].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tong; Yang, Rupu; Li, Shihong; Zheng, Guoqing; Xi, Yu; Cheng, Xuemin; Hou, Jiaxiang; Cui, Liuxin; Ba, Yue

    2013-03-01

    To explore the influence of water fluoride exposure on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and testosterone in adult male. Cross-sectional study was conducted in three villages of Tongxu county including high fluoride group (HFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG) and control group (CG) based on the fluoride concentration in drinking water. Adult male who were born and raised in the village and aged 18 - 50 years old were recruited using cluster sampling. Fasting blood and morning urine samples were collected. The fluoride levels in drinking water and urine were detected by fluoride-ion selective electrode method. Serum SHBG level was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The chemical luminescence immune analysis method was used to detect serum testosterone content. Serum SHBG level was 47.85 nmol/L in CG, 31.37 nmol/L in DFPG and 24.52 nmol/L in HFG respectively. There were significant difference among of three groups (P < 0.05). Serum testosterone level was 3.69 ng/ml in CG, 4.61 ng/ml in DFPG and 4.83 ng/ml in HFG respectively. Serum testosterone level in HFG was significantly higher than that in CG (P < 0.05). Serum SHBG level in HFG has positive correlation with serum testosterone (r = 0.230, P = 0.049), which has not been observed in DFPG and CG. Long-time fluorine exposure may affect serum SHBG and testosterone level in adult male.

  8. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J

  9. Fluoride loaded polymeric nanoparticles for dental delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sanko; Escudero, Carlos; Sediqi, Nadia; Smistad, Gro; Hiorth, Marianne

    2017-06-15

    The overall aim of the present paper was to develop fluoride loaded nanoparticles based on the biopolymers chitosan, pectin, and alginate, for use in dental delivery. First, the preparation of nanoparticles in the presence of sodium fluoride (NaF) as the active ingredient by ionic gelation was investigated followed by an evaluation of their drug entrapment and release properties. Chitosan formed stable, spherical, and monodisperse nanoparticles in the presence of NaF and tripolyphoshate as the crosslinker, whereas alginate and pectin were not able to form any definite nanostructures in similar conditions. The fluoride loading capacity was found to be 33-113ppm, and the entrapment efficiency 3.6-6.2% for chitosan nanoparticles prepared in 0.2-0.4% (w/w) NaF, respectively. A steady increase in the fluoride release was observed for chitosan nanoparticles prepared in 0.2% NaF both in pH5 and 7 until it reached a maximum at time point 4h and maintained at this level for at least 24h. Similar profiles were observed for formulations prepared in 0.4% NaF; however the fluoride was released at a higher level at pH5. The low concentration, but continuous delivery of fluoride from the chitosan nanoparticles, with possible expedited release in acidic environment, makes these formulations highly promising as dental delivery systems in the protection against caries development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The differences in healthcare utilization for dental caries based on the implementation of water fluoridation in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung-Soo; Han, Kyu-Tae; Park, Sohee; Moon, Ki Tae; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-11-08

    There were some debates about the water fluoridation program in South Korea, even if the program had generally substantial effectiveness. Because the out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care were higher in South Korea than in other countries, an efficient solution was needed. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the implementation of water fluoridation and the utilization of dental care. We used the National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort. In this study, data finally included 472,250 patients who were newly diagnosed with dental caries during 2003-2013. We performed survival analysis using cox proportional hazard model, negative binomial-regression, and regression analyses using generalized estimating equation models. There were 48.49 % outpatient dental care visit during study period. Individuals with water fluoridation had a lower risk of dental care visits (HR = 0.949, 95 % CI = 0.928-0.971). Among the individuals who experienced a dental care visit, those with water fluoridation program had a lower number of dental care visits (β = -0.029), and the period of water fluoridation had an inverse association with the dental care expenditures. The implementation of water fluoridation programs and these periods are associated with reducing the utilization of dental health care. Considering these positive impacts, healthcare professionals must consider preventive strategies for activating water fluoridation programs, such as changes in public perception and relations, for the effective management of dental care in South Korea.

  11. Dental Fluorosis and Catalase Immunoreactivity of the Brain Tissues in Rats Exposed to High Fluoride Pre- and Postnatally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güner, Şirin; Uyar-Bozkurt, Süheyla; Haznedaroğlu, Eda; Menteş, Ali

    2016-11-01

    This study evaluated dental fluorosis of the incisors and immunoreactivity in the brain tissues of rats given chronic fluoride doses pre- and postnatally. Female rats were given drinking water with 0, 30 or 100 ppm fluoride ad libitum throughout gestation and the nursing period. In addition, 63 male offspring were treated with the same water regimens as the mothers after weaning and were followed for 1, 3 or 5 months. The upper and lower incisors were collected, and all teeth were examined under a stereomicroscope and scored by two blinded examiners using a modified rodent enamel fluorosis index. Cortical, hippocampal and cerebellar brain samples were evaluated morphologically and immunohistochemically. All fluoride-treated pups were born with low body weight (p = 0.001). All animals from the fluoride groups had enamel fluorosis with defects of various degrees. The increase in the dental fluorosis scores in the fluoride treatment groups was significant (p fluoride groups was significantly higher than that in the controls after 1, 3 and 5 months (p toxicity of fluoride.

  12. Low-Cost, Robust, and Field Portable Smartphone Platform Photometric Sensor for Fluoride Level Detection in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Iftak; Ahamad, Kamal Uddin; Nath, Pabitra

    2017-01-03

    Groundwater is the major source of drinking water for people living in rural areas of India. Pollutants such as fluoride in groundwater may be present in much higher concentration than the permissible limit. Fluoride does not give any visible coloration to water, and hence, no effort is made to remove or reduce the concentration of this chemical present in drinking water. This may lead to a serious health hazard for those people taking groundwater as their primary source of drinking water. Sophisticated laboratory grade tools such as ion selective electrodes (ISE) and portable spectrophotometers are commercially available for in-field detection of fluoride level in drinking water. However, such tools are generally expensive and require expertise to handle. In this paper, we demonstrate the working of a low cost, robust, and field portable smartphone platform fluoride sensor that can detect and analyze fluoride concentration level in drinking water. For development of the proposed sensor, we utilize the ambient light sensor (ALS) of the smartphone as light intensity detector and its LED flash light as an optical source. An android application "FSense" has been developed which can detect and analyze the fluoride concentration level in water samples. The custom developed application can be used for sharing of in-field sensing data from any remote location to the central water quality monitoring station. We envision that the proposed sensing technique could be useful for initiating a fluoride removal program undertaken by governmental and nongovernmental organizations here in India.

  13. The concentration data of fluoride and health risk assessment in drinking water in the Ardakan city of Yazd province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzabeygi Rad Fard, Majid; Yousefi, Mahmood; Soleimani, Hamed; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Abbasnia, Abbas

    2018-06-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) reports, Iran is located in the global fluoride belts, so that is why carrying out extended research on this contaminant anion in water supplies must be considered. Due to the various industries in the Ardakan city, this region is severely suffering from fluoride contamination. This study was designed to investigate the fluoride concentration and its distribution pattern as well as related health risk assessment in groundwater resources of 28 villages of the Ardakan city in Yazd province using SPADNS method according to standard instructions. Our results show that, the average concentration of fluoride was 2.92 mg/l (range: 0.9-6 mg/l), also in half of the villages, the concentration range of this element was over than standard level (1.5 mg/l) given by WHO rules. In addition, risk assessment results showed that HQ value is higher than 1 in 46.4% of samples of groundwater resources in age groups of infants, children, teenagers and adults. Therefore, it is necessary to take measures to reduce fluoride concentration in drinking water in order to control resultant fluorosis. Actions should be implemented to enhance monitoring of fluoride levels to avoid the potential risk of high Fluoride concentration.

  14. Analysis of Ground Water Fluoride Content and its Association with Prevalence of Fluorosis in Zarand/Kerman: (Using GIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    T, Malek Mohammadi; R, Derakhshani; M, Tavallaie; M, Raoof; N, Hasheminejad; Aa, Haghdoost

    2017-06-01

    The concentration of fluoride in water is usually higher in areas around the coal mines. Zarand region in the south-east of Iran is known for its coal mines. Some studies have shown the high prevalence of fluorosis and some studies reported high levels of fluoride in the region. This study aimed to use Geographic Information System (GIS) to assess the relationship between water fluoride content and the prevalence of fluorosis and its spatial distribution in Zarand region. This cross-sectional study aimed to recruit 550 people aged 7-40 years in Zarand. Dental examination for fluorosis was conducted based on the Dean's Index. The level of fluoride in the water was determined in samples of water taken from 35 areas. Information on fluorosis and fluoride content was mapped on GIS. Most participants lived in rural areas (87.25%) and had an educational status of high school level (66%). About 23% of the examined people had normal teeth, 10% had severe and 67% had mild to moderate fluorosis. Distribution of severe fluorosis was higher in areas with higher levels of fluoride in the water according to GIS map. GIS map clearly showed a positive relationship between the prevalence and severity of fluorosis with the level of fluoride in water in Zarand. The GIS analysis may be useful in the analysis of other oral conditions.

  15. Parental preference for fluoride varnish: a new concept in a rapidly developing nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendaus MA

    2016-07-01

    availability of the fluoride varnish in all clinics. Conclusion: The robust positive attitude of parents in this sample suggests that introducing fluoride varnish is feasible and acceptable in our community. Actions to augment fluoride varnish acceptability in the developing world, such as focusing on safety, could be important in the disseminated implementation of fluoride varnish. Keywords: fluoride, parents, varnish, Qatar

  16. THE USE OF FLUORIDE AND ITS EFFECT ON HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domen Kanduti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate oral health care is fundamental for any individual’s health. Dental caries is still one of the major public health problems. The most effective way of caries prevention is the use of fluoride. Fluoride occurs naturally in our environment and is always present in our lives. However, the concentration differs from area to area. Exposure can occur through diet, respiration and fluoride supplements. During pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier. The fluoride, therefore, crosses the placenta in low concentrations. Drinking water in Slovenia is not fluoridated; the amount of naturally present fluoride is very low. Fluoride can be toxic in extremely high concentrations. The most important effect of fluoride on caries incidence is through its role in the process of remineralisation and demineralisation of tooth enamel. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD recommends a preventive topical use of fluoride supplements because of their cariostatic effect. 

  17. Advanced Carbon Fluorides For Primary Lithium Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guérin K.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Li-CFx battery using a specific fluorinated nanocarbon as cathode material exhibits a capacity exceeding the expected theoretical value when used as an electrode material in primary lithium battery. Carbon nanodiscs were partially fluorinated by atomic fluorine released by thermal decomposition of TbF4, and the capacity of this material was up to 1180 mAh.g−1, whereas a theoretical value of 847 mAh.g−1 for the CF0.95 sample was calculated. The obtained value is also higher than the maximum one of 865 mAh.g−1 expected for CF1 carbon fluorides. The discharge mechanism was investigated using mainly SEM and solid state NMR in order to understand this “extracapacity”. Both the unfluorinated carbon and the LiF covering, which is formed outside the carbon lattice during the discharge mechanism, play a key role for the achievement of the extracapacity by the consumption of Li+ to form Li2F+ species stabilized by the carbon host structure formed after the electrochemical defluorination.

  18. Correlation among fluoride and metals in irrigation water and soils of Ethiopian Rift Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Gizaw

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The levels of fluoride and selected metals in Ethiopian Rift Valley soils and irrigation water in the nearby sources were determined by fluoride ion selective electrode and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer, respectively. The pH, conductivity, salinity and total dissolved solids in water and soil samples were also determined. Accuracy of the optimized procedure was evaluated using standard addition (spiking method and an acceptable percentage recovery was obtained. The fluoride concentrations in water samples were found in the range of 0.14-8.0 mg/L which is below the WHO limit of fluoride concentration for irrigation (less than 10 mg/L. The water soluble and total fluorides in soil were 2.3-16 µg/g and 209-1210 µg/g, respectively and are within the ranges recommended by FAO and WHO. The range of metal concentration in soil samples (µg/g dry weight basis and in water samples (mg/L respectively were: Na (684-6703, 8.6-67, Mg (1608-11229, 23-67, K (1776-4394, 1.1-20, Ca (7547-22998, 17-267, Cr (9.8-79, 0.07-0.17, Mn (143-700, 0.05-37, Co (50-112, 0.35-1.5, Ni (446-1288, 0.27-41, Fe (12180-32681, 6.0-48, Cu (8.9-45, 0.09-0.25 and Zn (31-89, 0.14-0.56. Fluoride was found to have significant correlation with major trace metals (Fe, Cu and Cr, but the correlation with other trace metals was not significant. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v28i2.7

  19. Decomposição de amostras de solos assistida por radiação microondas: estratégia para evitar a formação de fluoretos insolúveis Microwave-assisted decomposition of soil samples: strategies to avoid formation of insoluble fluoride salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivan Carvalho Vieira

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A decomposição de amostras que contêm elevados teores de Si, utilizando mistura com os ácidos nítrico e fluorídrico, pode provocar a precipitação de fluoretos de Al(III, Ca(II, Fe(III e Mg(II durante a digestão, impedindo a recuperação total desses elementos. Visando minimizar esse problema, foram testados quatro procedimentos aplicados a diferentes amostras de solos. O procedimento mais eficiente envolveu a decomposição assistida por radiação microondas, seguida pela separação do material sólido residual com elevado teor de Si do sobrenadante ácido. A fração residual foi solubilizada usando HF concentrado e, após complexação com ácido bórico, essa solução foi misturada à fase líquida do digerido. Os teores de metais nos digeridos foram determinados por espectrometria de emissão óptica em plasma induzido (ICP OES e a exatidão foi demonstrada aplicando o procedimento proposto em amostras provenientes do programa colaborativo International Soil-Analytical Exchange (ISE, Wegening Agricultural University, Holanda e em amostra certificada de solo proveniente do National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST, SRM 2709, que apresentou respectivamente, os seguintes percentuais de recuperação: 100,0 ± 2,6; 99,5 ± 1,9; 108,5 ± 2,7; 94,6 ± 8,9; 92,2 ± 9,7; 95,7 ± 1,8; 96,7 ± 2,7; 95,2 ± 0,6; 103,6 ± 2,6 e 96,1 ± 1,6 para, Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, V e Zn.The use of pre-mixed nitric and hydrofluoric acids for the decomposition of samples containing high amounts of Si can cause the precipitation of Al(III, Ca(II, Fe(III, and Mg(II fluorides during digestion, reducing the total recovery of these elements. Four procedures were applied to certified soil samples in an attempt to circumvent this problem. The most efficient procedure was based on microwave-assisted acid digestion decomposition of the samples, followed by separation of the residual silicate compounds. This fraction was solubilized using

  20. Chemisorption of uranium hexa-fluoride on sodium fluoride pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalburgi, A K; Sanyal, A; Puranik, V D; Bhattacharjee, B [Chemical Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    This paper comprises kinetics of chemical reaction or rather chemisorption of uranium hexafluoride gas on sodium fluoride pellets. The chemisorption is essentially irreversible at room temperature, while the process reverses at high temperature above 280 deg C. This chemisorption process was experimentally conducted in static condition at room temperature and its kinetics was studied. In the experiments, practically pure UF{sub 6} was used and the effects of gas pressure and weight of NaF pellets, were studied. In this heterogenous reaction, in which diffusion through ash layer is followed by chemical reaction, the reaction part is instantaneous and is first order with respect to gas concentration. Since the process of chemisorption is not only pure chemical reaction but also gas diffusion through ash layer, the rate constant depreciates with the percentage loading of UF{sub 6} on NaF pellets. The kinetic equation for the above process has been established for a particular size of NaF pellets and pellet porosity. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  2. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  3. Effect of titanium tetrafluoride, amine fluoride and fluoride varnish on enamel erosion in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A; Ruben, JL; Huysmans, MCDNJM

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of 1 and 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) gels, amine fluoride (AmF) 1 and 0.25% and a fluoride varnish (FP) on the prevention of dental erosion. Two experimental groups served as controls, one with no pretreatment and another one pre-treated with a

  4. Daily Fluoride Intake from Iranian Green Tea: Evaluation of Various Flavorings on Fluoride Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Maleki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With increased awareness of the health benefits of the compounds in green tea, especially polyphenols, its consumption is rising. The main purpose of this study is to determine the effect of different additives on the released fluoride into tea liquor and also daily fluoride intake. The concentrations of fluoride, nitrate, sulfate, and chloride were measured in 15 different flavored green teas (Refah-Lahijan. The fluoride and other anion concentrations were measured by ion chromatography method. The data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16.0. The results showed that the minimum and maximum concentrations of fluoride in the green tea infusions were 0.162 mg/L (cinnamon-flavored green tea and 3.29 mg/L (bagged peach-flavored green tea, respectively. The mean concentration of fluoride in the green tea leaves was 52 mg/kg, and approximately 89% of the fluoride was released from the green tea leaves into the infusions after brewing. The fluoride concentrations varied significantly among the examined green teas ( P 0.05. Finally, drinking of the studied green teas cannot make a significant contribution to the daily dietary intake of F for consumers.

  5. Fluoride release and cariostatic potential of orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride rinsing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, M.Y.; Sandham, A.; Rumachik, E.N.; Ruben, J.L.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the fluoride-release profiles and caries lesion development in an enamel model with brackets cemented with 4 orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride exposure. METHODS: Four orthodontic adhesives (Ketac Cem mu, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany;

  6. Fluoride release and cariostatic potential of orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride rinsing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, Yeen; Sandham, John; Rumachik, Elena N.; Ruben, Jan L.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the fluoride-release profiles and caries lesion development in an enamel model with brackets cemented with 4 orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride exposure. Methods: Four orthodontic adhesives (Ketac Cem mu, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany;

  7. Oral fluoride levels 1 h after use of a sodium fluoride rinse: effect of sodium lauryl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Gerald L; Schumacher, Gary E; Chow, Laurence C; Tenuta, Livia M A

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the concentration of free fluoride in oral fluids is an important goal in the use of topical fluoride agents. Although sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) is a common dentifrice ingredient, the influence of this ion on plaque fluid and salivary fluid fluoride has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of SLS on these parameters and to examine the effect of this ion on total (or whole) plaque fluoride, an important source of plaque fluid fluoride after a sufficient interval following fluoride administration, and on total salivary fluoride, a parameter often used as a surrogate measure of salivary fluid fluoride. Ten subjects accumulated plaque for 48 h before rinsing with a 12 mmol/l NaF (228 µg/g F) rinse containing or not containing 0.5% (w/w) SLS. SLS had no statistically significant effect on total plaque and total saliva fluoride but significantly increased salivary fluid and plaque fluid fluoride (by 147 and 205%, respectively). These results suggest that the nonfluoride components of topical agents can be manipulated to improve the fluoride release characteristics from oral fluoride reservoirs and that statistically significant change may be observed in plaque fluid and salivary fluid fluoride concentrations that may not be observed in total plaque and total saliva fluoride concentrations.

  8. Widespread genetic switches and toxicity resistance proteins for fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jenny L; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Weinberg, Zasha; Roth, Adam; Stockbridge, Randy B; Breaker, Ronald R

    2012-01-13

    Most riboswitches are metabolite-binding RNA structures located in bacterial messenger RNAs where they control gene expression. We have discovered a riboswitch class in many bacterial and archaeal species whose members are selectively triggered by fluoride but reject other small anions, including chloride. These fluoride riboswitches activate expression of genes that encode putative fluoride transporters, enzymes that are known to be inhibited by fluoride, and additional proteins of unknown function. Our findings indicate that most organisms are naturally exposed to toxic levels of fluoride and that many species use fluoride-sensing RNAs to control the expression of proteins that alleviate the deleterious effects of this anion.

  9. Implementing a geographical information system to assess endemic fluoride areas in Lamphun, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theerawasttanasiri N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonthaphat Theerawasttanasiri,1,2 Surasak Taneepanichskul,1 Wichain Pingchai,3 Yuwaree Nimchareon,4 Sangworn Sriwichai5 1College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Health, Health Promotion Center Region 1, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Mueang Lamphun District Public Health Office, 4Pasang District Public Health Office, 5Ban Thi District Public Health Office, Lamphun, Thailand Introduction: Many studies have shown that fluoride can cross the placenta and that exposure to high fluoride during pregnancy may result in premature birth and/or a low birth weight. Lamphun is one of six provinces in Thailand where natural water fluoride (WF concentrations >10.0 mg/L were found, and it was also found that >50% of households used water with high fluoride levels. Nevertheless, geographical information system (GIS and maps of endemic fluoride areas are lacking. We aimed to measure the fluoride level of village water supplies to assess endemic fluoride areas and present GIS with maps in Google Maps.Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted from July 2016 to January 2017. Purpose sampling was used to identify villages of districts with WF >10.0 mg/L in the Mueang Lamphun, Pasang, and Ban Thi districts. Water samples were collected with the geolocation measured by Smart System Info. Fluoride was analyzed with an ion-selective electrode instrument using a total ionic strength adjustment buffer. WF >0.70 mg/L was used to identify unsafe drinking water and areas with high endemic fluoride levels. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the findings, and MS Excel was used to create the GIS database. Maps were created in Google Earth and presented in Google Maps.Results: We found that WF concentrations ranged between 0.10–13.60 mg/L. Forty-four percent (n=439 of samples were at unsafe levels (>0.70 mg/L, and. 54% (n=303 of villages and 46% (n=79,807 of households used the unsafe drinking water. Fifty percent

  10. Influence of the method of fluoride administration on toxicity and fluoride concentrations in Japanese quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W.J.; Schuler, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Young Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were administered NaF for 16 d either in their diet or by esophageal intubation. Based on the total fluoride ion (Emg F-) intake over the l6-d experimental period, fluoride administered by intubation was at least six times more toxic than that fed in the diet. Dietary concentrations of 1,000 ppm F- (Emg F- for 16 d = approx. 144) produced no mortality, whereas intubated doses produced 73% or greater mortality in all groups administered 54 mg F- /kg/d or more (Emg F- for 16 d _ approx. 23 mg). GraphIc companson of the regression of log F- ppm in femurs/mg F- intake showed that fluoride levels in the femurs of quail administered fluoride by intubation were higher than in those administered fluoride in the diet.

  11. Fluoride Levels in Urine, Blood Plasma and Serum of People Living in an Endemic Fluorosis Area in the Thar Desert, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafique, T.; Shirin, K.; Ahmed, I.; Khan, M. H.; Soomro, F.

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride (F/sup -/) levels in the urine, blood plasma and serum samples of people living in a village in the Thar Desert have been analysed where fluorosis is endemic and groundwater contains fluoride as high as 9.76 mg/L. Average values of fluoride levels in these human specimens i.e. urine, blood plasma and serum have been found to be 12.98 mg/L, 0.61 mg/L and 0.75 mg/L, respectively. These values are much higher than the normal values reported from other parts of the world. It was observed that urinary fluoride levels increase with age of an individual but with an insignificant correlation (r = 0.116), however, fluoride levels in plasma and serum samples did not vary considerably with age in male and female subjects. It has been found that after the age of 50 years the urinary fluoride decreases with its concomitant increase in serum fluoride level. Since groundwater is the only available source of water for human consumption and it contains higher fluoride (av. 7.09 mg/L) than WHO limit (1.5 mg/L), therefore, it is the main cause of fluorosis in the area. (author)

  12. Environmental radiation measurements using lithium fluoride thermoluminescence dosemeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, C.M.H.; Green, B.M.R.; McKinlay, A.F.; Richards, D.J. (National Radiological Protection Board, Harwell (UK))

    1984-01-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board is involved in a large scale environmental survey of radiation levels in homes throughout the United Kingdom. Passive radon and gamma ray dosemeters are posted to a representative sample of households. Lithium fluoride thermoluminescence dosemeters are used to assess natural gamma radiation and are left in the measurement location for a period of six months before being returned to the Board for processing. As a preliminary to the national survey, the Board has been engaged on several limited surveys in regions of igneous and sedimentary geology. Experience gained in these limited surveys and from standardisation studies using environmental dosemeters are reported.

  13. Environmental evaluation of fluoride in drinking water at "Los Altos de Jalisco," in the central Mexico region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Roberto; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge

    Naturally occurring fluoride has been detected and quantified in drinking water in several cities of the "Los Altos de Jalisco" (LAJ) region. LAJ is located in the northeastern part of the state of Jalisco-Mexico, covering an area of 16,410 km2 with a population of 696,318 in 20 municipalities. Drinking water comes mainly from groundwater aquifers, located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, which is a volcanic region characterized by hydrothermal activity. Results indicated that water supply from 42% of the municipalities had a fluoride concentration over the Mexican standards of 1.5 mg/L. It is important to notice that there are three cities, Lagos de Moreno (1.66-5.88 mg/L F(-)), Teocaltiche (3.82-18.58 mg/L F(-)), and Encarnación de Díaz (2.58-4.40 mg/L F(-)) where all water samples resulted in fluoride concentration over the maximum contaminant level. The total population from these three cities is over 122,000 inhabitants. Another important city with high levels of fluoride in the water supply was Tepatitlán de Morelos (2 wells with 6.54 and 13.47 mg/L F(-)). In addition to water supply, 30 samples of brand-name bottled water were tested. Surprisingly, 8 samples (27%) demonstrated fluoride level over the standards, mainly Agua de Lagos with 5.27 mg/L. Fluoridated table salt (200-300 mg/kg F(-)) is another important source of fluoride. A large number of people living in the region, mainly school children, might be under adverse health risk because they are consuming contaminated drinking water. It is well known that long-term exposure to water with high levels of fluoride produces severe health problems.

  14. Hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2008-01-01

    The USA Administration would like to consider the US power generating industry as a basis ensuring both the full-scale production of hydrogen and the widespread use of the hydrogen related technological processes into the economy [ru

  15. Effect of various rinsing protocols after use of amine fluoride/stannous fluoride toothpaste on the bacterial composition of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loveren, C; Gerardu, V A M; Sissons, C H; van Bekkum, M; ten Cate, J M

    2009-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the effect of different oral hygiene protocols on the bacterial composition of dental plaque. After a 2-week period of using fluoride-free toothpaste, 30 participants followed three 1-week experimental protocols, each followed by 2-week fluoride-free washout periods in a randomized crossover examiner-blind controlled trial. The 1-week experimental protocols comprised the use of AmF/SnF(2) toothpaste twice daily, after which participants either (1) rinsed with tap water, (2) did not rinse but only spat out the toothpaste, or (3) rinsed with an AmF/SnF(2) mouthwash. In the fluoride-free washout periods, the participants brushed their teeth with fluoride-free toothpaste without further instructions. Six hours after the last brushing (+/- rinsing) of each period, buccal plaque samples in the upper molar region were taken. The microbiota composition of the plaque samples was analyzed by checkerboard DNA:DNA hybridization. A statistically significant reduction was found in the total amount of DNA of the 39 major plaque species measured, and in the proportions of some acid-producing bacterial strains after the period having used the AmF/SnF(2) toothpaste + AmF/SnF(2) mouthrinsing. The results indicate that using the AmF/SnF(2) toothpaste and rinse combination could result in plaque of lower cariogenicity. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Cytotoxic effects of glass ionomer cements on human dental pulp stem cells correlate with fluoride release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjevac, Tatjana; Milovanovic, Marija; Volarevic, Vladislav; Lukic, Miodrag L; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Markovic, Dejan; Zdravkovic, Nebojsa; Tesic, Zivoslav; Lukic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are commonly used as restorative materials. Responses to GICs differ among cell types and it is therefore of importance to thoroughly investigate the influence of these restorative materials on pulp stem cells that are potential source for dental tissue regeneration. Eight biomaterials were tested: Fuji I, Fuji II, Fuji VIII, Fuji IX, Fuji Plus, Fuji Triage, Vitrebond and Composit. We compared their cytotoxic activity on human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) and correlated this activity with the content of Fluoride, Aluminium and Strontium ions in their eluates. Elution samples of biomaterials were prepared in sterile tissue culture medium and the medium was tested for toxicity by an assay of cell survival/proliferation (MTT test) and apoptosis (Annexin V FITC Detection Kit). Concentrations of Fluoride, Aluminium and Strontium ions were tested by appropriate methods in the same eluates. Cell survival ranged between 79.62% (Fuji Triage) to 1.5% (Fuji Plus) and most dead DPSCs were in the stage of late apoptosis. Fluoride release correlated with cytotoxicity of GICs, while Aluminium and Strontium ions, present in significant amount in eluates of tested GICs did not. Fuji Plus, Vitrebond and Fuji VIII, which released fluoride in higher quantities than other GICs, were highly toxic to human DPSCs. Opposite, low levels of released fluoride correlated to low cytotoxic effect of Composit, Fuji I and Fuji Triage.

  17. SITUATION OF FLUORIDES RATE IN WATERS AND MAJOR CONSUMED FOOD IN WILAYA EL-OUED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zobeidi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of mineral salts in the drinking water, beneficial or harmful depending on their concentration, are known for many years and thus the problem posed by fluoride ions in the waters of the region (Fluorosis Dental and skeletal. This study proposes, the estimated daily intake of fluoride from its water distribution and the main food consumed per capita in the region of El-Oued (dates, tea, couscous, lentils, carrots, potatoes, pumpkin ..., which has a significant content of fluoride in their composition. In addition to the arid climatic conditions, the air temperature is very high in summer, leads to a strong human perspiration. This preliminary result leads us to propose a standard fluoride-specific region of El-Oued. The results showed that the majority of water samples and analyzed the main foods of the region of El-Oued is charged fluoride ions and exceed the maximum dose recommended for adults from 0.05 to 0.07 mg / kg / day.

  18. SITUATION OF FLUORIDES RATE IN WATERS AND MAJOR CONSUMED FOOD IN WILAYA EL-OUED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zobeidi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of mineral salts in the drinking water, beneficial or harmful depending on their concentration, are known for many years and thus the problem posed                     by fluoride ions in the waters of the region (Fluorosis Dental and skeletal. This                  study proposes, the estimated daily intake of fluoride from its water distribution and           the main food consumed per capita in the region of El-Oued (dates, tea,                          couscous, lentils, carrots, potatoes, pumpkin ..., which has a significant content of fluoride in their composition. In addition to the arid climatic conditions, the air temperature is very high in summer, leads to a strong human perspiration. This preliminary result leads us to propose a standard fluoride-specific region of El-Oued. The results showed that the majority of water samples and analyzed the main foods of the region of El-Oued is charged fluoride ions and exceed the maximum dose recommended for adults from 0.05 to 0.07 mg / kg / day.

  19. Antibacterial Properties of Calcium Fluoride-Based Composite Materials: In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycka, Beata; Grzegorczyk, Janina; Sokołowski, Krzysztof; Półtorak, Konrad; Sokołowski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate antibacterial activity of composite materials modified with calcium fluoride against cariogenic bacteria S. mutans and L. acidophilus. One commercially available conventional light-curing composite material containing fluoride ions (F2) and two commercially available flowable light-curing composite materials (Flow Art and X-Flow) modified with 1.5, 2.5, and 5.0 wt% anhydrous calcium fluoride addition were used in the study. Composite material samples were incubated in 0.95% NaCl at 35°C for 3 days; then dilution series of S. mutans and L. acidophilus strains were made from the eluates. Bacteria dilutions were cultivated on media afterwards. Colony-forming unit per 1 mL of solution (CFU/mL) was calculated. Composite materials modified with calcium fluoride highly reduced (p composite materials containing fluoride compounds. The greatest reduction in bacteria growth was observed for composite materials modified with 1.5% wt. CaF2. All three tested composite materials showed statistically greater antibacterial activity against L. acidophilus than against S. mutans. PMID:28053976

  20. Data on fluoride concentration levels in semi-arid region of Medak, Telangana, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adimalla Narsimha

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization recommendation, the optimal fluoride concentration levels in drinking water have to be in the range of 0.5 and 1.5 mg/L since this permissible range is essential for normal mineralization of bones and teeth as well as for dental enamel formation in human's body Bell and budwig, 1970; Adimalla and Venkatayogi, 2017; Narsimha and Sudarshan, 2013, 2016; 2017 [1,2,4,5,6]. If continues intake of high fluoride (>1.5 water can severely cause dental and skeletal fluorosis. The investigated area people majorly depend on groundwater for drinking purposes and fluoride concentration ranged from 0.2 to 7.4 mg/L with mean concentration of 2.7 mg/L and data was compared with WHO guidelines for drinking purposes. Overall, data reveals that the 57% of groundwater samples data was not safe for drinking purposes. Therefore, distribution of fluoride in the groundwater of Medak region in Telangana was suggested to intake drinking water, which are below level of fluoride concentration in the groundwater and take care about health implications.

  1. The Karlsruhe 4π barium fluoride detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisshak, K.; Guber, K.; Kaeppeler, F.; Krisch, J.; Mueller, H.; Rupp, G.; Voss, F.

    1989-12-01

    A new experimental approach has been implemented for accurate measurements of neutron capture cross sections in the energy range from 5 to 200 keV. The Karlsruhe 4π Barium Fluoride Detector consists of 42 crystals shaped as hexagonal and pentagonal truncated pyramids forming a spherical shell with 10 cm inner radius and 15 cm thickness. All crystals are supplied with reflector and photomultiplier, thus representing independent gamma-ray detectors. Each detector module covers the same solid angle with respect to a gamma-ray source located in the centre. The energy resolution of the 4π detector is 14% at 662 keV and 7% at 2.5 MeV gamma-ray energy, the overall time reslution is 500 ps and the peak efficiency 90% at 1 MeV. The detector allows to register capture cascades with 95% probability above a threshold energy of 2.5 MeV in the sum energy spectrum. Neutrons are produced via the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction using the pulsed proton beam of a Van de Graaff accelerator. The neutron spectrum can be taylored according to the experimental requirements in an energy range from 5 to 200 keV by choosing appropriate proton energies. A collimated neutron beam is passing through the detector and hits the sample in the centre. The energy of captured neutrons is determined via time of flight, the primary flight path being 77 cm. The combination of short primary flight path, a 10 cm inner radius of the spherical BaF 2 shell, and the low capture cross section of barium allows to discriminate background due to capture of sample scattered neutrons in the scintillator by time of flight, leaving part of the neutron energy range completely undisturbed. (orig./HSI) [de

  2. Fabrication of dense panels in lithium fluoride; Fabrication de panneaux denses en fluorure de lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farcy, P.; Roger, J.; Pointud, R.

    1958-04-15

    The authors report a study aimed at the fabrication of large and dense lithium fluoride panels. This sintered lithium fluoride is then supposed to be used for the construction of barriers of protection against a flow of thermal neutrons. They briefly present the raw material which is used under the form of chamotte obtained through a pre-sintering process which is also described. Grain size measurements and sample preparation are indicated. Shaping, drying, and thermal treatment are briefly described, and characteristics of the sintered product are indicated.

  3. Effect of dispersed particles of calcium fluoride on the molybdenum solubility in iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvejkin, G.P.; Antsiferov, V.N.; Postnikov, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of the investigation of compositions containing 20 at% Mo and 12 vol.% CaF 2 are presented. The sample diffractograms of compositions Fe+20 at% Mo and (Fe+20 at% Mo)+12 vol.% CaF 2 are given. It is shown that the introduction of calcium fluoride results in formation of continuos series of solid solutions of molybdenum in iron. The results of X-ray diffraction investigations on exceeding solubility limit of molybdenum in iron in the presence of calcium fluoride are confirmed

  4. Preparation of Bioactive Titanium Surfaces via Fluoride and Fibronectin Retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Nelson Elias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem. The chemical or topographic modification of the dental implant surface can affect bone healing, promote accelerated osteogenesis, and increase bone-implant contact and bonding strength. Objective. In this work, the effects of dental implant surface treatment and fibronectin adsorption on the adhesion of osteoblasts were analyzed. Materials and Methods. Two titanium dental implants (Porous-acid etching and PorousNano-acid etching followed by fluoride ion modification were characterized by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray diffraction before and after the incorporation of human plasma fibronectin (FN. The objective was to investigate the biofunctionalization of these surfaces and examine their effects on the interaction with osteoblastic cells. Results. The evaluation techniques used showed that the Porous and PorousNano implants have similar microstructural characteristics. Spectrophotometry demonstrated similar levels of fibronectin adsorption on both surfaces (80%. The association indexes of osteoblastic cells in FN-treated samples were significantly higher than those in samples without FN. The radioactivity values associated with the same samples, expressed as counts per minute (cpm, suggested that FN incorporation is an important determinant of the in vitro cytocompatibility of the surfaces. Conclusion. The preparation of bioactive titanium surfaces via fluoride and FN retention proved to be a useful treatment to optimize and to accelerate the osseointegration process for dental implants.

  5. Changing use and knowledge of fluoride toothpaste by schoolchildren, parents and schoolteachers in Beijing, China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Min; Zhu, Ling; Zhang, BoXue

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the oral hygiene practices, current use of and knowledge about fluoride toothpaste among schoolchildren, parents, and schoolteachers; to describe the attitudes of parents and schoolteachers in relation to improving schoolchildren's oral health. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study....... PARTICIPANTS: 1,557 schoolchildren, 1,132 parents, and 352 schoolteachers were recruited by multistage stratified sampling procedure in a district of Beijing, China. METHODS: Self-completed questionnaire. RESULTS: The percentage of schoolchildren, parents, and schoolteachers who actually used fluoride...... toothpaste was 88%, 86%, and 87%, respectively, and 74-78% of the respondent groups brushed their teeth twice a day or more. 64% of schoolchildren, 73% of parents, and 74% of schoolteachers confirmed the caries preventive effect of fluoride toothpaste. Toothpaste recommended by oral health professional...

  6. Metallic hydrogen research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, T.J.; Hawke, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical studies predict that molecular hydrogen can be converted to the metallic phase at very high density and pressure. These conditions were achieved by subjecting liquid hydrogen to isentropic compression in a magnetic-flux compression device. Hydrogen became electrically conducting at a density of about 1.06 g/cm 3 and a calculated pressure of about 2 Mbar. In the experimental device, a cylindrical liner, on implosion by high explosive, compresses a magnetic flux which in turn isentropically compresses a hydrogen sample; coaxial conical anvils prevent escape of the sample during compression. One anvil contains a coaxial cable that uses alumina ceramic as an insulator; this probe allows continuous measurement of the electrical conductivity of the hydrogen. A flash x-ray radiograph exposed during the experiment records the location of the sample-tube boundaries and permits calculation of the sample density. The theoretical underpinnings of the metallic transition of hydrogen are briefly summarized, and the experimental apparatus and technique, analytical methods, and results are described. 9 figures

  7. Thermodynamic data-base for metal fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Hyung; Lee, Byung Gik; Kang, Young Ho and others

    2001-05-01

    This study is aimed at collecting useful data of thermodynamic properties of various metal fluorides. Many thermodynamic data for metal fluorides are needed for the effective development, but no report of data-base was published. Accordingly, the objective of this report is to rearrange systematically the existing thermodynamic data based on metal fluorides and is to use it as basic data for the development of pyrochemical process. The physicochemical properties of various metal fluorides and metals were collected from literature and such existing data base as HSC code, TAPP code, FACT code, JANAF table, NEA data-base, CRC handbook. As major contents of the thermodynamic data-base, the physicochemical properties such as formation energy, viscosity, density, vapor pressure, etc. were collected. Especially, some phase diagrams of eutectic molten fluorides are plotted and thermodynamic data of liquid metals are also compiled. In the future, the technical report is to be used as basic data for the development of the pyrochemical process which is being carried out as a long-term nuclear R and D project.

  8. Thermodynamic data-base for metal fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae Hyung; Lee, Byung Gik; Kang, Young Ho and others

    2001-05-01

    This study is aimed at collecting useful data of thermodynamic properties of various metal fluorides. Many thermodynamic data for metal fluorides are needed for the effective development, but no report of data-base was published. Accordingly, the objective of this report is to rearrange systematically the existing thermodynamic data based on metal fluorides and is to use it as basic data for the development of pyrochemical process. The physicochemical properties of various metal fluorides and metals were collected from literature and such existing data base as HSC code, TAPP code, FACT code, JANAF table, NEA data-base, CRC handbook. As major contents of the thermodynamic data-base, the physicochemical properties such as formation energy, viscosity, density, vapor pressure, etc. were collected. Especially, some phase diagrams of eutectic molten fluorides are plotted and thermodynamic data of liquid metals are also compiled. In the future, the technical report is to be used as basic data for the development of the pyrochemical process which is being carried out as a long-term nuclear R and D project

  9. Determination of fluoride ions by measuring ionic activities and using selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, J.M.G.; Castro Miquelino, F.L. de

    1984-01-01

    Fluorides interfere adversely in electroplating baths of printed circuits and in other environments where it promotes corrosion. A calibration curve for its determination was drawn with standards of known concentrations. As the concentration of the fluorite ions in the sample did not follow the linearity of the curve, it was measured by means of the standard addition method. (C.L.B.) [pt

  10. Gramicidin D enhances the antibacterial activity of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Breaker, Ronald R

    2014-07-01

    Fluoride is a toxic anion found in many natural environments. One of the major bacterial defenses against fluoride is the cell envelope, which limits passage of the membrane-impermeant fluoride anion. Accordingly, compounds that enhance the permeability of bacterial membranes to fluoride should also enhance fluoride toxicity. In this study, we demonstrate that the pore-forming antibiotic gramicidin D increases fluoride uptake in Bacillus subtilis and that the antibacterial activity of this compound is potentiated by fluoride. Polymyxin B, another membrane-targeting antibiotic with a different mechanism of action, shows no such improvement. These results, along with previous findings, indicate that certain compounds that destabilize bacterial cell envelopes can enhance the toxicity of fluoride. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Potential fluoride toxicity from oral medicaments: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Ullah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of fluoride on human oral health are well studied. There are numerous studies demonstrating that a small amount of fluoride delivered to the oral cavity decreases the prevalence of dental decay and results in stronger teeth and bones. However, ingestion of fluoride more than the recommended limit leads to toxicity and adverse effects. In order to update our understanding of fluoride and its potential toxicity, we have described the mechanisms of fluoride metabolism, toxic effects, and management of fluoride toxicity. The main aim of this review is to highlight the potential adverse effects of fluoride overdose and poorly understood toxicity. In addition, the related clinical significance of fluoride overdose and toxicity has been discussed.

  12. Potential fluoride toxicity from oral medicaments: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Rizwan; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Shahani, Nazish

    2017-08-01

    The beneficial effects of fluoride on human oral health are well studied. There are numerous studies demonstrating that a small amount of fluoride delivered to the oral cavity decreases the prevalence of dental decay and results in stronger teeth and bones. However, ingestion of fluoride more than the recommended limit leads to toxicity and adverse effects. In order to update our understanding of fluoride and its potential toxicity, we have described the mechanisms of fluoride metabolism, toxic effects, and management of fluoride toxicity. The main aim of this review is to highlight the potential adverse effects of fluoride overdose and poorly understood toxicity. In addition, the related clinical significance of fluoride overdose and toxicity has been discussed.

  13. comparative study of fluoride in alcornea cordifolia and commercial

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantum

    2013-07-31

    Jul 31, 2013 ... fluoride than the tender stem. Hence, the hard stem is a cheap source of fluoride when compared to commercial ... The importance of addition of 10% zinc .... 1st edition, Prentice Hall, Education Limited, Publisher, Edinburgh.

  14. State and National Water Fluoridation System (Public Water Systems)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS) has been developed to provide tools to assist states in managing fluoridation programs. WFRS is designed to track all...

  15. A simple and colorimetric fluoride receptor and its fluoride-responsive organogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Xudong, E-mail: 081022009@fudan.edu.cn [College of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Yuhua Road 70, Shijiazhuang 050080 (China); Li Yajuan [College of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Yuhua Road 70, Shijiazhuang 050080 (China); Yin Yaobing; Yu Decai [College of Science, Hebei University of Engineering, 199 South street of Guangming, Handan 056038 (China)

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a new p-nitrophenylhydrozine-based anion receptor 1 containing cholesterol group had been designed and synthesized. It could selectively recognize fluoride among different anions tested with color changes from pale yellow to red for visual detection. Simultaneously, it could gel in cyclohexane, and the gel was also fluoride-responsive. When treated with TBAF (tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride), the gel could undergo gel-sol transition accompanied by color, morphology and surface changes. The binding mechanism had been investigated by UV-vis and {sup 1}HNMR (proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra) titrations. From SEM (scanning electron microscope), SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering), IR (Infrared Spectroscopy) and CA (contact angle) experiments, it was indicated that the addition of F{sup -} could destroy the molecule assembly of host 1 in the gel state, thus resulting in the gel-to-sol transition due to the binding site competition effect. To the best of our knowledge, this was the simplest fluoride-responsive organogel with high selectivity. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel kind receptor for selective recognition of fluoride had been designed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its organogel was also fluoride-responsive. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the simplest fluoride-responsive organogel with high selectivity.

  16. FLUORIDE: A REVIEW OF USE AND EFFECTS ON HEALTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduti, Domen; Sterbenk, Petra; Artnik, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate oral health care is fundamental for any individual's health. Dental caries is still one of the major public health problems. The most effective way of caries prevention is the use of fluoride. The aim of our research was to review the literature about fluoride toxicity and to inform physicians, dentists and public health specialists whether fluoride use is expedient and safe. Data we used in our review were systematically searched and collected from web pages and documents published from different international institutions. Fluoride occurs naturally in our environment but we consume it in small amounts. Exposure can occur through dietary intake, respiration and fluoride supplements. The most important factor for fluoride presence in alimentation is fluoridated water. Methods, which led to greater fluoride exposure and lowered caries prevalence, are considered to be one of the greatest accomplishments in the 20th century`s public dental health. During pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier. The fluoride, therefore, crosses the placenta in low concentrations. Fluoride can be transmitted through the plasma into the mother's milk; however, the concentration is low. The most important action of fluoride is topical, when it is present in the saliva in the appropriate concentration. The most important effect of fluoride on caries incidence is through its role in the process of remineralization and demineralization of tooth enamel. Acute toxicity can occur after ingesting one or more doses of fluoride over a short time period which then leads to poisoning. Today, poisoning is mainly due to unsupervised ingestion of products for dental and oral hygiene and over-fluoridated water. Even though fluoride can be toxic in extremely high concentrations, it`s topical use is safe. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) recommends a preventive topical use of fluoride supplements because of their cariostatic effect.

  17. The effective use of fluorides in public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sheila; Burt, Brian A; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2005-01-01

    , systematic reviews summarizing these extensive databases have indicated that water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes both substantially reduce the prevalence and incidence of dental caries. We present four case studies that illustrate the use of fluoride in modern public health practice, focusing on......Dental caries remain a public health problem for many developing countries and for underprivileged populations in developed countries. This paper outlines the historical development of public health approaches to the use of fluoride and comments on their effectiveness. Early research...

  18. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  19. Fluoride in dental biofilm and saliva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Line Staun

    Dette ph.d.-projekt bidrager med ny viden om fordelingen af fluorid i dental biofilm og saliva. For at udforske koncentrationen af fluorid i naturlig (in vivo) biofilmvæske, biofilmsediment og i saliva, blev der udført to meget forskellige kliniske studier. Resultaterne fra tværsnitsstudiet (Studie...... I), hos en stor gruppe mennesker (n=42) der konsulterede en tandklinik for behandling, bekræfter tidligere viden, at der findes en naturlig biologisk variation i fluoridkoncentrationerne i biofilm fra forskellige intra-orale regioner samt mellem biofilmvæske, biofilmsediment og saliva...... fluoridkoncentrationer i underkæbefronten, intermediære koncentrationer i alle tre overkæberegioner og de laveste koncentrationer i underkæbemolarregionerne. Begge studier viser at biofilmsedimentet indeholder størstedelen af fluorid i biofilm. Set i et bredere perspektiv viser fundene at der er et omvendt forhold...

  20. Effect of atmospheric fluoride on plant metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suketa, Y; Yamamoto, T

    1971-05-01

    Studies on the relationship between the exposure factor and foliar deposition of fluoride, or foliar burn, are introduced. Photosynthesis is adversely affected by atmospheric fluoride. The photosynthesis of a strawberry deteriorated by 50% when the strawberry was exposed to 48 ppb hydrofluoric acid for one hour. The effect of fluoride on the respiratory organs of plants is also reported. Soy beans exposed to 0.03 ppm HF had metabolic abnormalities. The total sugar quantity of leaves decreased from 242-253 mg/100 g to 111-141 mg/100 g and the non-reduced sugar/reduced sugar ratio decreased from 4.6-8.7 to 0.8-1.6. 30 references, 3 figures, 14 tables.

  1. Purification method for calcium fluoride containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogami, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    Calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) containing uranium is heated in an electrolytic bath having a cathode and an anode to form a molten salt, and the molten salt is electrolytically reduced to form metal uranium deposited on the surface of the cathode. The calcium fluoride molten salt separated by the deposition of generated metal uranium on the surface of the cathode is solidified by cooling. The solidified calcium fluoride is recovered. When metal uranium is deposited on the surface of the cathode by the electrolytic reduction of the molten salt, impurities such as plutonium and neptunium are also deposited on the surface of the anodes entrained by the metal uranium. Impurities having high vapor pressures such as americium and strontium are evaporated and removed from the molten salts. Then, nuclides such as uranium can thus be separated and recovered, and residual CaF 2 can be recovered in a state easily storable and reutilizable. (T.M.)

  2. HOUSEHOLD PURIFICATION OF FLUORIDE CONTAMINATED MAGADI (TRONA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joan Maj; Dahi, Elian

    1997-01-01

    Purification of fluoride contaminated magadi is studied using bone char sorption and calcium precipitation. The bone char treatment is found to be workable both in columns and in batches where the magadi is dissolved in water prior to treatment. The concentrations in the solutions were 89 g magadi....../L and 95 and 400 mg F/L respectively in natural and synthetic solutions. The fluoride removal capacities observed were 4.6 mg F/g bone char for the column system and 2.7 mg F/g bone char for the batch system in case of synthetic magadi solution. It is however concluded that the batch system is the best...... treatment method. A procedure for purification of fluoride contaminated magadi at household level is described....

  3. Association between Urine Fluoride and Dental Fluorosis as a Toxicity Factor in a Rural Community in the State of San Luis Potosi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizet Jarquín-Yañez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate urine fluoride concentration as a toxicity factor in a rural community in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Materials and Methods. A sample of 111 children exposed to high concentrations of fluoride in drinking water (4.13 mg/L was evaluated. Fluoride exposure was determined by measuring urine fluoride concentration using the potentiometric method with an ion selective electrode. The diagnosis of dental fluorosis was performed by clinical examination, and the severity of damage was determined using Dean’s index and the Thylstrup-Fejerskov (TF index. Results. The range of exposure in the study population, evaluated through the fluoride content in urine, was 1.1 to 5.9 mg/L, with a mean of 3.14 ± 1.09 mg/L. Dental fluorosis was present in all subjects, of which 95% had severe cases. Higher urine fluoride levels and greater degrees of severity occurred in older children. Conclusions. The results show that dental fluorosis was determined by the presence of fluoride exposure finding a high positive correlation between the severity of fluorosis and urine fluoride concentration and the years of exposure suggested a cumulative effect.

  4. Association between urine fluoride and dental fluorosis as a toxicity factor in a rural community in the state of San Luis Potosi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarquín-Yañez, Lizet; de Jesús Mejía-Saavedra, José; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Gaona, Enrique; Rocha-Amador, Diana Olivia; López-Guzmán, Olga Dania; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate urine fluoride concentration as a toxicity factor in a rural community in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. A sample of 111 children exposed to high concentrations of fluoride in drinking water (4.13 mg/L) was evaluated. Fluoride exposure was determined by measuring urine fluoride concentration using the potentiometric method with an ion selective electrode. The diagnosis of dental fluorosis was performed by clinical examination, and the severity of damage was determined using Dean's index and the Thylstrup-Fejerskov (TF) index. The range of exposure in the study population, evaluated through the fluoride content in urine, was 1.1 to 5.9 mg/L, with a mean of 3.14±1.09 mg/L. Dental fluorosis was present in all subjects, of which 95% had severe cases. Higher urine fluoride levels and greater degrees of severity occurred in older children. The results show that dental fluorosis was determined by the presence of fluoride exposure finding a high positive correlation between the severity of fluorosis and urine fluoride concentration and the years of exposure suggested a cumulative effect.

  5. The effect of supplementation of calcium, vitamin D, boron, and increased fluoride intake on bone mechanical properties and metabolic hormones in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, G; Babaei, M; Naghii, Mohammad Reza; Mofid, M; Torkaman, G; Hedayati, M

    2014-04-01

    Evidence indicates that optimal nutrition plays a role in bone formation and maintenance. Besides major components of mineralization such as calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D, other nutrients like boron and fluoride have beneficial role, too. In this study, 34 male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: control diet, fluoride, fluoride + boron, fluoride + calcium + vitamin D, and fluoride + boron + calcium + vitamin D. Boron equal to 1.23 mg, calcium and vitamin D equal to 210 mg + 55 IU and fluoride equal to 0.7 mg/rat/day was added to their drinking water for 8 weeks. Plasma blood samples and bones were collected. Findings are evidence that fluoride + boron intake revealed significant positive effects on bone mechanical properties and bone metabolic hormones. These findings suggest that combined intake of these two elements has beneficial effects on bone stiffness and breaking strength comparing to even calcium + vitamin D supplementation. This evidence dealing with health problems related to bone and skeletal system in humans should justify further investigation of the role of boron and fluoride with other elements in relation to bone.

  6. Health effects of fluoride pollution caused by coal burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, M.; Tadano, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Tamura, K.; Chen, X. [Regional Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, 305-0083 Ibaraki (Japan); Asanuma, S. [Japan Institute of Rural Medicine, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Saku Central Hospital, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Kondo, T. [Matsumoto Dental College, Shiojiri, Nagano (Japan); Sakurai, S. [Otsuma Women' s University, Tama, Tokyo (Japan); Ji, R.; Liang, C.; Cao, S. [Institute of Environmental Health and Engineering, Beijing (China); Hong, Z. [Shanxi Maternity and Children' s Hospital, Taiyuan (China)

    2001-04-23

    Recently a huge amount of fluoride in coal has been released into indoor environments by the combustion of coal and fluoride pollution seems to be increasing in some rural areas in China. Combustion of coal and coal bricks is the primary source of gaseous and aerosol fluoride and these forms of fluoride can easily enter exposed food products and the human respiratory tract. Major human fluoride exposure was caused by consumption of fluoride contaminated food, such as corn, chilies and potatoes. For each diagnostic syndrome of dental fluorosis, a log-normal distribution was observed on the logarithm of urinary fluoride concentration in students in China. Urinary fluoride content was found to be a primary health indicator of the prevalence of dental fluorosis in the community. In the fluorosis areas, osteosclerosis in skeletal fluorosis patients was observed with a high prevalence. A biochemical marker of bone resorption, urinary deoxypyridinoline content was much higher in residents in China than in residents in Japan. It was suggested that bone resorption was stimulated to a greater extent in residents in China and fluoride may stimulate both bone resorption and bone formation. Renal function especially glomerular filtration rate was very sensitive to fluoride exposure. Inorganic phosphate concentrations in urine were significantly lower in the residents in fluorosis areas in China than in non-fluorosis area in China and Japan. Since airborne fluoride from the combustion of coal pollutes extensively both the living environment and food, it is necessary to reduce fluoride pollution caused by coal burning.

  7. Fluoride removal performance of phosphoric acid treated lime ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fluoride in drinking water above permissible levels is responsible for dental and skeletal fluorosis. In this study, removal of fluoride ions from water using phosphoric acid treated lime was investigated in continuous and point-of-use system operations. In the continuous column operations, fluoride removal performance was ...

  8. Fluoride removal from aqueous solution by pumice: case study on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fluoride removal from synthetic water by pumice was studied at batch experiments in this study. The effect of pH, contact time, fluoride concentration and adsorbent dose on the fluoride sequestration was investigated. The optimum conditions were studied on Kuhbonan water as a case study. The results showed that ...

  9. Coprecipitation of iron and silver with barium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopilova, N.V.; Khamidov, B.O.; Kashina, Z.A.; Ikrami, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    Distribution of trace contaminants of iron and silver at coprecipitation of barium fluoride is studied in present work. It is defined that iron almost completely coprecipitated with barium fluoride in wide range of ph 5.5-12. Silver coprecipitated with barium fluoride in ph range 4-7. The value of coprecipitation varies from 94% to 100%.

  10. Comparison of effects of diode laser and CO2 laser on human teeth and their usefulness in topical fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Alberto; de Dios López-González, Juan; del Castillo, Juan de Dios Luna; Villalba-Moreno, Juan

    2011-05-01

    Various authors have reported more effective fluoridation from the use of lasers combined with topical fluoride than from conventional topical fluoridation. Besides the beneficial effect of lasers in reducing the acid solubility of an enamel surface, they can also increase the uptake of fluoride. The study objectives were to compare the action of CO(2) and GaAlAs diode lasers on dental enamel and their effects on pulp temperature and enamel fluoride uptake. Different groups of selected enamel surfaces were treated with amine fluoride and irradiated with CO(2) laser at an energy power of 1 or 2 W or with diode laser at 5 or 7 W for 15 s each and compared to enamel surfaces without treatment or topical fluoridated. Samples were examined by means of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Surfaces of all enamel samples were then acid-etched, measuring the amount of fluoride deposited on the enamel by using a selective ion electrode. Other enamel surfaces selected under the same conditions were irradiated as described above, measuring the increase in pulp temperature with a thermocouple wire. Fluorination with CO(2) laser at 1 W and diode laser at 7 W produced a significantly greater fluoride uptake on enamel (89 ± 18 mg/l) and (77 ± 17 mg/l) versus topical fluoridation alone (58 ± 7 mg/l) and no treatment (20 ± 1 mg/l). Diode laser at 5 W produced a lesser alteration of the enamel surface compared to CO(2) laser at 1 W, but greater pulp safety was provided by CO(2) laser (ΔT° 1.60° ± 0.5) than by diode laser (ΔT° 3.16° ± 0.6). Diode laser at 7 W and CO(2) laser at 2 W both caused alterations on enamel surfaces, but great pulp safety was again obtained with CO(2) (ΔT° 4.44° ± 0.60) than with diode (ΔT° 5.25° ± 0.55). Our study demonstrates that CO(2) and diode laser irradiation of the enamel surface can both increase fluoride uptake; however, laser energy parameters must be carefully

  11. Radioactive kryptonates in the analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolgyessy, J.

    1986-01-01

    The term ''radioactive Kryptonates'' is used for substances into which atoms or ions of the radioactive nuclide 85 Kr are incorporated. The basis of the use of radioactive Kryptonates in analytical chemistry is that during a chemical reaction the crystalline lattice of the kryptonated carrier is destroyed, the carrier consumed, and the radioactive krypton released (radio-release method). Analysis can be made with a calibration curve or by comparison with a standard. Radio-release methods with the aid of radioactive Kryptonates as analytical reagents are very useful for the analysis of environmental samples, e.g. for the determination of air pollutants (ozone, sulphur dioxide, fluorine, hydrogen fluoride, mercury); and water pollutants (oxygen, dichromate, vanadium, hydrochloric acid, sulphur dioxide). (author)

  12. Fluoride-induced foliar injury in Solanum pseudo-capsicum: its induction in the dark and activation in the light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLean, D.C.; Schneider, R.C.; Weinstein, L.H.

    1982-09-01

    The differential responses of plants exposed to hydrogen fluoride (HF) in continuous light or darkness were investigated in Jerusalem cherry Solanum pseudo-capsicum L. Plants exposed to HF in the dark develop few, if any, foliar symptoms by the end of the exposure period, but severe foliar injury develops rapidly upon transfer to the light after exposure. The results suggest that light is required for the expression of responses induced by exposure to HF in the dark.

  13. Fluoride-induced foliar injury in Solanum pseudo-capsicum: its induction in the dark and activation in the light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLean, D.C.; Schneider, R.E.; Weinstein, L.H.

    1982-01-01

    The differential responses of plants exposed to hydrogen fluoride (HF) in continuous light or darkness were investigated in Jerusalem cherry Solanum pseudo-capsicum L. Plants exposed to HF in the dark develop few, if any, foliar symptoms by the end of the exposure period, but severe folia injury develops rapidly upon transfer to the light after exposure. The results suggest that light is required for the expression of responses induced by exposure to HF in the dark.

  14. Corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anie Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF representing acidic environments and fluoride treatments was studied. Material and Methods Zirconia rods were immersed in 1.23% and 0.123% APF solutions and maintained at 37°C for determined periods of time. Surfaces of all specimens were imaged using digital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Sample mass and dimensions were measured for mass loss determination. Samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD to detect changes in crystallinity. A biosensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was used to detect ion dissolution of material into the immersion media. Results Digital microscopy revealed diminishing luster of the materials and SEM showed increased superficial corrosion of zirconia submerged in 1.23% APF. Although no structural change was found, the absorption of salts (sodium phosphate onto the surface of the materials bathed in 0.123% APF was significant. EIS indicated a greater change of impedance for the immersion solutions with increasing bathing time. Conclusion Immersion of zirconia in APF solutions showed deterioration limited to the surface, not extending to the bulk of the material. Inferences on zirconia performance in acidic oral environment can be elucidated from the study.

  15. Hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  16. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  17. Seasonal Variation in Fluoride Content in Groundwaters of Langtang Area, Northcentral Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibal, H. U.; Dajilak, W. N.; Lekmang, I. C.; Nimze, L. W.; Yenne, E. Y.

    2017-06-01

    Thirty groundwater samples were collected at the peak of the rainy season and analysed for fluoride and other cations and anions in drinking water sources of Langtang area. For comparative purposes, thirty seven groundwater samples were collected in the dry season. The aim of the study was to determine variation in fluoride content with respect to the seasons. Fluoride in water was determined by the Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) and the cations by the Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The anion (sulphate) was determined by Multi - Ion Colorimeter, bicarbonate and chloride by titration method. In addition fluorine content in aquifer materials from a borehole section were determined by Fusion method. The two seasons show variation in content of fluoride in groundwater. Fluoride content in groundwater is higher in the dry season ranging from 0.13 - 10.3 mg/l compared to the 0.06 - 4.60 mg/l values in the rainy season. Content of fluorine (0.01 wt %) in the aquifer materials (sands) is low from depth of 0 to 7.95 m. However, fluorine content increases with depth, from 7.95 to 10.60 m with concentration of 0.04 wt %, 0.05 wt % from 10.60 to 13.25m, and 0.07 wt % from 13.25 to 15.70 m, the content of fluorine however, decreased at depth 15.70 to18.55m with concentration of 0.02 wt % even with fluorite mineral in the aquifer material at this depth. Dilution of fluoride ion as a result of rain input which recharges the aquifer may be the main reason for lower values recorded in the rainy season. Over fifty and sixty percent of waters in both dry and rainy season have fluoride concentration above the WHO upper limit of 1.5 mg/l. Consumption of these elevated values of fluoride in groundwater of the study area, clearly manifests as symptoms of dental fluorosis.

  18. Seasonal Variation in Fluoride Content in Groundwaters of Langtang Area, Northcentral Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibal H.U.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thirty groundwater samples were collected at the peak of the rainy season and analysed for fluoride and other cations and anions in drinking water sources of Langtang area. For comparative purposes, thirty seven groundwater samples were collected in the dry season. The aim of the study was to determine variation in fluoride content with respect to the seasons. Fluoride in water was determined by the Ion Selective Electrode (ISE and the cations by the Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES. The anion (sulphate was determined by Multi – Ion Colorimeter, bicarbonate and chloride by titration method. In addition fluorine content in aquifer materials from a borehole section were determined by Fusion method. The two seasons show variation in content of fluoride in groundwater. Fluoride content in groundwater is higher in the dry season ranging from 0.13 – 10.3 mg/l compared to the 0.06 – 4.60 mg/l values in the rainy season. Content of fluorine (0.01 wt % in the aquifer materials (sands is low from depth of 0 to 7.95 m. However, fluorine content increases with depth, from 7.95 to 10.60 m with concentration of 0.04 wt %, 0.05 wt % from 10.60 to 13.25m, and 0.07 wt % from 13.25 to 15.70 m, the content of fluorine however, decreased at depth 15.70 to18.55m with concentration of 0.02 wt % even with fluorite mineral in the aquifer material at this depth. Dilution of fluoride ion as a result of rain input which recharges the aquifer may be the main reason for lower values recorded in the rainy season. Over fifty and sixty percent of waters in both dry and rainy season have fluoride concentration above the WHO upper limit of 1.5 mg/l. Consumption of these elevated values of fluoride in groundwater of the study area, clearly manifests as symptoms of dental fluorosis.

  19. Comparative evaluation of fluoride release from PRG-composites and compomer on application of topical fluoride: An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhull K

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: To determine the fluoride release from Giomer and Compomer, using different topical fluoride regimes, and to compare the amount of fluoride release from giomer with that of compomer. Materials and Method: Forty-eight specimens of each giomer and compomer were divided into four treatment groups, namely, control group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm twice daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once daily + fluoridated mouthwash (225 ppm group. Each specimen was suspended in demineralizing solution for six hours and remineralizing solution for 18 hours. Fluoride release was measured in both the demineralizing solution and remineralizing solution daily for seven days. Total daily fluoride release for each specimen was calculated by adding the amount released in the demineralizing solution to that released in remineralizing solution. Results and Conclusion: The fluoride release (ppm was found to be more in Giomer when compared to Compomer. The fluoride released from Giomer and Compomer was significantly greater in the acidic demineralizing solution than in the neutral remineralizing solution. It was found that increasing fluoride exposure significantly increased fluoride release from the giomer and compomer. It was found that the fluoride release from the subgroups of giomer and compomer was in the following order: fluoridated dentifrice twice daily > fluoridated dentifrice once daily + fluoridated mouthwash > fluoridated dentifrice once daily > control group. It was found that the giomer showed a greater fluoride uptake than the compomer.

  20. Erosive potential of saliva stimulating tablets with and without fluoride in irradiated head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajer, Christel; Buchwald, Christian; Nauntofte, Birgitte; Specht, Lena; Bardow, Allan; Jensdottir, Thorbjoerg

    2009-01-01

    Background: Patients irradiated in the head and neck region often suffer from severe dry mouth and use acidic saliva stimulating products, which may cause erosion of teeth. Purpose: To determine saliva stimulating effects and erosive potential (EP) of acidic saliva stimulating tablets (Xerodent TM ) with and without fluoride in irradiated head and neck cancer patients. Materials and method: Nineteen irradiated patients (median age 57 years) sucked Xerodent TM tablets with and without fluoride. Saliva collections were divided into three 10-min sessions in the sequence: unstimulated whole saliva, Xerodent TM stimulated saliva without fluoride, and with fluoride. Saliva pH was determined without loss of CO 2 and in combination with inorganic measures used to calculate the degree of saturation of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and fluorapatite (FAp). EP was determined directly in all saliva samples by monitored dissolution of HAp crystals. Results: Saliva flow rates increased significantly (15-fold) when sucking both tablets (p TM with and without fluoride were evaluated as non-erosive, however, for additional caries protection the fluoride variant is preferable.

  1. Momentum distributions and ionization potentials for the valence orbitals of hydrogen fluoride and hydrogen chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brion, C.E.; Hood, S.T.; Suzuki, I.H.; Weigold, E.

    1980-02-01

    The binding energy spectra and momentum distributions for the valence orbitals of HF and HCl have been obtained using (e,2e) spectroscopy with symmetric kinematics at 1200eV and 400eV. For HCl the strength of the innermost valence orbital (4sigma) is found to be significantly split among several ion states in the range 25eV to 41eV. The corresponding orbital in HF (2sigma) is however not significantly split among ion states. The measured momentum distributions are compared with the results of several calculatons of at least double zeta quality as well as with a one particle Green's function calculation of the generalized overlap amplitude. Agreement in shape is quite good for the innermost orbitals, but for the π and outer sigma orbitals of HF the momentum distributions calculated directly from the molecular orbitals are significantly more extended in momentum space than the measured distributions. The Green's function calculations give momentum distributions in good agreement with the data and pole strengths for transitions in qualitative agreement with the observed cross sections

  2. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Benard, P.

    2000-05-01

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  3. Hydrogeochemical framework and factor analysis of fluoride contamination in Groundwater within the Savelugu-Nanton District, Northern Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, Collins K.

    2017-01-01

    Fluoride contamination of groundwater within the Savelugu-Nanton District was assessed using hydrogeochemical framework and multivariate statistical approach. Eighty-one (No) boreholes were sampled for quality assessment in May and June 2008. The main objective of this study was to assess the fluoride levels in groundwater and delineate areas of low fluoride and high fluoride within the district. The study show that, 41.9% of the boreholes are within the safe limits of 0.5 –1.5 mg/L of fluoride for the protection of bones and teeth, 43.2% of the boreholes have fluoride levels below the lower safe limit (< 0.5 mg/L) and therefore vulnerable to dental caries, 10.8% of the boreholes have fluoride levels between 1.5 and 3.0 mg/Land therefore vulnerable to dental fluorosis and 4.1% of the boreholes have fluoride levels between 3.0 and 10 mg/L and therefore vulnerable to skeletal fluorosis. The results further show that, 14.9% of groundwater requires defluoridation, while, 43.2% of groundwater requires fluoride addition to the groundwaters. PCA using Varimax with Kaiser Normalization results in the extraction of three main principal components which delineates the factors that influence the principal components of the physico-chemical parameters. The three principal components have accounted for approximately 83% of the total variance. Component 1 delineates the main natural processes through which groundwater within the basin acquire its chemical characteristics. Component 2 delineates pollution sources principally fluoride and nitrate. Component 3 suggests mineralogical influence of fluoride with some major ions on the chemistry of groundwater. The loadings and score plots of the first two PCs which explains 71.52% of the total variance show grouping pattern which indicates the strength of the mutual relation amongst the hydrochemical variables. Biological defluoridation though not very well understood, is recommended as a best alternative to the conventional methods

  4. Review on fluoride-releasing restorative materials--fluoride release and uptake characteristics, antibacterial activity and influence on caries formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Annette; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Attin, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the fluoride release and recharge capabilities, and antibacterial properties, of fluoride-releasing dental restoratives, and discuss the current status concerning the prevention or inhibition of caries development and progression. Information from original scientific full papers or reviews listed in PubMed (search term: fluoride release AND (restorative OR glass-ionomer OR compomer OR polyacid-modified composite resin OR composite OR amalgam)), published from 1980 to 2004, was included in the review. Papers dealing with endodontic or orthodontic topics were not taken into consideration. Clinical studies concerning secondary caries development were only included when performed in split-mouth design with an observation period of at least three years. Fluoride-containing dental materials show clear differences in the fluoride release and uptake characteristics. Short- and long-term fluoride releases from restoratives are related to their matrices, setting mechanisms and fluoride content and depend on several environmental conditions. Fluoride-releasing materials may act as a fluoride reservoir and may increase the fluoride level in saliva, plaque and dental hard tissues. However, clinical studies exhibited conflicting data as to whether or not these materials significantly prevent or inhibit secondary caries and affect the growth of caries-associated bacteria compared to non-fluoridated restoratives. Fluoride release and uptake characteristics depend on the matrices, fillers and fluoride content as well as on the setting mechanisms and environmental conditions of the restoratives. Fluoride-releasing materials, predominantly glass-ionomers and compomers, did show cariostatic properties and may affect bacterial metabolism under simulated cariogenic conditions in vitro. However, it is not proven by prospective clinical studies whether the incidence of secondary caries can be significantly reduced by the fluoride release of

  5. Determination of Th and REE in columbite - tantalite samples by ICP-OES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanuman, V.V.; Khorge, C.R.; Radhamai, R.; Nair, Sajitha; Srivastava, P.K.

    2007-01-01

    A simple method of decomposition and separation of Th and REE in columbite- tantalite is developed for determination by ICP- OES. The sample is decomposed with hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acid in presence of little sulphuric acid to avoid drying on water bath. Th and rare earths are separated as fluoride together with undecomposed sample. The residue is fused with a 1: 1 mixture of sodium di hydrogen orthophosphate and sodium pyrophosphate. The melt is dissolved in water for measurement. Nitric acid is found unsuitable due to loss in Ce in some of the samples. Matrix elements (more than 97.5) are removed in single step by both the treatments. The free cassiterite present in samples is not attacked during acid digestion. However, the same is easily decomposed in fusion. U (IV) is also precipitated along with Th and REE when hydrochloric acid is used. As expected uranium is lost when nitric acid is used. The results are compared with existing well-established procedure involving peroxide fusion for decomposition; hydroxide and fluoride precipitation separation. Both the methods yielded comparable result. The method is simple, comparatively rapid and suitable for routine application for determination of REE , Th and U(IV) content. The RSD of the method was found to be in the range of 1- 1.5% for various elements. (author)

  6. EPR-spin probe studies of model polymers: separation of covalent cross-linking effects from hydrogen bonding effects in swelled Argonne Premium Coal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears, D.R.; Sady, W.; Tucker, D.; Kispert, L.D. (University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States). Chemistry Dept.)

    The swelling behaviour of 2-12% cross-linked polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PSDVB) copolymers was examined by an EPR-spin probe technique. It was observed that the mechanism of spin probe inclusion was the intercalation into the matrix rather than diffusion into the pores. The disruption of van der Waals forces between adjacent aromatic rings appeared to be the primary mechanism for pyridine swelling of PSDVB. By comparing the data to results from coal swelling studies it was also inferred that the extent of hydrogen bonding in coal will have a much greater impact on its swelling properties than its covalently cross-linked character. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Prenatal Fluoride Exposure and Cognitive Outcomes in Children at 4 and 6-12 Years of Age in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashash, Morteza; Thomas, Deena; Hu, Howard; Martinez-Mier, E Angeles; Sanchez, Brisa N; Basu, Niladri; Peterson, Karen E; Ettinger, Adrienne S; Wright, Robert; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Yun; Schnaas, Lourdes; Mercado-García, Adriana; Téllez-Rojo, Martha María; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio

    2017-09-19

    Some evidence suggests that fluoride may be neurotoxic to children. Few of the epidemiologic studies have been longitudinal, had individual measures of fluoride exposure, addressed the impact of prenatal exposures or involved more than 100 participants. Our aim was to estimate the association of prenatal exposure to fluoride with offspring neurocognitive development. We studied participants from the Early Life Exposures in Mexico to Environmental Toxicants (ELEMENT) project. An ion-selective electrode technique was used to measure fluoride in archived urine samples taken from mothers during pregnancy and from their children when 6-12 y old, adjusted for urinary creatinine and specific gravity, respectively. Child intelligence was measured by the General Cognitive Index (GCI) of the McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities at age 4 and full scale intelligence quotient (IQ) from the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) at age 6-12. We had complete data on 299 mother-child pairs, of whom 287 and 211 had data for the GCI and IQ analyses, respectively. Mean (SD) values for urinary fluoride in all of the mothers (n=299) and children with available urine samples (n=211) were 0.90 (0.35) mg/L and 0.82 (0.38) mg/L, respectively. In multivariate models we found that an increase in maternal urine fluoride of 0.5mg/L (approximately the IQR) predicted 3.15 (95% CI: -5.42, -0.87) and 2.50 (95% CI -4.12, -0.59) lower offspring GCI and IQ scores, respectively. In this study, higher prenatal fluoride exposure, in the general range of exposures reported for other general population samples of pregnant women and nonpregnant adults, was associated with lower scores on tests of cognitive function in the offspring at age 4 and 6-12 y. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP655.

  8. Preparation and properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride nanocomposites blended with graphene oxide coated silica hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Fu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide coated silica hybirds (SiO2-GO were fabricated through electrostatic assembly in this work, then blended with poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF by solution mixing to make PVDF nanocomposites. The interfacial interaction was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, polarized optical microscopy (POM and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The results showed that the interfacial interaction was enhanced by adding of SiO2-GO and strong hydrogen bonds were observed. The as-made nanocomposites were investigated using standard tensile test and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA measurements, mechanical properties of PVDF with SiO2-GO hybrids showed limited improvement.

  9. Design and performance of a lead fluoride detector as a luminosity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez Benito, R.; Khaneft, D.; O'Connor, C.; Capozza, L.; Diefenbach, J.; Gläser, B.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.E.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D.

    2016-01-01

    Precise luminosity measurements for the OLYMPUS two-photon exchange experiment at DESY were performed by counting scattering events with alternating beams of electrons and positrons incident on atomic electrons in a gaseous hydrogen target. Final products of Møller, Bhabha, and pair annihilation interactions were observed using a pair of lead fluoride Cherenkov calorimeters with custom housings and electronics, adapted from a system used by the A4 parity violation experiment at MAMI. This paper describes the design, calibration, and operation of these detectors. An explanation of the Monte Carlo methods used to simulate the physical processes involved both at the scattering vertices and in the detector apparatus is also included.

  10. Design and performance of a lead fluoride detector as a luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Benito, R.; Khaneft, D. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (Germany); O' Connor, C., E-mail: colton@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Capozza, L. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (Germany); Diefenbach, J. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Gläser, B.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.E.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    Precise luminosity measurements for the OLYMPUS two-photon exchange experiment at DESY were performed by counting scattering events with alternating beams of electrons and positrons incident on atomic electrons in a gaseous hydrogen target. Final products of Møller, Bhabha, and pair annihilation interactions were observed using a pair of lead fluoride Cherenkov calorimeters with custom housings and electronics, adapted from a system used by the A4 parity violation experiment at MAMI. This paper describes the design, calibration, and operation of these detectors. An explanation of the Monte Carlo methods used to simulate the physical processes involved both at the scattering vertices and in the detector apparatus is also included.

  11. FLUORIDE CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE SOY MILK PRODUCTS IN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rirattanapong, Opas; Rirattanapong, Praphasri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In Thailand, the consumption of soy milk products is common but there is limited data about their fluoride content. The purpose of this study was to es- timate the fluoride content of soy milk products available in Thailand. Fluoride content was determined for 76 brands of soy milk using a F-ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.78 μg/ml. The fluoride content was not related to sugar content, soy bean content or the sterilization process. Among 3 brands of soy milk containing tea powder extract, the fluoride content was high (1.25 to 3.78 μg/ml). Most brands of soy milk tested in our study had fluoride content below the optimal daily intake but brands containing tea powder extract if consumed by children may increase their risk for fluorosis.

  12. New Insight on the Response of Bacteria to Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    Fluoride has been used for decades to prevent caries and it is well established that this anion can inhibit the growth of bacteria. However, the precise effects that fluoride has on bacteria and the mechanisms that bacteria use to overcome fluoride toxicity have largely remained unexplored. Recently, my laboratory reported the discovery of biological systems that bacteria use to sense fluoride and reduce fluoride toxicity. These sensors and their associated genes are very widespread in biology, which has implications for a number of issues that are central to the use of fluoride for dental care. Below I provide a summary of our findings, comment on some of the key prospects for expanding our understanding of fluoride's effects on biology, and propose some future uses of this knowledge. PMID:22327376

  13. New insight on the response of bacteria to fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, R R

    2012-01-01

    Fluoride has been used for decades to prevent caries and it is well established that this anion can inhibit the growth of bacteria. However, the precise effects that fluoride has on bacteria and the mechanisms that bacteria use to overcome fluoride toxicity have largely remained unexplored. Recently, my laboratory reported the discovery of biological systems that bacteria use to sense fluoride and reduce fluoride toxicity. These sensors and their associated genes are very widespread in biology, which has implications for a number of issues that are central to the use of fluoride for dental care. Below I provide a summary of our findings, comment on some of the key prospects for expanding our understanding of fluoride's effects on biology, and propose some future uses of this knowledge. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Adverse effects of fluoride towards thyroid hormone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enggar Abdullah Idris MZ

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An easily ionized fluoride compound like Sodium Fluoride (NaF has been used thus far as a dental caries prevention substance. However, fluoride ions also have a negative effect because it is very toxic. Several types of research on the effect of fluoride on guinea pigs and human beings indicate the presence synthesis obstruction of T3 and T4 that causes declined production, known as hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism condition may obstruct tissue growth process and metabolism so as to impact various body organ systems. Preventive efforts against hypothyroidism caused by fluoride include avoiding diffusible fluoride compound intake, like NaF, in a long run systemic use, whereas efforts to overcome fluoride intoxication include consuming food that is rich in calcium, vitamin D, and antioxidant.

  15. Fluoride concentration in urine after silver diamine fluoride application on tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, D. L.; Bahar, A.; Gunawan, H. A.; Adiatman, M.; Rahardjo, A.; Maharani, D. A.; Toptanci, I. R.; Yavuz, I.

    2017-08-01

    Silver Diammine Fluoride (SDF), which contains fluoride, is known to inhibit tooth enamel demineralization and increase fluoride concentrations in saliva and urine. The aim of this study is to analyze the fluoride concentration in urine after application of SDF on tooth enamel. Urine from four subjects was collected prior to, 30 minutes after, and two and three hours after the application of SDF, and an ion-selective electrode was used to measure the fluoride concentrations. There was no significant difference between time 1 and time 2, time 1 and time 3, time 1 and time 4, time 2 and 3 (p > 0.05), and there was a significant difference between time 2 and time 4 as well as time 3 and time 4 (p < 0.05). There was a decrease in the concentration of fluoride ions in urine from the baseline to 30 minutes after application, and an increase from baseline to two and three hours after the application of SDF.

  16. Unconventional fluoride conversion coating preparation and characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drábiková, J.; Fintová, Stanislava; Tkacz, J.; Doležal, P.; Wasserbauer, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2017), s. 613-619 ISSN 0003-5599 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : fluoride conversion coating * magnesium * corrosion Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 0.364, year: 2016 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/ACMM-02-2017-1757

  17. Diffusion of fluoride in bovine enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flim, G.J.; Arends, J.; Kolar, Z.

    1976-01-01

    The uptake of 18 F and the penetration of both F and 18 F in bovine enamel was investigated. Sodium fluoride solutions buffered at pH 7 were employed. The uptake of 18 F was measured by a method described by R. Duckworth and M. Braden, Archs. Oral. Biol., 12(1967), pp. 217-230. The penetration concentration profiles of fluoride (F, 18 F) in the enamel were measured by a sectioning technique. The 18 F uptake in enamel was proportional to approximately tsup(3/4); t being the uptake time. The 18 F concentration as a function of the position in the enamel can be described by: c*(x,t) = c 0 *(t)exp[-α*(t)x]. After correction for the initial fluoride concentration in enamel, for unlabelled fluoride the same dependency is obtained. A model based on simultaneous diffusion and chemical reaction in the pores and diffusion into the hydroxyapatite crystallites will be presented. The results show that diffusion coefficients of the pores are approximately equal to 10 -10 cm 2 s -1 and in the apatite crystallites approximately equal to 10 -17 cm 2 s -1 . The limitations and the approximations of the model are discussed

  18. CORRELATION AMONG FLUORIDE AND METALS IN IRRIGATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    The levels of fluoride and selected metals in Ethiopian Rift Valley soils and irrigation water in the nearby sources were ... exhaust fumes, process waters and waste from various industrial processes [1]. The uses of ... into four sub-systems: Lake Rudolf, Chew Bahir, the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) and the Afar. The seismically ...

  19. Uranium fluorides analysis. Titanium spectrophotometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Titanium determination in uranium hexafluoride in the range 0.7 to 100 microgrammes after transformation of uranium fluoride in sulfate. Titanium is separated by extraction with N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine, reextracted by hydrochloric-hydrofluoric acid. The complex titanium-N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine is extracted by chloroform. Spectrophotometric determination at 400 nm [fr

  20. Polyvinylidene fluoride film as a capacitor dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dematos, H. V.

    1981-01-01

    Thin strips of polyvinylidene fluoride film (PVDF) with vacuum deposited electrodes were made into capacitors by conventional winding and fabrication techniques. These devices were used to identify and evaluate the performance characteristics offered by the PVDF in metallized film capacitors. Variations in capacitor parameters with temperature and frequence were evaluated and compared with other dielectric films. Their impact on capacitor applications is discussed.