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Sample records for hydrogen exchange kinetics

  1. Kinetics of hydrogen isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, V.; McAdam, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    Under the influence of tritium β-radiation, 1,4-dioxan undergoes hydrogen exchange with the solvent water. The inhibition of the reaction by known electron scavengers (Ag + , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Zn 2+ , H 3 + O) and also by species with high reactivity towards hydroxyl radicals but negligible reactivity towards solvated electrons (N 3 - , Br - , SCN - ) has been examined in detail. γ-irradiation similarly induces hydrogen exchange. The action of scavengers is interpreted as requiring the involvement of two separately scavengeable primary radiolysis products in the sequence of reactions leading to exchange. The presence of electron scavengers, even at high concentration, does not totally inhibit the exchange, and a secondary exchange route, involving a low vacancy state of inhibitor cations, is considered responsible for the 'unscavengeable' portion of the reaction, by providing an alternative exchange route. Analogies are drawn between the exchange reaction and other radiation-induced reactions that are thought to involve spur processes. Some implication of radiation-chemical studies in water-alcohol mixtures are indicated. (author)

  2. Equilibrium amide hydrogen exchange and protein folding kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yawen

    1999-01-01

    The classical Linderstrom-Lang hydrogen exchange (HX) model is extended to describe the relationship between the HX behaviors (EX1 and EX2) and protein folding kinetics for the amide protons that can only exchange by global unfolding in a three-state system including native (N), intermediate (I), and unfolded (U) states. For these slowly exchanging amide protons, it is shown that the existence of an intermediate (I) has no effect on the HX behavior in an off-pathway three-state system (I↔U↔N). On the other hand, in an on-pathway three-state system (U↔I↔N), the existence of a stable folding intermediate has profound effect on the HX behavior. It is shown that fast refolding from the unfolded state to the stable intermediate state alone does not guarantee EX2 behavior. The rate of refolding from the intermediate state to the native state also plays a crucial role in determining whether EX1 or EX2 behavior should occur. This is mainly due to the fact that only amide protons in the native state are observed in the hydrogen exchange experiment. These new concepts suggest that caution needs to be taken if one tries to derive the kinetic events of protein folding from equilibrium hydrogen exchange experiments

  3. Hydrogen exchange kinetics changes upon formation of the soybean trypsin inhibitor: trypsin complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, C.K.; Ellis, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The hydrogen exchange kinetics of the complex of trypsin--soybean trypsin inhibitor (Kunitz) have been compared to the calculated sum of the exchange kinetics for the inhibitor and trypsin measured separately. The exchange rates observed for the complex are substantially less than the sum of the exchange rates in the two individual proteins. These results cannot be accounted for by changes in intermolecular or intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The decrease in exchange rates in the complex are ascribed to changes in solvent accessibility in the component proteins. (U.S.)

  4. Kinetics of tritium isotope exchange between liquid pyrrole and gaseous hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolarz, A.

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of tritium isotope exchange between liquid pyrrole and gaseous hydrogen has been studied over the temperature range of 290-303 K. The reaction was carried out in the presence of platinum black but in spite of that, it appeared to be relatively slow. The kinetics of the exchange reaction studied could be described by the simple McKay equation. The results obtained suggest that diffusion is the rate-determining step. A mechanism of exchange is proposed. (author) 10 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  5. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  6. Proton NMR investigation of heme pocket mobility in hemoglobin via hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic mobility of heme cavity, the active site of Hb, was investigated by analyzing the hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of the proximal histidyl ring NH of various kinds of Hbs with the aid of the high field Fourier Transform 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The exchange reaction occurs faster in oxy or R-state Hb than in deoxy or T-state Hb and there exists a good correlation between the oxygen affinity of Hb and the heme pocket mobility reflected in the hydrogen exchange rate. The effect of pH on the exchange is dramatically different for the two subunits of Hb A. Studying the exchange characteristics of mutant Hbs and chemically modified Hbs not only showed the existence of three well-defined localized paths for transmission of conformational changes between different heme pockets through a 1 b 2 subunit interface, but also indicated that the heme pocket mobility is regulated by the quaternary state of Hb as well as by the ligation state of Hb. Finally, the effect of the quaternary state on the heme pocket mobility is separated from that of the ligation by following the exchange reactions in Hbs where only their quaternary structure transition can be achieved without changing their ligation states by adjusting experimental conditions such as adding inositol hexaphosphate

  7. Time-resolved pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry probes gaseous proteins structural kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    A pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) method has been developed for rapid monitoring of the exchange kinetics of protein ions with D2O a few milliseconds after electrospray ionization (ESI). The stepwise gradual evolution of HDX of multiply charged protein ions was monitored using the pulsed HDX mass spectrometry technique. Upon introducing a very short pulse of D2O (in the μs to ms time scale) into the linear ion trap (LIT) of a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, bimodal distributions were detected for the ions of cytochrome c and ubiquitin. Mechanistic details of HDX reactions for ubiquitin and cytochrome c in the gas phase were uncovered and the structural transitions were followed by analyzing the kinetics of HDX.

  8. Kinetics of isotopic exchange of [1-3H]saccharides with hydrogen using palladium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Kayumov, V.G.; Snetkova, E.V.; Kaminskij, Yu.L.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics was studied of the isotopic exchange of [1- 3 H]saccharides with hydrogen on palladium catalysts. The effect was studied of different factors on the rate of isotopic exchange, e.g., of the composition and structure of saccharides, their concentration in the solution (C), the type of catalyst and of the buffer solution. It was found that by reduced rate of isotopic exchange with hydrogen, all studied saccharides may be arranged into a series independent of the type of catalyst in accordance with the sequence of declining coefficient of relative mobility of l-H atoms during the reaction. Linear dependence was found to exist between the rate constant of the isotopic exchange reaction (r) and the coefficient of relative lability. It was also found that in the range of low concentrations the observed rate constants of isotopic exchange were not dependent on concentration and in the range of higher concentrations, r decreased with increasing C. This character of dependence is justified by the side effect of the processes of sorption on the catalyst. (author). 3 figs., 1 tab., 4 refs

  9. Real-time hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics via supercharged electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Harry J; Williams, Evan R

    2010-11-01

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) rate constants of bovine ubiquitin in an ammonium acetate solution containing 1% of the electrospray ionization (ESI) "supercharging" reagent m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) were obtained using top-down, electron transfer dissociation (ETD) tandem mass spectrometry (MS). The supercharging reagent replaces the acid and temperature "quench" step in the conventional MS approach to HDX experiments by causing rapid protein denaturation to occur in the ESI droplet. The higher charge state ions that are produced with m-NBA are more unfolded, as measured by ion mobility, and result in higher fragmentation efficiency and higher sequence coverage with ETD. Single amino acid resolution was obtained for 44 of 72 exchangeable amide sites, and summed kinetic data were obtained for regions of the protein where adjacent fragment ions were not observed, resulting in an overall spatial resolution of 1.3 residues. Comparison of these results with previous values from NMR indicates that the supercharging reagent does not cause significant structural changes to the protein in the initial ESI solution and that scrambling or back-exchange is minimal. This new method for top-down HDX-MS enables real-time kinetic data measurements under physiological conditions, similar to those obtained using NMR, with comparable spatial resolution and significantly better sensitivity.

  10. Study of hydrogen mobility by hydrogen-deuterium exchange. II. Theoretical kinetic study in alkyl and amino-alkyl pyrimidines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pompon, Alain

    1975-01-01

    Alkyl groups bound to the pyrimidine ring can be deuterium substituted on the carbon adjacent to the ring, in acidic D 2 O; kinetic equations corresponding to various exchange mechanism hypothesis are established. It is shown that theoretical and experimental results can be compared in order to precise the mechanism and to measure the characteristic parameters of the exchange reaction [fr

  11. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D[subscript 2]O and a catalytic amount of H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4]. The resulting labeled product is characterized by [superscript 1]H NMR. Students also…

  12. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H](4+) ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å(2) and 446 Å(2); the [M + 3H](3+) ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å(2) and 367 Å(2). Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H](3+) ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H](4+) ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H](4+) ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  13. Site-Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Propane: Mass spectrometric methods, equilibrium temperature dependence, and kinetics of exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Ponton, C.; Kitchen, N.; Lloyd, M. K.; Lawson, M.; Formolo, M. J.; Eiler, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Intramolecular isotope ordering can constrain temperatures of synthesis, mechanisms of formation, and/or source substrates of organic compounds. Here we explore site-specific hydrogen isotope variations of propane. Statistical thermodynamic models predict that at equilibrium methylene hydrogen (-CH2-) in propane will be 10's of per mil higher in D/H ratio than methyl hydrogen (-CH3) at geologically relevant temperatures, and that this difference is highly temperature dependent ( 0.5-1 ‰/°C). Chemical-kinetic controls on site-specific D/H in propane could constrain the mechanisms, conditions and extents of propane synthesis or destruction. We have developed a method for measuring the difference in D/H ratio between methylene and methyl hydrogen in propane by gas source mass spectrometry. The data were measured using the Thermo Fisher Double Focusing Sector high resolution mass spectrometer (DFS), and involve comparison of the D/H ratios of molecular ion (C3H8+) and the ethyl fragmental ion (C2H5+). We demonstrate the accuracy and precision of this method through analysis of D-labeled and independently analyzed propanes. In the exchange experiments, propane was heated (100-200 oC) either alone or in the presence of D-enriched water (δD=1,1419 ‰ SMOW), with or without one of several potentially catalytic substrates for hours to weeks. Propane was found to exchange hydrogen with water vigorously at 200 °C in the presence of metal catalysts. In the presence of Ni catalyst, methylene hydrogen exchanges 2.5 times faster than methyl hydrogen. Hydrogen exchange in the presence of Pd catalyst is more effective and can equilibrate hydrogen isotope distribution on propane on the order of 7 days. Isotopic exchange in the presence of natural materials have also been tested, but is only measurable in the methylene group at 200 °C. High catalytic activity of Pd permits attainment of a bracketed, time-invariant equilibrium state that we use to calibrate the site

  14. Kinetics of solid-phase in ion exchange on tin hydrogen phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kislitsyn, M.N.; Ketsko, V.A.; Yaroslavtsev, A.B.

    2004-01-01

    Solid state reactions in mixture of tin hydrogen phosphate and alkali metal (M=Na, K, Cs) chlorides have been studied both in the mode of polythermal heating and at a fixed temperature, using data of X-ray phase and thermogravimetric analyses. In the range 400-750 Deg C solid state ion exchange reactions occur in the systems studied and yield mono-- and dialkali phosphates MHSn(PO 4 ) 2 and M 2 Sn(PO 4 ) 2 . Counter diffusion coefficients for alkali metal cations and protons in the matrices of compositions MHSn(PO 4 ) 2 and M 2 Sn(PO 4 ) 2 have been determined [ru

  15. Kinetics of exchange between zero-, one-, and two-hydrogen-bonded states of methyl and ethyl acetate in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuntonov, Lev; Pazos, Ileana M; Ma, Jianqiang; Gai, Feng

    2015-03-26

    It has recently been shown that the ester carbonyl stretching vibration can be used as a sensitive probe of local electrostatic field in molecular systems. To further characterize this vibrational probe and extend its potential applications, we studied the kinetics of chemical exchange between differently hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) ester carbonyl groups of methyl acetate (MA) and ethyl acetate (EA) in methanol. We found that, while both MA and EA can form zero, one, or two H-bonds with the solvent, the population of the 2hb state in MA is significantly smaller than that in EA. Using a combination of linear and nonlinear infrared measurements and numerical simulations, we further determined the rate constants for the exchange between these differently H-bonded states. We found that for MA the chemical exchange reaction between the two dominant states (i.e., 0hb and 1hb states) has a relaxation rate constant of 0.14 ps(-1), whereas for EA the three-state chemical exchange reaction occurs in a predominantly sequential manner with the following relaxation rate constants: 0.11 ps(-1) for exchange between 0hb and 1hb states and 0.12 ps(-1) for exchange between 1hb and 2hb states.

  16. The kinetics of tritium-hydrogen exchange in xanthosine, theobromine and monomethylated derivatives of xanthine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinska, M.; Szydlowski, J.; Sobkowski, J.

    1979-01-01

    Tritium exchange at C-8 of xanthosine, theobromine, 1-, 3-and 7-methylxanthine in water has been studied. The rates of detritiation of these compounds have been determined over a pH range at constant temperature. Several mechanisms of exchange involving various ionic forms of substrate operating at different pH have been suggested. (author)

  17. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Leland

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) methods can reveal much about the structure, energetics, and dynamics of proteins. The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) to an earlier fragmentation-separation HX analysis now extends HX studies to larger proteins at high structural resolution and can provide information not available before. This chapter discusses experimental aspects of HX labeling, especially with respect to the use of MS and the analysis of MS data. PMID:26791986

  18. Hydrogen-exchange kinetics of the indole NH proton of the buried tryptophan in the constant fragment of the immunoglobulin light chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Y.; Goto, Y.; Hamaguchi, K.; Hayashi, F.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kyogoku, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The constant fragment of the immunoglobulin light chain (type λ) has two trytophyl residues at positions 150 and 187. Trp-150 is buried in the interior, and Trp-187 lies on the surface of the molecule. The hydrogen-deuterium exchange kinetics of the indole NH proton Trp-150 were studied at various pH values at 25 0 C by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance. Exchange rates were approximately first order in hydroxyl ion dependence above pH 8, were relatively independent of pH between pH 7 and 8, and decreased below pH 7. On the assumption that the exchange above pH 8 proceeds through local fluctuations of the protein molecule, the exchange rates between pH 7 and 8 through global unfolding were estimated. The exchange rate constant within this pH range at 25 0 C thus estimated was consistent with that of the global unfolding of the constant fragment under the same conditions as those reported previously. The activation energy for the exchange process at pH 7.8 was the same as that for the unfolding process by 2 M guanidine hydrochloride. The exchange rates of backbone NH protons were almost the same as that of the indole NH proton of Trp-150 at pH 7.l. These observations also indicated that the exchange between pH 7 and 8 occurs through global unfolding of the protein molecule and is rate-limited by the unfolding. At around pH 9, on the other hand, the activation energy for the exchange process of the indole NH proton of Trp-150 was smaller than that for the unfolding process, and the exchange rates differed according to the different signals of backbone NH protons. These findings together with the pH dependence of the rate constant indicated that exchange due to local fluctuations is predominant above pH 8

  19. Quasiclassical trajectory study of the molecular beam kinetics of the deuterium atom--hydrogen halide exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raff, L.M.; Suzukawa, H.H. Jr.; Thompson, D.L.

    1975-01-01

    Unadjusted quasiclassical trajectory computations have been carried out to simulate the molecular beam scattering of thermal D atom beams at 2800 degreeK crossed with beams of HCl and HI at 250 degreeK. Total reaction cross sections, energy partitioning distributions, and differential scattering cross sections have been computed for the exchange reactions D+HCl → DCl+H and D+HI → DI+H while total reaction cross sections are reported for the corresponding abstractions, i.e., D+HCl → HD+Cl and D+HI → HD+I. For the exchange reactions, the computed reaction cross sections are within the range estimated from the crossed beam experiments. The calculated average energy partitioned into relative translational motion of products is in near quantitative agreement with the beam results, and the predicted differential scattering cross sections appear to be in qualitative accord with the beam experiments. The over-all agreement between theory and experiment indicates that previously computed values for the thermal rate coefficients for the exchange reactions are of the right order and that a systematic error exists in the interpretation of photolysis data in the hydrogen--hydrogen halide systems

  20. Catalysed hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    A method is described for enhancing the rate of exchange of hydrogen atoms in organic compounds or moieties with deuterium or tritium atoms. It comprises reacting the organic compound or moiety and a compound which is the source of deuterium or tritium in the presence of a catalyst consisting of a non-metallic, metallic or organometallic halide of Lewis acid character and which is reactive towards water, hydrogen halides or similar protonic acids. The catalyst is a halide or organometallic halide of: (i) zinc or another element of Group IIb; (ii) boron, aluminium or another element of Group III; (iii) tin, lead, antimony or another element of Groups IV to VI; or (iv) a transition metal, lanthanide or stable actinide; or a halohalide. (author)

  1. Kinetics of liquid-phase catalytic heterogeneous protium-tritium isotope exchange with participation of gaseous hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Snetkova, E.V.; Kayumov, V.G.; Kaminskij, Yu.L.

    1990-01-01

    Reaction rate constants of catalytic (PdO/BaSO 4 (Al 2 O 3 ) catalyst) heterogeneous protium - tritium isotopic exchange D - [1- 3 H] of carbohydrates and gaseous oxygen have been measured. It is ascertained that the rate of isotopic exchange depends on the nature of carbohydrate, catalyst, buffer and medium acidity. The value of concentration of carbohydrate acyclic forms plays the determining role in the process

  2. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S. G.; Roberts, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst

  3. NMR studies of the influence of dodecyl sulfate on the amide hydrogen exchange kinetics of a micelle-solubilized hydrophobic tripeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, J.D.J.; Sykes, B.D.

    1989-01-01

    Backbone amide hydrogen exchange measurements are an important source of information about the internal dynamics of proteins. Before such measurements can be interpreted unambiguously, contributions to hydrogen exchange rates from the chemical and physical environment of the amides must be taken into account. Membrane proteins are often solubilized in detergents, yet there have not been any systematic investigations of the possible effects detergents may have on the amide hydrogen exchange rates of proteins. To address this question, the authors have measured individual backbone and carboxyl-terminal amide exchange rates for the amphipathic tripeptide Leu-Val-Ile-amide dissolved in water and dodecyl sulfate micelles. Proton NMR spectroscopy was used to measure exchange using the direct exchange-out into D 2 O technique at 5 degree C and using an indirect steady-state saturation-transfer technique at 25 degree C. The broadening effect of micelle-incorporated spin-labeled fatty acid (12-doxylsterate) on the 1 H NMR spectra of both the detergent and the peptide resonances was used to demonstrate that the tripeptide is intimately associated with the micelle. These experiments help to explain the elevated pH min observed for backbone amides in the sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilized M13 coat protein

  4. Trends in the exchange current for hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Bligaard, Thomas; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2005-01-01

    A density functional theory database of hydrogen chemisorption energies on close packed surfaces of a number of transition and noble metals is presented. The bond energies are used to understand the trends in the exchange current for hydrogen evolution. A volcano curve is obtained when measured...... exchange currents are plotted as a function of the calculated hydrogen adsorption energies and a simple kinetic model is developed to understand the origin of the volcano. The volcano curve is also consistent with Pt being the most efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution. (c) 2005...

  5. Hydrogen exchange kinetics in a membrane protein determined by 15N NMR spectroscopy: Use of the INEPT [insensitive nucleus enhancement by polarization transfer] experiment to follow individual amides in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, G.D.; Sykes, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    The coat protein of the filamentous coliphage M13 is a 50-residue polypeptide which spans the inner membrane of the Escherichia coli host upon infection. Amide hydrogen exchange kinetics have been used to probe the structure and dynamics of M13 coat protein which has been solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. In a previous 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study, multiple exponential analysis of the unresolved amide proton envelope revealed the existence of two slow kinetic sets containing a total of about 30 protons. The slower set (15-20 amides) originates from the hydrophobic membrane-spanning region and exchanges at least 10 5 -fold slower than the unstructured, non-H-bonded model polypeptide poly(DL-alanine). Herein the authors use 15 N NMR spectroscopy of biosynthetically labeled coat protein to follow individual, assigned, slowly exchanging amides in or near the hydrophobic segment. The INEPT (insensitive nucleus enhancement by polarization transfer) experiments can be used to transfer magnetization to the 15 N nucleus from a coupled proton; when 15 N-labeled protonated protein is dissolved in 2 H 2 O, the INEPT signal disappears with time as the amide protons are replaced by solvent deuterons. Amide hydrogen exchange is catalyzed by both H + and OH - ions. The time-dependent exchange-out experiment is suitable for slow exchange rates (k ex ). The INEPT experiment was also adapted to measure some of the more rapidly exchanging amides in the coat protein using either saturation transfer from water or exchange effects on the polarization transfer step itself. The results of all of these experiments are consistent with previous models of the coat protein in which a stable segment extends from the hydrophobic membrane-spanning region through to the C-terminus, whereas the N-terminal region is undergoing more extensive dynamic fluctuations

  6. Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and uranium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Buffleben, George M.; Johnson, Terry A.; Robinson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and uranium hydride powder can be rapid and reversible. • Gas–solid exchange rate is controlled by transport within ∼0.7 μm hydride particles. • Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using uranium hydride is feasible. - Abstract: Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and solid uranium hydride has been studied by flowing hydrogen (deuterium) gas through packed powder beds of uranium deuteride (hydride). We used a residual gas analyzer system to perform real-time analysis of the effluent gas composition. We also developed an exchange and transport model and, by fitting it to the experimental data, extracted kinetic parameters for the isotope exchange reaction. Our results suggest that, from approximately 70 to 700 kPa and 25 to 400 °C, the gas-to-solid exchange rate is controlled by hydrogen and deuterium transport within the ∼0.7 μm diameter uranium hydride particles. We use our kinetic parameters to show that gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen and deuterium using uranium hydride could be feasible

  7. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide kinetics in water radiolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Kazuhiro; Sundin, Sara; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2018-04-01

    The kinetics of the formation and reaction of hydrogen peroxide in the long time γ- radiolysis of water is examined using a combination of experiment with model calculations. Escape yields of hydrogen peroxide on the microsecond time scale are easily measured with added radical scavengers even with substantial amounts of initial added hydrogen peroxide. The γ-radiolysis of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions without added radical scavengers reach a steady state limiting concentration of hydrogen peroxide with increasing dose, and that limit is directly proportional to the initial concentration of added hydrogen peroxide. The dose necessary to reach that limiting hydrogen peroxide concentration is also proportional to the initial concentration, but dose rate has a very small effect. The addition of molecular hydrogen to aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide leads to a decrease in the high dose limiting hydrogen peroxide concentration that is linear with the initial hydrogen concentration, but the amount of decrease is not stoichiometric. Proton irradiations of solutions with added hydrogen peroxide and hydrogen are more difficult to predict because of the decreased yields of radicals; however, with a substantial increase in dose rate there is a sufficient decrease in radical yields that hydrogen addition has little effect on hydrogen peroxide decay.

  9. Combined electrolysis catalytic exchange (CECE) process for hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.; Stevens, W.H.; Butler, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes can be separated efficiently by a process which combines an electrolysis cell with a trickle bed column packed with a hydrophobic platinum catalyst. The column effects isotopic exchange between countercurrent streams of electrolytic hydrogen and liquid water while the electrolysis cell contributes to isotope separation by virtue of the kinetic isotope effect inherent in the hydrogen evolution reaction. The main features of the CECE process for heavy water production are presented as well as a discussion of the inherent positive synergistic effects, and other advantages and disadvantages of the process. Several potential applications of the process in the nuclear power industry are discussed. 3 figures, 2 tables

  10. Kinetic equation of heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trokhimets, A I [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziko-Organicheskoj Khimii

    1979-12-01

    A kinetic equation is derived for the bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between AXsub(n)sup(*) and BXsub(m)sup(o), all atoms of element X in each molecule being equivalent. The equation can be generalized for homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange.

  11. Hydrogen electrode reaction: A complete kinetic description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaino, P.M.; Gennero de Chialvo, M.R.; Chialvo, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetic description of the hydrogen electrode reaction (HER) in the whole range of overpotentials (-0.2 < η (V) < 0.40) is presented. The Volmer-Heyrovsky-Tafel mechanism was solved considering simultaneously the following items: (i) the diffusional contribution of the molecular hydrogen from and towards the electrode surface, (ii) the forward and backward reaction rates of each elementary step and (iii) a Frumkin type adsorption for the reaction intermediate. In order to verify the descriptive capability of the kinetic expressions derived, an experimental study of the HER was carried out on a rotating platinum disc electrode in acid solution. From the correlation of these results the elementary kinetic parameters were evaluated and several aspects related to the kinetic mechanism were discussed. Finally, the use of these kinetic expressions to interpret results obtained on microelectrodes is also analysed

  12. Calmodulin-lanthanide ion exchange kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buccigross, J.; O'Donnell, C.; Nelson, D.

    1985-01-01

    A flow dialysis apparatus suitable for the study of high affinity metal binding proteins has been utilized to study calmodulin-metal exchange kinetics. Calmodulin labeled with Eu-155 and Gd-153 was dialyzed against buffer containing various competing metal ions. The rate of metal exchange was monitored by a gamma-ray scintillation detector. The kinetics of exchange are first order, and the rates fall into two categories: Ca (II) and CD (II) in one, and the lanthanides Eu (III), Gd (III), and La (III) in the other

  13. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S.G.; Roberts, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    A process is described for exchanging isotopes (particularly tritium) between water and gaseous hydrogen. Isotope depleted gaseous hydrogen and water containing a hydrogen isotope are introduced into the vapour phase in a first reaction area. The steam and gaseous hydrogen are brought into contact with a supported metal catalyst in this area in a parallel flow at a temperature range of around 225 and 300 0 C. An effluent flow comprising a mixture of isotope enriched gaseous hydrogen and depleted steam is evacuated from this area and the steam condensed into liquid water [fr

  14. Isotope exchange reactions in hydrogen mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaplinski, W.; Gula, A.; Kravtsov, A.; Mikhailov, A.; Popov, N.

    1990-12-01

    The rates of isotopic exchange for the excited states of muonic hydrogen are calculated as functions of collision energy. Ground state population q 1s for different collision energies, target densities and isotope concentrations is obtained. It is shown that for principal quantum numbers n > 5 the isotopic exchange still considerably influences the value of q 1s . (author)

  15. The Balescu kinetic equation with exchange interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyi, V V; Kukharenko, Yu A

    2009-01-01

    Starting with the quantum BBGKY hierarchy for the distribution functions, we have obtained the quantum kinetic equation including the dynamical screening of the interaction potential, which exactly takes into account the exchange scattering in the plasma. The collision integral is expressed in terms of the Green function of the linearized Hartree–Fock equation. The potential energy takes into account the polarization and exchange interaction too

  16. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange in mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Acter, Thamina; Zherebker, Alexander; Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Sunghwan; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2018-03-30

    The isotopic exchange approach is in use since the first observation of such reactions in 1933 by Lewis. This approach allows the investigation of the pathways of chemical and biochemical reactions, determination of structure, composition, and conformation of molecules. Mass spectrometry has now become one of the most important analytical tools for the monitoring of the isotopic exchange reactions. Investigation of conformational dynamics of proteins, quantitative measurements, obtaining chemical, and structural information about individual compounds of the complex natural mixtures are mainly based on the use of isotope exchange in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry. The most important reaction is the Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange, which is mainly performed in the solution. Recently we have developed the approach allowing performing of the Hydrogen/Deuterium reaction on-line directly in the ionization source under atmospheric pressure. Such approach simplifies the sample preparation and can accelerate the exchange reaction so that certain hydrogens that are considered as non-labile will also participate in the exchange. The use of in-ionization source H/D exchange in modern mass spectrometry for structural elucidation of molecules serves as the basic theme in this review. We will focus on the mechanisms of the isotopic exchange reactions and on the application of in-ESI, in-APCI, and in-APPI source Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange for the investigation of petroleum, natural organic matter, oligosaccharides, and proteins including protein-protein complexes. The simple scenario for adaptation of H/D exchange reactions into mass spectrometric method is also highlighted along with a couple of examples collected from previous studies. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. MODELING STYRENE HYDROGENATION KINETICS USING PALLADIUM CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Justino

    Full Text Available Abstract The high octane number of pyrolysis gasoline (PYGAS explains its insertion in the gasoline pool. However, its use is troublesome due to the presence of gum-forming chemicals which, in turn, can be removed via hydrogenation. The use of Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic models was evaluated for hydrogenation of styrene, a typical gum monomer, using Pd/9%Nb2O5-Al2O3 as catalyst. Kinetic models accounting for hydrogen dissociative and non-dissociative adsorption were considered. The availability of one or two kinds of catalytic sites was analyzed. Experiments were carried out in a semi-batch reactor at constant temperature and pressure in the absence of transport limitations. The conditions used in each experiment varied between 16 - 56 bar and 60 - 100 ºC for pressure and temperature, respectively. The kinetic models were evaluated using MATLAB and EMSO software. Models using adsorption of hydrogen and organic molecules on the same type of site fitted the data best.

  18. Kinetics from Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzl, Lukas S; Hummer, Gerhard

    2017-08-08

    Transitions between metastable states govern many fundamental processes in physics, chemistry and biology, from nucleation events in phase transitions to the folding of proteins. The free energy surfaces underlying these processes can be obtained from simulations using enhanced sampling methods. However, their altered dynamics makes kinetic and mechanistic information difficult or impossible to extract. Here, we show that, with replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), one can not only sample equilibrium properties but also extract kinetic information. For systems that strictly obey first-order kinetics, the procedure to extract rates is rigorous. For actual molecular systems whose long-time dynamics are captured by kinetic rate models, accurate rate coefficients can be determined from the statistics of the transitions between the metastable states at each replica temperature. We demonstrate the practical applicability of the procedure by constructing master equation (Markov state) models of peptide and RNA folding from REMD simulations.

  19. Exercise: Kinetic considerations for gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Harry B

    2011-01-01

    The activities of daily living typically occur at metabolic rates below the maximum rate of aerobic energy production. Such activity is characteristic of the nonsteady state, where energy demands, and consequential physiological responses, are in constant flux. The dynamics of the integrated physiological processes during these activities determine the degree to which exercise can be supported through rates of O₂ utilization and CO₂ clearance appropriate for their demands and, as such, provide a physiological framework for the notion of exercise intensity. The rate at which O₂ exchange responds to meet the changing energy demands of exercise--its kinetics--is dependent on the ability of the pulmonary, circulatory, and muscle bioenergetic systems to respond appropriately. Slow response kinetics in pulmonary O₂ uptake predispose toward a greater necessity for substrate-level energy supply, processes that are limited in their capacity, challenge system homeostasis and hence contribute to exercise intolerance. This review provides a physiological systems perspective of pulmonary gas exchange kinetics: from an integrative view on the control of muscle oxygen consumption kinetics to the dissociation of cellular respiration from its pulmonary expression by the circulatory dynamics and the gas capacitance of the lungs, blood, and tissues. The intensity dependence of gas exchange kinetics is discussed in relation to constant, intermittent, and ramped work rate changes. The influence of heterogeneity in the kinetic matching of O₂ delivery to utilization is presented in reference to exercise tolerance in endurance-trained athletes, the elderly, and patients with chronic heart or lung disease. © 2011 American Physiological Society.

  20. Catalyst for hydrogen-amine D exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtslander, W.J.; Johnson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A process is claimed for deuterium isotopic enrichment (suitable for use in heavy water production) by amine-hydrogen exchange in which the exchange catalyst comprises a mixture of alkyl amides of two metals selected from the group consisting of the alkali metals. Catalyst mixtures comprising at least one of the alkali amides of lithium and potassium are preferred. At least one of the following benefits are obtained: decreased hydride formation, decreased thermal decomposition of alkyl amide, increased catalyst solubility in the amine phase, and increased exchange efficiency. 11 claims

  1. Separation of hydrogen isotope by hydrogen-water exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomura, Shohei; Kaetsu, Hayato; Nakane, Ryohei

    1979-01-01

    The deuterium exchange reaction between gaseous hydrogen and liquid water is studied by use of three kinds of trickle bed exchange columns packed with hydrophobic catalysts supporting platinum. All columns have the effective lengths of 30 cm. They are 17 mm, 30 mm, and 95 mm in diameters, respectively. The separation experiments are carried out by the once-through methods. The separation efficiencies of the columns are evaluated by the parameters such as the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (H. E. T. P.) and the mass transfer co-efficient. It is found that the operating condition of the exchange column is optimum when the superficial hydrogen flow velocity is 0.3 m/sec. (author)

  2. Kinetics of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in guanosine 5'-monophosphate and guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate determined by laser-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, M J; Thomas, G J

    1979-09-04

    Pseudo-first-order rate constants governing the deuterium exchange of 8-CH groups in guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-rGMP) and guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cGMP) were determined as a function of temperature in the range 30-80 degrees C by means of laser-Raman spectroscopy. For each guanine nucleotide the logarithm of the rate constant exhibits a strictly linear dependence on reciprocal temperature: i.e., k psi = Ae-Ea/RT with A = 8.84 X 10(14) h-1 and Ea = 24.6 kcal/mol for 5'-rGMP and A = 3.33 X 10(13) h-1 and Ea = 22.2 kcal/mol for cGMP. Exchange of the 8-CH groups in guanine nucleotides is generally 2-3 times more rapid than in adenine nucleotides [cf. g. j. thomas, Jr., & J. Livramento (1975) Biochemistry 14, 5210-5218]. As in the case of adenine nucleotides, cyclic and 5' nucleotides of guanine exchange at markedly different rates at lower temperatures, with exchange in the cyclic nucleotide being the more facile. Each of the guanine nucleotides was prepared in four different isotopic modifications for Raman spectral analysis. The Raman frequency shifts resulting from the various isotopic substitutions have been tabulated, and assignments have been given for most of the observed vibrational frequencies.

  3. Kinetics of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in adenosine 5'-monophosphate, adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate, and poly(riboadenylic acid) determined by laser-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, G J; Livramento, J

    1975-11-18

    Pseudo-first-order rate constants governing the deuterium exchange of 8-CH groups in adenosine 5'-monophosphate, adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate, and poly(riboadenylic acid) (poly(rA)) were determined as a function of temperature in the range 20-90 degrees C by means of laser-Raman spectroscopy. For 5'-rAMP, the logarithm of the rate constant exhibits a strictly linear dependence on reciprocal temperature, i.e., kpsi = Ae-Ea/RT, with A = 2.3 X 10(14) hr-1 and Ea = 24.2 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol. For cAMP, above 50 degrees C, kpsi is nearly identical in magnitude and temperature dependence to that of 5'-rAMP. However, below 50 degrees C, isotope exchange in cAMP is much more rapid than in 5'-rAMP, characterized by a lower activation energy (17.7 kcal/mol) and frequency factor (9.6 X 10(9) hr-1). Exchange in poly(rA) is considerably slower than in 5'-rAMP at all temperatures, but like cAMP the in k vs. 1/T plot may be divided into high temperature and low temperature domains, each characterized by different Arrhenius parameters. Above 60 degrees C, poly(rA) gives Ea = 22.0 kcal/mol and A = 3.2 X 10(12) hr-1, while below 60 degrees C, Ea = 27.7 kcal/mol and A = 1.8 X 10(16) hr-1. Thus, increasing the temperature above 60 degrees C does not diminish the retardation of exchange in poly(rA) vis a vis 5'-rAMP. These results indicate that the distribution of electrons in the adenine ring of cAMP is altered by lowering the temperature below 50 degrees C, although no similar perturbation occurs for 5'-rAMP. Retardation of exchange in poly(rA) is most probably due to base stacking at lower temperatures and to steric hindrance from the ribopolymer backbone at higher temperatures. We also report the spectral effects of deuterium exchange on the vibrational Raman frequencies of 5'-rAMP, cAMP, and poly(rA) and suggest a number of new assignments for the 5' and cyclic ribosyl phosphate groups.

  4. Hydrogen-water isotopic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, H.

    1984-01-01

    The objects of this invention are achieved by a dual temperature isotopic exchange process employing hydrogen-water exchange with water passing in a closed recirculation loop between a catalyst-containing cold tower and the upper portion of a catalyst-containing hot tower, with feed water being introduced to the lower portion of the hot tower and being maintained out of contact with the water recirculating in the closed loop. Undue retarding of catalyst activity during deuterium concentration can thus be avoided. The cold tower and the upper portion of the hot tower can be operated with relatively expensive catalyst material of higher catalyst activity, while the lower portion of the hot tower can be operated with a relatively less expensive, more rugged catalyst material of lesser catalyst activity. The feed water stream, being restricted solely to the lower portion of the hot tower, requires minimal pretreatment for the removal of potential catalyst contaminants. The catalyst materials are desirably coated with a hydrophobic treating material so as to be substantially inaccessible to liquid water, thereby retarding catalyst fouling while being accessible to the gas for enhancing isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water vapor. A portion of the water of the closed loop can be passed to a humidification zone to heat and humidify the circulating hydrogen gas and then returned to the closed loop

  5. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetics in aquaculture water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    during the HP decomposition. The model assumes that the enzyme decay is controlled by an inactivation stoichiometry related to the HP decomposition. In order to make the model easily applicable, it is furthermore assumed that the COD is a proxy of the active biomass concentration of the water and thereby......Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish...... reared or the nitrifying bacteria in the biofilters at concentrations required to eliminating pathogens. This calls for quantitative insight into the fate of the disinfectant residuals during water treatment. This paper presents a kinetic model that describes the HP decomposition in aquaculture water...

  6. 1H NMR studies of substrate hydrogen exchange reactions catalyzed by L-methionine gamma-lyase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaki, N.; Nakayama, T.; Sawada, S.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, K.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange reactions of various L-amino acids catalyzed by L-methionine gamma-lyase (EC 4.4.1.11) have been studied. The enzyme catalyzes the rapid exchange of the alpha- and beta-hydrogens of L-methionine and S-methyl-L-cysteine with deuterium from the solvent. The rate of alpha-hydrogen exchange was about 40 times faster than that of the enzymatic elimination reaction of the sulfur-containing amino acids. The enzyme also catalyzes the exchange reaction of alpha- and beta-hydrogens of the straight-chain L-amino acids which are not susceptible to elimination. The exchange rates of the alpha-hydrogen and the total beta-hydrogens of L-alanine and L-alpha-aminobutyrate with deuterium followed first-order kinetics. For L-norvaline, L-norleucine, S-methyl-L-cysteine, and L-methionine, the rate of alpha-hydrogen exchange followed first-order kinetics, but the rate of total beta-hydrogen exchange decreased due to a primary isotope effect at the alpha-position. L-Phenylalanine and L-tryptophan slowly underwent alpha-hydrogen exchange. The pro-R hydrogen of glycine was deuterated stereospecifically

  7. Hydrogen-water isotopic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, H.

    1983-01-01

    Deuterium is concentrated in a hydrogen-water isotopic exchange process enhanced by the use of catalyst materials in cold and hot tower contacting zones. Water is employed in a closed liquid recirculation loop that includes the cold tower, in which deuterium is concentrated in the water, and the upper portion of the hot tower in which said deuterium is concentrated in the hydrogen stream. Feed water is fed to the lower portion of said hot tower for contact with the circulating hydrogen stream. The feed water does not contact the water in the closed loop. Catalyst employed in the cold tower and the upper portion of the hot tower, preferably higher quality material, is isolated from impurities in the feed water that contacts only the catalyst, preferably of lower quality, in the lower portion of the hot zone. The closed loop water passes from the cold zone to the dehumidification zone, and a portion of said water leaving the upper portion of the hot tower can be passed to the humidification zone and thereafter recycled to said closed loop. Deuterium concentration is enhanced in said catalytic hydrogen-water system while undue retarding of catalyst activity is avoided

  8. Hydrogen atom kinetics in capacitively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunomura, Shota; Katayama, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Isao

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen (H) atom kinetics has been investigated in capacitively coupled very high frequency (VHF) discharges at powers of 16-780 mW cm-2 and H2 gas pressures of 0.1-2 Torr. The H atom density has been measured using vacuum ultra violet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) with a micro-discharge hollow cathode lamp as a VUV light source. The measurements have been performed in two different electrode configurations of discharges: conventional parallel-plate diode and triode with an intermediate mesh electrode. We find that in the triode configuration, the H atom density is strongly reduced across the mesh electrode. The H atom density varies from ˜1012 cm-3 to ˜1010 cm-3 by crossing the mesh with 0.2 mm in thickness and 36% in aperture ratio. The fluid model simulations for VHF discharge plasmas have been performed to study the H atom generation, diffusion and recombination kinetics. The simulations suggest that H atoms are generated in the bulk plasma, by the electron impact dissociation (e + H2 \\to e + 2H) and the ion-molecule reaction (H2 + + H2 \\to {{{H}}}3+ + H). The diffusion of H atoms is strongly limited by a mesh electrode, and thus the mesh geometry influences the spatial distribution of the H atoms. The loss of H atoms is dominated by the surface recombination.

  9. Contribution to the study of catalytic hydrogen-deuterium exchange between hydrogen and hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravoire, J.

    1958-01-01

    The hydrogen-deuterium exchange between molecular hydrogen and hydrocarbons over a platinum and charcoal catalyst was studied in a static system. The change in isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen was followed by a thermal conductivity method. Cyclo-pentane and cyclohexane were chosen because of their stability. A reversible inactivation of the catalyst was observed with both hydrocarbons. The reasons for this inactivation are unknown but it was shown that reactivation led to satisfactory reproducibility. A kinetic study was done with cyclohexane in the range 30 to 160 deg. C, and 40 to 360 mm for the pressure of hydrogen, and 10 to 70 mm for the pressure of cyclohexane. The order of the reaction with respect to cyclohexane pressure is always close to zero; the order with respect to that of hydrogen is 0.5 above 100 deg. C. It decreases with increasing temperature and becomes negative (-0.5 at 30 deg. C), characterizing an inhibition by hydrogen. At the same time, the apparent activation energy goes from 6 to 13 kcal/mole. (author) [fr

  10. Logarithmic Exchange Kinetics in Monodisperse Copolymeric Micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Daza, Fabián A.; Bonet Avalos, Josep; Mackie, Allan D.

    2017-06-01

    Experimental measurements of the relaxation kinetics of copolymeric surfactant exchange for micellar systems unexpectedly show a peculiar logarithmic decay. Several authors use polydispersity as an explanation for this behavior. However, in coarse-grained simulations that preserve microscopic details of the surfactants, we find evidence of the same logarithmic behavior. Since we use a strictly monodisperse distribution of chain lengths such a relaxation process cannot be attributed to polydispersity, but has to be caused by an inherent physical process characteristic of this type of system. This is supported by the fact that the decay is specifically logarithmic and not a power law with an exponent inherited from the particular polydispersity distribution of the sample. We suggest that the degeneracy of the energy states of the hydrophobic block in the core, which is broken on leaving the micelle, can qualitatively explain the broad distribution of energy barriers, which gives rise to the observed nonexponential relaxation.

  11. Process for exchanging tritium between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S.G.; Roberts, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method of exchanging and concentrating the radioactive isotope of hydrogen from water or hydrogen gas is described. This heavy water enrichment system involves a low pressure, dual temperature process. (U.K.)

  12. Hydrogen content, interfacial exchange and hydrogen diffusion in high-temperature protonic conductors based on strontium and barium cerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, G.K.; Kurumchin, Eh.Kh.

    2004-01-01

    The hydrogen content and kinetics of the hydrogen exchange in the barium and strontium doped cerates are studied in the reduction atmosphere through the methods of isotope counterbalancing and isotope exchange. The measurements are carried out at 500-840 Deg C and hydrogen pressure of 2.7-16 gPa. It is established, that the hydrogen interfacial exchange proceeds at high velocities through the dissociative-type mechanisms. The effective activation energy of the hydrogen heteroexchange is determined. The coefficient of the hydrogen diffusion in BaCe 0.95 Nd 0.5 O 3-δ is calculated. The hydrogen content per formula unit constituted (0.48±0.05) in the SrCe 0.95 Y 0.05 O 3-δ and (0.60±0.05) in the BaCe 0.95 Nd 0.5 O 3-δ at 550 and 720 Deg C correspondingly and hydrogen pressure of 6.7 gPa [ru

  13. How amide hydrogens exchange in native proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2015-08-18

    Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) is widely used in protein biophysics even though our ignorance about the HX mechanism makes data interpretation imprecise. Notably, the open exchange-competent conformational state has not been identified. Based on analysis of an ultralong molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein BPTI, we propose that the open (O) states for amides that exchange by subglobal fluctuations are locally distorted conformations with two water molecules directly coordinated to the N-H group. The HX protection factors computed from the relative O-state populations agree well with experiment. The O states of different amides show little or no temporal correlation, even if adjacent residues unfold cooperatively. The mean residence time of the O state is ∼100 ps for all examined amides, so the large variation in measured HX rate must be attributed to the opening frequency. A few amides gain solvent access via tunnels or pores penetrated by water chains including native internal water molecules, but most amides access solvent by more local structural distortions. In either case, we argue that an overcoordinated N-H group is necessary for efficient proton transfer by Grotthuss-type structural diffusion.

  14. How amide hydrogens exchange in native proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) is widely used in protein biophysics even though our ignorance about the HX mechanism makes data interpretation imprecise. Notably, the open exchange-competent conformational state has not been identified. Based on analysis of an ultralong molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein BPTI, we propose that the open (O) states for amides that exchange by subglobal fluctuations are locally distorted conformations with two water molecules directly coordinated to the N–H group. The HX protection factors computed from the relative O-state populations agree well with experiment. The O states of different amides show little or no temporal correlation, even if adjacent residues unfold cooperatively. The mean residence time of the O state is ∼100 ps for all examined amides, so the large variation in measured HX rate must be attributed to the opening frequency. A few amides gain solvent access via tunnels or pores penetrated by water chains including native internal water molecules, but most amides access solvent by more local structural distortions. In either case, we argue that an overcoordinated N–H group is necessary for efficient proton transfer by Grotthuss-type structural diffusion. PMID:26195754

  15. Kinetics of H-D exchange in olefins with complicating reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trokhimets, A.I.

    1979-01-01

    The kinetics of H-D-exchange is considered for olefins under conditions when simple and complicated exchange occur together with hydrogenation. If hydrogenation takes place in the system, it is theoretically impossible to derive the integrated rate equation for the accumulation of deuterium in the olefin. The variation of the concentration of different deuteroolefins during the process can be calculated numerically. A method is proposed for evaluating the contribution of individual steps to the overall process and determining the rate constants of the most important reactions. (author)

  16. Water-hydrogen isotope exchange process analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchenko, O.; Alekseev, I.; Uborsky, V.

    2008-01-01

    The use of a numerical method is needed to find a solution to the equation system describing a general case of heterogeneous isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and liquid water in a column. A computer model of the column merely outputting the isotope compositions in the flows leaving the column, like the experimental column itself, is a 'black box' to a certain extent: the solution is not transparent and occasionally not fully comprehended. The approximate analytical solution was derived from the ZXY-diagram (McCabe-Thiele diagram), which illustrates the solution of the renewed computer model called 'EVIO-4.2' Several 'unusual' results and dependences have been analyzed and explained. (authors)

  17. Kinetics of Dicyclopentadiene Hydrogenation Using PD/C Catalyst

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skála, D.; Hanika, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 45, 3-4 (2003), s. 105-108 ISSN 1335-3055 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : hydrogenation * dicyclopentadiene * kinetics Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  18. Elementary Processes and Kinetic Modeling for Hydrogen and Helium Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Celiberto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report cross-sections and rate coefficients for excited states colliding with electrons, heavy particles and walls useful for the description of H 2 /He plasma kinetics under different conditions. In particular, the role of the rotational states in resonant vibrational excitations of the H 2 molecule by electron impact and the calculation of the related cross-sections are illustrated. The theoretical determination of the cross-section for the rovibrational energy exchange and dissociation of H 2 molecule, induced by He atom impact, by using the quasi-classical trajectory method is discussed. Recombination probabilities of H atoms on tungsten and graphite, relevant for the determination of the nascent vibrational distribution, are also presented. An example of a state-to-state plasma kinetic model for the description of shock waves operating in H 2 and He-H 2 mixtures is presented, emphasizing also the role of electronically-excited states in affecting the electron energy distribution function of free electrons. Finally, the thermodynamic properties and the electrical conductivity of non-ideal, high-density hydrogen plasma are finally discussed, in particular focusing on the pressure ionization phenomenon in high-pressure high-temperature plasmas.

  19. Deuterium exchange between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, S.M.; Ghosh, S.K.; Sadhukhan, H.K.

    1982-01-01

    The overall separation factors for the deuterium exchange between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen have been calculated over a wide range of temperature, pressure and deuterium concentrations. These data would be useful in the design and other considerations for heavy water production, based on hydrogen-water exchange. (author)

  20. A kinetic study of the electrochemical hydrogenation of ethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedighi, S.; Gardner, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we have examined the kinetics of the electrochemical hydrogenation of ethylene in a PEM reactor. While in itself this reaction is of little industrial interest, this reaction can be looked upon as a model reaction for many of the important hydrogenation processes including the refining of heavy oils and the hydrogenation of vegetable oils. To study the electrochemical hydrogenation of ethylene, several experimental techniques have been used including polarization measurements, measurement of the composition of the exit gases and potential step, transient measurements. The results show that the hydrogenation reaction proceeds rapidly and essentially to completion. By fitting the experimental transient data to the results from a zero-dimensional mathematical model of the process, a set of kinetic parameters for the reactions has been obtained that give generally good agreement with the experimental results. It seems probable that similar experimental techniques could be used to study the electrochemical hydrogenation of other unsaturated organic molecules of more industrial significance.

  1. Kinetic of martensitic transformations induced by hydrogen in the austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio P. de; Saavedra, A.; Miranda, P.E.V. de

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray diffractometry technique was used, with an automatic data acquisition system to determine the kinetics of hydrogen induced martensitic phase transformations in an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel type, used in nuclear power plants. Hydrogenation was performed cathodically in a 1N sulfuric acid solution, containing 100 mg/l of arsenic trioxide, at 50 0 C, during 2 hours and with a current density of 200 A/m 2 . It was found that the microstructure of the steel plays a role on the generation of hydrogen induced martensitic phases and surface micro cracks. Both kinetics were slower on a pre-cold rolled steel. (Author) [pt

  2. Transport kinetics of hydrogen permeable lanthanum tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenstein, Andreas

    2017-01-24

    The electrical conductivity relaxation technique is a widely used method to determine the oxygen transport parameters of mixed ionic-electronic conductors. In recent years, it has been modified to investigate the hydration behavior of proton conducting mixed conductors, giving access to up to four transport parameters in a single relaxation experiment, the diffusion coefficients and surface reaction rates of hydrogen and oxygen. In this work, the transport properties of the fluorite type protonic conductor lanthanum tungstate have been investigated by means of electrical conductivity relaxation. The experiments were performed in a temperature range from 650 C to 950 C, in a pO{sub 2} range from 3 mbar to 100 mbar and in a pH{sub 2}O range from 10 mbar to 100 mbar and in dry atmosphere. At high temperatures, the conductivity relaxation curve follows the expected two-fold non-monotonic behavior upon hydration. At low temperatures, however, the contribution of the fast hydrogen kinetic decreases and by a further decrease of the temperature, the relaxation shows two-fold monotonic behavior. The power factors - the contribution of each single fold relaxation curve to the resulting two-fold relaxation curve, which is a superposition - have been derived to explain the behavior mentioned above. The activation energy of the oxygen incorporation is rather low. Hence, oxidation experiments were performed in dry atmospheres in order to investigate if the origin of the oxygen species is relevant. The results revealed higher activation energies, which was expected, but also higher absolute values of the surface reaction rate and the diffusion coefficient. Oxidation experiments with increasing humidity revealed that the increased diffusivity cannot be attributed to the total concentrations of electron holes and proton interstitials. First experiments using spectroscopic relaxation, which is dependent on the concentration of hydroxy-anions only, were performed. Absorption bands

  3. A Hydrogen Exchange Method Using Tritium and Sephadex: Its Application to Ribonuclease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, S. Walter

    2012-01-01

    A new method for measuring the hydrogen exchange of macromolecules in solution is described. The method uses tritium to trace the movement of hydrogen, and utilizes Sephadex columns to effect, in about 2 minutes, a separation between tritiated macromolecule and tritiated solvent great enough to allow the measurement of bound tritium. High sensitivity and freedom from artifact is demonstrated and the possible value of the technique for investigation of other kinds of colloid-small molecule interaction is indicated. Competition experiments involving tritium, hydrogen, and deuterium indicate the absence of any equilibrium isotope effect in the ribonuclease-hydrogen isotope system, though a secondary kinetic isotope effect is apparent when ribonuclease is largely deuterated. Ribonuclease shows four clearly distinguishable kinetic classes of exchangeable hydrogens. Evidence is marshaled to suggest the independently measurable classes II, III, and IV (in order of decreasing rate of exchange) to represent “random-chain” peptides, peptides involved in α-helix, and otherwise shielded side-chain and peptide hydrogens, respectively. PMID:14075117

  4. Hydrogen vacancies facilitate hydrogen transport kinetics in sodium hydride nanocrystallites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.; Eijt, S.W.H.

    2008-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations based on density-functional theory, of the vacancy-mediated hydrogen migration energy in bulk NaH and near the NaH(001) surface. The estimated rate of the vacancy mediated hydrogen transport, obtained within a hopping diffusion model, is consistent with the reaction

  5. Study of kinetics, equilibrium and isotope exchange in ion exchange systems Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plicka, J.; Stamberg, K.; Cabicar, J.; Gosman, A.

    1986-01-01

    The description of kinetics of ion exchange in ternary system was based upon three Nernst-Planck equations, each of them describing the particle diffusion flux of a given counterion as an independent process. For experimental verification, the strongly acidic cation exchanger OSTION KS 08 the shallow-bed technique, and 0.2 mol x dm -3 aqueous nitrate solutions were chosen. The kinetics of ion exchange in the system of cations Na + - Mg 2+ - UO 2 2+ was studied. The values of diffusion coefficients obtained by evaluating of kinetics of isotope exchange and binary ion exchange were used for calculation. The comparison of calculated exchange rate curves with the experimental ones was made. It was found that the exchanging counterions were affected by each other. (author)

  6. Control of DNA strand displacement kinetics using toehold exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, David Yu; Winfree, Erik

    2009-12-02

    DNA is increasingly being used as the engineering material of choice for the construction of nanoscale circuits, structures, and motors. Many of these enzyme-free constructions function by DNA strand displacement reactions. The kinetics of strand displacement can be modulated by toeholds, short single-stranded segments of DNA that colocalize reactant DNA molecules. Recently, the toehold exchange process was introduced as a method for designing fast and reversible strand displacement reactions. Here, we characterize the kinetics of DNA toehold exchange and model it as a three-step process. This model is simple and quantitatively predicts the kinetics of 85 different strand displacement reactions from the DNA sequences. Furthermore, we use toehold exchange to construct a simple catalytic reaction. This work improves the understanding of the kinetics of nucleic acid reactions and will be useful in the rational design of dynamic DNA and RNA circuits and nanodevices.

  7. Kinetics of isotopic exchanges by using radioactive indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, S.

    1958-12-01

    After having noticed that iodine 131 under the form of sodium iodide has always been used as radioactive indicator in the CEA atomic pile located in Chatillon, this research report recalls the counting technique and some historical aspects of the notion of isotopic exchange and qualitative works, and presents some generalities on isotopic exchanges (reactions and calculation of rate constants of order 1 and 2, calculation of activation energy, spectro-photometric studies, Walden inversion, alkaline hydrolysis, influence of solvent on exchange kinetics, influence of the nature of the mineral halide). The author then addresses exchanges in aliphatic series (exchange with sodium iodide and with molecular iodine), exchanges in olefin series, exchanges in alicyclic series, and exchanges in aromatic series

  8. Factors determining the activity of catalysts of various chemical types in the oxidation of hydrogen. I. Oxidation and isotope exchange of hydrogen on cobalt monoxide-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgikh, L.Y.; Golodets, G.I.; Il'chenko, N.I.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of data on the kinetics of the reaction 2H 2 + O 2 = 2H 2 O isotope exchange H 2 + D 2 = 2HD under the conditions of oxidative catalysis, and the kinetic isotope effect, a mechanism is proposed for the oxidation of hydrogen on cobalt monoxide-oxide. At low temperatures the reaction proceeds according to a mechanism of alternating reduction-reoxidation of the surface with the participation of hydrogen adsorbed in molecular form; at increased temperature and low P 02 /P /SUB H2/ ratios, a significant contribution to the observed rate is made by a mechanism including dissociative chemisorption of hydrogen

  9. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwarno Suwarno

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium is reactive toward hydrogen forming metal hydride which has a potential application in      energy storage and conversion. Titanium hydride has been widely studied for hydrogen storage, thermal storage, and battery electrodes applications. A special interest is using titanium for hydrogen production in a hydrogen sorption-enhanced steam reforming of natural gas. In the present work, non-isothermal dehydrogenation kinetics of titanium hydride and kinetics of hydrogenation in gaseous flow at isothermal conditions were investigated. The hydrogen desorption was studied using temperature desorption spectroscopy (TDS while the hydrogen absorption and desorption in gaseous flow were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD. The present work showed that the path of dehydrogenation of the TiH2 is d®b®a hydride phase with possible overlapping steps occurred. The fast hydrogen desorption rate observed at the TDS main peak temperature were correlated with the fast transformation of the d-TiH1.41 to b-TiH0.59. In the gaseous flow, hydrogen absorption and desorption were related to the transformation of b-TiH0.59 Û d-TiH1.41 with 2 wt.% hydrogen reversible content. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 21st November 2016; Revised: 20th March 2017; Accepted: 9th April 2017; Available online: 27th October 2017; Published regularly: December 2017 How to Cite: Suwarno, S., Yartys, V.A. (2017. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (3: 312-317  (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.3.810.312-317

  10. Novel catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Rolston, J.H.; Stevens, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Catalytic isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water offers many inherent potential advantages for the separation of hydrogen isotopes which is of great importance in the Canadian nuclear program. Active catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and water vapor have long been available, but these catalysts are essentially inactive in the presence of liquid water. New, water-repellent platinum catalysts have been prepared by: (1) treating supported catalysts with silicone, (2) depositing platinum on inherently hydrophobic polymeric supports, and (3) treating platinized carbon with Teflon and bonding to a carrier. The activity of these catalysts for isotopic exchange between countercurrent streams of liquid water and hydrogen saturated with water vapor has been measured in a packed trickle bed integral reactor. The performance of these hydrophobic catalysts is compared with nonwetproofed catalysts. The mechanism of the overall exchange reaction is briefly discussed. 6 figures

  11. The kinetics of hydrogen removal from liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwyther, J.R.; Whittingham, A.C.

    1981-01-01

    The rates of hydrogen removal from liquid sodium-sodium hydride mixtures have been measured as a function of sodium stirring rate at temperatures up to 420 0 C. Two techniques have been employed - removal under continuous evacuation in which hydrogen flow rates were measured using a capillary flow technique and by argon purging in which hydrogen concentrations in the argon carrier gas were measured by gas chromatography. The results have been used to assess the feasibility of thermal decomposition of sodium hydride for the regeneration of hydride-laden LMFBR cold traps. Studies on the kinetics of desorption of hydrogen from solution in liquid sodium at temperatures up to 400 0 C are also presented and possible kinetic mechanisms discussed. (orig.)

  12. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  13. Ligand Exchange Kinetics of Environmentally Relevant Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panasci, Adele Frances [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The interactions of ground water with minerals and contaminants are of broad interest for geochemists but are not well understood. Experiments on the molecular scale can determine reaction parameters (i.e. rates of ligand exchange, activation entropy, activation entropy, and activation volume) that can be used in computations to gain insight into reactions that occur in natural groundwaters. Experiments to determine the rate of isotopic ligand exchange for three environmentally relevant metals, rhodium (Rh), iron (Fe), and neptunium (Np), are described. Many environmental transformations of metals (e.g. reduction) in soil occur at trivalent centers, Fe(III) in particular. Contaminant ions absorb to mineral surfaces via ligand exchange, and the reversal of this reaction can be dangerous, releasing contaminants into the environment. Ferric iron is difficult to study spectroscopically because most of its complexes are paramagnetic and are generally reactive toward ligand exchange; therefore, Rh(III), which is diamagnetic and less reactive, was used to study substitution reactions that are analogous to those that occur on mineral oxide surfaces. Studies on both Np(V) and Np(VI) are important in their own right, as 237Np is a radioactive transuranic element with a half-life of 2 million years.

  14. Charge exchange of excited mesic atoms of hydrogen isotopes in triple collisions with molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Men'shikov, L.I.; Ponomarev, L.I.

    1985-01-01

    At high densities of deuterium-tritium mixture the probability for the occurrence of the isotope-exchange reaction (dμ)/sub n/+t → d+(tμ)/sub n/ from the excited states of n mesic atoms of deuterium is high in the triple collisions of mesic atoms with the molecules of hydrogen isotopes. This reaction should be taken into account in describing the kinetics of muon catalysis

  15. Effects of apolipoproteins on the kinetics of cholesterol exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letizia, J.Y.; Phillips, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of apolipoproteins on the kinetics of cholesterol exchange have been investigated by monitoring the transfer of [ 14 C]cholesterol from donor phospholipid/cholesterol complexes containing human apolipoproteins A, B, or C. Negatively charged discoidal and vesicular particles containing purified apolipoproteins complexed with lipid and a trace of [ 14 C]cholesterol were incubated with a 10-fold excess of neutral, acceptor, small unilamellar vesicles. The donor and acceptor particles were separated by chromatogrphy of DEAE-Sepharose, and the rate of movement of labeled cholesterol was analyzed as a first-order exchange process. The kinetics of exchange of cholesterol from both vesicular and discoidal complexes that contain apoproteins are consistent with an aqueous diffusion mechanism, as has been established previously for PC/cholesterol SUV. Apolipoproteins A-I, A-II, reduced and carboxymethylated A-11, and B-100 present in SUV at the same lipid/protein (w/w) ratio all enhance the rate of cholesterol exchange to about the same degree. Cholesterol molecules exchange more rapidly from discoidal complexes. Generally, as the diameter of apoprotein/phospholipid/cholesterol discs decreases, t 1/2 for cholesterol exchange decreases. Since small bilayer discs have a relatively high ratio of boundary to face surface area, cholesterol molecules desorb more rapidly than from larger discs. The modulation of lipid packing by the apoprotein molecules present at the surface of lipoprotein particles affects the rate of cholesterol exchange from such particles

  16. Isotopic exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen over geologic timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Alex L.; Sylva, Sean P.; Summons, Roger E.; Hayes, John M.

    2004-04-01

    The increasing popularity of compound-specific hydrogen isotope (D/H) analyses for investigating sedimentary organic matter raises numerous questions about the exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen over geologic timescales. Important questions include the rates of isotopic exchange, methods for diagnosing exchange in ancient samples, and the isotopic consequences of that exchange. This article provides a review of relevant literature data along with new data from several pilot studies to investigate such issues. Published experimental estimates of exchange rates between organic hydrogen and water indicate that at warm temperatures (50-100°C) exchange likely occurs on timescales of 104 to 108 yr. Incubation experiments using organic compounds and D-enriched water, combined with compound-specific D/H analyses, provide a new and highly sensitive method for measuring exchange at low temperatures. Comparison of δD values for isoprenoid and n-alkyl carbon skeletons in sedimentary organic matter provides no evidence for exchange in young (exchange in ancient (>350 Ma) rocks. Specific rates of exchange are probably influenced by the nature and abundance of organic matter, pore-water chemistry, the presence of catalytic mineral surfaces, and perhaps even enzymatic activity. Estimates of equilibrium fractionation factors between organic H and water indicate that typical lipids will be depleted in D relative to water by ∼75 to 140‰ at equilibrium (30°C). Thus large differences in δD between organic molecules and water cannot be unambiguously interpreted as evidence against hydrogen exchange. A better approach may be to use changes in stereochemistry as a proxy for hydrogen exchange. For example, estimated rates of H exchange in pristane are similar to predicted rates for stereochemical inversion in steranes and hopanes. The isotopic consequences of this exchange remain in question. Incubations of cholestene with D2O indicate that the number of D atoms incorporated during

  17. Determination of kinetic parameters of heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ting-Chia; Tsai, Fuan-Nan

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model has been proposed for a heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction which involves film diffusion, surface chemical reaction and intraparticle diffusion. The exchange equation to predict the exchange fraction as a function of time for the spherical particles immersed in a solution of finite volume has been derived. The relations between the exchange fraction and dimensionless time are plotted with xi(=ak sub(f)/KD sub(e)), xi 1 (=K 1 a 2 /D sub(e)) and final fractional uptake as parameters. From the values of the kinetic parameters xi and xi 1 , the relative importance of each limiting step is discussed. Experimental results of the isotopic exchange reaction of calcium ion in both system CaCO 3 (s)/Ca 2+ (aq) and system calcium type resin Dowex 50W-X8/Ca 2+ (aq) are coincident with the theoretical equation proposed in this study. (auth.)

  18. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression.

  19. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange in imidazole as a tool for studying histidine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebo, Małgorzata; Kielmas, Martyna; Adamczyk, Justyna; Cebrat, Marek; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Stefanowicz, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Isotope exchange at the histidine C2 atom of imidazole in D2O solution is well known to occur at a significantly slower rate than the exchange of amide protons. Analysis of the kinetics of this isotope-exchange reaction is proposed herein as a method of detecting histidine phosphorylation. This modification of His-containing peptides is challenging to pinpoint because of its instability under acidic conditions as well as during CID-MS analysis. In this work, we investigated the effect of phosphorylation of the histidine side chain in peptides on deuterium-hydrogen exchange (DHX) in the imidazole. The results demonstrate that phosphorylation dramatically slows the rate of the DHX reaction. This phenomenon can be applied to detect phosphorylation of peptides at the histidine residue (e.g., in enzymatic digests). We also found that the influence of the peptide sequence on the exchange kinetics is relatively small. A CID fragmentation experiment revealed that there was no detectable hydrogen scrambling in peptides deuterated at C2 of the imidazole ring. Therefore, MS/MS can be used to directly identify the locations of deuterium ions incorporated into peptides containing multiple histidine moieties.

  20. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  1. Hydrogen--deuterium exchanges in nucleosides and nucleotides. A mechanism for exchange of the exocyclic amino hydrogens of adenosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, D.G.; Brown, A.; Fisher, H.F.

    1975-01-01

    The pH dependence of the apparent first-order rate constant for the exchange of the exocyclic amino hydrogens of adenosine with deuterium from the solvent was measured by stopped-flow ultraviolet spectroscopy. This dependence shows acid catalysis, base catalysis, and spontaneous exchange at neutral pH values. A study of the effect of several buffers on the rates of exchange reveals both general acid and general base catalytic behavior for the exchange process. We propose a general mechanism for the exchange which requires N-1 protonated adenosine as an intermediate for the acid-catalyzed exchange and amidine anion for the base-catalyzed exchange. In both cases the rate-limiting step is the base-catalyzed abstraction of a proton from the exocyclic amino moiety. Evaluation of the rate constants predicts the equilibrium for the exocyclic amino/imino tautomers to be 6.3 x 10 3 :1. (U.S.)

  2. Kinetics of gaseous uranium hexafluoride reaction with hydrogen chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezubchenko, A.N.; Ilyukhin, A.I.; Merzlyakov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Kinetics of decrease of concentration of gaseous uranium hexafluoride in reaction with hydrogen chloride at temperatures close to room ones, was investigated by the method of IR spectroscopy. It was established that the process represented the first order reaction by both UF 6 and HCl. Activation energy of the reaction was determined: 7.6 ± 0.7 kcal/mol. Specific feature of reaction kinetics was noted: inversely proportional dependence of effective constant on UF 6 initial pressure. 5 refs., 3 figs

  3. Exchange of deuterium with hydrogen of zeolite catalyst surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minachev, Kh.M.; Dmitriev, R.V.; Penchev, V.; Kanazirev, V.; Minchev, Kh.; Kasimov, Ch.K.; Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia. Inst. za Obshta i Organichna Khimiya; AN Azerbajdzhanskoj SSR, Baku. Inst. Neftekhimicheskikh Protsessov)

    1981-01-01

    Isotope heteromolecular exchange of hydrogen on the reduced nickel-containing zeolites takes places at the temperatures above 100 deg and it is controlled by activated hydrogen transfer from metal particles on the substrate surface. High-temperature redox treatment of nickel-containing zeolites results in the formation of large nickel crystallites on zeolite external faces. The rest part of nickel remains in zeolite pores and conditions a high promoting effect in the exchange reaction. Catalytic activity of reduced zeolites NiCaNaY in toluene disproportionation increases considerably only in the cases when nickel is introduced into zeolite by means of ion exchange. Close spatial location of nickel particles and OH groups promotes the procedure of both isotope exchange and disproportionation of toluene [ru

  4. Study of kinetics, equilibrium and isotope exchange in ion exchange systems Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamberg, K.; Plicka, J.; Calibar, J.; Gosman, A.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of ion exchange in the Nasup(+)-Mgsup(2+)-strongly acidic cation exchanger system in a batch stirred reactor was studied. The samples of exchangers OSTION KS (containing DVB in the range of 1.5 - 12%) and AMBERLITE IR 120 for experimental work were used; the concentration of the aqueous nitrate solution was always 0.2M. The Nernst-Planck equation for description of diffusion of ions in a particle was used. The values of diffusion coefficients of magnesium ions in the exchangers and their dependence on the content of DVB were obtained by evaluating the experimental data and using the self-diffusion coefficients of sodium. (author)

  5. Hydrogen isotope exchange in metal hydride columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiswall, R.; Reilly, J.; Bloch, F.; Wirsing, E.

    1977-01-01

    Several metal hydrides were shown to act as chromatographic media for hydrogen isotopes. The procedure was to equilibrate a column of hydride with flowing hydrogen, inject a small quantity of tritium tracer, and observe its elution behavior. Characteristic retention times were found. From these and the extent of widening of the tritium band, the heights equivalent to a theoretical plate could be calculated. Values of around 1 cm were obtained. The following are the metals whose hydrides were studied, together with the temperature ranges in which chromatographic behavior was observed: vanadium, 0 to 70 0 C; zirconium, 500 to 600 0 C; LaNi 5 , -78 to +30 0 C; Mg 2 Ni, 300 to 375 0 C; palladium, 0 to 70 0 C. A dual-temperature isotope separation process based on hydride chromatography was demonstrated. In this, a column was caused to cycle between two temperatures while being supplied with a constant stream of tritium-traced hydrogen. Each half-cycle was continued until ''breakthrough,'' i.e., until the tritium concentration in the effluent was the same as that in the feed. Up to that point, the effluent was enriched or depleted in tritium, by up to 20%

  6. Kinetics with deactivation of methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation for hydrogen energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria, G; Marin, A; Wyss, C; Mueller, S; Newson, E [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation step to recycle toluene and release hydrogen is being studied as part of a hydrogen energy storage project. The reaction is performed catalytically in a fixed bed reactor, and the efficiency of this step significantly determines overall system economics. The fresh catalyst kinetics and the deactivation of the catalyst by coke play an important role in the process analysis. The main reaction kinetics were determined from isothermal experiments using a parameter sensitivity analysis for model discrimination. An activation energy for the main reaction of 220{+-}11 kJ/mol was obtained from a two-parameter model. From non-isothermal deactivation in PC-controlled integral reactors, an activation energy for deactivation of 160 kJ/mol was estimated. A model for catalyst coke content of 3-17 weight% was compared with experimental data. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  7. Kinetic theory of oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, R.E.; Gregory, R.T.; Taylor, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic and mass conservation equations are used to describe oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water in "closed" and open hydrothermal systems. In cases where n coexisting mineral phases having different reaction rates are present, the exchange process is described by a system of n + 1 simultaneous differential equations consisting of n pseudo first-order rate equations and a conservation of mass equation. The simultaneous solutions to these equations generate curved exchange trajectories on ??-?? plots. Families of such trajectories generated under conditions allowing for different fluid mole fractions, different fluid isotopic compositions, or different fluid flow rates are connected by positive-sloped isochronous lines. These isochrons reproduce the effects observed in hydrothermally exchanged mineral pairs including 1) steep positive slopes, 2) common reversals in the measured fractionation factors (??), and 3) measured fractionations that are highly variable over short distances where no thermal gradient can be geologically demonstrated. ?? 1987.

  8. Gaseous exchange reaction of deuterium between hydrogen and water on hydrophobic catalyst supporting platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izawa, Hirozumi; Isomura, Shohei; Nakane, Ryohei.

    1979-01-01

    The deuterium exchange reaction between hydrogen and water in the gas phase where the fed hydrogen gas is saturated with water vapor is studied experimentally by use of the proper hydrophobic catalysts supporting platinum. It is found that the activities of those catalysts for this reaction system are very high compared with the other known ones for the systems in which gas and liquid should coexist on catalyst surfaces, and that the apparent catalytic activity becomes larger as the amount of platinum supported on a catalyst particle increases. By analyses of the data the following informations are obtained. The exchange reaction can be expressed by a first order reversible reaction kinetics. The pore diffusion in the catalyst particles has significant effect on the overall reaction mechanisms. (author)

  9. Exchange reaction between tritiated hydrogen and water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Koichi; Takano, Kenichi; Watanabe, Tamaki.

    1979-01-01

    Exchange reaction of tritiated hydrogen to water vapor under the condition of tritium gas concentration between 1 μCi/l and 1 mCi/l was studied. Tritium gas with hydrogen gas of 5 Torr and water of 20 mg were enclosed in a Pyrex glass ampule with volume of about 100 ml. The mixed gas with water vapor was heated with electric furnace. The heating time was between 2 and 100 hr, and the temperature was 776, 725, 675, 621, and 570.5 0 K. After heating, tritiated water was trapped with liquid nitrogen, and counted with a liquid scintillation counter. The radioactive concentration of initial tritiated hydrogen was measured with a calibrated ionization chamber. The main results obtained are as follows; 1) the concentration of produced tritiated water is well proportioned to that of initial tritiated hydrogen, 2) the activation energy of exchange reaction from tritiated hydrogen to tritiated water is 26.2 kcal/mol and that of inverse reaction is 27.4 kcal/mol, 3) the reaction rate at room temperature which calculated with activation energy is 1.04 x 10 -13 day -1 , and then exchange reaction at room temperature is negligible. (author)

  10. Isotopic studies on ligand exchange between complex and simple cyanides in water medium and in liquid hydrogen cyanide. Part 2. Radiocyanide ligand exchange study between hydrogen cyanide and octacyanotungstate(4) in water solutions of mineral acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.

    1979-01-01

    Radiocyanide ligand exchange between potassium octacyanotungstate(4) and hydrogen cyanide in aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid and between octacyanotungstic(4) acid and hydrogen cyanide in aqueous solutions have been investigated experimentally. The observed enhancement of the rate of ligand exchange in acidic medium has been rationalized in terms of the proposed new general reaction scheme taking into account the reversible decomposition of complex cyanide at low pH, and irreversible one at high pH. The discussion on the results obtained has been carried out within the framework of derived formal kinetic equations. (author)

  11. Improved hydrogen sorption kinetics in wet ball milled Mg hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Li

    2011-05-04

    In this work, wet ball milling method is used in order to improve hydrogen sorption behaviour due to its improved microstructure of solid hydrogen materials. Compared to traditional ball milling method, wet ball milling has benefits on improvement of MgH{sub 2} microstructure and further influences on its hydrogen sorption behavior. With the help of solvent tetrahydrofuran (THF), wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder has much smaller particle size and its specific surface area is 7 times as large as that of dry ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder. Although after ball milling the grain size is decreased a lot compared to as-received MgH{sub 2} powder, the grain size of wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder is larger than that of dry ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder due to the lubricant effect of solvent THF during wet ball milling. The improved particle size and specific surface area of wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder is found to be determining its hydrogen sorption kinetics especially at relatively low temperatures. And it also shows good cycling sorption behavior, which decides on its industrial applicability. With three different catalysts MgH{sub 2} powder shows improved hydrogen sorption behavior as well as the cyclic sorption behavior. Among them, the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst is found to be the most effective one in this work. Compared to the wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder, the particle size and specific surface area of the MgH{sub 2} powder with catalysts are similar to the previous ones, while the grain size of the MgH{sub 2} with catalysts is much finer. In this case, two reasons for hydrogen sorption improvement are suggested: one is the reduction of the grain size. The other may be as pointed out in some literatures that formation of new oxidation could enhance the hydrogen sorption kinetics, which is also the reason why its hydrogen capacity is decreased compared to without catalysts. After further ball milling, the specific surface area of wet ball milled Mg

  12. Ion exchange kinetics of alkaline earths on Zr(IV) arsenosilicate cation exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, K.G.; Agrawal, S.; Varshney, K.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations was applied to study the ion exchange kinetics for the exchange reactions of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) with H + -ions at various temperatures on the zirconium(IV) arsenosilicate phase. Under the conditions of particle diffusion, the rate of exchange was found to be independent of the metal ion concentration at and above 0.1 M in aqueous medium. Energy and entropy of activation were determined and found to vary linearly with the ionic radii and mobilities of alkaline earths, a unique feature observed for an inorganic ion exchanger. The results are useful for predicting the ion exchange processes occurring on the surface of an inorganic material of the type studied. (author)

  13. Reduction kinetics of zinc and cadmium sulfides with hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgenev, I.S.; Kabisov, I.Kh.; Zviadadze, G.N.; Vasil'eva, O.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Kinetics of reduction processes of zinc sulfide in the temperature range 800-1100 deg C and of cadmium sulfide 600-900 deg C has been stodied. Activation energies and reaction order in terms of hydrogen are calculated. Thermodynamic processes of reduction depend on aggregate state of the metal formed. For vaporous zinc in the temperature range 1050-950 deq C activation energy constitutes 174 kJ/mol, for liquid in the range 900-850 deg - 151 kJ/mol and reaction order in terms of hydrogen is 1.0. For vaporous cadmium in the temperature range 900-700 deg C activation energy constitutes 144 kJ/mol and reaction order in terms of hydrogen is 0.86, for liquid in the range 675-600 deg C 127 kJ/mol and 0.8 respectively. The processes of zinc and cadmium sulfide reduction proceed in kinetic regime and are limited by the rate of chemical reaction

  14. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrel, L.; Chopin, J.

    1996-01-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40 o C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H + ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I 2 ], [IO 3 - ], [H 2 O 2 ] and [H + ]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs

  15. Hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium isotope exchange experiments in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, L.D.; Andrew, P.; Bracco, G.; Conroy, S.; Corti, S.; Ehrenberg, J.; Goodall, D.H.J.; Jarvis, O.N.; Lomas, P.; Loughlin, M.; Peacock, A.T.; Saibene, G.; Sadler, G.; Sartori, R.; Stamp, M.F.; Thomas, P.R.; Belle, P. van (JET Joint Untertaking, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom))

    1992-12-01

    Isotope exchange experiments have been performed in JET using hydrogen, deuterium, and, in the recent preliminary tritium experiment (PTE), tritium. The rate of change-over from one isotope to another involves two quite different time constants. We have modelled this behaviour using a multireservoir model which splits the accessible hydrogenic particles into two groups, each having a different rate of exchange of particles with the plasma. By applying this model to the sequence of discharges during and after the PTE, we can determine the parameters in the model. The resulting fit also gives a good representation of hydrogen/deuterium change-over experiments, indicating that the tritium behaves in the same manner as other hydrogen isotopes, at least as far as recycling is concerned. Discrepancies between the model and the actual measurements of tritium recovery after the PTE lead us to conclude that isotope exchange processes resulting from collisions of molecules with the vessel walls play a significant role in spreading tritrium around the machine. (orig.).

  16. Critical overview on water - hydrogen isotopic exchange; a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculea, Marius

    2002-01-01

    Water - hydrogen isotopic exchange process is attractive due to its high separation factor; it is neither corrosive or pollutant and, when used as a technological process of heavy water production, it requires water as raw material. Its efficiency depends strongly on the catalyst performance and geometry of the isotopic water - hydrogen exchange zone in which the isotopic transfer proceeds in two steps: liquid vapor distillation in the presence of an inert gas and a catalytic reaction in vapor - gas gaseous phase. An overview of the water hydrogen isotopic exchange is presented and technological details of the Trail - Canada facility as well as characteristics of the two pilots operated in Romania with Ni, Cr and hydrophobic catalysts are described. The mathematical approach of the successive water-water vapor-hydrogen isotopic exchange process given is based on a mathematical model worked out earlier by Palibroda. Discrepancies between computation and experimental results, lower than 11% for extreme cases and around 6% for the average range are explained as due to the ratio of the exchange potentials. Assumption is made in the theoretical approach that this ratio is positive and constant all long the column while the measurements showed that it varies within 0.7 and 1.1 at the upper end and within - 2.5 and - 4.4 at the lower end, what indicates a strong end effect. In conclusion it is stressed that a competing technological solution is emerging based on a monothermal electrolytic process or a bithermal - bibaric process both for heavy water and tritium separation process

  17. Microstructure and hydrogen sorption kinetics of Mg nanopowders with catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revesz, A.; Fatay, D.; Spassov, T.

    2007-01-01

    MgH 2 powders were ball-milled with and without catalysts (Nb 2 O 5 ) under hydrogen in a high-energy mill for 10 h. Morphological, structural and microstructural characterization of the nanocomposites, including particle and crystallite size distribution were carried out before and after hydrogen absorption. In order to study the above-mentioned microstructural parameters imaging and X-ray scattering techniques (high-resolution X-ray diffractometry) have been employed. The effect of the particle and grain size on the hydriding/dehydriding kinetics of ball-milled MgH 2 + catalyst powders was analyzed. The grain and particle size reduction enhances substantially the hydriding/dehydriding

  18. O--H charge exchange in cold, dense, hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; Dylla, H.F.

    1977-05-01

    It is pointed out that the accidentally resonant charge exchange reaction, O + + H 0 reverse arrows O 0 + H + , is an important mechanism for causing the loss of singly charged oxygen ions from oxygen contaminated hydrogen plasmas. Results of a Monte Carlo simulation are presented which show that the fraction of oxygen lost because of charge exchange exceeds 1 / 3 when the parameters n/sub e/ approx. 10 13 cm -3 , n/sub H//sup o/ approx. 10 11 cm -3 and T/sub e/ approx. 3 eV are attained

  19. OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

    2011-07-14

    Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

  20. Hydrogen-tritium exchange survey of allosteric effects in hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englander, J.J.; Englander, S.W.

    1987-01-01

    The oxy and deoxy forms of hemoglobin display major differences in H-exchange behavior. Hydrogen-tritium exchange experiments on hemoglobin were performed in the low-resolution mode to observe the dependence of these differences on pH (Bohr effect), organic phosphates, and salt. Unlike a prior report, increasing pH was found to decrease the oxy-deoxy difference monotonically, in general accordance with the alkaline Bohr effect. A prior report that the H-exchange difference between oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin vanishes at pH 9, and thus appears to reflect the Bohr effect alone, was found to be due to the borate buffer used, which at high pH tends to abolish the oxy-deoxy difference in a limited region of the H-exchange curve. Effects on hemoglobin H exchange due to organic phosphates parallel the differential binding of these agents (inositol hexaphosphate more than diphosphoglycerate, deoxy more than oxy, at low pH more than at high pH). Added salt slows H exchange of deoxyhemoglobin and has no effect on the oxy form. These results display the sensitivity of simple H-exchange measurements for finding and characterizing effects on structure and dynamics that may occur anywhere in the protein and help to define conditions for higher resolution approaches that can localize the changes observed

  1. Study on influencing factors for hydrogen isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Mei; Liu Jun; Luo Yangming

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hydrogen-water catalytic exchange reaction offers an approach to hydrogen isotope separation, which can be applied in heavy water detritiation. Purpose: To optimize the operating condition for hydrogen-water catalytic exchange reaction, we analysed the influence of different factors on the transfer coefficient. Methods: In detail, the isotope exchange experiments of H-D system were carried out in a self-designed catalytic bed loaded with hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing with certain volume ratio. The experiments showed the changes of both the transfer coefficient and the pressure drop of column with the changing of the operational temperatures (29℃, 45℃, 60℃ and 75℃), the ratios of gas to liquid (0.58, 1.17, 2.65, 3.54) and the deuterium concentrations (5.05×10 -3 , 1.0144×10 -2 , 2.01×10 -2 ). Results: Results showed that 45℃ is the optimal temperature for operating. The transfer coefficient increases with the increasing of the ratio of gas to liquid in the ranges of 0.58 to 1.17 and 2.65 to 3.56, while decreases with the deuterium concentration increases from 5.05×10 -3 to 2.01×10 -2 . The pressure drop of column increases with increasing of gas flow rate. Conclusions: The experiment proves that the ratio of gas to liquid, the reaction temperature and the deuterium concentration are all important factors, which influence the transfer coefficient of deuterium obviously. The optimal operating condition for hydrogen-water catalytic exchange reaction are as follows: the temperature is 45℃, the ratio of gas to liquid is 3.56, and the deuterium concentration is 2.01×10 -2 . (authors)

  2. Intracellular sodium hydrogen exchange inhibition and clinical myocardial protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Robert M; Lasley, Robert D; Jessel, Andreas; Karmazyn, Morris

    2003-02-01

    Although the mechanisms underlying ischemia/reperfusion injury remain elusive, evidence supports the etiologic role of intracellular calcium overload and oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species. Activation of the sodium hydrogen exchanger (NHE) is associated with intracellular calcium accumulation. Inhibition of the NHE-1 isoform may attenuate the consequences of this injury. Although there is strong preclinical and early clinical evidence that NHE inhibitors may be cardioprotective, definitive proof of this concept in humans awaits the results of ongoing clinical trials.

  3. Empirical Correction for Differences in Chemical Exchange Rates in Hydrogen Exchange-Mass Spectrometry Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Ronald T; Mills, Brittney J; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Esfandiary, Reza; Bishop, Steven M; Middaugh, C Russell; Volkin, David B; Weis, David D

    2017-09-05

    A barrier to the use of hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry (HX-MS) in many contexts, especially analytical characterization of various protein therapeutic candidates, is that differences in temperature, pH, ionic strength, buffering agent, or other additives can alter chemical exchange rates, making HX data gathered under differing solution conditions difficult to compare. Here, we present data demonstrating that HX chemical exchange rates can be substantially altered not only by the well-established variables of temperature and pH but also by additives including arginine, guanidine, methionine, and thiocyanate. To compensate for these additive effects, we have developed an empirical method to correct the hydrogen-exchange data for these differences. First, differences in chemical exchange rates are measured by use of an unstructured reporter peptide, YPI. An empirical chemical exchange correction factor, determined by use of the HX data from the reporter peptide, is then applied to the HX measurements obtained from a protein of interest under different solution conditions. We demonstrate that the correction is experimentally sound through simulation and in a proof-of-concept experiment using unstructured peptides under slow-exchange conditions (pD 4.5 at ambient temperature). To illustrate its utility, we applied the correction to HX-MS excipient screening data collected for a pharmaceutically relevant IgG4 mAb being characterized to determine the effects of different formulations on backbone dynamics.

  4. Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates in tritium, hydrogen and deuterium mixed gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates in H 2 +T 2 , D 2 +T 2 and H 2 +D 2 +T 2 mixed gases, as induced by tritium decay and beta radiation, were experimentally measured by laser Raman spectrometry. Initially a glass cell was filled with T 2 gas to a pressure of 30-40 kPa, and an equivalent partial pressure of H 2 and/or D 2 was added. The first-order hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates were 5.54x10 -2 h -1 for H 2 +T 2 mixed gas and 4.76x10 -2 h -1 for D 2 +T 2 . The actual HT producing rate was nearly equivalent to the rate of DT, but the reverse reaction rate of HT was faster than that of DT. The exchange reaction rates between H, D and T showed the isotope effect, HD>HT>DT. The hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates observed were about twenty times larger than ion formation rates by beta radiation. This result suggests that a free radical chain reaction in hydrogen isotopes is occurring. (orig.)

  5. Tritium removal by hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water on hydrophobic catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, T.; Isomura, S.; Izawa, H.; Nakane, R.

    1980-01-01

    Many kinds of the hydrophobic catalysts for hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water have been prepared. The carriers are the hydrophobic organic materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE), monofluorocarbon-PTFE mixture(PTFE-FC), and styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer(SDB). 0.1 to 2 wt % Pt is deposited on the carriers. The Pt/SDB catalyst has much higher activity than the Pt/PTFE catalyst and the Pt/PTFE-FC catalyst shows the intermediate value of catalytic activity. The observation of electron microscope shows that the degrees of dispersion of Pt particles on the hydrophobic carriers result in the difference of catalytic activities. A gas-liquid separated type column containing ten stages is constructed. Each stage is composed of both the hydrophobic catalyst bed for the hydrogen gas/water vapor isotopic exchange and the packed column type bed for the water vapor/liquid water isotopic exchange. In the column hydrogen gas and water flow countercurrently and hydrogen isotopes are separated

  6. Neutron scattering from myelin revisited: bilayer asymmetry and water-exchange kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denninger, Andrew R. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Demé, Bruno; Cristiglio, Viviana [Institut Laue–Langevin (ILL), CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); LeDuc, Géraldine [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), CS 40220, F-38043 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Feller, W. Bruce [NOVA Scientific Inc., Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States); Kirschner, Daniel A., E-mail: kirschnd@bc.edu [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The structure of internodal myelin in the rodent central and peripheral nervous systems has been determined using neutron diffraction. The kinetics of water exchange in these tissues is also described. Rapid nerve conduction in the central and peripheral nervous systems (CNS and PNS, respectively) of higher vertebrates is brought about by the ensheathment of axons with myelin, a lipid-rich, multilamellar assembly of membranes. The ability of myelin to electrically insulate depends on the regular stacking of these plasma membranes and on the presence of a number of specialized membrane-protein assemblies in the sheath, including the radial component, Schmidt–Lanterman incisures and the axo–glial junctions of the paranodal loops. The disruption of this fine-structure is the basis for many demyelinating neuropathies in the CNS and PNS. Understanding the processes that govern myelin biogenesis, maintenance and destabilization requires knowledge of myelin structure; however, the tight packing of internodal myelin and the complexity of its junctional specializations make myelin a challenging target for comprehensive structural analysis. This paper describes an examination of myelin from the CNS and PNS using neutron diffraction. This investigation revealed the dimensions of the bilayers and aqueous spaces of myelin, asymmetry between the cytoplasmic and extracellular leaflets of the membrane, and the distribution of water and exchangeable hydrogen in internodal multilamellar myelin. It also uncovered differences between CNS and PNS myelin in their water-exchange kinetics.

  7. Hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung, Hong Suk

    2005-01-01

    The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) with a hydrophobic catalyst is ideally suited for extracting tritium from water because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. This process for different hydrogen isotope applications has been developed by AECL. A laboratory scale CECE was built and operated at Mound Laboratory. Belgium and Japan have also developed independently similar processes which are based on a hydrophobic catalyst. The CECE column is composed of an electrolysis cell and a liquid phase catalytic exchange column. The liquid phase catalytic exchange columns having various structures were developed; and it has been recognized that a multistage type and a trickle-bed type are promising. The multistage type gave more successful results than the trickle-bed type. However, the structure of the column is complicated. The trickle-bed type has a significant advantage in that the structure of the column is quite simple: the hydrophobic catalysts or the catalysts and packings are packed within the column. This structure would lead us to a smaller column height than the multistage type. This paper deals with the experiment for the hydrogen isotope exchange in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst and the design of the catalytic column for the CECE to tritium recovery from light water

  8. Hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle-bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung, Hong Suk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) with a hydrophobic catalyst is ideally suited for extracting tritium from water because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. This process for different hydrogen isotope applications has been developed by AECL. A laboratory scale CECE was built and operated at Mound Laboratory. Belgium and Japan have also developed independently similar processes which are based on a hydrophobic catalyst. The CECE column is composed of an electrolysis cell and a liquid phase catalytic exchange column. The liquid phase catalytic exchange columns having various structures were developed; and it has been recognized that a multistage type and a trickle-bed type are promising. The multistage type gave more successful results than the trickle-bed type. However, the structure of the column is complicated. The trickle-bed type has a significant advantage in that the structure of the column is quite simple: the hydrophobic catalysts or the catalysts and packings are packed within the column. This structure would lead us to a smaller column height than the multistage type. This paper deals with the experiment for the hydrogen isotope exchange in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst and the design of the catalytic column for the CECE to tritium recovery from light water.

  9. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange of multiply-protonated cytochrome c ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, T.D.; Guan, Ziqiang; O'Connor, P.B.

    1995-01-01

    Low resolution measurements show gaseous multiply-protonated cytochrome c ions undergo hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange with pseudo first-order kinetics at three distinct exchange levels, suggesting the co-existence of gaseous protein conformations. Although exchange levels first increase with increasing charge values, they decrease at the highest charge values, consistent with solution-phase behavior of cytochrome c, where the native structure unfolds with decreasing pH until folding into a compact A-state at lowest pH. High resolution measurements indicate the presence of at least six H/D exchange levels. Infrared (IR) laser heating and fast collisions via quadrupolar excitation (QE) increase H/D exchange levels (unfolding) while charge-stripping ions to lower charge values can increase or decrease H/D exchange levels (unfolding or folding). Wolynes has suggested studying proteins in vacuo could play an important role in delineating the contributions various forces play in the protein folding process, provided appropriate comparisons can be made between gas-phase and solution-phase structures

  10. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrel, L [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, IPNS, CEN Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Chopin, J [Laboratoire d` Electrochimie Inorganique, ENSSPICAM, Marseille (France)

    1996-12-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40{sup o}C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H{sup +} ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I{sub 2}], [IO{sub 3}{sup -}], [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] and [H{sup +}]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs.

  11. Ultrafast dynamics of hydrogen bond exchange in aqueous ionic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungnam; Odelius, Michael; Gaffney, Kelly J

    2009-06-04

    The structural and dynamical properties of aqueous ionic solutions influence a wide range of natural and biological processes. In these solutions, water has the opportunity to form hydrogen bonds with other water molecules and anions. Knowing the time scale with which these configurations interconvert represents a key factor to understanding the influence of molecular scale heterogeneity on chemical events in aqueous ionic solutions. We have used ultrafast IR spectroscopy and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations to investigate the hydrogen bond (H-bond) structural dynamics in aqueous 6 M sodium perchlorate (NaClO4) solution. We have measured the H-bond exchange dynamics between spectrally distinct water-water and water-anion H-bond configurations with 2DIR spectroscopy and the orientational relaxation dynamics of water molecules in different H-bond configurations with polarization-selective IR pump-probe experiments. The experimental H-bond exchange time correlates strongly with the experimental orientational relaxation time of water molecules. This agrees with prior observations in water and aqueous halide solutions, and has been interpreted within the context of an orientational jump model for the H-bond exchange. The CPMD simulations performed on aqueous 6 M NaClO4 solution clearly demonstrate that water molecules organize into two radially and angularly distinct structural subshells within the first solvation shell of the perchlorate anion, with one subshell possessing the majority of the water molecules that donate H-bonds to perchlorate anions and the other subshell possessing predominantly water molecules that donate two H-bonds to other water molecules. Due to the high ionic concentration used in the simulations, essentially all water molecules reside in the first ionic solvation shells. The CPMD simulations also demonstrate that the molecular exchange between these two structurally distinct subshells proceeds more slowly than the H

  12. Kinetic Study on the Sorption of Te (IV), Ce (III) and Eu (III) on some Inorganic Ion Exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sweify, F.H.; Shehata, M.K.K.; El-Shazly, E.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of Te (IV), Ce (III) and Eu (III) on zirconium phosphate (Zr P) and ceric tungstate under various conditions was studied. Some factors affecting the sorption kinetics of the aforementioned metal ions on both ion exchangers were investigated. These factors were: hydrogen ion concentration in the absence of complexing agents, contact time, particle size of the two mentioned ion exchangers, metal in concentration and temperature. Radioactive isotopes were used for tracing the corresponding elements. Some physical parameters related to the sorption process were calculated from the obtained data

  13. Catalytic heat exchangers for small-scale production of hydrogen - feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, F [Catator AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2002-02-01

    A feasibility study concerning heat-exchanger reactors in small-scale production of hydrogen has been performed on the request of Svenskt Gastekniskt Center AB and SWEP International AB. The basic idea is to implement different catalysts into brazed plate-type heat exchangers. This can be achieved by installing catalytic cylinders in the inlet-and outlet ports of the heat exchangers or through treatment of the plates to render them catalytically active. It is also possible to sandwich catalytically active wire meshes between the plates. Experiments concerning steam reforming of methanol and methane have been performed in a micro-reactor to gather kinetic data for modelling purposes. Performance calculations concerning heat exchanger reactors have then been conducted with Catator's generic simulation code for catalytic reactors (CatalystExplorer). The simulations clearly demonstrate the technical performance of these reactors. Indeed, the production rate of hydrogen is expected to be about 10 nm{sup 3}/h per litre of heat exchanger. The corresponding value for a conventional steam-reforming unit is about 1 nm{sup 3}/h or less per litre of reactor volume. Also, the compactness and the high degree of integration together with the possibilities of mass production will give an attractive cost for such units. Depending on the demands concerning the purity of the hydrogen it is possible to add secondary catalytic steps like water-gas shifters, methanation and selective oxidation, into a one-train unit, i.e. to design an all-inclusive design. Such reactors can be used for the supply of hydrogen to fuel cells. The production cost for hydrogen can be cut by 60 - 70% through the utilisation of heat exchanger reactors instead of conventional electrolysis. This result is primarily a result of the high price for electricity compared to the feed stock prices in steam reforming. It is important to verify the performance calculations and the simulation results through experimental

  14. Catalytic heat exchangers for small-scale production of hydrogen - feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, F. [Catator AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2002-02-01

    A feasibility study concerning heat-exchanger reactors in small-scale production of hydrogen has been performed on the request of Svenskt Gastekniskt Center AB and SWEP International AB. The basic idea is to implement different catalysts into brazed plate-type heat exchangers. This can be achieved by installing catalytic cylinders in the inlet-and outlet ports of the heat exchangers or through treatment of the plates to render them catalytically active. It is also possible to sandwich catalytically active wire meshes between the plates. Experiments concerning steam reforming of methanol and methane have been performed in a micro-reactor to gather kinetic data for modelling purposes. Performance calculations concerning heat exchanger reactors have then been conducted with Catator's generic simulation code for catalytic reactors (CatalystExplorer). The simulations clearly demonstrate the technical performance of these reactors. Indeed, the production rate of hydrogen is expected to be about 10 nm{sup 3}/h per litre of heat exchanger. The corresponding value for a conventional steam-reforming unit is about 1 nm{sup 3}/h or less per litre of reactor volume. Also, the compactness and the high degree of integration together with the possibilities of mass production will give an attractive cost for such units. Depending on the demands concerning the purity of the hydrogen it is possible to add secondary catalytic steps like water-gas shifters, methanation and selective oxidation, into a one-train unit, i.e. to design an all-inclusive design. Such reactors can be used for the supply of hydrogen to fuel cells. The production cost for hydrogen can be cut by 60 - 70% through the utilisation of heat exchanger reactors instead of conventional electrolysis. This result is primarily a result of the high price for electricity compared to the feed stock prices in steam reforming. It is important to verify the performance calculations and the simulation results through

  15. Mechanistic study of the isotopic-exchange reaction between gaseous hydrogen and palladium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outka, D.A.; Foltz, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed mechanism for the isotopic-exchange reaction between gaseous hydrogen and solid palladium hydride is developed which extends previous model for this reaction by specifically including surface reactions. The modeling indicates that there are two surface-related processes that contribute to the overall rate of exchange: the desorption of hydrogen from the surface and the exchange between surface hydrogen and bulk hydrogen. This conclusion is based upon measurements examining the effect of small concentrations of carbon monoxide were helpful in elucidating the mechanism. Carbon monoxide reversibly inhibits certain steps in the exchange; this slows the overall rate of exchange and changes the distribution of products from the reactor

  16. Kinetic stabilities of double, tetra- and hexarosette hydrogen-bonded assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.J.; Neuteboom, Edda E.; Paraschiv, V.; Crego Calama, Mercedes; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    2002-01-01

    A study of the kinetic stabilities of hydrogen-bonded double, tetra-, and hexarosette assemblies, comprising 36, 72, and 108 hydrogen bonds, respectively, is described. The kinetic stabilities are measured using both chiral amplification and racemization experiments. The chiral amplification studies

  17. Functional Dynamics of Hexameric Helicase Probed by Hydrogen Exchange and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radou, Gaël; Dreyer, Frauke N.; Tuma, Roman; Paci, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    The biological function of large macromolecular assemblies depends on their structure and their dynamics over a broad range of timescales; for this reason, it is a significant challenge to investigate these assemblies using conventional experimental techniques. One of the most promising experimental techniques is hydrogen-deuterium exchange detected by mass spectrometry. Here, we describe to our knowledge a new computational method for quantitative interpretation of deuterium exchange kinetics and apply it to a hexameric viral helicase P4 that unwinds and translocates RNA into a virus capsid at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Room-temperature dynamics probed by a hundred nanoseconds of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is sufficient to predict the exchange kinetics of most sequence fragments and provide a residue-level interpretation of the low-resolution experimental results. The strategy presented here is also a valuable tool to validate experimental data, e.g., assignments, and to probe mechanisms that cannot be observed by x-ray crystallography, or that occur over timescales longer than those that can be realistically simulated, such as the opening of the hexameric ring. PMID:25140434

  18. Hydrogen--deuterium exchange in saturated hydrocarbons on α-chromia catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalman, J.; Guczi, L.

    1977-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen--deuterium exchange in methane, ethane, and propane have been studied with unsupported α-chromia as catalyst in the temperature range of 598 to 688 0 K. The apparent activation energies for methane, ethane, and propane are 88, 130, and 84 kJ mol -1 , respectively, similar to those found on chromia gel. The order of reaction with respect to hydrocarbons and deuterium has been determined as also having the kinetic isotope effect. The main initial products are CH 3 D and CD 4 with methane, C 2 H 4 D 2 and C 2 D 6 with ethane, and C 3 H 7 D and C 3 D 8 with propane. A change in product distribution as a function of temperature, conversion, aging, and oxygen--deuterium treatment has been observed. In agreement with the kinetic data and the effect of oxygen, Cr 3+ has been assumed as the active species of the chromia catalyst, whereas Cr 2+ is an inactive site on the surface. There is no direct proof that chromium ion in a valence state higher than 3+ plays an important role in the exchange reaction. It was established that dual Cr 3+ -- Cr 3+ sites are responsible for the formation of ethane-d 2 . After a long deuterium treatment the number of dual sites is decreased, the effect being revealed in the decreased rate of exchange and the small amount of ethane-d 2 . On the contrary, the formation of methane-d 4 is interpreted by the formation of Cr = C bonds by analogy with homogeneous complexes. In the case of propane, the exchange reaction can be adequately interpreted by a π-allyl mechanism

  19. Synergistic methane formation kinetics for hydrogen impact on carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasz, A.A.; Davis, J.W.

    1986-06-01

    A physical/chemical model is presented for the reaction kinetics for methane formation from carbon, due to bombardment by energetic (∼ 100's eV) H + ions and thermal (∼ 1 eV) H 0 atoms. While the model was developed for H + and H 0 , it can be readily applied to non-hydrogenic energetic particles (ions or atoms, e.g., Ar + , He + , He) in combination with thermal (∼ 1 eV) hydrogen (again ions or atoms) impacting on carbon. Both collisional (in the case of the energetic particles) and chemical reaction processes are included. Special cases of sub-eV H 0 alone, energetic H + alone and combined H 0 plus H + were considered and fitted to experimental data. Generally good agreement was found between theoretical predictions and experimental results over the experimental flux and H + energy ranges studied (H 0 flux: 6x10 14 - 7x10 15 H 0 /cm 2 s, H + flux: 6x10 12 - 5x10 15 H + /cm 2 s, H + energy: 300 eV/H + and 1 keV/H + )

  20. Electrostatic influence of local cysteine environments on disulfide exchange kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, G H; Cennerazzo, M J; Karalis, A J; Field, D

    1981-11-10

    The ionic strength dependence of the bimolecular rate constant for reaction of the negative disulfide 5,5'-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) with cysteines in fragments of naturally occurring proteins was determined by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The Debye-Hückel relationship was applied to determine the effective charge at the cysteine and thereby determine the extent to which nearby neighbors in the primary sequence influence the kinetics. Corrections for the secondary salt effect on cysteine pKs were determined by direct spectrometric pH titration of sulfhydryl groups or by observation of the ionic strength dependence of kinetics of cysteine reaction with the neutral disulfide 2,2'-dithiodipyridine. Quantitative expressions was verified by model studies with N-acetyl-cystein. At ionic strengths equal to or greater than 20 mM, the net charge at the polypeptide cysteine site is the sum of the single negative charge of the thiolate anion and the charges of the amino acids immediately preceding and following the cysteine in the primary sequence. At lower ionic strengths, more distant residues influence kinetics. At pH 7.0, 23 degree C, and an ionic strength of 20 mM, rate constants for reaction of the negative disulfide with a cysteine having two positive neighbors, one positive and one neutral neighbor, or two neutral neighbors are 132000, 3350, and 367 s-1 M-1, respectively. This corresponds to a contribution to the activation energy of 0.65- 1.1 kcal/mol per ion pair involved in collision between the cysteine and disulfide regions. The results permit the estimation that cysteine local environments may provide a means of achieving a 10(6)-fold range in rate constants in disulfide exchange reactions in random-coil proteins. This range may prove useful in developing strategies for directing disulfide pairing in synthetic proteins.

  1. Thermodynamic modelling and kinetics of hydrogen absorption associated with phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondor, G.; Lexcellent, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    The intermetallic are used for hydrogen pressure containers in order to avoid leaks in the case of an hybrid container. The hydrogen atoms are absorbed by the intermetallic which act as a hydrogen sponge. This hydrogen absorption must be modelled for the container design. The Pressure-composition isotherms describe the equilibrium. Out of this equilibrium the kinetics are controlled by different processes, without taking into account the phase transformations. The author presents a new model of the p-c isotherms with the hydrogen absorption kinetics. (A.L.B.)

  2. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  3. Measurement and Characterization of Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Chemistry Using Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khirich, Gennady; Holliday, Michael J; Lin, Jasper C; Nandy, Aditya

    2018-03-01

    One-dimensional heteronuclear relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy at 13 C natural abundance successfully characterized the dynamics of the hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction occurring at the N ε position in l-arginine by monitoring C δ in varying amounts of D 2 O. A small equilibrium isotope effect was observed and quantified, corresponding to ΔG = -0.14 kcal mol -1 . A bimolecular rate constant of k D = 5.1 × 10 9 s -1 M -1 was determined from the pH*-dependence of k ex (where pH* is the direct electrode reading of pH in 10% D 2 O and k ex is the nuclear spin exchange rate constant), consistent with diffusion-controlled kinetics. The measurement of ΔG serves to bridge the millisecond time scale lifetimes of the detectable positively charged arginine species with the nanosecond time scale lifetime of the nonobservable low-populated neutral arginine intermediate species, thus allowing for characterization of the equilibrium lifetimes of the various arginine species in solution as a function of fractional solvent deuterium content. Despite the system being in fast exchange on the chemical shift time scale, the magnitude of the secondary isotope shift due to the exchange reaction at N ε was accurately measured to be 0.12 ppm directly from curve-fitting D 2 O-dependent dispersion data collected at a single static field strength. These results indicate that relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy is a robust and general method for studying base-catalyzed hydrogen-deuterium exchange chemistry at equilibrium.

  4. Hydrogen/Chlorine exchange reactions of gaseous carbanions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Cooks, R Graham; Meurer, Eduardo C; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2005-12-01

    Gas-phase reactions of three typical carbanions CH(2)NO(2)(-), CH(2)CN(-), and CH(2)S(O)CH(3)(-) with the chloromethanes CH(2)Cl(2), CHCl(3), and CCl(4), examined by tandem mass spectrometry, show a novel hydrogen/chlorine exchange reaction. For example, reaction between the nitromethyl anion CH(2)NO(2)(-) and carbon tetrachloride CCl(4) forms the ion CHClNO(2)(-). The suggested reaction mechanism involves nucleophilic attack by CH(2)NO(2)(-) at the chlorine of CCl(4) followed by proton transfer within the resulting complex [CH(2)ClNO(2) + CCl(3)(-)] to form CHClNO(2)(-) and CHCl(3). Two other carbanions CH(2)CN(-) and CH(2)S(O)CH(3)(-) also undergo the novel hydrogen/chlorine exchange reactions with CCl(4) but to a much smaller extent, their higher nucleophilicities favoring competitive nucleophilic attack reactions. Proton abstraction is the exclusive pathway in the reactions of these carbanions with CHCl(3). While CH(2)CN(-) and CH(2)S(O)CH(3)(-) promote mainly proton abstraction and nucleophilic displacement in reactions with CH(2)Cl(2), CH(2)NO(2)(-) does not react.

  5. In situ NMR studies of hydrogen storage kinetics and molecular diffusion in clathrate hydrate at elevated hydrogen pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuchi, T. [Okayama Univ., Misasa, Tottori (Japan); Moudrakovski, I.L.; Ripmeester, J.A. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences

    2008-07-01

    The challenge of storing high-density hydrogen into compact host media was investigated. The conventional storage scheme where an aqueous solution is frozen with hydrogen gas is too slow for practical use in a hydrogen-based society. Therefore, the authors developed a faster method whereby hydrogen was stored into gas hydrates. The hydrogen gas was directly charged into hydrogen-free, crystalline hydrate powders with partly empty lattices. The storage kinetics and hydrogen diffusion into the hydrate was observed in situ by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in a pressurized tube cell. At pressures up to 20 MPa, the storage was complete within 80 minutes, as observed by growth of stored-hydrogen peak into the hydrate. Hydrogen diffusion within the crystalline hydrate media is the rate-determining step of current storage scheme. Therefore, the authors measured the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen molecules using the pulsed field gradient NMR method. The results show that the stored hydrogen is very mobile at temperatures down to 250 K. As such, the powdered hydrate media should work well even in cold environments. Compared with more prevailing hydrogen storage media such as metal hydrides, clathrate hydrates have the advantage of being free from hydrogen embrittlement, more chemically durable, more environmentally sound, and economically affordable. It was concluded that the powdered clathrate hydrate is suitable as a hydrogen storage media. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Minimizing Back Exchange in the Hydrogen Exchange-Mass Spectrometry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Benjamin T.; Ricciuti, Alec; Mayne, Leland; Englander, S. Walter

    2012-12-01

    The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) analysis to the hydrogen exchange (HX) proteolytic fragmentation experiment extends powerful HX methodology to the study of large biologically important proteins. A persistent problem is the degradation of HX information due to back exchange of deuterium label during the fragmentation-separation process needed to prepare samples for MS measurement. This paper reports a systematic analysis of the factors that influence back exchange (solution pH, ionic strength, desolvation temperature, LC column interaction, flow rates, system volume). The many peptides exhibit a range of back exchange due to intrinsic amino acid HX rate differences. Accordingly, large back exchange leads to large variability in D-recovery from one residue to another as well as one peptide to another that cannot be corrected for by reference to any single peptide-level measurement. The usual effort to limit back exchange by limiting LC time provides little gain. Shortening the LC elution gradient by 3-fold only reduced back exchange by ~2 %, while sacrificing S/N and peptide count. An unexpected dependence of back exchange on ionic strength as well as pH suggests a strategy in which solution conditions are changed during sample preparation. Higher salt should be used in the first stage of sample preparation (proteolysis and trapping) and lower salt (<20 mM) and pH in the second stage before electrospray injection. Adjustment of these and other factors together with recent advances in peptide fragment detection yields hundreds of peptide fragments with D-label recovery of 90 % ± 5 %.

  7. Minimizing back exchange in the hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Benjamin T; Ricciuti, Alec; Mayne, Leland; Englander, S Walter

    2012-12-01

    The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) analysis to the hydrogen exchange (HX) proteolytic fragmentation experiment extends powerful HX methodology to the study of large biologically important proteins. A persistent problem is the degradation of HX information due to back exchange of deuterium label during the fragmentation-separation process needed to prepare samples for MS measurement. This paper reports a systematic analysis of the factors that influence back exchange (solution pH, ionic strength, desolvation temperature, LC column interaction, flow rates, system volume). The many peptides exhibit a range of back exchange due to intrinsic amino acid HX rate differences. Accordingly, large back exchange leads to large variability in D-recovery from one residue to another as well as one peptide to another that cannot be corrected for by reference to any single peptide-level measurement. The usual effort to limit back exchange by limiting LC time provides little gain. Shortening the LC elution gradient by 3-fold only reduced back exchange by ~2%, while sacrificing S/N and peptide count. An unexpected dependence of back exchange on ionic strength as well as pH suggests a strategy in which solution conditions are changed during sample preparation. Higher salt should be used in the first stage of sample preparation (proteolysis and trapping) and lower salt (<20 mM) and pH in the second stage before electrospray injection. Adjustment of these and other factors together with recent advances in peptide fragment detection yields hundreds of peptide fragments with D-label recovery of 90% ± 5%.

  8. Kinetics of hydrogen adsorption on MgH{sub 2}/CNT composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rather, Sami ullah, E-mail: rathersami@gmail.com; Taimoor, Aqeel Ahmad; Muhammad, Ayyaz; Alhamed, Yahia Abobakor; Zaman, Sharif Fakhruz; Ali, Arshid Mahmood

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Hydrogen adsorption comparisons of commercial, milled, and MgH{sub 2} composite. • Hydrogen adsorption capacity and kinetics improves tremendously by CNT embedding. • Unsteady state modeling and simulation of adsorption kinetics. - Abstract: Magnesium hydride (MgH{sub 2})–carbon nanotubes (CNT) composite has been prepared by high-energy ball milling method and their experimental and kinetic hydrogen adsorption studies was assessed. Hydrogen adsorption studies were performed by Sievert’s volumetric apparatus and kinetic evaluation was conducted by surface chemistry and Langmuir–Hinshelwood–Hougen–Watson (LHHW) type mode. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were performed. Hydrogen adsorption capacity of commercial MgH{sub 2}, milled MgH{sub 2}, and MgH{sub 2}/CNT composite are found to be 0.04, 0.057, and 0.059 g (H{sub 2})/g (MgH{sub 2}) at 673 K and hydrogen pressure of 4.6 MPa. Addition of 5 wt% of CNTs to MgH{sub 2} proved to be very critical to enhance hydrogen adsorption as well as to improve its kinetics. It was observed that hydrogen adsorption is not in quasi-state equilibrium and is modeled using kinetic rate laws.

  9. Process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas and catalyst assembly therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A bithermal, catalytic, hydrogen isotope exchange process between liquid water and hydrogen gas to effect concentration of the deuterium isotope of hydrogen is described. Liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted with one another and with at least one catalytically active metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table; the catalyst body has a water repellent, gas and water vapor permeable, organic polymer or resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone resin coating, so that the isotope exchange takes place by two simultaneously occurring, and closely coupled in space, steps and concentration is effected by operating two interconnected sections containing catalyst at different temperatures. (U.S.)

  10. Estimation of Hydrogen-Exchange Protection Factors from MD Simulation Based on Amide Hydrogen Bonding Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Hee; Venable, John D.; Steckler, Caitlin; Cellitti, Susan E.; Lesley, Scott A.; Spraggon, Glen; Brock, Ansgar

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) studies have provided critical insight into our understanding of protein folding, structure and dynamics. More recently, Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HX-MS) has become a widely applicable tool for HX studies. The interpretation of the wealth of data generated by HX-MS experiments as well as other HX methods would greatly benefit from the availability of exchange predictions derived from structures or models for comparison with experiment. Most reported computational HX modeling studies have employed solvent-accessible-surface-area based metrics in attempts to interpret HX data on the basis of structures or models. In this study, a computational HX-MS prediction method based on classification of the amide hydrogen bonding modes mimicking the local unfolding model is demonstrated. Analysis of the NH bonding configurations from Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation snapshots is used to determine partitioning over bonded and non-bonded NH states and is directly mapped into a protection factor (PF) using a logistics growth function. Predicted PFs are then used for calculating deuteration values of peptides and compared with experimental data. Hydrogen exchange MS data for Fatty acid synthase thioesterase (FAS-TE) collected for a range of pHs and temperatures was used for detailed evaluation of the approach. High correlation between prediction and experiment for observable fragment peptides is observed in the FAS-TE and additional benchmarking systems that included various apo/holo proteins for which literature data were available. In addition, it is shown that HX modeling can improve experimental resolution through decomposition of in-exchange curves into rate classes, which correlate with prediction from MD. Successful rate class decompositions provide further evidence that the presented approach captures the underlying physical processes correctly at the single residue level. This assessment is further strengthened in a comparison of

  11. Nickel speciation and complexation kinetics in freshwater by ligand exchange and DPCSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Bin Xue,; Jansen, S.; Prasch, A.; Sigg, L.

    2001-01-01

    A technique of ligand exchange with DMG (dimethylglyoxime) and DPCSV was applied to determine Ni speciation in lake, river, and groundwater samples. The working conditions related to ligand-exchange equilibrium were optimized, and the ligand-exchange kinetics were examined. The observed

  12. Efficiency of Al2O3 supported palladium sorbents in the process of hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, B.M.; Perevezentsev, A.N.; Yasenkov, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    It is found that in the hydrogen-palladium system while applying the metal to aluminium oxide a considerable increase of the heterogeneous hydrogen isotopic exchange rate is observed due to the increase of its specific surface at 167-298 K temperatures and 350-500 Torr hydrogen pressures. It is shown that in the process of thermal treatment of the supported palladium sorbent resulting in reconstruction of the carrier porous structure, as well as in increasing the metal crystal size, the change of the stage, limiting the isotopic exchange process, occurs. The values of the rate and energy of activation of the hydrogen isotopic exchange are presented [ru

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of nitrobenzene hydrogenation to phenylhydroxylamine in rhenium thiocomplexes solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenyako, G.I.; Belousov, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made on kinetics of nitrobenzene hydrogenation to phenylhydroxylamine in dimethylformamide solutions of rhenium thiocomplexes. The mechanism of hydrogenation was suggested. Formation of hydride catalyst complex represents the first stage of the process. Kinetic equation derived on the basis of suggested mechanism corresponds satisfactorily with experimental results. Thermodynamic parameters of separate process stages calculated on the basis of equilibrium constant values testify as well to the benefit of suggested mechanism

  14. Contribution to the study of catalytic hydrogen-deuterium exchange between hydrogen and hydrocarbons; Contribution a l'etude de l'echange catalytique hydrogene-deuterium entre l'hydrogene et les hydrocarbures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravoire, J

    1958-12-20

    The hydrogen-deuterium exchange between molecular hydrogen and hydrocarbons over a platinum and charcoal catalyst was studied in a static system. The change in isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen was followed by a thermal conductivity method. Cyclo-pentane and cyclohexane were chosen because of their stability. A reversible inactivation of the catalyst was observed with both hydrocarbons. The reasons for this inactivation are unknown but it was shown that reactivation led to satisfactory reproducibility. A kinetic study was done with cyclohexane in the range 30 to 160 deg. C, and 40 to 360 mm for the pressure of hydrogen, and 10 to 70 mm for the pressure of cyclohexane. The order of the reaction with respect to cyclohexane pressure is always close to zero; the order with respect to that of hydrogen is 0.5 above 100 deg. C. It decreases with increasing temperature and becomes negative (-0.5 at 30 deg. C), characterizing an inhibition by hydrogen. At the same time, the apparent activation energy goes from 6 to 13 kcal/mole. (author) [French] L'echange hydrogene-deuterium entre l'hydrogene moleculaire et les hydrocarbures sur un catalyseur au platine depose sur charbon a ete etudie a l'aide d'un appareil statique. La teneur en deuterium de L'hydrogene moleculaire a ete suivie par conductibilite thermique. Le cyclopentane et le cyclohexane ont ete choisis en raison de leur stabilite. Une desactivation reversible du catalyseur pendant son utilisation a ete observee pour les deux hydrocarbures. Les causes de la desactivation n'ont pas ete determinees, mais il a ete montre qu'une reactivation conduisait une reproductibilite satisfaisante. Une etude cinetique a ete conduite avec le cyclohexane dans le domaine: 30 deg C - 160 deg C, 40 mm - 360 mm comme pression d'hydrogene, 10 mm - 70 mm comme pression de cyclohexane. L'ordre par rapport a la pression de cyclohexane est toujours voisin de zero; l'ordre par rapport a la pression d'hydrogene est de 0,5 au-dessus de

  15. Metal and hydrogen catalysis in isotopic hydrogen exchange in some biologically important heterocyclic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncel, E.; Joly, H.A.; Jones, J.R.; Onyido, I.

    1989-01-01

    This study reports on the catalytic roles of metal and hydrogen ions in tritium exchange in some heterocyclic substrates which occur as residues in many biologically important molecules. We have found that detritiation of 1-methyl[2- 3 H]imidazole is inhibited by a number of metal ions. As well, inhibition of exchange rates was noted with Ag(I) and Cu(II) for [2- 3 H]thiazole and 1-methyl[8- 3 H]inosine, with Ag(I) for [2- 3 H]benzothiazole, and with Cu(II) for 1-methyl[8- 3 H]guanosine. A complete mechanistic description, which includes the various metal ion-coordinated species generated under the experimental conditions, is presented. The results demonstrate the reactivity order: protonated >> metal-coordinated >> neutral substrates. The differential catalytic effects of metal and hydrogen ions in these processes are discussed in terms of the extent of charge developed on the ligating heteroatom in the reaction intermediate. (author). 13 refs.; 1 fig

  16. Difluoroborane, a hydrogen-deuterium exchange catalyst. Application to pentaborane (9) and methylpentaborane (9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, G.A.; Porter, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    The hydrogen exchange reaction of pentaborane with difluoroborane suggests the existence of a multicentered intermediate similar to that proposed by DeStefano and Porter for the difluoroborane-borazine exchange reaction. A similar intermediate may apply to the borane-pentaborane exchange reaction

  17. Hydrogen desorption kinetics from zirconium hydride and zirconium metal in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride is important in many nuclear design and safety applications. In this paper, a coordinated experimental and modeling study has been used to explicitly demonstrate the applicability of existing kinetic theories for hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride and α-zirconium. A static synthesis method was used to produce δ-zirconium hydride, and the crystallographic phases of the zirconium hydride were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Three obvious stages, involving δ-zirconium hydride, a two-phase region, and α-zirconium, were observed in the hydrogen desorption spectra of two zirconium hydride specimens with H/Zr ratios of 1.62 and 1.64, respectively, which were obtained using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). A continuous, one-dimensional, two-phase moving boundary model, coupled with the zero- and second-order kinetics of hydrogen desorption from δ-zirconium hydride and α-zirconium, respectively, has been developed to reproduce the TDS experimental results. A comparison of the modeling predictions with the experimental results indicates that a zero-order kinetic model is valid for description of hydrogen flux away from the δ-hydride phase, and that a second-order kinetic model works well for hydrogen desorption from α-Zr if the activation energy of desorption is optimized to be 70% of the value reported in the literature

  18. Measuring the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of proteins at high spatial resolution by mass spectrometry: overcoming gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium scrambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2014-10-21

    Proteins are dynamic molecules that exhibit conformational flexibility to function properly. Well-known examples of this are allosteric regulation of protein activity and ligand-induced conformational changes in protein receptors. Detailed knowledge of the conformational properties of proteins is therefore pertinent to both basic and applied research, including drug development, since the majority of drugs target protein receptors and a growing number of drugs introduced to the market are therapeutic peptides or proteins. X-ray crystallography provides a static picture at atomic resolution of the lowest-energy structure of the native ensemble. There is a growing need for sensitive analytical tools to explore all of the significant molecular structures in the conformational landscape of proteins. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently emerged as a powerful method for characterizing protein conformational dynamics. The basis of this method is the fact that backbone amides in stable hydrogen-bonded structures (e.g., α-helices and β-sheets) are protected against exchange with the aqueous solvent. All protein structures are dynamic, however, and eventually all of the protecting hydrogen bonds will transiently break as the protein--according to thermodynamic principles--cycles through partially unfolded states that correspond to excited free energy levels. As a result, all of the backbone amides will eventually become temporarily solvent-exposed and exchange-competent over time. Consequently, a folded protein in D2O will gradually incorporate deuterium into its backbone amides, and the kinetics of the process can be readily monitored by mass spectrometry. The deuterium uptake kinetics for the intact protein (global exchange kinetics) represents the sum of the exchange kinetics for the individual backbone amides. Local exchange kinetics is typically achieved by using pepsin digestion under quench conditions (i.e., under cold

  19. Comparative study on ion-isotopic exchange reaction kinetics by application of tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhande, R.S.; Singare, P.U.

    2007-01-01

    The radioactive isotopes 131 I and 82 Br were used to trace the ion-isotopic exchange reactions using industrial grade ion exchange resins Amberlite IRA-400. The experiments were performed to understand the effect of temperature and concentration of ionic solution on kinetics of exchange reactions. Both the exchange reactions were greatly influenced by rise in temperature, which result in higher percentage of ions exchanged. For bromide ion-isotopic exchange reactions, the calculated values of specific reaction rate/min -1 , and amount of ions exchanged/mmol were obtained higher than that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reactions under identical experimental conditions. The observed variation in the results for two ion-isotopic exchange reactions was due to the difference in the ionic size of bromide and iodide ions. (orig.)

  20. The role of surface oxides on hydrogen sorption kinetics in titanium thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjixenophontos, Efi; Michalek, Lukas; Roussel, Manuel; Hirscher, Michael; Schmitz, Guido

    2018-05-01

    Titanium is presently discussed as a catalyst to accelerate the hydrogenation kinetics of hydrogen storage materials. It is however known that H absorption in Ti decisively depends on the surface conditions (presence or absence of the natural surface oxide). In this work, we use Ti thin films of controlled thickness (50-800 nm) as a convenient tool for quantifying the atomic transport. XRD and TEM investigations allow us to follow the hydrogenation progress inside the film. Hydrogenation of TiO2/Ti bi-layers is studied at 300 °C, for different durations (10 s to 600 min) and at varying pressures of pure H2 atmosphere. Under these conditions, the hydrogenation is found to be linear in time. By comparing films with and without TiO2, as well as by studying the pressure dependence of hydrogenation, it is demonstrated that hydrogen transport across the oxide represents the decisive kinetic barrier rather than the splitting of H2 molecules at the surface. Hydrogenation appears by a layer-like reaction initiated by heterogeneous nucleation at the backside interface to the substrate. The linear growth constant and the H diffusion coefficient inside the oxide are quantified, as well as a reliable lower bound to the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in Ti is derived. The pressure dependence of hydrogen absorption is quantitatively modelled.

  1. Kinetic Characteristics of Hydrogen Transfer Through Palladium-Modified Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriev, I. S.; Frolov, V. Yu.; Bolotin, S. N.; Baryshev, M. G.; Kopytov, G. F.

    2018-01-01

    The paper deals with hydrogen transfer through Pd-23%Ag alloy membrane, the surface of which is modified by the electrolytic deposition of highly dispersed palladium. The dependence between the density of hydrogen flow and its excess pressure on the input surface of membrane is well approximated by the first-order curve. This fact indicates that the process of hydrogen permeability is defined by its dissociation on the input surface. Activation energy of this process is 47.9 kJ/mol which considerably exceeds that of the process of hydrogen transfer through palladium (22-30 kJ/mol). This confirms the fact that the chemisorption is a rate-controlling step of the hydrogen transfer through membrane.

  2. Kinetics of the excited muonic hydrogen in the mixtures of hydrogen isotopes in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystritskij, V.M.; Kravtsov, A.V.; Popov, N.P.

    1989-01-01

    De-excitation of the excited muonic hydrogen in the mixture of hydrogen isotopes and helium is considered. The method is proposed which allows one to determine the rates of the muon transfer from the excited muonic hydrogen to helium nuclei, as well as the probability of the direct muon atomic capture by nuclei of hydrogen isotopes. 20 refs.; 4 figs

  3. Mechanisms of hydrogen exchange in proteins from nuclear magnetic resonance studies of individual tryptophan indole NH hydrogens in lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedin, R.E.; Delepierre, M.; Dobson, C.M.; Poulsen, F.M.

    1982-01-01

    The individual rates of solvent exchange of the six tryptophan indole NH hydrogens of lysozyme in 2 H 2 O have been measured over a wide range of temperatures by using 1 H NMR. Two distinct mechanisms for exchange have been identified, one characterized by a high activation energy and the other by a much lower activation energy. The high-energy process has been shown to be associated directly with the cooperative thermal unfolding of the protein and is the dominant mechanism for exchange of the most slowly exchanging hydrogen even 15 0 C below the denaturation temperature. Rate constants and activation energies for the folding and unfolding reactions were obtained from the experimental exchange rates. At low temperatures, a lower activation energy mechanism is dominant for all hydrogens, and this can be associated with local fluctuations in the protein structure which allow access of solvent. The relative exchange rates and activation energies can only qualitatively be related to the different environments of the residues in the crystal structure. There is provisional evidence that a mechanism intermediate between these two extremes may be significant for some hydrogens under restricted conditions

  4. Kinetics of exchange of a tracer in soil and clay samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotti, J.C.; Facetti, J.F.

    1971-01-01

    The kinetics of exchange of a Na tracer in soil and clay samples, provides with a reliable and convenient method for the determination of the different soil fraction ahd their CEC values, In addition, the analysis of the exchanges curves can be used for the identification of the clay present in the soil

  5. Kinetics of exchange of a tracer in soil and clay samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanotti, J C; Facetti, J F [Asuncion Nacional Univ. (Paraguay). Inst. de Ciencias

    1971-01-01

    The kinetics of exchange of a Na tracer in soil and clay samples, provides with a reliable and convenient method for the determination of the different soil fraction ahd their CEC values, In addition, the analysis of the exchanges curves can be used for the identification of the clay present in the soil.

  6. Some considerations on the treatment of the kinetic data of heterogeneous isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koernyei, J.; Szirtes, L.; Lakatos, M.

    1985-01-01

    A direct curve simulation treatment was worked out for the evaluation of the kinetic curves of heterogeneous isotope exchange. Based on the data obtained by a personal computer, some considerations were made on the transport processes in the fully and half exchanged sodium forms of crystalline zirconium phosphate. (author)

  7. Electrochemical permeation tests on the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption of palladium and iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dafft, E.G.

    1977-01-01

    Electrochemical permeation tests were performed to investigate the kinetics of the hydrogen development and hydrogen absorption. The cathode side of the samples was galvanostatically cathodically polarized in different electrolyte solutions with and without additions. THe hydrogen atoms diffusing out of the opposite side for iron and α-palladium were oxidized with potentiostatic, sufficiently anodic polarization. The thus registered stationary current is proportional to the hydrogen activity on the cathode side. Test apparatus and conditions are described. The measurements on iron are discussed. (orig./HPOE) [de

  8. Improved hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of magnesium-based alloy via addition of yttrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tai; Li, Qiang; Liu, Ning; Liang, Chunyong; Yin, Fuxing; Zhang, Yanghuan

    2018-02-01

    Yttrium (Y) is selected to modify the microstructure of magnesium (Mg) to improve the hydrogen storage performance. Thereby, binary alloys with the nominal compositions of Mg24Yx (x = 1-5) are fabricated by inexpensive casting technique. Their microstructure and phase transformation during hydriding and dehydriding process are characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. The isothermal hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics are also measured by a Sievert's-type apparatus at various temperatures. Typical multiphase structures of binary alloy can be clearly observed. All of these alloys can reversibly absorb and desorb large amount of hydrogen at proper temperatures. The addition of Y markedly promotes the hydrogen absorption kinetics. However, it results in a reduction of reversible hydrogen storage capacity. A maximum value of dehydrogenation rate is observed with the increase of Y content. The Mg24Y3 alloy has the optimal desorption kinetic performance, and it can desorb about 5.4 wt% of hydrogen at 380 °C within 12 min. Combining Johnson-Mehl-Avrami kinetic model and Arrhenius equation, the dehydrogenation activation energy of the alloys are evaluated. The Mg24Y3 alloy also has the lowest dehydrogenation activation energy (119 kJ mol-1).

  9. Beneficial effect of carbon on hydrogen desorption kinetics from Mg–Ni–In alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermak, J.; Kral, L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Beneficial effect of graphitic carbon was observed. ► The effect is optimal up to c opt . ► Above c opt , phase decomposition occurs. ► Indium in studied Mg–Ni-based alloys prevents oxidation. - Abstract: In the present paper, hydrogen desorption kinetics from hydrided Mg–Ni–In–C alloys was investigated. A chemical composition that substantially accelerates hydrogen desorption was found. It was observed that carbon improves the hydrogen desorption kinetics significantly. Its beneficial effect was found to be optimum close to the carbon concentration of about c C ≅ 5 wt.%. With this composition, stored hydrogen can be desorbed readily at temperatures down to about 485 K, immediately after hydrogen charging. This can substantially shorten the hydrogen charging/discharging cycle of storage tanks using Mg–Ni-based alloys as hydrogen storage medium. For higher carbon concentrations, unwanted phases precipitated, likely resulting in deceleration of hydrogen desorption and lower hydrogen storage capacity.

  10. Methylamine-hydrogen exchange Part III. Physicochemical properties of amide-amine solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasa, K.; Dave, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Different physicochemical properties of potassium methylamide/methylamine solutions have been compiled and reviewed. These properties will be quite useful in design calculations for plants based on amine-hydrogen exchange for the production of heavy water. (author)

  11. Tailoring Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides towards Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state hydrogen storage using various materials is expected to provide the ultimate solution for safe and efficient on-board storage. Complex hydrides have attracted increasing attention over the past two decades due to their high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. In this account, we review studies from our lab on tailoring the thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage in complex hydrides, including metal alanates, borohydrides and amides. By changing the material composition and structure, developing feasible preparation methods, doping high-performance catalysts, optimizing multifunctional additives, creating nanostructures and understanding the interaction mechanisms with hydrogen, the operating temperatures for hydrogen storage in metal amides, alanates and borohydrides are remarkably reduced. This temperature reduction is associated with enhanced reaction kinetics and improved reversibility. The examples discussed in this review are expected to provide new inspiration for the development of complex hydrides with high hydrogen capacity and appropriate thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage. © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A Simulation Study of Inter Heat Exchanger Process in SI Cycle Process for Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jae Sun; Cho, Sung Jin; Choi, Suk Hoon; Qasim, Faraz; Lee, Euy Soo; Park, Sang Jin; Lee, Heung N.; Park, Jae Ho; Lee, Won Jae

    2014-01-01

    SI Cyclic process is one of the thermochemical hydrogen production processes using iodine and sulfur for producing hydrogen molecules from water. VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) can be used to supply heat to hydrogen production process, which is a high temperature nuclear reactor. IHX (Intermediate Heat Exchanger) is necessary to transfer heat to hydrogen production process safely without radioactivity. In this study, the strategy for the optimum design of IHX between SI hydrogen process and VHTR is proposed for various operating pressures of the reactor, and the different cooling fluids. Most economical efficiency of IHX is also proposed along with process conditions

  13. Kinetics of the radiation-induced exchange reactions of H2, D2, and T2: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyper, J.W.; Briggs, C.K.

    1978-01-01

    Mixtures of H 2 --T 2 or D 2 --T 2 will exchange to produce HT or DT due to catalysis by the tritium β particle. The kinetics of the reaction D 2 + T 2 = 2DT may play an important role in designing liquid or solid targets of D 2 --DT--T 2 for implosion fusion, and distillation schemes for tritium cleanup systems in fusion reactors. Accordingly, we have critically reviewed the literature for information on the kinetics and mechanism of radiation-induced self-exchange reactions among the hydrogens. We found data for the reaction H 2 + T 2 = 2HT in the gas phase and developed a scheme based on these data to predict the halftime to equilibrium for any gaseous H 2 + T 2 mixture at ambient temperature with an accuracy of +-10 percent. The overall order of the H 2 + T 2 = 2HT reaction is 1.6 based on an initial rate treatment of the data. The most probable mechanism for radiation-induced self-exchange reaction is an ion-molecule chain mechanism

  14. Kinetics of transesterification of methyl acetate and n-octanol catalyzed by cation exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yong; Gao, Li; Li, Xiying; Mao, Liqun [Henan University, Kaifeng (China); Wei, Min [Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou (China)

    2013-05-15

    The transesterification kinetics of methyl acetate with n-octanol to octyl acetate and methanol were studied using Amberlyst 15 as catalyst in a batch stirred reactor. The influence of the agitation speed, particle size, temperature, catalyst loading, and initial reactants molar ratio was investigated in detail. A pseudo-homogeneous (PH) kinetic model was applied to correlate the experimental data in the temperature range of 313.15 K to 328.15 K. The estimated kinetic parameters made the calculated results in good agreement with the experimental data. A kinetic model describing the transesterification reaction catalyzed by cation exchange resins was developed.

  15. Separation of rate processes for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water in packed columns 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Hartog, J. den; Goodale, J.W.; Rolston, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    Wetproofed platinum catalysts in packed columns promote isotopic exchange between counter-current streams of hydrogen saturated with water vapour and liquid water. The net rate of deuterium transfer from isotopically enriched hydrogen has been measured and separated into two rate processes involving the transfer of deuterium from hydrogen to water vapour and from water vapour to liquid. These are compared with independent measurements of the two rate processes to test the two-step successive exchange model for trickle bed reactors. The separated transfer rates are independent of bed height and characterize the deuterium concentrations of each stream along the length of the bed. The dependences of the transfer rates upon hydrogen and liquid flow, hydrogen pressure, platinum loading and the effect of dilution of the hydrophobic catalyst with inert hydrophilic packing are reported. The results indicate a third process may be important in the transfer of deuterium between hydrogen and liquid water. (author)

  16. Process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes using a catalyst packed bed assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; den Hartog, J.; Molson, F.W.R.

    1978-01-01

    A process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of gaseous hydrogen and liquid water is described, wherein the streams of liquid water and gaseous hydrogen are simultaneously brought into contact with one another and a catalyst packed bed assembly while at a temperature in the range 273 0 to 573 0 K. The catalyst packed bed assembly may be composed of discrete carrier bodies of e.g. ceramics, metals, fibrous materials or synthetic plastics with catalytically active metal crystallites selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table, partially enclosed in and bonded to the carrier bodies by a water repellent, water vapor and hydrogen gas permeable, porous, polymeric material, and discrete packing bodies having an exterior surface which is substantially hydrophilic and relatively noncatalytically active with regard to hydrogen isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and water vapor to that of the catalyst bodies

  17. Kinetic Monte Carlo study on the evolution of silicon surface roughness under hydrogen thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Junzhuan; Pan, Lijia; Yu, Linwei; Zheng, Youdou; Shi, Yi, E-mail: yshi@nju.edu.cn

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • The KMC method is adopted to investigate the relationships between surface evolution and hydrogen thermal treatment conditions. • The reduction in surface roughness is divided into two stages at relatively low temperatures, both exhibiting exponential dependence on the time. • The optimized surface structure can be obtained by precisely adjusting thermal treatment temperatures and hydrogen pressures. - Abstract: The evolution of a two-dimensional silicon surface under hydrogen thermal treatment is studied by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, focusing on the dependence of the migration behaviors of surface atoms on both the temperature and hydrogen pressure. We adopt different activation energies to analyze the influence of hydrogen pressure on the evolution of surface morphology at high temperatures. The reduction in surface roughness is divided into two stages, both exhibiting exponential dependence on the equilibrium time. Our results indicate that a high hydrogen pressure is conducive to obtaining optimized surfaces, as a strategy in the applications of three-dimensional devices.

  18. Adsorption behaviour and kinetics of exchange of Zn2+ and Eu3+ ions on a composite ion exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcos, T.N.

    2007-01-01

    Equilibria and kinetics of exchange of both Zn2+ and Eu3+ ions on a composite ion-exchanger, cobalt hexacyanocobaltate (III) (CoHCC) incorporated in polyacrylonitrile (PAN), has been studied. The apparent capacity of CoHCC-PAN for Zn2+ and Eu3+ was determined and found to be 0.353 and 0.69 meq/g, respectively. The higher capacity for Eu3+ ions than that for Zn2+ ions is due to the higher electrostatic interaction strength of the higher charge ion with the surface. Freundlich and Langmiur adsorption isotherms were used to investigate solute (Zn2+ or Eu3+) exchange phenomenon at the liquid/solid interface. The results indicated that both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms fit well for both Zn2+ and Eu3+. Sorption data have been also treated with the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation. The kinetics of Zn2+ or Eu3+ sorption on the composite seems to show that the reaction was proceed via two steps. The first one was fast and probably due to adsorption followed by a slow exchange reaction. In view of the data obtained on the effect of particle size and metal ion concentrations on the rate of exchange reaction, it is concluded that the mechanism for both ions was chemical control. Generally, it seems that there are two exchange sites chemically equivalent but present in pores of different sizes which lead to different degrees of dehydration of the ions sorbed on the two sites

  19. Thermodynamic and kinetics models of hydrogen absorption bound to phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondor, G.; Lexcellent, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    In order to design hydrogen gaseous pressure tanks, the absorption (desorption) of hydrogen has to be described and modelled. The equilibrium state can be described by the 'H 2 gas pressure - H 2 composition in the intermetallic compounds - isotherms' (PCI) curves. Several models of PCI curves already exist. At the beginning of the absorption, the hydrogen atoms and the intermetallic compounds form a solid solution (α phase). When the hydrogen concentration increases, a phase transformation appears changing the α solid solution into an hydride (β phase) (solid solution + H 2 ↔ hydride). When all the solid solution has been transformed into hydride, the absorbed hydrogen atoms are in β phase. A new thermodynamic model has been developed in order to take into account this transition phase. The equilibrium state is then given by a relation between the H 2 gas pressure and the H 2 concentration in the intermetallic compound for a fixed external temperature. Two kinetics models have been developed too; at first has been considered that the kinetics depend only of the entire concentration in the intermetallic compound and of the difference between the applied pressure and the equilibrium pressure. Then, has been considered that the hydrogen concentration changes in the metallic matrix. In this last case, for each hydrogenation process, the absorption velocity is calculated to determine the slowest local process which regulates the local evolution of the hydrogen concentration. These two models are based on the preceding thermodynamic model of the PCI curves. (O.M.)

  20. KINETIC BEHAVIOR IN THE HYDROGENATION OF FURFURAL OVER IR CATALYSTS SUPPORTED ON TIO2

    OpenAIRE

    ROJAS, HUGO; MARTÍNEZ, JOSÉ J.; REYES, PATRICIO

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the liquid-phase hydrogenation of furfuraldehyde to furfuryl alcohol over Ir catalysts supported over TiO2 was studied in the temperature range of 323 to 373 K. The effect of furfural concentration, hydrogen pressure and the solvent effect were also studied. A high selectivity towards furfuryl alcohol was demonstrated. Initial rates describes the order global of the reaction. The experimental data could also be explained using the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model with of a single-si...

  1. Kinetics of Butyrate, Acetate, and Hydrogen Metabolism in a Thermophilic, Anaerobic, Butyrate-Degrading Triculture

    OpenAIRE

    Ahring, Birgitte K.; Westermann, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism were determined with butyrate-limited, chemostat-grown tricultures of a thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium together with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic rod. Kinetic parameters were determined from progress curves fitted to the integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation. The apparent half-saturation constants, Km, for butyrate, acetate, and dissolved hyd...

  2. On the proton exchange contribution to electron-hydrogen atom elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignaco, J.A.; Tort, A.C.

    1979-05-01

    It is shown that the exchange contribution to the electron-proton potential Born term in elastic electron-hydrogen atom scattering arises as the non relativistic limit from the exchange of a proton between the two participant electrons - calculated from quantum electrodynamics including properly bound states (as solution of Bethe - Salpeter equation). (Author) [pt

  3. On line determination of deuterium in hydrogen water exchange reaction by mass spectrometry. IRP-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, J.D.; Alphonse, K.P.; Mishra, Sushama; Prabhu, S.A.; Mohan, Sadhana; Tangri, V.K.

    2007-01-01

    The Deuterium (D)/Hydrogen (H) analysis at low Concentration is generally carried out by Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometer is specially designed for the measurement of Mass 2 and 3 ratio. The Deuterium analysis of water and hydrogen in concentration range of a few ppm to about 1% plays an important role in the Heavy Water Production Plants. For the enrichment of the Deuterium concentration in H 2 O by H 2 - H 2 O exchange a catalyst is essential as reaction is relatively slow. Heavy Water Division has developed in house Platinum based catalyst for the isotopic exchange of Hydrogen and Water

  4. Resonance charge exchange between excited states in slow proton-hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Kato, Daiji

    2010-01-01

    The theory of resonance charge exchange in slow collisions of a proton with a hydrogen atom in the excited state is developed. It extends the Firsov-Demkov theory of resonance charge exchange to the case of degenerate initial and final states. The theory is illustrated by semiclassical and quantum calculations of charge exchange cross sections between states with n=2 in parabolic and spherical coordinates. The results are compared with existing close-coupling calculations.

  5. Dissolution kinetics of lead telluride in alkali solutions of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilova, M.G.; Sveshnikova, L.L.; Stavitskaya, T.A.; Repinskij, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Dissolution kinetics of lead telluride in alkali solutions of hydrogen peroxide was investigated. Dependences of change of PbTe dissolution rate on concentration of hydrogen peroxide and alkali in the solution were obtained. It is shown that dissolution rate of lead telluride is affected by dissolution rate of lead oxide, representing the product of ReTe dissolution. The obtained regularities can be explained by change of solution structure with increase of KOH concentration and by the state of hydrogen peroxide in the solution

  6. A feasible kinetic model for the hydrogen oxidation on ruthenium electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, M.S.; Gennero de Chialvo, M.R.; Chialvo, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen oxidation reaction (hor) was studied on a polycrystalline ruthenium electrode in H 2 SO 4 solution at different rotation rates (ω). The experimental polarization curves recorded on steady state show the existence of a maximum current with a non-linear dependence of the current density on ω 1/2 . On the basis of the Tafel-Heyrovsky-Volmer kinetic mechanism, coupled with a process of inhibition of active sites by the reversible electroadsorption of hydroxyl species, it was possible to appropriately describe the origin of the maximum current. The corresponding set of kinetic parameters was also calculated from the correlation of the experimental results with the proposed kinetic model.

  7. Measurement of atomic-hydrogen spin-exchange parameters at 0.5 K using a cryogenic hydrogen maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, M.E.; Huerlimann, M.D.; Hardy, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    Using a cryogenic hydrogen maser, suitably modified to have electronic control of both the resonance frequency and the quality factor of the external cavity, we have measured a number of spin-exchange parameters for an atomic-hydrogen (H) gas at a temperature of 0.5 K. These results are relevant to the ultimate achievable frequency stability for cryogenic H masers and, when coupled with accurate calculations of the spin-exchange parameters, serve as a sensitive test of the H-H interatomic potentials. We find evidence for a frequency shift not predicted by semiclassical theories of spin exchange. In the context of a fully quantum mechanical hydrogen-atom spin-exchange theory [B. J. Verhaar et al., Phys. Rev. A 35, 3825 (1987) and J. M. V. A. Koelman et al., Phys. Rev. A 38, 3535 (1988)], this frequency shift is attributed to the influence of hyperfine interactions during spin-exchange collisions. Our findings are generally in agreement with these predictions; however, the sign of the hyperfine-induced frequency shift appears to differ from theory. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. NMR studies of proton exchange kinetics in aqueous formaldehyde solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivlin, Michal; Eliav, Uzi; Navon, Gil

    2014-05-01

    Aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, formalin, are commonly used for tissue fixation and preservation. Treatment with formalin is known to shorten the tissue transverse relaxation time T2. Part of this shortening is due to the effect of formalin on the water T2. In the present work we show that the shortening of water T2 is a result of proton exchange between water and the major constituent of aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, methylene glycol. We report the observation of the signal of the hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol at 2ppm to high frequency of the water signal that can be seen at low temperatures and at pH range of 6.0±1.5 and, at conditions where it cannot be observed by the single pulse experiment, it can be detected indirectly through the water signal by the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment. The above finding made it possible to obtain the exchange rate between the hydroxyl protons of the methylene glycol and water in aqueous formaldehyde solutions, either using the dispersion of the spin-lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame (1/T1ρ) or, at the slow exchange regime, from the line width hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol. The exchange rate was ∼10(4)s(-1) at pH 7.4 and 37°C, the activation energy, 50.2kJ/mol and its pH dependence at 1.1°C was fitted to: k (s(-1))=520+6.5×10(7)[H(+)]+3.0×10(9)[OH(-)]. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Kinetics of hydrogen reduction of titanium-doped molybdenum dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Qian; Marin-Flores, Oscar; Hu, Shuozhen; Scudiero, Louis; Ha, Su; Norton, M. Grant

    2015-01-01

    Ti-doped MoO 2 was synthesized to broaden the oxygen-to-carbon ratio operating range of MoO 2 for partial oxidation of long-chain hydrocarbons by increasing the redox stability. The structure modification causes the hydrogen reduction mechanism to change from three-dimensional nuclei growth with an activation energy of 61.3 kJ mol −1 to a three-dimensional hydrogen diffusion limited model with an activation energy of 317.9 kJ mol −1 . Because of the enhanced redox stability, Ti-doped MoO 2 has potential as an alternative anode in direct liquid-fed solid oxide fuel cells

  10. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange reactions over illuminated and nonilluminated TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange between H 2 , gaseous H 2 O, and the surface hydroxyls of TiO 2 , and oxygen isotope exchange between O 2 , CO 2 , CO, H 2 O vapor, and the hydroxyls over TiO 3 were studied at room temperature in the dark and under illumination. Hydrogen isotope exchange between H 2 O and the hydroxyls occurred rapidly in the dark, but the exchange involving H 2 did not occur at all even under illumination. Oxygen isotope exchange among H 2 O vapor, CO 2 , and the hydroxyls easily took place in the dark, but the exchange involving O 2 required band-gap illumination. Dioxygen isotope equilibration was much faster than the other photoexchange reactions. Although the oxygen exchange between O 2 and illuminated TiO 2 has been considered to involve lattice-oxygen exchange, the present experiments revealed that the hydroxyls of TiO 2 mainly participate in the exchange reaction. The oxygen exchange between O 2 and H 2 O vapor was strongly inhibited by H 2 O vapor itself probably because oxygen adsorption was retarded by adsorbed water. Oxygen in CO was not exchanged with the other substrates under any conditions tested

  11. Isotope exchange kinetic of phosphorus in soils from Pernambuco State -Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, F.J.B. de.

    1989-12-01

    The applicability of isotopic exchange kinetics of 32 p to characterize phosphorus available to plants and to diagnose the reactivity of soil-fertilizer-P in six soils from Pernambuco is described. This methodology was compared with anion exchange resin, isotopic exchange equilibrium methods (E-value and L-value) and P absorption by plants. The first greenhouse experiment had the following treatments: 1) with P and, 2) with addition of 43.7 mg P/Kg of soil, incubated for O, 42 and 84 days before seeding. The kinetic of isotopic exchange (KIE), resin-P and E-value were determined before seeding and after harvesting pearl millet grown for 42 days. Results indicated that the KIE parameters rated the soils more efficiently, in terms of available P and soil-fertilizer-P reactivity, than resin-P, E-value and L-value. (author). 38 refs, 2 figs, 18 tabs

  12. Investigation of hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rate in mixed gas (H2 and D2) at pressure up to 200 MPa using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, V.V.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Musyayev, R.K.; Gurkin, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a relevant method for obtaining objective data on isotopic exchange rate in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes, since it allows one to determine a gaseous mix composition in real time without sampling. We have developed a high-pressure fiber-optic probe to be used for obtaining protium Raman spectra under pressures up to 400 MPa and we have recorded spectral line broadening induced by molecule collisions starting from ∼ 40 MPa. Using this fiber-optic probe we have performed experiments to study isotopic exchange kinetics in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes (protium-deuterium) at pressures up to 200 MPa. Preliminary results show that the dependence of the average isotopic exchange rate related to pressure take unexpected values at the very beginning of the time evolution. More work is required to understand this inconsistency

  13. Investigation of hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rate in mixed gas (H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}) at pressure up to 200 MPa using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhonov, V.V.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Musyayev, R.K.; Gurkin, A.I. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Raman spectroscopy is a relevant method for obtaining objective data on isotopic exchange rate in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes, since it allows one to determine a gaseous mix composition in real time without sampling. We have developed a high-pressure fiber-optic probe to be used for obtaining protium Raman spectra under pressures up to 400 MPa and we have recorded spectral line broadening induced by molecule collisions starting from ∼ 40 MPa. Using this fiber-optic probe we have performed experiments to study isotopic exchange kinetics in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes (protium-deuterium) at pressures up to 200 MPa. Preliminary results show that the dependence of the average isotopic exchange rate related to pressure take unexpected values at the very beginning of the time evolution. More work is required to understand this inconsistency.

  14. The hydrogen evolution and oxidation kinetics during overdischarging of sealed nickel-metal hydride batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayeb, A.; Otten, W.M.; Mank, A.J.G.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen evolution and oxidation kinetics in NiMH batteries have been investigated under temperature-controlled, steady-state, overdischarging conditions within a temperature range of 10 and 50°C and at discharging currents of 1–330 mA (0.0009 to 0.3 C rate). In situ Raman spectroscopic analyses

  15. Synthesis of Mg2Cu nanoparticles on carbon supports with enhanced hydrogen sorption kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Au, Y.S.; Ponthieu, M.; van Zwienen, M.; Zlotea, C.; Cuevas, F.; de Jong, K.P.; de Jongh, P.E.

    2013-01-01

    The reaction kinetics and reversibility for hydrogen sorption were investigated for supported Mg2Cu nanoparticles on carbon. A new preparation method is proposed to synthesize the supported alloy nanoparticles. The motivation of using a support is to separate the nanoparticles to prevent sintering

  16. Application of personal computers to study the kinetics of heterogeneous isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koernyei, Jozsef; Lakatos, Mihaly

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of some heterogeneous isotopic exchange reactions of alkaline metal ions between solid (crystalline zirconium phosphate) and liquid phases were investigated. Ion diffusion in solid phase was considered as rate controlling step. The Laplace transformation solution of Fick's II law was used with a Sinclair ZX Spectrum personal computer. In some cases the exchange reaction should be regarded as a superposition of diffusion and a first order process. (author)

  17. Gadolinium-hydrogen ion exchange of zirconium phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. C.; Power, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The Gd(+3)/H(+) ion exchange on a commercial zirconium phosphate ion exchanger was investigated in chloride, sulfate, and phosphate solutions of Gd(+3) at gadolinium concentrations of 0.001 to 1 millimole per cc and in the pH range of 0 to 3.5. Relatively low Gd(+3) capacities, in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 millimole per g of ion exchanger were found at room temperature. A significant difference in Gd(+3) sorption was observed, depending on whether the ion exchanger was converted from initial conditions of greater or lesser Gd(+3) sorption than the specific final conditions. Correlations were found between decrease in Gd(+3) capacity and loss of exchanger phosphate groups due to hydrolysis during washing and between increase in capacity and treatment with H3PO4. Fitting of the experimental data to ideal ion exchange equilibrium expressions indicated that each Gd(+3) ion is sorbed on only one site of the ion exchanger. The selectivity quotient was determined to be 2.5 + or - 0.4 at room temperature on gadolinium desorption in chloride solutions.

  18. Thermodynamics and kinetics of graphene chemistry: a graphene hydrogenation prototype study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Buu Q; Gordon, Mark S

    2016-12-07

    The thermodynamic and kinetic controls of graphene chemistry are studied computationally using a graphene hydrogenation reaction and polyaromatic hydrocarbons to represent the graphene surface. Hydrogen atoms are concertedly chemisorped onto the surface of graphene models of different shapes (i.e., all-zigzag, all-armchair, zigzag-armchair mixed edges) and sizes (i.e., from 16-42 carbon atoms). The second-order Z-averaged perturbation theory (ZAPT2) method combined with Pople double and triple zeta basis sets are used for all calculations. It is found that both the net enthalpy change and the barrier height of graphene hydrogenation at graphene edges are lower than at their interior surfaces. While the thermodynamic product distribution is mainly determined by the remaining π-islands of functionalized graphenes (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013, 15, 3725-3735), the kinetics of the reaction is primarily correlated with the localization of the electrostatic potential of the graphene surface.

  19. Ion-Isotopic Exchange Reaction Kinetics using Anion Exchange Resins Dowex 550A LC and Indion-930A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.U. Singare

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the characterization of ion exchange resins Dowex 550A LC and Indion-930A based on kinetics of ion-isotopic exchange reactions for which the short lived radioactive isotopes 131I and 82Br were used as a tracers. The study was performed for different concentration of ionic solution varying from 0.001 mol/L to 0.004 mol/L and temperature in the range of 30.0 °C to 45.0 °C. The results indicate that as compared to bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction, iodide exchange reaction take place at the faster rate. For both the ion-isotopic exchange reactions, under identical experimental conditions, the values of specific reaction rate increases with increase in the ionic concentration and decreases with rise in temperature. It was observed that at 35.00C, 1.000 g of ion exchange resins and 0.002 mol/L labeled iodide ion solution for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction, the values of specific reaction rate (min-1, amount of ion exchanged (mmol, initial rate of ion exchange (mmol/min and log Kd were 0.270, 0.342, 0.092 and 11.8 respectively for Dowex 550A LC resin, which was higher than the respective values of 0.156, 0.241, 0.038 and 7.4 as that obtained for Indion-930A resins. From the results, it appears that Dowex 550A LC resins show superior performance over Indion-930A resins under identical experimental conditions.

  20. Kinetics of hydrogen in chromospheres of red dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruevich, E.A.; Katsova, M.M.; Livshits, M.A.; AN SSSR, Moscow

    1990-01-01

    A method is suggested and solution is conducted of the stationary equations for an 8-level hydrogen atom with an approximate account for lines radiative transfer in an optically thick layer. Ionization and excitation of hydrogen atoms are caused by electron collisions; the influence of photospheric radiation was neglected. The medium stays motionless, and the photon escape from the layer is connected with gradual diffusion in frequency during multiple scatterings. Mean over the layer probabilities of photon escape are introduced into the stationary equations. They are determined for a finite-thickness layer with an uniform distribution of primary photon sources and with an absorption coefficient accounting for Stark and Doppler effects. As an example of application of the calculations, an interpretation is presented of the data on the Balmer decrement in the maximum of the stellar flare of YZ CMi on March 4, 1985. It is shown that the transition from a steep Balmer decrement to a mildly sloping one is due to a decrease of the photon escape probability in the higher members of Balmer series, i.e. the lines later than H γ

  1. Understanding the kinetics of sulfate reduction in brines by hydrogen: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, D.M.

    1988-07-01

    Experiments were conducted with mixtures of hydrogen gas and each of PBB1 and PBB3 brines to examine the reduction kinetics of sulfate in high ionic strength solutions. Results from the experiments with brines showed that the kinetics of sulfate reduction is slower in high ionic strength solutions than the kinetics in low ionic strength solutions. However, the kinetic mechanism does not seem to alter the slow kinetics, but the addition of much larger quantities of sulfide, about 40 mM, does accelerate the reduction of sulfate. Since the proposed reaction mechanism for the reduction of sulfate by hydrogen gas involves the reaction of sulfide with sulfate, slow initial kinetics in the absence of sulfide is understandable, but also implies an unknown rate-limiting reaction. Precipitation of calcium sulfate(s) and calcium sulfide may limit the sulfide and sulfate concentrations to low values. The coexistence of anhydrite and oldhamite may indicate a part of the Ca-S-H 2 O that has not yet been investigated. 6 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Ion Exchange Kinetics of CO2+ Ions In the Particles of Some Organic and Inorganic Sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, I.M.; Abou-Messalam, M.M; Shady, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    The rate of exchange and diffusion mechanism of Co 2+ and Zn 2+ on the hydrogen form of cerium (IV) antimonate Ce/Sb and polyacrylamide acrylic acid resin impregnated with zirconium phosphate p(A M-A A) Zr-P was determined at different reaction temperatures 25,45 and 60 degree. The exchange rate was controlled by a particle diffusion mechanism and a limited batch technique. The effective diffusion coefficients of exchange reactions, values of activation energies, entropy of activation have been calculated and were confirmed by the B t versus t plots

  3. Kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution:. ionic strength effects and temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, Frank; Elias, Horst; Wannowius, Klaus J.

    Conductometry was used to study the kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite, HSO -3, by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous non-buffered solution at the low concentration level of 10 -5-10 -6 M, typically found in cloud water. The kinetic data confirm that the rate law reported for the pH range 3-6 at higher concentration levels, rate= kH·[H +]·[HSO -3]·[H 2O 2], is valid at the low concentration level and at low ionic strength Ic. At 298 K and Ic=1.5×10 -4 M, third-order rate constant kH was found to be kH=(9.1±0.5)×10 7 M -2 s -1. The temperature dependence of kH led to an activation energy of Ea=29.7±0.9 kJ mol -1. The effect of the ionic strength (adjusted with NaCl) on rate constant kH was studied in the range Ic=2×10 -4-5.0 M at pH=4.5-5.2 by conductometry and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The dependence of kH on Ic can be described with a semi-empirical relationship, which is useful for the purpose of comparison and extrapolation. The kinetic data obtained are critically compared with those reported earlier.

  4. Kinetics of ethylenediaminetetraacetate exchange of americium (3) with copper (2) in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, S.I.; Martynenko, L.I.; Pechurova, N.I.

    1985-01-01

    By the method of spectrophotometry exchange kinetics in the AmA - -Cu 2+ , where A 4- -ethylenediaminetetraacetate, is studied. The values of exchange rate constants and thermodynamic activation parameters have been found. It is shown that exchange of central ions is rialized according to the dissociative mechanism with formation of intermediate protonated complexes and according to the associative mechanism with formation of binuclear intermediates. The exchange mechanisms identity for AmA - and LnA - , where Ln 3+ -RE cations of cerium subgroup is proved. It is assumed that values of activation entropy in exchange processes are determined by the radius of the leaving cation and of activation enthalpy - by the peculiarities of the electronic structure

  5. Kinetics of isotopic exchange between calcium molybdate and molybdate ions in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atun, G.; Ayar, N.; Bilgin, B. [Istanbul Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry, Fac. of Engineering; Bodur, N.; Ayyildiz, H. [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-07-01

    The heterogeneous isotopic anion exchange kinetics and equilibria between calcium molybdate and sodium molybdate solutions have been studied by using {sup 99}Mo as tracer in batch experiments. The values of exchange ratio lower than unity suggest that rate-limiting step is particle diffusion process and the effect of re-crystallization can be neglected. The self-diffusion coefficients calculated using both Paterson's and Nernst-Plank approximations are increased by the temperature. The observed values for isotope exchange characteristics such as exchange fractions, exchanging amounts and fractional attainment of equilibrium are consistent with those of their calculated values. Activation energy and thermodynamic parameters calculated based on transition state theory indicate the existence of both energy and entropy barrier in the system. (orig.)

  6. Kinetics of isotopic exchange between calcium molybdate and molybdate ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atun, G.; Ayar, N.; Bilgin, B.

    2007-01-01

    The heterogeneous isotopic anion exchange kinetics and equilibria between calcium molybdate and sodium molybdate solutions have been studied by using 99 Mo as tracer in batch experiments. The values of exchange ratio lower than unity suggest that rate-limiting step is particle diffusion process and the effect of re-crystallization can be neglected. The self-diffusion coefficients calculated using both Paterson's and Nernst-Plank approximations are increased by the temperature. The observed values for isotope exchange characteristics such as exchange fractions, exchanging amounts and fractional attainment of equilibrium are consistent with those of their calculated values. Activation energy and thermodynamic parameters calculated based on transition state theory indicate the existence of both energy and entropy barrier in the system. (orig.)

  7. Kinetic study of ion exchange in phosphoric acid chelating resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brikci-Nigassa, Mounir; Hamouche, Hafida

    1995-11-01

    Uranium may be recovered as a by product of wet phosphoric acid using a method based on specific ion exchange resins. These resins called chelates contain amino-phosphonic functional groups. The resin studied in this work is a purolite S-940; uranium may be loaded on this resin from 30% P2O5 phosphoric acid in its reduced state. The influence of different parameters on the successive steps of the process have been studied in batch experiments: uranium reduction, loading and oxydation. Uranium may be eluted with ammonium carbonate and the resin regeneration may be done with hydrochloric acid.Ferric ions reduce the effective resin capacity considerably and inert fixation conditions are proposed to enhance uranium loading

  8. Nonlocal exchange and kinetic-energy density functionals for electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glossman, M.D.; Rubio, A.; Balbas, L.C.; Alonso, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlocal weighted density approximation (WDA) to the exchange and kinetic-energy functionals of many electron systems proposed several years ago by Alonso and Girifalco is used to compute, within the framework of density functional theory, the ground-state electronic density and total energy of noble gas atoms and of neutral jellium-like sodium clusters containing up to 500 atoms. These results are compared with analogous calculations using the well known Thomas-Fermi-Weizsacker-Dirac (TFWD) approximations for the kinetic (TFW) and exchange (D) energy density functionals. An outstanding improvement of the total and exchange energies, of the density at the nucleus and of the expectation values is obtained for atoms within the WDA scheme. For sodium clusters the authors notice a sizeable contribution of the nonlocal effects to the total energy and to the density profiles. In the limit of very large clusters these effects should affect the surface energy of the bulk metal

  9. Two-photon exchange correction to the hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomalak, Oleksandr [Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Institut fuer Kernphysik and PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Mainz (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    We reevaluate the Zemach, recoil and polarizability corrections to the hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen expressing them through the low-energy proton structure constants and obtain the precise values of the Zemach radius and two-photon exchange (TPE) contribution. The uncertainty of TPE correction to S energy levels in muonic hydrogen of 105 ppm exceeds the ppm accuracy level of the forthcoming 1S hyperfine splitting measurements at PSI, J-PARC and RIKEN-RAL. (orig.)

  10. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange for Metabolomics Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Hossein; Karanji, Ahmad K.; Majuta, Sandra; Maurer, Megan M.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2018-02-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) in combination with gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) is evaluated as an analytical method for small-molecule standard and mixture characterization. Experiments show that compound ions exhibit unique HDX reactivities that can be used to distinguish different species. Additionally, it is shown that gas-phase HDX kinetics can be exploited to provide even further distinguishing capabilities by using different partial pressures of reagent gas. The relative HDX reactivity of a wide variety of molecules is discussed in light of the various molecular structures. Additionally, hydrogen accessibility scoring (HAS) and HDX kinetics modeling of candidate ( in silico) ion structures is utilized to estimate the relative ion conformer populations giving rise to specific HDX behavior. These data interpretation methods are discussed with a focus on developing predictive tools for HDX behavior. Finally, an example is provided in which ion mobility information is supplemented with HDX reactivity data to aid identification efforts of compounds in a metabolite extract.

  11. Charge exchange of muons in gases: I. Kinetic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.E.

    1983-06-01

    Kinetic equations for the spin density operators of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic states of the positive muon are obtained for the description of the slowing-down process encountered when high energy muons thermalize in a single component gas. The motion of this two species system is generated by the Liouville superoperators associated with the diamagnetic and paramagnetic spin Hamiltonians and by time-dependent rate superoperators which depict the probabilities per collision that an electron is captured or lost. These rates are translational averages of the appropriate Boltzmann collision operators. That is, they are momentum and position integrals of the product of either the electron capture or loss total cross section with the single particle translational density operators for the muon (or muonium) and a gas particle. These rates are time dependent because the muon (or muonium) translational density operator is time dependent. The initial amplitudes and phases of the observed thermal spin polarization in μSR experiments are then obtained in terms of the spin density operators emerging from the stopping regime

  12. Charge exchange of muons in gases. Kinetic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Kinetic equations for the spin-density operators of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic states of the positive muon are obtained for the description of the slowing-down process encountered when high-energy muons thermalize in a single-component gas. The motion of this two-species system is generated by the Liouville superoperators associated with the diamagnetic and paramagnetic spin Hamiltonians and by time-dependent rate superoperators which depict the probabilities per collision that an electron is captured or lost. These rates are translational averages of the appropriate Boltzmann collision operators. That is, they are momentum and position integrals of the product of either the electron capture or loss total cross section with the single-particle translational density operators for the muon (or muonium) and a gas particle. These rates are time dependent because the muon (or muonium) translational density operator is time dependent. The initial amplitudes and phases of the observed thermal spin polarization in muon-spin-rotation (μSR) experiments are then obtained in terms of the spin-density operators emerging from the stopping regime

  13. New method for the hydrogen isotope exchange reaction in a hydrophobic catalyst bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Y.; Kikuchi, M.; Yusa, H.

    1982-01-01

    To improve the isotope exchange reaction efficiency between water and hydrogen, a new reactor in which water mists and hydrogen gas react cocurrently was studied. To apply this to the enrichment of tritium in heavy water, a dual temperature isotope exchange reactor which is composed of cocurrent low temperature reactors and the usual countercurrent high temperature reactor was proposed and analyzed using a McCabe-Thiele diagram. By utilizing cocurrent reactors, in combination, the necessary catalyst volume can be reduced to one-tenth as compared with the usual countercurrent low temperature reactor. 17 refs

  14. A new type separation column for the water-hydrogen isotope catalytic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Alekseev, I.A.; Trenin, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic water/hydrogen isotope exchange process is by right considered the most attractive for the solution a number of urgent problems of hydrogen isotope separation. A new type exchange reaction column is described and studied in details by computer simulation and with the help of McCabe-Thiele diagrams. It is shown that the new column in comparison with a traditional one needs less catalyst quantity and a smaller diameter for the solving of the same separation tasks. Generalized calculation data are presented in graphical form

  15. Surface modification of a proton exchange membrane and hydrogen storage in a metal hydride for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lisa

    Interest in fuel cell technology is rising as a result of the need for more affordable and available fuel sources. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells involve the catalysis of a fuel to release protons and electrons. It requires the use of a polymer electrolyte membrane to transfer protons through the cell, while the electrons pass through an external circuit, producing electricity. The surface modification of the polymer, NafionRTM, commonly researched as a proton exchange membrane, may improve efficiency of a fuel cell. Surface modification can change the chemistry of the surface of a polymer while maintaining bulk properties. Plasma modification techniques such as microwave discharge of an argon and oxygen gas mixture as well as vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis may cause favorable chemical and physical changes on the surface of Nafion for improved fuel cell function. A possible increase in hydrophilicity as a result of microwave discharge experiments may increase proton conductivity. Grafting of acrylic acid from the surface of modified Nafion may decrease the permeation of methanol in a direct methanol fuel cell, a process which can decrease efficiency. Modification of the surface of Nafion samples were carried out using: 1) An indirect Ar/O2 gas mixture plasma investigating the reaction of oxygen radicals with the surface, 2) A direct Ar/O2 gas mixture plasma investigating the reaction of oxygen radicals and VUV radiation with the surface and, 3) VUV photolysis investigating exclusively the interaction of VUV radiation with the surface and any possible oxidation upon exposure to air. Acrylic acid was grafted from the VUV photolysed Nafion samples. All treated surfaces were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze the grafted Nafion samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurements were used to analyze experiments 2 and 3. Using hydrogen as fuel is a

  16. Searching out the hydrogen absorption/desorption limiting reaction factors: Strategies allowing to increase kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeaiter, Ali, E-mail: ali.zeaiter@femto-st.fr; Chapelle, David; Nardin, Philippe

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A macro scale thermodynamic model that simulates the response of a FeTi-X hydride tank is performed, and validated experimentally. • A sensibility study to identify the most influent input variables that can changes very largely the reaction rate. - Abstract: Hydrogen gas has become one of the most promising energy carriers. Main breakthrough concerns hydrogen solid storage, specially based on intermetallic material use. Regarding the raw material abundance and cost, the AB type alloy FeTi is an auspicious candidate to store hydrogen. Its absorption/desorption kinetics is a basic hindrance to common use, compared with more usual hydrides. First, discussions based on literature help us identifying the successive steps leading to metal hydriding, and allow to introduce the physical parameters which drive or limit the reaction. This analysis leads us to suggest strategies in order to increase absorption/desorption kinetics. Attention is then paid to a thermofluidodynamic model, allowing to describe a macroscopic solid storage reactor. Thus, we can achieve a simulation which describes the overall reaction inside the hydrogen reactor and, by varying the sub-mentioned parameters (thermal conductivity, the powder granularity, environment heat exchange…), we attempt to hierarchy the reaction limiting factors. These simulations are correlated to absorption/desorption experiments for which pressure, temperature and hydrogen flow are recorded.

  17. Poisoning by carbon monoxide in the hydrogen exchange reaction between deuterium gas and water preadsorbed on a platinum--alumina catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, I.; Tamaru, K.

    1979-01-01

    Poisoning by carbon monoxide in the exchange reaction between deuterium and the water preadsorbed on a platinum--alumina catalyst was studied, by measuring not only the rate of reaction but also its kinetic behavior and the adsorption of reactants on the catalyst surface. The shape of the poisoning curve is closely associated with the kinetic behavior and exhibited an abrupt change on freezing the adsorbed water below 273 0 K. When the rate is proportional to deuterium pressure and independent of the amount of water adsorbed, the exchange rate dropped sharply by carbon monoxide adsorbed of a few percent coverage without any marked changes in the amount and the rate of hydrogen adsorption on the platinum surface. However, at temperatures lower than 273 0 K and at higher deuterium pressures, the rate depends not on the deuterium pressure but on the amount of water adsorbed. The migration of hydrogen in or through the adsorbed water is seemingly sufficiently suppressed by freezing to control the overall reaction rate. In this case, a small amount of adsorption of carbon monoxide did not show any toxicity, but then a steep poisoning started accompanying a change in the kinetic behavior. It was accordingly demonstrated that the mechanism of the reaction may be better understood by studying poisoning and measuring adsorption, overall rate, and kinetic behavior

  18. Atmospheric pressure photo ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry--a method to differentiate isomers by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-12-01

    In this report, a method for in-source hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange at atmospheric pressure is reported. The method was named atmospheric pressure photo ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (APPI HDX MS). H/D exchange was performed by mixing samples dissolved in toluene with CH3OD solvent and analyzing the mixture using atmospheric pressure photo ionization mass spectrometry (APPI-MS). The APPI HDX spectra obtained with contact times between the analyte solution and methanol-OD (CH3OD) of atmospheric pressure. H/D exchange can be performed in any laboratory with a mass spectrometer and a commercial APPI source. Using this method, multiple H/D exchanges of aromatic hydrogen and/or H/D exchange of active hydrogen were observed. These results demonstrated that H/D exchange can be used to distinguish between isomers containing primary, secondary, and tertiary amines, as well as pyridine and pyrrole functional groups.

  19. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have measured the 13 C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D 2 O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D 2 O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The 13 C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the 13 C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier

  20. Kinetics of the high temperature oxygen exchange reaction on 238PuO2 powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiting, Christofer E.; Du, Miting; Felker, L. Kevin; Wham, Robert M.; Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen exchange reactions performed on PuO 2 suggest the reaction is influenced by at least three mechanisms: an internal chemical reaction, surface mobility of active species/defects, and surface exchange of gaseous oxygen with lattice oxygen. Activation energies for the surface mobility and internal chemical reaction are presented. Determining which mechanism is dominant appears to be a complex function including at least specific surface area and temperature. Thermal exposure may also impact the oxygen exchange reaction by causing reductions in the specific surface area of PuO 2 . Previous CeO 2 surrogate studies exhibit similar behavior, confirming that CeO 2 is a good qualitative surrogate for PuO 2 , in regards to the oxygen exchange reaction. Comparison of results presented here with previous work on the PuO 2 oxygen exchange reaction allows complexities in the previous work to be explained. These explanations allowed new conclusions to be drawn, many of which confirm the conclusions presented here. - Highlights: • PuO 2 Oxygen exchange kinetics can be influenced by at least 3 different mechanisms. • An internal chemical reaction controls the rate at high temperature and large SSA. • Surface mobility and surface exchange influence rate at lower temperatures and SSA. • Exchange temperatures may alter SSA and make data difficult to interpret.

  1. Kinetic study of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase in a flow-mix microcalorimetric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidaleo, Marcello; Lavecchia, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by the enzyme catalase was studied at pH 7.4 in the temperature range 10-30 deg. C. Experiments were performed by the LKB-2277 Thermal Activity Monitor equipped with a flow-mix cylinder. The calorimetric reaction unit was schematised as a tubular reactor operating under plug-flow conditions. A first-order kinetic expression, with respect to both the substrate and the enzyme, was used to describe the rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Regression analysis of calorimetric data provided a molar reaction enthalpy of -87.55 kJ mol -1 and an activation energy of 11 kJ mol -1 . Analysis of model residuals and the normal probability plot indicated that the results obtained were statistically significant

  2. Hydrogen isotope exchange in a metal hydride tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report describes a model of the displacement of one hydrogen isotope within a metal hydride tube by a different isotope in the gas phase that is blown through the tube. The model incorporates only the most basic parameters to make a clear connection to the theory of open-tube gas chromatography, and to provide a simple description of how the behavior of the system scales with controllable parameters such as gas velocity and tube radius. A single tube can be seen as a building block for more complex architectures that provide higher molar flow rates or other advanced design goals.

  3. Exchange reaction of acetylene-d2 with hydrogen chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bopp, A.F.; Kern, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    A mixture containing 3 percent each of the reactants C 2 D 2 and HCl in an Ne--Ar diluent was studied over the temperature range 1650 to 2600 0 K utilizing a shock tube coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Plots of the mole fractions f of the exchange products, DCl and C 2 HD, revealed two distinct regions of growth: (a) an initial low conversion region characterized by an induction period t/sub i/; and (b) a region of accelerated exchange during which exchange products were formed with a quadratic dependence of the reaction time. These two regions labeled a and b were combined using two empirical equations, 1 - f/sub a//f/sub eq,a/ = exp [-k/sub a/[M]t], where t less than or equal to t/sub i/, and 1 - f/sub b//f/sub eq,b/ = exp [-k/sub b/[M](t - t/sub i/) 2 ], in order to represent the entire reaction profile at any given temperature within the interval investigated. The Arrhenius parameters for k/sub a/ and k/sub b/ were determined to be 10 11 . 15+-0 . 30 exp (-19990 +- 2850/RT) and 10 16 . 40+-0 . 41 exp (-31480 +- 4200/RT), respectively, for DCl and 10 11 . 69+-0 . 29 exp (-19150 +- 2740/RT) and 10 15 . 24+-0 . 34 exp (-17620 +- 3480/RT) for C 2 HD. The units for k/sub a/ are cm 3 mol -1 sec -1 and cm 3 mol -1 sec -2 for k/sub b/. Activation energies are reported in cal mol -1 . Comparison with the profiles obtained for acetylene pyrolysis strongly suggests that the mechanism for the exchange is atomic. Furthermore, the exchange experiments indicate that the initial step in the pyrolysis of acetylene is the disproportionation reaction, 2C 2 H 2 → C 2 H + C 2 H 3

  4. Kinetics of the exchange of oxygen between carbon dioxide and carbonate in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, C.K.; Silverman, D.N.

    1975-01-01

    A kinetic analysis of the exchange of oxygen between carbon dioxide and carbonate ion in alkaline, aqueous solutions is presented. The exchange was observed by placing 18 O-labeled carbonate, not enriched in 13 C, into solution with 13 C-enriched carbonate, not enriched in 18 O. The rate of depletion of 18 O from the 12 C-containing species and the rate of appearance of 18 O in the 13 C-containing species was measured by mass spectrometry. From these data, the second-order rate constant for the reaction between carbon dioxide and carbonate which results in the exchange of oxygen at 25 0 is 114 +- 11 M -1 sec -1 . It is emphasized that this exchange of oxygen between species of CO 2 in solution must be recognized in studies using 18 O labels to determine the fate of CO 2 in biochemical and physiological processes. (auth)

  5. Kinetics of hydrogen evolution in the thermal dissociation of the hydride ZrNiH /SUB 2.8/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernavskii, P.A.; Lunin, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen evolution in the thermal decomposition of ZrNiH /SUB 2.8/ has been studied. The kinetic curve has two rate maxima. It is presumed that the second maximum is related to the phenomenon of critical inhibition that accompanies the phase transition. Apparent activation energies were determined for hydrogen evolution in argon and argon-ethylene atmospheres. The apparent energy increases in the argon-ethylene mixture. On the basis of the activation energy measurements it is presumed that the rate-determining step in hydrogen evolution is either the formation of hydrogen molecules from atoms on the surface of the lateral diffusion of atomic hydrogen. In the region of hydrogen concentration in the hydride corresponding to the phase transition, the rate-determining step is hydrogen diffusion in the hydride

  6. Radiation-related retrograde hydrogen isotope and K-Ar exchange in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halter, C.; Pagel, M.; Sheppard, S.M.F.; Weber, F.; Clauer, N.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies have been widely applied to characterize the origin of fluids during ore-foaming processes. The primary isotope record, however, may be disturbed by retrograde exchange reactions, thus complicating the interpretation of the data. The susceptibility of minerals to retrograde isotope and chemical exchange is variable, reflecting differences in the mechanism and rate of isotope exchange. Results are presented on deuterium depletion, K/Ar ages and H 2 O + content of illites associated with uranium mineralization from the Athabasca basin (Canada). (author)

  7. Dissolution of ion exchange resin by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.C.

    1981-08-01

    The resin dissolution process was conducted successfully in full-scale equipment at the SRL Semiworks. A solution containing 0.001M Fe 2+ , or Fe 3+ , and 3 vol % H 2 O 2 in 0.1M HNO 3 is sufficient to dissolve up to 40 vol % resin slurry (Dowex 50W-X8). Foaming and pressurization can be eliminated by maintaining the dissolution temperature below 99 0 C. The recommended dissolution temperature range is 85 to 90 0 C. Premixing hydrogen peroxide with all reactants will not create a safety hazard, but operating with a continual feed of hydrogen peroxide is recommended to control the dissolution rate. An air sparging rate of 1.0 to 1.5 scfm will provide sufficient mixing. Spent resin from chemical separation contains DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) residue, and the resin must be washed with 0.1M NH 4 OH to remove excess DTPA before dissolution. Gamma irradiation of resin up to 4 kW-hr/L did not change the dissolution rate significantly

  8. Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Kinetics of Nanocrystalline and Amorphous Mg₂Ni-type Alloy by Melt Spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang-Huan; Li, Bao-Wei; Ren, Hui-Ping; Li, Xia; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Dong-Liang

    2011-01-18

    Mg₂Ni-type Mg₂Ni 1-x Co x (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) alloys were fabricated by melt spinning technique. The structures of the as-spun alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of the alloys were measured by an automatically controlled Sieverts apparatus. The electrochemical hydrogen storage kinetics of the as-spun alloys was tested by an automatic galvanostatic system. The results show that the as-spun (x = 0.1) alloy exhibits a typical nanocrystalline structure, while the as-spun (x = 0.4) alloy displays a nanocrystalline and amorphous structure, confirming that the substitution of Co for Ni notably intensifies the glass forming ability of the Mg₂Ni-type alloy. The melt spinning treatment notably improves the hydriding and dehydriding kinetics as well as the high rate discharge ability (HRD) of the alloys. With an increase in the spinning rate from 0 (as-cast is defined as spinning rate of 0 m/s) to 30 m/s, the hydrogen absorption saturation ratio () of the (x = 0.4) alloy increases from 77.1 to 93.5%, the hydrogen desorption ratio () from 54.5 to 70.2%, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient (D) from 0.75 × 10 - 11 to 3.88 × 10 - 11 cm²/s and the limiting current density I L from 150.9 to 887.4 mA/g.

  9. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N(2) bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N(2) bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N(2) sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, "semi-unfolded" ↔ "native" ↔ "globally unfolded" → "aggregated". This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  10. Kinetics of zinc uptake and exchange by primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattison, S.E.; Cousins, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of 65 Zn 2+ uptake and exchange by hepatocytes in primary culture have been examined in detail to provide a basis for analyzing hormonal regulation of hepatic zinc metabolism. 65 Zn 2+ uptake was found to be a biphasic process. The slow phase represents an exchange between Zn 2+ in the medium and preexisting, intracellular zinc pools. This exchange rate was saturable with a medium zinc concentration of 9.5 microM eliciting one-half the maximum exchange rate and a maximum exchange rate of 9.9 pmol Zn 2+ . min-1 . mg protein-1 in the presence of bovine serum albumin. In the absence of albumin, a secondary, nonsaturable uptake rate was observed. The slow phase was relatively selective, and of the divalent transition metal ions tested, only Cd 2+ and Mn 2+ caused inhibition. The rate of exchange suggests total hepatocyte zinc has a turnover rate of approximately 30 h. The fast phase of 65 Zn 2+ reflects net Zn 2+ accumulation into a labile pool. The initial rates for this process were too fast to be measured accurately, but steady-state measurements allowed determination of the labile pool size. The pool dimensions saturated in the presence [Kapp = 28.6 microM; pool capacity = 0.44 nmol Zn 2+ /mg protein] and absence [Kapp = 11.8 microM; pool capacity = 0.34 nmol Zn 2+ /mg protein] of bovine serum albumin. Kinetics and equilibria of Zn 2+ uptake into the labile pool suggest that the latter acts as a source of Zn 2+ for the slow-exchange phase. Dexamethasone stimulated slow Zn 2+ exchange and also increased the labile pool size. The data suggest physiological factors alter hepatic zinc metabolism by influencing both intracellular Zn 2+ pools

  11. Contribution to the study of proteins and peptides structure by hydrogen isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabedryk-Viala, Eliane.

    1978-01-01

    Development of hydrogen exchange measurement methods to study the structure and the molecular interaction of globular protein molecules in aqueous solution (ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, coupling factors of chloroplasts), in peptide hormones in trifluoroethanol solution (angiotensin II, corticotropin) and in proteins of membranes (rhodopsin) [fr

  12. Analysis and test of a breadboard cryogenic hydrogen/Freon heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, L. F.; Hooper, J.

    1973-01-01

    System studies required to verify a tube-in-tube cryogenic heat exchanger as optimum for the space shuttle mission are described. Design of the optimum configuration, which could be fabricated from commercially available hardware, is discussed. Finally, testing of the proposed configuration with supercritical hydrogen and Freon 21 is discussed and results are compared with thermal and dynamic analysis.

  13. In situ hydrogen consumption kinetics as an indicator of subsurface microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S.H.; Smith, R.L.; Suflita, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    There are few methods available for broadly assessing microbial community metabolism directly within a groundwater environment. In this study, hydrogen consumption rates were estimated from in situ injection/withdrawal tests conducted in two geochemically varying, contaminated aquifers as an approach towards developing such a method. The hydrogen consumption first-order rates varied from 0.002 nM h-1 for an uncontaminated, aerobic site to 2.5 nM h-1 for a contaminated site where sulfate reduction was a predominant process. The method could accommodate the over three orders of magnitude range in rates that existed between subsurface sites. In a denitrifying zone, the hydrogen consumption rate (0.02 nM h-1) was immediately abolished in the presence of air or an antibiotic mixture, suggesting that such measurements may also be sensitive to the effects of environmental perturbations on field microbial activities. Comparable laboratory determinations with sediment slurries exhibited hydrogen consumption kinetics that differed substantially from the field estimates. Because anaerobic degradation of organic matter relies on the rapid consumption of hydrogen and subsequent maintenance at low levels, such in situ measures of hydrogen turnover can serve as a key indicator of the functioning of microbial food webs and may be more reliable than laboratory determinations. ?? 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  14. Superior hydrogen storage kinetics of MgH2 nanoparticles doped with TiF3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, L.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Y.T.; Zheng, J.; Li, X.G.

    2007-01-01

    MgH 2 nanoparticles were obtained by hydriding ultrafine magnesium particles which were prepared by hydrogen plasma-metal reaction. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show that the obtained sample is almost pure MgH 2 phase, without residual magnesium and with an average particle size of ∼300 nm. Milled with 5 wt.% TiF 3 as a doping precursor in a hydrogen atmosphere, the sample desorbed 4.5 wt.% hydrogen in 6 min under an initial hydrogen pressure of ∼0.001 bar at 573 K and absorbed 4.2 wt.% hydrogen in 1 min under ∼20 bar hydrogen at room temperature. Compared with MgH 2 micrometer particles doped with 5 wt.% TiF 3 under the same conditions as the MgH 2 nanoparticles, it is suggested that decrease of particle size is beneficial for enhancing absorption capacity at low temperatures, but has no effect on desorption. In addition, the catalyst was mainly responsible for improving the sorption kinetics and its catalytic mechanism is discussed

  15. Exchange of hydrogen isotopes in oxide ceramics at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Morita, K.; Soda, K.

    2001-01-01

    The decay curves of D and up-take curves of H on the exchange of D implanted into Li 2 TiO 3 for H in H 2 O vapor caused by exposure to normal-air at room temperature have been measured as a function of exposure time at different implantation concentrations by means of the elastic recoil detection technique. The re-emission curves of D retained and H up-taken in a specimen by isochronal annealing for 10 min have been also measured. It is found that the thermal re-emission of D and H takes place uniformly over the whole specimen due to local molecular recombination in the bulk and that the re-emission rates of H and D in the near-surface layers are slower than those in the deeper layers. It is also found that the decay of D caused by the D-H exchange takes place rapidly in the beginning and the retained amount of D attains at a constant level and the retained fraction of D are higher as the initial implantation concentrations of D are lower. The decay curves of D and the up-take curves of H have been analysed using the mass balance equations, in which the elementary processes are taken into account according to the exchange model of one way diffusion from the surface into the bulk. It is shown that the solution of the mass balance equations reproduces well the experimental data. The rate constants of the elementary processes determined are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Preparation of Pt-PTFE hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen-water isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junhua; Kang Yi; Han Yande; Ruan Hao; Dou Qincheng; Hu Shilin

    2001-01-01

    The hydrophobic catalyst used in the hydrogen-water isotope exchange is prepared with Pt as the active metal, PTFE as the hydrophobic material, active carbon or silicon dioxide as the support. The isotope catalytic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water is carried out in the trickle bed and the effects of different carriers, mass fraction of Pt and PTFE on the catalytic activity are discussed. The experimental results show that the activity of Pt-C-PTFE hydrophobic catalyst with the ratio between PTFE and Pt-C from 1 to 2 is higher than other kinds of catalysts and the overall volume transfer coefficient is increased with the increasing of the hydrogen flow rate and reaction temperature

  17. Effect of the strong metal-support interaction on hydrogen sorption kinetics of Pd-capped switchable mirrors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgschulte, A.; Westerwaal, R.J.; Rector, J.H.; Dam, B.; Griessen, R.P.; Schoenes, J.

    2004-01-01

    The morphology and electronic structure of Pd clusters grown on oxidized yttrium surfaces are investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The hydrogen sorption mediated by the Pd clusters is determined from the optically monitored switching kinetics of

  18. Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism in a thermophilic, anaerobic, butyrate-degrading triculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahring, B K; Westermann, P

    1987-02-01

    Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism were determined with butyrate-limited, chemostat-grown tricultures of a thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium together with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic rod. Kinetic parameters were determined from progress curves fitted to the integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation. The apparent half-saturation constants, K(m), for butyrate, acetate, and dissolved hydrogen were 76 muM, 0.4 mM, and 8.5 muM, respectively. Butyrate and hydrogen were metabolized to a concentration of less than 1 muM, whereas acetate uptake usually ceased at a concentration of 25 to 75 muM, indicating a threshold level for acetate uptake. No significant differences in K(m) values for butyrate degradation were found between chemostat- and batch-grown tricultures, although the maximum growth rate was somewhat higher in the batch cultures in which the medium was supplemented with yeast extract. Acetate utilization was found to be the rate-limiting reaction for complete degradation of butyrate to methane and carbon dioxide in continuous culture. Increasing the dilution rate resulted in a gradual accumulation of acetate. The results explain the low concentrations of butyrate and hydrogen normally found during anaerobic digestion and the observation that acetate is the first volatile fatty acid to accumulate upon a decrease in retention time or increase in organic loading of a digestor.

  19. Performance characterization of hydrogen isotope exchange and recombination catalysts for tritium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suppiah, S.; Ryland, D.; Marcinkowska, K.; Boniface, H.; Everatt, A.

    2010-01-01

    AECL's hydrogen isotope exchange catalyst and recombination catalysts have been successfully applied to a wide range of industrial tritium-removal applications. The catalysts are used for Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) and for gas-phase and trickle-bed recombination of hydrogen isotopes and have led to process simplification, improved safety and operational advantages. Catalyst performance design equations derived from laboratory testing of these catalysts have been validated against performance under industrial conditions. In a Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE) demonstration plant analyses of LPCE and recombiner efficiency were carried out as a function of catalyst activity over a wide range of operation. A steady-state process simulation used to model and design the hydrogen-water isotopic exchange processes, such as the CECE detritiation plant, was validated using the results of this demonstration. Catalyst development for isotope-exchange and recombination applications has continued over the last decade. As a result, significant improvements in catalyst performance have been achieved for these applications. This paper outlines the uniqueness of AECL's specialized catalysts and process designs for these applications with examples from laboratory and industrial case studies.

  20. Hydrogen-water deuterium exchange over metal oxide promoted nickel catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagert, N H; Shaw-Wood, P E; Pouteau, R M.L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba. Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment

    1975-11-01

    Specific rates have been measured for hydrogen-water deuterium isotope exchange over unsupported nickel promoted with about 20% of various metal oxides. The oxides used were Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MoO/sub 2/, MnO, WO/sub 2/-WO/sub 3/, and UO/sub 2/. Nickel surface areas, which are required to measure the specific rates, were determined by hydrogen chemisorption. Specific rates were measured as a function of temperature in the range 353 to 573 K and as a function of the partial pressure of hydrogen and water over a 10-fold range of partial pressure. The molybdenum and tungsten oxides gave the highest specific rates, and manganese and uranium oxides the lowest. Chromium oxide was intermediate, although it gave the highest rate per gram of catalyst. The orders with respect to hydrogen and water over molybdenum oxide and tungsten oxide promoted nickel were consistent with a mechanism in which nickel oxide is formed from the reaction of water with the catalyst, and then is reduced by hydrogen. Over manganese and uranium oxide promoted catalysts, these orders are consistent with a mechanism in which adsorbed water exchanges with chemisorbed hydrogen atoms on the nickel surface. Chromium oxide is intermediate. It was noted that those oxides which favored the nickel oxide route had electronic work functions closest to those of metallic nickel and nickel oxide.

  1. Ion-exchange behaviour of hydrous zirconia in mixed solvents: capacity and kinetics of exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misak, N.Z.; Ghoneimy, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    The capacity of the Li + form of hydrous zirconia for Na + and Cs + increases in the presence of methanol. This may be due to the greater stability of Li + in methanol/water than in pure water and to dehydration of Na + and Cs + and their stronger interaction with the exchange sites, which may facilitate their replacing Li + . The ion-exchange capacity of zirconia for NO 3 - , Cl - and Br - is almost the same in aqueous solution and is not affected by addition of up to 90% (v/v) methanol, which probably shows that these anions are electrostatically bound in zirconia without specific interactions. The internal diffusion coefficients of the Na + /H + and Cl - /OH - systems decrease in the presence of alcohol: the decrease is highest with methanol and similar for ethanol and propan-2-ol. This is discussed in the light of ion solvation and alcohol penetration inside zirconia. (author)

  2. Kinetic energy measurement of hydrogen in LHD peripheral plasma with a multi-wavelength-range fine-resolution spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Mizushiri, Keisuke; Nishioka, Tomomi; Shikama, Taiichi; Iwamae, Atsushi; Goto, Motoshi; Morita, Shigeru; Hasuo, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    We have simultaneously measured high resolution emission spectra of the hydrogen atomic Balmer-α, -β, -γ lines and molecular Fulcher-α band for a LHD peripheral plasma generated under a central magnetic field strength of 0.4 T. It is found that the velocity distributions of excited atoms calculated from the Balmer-α, -β, and -γ line shapes show similar profiles to each other. The translational kinetic energy corresponding to the average velocity is about 13 eV, which is about 300 times larger than the rotational energy of hydrogen molecules estimated from the line intensities in the Fulcher-α band. The velocity distributions differ from Maxwellian and have a high velocity tail over 1x10 5 m/s. A correlation between the high velocity tail and the electron temperature and density is seen and suggesting the excited atoms having such high velocities to be generated by the charge exchange collisions from high velocity protons in the peripheral region.

  3. Removal of Congo Red from Aqueous Solution by Anion Exchange Membrane (EBTAC): Adsorption Kinetics and Themodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Akhtar, Shahbaz; Zafar, Shagufta; Shaheen, Aqeela; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Luque, Rafael; ur Rehman, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of anionic dye congo red (CR) from aqueous solutions using an anion exchange membrane (EBTAC) has been investigated at room temperature. The effect of several factors including contact time, membrane dosage, ionic strength and temperature were studied. Kinetic models, namely pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order, liquid film diffusion and Elovich models as well as Bangham and modified freundlich Equations, were employed to evaluate the experimental results. Parameters such as adsorption capacities, rate constant and related correlation coefficients for every model were calculated and discussed. The adsorption of CR on anion exchange membranes followed pseudo-second-order Kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters, namely changes in Gibbs free energy (∆G°), enthalpy (∆H°) and entropy (∆S°) were calculated for the adsorption of congo red, indicating an exothermic process. PMID:28793430

  4. Kinetics of hydrogen release from dissolutions of ammonia borane in different ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valero-Pedraza, María José; Martín-Cortés, Alexandra; Navarrete, Alexander; Bermejo, María Dolores; Martín, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia borane is a promising hydrogen storage material that liberates hydrogen by thermolysis at moderate temperatures, but it also presents major limitations for practical applications including a long induction time before the initiation of hydrogen release and a difficult regeneration. Previous works have demonstrated that by dissolution of ammonia borane into several ionic liquids, and particularly in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride bmimCl, the induction period at the beginning of the thermolysis is eliminated, but some problems persist, including foaming and the formation of a residue after thermolysis that is insoluble in the ionic liquid. In this work, the release of hydrogen from ammonia borane dissolved in different ionic liquids has been analyzed, measuring the kinetics of hydrogen release, visually following the evolution of the sample during the process using pressure glass tube reactors, and analyzing the residue by spectroscopic techniques. While dissolutions of ammonia borane in most ionic liquids analyzed show similar properties as dissolutions in bmimCl, using ionic liquids with bis(trifluoromethylsulfanyl)imide Tf_2N anion the foaming problem is reduced, and in some cases the residue remains dissolved in the ionic liquid, while with ionic liquids with choline anion higher hydrogen yields are achieved that indicate that the decomposition of ammonia borane proceeds through a different path. - Highlights: • Hydrogen release from ammonia borane dissolved in 13 ionic liquids has been studied. • Induction time is shortened and hydrogen release rate is accelerated in all cases. • The best results are obtained using ionic liquids with Tf_2N anion. • Ch cation ionic liquids enable higher H_2 yield, but cyclotriborazane is produced.

  5. Inhibition of ligand exchange kinetics via active-site trapping with an antibody fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyen, David; Steyaert, Jan; Barlow, John N

    2014-04-01

    We describe the first example of an inhibitory antibody fragment (nanobody ca1697) that binds simultaneously to an enzyme (the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli) and its bound substrate (folate). Binding of the antibody to the substrate causes a 20-fold reduction in the rate of folate exchange kinetics. This work opens up the prospect of designing new types of antibody-based inhibitors of enzymes and receptors through suitable design of immunogens.

  6. Experimental evaluation of improved dual temperature hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Yamato; Uchida, Shunsuke

    1984-01-01

    A proposed dual temperature hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction system between water and hydrogen gas is evaluated experimentally. The proposed system is composed of low temperature co-current reactors for reaction between water mists and hydrogen gas and high temperature co-current reactors for reaction between water vapor and hydrogen gas. Thus, operation is possible under atmospheric pressure with high reaction efficiency. Using the pilot test system which is composed of ten low temperature (30 0 C) reaction units and ten high temperature (200 0 C) reaction units, an experimental separation of deuterium from light water is carried out. The enrichment factor under steady state conditions, its dependency on operating time, and the reaction period necessary to obtain the steady state enrichment factor are determined experimentally and compared with calculations. It is shown that separation ability in a multistage reaction system can be estimated by numerical calculation using actual reaction efficiency in a unit reactor. (author)

  7. Dynamics of urokinase receptor interaction with Peptide antagonists studied by amide hydrogen exchange and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Danø, Keld

    2004-01-01

    Using amide hydrogen exchange combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, we have in this study determined the number of amide hydrogens on several peptides that become solvent-inaccessible as a result of their high-affinity interaction with the urokinase-type plasminogen activator...... receptor (uPAR). These experiments reveal that at least six out of eight amide hydrogens in a synthetic nine-mer peptide antagonist (AE105) become sequestered upon engagement in uPAR binding. Various uPAR mutants with decreased affinity for this peptide antagonist gave similar results, thereby indicating...... that deletion of the favorable interactions involving the side chains of these residues in uPAR does not affect the number of hydrogen bonds established by the main chain of the peptide ligand. The isolated growth factor-like domain (GFD) of the cognate serine protease ligand for uPAR showed 11 protected amide...

  8. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen defect pairs in SrTiO3 from density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Nicolai Christian; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    A density functional theory investigation of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen–hydrogen defect interactions in the cubic SrTiO3 perovskite is presented. We find a net attraction between two hydrogen atoms with an optimal separation of ∼2.3 Å. The energy gain is ca. 0.33 eV comp...

  9. Thermogravimetric study of the kinetics of lithium titanate reduction by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonak, Sagar; Rakesh, R.; Jain, Uttam; Mukherjee, Abhishek; Kumar, Sanjay; Krishnamurthy, Nagaiyar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Li 2 TiO 3 powder is synthesized by the gel combustion route. • Activation energy of reduction of Li 2 TiO 3 by H 2 found out to be 27.45 kJ/mol H 2 . • Non-stoichiometric phase of Li 2 TiO 3 is formed in hydrogen atmosphere. • One-dimensional diffusion appears to be the most probable mechanism of reduction. - Abstract: The lithium titanate powder was synthesized by gel-combustion route. The mechanism and the kinetics of hydrogen interaction with lithium titanate powder were studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetric technique. Lithium titanate underwent reduction in hydrogen atmosphere which led to the formation of oxygen deficient non-stoichiometric compound in lithium titanate. One-dimensional diffusion appeared to be the most probable reaction mechanism. The activation energy for reduction of lithium titanate under hydrogen atmosphere was found to be 27.4 kJ/mol/K. Structural changes after hydrogen reduction in lithium titanate were observed in X-ray diffraction analysis

  10. Polarization measurement of atomic hydrogen beam spin-exchanged with optically oriented sodium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Akira; Ogura, Kouichi; Wakuta, Yoshihisa; Kumabe, Isao

    1988-01-01

    The spin-exchange reaction between hydrogen atoms and optically oriented sodium atoms was used to produce a polarized atomic hydrogen beam. The electron-spin polarization of the atomic hydrogen beam, which underwent the spin-exchange reaction with the optically oriented sodium atoms, was measured. A beam polarization of -(8.0±0.6)% was obtained when the thickness and polarization of the sodium target were (5.78±0.23)x10 13 atoms/cm 2 and -(39.6±1.6)%, respectively. The value of the spin-exchange cross section in the forward scattering direction, whose scattering angle in the laboratory system was less than 1.0 0 , was obtained from the experimental results as Δσ ex =(3.39±0.34)x10 -15 cm 2 . This value is almost seven times larger than the theoretical value calculated from the Na-H potential. The potential was computed quantum mechanically in the space of the appropriate wave functions of the hydrogen and the sodium atoms. (orig./HSI)

  11. Kinetics of hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetate exchange of neodymium (3) with ytterbium (3) and gadolinium (3) aquaions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, S.I.; Martynenko, L.I.; Petsurova, N.I.

    1985-01-01

    The exchange kinetic in the NdX-Ln 3+ , where X 3- is hydroxyethylethylenediamine triacetate, Ln 3+ -Yb 3+ , Cd 3+ is studied spectrophotometrically. It has been found that the stationary exchange reate is described by the kinetic equation: W=Ksub(1)csub.(NdX)sup(0)csub(H)+Ksub(2)csub(NdX)sup(0)csub(Ln)sup(0)(1). The exchange rate constant values are calulated at t=20 deg C and μ=0.1: K 1 =(4.5+-0.2)x10 3 (Yb 3+ ), (4.8+-0.3)x10 3 .(Gd 3+ ), K 2 =1.7+-0.2(Yb 3+ ), 0.9+-0.1(Gd 3+ ) l/molxmin. It is shown that the acidic dissociation mechanism corresponds to augend (1), the exchange associative mechanism - to addend. It is shown by the method of segments that Ln 3+ in intermediate complexes (NdXLn) 3+ is coordinated by X 3- hydroxyethylglicine group

  12. Determination of phosphorus in urban sewage sludge using the isotopic exchange kinetics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas de Tramontini, Susana; Barbaro, Nestor O.; Lopez, Silvia C.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the differences among soil available P, the use by the plants of sludge P, and of a water soluble fertilizer (Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 ) P, using isotopic exchange kinetics methods. The sludge was provided by the Sewage Sludge Treatment Plant of Tucuman City, Argentina. The isotopic exchange kinetics experiment, in which the fate of carrier free 32 PO 4 added to the soil solution at a steady state was studied, gives information on soil P exchangeability. The experiment was carried out in the laboratory, where sewage sludge and water soluble fertilizer were added to soil samples taken at a depth of 0-25 and 25-40 cm. Changes in the soil P isotopically exchangeable within 1 minute measurements in the soil with sludge and in the soil with water soluble fertilizer showed that the 0-25 cm deep soil samples had a low P sorption capacity (r1 /R values were low). The sludge had high total and organic P, but the P in the soil solution was lower than the P provided by the water soluble fertilizer. Therefore, despite its higher total P content, this sludge contained slow available forms of P

  13. Kinetic models for goods exchange in a multi-agent market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugna, Carlo; Toscani, Giuseppe

    2018-06-01

    In this paper we introduce a system of kinetic equations describing an exchange market consisting of two populations of agents (dealers and speculators) expressing the same preferences for two goods, but applying different strategies in their exchanges. Similarly to the model proposed in Toscani et al. (2013), we describe the trading of the goods by means of some fundamental rules in price theory, in particular by using Cobb-Douglas utility functions for the exchange. The strategy of the speculators is to recover maximal utility from the trade by suitably acting on the percentage of goods which are exchanged. This microscopic description leads to a system of linear Boltzmann-type equations for the probability distributions of the goods on the two populations, in which the post-interaction variables depend from the pre-interaction ones in terms of the mean quantities of the goods present in the market. In this case, it is shown analytically that the strategy of the speculators can drive the price of the two goods towards a zone in which there is a branded utility for their group. Also, according to Toscani et al. (2013), the general system of nonlinear kinetic equations of Boltzmann type for the probability distributions of the goods on the two populations is described in details. Numerical experiments then show how the policy of speculators can modify the final price of goods in this nonlinear setting.

  14. Chemical bond as a test of density-gradient expansions for kinetic and exchange energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdew, J.P.; Levy, M.; Painter, G.S.; Wei, S.; Lagowski, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Errors in kinetic and exchange contributions to the molecular bonding energy are assessed for approximate density functionals by reference to near-exact Hartree-Fock values. From the molecular calculations of Allan et al. and of Lee and Ghosh, it is demonstrated that the density-gradient expansion does not accurately describe the noninteracting kinetic contribution to the bonding energy, even when this expansion is carried to fourth order and applied in its spin-density-functional form to accurate Hartree-Fock densities. In a related study, it is demonstrated that the overbinding of molecules such as N 2 and F 2 , which occurs in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy, is not attributable to errors in the self-consistent LSD densities. Contrary to expectations based upon the Gunnarsson-Jones nodality argument, it is found that the LSD approximation for the exchange energy can seriously overbind a molecule even when bonding does not create additional nodes in the occupied valence orbitals. LSD and exact values for the exchange contribution to the bonding energy are displayed and discussed for several molecules

  15. Quantification of protein backbone hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez del Amo, Juan-Miguel; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    We present the quantification of backbone amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates (HDX) for immobilized proteins. The experiments make use of the deuterium isotope effect on the amide nitrogen chemical shift, as well as on proton dilution by deuteration. We find that backbone amides in the microcrystalline α-spectrin SH3 domain exchange rather slowly with the solvent (with exchange rates negligible within the individual 15 N-T 1 timescales). We observed chemical exchange for 6 residues with HDX exchange rates in the range from 0.2 to 5 s -1 . Backbone amide 15 N longitudinal relaxation times that we determined previously are not significantly affected for most residues, yielding no systematic artifacts upon quantification of backbone dynamics (Chevelkov et al. 2008b). Significant exchange was observed for the backbone amides of R21, S36 and K60, as well as for the sidechain amides of N38, N35 and for W41ε. These residues could not be fit in our previous motional analysis, demonstrating that amide proton chemical exchange needs to be considered in the analysis of protein dynamics in the solid-state, in case D 2 O is employed as a solvent for sample preparation. Due to the intrinsically long 15 N relaxation times in the solid-state, the approach proposed here can expand the range of accessible HDX rates in the intermediate regime that is not accessible so far with exchange quench and MEXICO type experiments.

  16. Kinetics of two-stage fermentation process for the production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Kaushik [Department of Chemical Engineering, G.H. Patel College of Engineering and Technology, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, Gujarat (India); Muthukumar, Manoj; Kumar, Anish; Das, Debabrata [Fermentation Technology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2008-02-15

    Two-stage process described in the present work is a combination of dark and photofermentation in a sequential batch mode. In the first stage glucose is fermented to acetate, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in an anaerobic dark fermentation by Enterobacter cloacae DM11. This is followed by a successive second stage where acetate is converted to H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in a photobioreactor by photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U. 001. The yield of hydrogen in the first stage was about 3.31molH{sub 2}(molglucose){sup -1} (approximately 82% of theoretical) and that in the second stage was about 1.5-1.72molH{sub 2}(molaceticacid){sup -1} (approximately 37-43% of theoretical). The overall yield of hydrogen in two-stage process considering glucose as preliminary substrate was found to be higher compared to a single stage process. Monod model, with incorporation of substrate inhibition term, has been used to determine the growth kinetic parameters for the first stage. The values of maximum specific growth rate ({mu} {sub max}) and K{sub s} (saturation constant) were 0.398h{sup -1} and 5.509gl{sup -1}, respectively, using glucose as substrate. The experimental substrate and biomass concentration profiles have good resemblance with those obtained by kinetic model predictions. A model based on logistic equation has been developed to describe the growth of R. sphaeroides O.U 001 in the second stage. Modified Gompertz equation was applied to estimate the hydrogen production potential, rate and lag phase time in a batch process for various initial concentration of glucose, based on the cumulative hydrogen production curves. Both the curve fitting and statistical analysis showed that the equation was suitable to describe the progress of cumulative hydrogen production. (author)

  17. SAIDE: A Semi-Automated Interface for Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Maria T; Miller, Danny E; Fenton, Aron W; Artigues, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Deuterium/hydrogen exchange in combination with mass spectrometry (DH MS) is a sensitive technique for detection of changes in protein conformation and dynamics. Since temperature, pH and timing control are the key elements for reliable and efficient measurement of hydrogen/deuterium content in proteins and peptides, we have developed a small, semiautomatic interface for deuterium exchange that interfaces the HPLC pumps with a mass spectrometer. This interface is relatively inexpensive to build, and provides efficient temperature and timing control in all stages of enzyme digestion, HPLC separation and mass analysis of the resulting peptides. We have tested this system with a series of standard tryptic peptides reconstituted in a solvent containing increasing concentration of deuterium. Our results demonstrate the use of this interface results in minimal loss of deuterium due to back exchange during HPLC desalting and separation. For peptides reconstituted in a buffer containing 100% deuterium, and assuming that all amide linkages have exchanged hydrogen with deuterium, the maximum loss of deuterium content is only 17% of the label, indicating the loss of only one deuterium molecule per peptide.

  18. Heterogeneously catalyzed deuterium separation processes: Hydrogen-water exchange studies at elevated temperatures and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliday, J.D.; Rolston, J.H.; Au, J.C.; Den Hartog, J.; Tremblay, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    New processes for the separation of hydrogen isotopes are required to produce heavy water for CANDU nuclear reactors and to extract tritium formed in the moderator during reactor operation. Wetproofed platinum catalysts capable of promoting rapid exchange of isotopes between countercurrent flows of hydrogen and liquid water in packed columns have been developed at CRNL over the past 15 years. These catalysts provide a catalystic surface for the gas phase exchange reaction H/sub 2/O/sub (v)/ + HD/sub (g)/ ↔ HDO/sub (v)/ + H/sub 2(g)/ as well as a large liquid surface for the liquid phase isotope transfer reaction HDO/sub (v)/ + H/sub 2/O/sub (iota)/↔HDO/sub (iota)/+H/sub 2/O/sub (v)/. Any economic stand-alone heavy water separation process, based on bithermal hydrogen-water exchange over wetproofed platinum catalysts, requires rapid overall exchange of isotopes between two phases at two temperatures. Catalysts developed for cold tower operation at 25-60 0 C are now being tested in a laboratory scale stainless steel trickle bed reactor for performance and stability at simulated hot tower conditions, 150 0 C and 2.0 MPa pressure. Catalytically active layers containing platinum supported on carbon or crystalline silica and wetproofed with Teflon have been prepared on ceramic spheres and stainless steel screening and tested in both random and ordered bed columns

  19. Studies on indigenous ion exchange resins: alkali metal ions-hydrogen ion exchange equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, S.; Kumar, Surender; Venkataramani, B.

    2001-01-01

    With a view to select a suitable ion exchange resin for the removal of radionuclides (such as cesium, strontium etc.) from low level radioactive effluents, alkali metal ion -H' exchanges on nine indigenous gel- and macroporous-type and nuclear grade resins have been studied at a total ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm .3 (in the case ofCs' -H' exchange it was 0.05 mol dm .3 ). The expected theoretical capacities were not attained by all the resins for the alkali metal ions. The water content (moles/equiv.) of the fully swollen resins for different alkali metal ionic forms do not follow the usual sequence of greater the tendency of the cation to hydrate the higher the water uptake, but a reverse trend. The ion exchange isotherms (plots of equivalent fractions of the ion in resin phase, N M1 to that in solution, N M ) were not satisfactory and sorption of cations, for most of the resins, was possible only when the acidity of the solution was lowered. The variations of the selectivity coefficient, K, with N M show that the resins are highly cross linked and the selectivity sequence: Cs + >K + >Na + >Li + , obtained for all the resins indicate that hydrated ions were involved in the exchange process. However, the increase in the selectivity was not accompanied by the release of water, but unusual uptake of water, during the exchange process. The characteristics of macroporous resins were not significantly different from those of the gel-type resins. The results are discussed in terms of heterogeneity in the polymer net work, improper sulphonation process resulting in the formation of functional groups at inaccessible sites with weak acidic character and the overall lack of control in the preparation of different resins. (author)

  20. Kinetics and thermodynamic for sorption of arsenate by Lanthanum-exchanged zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Jelas Haron; Saiful Adli Masdan; Mohd Zobir Hussein; Zulkarnain Zainal; Anuar Kassim

    2007-01-01

    negative values of ΔG degree meant that the sorption of As (V) ions on La-exchanged zeolite was spontaneous, perhaps because the La (III) had high affinity towards the arsenic ion as indicated by a low K sp value of of lanthanum arsenate. A slightly positive entropy change for sorption of As (V) ion on La-exchanged zeolite could be due to fixation of the ions on the La (III) exchange sites that was randomly distributed on the sorbents. The kinetics study showed that the As (V) sorption followed first order kinetic model. The first-order kinetic constants for the sorption are 2.77x10 -3 , 2.25x10 -3 and 1.60x10 -3 min -1 for La-ZX, La-ZSM and La-ZA, respectively. (author)

  1. Hydrogen absorption kinetics in powdered V + 80 wt.% LaNi5 composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Tirpude, Amit; Taxak, Manju; Krishnamurthy, Nagaiyar

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Vanadium prevents the pulverization of LaNi 5 . •H absorption capacity LaNi 5 –V composite is higher than LaNi 5 . •H absorption kinetics of LaNi 5 –V composite is relatively faster than V and LaNi 5 . •Fermi energy level of LaNi 5 –V composite lowered by vanadium addition. -- Abstract: The hydrogen absorption behavior of V + 80 wt.% LaNi 5 composite, LaNi 5 and V has been investigated. The LaNi 5 –V composite was prepared by high energy ball-milling technique using high pure vanadium and LaNi 5 powder. Lattice expansion of the composite has been observed in X-ray analysis which indicates the solid solution formation. Presence of free V and traces of V 2 O 5 phase were also observed in the composite. The hydrogen absorption capacity and absorption kinetics of the composite showed improvement as compared to LaNi 5 . The improved kinetics of the composite has been co-related to the change in lattices parameter, Fermi energy level and catalytic property of vanadium. Integrity of the composite has found to be effective even after 20 numbers of hydriding and dehydriding cycles due to the presence of vanadium

  2. Modified hydrogenated PBLH copolymer synthesis with styrene for proton exchange membranes fuel cell application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraz, Fernando A.; Oliveira, Angelo R.S.; Rodrigues, Maraiza F.; Groetzner, Mariana B.; Cesar-Oliveira, Maria Aparecida F.; Cantao, Mauricio P.

    2005-01-01

    Polymers used as electrolyte in fuel cells are expected to have functional groups in their structure which are responsible for proton conductivity. Since the use of hydroxylated liquid polybutadiene (PBLH) has not been mentioned in the literature as an ion exchange membrane for fuel cell application (PEMFC), and its structure can be modified for a later sulfonation, it has been studied. In this work, PBLH was modified through a hydrogenation reaction. Furthermore, hydrogenated polymeric esters were obtained by esterification and transesterification reactions (PBLH- estearate and PBLH- methacrylate). Reacting the PBLH methacrylate with styrene, it was generated a copolymer with appropriated structure for sulfonation, justifying researches for fuel cell. (author)

  3. A trap activation model for hydrogen retention and isotope exchange in some refractory materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, D.K.; Doyle, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    Our recently-developed Local Mixing Model (LMM) has been successful in describing and predicting the properties of hydrogen retention and isotope exchange for a variety of refractory materials. For some materials, however, the detailed predictions of the LMM are not observed. A Trap Activation Model (TAM) is proposed here to account for the observed departures from the LMM. Comparison of experimental room temperature saturation depth profiles for H + →Si with the predictions of TAM suggests that the hydrogen traps are multiple-vacancy complexes in this system. The observed profiles result from a beam-induced competition between trap creation/annihilation and H-trapping/detrapping. (orig.)

  4. Analysis of a Hydrogen Isotope separation process based on a continuous hydrogen-water exchange on column Transitions of Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodor, I.

    1988-01-01

    The analysed system consists of two plane-parallel walls, a water film flows down a wall, a catalyst layer is disposed on the other, a water vapour-hydrogen mixture moves up between the walls. A mathematical treatment is presented which permits to calculate the overall transfer coefficients and other parameters of practical interest from the local differential equations. (author)

  5. Kinetics and exchange mechanism of Zn2+and Eu3+ ions on tin and zirconium silicates as a cation exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, E.S.; Ali, I.M.; Aly, H.F.

    2005-01-01

    Tin and zirconium silicates have been prepared with Sn/Si and Zr/Si molar ratios of 1 and 0.75, respectively. Kinetics and exchange studies of Zn 2+ and Eu 3+ ions on the prepared stannous and zirconium silicates have been carried out as a function of reaction temperature, particle diameters, solution concentration of the exchanging cations from water and alcohol-water mixture. The capacity of the exchangers for the studied cations from alcohol-water mixture was found higher than in pure aqueous solutions. The rate of exchange was dependent on particle diameters and independent on concentration of metal ions. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, vis. effective diffusion coefficients, activation energies and entropies of activation have been evaluated. Negative values of entropy, enthalpy and free energy of activation for Zn 2+ /M + and Eu 3+ /H + on both exchangers have been recorded at different conditions

  6. HOGEN{trademark} proton exchange membrane hydrogen generators: Commercialization of PEM electrolyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.F.; Molter, T.M. [Proton Energy Systems, Inc., Rocky Hill, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    PROTON Energy Systems` new HOGEN series hydrogen generators are Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) based water electrolyzers designed to generate 300 to 1000 Standard Cubic Feet Per Hour (SCFH) of high purity hydrogen at pressures up to 400 psi without the use of mechanical compressors. This paper will describe technology evolution leading to the HOGEN, identify system design performance parameters and describe the physical packaging and interfaces of HOGEN systems. PEM electrolyzers have served US and UK Navy and NASA needs for many years in a variety of diverse programs including oxygen generators for life support applications. In the late 1970`s these systems were advocated for bulk hydrogen generation through a series of DOE sponsored program activities. During the military buildup of the 1980`s commercial deployment of PEM hydrogen generators was de-emphasized as priority was given to new Navy and NASA PEM electrolysis systems. PROTON Energy Systems was founded in 1996 with the primary corporate mission of commercializing PEM hydrogen generators. These systems are specifically designed and priced to meet the needs of commercial markets and produced through manufacturing processes tailored to these applications. The HOGEN series generators are the first step along the path to full commercial deployment of PEM electrolyzer products for both industrial and consumer uses. The 300/1000 series are sized to meet the needs of the industrial gases market today and provide a design base that can transition to serve the needs of a decentralized hydrogen infrastructure tomorrow.

  7. Experimental determination of reaction rates of water. Hydrogen exchange of tritium with hydrophobic catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixel, J.C.; Hartzell, B.W.; Park, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    This study was undertaken to obtain data needed for further development of a process for the enrichment and removal of tritium from the water associated with light-water reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, and tritium-handling laboratories. The approach is based on the use of antiwetting, hydrophobic catalysts which permit the chemical exchange reactions between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen in direct contact, thus eliminating problems of catalyst deactivation and the complexity of reactor design normally associated with current catalytic-detritiation techniques involving gas-phase catalysis. An apparatus and procedure were developed for measuring reaction rates of water-hydrogen chemical exchange with hydrophobic catalysts. Preliminary economic evaluations of the process were made as it might apply to the AGNS fuel reprocessing plant

  8. Electrochemical reduction of disulfide-containing proteins for hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Simon; Salbo, Rune; Ploug, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of disulfide bond-containing proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) requires reduction of the disulfide bonds under acidic and cold conditions, where the amide hydrogen exchange reaction is quenched (pH 2.5, 0 °C). The reduction typically...... of TCEP. In the present study, we explore the feasibility of using electrochemical reduction as a substitute for TCEP in HDX-MS analyses. Our results demonstrate that efficient disulfide bond reduction is readily achieved by implementing an electrochemical cell into the HDX-MS workflow. We also identify...... some challenges in using electrochemical reduction in HDX-MS analyses and provide possible conditions to attenuate these limitations. For example, high salt concentrations hamper disulfide bond reduction, necessitating additional dilution of the sample with aqueous acidic solution at quench conditions....

  9. Comparison of Methods for Computing the Exchange Energy of quantum helium and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayao, J. L. C. D.

    2009-01-01

    I investigate approach methods to find the exchange energy for quantum helium and hydrogen. I focus on Heitler-London, Hund-Mullikan, Molecular Orbital and variational approach methods. I use Fock-Darwin states centered at the potential minima as the single electron wavefunctions. Using these we build Slater determinants as the basis for the two electron problem. I do a comparison of methods for two electron double dot (quantum hydrogen) and for two electron single dot (quantum helium) in zero and finite magnetic field. I show that the variational, Hund-Mullikan and Heitler-London methods are in agreement with the exact solutions. Also I show that the exchange energy calculation by Heitler-London (HL) method is an excellent approximation for large inter dot distances and for single dot in magnetic field is an excellent approximation the Variational method. (author)

  10. Ortho-para-H2 conversion by hydrogen exchange: comparison of theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lique, François; Honvault, Pascal; Faure, Alexandre

    2012-10-21

    We report fully-quantum time-independent calculations of cross sections and rate coefficients for the collisional (de)excitation of H(2) by H. Our calculations are based on the H(3) global potential energy surface of Mielke et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 4142 (2002)]. The reactive hydrogen exchange channels are taken into account. We show that the ortho-para and para-ortho conversion of H(2) are significant processes at temperatures above ~300 K and for the last process we provide the first comparison with available experimental rate coefficients between 300 and 444 K. The good agreement between theory and experiment is a new illustration of our detailed understanding of the simplest chemical reaction. The importance of the ortho-para-H(2) conversion by hydrogen exchange in astrophysics is discussed.

  11. Kinetics, isotope effects, and mechanism for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on supported nickel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T.; Masuda, H.; Imai, H.; Miyamoto, A.; Baba, S.; Murakami, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Kinetics and hydrogen-deuterium isotope effects in the methanation of adsorbed CO molecules on a Ni/SiO 2 catalyst were precisely measured by using pulse surface reaction rate analysis (PSRA). When a CO pulse was injected into flowing hydrogen, it was immediately adsorbed on the catalyst and gradually hydrogenated to CH 4 and H 2 O. The amounts of CH 4 and H 2 O produced by the hydrogenation of the adsorbed CO were determined up to various times, and it was found that CH 4 and H 2 O were produced at the same rate. When O 2 instead of CO was injected, H 2 O was immediately produced. From these results, the rate-determining step of the reaction was found to be C-O bond dissociation of an adsorbed CO molecule or a partially hydrogenated CO species. By PSRA, the rate constant for the C-O bond dissocition process per adsorbed CO molecule (k/sub H/) was determined at various temperatures, and the Arrhenius parameters of the rate constant were obtained. The rate constant in flowing deuterium (k/sub D/) was also determined. it was found that k/sub D/ is considerably larger than k/sub H/, indicating an inverse isotope effect. The average value of k/sub H//k/sub D/ was 0.75. From these results, it was concluded that adsorbed CO is not directly dissociated to surface carbon and oxygen atoms but it is partially hydrogenated before C-O bond dissociation under the conditions of the PSRA experiment. 8 figures

  12. Kinetic energy of solid and liquid para-hydrogen: a path integral Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoppi, M.; Neumann, M.

    1992-01-01

    The translational (center of mass) kinetic energy of solid and liquid para-hydrogen have been recently measured by means of Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering. We have evaluated the same quantity, in similar thermodynamic conditions, by means of Path Integral Monte Carlo computer simulation, modelling the system as composed of a set of spherical molecules interacting through a pairwise additive Lennard-Jones potential. In spite of the crude approximations on the interaction potential, the agreement is excellent. The pressure was also computed by means of the same simulations. This quantity, compared with the equation of state for solid para-hydrogen given by Driessen and Silvera, gives an agreement of a lesser quality and a negative value for the liquid state. We attribute this discrepancy to the limitations of the Lennard-Jones potential. (orig.)

  13. Isotopic exchange reactions. Kinetics and efficiency of the reactors using them in isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravoire, Jean

    1979-11-01

    In the first part, some definitions and the thermodynamic and kinetic isotopic effect concepts are recalled. In the second part the kinetic laws are established, in homogeneous and heterogeneous medium (one component being on occasions present in both phases), without and with isotopic effects. Emphasis is put on application to separation of isotopes, the separation factor α being close to 1, one isotope being in large excess with respect to the other one. Isotopic transfer is then given by: J = Ka (x - y/α) where x and y are the (isotopic) mole fractions in both phases, Ka may be either the rate of exchange or a transfer coefficient which can be considered as the 'same in both ways' if α-1 is small compared to the relative error on the measure of Ka. The third part is devoted to isotopic exchange reactors. Relationships between their efficiency and kinetics are established in some simple cases: plug cocurrent flow reactors, perfectly mixed reactors, countercurrent reactors without axial mixing. We treat only cases where α and the up flow to down flow ratio is close to 1 so that Murphee efficiency approximately overall efficiency (discrete stage contactors). HTU (phase 1) approximately HTU (phase 2) approximately HETP (columns). In a fourth part, an expression of the isotopic separative power of reactors is proposed and discussed [fr

  14. Solid-state reaction kinetics and optical studies of cadmium doped magnesium hydrogen phosphate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Madhu; Gupta, Rashmi; Singh, Harjinder; Bamzai, K. K.

    2018-04-01

    The growth of cadmium doped magnesium hydrogen phosphate was successfully carried out by using room temperature solution technique i.e., gel encapsulation technique. Grown crystals were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structure of the grown crystal belongs to orthorhombic crystal system and crystallizes in centrosymmetric space group. Kinetics of the decomposition of the grown crystals were studied by non-isothermal analysis. Thermo gravimetric / differential thermo analytical (TG/DTA) studies revealed that the grown crystal is stable upto 119 °C. The various steps involved in the thermal decomposition of the material have been analysed using Horowitz-Metzger, Coats-Redfern and Piloyan-Novikova equations for evaluating various kinetic parameters. The optical studies shows that the grown crystals possess wide transmittance in the visible region and significant optical band gap of 5.5ev with cut off wavelength of 260 nm.

  15. Solid-state reaction kinetics of neodymium doped magnesium hydrogen phosphate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rashmi; Slathia, Goldy; Bamzai, K. K.

    2018-05-01

    Neodymium doped magnesium hydrogen phosphate (NdMHP) crystals were grown by using gel encapsulation technique. Structural characterization of the grown crystals has been carried out by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) and it revealed that NdMHP crystals crystallize in orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pbca. Kinetics of the decomposition of the grown crystals has been studied by non-isothermal analysis. The estimation of decomposition temperatures and weight loss has been made from the thermogravimetric/differential thermo analytical (TG/DTA) in conjuncture with DSC studies. The various steps involved in the thermal decomposition of the material have been analysed using Horowitz-Metzger, Coats-Redfern and Piloyan-Novikova equations for evaluating various kinetic parameters.

  16. Kinetic Monte-Carlo modeling of hydrogen retention and re-emission from Tore Supra deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, A.; Schneider, R.; Warrier, M.; Roubin, P.; Martin, C.; Richou, M.

    2009-01-01

    A multi-scale model has been developed to study the reactive-diffusive transport of hydrogen in porous graphite [A. Rai, R. Schneider, M. Warrier, J. Nucl. Mater. (submitted for publication). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnucmat.2007.08.013.]. The deposits found on the leading edge of the neutralizer of Tore Supra are multi-scale in nature, consisting of micropores with typical size lower than 2 nm (∼11%), mesopores (∼5%) and macropores with a typical size more than 50 nm [C. Martin, M. Richou, W. Sakaily, B. Pegourie, C. Brosset, P. Roubin, J. Nucl. Mater. 363-365 (2007) 1251]. Kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) has been used to study the hydrogen transport at meso-scales. Recombination rate and the diffusion coefficient calculated at the meso-scale was used as an input to scale up and analyze the hydrogen transport at macro-scale. A combination of KMC and MCD (Monte-Carlo diffusion) method was used at macro-scales. Flux dependence of hydrogen recycling has been studied. The retention and re-emission analysis of the model has been extended to study the chemical erosion process based on the Kueppers-Hopf cycle [M. Wittmann, J. Kueppers, J. Nucl. Mater. 227 (1996) 186].

  17. The kinetic isotope effect of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium absorbed and desorbed by titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Gang; Cao Xiaohua; Long Xinggui

    2008-06-01

    p-t curves of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium absorption at 550-750 degree C and desorption at 350-550 degree C by titanium were investigated. The rate constants of absorption and desorption for hydrogen, deuterium and tritium on each temperature are determined and the activation energy values obtained by this analysis are (55.6 ± 2.4) kJ·mol -1 , (110.2 ± 3.0) kJ·mol -1 and (155.5 ± 3.2) kJ·mol -1 for absorption and (27.1±0.4) KJ·mol -1 , (42.3 ± 1.9) kJ·mol -1 and (62.1±1.6) kJ·mol -1 for desorption respectively. The activation energy value of tritium absorption is highest which shows titanium tritiation is hardest. The activation energy value of tritium desorption is highest and it also can prove that titanium tritide is stablest. There are remarkable kinetic hydrogen isotope effects when titanium absorb and desorb hydrogen, deuterium and tritium. (authors)

  18. An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, Robers [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Dryer, Frederick [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Ju, Yiguang [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2013-09-30

    An integrated and collaborative effort involving experiments and complementary chemical kinetic modeling investigated the effects of significant concentrations of water and CO2 and minor contaminant species (methane [CH4], ethane [C2H6], NOX, etc.) on the ignition and combustion of HHC fuels. The research effort specifically addressed broadening the experimental data base for ignition delay, burning rate, and oxidation kinetics at high pressures, and further refinement of chemical kinetic models so as to develop compositional specifications related to the above major and minor species. The foundation for the chemical kinetic modeling was the well validated mechanism for hydrogen and carbon monoxide developed over the last 25 years by Professor Frederick Dryer and his co-workers at Princeton University. This research furthered advance the understanding needed to develop practical guidelines for realistic composition limits and operating characteristics for HHC fuels. A suite of experiments was utilized that that involved a high-pressure laminar flow reactor, a pressure-release type high-pressure combustion chamber and a high-pressure turbulent flow reactor.

  19. Hydrophobic catalyst mixture for the isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paek, S.; Ahn, D. H.; Choi, H. J.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, M.; Yim, S. P.; Chung, H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-15

    Pt/SDBC catalyst, which is used for the hydrogen-water isotopic exchange reaction, was prepared. The various properties of the catalyst, such as the thermal stability, pore structure and the platinum dispersion, were investigated. A hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst which has been developed for the LPCE column of the WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) was tested in a trickle bed reactor. An experimental apparatus was built for the test of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities.

  20. Hydrophobic catalyst mixture for the isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, S.; Ahn, D. H.; Choi, H. J.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, M.; Yim, S. P.; Chung, H.

    2005-01-01

    Pt/SDBC catalyst, which is used for the hydrogen-water isotopic exchange reaction, was prepared. The various properties of the catalyst, such as the thermal stability, pore structure and the platinum dispersion, were investigated. A hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst which has been developed for the LPCE column of the WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) was tested in a trickle bed reactor. An experimental apparatus was built for the test of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities

  1. Shape of the Hα emission line in non resonant charge exchange in hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susino Bueno, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1977-01-01

    The Hα line shape emitted from a maxwellian hydrogen plasma and produced by non resonant change exchange has been calculated. Its explicit shape depends on the ion temperature, on background neutral energy and on the relative shape of the collision cross section. A comparison between theoretical and experimental shapes of the Hα line is carried out to check the model and to deduce the ion plasma temperature. (author) [es

  2. Kinetic study of heavy metal ions removal by ion exchange in batch conical air spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Zewail

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spouted bed contactor is a hybrid of fixed and fluidized bed contactors, which retains the advantages of each with good hydrodynamic conditions. The aim of the present study is to investigate the performance of a batch conical air spouted vessel for heavy metal removal by strong cation exchange resins (AMBERJET 1200 Na. The effect of various parameters such as type of heavy metal ions (Ni+2 and Pb+2, contact time, superficial air velocity and initial heavy metal ion concentration on % heavy metal ion removal has been investigated. It has been found that under optimum conditions 98% and 99% removal of Ni+2 and Pb+2 were achieved respectively. Several kinetic models were used to test the experimental data and to examine the controlling mechanism of the sorption process. The present results of Ni+2 and Pb+2 well fit pseudo second order kinetic model with a high correlation coefficient. Both film diffusion and intra-particle diffusion contribute to the ion exchange process. The present study revealed that spouted bed vessel may provide an effective alternative for conducting ion exchange reactions.

  3. Kinetics of ion exchange in the chelating resin Dowex A-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzuru, Hideo; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1975-01-01

    The kinetics of ion exchanges of Ag + , Zn 2+ and Cr 3+ at extremely low concentrations on the chelating resin Dowex A-1 has been studied by means of finite volume method. The rate of exchanges for both Ag + and Zn 2+ is dependent on the ionic strength, particle size of the resin and reaction temperature. At higher ionic strength (0.1 - 0.05) the kinetics is controlled by particle diffusion, whereas at lower ionic one (0.01 - 0.001) film diffusion is predominant. The apparent activation energy obtained is 3.84 kcal/mol for Ag + and 3.91 kcal/mol for Zn 2+ . The exchange rate of Cr 3+ obeys a first-order rate equation independent of the ionic strength and particle size of the resin. The apparent activation energy is 15.5 kcal/mol. These results support the view that the rate-determining step of this reaction is chelate formation reaction. (auth.)

  4. Palladium mixed-metal surface-modified AB5-type intermetallides enhance hydrogen sorption kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V. Denys

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface engineering approaches were adopted in the preparation of advanced hydrogen sorption materials, based on ‘low-temperature’, AB5-type intermetallides. The approaches investigated included micro-encapsulation with palladium and mixed-metal mantles using electroless plating. The influence of micro-encapsulation on the surface morphology and kinetics of hydrogen charging were investigated. It was found that palladium-nickel (Pd-Ni co-deposition by electroless plating significantly improved the kinetics of hydrogen charging of the AB5-type intermetallides at low hydrogen pressure and temperature, after long-term pre-exposure to air. The improvement in the kinetics of hydrogen charging was credited to a synergistic effect between the palladium and nickel atoms in the catalytic mantle and the formation of an ‘interfacial bridge’ for hydrogen diffusion by the nickel atoms in the deposited layer. The developed surface-modified materials may find application in highly selective hydrogen extraction, purification, and storage from impure hydrogen feeds.

  5. Kinetics of the exchange between fibrous manganese dioxide and Mn2+ ions in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rophael, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    The rate of exchange between fibrous manganese dioxide epsilon-MnO 2 and a 0.1 M MnSO 4 solution at 25 0 C and pH 2.0 was higher than the corresponding rate at pH 5.4. When the solid was washed with dilute acid (pH 2.0) before the exchange at pH 2.0, the results of the exchange at the two pH values were similar. When epsilon-MnO 2 was partially reduced with N 2 H 4 .H 2 O solution before the exchange, the rate of exchange was appreciably higher than that obtained for the unreduced solid. The exchange, at nearly pH 2.0, between epsilon-MnO 2 and various concentrations of Mn(NO 3 ) 2 solutions was increased to a small extent as the concentration increased tenfold. The exchange was followed by using 56 Mn-labelled MnO 2 and by measuring the β activity acquired by the Mn 2+ ion solution. The activity induced in the solid MnO 2 was produced by irradiation with thermal neutrons from a 241 Am- 9 Be laboratory neutron source. The neutron activation of manganese oxides has the following advantages: (i) a relatively high level of activity can be induced in the 55 Mn of the irradiated oxide because of its 100% abundance and its high neutron activation cross section, whereas the oxygen is unaffected; (ii) the half-life of the product 56 Mn is 9274 s which is convenient for kinetic studies; (iii) the activity produced almost decays in 24 h. (Auth.)

  6. Theoretical study on platinum-catalyzed isotope exchange reaction mechanism of hydrogen and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Sheng; Wang Heyi; Luo Shunzhong

    2009-04-01

    Based on electron and vibration approximate means and the density function theory B3LYP, the ΔG degree and equilibrium pressures of adsorption and dissociation reactions of H 2 and water vapor on Pt surface have been calculated. The adsorption, dissociation and coadsorption actions of H 2 and water were analyzed. According to the ΔG degree, hydrogen molecule combines with metal atoms in single atom, and water vapor molecule has no tendency to dissociate on Pt surface. The dissociation of hydrogen molecule would hold back the direct adsorption of water vapor molecules on Pt surface. The structures of Pt-H (OH 2 ) n + (n=1, 2, 3) hydroniums were optimized. According to the mulliken overlap populations, Pt-H (OH 2 ) + is not stable or produced. Hydrogen isotope exchange occurs between hydration layer and D atoms which adsorb on Pt surface via intermediates (H 2 O) n D + (ads) (n≥2). (authors)

  7. Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry in biopharmaceutical discovery and development – A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Bin, E-mail: dengbin@yorku.ca [Chemistry Department, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); The Centre for Research in Mass Spectrometry, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J1P3 (Canada); Lento, Cristina, E-mail: clento@yorku.ca [Chemistry Department, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); The Centre for Research in Mass Spectrometry, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J1P3 (Canada); Wilson, Derek J., E-mail: dkwilson@yorku.ca [Chemistry Department, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); The Centre for Research in Mass Spectrometry, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J1P3 (Canada)

    2016-10-12

    Protein therapeutics have emerged as a major class of biopharmaceuticals over the past several decades, a trend that has motivated the advancement of bioanalytical technologies for protein therapeutic characterization. Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a powerful and sensitive technique that can probe the higher order structure of proteins and has been used in the assessment and development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and biosimilar antibodies. It has also been used to quantify protein-ligand, protein-receptor and other protein-protein interactions involved in signaling pathways. In manufacturing and development, HDX-MS can validate storage formulations and manufacturing processes for various biotherapeutics. Currently, HDX-MS is being refined to provide additional coverage, sensitivity and structural specificity and implemented on the millisecond timescale to reveal residual structure and dynamics in disordered domains and intrinsically disordered proteins. - Highlights: • The pharmaceuticals industry is increasingly shifting to protein therapeutics. • Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry is uniquely well suited to support biopharmaceutical development. • Applications for hydrogen deuterium exchange span drug discovery, development and manufacturing. • Future developments will allow improved sensitivity, structural resolution and a broader range of dynamics to be monitored.

  8. Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry in biopharmaceutical discovery and development – A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Bin; Lento, Cristina; Wilson, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    Protein therapeutics have emerged as a major class of biopharmaceuticals over the past several decades, a trend that has motivated the advancement of bioanalytical technologies for protein therapeutic characterization. Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a powerful and sensitive technique that can probe the higher order structure of proteins and has been used in the assessment and development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and biosimilar antibodies. It has also been used to quantify protein-ligand, protein-receptor and other protein-protein interactions involved in signaling pathways. In manufacturing and development, HDX-MS can validate storage formulations and manufacturing processes for various biotherapeutics. Currently, HDX-MS is being refined to provide additional coverage, sensitivity and structural specificity and implemented on the millisecond timescale to reveal residual structure and dynamics in disordered domains and intrinsically disordered proteins. - Highlights: • The pharmaceuticals industry is increasingly shifting to protein therapeutics. • Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry is uniquely well suited to support biopharmaceutical development. • Applications for hydrogen deuterium exchange span drug discovery, development and manufacturing. • Future developments will allow improved sensitivity, structural resolution and a broader range of dynamics to be monitored.

  9. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry reveal the pH-dependent conformational changes of diphtheria toxin T domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Rodnin, Mykola V; Ladokhin, Alexey S; Gross, Michael L

    2014-11-04

    The translocation (T) domain of diphtheria toxin plays a critical role in moving the catalytic domain across the endosomal membrane. Translocation/insertion is triggered by a decrease in pH in the endosome where conformational changes of T domain occur through several kinetic intermediates to yield a final trans-membrane form. High-resolution structural studies are only applicable to the static T-domain structure at physiological pH, and studies of the T-domain translocation pathway are hindered by the simultaneous presence of multiple conformations. Here, we report the application of hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) for the study of the pH-dependent conformational changes of the T domain in solution. Effects of pH on intrinsic HDX rates were deconvolved by converting the on-exchange times at low pH into times under our "standard condition" (pH 7.5). pH-Dependent HDX kinetic analysis of T domain clearly reveals the conformational transition from the native state (W-state) to a membrane-competent state (W(+)-state). The initial transition occurs at pH 6 and includes the destabilization of N-terminal helices accompanied by the separation between N- and C-terminal segments. The structural rearrangements accompanying the formation of the membrane-competent state expose a hydrophobic hairpin (TH8-9) to solvent, prepare it to insert into the membrane. At pH 5.5, the transition is complete, and the protein further unfolds, resulting in the exposure of its C-terminal hydrophobic TH8-9, leading to subsequent aggregation in the absence of membranes. This solution-based study complements high resolution crystal structures and provides a detailed understanding of the pH-dependent structural rearrangement and acid-induced oligomerization of T domain.

  10. Kinetics of boron ions sorption from solution by inorganic anion exchanger of MNH type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leont'eva, G.V.

    1990-01-01

    By the method of restricted volume in case of boron excess in solution kinetics of boron sorption by inorganic anion-exchanger of the composition (Mg 0.55 Ni 0.45 )(OH) 2 has been studied. The sorption was carried out from solution containing Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Cl - , SO 4 2- , CO 3 2- , HCO 3 at 283, 293, 303 and 313 K and pH 8.1, while the density of solution was 1225 kg/m 3 . The sorption mechanism was considered. It is shown that heterogeneity of the character of kinetic curves is caused by the change in the mechanism of limiting stages of the sorption

  11. Wave-particle energy exchange directly observed in a kinetic Alfvén-branch wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Daniel J; F-Viñas, Adolfo; Dorelli, John C; Boardsen, Scott A; Avanov, Levon A; Bellan, Paul M; Schwartz, Steven J; Lavraud, Benoit; Coffey, Victoria N; Chandler, Michael O; Saito, Yoshifumi; Paterson, William R; Fuselier, Stephen A; Ergun, Robert E; Strangeway, Robert J; Russell, Christopher T; Giles, Barbara L; Pollock, Craig J; Torbert, Roy B; Burch, James L

    2017-03-31

    Alfvén waves are fundamental plasma wave modes that permeate the universe. At small kinetic scales, they provide a critical mechanism for the transfer of energy between electromagnetic fields and charged particles. These waves are important not only in planetary magnetospheres, heliospheres and astrophysical systems but also in laboratory plasma experiments and fusion reactors. Through measurement of charged particles and electromagnetic fields with NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we utilize Earth's magnetosphere as a plasma physics laboratory. Here we confirm the conservative energy exchange between the electromagnetic field fluctuations and the charged particles that comprise an undamped kinetic Alfvén wave. Electrons confined between adjacent wave peaks may have contributed to saturation of damping effects via nonlinear particle trapping. The investigation of these detailed wave dynamics has been unexplored territory in experimental plasma physics and is only recently enabled by high-resolution MMS observations.

  12. Wave-Particle Energy Exchange Directly Observed in a Kinetic Alfven-Branch Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Daniel J.; F-Vinas, Adolfo; Dorelli, John C.; Boardsen, Scott A. (Inventor); Avanov, Levon A.; Bellan, Paul M.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Lavraud, Benoit; Coffey, Victoria N.; Chandler, Michael O.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Alfven waves are fundamental plasma wave modes that permeate the universe. At small kinetic scales they provide a critical mechanism for the transfer of energy between electromagnetic fields and charged particles. These waves are important not only in planetary magnetospheres, heliospheres, and astrophysical systems, but also in laboratory plasma experiments and fusion reactors. Through measurement of charged particles and electromagnetic fields with NASAs Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we utilize Earths magnetosphere as a plasma physics laboratory. Here we confirm the conservative energy exchange between the electromagnetic field fluctuations and the charged particles that comprise an undamped kinetic Alfven wave. Electrons confined between adjacent wave peaks may have contributed to saturation of damping effects via non-linear particle trapping. The investigation of these detailed wave dynamics has been unexplored territory in experimental plasma physics and is only recently enabled by high-resolution MMS observations.

  13. Hydrogen isotope exchange of organic compounds in dilute acid at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werstiuk, N.H.

    1987-01-01

    Introduction of one or more deuterium (or tritium) atoms into organic molecules can be accomplished in many ways depending on the nature of the substrate and the extent and sterochemistry of deuteriation or tritiation required. Some of the common methods include acid- and base-catalyzed exchange of carbonyl compounds, metal hydride reductions, dissolving metal reductions, catalytic reduction of double bonds, chromatographic exchange, homogeneous and heterogeneous metal-catalyzed exchange, base-catalyzed exchange of carbon acids other than carbonyl compounds and acid-catalyzed exchange via electrophilic substitution. Only the latter three methods have been used for perdeuteriation of organic compounds. A very useful compendium of labeling methods with examples has been available to chemists for some time. Although metal-catalyzed exchange has been used extensively, the method suffers from some deficiencies: irreproducibility of catalyst surfaces, catalyst poisoning, side reactions such as coupling and hydrogenolysis of labile groups and low deuterium incorporation. Usually a number of cycles are required with fresh catalyst and fresh deuterium source to achieve substantial isotope incorporation. Acid-catalyzed exchange of aromatics and alkenes, strongly acidic media such as liquid DBr, concentrated DBr, acetic acid/stannic chloride, concentrated D 3 PO 4 , concentrated DC1, D 3 PO 4 /BF 3 SO 2 , 50-80% D 2 SO 4 and DFSO 4 /SbF 5 at moderate temperatures (<100 degrees) have been used to effect exchange. The methods are not particularly suitable for large scale deuteriations because of the cost and the fact that the recovery and upgrading of the diluted deuterium pool is difficult. This paper describes the hydrogen isotope exchange of a variety of organic compounds in dilute aqueous acid (0.1-0.5 M) at elevated temperatures (150-300 degrees)

  14. Zinc oxide and chromia as catalysts for the isomerization of butene, the hydrogenation of ethylene, and the isotopic exchange and allotropic conversion of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.C. Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogenation of olefins has been studied over metals and metal oxides. Over metals the following observations generalize the characteristics of hydrogenation and isomerization. Metal hydrogenation catalysts are effective for H 2 -D 2 exchange (and para hydrogen conversion) under the same conditions as they effect olefin hydrogenation. This suggests that hydrogen ''activation'' involves formation of hydrogen atoms as a surface intermediate. Addition of deuterium to light ethylene leads to ethane products of the form C 2 H/sub 6-x/D/sub x/ (where 0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 6). This is a result of the reversal of the alkyl (C 2 H 5 *) formation on the surface. Moreover, efficient isomerization of olefins require hydrogen as a co-catalyst. Both these observations suggest that alkyl formation and its reversal play a major role in hydrogenation and related reactions over metals. In this work it is found that zinc oxide catalyzes the deuteration of ethylene to dideuterioethane selectivity. Furthermore, the hydrogenation of ethylene using mixtures of hydrogen and deuterium indicate that hydrogenation occurs in such a manner as to reflect the molecular identity of the gas phase in the product ethane

  15. Ion mobility spectrometry-hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry of anions: part 1. Peptides to proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  16. General Tritium Labelling of Gentamicin C by catalytic hydrogen exchange Reaction with Tritiated Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, C.; Diaz, D.; Paz, D.

    1991-01-01

    Gentamicin C was labelled with tritium by means of a PtO2 catalyzed hydrogen exchange reaction. Under the conditions of the exchange (100 mg of gentamicin, basic form, 0,3 ml H2O-3H, and 50 mg of prereduced PtO2) the radiochemical yield was 0,24, 0,38 and 0,48 % at 120 degree celsius, for 8, 16 and 24 hours respectively. Chemical yield for purified gentamicin was about 60 %. Purification was accomplished with a cellulose column eluted with the lower phase of chloroform-methanol 17 % ammonium hydroxide (2:1:1, v/v) . Chemical purity, determined by HPLC, was 96,5 % and radiochemical one was 95. Main exchange degradation products show biological activity. (Author) 12 refs

  17. General Tritium labelling of gentamicin C by catalytic hydrogen exchange reaction with tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, C.; Diaz, D.

    1991-01-01

    Gentamicin C was labelled with tritium by means of a PtO 2 catalized hydrogen exchange reaction. Under the conditions of the exchange (100 mg of gentamicin, basic form, 0,3 ml H 2 O- 3 H, and 50 mg of prereduced PtO 2 ) the radiochemical yield was 0,24, 0,38 and 0,48 % at 120 o C, for 8, 16 and 24 hours respectively. Chemical yield for purified gentamicin was about 60 %. Purification was accoumplished with a cellulose column eluted with the lower phase of chloroform-methanol 17 % ammonium hydroxide (2:1:1, v/v). Chemical purity, determined by HPLC, was 96,5 % and radiochemical one was 95 % . Main exchange degradation products show biological activity. (Author). 12 refs

  18. Kinetics of the hydrogen production reaction in a copper-chlorine water splitting plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2009-01-01

    The exothermic reaction of HCl with particulate Cu occurs during hydrogen production step in the thermochemical copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) water splitting cycle. In this paper, this chemical reaction is modeled kinetically, and a parametric study is performed to determine the influences of particle size, temperature and molar ratios on the reaction kinetics. It is determined that the residence time of copper particles varies between 10 and 100 s, depending on the operating conditions. The hydrogen conversion at equilibrium varies between 55 and 85%, depending on the reaction temperature. The heat flux at the particle surface, caused by the exothermic enthalpy of reaction, reaches about 3,000 W/m 2 when the particle shrinks to 0.1% from its initial size. A numerical algorithm is developed to solve the moving boundary Stefan problem with a chemical reaction. It predicts the shrinking of copper particles based on the hypothesis that the chemical reaction and heat transfer are decoupled. The model allows for estimation of the temperature of the copper particle, assumed spherical, in the radial direction. The maximum temperature at the interface is higher than the melting point of CuCl by 10-50 o C, depending on the assumed operating conditions. (author)

  19. Role of point defects and additives in kinetics of hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Walle, Chris

    2010-03-01

    First-principles computational studies of hydrogen interactions with storage materials can provide direct insight into the processes of H uptake and release, and may help in developing guidelines for designing storage media with improved storage capacity and kinetics. One important conclusion is that the defects involved in kinetics of semiconducting or insulating H-storage materials are charged, and hence their formation energy is Fermi-level dependent and can be affected by the presence of impurities that change the Fermi level [1,2]. This provides an explanation for the role played by transition-metal impurities in the kinetics of NaAlH4 and related materials. Desorption of H and decomposition of NaAlH4 requires not only mass transport of H but also of Al and/or Na. This process is mediated by native defects. We have investigated the structure, stability, and migration enthalpy of native defects based on density functional theory. The results allow us to estimate diffusion activation energies for the defects that may be involved in mass transport. Most of the relevant defects exist in charge states other than neutral, and consideration of these charge states is essential for a proper description of kinetics. We propose specific new mechanisms to explain the observed activation energies and their dependence on the presence of impurities. We have also expanded our studies to materials other than NaAlH4. In the case of LiBH4 and Li4BN3H10 we have found that the calculations have predictive power in terms of identifying which impurities will actually enhance kinetics. Other complex hydrides that we are currently investigating include Li2NH and LiNH2. [4pt] [1] A. Peles and C. G. Van de Walle, Phys. Rev. B 76, 214101 (2007). [0pt] [2] C. G. Van de Walle, A. Peles, A. Janotti, and G. B. Wilson-Short, Physica B 404, 793 (2009).

  20. Study of Hydrogen Consumption by Control System in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ros Emilia Rosli; Edy Herianto Majlan; Siti Afiqah Abd Hamid; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Ramizi Mohamed; Dedi Rohendi

    2016-01-01

    Efficient operation results from a proper control strategy. In the operation and performance of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC), the hydrogen gas flow rate is one of the most essential control parameter in addition to operating pressure, water management, temperature and humidity. This is because of the high cost and amount of energy are required to produce the purity hydrogen gas. In this paper, a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) feedback control system is used to control the hydrogen flow rate. A strategy is adapted to balance the hydrogen use based on the loading requirements, especially during start-ups and sudden power demands. This system is implemented using National Instrument (NI) devices powered by the LabVIEW program. This is due to its simplicity and customization flexibility for measuring, processing and recording data. Designed structure allows the real-time implementation of a robust control law that is able to address the related nonlinearities and uncertainties without incurring a heavy computational load for the controller algorithm. While it facilitating a fast sampling rate according to the needs of the power system. Test results from the controller show that the new fuel control system provides good performance by reducing the amount of wasted hydrogen gas compared with that of the previous open loop system by 30 % to over 80 % saved by the varied load. This improvement is beneficial for any PEMFC that experiences fluctuating power demand, especially for vehicle applications. (author)

  1. Comparison of hydrogen isotope exchange reactions between HTO vapor and the sodium salts of o-, m-, and p-aminobenzoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Minoru; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Itoh, Tomoko

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between HTO vapor and one of the sodium salts of o-, m-, and p-aminobenzoic acid (solid) was observed at 50 ∼ 80 degC. The acidity (acidity based on kinetic logic) for the materials at each temperature has been obtained with the A''-McKay plots based on the respective data obtained. The followings have been clarified by comparing these acidities (and the acidities obtained previously). 1) The acidity of aromatic amines can be expressed in terms of the acidity based on kinetic logic. 2) The reactivity of aromatic amine is strongly affected by both I-effect and R-effect. 3) It can be deduced that aromatic amines are more reactive than aliphatic amines. (author)

  2. Effect of the number of phenyl groups per molecule on the reactivity of hydroxyl or carboxyl group in hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Minoru; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Oguma, Shuichi

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen-exchange reactions in solid alcohols (or solid carboxylic acids) which contain phenyl group(s) in each molecule have been observed in a gas-solid system or liquid-solid system at 40 ≅ 80deg C. The data thus obtained have been analyzed by using the A''-McKay plot method, and 'the acidities based on kinetic logic' have been obtained for those compounds. From the acidities the following four characteristics have been determined. (1) The acidity increases with increases of temperature. (2) The reactivities of carboxylic acids are larger than those of alcohols at any temperature. (3) The effect of the number of phenyl groups on the reactivity of the functional group in the molecule in question is fairly large. (4) Acidity based on kinetic logic can be applied not only to gas-solid reactions, but also to liquid-solid reactions. (orig.)

  3. A kinetic model for quantitative evaluation of the effect of hydrogen and osmolarity on hydrogen production by Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacchi Guido

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus has attracted increased interest as an industrial hydrogen (H2 producer. The aim of the present study was to develop a kinetic growth model for this extreme thermophile. The model is based on Monod kinetics supplemented with the inhibitory effects of H2 and osmotic pressure, as well as the liquid-to-gas mass transfer of H2. Results Mathematical expressions were developed to enable the simulation of microbial growth, substrate consumption and product formation. The model parameters were determined by fitting them to experimental data. The derived model corresponded well with experimental data from batch fermentations in which the stripping rates and substrate concentrations were varied. The model was used to simulate the inhibition of growth by H2 and solute concentrations, giving a critical dissolved H2 concentration of 2.2 mmol/L and an osmolarity of 0.27 to 29 mol/L. The inhibition by H2, being a function of the dissolved H2 concentration, was demonstrated to be mainly dependent on H2 productivity and mass transfer rate. The latter can be improved by increasing the stripping rate, thereby allowing higher H2 productivity. The experimentally determined degree of oversaturation of dissolved H2 was 12 to 34 times the equilibrium concentration and was comparable to the values given by the model. Conclusions The derived model is the first mechanistically based model for fermentative H2 production and provides useful information to improve the understanding of the growth behavior of C. saccharolyticus. The model can be used to determine optimal operating conditions for H2 production regarding the substrate concentration and the stripping rate.

  4. Hydrogen Exchange Differences between Chemoreceptor Signaling Complexes Localize to Functionally Important Subdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The goal of understanding mechanisms of transmembrane signaling, one of many key life processes mediated by membrane proteins, has motivated numerous studies of bacterial chemotaxis receptors. Ligand binding to the receptor causes a piston motion of an α helix in the periplasmic and transmembrane domains, but it is unclear how the signal is then propagated through the cytoplasmic domain to control the activity of the associated kinase CheA. Recent proposals suggest that signaling in the cytoplasmic domain involves opposing changes in dynamics in different subdomains. However, it has been difficult to measure dynamics within the functional system, consisting of extended arrays of receptor complexes with two other proteins, CheA and CheW. We have combined hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry with vesicle template assembly of functional complexes of the receptor cytoplasmic domain to reveal that there are significant signaling-associated changes in exchange, and these changes localize to key regions of the receptor involved in the excitation and adaptation responses. The methylation subdomain exhibits complex changes that include slower hydrogen exchange in complexes in a kinase-activating state, which may be partially consistent with proposals that this subdomain is stabilized in this state. The signaling subdomain exhibits significant protection from hydrogen exchange in complexes in a kinase-activating state, suggesting a tighter and/or larger interaction interface with CheA and CheW in this state. These first measurements of the stability of protein subdomains within functional signaling complexes demonstrate the promise of this approach for measuring functionally important protein dynamics within the various physiologically relevant states of multiprotein complexes. PMID:25420045

  5. Kinetic modelling of slurry polymerization of ethylene with a polymer supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst (hydrogen)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shariati, A.

    1996-12-31

    The kinetics of polymerization of ethylene catalyzed by a polymer supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst were investigated in a semi-batch reactor system. The influences of six polymerization variables were investigated using a central composite design. The variables were monomer partial pressure, catalyst loading, co-catalyst loading, catalyst particle size and hydrogen to monomer ratio. The influence of temperature on rate and polymer properties were investigated. Empirical models were fitted to the experimental data to quantify the effects of the polymerization variables on the rate characteristics and polymer properties. The rate of polymerization exhibited a first order dependency with respect to monomer partial pressure, but a nonlinear relationship with respect to catalyst loading. In the absence of hydrogen, the polymerization rate showed a non-decaying profile at the centre point conditions for the other variables. Catalyst loading and catalyst particle size had a negligible effect on weight-and-number-average molecular weights, while increasing co-catalysts loading lowered the molecular weights, as did increased temperature and hydrogen concentration. refs., figs.

  6. Efficient hydrogen production on MoNi4 electrocatalysts with fast water dissociation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Tao; Liu, Pan; Liao, Zhongquan; Liu, Shaohua; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Chen, Mingwei; Zschech, Ehrenfried; Feng, Xinliang

    2017-05-01

    Various platinum-free electrocatalysts have been explored for hydrogen evolution reaction in acidic solutions. However, in economical water-alkali electrolysers, sluggish water dissociation kinetics (Volmer step) on platinum-free electrocatalysts results in poor hydrogen-production activities. Here we report a MoNi4 electrocatalyst supported by MoO2 cuboids on nickel foam (MoNi4/MoO2@Ni), which is constructed by controlling the outward diffusion of nickel atoms on annealing precursor NiMoO4 cuboids on nickel foam. Experimental and theoretical results confirm that a rapid Tafel-step-decided hydrogen evolution proceeds on MoNi4 electrocatalyst. As a result, the MoNi4 electrocatalyst exhibits zero onset overpotential, an overpotential of 15 mV at 10 mA cm-2 and a low Tafel slope of 30 mV per decade in 1 M potassium hydroxide electrolyte, which are comparable to the results for platinum and superior to those for state-of-the-art platinum-free electrocatalysts. Benefiting from its scalable preparation and stability, the MoNi4 electrocatalyst is promising for practical water-alkali electrolysers.

  7. Kinetic Modeling of a Silicon Refining Process in a Moist Hydrogen Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Morita, Kazuki

    2018-06-01

    We developed a kinetic model that considers both silicon loss and boron removal in a metallurgical grade silicon refining process. This model was based on the hypotheses of reversible reactions. The reaction rate coefficient kept the same form but error of terminal boron concentration could be introduced when relating irreversible reactions. Experimental data from published studies were used to develop a model that fit the existing data. At 1500 °C, our kinetic analysis suggested that refining silicon in a moist hydrogen atmosphere generates several primary volatile species, including SiO, SiH, HBO, and HBO2. Using the experimental data and the kinetic analysis of volatile species, we developed a model that predicts a linear relationship between the reaction rate coefficient k and both the quadratic function of p(H2O) and the square root of p(H2). Moreover, the model predicted the partial pressure values for the predominant volatile species and the prediction was confirmed by the thermodynamic calculations, indicating the reliability of the model. We believe this model provides a foundation for designing a silicon refining process with a fast boron removal rate and low silicon loss.

  8. Isotopic exchange between CO2 and H2O and labelling kinetics of photosynthetic oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerster, Richard

    1971-01-01

    The reaction of carbon dioxide with water has been studied by measuring the rate of oxygen exchange between C 18 O 2 and H 2 16 O. The mathematical treatment of the kinetics allows to determine with accuracy the diffusion flow between the gas and the liquid phase, in the same way as the CO 2 hydration rate. The velocity constant of this last process, whose value gives the in situ enzymatic activity of carbonic anhydrase, has been established in the case of chloroplast and Euglena suspensions and of aerial leaves. The study of the isotopic exchange between C 18 O 2 and a vegetable submitted to alternations of dark and light has allowed to calculate the isotopic abundance of the metabolized CO 2 whose value has been compared to that of the intracellular water and that of photosynthetic oxygen. In addition, a new method using 13 C 18 O 2 gives the means to measure with accuracy eventual isotopic effects. The labelling kinetics of the oxygen evolved by Euglena suspensions whose water has been enriched with 18 O have been established at different temperatures. (author) [fr

  9. Kinetic Behavior of Exchange-Driven Growth with Catalyzed-Birth Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Feng; Lin, Zhen-Quan; Kong, Xiang-Mu

    2006-12-01

    Two catalyzed-birth models of n-species (n>=2) aggregates with exchange-driven growth processes are proposed and compared. In the first one, the exchange reaction occurs between any two aggregates Amk and Amj of the same species with the rate kernels Km(k,j) = Kmkj (m = 1,2,...,n, n>=2), and aggregates of An species catalyze a monomer-birth of Al species (l = 1,2,...,n-1) with the catalysis rate kernel Jl(k,j) = Jlkjυ. The kinetic behaviors are investigated by means of the mean-field theory. We find that the evolution behavior of aggregate-size distribution alk(t) of Al species depends crucially on the value of the catalysis rate parameter υ: (i) alk(t) obeys the conventional scaling law in the case of υ0. In the second model, the mechanism of monomer-birth of An-species catalyzed by Al species is added on the basis of the first model, that is, the aggregates of Al and An species catalyze each other to cause monomer-birth. The kinetic behaviors of Al and An species are found to fall into two categories for the different υ: (i) growth obeying conventional scaling form with υ0.

  10. Gas exchange kinetics following concentric-eccentric isokinetic arm and leg exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, U; Mookerjee, S; Steegmanns, A; Knicker, A; Hoffmann, U

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of exercise velocity (60, 150, 240deg∙s -1 ) and muscle mass (arm vs leg) on changes in gas exchange and arterio-venous oxygen content difference (avDO 2 ) following high-intensity concentric-eccentric isokinetic exercise. Fourteen subjects (26.9±3.1years) performed a 3×20-repetition isokinetic exercise protocol. Recovery beat-to-beat cardiac output (CO) and breath-by-breath gas exchange were recorded to determine post-exercise half-time (t 1/2 ) for oxygen uptake (V˙O 2 pulm), carbon dioxide output (V˙CO 2 pulm), and ventilation (V˙ E ). Significant differences of the t 1/2 values were identified between 60 and 150deg∙s -1 . Significant differences in the t 1/2 values were observed between V˙O 2 pulm and V˙CO 2 pulm and between V˙CO 2 pulm and V˙ E . The time to attain the first avDO 2 -peak showed significant differences between arm and leg exercise. The present study illustrates, that V˙O 2 pulm kinetics are distorted due to non-linear CO dynamics. Therefore, it has to be taken into account, that V˙O 2 pulm may not be a valuable surrogate for muscular oxygen uptake kinetics in the recovery phases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hydrogen production by high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Conceptual design of advanced process heat exchangers of the HTTR-IS hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaba, Nariaki; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Hara, Teruo; Kato, Ryoma; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear hydrogen production is necessary in an anticipated hydrogen society that demands a massive quantity of hydrogen without economic disadvantage. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has launched the conceptual design study of a hydrogen production system with a near-term plan to connect it to Japan's first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor HTTR. The candidate hydrogen production system is based on the thermochemical water-splitting iodine sulphur (IS) process.The heat of 10 MWth at approximately 900degC, which can be provided by the secondary helium from the intermediate heat exchanger of the HTTR, is the energy input to the hydrogen production system. In this paper, we describe the recent progresses made in the conceptual design of advanced process heat exchangers of the HTTR-IS hydrogen production system. A new concept of sulphuric acid decomposer is proposed. This involves the integration of three separate functions of sulphuric acid decomposer, sulphur trioxide decomposer, and process heat exchanger. A new mixer-settler type of Bunsen reactor is also designed. This integrates three separate functions of Bunsen reactor, phase separator, and pump. The new concepts are expected to result in improved economics through construction and operation cost reductions because the number of process equipment and complicated connections between the equipment has been substantially reduced. (author)

  12. Influence of the evaporation rate and the evaporation mode on the hydrogen sorption kinetics of air-exposed magnesium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, A.; Knystautas, E.J.; Huot, J.; Schulz, R.

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that the hydrogen sorption properties of air-exposed magnesium films are influenced by the deposition parameters such as the evaporation rate or the evaporation mode used during their preparation. As the evaporation rate increases, the structure of the film tends to be highly oriented along the [002] direction and the kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption are faster. Moreover, the hydrogen sorption kinetics of magnesium films prepared with an electron beam source under a high vacuum are faster by almost a factor of two compared to those prepared using resistive heating under low vacuum. These two parameters reduce drastically the activation and the incubation period during hydrogen absorption and desorption, respectively

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of ligand-exchange reactions of Cd(II) chelates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nivorozhkin, L.E.; Kalabin, G.A.; Nivorozhkin, A.L.; Valeev, R.B.; Minkin, V.I.

    1987-03-01

    Tetrahedral Cd(II) bis(5-thio(or seleno)pyrazole-4-carboxaldiminates) of types II and III have been synthesized for the first time. The kinetics of the degenerate ligand exchange and enantiomerization of the complexes obtained have been studied by dynamic /sup 111/Cd, /sup 77/Se, and /sup 1/H (s = 1/2) NMR. The rate of intramolecular enantiomerization (k = 1/tau) is more than an order of magnitude greater than the corresponding values for processes of degenerate ligand exchange (a second-order reaction) determined from the dynamics of the averaging of the /sup 111/Cd-/sup 77/Se and /sup 111/Cd-N=CH spin-spin coupling constants. The cleavage and formation processes of the Cd-Se and Cd-N bonds are isoenergetic (..delta.. G/sub 298//sup not equal to/ = 14.4 kcal/mole for chelate II with X = Se and R = CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/). The free energies of activation of degenerate ligand exchange determined form the dynamics of the averaging of the /sup 111/Cd N=CH spin-spin coupling constant increase from 12.7 to 17.9 kcal/mole along the following series for R: C/sub 2/H/sub 5/ < Ar < CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/ < t-C/sub 4/H/sub 9/ < cyclo-C/sub 6/H/sub 11/. Replacement of the sulfur atom in the chelate ring by selenium results in increases in the rates of ligand exchange. A mechanism of degenerate ligand exchange has been proposed.

  14. Ion-exchange Resin Catalyzed Esterification of Lactic Acid with Isopropanol: a Kinetic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit P. Toor

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic behavior of esterification of lactic acid with isopropanol over an acidic cation exchange resin, Amberlyst 15, was studied under isothermal condition. Isopropyl lactate synthesized in this reaction is an important pharmaceutical intermediate. The experiments were carried out in a stirred batch reactor in the temperature range of 323.15 to 353.15 K. The effect of various parameters such as temperature, molar ratio and catalyst loading was studied. Variation in parameters on rate of reaction demonstrated that the reaction was intrinsically controlled. Kinetic modeling was performed using Eley-Rideal model which acceptably fits the experimental data. The activation energy was found to be 22.007 kJ/mol and frequency factor was 0.036809 l2 g-1 mol-1 min-1 for forward reaction. The value of entropy for the forward reaction was found to be 182.317 J K-1 mol-1 . © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 19th January 2011, Revised: 16th March 2011; Accepted: 16th March 2011[How to Cite: A.P. Toor, M. Sharma, S. Thakur, and R. K. Wanchoo. (2011. Ion-exchange Resin Catalyzed Esterification of Lactic Acid with Isopropanol: a Kinetic Study. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 6(1: 39-45. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.791.39-45][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.791.39-45 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/791 ] | View in  

  15. Improved protein hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry platform with fully automated data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongqi; Zhang, Aming; Xiao, Gang

    2012-06-05

    Protein hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) followed by protease digestion and mass spectrometric (MS) analysis is accepted as a standard method for studying protein conformation and conformational dynamics. In this article, an improved HDX MS platform with fully automated data processing is described. The platform significantly reduces systematic and random errors in the measurement by introducing two types of corrections in HDX data analysis. First, a mixture of short peptides with fast HDX rates is introduced as internal standards to adjust the variations in the extent of back exchange from run to run. Second, a designed unique peptide (PPPI) with slow intrinsic HDX rate is employed as another internal standard to reflect the possible differences in protein intrinsic HDX rates when protein conformations at different solution conditions are compared. HDX data processing is achieved with a comprehensive HDX model to simulate the deuterium labeling and back exchange process. The HDX model is implemented into the in-house developed software MassAnalyzer and enables fully unattended analysis of the entire protein HDX MS data set starting from ion detection and peptide identification to final processed HDX output, typically within 1 day. The final output of the automated data processing is a set (or the average) of the most possible protection factors for each backbone amide hydrogen. The utility of the HDX MS platform is demonstrated by exploring the conformational transition of a monoclonal antibody by increasing concentrations of guanidine.

  16. Modification of interlayer exchange coupling in Fe/V/Fe trilayers using hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoryna, J., E-mail: jskoryna@ifmpan.poznan.pl [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17 St., 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Marczyńska, A. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17 St., 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Lewandowski, M. [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85 St., 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Smardz, L. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17 St., 60-179 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Magnetic films and multilayers. • Thin films. • Hydrogen absorbing materials. • Magnetic measurements. • Exchange coupling. - Abstract: Fe/V/Fe trilayers with constant-thickness Fe and step-like wedged V sublayers were prepared at room temperature using UHV magnetron sputtering. The bottom Fe layer grows onto oxidised Si(1 0 0) substrate and shows relatively high coercivity. The top Fe layer grows on vanadium spacer and shows considerably lower coercivity. The planar growth of the Fe and V sublayers was confirmed in-situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results show that the Fe sublayers are weakly exchange coupled for d{sub V} > 1.4 nm. Results on the coercivity studies as a function of the V interlayer thickness show near d{sub V} ∼ 1.95 nm (∼2.45 nm) weak antiferromagnetic (ferromagnetic) coupling, respectively. The hydrogenation of the Fe/V/Fe trilayers leads to increase of the strength of the ferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling.

  17. Gas-phase ion/molecule isotope-exchange reactions: methodology for counting hydrogen atoms in specific organic structural environments by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, D.F.; Sethi, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ion/molecule reactions are described which facilitate exchange of hydrogens for deuteriums in a variety of different chemical environments. Aromatic hydrogens in alkylbenzenes, oxygenated benzenes, m-toluidine, m-phenylenediamine, thiophene, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metallocenes are exchanged under positive ion CI conditions by using either D 2 O, EtOD, or ND 3 as the reagent gas. Aromatic hydrogens, benzylic hydrogens, and hydrogens on carbon adjacent to carbonyl groups suffer exchange under negative ion CI conditions in ND 3 , D 2 O, and EtOD, respectively. A possible mechanism for the exchange process is discussed. 1 figure, 2 tables

  18. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange of cross-linkable alpha-amino acid derivatives in deuterated triflic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lei; Murai, Yuta; Yoshida, Takuma; Okamoto, Masashi; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Sakihama, Yasuko; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Hatanaka, Yasumaru; Hashimoto, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report here a hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/D exchange) of cross-linkable alpha-amino acid derivatives with deuterated trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TfOD). H/D exchange with TfOD was easily applied to o-catechol containing phenylalanine (DOPA) within an hour. A partial H/D exchange was observed for trifluoromethyldiazirinyl (TFMD) phenylalanine derivatives. N-Acetyl-protected natural aromatic alpha-amino acids (Tyr and Trp) were more effective in H/D exchange than unprotect...

  19. Dispersive kinetic model for the non-isothermal reduction of nickel oxide by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adnadevic, Borivoj; Jankovic, Bojan

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of the non-isothermal reduction process of powder nickel oxide samples using hydrogen was investigated by temperature-programmed experiments at the different constant heating rates. The new procedure for the determination of density distribution function of activation energies (ddfE a ), evaluated from the experimentally obtained non-isothermal conversion curves, was developed. The analytical relationships between the corresponding thermo-kinetic parameters for the investigated reduction process were established. From the influence of heating rate on the basic characteristics of ddfE a 's, it was concluded that the evaluated ddfE a 's are completely independent of the heating rate (v h ). It was found that the value of activation energy at the peak of the distribution curve (E a,max ), at all considered heating rates, is in good agreement with the value of E a,0 (96.6 kJ mol -1 ) calculated from the isoconversional dependence of activation energy, in the conversion range of 0.20≤α≤0.60. From the appearances of the true compensation effect, it was concluded that the factor that produces the changes of kinetic parameter values is a conversion fraction (α). Using the model prediction, the experimentally obtained conversion curves are completely described by the evaluated distribution curves (g(E a ) vhj ) at all considered heating rates. It was concluded that the assumption about the distribution of potential energies of oxygen vacancies presented in NiO samples leads to the distribution of activation energies, which determine the kinetics of non-isothermal reduction processes

  20. Modeling of hydrogen production methods: Single particle model and kinetics assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.S.; Bellan, J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The investigation carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is devoted to the modeling of biomass pyrolysis reactors producing an oil vapor (tar) which is a precursor to hydrogen. This is an informal collaboration with NREL whereby JPL uses the experimentally-generated NREL data both as initial and boundary conditions for the calculations, and as a benchmark for model validation. The goal of this investigation is to find drivers of biomass fast-pyrolysis in the low temperature regime. The rationale is that experimental observations produce sparse discrete conditions for model validation, and that numerical simulations produced with a validated model are an economic way to find control parameters and an optimal operation regime, thereby circumventing costly changes in hardware and tests. During this first year of the investigation, a detailed mathematical model has been formulated for the temporal and spatial accurate modeling of solid-fluid reactions in biomass particles. These are porous particles for which volumetric reaction rate data is known a priori and both the porosity and the permeability of the particle are large enough to allow for continuous gas phase flow. The methodology has been applied to the pyrolysis of spherically symmetric biomass particles by considering previously published kinetics schemes for both cellulose and wood. The results show that models which neglect the thermal and species boundary layers exterior to the particle will generally over predict both the pyrolysis rates and experimentally obtainable tar yields. An evaluation of the simulation results through comparisons with experimental data indicates that while the cellulose kinetics is reasonably accurate, the wood pyrolysis kinetics is not accurate; particularly at high reactor temperatures. Current effort in collaboration with NREL is aimed at finding accurate wood kinetics.

  1. Kinetic Behaviors of a Competitive Population and Fitness System in Exchange-Driven Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Ke; Lin Zhenquan; Sun Yunfei

    2008-01-01

    We proposed an aggregation model of two species aggregates of fitness and population to study the interaction between the two species in their exchange-driven processes of the same species by introducing the monomer birth of fitness catalyzed by the population, where the fitness aggregates perform self-death process and the population aggregates perform self-birth process. The kinetic behaviors of the aggregate size distributions of the fitness and population were analyzed by the rate equation approach with their exchange rate kernel K 1 (k,j) = K 1 kj and K 2 (k,j) = K 2 kj, the fitness aggregate's self-death rate kernel J 1 (k) = J 1 k, population aggregate's self-birth rate kernel J 2 (k) = J 2 k and population-catalyzed fitness birth rate kernel I(k,j) = Ikj v . The kinetic behavior of the fitness was found depending crucially on the parameter v, which reflects the dependence of the population-catalyzed fitness birth rate on the size of the catalyst (population) aggregate. (i) In the v ≤ 0 case, the effect of catalyzed-birth of fitness is rather weak and the exchange-driven aggregation and self-death of the fitness dominate the process, and the fitness aggregate size distribution a k (t) does not have scale form. (ii) When v > 0, the effect of the population-catalyzed birth of fitness gets strong enough, and the catalyzed-birth and self-death of the fitness aggregates, together with the self-birth of the population aggregates dominate the evolution process of the fitness aggregates. The aggregate size distribution a k (t) approaches a generalized scaling form

  2. Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-05

    This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

  3. Isotopic exchange kinetics of zinc ions in Zn-A zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radak, V M; Gal, I J; Salai, J J [Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia)

    1976-01-01

    The isotopic exchange kinetics of Zn/sup 2 +/ ions in hydrated Zn-A zeolite of composition (Znsub(5.55)Nasub(0.90)(A10/sub 2/)/sub 12/(Si0/sub 2/)/sub 12/.aq) have been investigated by measuring the fractional attainment of isotopic equilibrium between a ZnCl/sub 2/ solution and a /sup 65/Zn-labelled Zn-A zeolite (30 and 45 ..mu..m particle radii) as a function of time, in the temperature range 25 to 60/sup 0/C. The exchange mechanism is a two-step process which has been resolved, using the Brown-Sherry-Krambeck model (J.Phys.Chem.;75:3846(1971)) into diffusion in the solid particles, with Zn/sup 2 +/ diffusivity of D = 10sup(-3.97 + -0.03) exp(-Esub(D)/RT)m/sup 2/ s/sup -1/, Esub(D) = 67.1 +- 0.5 kJ molee/sup -1/, and an intracrystalline first-order exchange between bound and mobile Zn/sup 2 +/ ions in the network, with a rate constant of k/sub 2/ = 10sup(3.05 +- 0.25) exp(-Esub(k)/RT)s/sup -1/, Esub(k) = 56.5 +- 1.5 kJ mol/sup -1/.

  4. Charge-exchange neutral hydrogen measurements in TFTR using Pd-MOS microsensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastasz, R.; Kilpatrick, S.J.; Ruzic, D.N.

    1991-06-01

    An array of Pd-metal-oxide semiconductor (Pd-MOS) diodes has been used to monitor the fluence and energy of charge-exchange neutral hydrogen isotopes striking the wall of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The array was positioned 4 cm behind the graphite-tiled wall at the toroidal midplane and exposed to several hundred plasma discharges. Hydrogen isotopes striking the Pd-MOS diodes were detected by measuring the leakage current, which is affected by the presence of these species at the Pd/SiO 2 interface. It was found that the midplane flux strongly increased for neutral-beam heated plasmas and correlated with co-injected neutral beam power. The majority of the neutral flux was <50 eV in energy but its energy distribution extended to above 500 eV. 20 refs., 4 figs

  5. AMORE-HX: a multidimensional optimization of radial enhanced NMR-sampled hydrogen exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gledhill, John M.; Walters, Benjamin T.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2009-01-01

    The Cartesian sampled three-dimensional HNCO experiment is inherently limited in time resolution and sensitivity for the real time measurement of protein hydrogen exchange. This is largely overcome by use of the radial HNCO experiment that employs the use of optimized sampling angles. The significant practical limitation presented by use of three-dimensional data is the large data storage and processing requirements necessary and is largely overcome by taking advantage of the inherent capabilities of the 2D-FT to process selective frequency space without artifact or limitation. Decomposition of angle spectra into positive and negative ridge components provides increased resolution and allows statistical averaging of intensity and therefore increased precision. Strategies for averaging ridge cross sections within and between angle spectra are developed to allow further statistical approaches for increasing the precision of measured hydrogen occupancy. Intensity artifacts potentially introduced by over-pulsing are effectively eliminated by use of the BEST approach

  6. Amide proton solvent protection in amylin fibrils probed by quenched hydrogen exchange NMR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei T Alexandrescu

    Full Text Available Amylin is an endocrine hormone that accumulates in amyloid plaques in patients with advanced type 2 diabetes. The amyloid plaques have been implicated in the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, which synthesize amylin and insulin. To better characterize the secondary structure of amylin in amyloid fibrils we assigned the NMR spectrum of the unfolded state in 95% DMSO and used a quenched hydrogen-deuterium exchange technique to look at amide proton solvent protection in the fibrils. In this technique, partially exchanged fibrils are dissolved in 95% DMSO and information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils is determined from DMSO-denatured monomers. Hydrogen exchange lifetimes at pH 7.6 and 37°C vary between ∼5 h for the unstructured N-terminus to 600 h for amide protons in the two β-strands that form inter-molecular hydrogen bonds between amylin monomers along the length of the fibril. Based on the protection data we conclude that residues A8-H18 and I26-Y37 comprise the two β-strands in amylin fibrils. There is variation in protection within the β-strands, particularly for strand β1 where only residues F15-H18 are strongly protected. Differences in protection appear to be due to restrictions on backbone dynamics imposed by the packing of two-layers of C2-symmetry-related β-hairpins in the protofilament structure, with strand β1 positioned on the surface and β2 in the interior.

  7. The study of stability of Pt-SDB in isotopic exchange between tritium oxide and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan Guiping

    2008-06-01

    The stability of Pt-SDB on its catalytic activity and the Pt contained in Pt-SDB have been studied during three years in isotopic exchange between tritium oxide and hydrogen. The convert efficiency of the catalyst declined 10% in first two years and then it is 2% after another two years, when it is used interruptedly. The losing of Pt on Pt-SDB is separately 9.09% and 2.31% after it is washed 2000 hours by water and immersed in water 525 days. (authors)

  8. Selection of the process for the heavy water production using isotopic exchange amonia-hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman R, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    The utilization of the Petroleos Mexicanos ammonia plants for heavy water production by the isotopic exchange NH 3 -H 2 process is presented, in addition a description of the other heavy water production processes was presented. In the ammonia hydrogen process exist two possible alternatives for the operation of the system, one of them is to carry out the enrichment to the same temperature, the second consists in making the enrichment at two different temperatures (dual temperature process), an analysis was made to select the best alternative. The conclusion was that the best operation is the dual temperature process, which presents higher advantages according to the thermodynamics and engineering of the process. (author)

  9. Protein hydrogen exchange measured at single-residue resolution by electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2009-01-01

    Because of unparalleled sensitivity and tolerance to protein size, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a popular method for measuring the solution hydrogen (1H/2H) exchange (HX) of biologically relevant protein states. While incorporated deuterium can be localized to different regions by pepsin....... The deuterium labeling pattern of beta2-microglobulin is retained in the gaseous fragment ions by employing mild declustering conditions for electrospray ionization. A recently developed model peptide is used to arrive at such ion source declustering conditions that prevent the occurrence of intramolecular gas...

  10. Improving the Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Mg(BH4)2 for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Brandon [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Klebanoff, Lennie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Stavila, Vitalie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Heo, Tae Wook [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ray, Keith [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lee, Jonathan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, Alex [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kang, ShinYoung [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yu, Hui-Chia [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Thornton, Katsuyo [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-10-31

    The objective of this project is to (1) combine theory, synthesis, and characterization across multiple scales to understand the intrinsic kinetic and thermodynamic limitations in MgB2/Mg(BH4)2; (2) construct and apply a flexible, validated, multiscale theoretical framework for modeling (de)hydrogenation kinetics of the Mg-B-H system and related metal hydrides; and (3) devise strategies for improving kinetics and thermodynamics, particularly through nanostructuring and doping. The project has an emphasis on understanding and improving rehydrogenation of MgB2, which has generally been less explored and is key to enabling practical use.

  11. Hydrogen production in the K-Basin ion exchange columns, modules and cartridge filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    K-Basin uses ion exchange modules and ion exchange (IX) columns for removing radionuclides from the basin water. When the columns and modules are loaded, they are removed from service, drained and stored. After a few IX columns accumulate in storage, they are moved to a burial box. One of the burial box contains 33 columns and the other, six. The radionuclides act on the liquid left within and adhering to the beads to produce hydrogen. This report describes the generation rate, accumulation rate and significance of that accumulation. This summary also highlights those major areas of concern to the external (to Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC]) reviewers. Appendix H presents the comments made by the external reviewers and, on a separate sheet, the responses to those comments. The concerns regarding the details of the analytical approach, are addressed in Appendix H and in the appropriate section

  12. Deuterium exchange between hydrogen and water in a trickle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enright, J.T.; Chuang, T.T.

    1978-01-01

    The catalyzed exchange of deuterium between hydrogen and liquid water has been studied as the basis for a heavy water production process. Platinum catalyst which had been waterproofed with Teflon was tested in a 0.2 m diameter trickle bed reactor at pressures and temperatures up to 6 MPa and 440 K. Extensive experimental data were used to test a model of the system which was developed from fundamental principles. It was found that mass transfer plays a very important role in the overall exchange and the conventional theory of vapour/liquid mass transfer does not adequately describe the absorption process. Modelling of the data has resulted in the postulation of a second method of mass transfer whereby HDO transfers directly from the catalyst to the bulk liquid phase. (author)

  13. Hydrogen production in the K-Basin ion exchange columns, modules and cartridge filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-21

    K-Basin uses ion exchange modules and ion exchange (IX) columns for removing radionuclides from the basin water. When the columns and modules are loaded, they are removed from service, drained and stored. After a few IX columns accumulate in storage, they are moved to a burial box. One of the burial box contains 33 columns and the other, six. The radionuclides act on the liquid left within and adhering to the beads to produce hydrogen. This report describes the generation rate, accumulation rate and significance of that accumulation. This summary also highlights those major areas of concern to the external (to Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC]) reviewers. Appendix H presents the comments made by the external reviewers and, on a separate sheet, the responses to those comments. The concerns regarding the details of the analytical approach, are addressed in Appendix H and in the appropriate section.

  14. Oligomerization interface of RAGE receptor revealed by MS-monitored hydrogen deuterium exchange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Sitkiewicz

    Full Text Available Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE leads to a chronic proinflammatory signal, affecting patients with a variety of diseases. Potentially beneficial modification of RAGE activity requires understanding the signal transduction mechanism at the molecular level. The ligand binding domain is structurally uncoupled from the cytoplasmic domain, suggesting receptor oligomerization is a requirement for receptor activation. In this study, we used hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry to map structural differences between the monomeric and oligomeric forms of RAGE. Our results indicated the presence of a region shielded from exchange in the oligomeric form of RAGE and led to the identification of a new oligomerization interface localized at the linker region between domains C1 and C2. Based on this finding, a model of a RAGE dimer and higher oligomeric state was constructed.

  15. NMR Analysis of Amide Hydrogen Exchange Rates in a Pentapeptide-Repeat Protein from A. thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shenyuan; Ni, Shuisong; Kennedy, Michael A

    2017-05-23

    At2g44920 from Arabidopsis thaliana is a pentapeptide-repeat protein (PRP) composed of 25 repeats capped by N- and C-terminal α-helices. PRP structures are dominated by four-sided right-handed β-helices typically consisting of mixtures of type II and type IV β-turns. PRPs adopt repeated five-residue (Rfr) folds with an Rfr consensus sequence (STAV)(D/N)(L/F)(S/T/R)(X). Unlike other PRPs, At2g44920 consists exclusively of type II β-turns. At2g44920 is predicted to be located in the thylakoid lumen although its biochemical function remains unknown. Given its unusual structure, we investigated the biophysical properties of At2g44920 as a representative of the β-helix family to determine if it had exceptional global stability, backbone dynamics, or amide hydrogen exchange rates. Circular dichroism measurements yielded a melting point of 62.8°C, indicating unexceptional global thermal stability. Nuclear spin relaxation measurements indicated that the Rfr-fold core was rigid with order parameters ranging from 0.7 to 0.9. At2g44920 exhibited a striking range of amide hydrogen exchange rates spanning 10 orders of magnitude, with lifetimes ranging from minutes to several months. A weak correlation was found among hydrogen exchange rates, hydrogen bonding energies, and amino acid solvent-accessible areas. Analysis of contributions from fast (approximately picosecond to nanosecond) backbone dynamics to amide hydrogen exchange rates revealed that the average order parameter of amides undergoing fast exchange was significantly smaller compared to those undergoing slow exchange. Importantly, the activation energies for amide hydrogen exchange were found to be generally higher for the slowest exchanging amides in the central Rfr coil and decreased toward the terminal coils. This could be explained by assuming that the concerted motions of two preceding or following coils required for hydrogen bond disruption and amide hydrogen exchange have a higher activation energy

  16. Non-equilibrium hydrogen exchange for determination of H-bond strength and water accessibility in solid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohe, Kristof; Movellan, Kumar Tekwani; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate measurement of non-equilibrium backbone amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates (HDX) for solid proteins. The target of this study are the slowly exchanging residues in solid samples, which are associated with stable secondary-structural elements of proteins. These hydrogen exchange processes escape methods measuring equilibrium exchange rates of faster processes. The method was applied to a micro-crystalline preparation of the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin. Therefore, from a 100% back-exchanged micro-crystalline protein preparation, the supernatant buffer was exchanged by a partially deuterated buffer to reach a final protonation level of approximately 20% before packing the sample in a 1.3 mm rotor. Tracking of the HN peak intensities for 2 weeks reports on site-specific hydrogen bond strength and also likely reflects water accessibility in a qualitative manner. H/D exchange can be directly determined for hydrogen-bonded amides using 1 H detection under fast magic angle spinning. This approach complements existing methods and provides the means to elucidate interesting site-specific characteristics for protein functionality in the solid state.

  17. Conformational analysis of g protein-coupled receptor signaling by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Lee, Su Youn; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-01-01

    Conformational change and protein-protein interactions are two major mechanisms of membrane protein signal transduction, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon agonist binding, GPCRs change conformation, resulting in interaction with downstream signaling molecules such as G proteins. To understand the precise signaling mechanism, studies have investigated the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), or electron paramagnetic resonance. In addition to these techniques, hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently been used in GPCR studies. HDX-MS measures the rate at which peptide amide hydrogens exchange with deuterium in the solvent. Exposed or flexible regions have higher exchange rates and excluded or ordered regions have lower exchange rates. Therefore, HDX-MS is a useful tool for studying protein-protein interfaces and conformational changes after protein activation or protein-protein interactions. Although HDX-MS does not give high-resolution structures, it analyzes protein conformations that are difficult to study with X-ray crystallography or NMR. Furthermore, conformational information from HDX-MS can help in the crystallization of X-ray crystallography by suggesting highly flexible regions. Interactions between GPCRs and downstream signaling molecules are not easily analyzed by X-ray crystallography or NMR because of the large size of the GPCR-signaling molecule complexes, hydrophobicity, and flexibility of GPCRs. HDX-MS could be useful for analyzing the conformational mechanism of GPCR signaling. In this chapter, we discuss details of HDX-MS for analyzing GPCRs using the β2AR-G protein complex as a model system. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulation of uranium oxides reduction kinetics by hydrogen. Reactivities of germination and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, C.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to simulate the reduction by hydrogen of the tri-uranium octo-oxide U 3 O 8 (obtained by uranium trioxide calcination) into uranium dioxide. The kinetics curves have been obtained by thermal gravimetric analysis, the hydrogen and steam pressures being defined. The geometrical modeling which has allowed to explain the trend of the kinetics curves and of the velocity curves is an anisotropic germination-growth modeling. The powder is supposed to be formed of spherical grains with the same radius. The germs of the new UO 2 phase appear at the surface of the U 3 O 8 grains with a specific germination frequency. The growth reactivity is anisotropic and is very large in the tangential direction to the grains surface. Then, the uranium dioxide growths inside the grain and the limiting step is the grain surface. The variations of the growth reactivity and of the germination specific frequency in terms of the gases partial pressures and of the temperature have been explained by two different mechanisms. The limiting step of the growth mechanism is the desorption of water in the uranium dioxide surface. Concerning the germination mechanism the limiting step is a water desorption too but in the tri-uranium octo-oxide surface. The same geometrical modeling and the same germination and growth mechanisms have been applied to the reduction of a tri-uranium octo-oxide obtained by calcination of hydrated uranium trioxide. The values of the germination specific frequency of this solid are nevertheless weaker than those of the solid obtained by direct calcination of the uranium trioxide. (O.M.)

  19. Proceedings of the fourth information exchange meeting on nuclear production of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The use of hydrogen, both as feedstock for the industry (oil and chemical) and as an energy carrier, is expected to grow substantially during the coming decades. The current predominant method of producing hydrogen by steam-reforming methane (from natural gas) is not sustainable and has environmental drawbacks, including the emission of greenhouse gasses (GHGs). Nuclear energy offers a way to produce hydrogen from water without depleting natural gas, a valuable natural resource, and without the emission of GHGs. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has conducted a number of information exchange meetings with the objective of stimulating progress in the development of nuclear production of hydrogen. These meetings, held in 2000 in Paris, France, in 2003 in Argonne, Illinois, USA, and in 2005 in Oarai, Japan, were well-attended and very successful. It is hoped that the information presented at fourth meeting and contained in these proceedings may be useful in advancing the objective of achieving economically viable, sustainable and emission-free production of hydrogen. The need for a sustainable supply of clean energy is one of the main problems facing the world. Among the various energy technologies which may be considered (including hydro, wind, solar, geo-thermal, wave and tidal), only nuclear - through the use of fast-neutron fission reactors - is capable of delivering the copious quantities of sustainable energy that will be required. In view of this, one of the means under consideration for achieving the objective of nuclear-produced hydrogen is enhanced international cooperation, including the establishment of one or more OECD/NEA joint projects. In this respect, it is worth noting that similar joint projects undertaken in the past (for example, the Dragon Project and the Halden Reactor Project) have been highly beneficial and have provided significant amounts of useful information to the sponsoring countries at shared costs. This report describes the

  20. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Functional Membrane-bound Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, Seena S.; Eyles, Stephen J.; Weis, Robert M.; Thompson, Lynmarie K.

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane signaling mechanism of bacterial chemotaxis receptors is thought to involve changes in receptor conformation and dynamics. The receptors function in ternary complexes with two other proteins, CheA and CheW, that form extended membrane-bound arrays. Previous studies have shown that attractant binding induces a small (~2 Å) piston displacement of one helix of the periplasmic and transmembrane domains towards the cytoplasm, but it is not clear how this signal propagates through the cytoplasmic domain to control the kinase activity of the CheA bound at the membrane-distal tip, nearly 200 Å away. The cytoplasmic domain has been shown to be highly dynamic, which raises the question of how a small piston motion could propagate through a dynamic domain to control CheA kinase activity. To address this, we have developed a method for measuring dynamics of the receptor cytoplasmic fragment (CF) in functional complexes with CheA and CheW. Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) measurements of global exchange of CF demonstrate that CF exhibits significantly slower exchange in functional complexes than in solution. Since the exchange rates in functional complexes are comparable to that of other proteins of similar structure, the CF appears to be a well-structured protein within these complexes, which is compatible with its role in propagating a signal that appears to be a tiny conformational change in the periplasmic and transmembrane domains of the receptor. We also demonstrate the feasibility of this protocol for local exchange measurements, by incorporating a pepsin digest step to produce peptides with 87% sequence coverage and only 20% back exchange. This method extends HDX-MS to membrane-bound functional complexes without detergents that may perturb the stability or structure of the system. PMID:24274333

  1. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li(+) - BF4 (-)/PF6 (-) ion pairs in acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Liem X; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-07

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li(+) and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around solvated Li(+) in acetonitrile (ACN), which is a common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li(+). We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with the transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux, Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches, and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems.

  2. Equilibrium isotope exchange kinetics of native and site-specific mutant forms of E. coli aspartate transcarbamoylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedler, F.C.; Hsuanyu, Y.; Kantrowitz, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    Isotope exchange kinetics at equilibrium (EIEK) have been used to probe the kinetic and regulatory mechanisms of native aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from E. coli at pH 7.0, 30 0 . Substrate saturation patterns were most consistent with a preferred order random kinetic mechanism: C-P prior to L-Asp, C-Asp released before Pi, with the Asp ↔ C-Asp exchange rate 5X faster than C-P ↔ Pi. Computer simulations allow one to fit the EIEK experimental data and to arrive at the best set of kinetic constants for a given enzyme state. These approaches have been applied to modified ATCase. Bound CTP and ATP were observed, respectively, to inhibit and activate differentially Asp ↔ C-Asp, but not C-P ↔ Pi, indicating that these modifiers alter the association-dissociation rates of L-Asp and C-Asp but not of C-P or Pi. Low levels of PALA activated both exchange rates (due to shifting the T-R equilibrium), but higher [PALA] completely blocked both exchanges. The effects of a site-specific mutation of Tyr240 Phe have been similarly probed by EIEK methods. The Phe240 mutant enzyme exhibited kinetic properties markedly different from native ATCase: the data indicate that Phe240 ATCase is much closer to an R-state enzyme than is native enzyme

  3. The impact of surface composition on Tafel kinetics leading to enhanced electrochemical insertion of hydrogen in palladium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriyeva, Olga; Hamm, Steven C.; Knies, David L.; Cantwell, Richard; McConnell, Matt

    2018-05-01

    Our previous work experimentally demonstrated the enhancement of electrochemical hydrogen insertion into palladium by modifying the chemical composition of the cathode surface with Pb, Pt and Bi, referred to as surface promoters. The experiment demonstrated that an optimal combination of the surface promoters led to an increase in hydrogen fugacity of more than three orders of magnitude, while maintaining the same current density. This manuscript discusses the application of Density Functional Theory (DFT) to elucidate the thermodynamics and kinetics of observed enhancement of electrochemical hydrogen insertion into palladium. We present theoretical simulations that: (1) establish the elevation of hydrogen's chemical potential on Pb and Bi surfaces to enhance hydrogen insertion, (2) confirm the increase of a Tafel activation barrier that results in a decrease of the reaction rate at the given hydrogen overpotential, and (3) explain why the surface promoter's coverage needs to be non-uniform, namely to allow hydrogen insertion into palladium bulk while simultaneously locking hydrogen below the surface (the corking effect). The discussed DFT-based method can be used for efficient scanning of different material configurations to design a highly effective hydrogen storage system.

  4. Kinetic modeling of levulinic acid hydrogenation to gamma-valerolactone in water using a carbon supported Ru catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piskun, A.S.; van de Bovenkamp, H.H.; Rasrendra, C.B.; Winkelman, J.G.M.; Heeres, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    gamma-Valerolactone (GVL) is considered a very interesting green, bio-based platform chemical with highapplication potential for the production of both biofuels and biobased chemicals. In this contribution, wereport a kinetic study on the hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA) to 4-hydroxypentanoic

  5. Unravelling the dependence of hydrogen oxidation kinetics on the size of Pt nanoparticles by in operando nanoplasmonic temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wettergren, Kristina; Hellman, Anders; Cavalca, Filippo Carlo

    2015-01-01

    We use a noninvasive nanoscale optical-temperature measurement method based on localized surface plasmon resonance to investigate the particle size-dependence of the hydrogen oxidation reaction kinetics on model supported Pt nanocatalysts at atmospheric pressure in operando. With decreasing average...

  6. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, Y. [Nuclear Research Center–Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Moreh, R. [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Shchur, Ya. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, 1 Svientsitskii str., L’viv 79011 (Ukraine)

    2016-02-07

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance R{sub OO}, being a measure of the HB strength.

  7. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.; Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K.; Shchur, Ya.

    2016-01-01

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH 2 PO 4 , X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD 2 PO 4 , X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance R OO , being a measure of the HB strength

  8. Kinetics of Natural Detoxification of Hydrogen Cyanide Contained In Retted Cassava Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the kinetics of natural detoxification of hydrogen cyanide contained in retted cassava roots. Retting is traditional fermentation of cassava, performed to soften the roots. During retting, cyanide diffuses into water used for the retting. The fresh cassava roots (bitter and sweet varieties used for this experiment were separately retted at ambient 0 temperature of 30 C. The cyanide content and pH were monitored daily. From the analysis of the experimental results, a first order consecutive rate equation is an adequate tool for explaining the mechanism of HCN reduction (or decay in retted cassava roots. The detoxification constants for the bound cyanide in the bitter and sweet cassava roots were 0.378/day and 0.438/day respectively, while that of the free hydrogen cyanide were 0.63/day and 0.74/day for the bitter and sweet varieties respectively. Cassava tubers from different species cannot be fermented with the same retting condition unless they have same or close functional properties.

  9. Understanding the Relationship Between Kinetics and Thermodynamics in CO 2 Hydrogenation Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeletic, Matthew S. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Hulley, Elliott B. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Helm, Monte L. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Mock, Michael T. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Appel, Aaron M. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Wiedner, Eric S. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Linehan, John C. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States

    2017-08-14

    Linear free-energy relationships have been identified that link the kinetic activity for catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to formate with the thermodynamic driving force for the rate-limiting steps of catalysis. Cobalt and rhodium bis(diphosphine) complexes with different hydricities (G°H-), acidities (pKa), and free energies for H2 addition (G°H2) were examined. Catalytic CO2 hydrogenation was studied under 1.8 and 20 atm of pressure (1:1 CO2:H2) at room temperature in tetrahydrofuran with a spread of turnover frequencies (TOF) ranging from 0 to 74,000 h-1. The catalysis was followed by 1H and 31P NMR in real time under all conditions to yield information about the rate determining step. Catalysts exhibiting the highest activities were found to have hydride transfer and hydrogen addition steps that were each downhill by approximately 6 to 7 kcal/mol, and the deprotonation step was thermoneutral. The research by M.S.J., A.M.A., E.S.W., and J.C.L. was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The research by E.B.H., M.L.H., and M.T.M. (X-ray crystallography, synthesis) was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The authors thank Dr. Samantha A. Burgess for assistance in collecting cyclic voltammetry data. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Isotopic modeling of water and sodium distribution and exchange kinetics in 7 stable hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamoiseau, S.; Bertrou, L.; Pujo, J.M.; Massol, M.

    1988-01-01

    Sequential serum sampling over 24 h. has been performed in 7 hemodialysis patients after simultaneous intra-venous injection of tritiated water and 24 Na. Each time-activity curve fits a biexponential pattern. A compartment analysis leads to describe either a simple but incomplete single compartment model or a much more satisfactory open two-compartment mamillary model featuring 2 intercompartment transfer rate constants k 21 and k 12 , and a loss out of the system, k 01 . These constants can be related to intrabody resistances to sodium and water transfers. Compartment analysis allows a comprehensive quantitated description of the exchange and transfer kinetics of sodium and water throughout the system. Evidence for a sodium reservoir, probably located in bone, can be drawn from the results and leads to propose a strategy for a targetted bone sodium removal [fr

  11. Hydrogen Temperature-Programmed Desorption in Platinum Catalysts: Decomposition and Isotopic Exchange by Spillover Hydrogen of Chemisorbed Ammonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Miller, J.T.; Meyers, B.L.; Barr, M.K.; Modica, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    H{2}-TPD of Pt/alumina catalysts display multiple hydrogendesorptions. In addition to chemisorbed hydrogen (Peak I) atapproximately 175}o{C, there is a small hydrogen desorption (PeakII) at about 250}o{C and a large, irreversible hydrogen desorption(Peak III) at 450}o{C. The quantity of hydrogen

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of photoaccelerated isotope exchange between U(VI) and U(IV) in oxalate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaban, I.S.; Owreit, M.F.; Nikitenko, S.I.

    1992-01-01

    A kinetic study of thermal and photoaccelerated U(IV)-U(VI) isotope exchange has been carried out in oxalate solutions at 11-40 deg C. The rate and quantum yield were determined as a function of U(IV), U(VI) and oxalate concentration, wavelength of incident light, temperature and absorbed dose of γ-radiation. The kinetic equations for thermal and photoaccelerated exchange have been obtained. It was assumed that the mechanism of exchange involves formation of U(V) as an intermediate, followed by slow exchange between U(V) and U(IV). The isokinetic dependence confirms the identity of limiting stages for thermal and photostimulated exchange. The upper component of photoexcited T 1 level of uranyl is supposed to be the most reactive in the process of U(V) generation. It was observed that the small doses of γ-radiation evoke the acceleration of isotope exchange, however, at D>100 krad the rate of exchange is reduced to the level of thermal exchange. (author) 8 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  13. Kinetic Behavior of Exchange-Driven Growth with Catalyzed-Birth Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haifeng; Lin Zhenquan; Kong Xiangmu

    2006-01-01

    Two catalyzed-birth models of n-species (n≥2) aggregates with exchange-driven growth processes are proposed and compared. In the first one, the exchange reaction occurs between any two aggregates A m k and A m j of the same species with the rate kernels K m (k,j) = K m kj (m = 1,2,...,n, n≥2), and aggregates of A n species catalyze a monomer-birth of A l species (l = 1,2,...,n-1) with the catalysis rate kernel J l (k,j) = J l kj υ . The kinetic behaviors are investigated by means of the mean-field theory. We find that the evolution behavior of aggregate-size distribution a l k (t) of A l species depends crucially on the value of the catalysis rate parameter υ: (i) a l k (t) obeys the conventional scaling law in the case of υ≤0, (ii) a l k (t) satisfies a modified scaling form in the case of υ>0. In the second model, the mechanism of monomer-birth of A n -species catalyzed by A l species is added on the basis of the first model, that is, the aggregates of A l and A n species catalyze each other to cause monomer-birth. The kinetic behaviors of A l and A n species are found to fall into two categories for the different υ: (i) growth obeying conventional scaling form with υ≤0, (ii) gelling at finite time with υ>0.

  14. Probing conserved helical modules of portal complexes by mass spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sebyung; Poliakov, Anton; Sexton, Jennifer; Renfrow, Matthew B; Prevelige, Peter E

    2008-09-05

    The Double-stranded DNA bacteriophage P22 has a ring-shaped dodecameric complex composed of the 84 kDa portal protein subunit that forms the central channel of the phage DNA packaging motor. The overall morphology of the P22 portal complex is similar to that of the portal complexes of Phi29, SPP1, T3, T7 phages and herpes simplex virus. Secondary structure prediction of P22 portal protein and its threading onto the crystal structure of the Phi29 portal complexes suggested that the P22 portal protein complex shares conserved helical modules that were found in the dodecameric interfaces of the Phi29 portal complex. To identify the amino acids involved in intersubunit contacts in the P22 portal ring complexes and validate the threading model, we performed comparative hydrogen/deuterium exchange analysis of monomeric and in vitro assembled portal proteins of P22 and the dodecameric Phi29 portal. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments provided evidence of intersubunit interactions in the P22 portal complex similar to those in the Phi29 portal that map to the regions predicted to be conserved helical modules.

  15. Enhanced hydrogen reaction kinetics of nanostructured Mg-based composites with nanoparticle metal catalysts dispersed on supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Yeong; Tuck, Mark; Kondakindi, Rajender; Seo, Chan-Yeol; Dehouche, Zahir; Belkacemi, Khaled

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen reaction kinetics of nanocrystalline MgH 2 co-catalyzed with Ba 3 (Ca 1+x Nb 2-x )O 9-δ (BCN) proton conductive ceramics and nanoparticle bimetallic catalyst of Ni/Pd dispersed on single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) support has been investigated. The nanoparticle bimetallic catalysts of Ni/Pd supported by SWNTs were synthesized based on a novel polyol method using NiCl 2 .6H 2 O, PdCl 2 , NaOH and ethylene glycol (EG). The nanostructured Mg composites co-catalyzed with BCN and bimetallic supported catalysts exhibited stable hydrogen desorption capacity of 6.3-6.7 wt.% H 2 and the significant enhancement of hydrogen desorption kinetics at 230-300 deg. C in comparison to either non-catalyzed MgH 2 or the nanocomposite of MgH 2 catalyzed with BCN

  16. Kinetic Studies on State of the Art Solid Oxide Cells – A Comparison between Hydrogen/Steam and Reformate Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude; Graves, Christopher R.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigated – hydrogen/steam and refor......Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigated – hydrogen....../steam fuel split into two processes with opposing temperature behavior in the reformate fuels. An 87.5% reduction in active electrode area diminishes the gas conversion impedance in the hydrogen/steam fuel at high fuel flow rates. In both reformates, the second and third lowest frequency processes merged...

  17. Hydrogen absorption kinetics and structural properties of Mg85Ni10Ca5 and Mg90Ni10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masakazu; Saito, Katsushi; Towata, Shin-ichi

    2005-01-01

    Mg 85 Ni 10 Ca 5 and Mg 90 Ni 10 were prepared by melting mixtures of the elements in mild steel crucibles and pouring them into copper molds. Hydrogen absorption kinetics and structural properties of the alloys were characterized by the volumetric method using a Sievert's apparatus, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystallite size of Mg in Mg 85 Ni 10 Ca 5 , which is evaluated by XRD peak broadening, is about 50% smaller than that in Mg 90 Ni 10 . In addition, the nanometer-scale structure composed of Mg, Mg 2 Ni, Mg 2 Ca was observed in Mg 85 Ni 10 Ca 5 . Mg 85 Ni 10 Ca 5 shows better hydrogen absorption kinetics than Mg 90 Ni 10 in the temperature range of room temperature to 573 K. The better absorption kinetics of Mg 85 Ni 10 Ca 5 is mainly attributed to the nanometer-scale structure

  18. Kinetic Modeling of Methionine Oxidation in Monoclonal Antibodies from Hydrogen Peroxide Spiking Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Ada; Lam, Xanthe M; Kuehl, Christopher; Grauschopf, Ulla; Wang, Y John

    2015-01-01

    When isolator technology is applied to biotechnology drug product fill-finish process, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) spiking studies for the determination of the sensitivity of protein to residual peroxide in the isolator can be useful for assessing a maximum vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP) level. When monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug products were spiked with H2O2, an increase in methionine (Met 252 and Met 428) oxidation in the Fc region of the mAbs with a decrease in H2O2 concentration was observed for various levels of spiked-in peroxide. The reaction between Fc-Met and H2O2 was stoichiometric (i.e., 1:1 molar ratio), and the reaction rate was dependent on the concentrations of mAb and H2O2. The consumption of H2O2 by Fc-Met oxidation in the mAb followed pseudo first-order kinetics, and the rate was proportional to mAb concentration. The extent of Met 428 oxidation was half of that of Met 252, supporting that Met 252 is twice as reactive as Met 428. Similar results were observed for free L-methionine when spiked with H2O2. However, mAb formulation excipients may affect the rate of H2O2 consumption. mAb formulations containing trehalose or sucrose had faster H2O2 consumption rates than formulations without the sugars, which could be the result of impurities (e.g., metal ions) present in the excipients that may act as catalysts. Based on the H2O2 spiking study results, we can predict the amount Fc-Met oxidation for a given protein concentration and H2O2 level. Our kinetic modeling of the reaction between Fc-Met oxidation and H2O2 provides an outline to design a H2O2 spiking study to support the use of VPHP isolator for antibody drug product manufacture. Isolator technology is increasing used in drug product manufacturing of biotherapeutics. In order to understand the impact of residual vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP) levels on protein product quality, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) spiking studies may be performed to determine the sensitivity of monoclonal antibody

  19. Charge exchange of hydrogen atoms with multiply charged ions in a hot plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, V.A.; Baryshnikov, F.F.; Lisitsa, V.S.

    1980-08-01

    The symmetry properties of the hydrogen atom are used to calculate the charge exchange cross-sections sigma of hydrogen with the nuclei of multiply charged ions, allowance being made for the degeneration of final states. If the transitions between these states produced by rotation of the internuclear axis are taken into account, there is a qualitative change in the dependence of sigma on v for low values of v (a gradual decrease in the cross-section instead of the exponential one in the Landau-Zener model) and also a considerable increase in the peak cross-section. The cross-sections are calculated for a wide range of velocities and charge values Z. It is shown that the cross-section may be approximated to within approximately 9 /v).10 -15 cm 2 for Z>=18 (v in cm/s). A detailed comparison with the calculations of various authors is performed. The distribution of final states over orbital angular momenta is found. A calculation is made of variation in the spectral line intensities of the ion O +7 with injection of a neutral hydrogen beam in conditions similar to the experimental conditions on the ORMAK facility. (author)

  20. Determination of Backbone Amide Hydrogen Exchange Rates of Cytochrome c Using Partially Scrambled Electron Transfer Dissociation Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; E, Sook Yen

    2018-05-01

    The technological goal of hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is to determine backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The most critical challenge to achieve this goal is obtaining the deuterium incorporation in single-amide resolution, and gas-phase fragmentation may provide a universal solution. The gas-phase fragmentation may generate the daughter ions which differ by a single amino acid and the difference in deuterium incorporations in the two analogous ions can yield the deuterium incorporation at the sub-localized site. Following the pioneering works by Jørgensen and Rand, several papers utilized the electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to determine the location of deuterium in single-amide resolution. This paper demonstrates further advancement of the strategy by determining backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates, instead of just determining deuterium incorporation at a single time point, in combination with a wide time window monitoring. A method to evaluate the effects of scrambling and to determine the exchange rates from partially scrambled HDX-ETD-MS data is described. All parent ions for ETD fragmentation were regio-selectively scrambled: The deuterium in some regions of a peptide ion was scrambled while that in the other regions was not scrambled. The method determined 31 backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates of cytochrome c in the non-scrambled regions. Good fragmentation of a parent ion, a low degree of scrambling, and a low number of exchangeable hydrogens in the preceding side chain are the important factors to determine the exchange rate. The exchange rates determined by the HDX-MS are in good agreement with those determined by NMR. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Determination of Backbone Amide Hydrogen Exchange Rates of Cytochrome c Using Partially Scrambled Electron Transfer Dissociation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; E, Sook Yen

    2018-05-01

    The technological goal of hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is to determine backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The most critical challenge to achieve this goal is obtaining the deuterium incorporation in single-amide resolution, and gas-phase fragmentation may provide a universal solution. The gas-phase fragmentation may generate the daughter ions which differ by a single amino acid and the difference in deuterium incorporations in the two analogous ions can yield the deuterium incorporation at the sub-localized site. Following the pioneering works by Jørgensen and Rand, several papers utilized the electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to determine the location of deuterium in single-amide resolution. This paper demonstrates further advancement of the strategy by determining backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates, instead of just determining deuterium incorporation at a single time point, in combination with a wide time window monitoring. A method to evaluate the effects of scrambling and to determine the exchange rates from partially scrambled HDX-ETD-MS data is described. All parent ions for ETD fragmentation were regio-selectively scrambled: The deuterium in some regions of a peptide ion was scrambled while that in the other regions was not scrambled. The method determined 31 backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates of cytochrome c in the non-scrambled regions. Good fragmentation of a parent ion, a low degree of scrambling, and a low number of exchangeable hydrogens in the preceding side chain are the important factors to determine the exchange rate. The exchange rates determined by the HDX-MS are in good agreement with those determined by NMR. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Determination of Backbone Amide Hydrogen Exchange Rates of Cytochrome c Using Partially Scrambled Electron Transfer Dissociation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; E, Sook Yen

    2018-03-01

    The technological goal of hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is to determine backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The most critical challenge to achieve this goal is obtaining the deuterium incorporation in single-amide resolution, and gas-phase fragmentation may provide a universal solution. The gas-phase fragmentation may generate the daughter ions which differ by a single amino acid and the difference in deuterium incorporations in the two analogous ions can yield the deuterium incorporation at the sub-localized site. Following the pioneering works by Jørgensen and Rand, several papers utilized the electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to determine the location of deuterium in single-amide resolution. This paper demonstrates further advancement of the strategy by determining backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates, instead of just determining deuterium incorporation at a single time point, in combination with a wide time window monitoring. A method to evaluate the effects of scrambling and to determine the exchange rates from partially scrambled HDX-ETD-MS data is described. All parent ions for ETD fragmentation were regio-selectively scrambled: The deuterium in some regions of a peptide ion was scrambled while that in the other regions was not scrambled. The method determined 31 backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates of cytochrome c in the non-scrambled regions. Good fragmentation of a parent ion, a low degree of scrambling, and a low number of exchangeable hydrogens in the preceding side chain are the important factors to determine the exchange rate. The exchange rates determined by the HDX-MS are in good agreement with those determined by NMR. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Strontium-free rare earth perovskite ferrites with fast oxygen exchange kinetics: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Christian; Bucher, Edith; Windischbacher, Andreas; Boese, A. Daniel; Sitte, Werner

    2018-03-01

    The Sr-free mixed ionic electronic conducting perovskites La0.8Ca0.2FeO3-δ (LCF82) and Pr0.8Ca0.2FeO3-δ (PCF82) were synthesized via a glycine-nitrate process. Crystal structure, phase purity, and lattice constants were determined by XRD and Rietveld analysis. The oxygen exchange kinetics and the electronic conductivity were obtained from in-situ dc-conductivity relaxation experiments at 600-800 °C and 1×10-3≤pO2/bar≤0.1. Both LCF82 and PCF82 show exceptionally fast chemical surface exchange coefficients and chemical diffusion coefficients of oxygen. The oxygen nonstochiometry of LCF82 and PCF82 was determined by precision thermogravimetry. A point defect model was used to calculate the thermodynamic factors of oxygen and to estimate self-diffusion coefficients and ionic conductivities. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations on the crystal structure, oxygen vacancy formation as well as oxygen migration energies are in excellent agreement with the experimental values. Due to their favourable properties both LCF82 and PCF82 are of interest for applications in solid oxide fuel cell cathodes, solid oxide electrolyser cell anodes, oxygen separation membranes, catalysts, or electrochemical sensors.

  4. Mapping temperature-induced conformational changes in the Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma 32 by amide hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Wolfgang; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Roepstorff, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Stress conditions such as heat shock alter the transcriptional profile in all organisms. In Escherichia coli the heat shock transcription factor, sigma 32, out-competes upon temperature up-shift the housekeeping sigma-factor, sigma 70, for binding to core RNA polymerase and initiates heat shock...... gene transcription. To investigate possible heat-induced conformational changes in sigma 32 we performed amide hydrogen (H/D) exchange experiments under optimal growth and heat shock conditions combined with mass spectrometry. We found a rapid exchange of around 220 of the 294 amide hydrogens at 37...... degrees C, indicating that sigma 32 adopts a highly flexible structure. At 42 degrees C we observed a slow correlated exchange of 30 additional amide hydrogens and localized it to a helix-loop-helix motif within domain sigma 2 that is responsible for the recognition of the -10 region in heat shock...

  5. Development of styrene divinyl benzene catalyst in isotopic exchange reaction of water and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Teizo; Noda, Shigeyuki; Tan, Tsutomu; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Styrene divinyl benzene copolymer (SDBC) is hydrophobic, and porous with large specific surface area. Utilizing these properties, the SDBC was used for the carrier of catalyst in water-hydrogen exchange reaction process, and the hydrophobic platinum catalyst with very high performance was able to be developed. However, the SDBC is usually fine particles smaller than 1 mm, and is not suitable as the filling catalyst for exchange reaction towers. Therefore, in this study, using only platinum as a catalyst metal, the improvement of the property of carriers was emphatically examined, and platinum bearing was proved with an optical or electron microscope. As the result, it was found that the SDBC catalyst showed high activity practically usable as the hydrophobic catalyst for heavy water or tritium exchange reaction. The characteristics of SDBC are explained. The manufacturing processes of the catalyst by making SDBC carriers with fine particles and letting them bear platinum are described. The results of the trial manufacture of spherical, extrusion-formed and honeycomb carrier catalysts are reported. Platinum must be dispersed over the large specific surface area of SDBC carriers. (Kako, I.)

  6. Ultrafast hydrogen exchange reveals specific structural events during the initial stages of folding of cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazelinia, Hossein; Xu, Ming; Cheng, Hong; Roder, Heinrich

    2014-01-15

    Many proteins undergo a sharp decrease in chain dimensions during early stages of folding, prior to the rate-limiting step in folding. However, it remains unclear whether compact states are the result of specific folding events or a general hydrophobic collapse of the poly peptide chain driven by the change in solvent conditions. To address this fundamental question, we extended the temporal resolution of NMR-detected H/D exchange labeling experiments into the microsecond regime by adopting a microfluidics approach. By observing the competition between H/D exchange and folding as a function of labeling pH, coupled with direct measurement of exchange rates in the unfolded state, we were able to monitor hydrogen-bond formation for over 50 individual backbone NH groups within the initial 140 microseconds of folding of horse cytochrome c. Clusters of solvent-shielded amide protons were observed in two α-helical segments in the C-terminal half of the protein, while the N-terminal helix remained largely unstructured, suggesting that proximity in the primary structure is a major factor in promoting helix formation and association at early stages of folding, while the entropically more costly long-range contacts between the N- and C-terminal helices are established only during later stages. Our findings clearly indicate that the initial chain condensation in cytochrome c is driven by specific interactions among a subset of α-helical segments rather than a general hydrophobic collapse.

  7. Time-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy as a tool to measure the ligand exchange kinetics on a quantum dot surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, R.; Schapotschnikow, P.Z.; de Mello Donega, C.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Meijerink, A.

    2008-01-01

    The exchange kinetics of native ligands that passivate CdSe quantum dots (hexadecylamine (HDA), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), and trioctylphosphine (TOP)) by thiols is followed in situ. This is realized by measuring, in real-time, the decrease in emission intensity of the QDs upon addition of

  8. Charge exchange in a planetary corona - Its effect on the distribution and escape of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The theory for a spherical collisionless planetary corona is extended to include charge-exchange collisions between H(+) and H, which are assumed to constitute intermingled gases with different kinetic temperatures. The treatment is based on the conventional concept of a critical level (or exobase) above which the only collisions considered in the Boltzmann equation are those that resonantly exchange charge. Although the geometry treated is an oversimplification for a real planet, numerical examples are given for an idealized earth and Venus. For earth, an ion temperature of 4 times the neutral temperature, an ion density at the exobase of 14,000 per cu cm, and a plasmapause at 1.5 earth radii will raise the escape flux of H by a factor of 6. The total H above the exobase is changed by less than 1%. For Venus, conditions are examined that would account for the peculiar H distribution observed from Mariner 5. The plasma conditions required are not obviously outrageous by terrestrial standards, but the Mariner 5 ionosphere measurements did not show a high plasmapause at, say, 1.25 or 1.5 planetary radii, a fact that might argue against a charge-exchange model.

  9. Ion Exchange Equilibrium and Kinetic Properties of Polyacrylate Films and Applications to Chemical Analysis and Environmental Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Stephen P.

    1997-01-01

    One of the goals of the original proposal was to study how cross-linking affects the properties of an ion exchange material(IEM) developed at Lewis Research Center. However, prior to the start of this work, other workers at LERC investigated the effect of cross-linking on the properties of this material. Other than variation in the ion exchange capacity, the chemical characteristics were shown to be independent of the cross-linking agent, and the degree of cross-linking. New physical forms of the film were developed (film, supported film, various sizes of beads, and powder). All showed similar properties with respect to ion exchange equilibria but the kinetics of ion exchange depended on the surface area per unit mass; the powder form of the IEM exchanging much more rapidly than the other forms. The research performed under this grant was directed towards the application of the IEM to the analysis of metal ions at environmental concentrations.

  10. Stomatal kinetics and photosynthetic gas exchange along a continuum of isohydric to anisohydric regulation of plant water status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Frederick C; Smith, Duncan D; Woodruff, David R; Marias, Danielle E; McCulloh, Katherine A; Howard, Ava R; Magedman, Alicia L

    2017-08-01

    Species' differences in the stringency of stomatal control of plant water potential represent a continuum of isohydric to anisohydric behaviours. However, little is known about how quasi-steady-state stomatal regulation of water potential may relate to dynamic behaviour of stomata and photosynthetic gas exchange in species operating at different positions along this continuum. Here, we evaluated kinetics of light-induced stomatal opening, activation of photosynthesis and features of quasi-steady-state photosynthetic gas exchange in 10 woody species selected to represent different degrees of anisohydry. Based on a previously developed proxy for the degree of anisohydry, species' leaf water potentials at turgor loss, we found consistent trends in photosynthetic gas exchange traits across a spectrum of isohydry to anisohydry. More anisohydric species had faster kinetics of stomatal opening and activation of photosynthesis, and these kinetics were closely coordinated within species. Quasi-steady-state stomatal conductance and measures of photosynthetic capacity and performance were also greater in more anisohydric species. Intrinsic water-use efficiency estimated from leaf gas exchange and stable carbon isotope ratios was lowest in the most anisohydric species. In comparisons between gas exchange traits, species rankings were highly consistent, leading to species-independent scaling relationships over the range of isohydry to anisohydry observed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Preliminary design analysis of hot gas ducts and a intermediate heat exchanger for the nuclear hydrogen reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K. N.; Kim, Y. W.

    2008-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is in the process of carrying out a nuclear hydrogen system by considering the indirect cycle gas cooled reactors that produce heat at temperatures in the order of 950 .deg. C. Primary and secondary hot gas ducts with coaxial double tubes and are key components connecting a reactor pressure vessel and a intermediate heat exchanger for the nuclear hydrogen system. In this study, preliminary design analyses on the hot gas ducts and the intermediate heat exchanger were carried out. These preliminary design activities include a preliminary design on the geometric dimensions, a preliminary strength evaluation, thermal sizing, and an appropriate material selection

  12. Field-controlled electron transfer and reaction kinetics of the biological catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongki Choi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Controlled reaction kinetics of the bio-catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide has been achieved using an electrostatic technique. The technique allowed independent control of 1 the thermodynamics of the system using electrochemical setup and 2 the quantum mechanical tunneling at the interface between microperoxidase-11 and the working electrode by applying a gating voltage to the electrode. The cathodic currents of electrodes immobilized with microperoxidase-11 showed a dependence on the gating voltage in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, indicating a controllable reduction reaction. The measured kinetic parameters of the bio-catalytic reduction showed nonlinear dependences on the gating voltage as the result of modified interfacial electron tunnel due to the field induced at the microperoxidase-11-electrode interface. Our results indicate that the kinetics of the reduction of hydrogen peroxide can be controlled by a gating voltage and illustrate the operation of a field-effect bio-catalytic transistor, whose current-generating mechanism is the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water with the current being controlled by the gating voltage.

  13. Sodium/hydrogen-exchanger inhibition during cardioplegic arrest and cardiopulmonary bypass: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Charles S; Sauer, Henning; Allen, Steven J; Buja, L Maximilian; Laine, Glen A

    2002-05-01

    We sought to determine whether pretreatment with a sodium/hydrogen-exchange inhibitor (EMD 96 785) improves myocardial performance and reduces myocardial edema after cardioplegic arrest and cardiopulmonary bypass. Anesthetized dogs (n = 13) were instrumented with vascular catheters, myocardial ultrasonic crystals, and left ventricular micromanometers to measure preload recruitable stroke work, maximum rate of pressure rise (positive and negative), and left ventricular end-diastolic volume and pressure. Cardiac output was measured by means of thermodilution. Myocardial tissue water content was determined from sequential biopsy. After baseline measurements, hypothermic (28 degrees C) cardiopulmonary bypass was initiated. Cardioplegic arrest (4 degrees C Bretschneider crystalloid cardioplegic solution) was maintained for 2 hours, followed by reperfusion-rewarming and separation from cardiopulmonary bypass. Preload recruitable stroke work and myocardial tissue water content were measured at 30, 60, and 120 minutes after bypass. EMD 96 785 (3 mg/kg) was given 15 minutes before bypass, and 2 micromol was given in the cardioplegic solution. Control animals received the same volume of saline vehicle. Arterial-coronary sinus lactate difference was similar in both animals receiving EMD 96 785 and control animals, suggesting equivalent myocardial ischemia in each group. Myocardial tissue water content increased from baseline in both animals receiving EMD 96 785 and control animals with cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest but was statistically lower in animals receiving EMD 96 785 compared with control animals (range, 1.0%-1.5% lower in animals receiving EMD 96 785). Preload recruitable stroke work decreased from baseline (97 +/- 2 mm Hg) at 30 (59 +/- 6 mm Hg) and 60 (72 +/- 9 mm Hg) minutes after cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest in control animals; preload recruitable stroke work did not decrease from baseline (98 +/- 2 mm Hg) in animals receiving

  14. Oxygen exchange at gas/oxide interfaces: how the apparent activation energy of the surface exchange coefficient depends on the kinetic regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielitz, Peter; Borchardt, Günter

    2016-08-10

    In the dedicated literature the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the equilibrium oxygen exchange rate [Fraktur R] are considered to be directly proportional to each other regardless of the experimental circumstances. Recent experimental observations, however, contradict the consequences of this assumption. Most surprising is the finding that the apparent activation energy of KO depends dramatically on the kinetic regime in which it has been determined, i.e. surface exchange controlled vs. mixed or diffusion controlled. This work demonstrates how the diffusion boundary condition at the gas/solid interface inevitably entails a correlation between the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient DO in the bulk ("on top" of the correlation between KO and [Fraktur R] for the pure surface exchange regime). The model can thus quantitatively explain the range of apparent activation energies measured in the different regimes: in the surface exchange regime the apparent activation energy only contains the contribution of the equilibrium exchange rate, whereas in the mixed or in the diffusion controlled regime the contribution of the oxygen self-diffusivity has also to be taken into account, which may yield significantly higher apparent activation energies and simultaneously quantifies the correlation KO ∝ DO(1/2) observed for a large number of oxides in the mixed or diffusion controlled regime, respectively.

  15. Kinetic analysis on photocatalytic degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide on nanosized porous TiO2 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iis Sopyan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the UV illumination-assisted degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, hydrogen sulfide, and ammonia on highly active nanostructured-anatase and rutile films were investigated. It was found that the anatase film showed a higher photocatalytic activity than the counterpart did, however, the magnitude of difference in the photocatalytic activity of both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide. To elucidate the reasons for the observation, the adsorption characteristics and the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of the three reactants on both films were analyzed. The adsorption analysis examined using a simple Langmuir isotherm, showed that adsorbability on both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide, which can be explained in terms of the decreasing electron-donor capacity. Acetaldehyde and ammonia adsorbed more strongly and with higher coverage on anatase film (1.2 and 5.6 molecules/nm2, respectively than on rutile (0.6 and 4.7 molecules/nm2, respectively. Conversely, hydrogen sulfide molecules adsorbed more strongly on rutile film (0.7 molecules/nm2 than on anatase (0.4 molecules/nm2. Exposure to UV light illumination brought about the photocatalytic oxidation of the three gases in contact with both TiO2 films, and the decrease in concentration were measured, and their kinetics are analyzed in terms of the Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetic model. From the kinetic analysis, it was found that the anatase film showed the photocatalytic activities that were factors of ~8 and ~5 higher than the rutile film for the degradation of gaseous ammonia and acetaldehyde, respectively. However, the activity was only a factor of ~1.5 higher for the photodegradation of hydrogen sulfide. These observations are systematically explained by the charge separation efficiency and the adsorption characteristics of each catalyst as well as by the physical and electrochemical properties of each

  16. Simultaneous Blood–Tissue Exchange of Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide, Bicarbonate, and Hydrogen Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Ranjan K.; Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2014-01-01

    A detailed nonlinear four-region (red blood cell, plasma, interstitial fluid, and parenchymal cell) axially distributed convection-diffusion-permeation-reaction-binding computational model is developed to study the simultaneous transport and exchange of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the blood–tissue exchange system of the heart. Since the pH variation in blood and tissue influences the transport and exchange of O2 and CO2 (Bohr and Haldane effects), and since most CO2 is transported as HCO3- (bicarbonate) via the CO2 hydration (buffering) reaction, the transport and exchange of HCO3- and H+ are also simulated along with that of O2 and CO2. Furthermore, the model accounts for the competitive nonlinear binding of O2 and CO2 with the hemoglobin inside the red blood cells (nonlinear O2–CO2 interactions, Bohr and Haldane effects), and myoglobin-facilitated transport of O2 inside the parenchymal cells. The consumption of O2 through cytochrome-c oxidase reaction inside the parenchymal cells is based on Michaelis–Menten kinetics. The corresponding production of CO2 is determined by respiratory quotient (RQ), depending on the relative consumption of carbohydrate, protein, and fat. The model gives a physiologically realistic description of O2 transport and metabolism in the microcirculation of the heart. Furthermore, because model solutions for tracer transients and steady states can be computed highly efficiently, this model may be the preferred vehicle for routine data analysis where repetitive solutions and parameter optimization are required, as is the case in PET imaging for estimating myocardial O2 consumption. PMID:16775761

  17. Co-fermentation of sewage sludge with ryegrass for enhancing hydrogen production: Performance evaluation and kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Wang, Jianlong

    2017-11-01

    The low C/N ratio and low carbohydrate content of sewage sludge limit its application for fermentative hydrogen production. In this study, perennial ryegrass was added as the co-substrate into sludge hydrogen fermentation with different mixing ratios for enhancing hydrogen production. The results showed that the highest hydrogen yield of 60mL/g-volatile solids (VS) added was achieved when sludge/perennial ryegrass ratio was 30:70, which was 5 times higher than that from sole sludge. The highest VS removal of 21.8% was also achieved when sludge/perennial ryegrass ratio was 30:70, whereas VS removal from sole sludge was only 0.7%. Meanwhile, the co-fermentation system simultaneously improved hydrogen production efficiency and organics utilization of ryegrass. Kinetic analysis showed that the Cone model fitted hydrogen evolution better than the modified Gompertz model. Furthermore, hydrogen yield and VS removal increased with the increase of dehydrogenase activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Proceedings of the 1st JAEA/KAERI information exchange meeting on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Sakaba, Nariaki; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Yan, Xing L.; Hino, Ryutaro

    2007-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has completed an implementation with Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology, 'The Implementation of Cooperative Program in the Field of Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy between KAERI and JAEA. 'To facilitate efficient technology development on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen by the IS process, an information exchange meeting was held at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA on August 28-30, 2006 under Program 13th of the JAEA/KAERI Implementation, 'Development of HTGR and Nuclear Hydrogen Technology'. JAEA and KAERI mutually showed the status and future plan of the HTTR (High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) project in Japan and of the NHDD (Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration) project in Korea, respectively, and discussed collaboration items. This proceedings summarizes all materials of presented technical discussions on HTGR and hydrogen production technology as well as the meeting briefing including collaboration items. (author)

  19. Conformational Assessment of Adnectin and Adnectin-Drug Conjugate by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Richard Y.-C.; O'Neil, Steven R.; Lipovšek, Daša; Chen, Guodong

    2018-05-01

    Higher-order structure (HOS) characterization of therapeutic protein-drug conjugates for comprehensive assessment of conjugation-induced protein conformational changes is an important consideration in the biopharmaceutical industry to ensure proper behavior of protein therapeutics. In this study, conformational dynamics of a small therapeutic protein, adnectin 1, together with its drug conjugate were characterized by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) with different spatial resolutions. Top-down HDX allows detailed assessment of the residue-level deuterium content in the payload conjugation region. HDX-MS dataset revealed the ability of peptide-based payload/linker to retain deuterium in HDX experiments. Combined results from intact, top-down, and bottom-up HDX indicated no significant conformational changes of adnectin 1 upon payload conjugation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Experimental studies on hydrogen isotopic deuterium from gas to liquid phase by catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yangming; Wang Heyi; Liu Jun; Fu Zhonghua; Wang Changbin; Han Jun; Xia Xiulong; Tang Lei

    2005-01-01

    The experimental studies on hydrogen isotopic deuterium from gas to liquid phase were completed by mixed ratio 1:4 of Pt-SDB hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing. The influencing factors on number of transfer units (NTU) and transformation efficiencies of deuterium were researched. The results show that preferable NTU can be obtained by choosing suitable operational temperature and flux of exchange gas. The transformation rate increases with increasing liquid flux, but it cannot obviously be improved when liquid flux attains some level. The length of catalytic column has an obvious influence on transformation rate and 90% of transformation rate is obtained by 4 m column length at gas flux with 2 m 3 /h, liquid flux with 1-2 kg/h and 45 degree C. (author)

  1. [Solid state isotope hydrogen exchange for deuterium and tritium in human gene-engineered insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotarev, Yu A; Dadayan, A K; Kozik, V S; Gasanov, E V; Nazimov, I V; Ziganshin, R Kh; Vaskovsky, B V; Murashov, A N; Ksenofontov, A L; Haribin, O N; Nikolaev, E N; Myasoedov, N F

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of high temperature solid state catalytic isotope exchange in peptides and proteins under the action of catalyst-activated spillover hydrogen was studied. The reaction of human gene-engineered insulin with deuterium and tritium was conducted at 120-140° C to produce insulin samples containing 2-6 hydrogen isotope atoms. To determine the distribution of the isotope label over tritium-labeled insulin's amino acid residues, oxidation of the S-S bonds of insulin by performic acid was performed and polypeptide chains isolated; then their acid hydrolysis, amino acid analysis and liquid scintillation counts of tritium in the amino acids were conducted. The isotope label was shown to be incorporated in all amino acids of the protein, with the peptide fragment FVNQHLCGSHLVE of the insulin β-chain showing the largest incorporation. About 45% of the total protein isotope label was incorporated in His5 and His10 of this fragment. For the analysis of isotope label distribution in labeled insulin's peptide fragments, the recovery of the S-S bonds by mercaptoethanol, the enzymatic hydrolysis by glutamyl endopeptidase from Bacillus intermedius and HPLC division of the resulting peptides were carried out. Attribution of the peptide fragments formed due to hydrolysis at the Glu-X bond in the β-chain was accomplished by mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry analysis data of the deuterium-labeled insulin samples' isotopomeric composition showed that the studied solid state isotope exchange reaction equally involved all the protein molecules. Biological studying of tritium-labeled insulin showed its physiological activity to be completely retained.

  2. Kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and its protein complex by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Antina, E. V.

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study of oxidation reactions of bilirubin and its complex with albumin was carried out in aqueous solutions under the action of hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen at different pH values. Free radical oxidation of the pigment in both free and bound forms at pH 7.4 was shown not to lead to the formation of biliverdin, but to be associated with the decomposition of the tetrapyrrole chromophore into monopyrrolic products. The effective and true rate constants of the reactions under study were determined. It was assumed that one possible mechanism of the oxidation reaction is associated with the interaction of peroxyl radicals and protons of the NH groups of bilirubin molecules at the limiting stage with the formation of a highly reactive radical intermediate. The binding of bilirubin with albumin was found to result in a considerable reduction in the rate of the oxidation reaction associated with the kinetic manifestation of the protein protection effect. It was found that the autoxidation of bilirubin by molecular oxygen with the formation of biliverdin at the intermediate stage can be observed with an increase in the pH of solutions.

  3. Correlation between Gas Bubble Formation and Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Kinetics at Nanoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianjin; Luo, Long

    2018-04-17

    We report the correlation between H 2 gas bubble formation potential and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activity for Au and Pt nanodisk electrodes (NEs). Microkinetic models were formulated to obtain the HER kinetic information for individual Au and Pt NEs. We found that the rate-determining steps for the HER at Au and Pt NEs were the Volmer step and the Heyrovsky step, respectively. More interestingly, the standard rate constant ( k 0 ) of the rate-determining step was found to vary over 2 orders of magnitude for the same type of NEs. The observed variations indicate the HER activity heterogeneity at the nanoscale. Furthermore, we discovered a linear relationship between bubble formation potential ( E bubble ) and log( k 0 ) with a slope of 125 mV/decade for both Au and Pt NEs. As log ( k 0 ) increases, E bubble shifts linearly to more positive potentials, meaning NEs with higher HER activities form H 2 bubbles at less negative potentials. Our theoretical model suggests that such linear relationship is caused by the similar critical bubble formation condition for Au and Pt NEs with varied sizes. Our results have potential implications for using gas bubble formation to evaluate the HER activity distribution of nanoparticles in an ensemble.

  4. Two-dimensional kinetic model for the evaporation of hydrogen pellets in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteev, B.V.; Umov, A.P.; Tsendin, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of the evaporation of a hydrogen fuel pellet in a hot plasma is solved for the case with a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a nonuniform evaporation over the surface of the pellet. An expression derived for the evaporation rate N describes this rate within 10% as a function of the temperature, the plasma density, and the pellet radius. The values found for N are only slightly higher than the values calculated in the model of Parks et al. [Nucl. Fusion 17, 539 (1977)], Milora and Foster [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 6, 578, (1978)], and Parks and Turnbull [Phys. Fluids 21, 1735 (1978)]. The reason is a mutual cancellation of some factors ignored in that model: the electron distribution as a function of energy and angle and the nonuniformity of the evaporation. In a kinetic model, the heat flux to the pellet is carried by electrons with an initial energy (6--8)T/sub e/. This circumstance explains why the electric fields have only a weak effect on the evaporation rate near the surface. A refined model is used to calculate the evaporation rates in existing devices

  5. An intermediate heat exchanging-depressurizing loop for nuclear hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Soo [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); No, Hee Cheon, E-mail: hcno@kaist.ac.k [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho Joon; Lee, Jeong Ik [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Sulfur-iodine (SI) cycle should overcome many engineering challenges to commercialize and prove its feasibilities to compete other thermo-chemical cycles. Some critical issues such as structural material, harsh operating condition and high capital costs were considered obstacles to be actualized. Operating SI cycle at low-pressure is one of the solutions to actualize the cycle. The flash operation with over-azeotropic HI at low pressure does not require temperature and pressure as high as those in the existing methods as well as heating for separation. The operation in low pressure reduces corrosion problems and enables us to use flexible selection of structural material. We devised an intermediate heat exchanging-depressurizing loop to eliminate high operating pressure in the hydrogen side as well as a large pressure difference between the reactor side and the hydrogen side. Molten salts are adequate candidates as working fluids under the high-temperature condition with homogeneous phase during pressure changing process. Using molten salts, 2.20-4.65 MW of pumping work is required to change the pressure from 1 bar to 7 MPa. We selected BeF{sub 2}-containing salts as the possible candidates based on preliminary economic and thermal hydraulic consideration.

  6. Experimental Characterization and Modelization of Ion Exchange Kinetics for a Carboxylic Resin in Infinite Solution Volume Conditions. Application to Monovalent-Trivalent Cations Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picart, S.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I. [CEA Marcoule, Nucl Energy Div, RadioChem and Proc Dept, Actinides Chem and Convers Lab, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Ramiere, I. [Fuel Simulat Lab, Fuel Study Dept, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance (France)

    2010-07-01

    This study is devoted to the characterization of ion exchange inside a microsphere of carboxylic resin. It aims at describing the kinetics of this exchange reaction which is known to be controlled by interdiffusion in the particle. The fractional attainment of equilibrium function of time depends on the concentration of the cations in the resin which can be modelled by the Nernst-Planck equation. A powerful approach for the numerical resolution of this equation is introduced in this paper. This modeling is based on the work of Helfferich but involves an implicit numerical scheme which reduces the computational cost. Knowing the diffusion coefficients of the cations in the resin and the radius of the spherical exchanger, the kinetics can be hence completely determined. When those diffusion parameters are missing, they can be deduced by fitting experimental data of fractional attainment of equilibrium. An efficient optimization tool coupled with the implicit resolution has been developed for this purpose. A monovalent/trivalent cation exchange had been experimentally characterized for a carboxylic resin. Diffusion coefficients and concentration profiles in the resin were then deduced through this new model. (authors)

  7. Experimental Characterization and Modelization of Ion Exchange Kinetics for a Carboxylic Resin in Infinite Solution Volume Conditions. Application to Monovalent-Trivalent Cations Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picart, S.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I.; Ramiere, I.

    2010-01-01

    This study is devoted to the characterization of ion exchange inside a microsphere of carboxylic resin. It aims at describing the kinetics of this exchange reaction which is known to be controlled by interdiffusion in the particle. The fractional attainment of equilibrium function of time depends on the concentration of the cations in the resin which can be modelled by the Nernst-Planck equation. A powerful approach for the numerical resolution of this equation is introduced in this paper. This modeling is based on the work of Helfferich but involves an implicit numerical scheme which reduces the computational cost. Knowing the diffusion coefficients of the cations in the resin and the radius of the spherical exchanger, the kinetics can be hence completely determined. When those diffusion parameters are missing, they can be deduced by fitting experimental data of fractional attainment of equilibrium. An efficient optimization tool coupled with the implicit resolution has been developed for this purpose. A monovalent/trivalent cation exchange had been experimentally characterized for a carboxylic resin. Diffusion coefficients and concentration profiles in the resin were then deduced through this new model. (authors)

  8. Kinetics of the high temperature oxygen exchange reaction on {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiting, Christofer E., E-mail: chris.whiting@udri.udayton.edu [University of Dayton – Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0172 (United States); Du, Miting; Felker, L. Kevin; Wham, Robert M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P. [University of Dayton – Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0172 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen exchange reactions performed on PuO{sub 2} suggest the reaction is influenced by at least three mechanisms: an internal chemical reaction, surface mobility of active species/defects, and surface exchange of gaseous oxygen with lattice oxygen. Activation energies for the surface mobility and internal chemical reaction are presented. Determining which mechanism is dominant appears to be a complex function including at least specific surface area and temperature. Thermal exposure may also impact the oxygen exchange reaction by causing reductions in the specific surface area of PuO{sub 2}. Previous CeO{sub 2} surrogate studies exhibit similar behavior, confirming that CeO{sub 2} is a good qualitative surrogate for PuO{sub 2}, in regards to the oxygen exchange reaction. Comparison of results presented here with previous work on the PuO{sub 2} oxygen exchange reaction allows complexities in the previous work to be explained. These explanations allowed new conclusions to be drawn, many of which confirm the conclusions presented here. - Highlights: • PuO{sub 2} Oxygen exchange kinetics can be influenced by at least 3 different mechanisms. • An internal chemical reaction controls the rate at high temperature and large SSA. • Surface mobility and surface exchange influence rate at lower temperatures and SSA. • Exchange temperatures may alter SSA and make data difficult to interpret.

  9. The load and release characteristics on a strong cationic ion-exchange fiber: kinetics, thermodynamics, and influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Gao, Yanan; Wang, Xinyu; Liu, Hongzhuo; Che, Xin; Xu, Lu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Qifang; Wang, Yan; Li, Sanming

    2014-01-01

    Ion-exchange fibers were different from conventional ion-exchange resins in their non-cross-linked structure. The exchange was located on the surface of the framework, and the transport resistance reduced significantly, which might mean that the exchange is controlled by an ionic reaction instead of diffusion. Therefore, this work aimed to investigate the load and release characteristics of five model drugs with the strong cationic ion-exchange fiber ZB-1. Drugs were loaded using a batch process and released in United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) dissolution apparatus 2. Opposing exchange kinetics, suitable for the special structure of the fiber, were developed for describing the exchange process with the help of thermodynamics, which illustrated that the load was controlled by an ionic reaction. The molecular weight was the most important factor to influence the drug load and release rate. Strong alkalinity and rings in the molecular structures made the affinity between the drug and fiber strong, while logP did not cause any profound differences. The drug-fiber complexes exhibited sustained release. Different kinds and concentrations of counter ions or different amounts of drug-fiber complexes in the release medium affected the release behavior, while the pH value was independent of it. The groundwork for in-depth exploration and further application of ion-exchange fibers has been laid.

  10. The deuterium-exchange reaction between water and hydrogen with the thin-film hydrophobic catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hisao; Mizumoto, Mamoru; Matsuda, Shimpei

    1985-01-01

    The deuterium-exchange reaction between water and hydrogen with a hydrophobic catalyst was studied. The hydrophobic catalyst was composed of platinum as an active component and porous poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) as a support. The PTFE support was in two forms, i.e., (a) a pellet and (b) a thin-film with the thickness of 50 μm. The primary purpose of the thin film hydrophobic catalyst was to reduce the platinum usage in the reactor. The activity of the catalyst was measured in a trickle bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and temperature of 20 ∼ 70 deg C. It has been found that the employment of the thin-film catalyst reduced the platinum usage to 1/5 of the reactor in the case of using a conventional catalyst. Platinum particles on the thin-film catalyst work efficiently because the reactants were easily diffused to the active sites. It has also been found that the isotopic exchange rate with the thin-film catalyst increased with the increase in the ratio of liquid/gas and increased with the rise of the reaction temperature. It was found from an endurance test that the activity of the thin-film catalyst decreased gradually due to the condensation of water vapor in the catalyst, but was regenarated by heating the catalyst to remove the condensed water. (author)

  11. Probing protein interactions with hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry—A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percy, Andrew J.; Rey, Martial; Burns, Kyle M.; Schriemer, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Protein chemistry generates mass shifts useful for structure–function studies. ► H/DX supports a powerful mass shift method for protein interaction analysis. ► H/DX mass shifts are useful for determining binding data (K d , off-rates). ► Improved H/DX–MS workflows can accommodate complex protein systems. - Abstract: Assessing the functional outcome of protein interactions in structural terms is a goal of structural biology, however most techniques have a limited capacity for making structure–function determinations with both high resolution and high throughput. Mass spectrometry can be applied as a reader of protein chemistries in order to fill this void, and enable methodologies whereby protein structure–function determinations may be made on a proteome-wide level. Protein hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/DX) offers a chemical labeling strategy suitable for tracking changes in “dynamic topography” and thus represents a powerful means of monitoring protein structure–function relationships. This review presents the exchange method in the context of interaction analysis. Applications involving interface detection, quantitation of binding, and conformational responses to ligation are discussed, and commentary on recent analytical developments is provided.

  12. Effective Application of Bicelles for Conformational Analysis of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S.; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K.; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., β2-adrenergic receptor [β2AR], μ-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of β2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of β2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in β2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS.

  13. Ammonia-water exchange front end process for ammonia-hydrogen heavy water plants (Preprint No. PD-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadhukhan, H.K.; Varadarajan, T.G.; Nair, N.K.; Das, S.K.; Nath, G.K.

    1989-04-01

    The ammonia-hydrogen exchange process, which utilizes the deutrium exchange between liquid ammonia and gaseous hydrogen is a parasitic process and the heavy water plants (HWP) based on this process has to be linked with the fertilizer plant (FP) for its enormous requirements of hydrogen (synthesis gas, N 2 +3H 2 ). This dependence of HWP on FP gives rise to certain constraints which are listed. These deficiencies of the ammonia-hydrogen process can be overcome to a great extent by delinking the HWP from FP by incorporating NH 3 -H 2 O exchange as the front end step. In addition to the elimination of the above limitations, by employing water as the ultimate feed for the HWP, the plant capacity can be increased substantially and this would go a long way in achieving economies of the large capacity plants. A schematic diagram of this integrated plant is given. Some of the results of developmental efforts and feasibility studies of this NH 3 -H 2 O exchange are briefly reviewed. (author). 4 figs

  14. Kinetic study of the isotopic exchange of Na+ and Zn2+ ions on iron and chromium titanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, E.S.; Ali, I.M.; Aly, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    Iron(III) (FeTi) and chromium (III) titanates (CrTi) were prepared as cation exchange materials in a granular form. The rate of the isotopic exchange of Na + /*Na + and Zn 2+ /*Zn 2+ between aqueous solution and iron(III) and chromium(III) titanates in Na + or Zn 2+ form has been carried out radiometrically in the 25-60 deg C temperature range. The exchange rate is controlled by a particle diffusion mechanism and experimental and theoretical approaches have been used to obtain the rate of diffusion through the spherical particles of the exchangers. The values of self diffusion (D-bar) of Na + and Zn 2+ ions were measured at different operation conditions, particle size, reaction temperatures and drying temperatures of the matrix. The values of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated and their significance discussed. (author)

  15. Gaseous anion chemistry. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange in mono- and dialcohol alkoxide ions: ionization reactions in dialcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, J.R.; Agosta, W.C.; Field, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    The subject of this work is H-D exchange in certain gaseous anions using D 2 as the exchanging agent. The anions involved are produced from ethylene glycol, 1,3-propanediol, 1,4-butanediol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol. Spectra and postulated ionization reactions for these mono- and dialcohols are given. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange occurs in the (M - 1) - and (2M - 1) - ions of ethylene glycol, 1,3-propanediol, and 1,4-butanediol. The amount of exchange occurring is 3-8 times greater in (2M - 1) - than in (M - 1) - . The amount of H-D exchange occurring in ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol is small or zero in the (2M - 1) - ions and in the (M - 1) - ion for 1-butanol [the only (M - 1) - ion which could be examined experimentally]. The amount of exchange occurring in the (2M - 1) - and (M - 1) - ions from ethylene glycol is not affected by the total pressure or composition of the reaction mixture in the ionization chamber of the mass spectrometer. A novel hydrogen-bridging mechanism is suggested to account for the observed exchange occurring in the dialcohols

  16. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies of the rat thyroid transcription factor 1 homeodomain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, Gennaro; Fogolari, Federico; Damante, Giuseppe; Formisano, Silvestro; Tell, Gianluca; Leonardi, Antonio; Di Lauro, Roberto; Viglino, Paolo

    1997-01-01

    The 1 H NMR solution structure of the rat thyroid transcription factor 1 homeodomain (TTF-1 HD) showed that the molecule folds like classical homeodomains. The C-terminal extension of helix III (fragment 51-59) appeared to adopt a helical geometry, albeit not as rigid as the preceding portion, but the hydrogen-deuterium exchange of backboneamides and the NOE data provided evidence of a discontinuity between the two moieties of helix III at the highly conserved fragmentAsn 51 -His 52 -Arg 53 .Analysis of quantitative measurements of isotope exchange rates allows one to recognize the general occurrence, in that region of HD motifs, of opposite effects to helix III stability. Asparagine, histidine and arginine residues occur most frequently at the beginning and end of protein helices.In TTF-1 HD a local fluctuation is observed in the fragment 51-53 which either kinks or tightens the α-helix. A search through the protein structure database reveals that the three most common variants of HD fragments 51-53 are often involved in helices and, frequently, in helix initiation or termination. For homeodomains in general, the nature of the fragment 51-53 may be related to the conformational dynamics of their DNA-recognition helix (helix III). Besides the specific results on fragment 51-53, the complete isotope exchange analysis of TTF-1 HD data shows that the partially solvent-exposed recognition helix is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, like most of the structured regions of the molecule. Hydrophobic stabilization of the contacting regions meets the requirements of a DNA-interaction mechanism which, as shown with other DNA-protein complexes, should entail negative heat capacity variations due to changes in solvent exposure of the nonpolar protein surface

  17. Relationship Between Equilibrium Hydrogen Pressure and Exchange Current for the Hydrogen Electrode-Reaction at Mmni(3.9-X)Mn(0.4)A1(X)Co(0.7) Alloy Electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senoh, H.; Morimoto, K.; Inoue, H.; Iwakura, C.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2000-01-01

    We present a theoretical relationship between equilibrium hydrogen pressure and exchange current for the hydrogen electrode reaction which considers the degree of hydrogen coverage at the electrode surface. Electrochemical measurements at MmNi3.9–xMn0.4AlxCo0.7 (0 x 0.8) electrodes were performed to

  18. Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Kinetics of Nanocrystalline and Amorphous Mg2Ni-type Alloy by Melt Spinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ping Ren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mg2Ni-type Mg2Ni1−xCox (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 alloys were fabricated by melt spinning technique. The structures of the as-spun alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of the alloys were measured by an automatically controlled Sieverts apparatus. The electrochemical hydrogen storage kinetics of the as-spun alloys was tested by an automatic galvanostatic system. The results show that the as-spun (x = 0.1 alloy exhibits a typical nanocrystalline structure, while the as-spun (x = 0.4 alloy displays a nanocrystalline and amorphous structure, confirming that the substitution of Co for Ni notably intensifies the glass forming ability of the Mg2Ni-type alloy. The melt spinning treatment notably improves the hydriding and dehydriding kinetics as well as the high rate discharge ability (HRD of the alloys. With an increase in the spinning rate from 0 (as-cast is defined as spinning rate of 0 m/s to 30 m/s, the hydrogen absorption saturation ratio ( of the (x = 0.4 alloy increases from 77.1 to 93.5%, the hydrogen desorption ratio ( from 54.5 to 70.2%, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient (D from 0.75 × 10−11 to 3.88 × 10−11 cm2/s and the limiting current density IL from 150.9 to 887.4 mA/g.

  19. Microstructure and kinetics evolution in MgH2–TiO2 pellets after hydrogen cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirabile Gattia, D.; Di Girolamo, G.; Montone, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • MgH 2 was ball milled with TiO 2 anatase phase and expanded graphite to prepare pellets. • Different pellets have been prepared at different compression load. • Pellets were repeatedly cycled under hydrogen pressure to simulate tank exercise and verify their stability. • The compression load highly affects the stability of the pellets to cycling. • Microstructural evolution of the particles due to cycling have been observed. - Abstract: The interest in Mg-based hydrides for solid state hydrogen storage is associated to their capability to reversibly absorb and desorb large amounts of hydrogen. In this work MgH 2 powder with 5 wt.% TiO 2 was ball milled for 10 h. The as-milled nanostructured powder was enriched with 5 wt.% of Expanded Natural Graphite (ENG) and then compacted in cylindrical pellets by cold pressing using different loads. Both the powder and the pellets were subjected to kinetic and thermodynamic tests using a Sievert’s type gas reaction controller, in order to study the microstructural and kinetic changes which took place during repeated H 2 absorption and desorption cycles. The pellets exhibited good kinetic performance and durability, even if the pressure of compaction revealed to be an important parameter for their mechanical stability. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations of as-prepared and cycled pellets were carried out to investigate the evolution of their microstructure. In turn the phase composition before and after cycling was analyzed by X-ray diffraction

  20. Superior hydrogen storage kinetics of MgH{sub 2} nanoparticles doped with TiF{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, L. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Y.T. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zheng, J. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, X.G. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)]. E-mail: xgli@pku.edu.cn

    2007-08-15

    MgH{sub 2} nanoparticles were obtained by hydriding ultrafine magnesium particles which were prepared by hydrogen plasma-metal reaction. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show that the obtained sample is almost pure MgH{sub 2} phase, without residual magnesium and with an average particle size of {approx}300 nm. Milled with 5 wt.% TiF{sub 3} as a doping precursor in a hydrogen atmosphere, the sample desorbed 4.5 wt.% hydrogen in 6 min under an initial hydrogen pressure of {approx}0.001 bar at 573 K and absorbed 4.2 wt.% hydrogen in 1 min under {approx}20 bar hydrogen at room temperature. Compared with MgH{sub 2} micrometer particles doped with 5 wt.% TiF{sub 3} under the same conditions as the MgH{sub 2} nanoparticles, it is suggested that decrease of particle size is beneficial for enhancing absorption capacity at low temperatures, but has no effect on desorption. In addition, the catalyst was mainly responsible for improving the sorption kinetics and its catalytic mechanism is discussed.

  1. An NMR-based quenched hydrogen exchange investigation of model amyloid fibrils formed by cold shock protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, A T

    2001-01-01

    Acid-denatured cold shock protein A (CspA) self-assembles into polymers with properties typical of amyloid fibrils. In the present work, a quenched hydrogen exchange experiment was used to probe the interactions of CspA fibrils with solvent. Exchange was initiated by incubating suspensions of fibrils in D2O, and quenched by flash freezing. Following lyophilization, exchange-quenched samples were dissolved in 90% DMSO/10% D2O, giving DMSO-denatured monomers. Intrinsic exchange rates for denatured CspA in 90% DMSO/10% D2O (pH* 4.5) were sufficiently slow (approximately 1 x 10(-3) min-1) to enable quantification of NMR signal intensity decays due to H/D exchange in the fibrils. Hydrogen exchange rate constants for CspA fibrils were found to vary less than 3-fold from a mean value of 5 x 10(-5) min-1. The uniformity of rate constants suggests that exchange is in the EX1 limit, and that the mechanism of exchange involves a cooperative dissociation of CspA monomers from fibrils, concomitant with unfolding. Previous studies indicated that the highest protection factors in native CspA are approximately 10(3), and that protection factors for the acid-denatured monomer precursors of CspA fibrils are close to unity. Because exchange in is in the EX1 regime, it is only possible to place a lower limit of at least 10(5) on protection factors in CspA fibrils. The observation that all amide protons are protected from exchange indicates that the entire CspA polypeptide chain is structured in the fibrils.

  2. Destruction of gel sulfonated cation-exchangers of the KU-2 type under the influence of hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roginskaya, B.S.; Zavadovskaya, A.S.; Znamenskii, Yu.P.; Paskhina, N.A.; Dobrova, E.I.

    1988-10-20

    The purpose of this work was to study the mechanism of interaction of Soviet sulfonated cation-exchangers of the KU-2 type with hydrogen peroxide. It is shown that under the influence of hydrogen peroxide sulfonated cation-exchangers begin, after a certain induction period, to lose capacity and to release destruction products into water; the length of the induction period increases with the degree of cross-linking. In a given time of contact between the resin and the solution the degree of destruction falls with increase of cross-linking. The principal product of destruction of sulfonated cation-exchangers is an aromatic sulfonic acid containing oxidized groups in the side chains.

  3. Water-Protein Hydrogen Exchange in the Micro-Crystalline Protein Crh as Observed by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeckmann, Anja; Juy, Michel; Bettler, Emmanuel; Emsley, Lyndon; Galinier, Anne; Penin, Francois; Lesage, Anne

    2005-01-01

    We report site-resolved observation of hydrogen exchange in the micro-crystalline protein Crh. Our approach is based on the use of proton T 2 ' -selective 1 H- 13 C- 13 C correlation spectra for site-specific assignments of carbons nearby labile protein protons. We compare the proton T 2 ' selective scheme to frequency selective water observation in deuterated proteins, and discuss the impacts of deuteration on 13 C linewidths in Crh. We observe that in micro-crystalline proteins, solvent accessible hydroxyl and amino protons show comparable exchange rates with water protons as for proteins in solution, and that structural constraints, such as hydrogen bonding or solvent accessibility, more significantly reduce exchange rates

  4. Kinetics of the decomposition and the estimation of the stability of 10% aqueous and non-aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zun Maria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the stability of 10% hydrogen peroxide aqueous and non-aqueous solutions with the addition of 6% (w/w of urea was evaluated. The solutions were stored at 20°C, 30°C and 40°C, and the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide proceeded according to first-order kinetics. With the addition of the urea in the solutions, the decomposition rate constant increased and the activation energy decreased. The temperature of storage also affected the decomposition of substance, however, 10% hydrogen peroxide solutions prepared in PEG-300, and stabilized with the addition of 6% (w/w of urea had the best constancy.

  5. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and Kinetic Study of 2-Methylfuran and 2,5-Dimethylfuran Hydrogenation over 7 nm Platinum Cubic Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Aliaga, Cesar; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Alayoglu, Selim; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2011-01-01

    Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements obtained from gas chromatography were used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) over cubic Pt nanoparticles of 7 nm

  6. Kinetics of soybean oil epoxidation with peracetic acid formed in situ in the presence of an ion exchange resin: Pseudo-homogeneous model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Milovan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic model was proposed for the epoxidation of vegetable oils with peracetic acid formed in situ from acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of an acidic ion exchange resin as a catalyst. The model is pseudo-homogeneous with respect to the catalyst. Besides the main reactions of peracetic acid and epoxy ring formation, the model takes into account the side reaction of epoxy ring opening with acetic acid. The partitioning of acetic acid and peracetic acid between the aqueous and organic phases and the change in the phases’ volumes during the process were considered. The temperature dependency of the apparent reaction rate coefficients is described by a reparameterized Arrhenius equation. The constants in the proposed model were estimated by fitting the experimental data obtained for the epoxidations of soybean oil conducted under defined reaction conditions. The highest epoxy yield of 87.73% was obtained at 338 K when the mole ratio of oil unsaturation:acetic acid:hydrogen peroxide was 1:0.5:1.35 and when the amount of the catalyst Amberlite IR-120H was 4.04 wt.% of oil. Compared to the other reported pseudo-homogeneous models, the model proposed in this study better correlates the change of double bond and epoxy group contents during the epoxidation process. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III45022

  7. Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry of bacteriorhodopsin reveals light-induced changes in the structural dynamics of a biomolecular machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yan; Brown, Leonid; Konermann, Lars

    2011-12-21

    Many proteins act as molecular machines that are fuelled by a nonthermal energy source. Examples include transmembrane pumps and stator-rotor complexes. These systems undergo cyclic motions (CMs) that are being driven along a well-defined conformational trajectory. Superimposed on these CMs are thermal fluctuations (TFs) that are coupled to stochastic motions of the solvent. Here we explore whether the TFs of a molecular machine are affected by the occurrence of CMs. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) is a light-driven proton pump that serves as a model system in this study. The function of BR is based on a photocycle that involves trans/cis isomerization of a retinal chromophore, as well as motions of transmembrane helices. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry was used to monitor the TFs of BR, focusing on the monomeric form of the protein. Comparative HDX studies were conducted under illumination and in the dark. The HDX kinetics of BR are dramatically accelerated in the presence of light. The isotope exchange rates and the number of backbone amides involved in EX2 opening transitions increase roughly 2-fold upon illumination. In contrast, light/dark control experiments on retinal-free protein produced no discernible differences. It can be concluded that the extent of TFs in BR strongly depends on photon-driven CMs. The light-induced differences in HDX behavior are ascribed to protein destabilization. Specifically, the thermodynamic stability of the dark-adapted protein is estimated to be 5.5 kJ mol(-1) under the conditions of our work. This value represents the free energy difference between the folded state F and a significantly unfolded conformer U. Illumination reduces the stability of F by 2.2 kJ mol(-1). Mechanical agitation caused by isomerization of the chromophore is transferred to the surrounding protein scaffold, and subsequently, the energy dissipates into the solvent. Light-induced retinal motions therefore act analogously to an internal heat

  8. An investigation on hydrogen storage kinetics of nanocrystalline and amorphous Mg2Ni1-xCox (x = 0-0.4) alloy prepared by melt spinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yanghuan; Li Baowei; Ren Huipin; Ding Xiaoxia; Liu Xiaogang; Chen Lele

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The investigation of the structures of the Mg 2 Ni 1-x Co x (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) alloys indicates that a nanocrystalline and amorphous structure can be obtained in the experiment alloys by melt spinning technology. The substitution of Co for Ni facilitates the glass formation in the Mg 2 Ni-type alloy. And the amorphization degree of the alloys visibly increases with increasing Co content. → Both the melt spinning and Co substitution significantly improve the hydrogen storage kinetics of the alloys. The hydrogen absorption saturation ratio (R t a ) and hydrogen desorption ratio (R t d ) as well as the high rate discharge ability (HRD) increase with rising spinning rate and Co content. The hydrogen diffusion coefficient (D), the Tafel polarization curves and the electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) measurements show that the electrochemical kinetics notably increases with rising spinning rate and Co content. → Furthermore, all the as-spun alloys, when the spinning rate reaches to 30 m/s, have nearly same hydrogen absorption kinetics, indicating that the hydrogen absorption kinetics of the as-spun alloy is predominately controlled by diffusion ability of hydrogen atoms. - Abstract: In order to improve the hydrogen storage kinetics of the Mg 2 Ni-type alloys, Ni in the alloy was partially substituted by element Co, and melt-spinning technology was used for the preparation of the Mg 2 Ni 1-x Co x (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) hydrogen storage alloys. The structures of the as-cast and spun alloys are characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. The hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of the alloys were measured by an automatically controlled Sieverts apparatus. The electrochemical hydrogen storage kinetics of the as-spun alloys is tested by an automatic galvanostatic system. The hydrogen diffusion coefficients in the alloys are calculated by virtue of potential-step method. The electrochemical impedance spectrums (EIS) and the Tafel

  9. A Kinetic Platform to Determine the Fate of Hydrogen Peroxide in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin J Adolfsen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is used by phagocytic cells of the innate immune response to kill engulfed bacteria. H2O2 diffuses freely into bacteria, where it can wreak havoc on sensitive biomolecules if it is not rapidly detoxified. Accordingly, bacteria have evolved numerous systems to defend themselves against H2O2, and the importance of these systems to pathogenesis has been substantiated by the many bacteria that require them to establish or sustain infections. The kinetic competition for H2O2 within bacteria is complex, which suggests that quantitative models will improve interpretation and prediction of network behavior. To date, such models have been of limited scope, and this inspired us to construct a quantitative, systems-level model of H2O2 detoxification in Escherichia coli that includes detoxification enzymes, H2O2-dependent transcriptional regulation, enzyme degradation, the Fenton reaction and damage caused by •OH, oxidation of biomolecules by H2O2, and repair processes. After using an iterative computational and experimental procedure to train the model, we leveraged it to predict how H2O2 detoxification would change in response to an environmental perturbation that pathogens encounter within host phagosomes, carbon source deprivation, which leads to translational inhibition and limited availability of NADH. We found that the model accurately predicted that NADH depletion would delay clearance at low H2O2 concentrations and that detoxification at higher concentrations would resemble that of carbon-replete conditions. These results suggest that protein synthesis during bolus H2O2 stress does not affect clearance dynamics and that access to catabolites only matters at low H2O2 concentrations. We anticipate that this model will serve as a computational tool for the quantitative exploration and dissection of oxidative stress in bacteria, and that the model and methods used to develop it will provide important templates for the

  10. Soil solution phosphorus turnover: derivation, interpretation, and insights from a global compilation of isotope exchange kinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Julian; Jegminat, Jannes; McLaren, Timothy I.; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2018-01-01

    The exchange rate of inorganic phosphorus (P) between the soil solution and solid phase, also known as soil solution P turnover, is essential for describing the kinetics of bioavailable P. While soil solution P turnover (Km) can be determined by tracing radioisotopes in a soil-solution system, few studies have done so. We believe that this is due to a lack of understanding on how to derive Km from isotopic exchange kinetic (IEK) experiments, a common form of radioisotope dilution study. Here, we provide a derivation of calculating Km using parameters obtained from IEK experiments. We then calculated Km for 217 soils from published IEK experiments in terrestrial ecosystems, and also that of 18 long-term P fertilizer field experiments. Analysis of the global compilation data set revealed a negative relationship between concentrations of soil solution P and Km. Furthermore, Km buffered isotopically exchangeable P in soils with low concentrations of soil solution P. This finding was supported by an analysis of long-term P fertilizer field experiments, which revealed a negative relationship between Km and phosphate-buffering capacity. Our study highlights the importance of calculating Km for understanding the kinetics of P between the soil solid and solution phases where it is bioavailable. We argue that our derivation can also be used to calculate soil solution turnover of other environmentally relevant and strongly sorbing elements that can be traced with radioisotopes, such as zinc, cadmium, nickel, arsenic, and uranium.

  11. Isotopic studies on ligand exchange between complex and simple cyanides in aqueous medium and in liquid hydrogen cyanide. Part 1. Rate law and temperature dependence study of the radiocyanide exchange between hydrogen cyanide and octacyanotungstate(4) in aque us medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.

    1978-01-01

    Dark radiocyanide ligand exchange in the closed system consisting of K 4 W(CN) 8 , hydrogen cyanide and water have been investigated. It has been found that the reaction is first order in respect to the complex cyanide and zero order in respect to the free hydrogen cyanide. Arrhenius activation energy within the temperature interval of 20-100 0 C equals to 32.373 kcal/mole. Enthalpy and entropy of activation are correspondingly ΔH not equal to Λ31.716kcal/mole and ΔS not equal to =5.45 e.u. A preliminary discussion of the above findings is presented. (author)

  12. Desalination and hydrogen, chlorine, and sodium hydroxide production via electrophoretic ion exchange and precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolnikov, Viktor; Bahga, Supreet S; Santiago, Juan G

    2012-08-28

    We demonstrate and analyze a novel desalination method which works by electrophoretically replacing sodium and chloride in feed salt water with a pair of ions, calcium and carbonate, that react and precipitate out. The resulting calcium carbonate precipitate is benign to health, and can be filtered or settled out, yielding low ionic strength product water. The ion exchange and precipitation employs self-sharpening interfaces induced by movement of multiple ions in an electric field to prevent contamination of the product water. Simultaneously, the electrolysis associated with the electromigration produces hydrogen gas, chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide. We conducted an experimental study of this method's basic efficacy to desalinate salt water from 100 to 600 mol m(-3) sodium chloride. We also present physicochemical models of the process, and analyze replacement reagents consumption, permeate recovery ratio, and energy consumption. We hypothesize that the precipitate can be recycled back to replacement reagents using the well-known, commercially implemented Solvay process. We show that the method's permeate recovery ratio is 58% to 46%, which is on par with that of reverse osmosis. We show that the method's energy consumption requirement over and above that necessary to generate electrolysis is 3 to 10 W h l(-1), which is on par with the energy consumed by state-of-the-art desalination methods. Furthermore, the method operates at ambient temperature and pressure, and uses no specialized membranes. The process may be feasible as a part of a desalination-co-generation facility: generating fresh water, hydrogen and chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide.

  13. Kinetic Behavior of Aggregation-Exchange Growth Process with Catalyzed-Birth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Anjia; Chen Yu; Lin Zhenquan; Ke Jianhong

    2007-01-01

    We propose an aggregation model of a two-species system to mimic the growth of cities' population and assets, in which irreversible coagulation reactions and exchange reactions occur between any two aggregates of the same species, and the monomer-birth reactions of one species occur by the catalysis of the other species. In the case with population-catalyzed birth of assets, the rate kernel of an asset aggregate B k of size k grows to become an aggregate B k+1 through a monomer-birth catalyzed by a population aggregate A j of size j is J(k,j) = Jkj λ . And in mutually catalyzed birth model, the birth rate kernels of population and assets are H(k,j) = Hkj η and J(k,j) = Jkj λ , respectively. The kinetics of the system is investigated based on the mean-field theory. In the model of population-catalyzed birth of assets, the long-time asymptotic behavior of the assets aggregate size distribution obeys the conventional or modified scaling form. In mutually catalyzed birth system, the asymptotic behaviors of population and assets obey the conventional scaling form in the case of η = λ = 0, and they obey the modified scaling form in the case of η = 0,λ = 1. In the case of η = λ = 1, the total mass of population aggregates and that of asset aggregates both grow much faster than those in population-catalyzed birth of assets model, and they approaches to infinite values in finite time.

  14. Model-independent determination of the two-photon exchange contribution to hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peset, Clara; Pineda, Antonio [Grup de Física Teòrica, Dept. Física and IFAE-BIST, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona,E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2017-04-11

    We obtain a model-independent prediction for the two-photon exchange contribution to the hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen. We use the relation of the Wilson coefficients of the spin-dependent dimension-six four-fermion operator of NRQED applied to the electron-proton and to the muon-proton sectors. Their difference can be reliably computed using chiral perturbation theory, whereas the Wilson coefficient of the electron-proton sector can be determined from the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen. This allows us to give a precise model-independent determination of the Wilson coefficient for the muon-proton sector, and consequently of the two-photon exchange contribution to the hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen, which reads δĒ{sub pμ,HF}{sup TPE}(nS)=−(1/(n{sup 3}))1.161(20) meV. Together with the associated QED analysis, we obtain a prediction for the hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen that reads E{sub pμ,HF}{sup th}(1S)=182.623(27) meV and E{sub pμ,HF}{sup th}(2S)=22.8123(33) meV. The error is dominated by the two-photon exchange contribution.

  15. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.E. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

  16. Hydrogen absorption kinetics of niobium with an ion-plated nickel overlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, K.

    1981-01-01

    The hydrogen absorption rate for nickel-ion-plated niobium was measured as a function of hydrogen pressure and temperature. The observed absorption curves of c(mean)/csub(e) against time (c(mean) and csub(e) are the mean and equilibrium hydrogen concentrations respectively) exhibited a marked hydrogen pressure dependence below 628 K but this was less marked above 723 K. The results were analysed on the basis of the proposed model that the rate-determining step is the hydrogen permeation through the nickel overlayer and that the permeation is driven by the hydrogen activity difference between the two interfaces, namely the H 2 -Ni and Ni-Nb interfaces. The marked pressure dependence can be attributed to the fact that the hydrogen activity coefficient in nickel is constant and that in niobium it varies markedly with concentration, i.e. with hydrogen pressure and temperature. It was also found that the change in the nickel overlayer structure caused by the dilatation of bulk niobium during hydrogen absorption enhances the hydrogen absorption rates. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen absorption rate is also discussed in comparison with that for tantalum with a vacuum-deposited nickel overlayer. (Auth.)

  17. Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation into Higher Hydrocarbons and Oxygenates: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Bounds and Progress with Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Gonzalo

    2017-03-22

    Under specific scenarios, the catalytic hydrogenation of CO 2 with renewable hydrogen is considered a suitable route for the chemical recycling of this environmentally harmful and chemically refractory molecule into added-value energy carriers and chemicals. The hydrogenation of CO 2 into C 1 products, such as methane and methanol, can be achieved with high selectivities towards the corresponding hydrogenation product. More challenging, however, is the selective production of high (C 2+ ) hydrocarbons and oxygenates. These products are desired as energy vectors, owing to their higher volumetric energy density and compatibility with the current fuel infrastructure than C 1 compounds, and as entry platform chemicals for existing value chains. The major challenge is the optimal integration of catalytic functionalities for both reductive and chain-growth steps. This Minireview summarizes the progress achieved towards the hydrogenation of CO 2 to C 2+ hydrocarbons and oxygenates, covering both solid and molecular catalysts and processes in the gas and liquid phases. Mechanistic aspects are discussed with emphasis on intrinsic kinetic limitations, in some cases inevitably linked to thermodynamic bounds through the concomitant reverse water-gas-shift reaction, which should be considered in the development of advanced catalysts and processes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Towards quantifying the role of exact exchange in the prediction hydrogen bond spin-spin coupling constants involving fluorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Fabián, J.; Omar, S.; García de la Vega, J. M., E-mail: garcia.delavega@uam.es [Departamento de Química Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-08-28

    The effect of a fraction of Hartree-Fock exchange on the calculated spin-spin coupling constants involving fluorine through a hydrogen bond is analyzed in detail. Coupling constants calculated using wavefunction methods are revisited in order to get high-level calculations using the same basis set. Accurate MCSCF results are obtained using an additive approach. These constants and their contributions are used as a reference for density functional calculations. Within the density functional theory, the Hartree-Fock exchange functional is split in short- and long-range using a modified version of the Coulomb-attenuating method with the SLYP functional as well as with the original B3LYP. Results support the difficulties for calculating hydrogen bond coupling constants using density functional methods when fluorine nuclei are involved. Coupling constants are very sensitive to the Hartree-Fock exchange and it seems that, contrary to other properties, it is important to include this exchange for short-range interactions. Best functionals are tested in two different groups of complexes: those related with anionic clusters of type [F(HF){sub n}]{sup −} and those formed by difluoroacetylene and either one or two hydrogen fluoride molecules.

  19. Protein and Peptide Gas-phase Structure Investigation Using Collision Cross Section Measurements and Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar

    Protein and peptide gas-phase structure analysis provides the opportunity to study these species outside of their explicit environment where the interaction network with surrounding molecules makes the analysis difficult [1]. Although gas-phase structure analysis offers a unique opportunity to study the intrinsic behavior of these biomolecules [2-4], proteins and peptides exhibit very low vapor pressures [2]. Peptide and protein ions can be rendered in the gas-phase using electrospray ionization (ESI) [5]. There is a growing body of literature that shows proteins and peptides can maintain solution structures during the process of ESI and these structures can persist for a few hundred milliseconds [6-9]. Techniques for monitoring gas-phase protein and peptide ion structures are categorized as physical probes and chemical probes. Collision cross section (CCS) measurement, being a physical probe, is a powerful method to investigate gas-phase structure size [3, 7, 10-15]; however, CCS values alone do not establish a one to one relation with structure(i.e., the CCS value is an orientationally averaged value [15-18]. Here we propose the utility of gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) as a second criterion of structure elucidation. The proposed approach incudes extensive MD simulations to sample biomolecular ion conformation space with the production of numerous, random in-silico structures. Subsequently a CCS can be calculated for these structures and theoretical CCS values are compared with experimental values to produce a pool of candidate structures. Utilizing a chemical reaction model based on the gas-phase HDX mechanism, the HDX kinetics behavior of these candidate structures are predicted and compared to experimental results to nominate the best in-silico structures which match (chemically and physically) with experimental observations. For the predictive approach to succeed, an extensive technique and method development is essential. To combine CCS

  20. Study on the effects of titanium oxide based nanomaterials as catalysts on the hydrogen sorption kinetics of magnesium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Anderson de Farias; Jardim, Paula Mendes; Santos, Dilson Silva dos, E-mail: anderso.n@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Conceicao, Monique Osorio Talarico da [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda (UniFOA), RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Magnesium hydride is highly attractive for hydrogen storage in solid state in reason of its high gravimetric capacity (7,6 wt% of H{sub 2}) and low density (1,7 g/cm³), making it a promissory candidate for mobile applications [1]. However, its low sorption kinetics and desorption temperature are the main obstacles for its application. In the present study the catalytic role of TiO{sub 2} based nanomaterials with different morphologies on the sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2} was evaluated. The additions consisted on titanate nanotubes (TTNT-Low), TiO{sub 2} nanorods (TTNT-550) and nanoparticles (KA-100, TTNT-ACID). Transmission and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (S/TEM) associated with X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS) mapping was used to characterize the catalysts' morphology and crystalline structure and their dispersion within magnesium hydride, altogether with other characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and BET technique for structure and surface area analysis. The sorption kinetics were evaluated by means of a volumetric gas absorption/desorption (Sievert-type) apparatus. The results indicated that all additives improved the sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}, but the samples with TTNT-550 (TiO{sub 2} nanorods) and TTNT-ACID (TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles) presented the best and the second best performances, respectively, suggesting that the 1D morphology may promote a slightly superior kinetics than particulate catalysts. (author)

  1. Ion Exchange Kinetics of some Heavy Metals from Aqueous Solutions onto Poly(Acrylic Acid-Acrylo nitrle) Potassium Titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shorbagy, M.M.; El-Sadek, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Composite inorganic-organic absorbers represent a group of inorganic ion exchangers modified using binding organic materials for preparation of larger size particles heaving higher granular strength. Such modification of originally powdered or microcrystalline inorganic ion exchangers makes their application in peaked beds possible-modified polyacrylonitrile (PAN) has been used as a universal binding polymer for a number of inorganic ion exchangers. The kinetic of ion exchange and sorption capacity of such composite absorbers is not influenced by the binding polymer mentioned above. These composites have been tested for separation and concentration of various contaminants from aqueous solutions. Their high selectivity and sorption efficiency are advantageous for treatment of various industrial waste waters. Removal of natural or artificial and the heavy metals, Pb, Cd and Zn ions. the influence of initial metal ion concentration and ph on metal ion removal has been studied. The process was found to follow a first order rate kinetics. The intra-particle diffusion of ions through pores in the adsorbent was to be the main rate limiting step. The selectivity order towards the ions was Pb(II) > Cd(II) > Zn(II)

  2. Surface defect chemistry and oxygen exchange kinetics in La2-xCaxNiO4+δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropin, E. S.; Ananyev, M. V.; Farlenkov, A. S.; Khodimchuk, A. V.; Berenov, A. V.; Fetisov, A. V.; Eremin, V. A.; Kolchugin, A. A.

    2018-06-01

    Surface oxygen exchange kinetics and diffusion in La2-xCaxNiO4+δ (x = 0; 0.1; 0.3) have been studied by the isotope exchange method with gas phase equilibration in the temperature range of 600-800 °C and oxygen pressure range 0.13-2.5 kPa. Despite an enhanced electrical conductivity of La2-xCaxNiO4+δ theirs oxygen surface exchange (k*) and oxygen tracer diffusion (D*) coefficients were significantly lower in comparison with La2NiO4+δ. The rates of the elementary stages of oxygen exchange have been calculated. Upon Ca doping the change of the rate-determining stage was observed. The surface of the oxides was found to be inhomogeneous towards oxygen exchange process according to the recently developed model. The reasons of such inhomogeneity are discussed as well as Ca influence on the surface defect chemistry and oxygen surface exchange and diffusivity.

  3. Operating experiences of Heavy Water Plant at Talcher using bithermal ammonia-hydrogen exchange process (Paper No. 1.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haldar, T.K.; Manoj Kumar; Ramamurty, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    A heavy water plant employing bithermal ammonia-hydrogen exchange process was set up at Talcher (India). The energy consumption in the process is lower as compared to monothermal process. The plant performance was affected by various problems and has resulted in low heavy water production. The problems are: (i)formation of solid deposits, (ii)inability of exchange towers to process design gas flow rates, (iii)inadequate exchange efficiency of the sieve trays provided as exchange trays, and (iv)differential amide concentration in different plant sections. These problems and their effect on the overall plant performance are discussed in detail and modifications to improve the performance are suggested. (author). 4 figs

  4. Data acquisition and quantitative analysis of stable hydrogen isotope in liquid and gas in the liquid phase catalytic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, H. J.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, K. R.; Cheong, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Lee, S. H.; Paek, S. W.; Kang, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    A pilot plant for the Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange process was built and has been operating to test the hydrophobic catalyst developed to remove the tritium generated at the CANDU nuclear power plants. The methods of quantitative analysis of hydrogen stable isotope were compared. Infrared spectroscopy was used for the liquid samples, and gas chromatography with hydrogen carrier gas showed the best result for gas samples. Also, a data acquisition system was developed to record the operation parameters. This record was very useful to investigate the causes of the system trip

  5. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction of 2-methylpyridine catalyzed by several fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Hirohumi; Fukuzumi, Kazuo.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction of 2-methylpyridine has been studied by using several fatty acids as catalysts. The reaction was carried out in a sealed pyrex tube at 120 0 C, and the contents of the products were determined by mass spectrometry. Reaction of 2-methylpyridine with monodeuteroacetic acid (1 : 1, mol/mol) arrived at a equilibrium (d 0 reversible d 1 reversible d 2 reversible d 3 ) in 2 hr (d 0 41%, d 1 42%, d 2 15%, d 3 2%). No exchange was observed for the reaction of pyridine with monodeuteroacetic acid. The conversion-time curves of typical series reactions (d 0 → d 1 → d 2 → d 3 ) were obtained for the fatty acid catalyzed exchange in deuterium oxide. The effect of the fatty acid RCO 2 H (substrate : fatty acid : D 2 O=1 : 0.86 : 27.6, mol/mol/mol) on the conversion was in the order of R; C 1 --C 3 4 --C 10 , where the reaction mixtures were homogeneous in the case of C 1 --C 3 and were heterogeneous in the case of C 4 --C 10 . The effects of the initial concentration of the substrates and the catalysts (RCO 2 H) on the total conversion were studied by using some fatty acids (R; C 2 , C 4 and C 9 ) in deuterium oxide (for 2 hr). The total conversion of the substrate increases with increasing the concentration of the acids. The total conversion decreases in the case of R=C 9 , but, increases in the case of R=C 2 with increasing the concentration of the substrate. In the case of reactions with low concentrations of the substrate, the reactivity was in the order of C 9 >C 4 >C 2 , while with high concentrations, the reactivity was in the order of C 4 >C 2 >C 9 and C 9 >C 4 >C 2 with high and low concentrations of the acids, respectively. A possible reaction mechanism was proposed and discussed. (auth.)

  6. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; El Morsli, Mbark

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which

  7. Status of Charge Exchange Cross Section Measurements for Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.; Schultz, D. R.; Seely, D. G.; Schultz, P. C.

    2011-05-01

    Total cross sections of charge exchange (CX) for C5+, N6+, and O7+ ions on ground state atomic hydrogen are measured in an extended collision energy range of 1 - 20,000 eV/u. Absolute CX measurements are performed using an improved merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source mounted on a high voltage platform. In order to improve the problematic H+ signal collection for these exoergic CX collisions at low relative energies, a new double focusing electrostatic analyzer was installed. Experimental CX data are in good agreement with all previous H-oven relative measurements at higher collision energies. We compare our results with the most recent molecular orbital close-coupling (MOCC) and atomic orbital close-coupling (AOCC) theoretical calculations. Work supported by the NASA Solar & Heliospheric Physics Program NNH07ZDA001N, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. DoE.

  8. Fast hydrogen exchange affects 15N relaxation measurements in intrinsically disordered proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seho; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Baum, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Unprotected amide protons can undergo fast hydrogen exchange (HX) with protons from the solvent. Generally, NMR experiments using the out-and-back coherence transfer with amide proton detection are affected by fast HX and result in reduced signal intensity. When one of these experiments, 1 H– 15 N HSQC, is used to measure the 15 N transverse relaxation rate (R 2 ), the measured R 2 rate is convoluted with the HX rate (k HX ) and has higher apparent R 2 values. Since the 15 N R 2 measurement is important for analyzing protein backbone dynamics, the HX effect on the R 2 measurement is investigated and described here by multi-exponential signal decay. We demonstrate these effects by performing 15 N R 2 CPMG experiments on α-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein, in which the amide protons are exposed to solvent. We show that the HX effect on R 2 CPMG can be extracted by the derived equation. In conclusion, the HX effect may be pulse sequence specific and results from various sources including the J coupling evolution, the change of steady state water proton magnetization, and the D 2 O content in the sample. To avoid the HX effect on the analysis of relaxation data of unprotected amides, it is suggested that NMR experimental conditions insensitive to the HX should be considered or that intrinsic R 2 CPMG values be obtained by methods described herein.

  9. Probing Conformational Dynamics of Tau Protein by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Iacob, Roxana E.; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Yang, Ling; Ahlijanian, Michael; Tao, Li; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Chen, Guodong

    2018-01-01

    Fibrillization of the microtubule-associated protein tau has been recognized as one of the signature pathologies of the nervous system in Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and other tauopathies. The conformational transition of tau in the fibrillization process, tau monomer to soluble aggregates to fibrils in particular, remains unclear. Here we report on the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) in combination with other biochemical approaches, including Thioflavin S fluorescence measurements, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and Western blotting to understand the heparin-induced tau's fibrillization. HDX-MS studies including anti-tau antibody epitope mapping experiments provided molecular level details of the full-length tau's conformational dynamics and its regional solvent accessibility upon soluble aggregates formation. The results demonstrate that R3 region in the full-length tau's microtubule binding repeat region (MTBR) is stabilized in the aggregation process, leaving both N and C terminal regions to be solvent exposed in the soluble aggregates and fibrils. The findings also illustrate the practical utility of orthogonal analytical methodologies for the characterization of protein higher order structure. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Top-Down Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Analysis of Protein Structures Using Ultraviolet Photodissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Nicholas I; Huguet, Romain; Zhang, Terry; Viner, Rosa; Zabrouskov, Vlad; Pan, Jingxi; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Borchers, Christoph H

    2018-03-06

    Top-down hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) analysis using electron capture or transfer dissociation Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) is a powerful method for the analysis of secondary structure of proteins in solution. The resolution of the method is a function of the degree of fragmentation of backbone bonds in the proteins. While fragmentation is usually extensive near the N- and C-termini, electron capture (ECD) or electron transfer dissociation (ETD) fragmentation methods sometimes lack good coverage of certain regions of the protein, most often in the middle of the sequence. Ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) is a recently developed fast-fragmentation technique, which provides extensive backbone fragmentation that can be complementary in sequence coverage to the aforementioned electron-based fragmentation techniques. Here, we explore the application of electrospray ionization (ESI)-UVPD FTMS on an Orbitrap Fusion Lumos Tribrid mass spectrometer to top-down HDX analysis of proteins. We have incorporated UVPD-specific fragment-ion types and fragment-ion mixtures into our isotopic envelope fitting software (HDX Match) for the top-down HDX analysis. We have shown that UVPD data is complementary to ETD, thus improving the overall resolution when used as a combined approach.

  11. Exchange reaction between hydrogen and deuterium. I. Importance of surface reactions in the steady-state mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marteau, C; Gaillard-Cusin, F; James, H [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France). Centre de Recherches sur la Chimie de Combustion et des Hautes Temperatures

    1978-05-01

    Investigation of heterogeneous initiation process of gas phase linear chain reactions is carried out through the study of H/sub 2/-D/sub 2/ exchange reaction. Experimental data under study concern mainly the stationary rate of HD formation and the prestationary proceeding. Steady-state method accounts for the first one of these data; it allows to clearly compare the wall process part to the part played by the homogeneous chain reaction towards HD formation. Activation energy of exchange elementary step between chemisorbed hydrogen (on silica) and gaseous deuterium has been evaluated: Esub(e1)=52+-1 Kcal/mole.

  12. Process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of liquid water and gaseous halohydrocarbon and an apparatus therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, E.A.; Rolston, J.H.; Clermont, M.J.; Paterson, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    This invention provides a process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of liquid water and gaseous halohydrocarbons comprising: (a) bringing into contact a water stream, a halohydrocarbon stream, and a catalytic porous anion exchange resin so that the isotope-deficient halohydrocarbon stream is enriched; (b) decomposing the halohydrocarbon stream photolytically into two gaseous streams, one enriched and the other deficient; (c) removing as a product the first, enriched stream; and (d) recycling the second stream for enrichment. An apparatus is also provided

  13. Process and device for stage by stage enrichment of deuterium and/or tritium in a material suitable for isotope exchange of deuterium and tritium with hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iniotakis, N.; Decken, C.B. von der.

    1983-01-01

    Water containing deuterium and/or tritium is first introduced into a carrier gas flow and reduced for the stage by stage enrichment of deuterium and/or tritium. A hydrogen partial pressure of a maximum of 100 millibar is set in the carrier gas flow. The carrier gas flow is taken along the primary side of an exchange wall suitable for the permeation of hydrogen, and a further carrier gas flow flows on its secondary side, which contains water or hydrogen. Reaction products formed after isotope exchange of deuterium and/or tritium with hydrogen are removed by the secondary carrier gas flow. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Deactivation of hydrophobic catalysts for a hydrogen isotope exchange: Application of the time-on-stream theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Heui-Joo; Lee, Han Soo; Ahn, Do-Hee; Kim, Jeong-Guk; Kim, Wi-soo; Sohn, SoonHwan

    2005-01-01

    A recycle reactor was built for the purpose of characterizing newly developed hydrophobic catalysts for a hydrogen isotope exchange. The catalytic rate constants of two types of hydrophobic catalysts were measured at a 100% relative humidity. The catalytic rate constants were measured at 60 deg C for 28 days and both the catalysts showed very high initial catalytic rate constants. The measured deactivation profile showed that the catalytic rate constants of both the catalysts were almost identical for 28 days. The deactivation of the catalysts was modelled based upon the time-on-stream theory. The deactivation profiles of the catalysts were estimated by using the model for a period of three years. The results showed that both the catalysts had a good exchange capacity for hydrogen isotopes and they could be applicable to a tritium removal facility that will be built at the Wolsong nuclear power plants in the near future

  15. SOLVENT EFFECTS ON THE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN .2. EFFECT OF SULFOLANE ON THE REACTION-KINETICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    The kinetics of the' hydration of cyclohexene, catalyzed by a strong acid ion-exchange resin, have been studied in a packed bed reactor at temperatures between 353 and 413 K and a pressure of 20 bar. The kinetic rate constants were measured as a function of temperature and solvent composition (0-90

  16. Gas-phase fragmentation of peptides to increase the spatial resolution of the Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    are produced after precursor ion selection and thus do not add complexity to the LC-MS analysis. The key to obtaining optimal spatial resolution in a hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) experiment is the fragmentation efficiency. This chapter discusses common fragmentation techniques like collision....../D scrambling, thus making them suitable for HX applications. By combining the classic bottom-up HX-MS workflow with gas-phase fragmentation by ETD, detailed information on protein HX can be obtained....

  17. Homogeneous activation of molecular hydrogen: on the development of effective catalysts for isotopic exchange in protolytic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakharovskij, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of different catalytic systems for hydrogen isotopic exchange with protolytic solvent based on activation enthalpy and entropy values is carried out. Particular attention is paid to the effect of ligand environment of complex forming metallic central ion and solvent composition on free activation energy and stability of catalytic system. A conclusion is drawn on impossibility of absolutely stable and high-temperature catalyst in an isolated system

  18. Microstructure and kinetics evolution in MgH{sub 2}–TiO{sub 2} pellets after hydrogen cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirabile Gattia, D., E-mail: daniele.mirabile@enea.it; Di Girolamo, G.; Montone, A.

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • MgH{sub 2} was ball milled with TiO{sub 2} anatase phase and expanded graphite to prepare pellets. • Different pellets have been prepared at different compression load. • Pellets were repeatedly cycled under hydrogen pressure to simulate tank exercise and verify their stability. • The compression load highly affects the stability of the pellets to cycling. • Microstructural evolution of the particles due to cycling have been observed. - Abstract: The interest in Mg-based hydrides for solid state hydrogen storage is associated to their capability to reversibly absorb and desorb large amounts of hydrogen. In this work MgH{sub 2} powder with 5 wt.% TiO{sub 2} was ball milled for 10 h. The as-milled nanostructured powder was enriched with 5 wt.% of Expanded Natural Graphite (ENG) and then compacted in cylindrical pellets by cold pressing using different loads. Both the powder and the pellets were subjected to kinetic and thermodynamic tests using a Sievert’s type gas reaction controller, in order to study the microstructural and kinetic changes which took place during repeated H{sub 2} absorption and desorption cycles. The pellets exhibited good kinetic performance and durability, even if the pressure of compaction revealed to be an important parameter for their mechanical stability. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations of as-prepared and cycled pellets were carried out to investigate the evolution of their microstructure. In turn the phase composition before and after cycling was analyzed by X-ray diffraction.

  19. Isotopic exchange between molecular hydrogen and liquid ammonia catalysed by alkali amides; Echange isotopique entre l'hydrogene moleculaire et l'ammoniac liquide catalyse par les amidures alcalins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmas, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-15

    The catalytic action of alkali amides on the isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid ammonia has been reinvestigated. It was clear before this work that the reaction is homogeneous and first order with respect to the concentration of dissolved hydrogen, but the nature of the catalytic species was still subject to discussion. On one hand new precise kinetic measurements have been made with sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium amide. On the other hand, the dissociation of these salts has been calculated with the help of the FUOSS-ONSAGER equation. If the rate of exchange is plotted as a function of the concentration of the free amide ion, a linear relationship is obtained. In our experimental conditions, primary salt effects are negligible and the concentration has to be used in the rate equations. This shows that only the free amide ion is acting as a catalytic species. Experiments on common ion effects and secondary salt effects support this conclusion. The results are in agreement with an associative mechanism. (author) [French] Une nouvelle etude de l'echange isotopique entre l'hydrogene et l'ammoniac liquide catalyse par les amidures alcalins a ete effectuee. II etait bien etabli avant le present travail que la reaction etait homogene et que sa vitesse etait du premier ordre par rapport a la concentration d'hydrogene dissous, mais la nature de l'espece catalytique etait encore controversee. De nouvelles mesures cinetiques precises ont ete faites avec les amidures de sodium, de potassium, de rubidium et de cesium. D'autre part, la dissociation de ces sels a ete calculee a l'aide de l'equation de FUOSS-ONSAGER. On constate que la vitesse d'echange est proportionnelle a la concentration de l'ion amidure libre. Dans nos conditions experimentales, les effets de sel primaires sont negligeables, l'equation de vitesse doit s'exprimer simplement en fonction des concentrations. Ceci indique que l'ion amidure libre est la seule espece catalytique. Des experiences d

  20. Kinetics of Oxidation of Cobalt(III Complexes of a Acids by Hydrogen Peroxide in the Presence of Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide oxidation of pentaamminecobalt(III complexes of α-hydroxy acids at 35°C in micellar medium has been attempted. In this reaction the rate of oxidation shows first order kinetics each in [cobalt(III] and [H2O2]. Hydrogen peroxide induced electron transfer in [(NH35 CoIII-L]2+ complexes of α-hydroxy acids readily yields 100% of cobalt(II with nearly 100% of C-C bond cleavage products suggesting that it behaves mainly as one equivalent oxidant in micellar medium. With unbound ligand also it behaves only as C-C cleavage agent rather than C-H cleavage agent. With increasing micellar concentration an increase in the rate is observed.

  1. To problem of experimental determination of parameters of μ-atom charge-exchange process of hydrogen isotopes on He nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystritskij, V.M.; Stolupin, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of μ-atomic and μ-molecular processes occuring in hydrogen isotopes-helium mixture is observed. The expressions are obtained to determine the parameters of a process of the muon transition from hydrogen isotope μ atoms to helium nuclei with the use of different experimental methods. 18 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  2. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Allylic Sites by 3O2; Implications for Combustion Modeling and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Simmie, John M; Somers, Kieran P; Goldsmith, C Franklin; Curran, Henry J

    2017-03-09

    Hydrogen atom abstraction from allylic C-H bonds by molecular oxygen plays a very important role in determining the reactivity of fuel molecules having allylic hydrogen atoms. Rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction by molecular oxygen from molecules with allylic sites have been calculated. A series of molecules with primary, secondary, tertiary, and super secondary allylic hydrogen atoms of alkene, furan, and alkylbenzene families are taken into consideration. Those molecules include propene, 2-butene, isobutene, 2-methylfuran, and toluene containing the primary allylic hydrogen atom; 1-butene, 1-pentene, 2-ethylfuran, ethylbenzene, and n-propylbenzene containing the secondary allylic hydrogen atom; 3-methyl-1-butene, 2-isopropylfuran, and isopropylbenzene containing tertiary allylic hydrogen atom; and 1-4-pentadiene containing super allylic secondary hydrogen atoms. The M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory was used to optimize the geometries of all of the reactants, transition states, products and also the hinder rotation treatments for lower frequency modes. The G4 level of theory was used to calculate the electronic single point energies for those species to determine the 0 K barriers to reaction. Conventional transition state theory with Eckart tunnelling corrections was used to calculate the rate constants. The comparison between our calculated rate constants with the available experimental results from the literature shows good agreement for the reactions of propene and isobutene with molecular oxygen. The rate constant for toluene with O 2 is about an order magnitude slower than that experimentally derived from a comprehensive model proposed by Oehlschlaeger and coauthors. The results clearly indicate the need for a more detailed investigation of the combustion kinetics of toluene oxidation and its key pyrolysis and oxidation intermediates. Despite this, our computed barriers and rate constants retain an important internal consistency. Rate constants

  3. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Lens, Piet N.L.; Nielsen, Jeppe L.; Bester, Kai; Nielsen, Asbjorn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria, were suspended in aqueous solution at pH similar to that of corroded concrete. Hydrogen sulfide was supplied to the reactor to provide the source of reduced sulfur. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen was monitored. The utilization rates of both hydrogen sulfide and oxygen suggested exponential bacterial growth with median growth rates of 1.25 d -1 and 1.33 d -1 as determined from the utilization rates of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, respectively. Elemental sulfur was found to be the immediate product of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation. When exponential growth had been achieved, the addition of hydrogen sulfide was terminated leading to elemental sulfur oxidation. The ratio of consumed sulfur to consumed oxygen suggested that sulfuric acid was the ultimate oxidation product. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first study to determine the growth rate of bacteria involved in concrete corrosion with hydrogen sulfide as source of reduced sulfur.

  4. Improvement of hydrogen storage kinetics in ball-milled magnesium doped with antimony

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír; Roupcová, Pavla

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 9 (2017), s. 6144-6151 ISSN 0360-3199 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Hydrogen * Hydrogen storage * Storage capacity * Magnesium alloys * Antimony Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 3.582, year: 2016

  5. Investigation of hydrogen micro-kinetics in metals with ion beam implantation and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T.S.; Peng, H.B.; Lv, H.Y.; Han, Y.C.; Grambole, D.; Herrmann, F.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important subjects in the fusion material research is to study the hydrogen and helium concentration, diffusion and evolution in the structure material of fusion reactor, since the hydrogen and helium can be continuously produced by the large dose fast neutron irradiation on material. Various analysis Methods can be used, but the ion beam analysis method has some advantages for studying the hydrogen behaviors in nano- or micrometer resolution. In this work, the hydrogen motion and three-dimensional distribution after implantation into metal has been studied by resonance NRA, micro-ERDA and XRD etc Methods. The resolution of the H-depth-profile is in nanometer level and the lateral resolution can be reached to 2 micrometers. The evolution of hydrogen depth-profile in a titanium sample has been studied versus the change of normal stress in samples. Evident hydrogen diffusion has been observed, while a normal stress is changed in the range of 107-963 MPa. A new phase transformation during the hydrogenation is observed by the in-situ XRD analysis. The further study on the hydrogen behaviors in the structure materials of fusion reactor is in plan. (authors)

  6. Merging Iron Catalysis and Biocatalysis-Iron Carbonyl Complexes as Efficient Hydrogen Autotransfer Catalysts in Dynamic Kinetic Resolutions

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama

    2016-09-29

    A dual catalytic iron/lipase system has been developed and applied in the dynamic kinetic resolution of benzylic and aliphatic secondary alcohols. A detailed study of the Knölker-type iron complexes demonstrated the hydrogen autotransfer of alcohols to proceed under mild reaction conditions and allowed the combination with the enzymatic resolution. Different racemic alcohols were efficiently converted to chiral acetates in good yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  7. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernusca, S.; Winter, HP.; Aumayr, F.; Díez Muiño, R.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2003-04-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to "projectile molecular effects" (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials.

  8. Merging Iron Catalysis and Biocatalysis-Iron Carbonyl Complexes as Efficient Hydrogen Autotransfer Catalysts in Dynamic Kinetic Resolutions

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama; Alandini, Nurtalya; Rueping, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    A dual catalytic iron/lipase system has been developed and applied in the dynamic kinetic resolution of benzylic and aliphatic secondary alcohols. A detailed study of the Knölker-type iron complexes demonstrated the hydrogen autotransfer of alcohols to proceed under mild reaction conditions and allowed the combination with the enzymatic resolution. Different racemic alcohols were efficiently converted to chiral acetates in good yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  9. Predicting protein aggregation during storage in lyophilized solids using solid state amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Schultz, Steven G; Kim, Sherry G; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-06-02

    Solid state amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX-MS) was used to assess the conformation of myoglobin (Mb) in lyophilized formulations, and the results correlated with the extent of aggregation during storage. Mb was colyophilized with sucrose (1:1 or 1:8 w/w), mannitol (1:1 w/w), or NaCl (1:1 w/w) or in the absence of excipients. Immediately after lyophilization, samples of each formulation were analyzed by ssHDX-MS and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to assess Mb conformation, and by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to determine the extent of aggregation. The remaining samples were then placed on stability at 25 °C and 60% RH or 40 °C and 75% RH for up to 1 year, withdrawn at intervals, and analyzed for aggregate content by SEC and DLS. In ssHDX-MS of samples immediately after lyophilization (t = 0), Mb was less deuterated in solids containing sucrose (1:1 and 1:8 w/w) than in those containing mannitol (1:1 w/w), NaCl (1:1 w/w), or Mb alone. Deuterium uptake kinetics and peptide mass envelopes also indicated greater Mb structural perturbation in mannitol, NaCl, or Mb-alone samples at t = 0. The extent of deuterium incorporation and kinetic parameters related to rapidly and slowly exchanging amide pools (Nfast, Nslow), measured at t = 0, were highly correlated with the extent of aggregation on storage as measured by SEC. In contrast, the extent of aggregation was weakly correlated with FTIR band intensity and peak position measured at t = 0. The results support the use of ssHDX-MS as a formulation screening tool in developing lyophilized protein drug products.

  10. EFFECT OF DIATOMEAOUS EARTH TREATMENT USING HYDROGEN CHLORIDE AND SULFURIC ACID ON KINETICS OF CADMIUM(II ADSORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryono Nuryono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, treatment of diatomaceous earth, Sangiran, Central Java using hydrogen chloride (HCl and sulfuric acid (H2SO4 on kinetics of Cd(II adsorption in aqueous solution has been carried out. The work was conducted by mixing an amount of grounded diatomaceous earth (200 mesh in size with HCl or H2SO4 solution in various concentrations for two hours at temperature range of 100 - 150oC. The mixture was then filtered and washed with water until the filtrate pH is approximately 7 and then the residue was dried for four hours at a temperature of 70oC. The product was used as an adsorbent to adsorb Cd(II in aqueous solution with various concentrations. The Cd(II adsorbed was determined by analyzing the rest of Cd(II in the solution using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The effect of treatment was evaluated from kinetic parameter of adsorption rate constant calculated based on the simple kinetic model. Results showed  that before equilibrium condition reached, adsorpstion of Cd(II occurred through two steps, i.e. a step tends to follow a reaction of irreversible first order  (step I followed by reaction of reversible first order (step II. Treatment with acids, either hydrogen chloride or sulfuric acid, decreased adsorption rate constant for the step I from 15.2/min to a range of 6.4 - 9.4/min.  However, increasing concentration of acid (in a range of concentration investigated did not give significant and constant change of adsorption rate constant. For step II process,  adsorption involved physical interaction with the sufficient low adsorption energy (in a range of 311.3 - 1001 J/mol.     Keywords: adsorption, cdmium, diatomaceous earth, kinetics.

  11. A study on the deactivation and stability of hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Soon Hwan

    2006-02-01

    The hydrophobic catalyst has been prepared by deposition of platinum on porous styrene divinylbenzene copolymers(Pt/SDBC) and at the same time a separated type catalytic reactor has been developed for the Wolsong tritium removal facility(WTRF). Several tests carried out to obtain the experimental performance data of the Pt/SDBC with a recycle reactor system. The long-term stability was also measured with the Pt/SDBC catalyst immersed in water for a long time. The long-term deactivations of the Pt/SDBC catalyst were evaluated quantitatively by mathematical models. The simple mathematical models were presented to evaluate the uniform poisoning and shell progressive poisoning to be occurred simultaneously during the hydrogen isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and liquid water in the Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange(LPCE) column. The uniform poisoning was well characterized by a time on stream theory and then the deactivation parameters were determined from the experimental performance data. The impurity poisoning was derived by a shell progressive model with two-layer mass transfer. The water vapor condensation was a main cause of the reversible uniform poisoning for the Pt/SDBC catalyst. The values of the decay rate constant (K d ) and order of the decay reaction(m) were of 2 and 4, respectively, based on the experimental data. It indicated that the decay might be attributable to pore mouth poisoning. From the long-term stability of the catalyst immersed in water, there was no intrinsic decay of catalyst activity due to water logging to the catalyst. The activity decreased by only 7% over 18 months, which was equivalent to a catalyst half-life longer than 15 years. On the basis of the above deactivation parameters, the values for k c /k co with Thiele modulus=20 after 3 years and 10 years of operation were expected about 19% and 15% of the initial activity, respectively, while the values for k c /k co with Thiele modulus=100 were of about 22% and 18%, respectively

  12. Fast hydrogen exchange affects {sup 15}N relaxation measurements in intrinsically disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seho; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Baum, Jean, E-mail: jean.baum@rutgers.edu [Rutgers University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Unprotected amide protons can undergo fast hydrogen exchange (HX) with protons from the solvent. Generally, NMR experiments using the out-and-back coherence transfer with amide proton detection are affected by fast HX and result in reduced signal intensity. When one of these experiments, {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC, is used to measure the {sup 15}N transverse relaxation rate (R{sub 2}), the measured R{sub 2} rate is convoluted with the HX rate (k{sub HX}) and has higher apparent R{sub 2} values. Since the {sup 15}N R{sub 2} measurement is important for analyzing protein backbone dynamics, the HX effect on the R{sub 2} measurement is investigated and described here by multi-exponential signal decay. We demonstrate these effects by performing {sup 15}N R{sub 2}{sup CPMG} experiments on {alpha}-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein, in which the amide protons are exposed to solvent. We show that the HX effect on R{sub 2}{sup CPMG} can be extracted by the derived equation. In conclusion, the HX effect may be pulse sequence specific and results from various sources including the J coupling evolution, the change of steady state water proton magnetization, and the D{sub 2}O content in the sample. To avoid the HX effect on the analysis of relaxation data of unprotected amides, it is suggested that NMR experimental conditions insensitive to the HX should be considered or that intrinsic R{sub 2}{sup CPMG} values be obtained by methods described herein.

  13. Platform dependencies in bottom-up hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kyle M; Rey, Martial; Baker, Charles A H; Schriemer, David C

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry is an important method for protein structure-function analysis. The bottom-up approach uses protein digestion to localize deuteration to higher resolution, and the essential measurement involves centroid mass determinations on a very large set of peptides. In the course of evaluating systems for various projects, we established two (HDX-MS) platforms that consisted of a FT-MS and a high-resolution QTOF mass spectrometer, each with matched front-end fluidic systems. Digests of proteins spanning a 20-110 kDa range were deuterated to equilibrium, and figures-of-merit for a typical bottom-up (HDX-MS) experiment were compared for each platform. The Orbitrap Velos identified 64% more peptides than the 5600 QTOF, with a 42% overlap between the two systems, independent of protein size. Precision in deuterium measurements using the Orbitrap marginally exceeded that of the QTOF, depending on the Orbitrap resolution setting. However, the unique nature of FT-MS data generates situations where deuteration measurements can be inaccurate, because of destructive interference arising from mismatches in elemental mass defects. This is shown through the analysis of the peptides common to both platforms, where deuteration values can be as low as 35% of the expected values, depending on FT-MS resolution, peptide length and charge state. These findings are supported by simulations of Orbitrap transients, and highlight that caution should be exercised in deriving centroid mass values from FT transients that do not support baseline separation of the full isotopic composition.

  14. Kinetics on NiZn Bimetallic Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution via Selective Dehydrogenation of Methylcyclohexane to Toluene

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam

    2017-01-18

    Liquid organic chemical hydrides are effective hydrogen storage media for easy and safe transport. The chemical couple of methylcyclohexane (MCH) and toluene (TOL) has been considered one of the feasible cycles for a hydrogen carrier, but the selective dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL has been reported using only Pt-based noble metal catalysts. This study reports MCH dehydrogenation to TOL using supported NiZn as a selective, non-noble-metal catalyst. A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to provide insight into the site requirements and reaction mechanism for MCH dehydrogenation to TOL, which were compared with those for cyclohexane (CH) dehydrogenation to benzene (BZ). The kinetic measurements carried out at 300-360°C showed an almost zero order with respect to MCH pressure in the high-pressure region (≥10 kPa) and nearly a positive half order with respective to H pressure (≤40 kPa). These kinetic data for the dehydrogenation reaction paradoxically indicate that hydrogenation of a strongly chemisorbed intermediate originating from TOL is the rate-determining step. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation confirms that the dehydrogenated TOL species at the aliphatic (methyl) position group (CHCH) were strongly adsorbed on the surface, which must be hydrogenated to desorb as TOL. This hydrogen-assisted desorption mechanism explains the essential role of excess H present in the feed in maintaining the activity of the metallic surface for hydrogenation. The rate of the CH to BZ reaction was less sensitive to H pressure than that of MCH to TOL, which can be explained by the absence of a methyl group in the structure, which in turn reduces the binding energy of the adsorbed species. DFT suggests that the improved TOL selectivity by adding Zn to Ni was due to Zn atoms preferentially occupying low-coordination sites on the surface (the corner and edge sites), which are likely the unselective sites responsible for the C-C dissociation of the

  15. Kinetics on NiZn Bimetallic Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution via Selective Dehydrogenation of Methylcyclohexane to Toluene

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam; Jedidi, Abdesslem; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Cavallo, Luigi; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Liquid organic chemical hydrides are effective hydrogen storage media for easy and safe transport. The chemical couple of methylcyclohexane (MCH) and toluene (TOL) has been considered one of the feasible cycles for a hydrogen carrier, but the selective dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL has been reported using only Pt-based noble metal catalysts. This study reports MCH dehydrogenation to TOL using supported NiZn as a selective, non-noble-metal catalyst. A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to provide insight into the site requirements and reaction mechanism for MCH dehydrogenation to TOL, which were compared with those for cyclohexane (CH) dehydrogenation to benzene (BZ). The kinetic measurements carried out at 300-360°C showed an almost zero order with respect to MCH pressure in the high-pressure region (≥10 kPa) and nearly a positive half order with respective to H pressure (≤40 kPa). These kinetic data for the dehydrogenation reaction paradoxically indicate that hydrogenation of a strongly chemisorbed intermediate originating from TOL is the rate-determining step. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation confirms that the dehydrogenated TOL species at the aliphatic (methyl) position group (CHCH) were strongly adsorbed on the surface, which must be hydrogenated to desorb as TOL. This hydrogen-assisted desorption mechanism explains the essential role of excess H present in the feed in maintaining the activity of the metallic surface for hydrogenation. The rate of the CH to BZ reaction was less sensitive to H pressure than that of MCH to TOL, which can be explained by the absence of a methyl group in the structure, which in turn reduces the binding energy of the adsorbed species. DFT suggests that the improved TOL selectivity by adding Zn to Ni was due to Zn atoms preferentially occupying low-coordination sites on the surface (the corner and edge sites), which are likely the unselective sites responsible for the C-C dissociation of the

  16. Kinetic Analysis of Lactose Exchange in Proteoliposomes Reconstituted with Purified lac Permease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Julius S.; Carrasco, Nancy; Kaback, H. Ronald

    1991-01-01

    Lactose exchange catalyzed by purified lac permease reconstituted into proteoliposomes was analyzed with unequal concentrations of lactose on either side of the membrane and at low pH so as to prevent equilibration of the two pools. Exchange with external concentrations below 1.0 mM is a

  17. Probabilistic multiobjective operation management of MicroGrids with hydrogen storage and polymer exchange fuel cell power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, T.; Golestaneh, F. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    This paper models and solves the operation management problem of MicroGrids (MGs) including cost and emissions minimization under uncertain environment. The proposed model emphasizes on fuel cells (FCs) as a prime mover of combined heat and power (CHP) systems. An electro-chemical model of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is used and linked to the daily operating cost and emissions of the MGs. A reformer is considered to produce hydrogen for PEMFCs. Moreover, in high thermal load intervals, in order to make the MG more efficient, a part of produced hydrogen is stored in a hydrogen tank. The stored hydrogen can be reused by PEMFCs to generate electricity or be sold to other hydrogen consumers. A probabilistic optimization algorithm is devised which consists of 2m + 1 point estimate method to handle the uncertainty in input random variables (IRVs) and a multi-objective Self-adaptive Bee Swarm Optimization (SBSO) algorithm to minimize the cost and emissions simultaneously. Several techniques are proposed in the SBSO algorithm to make it a powerful black-box optimization tool. The efficiency of the proposed approach is verified on a typical grid-connected MG with several distributed energy sources. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Method for enriching and separating heavy hydrogen isotopes from substance streams containing such isotopes by means of isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knochel, A.; Eggers, I.; Klatte, B.; Wilken, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    A process for enriching and separating heavy hydrogen isotopes having a heavy hydrogen cation (deuterium and/or tritium) from substance streams containing them, wherein the respectively present hydrogen isotopes are exchanged in chemical equilibria. A protic, acid solution containing deuterium and/or tritium is brought into contact with a value material from the group of open-chained polyethers or aminopolyethers, macro-monocyclic or macro-polycyclic polyethers, macro-monocyclic or macro-polycyclic amino polyethers, and mixtures of these values, in their free or proton salt form to form a reaction product of the heavy hydrogen cation with the value or value salt and bring about enrichment of deuterium and/or tritium in the reaction product. The reaction product containing the value or value salt is separated from the solution. The separated reaction product is treated to release the hydrogen isotope(s) to be enriched in the form of deuterium oxide (HDO) and/or tritium oxide (HTO) by regenerating the value or its salt, respectively. The regenerated value is returned for reuse

  19. The kinetics of Cr layer coated on TiNi films for hydrogen absorption

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of hydrogen absorption on electrical resistance with temperature ... pressure by thermal evaporation on the glass substrate at room temperature. ... and charging rate becomes faster in comparison to FeTi and TiNi thin films.

  20. Modeling the reaction kinetics of a hydrogen generator onboard a fuel cell -- Electric hybrid motorcycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Karthik

    Owing to the perceived decline of the fossil fuel reserves in the world and environmental issues like pollution, conventional fuels may be replaced by cleaner alternative fuels. The potential of hydrogen as a fuel in vehicular applications is being explored. Hydrogen as an energy carrier potentially finds applications in internal combustion engines and fuel cells because it is considered a clean fuel and has high specific energy. However, at 6 to 8 per kilogram, not only is hydrogen produced from conventional methods like steam reforming expensive, but also there are storage and handling issues, safety concerns and lack of hydrogen refilling stations across the country. The purpose of this research is to suggest a cheap and viable system that generates hydrogen on demand through a chemical reaction between an aluminum-water slurry and an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution to power a 2 kW fuel cell on a fuel cell hybrid motorcycle. This reaction is essentially an aluminum-water reaction where sodium hydroxide acts as a reaction promoter or catalyst. The Horizon 2000 fuel cell used for this purpose has a maximum hydrogen intake rate of 28 lpm. The study focuses on studying the exothermic reaction between the reactants and proposes a rate law that best describes the rate of generation of hydrogen in connection to the surface area of aluminum available for the certain reaction and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution. Further, the proposed rate law is used in the simulation model of the chemical reactor onboard the hybrid motorcycle to determine the hydrogen flow rate to the fuel cell with time. Based on the simulated rate of production of hydrogen from the chemical system, its feasibility of use on different drive cycles is analyzed. The rate of production of hydrogen with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide and smaller aluminum powder size was found to enable the installation of the chemical reactor on urban cycles with frequent stops and starts

  1. Kinetic Models Study of Hydrogenation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Vacuum Gas Oil and Basrah Crude Oil Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzher M. Ibraheem

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available             The aim of this research is to study the kinetic reaction models for catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic content for Basrah crude oil (BCO and vacuum gas oil (VGO derived from Kirkuk crude oil which has the boiling point rang of (611-833K.            This work is performed using a hydrodesulphurization (HDS pilot plant unit located in AL-Basil Company. A commercial (HDS catalyst cobalt-molybdenum (Co-Mo supported in alumina (γ-Al2O3 is used in this work. The feed is supplied by North Refinery Company in Baiji. The reaction temperatures range is (600-675 K over liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV range of (0.7-2hr-1 and hydrogen pressure is 3 MPa with H2/oil ratio of 300 of Basrah Crude oil (BCO, while the corresponding conditions for vacuum gas oil (VGO are (583-643 K, (1.5-3.75 hr-1, 3.5 MPa and 250  respectively .            The results showed that the reaction kinetics is of second order for both types of feed. Activation energies are found to be 30.396, 38.479 kJ/mole for Basrah Crude Oil (BCO and Vacuum Gas Oil (VGO respectively.

  2. Investigation of the kinetics of the reactions of oxidation, nitration, and hydrogenation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adda, Y.

    1955-06-01

    Various physico-chemical methods have been used to investigate the kinetics of the oxidation hydridation and nitridation of uranium. The experimental results show that the kinetics of these reactions are influenced by many factors also the Pilling and Bedworth rule is valid only under very limited conditions. The disagreement between this rule and the experimental results could be explained by the existence of numerous mechanical faults in the compounds obtained by the dry corrosion of the metal. (author) [fr

  3. Kinetic study on ligand exchange reaction between EC and 99mTc-GH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chunying; Luo Shineng; Fang Ping; Huang Heyun; Xie Minhao; Meng Hong

    1995-01-01

    The ligand exchange reaction between EC and 99m Tc-GH and its influence factors such as concentrations of EC and pH were described. The concentration of EC has no influence on the exchange reaction rate constant, while pH is the most important influence factor. The rate constants of ligand exchange reaction at different pH values were determined. The results showed that in order to make the labelling yield of 99m Tc-EC higher than 90%, pH of the reaction must be higher than 8

  4. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ling-Ling; Lv, Cun-Qin; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H_2 molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H_2. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of C−H/C−C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H_2 dissociation and

  5. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ling-Ling; Lv, Cun-Qin; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2017-07-01

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H2 molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H2. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of Csbnd H/Csbnd C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H2 dissociation and

  6. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ling-Ling [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Lv, Cun-Qin, E-mail: lcq173@126.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009, Shanxi Province (China); Wang, Gui-Chang, E-mail: wangguichang@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H{sub 2} molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H{sub 2}. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of C−H/C−C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H{sub 2

  7. A kinetic model of the formation of organic monolayers on hydrogen-terminated silicon by hydrosilation of alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, M; Carlsson, S; Hong, Q; Patole, S N; Lie, L H; Houlton, A; Horrocks, B R

    2005-12-22

    We have analyzed a kinetic model for the formation of organic monolayers based on a previously suggested free radical chain mechanism for the reaction of unsaturated molecules with hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces (Linford, M. R.; Fenter, P. M.; Chidsey, C. E. D. J. Am. Chem. Soc 1995, 117, 3145). A direct consequence of this mechanism is the nonexponential growth of the monolayer, and this has been observed spectroscopically. In the model, the initiation of silyl radicals on the surface is pseudo first order with rate constant, ki, and the rate of propagation is determined by the concentration of radicals and unreacted Si-H nearest neighbor sites with a rate constant, kp. This propagation step determines the rate at which the monolayer forms by addition of alkene molecules to form a track of molecules that constitute a self-avoiding random walk on the surface. The initiation step describes how frequently new random walks commence. A termination step by which the radicals are destroyed is also included. The solution of the kinetic equations yields the fraction of alkylated surface sites and the mean length of the random walks as a function of time. In mean-field approximation we show that (1) the average length of the random walk is proportional to (kp/ki)1/2, (2) the monolayer surface coverage grows exponentially only after an induction period, (3) the effective first-order rate constant describing the growth of the monolayer and the induction period (kt) is k = (2ki kp)1/2, (4) at long times the effective first-order rate constant drops to ki, and (5) the overall activation energy for the growth kinetics is the mean of the activation energies for the initiation and propagation steps. Monte Carlo simulations of the mechanism produce qualitatively similar kinetic plots, but the mean random walk length (and effective rate constant) is overestimated by the mean field approximation and when kp > ki, we find k approximately ki0.7kp0.3 and Ea = (0.7Ei+ 0.3Ep

  8. Reaction kinetics of hydrogen atom abstraction from isopentanol by the H atom and HO2˙ radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, Prajakta Rajaram; Heufer, K Alexander; Fernandes, Ravi Xavier

    2018-04-25

    Isopentanol is a potential next-generation biofuel for future applications to Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine concepts. To provide insights into the combustion behavior of isopentanol, especially to its auto-ignition behavior which is linked both to efficiency and pollutant formation in real combustion systems, detailed quantum chemical studies for crucial reactions are desired. H-Abstraction reaction rates from fuel molecules are key initiation steps for chain branching required for auto-ignition. In this study, rate constants are determined for the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from isopentanol by the H atom and HO2˙ radical by implementing the CBS-QB3 composite method. For the treatment of the internal rotors, a Pitzer-Gwinn-like approximation is applied. On comparing the computed reaction energies, the highest exothermicity (ΔE = -46 kJ mol-1) is depicted for Hα abstraction by the H atom whereas the lowest endothermicity (ΔE = 29 kJ mol-1) is shown for the abstraction of Hα by the HO2˙ radical. The formation of hydrogen bonding is found to affect the kinetics of the H atom abstraction reactions by the HO2˙ radical. Further above 750 K, the calculated high pressure limit rate constants indicate that the total contribution from delta carbon sites (Cδ) is predominant for hydrogen atom abstraction by the H atom and HO2˙ radical.

  9. Kinetic investigation of the immobilization of chromotropic acid derivatives onto anion exchange resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Jasmina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption kinetics of pyrazol- (РАСА and imidazol-azo-chromo-tropic acid (IACA onto Dowex 1-X8 resin, as a function of the dye concentration and temperature were investigated at pH 4.5. The pseudo-first- and second-order kinetic models and intraparticle diffusion model were used to describe the obtained kinetic data. The adsorption rate constants were found to be in the order of magnitude 10-2 min-1 for all of the used kinetics models. The adsorption capacity increases with increasing initial dye concentration. The study of adsorption kinetics at different temperatures (in the range from 5 to 25 °C reveals an increase in the rate of adsorption and adsorption capacity with increasing temperature. The activation energy (in the case of РАСА 16.6 kJ/mol, and for IACA 11.3 kJ/mol was determined using the Arrhenius dependence. Electrostatic interactions between the dye and resin beads were shown to be the adsorption mechanism.

  10. Kinetics of isotopic exchange between strontium polymolybdate and strontium ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atun, Gulten; Bilgin, Binay; Kilislioglu, Ayben

    2002-01-01

    A heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction of strontium polymolybdate in strontium chloride solution was studied using 90 Sr as a tracer. The effects of low and high strontium chloride concentration on the rate and mechanism of the isotopic exchange reaction were investigated. It was found that, at high concentrations, the rate is independent of strontium concentration, but, at low concentrations, the rate is proportional to the strontium concentration. These results support a hypothesis that, at low concentrations, the rate is controlled by film diffusion, whereas at high concentrations it is controlled by particle diffusion. Experiments were performed at 293, 303 and 313 K. Activation energy of isotopic exchange reaction and thermodynamic parameters ΔH*, ΔS*, and ΔG* were calculated using the Arrhenius and Eyring equations. The results also indicated that recrystallization is a predominant factor in the present exchange reaction

  11. Kinetics of isotopic exchange between strontium polymolybdate and strontium ions in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atun, Gulten E-mail: gultena@istanbul.edu.tr; Bilgin, Binay; Kilislioglu, Ayben

    2002-06-01

    A heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction of strontium polymolybdate in strontium chloride solution was studied using {sup 90}Sr as a tracer. The effects of low and high strontium chloride concentration on the rate and mechanism of the isotopic exchange reaction were investigated. It was found that, at high concentrations, the rate is independent of strontium concentration, but, at low concentrations, the rate is proportional to the strontium concentration. These results support a hypothesis that, at low concentrations, the rate is controlled by film diffusion, whereas at high concentrations it is controlled by particle diffusion. Experiments were performed at 293, 303 and 313 K. Activation energy of isotopic exchange reaction and thermodynamic parameters {delta}H*, {delta}S*, and {delta}G* were calculated using the Arrhenius and Eyring equations. The results also indicated that recrystallization is a predominant factor in the present exchange reaction.

  12. The broad component of hydrogen emission lines in nuclei of Seyfert galaxies: Comments on a charge exchange model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, A.

    1975-01-01

    A model to account for the broad hydrogen line emission from the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies based on charge exchange and collisional processes, as proposed by Ptak and Stoner, is investigated. The model consists of a source of fast (E approx. 10 5 eV) protons streaming through a medium of quiescent gas. One of the major problems that results from such a model concerns the strong narrow hydrogen line core that would be produced, in direct conflict with the observations. The lines cannot arise from gas arranged throughout a spherical volume surrounding the source of the fast particles because the fast protons would produce far more ionizations than the possible number of recombinations. A very dense shell source of less than 1 AU in thickness and at least several tens of parsecs in radius must be invoked to reproduce the asymmetric broad profiles observed. There must be absorption throughout the center of the shell to account for the line profiles. The gas cannot be arranged in dense clumps throughout a large volume because momentum exchange of the gas with the primary particles would quickly accelerate any clumps. The energy balance and energy requirements of such a model are investigated, and it is found that an energy equal to or greater than the total luminosity of most Seyfert galaxies is required to produce the hydrogen line alone. The gas must be mostly neutral and den []e (N approx. 10 7 ) if a reasonable temperature is to be maintained

  13. Improvement of thermal exchange between feedstock and effluent in a hydrocarbon processing unit under hydrogen atmosphere by partial recycling of the product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orieux, A.

    1990-01-19

    Heat exchange is improved in light naphta hydroisomerization and catalytic reforming by recirculation of a part of the product in the thermal exchange zone at a temperature higher than the dew point of the effluent under hydrogen atmosphere and preferentially as a temperature lower than the temperature of the recycled product.

  14. Theory of kinetics and equilibrium of ion exchange-adsorption and mechanism of extracting uranium from sea-water with titanic gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai Hongtao

    1989-01-01

    An isothermal equation for ion exchange-adsorption is derived by mass action law. The equation can be used to sum up empirical and semiempirical formulas of the exchange adsorption, such as Gapon Equation, Sips Formula, Langmuir Equation and Freundlich Formula. In this paper, by adopting the ion exchange reaction to act as the determining step of the ion exchange adsorption kinetics, and exchange-adsorption kinetics equation is derived. It is verified by he results of a series of experiments in which uranium is extracted form enriched sea-water and natural sea-water with hydrous titanium oxide (titanic gel). This equation can be used to explain not only the results of test which have been applied to prove fast intraparticle diffusion of liquid film deffusion mechanism, but also test data which can be expalined by the co-controlling fast intraparticle and liquid film diffusion, and the kinetic data which can not be clarified by diffusion mechanism. It is proposed that the mechanism of the exchange adsorption of uranium from sea-water with titanic gel is a cationic exchange reaction. A method for calculating the quantity of exchange-adsorption at equilibrium is also given

  15. FUNDAMENTAL KINETICS OF SUPERCRITICAL COAL LIQUEFACTION: EFFECT OF CATALYSTS AND HYDROGEN-DONOR SOLVENTS; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin J. McCoy; J.M. Smith

    1998-01-01

    This report outlines a distribution kinetics approach to macromolecular reactions that has been applied to several processes. The objective was to develop an understanding of high-temperature, dense-phase thermolytic processes for complex macromolecular systems, such as coal. Experiments and theory are described for chemical models that simulate depolymerization of coal. The approach has been exceptionally successful for the model macromolecular systems. Development of a novel chemical reaction engineering analysis, based on distribution kinetics, was a major accomplishment of the current research

  16. Probing the hydrogen equilibrium and kinetics in zeolite imidazolate frameworks via molecular dynamics and quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantatosaki, Evangelia; Jobic, Hervé; Kolokolov, Daniil I; Karmakar, Shilpi; Biniwale, Rajesh; Papadopoulos, George K

    2013-01-21

    The problem of simulating processes involving equilibria and dynamics of guest sorbates within zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIF) by means of molecular dynamics (MD) computer experiments is of growing importance because of the promising role of ZIFs as molecular "traps" for clean energy applications. A key issue for validating such an atomistic modeling attempt is the possibility of comparing the MD results, with real experiments being able to capture analogous space and time scales to the ones pertained to the computer experiments. In the present study, this prerequisite is fulfilled through the quasi-elastic neutron scattering technique (QENS) for measuring self-diffusivity, by elaborating the incoherent scattering signal of hydrogen nuclei. QENS and MD experiments were performed in parallel to probe the hydrogen motion, for the first time in ZIF members. The predicted and measured dynamics behaviors show considerable concentration variation of the hydrogen self-diffusion coefficient in the two topologically different ZIF pore networks of this study, the ZIF-3 and ZIF-8. Modeling options such as the flexibility of the entire matrix versus a rigid framework version, the mobility of the imidazolate ligand, and the inclusion of quantum mechanical effects in the potential functions were examined in detail for the sorption thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen and also of deuterium, by employing MD combined with Widom averaging towards studying phase equilibria. The latter methodology ensures a rigorous and efficient way for post-processing the dynamics trajectory, thereby avoiding stochastic moves via Monte Carlo simulation, over the large number of configurational degrees of freedom a nonrigid framework encompasses.

  17. Measurement of backbone hydrogen-deuterium exchange in the type III secretion system needle protein PrgI by solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2017-10-01

    In this report we present site-specific measurements of amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates in a protein in the solid state phase by MAS NMR. Employing perdeuteration, proton detection and a high external magnetic field we could adopt the highly efficient Relax-EXSY protocol previously developed for liquid state NMR. According to this method, we measured the contribution of hydrogen exchange on apparent 15N longitudinal relaxation rates in samples with differing D2O buffer content. Differences in the apparent T1 times allowed us to derive exchange rates for multiple residues in the type III secretion system needle protein.

  18. Enzymatic exchange of sulphur between cysteine and hydrogen sulphide in the yolk sac of an incubated bird's egg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapeville, F.; Fromageot, P.

    1960-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the formation of cysteic acid from sulphate in incubated hen's eggs is due to the following reactions: a) reduction of sulphate to sulphite by the yolk sac endoderm cells; b) synthesis of cysteic acid from the sulphite in the presence of cysteine with liberation of hydrogen sulphide: HS-CH 2 -CH(NH 2 )-COOH + SO 3 H - → H 2 S + - O 3 S-CH 2 -CH(NH 2 )-COOH (1). The enzymatic system responsible for this reaction is localized on the yolk sac endoderm and in the yolk. It may be wondered whether reaction (1) is not made up of two consecutive reactions, one of which is reversible: HS-CH 2 -CH(NH 2 )-COOH ↔ H 2 S + organic chain (2) and organic chain + SO 3 H - → - O 3 S-CH 2 -CH(NH 2 )-COOH (3). It would then be clear why the addition of sulphite displaces the equilibrium towards the production of cysteic acid and hydrogen sulphide. If this is the case, the addition of ordinary cysteine and of marked hydrogen sulphide to the biological medium should make it possible to detect the formation of 35 S cysteine. The present work shows that the desulphurization of the cysteine (reaction 2) by the yolk sac + the yolk is in fact a reversible reaction, and that an enzymatic exchange occurs between the sulphur of the cysteine and that of the hydrogen sulphide. (author) [fr

  19. Maximum Potential Hydrogen Gas Retention in the sRF Resin Ion Exchange Column for the LAWPS Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wells, Beric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bottenus, Courtney LH [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schonewill, Philip P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The Low-Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) is being developed to provide treated supernatant liquid from the Hanford tank farms directly to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The design and development of the LAWPS is being conducted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC. A key process in LAWPS is the removal of radioactive Cs in ion exchange (IX) columns filled with spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. One accident scenario being evaluated is the loss of liquid flow through the sRF resin bed after it has been loaded with radioactive Cs and hydrogen gas is being generated by radiolysis. In normal operations, the generated hydrogen is expected to remain dissolved in the liquid and be continuously removed by liquid flow. For an accident scenario with a loss of flow, hydrogen gas can be retained within the IX column both in the sRF resin and below the bottom screen that supports the resin within the column. The purpose of this report is to summarize calculations that estimate the upper-bound volume of hydrogen gas that can be retained in the column and potentially be released to the headspace of the IX column or to process equipment connected to the IX column and, thus, pose a flammability hazard.

  20. Kinetics of electrophilic exchange of lanthanide(3) and copper(2) ions in aqueous solutions of ethylenediaminetetraacetates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, S.I.; Martynenko, L.I.; Pechurova, N.I.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    Electrophilic exchange in the MA - - Cu 2+ (M 3+ =La 3+ , P 2 3+ , Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ , Gd 3+ , Tb 3+ , Er 3+ , Yb 3+ , A 4- =ethylenediaminetetraacetate) systems is studied. Copper is chosen as a constituent cation, because the stability of the CuA 2+ - complex is higher than that of the MA - complex, besides the CuA 2- , is characterized by a high extinction coefficient E 280 =3200. Electrophilic exchange in the systems is shown to be realized through the acid dissociation mechanism and through the association mechanism. Consideration of the acid dissociation mechanism assumes that the exchange is limited by a break in the metal-oxygen bond in the intermediate protonated complex. In case of the association mechanism it is limited by a break in the metal-nitrogen bond in the intermediate binuclear complex. Rate constants of the limiting stage are calculated. Dependences of the rate constants of exchange on the stability of the complexes, the order number of the element, acidity of medium, Cu 2+ concentration are given. Differences are shown to exist between the exchange mechanisms in the studied: systems for the REE of cerium and yttrium subgroups

  1. Roles of Bulk and Surface Chemistry in the Oxygen Exchange Kinetics and Related Properties of Mixed Conducting Perovskite Oxide Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola H. Perry

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mixed conducting perovskite oxides and related structures serving as electrodes for electrochemical oxygen incorporation and evolution in solid oxide fuel and electrolysis cells, respectively, play a significant role in determining the cell efficiency and lifetime. Desired improvements in catalytic activity for rapid surface oxygen exchange, fast bulk transport (electronic and ionic, and thermo-chemo-mechanical stability of oxygen electrodes will require increased understanding of the impact of both bulk and surface chemistry on these properties. This review highlights selected work at the International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (I2CNER, Kyushu University, set in the context of work in the broader community, aiming to characterize and understand relationships between bulk and surface composition and oxygen electrode performance. Insights into aspects of bulk point defect chemistry, electronic structure, crystal structure, and cation choice that impact carrier concentrations and mobilities, surface exchange kinetics, and chemical expansion coefficients are emerging. At the same time, an understanding of the relationship between bulk and surface chemistry is being developed that may assist design of electrodes with more robust surface chemistries, e.g., impurity tolerance or limited surface segregation. Ion scattering techniques (e.g., secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, or low energy ion scattering spectroscopy, LEIS with high surface sensitivity and increasing lateral resolution are proving useful for measuring surface exchange kinetics, diffusivity, and corresponding outer monolayer chemistry of electrodes exposed to typical operating conditions. Beyond consideration of chemical composition, the use of strain and/or a high density of active interfaces also show promise for enhancing performance.

  2. Combined Yamamoto approach for simultaneous estimation of adsorption isotherm and kinetic parameters in ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdt, Matthias; Gillet, Florian; Heege, Stefanie; Hitzler, Julian; Kalbfuss, Bernd; Guélat, Bertrand

    2015-09-25

    Application of model-based design is appealing to support the development of protein chromatography in the biopharmaceutical industry. However, the required efforts for parameter estimation are frequently perceived as time-consuming and expensive. In order to speed-up this work, a new parameter estimation approach for modelling ion-exchange chromatography in linear conditions was developed. It aims at reducing the time and protein demand for the model calibration. The method combines the estimation of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters based on the simultaneous variation of the gradient slope and the residence time in a set of five linear gradient elutions. The parameters are estimated from a Yamamoto plot and a gradient-adjusted Van Deemter plot. The combined approach increases the information extracted per experiment compared to the individual methods. As a proof of concept, the combined approach was successfully applied for a monoclonal antibody on a cation-exchanger and for a Fc-fusion protein on an anion-exchange resin. The individual parameter estimations for the mAb confirmed that the new approach maintained the accuracy of the usual Yamamoto and Van Deemter plots. In the second case, offline size-exclusion chromatography was performed in order to estimate the thermodynamic parameters of an impurity (high molecular weight species) simultaneously with the main product. Finally, the parameters obtained from the combined approach were used in a lumped kinetic model to simulate the chromatography runs. The simulated chromatograms obtained for a wide range of gradient lengths and residence times showed only small deviations compared to the experimental data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Preparation and hydrogen-deuterium exchange of alkyl and hydride bis(trimethylsilyl)amido derivatives of the actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, S.J.; Turner, H.W.; Andersen, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The monomeric, hydrocarbon-soluble monohydrides and monodeuterides of the actinide metals (thorium or uranium) of the type HM[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 have been prepared. Their reaction chemistry - n-BuLi followed by MeBr yields MeM[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 and borane in tetrahydrofuran yields BH 4 M[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 - suggests that the hydrogen atom is hydridic. Pyrolysis of the hydrides yields the novel, four-membered ring metallacycle [(Me 3 Si) 2 N] 2 MCH 2 Si(Me) 2 NSiMe 3 where M is Th or U. These metallacycles are the key intermediates in the hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction that yields ([CD 3 ) 3 Si] 2 N) 3 MD

  4. Hydrogen kinetics studies of MgH2-FeTi composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Priyanka; Jangir, Mukesh; Singh, Ramvir; Sharma, V. K.; Jain, I. P.

    2018-05-01

    MgH2 + x wt% FeTi (x=10, 25, 50) nano composites were ball milled to get nano structured material and characterized for structural, morphological and thermal properties. XRD of the milled samples revealed the formation of MgH2, FeTi, Fe2Ti and H0.06FeTi phases. Morphological studies by SEM were undertaken to investigate the effect of hydrogenation of nanostructure alloy. EDX confirmed elemental composition of the as-prepared alloy. TGA studies showed higher desorption temperature for milled MgH2 compared to x wt% FeTi added MgH2. Activation energy for hydrogen desorption was found to be -177.90, -215.69, -162.46 and -87.93 kJ/mol for milled MgH2 and Mg2+x wt% FeTi (10, 25, 50), showing 89.97 kJ/ mol reduction in activation energy for 50 wt% alloy additives resulting in improved hydrogen storage capacity. DSC investigations were carried out to investigate the effect of alloy on hydrogen absorption behavior of MgH2.

  5. Qualitative relations between the kinetics of sintering in hydrogen and the observed microstructures of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, B.; Delmas, R.; Caillat, F.; Lacombe, P.

    1975-01-01

    The microscopic study of uranium dioxide sintered in hydrogen, together with density measurements, shows on the one hand that the large scale appearance of pores trapped at the grain boundaries in the course of sintering has the effect of practically stopping densification, and on the other hand that this particular microstructure is stable over a wide range of time and temperature. (author)

  6. Stomatal clustering in Begonia associates with the kinetics of leaf gaseous exchange and influences water use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanatsiou, Maria; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R

    2017-04-01

    Stomata are microscopic pores formed by specialized cells in the leaf epidermis and permit gaseous exchange between the interior of the leaf and the atmosphere. Stomata in most plants are separated by at least one epidermal pavement cell and, individually, overlay a single substomatal cavity within the leaf. This spacing is thought to enhance stomatal function. Yet, there are several genera naturally exhibiting stomata in clusters and therefore deviating from the one-cell spacing rule with multiple stomata overlaying a single substomatal cavity. We made use of two Begonia species to investigate whether clustering of stomata alters guard cell dynamics and gas exchange under different light and dark treatments. Begonia plebeja, which forms stomatal clusters, exhibited enhanced kinetics of stomatal conductance and CO2 assimilation upon light stimuli that in turn were translated into greater water use efficiency. Our findings emphasize the importance of spacing in stomatal clusters for gaseous exchange and plant performance under environmentally limited conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  7. Kinetics and the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide removal by biochar derived from rice hull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Guofeng; Liu, Liang; Chen, Ping; Shen, Guoqing; Li, Qiwu

    2016-05-01

    The biochar derived from rice hull was evaluated for its abilities to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The biochar derived from rice hull was evaluated for its abilities to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The different pyrolysis temperature has great influence on the adsorption of H2S. At the different pyrolysis temperature, the H2S removal efficiency of rice hull-derived biochar was different. The adsorption capacities of biochar were 2.09 mg·g(-1), 2.65 mg·g(-1), 16.30 mg·g(-1), 20.80 mg·g(-1), and 382.70 mg·g(-1), which their pyrolysis temperatures were 100 °C, 200 °C, 300 °C, 400 °C and 500 °C respectively. Based on the Yoon-Nelson model, it analyzed the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochar. The paper focuses on the biochar derived from rice hull-removed hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The different pyrolysis temperatures have great influence on the adsorption of H2S. At the different pyrolysis temperatures, the H2S removal efficiency of rice hull-derived biohar was different. The adsorption capacities of biochar were 2.09, 2.65, 16.30, 20.80, and 382.70 mg·g(-1), and their pyrolysis temperatures were 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 °C, respectively. Based on the Yoon-Nelson model, the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochar was analyzed.

  8. Rapid Conformational Analysis of Protein Drugs in Formulation by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esmail Nazari, Zeinab; van de Weert, Marco; Bou-Assaf, George

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange coupled to Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS) has become an established method for analysis of protein higher-order structure. Here, we use HDX-MS methodology based on manual Solid-Phase Extraction (SPE) to allow fast and simplified conformational analysis of proteins under...... pharmaceutically relevant formulation conditions. Of significant practical utility, the methodology allows global HDX-MS analyses to be performed without refrigeration or external cooling of the setup. In Mode 1, we used DMSO-containing solvents for SPE, allowing the HDX-MS analysis to be performed at acceptable...... in formulation, using an internal HDX reference peptide (P7I) to control for any sample-to-sample variations in back exchange. Advantages of the methodology include low sample use, optimized excipient removal using multiple solvents, and fast data acquisition. Our results indicate that the SPE-HDX-MS system can...

  9. Investigating the Interaction between the Neonatal Fc Receptor and Monoclonal Antibody Variants by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Larraillet, Vincent; Schlothauer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    The recycling of immunoglobulins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is of crucial importance in the maintenance of antibody levels in plasma and is responsible for the long half-lives of endogenous and recombinant monoclonal antibodies. From a therapeutic point of view there is great interest...... in understanding and modulating the IgG-FcRn interaction to optimize antibody pharmacokinetics and ultimately improve efficacy and safety. Here we studied the interaction between a full-length human IgG1 and human FcRn via hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and targeted electron transfer dissociation...... to map sites perturbed by binding on both partners of the IgG-FcRn complex. Several regions in the antibody Fc region and the FcRn were protected from exchange upon complex formation, in good agreement with previous crystallographic studies of FcRn in complex with the Fc fragment. Interestingly, we found...

  10. Using a Potassium Acetate Solution for Cooling High Pressure Hydrogen in a Prototype Heat Exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Abel, M.; Rokni, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    is to be delivered at high pressure a heat exchanger was designed and constructed. The paper presents a detailed study of construction of the heat exchanger which has been tested and compared to theory to predict and verify its performance. The method presented by Nellis and Klein for laminar flow in annulus tubes...

  11. Exchange and polarization effects in the elementary excitation spectrum of a hydrogen atom immersed in a hot plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharma-wardana, M.W.C.; Grimaldi, F.; Lecourt, A.; Pellissier, J.

    1980-01-01

    The one-particle hydrogenic Green's function has been calculated for a partially ionized plasma consisting of hydrogen atoms, electrons, and protons at high temperatures. The theoretical method extends a previous publication and involves an evaluation of the mass operator in the Dyson equation to include proper self-energy parts to ''all orders'' in the screened interaction. This mass operator characterizes the effective micropotential felt by the atom in the plasma and determines all of the one-particle properties and some two-particle properties associated with the atomic subsystem. The first-order mass operator is nonzero only for exchange scattering, which leads to a frequency-independent exchange shift. This temperature- and density-dependent theory of the exchange shift replaces the usual semiphenomenological schemes based on the Slater-Kohn-Sham type of theory. The exchange-shifted Green's functions are used in evaluating the higher-order contributions. Computer calculations and the resolution of the poles of the Green's function lead to level shifts, widths, and spectral functions. These are calculated within both the second-order and the all-order theory. The second-order theory, which may be valid at sufficiently high densities and in turbulent plasmas, overemphasises the atom-plasmon coupling and shows new structures. The inclusion of contributions beyond second order removes these structures and produces a more ''conventional'' spectral-intensity function. The effects of center-of-mass motion on the level shifts and level profiles are investigated and the onset of plasma instabilities touched upon. These calculations make contact with the work on ''plasma-polarization shifts'' and provide an approach to q,ω-dependent plasma microfields

  12. Oxygen isotope exchange kinetics between coexistent minerals and water in the Ertaibei granite pluton, northern Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 李志安; 赵志忠

    1996-01-01

    Coexistent minerals quartz, feldspar and biotite vary widely in δ18O value and display remarkable 18O/16O disequilibrium relations in the Ertaibei granite pluton, northern Xinjiang. The 18O/16O exchange reaction definitely occurred between granite and water. Initial δ18O values of the granite and exotic water are evaluated by the mass balance consideration. The results show that the 18O/16O exchange reaction is not necessarily accompanied by what geologists describe as petrological and mineralogiesl alteration effects, indicating that the exchange reaction occurs at a comparatively high temperature during subsolidus cooling of magmas. Exchange mechanism is mainly controlled by diffusion. It is demonstrated through quantitative modelling that the hydrothermal system associated with the Ertaibei pluton lived for 0.8-3 Ma, with a fluid flow rate of 3 × 10-14 mol · s-1 and water/rock (W/R) ratio of 0.79 - 3.08. Flow path and initial heterogeneity of the exotic metamorphic fluid are modelled with the δ1

  13. Complex ion kinetics. Reaction rates on ion-exchange resins compared to those in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liss, I.B.; Murmann, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison has been made between the rates in water and on an ion-exchange resin for the aquation of [(NH 3 ) 5 CoOReO 3 ] 2+ and [(H 2 O) 5 CrCl] 2+ and for the 18 O isotopic exchange of water with [(NH 3 ) 5 Co(OH 2 )] 3+ and ReO 4 - . The rate of water exchange on [(NH 3 ) 5 Co(OH 2 )] 3+ was not changed by association with Dowex 50W resins. Aquation of [(NH 3 ) 5 CoOReO 3 ] 2+ and water exchange on ReO 4 - had modified pH dependencies when associated with a resin. With the cobalt complex the rates were faster on the resin in the acidic region and slower on the resin in the basic region. A new term in the rate equation was observed when ReO 4 - was on the resin, first order in H + , while the other terms appear to be unchanged. Aquation of [(H 2 O) 5 CrCl] 2+ was much slower when it was absorbed on the resin. This was related to the known ionic strength effect of the reaction. (auth)

  14. Analytical Description of the H/D Exchange Kinetic of Macromolecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Kononikhin, Alexey; Popov, Igor; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2018-04-17

    We present the accurate analytical solution obtained for the system of rate equations describing the isotope exchange process for molecules containing an arbitrary number of equivalent labile atoms. The exact solution was obtained using Mathematica 7.0 software, and this solution has the form of the time-dependent Gaussian distribution. For the case when forward exchange considerably overlaps the back exchange, it is possible to estimate the activation energy of the reaction by obtaining a temperature dependence of the reaction degree. Using a previously developed approach for performing H/D exchange directly in the ESI source, we have estimated the activation energies for ions with different functional groups and they were found to be in a range 0.04-0.3 eV. Since the value of the activation energy depends on the type of functional group, the developed approach can have potential analytical applications for determining types of functional groups in complex mixtures, such as petroleum, humic substances, bio-oil, and so on.

  15. Kinetics of the homogeneous exchange of alpha-lactalbumin adsorbed on titanium oxide surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentaleb, A; Haïkel, Y; Voegel, J C; Schaaf, P

    1998-06-05

    The homogeneous exchange process whereby alpha-lactalbumine molecules adsorbed on hydrophilic titanium oxide particles are replaced by alpha-lactalbumine molecules in solution has been investigated by means of a 125I radio-labeling technique, alpha-lactalbumine is a compact and highly negatively charged protein, making this study complementary to previous work devoted to the general understanding of the exchange mechanisms of adsorbed proteins on solid surfaces. The isotherm of alpha-lactalbumine exhibits bimodal adsorption shape, and the exchange process whereby adsorbed proteins are replaced by new incoming ones from the bulk solution has been studied at both the upper and the lower plateau of the isotherm. In the upper plateau the exchange process was found to be of first order with respect to the bulk molecules, and the release rate constant was equal to 0.914 L. mol-1.s-1. This behavior is identical to what has been observed with other proteinic systems. In the lower plateau domain, in contrast, the protein release process is independent of the concentration of proteins in the bulk, but the release rates are higher than the pure desorption rates. This constitutes, to our knowledge, a behavior that never before has been observed and that remains to be explained.

  16. Working-state Morphologies of Ion Exchange Catalysts and Their Influence on Reaction Kinetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeřábek, Karel; Hanková, Libuše; Holub, Ladislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 333, 1-2 (2010), s. 109-113 ISSN 1381-1169 Grant - others:DCH(US) BD20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ion exchanger catalyst * morphology * esterification Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.872, year: 2010

  17. Ortho-para forms of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium: radiation and self-induced conversion kinetics and equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyper, J.W.; Briggs, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    The theory of the ortho-para transitions in H 2 , D 2 , and T 2 is developed. Experimental and calculated values of the ortho-para compositions of the three hydrogen isotopes mentioned in the literature are correlated as a function of temperature, and are discussed critically. The kinetics of the radiation and self-induced ortho-para transitions are reviewed. In general, the radiation-induced transitions are more rapid than the self-induced transitions. We estimate (based on data for other systems) that the β-ray-induced ortho-para transitions in liquid D 2 or T 2 would be fast, with a half time on the order of a few minutes. Experiments are proposed to study these transitions in the liquid phase using infrared spectroscopy

  18. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernusca, S.; Winter, H.P.; Aumayr, F.; Diez Muino, R.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy <10 keV) on atomically clean surfaces of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to 'projectile molecular effects' (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials

  19. Annealing Kinetic Model Using Fast and Slow Metastable Defects for Hydrogenated-Amorphous-Silicon-Based Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Yeop Myong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-component kinetic model employing “fast” and “slow” metastable defects for the annealing behaviors in pin-type hydrogenated-amorphous-silicon- (a-Si:H- based solar cells is simulated using a normalized fill factor. Reported annealing data on pin-type a-Si:H-based solar cells are revisited and fitted using the model to confirm its validity. It is verified that the two-component model is suitable for fitting the various experimental phenomena. In addition, the activation energy for annealing of the solar cells depends on the definition of the recovery time. From the thermally activated and high electric field annealing behaviors, the plausible microscopic mechanism on the defect removal process is discussed.

  20. Swelling and hydrolysis kinetics of Kraft pulp fibers in aqueous 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jia; Abushammala, Hatem; Pereira, Laura Barcellos; Laborie, Marie-Pierre

    2016-11-20

    1Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([Bmim]HSO4) is efficient at extracting cellulose nanocrystals from pulp fibers. To shed some light on the respective contributions of swelling and hydrolysis of pulp fibers by [Bmim]HSO4, the physical, structural and morphological characteristics of hardwood Kraft pulp fibers were monitored under various conditions of temperature, water content and time. Swelling was largely compounded by hydrolysis at the highest temperatures (120°C) as evidenced by mass loss and reduced degree of polymerization (DPn) at this temperature. At 120°C only, water content appeared to play a significant role on the extent of hydrolysis. At this temperature, a heterogeneous kinetic model involving weak links and amorphous regions best described the experimental data. Hydrolysis rates were maximum at 25% water content in the aqueous ionic liquid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    CERN Document Server

    Cernusca, S; Aumayr, F; Diez-Muino, R; Juaristi, J I

    2003-01-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy <10 keV) on atomically clean surfaces of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to 'projectile molecular effects' (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials.

  2. Investigation on hydrogen permeation on heat exchanger materials in conditions of steam coal gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moellenhoff, H.

    1984-01-01

    The permeation of hydrogen through iron-based alloys of different compositions in the temperature range between 700 and 1000 0 C was examined in a laboratory fluidized bed in the conditions of steam/coal gasification. Apart from tests on bright metal samples, measurement in the gasification atmosphere at a maximum pressure of 1 bar were carried out during oxidation of the metal. Experiments in a steam/hydrogen/argon mixture with the same oxidation potential were used for comparison purposes. The hydrogen permeated through the metal sample was taken to a gas chromatograph with argon flushing gas and analyzed there. The investigations on bright steel samples of various composition showed that their permeabilities for hydrogen at temperatures around 900 0 C only differed by a maximum of ± 30%. Effective prevention of permeation is therefore not possible simply by choosing a suitable alloy. If the steels are oxidized during permeation measurements, there is a reduction of the hydrogen permeability by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude due to the oxidation process, both in the steam/coal gasification fluidized bed and in a pure steam/hydrogen/argon mixture. (orig./GG) [de

  3. Measuring oxygen surface exchange kinetics on mixed-conducting composites by electrical conductivity relaxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Bobing; Wang, Yunlong; Zhu, Zhuoying; Xia, Changrong; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The oxygen release kinetics of mixed-conducting Sr2Fe1.5Mo0.5O6 d–Sm0.2Ce0.8O2 d (SFM–SDC) dualphase composites has been investigated, at 750 C, as a function of the SDC phase volume fraction using electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR) under reducing atmospheres, extending our previous work on

  4. Application of tracer isotope in kinetic study of first order ion exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhande, R.S.; Singare, P.U.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of first order ion exchange reaction rates at different temperatures (27 deg- 48 degC) and particularly at low concentration of potassium iodide solution (electrolyte) ranging from 0.005 M to 0.040 M is carried out by application of radioactive tracer isotope 131 I. With increase in concentration of electrolyte, amount of iodide ion exchanged in millimoles increases. Specific reaction rates of ion exchange reaction are calculated for different temperatures and for different amount of ion exchange resins. It is observed that with increase in temperature, reaction rate increases but the increase is more pronounced for increase in amount of ion exchange resins. For 0.005 M solution of electrolyte, the reaction rate increases from 0.121 min -1 at 27 degC to 0.178 min -1 at 48 degC. For 0.005 M solution of electrolyte the reaction rate increases from 0.121 min -1 at 27 degC to 0.178 min 1 at 48 degC. For 0.005 M solution of electrolyte at 27 degC the reaction rate increases from 0.121 min -1 for 1.0 g of resin to 0.368 min -1 for 5.0 g of resin. From the reaction rates calculated at different temperatures, energy of activation in kJ/mole is calculated. It is observed that for 0.005 M solution of electrolyte, energy of activation is 4.62 kJ/mole which decreases to 2.87 kJ/mole for increase in concentration of electrolyte to 0.100 M. (author)

  5. Kinetic Studies on Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Oxidation of Glucose, Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide and Their Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhimin; Raffel, Ryan A.; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Goodisman, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of the glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction of glucose with O2, which produces gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the catalase-assisted breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen, have been measured via the rate of O2 depletion or production. The O2 concentrations in air-saturated phosphate-buffered salt solutions were monitored by measuring the decay of phosphorescence from a Pd phosphor in solution; the decay rate was obtained by fitting the tail of the phosphorescence intensity profile to an exponential. For glucose oxidation in the presence of glucose oxidase, the rate constant determined for the rate-limiting step was k = (3.0 ± 0.7) ×104 M−1s−1 at 37°C. For catalase-catalyzed H2O2 breakdown, the reaction order in [H2O2] was somewhat greater than unity at 37°C and well above unity at 25°C, suggesting different temperature dependences of the rate constants for various steps in the reaction. The two reactions were combined in a single experiment: addition of glucose oxidase to glucose-rich cell-free media caused a rapid drop in [O2], and subsequent addition of catalase caused [O2] to rise and then decrease to zero. The best fit of [O2] to a kinetic model is obtained with the rate constants for glucose oxidation and peroxide decomposition equal to 0.116 s−1 and 0.090 s−1 respectively. Cellular respiration in the presence of glucose was found to be three times as rapid as that in glucose-deprived cells. Added NaCN inhibited O2 consumption completely, confirming that oxidation occurred in the cellular mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:19348778

  6. Hydrogen/Oxygen Reactions at High Pressures and Intermediate Temperatures: Flow Reactor Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Glarborg, Peter

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations into hydrogen oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures has been conducted. The experiments were carried out in a high pressure laminar flow reactor at 50 bar pressure and a temperature range of 600–900 K. The equivalence ratio......, the mechanism is used to simulate published data on ignition delay time and laminar burning velocity of hydrogen. The flow reactor results show that at reducing, stoichiometric, and oxidizing conditions, conversion starts at temperatures of 750–775 K, 800–825 K, and 800–825 K, respectively. In oxygen atmosphere......, ignition occurs at the temperature of 775–800 K. In general, the present model provides a good agreement with the measurements in the flow reactor and with recent data on laminar burning velocity and ignition delay time....

  7. Kinetic analysis of the reactivity of aromatic amino acids in the T-for-H exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Akira; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Sato, Takayuki; Kano, Naoki

    2009-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the influence of tritium ( 3 H or T) on ecosystem, the hydrogen isotope exchange reaction (T-for-H exchange reaction) between each aromatic amino acid (L-tyrosine, L-phenylalanine, or L-2-phenylglycine) and HTO vapor was observed at 50-70degC in the gas-solid system. Applying the A''-McKay plot method to data (obtained in the exchange reaction), the rate constants (k) of functional groups of each aromatic amino acid in this reaction was obtained. Comparing the rate constants, following six matters have been found in the T-for-H exchange reaction. (1) The reactivity of the functional groups in each amino acid increases with increasing temperature. (2) The reactivity of the functional groups of the amino acids (used) increases in the order of L-tyrosine, L-phenylalanine, and L-2-phenylglycine. (3) As to l-tyrosine, 1) the temperature dependence of each functional group increases in the order of COOH group, OH one, and NH 2 one, 2) the reactivity of OH group is 3.8 times greater than that of NH 2 one, and 3) the reactivity of COOH group is 2.0 times greater than NH 2 one. (4) As to the influence of the substituent, the reactivity of NH 2 group is larger than that of the COOH one. (5) Using the A''-McKay plot method, the reactivity of each functional group in an amino acid can be nondestructively and simultaneously clarified without using masking reagent. (6) The results obtained in this work is useful for preventing T contamination and for evaluating the influence of T on environment. (author)

  8. Beneficial effect of carbon on hydrogen desorption kinetics from Mg–Ni–In alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 546, JAN (2013), s. 129-137 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068; GA ČR GA106/09/0814; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Energy storage materials * Hydrogen absorbing materials * Metal hydrides Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 2.726, year: 2013

  9. A Kinetic Study of a Homodienyl-[1,5]-Hydrogen Shift in a Vinylaziridine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, David Ackland; Hussenius, Anita; Somfai, Peter

    1996-01-01

    The thermal rearrangement of an N-substituted vinylaziridine to the corresponding Z-allylic amine, i.e. a homodienyl-[1,5]-hydrogen shift was studied at various temperatures in the reange 40 90 oC, and NMR spectroscopy was used to follow the reactiuon. The activation enthalpiies and entropies...... measured clearly indicate a concerted mechanism for the rearrangement, via a cyclic transition state....

  10. The kinetics of Cr layer coated on TiNi films for hydrogen absorption

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of hydrogen absorption on electrical resistance with temperature for TiNi and TiNi–Cr thin films was investigated. The TiNi thin films of thickness 800 Å were deposited at different angles ( = 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 75°) under 10−5 Torr pressure by thermal evaporation on the glass substrate at room temperature.

  11. One-step reduced kinetics for lean hydrogen-air deflagration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Galisteo, D.; Sanchez, A.L. [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Univ. Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes 28911 (Spain); Linan, A. [ETSI Aeronauticos, Pl. Cardenal Cisneros 3, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Williams, F.A. [Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    A short mechanism consisting of seven elementary reactions, of which only three are reversible, is shown to provide good predictions of hydrogen-air lean-flame burning velocities. This mechanism is further simplified by noting that over a range of conditions of practical interest, near the lean flammability limit all reaction intermediaries have small concentrations in the important thin reaction zone that controls the hydrogen-air laminar burning velocity and therefore follow a steady state approximation, while the main species react according to the global irreversible reaction 2H{sub 2} + O{sub 2} {yields} 2H{sub 2}O. An explicit expression for the non-Arrhenius rate of this one-step overall reaction for hydrogen oxidation is derived from the seven-step detailed mechanism, for application near the flammability limit. The one-step results are used to calculate flammability limits and burning velocities of planar deflagrations. Furthermore, implications concerning radical profiles in the deflagration and reasons for the success of the approximations are clarified. It is also demonstrated that adding only two irreversible direct recombination steps to the seven-step mechanism accurately reproduces burning velocities of the full detailed mechanism for all equivalence ratios at normal atmospheric conditions and that an eight-step detailed mechanism, constructed from the seven-step mechanism by adding to it the fourth reversible shuffle reaction, improves predictions of O and OH profiles. The new reduced-chemistry descriptions can be useful for both analytical and computational studies of lean hydrogen-air flames, decreasing required computation times. (author)

  12. A study on the kinetics of hydrogen reduction of molybdenum disulphide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdi Afsahi, M.; Sohrabi, Morteza; Vasant Kumar, R.; Ale Ebrahim, Habib

    2008-01-01

    In order to achieve direct reduction of molybdenite in presence of a sulphur scavenger such as CaO such that SO 2 emission is completely avoided, it is important to maximise the rate of the partial reaction involving molybdenite and hydrogen (without lime) given the low thermodynamic driving force for this reaction. Accordingly, reaction of molybdenum disulphide powders with hydrogen was investigated by thermogravimetric method. Effect of temperature and concentration on the reaction rate was studied under such conditions that resistance to mass transfer arising from external film, between particles and intra-grain was negligible. The operating temperature ranged between 973 and 1173 K while the hydrogen concentration was varied between 30 and 100%. The experimental data obtained under the above conditions were analyzed by applying 'the shrinking unreacted core model'. The reduction reaction was found to be first order with respect to the gaseous reactant. Pre-exponential factor and activation energy have been determined to be 3.91 x 10 3 cm min -1 and 139.0 kJ mol -1 , respectively. Activation energy obtained from a fitted model, agreed well with the values determined from the model-free methods using isothermal measurements

  13. A study on the kinetics of hydrogen reduction of molybdenum disulphide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdi Afsahi, M. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tehran 15914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); University of Cambridge, Department of Materials Sciences and Metallurgy, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mma50@cam.ac.uk; Sohrabi, Morteza [Amirkabir University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tehran 15914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vasant Kumar, R. [University of Cambridge, Department of Materials Sciences and Metallurgy, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Ale Ebrahim, Habib [Amirkabir University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tehran 15914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-10

    In order to achieve direct reduction of molybdenite in presence of a sulphur scavenger such as CaO such that SO{sub 2} emission is completely avoided, it is important to maximise the rate of the partial reaction involving molybdenite and hydrogen (without lime) given the low thermodynamic driving force for this reaction. Accordingly, reaction of molybdenum disulphide powders with hydrogen was investigated by thermogravimetric method. Effect of temperature and concentration on the reaction rate was studied under such conditions that resistance to mass transfer arising from external film, between particles and intra-grain was negligible. The operating temperature ranged between 973 and 1173 K while the hydrogen concentration was varied between 30 and 100%. The experimental data obtained under the above conditions were analyzed by applying 'the shrinking unreacted core model'. The reduction reaction was found to be first order with respect to the gaseous reactant. Pre-exponential factor and activation energy have been determined to be 3.91 x 10{sup 3} cm min{sup -1} and 139.0 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. Activation energy obtained from a fitted model, agreed well with the values determined from the model-free methods using isothermal measurements.

  14. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li+ − BF4−/PF6− ion pairs in acetonitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li + and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around solvated Li + in acetonitrile (ACN), which is a common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li + -[BF 4 ] and Li + -[PF 6 ] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li + . We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with the transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux, Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches, and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li + -[BF 4 ] and Li + -[PF 6 ] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems.

  15. Kinetic study of the effects of calcium ions on cationic artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase: calcium binding, steady-state kinetics and reactions with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Sidrach, Lara; Chazarra, Soledad; Varón, Ramón; Tudela, José; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2004-01-01

    The apparent catalytic constant (k(cat)) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase (AKPC) with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) increased 130-fold in the presence of calcium ions (Ca2+) but the affinity (K(m)) of the enzyme for ABTS was 500 times lower than for Ca2+-free AKPC. AKPC is known to exhibit an equilibrium between 6-aquo hexa-coordinate and penta-coordinate forms of the haem iron that is modulated by Ca2+ and affects compound I formation. Measurements of the Ca2+ dissociation constant (K(D)) were complicated by the water-association/dissociation equilibrium yielding a global value more than 1000 times too high. The value for the Ca2+ binding step alone has now been determined to be K(D) approximately 10 nM. AKPC-Ca2+ was more resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and exhibited increased catalase activity. An analysis of the complex H(2)O(2) concentration dependent kinetics of Ca2+-free AKPC is presented.

  16. Isotope exchange kinetic of phosphorus in soils from Pernambuco State -Brazil; Cinetica de diluicao isotopica de fosforo em solos de Pernambuco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, F J.B. de

    1989-12-01

    The applicability of isotopic exchange kinetics of {sup 32} p to characterize phosphorus available to plants and to diagnose the reactivity of soil-fertilizer-P in six soils from Pernambuco is described. This methodology was compared with anion exchange resin, isotopic exchange equilibrium methods (E-value and L-value) and P absorption by plants. The first greenhouse experiment had the following treatments: (1) with P and, (2) with addition of 43.7 mg P/Kg of soil, incubated for O, 42 and 84 days before seeding. The kinetic of isotopic exchange (KIE), resin-P and E-value were determined before seeding and after harvesting pearl millet grown for 42 days. Results indicated that the KIE parameters rated the soils more efficiently, in terms of available P and soil-fertilizer-P reactivity, than resin-P, E-value and L-value. (author). 38 refs, 2 figs, 18 tabs.

  17. Hydrogen storage thermodynamics and kinetics of LaMg11Ni + x wt.% Ni (x = 100, 200) alloys synthesized by mechanical milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yanghuan; Jia, Zhichao; Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing; Yuan, Zeming; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Dongliang; Hou, Zhonghui

    2016-01-01

    LaMg 11 Ni + x wt.% Ni (x = 100, 200) composite hydrogen storage alloys with a nanocrystalline/amorphous structure were synthesized using ball milling technology. The effects of Ni content and milling time on hydrogen storage thermodynamics and dynamics of the alloys were investigated systematically. The hydrogen desorption properties were assessed using a Sieverts apparatus and differential scanning calorimetry. The thermodynamic parameters for the hydrogen absorption and desorption were calculated using the Van't Hoff equation. The hydrogen desorption activation energies of the hydrogenated alloys were also estimated by Arrhenius and Kissinger methods. Results indicate that the amount of Ni added has no effect on the thermodynamics of the alloys, but it significantly improves their absorption and desorption kinetics. Furthermore, the milling time has a great influence on the hydrogen storage properties. To be specific, the hydrogen absorption capacities reach the maximum values with the variation of milling time, and the hydrogen desorption activation energy obviously decreases with increasing milling time.

  18. High-yield hydrogen production from biomass by in vitro metabolic engineering: Mixed sugars coutilization and kinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A.; Martin del Campo, Julia; Myung, Suwan; Sun, Fangfang; You, Chun; Bakovic, Allison; Castro, Roberto; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W. W.; Senger, Ryan S.; Zhang, Y.-H. Percival

    2015-01-01

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a fuel offers enhanced energy conversion efficiency and tremendous potential to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, but producing it in a distributed, carbon-neutral, low-cost manner requires new technologies. Herein we demonstrate the complete conversion of glucose and xylose from plant biomass to H2 and CO2 based on an in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway. Glucose and xylose were simultaneously converted to H2 with a yield of two H2 per carbon, the maximum possible yield. Parameters of a nonlinear kinetic model were fitted with experimental data using a genetic algorithm, and a global sensitivity analysis was used to identify the enzymes that have the greatest impact on reaction rate and yield. After optimizing enzyme loadings using this model, volumetric H2 productivity was increased 3-fold to 32 mmol H2⋅L−1⋅h−1. The productivity was further enhanced to 54 mmol H2⋅L−1⋅h−1 by increasing reaction temperature, substrate, and enzyme concentrations—an increase of 67-fold compared with the initial studies using this method. The production of hydrogen from locally produced biomass is a promising means to achieve global green energy production. PMID:25848015

  19. High-yield hydrogen production from biomass by in vitro metabolic engineering: Mixed sugars coutilization and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A; Martin del Campo, Julia; Myung, Suwan; Sun, Fangfang; You, Chun; Bakovic, Allison; Castro, Roberto; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W W; Senger, Ryan S; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2015-04-21

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a fuel offers enhanced energy conversion efficiency and tremendous potential to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, but producing it in a distributed, carbon-neutral, low-cost manner requires new technologies. Herein we demonstrate the complete conversion of glucose and xylose from plant biomass to H2 and CO2 based on an in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway. Glucose and xylose were simultaneously converted to H2 with a yield of two H2 per carbon, the maximum possible yield. Parameters of a nonlinear kinetic model were fitted with experimental data using a genetic algorithm, and a global sensitivity analysis was used to identify the enzymes that have the greatest impact on reaction rate and yield. After optimizing enzyme loadings using this model, volumetric H2 productivity was increased 3-fold to 32 mmol H2⋅L(-1)⋅h(-1). The productivity was further enhanced to 54 mmol H2⋅L(-1)⋅h(-1) by increasing reaction temperature, substrate, and enzyme concentrations--an increase of 67-fold compared with the initial studies using this method. The production of hydrogen from locally produced biomass is a promising means to achieve global green energy production.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide release kinetics into saliva from different whitening products: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Duarte Nuno da Silva; da Mata, António Duarte Sola Pereira; Silveira, João Miguel Lourenço; Marques, Joana Rita Oliveira Faria; Amaral, João Pedro de Almeida Rato; Guilherme, Nuno Filipe Rito Parada Marques

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare salivary hydrogen peroxide (HP) release kinetics and potential toxicity of systemic exposure of four different whitening products. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in a Portuguese dental faculty clinic. Two hundred forty volunteers were randomized to eight intervention groups. Participants were randomly assigned to receive active or placebo applications of one of four different products: Opalescence 10% PF™ (OPL), Vivastyle® 10%™ (VS10%), Vivadent Paint On Plus™ (PO+), and Trés White Supreme™ (TWS). Saliva collection was obtained by established methods at different times. The HP salivary content was determined by a photometric method. Salivary HP variations, total amount of salivary HP, and counts of subjects above the safe daily HP dose were the main outcome measures. All whitening systems significantly released HP to the saliva when compared to placebo, and all showed different release kinetics. The adaptable tray system (TWS) presented a risk increase of 37% [20-54%, 95% confidence interval] when compared to the other systems. The use of an adaptable tray whitening system with higher concentration of HP increases the toxicity potential.