WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrilla management summit

  1. Snow Drift Management: Summit Station Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    ER D C/ CR RE L TR -1 6- 6 Engineering for Polar Operations, Logistics, and Research (EPOLAR) Snow Drift Management Summit Station...Drift Management Summit Station Greenland Robert B. Haehnel and Matthew F. Bigl U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Cold...Engineering for Polar Operations, Logistics, and Research (EPOLAR) EP-ARC-15-33, “Monitoring and Managing Snow Drifting at Summit Station, Greenland” ERDC

  2. Establishing Research and Management Priorities for Monoecious Hydrilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    between the biotypes were successful and variations of these early tests are in use today (Ryan et al. 1991; Madeira et al. 2004; Rybicki et al. 2013...Management Society awarded a graduate student stipend to Dr. Rob Richardson at North Carolina State University (NCSU) to evaluate the phenology and...optimal treatment timing require additional information on tuber sprouting dynamics (e.g. plant phenology information described above would provide

  3. Mass-Rearing Hydrellia Pakistanae Deonier and H. balciunasi Bock for the Management of Hydrilla verticillata

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    provided on rearing methods, releases, and associated costs. BACKGROUND: Hydrilla, family Hydrocharitaceae, is an exotic submersed macrophyte that...amount of topped-out, contiguous hydrilla was noted, as was the location within the reservoir (cove, boat lane, etc.). Sites containing large...as Berlese extraction with the same methods previously mentioned to monitor rearing pond numbers. Generally, two or three sites per reservoir were

  4. Life cycle assessment of nutrient remediation and bioenergy production potential from the harvest of hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jason M; Wilkie, Ann C

    2010-12-01

    Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) is one of the world's most problematic invasive aquatic plants. Although management of hydrilla overgrowth has often been based on use of chemical herbicides, issues such as the emergence of herbicide-resistant hydrilla biotypes and the need for in situ nutrient remediation strategies have together raised interest in the use of harvester machines as an alternative management approach. Using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach, we calculated a range of net energy and economic benefits associated with hydrilla harvests and the utilization of biomass for biogas and compost production. Base case scenarios that used moderate data assumptions showed net energy benefit ratios (NEBRs) of 1.54 for biogas production and 1.32 for compost production pathways. NEBRs for these respective pathways rose to 2.11 and 2.68 when labor was excluded as a fossil fuel input. Base case biogas and compost production scenarios respectively showed a monetary benefit cost ratio (BCR) of 1.79 and 1.83. Moreover, very high NEBRs (3.94 for biogas; 6.37 for compost) and BCRs (>11 for both biogas and compost) were found for optimistic scenarios in which waterways were assumed to have high hydrilla biomass density, high nutrient content in biomass, and high priority for nutrient remediation. Energy and economic returns were largely decoupled, with biogas and fertilizer providing the bulk of output energy, while nutrient remediation and herbicide avoidance dominated the economic output calculations. Based on these results, we conclude that hydrilla harvest is likely a suitable and cost-effective management program for many nutrient-impaired waters. Additional research is needed to determine how hydrilla harvesting programs may be most effectively implemented in conjunction with fish and wildlife enhancement objectives.

  5. Overseas Surveys (1981-1983) for Insects to Control Hydrilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    several treatments usually required during the growing season, only high priority waters can be effectively managed. Taxonomy Identification difficulties...11. Hydrilla has been recognized as a separate species of plant since the early days of taxonomy . According to Cook and Luond’s (1982) synonomy...Order Tanaidacea Tanaids Philippines 5 LUZ32Z1, LUZ832Z2 Total 105 Glass Mollusca Order Gastropoda (Snails) Ampullariidae Burma 3 BUR82204 Malaysia I

  6. Core competencies for pain management: results of an interprofessional consensus summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Scott M; Young, Heather M; Lucas Arwood, Ellyn; Chou, Roger; Herr, Keela; Murinson, Beth B; Watt-Watson, Judy; Carr, Daniel B; Gordon, Debra B; Stevens, Bonnie J; Bakerjian, Debra; Ballantyne, Jane C; Courtenay, Molly; Djukic, Maja; Koebner, Ian J; Mongoven, Jennifer M; Paice, Judith A; Prasad, Ravi; Singh, Naileshni; Sluka, Kathleen A; St Marie, Barbara; Strassels, Scott A

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this project was to develop core competencies in pain assessment and management for prelicensure health professional education. Such core pain competencies common to all prelicensure health professionals have not been previously reported. An interprofessional executive committee led a consensus-building process to develop the core competencies. An in-depth literature review was conducted followed by engagement of an interprofessional Competency Advisory Committee to critique competencies through an iterative process. A 2-day summit was held so that consensus could be reached. The consensus-derived competencies were categorized within four domains: multidimensional nature of pain, pain assessment and measurement, management of pain, and context of pain management. These domains address the fundamental concepts and complexity of pain; how pain is observed and assessed; collaborative approaches to treatment options; and application of competencies across the life span in the context of various settings, populations, and care team models. A set of values and guiding principles are embedded within each domain. These competencies can serve as a foundation for developing, defining, and revising curricula and as a resource for the creation of learning activities across health professions designed to advance care that effectively responds to pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. SUMMIT ASCENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The SCO charts a course for the future at landmark meetings marking its fifth anniversary The Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) Summit on June 15 received extraordinary media coverage in China. Broadcast live on state radio and television and on the Internet, the summit made headlines in

  8. Surveys for Pathogens of Monoecious Hydrilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    purpose of the study presented herein was to survey some known populations of monoecious hydrilla and isolate potential fungal pathogens. MATERIALS ...sporulating species herein noted as dematiaceous (dark mycelium ) or moniliaceous (hyaline mycelium ) Ascomycetes (Table 1). The majority of the species

  9. Atrial Arrhythmia Summit: Post Summit Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together nationally and internationally recognized experts in cardiology, electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space medicine in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms, risk factors, and management of atrial arrhythmias in the unique occupational cohort of the U.S. astronaut corps.

  10. Surveys for Pathogens of Monoecious Hydrilla 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    hypothesized that the growth and reproductive habits were adaptations to northern climates, which suggests a temperate origin of the plant that was...it was only mildly pathogenic; but when it was inoculated onto plants that were endophyte-infected, the stressed plants usually died. These...Netherland, and Zack Banks for collecting monoecious hydrilla samples. Thanks also go to Michael Grodowitz and Lynde Dodd for reviewing the manuscript

  11. Adding a Community University Educational Summit (CUES) to Enhance Service Learning in Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Catherine; Schriehans, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    For this study, one hundred and twenty student reflection papers (undergraduate and graduate) from a service learning extracurricular event titled, "Community University Educational Summit" (CUES) was analyzed. Over a two-year period, this event was held on one Saturday during the month of October at California State University San…

  12. Summit-to-sea mapping and change detection using satellite imagery: tools for conservation and management of coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A C; Rohmann, S O

    2005-05-01

    Continuous summit-to-sea maps showing both land features and shallow-water coral reefs have been completed in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, using circa 2000 Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) Imagery. Continuous land/sea terrain was mapped by merging Digital Elevation Models (DEM) with satellite-derived bathymetry. Benthic habitat characterizations were created by unsupervised classifications of Landsat imagery clustered using field data, and produced maps with an estimated overall accuracy of>75% (Tau coefficient >0.65). These were merged with Geocover-LC (land use/land cover) data to create continuous land/ sea cover maps. Image pairs from different dates were analyzed using Principle Components Analysis (PCA) in order to detect areas of change in the marine environment over two different time intervals: 2000 to 2001, and 1991 to 2003. This activity demonstrates the capabilities of Landsat imagery to produce continuous summit-to-sea maps, as well as detect certain changes in the shallow-water marine environment, providing a valuable tool for efficient coastal zone monitoring and effective management and conservation.

  13. Surveys for Pathogens of Monoecious Hydrilla in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    2013, monoecious hydrilla was collected in the field from Strom Thurmond Reservoir in South Carolina/ Georgia , Lake Guntersville in Alabama, and Lake...Gainesville, Florida where monoecious hydrilla plants collected in Missouri, Kansas, South Carolina/ Georgia (Strom Thurmond Reservoir), and North...species” was plated onto Potato Carrot Agar (PCA; Dhingra and Sinclair 1995) and PDA and incubated at 25 oC under a grow light (plant aquarium wide

  14. The phylogeographic structure of Hydrilla verticillata (Hydrocharitaceae) in China and its implications for the biogeographic history of this worldwide-distributed submerged macrophyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinning; Yu, Dan; Xu, Xinwei

    2015-05-24

    Aquatic vascular plants are a distinctive group, differing from terrestrial plants in their growth forms and habitats. Among the various aquatic plant life forms, the evolutionary processes of freshwater submerged species are most likely distinct due to their exclusive occurrence in the discrete and patchy aquatic habitats. Using the chloroplast trnL-F region sequence data, we investigated the phylogeographic structure of a submerged macrophyte, Hydrilla verticillata, the single species in the genus Hydrilla, throughout China, in addition to combined sample data from other countries to reveal the colonisation and diversification processes of this species throughout the world. We sequenced 681 individuals from 123 sampling locations throughout China and identified a significant phylogeographic structure (NST > GST, p China indicates that China is most likely the centre of Hydrilla genetic diversity. The worldwide distribution of Hydrilla is due to recent vicariance and dispersal events that occurred in different clades during the Pleistocene. Our findings also provide useful information for the management of invasive Hydrilla in North America.

  15. Combining Plant Pathogenic Fungi and the Leaf-Mining Fly, Hydrellia pakistanae, Increases Damage to Hydrilla

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Four fungal species, F71PJ Acremonium sp., F531 Cylindrocarpon sp., F542, Botrytis sp., and F964 Fusarium culmorum [Wm. G. Sm.] Sacc. were recovered from hydrilla [ Hydrilla verticillata (L. f.) Royle] shoots or from soil and water surrounding hydrilla growing in ponds and lakes in Florida and shown to be capable of killing hydrilla in a bioassay. The isolates were tested singly and in combination with the leaf-mining fly, Hydrellia pakistanae ...

  16. Management of adult and paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Asia: resource-stratified guidelines from the Asian Oncology Summit 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Allen E J; Tan, Daryl; Li, Chi-Kong; Hori, Hiroki; Tse, Eric; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2013-11-01

    Survival for adults and children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia has risen substantially in recent years because use of improved risk-directed treatments and supportive care has widened. In nearly all developed countries, multidisciplinary panels of leukaemia experts have formulated clinical practice guidelines in which standard treatment approaches are recommended on the basis of current evidence. However, those guidelines do not take into account resource limitations in low-income countries, including financial and technical challenges. In Asia, huge disparities in economy and infrastructure exist between countries, and even among different regions in some large countries. At a consensus session held as part of the 2013 Asian Oncology Summit in Bangkok, Thailand, a panel of experts summarised recommendations for management of adult and paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Strategies were developed for Asian countries on the basis of available financial, skill, and logistical resources and were stratified in a four-tier system according to the resources available in a particular country or region (basic, limited, enhanced, and maximum).

  17. Management of adult and paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Asia: resource-stratified guidelines from the Asian Oncology Summit 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Allen EJ; Tan, Daryl; Li, Chi-Kong; Hori, Hiroki; Tse, Eric; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2014-01-01

    The survival rates for both adult and children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia have improved substantially in recent years with wider use of improved risk-directed therapy and supportive care. In nearly all developed countries, clinical practice guidelines have been formulated by multidisciplinary panels of leukaemia experts, with the goal of providing recommendations on standard treatment approaches based on current evidence. However, those guidelines do not take into account resource limitations in low-income countries, including financial and technical challenges. In Asia, there are huge disparities in economy and infrastructure among the countries, and even among different regions in some large countries. This review summarizes the recommendations developed for Asian countries by a panel of adult and paediatric leukaemia therapists, based on the availability of financial, skill and logistical resources, at a consensus session held as part of the 2013 Asian Oncology Summit in Bangkok, Thailand. The management strategies described here are stratified by a four-tier system (basic, limited, enhanced and maximum) based on the resources available to a particular country or region. PMID:24176570

  18. Spectral signatures of hydrilla from a tank and field setting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alfonso BLANCO; John J.QU; William E.ROPER

    2012-01-01

    The invasion of hydrilla in many waterways has caused significant problems resulting in high maintenance costs for eradicating this invasive aquatic weed.Present identification methods employed for detecting hydrilla invasions such as aerial photography and videos are difficult,costly,and time consuming.Remote sensing has been used for assessing wetlands and other aquatic vegetation,but very little information is available for detecting hydrilla invasions in coastal estuaries and other water bodies.The objective of this study is to construct a library of spectral signatures for identifying and classifying hydrilla invasions.Spectral signatures of hydrilla were collected from an experimental tank and field locations in a coastal estuary in the upper Chesapeake Bay.These measurements collected from the experimental tank,resulted in spectral signatures with an average peak surface reflectance in the near-infrared (NIR) region of 16% at a wavelength of 818 nm.However,the spectral measurements,collected in the estuary,resulted in a very different spectral signature with two surface reflectance peaks of 6% at wavelengths of 725 nm and 818 nm.The difference in spectral signatures between sites are a result of the components in the water column in the estuary because of increased turbidity (e.g.,nutrients,dissolved matter and suspended matter),and canopy being lower (submerged) in the water column.Spectral signatures of hydrilla observed in the tank and the field had similar characteristics with low reflectance in visible region of the spectrum from 400 to 700 nm,but high in the NIR region from 700 to 900 nm.

  19. A social analysis of the bioinvasions of Dreissena polymorpha in Spain and Hydrilla verticillata in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binimelis, Rosa; Monterroso, Iliana; Rodríguez-Labajos, Beatriz

    2007-10-01

    Human agency plays a key role in the processes of biological invasions. This comprises not only the human role in the configuration of driving forces or in the perception of the impacts, but also the conceptualization of alien species themselves as an environmental problem. This paper examines different stakeholders' positions in bioinvasion processes at different scales, and it looks at their relevance for the management of invasive species. It compares two cases: the invasion process of Dreissena polymorpha in the Ebro River in Spain and the case of Hydrilla verticillata in Lake Izabal, Guatemala. Our results are structured according to impacts and to management options. The discussion focuses on the relevance of incorporating the different stakeholders' interests and values in the analysis and management of biological invasions. Although social analysis of stakeholders' positions is necessary in order to foster management actions, it also reveals conflicts on the relevant criteria and on the very definition of invasive species.

  20. A Social Analysis of the Bioinvasions of Dreissena polymorpha in Spain and Hydrilla verticillata in Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binimelis, Rosa; Monterroso, Iliana; Rodríguez-Labajos, Beatriz

    2007-10-01

    Human agency plays a key role in the processes of biological invasions. This comprises not only the human role in the configuration of driving forces or in the perception of the impacts, but also the conceptualization of alien species themselves as an environmental problem. This paper examines different stakeholders’ positions in bioinvasion processes at different scales, and it looks at their relevance for the management of invasive species. It compares two cases: the invasion process of Dreissena polymorpha in the Ebro River in Spain and the case of Hydrilla verticillata in Lake Izabal, Guatemala. Our results are structured according to impacts and to management options. The discussion focuses on the relevance of incorporating the different stakeholders’ interests and values in the analysis and management of biological invasions. Although social analysis of stakeholders’ positions is necessary in order to foster management actions, it also reveals conflicts on the relevant criteria and on the very definition of invasive species.

  1. Summit Station Skiway Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    operating procedures (SOPs) for future construction and maintenance efforts. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for...Runway Construction .......................................................... 22 Appendix B: Rammsonde Instructions...13. Snow accumulation at Summit Station in the Bamboo Forest. .......................................... 13 Figure 14. Strength of Summit skiway

  2. Halter Financial Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>The prolonged financial crisis brought about profound changes in international political and economic patterns. With a focus on China’s place in the post-crisis world situation, the Halter Financial Summit,

  3. Declaration of the 2nd Meeting of the Committee on Clinical Application of Human Organ Transplantation of China and National Summit of Clinical Application and Management of Human Organ Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ We, medical practitioners of human organ transplantation, met in the 2nd Meeting of the People's Republic of China Ministry of Health Committee on Clinical Application of Human Organ Transplantation and National Summit of Clinical Application and Management of Human Organ Transplantation in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China, on 13 and 14 November 2006.

  4. Phytofabrication of silver nanoparticles by using aquatic plant Hydrilla verticilata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHENDRA RAI

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Sable N, Gaikwad S, Bonde S, Gade A, Rai M. 2012. Phytofabrication of silver nanoparticles by using aquatic plant Hydrilla verticilata. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 45-49. In the context of current drive to developed new green technology in nanomaterials, synthesis of nanoparticles is of considerable importance. There has been considerable work done in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology during the last decade due to the introduction of various protocols for the synthesis of nanoparticles by using plants and microorganisms. Here we firstly report the extracellular phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs using aquatic plants Hydrilla verticilata. The characterization of the phytosynthesized Ag-NPs was done with the help of UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, Zeta potential and SEM. The SEM micrograph revealed the synthesis of polydispersed spherical nanoparticles, with the average size of 65.55 nm. The phytofabricated Ag-NPs can be used in the field of medicine and agriculture, due to their antimicrobial potential.

  5. Skeletal health in long-duration astronauts: nature, assessment, and management recommendations from the NASA Bone Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwoll, Eric S; Adler, Robert A; Amin, Shreyasee; Binkley, Neil; Lewiecki, E Michael; Petak, Steven M; Shapses, Sue A; Sinaki, Mehrsheed; Watts, Nelson B; Sibonga, Jean D

    2013-06-01

    Concern about the risk of bone loss in astronauts as a result of prolonged exposure to microgravity prompted the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to convene a Bone Summit with a panel of experts at the Johnson Space Center to review the medical data and research evidence from astronauts who have had prolonged exposure to spaceflight. Data were reviewed from 35 astronauts who had served on spaceflight missions lasting between 120 and 180 days with attention focused on astronauts who (1) were repeat fliers on long-duration missions, (2) were users of an advanced resistive exercise device (ARED), (3) were scanned by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) at the hip, (4) had hip bone strength estimated by finite element modeling, or (5) had lost >10% of areal bone mineral density (aBMD) at the hip or lumbar spine as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Because of the limitations of DXA in describing the effects of spaceflight on bone strength, the panel recommended that the U.S. space program use QCT and finite element modeling to further study the unique effects of spaceflight (and recovery) on bone health in order to better inform clinical decisions. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  6. An extract of Hydrilla verticillata and associated epiphytes induces avian vacuolar myelinopathy in laboratory mallards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Faith E; Twiner, Michael J; Leighfield, Tod A; Wilde, Susan B; Van Dolah, Frances M; Fischer, John R; Bowerman, William W

    2009-08-01

    Avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM) is a neurological disease affecting bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), American coots (Fulica americana), waterfowl, and other birds in the southeastern United States. The cause of the disease is unknown, but is thought to be a naturally produced toxin. AVM is associated with aquatic macrophytes, most frequently hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata), and researchers have linked the disease to an epiphytic cyanobacterial species associated with the macrophytes. The goal of this study was to develop an extraction protocol for separating the putative toxin from a hydrilla-cyanobacterial matrix. Hydrilla samples were collected from an AVM-affected reservoir (J. Strom Thurmond Lake, SC) and confirmed to contain the etiologic agent by mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) bioassay. These samples were then extracted using a solvent series of increasing polarity: hexanes, acetone, and methanol. Control hydrilla samples from a reference reservoir with no history of AVM (Lake Marion, SC) were extracted in parallel. Resulting extracts were administered to mallards by oral gavage. Our findings indicate that the methanol extracts of hydrilla collected from the AVM-affected site induced the disease in laboratory mallards. This study provides the first data documenting for an "extractable" AVM-inducing agent.

  7. PACIFIC NORTHWEST CYBER SUMMIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Matlock, Gordon W.; Becker-Dippmann, Angela S.; Smith, Karen S.

    2013-08-07

    On March 26, 2013, the Snohomish County Public Utility District (PUD) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) jointly hosted the Pacific Northwest Cyber Summit with the DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, the White House, Washington State congressional delegation, Washington State National Guard, and regional energy companies.

  8. Simulating Global Climate Summits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesperman, Dean P.; Haste, Turtle; Alrivy, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    One of the most persistent and controversial issues facing the global community is climate change. With the creation of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992 and the Kyoto Protocol (1997), the global community established some common ground on how to address this issue. However, the last several climate summits have failed…

  9. Simulating Global Climate Summits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesperman, Dean P.; Haste, Turtle; Alrivy, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    One of the most persistent and controversial issues facing the global community is climate change. With the creation of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992 and the Kyoto Protocol (1997), the global community established some common ground on how to address this issue. However, the last several climate summits have failed…

  10. New methods for the analysis of invasion processes: multi-criteria evaluation of the invasion of Hydrilla verticillata in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterroso, I; Binimelis, R; Rodríguez-Labajos, B

    2011-03-01

    The study described in this article incorporates stakeholders' views on aquatic invasion processes and combines expert analysis with information from field work into an evaluation exercise. Management scenarios are designed based on available technical data and stakeholders' perceptions. These scenarios are evaluated using the Social Multi-Criteria Evaluation framework employing the NAIADE model. Two evaluations are carried out, technical and social. Social acceptance of different management scenarios, distribution of costs and benefits, and attribution of responsibility are discussed. The case study was carried out on Lake Izabal, a body of water connected to the Caribbean Sea in Northeastern Guatemala. In 2000, local fishermen reported the presence of an alien species in the lake, the macrophyte Hydrilla verticillata. Two years later, this alien species was established around the entire lakeshore, damaging the ecosystem, endangering native species and the subsistence of local inhabitants through impacts on transportation, fishing practices, and tourism.

  11. Climate Summit in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delman, Jørgen

      Together with the United States, China has moved to centre stage in the running up to the Climate Summit in Copenhagen 7-18 December 2009. To make the Summit a success, the two countries have started signalling positive commitment to formulation of quantitative targets and engage constructively...... in elaborating a reasonably ambitious, yet realistic framework for the implementation of a new global post-Kyoto regime that will have to take effect from 2012. China's leadership has already acknowledged that climate change may exacerbate an exceedingly unsustainable development path over the next decades...... if action is not taken to change its course dramatically. The challenges are formidable, yet the window of opportunity to take action is quite narrow. For these reasons and due to international pressure, China's position on climate change has been made gradually clearer as the climate negotiations have...

  12. 2013 Summit on Reducing Exposure to Dust from Treated Seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pollinator Summit was part of EPA's ongoing collaboration with stakeholders to manage pesticide risks to bees. Focus: how to protect bees from unintended pesticide exposure, esp. dust in agricultural planting operations using pesticide-coated seeds.

  13. Summiteers--Moving Mountains with Bereaved Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Hans-Georg

    2011-01-01

    Summiteers are people who rush to the top. There is a mountain summit and a metaphorical summit inside us which we can climb. In the area of mountain summits, Reinhold Messner is surely the best known and most successful summiteer. He climbed, among other things, the highest peak on earth without supplemental oxygen. In the language of the country…

  14. Experimental feeding of Hydrilla verticillata colonized by stigonematales cyanobacteria induces vacuolar myelinopathy in painted turtles (Chrysemys picta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert D Mercurio

    Full Text Available Vacuolar myelinopathy (VM is a neurologic disease primarily found in birds that occurs when wildlife ingest submerged aquatic vegetation colonized by an uncharacterized toxin-producing cyanobacterium (hereafter "UCB" for "uncharacterized cyanobacterium". Turtles are among the closest extant relatives of birds and many species directly and/or indirectly consume aquatic vegetation. However, it is unknown whether turtles can develop VM. We conducted a feeding trial to determine whether painted turtles (Chrysemys picta would develop VM after feeding on Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata, colonized by the UCB (Hydrilla is the most common "host" of UCB. We hypothesized turtles fed Hydrilla colonized by the UCB would exhibit neurologic impairment and vacuolation of nervous tissues, whereas turtles fed Hydrilla free of the UCB would not. The ability of Hydrilla colonized by the UCB to cause VM (hereafter, "toxicity" was verified by feeding it to domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus or necropsy of field collected American coots (Fulica americana captured at the site of Hydrilla collections. We randomly assigned ten wild-caught turtles into toxic or non-toxic Hydrilla feeding groups and delivered the diets for up to 97 days. Between days 82 and 89, all turtles fed toxic Hydrilla displayed physical and/or neurologic impairment. Histologic examination of the brain and spinal cord revealed vacuolations in all treatment turtles. None of the control turtles exhibited neurologic impairment or had detectable brain or spinal cord vacuolations. This is the first evidence that freshwater turtles can become neurologically impaired and develop vacuolations after consuming toxic Hydrilla colonized with the UCB. The southeastern United States, where outbreaks of VM occur regularly and where vegetation colonized by the UCB is common, is also a global hotspot of freshwater turtle diversity. Our results suggest that further investigations into the effect of the

  15. Experimental feeding of Hydrilla verticillata colonized by stigonematales cyanobacteria induces vacuolar myelinopathy in painted turtles (Chrysemys picta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Albert D; Hernandez, Sonia M; Maerz, John C; Yabsley, Michael J; Ellis, Angela E; Coleman, Amanda L; Shelnutt, Leslie M; Fischer, John R; Wilde, Susan B

    2014-01-01

    Vacuolar myelinopathy (VM) is a neurologic disease primarily found in birds that occurs when wildlife ingest submerged aquatic vegetation colonized by an uncharacterized toxin-producing cyanobacterium (hereafter "UCB" for "uncharacterized cyanobacterium"). Turtles are among the closest extant relatives of birds and many species directly and/or indirectly consume aquatic vegetation. However, it is unknown whether turtles can develop VM. We conducted a feeding trial to determine whether painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) would develop VM after feeding on Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata), colonized by the UCB (Hydrilla is the most common "host" of UCB). We hypothesized turtles fed Hydrilla colonized by the UCB would exhibit neurologic impairment and vacuolation of nervous tissues, whereas turtles fed Hydrilla free of the UCB would not. The ability of Hydrilla colonized by the UCB to cause VM (hereafter, "toxicity") was verified by feeding it to domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) or necropsy of field collected American coots (Fulica americana) captured at the site of Hydrilla collections. We randomly assigned ten wild-caught turtles into toxic or non-toxic Hydrilla feeding groups and delivered the diets for up to 97 days. Between days 82 and 89, all turtles fed toxic Hydrilla displayed physical and/or neurologic impairment. Histologic examination of the brain and spinal cord revealed vacuolations in all treatment turtles. None of the control turtles exhibited neurologic impairment or had detectable brain or spinal cord vacuolations. This is the first evidence that freshwater turtles can become neurologically impaired and develop vacuolations after consuming toxic Hydrilla colonized with the UCB. The southeastern United States, where outbreaks of VM occur regularly and where vegetation colonized by the UCB is common, is also a global hotspot of freshwater turtle diversity. Our results suggest that further investigations into the effect of the putative UCB toxin

  16. Vienna Summit Declaration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-21

    The leaders of the European Union (EU) and the United States of America (USA) met June 2006 in Vienna to respond to the concerns of their citizens for peace, security, stability and prosperity in an increasingly globalised world. They welcome that over the past year the Transatlantic Partnership has delivered real results as shown by the political and economic Progress Reports issued during the summit (http://www.eu2006.at/en/The{sub C}ouncil{sub P}residency/EU-USSummit/index.html). They remain committed to finding common or complementary lines of action in many areas. Over the last year there have been many examples of how productive the relationship is, in the Middle East, Iran, the Western Balkans, Belarus, on the frozen conflicts, and Sudan, as well as in the efforts to promote transatlantic trade and investment under last Summit's Economic Initiative. They have decided to further strengthen the strategic Partnership by adopting a number of priority actions to support cooperation in the following four areas: Promoting peace, human rights and democracy worldwide; Confronting global challenges, including security; Fostering prosperity and opportunity; and Promoting strategic cooperation on energy and energy security, climate change and sustainable development.

  17. Ebook Summit: Our Ebook Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Over 2000 participants made the daylong programming at the "Library Journal"/"School Library Journal" Virtual Ebook Summit, September 29, a robust conversation and not just within the summit interface but also in tweets with the #ebooksummit hashtag (and beyond) and in libraries across the country where participants logged in to take part. The…

  18. Ebook Summit: Our Ebook Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Over 2000 participants made the daylong programming at the "Library Journal"/"School Library Journal" Virtual Ebook Summit, September 29, a robust conversation and not just within the summit interface but also in tweets with the #ebooksummit hashtag (and beyond) and in libraries across the country where participants logged in to take part. The…

  19. Captive bubble and sessile drop surface characterization of a submerged aquatic plant, Hydrilla verticillata

    Science.gov (United States)

    The surface energy parameters of the invasive aquatic weed, Hydrilla verticillata, were determined using contact angle measurements using two different methods. The abaxial and adaxial surfaces of the leaves and stem were characterized for the weed while submerged in water using captive air and octa...

  20. Port Stakeholder Summit - April 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's National Port Stakeholders Summit, Advancing More Sustainable Ports, focused on actions to protect air quality while reducing climate risk and supporting economic growth, making ports more environmentally sustainable.

  1. Genetic Relationships among Invasive Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata L.f. Royle) Biotypes in the US and Their Implications for Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    1 US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS. 2 Department of Biology , Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX. Report...2011). Experimental crosses have revealed that female dioecious plants in Florida are potentially fertile and can produce viable seed when pollinated by...Ecology Letters 13:145-153. Harms, N. E., Grodowitz, M. J. 2011. Overwintering biology of Hydrellia pakistanae, a biological control agent of

  2. Beyond the World Food Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvany, P

    1997-08-01

    While most speakers at the 1996 World Food Summit expressed concern about the injustice that forces more than 800 million people worldwide to live with hunger, some sought solutions through economic and social development while others called for a more liberal marketplace. Among world leaders, only Fidel Castro raised issues and challenges that addressed some of the underlying causes of malnutrition. The Plan of Action that grew out of the Summit has only one measurable commitment, which is to halve the number of undernourished people by 2015. The other six commitments, while diluted, contain important objectives even though they give little emphasis to the underlying causes of poverty or hunger. The Summit process, however, did contribute to the fact that food-related issues are now placed higher on the world agenda because many of these issue were raised by civil service organizations (CSOs) at the Summit's parallel NGO (nongovernmental organization) forum. In fact, one of the most positive outcomes of the Summit may prove to be the increased effectiveness of the CSOs as a result of the creation of improved networks in preparation for the Summit. The CSOs contributed examples of how food security could be improved, published an active site on the World Wide Web, and challenged the statements of governments. In addition to raising trade issues, CSOs also lobbied for sustainable agriculture and agricultural biodiversity. In fact, CSOs may have to set a new action agenda for the formal sector to encourage development of new institutions and new global forums that give NGOs a place at the table.

  3. Mushrooms and Health Summit proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Mary Jo; Dwyer, Johanna; Hasler-Lewis, Clare M; Milner, John A; Noakes, Manny; Rowe, Sylvia; Wach, Mark; Beelman, Robert B; Caldwell, Joe; Cantorna, Margherita T; Castlebury, Lisa A; Chang, Shu-Ting; Cheskin, Lawrence J; Clemens, Roger; Drescher, Greg; Fulgoni, Victor L; Haytowitz, David B; Hubbard, Van S; Law, David; Myrdal Miller, Amy; Minor, Bart; Percival, Susan S; Riscuta, Gabriela; Schneeman, Barbara; Thornsbury, Suzanne; Toner, Cheryl D; Woteki, Catherine E; Wu, Dayong

    2014-07-01

    The Mushroom Council convened the Mushrooms and Health Summit in Washington, DC, on 9-10 September 2013. The proceedings are synthesized in this article. Although mushrooms have long been regarded as health-promoting foods, research specific to their role in a healthful diet and in health promotion has advanced in the past decade. The earliest mushroom cultivation was documented in China, which remains among the top global mushroom producers, along with the United States, Italy, The Netherlands, and Poland. Although considered a vegetable in dietary advice, mushrooms are fungi, set apart by vitamin B-12 in very low quantity but in the same form found in meat, ergosterol converted with UV light to vitamin D2, and conjugated linoleic acid. Mushrooms are a rare source of ergothioneine as well as selenium, fiber, and several other vitamins and minerals. Some preclinical and clinical studies suggest impacts of mushrooms on cognition, weight management, oral health, and cancer risk. Preliminary evidence suggests that mushrooms may support healthy immune and inflammatory responses through interaction with the gut microbiota, enhancing development of adaptive immunity, and improved immune cell functionality. In addition to imparting direct nutritional and health benefits, analysis of U.S. food intake survey data reveals that mushrooms are associated with higher dietary quality. Also, early sensory research suggests that mushrooms blended with meats and lower sodium dishes are well liked and may help to reduce intakes of red meat and salt without compromising taste. As research progresses on the specific health effects of mushrooms, there is a need for effective communication efforts to leverage mushrooms to improve overall dietary quality.

  4. Fiftieth Anniversary at the summit

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Neither fear of heights nor the cold succeeded in cooling the ardour of four brave climbers from CERN who celebrated CERN's 50th Anniversary at the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro (5,895 metres). On the way back from the summit, Miguel Cerqueira Bastos (AB/PO), David Collados Polidura (IT/GM), Sandra Sequeira Tavares (PH/CMI) and Daniel Cano Ott (n_TOF) raised the official CERN Jubilee flag at 4750 metres altitude. How long will it be before a CERN flag is planted on the moon?

  5. Biological Control Agents of Hydrilla Verticillata; Final Report on Surveys in East Africa, 1981-1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    eastern arm of the Rift Valley are mainly "soda" lakes (Magadi, Elmenteita, Nakuru, and Bogoria ), which are too saline to support aquatic macrophytes...J.A Lakes Magadi, Elmenteita, Nakuru, Bogoria , Turkana - no hydrilla Soda lakes of eastern Rift. First four too saline to support any submerged...inued). distribution in Uganda ( Lake Kioga), Rwanda ( Lake Bulera and Mukungwa River), and Burundi ( Lake Tanganyika). In Kenya, despite an intensive

  6. Field Surveys to Identify Biocontrol Agents of Hydrilla verticillata from June - September 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    recreational uses, out-competes native vegetation, acts as a breeding ground for mosquitoes , and destroys fish and wildlife habitats. Hydrilla is...1 Invasion Biology and Biocontrol Lab, Wuhan Botanical Institute, CAS ERDC/TN APCRP-BC-36 July 2015 3 named previously as Bagous sp. 3 and...Continued exploration will be conducted in Guangxi Province to find new agents. ERDC/TN APCRP-BC-36 July 2015 9 Rearing, biology , and host

  7. Higher Ambitions Summit. Rapporteur Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The Sutton Trust and Pearson two-day summit on higher ambitions in apprenticeships and vocational education drew more than 120 leaders in education, training and employment, policy makers, academics, and researchers to London. Delegates heard from political leaders stressing the importance they attach to high-quality apprenticeships. Presentations…

  8. A CO2-flux mechanism operating via pH-polarity in Hydrilla verticillata leaves with C-3 and C-4 photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ginkel, LC; Bowes, G; Reiskind, JB; Prins, HBA

    2001-01-01

    The aquatic angiosperm Hydrilla verticillata lacks Kranz anatomy, but has an inducible, C-4-based, CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) that concentrates CO2 in the chloroplasts. Both C-3 and C-4 Hydrilla leaves showed light-dependent pH polarity that was suppressed by high dissolved inorganic carbon (

  9. What Makes a Great Teacher? PDK Summit Offers Many Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Erin

    2009-01-01

    Creating change school requires courage. Great teachers can't be satisfied with managing change; they must be prepared to lead change, argues Thomas Guskey, keynote speaker at the 2008 Phi Delta Kappa Summit on High-Performing Educators and a professor of education at Georgetown College in Georgetown, Kentucky.

  10. 2007 Simulation Education Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    miscategorizing good people. Moreover, credentialing may be irrelevant to certain groups, as local oversight of nursing and allied health professional...Association 13. American Heart Association, National Center 14. American Hospital Association 15. American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry 16. American...Management AHA 19. American Society of Anesthesiologists 14 20. Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation 21. Association of Standardized Patient

  11. Atrial Arrhythmias in Astronauts - Summary of a NASA Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Yael R.; Watkins, Sharmila D.; Polk, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Problem Definition: To evaluate NASA s current standards and practices related to atrial arrhythmias in astronauts, Space Medicine s Advanced Projects Section at the Johnson Space Center was tasked with organizing a summit to discuss the approach to atrial arrhythmias in the astronaut cohort. Since 1959, 11 cases of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, or supraventricular tachycardia have been recorded among active corps crewmembers. Most of the cases were paroxysmal, although a few were sustained. While most of the affected crewmembers were asymptomatic, those slated for long-duration space flight underwent radiofrequency ablation treatment to prevent further episodes of the arrhythmia. The summit was convened to solicit expert opinion on screening, diagnosis, and treatment options, to identify gaps in knowledge, and to propose relevant research initiatives. Summit Meeting Objectives: The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together a panel of six cardiologists, including nationally and internationally renowned leaders in cardiac electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space flight cardiovascular physiology. The primary objectives of the summit discussions were to evaluate cases of atrial arrhythmia in the astronaut population, to understand the factors that may predispose an individual to this condition, to understand NASA s current capabilities for screening, diagnosis, and treatment, to discuss the risks associated with treatment of crewmembers assigned to long-duration missions or extravehicular activities, and to discuss recommendations for prevention or management of future cases. Summary of Recommendations: The summit panel s recommendations were grouped into seven categories: Epidemiology, Screening, Standards and Selection, Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation Manifesting Preflight, Atrial Fibrillation during Flight, Prevention of Atrial Fibrillation, and Future Research

  12. American Telemedicine Association: Federal Telemedicine Policy Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Forstag

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ATA Federal Telemedicine Policy Summit, Washington DC - Hyatt Regency on Capitol Hill June 27, 2013 at 1:00 pm and June 28, 2013 at 12:00 pm The ATA Federal Telemedicine Policy Summit is an opportunity to hear and interact with leaders from Congress, key federal agencies and influential policy thinkers about the latest developments affecting telemedicine. The Summit will include participation of key stakeholders including healthcare providers, business interests, medical societies, consumer groups and more. Join the conversation and hear the latest, inside information about the swift changes underway in healthcare delivery, public policy and the opportunities these provide for those involved in telemedicine. The Summit has an exciting line-up of speakers, representing the nation’s top policy leaders in healthcare. For information: http://www.americantelemed.org/ata-federal-telemedicine-policy-summit/summit-overview

  13. Assessment and monitoring of recreation impacts and resource conditions on mountain summits: examples from the Northern Forest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monz, Christopher A.; Marion, Jeffrey L.; Goonan, Kelly A.; Manning, Robert E.; Wimpey, Jeremy; Carr, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Mountain summits present a unique challenge to manage sustainably: they are ecologically important and, in many circumstances, under high demand for recreation and tourism activities. This article presents recent advances in the assessment of resource conditions and visitor disturbance in mountain summit environments, by drawing on examples from a multiyear, interdisciplinary study of summits in the northeastern United States. Primary impact issues as a consequence of visitor use, such as informal trail formation, vegetation disturbance, and soil loss, were addressed via the adaption of protocols from recreation ecology studies to summit environments. In addition, new methodologies were developed that provide measurement sensitivity to change previously unavailable through standard recreation monitoring protocols. Although currently limited in application to the northeastern US summit environments, the methods presented show promise for widespread application wherever summits are in demand for visitor activities.

  14. National Farmers Market Summit Proceedings Report

    OpenAIRE

    Tropp, Debra; Barham, James

    2008-01-01

    The USDA Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), in partnership with the Farmers Market Consortium, hosted the National Farmers Market Summit November 7–9, 2007, in Baltimore, MD. The Summit assembled key stakeholders from the farmers market community to convene a national conversation on issues and challenges facing today’s farmers markets. The National Farmers Market Summit had three broad objectives: (1) Identify farmers market needs and existing gaps in assistance, (2) Prioritize future res...

  15. Global warming at the summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    During the recent summit meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Bill Clinton, the two leaders reaffirmed their concerns about global warming and the need to continue to take actions to try to reduce the threat.In a June 4 joint statement, they stressed the need to develop flexibility mechanisms, including international emissions trading, under the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. They also noted that initiatives to reduce the risk of greenhouse warming, including specific mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol, could potentially promote economic growth.

  16. Surveys for Biological Control Agents of Hydrilla verticillata in the People’s Republic of China in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    monoecious hydrilla is widely recognized as a relatively recent introduction. It was first discovered in Delaware in 1976 (Steward et al. 1984) and has...UNCLASSIFIED c. THIS PAGE UNCLASSIFIED 54 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std . 239.18

  17. The Education Summit; A Different Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1996-05-01

    The last National Education Summit held by the Governors occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia in 1989. That Summit, chaired by then Governor Clinton, produced the national goals for education announced by President Bush. These top-down goals are unfulfilled and are, for all practical purposes, dead. The 1996 Education Summit seems different, although its recommendations may suffer the same fate of those of the 1989 Summit. The 1996 Education Summit was held at IBM's Executive Conference Center in Palisades, New York. The Governors invited 44 executives of major businesses from virtually every state. CEO's from IBM, AT&T, Bell South, Eastman Kodak, Procter & Gamble, and Boeing were a part of the planning committee. Absent, for the most part, were professional educators and their organizations. The constitution of the 1996 Education Summit sent a clear signal, viz., that the "professional educators," whatever their individual talents, as a group have failed the nation's public schools and now its time for someone else to try. The "someone else" is the group of individuals that are the ultimate consumers of the output of the American education system. The collective point of view of the attending CEO's is that companies have undergone radical changes to become globally competitive, now it's time to keep the work force equally competitive. And this can only come through radical changes in the educational system. The CEO's point out that the companies they represent live or die by the (international) standards they establish, some of which are expressed in the principles of Total Quality Management (TQM), which represents a systemic approach to the changes American industry had to undergo to stay competitive. The executives clearly have run out of patience with the current system of public education. Many feel that they are running out of talented people to fill the important jobs that this society will need to fill to keep it moving forward. That talent is not being

  18. World Summit embraces Open Access, libraries

    CERN Multimedia

    Kaser, D

    2004-01-01

    "The long-anticipated "first phase" meeting of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), held in Geneva in December, was supposed to have been about equal access. It turned out being equally about open access as leading scientific organizations pushed their open-access initiative onto the World Summit agenda" (1 page)

  19. Summit documents; Documents du sommet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This document gathers three declarations about the non-proliferation of massive destruction weapons, made by the G8 organization participants during their last summit held in Evian (France): declaration about the enforcement and respect of the non-proliferation measures implemented by the IAEA and by the conventions for chemical and biological weapons; declaration about the protection of radioactive sources against diversion (regulatory control, inventory, control of sources export etc..); warranty about the security of radioactive sources (G8 approach, sustain of the IAEA action, sustain to the most vulnerable states, control mechanisms, political commitment of states, implementation of the recommendations of the international conference about the security and safety of radiation sources, held in Vienna (Austria) on March 2003. (J.S.)

  20. Anthropic changes to the biotic factor of soil formation from forests to managed grasslands along summits of the western Pyrenees Mountains, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, David; Gragson, Theodore

    2017-04-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that highland pastures of the humid-temperate western Pyrenees were converted from mixed forests to managed grasslands thousands of years ago, as early as during the late Neolithic and Bronze age by human actions including use of fire. We observe pronounced differences between soil profiles of ancient pastures and old-growth forests in otherwise similar landscape positions. In order to test physical and chemical differences, we collected paired samples of forest versus grassland soils at four separate hillslope sites where there was a clear boundary between the two vegetation types. Animal trails were excluded from sampling. Factors of climate, topography, parent material, and time of soil formation were essentially identical in the forests and pastures of each site, but the time of soil under grassland vegetation may have varied. Each paired hillslope site included five core samples (7.6 cm diameter) from the upper 7.6 cm of the mineral soil within each vegetation type, and the A horizon thickness was recorded at each core hole site. In addition, one complete soil profile was sampled in each vegetation type at each site, making a total of 20 core samples and 4 complete profiles from each respective vegetation type. In addition, we measured the magnetic susceptibility of the mineral soil surface on two transects crossing the vegetation boundary. Core samples have been measured for bulk density, pH, plant-available nutrients, and organic matter; and tests for total carbon and nitrogen, amorphous silica, charcoal, and other forms of black carbon are ongoing. Preliminary results indicate pastured A horizons are about three times as thick as forested soils, contain more organic matter, have lower soil bulk densities, have much finer and stronger structural development of soil aggregates. These traits favor much greater infiltration and water holding capacities of the pastured soils, which we have validated with saturated hydraulic

  1. People, poverty and the Earth Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J

    1992-01-01

    UNCED is about human beings managing their affairs so that all can achieve a reasonably good life without destroying the life-supporting environment. Currently human activities are approaching an upset of environmental balance through production of greenhouse gases, depletion of the ozone layer, and reduction of natural resources. Equity is the right to a decent life for the current human population of 5.5 billion and the future 10 billion expected within the next 50 years. A minimum use of environmental space/person is required. The Earth Summit will be a broad statement of environmental policy. Agenda 21 includes 115 action programs within 40 chapters. Separate conventions will be held on climate and biodiversity. The secretariat of UNCED has been working primarily with Agenda 21. Population issues are emphasized in Chapter 5 ("Demographic Dynamics and Sustainability") of the first section in Agenda 21 on Social and Economic Dimensions. The program areas include 1) research on the links between population, the environment, and development; 2) formulation by governments of integrated national policies on environment and development, which account for demographic trends, and promotion of population literacy; and 3) implementation of local level programs to ensure access to education and information and services in order to plan families freely and responsibly. Increases in funding for the population program are anticipated to be US $9 billion by the year 2000 and about US $7 billion/year until then. The year 2000 will bring with it a doubling of urban population in developing countries. There are challenges and opportunities to expand private sector job creation, education, clean water, and family health services. In addition to managing human settlements, there is also management of fragile ecosystems, which means relieving the pressure on these lands through urban migration or relocation to richer agricultural areas. The goal for agriculture is to triple food

  2. The 1992 Earth Summit: background and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, M F

    1992-03-01

    In 1989, the UN General Assembly agreed to sponsor a conference on environment and development and that the Heads of State would attend this 1st ever Earth Summit in June 1992. The planned agenda included making concrete changes to the basis of our economic life, relations between and among nations, and the outlook for the future. This would result in restructuring world priorities. Despite the 1972 Stockholm Conference on the human Environment acknowledging the basic link between environment and development, the environment has deteriorated even further, especially ozone depletion. Yet some governments did set up environmental agencies or ministries, like the US Environmental Protection Agency, but they were not allowed to influence economic policy or the policies and/or practices of major sectoral agencies. These environmental organizations relied too heavily on regulation. The 1992 conference needs to result in a political commitment to place reduction of poverty worldwide as the 1st priority since poverty and underdevelopment are strongly related to destruction of the environment. It is particularly important that developing countries improve their strengths by developing their human resources and institutional capacities (science, technology, management and professional skills) and reduce their vulnerabilities, such as dependence on foreign experts. This can best be achieved if they have access to technology. Moreover they must reduce population growth and reach population stability quickly. The 1992 conference in Brazil should also result in a global partnership based on common interest, mutual need, and shared responsibility. The world ecoindustrial revolution has already begun in some countries, such as Japan which has reduced energy use 40% since 1975. In fact, Japan has proven that environmental improvement can be accomplished with high rates of economic growth.

  3. The First National Pain Medicine Summit--final summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippe, Philipp M; Brock, Charles; David, Jose; Crossno, Ronald; Gitlow, Stuart

    2010-10-01

    Pain is ubiquitous. At some point in time it affects everyone. For many millions pain becomes chronic, a scourge that impacts every facet of life-work, hobbies, family relations, social fabric, finances, happiness, mood, and even the very essence of identity. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), pain is one of our most important national public health problems, a silent epidemic. In 1998, NIH reported that the annual amount spent on health care, compensation, and litigation related to pain had reached one hundred billion dollars ($100,000,000,000). Considering that health care costs have doubled since then, it is not unreasonable to assume that the costs related to pain care have doubled as well. Millions of patients suffer needlessly with acute pain, with cancer pain, and with chronic pain. The ineffective management of pain results in an escalating cascade of health care issues. Acute pain that is not treated adequately and promptly results in persistent pain that eventually causes irreversible changes in the nervous system. This translates into progressive bio-psycho-social epiphenomena resulting in further pain and disability. It creates a vicious cycle transforming a functional human being into an invalid who becomes a burden to family, to society, and to oneself. In the face of adequate medical science, adequate technical skills, and adequate resources the reality of delayed and inadequate pain care is paradoxical. This dilemma deserves close scrutiny and effective remediation. The American Medical Association (AMA), long dedicated to the need to improve pain care in this country, has been faced with this reality. It was from this vision that the idea of holding a Pain Medicine Summit was conceived. Resolution 321 (A-08) set in motion a process that would bring together a diverse group of stakeholders for the purpose of discussing the present and future status of pain care; a process that culminated in a broad-based coalition of physicians

  4. Application of ADM1 for modeling of biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Hydrilla verticillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojuan; Chen, Zhihua; Wang, Xun; Huo, Chan; Hu, Zhiquan; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Mian

    2016-07-01

    The present study focused on the application of anaerobic digestion model no. 1 (ADM1) to simulate biogas production from Hydrilla verticillata. Model simulation was carried out by implementing ADM1 in AQUASIM 2.0 software. Sensitivity analysis was used to select the most sensitive parameters for estimation using the absolute-relative sensitivity function. Among all the kinetic parameters, disintegration constant (kdis), hydrolysis constant of protein (khyd_pr), Monod maximum specific substrate uptake rate (km_aa, km_ac, km_h2) and half-saturation constants (Ks_aa, Ks_ac) affect biogas production significantly, which were optimized by fitting of the model equations to the data obtained from batch experiments. The ADM1 model after parameter estimation was able to well predict the experimental results of daily biogas production and biogas composition. The simulation results of evolution of organic acids, bacteria concentrations and inhibition effects also helped to get insight into the reaction mechanisms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Interspecific competition effects on phosphorus accumulation by Hydrilla verticillata and Vallisneria natans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufeng Zhang; Zhengwen Liu

    2011-01-01

    The competition between submersed plants has been recognized as an important factor influencing the structure of plant communities in shallow lakes.The ability of different species to take up and store nutrients from the surrounding ambience varies,and hence plant community structure might be expected to affect the cycling of nutrients in lake ecosystems.In this study,the uptake of phosphorus by Hydrilla verticillata and Vallisneria natans was studied and compared in monoculture and competitive mixed-culture plantings.Results showed that for both studied species the phosphorus concentrations of different tissues and of whole plants was unaffected by competition.However,the quantity of phosphorus accumulated by whole plants of H.verticillata was significantly higher in mixture culture than in monoculture,while that of V.natans was lower in the mixed culture.The results indicated that H.verticillata has a competitive advantage over V.natant,when the two species are grown in competition,and is able to accumulate a greater quantity of phosphorus.

  6. Development and evaluation of a regional, large-scale interprofessional collaborative care summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Edward F; Clarke, Virginia; Szarek, John L; Waters, Sharon K; Walline, Vera; Shea, Diane; Goss, Sheryl; Farrell, Marian; Easton, Diana; Dunleavy, Erin; Arscott, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The Northeastern/Central Pennsylvania Interprofessional Education Coalition (NECPA IPEC) is a coalition of faculty from multiple smaller academic institutions with a mission to promote interprofessional education. An interprofessional learning program was organized, which involved 676 learners from 10 different institutions representing 16 unique professions, and took place at seven different institutions simultaneously. The program was a 3-hour long summit which focused on the management of a patient with ischemic stroke. A questionnaire consisting of the Interprofessional Education Perception Scale (IEPS) questionnaire (pre-post summit), Likert-type questions, and open comment questions explored the learners' perceptions of the session and their attitudes toward interprofessional learning. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and statistical tests for difference and qualitative thematic coding. The attitude of learners toward interprofessional education (as measured by the IEPS) was quite high even prior to the summit, so there were no significant changes after the summit. However, a high percentage of learners and facilitators agreed that the summit met its objective and was effective. In addition, the thematic analysis of the open-ended questions confirmed that students learned from the experience with a sense of the core competencies of interprofessional education and practice. A collaborative approach to delivering interprofessional learning is time and work intensive but beneficial to learners.

  7. NATO’s Warsaw Summit: In Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    Increasing Support for Ukraine ................................................................................................. 6 Addressing “ Brexit ” and...exit from the EU, referred to as Brexit , would have negative repercussions for regional security. Since the referendum, these leaders have stressed...as intelligence capabilities or weapons systems. Addressing “ Brexit ” and Expanding NATO-EU Ties As noted above, the Warsaw summit took place just

  8. National Leadership Summit on Military Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    his agency in working with the military to support military families. Dr. Shah had the opportunity earlier in 2009 to visit Kenya as part of...Leadership Summit on Military Families 38 14 can cause health problems, including increasing blood pressure, making asthma and diabetes more severe, and

  9. CCI President Participated in China Cotton Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ On May 7-8 the 2010 China Cotton Summit and the International Cotton Fair were held in Sanya, Hainan Province, China. Mr. Wallace L. Darneille, the new president of Cotton Council International (CCI) made a special trip to China to participate in the event and present on the "cotton and textile supply and demand situation in the U.S."

  10. Summary report UN World Summit 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Fraats (Judith)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis summary report provides an overview of main discussions and outputs of the United Nations World Summit in September 2010, in particular related to information regarding partnerships. The information provided in this report are obtained through an extensive internet search. The

  11. Report from the 2012 European Gender Summit

    CERN Document Server

    European Gender Summit, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Report from the 2012 European Gender Summit to the European Parliament and the Council, the European Commission, the Council of Europe, EU Member and Associate States, Science Institutions. Developing Systematic Implementation Strategy to Advance EU Policy on Gender Equality in Science, as part of HORIZON 2020, European Research Area and Innovation Union.

  12. Geneva summit aims to bridge 'digital divide'

    CERN Multimedia

    Williams, F

    2003-01-01

    "With almost all the political hurdles swept aside in negotiations last weekend, the huge World Summit on the Information Society that opens in Geneva today will be clearly focused on its initial objective - boosting the use of information and communication technologies in the developing world" (1 page).

  13. Global Civil Society and International Summits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas

    2011-01-01

    Research in the field of citizenship, civil society, and social movements in relation to larger democratic summits has either focused on radical confrontational elements of activism, broad public demonstrations, or the professional non-governmental organizations. In this article, I label the type...

  14. Summit firn caves, mount rainier, washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiver, E P; Mumma, M D

    1971-07-23

    Heat and steam from the crater fumaroles have melted over 5700 feet (1737 meters) of cave passage in the ice-filled east crater of Mount Rainier. The caves are in approximate balance with the present geothermal heat release. Future changes in the thermal activity of the summit cone will cause corresponding changes in cave passage dimensions, location, and ceiling and wall ablation features.

  15. Second World Materials Summit Suzhou Declaration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Suzhou 2009 Declaration Clean energy and sustainability are global issues that require international collaboration.Materials play a critical role in addressing these challenges.The Second World Materials Summit in Suzhou provides an avenue to create international cooperation to address energy related materials solutions.Our priorities track the relevant sections of the Kyoto resolution.

  16. CPAFFC Delegation Attends Global Zero Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>CPAFFC President Chen Haosu led a delegation to attend the Global Zero Summit in Paris,France from February 2 to 4.The event aimed to promote a new phase in the"Global Zero"movement:working to reach a binding and verifiable agreement on elimination of all nuclear weapons worldwide.More than 200

  17. ORTHOIMAGERY, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This data set contains imagery from the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP). NAIP acquires digital ortho imagery during the agricultural growing seasons in...

  18. SSC OCIO, IT SUMMIT 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Dinna L.

    2011-01-01

    The Stennis Space Center (SSC) Records Retention Facility is a centralized location for all SSC records, Records Management staff, and the SSC History Office. The building is a storm resistant facility and provides a secure environment for records housing. The Records Retention Facility was constructed in accordance with The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) requirements for records storage, making it the first NARA compliant facility in the agency. Stennis Space Center's Records Retention Facility became operational in May 2010. The SSC Records Retention Facility ensures that the required federal records are preserved, managed and accessible to all interested personnel. The facility provides 20,000 cubic feet of records storage capacity for the purpose of managing the centers consolidated records within a central, protected environment. Records housed in the facility are in the form of paper, optical, film and magnetic media. Located within the SSC Records Retention Facility, the Records Management Office provides comprehensive records management services in the form of: a) Storage and life-cycle management of inactive records of all media types; b) Digitizing/scanning of records and documents; c) Non-textual/digital electronic records media storage, migration and transfer; d) Records Remediation.

  19. Evaluation of uranium removal by Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle from low level nuclear waste under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Bhainsa, K C

    2016-02-01

    The present study evaluated uranium (U) removal ability and tolerance to low level nuclear waste (LLNW) of an aquatic weed Hydrilla verticillata. Plants were screened for growth in 10%-50% waste treatments up to 3 d. Treatments of 20% and 50% waste imposed increasing toxicity with duration assessed in terms of change in fresh weight and in the levels of photosynthetic pigments and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. U concentration, however, did not show a progressive increase and was about 42 μg g(-1) dw from 20% to 50% waste at 3 d. This suggested that a saturation stage was reached with respect to U removal due to increasing toxicity. However, in another experiment with 10% waste and 10% waste+10 ppm U treatments, plants showed an increase in U concentration with the maximum level approaching 426 μg g(-1) dw at 3 d without showing any toxicity as compared to that at 20% and 50% waste treatments. Hence, plants possessed significant potential to take up U and toxicity of LLNW limited their U removal ability. This implies that the use of Hydrilla plants for U removal from LLNW is feasible at low concentrations and would require repeated harvesting at short intervals.

  20. Global Summit on Regulatory Science 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Paul C; Tong, Weida; Weichold, Frank; Healy, Marion; Slikker, William

    2014-12-01

    Regulatory science has been defined as the science that is used to develop regulatory decisions by government bodies. Regulatory science encompasses many scientific disciplines that oversee many studies producing a wide array of data. These may include fundamental research into the cellular interaction or response to a particular chemical or substance, hazard-assessment and dose-response studies in animal species, neurophysiological or neurobehavioral studies, best practices for the generation and analysis of genomics data, bioinformatics approaches, and mathematical modeling of risk. The Global Summit on Regulatory Science is an international conference with a mission to explore emerging and innovative technologies, and provide a platform to enhance translation of basic science into regulatory applications. The Third Global Summit on Regulatory Science which focused on nanotechnology is discussed.

  1. CCI President Participated in China Cotton Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    On May 7-8 the 2010 China Cotton Summit and the International Cotton Fair were held in Sanya,Hainan Province,China.Mr.Wallace L.Darneille, the new president of Cotton Council International(CCI) made a special trip to China to participate in the event and present on the"cotton and textile supply and demand situation in the U.S."

  2. 7th International Polyurethane Summit in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>Tecnon OrbiChem and PUWorld invite you to join us in Xiamen,China for the 7th International Polyurethane Summit on 7-8November 2013.The global polyurethane industry has demonstrated its innovative approach-promoting new applications and technologies and pushing forward bio-based developments.However,the industry still faces huge challenges including a slowdown in the key Chinese PU market,ongoing fragility of the

  3. CERN's Tree of Science at the Summit

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The World Summit on the Information Society held its closing session at Palexpo on 12 December. During the Summit, CERN organised the SIS Forum, the Tree of Science, at Palexpo. Kofi Annan and Tim Berners-Lee, sending a message to 800 schools around the world, from the first Web server will remain one of the abiding images of the Science Stand organised by CERN as part of the World Summit on the Information Society last December. According to its designer, François Fluckiger (IT Department) this stand was not intended purely as an exhibition or as a lecture point but as a forum. Thirty-two scientific institutions throughout the world made their own contributions to the information society over the five days of the exhibition. In all, 42 science projects were exhibited to several thousand visitors under four themes: education and culture; health; environment, development and risks; fundamental sciences and enabling technologies. CERN's stand represented a tree with a trunk in the centre with scre...

  4. Thermal conductivity measurements of Summit polycrystalline silicon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, Rebecca; Kuppers, Jaron D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-11-01

    A capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials using a steady state resistance technique was developed and used to measure the thermal conductivities of SUMMiT{trademark} V layers. Thermal conductivities were measured over two temperature ranges: 100K to 350K and 293K to 575K in order to generate two data sets. The steady state resistance technique uses surface micromachined bridge structures fabricated using the standard SUMMiT fabrication process. Electrical resistance and resistivity data are reported for poly1-poly2 laminate, poly2, poly3, and poly4 polysilicon structural layers in the SUMMiT process from 83K to 575K. Thermal conductivity measurements for these polysilicon layers demonstrate for the first time that the thermal conductivity is a function of the particular SUMMiT layer. Also, the poly2 layer has a different variation in thermal conductivity as the temperature is decreased than the poly1-poly2 laminate, poly3, and poly4 layers. As the temperature increases above room temperature, the difference in thermal conductivity between the layers decreases.

  5. The Ontogeny of Hydrilla verticillata(L.f.)Royle%黑藻早期个体发育的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玫; 王臣; 刘鸣远

    2007-01-01

    对黑藻(Hydrilla verticillata)个体发育中的胚胎发育(从合子到种子胚)和种苗发育(从种子到种苗)进行了研究.发现沉水植物黑藻与挺水植物泽泻(Alisma orientale)在胚柄只有1~2个细胞、种子胚苗端发达根端未分化、萌发后根端始分化、分生区之上产生根环与下胚轴毛、初生根短命等特点上基本相同,并对这些特点进行了讨论.

  6. Effects of chitosan on growth of an aquatic plant (Hydrilla verticillata) in polluted waters with different chemical oxygen demands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Qiu-jin; NIAN Yue-gang; JIN Xiang-can; YAN Chang-zhou; LIU Jin; Jiang Gao-ming

    2007-01-01

    Effects of chitosan on a submersed plant, Hydrilla verticillata, were investigated. Results indicated that H. verticillata could prevent ultrastructure phytotoxicities and oxidativereaction from polluted water with high chemical oxygen demand (COD). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents in H. verticillata treated with 0.1% chitosan in wastewater increased with high COD (980 mg/L) and decreased with low COD (63 mg/L), respectively. Ultrastructural analysis showed that the stroma and grana of chloroplast basically remained normal. However, plant cells from the control experiment (untreated with chitosan) were vacuolated and the cell interval increased. The relict of protoplast moved to the center, with cells tending to disjoint. Our findings indicate that wastewater with high COD concentration can cause a substantial damage to submersed plant, nevertheless, chitosan probably could alleviate the membrane lipid peroxidization and ultrastructure phytotoxicities, and protect plant cells from stress of high COD concentration polluted water.

  7. Evaluation of peroxidase as a biochemical indicator of toxic chemical exposure in the aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata, Royle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byl, T.D.; Sutton, H.D.; Klaine, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the utility of peroxidase (POD) activity as a biochemical indicator of contaminant exposure in the aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata, Royle. The plants were exposed to anthracene, sulfometuron methyl (Oust??), Cd2+, Cr6+, Cu2+, Mn2+, and Se4+ in concentration factors of 10. POD was extracted and measured by spectrophotometric assay. There was a significant increase in POD activity after a 5-d exposure to each of the chemicals at 1 mg/L. The optimum pH for POD activity after exposure to the chemicals was 5.5 to 6.0. The increase in POD was found to be dose dependent for each of the chemicals. The lowest concentration of chemical to induce a significant POD increase was 0.01 mg/L for anthracene, Oust, Cd, Cr, and Cu; 0.1 mg/L for Se; and 1.0 mg/L for Mn.Laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the utility of peroxidase (POD) activity as a biochemical indicator of contaminant exposure in the aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata, Royle. The plants were exposed to anthracene, sulfometuron methyl (Oust), Cd2+, Cr6+, Cu2+, Mn2+, and Se4+ in concentration factors of 10. POD was extracted and measured by spectrophotometric assay. There was a significant increase in POD activity after a 5-d exposure to each of the chemicals at 1 mg/L. The optimum pH for POD activity after exposure to the chemicals was 5.5 to 6.0. The increase in POD was found to be dose dependent for each of the chemicals. The lowest concentration of chemical to induce a significant POD increase was 0.01 mg/L for anthracene, Oust, Cd, Cr, and Cu: 0.1 mg/L for Se; and 1.0 mg/L for Mn.

  8. Manor Summit:Chinese diplomacy upgraded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      “This is the 1st state visit without a 21-gun salute and state banquet.”It indicates that the contents of the meeting are more important than the forms.   Between June 7 and 8, Chinese President Xi Jinping and US President Obama had a meeting at Annenberg Estate, the Sunnylands in California. Without neckties, the two leaders made complete and in-depth communications on domestic and foreign policies, major international and regional issues of common concerns and how to build new type of China-US relationship.   From the idea of“laid-back meeting”between both countries’ leaders, to the practice desire of top levels of both countries, intensive negotiations, coordination and settlement of venue, time and formalities and the joint announcement of this unconventional arrangement…The Manor Summit was smoothly completed within five months.   International issue experts believe that the China-US Manor Summit at California is an important step of both countries to jump out of historical absurd circle and build a new type of major power relationship, and the updated Chinese diplomacy takes into shape.

  9. The global summit on nurse faculty migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Patricia E; Benton, David C; Adams, Elizabeth; Morin, Karen H; Barry, Jean; Prevost, Suzanne S; Vlasich, Cynthia; Oywer, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    As global demand for health care workers burgeons, information is scant regarding the migration of faculty who will train new nurses. With dual roles as clinicians and educators, and corresponding dual sets of professional and legal obligations, nurse faculty may confront unique circumstances in migration that can impact nations' ability to secure an adequate, stable nursing workforce. In a seminal effort to address these concerns, the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International, and the International Council of Nurses invited a diverse group of international experts to a summit designed to elucidate forces that drive nurse faculty migration. The primary areas of consideration were the impact on nurse faculty migration of rapid health care workforce scale-up, international trade agreements, and workforce aging. Long-term summit goals included initiating action affecting national, regional, and global supplies of nurse educators and helping to avert catastrophic failure of health care delivery systems caused by an inadequate ability to educate next-generation nurses.

  10. Preparing for the China-ASEAN Business and Investment Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ On July 3, 2009, liaison of ficers meeting for the Sixth China-ASEAN Business and Investment Summit hosted by CCPIT was hold in Beijing. The summit liaison officers coming from Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam and other countries, the Embassy officials in China of Thailand, Malaysia, Brunei, the Philippines and other countries, and the related Chinese officials, attended the meeting.

  11. Wild Food Summit: Anishinaabe Relearning Traditional Gathering Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Barbara Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Wild Food Summits is a program initiated by Steve Dahlberg, the White Earth Tribal & Community College Extension director. Dahlberg began Wild Food Summits to teach people about identifying and gathering wild greens, mushrooms, and other edible plant life. The whole community comes together to cook and eat the foods. The tribal college has…

  12. Wild Food Summit: Anishinaabe Relearning Traditional Gathering Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Barbara Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Wild Food Summits is a program initiated by Steve Dahlberg, the White Earth Tribal & Community College Extension director. Dahlberg began Wild Food Summits to teach people about identifying and gathering wild greens, mushrooms, and other edible plant life. The whole community comes together to cook and eat the foods. The tribal college has…

  13. 78 FR 36683 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Summit, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Summit, Mississippi AGENCY: Federal Communications... Broadcasting, allots FM Channel 228A ] as a first local service at Summit, Mississippi. To accommodate that... U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting....

  14. 7th International Polyurethane Summit in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>Tecnon OrbiChem and PUWorld invite you to join us in Xiamen,China for the 7th International Polyurethane Summit on 7-8November 2013.The global polyurethane industry has demonstrated its innovative approach-promoting new applications and technologies and pushing forward bio-based developments.However,the industry still faces huge challenges including a slowdown in the key Chinese PU market,ongoing fragility of the European market as well as oversupply of certain raw materials and feedstock volatility.Bright spots include the recovery of the US market,the increased usage in Europe of PU based insulation,and the new raw material plants under construction in the Middle East.What are the prospects for the industry in 2013 and beyond,and how will the markets shift in response to changing global dynamics?

  15. Summit Lake landslide and geomorphic history of Summit Lake basin, northwestern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, B. Brandon; Melhorn, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    The Summit Lake landslide, northwestern Nevada, composed of Early Miocene pyroclastic debris, Ashdown Tuff, and basalt and rhyolite of the Black Rock Range, blocked the upper Soldier Creek-Snow Creek drainage and impounded Summit Lake sometimes prior to 7840 yr B.P. The slide covers 8.2 km2 and has geomorphic features characteristic of long run-out landslides, such as lobate form, longitudinal and transverse ridges, low surface gradient (7.1 ??), and preservation of original stratigraphic position of transported blocks. However, estimated debris volume is the smallest reported (2.5 ?? 105 m3) for a landslide of this type. The outflow channel of the Summit Lake basin was a northward-flowing stream valley entrenched by Mahogany Creek. Subsequent negative tectonic adjustment of the basin by about 35 m, accompanied by concommitant progradation of a prominent alluvial fan deposited by Mahogany Creek, argues for a probable diversion of drainage from the Alvord basin southward into the Lahontan basin. The landslide occurred while the creek flowed southward, transferring about 147 km2 of watershed from the Lahontan basin back to the Alvord basin. Overflow northward occurred during high stands of Pluvial Lake Parman in the basin; otherwise, under drier climates, the Summit Lake basin has been closed. Within large depressions on the slide surface, the ca. 6800 yr old Mazama Bed and other sediments have buried a weakly developed soil. Disseminated humus in the soil yields an age of 7840 ?? 310 yr B.P. Absence of older tephra (such as St. Helens M) brackets the slide age between 7840 and 19,000 yr B.P. Projectile points found on the highest strandlines of Pluvial Lake Parman suggest a ca 8700 yr B.P. age by correlation with cultural artifacts and radiocarbon ages from nearby Last Supper Cave, Nevada. Organic matter accumulation in landslide soils suggests ages ranging from 9100 to 16,250 yr B.P. Estimation of the age of the slide from morphologic data for the isolated Summit

  16. Winter Camp: A Blog from the Greenland Summit, Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Lora

    2009-01-01

    An earlier issue presents the first half of the author's experience living and working at the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Greenland Summit Camp. The author is a remote-sensing glaciologist at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center. She took measurements that will be used to validate data collected by NASA s Aqua, Terra, and Ice, Clouds, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) satellites with ground-truth measurements of the Greenland Ice Sheet she made at Summit Camp from November 2008-February 2009. This article presents excerpts from the second half of her stay and work at the Greenland Summit.

  17. Antarctic Treaty Summit to Focus on Global Science Policy Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkman, Paul Arthur; Walton, David W. H.; Weiler, C. Susan

    2008-10-01

    The Antarctic Treaty Summit, which will coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the treaty's signing, will be held at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, in Washington, D. C., from 30 November to 3 December 2009. The summit will provide an open international forum for scientists, legislators, lawyers, administrators, educators, students, corporate executives, historians, and other members of global civil society to explore science policy achievements from the first 50 years of the Antarctic Treaty. In addition, the summit will complement official government celebrations of the Antarctic Treaty anniversary that do not include public participation.

  18. Regional Overview: Summits Galore, But (Mostly) Business as Usual

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ralph A Cossa; Brad Glosserman

    2016-01-01

    ...) in Seoul and the "non-summit" between Mr. Xi Jinping and Mr. Ma Ying-Jeou who just happen to be the presidents, respectively, of the People's Republic of China and Republic of China, in Singapore. Chinese actions...

  19. Women Leaders of New Asia Summit Held in Zhenjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>With women now playing a wider role in world development each passing day, much attention was focused on the 2012 "Women Leaders of New Asia Summit", held in Zhenjiang, Jiangsu Province, April 19-21.

  20. 2009 APEC SME Summit Held in Hangzhou,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ On September 11th 2009,2009 APEC SME Summit,themed by "small enterprises,big dreams" was held in Hangzhou,China.Entrepreneur delegates trom 21 Asian-pacltiC countries and regions gathered in Hangzhou,discussing the issues concerning the development of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) and sorting out the experience for the SME to bottom out of the recession.Zhang Wei,Vice Chairman of CCPIT attended and addressed the summit.

  1. Packed-bed column biosorption of chromium(VI) and nickel(II) onto Fenton modified Hydrilla verticillata dried biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Tripathi, Brahma Dutt; Rai, Ashwani Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The present study represents the first attempt to investigate the biosorption potential of Fenton modified Hydrilla verticillata dried biomass (FMB) in removing chromium(VI) and nickel(II) ions from wastewater using up-flow packed-bed column reactor. Effects of different packed-bed column parameters such as bed height, flow rate, influent metal ion concentration and particle size were examined. The outcome of the column experiments illustrated that highest bed height (25cm); lowest flow rate (10mLmin(-1)), lowest influent metal concentration (5mgL(-1)) and smallest particle size range (0.25-0.50mm) are favourable for biosorption. The maximum biosorption capacity of FMB for chromium(VI) and nickel(II) removal were estimated to be 89.32 and 87.18mgg(-1) respectively. The breakthrough curves were analyzed using Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) and Thomas models. The experimental results obtained agree to both the models. Column regeneration experiments were also carried out using 0.1M HNO3. Results revealed good reusability of FMB during ten cycles of sorption and desorption. Performance of FMB-packed column in treating secondary effluent was also tested under identical experimental conditions. Results demonstrated significant reduction in chromium(VI) and nickel(II) ions concentration after the biosorption process.

  2. G8 SUMMIT MEETING AT EVIAN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Swiss and French authorities have informed CERN that plans are in hand for the safety and traffic arrangements associated with the G8 Summit Meeting, which will be held in Evian between 1 and 3 June 2003. Detailed information will be communicated in the coming weeks. However, changes to traffic arrangements on certain sections of the road network in the Canton of Geneva (particularly the left bank) and the neighbouring parts of France (specially Haute-Savoie) from 22 May 2003 can already be predicted. All pertinent information and any recommendations by the authorities concerned will be brought to the attention of the personnel as soon as possible. In the mean time, those concerned can consult the various Web sites devoted to this event, especially: - http://www.g8.fr/evian/english/home.html (French site); - http://www.g8info.ch/accueil.htm (Swiss site). Relations with the Host States Service http://www.cern.ch/relations/ Tel. 72848

  3. Antarctic Treaty Summit: Washington, DC (2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkman, P. A.; Young, O. R.

    2005-12-01

    Advancement in Earth system science and international cooperation have been intertwined with the International Polar Years since 1882. In particular, the 3rd International Polar Year (which was convened as the International Geophysical Year from 1 July 1957 through 31 December 1958) specifically demonstrates the role of science in international policy: Acknowledging the substantial contributions to scientific knowledge resulting from international cooperation in scientific investigation in Antarctica; Convinced that the establishment of a firm foundation for the continuation and development of such cooperation on the basis of freedom of scientific investigation in Antarctica as applied during the International Geophysical Year accords with the interests of science and the progress of all mankind; Preamble, 1959 Antarctic Treaty To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1959 Antarctic Treaty and to explore the complexities of the science-policy relationship through the lens of a well-constrained case study, an international and interdisciplinary Antarctic Treaty Summit is being planned for 2009 in Washington, DC in conjunction with the International Polar Year 2007-08 (http://www.ipy.org).

  4. Removal of Organochlorine Pesticides by Hydrilla verticillata%黑藻对有机氯农药去除特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迟杰; 张雷; 吴万秀

    2011-01-01

    The potential function of hydrophytes for field bioremediation has been more and more concerned. In this work, a common hydrophyte, Hydrilla verticillata was selected to investigate its ability to remove α-HCH, γ-HCH and p,p'-DDT. The results showed that the biodegradation of α-HCH, γ-HCH and p,p'-DDT by Hydrilla verticillata followed first-order kinetics, and biodegradation rate constants were 0.086, 0.103 d-1 and 0.077 d-1, respectively. The bioconcentration factors of α-HCH, γ-HCH and p,p'-DDT by Hydrilla verticillata were significantly higher than 1, and in the order of p,p'-DDT>γ-HCH>α-HCH, α-HCH, γ-HCH and p,p'-DDT were mainly enriched in leaf. p,p'-DDD, the anaerobic product of p,p'-DDT, was detected in the experiment samples.%水生植物在水体污染修复中所起的作用越来越受到关注.采用室内培养方法,选取常见水生植物黑藻对α-HCH、γ-HCH和p,p′-DDT的去除特性进行了研究.结果表明,黑藻对α-HCH、γ-HCH和p,p′-DDT的降解符合一级反应动力学,降解速率常数分别为0.086、0.103 d-1和0.077 d-1;α-HCH、γ-HCH和p,p′-DDT在黑藻中的富集系数均显著大于1,顺序为p,p′-DDT>γ-HCH>α-HCH,主要富集在叶中;实验样品中均检出有p,p′-DDT的厌氧降解产物p,p′-DDD生成.

  5. A knowledge base system for multidisciplinary model-based water management, Summit on Environmentel Modelling and Software, 3rd Biennial meeting of the International Environmental Modelling and Software Society, Burlington, Vermont, USA, July 9-12, 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassahun, A.; Scholten, H.

    2006-01-01

    To improve the quality of multidisciplinary model-based water management studies and provide guidance on best practices, a user-friendly guidance and quality assurance knowledge-based system has been built within the EU funded HarmoniQuA project. The knowledge base system provides experts and experi

  6. A knowledge base system for multidisciplinary model-based water management, Summit on Environmentel Modelling and Software, 3rd Biennial meeting of the International Environmental Modelling and Software Society, Burlington, Vermont, USA, July 9-12, 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassahun, A.; Scholten, H.

    2006-01-01

    To improve the quality of multidisciplinary model-based water management studies and provide guidance on best practices, a user-friendly guidance and quality assurance knowledge-based system has been built within the EU funded HarmoniQuA project. The knowledge base system provides experts and

  7. News from the Breath Analysis Summit 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2012-06-01

    This special section highlights some of the important work presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2011, which was held in Parma (Italy) from 11 to 14 September 2011. The meeting, which was jointly organized by the International Association for Breath Research and the University of Parma, was attended by more than 250 delegates from 33 countries, and offered 34 invited lectures and 64 unsolicited scientific contributions. The summit was organized to provide a forum to scientists, engineers and clinicians to present their latest findings and to meet industry executives and entrepreneurs to discuss key trends, future directions and technologies available for breath analysis. A major focus was on nitric oxide, exhaled breath condensate, electronic nose, mass spectrometry and newer sensor technologies. Medical applications ranged from asthma and other respiratory diseases to gastrointestinal disease, occupational diseases, critical care and cancer. Most people identify breath tests with breathalysers used by police to estimate ethanol concentration in blood. However, breath testing has far more sophisticated applications. Breath analysis is rapidly evolving as a new frontier in medical testing for disease states in the lung and beyond. Every individual has a breath fingerprint-or 'breathprint'-that can provide useful information about his or her state of health. This breathprint comprises the many thousands of molecules that are expelled with each breath we exhale. Breath research in the past few years has uncovered the scientific and molecular basis for such clinical observations. Relying on mass spectrometry, we have been able to identify many such unique substances in exhaled breath, including gases, such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), and a wide array of volatile organic compounds. Exhaled breath also carries aerosolized droplets that can be collected as an exhaled breath condensate that contains endogenously produced non-volatile compounds. Breath

  8. Redox state and energetic equilibrium determine the magnitude of stress in Hydrilla verticillata upon exposure to arsenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Suprasanna, Penna; D'Souza, Stanislaus Francis

    2011-10-01

    Arsenic (As) is a potential hazard to plants' health, however the mechanisms of its toxicity are yet to be properly understood. To determine the impact of redox state and energetic in stress imposition, plants of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle, which are known to be potential accumulator of As, were exposed to 100 and 500 μM arsenate (AsV) for 4 to 96 h. Plants demonstrated significant As accumulation with the maximum being at 500 μM after 96 h (568 μg g(-1) dry weight, dw). The accumulation of As led to a significant increase in the level of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, carbonyl, malondialdehyde, and percentage of DNA degradation. In addition, the activity of pro-oxidant enzymes like NADPH oxidase and ascorbate oxidase also showed significant increases. These parameters collectively indicated oxidative stress, which in turn caused an increase in percentage of cell death. These negative effects were seemingly linked to an altered energetic and redox equilibrium [analyzed in terms of ATP/ADP, NADH/NAD, NADPH/NADP, reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione, and ascorbate/dehydroascobate ratios]. Although there was significant increase in the levels of phytochelatins, the As chelating ligands, a large amount of As was presumably present as free ion particularly at 500 μM AsV, which supposedly produced toxic responses. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that the magnitude of disturbance to redox and energetic equilibrium of plants upon AsV exposure determines the extent of toxicity to plants.

  9. Copper-induced oxidative stress and responses of antioxidants and phytochelatins in Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Mishra, Seema; Tripathi, Rudra D; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Gupta, Dharmendra K

    2006-12-30

    Copper, though essential, is potentially toxic heavy metal at supraoptimal level and has widespread contamination. The present investigation was carried out to study the responses induced by lower as well as higher doses of copper (0.1-25 microM) in an aquatic macrophyte, Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle for a period of 1-7 days. The plants accumulated copper in high amount with a maximum of 770 microg g(-1) dw on day 7 at 25 microM. Biomass and photosynthetic pigments showed less alteration up to 1 microM while at higher concentrations, significant decline occurred. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content and electrical conductivity (EC) also showed sharp increase at higher concentrations indicating oxidative stress. In response to copper exposure, plants showed significant induction of proteins and enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR), however, only up to moderate exposures. Total non-protein thiols (NP-SH) and cysteine levels increased significantly up to 5 microM copper exposure while at 25 microM, their level declined drastically. Reduced glutathione (GSH) showed decrease at all concentrations while oxidized glutathione (GSSG) simultaneously increased. Phytochelatins (PCs) were also induced significantly at studied concentrations of 1 and 5 microM on day 4 in comparison to control. However, copper chelation depicted by PC-SH to copper ratio was found to be low (6.5% at 1 microM and 2.4% at 5 microM) suggesting that PCs play only a part in integrated mechanisms of copper homeostasis and detoxification. Tolerant response of plants to moderate copper exposures and high accumulation potential warrants their suitability for remediation of moderately copper polluted water bodies.

  10. Phytochelatins and antioxidant systems respond differentially during arsenite and arsenate stress in Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S; Mishra, S; Tripathi, R D; Dwivedi, S; Trivedi, P K; Tandon, P K

    2007-04-15

    Serious contamination of aquatic systems by arsenic (As) in different parts of the world calls for the development of an in situ cost-effective phytoremediation technology. In the present investigation, plants of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle were exposed to various concentrations of arsenate (As(V)) (0-250 microM) and arsenite (AsIII) (0-25 microM) and analyzed for accumulation responses vis-à-vis biochemical changes. Total As accumulation was found to be higher in plants exposed to AsIII (315 microg g(-1) dw at 25 microM) compared to As(V) (205 microg g(-1) dw at 250 microM) after 7 d of treatment. Plants tolerated low concentrations of As(III) and As(V) by detoxifying the metalloid through augmented synthesis of thiols such as phytochelatins and through increased activity of antioxidant enzymes. While As(V) predominantly stimulated antioxidant enzyme activity, As(III) primarily caused enhanced levels of thiols. The maximum amount of As chelated by PCs was found to be about 39% in plants exposed to As(III) (at 10 microM) and 35% in As(V) exposed plants (at 50 microM) after 4 d. Only the respective highest concentrations of As(III) (25 microM) and As(V) (250 microM) proved toxic for normal plant growth after prolonged treatment. Thus, H. verticillata forms a promising candidate for the phytoremediation of As contaminated water.

  11. Recent warming at Summit, Greenland: Global context and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Daniel; Colgan, William; Bayou, Nicolas; Muto, Atsuhiro; Steffen, Konrad

    2013-05-01

    at Summit, Greenland suggest that the annual mean near-surface air temperature increased at 0.09 ± 0.01°C/a over the 1982-2011 climatology period. This rate of warming, six times the global average, places Summit in the 99th percentile of all globally observed warming trends over this period. The rate of warming at Summit is increasing over time. During the instrumental period (1987-2011), warming has been greatest in the winter season, although the implications of summer warming are more acute. The annual maximum elevation of the equilibrium line and dry snow line has risen at 44 and 35 m/a over the past 15 and 18 years, respectively. Extrapolation of this observed trend now suggests, with 95% confidence intervals, that the dry snow facies of the Greenland Ice Sheet will inevitably transition to percolation facies. There is a 50% probability of this transition occurring by 2025.

  12. NATO’s Wales Summit: Expected Outcomes and Key Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-26

    September 4-5, the leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s ( NATO ) 28 member states will meet in Wales for the alliance’s 2014 summit. This...the planned completion by the end of 2014 of NATO’s mission in Afghanistan, the longest and most ambitious operation in NATO history. As such, some...analysts portray the summit as an opportunity to consider a possible strategic shift for NATO , away from the broad, “out of area” focus embodied by

  13. 77 FR 6534 - Malheur National Forest; Oregon; Summit Logan Grazing Authorization Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... Forest Service Malheur National Forest; Oregon; Summit Logan Grazing Authorization Project AGENCY: Forest... authorize livestock grazing on all or portions of the Lake Creek, Logan Valley, McCoy Creek and Summit... watersheds. The Summit Logan Grazing Authorization Project area is located south and west of Prairie...

  14. Reaching the Summit: Deaf Adults as Essential Partners in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne-Firl, Bridgetta

    2016-01-01

    How do we reach the summit in terms of supporting the best transition possible for each young deaf or hard of hearing individual in the United States? Should professionals who are hearing work alone to succeed with deaf and hard of hearing students? No matter how good the intention, if we want deaf and hard of hearing students to transition from…

  15. World summit urged to make science more available

    CERN Multimedia

    Mantell, K

    2003-01-01

    "Scientific information should be made more easily and freely available, especially to researchers and others in developing countries. That is one of the key messages that the scientific community is sending the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), which opens in Geneva, Switzerland, today" (1 page)

  16. 76 FR 52670 - 2011 Technology Transfer Summit North America Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health 2011 Technology Transfer Summit North America Conference...: The NIH Office of Technology Transfer extends invitations to attend the 2011 Technology Transfer... by the NIH Office of Technology Transfer, TTS Ltd. and regional host partners such as BIO Maryland...

  17. The Summit Forum on Food of 2005 Held in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ On Feb. 2, the summit forum on food of 2005 was held in Beijing. Attending the forum were: persons in charge, experts and scholars from the relevant departments of the China national government, the professional association and the scientific research institute, and the leaders of domestic well-known food enterprises.

  18. Sourcing USA Summit Engages Global Cotton Industry Leaders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    From November 9-12,the"6th Biennial Sourcing USA Summit,"organized by Cotton Council International and Cotton Incorporated and with the support of the U.S.cotton industry and USDA, took place at Terranea in Rancho Palos Verdes,

  19. CPAFFC Delegation Attends "Climate& Territories" Summit in France

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo; Fengqiang

    2015-01-01

    At the Climate and Territories world summit held in Lyon in July 2015,French President Francois Hollande applauded China’s commitment to reducing carbon intensity in the process of its economic growth.In his speech made after the"Mayor’s Round Table".Hollande said more than 40 countries had made promises

  20. 77 FR 23203 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Summit, MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Summit, MS AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission.... The Commission requests comment on a petition filed by Bowen Broadcasting, proposing to amend the...., Officer, Bowen Broadcasting, 1125 Petrified Forest Road, Flora, Mississippi 39071. FOR FURTHER...

  1. Women's human rights at the World Summit for Social Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, S

    1995-01-01

    The Copenhagen Hearing on Economic Justice and Women's Human Rights was held on March 7, 1995 in conjunction with the NGO (nongovernmental organization) Forum during the UN World Summit on Social Development (the Social Summit). During the Copenhagen Hearing, 10 women from around the world testified on a wide range of topics connected with the issue of providing tangible meaning to the indivisibility of women's human rights. Also emphasized was the complexity of the US government in perpetrating abuses against women's human rights, either directly or indirectly. The NGO Forum resulted in several hundred NGOs signing The Quality Benchmark for the Social Summit and The Copenhagen Alternative Declaration, which pointed out the need to critique conventional economic and social policies. While many of the concerns raised at the NGO Forum were not reflected in the Summit's Programme of Action, one of the Programme's 10 commitments called for the promotion of gender equality and improvement in the status of women. The Programme also recognized the burden placed on women by poverty and social disintegration; accepted a broad definition of "family"; called for a quantitative consideration of the value of unremunerated work; and advanced the rights of workers in general, migrant workers, and indigenous people. The capacity of NGOs and other grassroots groups to demand implementation of international agreements and adherence to international human rights standards was also strengthened. Specifically, such groups may urge governments to 1) meet with women's NGOs to discuss implementation of the Social Summit Declaration and Programme of Action; 2) make a national commitment to implement the Platform of Action of the Fourth World Conference on Women; and 3) commit to the Pledge to Gender Justice, particularly to the implementation of international agreements in local and national laws and policies.

  2. Recommendations from NASA's Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. A.; Johnson-Throop, K. A.; Scheuring, R. A.; Walton, M. E.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Smaka, T.; McCulley, P. A.; Jones, J. A.; Stokes, C. R.; Parker, K. K.; Wear, M.; Johnson-Throop, K. A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Continuously evolving medical standards of care, limited crew training time, and the inherent constraints of space flight necessitate regular revisions of the mission medical support infrastructure and methodology. A three-day Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit was held to review NASA s current strategy for preflight health maintenance and injury screening, risk mitigation for musculoskeletal injuries or syndromes, treatment methods during flight, and research topics to mitigate risks to astronaut health. The Summit also undertook consideration of the best evidence-based terrestrial musculoskeletal practices to recommend their adaptation for use in space. Methods: The types and frequencies of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by short- and long-duration astronauts were obtained from the Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health. The Summit panel was comprised of experts from the clinical and research communities, as well as representatives from NASA Headquarters, the Astronaut corps, and the offices of JSC Medical Operations, JSC Human Adaptation and Countermeasures, Glenn Research Center Human Research, and Astronaut Strength Conditioning and Rehabilitation. Before the summit, panelists participated in a Web-based review of NASA s Space Medical Conditions List (SMCL). Results: The Summit generated seventy-five operational and research recommendations to the NASA Office of Space Medicine, including changes to the SMCL and to the musculoskeletal section of the ISS debrief questionnaire. From these recommendations, seven were assigned highest value and priority, and could be immediately adopted for the exploration architecture. Discussion: Optimized exercise and conditioning to improve performance and forestall musculoskeletal damage on orbit were the primary area of focus. Special attention was paid to exercise timing and muscle group specificity. The panel s recommendations are currently in various stages of consideration or integration

  3. Monitoring of stage and velocity, for computation of discharge in the Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois, 2010-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin K.; Goodwin, Greg E.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Michigan diversion accounting is the process used by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers to quantify the amount of water that is diverted from the Lake Michigan watershed into the Illinois and Mississippi River Basins. A network of streamgages within the Chicago area waterway system monitor tributary river flows and the major river flow on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal near Lemont as one of the instrumental tools used for Lake Michigan diversion accounting. The mean annual discharges recorded by these streamgages are used as additions or deductions to the mean annual discharge recorded by the main stream gaging station currently used in the Lake Michigan diversion accounting process, which is the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal near Lemont, Illinois (station number 05536890). A new stream gaging station, Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois (station number 414757087490401), was installed on September 23, 2010, for the purpose of monitoring stage, velocity, and discharge through the Summit Conduit for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in accordance with Lake Michigan diversion accounting. Summit Conduit conveys flow from a small part of the lower Des Plaines River watershed underneath the Des Plaines River directly into the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal. Because the Summit Conduit discharges into the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal upstream from the stream gaging station at Lemont, Illinois, but does not contain flow diverted from the Lake Michigan watershed, it is considered a flow deduction to the discharge measured by the Lemont stream gaging station in the Lake Michigan diversion accounting process. This report offers a technical summary of the techniques and methods used for the collection and computation of the stage, velocity, and discharge data at the Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois stream gaging station for the 2011 and 2012 Water Years. The stream gaging station Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois (station number 414757087490401) is an

  4. INFORMATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS CONCERNING THE ENLARGED G8 SUMMIT MEETING AT EVIAN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Despite the difficulties that CERN might encounter, the Organization will pursue its activities for the duration of the G8 Summit Meeting. The Management and Division leaders will take the necessary steps to ensure the proper functioning of the Organization, while taking account of the aforementioned difficulties. The Swiss and French authorities have informed CERN of the following general security and traffic arrangements associated with the enlarged G8 summit: a) Road traffic Between 22 May and 6 June traffic on certain roads in the Canton of Geneva (notably on the left bank) and in neighbouring France (mainly Haute-Savoie) will be disrupted and, in some cases, roads closed. As far as border crossings between 22 May and 4 June are concerned, the frontier posts will be divided into three categories (see map): - posts closed to all traffic (diversion signs will be in place), - posts open at certain times, - posts open at all times. N.B. : the road from Prévessin to Mategnin will be closed and traffic div...

  5. The Pharma Summit 2010: competing in the future healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibble, Alexandra

    2010-04-01

    The Pharma Summit 2010, held in London, included topics covering the future changes and developments that are expected in the pharmaceutical industry. This conference report highlights selected presentations on various visions for the future of the pharma industry, the expected revolution in healthcare, changes with patients driving healthcare innovation, the future of healthcare technology, and the outlook for the global economy and emerging markets in the pharma industry.

  6. [The Washington summit: orange light for genome editing?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-02-01

    The summit organised in early December 2015 considered in depth the various issues (technical, scientific, societal and ethical) raised by the prospect of genome editing using the extremely effective CRISPR system. Germline editing (for therapeutic or "enhancement" purposes) was stated to be irresponsible under current conditions, but the possibility that this could be considered in the future was not excluded; a mechanism for monitoring progress and possibly revising recommendations was proposed. © 2016 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  7. Papers of the green building opportunities summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This conference focused on developing strategies and opportunities for sustainable development in residential and commercial buildings. Current environmental policies were examined, as well as rating systems, conservation standards and green building codes and regulations. Design practices and construction processes were also presented, with case studies of significant buildings that incorporated green building practices. Market demand and supply issues were also a focus, including the priorities of local government. An examination of global practices in sustainable building was presented. Details of recent developments in the private sector and new trends in resource management were also given. The conference featured 14 presentations, of which 6 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  8. Climate Monitoring Network on Maunakea - Master Station at Summit and Lower Elevation Satellite Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, M. M.; Klasner, F.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Businger, S.

    2014-12-01

    Maunakea, a dormant shield volcano on the Big Island of Hawai'i, rises 13,796 feet above sea level, making it the highest point in the Pacific Basin. From sea floor to summit, it's the tallest mountain in the world. The high elevation, low air and light pollution, as well as dry weather year round make it the best location in the world for astronomy observations. The summit is home to 13 ground based telescope facilities. Like all alpine regions, it is an extremely fragile and unique ecosystem because of the harsh conditions and short growing seasons located at high altitudes. The summit is home to several federal and/or state protected species. It supports 11 species of arthropods found nowhere else on Earth. Most noted of these is the Wēkiu bug, whose habitat has been altered by the infrastructural development on the mountain. Arthropod habitat model development has highlighted gaps in climate information, for example, lack of climate precipitation data, snow data and reliable temperature data. Furthermore, in tropical regions, precipitation is the most variable climate component due to topography and local winds. The telescopes collect weather data for the purpose of knowing when it is dry and clear for astronomical observation. Although existing weather stations associated with the telescopes meet some weather and climate monitoring needs, it cannot address the full range of issues needed due to technological limitation and site design. Precipitation does not occur often and is likely to be in the form of snow or ice. Snow cover data has not been directly recorded despite astronomical recording of other meteorological data that began in the1960s. Therefore, the need to monitor the weather and climate in a long-term and well-calibrated way is critical for management of the ecosystems on the slopes of Maunakea. Long-term weather and climate monitoring stations are the primary building blocks for research partnerships, which encourage collaboration and ultimately

  9. Detecting vegetation cover change on the summit of Cadillac Mountain using multi-temporal remote sensing datasets: 1979, 2001, and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Kook; Daigle, John J

    2011-09-01

    This study examines the efficacy of management strategies implemented in 2000 to reduce visitor-induced vegetation impact and enhance vegetation recovery at the summit loop trail on Cadillac Mountain at Acadia National Park, Maine. Using single-spectral high-resolution remote sensing datasets captured in 1979, 2001, and 2007, pre-classification change detection analysis techniques were applied to measure fractional vegetation cover changes between the time periods. This popular sub-alpine summit with low-lying vegetation and attractive granite outcroppings experiences dispersed visitor use away from the designated trail, so three pre-defined spatial scales (small, 0-30 m; medium, 0-60 m; and large, 0-90 m) were examined in the vicinity of the summit loop trail with visitor use (experimental site) and a site chosen nearby in a relatively pristine undisturbed area (control site) with similar spatial scales. Results reveal significant changes in terms of rates of vegetation impact between 1979 and 2001 extending out to 90 m from the summit loop trail with no management at the site. No significant differences were detected among three spatial zones (inner, 0-30 m; middle, 30-60 m; and outer, 60-90 m) at the experimental site, but all were significantly higher rates of impact compared to similar spatial scales at the control site (all p vegetation impact and enhance vegetation recovery at the summit loop trail of Cadillac Mountain since 2000. However, the vegetation recovery has been rather minimal and did not reach the level of cover observed during the 1979 time period. In addition, the advantages and some limitations of using remote sensing technologies are discussed in detecting vegetation change in this setting and potential application to other recreation settings.

  10. World Summit for Social Development: year-end update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasek, P; Schmidt, C; Jordan, R

    1995-12-18

    This report is devoted to the follow-up activities of the 50th UN General Assembly pertaining to Copenhagen's World Summit for Social Development's Program of Action, which was adopted by the Conference on March 12, 1995. Summaries are provided of the background history to the Summit, the activities of the UN Commission for Social Development, the Economic and Social Council meetings, and General Assembly delegate discussion. The draft resolution on the implementation of the World Summit on Social Development generated lengthy discussions and was expected to be adopted by the General Assembly Plenary before adjournment in December 22, 1995. Follow-up under the draft resolution is expected to include the joint actions within the UN system of the General Assembly, the ECOSOC, and the Commission for Social Development. The resolution includes an overall review and appraisal of UN progress in implementing Copenhagen's Declaration and Program of Action, which will occur in the year 2000. The draft resolution urges the Secretary-General, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund to study the impact of structural adjustment programs on economic and social development. Nine other specific directives are listed in the draft resolution. Related activities for 1996 are identified as a special meeting of the Commission on Social Development, which is scheduled for May 21-30, 1996, in New York. The meeting will discuss the strategies for poverty alleviation, meeting human needs, and promotion of self-reliance and community-based initiatives. Norway has initiated a planning meeting of three developed and three developing country representatives on a future conference. The conference would work towards a common definition of basic social programs, the implementation of the 20:20 concept, and ways to monitor implementation. Denmark is planning international seminars on social development issues.

  11. Coordination and Convening of the 2016 Arctic Science Summit Week

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinzman, Larry D. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    2016-11-13

    The Arctic Science Summit Week, Arctic Observing Summit, Arctic Council Senior Arctic Officials, Model Arctic Council, and International Arctic Assembly were convened on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks with great productivity and satisfaction of the participants. We were pleased to welcome over 1000 participants from 30 different nations and over 130 different institutions. The organization and execution of these meetings was extensive and complex involving more than 250 coordinators, volunteers and contributors from across Alaska. The participants were enthusiastic in their praise of the content and accomplishments of the meeting, but they were equally happy about the genuine welcome offered to our guests by the people of Alaska. Hosting a complex event such as this summit required an army of supporting services and we were blessed to have volunteers from Fairbanks, North Pole, Anchorage and other communities throughout Alaska helping us meet these needs. This truly was an event hosted by the people of Alaska. The significance of these events cannot be overstated. The US and global communities are finally coming to the realization of the important role that the Arctic plays in international politics, economics, and science. The Arctic has experienced tremendous changes in recent years, offering new opportunities that may be addressed through international collaborations, and serious challenges that must be addressed through active investment, adaptation and national and international coordination. Over 10% of the meeting participants were indigenous peoples, from indigenous organizations or hailed from small remote communities. This is still lower than we had hoped, but it is greater participation than similar meetings have experienced in the past. It is through such engagement that we can attack problems related to the changing environment, stagnant economies, and social ills.

  12. Climate Change Student Summits: A Model that Works (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    The C2S2: Climate Change Student Summit project has completed four years of activities plus a year-long longitudinal evaluation with demonstrated positive impacts beyond the life of the project on both students and teachers. This presentation will share the lessons learned about implementing this climate change science education program and suggest that it is a successful model that can be used to scale up from its Midwestern roots to achieve measurable national impact. A NOAA Environmental Literacy grant allowed ANDRILL (ANtarctic geological DRILLing) to grow a 2008 pilot program involving 2 Midwestern sites, to a program 4 years later involving 10 sites. The excellent geographical coverage included 9 of the U.S. National Climate Assessment regions defined by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Through the delivery of two professional development (PD) workshops, a unique opportunity was provided for both formal and informal educators to engage their classrooms/audiences in understanding the complexities of climate change. For maximum contact hours, the PD experience was extended throughout the school year through the use of an online grouphub. Student teams were involved in a creative investigative science research and presentation experience culminating in a Climate Change Student Summit, an on-site capstone event including a videoconference connecting all sites. The success of this program was based on combining multiple aspects, such as encouraging the active involvement of scientists and early career researchers both in the professional development workshops and in the Student Summit. Another key factor was the close working relationships between informal and formal science entities, including involvement of informal science learning facilities and informal science education leaders. The program also created cutting-edge curriculum materials titled the ELF, (Environmental Literacy Framework with a focus on climate change), providing an earth systems

  13. Report of the 2014 Programming Models and Environments Summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Lethin, Richard [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-19

    Programming models and environments play the essential roles in high performance computing of enabling the conception, design, implementation and execution of science and engineering application codes. Programmer productivity is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of our programming models and environments, as is software sustainability since our codes have lifespans measured in decades, so the advent of new computing architectures, increased concurrency, concerns for resilience, and the increasing demands for high-fidelity, multi-physics, multi-scale and data-intensive computations mean that we have new challenges to address as part of our fundamental R&D requirements. Fortunately, we also have new tools and environments that make design, prototyping and delivery of new programming models easier than ever. The combination of new and challenging requirements and new, powerful toolsets enables significant synergies for the next generation of programming models and environments R&D. This report presents the topics discussed and results from the 2014 DOE Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Programming Models & Environments Summit, and subsequent discussions among the summit participants and contributors to topics in this report.

  14. Proceedings of the clean air and climate change summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The Clean Air Partnership was established in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) over 10 years ago to work on issues related to air pollution and climate change. This summit presented details of the partnership's municipal activities and provided an outline of various projects conducted to reduce air pollution, increase the use of green energy, and encourage residents to reduce their ecological footprint. Climate change was discussed in relation to the recent economic crisis and recently discovered problems related to ocean acidification. The International Energy Agency (IEA) annual report was discussed in relation to peak oil and future economic crises. Advancements in green energy policy in Ontario were outlined. Sustainable housing and renewable energy projects in Germany were presented along with successful urban designs in Melbourne, New York City, and Denver. The GTA-CAC inter-governmental declaration on clean air was discussed, and an interim progress report was presented. The summit concluded with a video presentation of a collaborative artistic piece about climate change and the Arctic. 11 figs.

  15. Hydrothermal activity on the summit of Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, H.; Tsubota, H.; Nakai, T.; Ishibashi, J.; Akagi, T.; Gamo, T.; Tilbrook, B.; Igarashi, G.; Kodera, M.; Shitashima, K.

    1987-01-01

    Loihi Seamount is located about 30km southeast of the Island of Hawaii; it rises from the sea floor at a depth of 4000m and reaches a maximum elevation of 1000m blow sea level. Oceanographic studies including CTD survey of warm sites and bottom photography confirmed several hydrothermal fields on the summit of the seamount. The summit is covered with hydrothermal plumes which are extremely rich in methane, helium, carbon dioxide, iron and manganese; the maximum concentration of helium is 91.8 n1/1, the highest so far reported for open-ocean water. The /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio of helium injected into seawater is 14 times the atmospheric level. The 3He/heat and CO/sub 2//heat ratios in the plumes are one to two orders of magnitude greater than those at oceanic spreading centers, implying a more primitive source region for hotspot volcanism. The plumes also show negative pH anomalies up to half a pH unit from ambient owing to the high injection rate of CO/sub 2/. (4 figs, 3 photos, 1 tab, 31 refs)

  16. LSST summit facility construction progress report: reacting to design refinements and field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jeffrey D.; Gressler, William; Sebag, Jacques; Seriche, Jaime; Serrano, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    The civil work, site infrastructure and buildings for the summit facility of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) are among the first major elements that need to be designed, bid and constructed to support the subsequent integration of the dome, telescope, optics, camera and supporting systems. As the contracts for those other major subsystems now move forward under the management of the LSST Telescope and Site (T and S) team, there has been inevitable and beneficial evolution in their designs, which has resulted in significant modifications to the facility and infrastructure. The earliest design requirements for the LSST summit facility were first documented in 2005, its contracted full design was initiated in 2010, and construction began in January, 2015. During that entire development period, and extending now roughly halfway through construction, there continue to be necessary modifications to the facility design resulting from the refinement of interfaces to other major elements of the LSST project and now, during construction, due to unanticipated field conditions. Changes from evolving interfaces have principally involved the telescope mount, the dome and mirror handling/coating facilities which have included significant variations in mass, dimensions, heat loads and anchorage conditions. Modifications related to field conditions have included specifying and testing alternative methods of excavation and contending with the lack of competent rock substrate where it was predicted to be. While these and other necessary changes are somewhat specific to the LSST project and site, they also exemplify inherent challenges related to the typical timeline for the design and construction of astronomical observatory support facilities relative to the overall development of the project.

  17. Proceedings from the Ice Hockey Summit on concussion: a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A; Stuart, M; Greenwald, R; Benson, B; Dodick, D; Emery, C; Finnoff, J; Mihalik, J; Roberts, W; Sullivan, C A; Meeuwisse, W

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this proceedings is to integrate the concussion in sport literature and sport science research on safety in ice hockey to develop an action plan to reduce the risk, incidence, severity, and consequences of concussion in ice hockey. A rationale paper outlining a collaborative action plan to address concussions in hockey was posted for review two months prior to the Ice Hockey Summit: Action on Concussion. Focused presentations devoted specifically to concussion in ice hockey were presented during the Summit and breakout sessions were used to develop strategies to reduce concussion in the sport. This proceedings and a detailed scientific review (a matrix of solutions) were written to disseminate the evidence-based information and resulting concussion reduction strategies. The manuscripts were reviewed by the authors, advisors and contributors to ensure that the opinions and recommendations reflect the current level of knowledge on concussion in hockey. Six components of a potential solution were articulated in the Rationale paper and became the topics for breakout groups that followed the professional, scientific lectures. Topics that formed the core of the action plan were: metrics and databases; recognizing, managing and return to play; hockey equipment and ice arenas; prevention and education; rules and regulations; and expedient communication of the outcomes. The attendees in breakout sessions identified action items for each section. The most highly ranked action items were brought to a vote in the open assembly, using an Audience Response System (ARS). The strategic planning process was conducted to assess: Where are we at?; Where must we get to?; and What strategies are necessary to make progress on the prioritized action items? Three prioritized action items for each component of the solution and the percentage of the votes received are listed in the body of this proceedings.

  18. Primative components, crustal assimilation, and magmatic degassing of the 2008 Kilauea summit eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Michael C.; Thornber, Carl R.; Orr, Tim R.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous summit and rift zone eruptions at Kīlauea starting in 2008 reflect a shallow eruptive plumbing system inundated by a bourgeoning supply of new magma from depth. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions, host glass, and bulk lava compositions of magma erupted at both the summit and east rift zone demonstrate chemical continuity at both ends of a well-worn summit-to-rift pipeline. Analysis of glass within dense-cored lapilli erupted from the summit in March – August 2008 show these are not samplings of compositionally distinct magmas stored in the shallow summit magma reservoir, but instead result from remelting and assimilation of fragments from conduit wall and vent blocks. Summit pyroclasts show the predominant and most primitive component erupted to be a homogenous, relatively trace-element-depleted melt that is a compositionally indistinguishable from east rift lava. Based on a “top-down” model for the geochemical variation in east rift zone lava over the past 30 years, we suggest that the apparent absence of a 1982 enriched component in melt inclusions, as well as the proposed summit-rift zone connectivity based on sulfur and mineral chemistry, indicate that the last of the pre-1983 magma has been flushed out of the summit reservoir during the surge of mantle-derived magma from 2003-2007.

  19. It's Not a Matter of Time: Highlights from the 2011 Competency-Based Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgis, Chris; Patrick, Susan; Pittenger, Linda

    2011-01-01

    From Anchorage, Alaska, to Orlando, Florida, and from Gray, Maine, to Yuma, Arizona, one hundred competency-based innovators gathered at the Competency-Based Learning Summit in March 2011. Sponsored by the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL), the Summit was developed in…

  20. 78 FR 18611 - Summit on Color in Medical Imaging; Cosponsored Public Workshop; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Summit on Color in Medical Imaging; Cosponsored Public... International Color Consortium (ICC) are announcing the following public workshop entitled ``Summit on Color in... Approaches for Dealing with Color in Medical Images.'' The purpose of the workshop is to bring together...

  1. 77 FR 25892 - Security Zones; North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Summit, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... No. USCG-2012-0052] RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Summit... River during the NATO Summit. This statement is incorrect. The Coast Guard received one comment. DATES... explained that it expects the NATO conference to have [[Page 25893

  2. Arsenic, Zinc, and Aluminium Removal from Gold Mine Wastewater Effluents and Accumulation by Submerged Aquatic Plants (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Farid Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of three submerged aquatic plant species (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata to be used for As, Al, and Zn phytoremediation was tested. The plants were exposed for 14 days under hydroponic conditions to mine waste water effluents in order to assess the suitability of the aquatic plants to remediate elevated multi-metals concentrations in mine waste water. The results show that the E. densa and H. verticillata are able to accumulate high amount of arsenic (95.2% and zinc (93.7% and resulted in a decrease of arsenic and zinc in the ambient water. On the other hand, C. piauhyensis shows remarkable aluminium accumulation in plant biomass (83.8% compared to the other tested plants. The ability of these plants to accumulate the studied metals and survive throughout the experiment demonstrates the potential of these plants to remediate metal enriched water especially for mine drainage effluent. Among the three tested aquatic plants, H. verticillata was found to be the most applicable (84.5% and suitable plant species to phytoremediate elevated metals and metalloid in mine related waste water.

  3. Phytotoxicity and accumulation of zinc oxide nanoparticles on the aquatic plants Hydrilla verticillata and Phragmites Australis: leaf-type-dependent responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Uhram; Lee, Sunryung

    2016-05-01

    The phytotoxicity and accumulation of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata and Phragmites australis were investigated using mesocosms. The percentage of dissolved Zn in the ZnO NP treatment solutions was measured along with plant shoot growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, chlorophyll content, and Zn content. The dissolution rate of ZnO NPs in Hoagland solution was inversely related to the concentration. The submerged aquatic plant H. verticillata, growth was reduced during the early stages of the experiment when exposed to the highest ZnO NP concentration (1000 mg/L), whereas the emerged aquatic plant P. australis began to show significantly reduced growth after a few weeks. The measurements of chlorophyll content, antioxidant enzyme activity, and Zn accumulation showed that P. australis was adversely affected by NPs and absorbed more Zn than H. verticillata. The results indicated that physiological differences among aquatic plants, such as whether they use leaves or roots for nutrient and water uptake, led to differences in nanoparticle toxicity. Overall, High ZnO NP concentrations caused significant phytotoxicity on aquatic plants, and low concentrations caused unpredictable phytotoxicity. Therefore, the use and disposal of zinc oxide nanoparticles should be carefully monitored.

  4. Arsenic, zinc, and aluminium removal from gold mine wastewater effluents and accumulation by submerged aquatic plants (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Ahmad Farid; Yusoff, Ismail; Fatt, Ng Tham; Othman, Faridah; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2013-01-01

    The potential of three submerged aquatic plant species (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata) to be used for As, Al, and Zn phytoremediation was tested. The plants were exposed for 14 days under hydroponic conditions to mine waste water effluents in order to assess the suitability of the aquatic plants to remediate elevated multi-metals concentrations in mine waste water. The results show that the E. densa and H. verticillata are able to accumulate high amount of arsenic (95.2%) and zinc (93.7%) and resulted in a decrease of arsenic and zinc in the ambient water. On the other hand, C. piauhyensis shows remarkable aluminium accumulation in plant biomass (83.8%) compared to the other tested plants. The ability of these plants to accumulate the studied metals and survive throughout the experiment demonstrates the potential of these plants to remediate metal enriched water especially for mine drainage effluent. Among the three tested aquatic plants, H. verticillata was found to be the most applicable (84.5%) and suitable plant species to phytoremediate elevated metals and metalloid in mine related waste water.

  5. The first Research Consensus Summit of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare: conduction and a synthesis of the results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Phero, James C; Issenberg, S Barry

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe the preparation and execution of the first Research Consensus Summit (Summit) of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) held in January 2011 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The goals of the Summit were to provide guidance for better simulation-related research...

  6. The first Research Consensus Summit of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare: conduction and a synthesis of the results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Phero, James C; Issenberg, S Barry

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe the preparation and execution of the first Research Consensus Summit (Summit) of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) held in January 2011 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The goals of the Summit were to provide guidance for better simulation-related research, to ...

  7. EFFECT OF LIGHT INTENSITY, TEMPERATURE, TOTAL NITROGEN CONCENTRATION AND THEIR INTERACTION ON HYDRILLA VERTICILLATA%光强、温度、总氮浓度对黑藻生长的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱丹婷; 乔宁宁; 李铭红; 陈攀

    2011-01-01

    为寻求沉水植物生长的主效环境因子,探求富营养化水体沉水植物的衰亡机理并选择治理富营养化的先锋植物,实验选择长江中下游常见沉水植物种黑藻(Hydrilla verticillata),利用正交试验设计,通过室内静态模拟实验研究三种主要环境因子光照强度、温度、总氮浓度及其互作对黑藻断枝生长的影响.结果表明:光照强度和温度为影响黑藻生长的主效环境因子,并且光强与温度的交互作用对黑藻生长有较为显著的影响,具体表现为黑藻的生长指标(株高、生物量、分枝数)、光合指标(叶绿素a+b浓度、叶绿素a/b、叶绿体总色素含量)和生理活性指标(根活力、可溶性糖含量、MDA含量)的变化均与这两个环境因子及其互作呈显著相关;总氮浓度的变化对黑藻生长影响不大,在2-8 mg/L的总氮浓度下,黑藻均可以正常生长.根据本实验黑藻生长指标、光合色素含量以及生理活性在不同环境因子组合的变化结果可知,黑藻在5320-12000 lx光照强度、20℃-30℃、4-8 mg/L水体总氮浓度的条件下生长良好,故推测黑藻可作为春夏季富营养化水体中恢复和重建沉水植被的先锋工具种.%With the strengthening of freshwater eutrophication, the original aquatic vegetation gradually reduced and even disappeared, resulting in the well-functional grass type water degraded to algae-based water. Submerged plant is a key factor for the construction of stable and well-functioning freshwater ecosystems. Therefore, restoration and reconstruction of submerged plants is very important for prevention and control of eutrophication. The growth and development, decline and extinction of submerged plants are closely related with environmental factors due to their aquatic characteristics. In this study, we aim to explore the effects of light intensity, temperature, total nitrogen concentration and their interactions on the growth and development

  8. Economic impact of the world summit on sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JH Martins

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available South Africa hosted the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD in 2002.  This event is regarded as the single biggest conference to be held anywhere in the world. The aim of this paper is to set out the estimated economic impact of the WSSD and its parallel events on South Africa.  This impact can be expressed in monetary terms as well as employment figures.  The impact is calculated by using an input-output model and employment spin-offs determined from the IO table by using partial multipliers.  The input data were derived from a survey amongst WSSD delegates as well as information on government and private investments made.

  9. Major highlights of the CAR-TCR Summit, Boston, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovskaya, Vita; Berahovich, Robert; Xu, Shirley; Harto, Hizkia; Wu, Lijun

    2017-01-10

    Cellular immunotherapies such as CAR-T cell therapy and TCR-T cell therapy are relatively new, highly promising approaches for the treatment of cancer. In CAR-T cell therapy, a patient's T cells are engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors targeting tumor-associated cell surface antigens. In TCR-T cell therapy, the patient's T cells are engineered to express receptors targeting intracellular antigens. This report will summarize presentations from the recent CAR-TCR summit in Boston on September 13-16, 2016. These presentations were given by leaders in the field and many were divided into three streams: Discovery and Genetic T Cell Engineering; Translation and Clinical Development; and Manufacturing, Supply Chain and Commercialization. The report summarizes major pharmaceutical companies developing these novel therapies and provides challenges and perspectives for future therapeutic developments.

  10. Assessing Summit Engagement with Other International Organizations in Global Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Larionova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent decades have witnessed dramatic changes all over the world. One major trend is the proliferation and diversification of actors, forums and their arrangements to address global governance challenges, which has led to fragmentation in global governance. However, such contested multilateralism has a positive dimension, as the emergence of informal multilateral institutions claiming a major role in defining the global governance agenda creates alternatives for providing common goods. New arrangements acquire their own actorness and place in the system of global governance. In certain policy areas, there is a clear trend for the new summit institutions’ leadership. The most visible recent cases include the Group of 20 (G20, the BRICS group of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC forum, with APEC gaining importance regionally and globally. These new informal groupings work on their own agenda. They also engage with established international organizations to steer global governance processes. Taken together, the transformative trends in international relations, the emergence of new actors, tensions between exclusive and inclusive clubs, and demands for the legitimacy and effectiveness of the international institutions define the relevance of the study, systematization and comparative analysis of the effectiveness of this model of cooperation among international institutions. This article builds an analytical framework by undertaking three tasks. It first reviews the key concepts. Second, it argues for a rational choice institutionalist approach. Third, it puts forward a hypothesis for research: to compensate for their inefficiencies, summit institutions engage with other international organizations in a mode they regard most efficient for attainment of their goals. The modes of those institutions’ engagement with other international organizations as reflected in the leaders

  11. 5th Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Wade; Perros, Manos

    2004-08-01

    The 5th Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Summit provided an up-to-date snapshot of the ongoing developments in the area. The topics covered ranged from updates on recently launched drugs (Kaletra), Fuzeon) and new investigational inhibitors (T-1249, Reverset, UK-427857, L-870810, PA-457, remofovir, VX-950), to the discovery of new antiviral targets and advances in technologies that may provide the substrate for the next generation of therapeutics. It is apparent from the range of presentations that much of today's efforts are focused on developing new classes of HIV inhibitors (gp41, integrase), while there is also considerable progress in hepatitis C, where a number of inhibitors have or should reach proof-of-concept studies in the coming months. Here we provide the highlights of this meeting, with particular emphasis on the new developments in HIV and hepatitis C virus.

  12. Elaboración de abono orgánico a partir de plantas acuáticas: Elodea (Hydrilla verticillata) y Jacinto o Lirio de agua (Eichhornia crassipes), procedentes del Lago de Coatepeque y Lago de Güija

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes de Cabrales, Cecilia Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    El presente estudio tiene por finalidad elaborar un abono orgánico bajo la técnica de compostaje, conocida como proceso de descomposición aeróbica. Se realizaron tres formulaciones de abono a partir de las plantas acuáticas Elodea (Hydrilla verticillata) y Jacinto de agua (Eichhornia crassipes) en las siguientes proporciones: Elodea 100%, Jacinto de agua 100% y mezcla de ambas en una proporción de 50:50. A los abonos obtenidos se les realizaron análisis químico con la finalidad de cuantificar...

  13. Appraising Contemporary Strategies to Combat Multidrug Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections–Proceedings and Data From the Gram-Negative Resistance Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Yoav; Micek, Scott T.; Shorr, Andrew F.; Restrepo, Marcos I.

    2011-01-01

    The emerging problem of antibiotic resistance, especially among Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), has become a serious threat to global public health. Very few new antibacterial classes with activity against antibiotic-resistant GNB have been brought to market. Renewed and growing attention to the development of novel compounds targeting antibiotic-resistant GNB, as well as a better understanding of strategies aimed at preventing the spread of resistant bacterial strains and preserving the efficacy of existing antibiotic agents, has occurred. The Gram-Negative Resistance Summit convened national opinion leaders for the purpose of analyzing current literature, epidemiologic trends, clinical trial data, therapeutic options, and treatment guidelines related to the management of antibiotic-resistant GNB infections. After an in-depth analysis, the Summit investigators were surveyed with regard to 4 clinical practice statements. The results then were compared with the same survey completed by 138 infectious disease and critical care physicians and are the basis of this article. PMID:21868447

  14. Comparison of UV irradiance measurements at Summit, Greenland; Barrow, Alaska; and South Pole, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bernhard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available An SUV-150B spectroradiometer for measuring solar ultraviolet (UV irradiance was installed at Summit, Greenland, in August 2004. Here we compare the initial data from this new location with similar measurements from Barrow, Alaska, and South Pole. Measurements of irradiance at 345 nm performed at equivalent solar zenith angles (SZAs are almost identical at Summit and South Pole. The good agreement can be explained with the similar location of the two sites on high-altitude ice caps with high surface albedo. Clouds attenuate irradiance at 345 nm at both sites by less than 6% on average, but can reduce irradiance at Barrow by more than 75%. Clear-sky measurements at Barrow are smaller than at Summit by 14% in spring and 36% in summer, mostly due to differences in surface albedo and altitude. Comparisons with model calculations indicate that aerosols can reduce clear-sky irradiance at Summit by 4–6%; aerosol influence is largest in April. Differences in total ozone at the three sites have a large influence on the UV Index. At South Pole, the UV Index is on average 20–80% larger during the ozone hole period than between January and March. At Summit, total ozone peaks in April and UV Indices in spring are on average 10–25% smaller than in the summer. Maximum UV Indices ever observed at Summit, Barrow, and South Pole are 6.7, 5.0, and 4.0, respectively. The larger value at Summit is due to the site's lower latitude. For comparable SZAs, average UV Indices measured during October and November at South Pole are 1.9–2.4 times larger than measurements during March and April at Summit. Average UV Indices at Summit are over 50% greater than at Barrow because of the larger cloud influence at Barrow.

  15. Diversity Summit 2008: challenges in the recruitment and retention of ethnic minorities in neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Desiree; Razani, Jill; Suarez, Paola; Lafosse, Jose M; Manly, Jennifer; Attix, Deborah K

    2010-11-01

    The 2008 Diversity Summit recognized the many advantages of increasing the number of neuropsychologists from ethnically diverse backgrounds. The Summit addressed the aspiration of creating a more ethnically diverse body of neuropsychologists by increasing the recruitment of ethnic minority students to neuropsychology training programs. Challenges to successful recruitment and retention of ethnic minority students were discussion points at the Summit. This paper summarizes and expands these points and also suggests solutions to these challenges with the aim of stimulating innovative approaches to increasing the representation of ethnic minorities in neuropsychology.

  16. Integrated role of ROS and Ca(+2) in blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in leaves of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arkajo; Kar, Rup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Directional chloroplast photorelocation is a major physio-biochemical mechanism that allows these organelles to realign themselves intracellularly in response to the intensity of the incident light as an adaptive response. Signaling processes involved in blue light (BL)-dependent chloroplast movements were investigated in Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle leaves. Treatments with antagonists of actin filaments [2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA)] and microtubules (oryzalin) revealed that actin filaments, but not microtubules, play a pivotal role in chloroplast movement. Involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in controlling chloroplast avoidance movement has been demonstrated, as exogenous H2O2 not only accelerated chloroplast avoidance but also could induce chloroplast avoidance even in weak blue light (WBL). Further support came from experiments with different ROS scavengers, i.e., dimethylthiourea (DMTU), KI, and CuCl2, which inhibited chloroplast avoidance, and from ROS localization using specific stains. Such avoidance was also partially inhibited by ZnCl2, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (NOX) as well as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), a photosynthetic electron transport chain (ETC) inhibitor at PS II. However, methyl viologen (MV), a PS I ETC inhibitor, rather accelerated avoidance response. Exogenous calcium (Ca(+2)) induced avoidance even in WBL while inhibited chloroplast accumulation partially. On the other hand, chloroplast movements (both accumulation and avoidance) were blocked by Ca(+2) antagonists, La(3+) (inhibitor of plasma membrane Ca(+2) channel) and ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA, Ca(+2) chelator) while LiCl that affects Ca(+2) release from endosomal compartments did not show any effect. A model on integrated role of ROS and Ca(+2) (influx from apolastic space) in actin-mediated chloroplast avoidance has been proposed.

  17. Surface energy budget responses to radiative forcing at Summit, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathaniel B.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Cox, Christopher J.; Noone, David; Persson, P. Ola G.; Steffen, Konrad

    2017-02-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet surface temperatures are controlled by an exchange of energy at the surface, which includes radiative, turbulent, and ground heat fluxes. Data collected by multiple projects are leveraged to calculate all surface energy budget (SEB) terms at Summit, Greenland, for the full annual cycle from July 2013 to June 2014 and extend to longer periods for the radiative and turbulent SEB terms. Radiative fluxes are measured directly by a suite of broadband radiometers. Turbulent sensible heat flux is estimated via the bulk aerodynamic and eddy correlation methods, and the turbulent latent heat flux is calculated via a two-level approach using measurements at 10 and 2 m. The subsurface heat flux is calculated using a string of thermistors buried in the snow pack. Extensive quality-control data processing produced a data set in which all terms of the SEB are present 75 % of the full annual cycle, despite the harsh conditions. By including a storage term for a near-surface layer, the SEB is balanced in this data set to within the aggregated uncertainties for the individual terms. November and August case studies illustrate that surface radiative forcing is driven by synoptically forced cloud characteristics, especially by low-level, liquid-bearing clouds. The annual cycle and seasonal diurnal cycles of all SEB components indicate that the non-radiative terms are anticorrelated to changes in the total radiative flux and are hence responding to cloud radiative forcing. Generally, the non-radiative SEB terms and the upwelling longwave radiation component compensate for changes in downwelling radiation, although exact partitioning of energy in the response terms varies with season and near-surface characteristics such as stability and moisture availability. Substantial surface warming from low-level clouds typically leads to a change from a very stable to a weakly stable near-surface regime with no solar radiation or from a weakly stable to neutral

  18. Monitoring of Vegetation Impact Due to Trampling on Cadillac Mountain Summit Using High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Kook; Daigle, John J.

    2012-11-01

    Cadillac Mountain—the highest peak along the eastern seaboard of the United States—is a major tourist destination in Acadia National Park, Maine. Managing vegetation impact due to trampling on the Cadillac Mountain summit is extremely challenging because of the large number of visitors and the general open nature of landscape in this fragile subalpine environmental setting. Since 2000, more intensive management strategies—based on placing physical barriers and educational messages for visitors—have been employed to protect threatened vegetation, decrease vegetation impact, and enhance vegetation recovery in the vicinity of the summit loop trail. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the management strategies employed. For this purpose, vegetation cover changes between 2001 and 2007 were detected using multispectral high spatial resolution remote sensing data sets. A normalized difference vegetation index was employed to identify the rates of increase and decrease in the vegetation areas. Three buffering distances (30, 60, and 90 m) from the edges of the trail were used to define multiple spatial extents of the site, and the same spatial extents were employed at a nearby control site that had no visitors. No significant differences were detected between the mean rates of vegetation increase and decrease at the experimental site compared with a nearby control site in the case of a small spatial scale (≤30 m) comparison (in all cases P > 0.05). However, in the medium (≤60 m) and large (≤90 m) spatial scales, the rates of increased vegetation were significantly greater and rates of decreased vegetation significantly lower at the experimental site compared with the control site (in all cases P < 0.001). Research implications are explored that relate to the spatial extent of the radial patterns of impact of trampling on vegetation at the site level. Management implications are explored in terms of the spatial strategies used to

  19. Monitoring of vegetation impact due to trampling on Cadillac Mountain summit using high spatial resolution remote sensing data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Kook; Daigle, John J

    2012-11-01

    Cadillac Mountain--the highest peak along the eastern seaboard of the United States--is a major tourist destination in Acadia National Park, Maine. Managing vegetation impact due to trampling on the Cadillac Mountain summit is extremely challenging because of the large number of visitors and the general open nature of landscape in this fragile subalpine environmental setting. Since 2000, more intensive management strategies--based on placing physical barriers and educational messages for visitors--have been employed to protect threatened vegetation, decrease vegetation impact, and enhance vegetation recovery in the vicinity of the summit loop trail. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the management strategies employed. For this purpose, vegetation cover changes between 2001 and 2007 were detected using multispectral high spatial resolution remote sensing data sets. A normalized difference vegetation index was employed to identify the rates of increase and decrease in the vegetation areas. Three buffering distances (30, 60, and 90 m) from the edges of the trail were used to define multiple spatial extents of the site, and the same spatial extents were employed at a nearby control site that had no visitors. No significant differences were detected between the mean rates of vegetation increase and decrease at the experimental site compared with a nearby control site in the case of a small spatial scale (≤30 m) comparison (in all cases P > 0.05). However, in the medium (≤60 m) and large (≤90 m) spatial scales, the rates of increased vegetation were significantly greater and rates of decreased vegetation significantly lower at the experimental site compared with the control site (in all cases P vegetation at the site level. Management implications are explored in terms of the spatial strategies used to decrease the impact of trampling on vegetation.

  20. World Summit on the Information Society finding the best use of a global asset

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The first global summit on bridging the digital divide between rich and poor countries - the first meeting of its kind - convened in Geneva last week as governments struggled to agree on what they wanted to achieve" (2 pages)

  1. The science of eliminating health disparities: summary and analysis of the NIH summit recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankwa-Mullan, Irene; Rhee, Kyu B; Williams, Kester; Sanchez, Idalia; Sy, Francisco S; Stinson, Nathaniel; Ruffin, John

    2010-04-01

    In December 2008, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored the first NIH Summit showcasing its investment and contribution to health disparities research and unveiling a framework for moving this important field forward. The Summit, titled "The Science of Eliminating Health Disparities," drew on extensive experience of experts leading health disparities research transformation in diverse fields. The Summit also provided a historic educational opportunity to contribute to health care reform. The theme, addressing disparities through integration of science, practice, and policy, introduced a paradigm for advancing research through transformational, translational, and transdisciplinary research. Engaging active participation throughout the Summit generated recommendations bridging science, practice, and policy, including action on social determinants of health, community engagement, broad partnerships, capacity-building, and media outreach.

  2. China-Japan-Korean Summit:New Barometer for East Asian Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Xiaosheng

    2009-01-01

    @@ On December 13, 2008, China Japan-Korean Summit was held in Fukuoka, Japan. The summit, which was greatly different from the previously eight summits held in the framework of ASEAN plus China,Japan and South Korean, that is 10+3, was confined to only these three countries and it's the first time for them to do so. It happened to be China's first foreign activity after the opening of the Central Economic Working Conference in the same month and explained its new economic policy and measures in 2009. In addition, it's the first time for three main economic entities to meet after the breakout of the global financial crisis. Thus financial and economic affairs were the core issues of the summit.

  3. Soviet-U.S. Summit: Science Accords Open the Way to Joint Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Constance

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes the agreements between the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on cooperation in a number of scientific and technical fields signed during the 1972 Moscow summit meetings. (AL)

  4. CPAFFC President Chen Haosu Leads Delegation to Local Government Climate Change Leadership Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>From June 1 to 10, a CPAFFC delegation led by its president Chen Haosu attended the Local Government Climate Change Leadership Summit and the UCLG World Council Meeting in Copenhagen, Demark. The Local

  5. The Comparative Study on Photosynthesis of Hydrilla verticillata and Vallisneria natans in the Different Depth%黑藻与苦草在不同水深下光合作用的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    经博翰; 袁龙义

    2014-01-01

    Chosen the Wagouzi site with abundant submerged population in the Honghu Lake as a sampling region, the difference of photosynthesis of submerged macrophytes Hydrilla verticillata( L. f. )Royle and vallisneria natans ( Lour. )Hara which are high resistance and obsorption to the dirty water in Honghu Lake was designed to research their response in the 100 cm and 50 cm water depth by Diving-PAM apparatus. The results showed that the value of External Transfer Rate(ETR)of Hydrilla verticillata and vallisneria natans separately approached to 25. 1 μmol· m-2 · s-1 and 10 . 1 μmol · m-2 · s-1 when the value of Photosynthetic Active Radiation( PAR )was stable for 342 μmol·m-2 · s-1 under the condition of 100 cm water depth. With the PAr intensity gradually becoming strong,ETr of Hydrilla verticillata reached its peak 21. 76 μmol·m-2 ·s-1 when the PAr value was 219 μmol· m-2 ·s-1 ,as well as ETr of vallisneria natans reached its peak 12. 65 μmol·m-2 ·s-1 when the PAr value was 515 μmol·m-2 ·s-1 . On the other hand,the value of ETr of Hydrilla verticillata and vallisneria natans separately approached to 26. 2 μmol·m-2 ·s-1 and 11. 9 μmol·m-2 ·s-1 when the value of PAr was stable for 515 μmol· m-2 ·s-1 under the condition of 50 cm water depth. With the PAr intensity gradually becoming strong,ETr of Hydrilla verticillata reached its peak 25. 27 μmol·m-2 ·s-1 when the PAr value was 219 μmol·m-2 ·s-1 ,as well as ETr of vallisneria natans reached its peak 4. 80 μmol·m-2 ·s-1 when the PAr value was 1 042 μmol· m-2 ·s-1 . In summary,no matter in 100 cm or 50 cm water depth condition,photosynthesis intensity of Hydrilla verticillata is stronger than that of vallisneria natans.%以沉水植物较为丰富的洪湖凹沟子作为采样区域,利用水下调制荧光仪研究洪湖常见的2种高耐污、高吸污水鳖科沉水植物黑藻( Hydrilla verticillata( L. f.)Royle)与苦草( vallisneria natans( Lour

  6. Proceedings of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 2015 Research Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillo, Joseph E; Basi, David; Peacock, Zachary; Aghaloo, Tara; Bouloux, Gary; Dodson, Thomas; Edwards, Sean P; Kademani, Deepak

    2016-03-01

    The Fifth Biennial Research Summit of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and its Committee on Research Planning and Technology Assessment was held in Rosemont, Illinois on May 6 and 7, 2015. The goal of the symposium is to provide a forum for the most recent clinical and scientific advances to be brought to the specialty. The proceedings of the events of that summit are presented in this report.

  7. 2012 Global Summit on Regulatory Science (GSRS-2012)--modernizing toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Margaret A; Tong, Weida; Fan, Xiaohui; Slikker, William

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory science encompasses the tools, models, techniques, and studies needed to assess and evaluate product safety, efficacy, quality, and performance. Several recent publications have emphasized the role of regulatory science in improving global health, supporting economic development and fostering innovation. As for other scientific disciplines, research in regulatory science is the critical element underpinning the development and advancement of regulatory science as a modern scientific discipline. As a regulatory agency in the 21st century, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has an international component that underpins its domestic mission; foods, drugs, and devices are developed and imported to the United States from across the world. The Global Summit on Regulatory Science, an international conference for discussing innovative technologies, approaches, and partnerships that enhance the translation of basic science into regulatory applications, is providing leadership for the advancement of regulatory sciences within the global context. Held annually, this international conference provides a platform where regulators, policy makers, and bench scientists from various countries can exchange views on how to develop, apply, and implement innovative methodologies into regulatory assessments in their respective countries, as well as developing a harmonized strategy to improve global public health through global collaboration.

  8. Summary Points and Consensus Recommendations From the International Protein Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Ryan T; McClave, Stephen A; Martindale, Robert G; Ochoa Gautier, Juan B; Coss-Bu, Jorge A; Dickerson, Roland N; Heyland, Daren K; Hoffer, L John; Moore, Frederick A; Morris, Claudia R; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Patel, Jayshil J; Phillips, Stuart M; Rugeles, Saúl J; Sarav Md, Menaka; Weijs, Peter J M; Wernerman, Jan; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill; McClain, Craig J; Taylor, Beth

    2017-04-01

    The International Protein Summit in 2016 brought experts in clinical nutrition and protein metabolism together from around the globe to determine the impact of high-dose protein administration on clinical outcomes and address barriers to its delivery in the critically ill patient. It has been suggested that high doses of protein in the range of 1.2-2.5 g/kg/d may be required in the setting of the intensive care unit (ICU) to optimize nutrition therapy and reduce mortality. While incapable of blunting the catabolic response, protein doses in this range may be needed to best stimulate new protein synthesis and preserve muscle mass. Quality of protein (determined by source, content and ratio of amino acids, and digestibility) affects nutrient sensing pathways such as the mammalian target of rapamycin. Achieving protein goals the first week following admission to the ICU should take precedence over meeting energy goals. High-protein hypocaloric (providing 80%-90% of caloric requirements) feeding may evolve as the best strategy during the initial phase of critical illness to avoid overfeeding, improve insulin sensitivity, and maintain body protein homeostasis, especially in the patient at high nutrition risk. This article provides a set of recommendations based on assessment of the current literature to guide healthcare professionals in clinical practice at this time, as well as a list of potential topics to guide investigators for purposes of research in the future.

  9. Kīlauea summit eruption—Lava returns to Halemaʻumaʻu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Janet L.; Wessells, Stephen M.; Neal, Christina A.

    2017-10-06

    In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened within Halemaʻumaʻu, a crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park on the Island of Hawaiʻi. This new vent is one of two ongoing eruptions on the volcano. The other is on Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, where vents have been erupting nearly nonstop since 1983. The duration of these simultaneous summit and rift zone eruptions on Kīlauea is unmatched in at least 200 years.Since 2008, Kīlauea’s summit eruption has consisted of continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, and an active, circulating lava lake. Because of ongoing volcanic hazards associated with the summit vent, including the emission of high levels of sulfur dioxide gas and fragments of hot lava and rock explosively hurled onto the crater rim, the area around Halemaʻumaʻu remains closed to the public as of 2017.Through historical photos of past Halemaʻumaʻu eruptions and stunning 4K imagery of the current eruption, this 24-minute program tells the story of Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake—now one of the two largest lava lakes in the world. It begins with a Hawaiian chant that expresses traditional observations of a bubbling lava lake and reflects the connections between science and culture that continue on Kīlauea today.The video briefly recounts the eruptive history of Halemaʻumaʻu and describes the formation and continued growth of the current summit vent and lava lake. It features USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists sharing their insights on the summit eruption—how they monitor the lava lake, how and why the lake level rises and falls, why explosive events occur, the connection between Kīlauea’s ongoing summit and East Rift Zone eruptions, and the impacts of the summit eruption on the Island of Hawaiʻi and beyond. The video is also available at the following U.S. Geological Survey Multimedia Gallery link (video hosted on YouTube): Kīlauea summit eruption—Lava returns to Halemaʻumaʻu

  10. Geology of the Cerro Summit quadrangle, Montrose County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Robert G.

    1966-01-01

    The Cerro Summit quadrangle covers 58 square miles of dissected plateau on the south flank of the Gunnison uplift in southwestern Colorado. It lies east of the Uncompahgre River valley and south of the Black Canyon of the Gunnison River. Rocks dip gently in most of the quadrangle, but they are locally upturned and faulted on the margin of the Gunnison uplift and are intensely deformed in the core of the uplift. The rocks exposed are of Precambrian, late Mesozoic, and Cenozoic age. Precambrian rocks include metasedimentary schist and gneiss, granitic pegmatite, and olivine gabbro. The oldest Mesozoic rocks exposed are continental, fresh-water, and lagoonal deposits in the Late Jurassic Entrada Sandstone, Wanakah Formation, and Morrison Formation. Channel-fill deposits that unconformably overlie the Jurassic rocks are possibly the Burro Canyon Formation of Early Cretaceous age. Upper Cretaceous rocks include marine and nearshore deposits of the Dakota Sandstone, Mancos Shale, and Pictured Cliffs Sandstone, and the fresh- and brackish-water sandstone, shale, and coal of the Fruitland Formation. Rocks of Late Cretaceous age that crop out in the adjacent Cimarron Ridge area may also have been deposited in this quadrangle but are now eroded; these rocks include the nonmarine Kirtland Shale and an unnamed volcanic conglomerate and tuff breccia. Nine faunal zones in the Mancos Shale help to establish the correct correlation of units in the Upper Cretaceous. The Pictured Cliffs Sandstone, Fruitland Formation, and Kirtland Shale of the Cerro Summit area have been mapped by some geologists as the Mesaverde Formation. Fossils indicate that the rocks are younger than the type Mesaverde. The unnamed volcanic rocks represent major volcanism in nearby areas. A Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian) age for the volcanism is indicated by palynological evidence and an isotopic age of approximately 66 million years. Middle Tertiary rocks are conglomerate and tuff breccia. Upper Tertiary or

  11. Interannual Variations of Shallow Firn Temperature at Greenland Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Li; Wang, W. L.; Zwally, H. J.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Firn-temperature profiles are calculated in a thermal model using continuous surface temperatures derived from Automatic Weather Station (AWS) data and passive microwave data in the Greenland Summit region during the period 1987-1999. The results show that significant interannual variations of mean summer (June to August) and annual temperatures occur in the top 15 m, in addition to the normal seasonal cycle of firn temperature. At 5 m depth, the seasonal cycle is damped to 13% of the surface seasonal amplitude, but even at 15 m about 1% or 0.6 C of the seasonal cycle persists. Both summer and mean annual temperatures decrease from 1987 to 1992, followed by a general increasing trend. Interannual variability is 5 C at the surface, but only is only dampened to 3.2 C at 10 m depth and 0.7 C at 15 m depth. Dampening of the interannual variability with depth is slower than dampening of the seasonal cycle, because of the longer time constant of the interannual variation. The warmer spring and summer temperatures experienced in the top 5 m, due to both the seasonal cycle and interannual variations, affect the rate of firn densification, which is non-linearly dependent on temperature. During the 12 year period 1987-1999, the mean annual surface temperature is -29.2 C, and the mean annual 15 m temperature is -30. 1 C, which is more than 1 C warmer than a 15-m borehole temperature representing the period of about 1959 and warmer than the best-fit temperature history by Alley and Koci back to 1500 A.D..

  12. The 2016 World Humanitarian Summit Report Card: Both Failing Marks and Substantive Gains for an Increasingly Globalized Humanitarian Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    V. Canyon, Deon; Burkle, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes of the World Humanitarian Summit were mixed with some refreshing new directions being endorsed and a lack of systemic reform. The selective agenda and OCHAs lack of success in engaging pre-meeting political participation not only hampered the Summit’s ability to deal with global issues and institutional reform, but also alienated it from leading aid agencies and governments. The UN’s failure to commit to humanitarian principles and global disarray of the humanitarian system indicates the need for extensive reform or a new global humanitarian body. This agency needs to employ a decentralized model to manage aid funds, assume coordination of international responses, resolve civil-military coordination, cater for people affected by both conflict and disasters, and professionalize the humanitarian career.  PMID:27679738

  13. Florida TeleHealth Summit: “Telemedicine –It’s Here, It’s Now”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Wainright Haas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Southeastern Telehealth Resource Center, Florida State University College of Medicine, and the Florida Partnership for TeleHealth invites participation in the 2nd Annual Florida TeleHealth Summit. The Summit will be held December 3-4, 2015 at the Alfond Inn, Winter Park, Florida. For further information about the Southeastern Telehealth Resource Center and the Summit, visit: http://www.setrc.us/

  14. The meta-leadership summit for preparedness initiative: an innovative model to advance public health preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobelson, Robyn K; Young, Andrea C; Marcus, Leonard J; Dorn, Barry C; Neslund, Verla S; McNulty, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    This article reports on the design, evaluation framework, and results from the Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness Initiative. The Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness was a 5-year initiative based on the premise that national preparedness and emergency response is not solely the responsibility of government. From 2006 to 2011, 36 Meta-Leadership Summits were delivered in communities across the country. Summits were customized, 10-hour leadership development, networking, and community action planning events. They included participation from targeted federal, state, local, nonprofit/philanthropic, and private sector leaders who are directly involved in decision making during a major community or state-wide emergency. A total of 4,971 government, nonprofit, and business leaders attended Meta-Leadership Summits; distribution of attendees by sector was balanced. Ninety-three percent of respondents reported the summit was a valuable use of time, 91% reported the overall quality as "good" or "outstanding," and 91% would recommend the summit to their colleagues. In addition, approximately 6 months after attending a summit, 80% of respondents reported that they had used meta-leadership concepts or principles. Of these, 93% reported that using meta-leadership concepts or principles had made a positive difference for them and their organizations. The Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness Initiative was a value-added opportunity for communities, providing the venue for learning the concepts and practice of meta-leadership, multisector collaboration, and resource sharing with the intent of substantively improving preparedness, response, and recovery efforts.

  15. Nine thousand years of upper montane soil/vegetation dynamics from the summit of Caratuva Peak, Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Maurício B.; Pereira, Nuno Veríssimo; Behling, Hermann; Curcio, Gustavo R.; Roderjan, Carlos V.

    2014-12-01

    Biodiversity loss, climate change, and increased freshwater consumption are some of the main environmental problems on Earth. Mountain ecosystems can reduce these threats by providing several positive influences, such as the maintenance of biodiversity, water regulation, and carbon storage, amongst others. The knowledge of the history of these environments and their response to climate change is very important for management, conservation, and environmental monitoring programs. The genesis of the soil organic matter of the current upper montane vegetation remains unclear and seems to be quite variable depending on location. Some upper montane sites in the very extensive coastal Sea Mountain Range present considerable organic matter from the late Pleistocene and other from only the Holocene. Our study was carried out on three soil profiles (two cores in grassland and one in forest) on the Caratuva Peak of the Serra do Ibitiraquire (a sub-range of Sea Mountain Range - Serra do Mar) in Southern Brazil. The δ13C isotopic analyses of organic matter in soil horizons were conducted to detect whether C3 or C4 plants dominated the past communities. Complementarily, we performed a pollen analysis and 14C dating of the humin fraction to obtain the age of the studied horizons. Except for a short and probably drier period (between 6000 and 4500 cal yr BP), C3 plants, including ombrophilous grasses and trees, have dominated the highlands of the Caratuva Peak (Pico Caratuva), as well as the other uppermost summits of the Serra do Ibitiraquire, since around 9000 cal yr BP. The Caratuva region represents a landscape of high altitude grasslands (campos de altitude altomontanos or campos altomontanos) and upper montane rain/cloud forests with soils that most likely contain some organic matter from the late Pleistocene, as has been reported in Southern and Southeastern Brazil for other sites. However, our results indicate that the studied deposits (near the summit) are from the early

  16. The "Ethics Rupture" Summit, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, October 25-28, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoonaard, Will C

    2013-02-01

    This report explains the background of the "Ethics Rupture" Summit held in New Brunswick, Canada, October 2012, focusing on the disconnect between research-ethics policies and the nature and purpose of social-science research-an unintended "rupture" in ethics governance. Ethics is about human relationships, and the governance of ethics must reflect that fact rather than function as a bureaucratic, self-legitimating system of control. The themes that emerged from the Summit point to: structural problems with the current system; an undermining of the original, historical mission of some social-science disciplines; a discomfort with new methodologies; ethics committees and the well-being and education of social-science students; the possibilities of reform and renewal; and the next steps. Finally, the report refers in broad outlines to a "New Brunswick Declaration," which is currently being considered by participants of the Summit.

  17. An in situ measurement of the radio-frequency attenuation in ice at Summit Station, Greenland

    CERN Document Server

    Avva, J; Miki, C; Saltzberg, D; Vieregg, A G

    2014-01-01

    We report an in situ measurement of the electric field attenuation length at radio frequencies for the bulk ice at Summit Station, Greenland, made by broadcasting radio-frequency signals vertically through the ice and measuring the relative power in the return ground bounce signal. We find the depth-averaged field attenuation length to be 947 +92/-85 meters at 75 MHz. While this measurement has clear radioglaciological applications, the radio clarity of the ice also has implications for the detection of ultra-high energy (UHE) astrophysical particles via their radio emission in dielectric media such as ice. The measured attenuation length at Summit Station is comparable to previously measured radio-frequency attenuation lengths at candidate particle detector sites around the world, and strengthens the case for Summit Station as the most promising northern site for UHE neutrino detection.

  18. Massage Therapy and Canadians’ Health Care Needs 2020: Proceedings of a National Research Priority Setting Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Trish; Sumpton, Bryn; Shipwright, Stacey; Kahn, Janet; Reece, Barbara (Findlay)

    2014-01-01

    Background The health care landscape in Canada is changing rapidly as forces, such as an aging population, increasingly complex health issues and treatments, and economic pressure to reduce health care costs, bear down on the system. A cohesive national research agenda for massage therapy (MT) is needed in order to ensure maximum benefit is derived from research on treatment, health care policy, and cost effectiveness. Setting A one-day invitational summit was held in Toronto, Ontario to build strategic alliances among Canadian and international researchers, policy makers, and other stakeholders to help shape a national research agenda for MT. Method Using a modified Delphi method, the summit organizers conducted two pre-summit surveys to ensure that time spent during the summit was relevant and productive. The summit was facilitated using the principles of Appreciative Inquiry which included a “4D” strategic planning approach (defining, discovery, dreaming, designing) and application of a SOAR framework (strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results). Participants Twenty-six researchers, policymakers, and other stakeholders actively participated in the events. Results Priority topics that massage therapists believe are important to the Canadian public, other health care providers, and policy makers and massage therapists themselves were identified. A framework for a national massage therapy (MT) research agenda, a grand vision of the future for MT research, and a 12-month action plan were developed. Conclusion The summit provided an excellent opportunity for key stakeholders to come together and use their experience and knowledge of MT to develop a much-needed plan for moving the MT research and professionalization agenda forward. PMID:24592299

  19. The study to understand mortality and morbidity in COPD (SUMMIT) study protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Anderson, Julie; Brook, Robert D;

    2013-01-01

    medications on CVD in patients with both diseases.The "Study to Understand Mortality and MorbidITy in COPD" (SUMMIT) aims at determining the impact of Fluticasone Furoate/Vilanterol combination (FF/VI), and the individual components on the survival of patients with moderate COPD and either a history of CVD...... or at increased risk for CVD.SUMMIT is a multi-center, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of 16,000 patients with moderate COPD randomly assigned to once daily treatment with FF/VI (100/25 ;mcg), Fluticasone Furoate (100 ;mcg), Vilanterol (25 ;mcg) or matched placebo; mortality...

  20. An introduction to the 2011 National Multicultural Conference & Summit keynote addresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Francisco J; Kawahara, Debra; Thomas, Lisa Rey; Worthington, Roger

    2011-07-01

    This article provides and introduction to the 2011 National Multicultural Conference & Summit Keynote Addresses. The authors explain that they chose to focus on the tension and possibilities within multicultural psychology at the seventh biennial National Multicultural Conference & Summit (NMCS), which was held on January 27-28, 2011, at The Westin-Seattle Hotel. During the 2-day conference, nearly 900 attendees engaged with one another and heard from experts in the field as we focused on the theme, "Unification through Diversity: Bridging Psychological Science & Practice in the Public Interest. Two key sets of presentations are highlighted.

  1. Beijing Managing Government Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAELO'NEILL

    2005-01-01

    Aroster of top-level speakers and over 100 delegates gathered at the 2nd China Government Relations Management Summit held in Beiiing at the end of March and organized by the Research Center on Transnational Corporation (CAITEC) of the Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM). With presentations from a number of multinational corporations including Coca-Cola, Kodak,

  2. Talent Development Research, Policy, and Practice in Europe and the United States: Outcomes from a Summit of International Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotnik, Rena F.; Stoeger, Heidrun; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this article is to convey a summary of research and conversation on talent development on the part of a small group of European and American researchers who participated in the Inaugural American European Research Summit in Washington. In the final hours of the summit, participants discussed the state of research on talent development…

  3. Carbon dioxide emission rate of Kīlauea Volcano: Implications for primary magma and the summit reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, T.M.; McGee, K.A.; Elias, T.; Sutton, A.J.; Doukas, M.P.

    2002-01-01

     We report a CO2 emission rate of 8500 metric tons per day (t d−1) for the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, several times larger than previous estimates. It is based on three sets of measurements over 4 years of synchronous SO2 emission rates and volcanic CO2/SO2concentration ratios for the summit correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) traverse. Volcanic CO2/SO2 for the traverse is representative of the global ratio for summit emissions. The summit CO2 emission rate is nearly constant, despite large temporal variations in summit CO2/SO2 and SO2 emission rates. Summit CO2 emissions comprise most of Kīlauea's total CO2 output (∼9000 t d−1). The bulk CO2 content of primary magma determined from CO2emission and magma supply rate data is ∼0.70 wt %. Most of the CO2 is present as exsolved vapor at summit reservoir depths, making the primary magma strongly buoyant. Turbulent mixing with resident reservoir magma, however, prevents frequent eruptions of buoyant primary magma in the summit region. CO2 emissions confirm that the magma supply enters the edifice through the summit reservoir. A persistent several hundred parts per million CO2 anomaly arises from the entry of magma into the summit reservoir beneath a square kilometer area east of Halemaumau pit crater. Since most of the CO2 in primary magma is degassed in the summit, the summit CO2 emission rate is an effective proxy for the magma supply rate. Both scrubbing of SO2 and solubility controls on CO2and S in basaltic melt cause high CO2/SO2 in summit emissions and spatially uncorrelated distributions of CO2 and SO2 in the summit plume.

  4. World Attention Focuses on China Tourism——The First World Summit of Tourism Promotion to be Held in Nanjing Grandly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>The Press Conference of the First World Summit of Tourism Promo tion was held in Nanjing on July 28. The summit would be a major event in tourism development in our country. It is known that initiated by World Trade University of UN and intended to promote the globalization of tourism, the UN Global Partnership Program, - the First World Summit of Tourism Promotion is to be held in Nanjing, China, in November, 2004.The World Summit of Tourism Pro-

  5. Common Glory & Sustainable Development——Convening of the fourth EU-China Business Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ On November 28, the fourth EU-China Business Summit was convened in the Great Hall of the People, sponsored by China Ministry of Commerce, Commission of European Union, and Portugal, the rotating chairman of EU, hosted by China Council for the Promotion of International Trade and European Union Chamber of Commerce in China.

  6. Attending 22nd General Assembly of CONGO and World Summit on Information Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>ACPAFFC delegation headed by its vice presi-dent Li Xiaolin attended the 22nd General Assembly of the Conference of NGOs (CONGO) and the World Summit on the Information Society in Geneva from December 4 to 12, 2003.CONGO, founded in

  7. Changing Public Discourse on the Environment: Danish Media Coverage of the Rio and Johannesburg UN Summits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Kjerulf

    2008-01-01

    cases of wider public conceptions of the environment. Over a decade rhetoric about the summits and the environment changed, the agenda changed, and key environmental issues were repackaged. These changes are further interpreted in relation to ecological modernisation and discussed as a possible...

  8. Rapid Review Summit: an overview and initiation of a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polisena, Julie; Garritty, Chantelle; Umscheid, Craig A; Kamel, Chris; Samra, Kevin; Smith, Jeannette; Vosilla, Ann

    2015-09-26

    The demand for accelerated forms of evidence synthesis is on the rise, largely in response to requests by health care decision makers for expeditious assessment and up-to-date information about health care technologies and health services and programs. As a field, rapid review evidence synthesis is marked by a tension between the strategic priority to inform health care decision-making and the scientific imperative to produce robust, high-quality research that soundly supports health policy and practice. In early 2015, the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health convened a forum in partnership with the British Columbia Ministry of Health, the British Columbia Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation, the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, and the University of Pennsylvania. More than 150 evidence synthesis producers and end users attended the Rapid Review Summit: Then, Now and in the Future. The Summit program focused on the evolving role and practices of rapid reviews to support informed health care policy and clinical decision-making, including the uptake and use of health technology assessment. Our discussion paper highlights the important discussions that occurred during the Rapid Review Summit. It focuses on the initial development of a research agenda that resulted from the Summit presentations and discussions. The research topics centered on three key areas of interest: (1) how to conduct a rapid review; (2) investigating the validity and utility of rapid reviews; and (3) how to improve access to rapid reviews.

  9. Sino-EU Business Summit:Both Sides Jointly Promote the Mutual Market Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yongjian

    2005-01-01

    @@ Minister Bo Xilai gave his speech with his unique humour: "Cate culture has a long history in China. Our Chinese people always say that 'Please take the dinner while it is hot!'" hinting that the hot discussion in the summit will result in an OK'd fruit.

  10. Constraints on the delta H-2 diffusion rate in firn from field measurements at Summit, Greenland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, L. G.; Been, H. A.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Smeets, C. J. P. P.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2015-01-01

    We performed detailed H-2 isotope diffusion measurements in the upper 3m of firn at Summit, Greenland. Using a small snow gun, a thin snow layer was formed from H-2-enriched water over a 6 x 6 m(2) area. We followed the diffusion process, quantified as the increase of the delta H-2 diffusion length,

  11. Using Film Clips to Teach Teen Pregnancy Prevention: "The Gloucester 18" at a Teen Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrman, Judith W.; Moore, Christopher C.; Anthony, Becky

    2012-01-01

    Teaching pregnancy prevention to large groups offers many challenges. This article describes the use of film clips, with guided discussion, to teach pregnancy prevention. In order to analyze the costs associated with teen pregnancy, a film clip discussion session based with the film "The Gloucester 18" was the keynote of a youth summit. The lesson…

  12. Ancient tepui summits harbor young rather than old lineages of endemic frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Patricia E; Ron, Santiago R; Señaris, J Celsa; Rojas-Runjaic, Fernando J M; Noonan, Brice P; Cannatella, David C

    2012-10-01

    The flattop mountains (tepuis) of South America are ancient remnants of the Precambrian Guiana Shield plateau. The tepui summits, isolated by their surrounding cliffs that can be up to 1000 m tall, are thought of as "islands in the sky," harboring relict flora and fauna that underwent vicariant speciation due to plateau fragmentation. High endemicity atop tepui summits support the idea of an ancient "Lost World" biota. However, recent work suggests that dispersal between lowlands and summits has occurred long after tepui formation indicating that tepui summits may not be as isolated from the lowlands as researchers have long suggested. Neither view of the origin of the tepui biota (i.e., ancient vicariance vs. recent dispersal) has strong empirical support owing to a lack of studies. We test diversification hypotheses of the Guiana Shield highlands by estimating divergence times of an endemic group of treefrogs, Tepuihyla. We find that diversification of this group does not support an ancient origin for this taxon; instead, divergence times among the highland species are 2-5 Ma. Our data indicate that most highland speciation occurred during the Pliocene. Thus, this unparalleled landscape known as "The Lost World" is inhabited, in part, not by Early Tertiary relicts but neoendemics.

  13. Mössbauer Spectroscopy of Samples from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull Summit Eruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur Pall; Höskuldsson, Á.; Steinthorsson, S.

    2012-01-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajökull summit eruption (Iceland) produced large amounts of fine ash, disturbing air traffic across the North-Atlantic and within Europe. Mössbauer spectroscopy of ash-samples and a lava-bomb has been performed to study the material properties and to gain insight into why the vo...

  14. Third European Influenza Summit: organized by the European Scientific Working group on Influenza (ESWI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhaney, Janet; Osterhaus, Ab

    2013-12-16

    On 2 May 2013, the European Scientific Working group on Influenza (ESWI) held its third influenza summit at the Institute of European Studies at the Free University of Brussels. ESWI brought together more than 90 representatives of organizations of healthcare providers, senior citizens, at-risk patients and public health authorities for a day of tailored lectures, Q&A sessions and networking. Since recent studies, surveys and reviews have shed new light on some of the most intriguing influenza issues, the Summit faculty translated the newest scientific data into practice. The first part of the Summit programme focused on the current flu status in Europe, paying special attention to the protection of pregnant women and the elderly as well as to the issues of vaccine safety and effectiveness. The programme continued to highlight future challenges and evolutions like novel antiviral drugs against influenza, improved flu vaccines and the prospect of a universal flu vaccine. The annual ESWI flu summits are the pinnacles of ESWI's efforts to bridge the gap between science and society. ESWI's members are convinced that the fight against influenza can only be won when all parties are well informed and ready to work together.

  15. Mass balance and surface movement of the Greenland Ice Sheet at Summit, Central Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, C.S.; Keller, K.; Gundestrup, N.S.;

    1997-01-01

    During the GRIP deep drilling in Central Greenland, the ice sheet topography and surface movement at Summit has been mapped with GPS. Measurements of the surface velocity are presented for a strain net consisting of 13 poles at distances of 25-60 km from the GRIP site. Some results are: The GRIP...

  16. Participants to the 3rd HEP Information Resources Summit, 6-7 May 2009

    CERN Multimedia

    Fermilab, Photo Service

    2009-01-01

    The broad theme of the 3rd HEP Information Resources Summit was "Collaboration between Information Services." As HEP increasingly borders fields such as instrumentation and astrophysics, it was discussed what potential interrelationships and communication this group have to serve this broader research community seamlessly.

  17. Reconstructing English Education for the 21st Century: A Report on the CEE Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Suzanne M.; Fox, Dana L.

    2006-01-01

    The coeditors of the special Summit issue of English Education provide the context for the "crucial moment" that prompted the Conference on English Education (CEE) to take up the task of rethinking issues related to the preparation and continuing professional development of English language arts teachers and teacher educators. The process of…

  18. 77 FR 22221 - Security Zones; North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Summit, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO... NATO Summit and associated events, which will be held in Chicago from May 16, 2012, through May 24... notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) entitled Security Zones; G8/North Atlantic Treaty Organization...

  19. Biological Studies of Bagous Hydrillae

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    garis L. cultivated beans Raphanus sativus L. cultivated radish Sedum sp. introduced, ornamental Sesuvium portulacastrum (L.)L. native Appencix A...watermelon Matsum. & Nakai var. lanatus Citrus sp. cultivated citrus Crassula argentea Thunb. introduced, ornamental Cucumis sativus L. cultivated cucumber

  20. Vilnius eastern partnership summit: milestone in EU-Russia relations – not just for Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havlik Peter

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Vilnius Eastern Partnership Summit on 28-29th November 2013 represents a milestone in EU relations not just with respect to the six Eastern Partnership countries (EaP Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and particularly Ukraine, but also with the EU’s ‘strategic partner’ Russia. The turbulence and numerous speculations regarding expectations about the signature of the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement (comprising a Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Agreement - AA/DCFTA, as well as progress in initialling similar future agreements with Georgia and Moldova, have been escalating before the summit. The association agreementswould bring EaP signatory countries closer to the EU not really closer to EU membership, but closer to the application of various EU norms and standards (takeover of the ‘acquis communautaire’ and - significantly - out of the Russian orbit, for the beginning at least symbolically. The last minute postponement of the EU-Ukraine AA/DCFTA signature announced by Ukraine’s government just one week before the summit represents a serious setback for the EU. Though the EU has no ‘Plan B’ and was stunned after Ukraine’s announcement, life will continue after the summit and new initiatives will have to be started. What are the relevant issues and challenges and what is at stake? This note attempts to evaluate the consequences (economic and otherwise of alternate decisions following the Vilnius Eastern Partnership Summit, reviews some of the disputed arguments and discusses selected relevant economic issues.

  1. The Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness Initiative: An Innovative Model to Advance Public Health Preparedness and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobelson, Robyn K.; Young, Andrea C.; Marcus, Leonard J.; Dorn, Barry C.; Neslund, Verla S.; McNulty, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the design, evaluation framework, and results from the Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness Initiative. The Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness was a 5-year initiative based on the premise that national preparedness and emergency response is not solely the responsibility of government. From 2006 to 2011, 36 Meta-Leadership Summits were delivered in communities across the country. Summits were customized, 10-hour leadership development, networking, and community action planning events. They included participation from targeted federal, state, local, nonprofit/philanthropic, and private sector leaders who are directly involved in decision making during a major community or state-wide emergency. A total of 4,971 government, nonprofit, and business leaders attended Meta-Leadership Summits; distribution of attendees by sector was balanced. Ninety-three percent of respondents reported the summit was a valuable use of time, 91% reported the overall quality as “good” or “outstanding,” and 91% would recommend the summit to their colleagues. In addition, approximately 6 months after attending a summit, 80% of respondents reported that they had used meta-leadership concepts or principles. Of these, 93% reported that using meta-leadership concepts or principles had made a positive difference for them and their organizations. The Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness Initiative was a value-added opportunity for communities, providing the venue for learning the concepts and practice of meta-leadership, multisector collaboration, and resource sharing with the intent of substantively improving preparedness, response, and recovery efforts. PMID:24251597

  2. The World Summit on Sustainable Development, which took place in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    foundly affect existing and future investors in the in- dustry and the ... most notably in fisheries compliance. Widespread ... number of critical factors for successful participative management ... Whereas this rent-seeking behaviour was logical. (small .... the fishery, legislative compliance (e.g. tax compliance) and degree of ...

  3. Glacial erosion of high-elevation low-relief summits on passive continental margins constrained by cosmogenic nuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    We present a new, extensive in-situ cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al dataset from high-elevation low-relief summits along Sognefjorden in Norway. Contrary to previous studies of high-elevation low-relief summits in cold regions, we find only limited cosmogenic nuclide inheritance in bedrock surfaces......, indicating that warm-based ice eroded the summits during the last glacial period. From the isotope concentrations we model denudation histories using a recently developed Monte Carlo Markov Chain inversion model (Knudsen et al, 2015). The model relies on the benthic d18O curve (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005...

  4. Burn Rehabilitation and Research: Proceedings of a Consensus Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Meyer WJ. Phantom limb pain in pediatric burn survi- vors. Burns 2003;29:139–42. 286. Ward RS, Hayes-Lundy C, Schnebly WA, Saffle JR. Pros- thetic use in...therapy with children and adults to distract patients from painful proce- dures while encouraging active limb movement. This and other forms of...rehabilitative management due to compromised skin integrity of a residual limb . Open wounds, fresh skin grafts, pain , and scar con- tractures that limit movement

  5. Proceedings of the 2015 international summit on fibropapillomatosis: Global status, trends, and population impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Stacy A.; Work, Thierry M.; Brunson, Shandell; Foley, Allen M.; Balazs, George H.

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 International Summit on Fibropapillomatosis (FP) was convened in Honolulu, Hawaii June 11-14, 2015. Scientists from around the world were invited to present results from sea turtle monitoring and research programs as they relate to the global status, trends, and population impacts of FP on green turtles. The participants engaged in discussions that resulted in the following conclusions: 1.Globally, FP has long been present in wild sea turtle populations the earliest mention was in the late 1800s in the Florida Keys. 2.FP primarily affects medium-sized immature turtles in coastal foraging pastures. 3.Expression of FP differs across ocean basins and to some degree within basins. Turtles in the Southeast US, Caribbean, Brazil, and Australia rarely have oral tumors (inside the mouth cavity), whereas they are common and often severe in Hawaii. Internal tumors (on vital organs) occur in the Atlantic and Hawaii, but only rarely in Australia. Liver tumors are common in Florida but not in Hawaii. 4.Recovery from FP through natural processes, when the affliction is not severe, has been documented in wild populations globally. 5.FP causes reduced survivorship, but documented mortality rates in Australia and Hawaii are low. The mortality impact of FP is not currently exceeding population growth rates in some intensively monitored populations (e.g., Florida, Hawaii) as evidenced by increasing nesting trends despite the incidence of FP in immature foraging populations. 6.Pathogens, hosts, and potential disease and environmental cofactors have the capacity to change; while we are having success now, there needs to be continued monitoring to detect changes in the distribution, occurrence, and severity of the disease. 7.While we do not have clear evidence to provide the direct link, globally, the preponderance of sites with a high frequency of FP tumors are areas with some degree of degradation resulting from altered watersheds. Watershed management and responsible coastal

  6. Road and Street Centerlines, West Summit Frontage, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'West Summit Frontage'. The extent of...

  7. Road and Street Centerlines, North Summit Frontage, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'North Summit Frontage'. The extent of...

  8. 77 FR 36549 - Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit-“Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit--``Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health Disparities, and Social Determinants of Health...). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing, will...

  9. On sustainable development problems, also according to the world summit in Johannesburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gino Moncada lo Giudice

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available In the intervention at the Environment Commission of the Senate on the problems of the sustainable development, following the recent World Summit in Johannesburg, some fundamental points are underpinned: the question is summed up and an exam is made about the results of the Summit and on the meaning of the commitments taken for the future. Indeed, it is universally accepted that, to be considered sustainable, the development must reach a compromise between economical, social and environmental goals, to maximize the present well-being, without challenging the right of future generations to satisfy their own needs. It is also accepted that this cannot be realised without defence for our eco-system and without a simultaneous and well coordinated intervention of all Countries and the participation of all productive and social categories; probably, this should be the true finality of the so much acclaimed “globalisation”.

  10. Efficient Mobility Summit: Transportation and the Future of Dynamic Mobility Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-12-01

    On October 27, 2015, The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) brought together local and national thought leaders to discuss the convergence of connectivity, vehicle automation, and transportation infrastructure investments at the Future Energy Efficient Mobility Workshop. The half-day workshop was held in conjunction with the Colorado Department of Transportation's (CDOT) Transportation Matters Summit and featured four panel sessions that showcased perspectives on efficient mobility from federal and state agencies, automakers and their suppliers, transportation data providers, and freight companies. This summary provides highlights from the meeting's exchanges of ideas and existing applications. Transportation's (CDOT) Transportation Matters Summit and featured four panel sessions that showcased perspectives on efficient mobility from federal and state agencies, automakers and their suppliers, transportation data providers, and freight companies. This summary provides highlights from the meeting's exchanges of ideas and existing applications.

  11. Current research in aging: a report from the 2015 Ageing Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyse, Emmanuel; Lahousse, Lies; Krantic, Slavica

    2015-01-01

    Ageing Summit, London, UK, 10-12 February 2015 The Ageing Summit 2015 held on 10-12 February 2015 in London (UK) provided an extensive update to our knowledge of the 'Biology of Ageing' and a forum to discuss the participants' latest research progress. The meeting was subdivided into four thematic sessions: cellular level research including the aging brain; slowing down progression, rejuvenation and self-repair; genetic and epigenetic regulation; and expression and pathology of age-related diseases. Each session included multiple key presentations, three to five short research communications and ongoing poster presentations. The meeting provided an exciting multidisciplinary overview of the aging process from cellular and molecular mechanisms to medico-social aspects of human aging.

  12. El único hotel asociado con summit hotels & resorts en Colombia - Hotel Bogotá Plaza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Carolina Rojas

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Es importante conocer acerca de la historia del Hotel Bogotá Plaza. Este es el primer hotel del norte de Bogotá. La misión del hotel es permanecer en el corazón de los huéspedes y visitantes, al satisfacer sus deseos con amor, calidez, amabilidad, seguridad y servicio de excelente calidad. Desde 1996 el Bogotá Plaza Hotel ha pertenecido a Summit Hotels & Resorts. Esta es una firma que proporciona al hotel un sistema de reservas por Internet, esta alianza ha generado que el hotel sea reconocido en muchos países del mundo. Summit además se ha establecido como una organización líder en ventas, mercadeo y reservas hoteleras del mundo. Es importante asociarse con compañías destacadas así como lo hizo el Hotel Bogotá Plaza.

  13. 76 FR 550 - Second National Bed Bug Summit; Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ...EPA is planning the second National Bed Bug Summit to be held February 1 and 2, 2011, on the topic of the bed bug resurgence in the United States. The goal of this meeting is to review the current bed bug problem and identify and prioritize further actions to address the problem. The objectives of the summit are to identify knowledge gaps and barriers to effective community-wide bed bug control; propose the next steps in addressing knowledge gaps and eliminating barriers; and develop a framework for addressing the highest priority needs. The agenda for this meeting is under development and will be posted on our Web site and placed in the docket in advance of the meeting.

  14. Structure of the Paleozoic rocks in the Tonkin Summit Quadrangle, Eureka County, Nevda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arney, Eric

    Paleozoic rocks in the northern Simpson Park Range, Tonkin Summit Quadrangle, are comprised of the syn-orogenic Roberts Mountains allochthon, the postorogenic Permian Garden Valley Formation, and autochthonous Devonian carbonates. Complex deformation includes the Late Devonian-Early Mississippian, Antler Orogeny, post-Antler thrusting, and Cenozoic Basin and Range extension. The Roberts Mountains thrust caused eastward advancement of deep marine, mainly siliciclastic strata on top of the shelfal, mainly carbonate platform during the Antler Orogeny. This study shows that an east-vergent, post-Antler thrust, emplace the topographically higher carbonate outliers of the autochthon on top of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. These carbonate masses sit on top of the Henderson thrust in the Tonkin Summit Quadrangle and timing of this thrust is constrained to be post-Permian.

  15. From the Earth Summit to Rio+20: integration of health and sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Andy; Alleyne, George; Kickbusch, Ilona; Dora, Carlos

    2012-06-09

    In 2012, world leaders will meet at the Rio+20 conference to advance sustainable development--20 years after the Earth Summit that resulted in agreement on important principles but insufficient action. Many of the development goals have not been achieved partly because social (including health), economic, and environmental priorities have not been addressed in an integrated manner. Adverse trends have been reported in many key environmental indicators that have worsened since the Earth Summit. Substantial economic growth has occurred in many regions but nevertheless has not benefited many populations of low income and those that have been marginalised, and has resulted in growing inequities. Variable progress in health has been made, and inequities are persistent. Improved health contributes to development and is underpinned by ecosystem stability and equitable economic progress. Implementation of policies that both improve health and promote sustainable development is urgently needed.

  16. Fouffeen Mountain Summits:the Dreams and Glory of Chinese Mountaineers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DORJE; DRADUL

    2007-01-01

    As the first mountaineering team to challenge the fourteen world's highest mountain summits,these Chinese mountaineers have finally realized their dream.They are all ethnic Tibetans and have gone through hardship and dangers over the years;some of them have even contributed their lives to the realization of the project.Finally,three of them have accomplished it and set a marvelous record in world mountaineering that is unprecedented.

  17. Proceedings of the 15th Annual UT-KBRIN Bioinformatics Summit 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Rouchka, Eric C.; Chariker, Julia H; Harrison, Benjamin J; Cao, Xueyuan; Pounds, Stanley; Raimondi, Susana; Downing, James; Ribeiro, Raul; Rubnitz, Jeffery; Lamba, Jatinder; Daigle, Bernie J.; Johnson, Nicholas; Gehrlich, Stephanie; Burgess, Deborah; John C Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents I1 Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual UT- KBRIN Bioinformatics Summit 2016 Eric C. Rouchka, Julia H. Chariker, Benjamin J. Harrison, Juw Won Park P1 CC-PROMISE: Projection onto the Most Interesting Statistical Evidence (PROMISE) with Canonical Correlation to integrate gene expression and methylation data with multiple pharmacologic and clinical endpoints Xueyuan Cao, Stanley Pounds, Susana Raimondi, James Downing, Raul Ribeiro, Jeffery Rubnitz, Jatinder Lamba P2 Integration...

  18. Romania's Iliescu to attend World Summit on Information Society organized by UN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Romanian President Ion Iliescu will be in Geneva, December 9-11, to attend a world summit on information society, organized by the United Nations Department of Public Information. On this occasion, Iliescu will visit on Tuesday the Geneva-based European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), where he will meet CERN General Director Luciano Maiani, as well as young Romanian researchers working there and will participate in a scientific session called The Role of Science in the Information Society" (1 page).

  19. The EU-Ukraine Association Agreement prior to the Vilnius Eastern Partnership Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastore Gunta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to explore how the EU policy on Ukraine evolved in the run-up to the Eastern Partnership Summit in Vilnius in November 2013. In particular, it looks into the preparations leading to the signature of the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement. Thereby it contributes to better understanding of the EU policy debate related to the associated negotiations with the Eastern Partnership countries.

  20. The NATO Warsaw Summit: How to Strengthen Alliance Cohesion (Strategic Forum, Number 296)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    multiple crises including Russian revanchism, mass migration, and terrorism. Summit preparations are also taking place under the shadow of potential... communication on countering hybrid threats suggests growing awareness about the security challenges in the EU’s neighborhood and calls for step- ping up...NATO-EU cooperation in areas ranging from situational awareness and strategic communication to crisis prevention and response.24 The notion of hybrid

  1. Travel Daily China Travel Innovation Summit to Be Held in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Guangzhou,China,April 7th- TravelDaily (www.traveldaily.cn), China’s leading online publisher and event organizer with emphasis on trends in the distribution,marketing and technology of the travel and tourism industries,today announced it will partner with PhoCusWright to host the 2009 China Travel Innovation Summit in Beijing from May 12 to 13,2009.

  2. Energy summit Hessen. Implementation concept of the state government Hessen; Hessischer Energiegipfel. Umsetzungskonzept der Hessischen Landesregierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-02-15

    By means of the concept under consideration, the state government of Hessen (Federal Republic of Germany) has pursued the possible and realistic course for the implementation of the targets of the energy summit. The main aspects of this contribution are the implementation of the energy policy of Hessen into the European and national framework; Status quo of the energy consumption in Hessen; Areas of action and measures of the state government of Hessen; Actors of the energy policy turnaround; Monitoring.

  3. The Toxicology Education Summit: building the future of toxicology through education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchowsky, Aaron; Buckley, Lorrene A; Carlson, Gary P; Fitsanakis, Vanessa A; Ford, Sue M; Genter, Mary Beth; Germolec, Dori R; Leavens, Teresa L; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Safe, Stephen H; Sulentic, Courtney E W; Eidemiller, Betty J

    2012-06-01

    Toxicology and careers in toxicology, as well as many other scientific disciplines, are undergoing rapid and dramatic changes as new discoveries, technologies, and hazards advance at a blinding rate. There are new and ever increasing demands on toxicologists to keep pace with expanding global economies, highly fluid policy debates, and increasingly complex global threats to public health. These demands must be met with new paradigms for multidisciplinary, technologically complex, and collaborative approaches that require advanced and continuing education in toxicology and associated disciplines. This requires paradigm shifts in educational programs that support recruitment, development, and training of the modern toxicologist, as well as continued education and retraining of the midcareer professional to keep pace and sustain careers in industry, government, and academia. The Society of Toxicology convened the Toxicology Educational Summit to discuss the state of toxicology education and to strategically address educational needs and the sustained advancement of toxicology as a profession. The Summit focused on core issues of: building for the future of toxicology through educational programs; defining education and training needs; developing the "Total Toxicologist"; continued training and retraining toxicologists to sustain their careers; and, finally, supporting toxicology education and professional development. This report summarizes the outcomes of the Summit, presents examples of successful programs that advance toxicology education, and concludes with strategies that will insure the future of toxicology through advanced educational initiatives.

  4. Blueprint for Action: Visioning Summit on the Future of the Workforce in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sectish, Theodore C; Hay, William W; Mahan, John D; Mendoza, Fernando S; Spector, Nancy D; Stanton, Bonita; Szilagyi, Peter G; Turner, Teri L; Walker, Leslie R; Slaw, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    The Federation of Pediatric Organizations engaged members of the pediatric community in an 18-month process to envision the future of the workforce in pediatrics, culminating in a Visioning Summit on the Future of the Workforce in Pediatrics. This article documents the planning process and methods used. Four working groups were based on the 4 domains that are likely to affect the future workforce: Child Health Research and Training, Diversity and Inclusion, Gender and Generations, and Pediatric Training Along the Continuum. These groups identified the issues and trends and prioritized their recommendations. Before the summit, 5 key megatrends cutting across all domains were identified:1. Aligning Education to the Emerging Health Needs of Children and Families 2. Promoting Future Support for Research Training and for Child Health Research 3. Striving Toward Mastery Within the Profession 4. Aligning and Optimizing Pediatric Practice in a Changing Health Care Delivery System 5. Taking Advantage of the Changing Demographics and Expertise of the Pediatric Workforce At the Visioning Summit, we assembled members of each of the working groups, the Federation of Pediatric Organizations Board of Directors, and several invited guests to discuss the 5 megatrends and develop the vision, solutions, and actions for each megatrend. Based on this discussion, we offer 10 recommendations for the field of pediatrics and its leading organizations to consider taking action. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. "we cannot Wait to ACT!" Simulating Global Climate Summits with Gifted and Talented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haste, T.; Vesperman, D.; Alrivy, S.

    2012-12-01

    Students simulated the 2011 Durban Climate Summit in order to experience two roles: global diplomats attempting to solve a significant global problem and scientists as contributors of knowledge. Together, they worked to develop a framework to provide global solutions as world leaders. This project demonstrated [highlighted?] student work from the climate summit, describing how students promoted dialogue and provided climate science information to their diplomatic peers, who then used this information in diplomatic negotiations. By focusing on increasing student climate literacy, students engaged in both climate science and global diplomacy through meaningful simulations to understand the global and political issues surrounding Climate Change mitigation. Three classes of international middle school students attending Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth summer programs enacted the 2011 Durban Model United Nations meeting. One class developed a deep understanding of climate and climate science by working with computer models and data to represent members of the IPCC. Members of this class collaborated with climate scientists, conducted experiments, and developed a well-rounded understanding of paleoclimate, current climatic trends, carbon cycling, and modeling future outcomes. Two additional classes took on the roles of UN diplomats, researched their respective nations, engaged in practice UN simulations, and developed a working understanding of the diplomatic process. Students representing the IPCC assisted their diplomatic peers in developing and proposing possible UN resolutions. All three classes worked together to enact the Durban Climate Summit with the underlying focus of developing diplomatic Climate Change mitigation strategies and ultimately resolutions for member nations.

  6. Summit on Improving the Economics of America's Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mason, Charles [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The Summit on Improving the Economics of America’s Nuclear Power Plants was convened May 19, 2016, by Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and co-sponsored by Idaho Senator Mike Crapo to stress the importance of existing nuclear reactors in meeting our nation’s energy goals. The summit was also designed to identify and discuss policy options that can be pursued at federal and state levels to address economic challenges, as well as technical options that utilities can use to improve the economic competitiveness of operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) and avoid early plant retirements that are driven by temporary market conditions. The owners of NPPs face difficult economic decisions and are working to improve the performance of existing NPPs. However, it soon became clear that some of the actions taken by states and regional markets have had an impact on the economic viability of existing power plants, including carbon free NPPs. Summit speakers identified concepts and actions that could be taken at state and federal levels to improve the economics of the existing fleet within these regulated and restructured electricity markets. This report summarizes the speeches, concepts, and actions taken.

  7. Methane anomalies in seawater above the Loihi submarine summit area, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamo, Toshitaka; Ishibashi, Junichiro; Sakai, Hitoshi (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Tilbrook, B. (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (USA))

    1987-10-01

    Hydrothermal activity above Loihi submarine volcano was characterized by water column distributions of methane, pH and helium-3. It was found that the southern Loihi summit is almost covered with hydrothermal plumes, which have anomalously high concentrations of methane (maximum: 569 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3} kg{sup {minus}}1) accompanied by high concentrations of helium-3 and low pH values (minimum: 7.18). The plumes consist of two layers: a shallow plume (about 200 m above the summit) and a deep plume (about 100 m above the summit), probably derived from different hydrothermal vents. The shallow and deep plumes showed different CH{sub 4}/{sup 3}He and CH{sub 4}/pH ratios with the same {sup 3}He/pH ratio, which implies that methane concentrations differ between the hydrothermal end members for the two plumes. The variation of methane between the end members is suggested to result from inter-vent inhomogeneity of bacterial activities that consume or produce methane within the vents. Comparison of the CH{sub 4}/{sup 3}He ratios of the two plumes with the previous data for Loihi and other submarine hydrothermal areas confirms that the Loihi hotspot has one to two orders of magnitude smaller CH{sub 4}/{sup 3}He value than those of the East Pacific Rise and the Galapagos spreading centers.

  8. Pedaling into high gear for bicycle policy in Canada : lessons from bike summit 2008 in Toronto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The 2008 bike summit provided a forum for the discussion of international and Canadian best practices related to bicycles and bicycling policy. The aim of the summit was to assist communities across Canada to improve conditions for cycling in the urban environment and help to generate a cultural shift towards greater acceptance of cycling on roads. This paper discussed lessons learned during the summit and outlined new methods of improving cycling in communities. The City of London has recently increased the amount of cyclists using its roads by 200 per cent. Cycling infrastructure is more affordable than constructing major public transit or road infrastructure. Savings in healthcare costs will be accrued over time as a result of the healthier lifestyles promoted by regular cycling activity. Bicycle trips can help to alleviate over-demand on heavy transit routes. Encouraging commuters to cycle will also reduce the amounts of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in urban areas. Lane width reductions will help to reduce speeds as drivers are forced to pay more attention when driving. Public bike sharing programs and bike stations are now being used in many North American cities. It was concluded that strong advocacy is needed to ensure the growth and acceptance of cycling in urban centres. 23 figs.

  9. 两种沉水植物黑藻和伊乐藻的种间竞争%INTER-SPECIFIC COMPETITION BETWEEN TWO SUBMERGED MACROPHYTES, ELODEA NUTTALLII AND HYDRILLA VERTICILLATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许经伟; 李伟; 刘贵华; 张利静; 刘文治

    2007-01-01

    采用取代系列实验方法,主要从竞争期的长短出发,研究了黑藻(Hydrilla verticillata)和伊乐藻(Elodea nuttallii)的种间竞争关系,并考查了在不同底质(土壤)肥力下两者种间竞争能力的变化情况.实验发现,伊乐藻由于具有较强的耐寒能力,在冬春时空竞争方面占有明显的优势,从而在周年实验中表现出较强的竞争优势,取代黑藻生长.而在短期实验中,黑藻由于可在水面生长形成较上位的冠层的特性,与伊乐藻相比在水体上层空间占领和阳光获取方面具有一定的优势,因此造成两种间竞争的不平衡,竞争偏利于黑藻,且这种优势随底质(土壤)肥力的增加而有所增强,但并没有明显取代现象的发生,两物种可以在混合种群中共存.

  10. Observational perspectives on cloud-atmosphere-surface coupling at Summit, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, C. J.; Shupe, M.; Miller, N.; Noone, D.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Raudzens Bailey, A.; O'Neill, M.; Persson, O. P. G.; Rowe, P. M.; Schneider, D. P.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Steffen, K.; Turner, D. D.; Walden, V. P.; White, J. W. C.

    2016-12-01

    The atmosphere modulates the surface mass and energy balances of the Greenland ice sheet, including the temperature of the snow and firn, thus facilitating surface melt. In the absence of clouds, infrared loss at the surface leads to the development of a stably-stratified boundary layer, which weakens turbulent mixing and limits surface mass loss through sublimation. This stable state is eroded by clouds, which are frequently observed throughout the year. Through precipitation clouds are a source of accumulation, but clouds also modify the surface energy budget substantially, providing an overall warming of the surface in all months (33 W m-2 annually) over the central plateau. Thus, variability in cloud cover can drive or facilitate many of the physical processes acting out at and near the surface. Here, recent research on the coupled surface-atmosphere dynamic, radiative, and mass relationships at Summit Station are discussed. The response of the surface energy and mass budgets to forcing caused by varying atmospheric and cloud conditions is quantified and contextualized with other Arctic locations. Some unique features of the Summit environment, such as its high elevation, low humidity, and seasonally persistent snow cover, are found to be important factors in the way that clouds and the atmosphere interact with the surface there compared to elsewhere. This work is supported by a recent critical mass of measurements pertaining to such interactions at Summit. Observations have been made by the Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric state, and Precipitation at Summit (ICECAPS) program since 2010, including twice-daily temperature and humidity profiles from radiosoundings and cloud properties acquired from measurements made by lidar, radar, and passive spectral infrared and microwave radiometers. These measurements complement those of the surface radiation budget and meteorology made by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and NOAA

  11. 3.5 Year Monitoring of 225 GHz Opacity at the Summit of Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Satoki; Asada, Keiichi; Martin-Cocher, Pierre L.; Chen, Ming-Tang; Ho, Paul T. P.; Inoue, Makoto; Koch, Patrick M.; Paine, Scott N.; Turner, David D.

    2017-02-01

    We present the 3.5 years monitoring results of 225 GHz opacity at the summit of the Greenland ice sheet (Greenland Summit Camp) at an altitude of 3200 m using a tipping radiometer. We chose this site as our submillimeter telescope (Greenland Telescope) site, because conditions are expected to have low submillimeter opacity and because its location offers favorable baselines to existing submillimeter telescopes for global-scale Very Long Baseline Interferometry. The site shows a clear seasonal variation with the average opacity lower by a factor of two during winter. The 25%, 50%, and 75% quartiles of the 225 GHz opacity during the winter months of November through April are 0.046, 0.060, and 0.080, respectively. For the winter quartiles of 25% and 50%, the Greenland site is about 10%-30% worse than the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) or the South Pole sites. Estimated atmospheric transmission spectra in winter season are similar to the ALMA site at lower frequencies (\\lt 450 GHz), which are transparent enough to perform astronomical observations almost all of the winter time with opacities \\lt 0.5, but 10%-25% higher opacities at higher frequencies (\\gt 450 GHz) than those at the ALMA site. This is due to the lower altitude of the Greenland site and the resulting higher line wing opacity from pressure-broadened saturated water lines in addition to higher dry air continuum absorption at higher frequencies. Nevertheless, half of the winter time at the Greenland Summit Camp can be used for astronomical observations at frequencies between 450 GHz and 1000 GHz with opacities \\lt 1.2, and 10% of the time show \\gt 10 % transmittance in the THz (1035 GHz, 1350 GHz, and 1500 GHz) windows. Summer season is good for observations at frequencies lower than 380 GHz. One major advantage of the Greenland Summit Camp site in winter is that there is no diurnal variation due to the polar night condition, and therefore the durations of low-opacity conditions

  12. Bedrock geology of snyderville basin: Structural geology techniques applied to understanding the hydrogeology of a rapidly developing region, Summit County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keighley, K.E.; Yonkee, W.A.; Ashland, F.X.; Evans, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The availability of ground water is a problem for many communities throughout the west. As these communities continue to experience growth, the initial allocation of ground water supplies proves inadequate and may force restrictions on existing, and future, development plans. Much of this new growth relies on ground water supplies extracted from fractured bedrock aquifers. An example of a community faced with this problem is western Summit County, near Park City, Utah, This area has experienced significant water shortages coupled with a 50% growth rate in the past 10-15 years. Recent housing development rests directly on complexly deformed Triassic to Jurassic sedimentary rocks in the hanging wall of the Mount Raymond-Absaroka thrust system. The primary fractured bedrock aquifers are the Nugget Sandstone, and limestones in the Thaynes and Twin Creek Formations. Ground water production and management strategies can be improved if the geometry of the structures and the flow properties of the fractured and folded bedrock can be established. We characterize the structures that may influence ground water flow at two sites: the Pinebrook and Summit Park subdivisions, which demonstrate abrupt changes (less than 1 mi/1.6 km) within the hydrogeologic systems. Geologic mapping at scales of 1:4500 (Pinebrook) and 1:9600 (Summit Park), scanline fracture mapping at the outcrop scale, geologic cross sections, water well data, and structural analysis, provides a clearer picture of the hydrogeologic setting of the aquifers in this region, and has been used to successfully site wells. In the Pinebrook area, the dominate map-scale structures of the area is the Twomile Canyon anticline, a faulted box-like to conical anticline. Widely variable bedding orientations suggest that the fold is segmented and is non-cylindrical and conical on the western limb with a fold axis that plunges to the northwest and also to the southeast, and forms a box-type fold between the middle and eastern

  13. Proceedings of the August 2011 Traceability Research Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Tejas; Buckley, Greg; McEntire, Jennifer C

    2013-12-01

    IFT's Traceability Improvement Initiative aims to advance work in the area of food product tracing through several means including hosted events where thought leaders exchange knowledge and ideas. In August 2011, the Initiative, in collaboration with GS1 US, convened a group of 50 product tracing stakeholders, as a follow-on to a successful event the month prior. Representatives conducting pilots or implementation studies in produce, seafood, dairy, and other industries discussed the objectives, challenges and learnings. Some of the learnings from on-going initiatives included the sense that better information management provides a return of investment; data often exist but may not necessarily be appropriately linked through the supply chain; and enhanced product tracing enables better accountability and quality control. Challenges identified in enabling traceability throughout the supply chain were the distribution complexity; the need for training, communication, and collaboration; improving the reliability, quality and security of data captured, stored and shared as well as the importance of standards in data and interoperability of technology. Several approaches to overcoming these challenges were discussed. The first approach incrementally improves upon the current "one up/one down" system by requiring electronic records and tracking internal as well as external critical tracking events. The benefits of this approach are its similarity to existing regulatory requirements and low cost of implementation; resulting in a higher probability of adoption. The major disadvantage to this process is the longer response time required during a trace (back or forward). The second approach is similar to a "pedigree" approach where historical information about the food travels with it through the value chain. A major advantage of this approach is the quickest response time during a trace. Some of the disadvantages of this approach are potential for misuse of data, the volume

  14. Millennium Pharma Summit--strategic planning to increase growth and generate pharmaceutical shareholder value. 26-27 January 2000, London, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worker, C; Kibble, A

    2000-05-01

    With mergers and acquisitions (M&As) being the 'watch words' of the moment among those involved in the pharmaceutical industry, this meeting aimed to bring together the senior hierarchy of both medium and big pharma to discuss the issues pertinent to competitive survival and shareholder profit delivery. Along with a more objective analysis delivered by a number of management consultancy representatives, the summit presented delegates with interesting and often controversial viewpoints on: strategic partnerships and alliances; developing organizational models to generate profitability; the promotion of innovative R&D to maximize shareholder value; the development of marketing strategies in line with increasing consumer power; and, past, present and future consequences for the industry as a result of 'merger mania'.

  15. Two magma bodies beneath the summit of Kilauea Volcano unveiled by isotopically distinct melt deliveries from the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietruszka, Aaron J; Heaton, Daniel E.; Marske, Jared P.; Garcia, Michael O.

    2015-01-01

    The summit magma storage reservoir of Kīlauea Volcano is one of the most important components of the magmatic plumbing system of this frequently active basaltic shield-building volcano. Here we use new high-precision Pb isotopic analyses of Kīlauea summit lavas—from 1959 to the active Halema‘uma‘u lava lake—to infer the number, size, and interconnectedness of magma bodies within the volcano's summit reservoir. From 1971 to 1982, the 206Pb/204Pb ratios of the lavas define two separate magma mixing trends that correlate with differences in vent location and/or pre-eruptive magma temperature. These relationships, which contrast with a single magma mixing trend for lavas from 1959 to 1968, indicate that Kīlauea summit eruptions since at least 1971 were supplied from two distinct magma bodies. The locations of these magma bodies are inferred to coincide with two major deformation centers identified by geodetic monitoring of the volcano's summit region: (1) the main locus of the summit reservoir ∼2–4 km below the southern rim of Kīlauea Caldera and (2) a shallower magma body 4 km3 of lava erupted), must therefore be sustained by a nearly continuous supply of new melt from the mantle. The model results show that a minimum of four compositionally distinct, mantle-derived magma batches were delivered to the volcano (at least three directly to the summit reservoir) since 1959. These melt inputs correlate with the initiation of energetic (1959 Kīlauea Iki) and/or sustained (1969–1974 Mauna Ulu, 1983-present Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and 2008-present Halema‘uma‘u) eruptions. Thus, Kīlauea's eruptive behavior is partly tied to the delivery of new magma batches from the volcano's source region within the Hawaiian mantle plume.

  16. Principle and geomorphological applicability of summit level and base level technique using Aster Gdem satellite-derived data and the original software Baz

    OpenAIRE

    Akihisa Motoki; Kenji Freire Motoki; Susanna Eleonora Sichel; Samuel da Silva; José Ribeiro Aires

    2015-01-01

    This article presents principle and geomorphological applicability of summit level technique using Aster Gdem satellite-derived topographicdata. Summit level corresponds to thevirtualtopographic surface constituted bylocalhighest points, such as peaks and plateau tops, and reconstitutes palaeo-geomorphology before the drainage erosion. Summit level map is efficient for reconstitution of palaeo-surfaces and detection of active tectonic movement. Base level is thevirtualsurface composed oflocal...

  17. Modeling chemistry in and above snow at Summit, Greenland – Part 1: Model description and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sun-lit snow is increasingly recognized as a chemical reactor that plays an active role in uptake, transformation, and release of atmospheric trace gases. Snow is known to influence boundary layer air on a local scale, and given the large global surface coverage of snow may also be significant on regional and global scales.

    We present a new detailed one-dimensional snow chemistry module that has been coupled to the 1-D atmospheric boundary layer model MISTRA, we refer to the coupled model as MISTRA-SNOW. The new 1-D snow module, which is dynamically coupled to the overlaying atmospheric model, includes heat transport in the snowpack, molecular diffusion, and wind pumping of gases in the interstitial air. The model includes gas phase photochemistry and chemical reactions both in the interstitial air and the atmosphere. Heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry on atmospheric aerosol is considered explicitly. The chemical interaction of interstitial air with snow grains is simulated assuming chemistry in a liquid (aqueous layer on the grain surface. The model was used to investigate snow as the source of nitrogen oxides (NOx and gas phase reactive bromine in the atmospheric boundary layer in the remote snow covered Arctic (over the Greenland ice sheet as well as to investigate the link between halogen cycling and ozone depletion that has been observed in interstitial air. The model is validated using data taken 10 June–13 June, 2008 as part of the Greenland Summit Halogen-HOx experiment (GSHOX. The model predicts that reactions involving bromide and nitrate impurities in the surface snow at Summit can sustain atmospheric NO and BrO mixing ratios measured at Summit during this period.

  18. Evaluating the Impact of the Summit Station, Greenland Radiosonde Program on Data Modelers and Forecast Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, C. J.; Starkweather, S.; Cox, C. J.; Solomon, A.; Shupe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Radiosondes are balloon-borne meteorological sensors used to acquire profiles of temperature and humidity. Radiosonde data are essential inputs for numerical weather prediction models and are used for climate research, particularly in the creation of reanalysis products. However, radiosonde programs are costly to maintain, in particular in the remote regions of the Arctic (e.g., $440,000/yr at Summit, Greenland), where only 40 of approximately 1000 routine global launches are made. The climate of this data-sparse region is poorly understood and forecast data assimilation procedures are designed for global applications. Thus, observations may be rejected from the data assimilation because they are too far from the model expectations. For the most cost-efficient deployment of resources and to improve forecasting methods, analyses of the effectiveness of individual radiosonde programs are necessary. Here, we evaluate how radiosondes launched twice daily (0 and 12 UTC) from Summit Station, Greenland, (72.58⁰N, 38.48⁰W, 3210 masl) influence the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) operational forecasts from June 2013 through May of 2015. A statistical analysis is conducted to determine the impact of the observations on the forecast model and the meteorological regimes that the model fails to reproduce are identified. Assimilation rates in the inversion layer are lower than any other part of the troposphere. Above the inversion, assimilation rates range from 85%-100%, 60%-98%, and > 99% for temperature, humidity, and wind, respectively. The lowest assimilation rates are found near the surface, possibly associated with biases in the representation of the temperature inversion by the ECMWF model at Summit. Consequently, assimilation rates are lower near the surface during winter when strong temperature inversions are frequently observed. Our findings benefit the scientific community who uses this information for climatological analysis of the

  19. Local anthropogenic impact on particulate elemental carbon concentrations at Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. W. Hagler

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Summit, Greenland is a remote Arctic research station allowing for field measurements at the highest point of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Due to the current reliance on diesel generators for electricity at Summit, unavoidable local emissions are a potential contamination threat to the measurement of combustion-related species in the air and snow. The effect of fossil-fuel combustion on particulate elemental carbon (EC is assessed by a combination of ambient measurements (~1 km from the main camp, a series of snow pits, and Gaussian plume modeling. Ambient measurements indicate that the air directly downwind of the research station generators experiences particulate absorption coefficient (closely related to EC values that are up to a factor of 200 higher than the summer 2006 non-camp-impacted ambient average. Local anthropogenic influence on snow EC content is also evident. The average EC concentration in 1-m snow pits in the "clean air" sector of Summit Camp are a factor of 1.8–2.4 higher than in snow pits located 10 km and 20 km to the north ("downwind" and south ("upwind" of the research site. Gaussian plume modeling performed using meteorological data from years 2003–2006 suggests a strong angular dependence of anthropogenic impact, with highest risk to the northwest of Summit Camp and lowest to the southeast. Along a transect to the southeast (5 degree angle bin, the modeled frequency of significant camp contribution to atmospheric EC (i.e. camp-produced EC>summer 2006 average EC at a distance of 0.5 km, 10 km, and 20 km is 1%, 0.2%, and 0.05%, respectively. According to both the snow pit and model results, a distance exceeding 10 km towards the southeast is expected to minimize risk of contamination. These results also suggest that other remote Arctic monitoring stations powered by local fuel combustion may need to account for local air and snow contamination in field sampling design and data interpretation.

  20. Rime Mushrooms - Extreme Rime Ice Buildup on Mountain Summits of Southern Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Patagonian Andes are known among mountain climbers for a meteorological phenomenon that occurs there but is unknown in many other mountain areas. The phenomenon is the buildup of rime ice in large bulbous or mushroom-shaped accretions on the windward side of projecting mountain summits, ridges and exposed near-vertical rock faces. These "ice mushrooms" have never been investigated scientifically. This talk will introduce the audience to ice mushrooms, describe where they are found, consider the meteorological factors leading to their formation, and illustrate how they are negotiated by mountain climbers using photographs and descriptions from Southern Patagonia.

  1. Annual report of the Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusin Working Group (FWG))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1987-04-01

    The Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusion Working Group (FWG)) was established in 1983 in response to the Declaration of the Heads of State and Government at the Versailles Economic Summit meeting of 1982, and in response to the subsequent report of the Working Group in Technology, Growth and Employment (TGE) as endorsed at the Williamsburg Summit meeting, 1983. This document contains the complete written record of each of the three FWG meetings which include the minutes, lists of attendees, agendas, statements, and summary conclusions as well as the full reports of the Technical Working Party. In addition, there is a pertinent exchange of correspondence between FWG members on the role of the Technical Working Party and a requested background paper on the modalities associated with a possible future ETR project.

  2. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling Foro Energy: High Power Lasers - Long Distances (Performer Video)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None Available

    2012-02-28

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video from Foro Energy are Joel Moxley, Founder and CEO, Mark Zediker, Founder and CTO, and Paul Deutch, President and COO. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy, also appears briefly in this video to praise the accomplishment of a high powered laser that can transmit that power long distances for faster and more powerful drilling of geothermal, oil, and gas wells.

  3. Framing the News on the Summits of Climate Change on Spanish Television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Aguila Coghlan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The MDCS Research Group at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, has analyzed the television coverage of the news in Spain on climate change summits developed in Cancun (2010 and Durban (2011. On a base of 309 news records, 169 and 140 respectively and through a registration protocol specially designed by the team for audiovisual works, we conducted a content analysis of the news corpus. Reference is made to the framing of the news, the social context and the cognitive framework of media formats. The information obtained was processed using SPSS. As a result of this analysis, this paper presents a comparison of the frequencies of some of the variables in the news of the two summits. Compared variables are:  Number of news per day;  No. of “Totales” (A “total” means someone is displayed with its own voice talking; Off Theme, Off Mode, Duration of news, Source of images,  Features of images (stock images, present images, Mood of the Presentation Phrases,  Problem solutions,  Responsibilities in the case of no solution.

  4. An Autonomous Polarized Raman Lidar System Designed for Summit Camp, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillwell, Robert A.; Neely, Ryan R.; Pilewskie, Peter; O'Neill, Michael; Thayer, Jeffrey P.; Hayman, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    A dearth of high-spatial and temporal resolution measurements of atmospheric state variables in the Arctic directly inhibits scientific understanding of radiative and precipitation impacts on the changing surface environment. More reliable and frequent measurements are needed to better understand Arctic weather processes and constrain model predictions. To partially address the lack of Artic observations, a new autonomous Raman lidar system, which will measure water vapor mixing ratio, temperature, extinction, and cloud phase profiles through the troposphere, is designed for deployment to Summit Camp, Greenland (72° 36' N, 38° 25' W, 3250 [m]). This high-altitude Arctic field site has co-located ancillary equipment such as a Doppler millimeter cloud radar, microwave radiometers, depolarization lidars, ceiliometer, an infrared interferometer and twice-daily radiosondes. The current suite of instruments allows for a near comprehensive picture of the atmospheric state above Summit but increased spatial and temporal resolution of water vapor and temperature will reveal detailed microphysical information. A system description will be provided with an emphasis on the Monte Carlo safety analysis done to ensure eye safety in all relevant weather conditions.

  5. Site evaluations of the summit of Co. Chajnantor for infrared observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Takashi; Motohara, Kentaro; Sako, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Masuo; Minezaki, Takeo; Mitani, Natsuko; Aoki, Tsutomu; Soyano, Takao; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Kawara, Kimiaki; Kohno, Kotaro; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Handa, Toshihiko; Doi, Mamoru; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Ezawa, Hajime; Bronfman, Leonardo; Ruiz, Maria T.

    2008-07-01

    Because of the high transparency in infrared wavelength, Co. Chajnantor (5,650m altitude) at Atacama, Chile, is one of the most promising sites for infrared astronomy in the world. For evaluating the site condition quantitatively we carried out weather and cloud emissivity monitoring campaign from April 2006 to April 2007. The ground-level condition such as wind direction, wind speed, air temperature, and humidity was monitored by a weather station installed at the summit. Cloud emissivity was estimated by mid-infrared sky images taken by a whole-sky infrared camera every five minutes for 24 hours a day, every day. Results are summarized as followings. 1) The weather condition at the summit is slightly harsher than the condition at the Pampa la Bola plateau. Maximum speed of the wind is 35m/s, and minimum temperature is about -10 degree. 2) Fraction of "clear+usable" weather (which is defined as the cloud emissivity < 10%)" is 82% in a year. The fraction decrease to 40-50% on Bolivian winter season, and increases to over 90% from April to July. This is comparable or even better than the other astronomical sites.

  6. The first geodetic investigation at the summit of Dome A, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shengkai; E Dongchen; Li Yuansheng; Wang Zemin; Zhou Chunxia; SHEN Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Dome A is the highest ice feature in the Antarctica,up to now,little is known about surface topography at Dome A.The first Chinese ITASE expedition was carried out from Zhongshan station to Dome A during the 1996/1997 austral summer.During the 2004/2005 austral summer,the traverse was extended to the summit of Dome A which is 1228 km from Zhongshan Station by 21st Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE).The real time kinematic (RTK) GPS surveywas carried out in the summit of Dome A during 2004/05 austral summer.The surface topography of Dome A was drawn up using the kinematic double frequency GPS data covering an area of about 70 km2.The accuracy of the kinematic survey is in the range of 0.20 m.Precise surface topography,bedrock morphology and internallayering geometry are important for the future selection of the best site for deep drilling at Dome A.

  7. Identifying practical solutions to meet America's fiber needs: proceedings from the Food & Fiber Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Amy R; Jones, Julie Miller; Rodriguez, Judith; Slavin, Joanne; Zelman, Kathleen M

    2014-07-08

    Fiber continues to be singled out as a nutrient of public health concern. Adequate intakes of fiber are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, certain gastrointestinal disorders and obesity. Despite ongoing efforts to promote adequate fiber through increased vegetable, fruit and whole-grain intakes, average fiber consumption has remained flat at approximately half of the recommended daily amounts. Research indicates that consumers report increasingly attempting to add fiber-containing foods, but there is confusion around fiber in whole grains. The persistent and alarmingly low intakes of fiber prompted the "Food & Fiber Summit," which assembled nutrition researchers, educators and communicators to explore fiber's role in public health, current fiber consumption trends and consumer awareness data with the objective of generating opportunities and solutions to help close the fiber gap. The summit outcomes highlight the need to address consumer confusion and improve the understanding of sources of fiber, to recognize the benefits of various types of fibers and to influence future dietary guidance to provide prominence and clarity around meeting daily fiber recommendations through a variety of foods and fiber types. Potential opportunities to increase fiber intake were identified, with emphasis on meal occasions and food categories that offer practical solutions for closing the fiber gap.

  8. Patient safety in emergency medical services: executive summary and recommendations from the Niagara Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Blair L; Bull, Ellen; Morrison, Merideth; Burgess, Rob; Maher, Janet; Brooks, Steven C; Morrison, Laurie J

    2011-01-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) personnel care for patients in challenging and dynamic environments that may contribute to an increased risk for adverse events. However, little is known about the risks to patient safety in the EMS setting. To address this knowledge gap, we conducted a systematic review of the literature, including nonrandomized, noncontrolled studies, conducted qualitative interviews of key informants, and, with the assistance of a pan-Canadian advisory board, hosted a 1-day summit of 52 experts in the field of EMS patient safety. The intent of the summit was to review available research, discuss the issues affecting prehospital patient safety, and discuss interventions that might improve the safety of the EMS industry. The primary objective was to define the strategic goals for improving patient safety in EMS. Participants represented all geographic regions of Canada and included administrators, educators, physicians, researchers, and patient safety experts. Data were collected through electronic voting and qualitative analysis of the discussions. The group reached consensus on nine recommendations to increase awareness, reduce adverse events, and suggest research and educational directions in EMS patient safety: increasing awareness of patient safety principles, improving adverse event reporting through creating nonpunitive reporting systems, supporting paramedic clinical decision making through improved research and education, policy changes, using flexible algorithms, adopting patient safety strategies from other disciplines, increasing funding for research in patient safety, salary support for paramedic researchers, and access to graduate training in prehospital research.

  9. Consensus recommendations from the strategic planning summit for pain and palliative care pharmacy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Christopher M; Strassels, Scott A; Strickland, Jennifer M; Kral, Lee A; Craig, David S; Nesbit, Suzanne Amato; Finley, Rebecca S; McPherson, Mary Lynn

    2012-05-01

    Pain and symptoms related to palliative care (pain and palliative care [PPC]) are often undertreated. This is largely owing to the complexity in the provision of care and the potential discrepancy in education among the various health care professionals required to deliver care. Pharmacists are frequently involved in the care of PPC patients, although pharmacy education currently does not offer or require a strong curriculum commitment to this area of practice. The Strategic Planning Summit for the Advancement of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacy was convened to address opportunities to improve the education of pharmacists and pharmacy students on PPC. Six working groups were charged with objectives to address barriers and opportunities in the areas of student and professional assessment, model curricula, postgraduate training, professional education, and credentialing. Consensus was reached among the working groups and presented to the Summit Advisory Board for adoption. These recommendations will provide guidance on improving the care provided to PPC patients by pharmacists through integrating education at all points along the professional education continuum.

  10. 3.5-Year Monitoring of 225 GHz Opacity at the Summit of Greenland

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Satoki; Martin-Cocher, Pierre L; Chen, Ming-Tang; Ho, Paul T P; Inoue, Makoto; Koch, Patrick M; Paine, Scott N; Turner, David D

    2016-01-01

    We present the 3.5-yr monitoring results of 225 GHz opacity at the summit of the Greenland ice sheet (Greenland Summit Camp) at an altitude of 3200 m using a tipping radiometer. We chose this site as our submillimeter telescope (Greenland Telescope; GLT) site, because its location offers favorable baselines to existing submillimeter telescopes for global-scale VLBI. The site shows a clear seasonal variation with the average opacity lower by a factor of two during winter. For the winter quartiles of 25% and 50%, the Greenland site is about 10%-30% worse than the ALMA or the South Pole sites. Estimated atmospheric transmission spectra in winter season are similar to the ALMA site at lower frequencies (450 GHz) than those at the ALMA site. This is due to the lower altitude of the Greenland site. Nevertheless, half of the winter time at the Greenland site can be used for astronomical observations at frequencies between 450 GHz and 1000 GHz with opacities 10% transmittance in the THz (1035 GHz, 1350 GHz, and 1500 ...

  11. An Autonomous Polarized Raman Lidar System Designed for Summit Camp, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stillwell Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A dearth of high-spatial and temporal resolution measurements of atmospheric state variables in the Arctic directly inhibits scientific understanding of radiative and precipitation impacts on the changing surface environment. More reliable and frequent measurements are needed to better understand Arctic weather processes and constrain model predictions. To partially address the lack of Artic observations, a new autonomous Raman lidar system, which will measure water vapor mixing ratio, temperature, extinction, and cloud phase profiles through the troposphere, is designed for deployment to Summit Camp, Greenland (72° 36’ N, 38° 25’ W, 3250 [m]. This high-altitude Arctic field site has co-located ancillary equipment such as a Doppler millimeter cloud radar, microwave radiometers, depolarization lidars, ceiliometer, an infrared interferometer and twice-daily radiosondes. The current suite of instruments allows for a near comprehensive picture of the atmospheric state above Summit but increased spatial and temporal resolution of water vapor and temperature will reveal detailed microphysical information. A system description will be provided with an emphasis on the Monte Carlo safety analysis done to ensure eye safety in all relevant weather conditions.

  12. International Summit Consensus Statement: Intellectual Disability Inclusion in National Dementia Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watchman, Karen; Janicki, Matthew P; Splaine, Michael; Larsen, Frode K; Gomiero, Tiziano; Lucchino, Ronald

    2017-06-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the development and adoption of national plans or strategies to guide public policy and set goals for services, supports, and research related to dementia. It called for distinct populations to be included within national plans, including adults with intellectual disability (ID). Inclusion of this group is important as having Down's syndrome is a significant risk factor for early-onset dementia. Adults with other ID may have specific needs for dementia-related care that, if unmet, can lead to diminished quality of old age. An International Summit on Intellectual Disability and Dementia, held in Scotland, reviewed the inclusion of ID in national plans and recommended that inclusion goes beyond just description and relevance of ID. Reviews of national plans and reports on dementia show minimal consideration of ID and the challenges that carers face. The Summit recommended that persons with ID, as well as family carers, should be included in consultation processes, and greater advocacy is required from national organizations on behalf of families, with need for an infrastructure in health and social care that supports quality care for dementia.

  13. Identifying Practical Solutions to Meet America’s Fiber Needs: Proceedings from the Food & Fiber Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Amy R.; Jones, Julie Miller; Rodriguez, Judith; Slavin, Joanne; Zelman, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Fiber continues to be singled out as a nutrient of public health concern. Adequate intakes of fiber are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, certain gastrointestinal disorders and obesity. Despite ongoing efforts to promote adequate fiber through increased vegetable, fruit and whole-grain intakes, average fiber consumption has remained flat at approximately half of the recommended daily amounts. Research indicates that consumers report increasingly attempting to add fiber-containing foods, but there is confusion around fiber in whole grains. The persistent and alarmingly low intakes of fiber prompted the “Food & Fiber Summit,” which assembled nutrition researchers, educators and communicators to explore fiber’s role in public health, current fiber consumption trends and consumer awareness data with the objective of generating opportunities and solutions to help close the fiber gap. The summit outcomes highlight the need to address consumer confusion and improve the understanding of sources of fiber, to recognize the benefits of various types of fibers and to influence future dietary guidance to provide prominence and clarity around meeting daily fiber recommendations through a variety of foods and fiber types. Potential opportunities to increase fiber intake were identified, with emphasis on meal occasions and food categories that offer practical solutions for closing the fiber gap. PMID:25006857

  14. Identifying Practical Solutions to Meet America’s Fiber Needs: Proceedings from the Food & Fiber Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R. Mobley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fiber continues to be singled out as a nutrient of public health concern. Adequate intakes of fiber are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, certain gastrointestinal disorders and obesity. Despite ongoing efforts to promote adequate fiber through increased vegetable, fruit and whole-grain intakes, average fiber consumption has remained flat at approximately half of the recommended daily amounts. Research indicates that consumers report increasingly attempting to add fiber-containing foods, but there is confusion around fiber in whole grains. The persistent and alarmingly low intakes of fiber prompted the “Food & Fiber Summit,” which assembled nutrition researchers, educators and communicators to explore fiber’s role in public health, current fiber consumption trends and consumer awareness data with the objective of generating opportunities and solutions to help close the fiber gap. The summit outcomes highlight the need to address consumer confusion and improve the understanding of sources of fiber, to recognize the benefits of various types of fibers and to influence future dietary guidance to provide prominence and clarity around meeting daily fiber recommendations through a variety of foods and fiber types. Potential opportunities to increase fiber intake were identified, with emphasis on meal occasions and food categories that offer practical solutions for closing the fiber gap.

  15. The Grand Challenges of Organ Banking: Proceedings from the first global summit on complex tissue cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jedediah K; Bischof, John C; Braslavsky, Ido; Brockbank, Kelvin G M; Fahy, Gregory M; Fuller, Barry J; Rabin, Yoed; Tocchio, Alessandro; Woods, Erik J; Wowk, Brian G; Acker, Jason P; Giwa, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The first Organ Banking Summit was convened from Feb. 27 - March 1, 2015 in Palo Alto, CA, with events at Stanford University, NASA Research Park, and Lawrence Berkeley National Labs. Experts at the summit outlined the potential public health impact of organ banking, discussed the major remaining scientific challenges that need to be overcome in order to bank organs, and identified key opportunities to accelerate progress toward this goal. Many areas of public health could be revolutionized by the banking of organs and other complex tissues, including transplantation, oncofertility, tissue engineering, trauma medicine and emergency preparedness, basic biomedical research and drug discovery - and even space travel. Key remaining scientific sub-challenges were discussed including ice nucleation and growth, cryoprotectant and osmotic toxicities, chilling injury, thermo-mechanical stress, the need for rapid and uniform rewarming, and ischemia/reperfusion injury. A variety of opportunities to overcome these challenge areas were discussed, i.e. preconditioning for enhanced stress tolerance, nanoparticle rewarming, cyroprotectant screening strategies, and the use of cryoprotectant cocktails including ice binding agents.

  16. Human traces in the bryophyte flora of the summit region of Karkonosze Mts (Polish side

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Fudali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on results of the bryofloristic investigations carried out in 2006 along tourist roads and around mountain chalets the problem of bryophyte response to the tourist utilization of the summit region of Karkonosze Mts is discussed here. The hypothesis that introduction of cement as building material might have caused the income and spread of subneutral or basiphilous ruderal species in that naturally acidic region was formulated and tested. In result 45 species were found, of which the majority do not occur in natural sites in the Karkonosze Mts. Among them 20 species are convinced to be highly hemerophilous. Most of the found species were eurytopic, only 14 prefered subneutral or basic substrata. Many of them produced sporogonia, what indicates high reproduction potential. It seems that the phenomenon of synanthropisation is limited mainly to places in which cement (as mortar or concrete has been used. The list of bryophytes found around all the anthropogenic sites and along the tourist roads in the summit region of Polish part of the massif with brief characteristics of their ecological preferences has been included.

  17. Seismic detection of increased degassing before Kīlauea's 2008 summit explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jessica H.; Poland, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    The 2008 explosion that started a new eruption at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, was not preceded by a dramatic increase in earthquakes nor inflation, but was associated with increases in SO2 emissions and seismic tremor. Here we perform shear wave splitting analysis on local earthquakes spanning the onset of the eruption. Shear wave splitting measures seismic anisotropy and is traditionally used to infer changes in crustal stress over time. We show that shear wave splitting may also vary due to changes in volcanic degassing. The orientation of fast shear waves at Kīlauea is usually controlled by structure, but in 2008 showed changes with increased SO2 emissions preceding the start of the summit eruption. This interpretation for changing anisotropy is supported by corresponding decreases in Vp/Vs ratio. Our result demonstrates a novel method for detecting changes in gas flux using seismic observations and provides a new tool for monitoring under-instrumented volcanoes.

  18. Characteristics of the summit lakes of Ambae volcano and their potential for generating lahars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions through crater lakes often generate lahars, causing loss of life and property. On Ambae volcano, recent eruptive activities have rather tended to reduce the water volume in the crater lake (Lake Voui, in turn, reducing the chances for outburst floods. Lake Voui occupies a central position in the summit caldera and is well enclosed by the caldera relief. Eruptions with significantly higher magnitude than that of 1995 and 2005 are required for an outburst. A more probable scenario for lahar events is the overflow from Lake Manaro Lakua bounded on the eastern side by the caldera wall. Morphology and bathymetry analysis have been used to identify the weakest point of the caldera rim from which water from Lake Manaro Lakua may overflow to initiate lahars. The 1916 disaster described on south-east Ambae was possibly triggered by such an outburst from Lake Manaro Lakua. Taking into account the current level of Lake Manaro Lakua well below a critical overflow point, and the apparently low potential of Lake Voui eruptions to trigger lahars, the Ambae summit lakes may not be directly responsible for numerous lahar deposits identified around the Island.

  19. Longpath DOAS observations of surface BrO at Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stutz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactive halogens, and in particular bromine oxide (BrO, have frequently been observed in regions with large halide reservoirs, for example during bromine catalyzed coastal polar ozone depletion events. Much less is known about the presence and impact of reactive halogens in areas without obvious halide reservoirs, such as the polar ice sheets or continental snow.

    We report the first LP-DOAS measurements of BrO at Summit research station in the center of the Greenland ice sheet at an altitude of 3200 m. BrO mixing ratios in May 2007 and June 2008 were typically between 1–3 pmol mol−1, with maxima of up to 5 pmol mol−1. These measurements unequivocally show that halogen chemistry is occurring in the remote Arctic, far from known bromine reservoirs, such as the ocean. During periods when FLEXPART retroplumes show that airmasses resided on the Greenland ice sheet for 3 or more days, BrO exhibits a clear diurnal variation, with peak mixing ratios of up to 3 pmol mol−1 in the morning and at night. The diurnal cycle of BrO can be explained by a changing boundary layer height combined with photochemical formation of reactive bromine driven by solar radiation at the snow surface. The shallow stable boundary layer in the morning and night leads to an accumulation of BrO at the surface, leading to elevated BrO despite the expected smaller release from the snowpack during these times of low solar radiation. During the day when photolytic formation of reactive bromine is expected to be highest, efficient mixing into a deeper neutral boundary layer leads to lower BrO mixing ratios than during mornings and nights.

    The extended period of contact with the Greenland snowpack combined with the diurnal profile of BrO, modulated by boundary layer height, suggests that photochemistry in the snow is a significant source of BrO measured at Summit during the 2008 experiment. In addition, a rapid transport event

  20. Longpath DOAS observations of surface BrO at Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stutz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive halogens, and in particular bromine oxide (BrO, have frequently been observed in regions with large halide reservoirs, for example during bromine catalyzed coastal polar ozone depletion events. Much less is known about the presence and impact of reactive halogens in areas without obvious halide reservoirs, such as the polar ice sheets or continental snow.

    We report the first LP-DOAS measurements of BrO at Summit research station in the center of the Greenland ice sheet at an altitude of 3200 m. BrO mixing ratios in May 2007 and June 2008 were typically between 1–3 pmol mol−1, with maxima of up to 5 pmol mol−1. These measurements unequivocally show that halogen chemistry is occurring in the remote Arctic, far from known bromine reservoirs, such as the ocean. During periods when FLEXPART retroplumes show that airmasses resided on the Greenland ice sheet for 3 or more days, BrO exhibits a clear diurnal variation, with peak mixing ratios of up to 3 pmol mol−1 in the morning and at night. The diurnal cycle of BrO can be explained by a changing boundary layer height combined with photochemical formation of reactive bromine driven by solar radiation at the snow surface. The shallow stable boundary in the morning and night leads to an accumulation of BrO at the surface, leading to elevated BrO despite the expected smaller release from the snowpack during these times of low solar radiation. During the day when photolytic formation of reactive bromine is expected to be highest, efficient mixing into a deeper neutral boundary layer leads to lower BrO mixing ratios than during mornings and nights.

    The extended period of contact with the Greenland snowpack combined with the diurnal profile of BrO, modulated by boundary layer height, suggests that photochemistry in the snow is a significant source of BrO measured at Summit during the 2008 experiment. In addition, a rapid transport event on 4

  1. The G8 summit of Gleneagles (July 6-8, 2005) - the energy-climate action plan - the France-Algeria cooperation. The works of the national commission of the public debate about energy - the management of nuclear wastes - the EPR at Flamanville - the Cotentin-Maine VHV line. The oil prices surge during summer 2005, national and international reactions; Le sommet du G8 de Gleneagles (6-8 juillet 2005) - le plan d'action energie-climat - cooperation France-Algerie. Les travaux de la Commission Nationale du debat public concernant l'energie - la gestion des dechets nucleaires - l'EPR a Flamanville - la ligne THT Cotentin - Maine. La flambee des prix du petrole lors de l'ete 2005, reactions nationales et internationales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, J.; Locufier, A.; Vincent, C.; Bros, Th.; Delmestre, N.; Noilban, F.; Quintaine, Th. [Direction des Ressources Energetiques et Minerales (DIREM), 75 - Paris (France); Perrin, J.L.; Branche, Th.; Barthe, F. [Direction de la Demande et des Marches Energetiques (DIDEME), 75 - Paris (France)

    2006-01-15

    This issue of Energies et matieres premieres newsletter comprises five articles dealing with: 1 - the energy-climate action plan adopted by the presidents of the 8 more industrialized countries of the world (G8) during the Gleneagles summit (Scotland) in July 6-8, 2005. This action plan was discussed in association with five emerging countries, among the biggest energy consumers in the world; 2 - the works carried out by the national commission of the public debate on energy about the management of radioactive wastes. The article recalls the 3 axes of research (separation-transmutation, underground disposal and surface or sub-surface storage) and the planning of the preparation of the future project of radioactive management law which will be examined by the European parliament during the second quarter of 2006; 3 - the public debate about the setting up of the European pressurized reactor (EPR) at Flamanville (Cotentin, France); 4 - the public debate about the project of very-high voltage power line between Flamanville and Maine region for the reinforcement of the regional power grid; and 5 - the national and international reactions in front of the surge of oil prices during summer 2005. (J.S.)

  2. La descontaminación de las aguas del lago Izabal en Guatemala a través de la extracción de la planta Hydrilla verticillata (L.F Royle y su uso como sustrato alternativo para la producción de plántulas de chile pimiento en invernadero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Dimitri Santos Castillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se caracterizaron las principales propiedades físicas, químicas y biológicas de sustratos elaborados a base de residuos de hydrilla verticillata y su efecto sobre la germinación y desarrollo durante la fase de plántula de semillas de chile pimiento (variedad tropical irazú mejorado. Al analizar los resultados obtenidos tales como agua fácilmente aprovechable, capacidad de aereación, PH, porciento de germinación, germinación acumulada ( 24 DDS, altura de la planta (cm, diámetro del tallo (cm, peso fresco de la parte aérea y sistema radical (g, materia seca de la parte aérea y radical ( % , todo ello 50 días después de siembra (50 DDS, se obtiene que el mejor tratamiento bajo las condiciones y metodologías utilizadas es el N0 12 (H30-85-15, o sea, 85% de hydrilla con 30 días de compostaje + 15 % de perlita y se recomienda como sustituto alternativo del sustrato comercial (turba de sphagnum para la producción de plántulas de chile pimiento en pilones y con ello dar uso productivo a esta planta contaminante de los lagos de Guatemala.

  3. A Vision for a Summit: CELT Recently Brought Together School Districts, Vendors and Professional Organizations for a National Summit on "Leadership, Learning and Technology for the 21st Century"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Priscilla; Milton, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    A lunch-time discussion among CELT (Center for Education Leadership and Technology) Corporation staff about how to positively impact the 2004 presidential campaign quickly evolved into a vision for bringing together top executive-level practitioners in education for a national summit on "Leadership, Learning and Technology for the 21st Century."…

  4. Fiftieth Anniversary at the summit : neither fear of heights nor the cold succeeded in cooling the ardour of four brave climbers from CERN who celebrated CERN's 50th Anniversary at the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro (5,895 metres).

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    On the way back from the summit, Miguel Cerqueira Bastos (AB/PO), David Collados Polidura (IT/GM), Sandra Sequeira Tavares (PH/CMI) and Daniel Cano Ott (n_TOF) raised the official CERN Jubilee flag at 4750 metres altitude.

  5. No Longer Calling the Shots The G8 Summit is unlikely to make a significant impact on pressing global issues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN XIANGYANG

    2011-01-01

    This year's Group of Eight (G8) Summit was held from May 26 to 27 in Deauville,France.Topics included the ongoing war in Libya,Japan's nuclear disaster and bumps in the road to economic recovery.Given the rise of emerging economies,Western nations stressed their common interests and values,intending to maintain their dominance over international affairs.

  6. Epicardial and endocardial mapping determine most successful site of ablation for ventricular tachyarrhythmias originating from left ventricular summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Kenichi; Chinushi, Masaomi; Furushima, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2012-06-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented with idiopathic premature ventricular complex (PVC) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the area called the left ventricular summit. Radiofrequency (RF) application both through the coronary sinus and to the epicardial surface transiently suppressed the VT/PVC. Radiofrequency with sufficient energy was only applicable from the endocardial site, and the VT/PVC was successfully eliminated.

  7. Teaching Excellence through Professional Learning and Policy Reform: Lessons from around the World. International Summit on the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    If the quality of an education system can never exceed the quality of its teachers, then countries need to do all they can to build a high-quality teaching force. "Teaching Excellence through Professional Learning and Policy Reform: Lessons from around the World," the background report to the sixth International Summit on the Teaching…

  8. 76 FR 49764 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy ICT Transmission Planning Summit and Entegry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy ICT Transmission Planning... Commission's ongoing outreach efforts. Entergy ICT Transmission Planning Summit August 23, 2011 (8 a.m.-5...

  9. "Don't Take Our Voices Away": A Role Play on the Indigenous Peoples' Global Summit on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Julie Treick; Swinehart, Tim

    2010-01-01

    The Indigenous Peoples' Climate Summit role play grew out of the Portland Area Rethinking Schools Earth in Crisis Curriculum Workgroup and the Oregon Writing Project. It was designed to introduce students to the broad injustice of the climate crisis and to familiarize them with some of the specific issues faced by different indigenous groups…

  10. EDUsummIT 2013 call to action: outcomes from the 2013 international summit on ICT in education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Knezek, G.; Searson, M.; Searson, M.; Ochoa, M.

    2014-01-01

    EDUsummIT is a global community of policy-makers, researchers, and educators working together to move education into the digital age. The first assembly of the International Summit on ICT in Education took place in 2009, in The Hague, The Netherlands, while the second was held in 2011 at UNESCO

  11. Chris Tudda, Cold War Summits: A History, from Potsdam to Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Andı, Ahmed Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Amerikalı tarihçi Chris Tudda’nın 2015’te çıkan “Cold War Summits: A History, From Potsdam to Malta” başlıklı kitabı uluslararası tarih literatürüne yeni ve nispeten farklı bir bakış sunuyor. Kitap, özellikle alışılagelmiş uluslararası tarih anlatısını farklı analiz düzeyleri arasında gidip gelen bir yaklaşımla ele almasıyla dikkat çekiyor.

  12. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Fireside Chat with Steven Chu and Bill Gates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Department of Energy Secretary); Gates, Bill (Microsoft, Chairman); Podesta, John (Center for American Progress, Chair and Counselor)

    2012-02-28

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. This video captures a session called 'Fireside Chat' that featured Steven Chu, the Secretary of Energy, and Bill Gates, Chairman of Microsoft Corporation. The session is moderated by John Podesta, Chair of the Center for American Progress. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Microsoft Founder and Chairman Bill Gates exchanged ideas about how small businesses and innovators can overcome the challenges that face many startups.

  13. International summit on the nutrition of adolescent girls and young women: consensus statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Nancy; Bagby, Susan; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Dewey, Kathryn; Fall, Caroline; Gregory, Fred; Hay, William; Rhuman, Lisa; Caldwell, Christine Wallace

    2017-01-01

    An international summit focusing on the difficult challenge of providing adequate nutrition for adolescent girls and young women in low‐ and middle‐income countries was held in Portland, Oregon in 2015. Sixty‐seven delegates from 17 countries agreed on a series of recommendations that would make progress toward improving the nutritional status of girls and young women in countries where their access to nutrition is compromised. Delegate recommendations include: (1) elevate the urgency of nutrition for girls and young women to a high international priority, (2) raise the social status of girls and young women in all regions of the world, (3) identify major knowledge gaps in the biology of adolescence that could be filled by robust research efforts, (4) and improve access to nutrient‐rich foods for girls and young women. Attention to these recommendations would improve the health of young women in all nations of the world. PMID:28722768

  14. The national summit on preconception care: a summary of concepts and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Samuel F; Johnson, Kay; Parker, Christopher; Atrash, Hani; Biermann, Janis

    2006-09-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and 35 partner organizations have engaged in developing an agenda for Preconception Health. A summit was held in June 2005 to discuss the current state of knowledge regarding preconception care and convene a select panel to develop recommendations and action steps for improving the health of women, children, and families through advances in clinical care, public health, and community action. A Select Panel on Preconception Care, convened by CDC, deliberated critical related issues and created refined definition of preconception care. The panel also developed a strategic plan with goals, recommendations, and action steps for improving preconception health. The recommendations and action steps are specific to the implementation of health behavior, access, consumer demand, research, and surveillance activities for monitoring and improving the health of women, children and families. The outcome of the deliberations is the CDC publication of detailed recommendations and action steps in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report series, Recommendations and Reports.

  15. Constraints on the δ2H diffusion rate in firn from field measurements at Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. van der Wel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We performed detailed 2H isotope diffusion measurements in the upper 3 m of firn at Summit, Greenland. Using a small snow gun, a thin snow layer was formed from 2H-enriched water over a 6 m × 6 m area. We followed the diffusion process, quantified as the increase of the δ2H diffusion length, over a four years period, by retrieving the layer once per year by drilling a firn core and slicing it into 1 cm layers and measuring the δ2H-signal of these layers. We compared our experimental findings to calculations based on the model by Johnsen et al. (2000, and found substantial differences. The diffusion length in our experiments increased much less over the years than in the model. We discuss the possible causes for this discrepancy, and conclude that several aspects of the diffusion process in firn are still poorly constrained, in particular the tortuosity.

  16. Summit-Watertown transmission line project, South Dakota. Final Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) needs to rebuild the existing Summit-Watertown 115-kV transmission line, located in northeastern South Dakota, and western Minnesota. Nearly 60 percent of the existing facility was replaced in 1965 after severe ice-loading broke structures and wires. Because of the extensive loss of the line, surplus poles had to be used to replace the damaged H-frame structures. These were of varying sizes, causing improper structure loading. Additionally, the conductors and overhead shield wires have been spliced in numerous places. This provides additional space on these wires for icing and wind resistance, which in turn create problems for reliability. Finally, a progressive fungal condition has weakened the poles and, along with the improper loading, has created an unsafe condition for maintenance personnel and the general public.

  17. An Intercultural Approach to Textbook Evaluation: A Case of Top Notch and Summit Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Homayounzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the representation of sociocultural identities in six textbooks selected from Top Notch and Summit series, to assess their potential to promote intercultural communicative competence in the learners. Ting-Toomey’s identity negotiation theory and Scollon and Scollon’s (2001 discourse system structure were used to assess the identity representations and the structure of discourses in the books. Identity representations were analyzed in terms of the four primary elements of cultural, ethnic, gender and personal identities, to determine the extent to which the books could foster communication between members of various identity groups. In the analysis of discourse structures, the study investigated primarily the politeness and face strategies used in the conversations and further the particular ideology they perpetuated, as a clue to their potential to promote the learners’ pragmatic competence for intercultural communication. Concerning identity representations in the books, different results were found for the two series. Top Notch, addressing beginner to intermediate level students, proved considerate of diversity in the sociocultural identities it presented and providing information about the values of different cultures and the customs and traditions of various nations it tried to set the bases of interculturality within its audience. Summit, on the other hand, addressing higher intermediate and advanced learners, had a unilateral approach in its identity presentations, depicting principally European and American nationalities and the cultural values of individualism typically associated with them. Nevertheless, where the discourse structures in the books were concerned, both the two series were identical in their exclusive focus upon the utilitarian ideology of discourse and its related politeness and face strategies. This was found as a pitfall in the books, limiting the students’ range of discursive resources

  18. Charlemagne's summit canal: an early medieval hydro-engineering project for passing the Central European Watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielhofer, Christoph; Leitholdt, Eva; Werther, Lukas; Stele, Andreas; Bussmann, Jens; Linzen, Sven; Schneider, Michael; Meyer, Cornelius; Berg-Hobohm, Stefanie; Ettel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Central European Watershed divides the Rhine-Main catchment and the Danube catchment. In the Early Medieval period, when ships were important means of transportation, Charlemagne decided to link both catchments by the construction of a canal connecting the Schwabian Rezat and the Altmühl rivers. The artificial waterway would provide a continuous inland navigation route from the North Sea to the Black Sea. The shortcut is known as Fossa Carolina and represents one of the most important Early Medieval engineering achievements in Europe. Despite the important geostrategic relevance of the construction it is not clarified whether the canal was actually used as a navigation waterway. We present new geophysical data and in situ findings from the trench fills that prove for the first time a total length of the constructed Carolingian canal of at least 2300 metres. We have evidence for a conceptual width of the artificial water course between 5 and 6 metres and a water depth of at least 60 to 80 cm. This allows a crossing way passage of Carolingian cargo scows with a payload of several tons. There is strong evidence for clayey to silty layers in the trench fills which reveal suspension load limited stillwater deposition and, therefore, the evidence of former Carolingian and post-Carolingian ponds. These findings are strongly supported by numerous sapropel layers within the trench fills. Our results presented in this study indicate an extraordinarily advanced construction level of the known course of the canal. Here, the excavated levels of Carolingian trench bottoms were generally sufficient for the efficient construction of stepped ponds and prove a final concept for a summit canal. We have evidence for the artificial Carolingian dislocation of the watershed and assume a sophisticated Early Medieval hydrological engineering concept for supplying the summit of the canal with adequate water.

  19. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pettersen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive datasets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliments past and existing global satellite observations. This paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland from 2010–2013. Data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 g m−2 or less, the cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225 GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. This measured ice signature was then compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single scattering properties for several ice habits. Initial model results compare well against the four years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.

  20. Charlemagne's summit canal: an early medieval hydro-engineering project for passing the Central European Watershed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Zielhofer

    Full Text Available The Central European Watershed divides the Rhine-Main catchment and the Danube catchment. In the Early Medieval period, when ships were important means of transportation, Charlemagne decided to link both catchments by the construction of a canal connecting the Schwabian Rezat and the Altmühl rivers. The artificial waterway would provide a continuous inland navigation route from the North Sea to the Black Sea. The shortcut is known as Fossa Carolina and represents one of the most important Early Medieval engineering achievements in Europe. Despite the important geostrategic relevance of the construction it is not clarified whether the canal was actually used as a navigation waterway. We present new geophysical data and in situ findings from the trench fills that prove for the first time a total length of the constructed Carolingian canal of at least 2300 metres. We have evidence for a conceptual width of the artificial water course between 5 and 6 metres and a water depth of at least 60 to 80 cm. This allows a crossing way passage of Carolingian cargo scows with a payload of several tons. There is strong evidence for clayey to silty layers in the trench fills which reveal suspension load limited stillwater deposition and, therefore, the evidence of former Carolingian and post-Carolingian ponds. These findings are strongly supported by numerous sapropel layers within the trench fills. Our results presented in this study indicate an extraordinarily advanced construction level of the known course of the canal. Here, the excavated levels of Carolingian trench bottoms were generally sufficient for the efficient construction of stepped ponds and prove a final concept for a summit canal. We have evidence for the artificial Carolingian dislocation of the watershed and assume a sophisticated Early Medieval hydrological engineering concept for supplying the summit of the canal with adequate water.

  1. The Physical Therapy and Society Summit (PASS) Meeting: observations and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigin, Colleen M; Rodgers, Mary M; Wolf, Steven L

    2010-11-01

    The construct of delivering high-quality and cost-effective health care is in flux, and the profession must strategically plan how to meet the needs of society. In 2006, the House of Delegates of the American Physical Therapy Association passed a motion to convene a summit on "how physical therapists can meet current, evolving, and future societal health care needs." The Physical Therapy and Society Summit (PASS) meeting on February 27-28, 2009, in Leesburg, Virginia, sent a clear message that for physical therapists to be effective and thrive in the health care environment of the future, a paradigm shift is required. During the PASS meeting, participants reframed our traditional focus on the physical therapist and the patient/client (consumer) to one in which physical therapists are an integral part of a collaborative, multidisciplinary health care team with the health care consumer as its focus. The PASS Steering Committee recognized that some of the opportunities that surfaced during the PASS meeting may be disruptive or may not be within the profession's present strategic or tactical plans. Thus, adopting a framework that helps to establish the need for change that is provocative and potentially disruptive to our present care delivery, yet prioritizes opportunities, is a critical and essential step. Each of us in the physical therapy profession must take on post-PASS roles and responsibilities to accomplish the systemic change that is so intimately intertwined with our destiny. This article offers a perspective of the dynamic dialogue and suggestions that emerged from the PASS event, providing further opportunities for discussion and action within our profession.

  2. Diffuse volcanic gas emission and thermal energy release from the summit crater of Pico do Fogo, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionis, Samara M.; Melián, Gladys; Rodríguez, Fátima; Hernández, Pedro A.; Padrón, Eleazar; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Barrancos, Jose; Padilla, Germán; Sumino, Hirochika; Fernandes, Paulo; Bandomo, Zuleyka; Silva, Sónia; Pereira, José M.; Semedo, Hélio

    2015-02-01

    We report the first detailed study of diffuse emission of carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), helium (He), and hydrogen (H2) from the summit crater of Pico do Fogo volcano, Cape Verde. Diffuse CO2, H2S, He, and H2 gas fluxes were measured at 57 sampling sites and ranged up to 12,800, 13, 1, and 6 g m-2 day-1, respectively. Soil temperature measurements at each sampling site were used to evaluate the heat flux. Most of the summit crater shows relatively high CO2 efflux, with highest values close to the fumarolic area, suggesting a structural control of the degassing process. In contrast, H2S effluxes were negligible or very low at the summit crater, except close to the fumarolic area where anomalously high CO2 efflux and soil temperatures were also measured. We estimate total CO2, H2S, He, and H2 diffuse gas fluxes of 219 t day-1, 25, 4, and 33 kg day-1, respectively. Based on a H2O/CO2 mass ratio of 1.52 measured at the fumaroles, we estimate a diffuse steam flux from the summit crater of approximately 330 t day-1. The enthalpy of this steam is equivalent to a heat flux of about 10.3 MW. The diffuse gas emission and thermal energy released from the summit crater of Pico do Fogo volcano are comparable to those observed at other volcanoes. Sustained surveillance of Pico do Fogo using these methods will be valuable for monitoring the activity of one of the most active volcanoes in the Atlantic Ocean.

  3. Effects of arsenic speciation on the phytochelatins (PCs) synthesis by Hydrilla verticillata%不同形态砷对黑藻植物络合素合成的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红梅; 王宏镔; 王海娟; 宋雁辉; 钟正燕

    2012-01-01

    采用反相高效液相色谱(RP-HPLC)法,研究了水培条件下3种形态砷[三价砷As(Ⅲ)、五价砷As(Ⅴ)和二甲基砷(DMA)]的5个处理浓度(0、0.3、1.0、3.0和5.0 mg·L-1)对黑藻(Hydrilla venicillata(L.f.)Royle)砷吸收和植物络合素(PCs)合成的影响.结果表明:黑藻对As表现出明显的吸收和富集效应,低浓度As能促进黑藻生长,对As (Ⅲ)的吸收显著高于As(Ⅴ)和DMA;As(Ⅲ)和As(Ⅴ)处理显著诱导了谷胱甘肽(GSH)、PC2和PC4的合成,且与黑藻体内As含量呈显著正相关(P<0.05);PCs对DMA处理不敏感,只有在0.3 mg·L-1下能合成PCs;在As( Ⅲ)处理下,GSH和PC2的合成随As(Ⅲ)浓度的增加呈先增加后减少的趋势,而PC4的合成却随As(Ⅲ)浓度的增加而增加;在As(Ⅴ)处理下,GSH的合成随As(Ⅴ)浓度的增加呈先增加后减少的趋势,而PG2和PC4的合成则随As(Ⅴ)浓度的增加而增加;在3种形态As的不同浓度处理中PC3的合成很少,只在0.3 mg·L-1下有少量合成.研究结果表明,PCs对As( Ⅲ)和As(Ⅴ)的胁迫较敏感,可选择性地作为这2种形态砷胁迫下黑藻的生物标记物.%A hydroponie experiment was conducted to study the effects of different arsenic species [As(III), As(V), and DMA] at five concentrations (0, 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 mg· L-1) on the arsenic uptake and phytochelatins (PCs) synthesis by Hydrilla verticillaia. The PCs contents were identified by reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography ( RP-HPLC). H. vertkillata had an obvious arsenic uptake and accumulation. Low concentrations arsenic promoted the growth of H. veniciilata, and the uptake of As( III) by H. vertkillata was significantly higher than that of As(V) or DMA. As(III) and As(V) promoted the synthesis of GSH, PC2, and PC4 significantly, and the synthesis was significantly positively correlated with the arsenic concentration in H. venkillala (P<0.05). DMA had little effects on the synthesis of PCs, with a detectable synthesis

  4. Securing Stability and Inclusiveness: G20 Summit Success in Controlling Financial Crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kirton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The G20 summit system has successfully controlled financial crises, restoring global financial stability after the shock from the US in 2008 and preventing the third shock from Europe in 2010 from resulting in a global contagion. After the G20 finance ministers effectively responded to the Asian-turned-global financial crisis in 1999, they failed to prevent the greater American-turned-global financial crisis in 2008, yet their leaders together responded effectively to it, then prevented the escalating euro crisis from going global, and finally reduced the likelihood of another global financial crisis emanating from a systemically significant country. Since 2013, the G20 has also enhanced economic equality between rich and poor countries, but has not fully made up for the loss in economic growth experienced in 2008 to 2013 or eliminated the socioeconomic scarring created during that period. This increasing success was driven by the changing conditions of the forces identified in the systemic hub model of G20 governance. The first was steadily escalating shocks in finance and economics, and related fields, from 1997 to 2012. The sources of these shifted from emerging Asia to a newly-vulnerable United States, Europe and then China in a much reduced form. With such shocks exposing and equalizing the vulnerability of the major powers, the formal multilateral organizations created by the United States and its Atlantic allies in the 1940s and their subsequent informal supplements such as the G7 could not cope. Among its many international institutional competitors, the G20 alone contained, as full, equal members, the countries that increasingly possessed the collectively predominant and internally equalizing capabilities required to respond effectively. They increasingly, if unevenly, became more internationally and domestically open and interconnected financial systems, economies and societies, albeit with some setbacks after 2013. The often high

  5. Road and Street Centerlines, Summit Mountain (Sugarloaf Mountain), Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'Summit Mountain (Sugarloaf Mountain)'....

  6. New directions in cellular therapy of cancer: a summary of the summit on cellular therapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroncek David F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A summit on cellular therapy for cancer discussed and presented advances related to the use of adoptive cellular therapy for melanoma and other cancers. The summit revealed that this field is advancing rapidly. Conventional cellular therapies, such as tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL, are becoming more effective and more available. Gene therapy is becoming an important tool in adoptive cell therapy. Lymphocytes are being engineered to express high affinity T cell receptors (TCRs, chimeric antibody-T cell receptors (CARs and cytokines. T cell subsets with more naïve and stem cell-like characteristics have been shown in pre-clinical models to be more effective than unselected populations and it is now possible to reprogram T cells and to produce T cells with stem cell characteristics. In the future, combinations of adoptive transfer of T cells and specific vaccination against the cognate antigen can be envisaged to further enhance the effectiveness of these therapies.

  7. Free trade – a priority issue of G-20 summits after the world economy went into recession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. D. Alina-Petronela Haller

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The world economy has been greatly affected by the current recession. All countries have suffered regardless of their level of development. Given that global problems require global solutions, world powers have met at summits of the G-20 forum, in order to determine the causes of the recession and adopt the most relevant measures to overcome the crisis and to correct other imbalances (e.g. environmental issues, hunger existing in the world.

  8. 华盛顿核安全峰会工作计划%Work Plan of Washington Nuclear Security Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ This Work Plan supports the Communiqué of the Washington Nuclear Security Summit.It constitutes a political commitlnent bv the participating states to catty out,on a voluntary basis,applicable portions of this Work Plan,consistent with respective national laws and intemational obligations,in all aspects of the storage,use,transportation and disposal of uclear materials and in preventing non-state actors from obtaining the information required to use such materials for malicious purposes.

  9. Evidence acquisition and evaluation for evidence summit on enhancing provision and use of maternal health services through financial incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Elizabeth S; Stammer, Emily; Roth, Rebecca; Balster, Robert L

    2013-12-01

    Recognizing the need for evidence to inform US Government and governments of the low- and middle-income countries on efficient, effective maternal health policies, strategies, and programmes, the US Government convened the Evidence Summit on Enhancing Provision and Use of Maternal Health Services through Financial Incentives in April 2012 in Washington, DC, USA. This paper summarizes the background and methods for the acquisition and evaluation of the evidence used for achieving the goals of the Summit. The goal of the Summit was to obtain multidisciplinary expert review of literature to inform both US Government and governments of the low- and middle-income countries on evidence-informed practice, policies, and strategies for financial incentives. Several steps were undertaken to define the tasks for the Summit and identify the appropriate evidence for review. The process began by identifying focal questions intended to inform governments of the low-and middle-income countries and the US Government about the efficacy of supply- and demand-side financial incentives for enhanced provision and use of quality maternal health services. Experts were selected representing the research and programme communities, academia, relevant non-governmental organizations, and government agencies and were assembled into Evidence Review Teams. This was followed by a systematic process to gather relevant peer-reviewed literature that would inform the focal questions. Members of the Evidence Review Teams were invited to add relevant papers not identified in the initial literature review to complete the bibliography. The Evidence Review Teams were asked to comply with a specific evaluation framework for recommendations on practice and policy based on both expert opinion and the quality of the data. Details of the search processes and methods used for screening and quality reviews are described.

  10. Holocene block-and-ash flows from summit dome activity of Citlaltépetl volcano, Eastern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo

    1999-01-01

    A major eruption produced several block-and-ash flows about 4,100 years B.P. at Citlaltépetl volcano (Pico de Orizaba), an ice-capped, 5670-m-high, andesitic, active stratovolcano located at the eastern end of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Repetitive gravitational collapse of a dacitic dome at the summit crater produced a series of block-and-ash flows, lahars, and floods, which were channeled through two main river-valleys on the west and south flanks of the volcano. The total erupted volume is estimated to be at least 0.27 km 3. The deposits in both areas are similar in composition, and size, but they differ in the area covered, distribution, and structure. The western deposits form a large fan, cover a larger area, and include numerous laharic and fluviatile deposits. In contrast, the southern deposits form prominent terraces where confined in narrow channels, and have associated laharic units in distal areas, where the flows reach a maximum distance of 30 km from the vent. Directed disruptions of a central summit dome occurred, possibly first to the west and then to the southeast, perhaps due to minor modifications of the summit dome morphology, producing the voluminous block-and-ash flow deposits documented here. The flows were strongly controlled by topography, influencing the deposition of the moving particles. Grain-size variations along the flow paths are hardly detectable suggesting no evident lateral downstream transformations. Because sudden changes in dome morphology may cause significant variations in the direction of future dome collapse, specific areas of potential affectation cannot be predicted. Therefore, about 350,000 inhabitants living within a radius of 35-km from the vent could be potentially impacted if catastrophic block-and-ash flows were to recur in the future from similar summit dome activity. Recognition of these deposits is therefore important for hazard assessment because some seemingly safe areas may be at high risk.

  11. Glacial erosion of high-elevation low-relief summits on passive continental margins constrained by cosmogenic nuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou;

    , indicating that warm-based ice eroded the summits during the last glacial period. From the isotope concentrations we model denudation histories using a recently developed Monte Carlo Markov Chain inversion model (Knudsen et al, 2015). The model relies on the benthic d18O curve (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005......., and Raymo, M. E. "A Pliocene-Pleistocene stack of 57 globally distributed benthic δ18O records." Paleoceanography 20.1 (2005)....

  12. The Dubai 2015 Global Islamic Economy Summit - and what it will take to become a heavyweight champion

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    I just attended the 2015 Global Islamic Economy Summit, in Dubai and it was a fantastic experience. The hospitality was first class and only surpassed by the energy, passion, sincerity and friendship selflessly handed out to everyone attending.\\ud \\ud However, two things that I think need addressing are the understanding, articulation, and execution of two key areas, which were weak in terms of intelligence and insight: Consumer Behaviour and Branding.

  13. Summit CO2 emission rates by the CO2/SO2 ratio method at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, during a period of sustained inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, S.A.; Gerlach, T.M.; Wallace, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    The emission rate of carbon dioxide escaping from the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, proved highly variable, averaging 4900 ± 2000 metric tons per day (t/d) in June–July 2003 during a period of summit inflation. These results were obtained by combining over 90 measurements of COSPEC-derived SO2emission rates with synchronous CO2/SO2 ratios of the volcanic gas plume along the summit COSPEC traverse. The results are lower than the CO2 emission rate of 8500 ± 300 t/d measured by the same method in 1995–1999 during a period of long-term summit deflation [Gerlach, T.M., McGee, K.A., Elias, T., Sutton, A.J. and Doukas, M.P., 2002. Carbon dioxide emission rate of Kīlauea Volcano: Implications for primary magma and the summit reservoir. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, 107(B9): art. no.-2189.]. Analysis of the data indicates that the emission rates of the present study likely reflect changes in the magma supply rate and residence time in the summit reservoir. It is also likely that emission rates during the inflation period were heavily influenced by SO2 pulses emitted adjacent to the COSPEC traverse, which biased CO2/SO2 ratios towards low values that may be unrepresentative of the global summit gas plume. We conclude that the SO2 pulses are consequences of summit re-inflation under way since 2003 and that CO2 emission rates remain comparable to, but more variable than, those measured prior to re-inflation.

  14. The Second Physical Therapy Summit on Global Health: developing an action plan to promote health in daily practice and reduce the burden of non-communicable diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Erna Rosenlund; Dean,, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Based on indicators that emerged from The First Physical Therapy Summit on Global Health (2007), the Second Summit (2011) identified themes to inform a global physical therapy action plan to integrate health promotion into practice across the World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT) regions....... Working questions were: (1) how well is health promotion implemented within physical therapy practice; and (2) how might this be improved across five target audiences (i.e. physical therapist practitioners, educators, researchers, professional body representatives, and government liaisons...

  15. Advancing PROMIS's methodology: results of the Third Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS(®)) Psychometric Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carle, Adam C; Cella, David; Cai, Li; Choi, Seung W; Crane, Paul K; Curtis, S McKay; Gruhl, Jonathan; Lai, Jin-Shei; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Reise, Steven P; Teresi, Jeanne A; Thissen, David; Wu, Eric J; Hays, Ron D

    2011-12-01

    In 2002, the NIH launched the 'Roadmap for Medical Research'. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS(®)) is one of the Roadmap's key aspects. To create the next generation of patient-reported outcome measures, PROMIS utilizes item response theory (IRT) and computerized adaptive testing. In 2009, the NIH funded the second wave of PROMIS studies (PROMIS II). PROMIS II studies continue PROMIS's agenda, but also include new features, including longitudinal analyses and more sociodemographically diverse samples. PROMIS II also includes increased emphasis on pediatric populations and evaluation of PROMIS item banks for clinical research and population science. These aspects bring new psychometric challenges. To address this, investigators associated with PROMIS gathered at the Third Psychometric Summit in September 2010 to identify, describe and discuss pressing psychometric issues and new developments in the field, as well as make analytic recommendations for PROMIS. The summit addressed five general themes: linking, differential item functioning, dimensionality, IRT models for longitudinal applications and new IRT software. In this article, we review the discussions and presentations that occurred at the Third PROMIS Psychometric Summit.

  16. Gravity changes and deformation at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, associated with summit eruptive activity, 2009-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnardi, Marco; Poland, Michael P.; Carbone, Daniele; Baker, Scott; Battaglia, Maurizio; Amelung, Falk

    2014-09-01

    Analysis of microgravity and surface displacement data collected at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii (USA), between December 2009 and November 2012 suggests a net mass accumulation at ~1.5 km depth beneath the northeast margin of Halema`uma`u Crater, within Kīlauea Caldera. Although residual gravity increases and decreases are accompanied by periods of uplift and subsidence of the surface, respectively, the volume change inferred from the modeling of interferometric synthetic aperture radar deformation data can account for only a small portion (as low as 8%) of the mass addition responsible for the gravity increase. We propose that since the opening of a new eruptive vent at the summit of Kīlauea in 2008, magma rising to the surface of the lava lake outgasses, becomes denser, and sinks to deeper levels, replacing less dense gas-rich magma stored in the Halema`uma`u magma reservoir. In fact, a relatively small density increase (formation of olivine cumulates, and filling of void space by magma. The rate of gravity increase, higher than during previous decades, varies through time and seems to be directly correlated with the volcanic activity occurring at both the summit and the east rift zone of the volcano.

  17. The National LGBT Cancer Action Plan: A White Paper of the 2014 National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolies, Liz; Sigurdsson, Hrafn Oli; Walland, Jonathan; Radix, Asa; Rice, David; Buchting, Francisco O.; Sanchez, Nelson F.; Bare, Michael G.; Boehmer, Ulrike; Cahill, Sean; Griebling, Tomas L.; Bruessow, Diane; Maingi, Shail

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite growing social acceptance of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender (LGBT) persons and the extension of marriage rights for same-sex couples, LGBT persons experience stigma and discrimination, including within the healthcare system. Each population within the LGBT umbrella term is likely at elevated risk for cancer due to prevalent, significant cancer risk factors, such as tobacco use and human immunodeficiency virus infection; however, cancer incidence and mortality data among LGBT persons are lacking. This absence of cancer incidence data impedes research and policy development, LGBT communities' awareness and activation, and interventions to address cancer disparities. In this context, in 2014, a 2-day National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities was convened by a planning committee for the purpose of accelerating progress in identifying and addressing the LGBT communities' concerns and needs in the spheres of cancer research, clinical cancer care, healthcare policy, and advocacy for cancer survivorship and LGBT health equity. Summit participants were 56 invited persons from the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada, representatives of diverse identities, experiences, and knowledge about LGBT communities and cancer. Participants shared lessons learned and identified gaps and remedies regarding LGBT cancer concerns across the cancer care continuum from prevention to survivorship. This white paper presents background on each of the Summit themes and 16 recommendations covering the following: sexual orientation and gender identity data collection in national and state health surveys and research on LGBT communities and cancer, the clinical care of LGBT persons, and the education and training of healthcare providers.

  18. Gravity changes and deformation at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, associated with summit eruptive activity, 2009-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnardi, Marco; Poland, Michael P.; Carbone, Daniele; Baker, Scott; Battaglia, Maurizio; Amelung, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of microgravity and surface displacement data collected at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii (USA), between December 2009 and November 2012 suggests a net mass accumulation at ~1.5 km depth beneath the northeast margin of Halema‘uma‘u Crater, within Kīlauea Caldera. Although residual gravity increases and decreases are accompanied by periods of uplift and subsidence of the surface, respectively, the volume change inferred from the modeling of interferometric synthetic aperture radar deformation data can account for only a small portion (as low as 8%) of the mass addition responsible for the gravity increase. We propose that since the opening of a new eruptive vent at the summit of Kīlauea in 2008, magma rising to the surface of the lava lake outgasses, becomes denser, and sinks to deeper levels, replacing less dense gas-rich magma stored in the Halema‘uma‘u magma reservoir. In fact, a relatively small density increase (gravity change measured during the period with the largest mass increase, between March 2011 and November 2012. Other mechanisms may also play a role in the gravity increase without producing significant uplift of the surface, including compressibility of magma, formation of olivine cumulates, and filling of void space by magma. The rate of gravity increase, higher than during previous decades, varies through time and seems to be directly correlated with the volcanic activity occurring at both the summit and the east rift zone of the volcano.

  19. 'The End of the Beginning' of Eastern Enlargement Luxembourg Summit and Agenda-setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lykke Friis

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The core argument of this article is that pre-negotiation matters. Policy problems are not just out there, but socially constructed. In order to comprehend the outcome of any negotiation it is therefore not sufficient just to look at the give and take at the actual bargaining table, but also at the negotiation to negotiate. Furthermore, the article argues that pre-negotiation carves out a role for agenda-setting, seeing that governments often enter this phase with un-fixed preferences. These central points of the article are summed up in a theoretical framework, which stands out as a critique of liberal intergovernmentalism. On the basis of this framework the article sets out to analyse the pre-negotiation phase of eastern enlargement, the Luxembourg Summit. Its key conclusion is that the majority of the governments entered this game searching for their preferences and that this enabled both the Commission and two smaller states to influence the outcome by setting the agenda in a specific way.

  20. Observation of lightning-induced signals on the summit of La Grande Montagne: HF measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolmasova Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A ground-based version of the IME-HF analyzer, developed for the French TARANIS mission, was connected to a magnetic loop antenna and used for broadband measurements of lightning-induced signals in the frequency range from 5 kHz to 36 MHz. A sampling frequency of 80 MHz allows examining submicrosecond timing properties of recorded horizontal magnetic-field waveforms related to different lightning phenomena. The instrumentation is placed in a quiet electromagnetic environment of an external measurement site of the Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit (LSBB on the summit of La Grande Montagne (1028 m, 43.94N, 5.48E. We present results of measurements recorded during two years of operation. We concentrate our attention on signals radiated by in-cloud processes which are difficult to detect in situ or optically. We also analyze a fine structure of the magnetic-field waveforms from different types of return strokes in order to investigate currents flowing in the lightning channels. After the launch of the TARANIS satellite the ground-based measurements will complement the observations from space.

  1. World Antibody Drug Conjugate Summit Europe: February 21-23, 2011; Frankfurt, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Alain; Senter, Peter; Chari, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    The World Antibody Drug Conjugate Summit Europe, organized by Biorbis/ Hanson Wade was held in Frankfurt, Germany on February 21-23, 2011. Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), also called immunoconjugates, are becoming an increasingly important class of therapeutics as demonstrated by the attendance of nearly 100 delegates at this highly focused meeting. Updates on three ADCs that are in late-stage clinical development, trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), brentuximab vedotin (SGN-35) and inotuzumab ozogamicin (CMC-544), were presented by speakers from ImmunoGen, Genentech, Roche, Seattle Genetics and Pfizer. These ADCs have shown encouraging therapeutic effects against solid tumors (T-DM1) and hematological malignancies (SGN-35, CMC-544). The key feature of the new generation of ADCs is the effective combination of the cytotoxicity of natural or synthetic highly potent antineoplastic agents, tumor selective monoclonal antibodies and blood-stable optimized linkers. Early clinical data for ADCs were showcased by Progenics Pharmaceuticals (PSMA ADC), Celldex (CDX-011) and Biotest (BT-062). Takeda, MedImmune and sanofi-aventis outlined their strategies for process development and analytical characterization. In addition, presentations on duocarmycin based-ADCs, alpha emitting immunoconjugates and antibody-conjugated nanoparticles were given by representatives from Syntarga, Algeta and the University of Stuttgart, respectively.

  2. Nitrate Deposition to Surface Snow at Summit, Greenland, Following the 9 November 2000 Solar Proton Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duderstadt, Katharine A.; Dibb, Jack E.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Spence, Harlan E.; Jackman, Charles Herbert; Randall, Cora E.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Mills, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This study considers whether spurious peaks in nitrate ions in snow sampled at Summit, Greenland from August 2000 to August 2002 are related to solar proton events. After identifying tropospheric sources of nitrate on the basis of correlations with sulfate, ammonium, sodium, and calcium, we use the three-dimensional global Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to examine unaccounted for nitrate spikes. Model calculations confirm that solar proton events significantly impact HOx, NOx, and O3 levels in the mesosphere and stratosphere during the weeks and months following the major 9 November 2000 solar proton event. However, SPE-enhanced NOy calculated within the atmospheric column is too small to account for the observed nitrate ion peaks in surface snow. Instead, our WACCM results suggest that nitrate spikes not readily accounted for by measurement correlations are likely of anthropogenic origin. These results, consistent with other recent studies, imply that nitrate spikes in ice cores are not suitable proxies for individual SPEs and motivate the need to identify alternative proxies.

  3. International summit on the nutrition of adolescent girls and young women: consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Nancy; Bagby, Susan; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Dewey, Kathryn; Fall, Caroline; Gregory, Fred; Hay, William; Rhuman, Lisa; Caldwell, Christine Wallace; Thornburg, Kent L

    2017-07-01

    An international summit focusing on the difficult challenge of providing adequate nutrition for adolescent girls and young women in low- and middle-income countries was held in Portland, Oregon in 2015. Sixty-seven delegates from 17 countries agreed on a series of recommendations that would make progress toward improving the nutritional status of girls and young women in countries where their access to nutrition is compromised. Delegate recommendations include: (1) elevate the urgency of nutrition for girls and young women to a high international priority, (2) raise the social status of girls and young women in all regions of the world, (3) identify major knowledge gaps in the biology of adolescence that could be filled by robust research efforts, (4) and improve access to nutrient-rich foods for girls and young women. Attention to these recommendations would improve the health of young women in all nations of the world. © 2017 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. The World Summit of Harmonization on Traditional, Alternative and Complementary Medicine (TACM) in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Aguilar, José; Villar, Martha

    2010-06-01

    The World Summit of Harmonization on Traditional, Alternative and Complementary Medicine (TACM) was held in Lima, Peru, November 7-11, 2007, with almost 600 worldwide participants. This meeting was organized by Peruvian Medical College, the institution that affiliates and authorizes all physicians to practice medicine in Peru. The meeting included seven sections starting with an overview on the current status of the TACM. The second section included experiences from different countries on regulations and quality control in products and services used in the TACM. The worldwide experience of education and training in TACM was a very important part of the meeting in which speakers from Spain, Germany, Argentina, Italy, Brazil, Cuba and Peru shared their experience. The meeting included topics on homeopathy, acupuncture, mind-body medicine, neural therapy, chiropraxis, among others. Two final sessions were related to the ways of linking Traditional medicine to the national Health Systems in the Latin America countries and also the association between bio-commerce and TACM including intellectual properties and bio-piracy.

  5. Seasonal behavior of non-methane hydrocarbons in the firn air at Summit, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, D.; Stephens, C. R.; Caramore, J.; Hueber, J.

    2014-03-01

    Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) were measured in the ambient air and in the snowpack interstitial firn air at ˜1 m depth continuously for nearly two years at Summit, Greenland, from fall 2008 through summer 2010. Additionally, five firn air depth profiles were conducted to a depth of 3 m spanning winter, spring, and summer seasons. Here we report measurements of ethane, ethene, ethyne, propane, propene, i-butane, n-butane, i-pentane, n-pentane, and benzene and discuss the seasonal behavior of these species in the ambient and firn air. The alkanes, ethyne, and benzene in the firn air closely reflect the ambient air concentrations during all the seasons of the year. In spring and summer seasons, ethene and propene were enhanced in the near-surface firn over that in the ambient air, indicating a photochemical production mechanism for these species within the snowpack interstitial air. Evaluation of the NMHC ratios of i-butane/n-butane, i-pentane/n-pentane, and benzene/ethyne in both ambient and firn air does not provide evidence for chlorine or bromine radical chemistry significantly affecting these gases, except in a few summer samples, where individual data points may suggest bromine oxidation influence.

  6. Rheological control on the dynamics of explosive activity in the 2000 summit eruption of Mt. Etna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Giordano

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In the period from January to June 2000 Mt. Etna exhibited an exceptional explosive activity characterised by a succession of 64 Strombolian and fire-fountaining episodes from the summit South-East crater. Textural analysis of the eruptive products reveals that the magma associated with the Strombolian phases had a much larger crystal content >55 vol% with respect to the magma discharged during the fire-fountain phases (~35 vol%. Rheological modelling shows that the crystal-rich magma falls in a region beyond a critical crystal content where the small addition of solid particles causes an exponential increase of the effective magma viscosity. When implemented into the modelling of steady magma ascent dynamics, the large crystal content of the Strombolian eruption phases results in a one order of magnitude decrease of mass flow-rate, and in the onset of conditions where small heterogeneities in the solid fraction carried by the magma translate into highly unsteady eruption dynamics. Therefore, we argue that crystallization on top of the magmatic column during the intermediate phases when magma was not discharged caused the conditions to shift from fire-fountain to Strombolian activity. The numerical simulations also provide a consistent interpretation of the association between fire-fountain activity and emergence of lava flows from the crater flanks.

  7. Solar irradiance observed at Summit, Greenland: Possible links to magnetic activity on short timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, John E.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of ground-level visible sunlight (400-600 nm) from Summit, Greenland over the period August 2004 through October 2014 define the attenuation provided by cloudiness, including its dependence on solar elevation and season. The long-term mean cloud-attenuation increases with increasing solar zenith angle, consistent with radiative transfer calculations which treat a cloud as a plane parallel layer with a strong bias toward forward scattering and an albedo for diffuse radiation near 0.1. The ratio of measured irradiance to clear-sky irradiance for solar zenith angles greater than 66° has a small, but statistically significant, positive correlation with the previous day's magnetic activity as measured by the daily Ap index, but no clear relationship exists between the irradiance ratio and daily changes in the ground-level neutron flux measured at Thule over the time frame considered. A high value of Ap on one day tends to be followed by a day whose ground-level solar irradiance is slightly greater than would occur otherwise. In an average sense, the visible irradiance following a day with Ap>16 exceeds that following a day with Ap≤16 by 1.2-1.3% with a 95% confidence range of approximately ±1.0%. The results are broadly compatible with small changes in atmospheric scattering following magnetic disturbances.

  8. Cosmogenic 21Ne concentrations and exposure ages of summit bedrocks in the Grove Mountains,Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Various sources of 21Ne and 22Ne exist in surface rocks:cosmogenic,in situ nucleogenic from internal U and Th,trapped crustal nucleogenic and trapped atmospheric.This paper reports the first measurement,in China,of cosmogenic 21Ne and 22Ne in surface bedrocks.We developed a unique sample pre-treatment procedure that effectively removed inclusions inside quartz grains,and thus maximally reduced nucleogenic contributions of 21Ne and 22Ne.Step-heating experiments show that concen-trations of cosmogenic 21Ne and 22Ne in summit bedrock samples R9202 and R9203 from Grove Mountains,Antarctica,are(3.83±0.87)×108 and(5.22±0.51)×108 atoms/g,respectively.The corresponding minimum exposure ages are 2.2±0.5 and 3.0±0.3 Ma.This indicates that the ice sheet in East Antarctica was uncovered the crest of Mount Harding,a typical nunatak in Grove Mountains,since at least mid-Pliocene.

  9. 'The End of the Beginning' of Eastern Enlargement – Luxembourg Summit and Agenda-setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lykke Friis

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The core argument of this article is that pre-negotiation matters. Policy problems are not just ‘out there’, but socially constructed. In order to comprehend the outcome of any negotiation it is therefore not sufficient just to look at the ‘give and take’ at the actual bargaining table, but also at the ‘negotiation to negotiate’. Furthermore, the article argues that pre-negotiation carves out a role for agenda-setting, seeing that governments often enter this phase with un-fixed preferences. These central points of the article are summed up in a theoretical framework, which stands out as a critique of liberal intergovernmentalism. On the basis of this framework the article sets out to analyse the pre-negotiation phase of eastern enlargement, the Luxembourg Summit. Its key conclusion is that the majority of the governments entered this ‘game’ searching for their preferences and that this enabled both the Commission and two smaller states to influence the outcome by setting the agenda in a specific way.

  10. Transplantation in end-stage pulmonary hypertension (Third International Right Heart Failure Summit, part 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Anuradha

    2014-12-01

    The Third International Right Heart Summit was organized for the purpose of bringing an interdisciplinary group of expert physician-scientists together to promote dialogue involving emerging concepts in the unique pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, and therapies of pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and right heart failure (RHF). This review summarizes key ideas addressed in the section of the seminar entitled "Transplantation in End-Stage Pulmonary Hypertension." The first segment focused on paradigms of recovery for the failing right ventricle (RV) within the context of lung-alone versus dual-organ heart-lung transplantation. The subsequent 2-part section was devoted to emerging concepts in RV salvage therapy. A presentation of evolving cell-based therapy for the reparation of diseased tissue was followed by a contemporary perspective on the role of mechanical circulatory support in the setting of RV failure. The final talk highlighted cutting-edge research models utilizing stem cell biology to repair diseased tissue in end-stage lung disease-a conceptual framework within which new therapies for PVD have potential to evolve. Together, these provocative talks provided a novel outlook on how the treatment of PVD and RHF can be approached.

  11. Rheological control on the dynamics of explosive activity in the 2000 summit eruption of Mt. Etna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Giordano

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the period from January to June 2000 Mt. Etna exhibited an exceptional explosive activity characterized by a succession of 64 Strombolian and fire-fountaining episodes from the summit South-East Crater. Textural analysis of the eruptive products reveals that the magma associated with the Strombolian phases had a much larger crystal content (>55 vol% with respect to the magma discharged during the fire-fountain phases (~35 vol%. Rheological modelling shows that the crystal-rich magma falls in a region beyond a critical crystal content where small addition of solid particles causes an exponential increase of the effective magma viscosity. When implemented into the modeling of steady magma ascent dynamics (as assumed for the fire-fountain activity, a large crystal content as the one found for products of Strombolian eruption phases results in a one order of magnitude decrease of mass flow-rate, and in the onset of conditions where small heterogeneities in the solid fraction carried by the magma translate into highly unsteady eruption dynamics. We argue that crystallization on top of the magmatic column during the intermediate phases when magma was not discharged favoured conditions corresponding to Strombolian activity, with fire-fountain activity resuming after removal of the highly crystalline top. The numerical simulations also provide a consistent interpretation of the association between fire-fountain activity and emergence of lava flows from the crater flanks.

  12. Diffuse Carbon Dioxide (CO2) degassing from the summit crater of Pico do Fogo during the 2014-15 eruption, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Fatima; Dionis, Samara; Padrón, Eleazar; Fernandes, Paulo; Melián, Gladys V.; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Hernández, Pedro A.; Silva, Sónia; Pereira, José Manuel; Cardoso, Nadir; Asensio-Ramos, María; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Calvo, David; Semedo, Helio

    2015-04-01

    On January 3, 2015, a new diffuse CO2 degassing survey at the summit crater of Pico do Fogo volcano (2,829 m above sea level) was carried out by ITER/INVOLCAN/UNICV/OVCV research team to investigate the effect of the 2014-15 Fogo eruption on the diffuse degassing through the summit crater. Before the eruption onset on November 23, 2014, these type of surveys were periodically performed by ITER/INVOLCAN/UNICV/OVCV research team since May 2007. The first published data on diffuse CO2 degassing rate from the summit crater of Pico do Fogo volcano (219 ± 36 t d-1) is related to a survey performed on February 2010 (Dionis et al., 2015). Each survey implies about 65 CO2 efflux measurements to obtain a good spatial distribution and cover homogeneously the summit crater area (0.14 km2). Because of the sudden falls of rocks of different sizes inside the summit crater during the January 3 survey, the research team aborted continues working in the summit crater without completing the survey only 32 of the 65 CO2 efflux measurements were performed covering a smaller area (0.065 km2). Observed CO2 efflux values ranged from non detectable ( 300 t d-1). This most recent survey did not cover the hydrothermal alteration zone within the crater, where the highest CO2 efflux measurements are usually recorded. Dionis et al. (2015), Bull. Volcanol., in press;

  13. Meeting the Challenges of Enterprise Risk Management in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattie, John

    2007-01-01

    In the summer of 2007, the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) and the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) held a summit on enterprise risk management (ERM) in Washington DC with senior officers and trustees from several leading colleges and universities. Approximately 40…

  14. 沉水植物轮叶黑藻附生细菌对双酚A的降解能力研究%Degradation of bisphenol A by the epiphytic bacteria of submerged macrophytes Hydrilla verticillata (L. f.) Royle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国森; 王玉; 庄晓瑾; 杨劭; 蒋金辉

    2016-01-01

    Epiphytic bacteria of submerged macrophytes may have the capability in biodegradation and/or biotransformation of bisphenol A (BPA) in water column, therefore affect the fate of such environmental pollutant. In this research,Hydrilla verticillata(L. f.) Royle was selected and their attached BPA degrading epiphytic bacteria attached were isolated. Among the 22bacteria strains, the BPA removal rates were from 11.46% to 25.06% with the inoculum density at 1×10-8cell/mL and culture at 37℃ for 72h. The most effective bacteria strains, B12, B14and B23 were identified asLysinibacillus sp.,Brevibacterium sp. andOchrobactrum sp., respectively, according to the results of 16S rDNA sequencing and morphological, physiological and biochemical tests. But aseptic seedlings ofH. verticillata significantly decreased their BPA removal rates after the addition with B12, B14and B23 (P<0.05). Natural seedlings of such species surprisingly increased about 5% in BPA removal after partially removing their epiphyte with physical methods. All the results indicated that epiphytic bacteria of submerged plant can remove BPA, although their contributions (about 23%) are less than the host plants in the submerged macrophytes-epiphyte associations.%沉水植物附生细菌可能具有降解转化水体中双酚 A(BPA)能力从而影响该污染物在环境中的归趋.以轮叶黑藻为代表,分离筛选其BPA降解附生菌,结果共获得22株,在接种量为1×108个/mL,37℃下72h对BPA的去除率为11.46%~25.06%.选择降解率最高的3株细菌B12、B14和B23,采用16S rDNA鉴定,结合生理生化反应和形态观察,3株细菌分别为属于Lysinibacillus sp.(杆菌属),Brevibacterium sp.(短杆菌属)和Ochrobactrum sp.(苍白杆菌属).将3株菌株添加至轮叶黑藻无菌苗体系中,发现BPA去除率显著下降(P<0.05).物理去除部分野生轮叶黑藻表面部分附生细菌后,BPA去除率反而上升(约5%).综合本研究结果,沉水植物附生细菌具有降

  15. Chemical composition and droplet size distribution of cloud at the summit of Mount Tai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of 39 cloud samples and droplet size distributions in 24 cloud events were investigated at the summit of Mt. Tai from July to October 2014. Inorganic ions, organic acids, metals, HCHO, H2O2, sulfur(IV, organic carbon, and elemental carbon as well as pH and electrical conductivity were analyzed. The acidity of the cloud water significantly decreased from a reported value of pH 3.86 during 2007–2008 (Guo et al., 2012 to pH 5.87 in the present study. The concentrations of nitrate and ammonium were both increased since 2007–2008, but the overcompensation of ammonium led to an increase in the mean pH value. The microphysical properties showed that cloud droplets were smaller than 26.0 µm and most were in the range of 6.0–9.0 µm at Mt. Tai. The maximum droplet number concentration (Nd was associated with a droplet size of 7.0 µm. High liquid water content (LWC values could facilitate the formation of larger cloud droplets and broadened the droplet size distribution. Cloud droplets exhibited a strong interaction with atmospheric aerosols. Higher PM2. 5 levels resulted in higher concentrations of water-soluble ions and smaller sizes with increased numbers of cloud droplets. The lower pH values were likely to occur at higher PM2. 5 concentrations. Clouds were an important sink for soluble materials in the atmosphere. The dilution effect of cloud water should be considered when estimating concentrations of soluble components in the cloud phase.

  16. The World Summit on Sustainable Development: reaffirming the centrality of health

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schirnding, Yasmin

    2005-01-01

    The World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) was held in Johannesburg in 2002 to review progress since the Rio conference in 1992, and to agree a new global deal on sustainable development. Unlike its predecessor, it was primarily concerned with implementation rather than with new treaties and targets, although a number of new targets were agreed, for example one on sanitation. Failure to agree a target on renewable energy was regarded as a major disappointment of the conference. While relatively modest in its achievements, and with difficulties in achieving consensus in key areas such as energy, trade, finance and globalisation, WSSD nevertheless succeeded in placing sustainable development back on the political agenda, giving new impetus, in particular to the environment and development needs of Africa, with a strong focus on local issues like household energy, water and sanitation. Health was singled out as one of five priority areas, along with water, energy, agriculture and biodiversity, and was devoted a separate chapter in the resulting Plan of Implementation, which highlighted a range of environmental health issues as well as issues relating to health services, communicable and non-communicable diseases. A number of new partnerships were formed at WSSD, including the Healthy Environments for Children Alliance (HECA) launched by WHO, which will form an important platform for implementation. The Commission on Sustainable Development has been designated main responsibility for monitoring and follow up, with its programme of work reorganised to focus on thematic clusters of issues. From the perspective of health, WSSD must be seen as a reaffirmation of the central place of health on the sustainable development agenda, and in the broader context of a process which began in Rio and was given added impetus with the Monterrey Financing for Development conference and the World Trade Organisation meeting held in Doha. Translating policies into action at all

  17. NSF-Sponsored Summit on the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, S.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-sponsored Summit on the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education made major progress toward developing a collective community vision for the geosciences. A broad spectrum of the geoscience education community, ~200 educators from research universities/four and two year colleges, focused on preparation of undergraduates for graduate school and future geoscience careers, pedagogy, use of technology, broadening participation/retention of underrepresented groups, and preparation of K-12 science teachers. Participants agreed that key concepts, competencies and skills learned throughout the curriculum were more important than specific courses. Concepts included understanding Earth as complex, dynamic system, deep time, evolution of life, natural resources, energy, hazards, hydrogeology, surface processes, Earth materials and structure, and climate change. Skills/competencies included ability to think spatially and temporally, reason inductively and deductively, make and use indirect observations, engage in complex open, coupled systems thinking, and work with uncertainty, non-uniqueness, and incompleteness, as well as critical thinking, problem solving, communication, and ability to think like a scientist and continue to learn. Successful ways of developing these include collaborative, integrative projects involving teams, interdisciplinary projects, fieldwork and research experiences, as well as flipped classrooms and integration and interactive use of technology, including visualization, simulation, modeling and analysis of real data. Wider adoption of proven, effective best practices is our communities' main pedagogical challenge, and we focused on identifying implementation barriers. Preparation of future teachers in introductory and general geoscience courses by incorporating Next Generation Science Standards and using other sciences/math to solve real world geoscience problems should help increase diversity and number of future geoscientists and

  18. Two Decades after the Rio Earth Summit: Sustainable Development Quo Vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korinna Horta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The world’s most influential development agency, the World Bank Group (WBG, is the leading actor in development finance and plays a central role in global efforts to protect the environment. Following the Rio Earth Summit in 1992, the institution was responsible for all investment projects of the Global Environment Facility (GEF, which was then newly established to serve as the interim financial mechanism for the United Nations Conventions on Climate Change and Biodiversity. The promise that the GEF would lead to the “greening” of development finance remains largely unfulfilled.More recently the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change appointed the WBG as the interim trustee of the new Green Climate Fund which plans to mobilize an estimated US$ 100 billion per year by 2020.While the World Bank Group plays this critical role in global environmental efforts, its main business continues to be lending for development. This includes the financing of large-scale infrastructure projects, agribusiness, large dams as well as investments in gas, oil and mining. This regular lending portfolio for development is often at odds with environmental sustainability. For example, despite the growing area of climate finance, support for fossil fuel projects continues to be dominant in the institution’s lending for the energy sector. Another climate-related area is the World Bank’s pioneering role in advancing REDD+, an initiative designed to reduce the emission of global green house gases by integrating efforts to protect forest areas into global carbon markets. Ultimately, its success will depend on addressing sensitive questions such as land ownership, forest governance and the equitable sharing of benefits.In conclusion the paper considers the underlying corporate culture and the difficulties in reconciling environmental and social sustainability with the institution’s supply-side driven focus on meeting lending targets.

  19. NATO Summit in Wales: From global megatrends to the new Euro-Atlanticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukadinović Lidija Čehulić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous representatives of theories of international relations, security theories or alliance theories have examined the new role of the North Atlantic Alliance or the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO in the post-bipolar world. Parallel with the theoretical examination of goals and tasks, NATO has transformed itself in practice, following the realities of the contemporary global era. In trying to achieve and keep the primacy of the strongest military- political organization, the Alliance has - especially in the Strategic Concept adopted in Lisbon in 2010-set the normative and institutional foundations of its global engagement, fulfilling the military (hard and a wide array of non-military (soft security challenges. This strategy has given rise to "Euro-Atlanticism", as a subsystem of international relations based on strong American-European relations, to fit with the process of regionalization of global politics. However, the 2013-2014 crisis in Ukraine has turned the focus of interest and activities of NATO once again primarily to Europe and it has stressed the importance and necessity of strengthening Euro-Atlantic security and defence ties. The most powerful member of the Alliance, the United States, is again strongly engaged in Europe and Russia, as a kind of successor to the Soviet Union, is once more detected as a major threat to European security. There have been many aspects of theories of international relations that have tried to explain the dynamic of the post-Cold War international community. However, the approach based on neo-realistic assumptions of the role of a security community, collective defence and the use of military force has proved to be dominant. NATO will continue to work on its political dimension as an alliance of the democratic world and the September 2014 Wales Summit will certainly mark the return of NATO to its roots, strengthening its security and military dimensions in the collective defence of Europe

  20. e8 Tokyo summit 2010 : smart grid technology innovation group report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T. [American Electric Power, Columbus, OH (United States); Ratnayake, A.; Patel, A. [Duke Energy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bornstain, D.; Hercberg, S. [Electricity de France, Paris (France); Wright, A. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Stein, D.; Stromsather, J. [Ente Nazionale per l' Energia eLettrica, Rome (Italy); Simard, G.; Parent, D.; Menard, B. [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Michiko, N.; Takayuki, S. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Osaka (Japan); Fest, C. [RWE AG, Pulheim (Germany); Okamoto, H.; Shibata, N. [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    The Tokyo summit on smart grid technology was attended by members of the e8 to promote the smart use of electricity in climate change mitigation. A list of initiatives was presented to maximize the benefits of the smart use of electricity to advance global solutions to climate change. The smart grid uses the basic design of today's electrical system, however, it has many more monitors, sensors, switching devices, and sophisticated communications that will allow it to be a highly automated power delivery system. The purpose of this report was to examine e8 member company experiences in Smart Grid deployment and provide recommendations that could help speed up the deployment of smart grid across e8 members and the world in general. The regulatory, financial, technical, policy and public communication/education issues that could accelerate or inhibit deployment of the smart grid were presented. The subsections of the report were entitled: drivers to adopt the smart grid; leading the world to a low carbon society; empowering the customer; improving system/network performance; improving system power flow and energy; and barriers to adoption of the smart grid. The report also discussed the achievement of a smart grid and its applicable components, such as meter technology; telecommunications technologies; demand-side technologies; distributed energy resources; grid intelligence and tools; customer offers; policy and regulatory needs; and financial commitment. The major successes and challenges of the plan and process were also identified. Recommendations were targeted at the role of the utility industry; research and development/technology needs; policy and regulations; customer-side recommendations; business models or opportunities; stakeholders; public-private partnerships; and developing nations. It was concluded that the e8 can play a role in overcoming barriers faced by all member countries and accelerating the development and the deployment of the smart grid

  1. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Bruce A; Caldwell, Kathleen; Congdon, Clare Bates; Disney, Jane; Donahue, Maria; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Flemings, Elsie; Golden, Meredith; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Highman, Jay; James, Karen; Kim, Carol; Lantz, R Clark; Marvinney, Robert G; Mayer, Greg; Miller, David; Navas-Acien, Ana; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Postema, Sonia; Rardin, Laurie; Rosen, Barry; SenGupta, Arup; Shaw, Joseph; Stanton, Elizabeth; Susca, Paul

    2015-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting "Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic" held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13-15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food, and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 μg/L in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry, and educators at the local, state, national, and international levels to (1) establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry, and others; (3) develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods; and (5) develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies.

  2. Regime Conflicts at the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F. Ruddy

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations opened the first ever World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS at the International Telecommunication Union (ITU in Geneva, Switzerland, in December 2003. Per the mandate given to hold WSIS by the ITU in 1998, the event was supposed to focus on using Information and Communication Technologies (ICT for development (ICT4D, or "E-Development". However in this broad field there were many other players besides the ITU and its UN partners, and it proved difficult to induce those existing authorities to cede power to the new venue. The event is scheduled to continue in Tunis in 2005. Negotiations are the usual form that actors choose for progress on goal to be achieved multilaterally. However WSIS is not a venue for negotiations, but rather a showcase and networking space. This paper strives to apply regime theory and institutional economics to the conflicts that arise when existing regimes are challenged by the ITU and its WSIS partners (including UNESCO and the UN ICT Task Force. The paper presents the interests of four of the other main institutions involved, which more closely reflect those of the United States: the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO, the World Trade Organization (WTO and the Group of Eight major industrialized nations (G-8. WSIS Geneva produced a mandate to UN SG Kofi Annan to set up groups to continue working on the issues of Internet governance and financing, and to report its results to WSIS Tunis. Answers to issues other than Internet governance and financing will have to be sought elsewhere. Nonetheless the emphasis on Internet governance emerging from WSIS Geneva is a confirmation of this paper's contention that regimes are important.

  3. Basalt of Summit Creek: Eocene Magmatism Associated with Farallon Slab Break Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, L. B.; Tepper, J. H.; Eddy, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    In the Pacific Northwest the Early-Middle Eocene was a time of widespread magmatism and tectonic reorganization that included accretion of the Siletzia terrane, Challis volcanism, and establishment of the modern Cascade arc. Although individual events are well documented our knowledge of the underlying tectonic framework is incomplete. To better understand the tectonic changes that occurred during this interval we studied the ~48 Ma Basalt of Summit Creek (BSC), a 1500m section of lavas located south of Mt. Rainier that erupted during the critical time period between the docking of Siletzia and the initiation of the modern Cascade arc. The BSC consists mainly of tholeiitic basalts (wt. % SiO2 = 45.54-63.45, Mg# = 0.68-0.30) with EMORB traits (La/YbN = 1.2-5.9; 206Pb/204Pb = 19.005-19.102; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.538-15.593; 208Pb/204Pb = 38.560-38.714). These lavas lack arc signatures (e.g., HFSE depletions) but overlap in elemental and isotopic composition with oceanic basalts of the Crescent Formation (part of Siletzia) located ~100 km to the west. We suggest that emplacement of lavas that lack arc traits in what was the forearc was a response to break off of the Farallon slab, which occurred as a result of the accretion of Siletzia at ~49 Ma (Wells et al., 2014). Break off opened a gap in the subducted slab, allowing upwelling and subsequent decompression melting. BSC lavas are consistent in age, location and composition with this model. After break off subduction resumed outboard of Siletzia, initiating the Cascade arc. Thus, BSC provides evidence of Farallon slab break off and furthers our understanding of the tectonic transition from widespread magmatism of the Early-Middle Eocene to the Cascade arc.

  4. Microbial communities established on Mont Blanc summit with Saharan dust deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvochina, M.; Alekhina, I.; Normand, P.; Petit, J. R.; Bulat, S.

    2009-04-01

    Dust originating from the Sahara desert can be uplifted during storms, transported across the Mediterranean towards the Alpine region and deposited during snowfalls. The microbes associated with dust particles can be involved in establishing microbiota in icy environments as well as affect ecosystem and human health. Our objective was to use a culture-free DNA-based approach to assess bacterial content and diversity and furthermore, to identify ‘icy' microbes which could be brought on the Mont Blanc (MtBl) summit with Saharan dust and became living in the snow. Saharan dust fallout on MtBl summit from one event (MB5, event June 2006) vs. control libraries and that from another event (May 2008) were collected in Grenoble (SD, 200 m a.s.l.) and at Col du Dome (MB-SD, 4250 m a.s.l.). Soil from Ksar Ghilane (SS, Saharan desert, Tunisia, March 2008) was taken for overall comparison as a possible source population. Fresh snow falling in Grenoble (85) was collected as example of diversity in this area. To assess the microbial diversity 16S rRNA gene libraries (v3-v5 region) were constructed for corresponding dust-snow samples (MB5, SS, SD, 85 and MB-SD) along with clear snow samples and several controls. For both MB5 and MB-SD samples full-gene technique was evoked in attempt to differentiate reproduced bacteria from damaged DNA. Before sequencing the clones were rybotyped. All clone libraries were distinct in community composition except for some single phylotypes (or closely related groups) overlap. Thus, clone libraries from two different events that were collected at Col du Dome area within 2 year interval (MB5 and MB-SD) were different in community composition except one of the abundant phylotype from MB-SD library (Geodermatophilus sp.) which was shared (98% sequence similarity) with single representative from MB-5 library. These bacteria are pigmented and radiation-resistant, so it could be an indicator of desert origin for our sequences. For MB5 library two

  5. A Comparison of Process-Scale Modeling and Measurements of Atmosphere-Snowpack Exchange of Nitrogen Oxides at Summit, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. A.; Helmig, D.; Kramer, L. J.; Doskey, P. V.; Van Dam, B. A.; Seok, B.; Ganzeveld, L.

    2015-12-01

    Snowpack over glacial ice is a reservoir for reactive nitrogen gases. Previous studies indicate nitrogen oxides (NOx) are generated in snowpack interstitial air through photolysis of nitrate (NO3-). Gradients in NOx mixing ratios between snowpack interstitial air and the overlying atmosphere regulate NOx surface exchange, which affects the Arctic ozone budget and climate. To better understand the dynamics of cryosphere-atmosphere exchange of NOx in the Arctic, we use a 1-D process-scale model to evaluate measurements of NOxin and above the snowpack during March-May 2009 at Summit, Greenland. The model is based upon the processes previously presented in the snowpack chemistry and physics model, MISTRA-SNOW, which represents snow grains as spheres with surfaces uniformly coated by an aqueous phase. Modeled profiles of NO, NO2, and O3 up to ~ 2 meters deep into the snowpack for March-May 2009 have been compared to measured profiles and will be presented. During the March-May time period at Summit, low irradiances are observed during March, diurnal irradiance profiles are observed during April, and the sun never sets in May. The model results suggest a key chemical pathway for the formation of NO2 during "nighttime" that was previously unexplained. In addition, modeled 24-hour NOx fluxes are compared to measured NOx fluxes from a MET tower at Summit. Modeled fluxes of NOx in April 2009 are the same order of magnitude as the measurements; however, modeled fluxes of NOx deviate up to one order of magnitude from measurements in May 2009. A detailed analysis of the modeled/measured flux comparison will be presented.

  6. Digital Elevation Model Creation Using SfM on High-Altitude Snow-Covered Surfaces at Summit, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millstein, J. D.; Hawley, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Structure from Motion (SfM) provides a means through which a digital elevation model (DEM) can be constructed with data acquired at a relatively low cost when compared to other current alternatives. Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), a large area can be efficiently covered at high spatial resolution to quantify regional topography. Structure from Motion applied to photogrammetric techniques from a UAV has proven to be a successful tool, but challenges to UAV-based SfM include high-altitude locations with few distinctive surface features and minor textural differences. In June 2015, we piloted a small UAV (Quest) in order to conduct a topographical survey of Summit Camp, Greenland using SfM. Summit Camp sits at a surface elevation of 3200 meters above sea level, and occupies a snow-covered surface. The flat, very uniform terrain proved to be a challenge when flying the UAV and processing imagery using SfM techniques. In this presentation we discuss the issues both with operating a UAV instrument platform at high-altitude in the polar regions and interpreting the resulting DEM from a snow-covered region. The final DEM of Summit Camp covers a large portion of the surface area directly impacted by camp activities. In particular, volume calculations of drifting snow gauge an estimate of the equipment hours that will be required to clear and unearth structures. Investigation of surface roughness at multiple length scales can similarly provide insight on the accuracy of the DEM when observing texturally uniform surfaces.

  7. [The Saint-Petersburg summit of Group of Eight: the problems of infectious diseases and the ways of their solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, G G

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, being the presiding country at the Group of Eight Summit for the first time, Russia proposed the issue of counteraction with infectious diseases as one of the priority issues. In addition to the realization of the priority National Health Project, which is to a large degree dedicated to the immunoprophylaxis of infectious diseases as well as the prevention and treatment of HIV-infection/AIDS and hepatites B and C, a meeting of the Presidium of Russian Federation State Council presided by President V. V. Putin, dedicated to the problem of HIV-infection epidemic spread, was held on April 21; the meeting resulted in the formation of Governmental Commission on the problems of HIV-infection/AIDS. On July 16, the leaders of Group of Eight during their meeting in Saint-Petersburg, discussed and validated the Declaration on counteraction with infectious diseases, reflecting the position of the leaders on the entire complex of problems connected with the spread of infectious diseases, and determining the main principles of the global strategy of counteraction with epidemics under the threats associated with the appearance of new infections, such as avian influenza, HIV-infection/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. While preparing for the Summit, Russia made a range of suggestion aimed mostly on the reinforcement of possibilities to control infectious diseases in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Practically all Russia's initiatives were supported by the partners, which was also reflected in the conclusive document of the Summit. Following Russian initiatives, Group of Eight intends to increase the effectiveness of international affords on the prevention and elimination of the consequences of natural disasters, including the use of fast response teams. To provide Russia's contribution to this initiative, modernized specialized antiepidemic teams will be used. Taking into consideration the present-day financial participation of Russian Federation in the realization of

  8. A model for climate change education in formal and informal settings--C2S2 Climate Change Student Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, L. T.; Lynds, S. E.; Rack, F. R.

    2012-12-01

    Through a NOAA Environmental Literacy grant, ANDRILL (ANtarctic geological DRILLing) created a unique opportunity for both formal and informal educators to engage their classrooms/audiences in understanding the complexities of climate change. The program, entitled C2S2: Climate Change Student Summits, included excellent geographical coverage through an exceptional two-workshop professional development series for teachers in each of nine different regions representing the U.S. National Climate Assessment regions defined by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. The program also included a creative, investigative science research and presentation experience for teams of students in each region, culminating in the Climate Change Student Summit, an on-site capstone event including a videoconference connecting all sites. The success of this program is based on combining multiple aspects, such as providing professional development for educators and encouraging the active involvement of research scientists, both in the professional development workshops and in the Student Summit. Another key factor is the close working relationships between informal and formal education entities, including the involvement of informal science learning facilities and informal science education leaders. The program includes the creation and use of cutting-edge curriculum materials available in the ELF, (Environmental Literacy Framework with a focus on climate change) and hands-on resources for teachers and students that provide an earth systems approach to climate change education, which have been successfully used in grades 5-12 as well as at numerous science museums. The C2S2 project has completed four years of activities with demonstrated positive impacts on both students and teachers. This presentation will share the lessons learned about implementing this climate change science education program and suggest that it is a successful model that can be used to scale up this project from

  9. Evaluation of the flux gradient technique for measurement of ozone surface fluxes over snowpack at Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bocquet

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step procedure for investigating ozone surface fluxes over polar snow by the tower gradient method was developed and evaluated. These measurements were then used to obtain four months of turbulent ozone flux data at the Summit research camp located in the center of the Greenland ice shield. Turbulent fluxes were determined by the aerodynamic gradient method incorporating tower measurements of (a ozone gradients measured by commercial ultraviolet absorption analyzers, (b ambient temperature gradients using aspirated thermocouple sensors, and (c wind speed gradients determined by cup anemometers. All gradient instruments were regularly inter-compared by bringing sensors or inlets to the same measurement height. The developed protocol resulted in an uncertainty on the order of 0.1 ppbv for 30-min averaged ozone gradients that were used for the ozone flux calculations. This protocol facilitated a lower sensitivity threshold for the ozone flux determination of −8 × 10−3 μg m−2 s−1, respectively ~0.01 cm s−1 for the ozone deposition velocity for typical environmental conditions encountered at Summit. Uncertainty in the 30-min ozone exchange measurements (evaluated by the Monte Carlo statistical approach was on the order of 10−2 cm s−1. This uncertainty typically accounted to ~20–100% of the ozone exchange velocities that were determined. These measurements are among the most sensitive ozone deposition determinations reported to date. This flux experiment, deployed at Summit for a period of four months, allowed for measurements of the relatively low ozone uptake rates encountered for polar snow, and thereby the study of their environmental and seasonal dependencies.

  10. Principle and geomorphological applicability of summit level and base level technique using Aster Gdem satellite-derived data and the original software Baz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihisa Motoki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents principle and geomorphological applicability of summit level technique using Aster Gdem satellite-derived topographicdata. Summit level corresponds to thevirtualtopographic surface constituted bylocalhighest points, such as peaks and plateau tops, and reconstitutes palaeo-geomorphology before the drainage erosion. Summit level map is efficient for reconstitution of palaeo-surfaces and detection of active tectonic movement. Base level is thevirtualsurface composed oflocallowest points, as valley bottoms. The difference between summit level and base level is called relief amount. Thesevirtualmapsareconstructed by theoriginalsoftwareBaz. Themacroconcavity index, MCI, is calculated from summit level and relief amount maps. The volume-normalised three-dimensional concavity index, TCI, is calculated from hypsometric diagram. The massifs with high erosive resistance tend to have convex general form and low MCI and TCI. Those with low resistance have concave form and high MCI and TCI. The diagram of TCI vs. MCI permits to distinguish erosive characteristics of massifs according to their constituent rocks. The base level map for ocean bottom detects the basement tectonic uplift which occurred before the formation of the volcanic seamounts.

  11. NE.TIGER Receives Exclusive Invitation from Sino-ltalian Fashion Summit to Launch Haute Couture Huafu Show in Milan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    China's prominent fashion brand NETIGER was exclusively invited to launch its Haute Couture "Huafu" collection at the Sino-ltalian Fashion Summit 2012, held on the evening of September 7, 2012, in the Sala Tepolo of Palace Cierici, Milan's historic and fabled landmark. The nearly 200 chief executives and representatives from across China and Italy's fashion and luxury industries who participated in the launch event were all deeply impressed by NETiGER's splendid designs that masterly captured the essence of China's 5,000 years of civilization.

  12. Characteristics and source apportionment of atmospheric aerosols at the summit of Mount Tai during summertime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Xu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the long-range transport of air pollutants in North China, aerosol samples were collected at the summit of Mount Tai (Shandong province in June of 2006. Water-soluble ion and metal element concentrations were analyzed using ion chromatography (IC and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, respectively. Results showed three different size distributions for the ions and metal elements characterized, including masses in: (i the accumulation mode, with a peak at 0.43 to 1.1 μm (SO42−, NH4+, K+, Pb, Zn, Ti; (ii the coarse particle mode, with a peak at 4.7 to 5.8 μm (Ca2+, Mg2+, Ca, Mg, Fe, Al, Ba, Mn; and (iii a bimodal distribution, with peaks at 0.43 to 0.65 μm and 4.7 to 5.8 μm (NO3, Na+, Cl, Na, Co, Ni, Mo, Cu. When SO42− was in high concentration, the mass median diameter was between 0.5 μm and 0.8 μm, belonging to the "drop mode". The concentrations of SO42−, NO3, NH4+, and K+ were quite variable. Interestingly, SO42−, NO3, and NH4+ reached their highest concentrations when the humid air mass was coming from the south. Furthermore, crustal element concentrations increased when the air mass came from the north and pollution element concentrations were elevated when the air mass came from the south.

  13. Monitoring diffuse He degassing from the summit crater of Pico do Fogo volcano, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Mar; Dionis, Samara; Fernandes, Paulo; Melián, Gladys; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padilla, Germán D.; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Silva, Sonia

    2017-04-01

    Fogo (476km2) is one of the Sotavento islands of Cape Verde archipelago. The main geomorphological feature is the presence of a 9 km wide caldera hosting one of the world's most active volcanoes, Pico do Fogo (2829 m.a.s.l.), with the last eruption occurring on November 2014. Pico do Fogo volcano is characterized by the existence of a fumarolic field situated NW inside the summit crater and composed by low- and high-temperature gas discharges (90 to above 200oC respectively) with widespread sulfur precipitates at the surface, typical of hydrothermal alteration. As part of the geochemical monitoring program for the volcanic surveillance of Fogo volcano, twelve surveys of diffuse Helium (He) emission through the surface of the crater have been performed since 2008. He emission has been measured because it is considered as an excellent geochemical indicator (Pogorsky and Quirt 1981) due to its geochemical properties. Recent results clearly show the importance of helium emission studies for the prediction of major volcanic events and the importance of continuous monitoring of this gas in active volcanic regions (Padrón et al. 2013). Soil He emission rates were measured always at the same 63 sampling sites distributed inside the crater and covering an area of 0.142km2. At each measurement site, soil gas was collected in 10 cc glass vials with a hypodermic syringe by inserting to 40 cm depth a 50 cm stainless probe and later analyzed for He content by a quadrupole mass spectrometer Pfeiffer Omnistar 422. Diffusive and convective emission values were estimated at each sampling site following the Fick and Darcy's laws. The He emission rate through the crater was estimated after making the spatial interpolation maps using sequential Gaussian simulation. The average emission rate during these eight years of study is 3.3 kg d-1. The emission rate showed an important increase (up to 5.7 kg d-1) eight months before the 2014 eruption onset. During the eruptive period the crater

  14. Measurements of hydrogen peroxide and formaldehyde exchange between the atmosphere and surface snow at Summit, Greenland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobi, H.W.; Frey, M.M.; Hutterli, M.A.; Bales, R.C. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources; Schrems, O. [Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); Cullen, N.J.; Steffen, K. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). CIRES; Koehler, C. [Manchester High School, Earth and Space Science, CT (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Tower-based measurements of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and formaldehyde (HCHO) exchange were performed above the snowpack of the Greenland ice sheet. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HCHO fluxes were measured continuously between 16 June and 7 July 2000, at the Summit Environmental Observatory. The fluxes were determined using coil scrubber-aqueous phase fluorometry systems together with micrometeorological techniques. Both compounds exhibit strong diel cycles in the observed concentrations as well as in the fluxes with emission from the snow during the day and the evening and deposition during the night. The averaged diel variations of the observed fluxes were in the range of +1.3x10{sup 13} molecules m{sup -2} s{sup -1} (deposition) and -1.6x10{sup 13} molecules m{sup -2} s{sup -1} (emission) for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and +1.1x10{sup 12} and -4.2x10{sup 12} molecules m{sup -2} s{sup -1} for HCHO, while the net exchange per day for both compounds were much smaller. During the study period of 22 days on average (0.8{sub -4.3}{sup +4.6}x10{sup 17} molecules m{sup -2} of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were deposited and (7.0{sub -12.2}{sup +12.6})x10{sup 16} molecules m{sup -2} of HCHO were emitted from the snow per day. A comparison with the inventory in the gas phase demonstrates that the exchange influences the diel variations in the boundary layer above snow covered areas. Flux measurements during and after the precipitation of new snow shows that <16% of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and more than 25% of the HCHO originally present in the new snow were available for fast release to the atmospheric boundary layer within hours after precipitation. This release can effectively disturb the normally observed diel variations of the exchange between the surface snow and the atmosphere, thus perturbing also the diel variations of corresponding gas-phase concentrations. (Author)

  15. Chemical characterization of aerosols at the summit of Mountain Tai in Central East China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Deng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available PM2.5 and TSP samples were collected at the summit of Mountain Tai (MT (1534 m a.s.l. in spring 2006/2007 and summer 2006 to investigate the characteristics of aerosols over central eastern China. For comparison, aerosol samples were also collected at Tazhong, Urumqi, and Tianchi in Xinjiang in northwestern China, Duolun and Yulin in northern China, and two urban sites in the megacities, Beijing and Shanghai, in 2007. Daily mass concentrations of TSP and PM2.5 ranged from 39.6–287.6 μg m−3 and 17.2–235.7 μg m−3 respectively at the summit of MT. Averaged concentrations of PM2.5 showed a pronounced seasonal variation with higher concentration in summer than spring. 17 water-soluble ions (SO42−, NO3, Cl, F, PO43−, NO2, CH3COO, CH2C2O42−, C2H4C2O42−, HCOO, MSA, C2O42−, NH4+, Ca2+, K+, Mg2+, Na+, and 19 elements of all samples were measured. SO42−, NO3, and NH4+ were the major water-soluble species in PM2.5, accounting for 61.50 % and 72.65 % of the total measured ions in spring and summer, respectively. The average ratio of PM2.5/TSP was 0.37(2006 and 0.49(2007 in spring, while up to 0.91 in summer, suggesting that aerosol particles were primarily comprised of fine particles in summer and of considerable coarse particles in spring. Crustal elements (e.g., Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, etc. showed higher concentration in spring than summer, while most of the pollution species (SO42−, NO3, K

  16. Energy Frontier Research Centers: Helping Win the Energy Innovation Race (2011 EFRC Summit Keynote Address, Secretary of Energy Chu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Steven (DOE Secretary of Energy)

    2011-05-25

    Secretary of Energy Steven Chu gave the keynote address at the 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum. In his talk, Secretary Chu highlighted the need to "unleash America's science and research community" to achieve energy breakthroughs. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  17. Whole grains and health: from theory to practice--highlights of The Grains for Health Foundation's Whole Grains Summit 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Nicola M; Jacques, Paul F; Seal, Chris J; de Vries, Jan; Jonnalagadda, Satya S; Clemens, Roger; Webb, Densie; Murphy, Lee Anne; van Klinken, Jan-Willem; Topping, David; Murray, Robyn; Degeneffe, Dennis; Marquart, Leonard F

    2013-05-01

    The Grains for Health Foundation's Whole Grains Summit, held May 19-22, 2012 in Minneapolis, was the first meeting of its kind to convene >300 scientists, educators, food technologists, grain breeders, food manufacturers, marketers, health professionals, and regulators from around the world. Its goals were to identify potential avenues for collaborative efforts and formulate new approaches to whole-grains research and health communications that support global public health and business. This paper summarizes some of the challenges and opportunities that researchers and nutrition educators face in expanding the knowledge base on whole grains and health and in translating and disseminating that knowledge to consumers. The consensus of the summit was that effective, long-term, public-private partnerships are needed to reach across the globe and galvanize the whole-grains community to collaborate effectively in translating whole-grains science into strategies that increase the availability and affordability of more healthful, grain-based food products. A prerequisite of that is the need to build trust among diverse multidisciplinary professionals involved in the growing, producing, marketing, and regulating of whole-grain products and between the grain and public health communities.

  18. The Challenges of Living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Summary of a Summit on Patient and Healthcare Provider Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Bray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Canada has one of the highest rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and the disease represents a significant health, social, and economic burden. There is currently no cure for IBD, although earlier diagnosis and new therapies have improved the overall health outcomes and quality of life for patients. Crohn’s and Colitis Canada is Canada’s only national, volunteer-based charity dedicated to finding cures for IBD and improving the lives of those affected, through research, education, patient programs, advocacy, and increased awareness. On April 30, 2015, Crohn’s and Colitis Canada hosted the “Patient and Healthcare Professional Summit on the Burden of Disease in IBD” to obtain a deeper understanding of the unmet needs of IBD patients and their caregivers. Through personal vignettes, patients articulated a pressing need to increase understanding of the challenges faced by people suffering from IBD among both health care professionals and the general public, develop best practices for navigating life transitions and addressing the unique challenges faced by children with IBD, and provide equitable access to appropriate, effective, and affordable treatments. The recommendations that emerged from the summit will inform about efforts to increase public awareness, inform about advocacy strategies, and contribute to the development of research priorities.

  19. Air quality real-time forecast before and during the G-20 Summit 2016 in Hangzhou with the WRF-CMAQ and WRF/Chem systems: Evaluation and Emission Reduction Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2016 G-20 Hangzhou summit, the eleventh annual meeting of the G-20 heads of government, will be held during September 3-5, 2016 in Hangzhou, China. For a successful summit, it is important to ensure good air quality. To achieve this goal, governments of Hangzhou and its surr...

  20. 加强合作携手努力共同维护全球粮食安全在世界粮食安全峰会上的讲话%Strengthen Cooperation for Global Food Security Address at the World Food Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    回良玉

    2010-01-01

    @@ Mr.Chair, Dear colleagues, Ladies and gentlemen, Let me stan by extending.on behalf of the Chinese Government,warm congratulations on the convocation of the World Food Summit and wishing the Summit acomplete success.

  1. Identification of water-quality trends using sediment cores from Dillon Reservoir, Summit County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Adrienne I.; Spahr, Norman E.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2001-01-01

    Since the construction of Dillon Reservoir, in Summit County, Colorado, in 1963, its drainage area has been the site of rapid urban development and the continued influence of historical mining. In an effort to assess changes in water quality within the drainage area, sediment cores were collected from Dillon Reservoir in 1997. The sediment cores were analyzed for pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and trace elements. Pesticides, PCBs, and PAHs were used to determine the effects of urban development, and trace elements were used to identify mining contributions. Water-quality and streambed-sediment samples, collected at the mouth of three streams that drain into Dillon Reservoir, were analyzed for trace elements. Of the 14 pesticides and 3 PCBs for which the sediment samples were analyzed, only 2 pesticides were detected. Low amounts of dichloro-diphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and dichloro-diphenyldichloroethane (DDD), metabolites of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), were found at core depths of 5 centimeters and below 15 centimeters in a core collected near the dam. The longest core, which was collected near the dam, spanned the entire sedimentation history of the reservoir. Concentrations of total combustion PAH and the ratio of fluoranthene to pyrene in the core sample decreased with core depth and increased over time. This relation is likely due to growth in residential and tourist populations in the region. Comparisons between core samples gathered in each arm of the reservoir showed the highest PAH concentrations were found in the Tenmile Creek arm, the only arm that has an urban area on its shores, the town of Frisco. All PAH concentrations, except the pyrene concentration in one segment in the core near the dam and acenaphthylene concentrations in the tops of three cores taken in the reservoir arms, were below Canadian interim freshwater sediment-quality guidelines. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium

  2. EPA Hosts International G7 Workshop on Sustainable Supply Chain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    WASHINGTON - On March 22-23, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy welcomes public and private sector representatives from G7 nations to a workshop on sustainable supply chain management. At their annual Summit in 2015, th

  3. Reactivation of Stromboli's summit craters at the end of the 2007 effusive eruption detected by thermal surveys and seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, E.; Calvari, S.; Cristaldi, A.; D'Auria, L.; Di Vito, M. A.; Moretti, R.; Peluso, R.; Spampinato, L.; Boschi, E.

    2015-11-01

    This work arises from the field observations made during the civil protection emergency period connected to the 2007 Stromboli eruption. We observed changes in the shallow feeding system of the volcano to which we give a volcanological interpretation and the relative implications. Here we describe the processes that occurred in the upper feeding system from the end of the 2007 effusive eruption on 3 April to the renewal of the strombolian explosive activity at the summit craters (30 June), interpreted using multidisciplinary data. We used thermal camera data collected both from helicopter and from a fixed station at 400 m to retrieve the evolving summit crater activity. These data, compared with seismic signals and published geochemical records, allowed us to detail the shifting of the degassing activity within the crater terrace from NE to SW, occurred between 15 and 25 April 2007 prior to the resumption of the strombolian activity. In particular, from mid-April, a gradual SW displacement in the maximum apparent temperatures was recorded at the vents within the summit craters, together with a change in the very long period location and confirmed by variations in geochemical indicators (CO2/SO2 plume ratios and CO2 fluxes) from literature. The shallow feeding system experienced a major readjustment after the end of the effusive activity, determining variations in the pressure leakage of the source, slowly deepening and shifting toward SW. All these data, together with the framework supplied by previous structural surveys, allowed us to propose that the compaction of debris accumulated in the uppermost conduit by inward crater collapses, occurred in early March, produced the observed anomalies. At Stromboli, major morphology changes, taking place in the following years, were anticipated by these small and apparently minor processes occurred in the upper feeding system. Other studies are relating similar changes to modifications of the eruptive activity also at other

  4. Bromide and other ions in the snow, firn air, and atmospheric boundary layer at Summit during GSHOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Dibb

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of gas phase soluble bromide in the boundary layer and in firn air, and Br in aerosol and snow, were made at Summit, Greenland (72.5° N, 38.4° W, 3200 m a.s.l. as part of a larger investigation into the influence of Br chemistry on HOx cycling. The soluble bromide measurements confirm that photochemical activation of Br in the snow causes release of active Br to the overlying air despite trace concentrations of Br in the snow (means 15 and 8 nmol Br kg−1 of snow in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Mixing ratios of soluble bromide above the snow were also found to be very small (mean <1 ppt both years, with maxima of 3 and 4 ppt in 2007 and 2008, respectively, but these levels clearly oxidize and deposit long-lived gaseous elemental mercury and may perturb HOx partitioning. Concentrations of Br in surface snow tended to increase/decrease in parallel with the specific activities of the aerosol-associated radionuclides 7Be and 210Pb. Earlier work has shown that ventilation of the boundary layer causes simultaneous increases in 7Be and 210Pb at Summit, suggesting there is a pool of Br in the free troposphere above Summit in summer time. Speciation and the source of this free tropospheric Br are not well constrained, but we suggest it may be linked to extensive regions of active Br chemistry in the Arctic basin which are known to cause ozone and mercury depletion events shortly after polar sunrise. If this hypothesis is correct, it implies persistence of the free troposphere Br for several months after peak Br activation in March/April. Alternatively, there may be a ubiquitous pool of Br in the free troposphere, sustained by currently unknown sources and processes.

  5. Diffuse volcanic degassing and thermal energy release 2015 surveys from the summit cone of Teide volcano, Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melián, Gladys; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padilla, Germán; Alonso, Mar; Halliwell, Simon; Sharp, Emerson; Butters, Damaris; Ingman, Dylan; Alexander, Scott; Cook, Jenny; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    The summit cone of Teide volcano (Spain) is characterized by the presence of a weak fumarolic system, steamy ground, and high rates of diffuse CO2 degassing all around this area. The temperature of the fumaroles (83° C) corresponds to the boiling point of water at discharge conditions. Water is the major component of these fumarolic emissions, followed by CO2, N2, H2, H2S, HCl, Ar, CH4, He and CO, a composition typical of hydrothermal fluids. Previous diffuse CO2 surveys have shown to be an important tool to detect early warnings of possible impending volcanic unrests at Tenerife Island (Melián et al., 2012; Pérez et al., 2013). In July 2015, a soil and fumarole gas survey was undertaken in order to estimate the diffuse volcanic degassing and thermal energy release from the summit cone of Teide volcano. A diffuse CO2 emission survey was performed selecting 170 observation sites according to the accumulation chamber method. Soil CO2 efflux values range from non-detectable (˜0.5 g m-2d-1) up to 10,672 g m-2d-1, with an average value of 601 g m-2d-1. Spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. Measurement of soil CO2 efflux allowed an estimation of 162 ± 14 t d-1 of deep seated derived CO2. To calculate the steam discharge associated with this volcanic/hydrothermal CO2 output, we used the average H2O/CO2 mass ratio equal to 1.19 (range, 0.44-3.42) as a representative value of the H2O/CO2 mass ratios for Teide fumaroles. The resulting estimate of the steam flow associated with the gas flux is equal to 193 t d-1. The condensation of this steam results in a thermal energy release of 5.0×1011J d-1 for Teide volcano or a total heat flow of 6 MWt. The diffuse gas emissions and thermal energy released from the summit of Teide volcano are comparable to those observed at other volcanoes. Sustained surveillance using these methods will be valuable for monitoring the activity of Teide volcano.

  6. Bromide and other ions in the snow, firn air, and atmospheric boundary layer at Summit during GSHOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Dibb

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of gas phase soluble bromide in the boundary layer and in firn air, and Br in aerosol and snow, were made at Summit, Greenland (72.5° N, 38.4° W, 3200 m a.s.l. as part of a larger investigation into the influence of Br chemistry on HOx cycling. The soluble bromide measurements confirm that photochemical activation of Br in the snow causes release of active Br to the overlying air despite trace concentrations of Br in the snow (means 15 and 8 nmol Br kg−1 of snow in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Mixing ratios of soluble bromide above the snow were also found to be very small (mean <1 ppt both years, with maxima of 3 and 4 ppt in 2007 and 2008, respectively, but these levels clearly oxidize and deposit long-lived gaseous elemental mercury and may perturb HOx partitioning. Concentrations of Br in surface snow tended to increase/decrease in parallel with the specific activities of the aerosol-associated radionuclides 7Be and 210Pb. Earlier work has shown that ventilation of the boundary layer causes simultaneous increases in 7Be and 210Pb at Summit, suggesting there is a pool of Br in the free troposphere above Summit in summer time. Speciation and the source of this free tropospheric Br are not well constrained, but we suggest it may be linked to extensive regions of active Br chemistry in the Arctic basin which are known to cause ozone and mercury depletion events shortly after polar sunrise. If this hypothesis is correct, it implies persistence of the free troposphere Br for several months after peak Br activation in March/April. Alternatively, there may be a~ubiquitous pool of Br in the free troposphere, sustained by currently unknown sources and processes.

  7. Dynamics of ozone and nitrogen oxides at Summit, Greenland. II. Simulating snowpack chemistry during a spring high ozone event with a 1-D process-scale model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murray, K.A.; Kramer, L.J.; Doskey, P.V.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Seok, B.; Dam, van B.; Helmig, D.

    2015-01-01

    Observed depth profiles of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) in snowpack interstitial air at Summit, Greenland were best replicated by a 1-D process-scale model, which included (1) geometrical representation of snow grains as spheres, (2) aqueous-phase chemistry confined to a

  8. Dynamics of ozone and nitrogen oxides at Summit, Greenland. II. Simulating snowpack chemistry during a spring high ozone event with a 1-D process-scale model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murray, K.A.; Kramer, L.J.; Doskey, P.V.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Seok, B.; Dam, van B.; Helmig, D.

    2015-01-01

    Observed depth profiles of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) in snowpack interstitial air at Summit, Greenland were best replicated by a 1-D process-scale model, which included (1) geometrical representation of snow grains as spheres, (2) aqueous-phase chemistry confined to a

  9. Legless Singer Held Wedding Ceremony on the Summit of Mount Tai%无腿歌手岱顶圆梦

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文进(撰文、摄影)

    2012-01-01

    2012年8月23日是中国传统的七夕节,山东临沂无腿歌手陈州登上泰山之巅,和妻子在这里举行了一场特别的婚礼,完成自己对妻子爱的诺言,圆了自己多年的梦。陈州1983年出生于山东临沂苍山县,6岁时父母离异,8岁流浪四方,13岁因为车祸失去双腿。%August 23, 2012 was the Chinese Valentine's Day. Chen Zhou, a .legless singer from Linyi, ShandongProvince, climbed up to the summit Mount Tai, where he held a special ceremony with his wife, which fulfilled the promise he made to her several years ago.

  10. 信息社会世界峰会简况%World Summit On the Information Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐岚; 李艳; 高瞻

    2004-01-01

    2003年12月10-12日,首届信息社会世界峰会(World Summit on the Information Society,简称WSIS)在瑞士日内瓦召开。此次会议由国际电信联盟(ITU)牵头,联合国经社理事会、教科文组织、联合国信息通讯技术顾问组参与,筹备时间长达5年,深得联合国支持和各国政府重视。会议期间,来自

  11. Phylosenetic identification and microbial diversity in snow of the summit (8201 m) of Cho Oyu Mountain,Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG XiaoMei; WANG Jian; CHEN Fang; YU Jun; HUA Sang; ASAN Ciren; LUOSANG JiangBai; WANG Wei; YU Liang; ZHENG XiaoGuang

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial diversity and abundance in snow of the summit (8201 m) of Cho Oyu mountain, Tibet,were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing followed by scanning electronic microscopy analysis. Most of bacteria were found to be of spherical or oval shape (>95%). Bacterial 16S rDNA sequences were classified into 5 genera (Caulobacter, Ralstonia, Cupriavidus, Pelomonas and Pseudornonas).Gammaproteobacteria were the most abundant (91.25%) among the library that consists of 594 clones. The sequences found in this study are highly similar to those previously retrieved from other cold en-vironments, such as ice core, sea ice, permafrost and snow. The results showed that the cold and barren environments strongly influence the survival of bacteria. The high similarity among sequences retrieved from snow sample and other places, such as ocean, soil and water, suggested that the bacte-ria in snow, soil and water environments have the same origin.

  12. Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, W. D.; Saynor, M. J.; Turner, K.; Whiteside, T.; Boyden, J.; Evans, K. G.

    2015-03-01

    Soil erosion rates on plots of waste rock at Ranger uranium mine and basin sediment yields have been measured for over 30 years in Magela Creek in northern Australia. Soil erosion rates on chlorite schist waste rock are higher than for mica schist and weathering is also much faster. Sediment yields are low but are further reduced by sediment trapping effects of flood plains, floodouts, billabongs and extensive wetlands. Suspended sediment yields exceed bedload yields in this deeply weathered, tropical landscape, but the amount of sand transported greatly exceeds that of silt and clay. Nevertheless, sand is totally stored above the topographic base level. Longitudinal continuity of sediment transport is not maintained. As a result, suspended sediment and bedload do not move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek and lower Magela Creek wetlands trap about 90.5% of the total sediment load input.

  13. Evaluation of the flux gradient technique for measurement of ozone surface fluxes over snowpack at Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bocquet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step procedure for investigating ozone surface fluxes over polar snow by the tower gradient method was developed and evaluated. These measurements were then used to obtain five months (April–August 2004 of turbulent ozone flux data at the Summit research camp located in the center of the Greenland ice shield. Turbulent fluxes were determined by the gradient method incorporating tower measurements of (a ozone gradients measured by commercial ultraviolet absorption analyzers, (b ambient temperature gradients using aspirated thermocouple sensors, and (c wind speed gradients determined by cup anemometers. All gradient instruments were regularly inter-compared by bringing sensors or inlets to the same measurement height. The developed protocol resulted in an uncertainty on the order of 0.1 ppbv for 30-min averaged ozone gradients that were used for the ozone flux calculations. This protocol facilitated a lower sensitivity threshold for the ozone flux determination of ∼8 × 10−3μg m−2 s−1, respectively ∼0.01 cm s−1 for the ozone deposition velocity for typical environmental conditions encountered at Summit. Uncertainty in the 30-min ozone exchange measurements (evaluated by the Monte Carlo statistical approach was on the order of 10−2 cm s−1. This uncertainty typically accounted to ~20–100% of the ozone exchange velocities that were determined. These measurements are among the most sensitive ozone deposition determinations reported to date. This flux experiment allowed for measurements of the relatively low ozone uptake rates encountered for polar snow, and thereby the study of their environmental and spring-versus-summer dependencies.

  14. Problems and Prospects of Kyoto Protocol Prolongation Till 2020 on the Basis of International Summits on Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishkan Ekaterina Romanovna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the research of the results of international summits on climate change held from 2009 to 2014 in Copenhagen, Cancun, Durban, Doha, Lima. Today climate change issues are among the most discussed problems in the world, and negative impact of human activities on climate change process is doubtless. The comprehension of importance of climate change problem at the international level led to signing Kyoto protocol. But the forms of international collaboration created by this protocol were not perfect. The contradictions between members of Kyoto protocol were strongly marked in 2009 at the Copenhagen Summit and they were caused by imperfections of Kyoto protocol itself. As a result, among countries, which signed the protocol, some major emitters of greenhouse gases (for instance, USA did not eventually ratify it, and that fact called into question the meaning of Kyoto initiatives on the whole. Since 2010 a nonstop process has been going on creating a new agreement, which would suit all parties. In 2011 the decision of Durban Platform was made. It was ought to be a prolongation of Kyoto initiatives, but the compromise had not yet been found, and the situation is aggravated by economic and political crisis in a number of countries, which put off solution of climate change problems on indefinite term. As a result of survey, the article reveals aspects, which are the basis of main contradictions between member countries, and which need to be taken into consideration when forming a new document in 2015, to avoid repetition of the Kyoto situation.

  15. Evaluation of the flux gradient technique for measurement of ozone surface fluxes over snowpack at Summit, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, F.; Helmig, D.; van Dam, B. A.; Fairall, C. W.

    2011-10-01

    A multi-step procedure for investigating ozone surface fluxes over polar snow by the tower gradient method was developed and evaluated. These measurements were then used to obtain five months (April-August 2004) of turbulent ozone flux data at the Summit research camp located in the center of the Greenland ice shield. Turbulent fluxes were determined by the gradient method incorporating tower measurements of (a) ozone gradients measured by commercial ultraviolet absorption analyzers, (b) ambient temperature gradients using aspirated thermocouple sensors, and (c) wind speed gradients determined by cup anemometers. All gradient instruments were regularly inter-compared by bringing sensors or inlets to the same measurement height. The developed protocol resulted in an uncertainty on the order of 0.1 ppbv for 30-min averaged ozone gradients that were used for the ozone flux calculations. This protocol facilitated a lower sensitivity threshold for the ozone flux determination of ∼8 × 10-3μg m-2 s-1, respectively ∼0.01 cm s-1 for the ozone deposition velocity for typical environmental conditions encountered at Summit. Uncertainty in the 30-min ozone exchange measurements (evaluated by the Monte Carlo statistical approach) was on the order of 10-2 cm s-1. This uncertainty typically accounted to ~20-100% of the ozone exchange velocities that were determined. These measurements are among the most sensitive ozone deposition determinations reported to date. This flux experiment allowed for measurements of the relatively low ozone uptake rates encountered for polar snow, and thereby the study of their environmental and spring-versus-summer dependencies.

  16. Setting a National Agenda for Surgical Disparities Research: Recommendations From the National Institutes of Health and American College of Surgeons Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adil H; Dankwa-Mullan, Irene; Maragh-Bass, Allysha C; Torain, Maya; Zogg, Cheryl K; Lilley, Elizabeth J; Kodadek, Lisa M; Changoor, Navin R; Najjar, Peter; Rose, John A; Ford, Henri R; Salim, Ali; Stain, Steven C; Shafi, Shahid; Sutton, Beth; Hoyt, David; Maddox, Yvonne T; Britt, L D

    2016-06-01

    Health care disparities (differential access, care, and outcomes owing to factors such as race/ethnicity) are widely established. Compared with other groups, African American individuals have an increased mortality risk across multiple surgical procedures. Gender, sexual orientation, age, and geographic disparities are also well documented. Further research is needed to mitigate these inequities. To do so, the American College of Surgeons and the National Institutes of Health-National Institute of Minority Health and Disparities convened a research summit to develop a national surgical disparities research agenda and funding priorities. Sixty leading researchers and clinicians gathered in May 2015 for a 2-day summit. First, literature on surgical disparities was presented within 5 themes: (1) clinician, (2) patient, (3) systemic/access, (4) clinical quality, and (5) postoperative care and rehabilitation-related factors. These themes were identified via an exhaustive preconference literature review and guided the summit and its interactive consensus-building exercises. After individual thematic presentations, attendees contributed research priorities for each theme. Suggestions were collated, refined, and prioritized during the latter half of the summit. Breakout sessions yielded 3 to 5 top research priorities by theme. Overall priorities, regardless of theme, included improving patient-clinician communication, fostering engagement and community outreach by using technology, improving care at facilities with a higher proportion of minority patients, evaluating the longer-term effect of acute intervention and rehabilitation support, and improving patient centeredness by identifying expectations for recovery. The National Institutes of Health and American College of Surgeons Summit on Surgical Disparities Research succeeded in identifying a comprehensive research agenda. Future research and funding priorities should prioritize patients' care perspectives, workforce

  17. 2013 Higher Education Summit/SUS Data Workshop Proceedings. Session: IRM Data Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Information Resource Management--State University System of Florida (IRM-SUS) is the primary collector and provider of data concerning state universities that is used to make sound education policy decisions. The office provides technical assistance to those using the information, state and federal reporting support, those supplying information,…

  18. Volcano Observations Using an Unmanned Autonomous Helicopter : seismic and GPS observations near the active summit area of Sakurajima and Kirishima volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohminato, T.; Kaneko, T.; Koyama, T.; Watanabe, A.; Takeo, M.; Iguchi, M.; Honda, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Observations in the vicinity of summit area of active volcanoes are very important from various viewpoints such as understanding physical processes in the volcanic conduit. It is, however, highly difficult to install observation sensors near active vents because of the risk of sudden eruptions. We have been developing a safe volcano observation system based on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). As an UAV, we adopted an unmanned autonomous helicopter manufactured by Yamaha-Motor Co., Ltd. We have also developed earthquake observation modules and GPS receiver modules that are exclusively designed for UAV installation at summit areas of active volcanoes. These modules are light weight, compact size, and solar powered. For data transmission, a commercial cellular-phone network is used. Our first application of the sensor installation by the UAV is Sakurajima, one of the most active volcanos in Japan. In November 2009, 2010, and 2011, we installed up to four seismic sensors within 2km from the active summit crater. In the 2010 and 2011 operations, we succeeded in pulling up and collecting the sensor modules by using the UAV. In the 2011 experiment, we installed two GPS receivers near the summit area of Sakurajima volcano. We also applied the UAV installation to another active volcano, Shinmoedake in Kirishima volcano group. Since the sub-plinian eruption in February 2011, entering the area 3km from the summit of Shinmoe-dake has been prohibited. In May and November 2011, we installed seismic sensors and GPS receivers in the off-limit zone. Although the ground coupling of the seismic modules is not perfect due to the way they are installed, the signal-to-noise ratio of the seismic signals recorded by these modules is fairly good. Despite the low antenna height of 50 cm from the ground surface, the location errors in horizontal and vertical GPS components are 1cm and 3cm, respectively. For seismic signals associated with eruptions at Sakurajima from November 2010 to

  19. Source apportionment of atmospheric ammonia before, during, and after the 2014 APEC summit in Beijing using stable nitrogen isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yunhua; Liu, Xuejun; Deng, Congrui; Dore, Anthony J.; Zhuang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Stable nitrogen isotope composition (δ15N) offers new opportunities to address the long-standing and ongoing controversy regarding the origins of ambient ammonia (NH3), a vital precursor of PM2.5 (particulate matters with aerodynamic diameter equal or less than 2.5 µm) inorganic components, in the urban atmosphere. In this study, the δ15N values of NH3 samples collected from various sources were constrained using a novel and robust chemical method coupled with standard elemental analysis procedures. Independent of the wide variation in mass concentrations (ranging from 33 (vehicle) to over 6000 (human excreta) µg m-3), different NH3 sources have generally different δ15N values (ranging from -52.0 to -9.6 ‰). Significantly high δ15N values are seen as a characteristic feature of all vehicle-derived NH3 samples (-14.2 ± 2.8 ‰), which can be distinguished from other sources emitted at environmental temperature (-29.1 ± 1.7, -37.8 ± 3.6, and -50.0 ± 1.8 ‰ for livestock, waste, and fertilizer, respectively). The isotope δ15N signatures for a range of NH3 emission sources were used to evaluate the contributions of the different sources within measured ambient NH3 in Beijing, using an isotope mixing model (IsoSource). The method was used to quantify the sources of ambient NH3 before, during and after the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, when a set of stringent air quality control measures were implemented. Results show that the average NH3 concentrations (the overall contributions of traffic, waste, livestock, and fertilizer) during the three periods were 9.1 (20.3, 28.3, 23.6, and 27.7 %), 7.3 (8.8, 24.9, 14.3, and 52.0 %), and 12.7 (29.4, 23.6, 31.7, and 15.4 %) µg m-3, respectively, representing a 20.0 % decrease first and then a 74.5 % increase in overall NH3 mass concentrations. During (after) the summit, the contributions of traffic, waste, livestock, and fertilizer decreased (increased) by 56.7 (234.2), 12.0 (-5.0), 39.4 (120

  20. Snow spectral albedo at Summit, Greenland: measurements and numerical simulations based on physical and chemical properties of the snowpack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Carmagnola

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The broadband albedo of surface snow is determined both by the near-surface profile of the physical and chemical properties of the snowpack and by the spectral and angular characteristics of the incident solar radiation. Simultaneous measurements of the physical and chemical properties of snow were carried out at Summit Camp, Greenland (72°36´ N, 38°25´ W, 3210 m a.s.l. in May and June 2011, along with spectral albedo measurements. One of the main objectives of the field campaign was to test our ability to predict snow spectral albedo by comparing the measured albedo to the albedo calculated with a radiative transfer model, using measured snow physical and chemical properties. To achieve this goal, we made daily measurements of the snow spectral albedo in the range 350–2200 nm and recorded snow stratigraphic information down to roughly 80 cm. The snow specific surface area (SSA was measured using the DUFISSS instrument (DUal Frequency Integrating Sphere for Snow SSA measurement, Gallet et al., 2009. Samples were also collected for chemical analyses including black carbon (BC and dust, to evaluate the impact of light absorbing particulate matter in snow. This is one of the most comprehensive albedo-related data sets combining chemical analysis, snow physical properties and spectral albedo measurements obtained in a polar environment. The surface albedo was calculated from density, SSA, BC and dust profiles using the DISORT model (DIScrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer, Stamnes et al., 1988 and compared to the measured values. Results indicate that the energy absorbed by the snowpack through the whole spectrum considered can be inferred within 1.10%. This accuracy is only slightly better than that which can be obtained considering pure snow, meaning that the impact of impurities on the snow albedo is small at Summit. In the near infrared, minor deviations in albedo up to 0.014 can be due to the accuracy of radiation and SSA measurements and to

  1. Unpublished Digital Glacial and Surficial Geologic Map of Summit County and parts of Cuyahoga County, Ohio (NPS, GRD, GRI, CUVA, SUCU digital map) adapted from Ohio Division of Geological Survey maps by Ford (1987), and White (1984)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Unpublished Digital Glacial and Surficial Geologic Map of Summit County and parts of Cuyahoga County, Ohio is composed of GIS data layers complete with ArcMap...

  2. Proceedings of the International Summit on Human Gene Editing: a global discussion-Washington, D.C., December 1-3, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBarbera, Andrew R

    2016-09-01

    The US Academies of Sciences and Medicine, the Royal Society, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences convened a summit of experts in biology, medicine, law, ethics, sociology, and journalism, in December 2015 to review the state of the art in gene editing technology and discuss the medical and social ramifications of the technologies. The summit concluded with the following consensus recommendations: (1) intensive basic and preclinical research in animal and human models should proceed with appropriate legal and ethical oversight; (2) clinical applications in somatic cells must be rigorously evaluated within existing and evolving regulatory frameworks for gene therapy; (3) it would be irresponsible to proceed with any clinical use of germline editing until relevant safety and efficacy issues have been resolved and there is broad societal consensus about such a use; and (4) the international community should strive to establish generally acceptable uses of human germline editing.

  3. International Leaders Summit: using dialogue to Center the Conversation on the Education of Deaf Children and Youth in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John L

    2011-01-01

    Om July 18, 2010, the eve of the 21st International Congress on the Education of the Deaf (ICED 2010), the International Leaders Summit was held at the Center for Dialogue at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada. A total of 120 world leaders from 32 countries participated. Presenters, including students, led the conversation on current perspectives, teacher preparation, worldwide resources, and major issues affecting the education of d/Deaf and hard of hearing infants, children, and youth. Summit participants recognized that advances in detection, early intervention, and technology present challenges in meeting the needs of a student population more diverse than at any other stage in history. While it was acknowledged that needs differ in various parts of the world, there was a consensus that change is required to prepare students to handle challenges in the 21st century.

  4. Radiocarbon-derived source apportionment of fine carbonaceous aerosols before, during, and after the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junwen; Mo, Yangzhi; Li, Jun; Liu, Di; Shen, Chengde; Ding, Ping; Jiang, Haoyu; Cheng, Zhineng; Zhang, Xiangyun; Tian, Chongguo; Chen, Yingjun; Zhang, Gan

    2016-04-01

    The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit took place in Beijing, China, 5-11 November 2014, during which numerous measures were performed to control the air pollution, and consequently, the sky of Beijing was so clean that the public called it "APEC blue." The concentrations before, during, and after the APEC summit are 14.4 ± 6.81 µg C/m3, 6.66 ± 2.99 µg C/m3, and 32.3 ± 10.6 µg C/m3, respectively, for organic carbon (OC), and 2.27 ± 1.17 µg C/m3, 0.76 ± 0.52 µg C/m3, and 4.99 ± 1.74 µg C/m3, respectively, for elemental carbon (EC). We quantify the contributions of fossil and nonfossil sources to the OC and EC using radiocarbon. Results show that the contribution of nonfossil sources is 56 ± 1% (before APEC), 61 ± 1% (during APEC), and 48 ± 1% (after APEC), respectively, for OC, and 36 ± 4% (before APEC), 46 ± 1% (during APEC), and 33 ± 4% (after APEC), respectively, for EC. Comparing to the period before APEC, 70% and 60% of fossil EC and OC and 60% and 50% of nonfossil EC and OC are reduced, respectively, implying that the control on the nonfossil sources has considerable contribution to the good air quality in Beijing. Both EC and OC mass loadings during the APEC summit would have increased by 60% if the biomass-burning activities were not taken into account for control. In such a case, the atmospheric visibility would decrease 20% at least and the blue sky thereby would likely not have been visible during the summit.

  5. Monitoring compliance with high-level commitments in health: the case of the CARICOM Summit on Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, T Alafia; Kirton, John; Guebert, Jenilee

    2014-04-01

    The CARICOM Summit on Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases - the first government summit ever devoted to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) - was convened by the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) in Trinidad and Tobago in September 2007. Leaders in attendance issued the declaration of Port of Spain, a call for the prevention and control of four major NCDs and their risk factors. An accountability instrument for monitoring compliance with summit commitments was developed for CARICOM by the University of the West Indies in 2008 and revised in 2010. The instrument - a one-page colour-coded grid with 26 progress indicators - is updated annually by focal points in Caribbean health ministries, verified by each country's chief medical officer and presented to the annual Caucus of Caribbean Community Ministers of Health. In this study, the G8 Research Group's methods for assessing compliance were applied to the 2009 reporting grid to assess each country's performance. Given the success of the CARICOM Summit, a United Nations high-level meeting of the General Assembly on the prevention and control of NCDs was held in September 2011. In May 2013 the World Health Assembly adopted nine global targets and 25 indicators to measure progress in NCD control. This study shows that the CARICOM monitoring grid can be used to document progress on such indicators quickly and comprehensibly. An annual reporting mechanism is essential to encourage steady progress and highlight areas needing correction. This paper underscores the importance of accountability mechanisms for encouraging and monitoring compliance with the collective political commitments acquired at the highest level.

  6. Geomorphology and structural development of the nested summit crater of Láscar Volcano studied with Terrestrial Laser Scanner data and analogue modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zeeuw-van Dalfsen, Elske; Richter, Nicole; González, Gabriel; Walter, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    Many volcano summits host craters that are partially overlapping. The formation of such nested craters has been commonly interpreted as vent migration. Here, we present an additional mechanism that may explain the geometry of nested craters at volcanoes. Láscar Volcano, the most active volcano of the Central Volcanic Zone in the Chilean Andes, hosts ENE-WSW trending summit craters that are partially overlapping (nested). Details on the evolution and interaction between the different craters remain unclear. To create a robust dataset, Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) data were collected at the summit of Láscar in 2013. The resulting topographic data set, consisting of more than 15 million data points with centimetre sampling, allows visualising almost the complete eastern edifice of the volcano's summit. From the TLS data, a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and a slope map were generated allowing us to create a lineament map and quantify the observed morphological and structural features. To further improve our understanding of the processes responsible for the formation of the craters and geomorphology, we designed sandbox analogue models. Results suggest that one of the craters is a 'parasite' crater, formed as a consequence of ongoing activity in the adjacent crater. Our data suggest that the nested craters have all been modified since the last major eruption in 1993, by near surface effects associated with cooling, compaction and gravitational sliding of the crater floor infill. As the active crater deepens, the adjacent inactive crater extends and partially slumps towards the active one. Understanding the structural development of these nested craters is relevant for assessing potential future eruption sites, thus making Láscar a dynamic target for a detailed morphology study. These findings may similarly be applied to other volcanoes, where nested craters have developed.

  7. Building a sustainable clinical academic workforce to meet the future healthcare needs of Australia and New Zealand: report from the first summit meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, J; Searle, J; Hanney, R; Chapman, A; Grigg, M; Choong, P; Mackay, A; Smithers, B M; Churchill, J A; Carney, S; Smith, J A; Wainer, Z; Talley, N J; Gladman, M A

    2015-09-01

    The delivery of healthcare that meets the requirements for quality, safety and cost-effectiveness relies on a well-trained medical workforce, including clinical academics whose career includes a specific commitment to research, education and/or leadership. In 2011, the Medical Deans of Australia and New Zealand published a review on the clinical academic workforce and recommended the development of an integrated training pathway for clinical academics. A bi-national Summit on Clinical Academic Training was recently convened to bring together all relevant stakeholders to determine how best to do this. An important part understood the lessons learnt from the UK experience after 10 years since the introduction of an integrated training pathway. The outcome of the summit was to endorse strongly the recommendations of the medical deans. A steering committee has been established to identify further stakeholders, solicit more information from stakeholder organisations, convene a follow-up summit meeting in late 2015, recruit pilot host institutions and engage the government and future funders.

  8. Assessment of NASA Airborne Laser Altimetry Data Using Ground-Based GPS Data near Summit Station, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Hawley, Robert L.; Lutz, Eric R.; Studinger, Michael; Sonntag, John G.; Hofton, Michelle A.; Andrews, Lauren C.; Neumann, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    A series of NASA airborne lidars have been used in support of satellite laser altimetry missions. These airbornelaser altimeters have been deployed for satellite instrument development, for spaceborne data validation, and to bridge the data gap between satellite missions. We used data from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys of an 11 km long track near Summit Station, Greenland, to assess the surface elevation bias and measurement precision of three airborne laser altimeters including the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS), and the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL). Ground-based GPS data from the monthly ground-based traverses, which commenced in 2006, allowed for the assessment of nine airborne lidar surveys associated with ATM and LVIS between 2007 and 2016. Surface elevation biases for these altimeters over the flat, ice-sheet interior are less than 0.12 m, while assessments of measurement precision are 0.09 m or better. Ground-based GPS positions determined both with and without differential post-processing techniques provided internally consistent solutions. Results from the analyses of ground-based and airborne data provide validation strategy guidance for the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2) elevation and elevation-change data products.

  9. Governing Global Crisis: Why the G20 Summit Was Created and What We Still Need It to Do?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Payne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The world needs an effective, functioning Group of Twenty (G20. After an early phase as a forum of finance ministers and central bank governors, the body was elevated to leaders’ level in order to steer the apparatus of global governance through times of great uncertainty from 2008 onwards. This period of uncertainty has been characterised by a peculiarly complex mix of financial crisis, shifting economic power and growing environmental threat. The G20’s record since 2008 is not without achievement – for example, it acted swiftly to stimulate the global economy sufficiently to avoid a recession becoming a depression – but it nevertheless remains disappointing overall, failing to break out of the trap of supposed ‘growth friendly fiscal consolidation’. The meeting held in St Petersburg in September 2013 was hijacked by the Syria crisis and contributed substantially to the current dominant view of the G20 as an increasingly ineffective agency of global governance. This places great pressure on Australia to deliver a successful summit in November 2014. It is also apparent that the G20 now needs substantial institutional reform in order to reduce the “occasionality” of its current mode of operation and embed it more comprehensively into the work of other major global economic organisations and the activities of global civil society.

  10. Introduction to the yogurt in nutrition initiative and the First Global Summit on the health effects of yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Sharon M; Shamir, Raanan

    2014-05-01

    Yogurt has been part of the human diet for thousands of years, and during that time a number of health benefits have been associated with its consumption. The goal of the First Global Summit on the Health Effects of Yogurt was to review and evaluate the strength of current scientific knowledge with regard to the health benefits of yogurt and to identify areas where further research is needed. The evidence base for the benefits of yogurt in promoting bone health, maintaining health throughout the life cycle, improving diet quality, and reducing the incidence of chronic diseases, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease, was presented. When assessing a complex food matrix, rather than specific nutrients, scientists and consumers are faced with new challenges as to how a food item's quality or necessity would be judged as part of an individual's whole diet. To tackle this challenge, speakers described methods for assessing the nutrient density of foods and its application to yogurt, use of yogurt for lactose intolerance, and the cost-effectiveness of yogurt and dairy products in reducing health care expenses. Last, speakers described the role of dairy products in global public health and nutrition, the scientific basis for current dairy recommendations, and future scientific and policy needs related to dairy and yogurt recommendations.

  11. Smectites and zeolites in ash from the 2010 summit eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paque, M.; Detienne, M.; Maters, E. C.; Delmelle, P.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrothermal alteration minerals are often incorporated in volcanic ash from phreatic and phreatomagmatic activity. Here we assess the presence and abundance of such minerals in the ash materials produced during the April-May 2010 initial phreatomagmatic ( phase I) and subsequent magmatic ( phases II and III) eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland. The results of X-ray diffraction analyses reveal significant quantities of smectites (up to 4 wt%, mainly as saponite) and zeolites (up to 7 wt%) in ash from phase I. While a minor amount of smectites (<0.5 wt%) is present in ash from the subsequent weak explosive activity ( phase II), both smectites and zeolites are absent in phase III ash. This material was generated following abrupt rejuvenation of explosive activity in the absence of magma-ice/water interaction. Smectites and zeolites in phase I ash result primarily from scouring of altered volcanic rocks in the subsurface, although some may derive also from water-rock interaction within the summit ice cauldrons through which fragmented magma was injected. We show that incorporation of smectites and zeolites in phase I ash can explain its anomalously high specific surface area. Further, the presence of these minerals in ash may enhance its ability to act as ice nuclei as well as favour particle aggregation processes in the volcanic plume/cloud. Finally, the Eyjafjallajökull eruption represents another case in which ash fallout acted as an exogenic source of 2:1-type clay minerals in volcanic soils.

  12. Circumarctic Conversations: Using Strategic Communication to Engage Participants and the Community in the 2016 Arctic Science Summit Week

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, S.; Timm, K.; Bakker, T.

    2016-12-01

    Arctic Science Summit Week (ASSW) is the annual gathering of international organizations engaged in supporting and facilitating Arctic research. The University of Alaska Fairbanks hosted the 2016 ASSW and several associated side meetings that attracted over 1,000 participants from 30 nations. Unlike most scientific conferences, a strategic communication plan was developed to engage key audiences and stakeholder groups to achieve the goals of (1) advancing stakeholder collaboration in the Arctic and (2) increasing awareness of America's role in international collaboration in the Arctic. Beyond ensuring that the conference was well attended and participants had the information to have a successful meeting, the communication plan also included several objectives to engage the broader community in opportunities to benefit from subject area experts attending the conference and learn about Arctic science. The strategic communication effort was instrumental in the success of the conference and several community events. However, introducing strategic communication into a process and to people with no prior experience also added some challenges. In order to be successful, we had to develop a shared understanding of the strategic communication process and discipline-specific terms with our colleagues in the biophysical sciences. The outcomes and lessons that will be shared in this poster are valuable to anyone in science or environmental communication, planning conference communications, and/or those who are adopting strategic communication approaches where they haven't previously existed.

  13. Dosimetry of cosmic radiation in the troposphere based on the measurements at the summit of Mt. Fuji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, H.; Yajima, K.; Yoshida, S. [National Insitute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Research Center for Radiation Protection

    2011-07-01

    Dose rate of cosmic-ray origin neutrons (abbreviated to ''cosmic neutrons'') at aviation altitude was estimated based on the measurements at Mt. Fuji. Cosmic neutrons were measured in a facility of the Mt. Fuji Weather Station located at the summit of Mt. Fuji, the highest mountain in Japan (3776m in altitude), in the summer of 2008 and 2009. The average of 1 cm ambient dose equivalent H*(10) for two measurements was verified by numerical model simulation and then used to empirically estimate the solar force field potential (FFP). The H*(10) rates at aviation altitude estimated from the measurements at Mt. Fuji were compared to those obtained in in-flight measurements onboard a civilian aircraft flying near Mt. Fuji at the time between the two measurements at the mountain. According to the results obtained, we expect that the empirical estimation based on the measurements at Mt. Fuji will work effectively for dosimetry of cosmic radiation in troposphere. (orig.)

  14. Social Representations of Protest and Police after the Genoa G8 Summit: A Qualitative Analysis of Activist Accounts of Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamperini, A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Genoa G8 Summit of 2001 was marred by violence and conflicts between police and activists. Afterwards, these different groups constructed clashing discourses about the events. In turn, these discourses sustained different types of social representations about the nature of the conflict. Earlier analyses of hegemonic social representations examining the Italian press suggested that non-violent activists were subject to processes of delegitimisation and that they were identified with black bloc activists (Cristante, 2003; Juris, 2005; Zamperini & Botticini, 2006. Conversely, in this study we analyze activists' accounts of the protest and of the violent police repression. We examine a collection of published texts (N= 223 posted on a 'cyber-wall' online as part of a collaborative project from three Italian media outlets: Il Manifesto, Radio Popolare, Carta. These texts represent a form of 'counter-narrative' produced by a stigmatized group to contest the dominant discourse, creating a tripartite of relations between non-violent activists, police and the black bloc. The analysis of these texts shows that activists represent the protest as a battle between two groups. Activists describe police as coercive, incompetent, and as the enemy. While the black bloc was perceived to have damaged the protest, they were not depicted as the enemy. Cognitive, emotive and behavioural factors associated with these representations are highlighted and discussed, together with the implications for future intergroup relations between activists and the police.

  15. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit-Developing Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence: A Framework for Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creehan, Sue; Cuddigan, Janet; Gonzales, Dana; Nix, Denise; Padula, William; Pittman, Joyce; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Walden, Christine; Wells, Belinda; Wheeler, Robinetta

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer occurrences have declined over the past decade as reimbursement policies have changed, evidence-based practice guidelines have been implemented, and quality improvement initiatives have been launched. However, the 2006-2008 Institute for Healthcare Improvement goal of zero pressure ulcers remains difficult to achieve and even more challenging to sustain. Magnet hospitals tend to have lower hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates than non-Magnet hospitals, yet many non-Magnet hospitals also have robust pressure ulcer prevention programs. Successful programs share commonalities in structure, processes, and outcomes. A national summit of 55 pressure ulcer experts was convened at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in March 2014. The group was divided into 3 focus groups; each was assigned a task to develop a framework describing components of a proposed Magnet-designated Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Systematic literature reviews, analysis of exemplars, and nominal group process techniques were used to create the framework. This article presents a framework describing the proposed Magnet-designated Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Critical attributes of Centers of Excellence are identified and organized according to the 4 domains of the ANCC model for the Magnet Recognition Program: transformational leadership; structural empowerment; exemplary professional practice; and new knowledge innovation and improvements. The structures, processes, and outcome measures necessary to become a proposed Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence are discussed.

  16. Hydrology and simulation of ground-water flow in Kamas Valley, Summit County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, L.E.; Stolp, B.J.; Spangler, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    Kamas Valley, Utah, is located about 50 miles east of Salt Lake City and is undergoing residential development. The increasing number of wells and septic systems raised concerns of water managers and prompted this hydrologic study. About 350,000 acre-feet per year of surface water flows through Kamas Valley in the Weber River, Beaver Creek, and Provo River, which originate in the Uinta Mountains east of the study area. The ground-water system in this area consists of water in unconsolidated deposits and consolidated rock; water budgets indicate very little interaction between consolidated rock and unconsolidated deposits. Most recharge to consolidated rock occurs at higher altitudes in the mountains and discharges to streams and springs upgradient of Kamas Valley. About 38,000 acre-feet per year of water flows through the unconsolidated deposits in Kamas Valley. Most recharge is from irrigation and seepage from major streams; most discharge is to Beaver Creek in the middle part of the valley. Long-term water-level fluctuations range from about 3 to 17 feet. Seasonal fluctuations exceed 50 feet. Transmissivity varies over four orders of magnitude in both the unconsolidated deposits and consolidated rock and is typically 1,000 to 10,000 feet squared per day in unconsolidated deposits and 100 feet squared per day in consolidated rock as determined from specific capacity. Water samples collected from wells, streams, and springs had nitrate plus nitrite concentrations (as N) substantially less than 10 mg/L. Total and fecal coliform bacteria were detected in some surface-water samples and probably originate from livestock. Septic systems do not appear to be degrading water quality. A numerical ground-water flow model developed to test the conceptual understanding of the ground-water system adequately simulates water levels and flow in the unconsolidated deposits. Analyses of model fit and sensitivity were used to refine the conceptual and numerical models.

  17. An Ice Core Melter System for Continuous Major and Trace Chemical Analyses of a New Mt. Logan Summit Ice Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterberg, E. C.; Handley, M. J.; Sneed, S. D.; Mayewski, P. A.; Kreutz, K. J.; Fisher, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    The ice core melter system at the University of Maine Climate Change Institute has been recently modified and updated to allow high-resolution (Mt. Logan summit ice core (187 m to bedrock), for analyses of 34 trace elements (Sr, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, Pb, Bi, U, As, Al, S, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, REE suite) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), 8 major ions (Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Cl-, SO42-, NO3-, MSA) by ion chromatography (IC), stable water isotopes (δ 18O, δ D, d) and volcanic tephra. The UMaine continuous melter (UMCoM) system is housed in a dedicated clean room with HEPA filtered air. Standard clean room procedures are employed during melting. A Wagenbach-style continuous melter system has been modified to include a pure Nickel melthead that can be easily dismantled for thorough cleaning. The system allows melting of both ice and firn without wicking of the meltwater into unmelted core. Contrary to ice core melter systems in which the meltwater is directly channeled to online instruments for continuous flow analyses, the UMCoM system collects discrete samples for each chemical analysis under ultraclean conditions. Meltwater from the pristine innermost section of the ice core is split between one fraction collector that accumulates ICP-MS samples in acid pre-cleaned polypropylene vials under a class-100 HEPA clean bench, and a second fraction collector that accumulates IC samples. A third fraction collector accumulates isotope and tephra samples from the potentially contaminated outer portion of the core. This method is advantageous because an archive of each sample remains for subsequent analyses (including trace element isotope ratios), and ICP-MS analytes are scanned for longer intervals and in replicate. Method detection limits, calculated from de-ionized water blanks passed through the entire UMCoM system, are below 10% of average Mt. Logan values. A strong correlation (R2>0.9) between Ca and S concentrations measured on different

  18. Preliminary Mineralogic and Stable Isotope Studies of Altered Summit and Flank Rocks and Osceola Mudflow Deposits on Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, Robert O.; Breit, George N.; Zimbelman, David R.

    2003-01-01

    About 5600 years ago part of Mount Rainier?s edifice collapsed with the resultant Osceola Mudflow traveling more than 120 km and covering an area of at least 505 km2. Mineralogic and stable isotope studies were conducted on altered rocks from outcrops near the summit and east flank of the volcano and samples of clasts and matrix from the Osceola Mudflow. Results of these analyses are used to constrain processes responsible for pre-collapse alteration and provide insight into the role of alteration in edifice instability prior to the Osceola collapse event. Jarosite, pyrite, alunite, and kaolinite occur in hydrothermally altered rock exposed in summit scarps formed by edifice collapse events and in altered rock within the east-west structural zone (EWSZ) of the volcano?s east flank. Deposits of the Osceola Mudflow contain clasts of variably altered and unaltered andesite within a clay-rich matrix. Minerals detected in samples from the edifice are also present in many of the clasts. The matrix includes abundant smectite, kaolinite and variably abundant jarosite. Hydrothermal fluid compositions calculated from hydrogen and oxygen isotope data of alunite, and smectite on Mount Rainier reflect mixing of magmatic and meteoric waters. The range in the dD values of modern meteoric water on the volcano (-85 to 155?) reflect the influence of elevation on the dD of precipitation. The d34S and d18OSO4 values of alunite, gypsum and jarosite are distinct but together range from 1.7 to 17.6? and -12.3 to 15.0?, respectively; both parameters increase from jarosite to gypsum to alunite. The variations in sulfur isotope composition are attributed to the varying contributions of disproportionation of magmatic SO2, the supergene oxidation of hydrothermal pyrite and possible oxidation of H2S to the parent aqueous sulfate. The 18OSO4 values of jarosite are the lowest recorded for the mineral, consistent with a supergene origin. The mineralogy and isotope composition of alteration

  19. Diurnal variations and source apportionment of ozone at the summit of Mount Huang, a rural site in Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J; Zhu, B; Xiao, H; Kang, H; Hou, X; Yin, Y; Zhang, L; Miao, Q

    2017-03-01

    Comprehensive measurements were conducted at the summit of Mount (Mt.) Huang, a rural site located in eastern China during the summer of 2011. They observed that ozone showed pronounced diurnal variations with high concentrations at night and low values during daytime. The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model was applied to simulate the ozone concentrations at Mt. Huang in June 2011. With processes analysis and online ozone tagging method we coupled into the model system, the causes of this diurnal pattern and the contributions from different source regions were investigated. Our results showed that boundary layer diurnal cycle played an important role in driving the ozone diurnal variation. Further analysis showed that the negative contribution of vertical mixing was significant, resulting in the ozone decrease during the daytime. In contrast, ozone increased at night owing to the significant positive contribution of advection. This shifting of major factor between vertical mixing and advection formed this diurnal variation. Ozone source apportionment results indicated that approximately half was provided by inflow effect of ozone from outside the model domain (O3-INFLOW) and the other half was formed by ozone precursors (O3-PBL) emitted in eastern, central, and southern China. In the O3-PBL, 3.0% of the ozone was from Mt. Huang reflecting the small local contribution (O3-LOC) and the non-local contributions (O3-NLOC) accounted for 41.6%, in which ozone from the southerly regions contributed significantly, for example, 9.9% of the ozone originating from Jiangxi, representing the highest geographical contributor. Because the origin and variation of O3-NLOC was highly related to the diurnal movements in boundary layer, the similar diurnal patterns between O3-NLOC and total ozone both indicated the direct influence of O3-NLOC and the importance of boundary layer diurnal variations in the formation of such distinct diurnal ozone variations

  20. Thinking critically about whole-grain definitions: summary report of an interdisciplinary roundtable discussion at the 2015 Whole Grains Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczak, Renee; Marquart, Len; Slavin, Joanne L; Ringling, Keagan; Chu, YiFang; O'Shea, Marianne; Harriman, Cynthia; Toups, Kelly; de Vries, Jan; Jacques, Paul; Klurfeld, David M; Camire, Mary Ellen; Unnevehr, Laurian

    2016-12-01

    Definitions for whole grain (WG) have been published by governments, the food industry, and grain organizations and generally fall into 2 categories: WG and WG food. WG definitions focus on the principal components of the WGs and their proportions, whereas WG-food definitions describe the quantity of WGs present in food. In the United States, widespread agreement exists on the main parts of a definition for a WG, with a definition for a WG food still in its early stages; a standard definition that has been universally accepted does not exist. Furthermore, nutrition policy advises consumers to eat WGs for at least one-half of their total grain intake (2010 and 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans), but confusion exists over which foods are considered WGs and how much is needed to achieve health benefits. In December 2014, a workshop sponsored by the subcommittee on collaborative process of the US Government's Interagency Committee on Human Nutrition Research convened in Washington, DC, and recognized WG definitions as a key nutrition and public health-related issue that could benefit from further collaboration. As a follow-up to that meeting, an interdisciplinary roundtable meeting was organized at the Whole Grains Summit on 25 June 2015 in Portland, Oregon, to help resolve the issue. This article summarizes the main opportunities and challenges that were identified during the meeting for defining WGs and WG foods internationally. Definitions of WGs and WG foods that are uniformly adopted by research, food industry, consumer, and public health communities are needed to enable comparison of research results across populations. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. Characterization of tropospheric ozone based on lidar measurement in Hangzhou, East China during the G20 Leaders' Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wenjing; Liu, Cheng; Fan, Guangqiang; Hu, Qihou; Huang, Xin; Dong, Yunsheng; Zhang, Tianshu; Liu, Jianguo

    2017-04-01

    Owing to the G20 (Group of Twenty Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors) Leaders' Summit (Sep.5th-6th, 2016), a series of strict air quality control measures were implemented in Hangzhou and its surrounding regions from Aug.26th to Sep.6th. A differential absorption lidar was employed to monitor tropospheric ozone in urban Hangzhou during a campaign from Aug. 24th to Sep. 10th, and the satellite-based NO2 VCDs and HCHO VCDs in the troposphere were also retrieved using the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). During our campaign, six O3 pollution events, which were determined according to the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of China (GB-3095-2012), and two stages with rapid reduction of O3 concentration on Aug. 26th and Sep.4-6th were observed. The temporal variation tendency of O3 concentrations was well reproduced by the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem). Typical cases with the abrupt rise and decline of O3 concentrations were analyzed using Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) back trajectory, satellite NO2 and HCHO product and the prediction by WRF-Chem model. The transport from northern cities have an important impact on pollutants observed in Hangzhou, and the chemical sensitivity of O3 production, which were approximately evaluated using the ratio of HCHO VCDs to NO2 VCDs in the troposphere, was turned from a mixed VOC-NOx-limited regime into a NOX-limited regime in Hangzhou due to the strict emission control measures.

  2. Using Geomorphic and Geologic Parameters to Identify Optimal Endemic Wēkiu Bug Habitat on the Summit of Maunakea, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, N. M.; Perroy, R. L.; Eiben, J.; Klasner, F.

    2015-12-01

    The upper summit region 3700-4205 m of the dormant post shield volcano Maunakea, located on the Big Island of Hawai'i, is home to the endemic Wēkiu bug (WB) (Nysius wekiuicola), an arthropod species that lives within the cinder layer and feeds on the hemolymph and organs of aeolian deposited insects. Areas of the summit are undergoing environmental and anthropogenic changes, including accelerated erosion and land modification due to increased foot and vehicle traffic, road maintenance, and large telescope construction, which may be altering WB habitat. Although first studied over 30 years ago, little is known about the optimal habitat or spatial distribution of the WB. Possible environmental characteristics that influence WB persistence include elevation, mineralogy, cinder size, aspect, slope, cinder depth to the ash layer, and surface roughness. The aim of this study is to determine if measurable geomorphic and geologic parameters can be used to identify and differentiate viable WB habitat. For example, cinder depth is thought to be an important variable in WB thermoregulation, but this has never been established. We used a terrestrial lidar scanner to collect high resolution topographic data over 3750 acres at the summit in order to derive slope, aspect, surface roughness and elevation information. These data also provide a topographic baseline that can be used to quantify contemporary erosion rates. 20 m resolution AVIRIS hyperspectral data were used to classify summit surface mineralogy. We collected field data across the study area, including measurements of cinder size, gradation, and depth to the underlying ash layer. We compared the results from these diverse datasets with 15 years of annual arthropod survey data, sampled at over 1000 locations on Maunakea from 2001-2015. Preliminary results show that elevation and mineralogy play significant roles in WB capture rates, although WB sampling efforts were not evenly distributed amongst classes. No apparent

  3. Preliminary Testing of Mycoleptodiscus terrestris Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    submersed macrophyte , Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle (hydrilla). BACKGROUND: As herbicide resistance becomes an increasing problem worldwide...Mycoleptodiscus terrestris, as a biocontrol agent for the management of Myriophyllum spicatum in Lake Guntersville Reservoir . Technical Report A-96-4

  4. 4D map of the Kilauea summit shallow magmatic system constrained by InSAR time series and geometry-free inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, G.; Shirzaei, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Kilauea volcano, Hawaii Island, is one of the most active volcanoes worldwide. Its complex system, including magma reservoirs and rift zones, provides a unique opportunity to investigate the dynamics of magma transport and supply. The models explaining the system are yet limited to the first order analytical solutions with fixed geometry. To obtain a 4D map of the volume changes at the Kilauea summit magmatic system (KSMS), we implement a novel geometry-free time-dependent inverse modeling scheme, using a distribution of point center of dilatations (PCDs). The model is constrained using high resolution surface deformation data, which are obtained through InSAR time series analysis of well populated SAR data sets acquired at two overlapping tracks of Envisat satellite during 2003 and 2011. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 4D maps of volume change identifies five major active reservoir beneath Kilauea caldera. The southern caldera reservoir (SCR) gains volume slowly till 2006 before its rapid inflation during 2006 - mid-2007, followed by deflation until the start of re-inflation in mid-2010. Other reservoirs show episodic temporal correlation and anti-correlation with SCR. We found that the top-down relation between reservoirs at the Kilauea summit is not necessarily valid at all time scales. Identifying statistically significant PCDs through Chi-square test, we develop and apply a boundary element modeling scheme to solve for the volume change time series and complex geometry of the summit magmatic system. Availability of such models allows realistic estimates of volume change and associated seismic hazard and enhance the forecast models.

  5. Scenario analysis on the global carbon emissions reduction goal proposed in the declaration of the 2009 G8 Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG JingYun; WANG ShaoPeng; YUE Chao; ZHU JiangLing; GUO ZhaoDi; HE CanFei; TANG ZhiYao

    2009-01-01

    A goal of a 50% reduction in global greenhouse gases emissions by 2050,with an 80% reduction by developed countries (hereafter referred to as the G8 Goal),was proposed at the G8 Summit held in L'Aquila,Italy,in July 2009.Here we analyze the scientific and political implications of the G8 Goal and its equity and feasibility by examining four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios.Our results show that (1) the goal to keep atmospheric CO_2 concentration of <450 ppmv,stated by G8 nations,can only be achieved under the scenario of a steady,linear emissions reduction by all countries and simultaneously meeting the G8 Goal during the period 2005-2050;(2) under the G8 Goal,the carbon emissions quota for developing countries would not meet their carbon emission demands even if very strict reduction regimes are followed,with a gap of up to>1/3 of emissions demand in the next 45 years;and (3) under the G8 Goal,the cumulative per capita emissions during the period of 2006-2050 for developed and developing countries will be 81 t C and 40-47 t C,respectively,with the former doubling that of the latter,implying that the historical disparity of carbon emissions between developed and developing countries would be widened.Historically,the cumulative per capita emissions from developed countries are 12 times of those from developing countries.We therefore conclude that (1) the G8 Goal seeks to impose binding reduction targets on developing countries that will impede their industrialization process and cause conflicts among developing countries in the allocation of carbon emission rights;(2) the G8 Goal will not only widen the existing disparities of historical carbon emissions between developed and developing countries,but also generate new inequalities in the rights of carbon emissions;and (3) the 450 ppmv threshold of atmospheric CO_2 concentration control,which is the basis for the G8 climate negotiation on carbon emission reduction.In summary,the G8 Goal is clearly against the

  6. Scenario analysis on the global carbon emissions reduction goal proposed in the declaration of the 2009 G8 Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A goal of a 50% reduction in global greenhouse gases emissions by 2050, with an 80% reduction by developed countries (hereafter referred to as the G8 Goal), was proposed at the G8 Summit held in L’Aquila, Italy, in July 2009. Here we analyze the scientific and political implications of the G8 Goal and its equity and feasibility by examining four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Our results show that (1) the goal to keep atmospheric CO2 concentration of <450 ppmv, stated by G8 nations, can only be achieved under the scenario of a steady, linear emissions reduction by all countries and simultaneously meeting the G8 Goal during the period 2005-2050; (2) under the G8 Goal, the carbon emissions quota for developing countries would not meet their carbon emission demands even if very strict reduction regimes are followed, with a gap of up to >1/3 of emissions demand in the next 45 years; and (3) under the G8 Goal, the cumulative per capita emissions during the period of 2006-2050 for developed and developing countries will be 81 t C and 40-47 t C, respectively, with the former doubling that of the latter, implying that the historical disparity of carbon emissions between developed and developing countries would be widened. Historically, the cumulative per capita emissions from developed countries are 12 times of those from developing countries. We therefore conclude that (1) the G8 Goal seeks to impose binding reduction targets on developing countries that will impede their industrialization process and cause conflicts among developing countries in the allocation of carbon emission rights; (2) the G8 Goal will not only widen the existing disparities of historical carbon emissions between developed and developing countries, but also generate new inequalities in the rights of carbon emissions; and (3) the 450 ppmv threshold of atmospheric CO2 concentration control, which is the basis for the G8 Goal, is impractical and impossible, and should not be accepted as the

  7. Chemical apportionment of aerosol optical properties during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tingting; Xu, Weiqi; Chen, Chen; Liu, Xingang; Wang, Qingqing; Li, Jie; Zhao, Xiujuan; Du, Wei; Wang, Zifa; Sun, Yele

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the chemical and optical properties of aerosol particles during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Beijing, China, using the highly time-resolved measurements by a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer and a cavity attenuated phase shift extinction monitor. The average (±σ) extinction coefficient (bext) and absorption coefficient (bap) were 186.5 (±184.5) M m-1 and 23.3 (±21.9) M m-1 during APEC, which were decreased by 63% and 56%, respectively, compared to those before APEC primarily due to strict emission controls. The aerosol composition and size distributions showed substantial changes during APEC; as a response, the mass scattering efficiency (MSE) of PM1 was decreased from 4.7 m2 g-1 to 3.5 m2 g-1. Comparatively, the average single-scattering albedo (SSA) remained relatively unchanged, illustrating the synchronous reductions of bext and bap during APEC. MSE and SSA were found to increase as function of the oxidation degree of organic aerosol (OA), indicating a change of aerosol optical properties during the aging processes. The empirical relationships between chemical composition and particle extinction were established using a multiple linear regression model. Our results showed the largest contribution of ammonium nitrate to particle extinction, accounting for 35.1% and 29.3% before and during APEC, respectively. This result highlights the important role of ammonium nitrate in the formation of severe haze pollution during this study period. We also observed very different optical properties of primary and secondary aerosol. Owing to emission controls in Beijing and surrounding regions and also partly the influences of meteorological changes, the average bext of secondary aerosol during APEC was decreased by 71% from 372.3 M m-1 to 108.5 M m-1, whereas that of primary aerosol mainly from cooking, traffic, and biomass burning emissions showed a smaller reduction from 136.7 M m-1 to 71.3 M m-1. As a result

  8. Aerosol composition, oxidative properties, and sources in Beijing: results from the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Q. Xu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The mitigation of air pollution in megacities remains a great challenge because of the complex sources and formation mechanisms of aerosol particles. The 2014 Asia- Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC summit in Beijing serves as a unique experiment to study the impacts of emission controls on aerosol composition, size distributions, and oxidative properties. Herein, a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer was deployed in urban Beijing for real-time measurements of size-resolved non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1 species from 14 October to 12 November 2014, along with a range of collocated measurements. The average (±σ PM1 was 41.6 (±38.9 μg m−3 during APEC, which was decreased by 53 % compared with that before APEC. The aerosol composition showed substantial changes owing to emission controls during APEC. Secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA = sulfate + nitrate + ammonium showed significant reductions of 62–69 %, whereas organics presented much smaller decreases (35 %. The results from the positive matrix factorization of organic aerosols (OA indicated that highly oxidized secondary OA (SOA showed decreases similar to those of SIA during APEC. However, primary OA (POA from cooking, traffic, and biomass burning sources were comparable to those before APEC, indicating the presence of strong local source emissions. The oxidation properties showed corresponding changes in response to OA composition. The average oxygen-to-carbon level during APEC was 0.36 (±0.10, which is lower than the 0.43 (±0.13 measured before APEC, demonstrating a decrease in the OA oxidation degree. The changes in size distributions of primary and secondary species varied during APEC. SIA and SOA showed significant reductions in large accumulation modes with peak diameters shifting from ~ 650 to 400 nm during APEC, whereas those of POA remained relatively unchanged. The changes in aerosol composition, size distributions, and oxidation degrees

  9. Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Ice Sheet Surface Elevation at the Summit of Greenland: Observed and Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Jun, Li; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observed seasonal and interannual variations in the surface elevation over the summit of the Greenland ice sheet are modeled using a new temperature-dependent formulation of firn-densification and observed accumulation variations. The observed elevation variations are derived from ERS (European Remote Sensing)-1 and ERS-2 radar altimeter data for the period between April 1992 and April 1999. A multivariate linear/sine function is fitted to an elevation time series constructed from elevation differences measured by radar altimetry at orbital crossovers. The amplitude of the seasonal elevation cycle is 0.25 m peak-to-peak, with a maximum in winter and a minimum in summer. Inter-annually, the elevation decreases to a minimum in 1995, followed by an increase to 1999, with an overall average increase of 4.2 cm a(exp -1) for 1992 to 1999. Our densification formulation uses an initial field-density profile, the AWS (automatic weather station) surface temperature record, and a temperature-dependent constitutive relation for the densification that is based on laboratory measurements of crystal growth rates. The rate constant and the activation energy commonly used in the Arrhenius-type constitutive relation for firn densification are also temperature dependent, giving a stronger temperature and seasonal amplitudes about 10 times greater than previous densification formulations. Summer temperatures are most important, because of the strong non-linear dependence on temperature. Much of firn densification and consequent surface lowering occurs within about three months of the summer season, followed by a surface build-up from snow accumulation until spring. Modeled interannual changes of the surface elevation, using the AWS measurements of surface temperature and accumulation and results of atmospheric modeling of precipitation variations, are in good agreement with the altimeter observations. In the model, the surface elevation decreases about 20 cm over the seven years due

  10. Characterization of atmospheric oxidants during, and after 2014 APEC summit: a case study of peroxides and ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H.; Chen, Z.; Huang, L.

    2016-12-01

    Peroxides and ozone (O3) are important atmospheric oxidants, and are directly related to the cycling of radicals in the atmosphere. They have a profound impact on many critical atmospheric chemical processes, and are closely associated with regional air pollution and global climate change. Many filed measurements have been conducted to study their concentrations, budget, and roles in the atmospheric chemistry in the past few decades. However, the characteristic and influencing factors of concentrations of peroxides and O3 are still not fully understood, especially in the polluted area. In this study, measurements for atmospheric peroxides and O3 were conducted simultaneously at PKU site in Beijing, China during, and after the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit when strict pollution control measures were deployed. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was the predominant peroxide observed, and occasionally, hydroxylmethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP) was detected. The average concentrations of H2O2 and O3 were 22.6±23.7pptv and 14.8±13.4ppbv, respectively. Both H2O2 and O3 showed distinct diurnal variations, with a peak between 14:00-16:00 for O3, and 18:00-20:00 for H2O2. However, the emergence of the H2O2 peak shifted to the night further both during, and after APEC compared to summer observations at the same site and in clean areas, but the exact mechanism is not clear. Concentrations of H2O2 and O3 were higher during APEC with A (After APEC)/D (During APEC) ratios of 0.3 and 0.7, respectively, contrary to the changes of most of the other observed trace constituents. We discussed the influencing factors in detail, and confirmed that the reduction of NOx was the decisive factors. Additionally, we found a sudden increase of concentrations of H2O2 and O3 on the early morning of 11 November. By analyzing the changes of related meteorological parameters, backward air mass trajectories, and pressure vertical velocity, we ascribed this to the downward transport of air

  11. Aerosol composition, oxidation properties, and sources in Beijing: results from the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W. Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Chen, C.; Du, W.; Han, T. T.; Wang, Q. Q.; Fu, P. Q.; Wang, Z. F.; Zhao, X. J.; Zhou, L. B.; Ji, D. S.; Wang, P. C.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The mitigation of air pollution in megacities remains a great challenge because of the complex sources and formation mechanisms of aerosol particles. The 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Beijing serves as a unique experiment to study the impacts of emission controls on aerosol composition, size distributions, and oxidation properties. Herein, a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer was deployed in urban Beijing for real-time measurements of size-resolved non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species from 14 October to 12 November 2014, along with a range of collocated measurements. The average (±σ) PM1 was 41.6 (±38.9) μg m-3 during APEC, which was decreased by 53 % compared with that before APEC. The aerosol composition showed substantial changes owing to emission controls during APEC. Secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA: sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) showed significant reductions of 62-69 %, whereas organics presented much smaller decreases (35 %). The results from the positive matrix factorization of organic aerosol (OA) indicated that highly oxidized secondary organic aerosol (SOA) showed decreases similar to those of SIA during APEC. However, primary organic aerosol (POA) from cooking, traffic, and biomass-burning sources were comparable to those before APEC, indicating the presence of strong local source emissions. The oxidation properties showed corresponding changes in response to OA composition. The average oxygen-to-carbon level during APEC was 0.36 (±0.10), which is lower than the 0.43 (±0.13) measured before APEC, demonstrating a decrease in the OA oxidation degree. The changes in size distributions of primary and secondary species varied during APEC. SIA and SOA showed significant reductions in large accumulation modes with peak diameters shifting from ~ 650 to 400 nm during APEC, whereas those of POA remained relatively unchanged. The changes in aerosol composition, size distributions, and oxidation

  12. Eficácia do diquat no controle de Hydrilla verticillata, Egeria densa e Egeria najas e toxicidade aguda para o Guaru (Phallocerus caudimaculatus, em condições de laboratório Efficacy of diquat in the control of Hydrylla verticillata, Egeria densa and Egeria najas and its acute toxicity to Phallocerus caudimaculatus, under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N.P. Henares

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available No Brasil, as macrófitas aquáticas submersas, Egeria densa e Egeria najas, têm causado prejuízos aos usos múltiplos da água. Hydrilla verticillata foi recentemente introduzida, mas tem histórico como planta problemática nos EUA, no México e na Austrália. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as suscetibilidades relativas dessas três macrófitas aquáticas ao diquat e os riscos da utilização desse herbicida para o guaru (Phallocerus caudimaculatus. Para isso, foram instalados ensaios em condições de laboratório, a fim de avaliar a suscetibilidade relativa das três macrófitas por meio da manutenção de ponteiros dessas plantas em soluções contendo 0,0; 0,2; 0,4; 0,8; e 1,6 mg L-1 de diquat (Reward® por 14 dias. A avaliação foi realizada pela variação do acúmulo de matéria fresca e do comprimento dos ponteiros no período de exposição ao herbicida. H. verticillata mostrou maior sensibilidade ao diquat em comparação com as duas macrófitas do gênero Egeria, mesmo em baixas concentrações do herbicida. Nas maiores concentrações, E. densa mostrou maior sensibilidade que E. najas. O risco da aplicação do diquat para P. caudimaculatus foi estimado pela toxicidade aguda. Alevinos de P. caudimaculatus de 0,4 ± 0,2 mg foram expostos a soluções de 0,0; 1,0; 5,0; 10,0; 15,0; 20,0; 25,0; e 30,0 mg L-1 de diquat. A concentração letal de 50% (CL(I (50;96h do diquat estimada para P. caudimaculatus foi de 7,17 mg L-1. Para P. caudimaculatus, a toxicidade aguda foi superior à concentração recomendada para o controle de macrófitas aquáticas submersas, indicando risco muito baixo para esse peixe.In Brazil, the submerged plants Egeria densa and Egeria najas have caused damage to multiple uses of water. Hydrilla verticillata has been recently introduced, but it has a history as a problem plant in the U.S., Mexico and Australia. The objectives of this work were to assess the relative susceptibilities of these three

  13. 2011 Munitions Executive Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    products and services to our customers. We accomplish our mission by promoting a dynamic culture of teamwork , corporate and social responsibility...372.8 3 Chevron 210.7 4 General Motors 182.3 5 ConocoPhillips 178.5 6 General Electric 176.6 7 Ford Motor 172.5 8 Citigroup 159.2 9 Bank of America...Acquisition/ Production K.  Henry Technology  & Prototyping G. O’Connor JOCG JOCG EXCOM Joint Services / JOCG Integration HQs JMC JMC Demil/APE   ARDEC

  14. The CIS coal summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The presentations (overhead/viewgraphs) include: the impacts of EU environmental legislation on Russian coal market (A. Sankovski); how Caterpillar and Cat dealers create value in the global mining industry (D. Mohr); new coal preparation technology and application in the Russian coal market (D. Morris); UK demand outlook and import growth (G. Parker); new technologies in blasting operations and services (J. Petzold and others); a global bank's view of the coal sector (M. Seleznev); ELGA coal deposit, Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), Russia (M. Tsikanov); Russia's economic outlook (P. Forrest); Renaissance Capital (investment bank) (R. Edwards); Russian coal for Korean gencos (S. Kim); and coking coal in Ukraine (V. Khilko).

  15. 2006 Munitions Executive Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-09

    DIR, BUSINESS TRANSFORMATION OFFICE Mr. Paul Brinkley 3E1025 614-5737 DIR, ACQUISITION RESOURCES & ANALYSIS Dr. Nancy Spruill 3E1025...LOGISTICS AGENCY VADM Keith Lippert, USN FT BEL 767-5200 ADUSD, SUPPLY CHAIN INTEGRATION Mr. Alan Estevez CGN 210B 604-0098 DEPUTY UNDER...Courtesy U.S. Army by Petty Officer 1st Class Alan D. Monyelle 3 Without ammo the soldier is a just a tourist Courtesy of LTG(R) Roy Beauchamp 4

  16. 2009 Munitions Executive Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-05

    SCIENCES Dr. William Rees Jr. 3B912 692-4592 DUSD, INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY SECURITY Mr. Alan Haggerty 2001 Beauregard, Ste 210B Alexandria...PADUSD(L&MR) Mr. Alan Estevez 1E518 604-0098 DEPUTY UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (LOGISTICS & MATERIEL READINESS) Honorable Phillip J. Bell...BEL 767-5223 DEPUTY UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (BUSINESS TRANSFORMATION) Mr. Paul Brinkley 3C889A 695-9715 DIR, MISSILE DEFENSE

  17. 2008 Munitions Executive Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-21

    Clearing $139.7 Tank $403.6 25/30MM $54.3 SAA $620.2 Rockets $137.3 Fuzes $41.4 NL Ammo $21.1 Demo $128.9 Grenades $157.2 Mortars $1,167.4 FY08-FY13...game planning & events) • Identify and clean legacy data bases for conversion to Navy ERP • High impact core value streams are DMAIC • Continuous

  18. Chemical characterization of aerosols at the summit of Mountain Tai in the middle of central east China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Deng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available PM2.5 and TSP samples were collected at the summit of Mountain Tai (MT (1534 m a.s.l. in spring 2006/2007 and summer 2006 to investigate the characteristics of aerosols over central eastern China. For comparison, aerosol samples were also collected at Tazhong, Urumqi, Tianchi in Xinjiang in northwestern China, Duolun and Yulin in northern China, and two urban sites in the megacities, Beijing and Shanghai, in spring 2007. Daily mass concentrations of TSP and PM2.5 ranged from 39.6–276.9 μg/m3 and 17.2–235.7 μg/m3 respectively at the summit of MT. Averaged concentrations of PM2.5 showed a pronounced seasonal variation with higher concentration in summer than spring. 17 water-soluble ions (SO42−, NO3, Cl, F, PO43−, NO2, CH3COO, CH2C2O42−, C2H4C2O42−, HCOO, MSA, C2O42−, NH4+, Ca2+, K+, Mg2+, Na+, and 19 elements of 176 samples from MT were measured. SO42−, NO3, and NH4+ were the major water-soluble species in PM2.5, accounting for 61.5% and 73.8% of the total measured ions in spring and summer, respectively. The average ratio of PM2.5/TSP was 0.37(2006 and 0.49(2007 in spring, while up to 0.91 in summer, suggesting that aerosol particles were primarily comprised of fine particles in summer and of considerable coarse particles in spring. Crustal elements (e.g., Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, etc. showed higher concentration in spring than summer, while most pollution species (SO42−, NO3, K

  19. Ground temperature regime and periglacial dynamics in three different sites from the summit area in Sierra Nevada (southern Spain) from 2006 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Franch, Ferran; Oliva, Marc; Salva-Catarineu, Montserrat; Gómez-Ortiz, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Ground temperatures and its control on snow cover are crucial factors conditioning the activity of current periglacial processes in the highest lands of Sierra Nevada (Betique Range, Iberian Peninsula). We present summary results of the monitoring period from September 2006 to August 2012 in three sites with contrasting topography, aspect and snow cover. Temperatures loggers have recorded data at 2 hours time lapse at: a) Veleta glacial cirque, an environment with marginal permafrost and a small active rock glacier in it (3107 m asl), b) the flat summit plateau of Collado de los Machos (3297 m) characterized by the existence of inactive sorted circles with scarce snow cover, and c) the southern cirque of Rio Seco, an area with moderate snow cover and widespread solifluction lobes (3105 m). We discuss the periglacial activity in the three study sites in relation with ground temperatures. Results show evidence of the decisive control played by snow cover (duration and thickness) in the thermal regime of the ground (rhythm, depth and intensity of freezing). Only the site in the Veleta cirque has revealed the existence of permafrost, which is inexistent at the summit plateaus and southern cirques. The freezing and thawing of the ground depends substantially on the geographical characteristics of the sites, although a common pattern is detected: the thawing occurs more rapidly than the freezing and the number of freeze-thaw cycles in air temperatures is substantially higher than in ground temperatures.

  20. Proposals of French representatives to the world summit on sustainable development; Les propositions des acteurs francais pour le sommet mondial du developpement durable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The aim of the Rennes colloquium was to present and discuss the proposals made by the French representatives (citizens, associations, companies, local authorities, universities, research institutes etc..) and which were presented at the world summit on sustainable development (Johannesburg, August 26 - September 4, 2002). This document presents, first, a summary of the work carried out by the 'energy' group on: the north-south problem and the need for the development of education plans on sustainable development, the climate change and the shared but differentiated liability, the mastery of consumptions and the development of renewable energy sources. A table summarizes the initiatives proposed by the group: decentralized energy production for the development of rural areas, institutional and financial mechanisms for the sustainable development of the energy efficiency of renewable energy sources, and the energy efficiency and the renewable energies for a sustainable development of urban areas. The second part of this document is the report made by the 'energy' group to the French committee for the summit: energy for the sustainable development and the fight against paucity, biomass as first stake of sustainable energy development for education plans, rural energy for the development, mastery of energy consumptions in urban areas, energy production and transport on networks. A report made by the non-governmental ecological organizations completes the document and presents the possible contribution of the French energy policy to the sustainable development of France. (J.S.)

  1. TerraSAR-X interferometry reveals small-scale deformation associated with the summit eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Nichole; Poland, Michael P.; Lundgren, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    On 19 March 2008, a small explosive eruption at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, heralded the formation of a new vent along the east wall of Halema‘uma‘u Crater. In the ensuing years, the vent widened due to collapses of the unstable rim and conduit wall; some collapses impacted an actively circulating lava pond and resulted in small explosive events. We used synthetic aperture radar data collected by the TerraSAR-X satellite, a joint venture between the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and EADS Astrium, to identify and analyze small-scale surface deformation around the new vent during 2008-2012. Lidar data were used to construct a digital elevation model to correct for topographic phase, allowing us to generate differential interferograms with a spatial resolution of about 3 m in Kīlauea's summit area. These interferograms reveal subsidence within about 100 m of the rim of the vent. Small baseline subset time series analysis suggests that the subsidence rate is not constant and, over time, may provide an indication of vent stability and potential for rim and wall collapse -- information with obvious hazard implications. The deformation is not currently detectable by other space- or ground-based techniques.

  2. Work together for new methods of development along the Silk Road, build a community of shared interests and enjoy common prosperity of Eurasian continent——Speech at the opening ceremony of the 19th Eurasian Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    (April 6th,Istanbul)Distinguished Mr.President Suver,Ladies and Gentlemen,Dear Friends,From the outset,let me extend,on behalf of the Chinese People’s Association for Peace and Disarmament,my heartfelt thanks to Marmara Foundation for inviting me to attend the 19th Eurasian Summit in the beautiful city of Istanbul.The theme of the Summit:"Silk Road Economic Belt"bears great historic and immediate relevance.In history,the Silk Road served as an

  3. Fumaroles in ice caves on the summit of Mount Rainier: preliminary stable isotope, gas, and geochemical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, D.R.; Rye, R.O.; Landis, G.P.

    2000-01-01

    The edifice of Mount Rainier, an active stratovolcano, has episodically collapsed leading to major debris flows. The largest debris flows are related to argillically altered rock which leave areas of the edifice prone to failure. The argillic alteration results from the neutralization of acidic magmatic gases that condense in a meteoric water hydrothermal system fed by the melting of a thick mantle of glacial ice. Two craters atop a 2000-year-old cone on the summit of the volcano contain the world's largest volcanic ice-cave system. In the spring of 1997 two active fumaroles (T=62°C) in the caves were sampled for stable isotopic, gas, and geochemical studies. Stable isotope data on fumarole condensates show significant excess deuterium with calculated δD and δ18O values (−234 and −33.2‰, respectively) for the vapor that are consistent with an origin as secondary steam from a shallow water table which has been heated by underlying magmatic–hydrothermal steam. Between 1982 and 1997, δD of the fumarole vapor may have decreased by 30‰. The compositions of fumarole gases vary in time and space but typically consist of air components slightly modified by their solubilities in water and additions of CO2 and CH4. The elevated CO2 contents δ13CCO2 = -11.8±0.7‰, with spikes of over 10,000 ppm, require the episodic addition of magmatic components into the underlying hydrothermal system. Although only traces of H2S were detected in the fumaroles, most notably in a sample which had an air δ13CCO2 signature (−8.8‰), incrustations around a dormant vent containing small amounts of acid sulfate minerals (natroalunite, minamiite, and woodhouseite) indicate higher H2S (or possibly SO2) concentrations in past fumarolic gases. Condensate samples from fumaroles are very dilute, slightly acidic, and enriched in elements observed in the much higher temperature fumaroles at Mount St. Helens (K and Na up to the ppm level; metals such as Al, Pb, Zn Fe and Mn up to the

  4. Fumaroles in ice caves on the summit of Mount Rainier—preliminary stable isotope, gas, and geochemical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, D. R.; Rye, R. O.; Landis, G. P.

    2000-04-01

    The edifice of Mount Rainier, an active stratovolcano, has episodically collapsed leading to major debris flows. The largest debris flows are related to argillically altered rock which leave areas of the edifice prone to failure. The argillic alteration results from the neutralization of acidic magmatic gases that condense in a meteoric water hydrothermal system fed by the melting of a thick mantle of glacial ice. Two craters atop a 2000-year-old cone on the summit of the volcano contain the world's largest volcanic ice-cave system. In the spring of 1997 two active fumaroles (T=62°C) in the caves were sampled for stable isotopic, gas, and geochemical studies. Stable isotope data on fumarole condensates show significant excess deuterium with calculated δD and δ18O values (-234 and -33.2‰, respectively) for the vapor that are consistent with an origin as secondary steam from a shallow water table which has been heated by underlying magmatic-hydrothermal steam. Between 1982 and 1997, δD of the fumarole vapor may have decreased by 30‰. The compositions of fumarole gases vary in time and space but typically consist of air components slightly modified by their solubilities in water and additions of CO2 and CH4. The elevated CO2 contents (δ13CCO2=-11.8±0.7‰), with spikes of over 10,000 ppm, require the episodic addition of magmatic components into the underlying hydrothermal system. Although only traces of H2S were detected in the fumaroles, most notably in a sample which had an air δ13CCO2 signature (-8.8‰), incrustations around a dormant vent containing small amounts of acid sulfate minerals (natroalunite, minamiite, and woodhouseite) indicate higher H2S (or possibly SO2) concentrations in past fumarolic gases. Condensate samples from fumaroles are very dilute, slightly acidic, and enriched in elements observed in the much higher temperature fumaroles at Mount St. Helens (K and Na up to the ppm level; metals such as Al, Pb, Zn Fe and Mn up to the ppb

  5. Modeling chemistry in and above snow at Summit, Greenland − Part 2: Impact of snowpack chemistry on the oxidation capacity of the boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lefer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of the boundary layer in snow covered regions is impacted by chemistry in the snowpack via uptake, processing, and emission of atmospheric trace gases. We use the coupled one-dimensional (1-D snow chemistry and atmospheric boundary layer model MISTRA-SNOW to study the impact of snowpack chemistry on the oxidation capacity of the boundary layer. The model includes gas phase photochemistry and chemical reactions both in the interstitial air and the atmosphere. Chemistry on snow grains is simulated assuming a liquid-like layer (LLL, treated as an aqueous layer on the snow grain surface. The model has been recently compared with BrO and NO data taken on 10 June–13 June 2008 as part of the Greenland Summit Halogen-HOx experiment (GSHOX. In the present study, we use the same focus period to investigate the influence of snowpack derived chemistry on OH and HOx + RO2 in the boundary layer. We compare model results with chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS measurements of the hydroxyl radical (OH and of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2 plus the sum of all organic peroxy radicals (RO2 taken at Summit during summer 2008. Using sensitivity runs we show that snowpack influenced nitrogen cycling and bromine chemistry both increase the oxidation capacity of the boundary layer and that together they increase the mid-day OH concentrations by approximately a factor of 2. We show for the first time, using an unconstrained coupled one-dimensional snowpack-boundary layer model, that air-snow interactions impact the oxidation capacity of the boundary layer and that it is not possible to match measured OH levels without snowpack NOx and halogen emissions. Model predicted HONO compared with mistchamber measurements suggests there may be an unknown HONO source at Summit. Other model predicted HOx precursors, H2O2 and HCHO, compare well with measurements taken in summer 2000. Over 3 days, snow sourced NOx contributes an additional 2 ppb to

  6. Viewing the effects of anthropogenic emission control from the change of CO2 concentration observed by GOSAT in China during the 2014 APEC summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, L.; Zhong, H.; Liu, L.; Yang, S., Sr.

    2016-12-01

    The growth of the global anthropogenic carbon emission stalled in 2014, according to data from International Energy Agency (IEA). This paper presents a practical application of satellite observation for detecting the regional enhancement of CO2 induced by underlying anthropogenic CO2 emissions especially during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. We collected the column averaged dry air mole fraction (XCO2) data from Greenhouse Observation SATellite (GOSAT) from Jan. 2010 to Dec. 2015, which are provided by Japan GOSAT project team. The spatial change of the 5-year averaged XCO2 derived by gap filling [Zeng et al., TGRS, 2014], as shown in Fig.1, demonstrated that high XCO2prefer to correspond to the most intensive power plants. We calculated the regional contrasts between source and almost without emission (Fig.2), which are defined based on emission and potential temperature. The source, which is defined around Beijing, has many big power plants (Fig.1). The regional contrast showed 1-3 ppm with large seasonal variations while it is the lowest in summer due to influence of biospheric fluxes and especially show abnormal fluctuation in autumn 2014 (Fig.3). XCO2 fell from 398.9 ppm in 15-30 Oct. before APEC to 395.7 ppm during 1-11 Nov. 2014 APEC in source area around Beijing, and the contrast decreased from 4.5 ppm to 1.0 ppm (Table 1). This abnormal decline of XCO2 likely indicate the effects of controlling action for strong local source emissions such as closed many small inefficient coal-fired power plants from the beginning of 2014, banned on burning straw, especially in addition to temporally shut down the big coal-power plants and limiting the number of vehicles running during the APEC summit within the large zone covering the six provinces around Beijing. The large reduction was reported in aerosol of 50% above during the APEC summit (Sun et al., Sci. report, 2016). Our results agree to the potential of satellite observations to

  7. It's a long way to Auchterarder! 'Negotiated management' and mismanagement in the policing of G8 protests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Hugo; Rosie, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Recent analyses of protest policing in Western democracies argue that there has been a marked shift away from oppressive or coercive approaches to an emphasis on consensus based negotiation. King and Waddington (2005) amongst others, however, suggest that the policing of international summits may be an exception to this rule. This paper examines protest policing in relation to the 2005 G8 summit in Gleneagles, Scotland. We argue that 'negotiated management' cannot be imported wholesale as a policing strategy. Rather it is mediated by local history, forms of police knowledge and modes of engagement. Drawing on interviews and participant observation we show that 'negotiated management' works best when both sides are committed to negotiation and that police stereotyping or protestor intransigence can lead to the escalation of any given event. In closing we note the new challenges posed by forms of 'global' protest and consider the implications for future policing of protest.

  8. Geologic map of the Alligator Ridge area, including the Buck Mountain East and Mooney Basin Summit quadrangles and parts of the Sunshine Well NE and Long Valley Slough quadrangles, White Pine County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Constance J.

    2000-01-01

    Data set describes the geology of Paleozoic through Quaternary units in the Alligator Ridge area, which hosts disseminated gold deposits. These digital files were used to create the 1:24,000-scale geologic map of the Buck Mountain East and Mooney Basin Summit Quadrangles and parts of the Sunshine Well NE and Long Valley Slough Quadrangles, White Pine County, east-central Nevada.

  9. 世界信息社会高峰会议即将召开%The World Summit on the Information Society is Going to be Held up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成然; 劲辛

    2002-01-01

    @@ 世界信息社会高峰会议(The world Summit on the Information Society)将在联合国秘书长安南的高度赞同和支持下召开.会议将分两个阶段进行,第一阶段于2003年12月10日~12日在日内瓦举行;第二阶段于2005年在突尼斯举行.会议的各项筹备工作正在进行.各界有关人士正在密切关注着世界信息社会高峰会议的召开.

  10. Coverage of Climate Change in Spanish Digital Media. Study in the Framework of the Climate Change Summit in Cancun (2010 and Durban (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Suárez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available From previous work whose aim was to establish the hegemonic discourse of Spanish television media on climate change (CC, this article reports on a study that selected a corpus of media discourse in Spanish digital media, during the days of the last two international Summits on the CC (Cancun, 2010, Durban, 2011. We made a contet analysys with the goal of giving visibility to the features that concern the CC reference as a subject of public agenda. The analysis found little use of digital resources for the submission of information by the news media within the sample, correlations between the emitters of the contents and the issues raised in reference to the CC, and we propose to analyze the discourses that frame the type of information that is given to the reading public.

  11. Report of the first Asia-Pacific influenza summit, Asia-Pacific Alliance for the Control of Influenza (APACI), Bangkok, 12-13 June 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Lance C; Smith, David W; Chan, Paul K S

    2013-11-01

    On June 12-13, 2012, the Asia-Pacific Alliance for the Control of Influenza (APACI) convened jointly with the Influenza Foundation of Thailand and the Thailand Department of Disease Control, the First Asia-Pacific Influenza Summit. The objectives of the meeting were to review the current state of official influenza control policies in Asia-Pacific countries; identify, summarize and communicate influenza control strategies that have successfully increased vaccine uptake in the region; develop policy and advocacy approaches to improve influenza vaccine uptake in high-risk groups and healthcare workers in the region; and establish collaborative relationships to promote best practices for the control of influenza. In moving forward, the challenge for the region will be establishing collaborations able to effectively communicate risk and key messages about influenza vaccination.

  12. Renewable energy and occupational health and safety research directions: a white paper from the Energy Summit, Denver Colorado, April 11-13, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulloy, Karen B; Sumner, Steven A; Rose, Cecile; Conway, George A; Reynolds, Stephen J; Davidson, Margaret E; Heidel, Donna S; Layde, Peter M

    2013-11-01

    Renewable energy production may offer advantages to human health by way of less pollution and fewer climate-change associated ill-health effects. Limited data suggests that renewable energy will also offer benefits to workers in the form of reduced occupational injury, illness and deaths. However, studies of worker safety and health in the industry are limited. The Mountain and Plains Education and Research Center (MAP ERC) Energy Summit held in April 2011 explored issues concerning worker health and safety in the renewable energy industry. The limited information on hazards of working in the renewable energy industry emphasizes the need for further research. Two basic approaches to guiding both prevention and future research should include: (1) applying lessons learned from other fields of occupational safety and health, particularly the extractive energy industry; and (2) utilizing knowledge of occupational hazards of specific materials and processes used in the renewable energy industry.

  13. Investigating the impact of regional transport on PM2.5 formation using vertical observation during APEC 2014 Summit in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yang; Wang, Shuxiao; Wang, Jiandong; Jiang, Jingkun; Zhang, Tianshu; Song, Yu; Kang, Ling; Zhou, Wei; Cai, Runlong; Wu, Di; Fan, Siwei; Wang, Tong; Tang, Xiaoqing; Wei, Qiang; Sun, Feng; Xiao, Zhimei

    2016-12-01

    During the APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) Economic Leaders' 2014 Summit in Beijing, strict regional air emission controls were implemented, providing a unique opportunity to investigate the transport and formation mechanism of fine particulate matter (PM2.5). This study explores the use of vertical observation methods to investigate the influence of regional transport on PM2.5 pollution in Beijing before and during the APEC Summit. Vertical profiles of extinction coefficient, wind, temperature and relative humidity were monitored at a rural site on the border of Beijing and Hebei Province. Three PM2.5 pollution episodes were analyzed. In episode 1 (27 October to 1 November), regional transport accompanied by the accumulation of pollutants under unfavorable meteorological conditions led to the pollution. In episode 2 (2-5 November), pollutants left from episode 1 were retained in the boundary layer of the region for 2 days and then settled down to the surface, leading to an explosive increase of PM2.5. The regional transport of aged aerosols played a crucial role in the heavy PM2.5 pollution. In episode 3 (6-11 November), emissions from large point sources had been controlled for several days while primary emissions from diesel vehicles might have led to the pollution. It is found that ground-level observation of meteorological conditions and air quality could not fully explain the pollution process, while vertical parameters (aerosol optical properties, winds, relative humidity and temperature) improved the understanding of regional transport influence on heavy pollution processes. Future studies may consider including vertical observations to aid investigation of pollutant transport, especially during episodic events of rapidly increasing concentrations.

  14. Evaluating the effectiveness of joint emission control policies on the reduction of ambient VOCs: Implications from observation during the 2014 APEC summit in suburban Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Li, Junling; Wang, Weigang; Tong, Shengrui; Liggio, John; Ge, Maofa

    2017-09-01

    Ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at a suburban Beijing site were on-line detected using proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) during autumn of 2014, near the location of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. During the APEC summit, the Chinese government enacted strict emission control policies. It was found that VOC concentrations only slightly decreased during the first emission control period (EC I), when control policies were performed in Beijing and 5 cities along the Tai-hang Mountains. However, most of the VOCs (10 out of 12 non-biogenic species) significantly decreased (more than 40%) during the second emission control period (EC II), when control policies were carried out in 16 cities including Beijing, Tianjin, 8 cities of Hebei province and 6 cities of Shandong province. Also the ratio of toluene and benzene decreased during EC II, likely because the emission control policies changed the proportions of different anthropogenic sources. Using the positive matrix factorization (PMF) source apportionment method, five factors are analyzed: (1) vehicle + fuel, (2) solvent, (3) biomass burning, (4) secondary, and (5) background + long-lived. Among them, vehicle + fuel, solvent and biomass burning contribute most of the VOCs concentrations (60%-80%) during the polluted periods and are affected most by emission control policies. During EC II, the reductions of vehicle + fuel, solvent, biomass burning and secondary species were all no less than 50%. Overall, when emission control policies were carried out in many North China Plain (NCP) cities (i.e. EC II), the VOC concentrations of suburban Beijing markedly decreased. This indicates the cross-regional joint-control policies have a large influence on reductions of organic gas species. The findings of this study have vital implications for helping formulate effective emission control policies in China and other countries.

  15. An automated SO2 camera system for continuous, real-time monitoring of gas emissions from Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Sutton, Jeff; Elias, Tamar; Lee, Robert Lopaka; Kamibayashi, Kevan P.; Antolik, Loren; Werner, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    SO2 camera systems allow rapid two-dimensional imaging of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from volcanic vents. Here, we describe the development of an SO2 camera system specifically designed for semi-permanent field installation and continuous use. The integration of innovative but largely “off-the-shelf” components allowed us to assemble a robust and highly customizable instrument capable of continuous, long-term deployment at Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater. Recorded imagery is telemetered to the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) where a novel automatic retrieval algorithm derives SO2 column densities and emission rates in real-time. Imagery and corresponding emission rates displayed in the HVO operations center and on the internal observatory website provide HVO staff with useful information for assessing the volcano's current activity. The ever-growing archive of continuous imagery and high-resolution emission rates in combination with continuous data from other monitoring techniques provides insight into shallow volcanic processes occurring at the Overlook Crater. An exemplary dataset from September 2013 is discussed in which a variation in the efficiency of shallow circulation and convection, the processes that transport volatile-rich magma to the surface of the summit lava lake, appears to have caused two distinctly different phases of lake activity and degassing. This first successful deployment of an SO2 camera for continuous, real-time volcano monitoring shows how this versatile technique might soon be adapted and applied to monitor SO2 degassing at other volcanoes around the world.

  16. High-priority topics for cancer quality measure development: results of the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology Collaborative Cancer Measure Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Michael J; McNiff, Kristen K; Dicker, Adam P; Gilligan, Timothy; Hendricks, Carolyn B; Lennes, Inga; Murray, Thomas; Krzyzanowska, Monika K

    2014-05-01

    Most cancer quality measures focus on individual cancers, assess specific providers, and evaluate processes of care. Although important, these efforts are not sufficient. A more comprehensive measure set is needed to address gaps in care, focus on patients rather than providers, and assess the cross-cutting aspects of care that are relevant to all patients with cancer throughout the trajectory of their illness. With the long-term goal of developing a more comprehensive oncology measure set, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) organized a collaborative measure summit that used an iterative consensus approach to identify priorities for the development of new cancer quality measures. The summit, which included professional societies and patient/consumer advocacy organizations, was held during the ASCO Quality Care Symposium in December 2012. This effort, which brought together 12 diverse stakeholders, identified 10 high-priority topics for cancer quality measure development that cross-cut cancer diagnoses and care settings and addressed patient-centered concerns. Topics of particular interest included planning and counseling before therapy, interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary coordinated care, comprehensive symptom assessment, patient experience of care, and use of palliative care and hospice services. This is an important first step in the development of patient-centered, cross-cutting cancer quality measures. Addressing the high-priority topics identified by this effort will help fill the gaps left by existing cancer quality measures, including care coordination and transitions, quality of life, safety, experience of care, and outcomes. More work will be needed to specify, implement, and validate measures based on these topics. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Exploration for Natural Enemies of Hydrilla verticillata in Eastern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    to Lake Baringo fol- lowed by Lake Naivasha bef6rb returning to Nairobi. Habitats Examined 25. The types of habitats surveyed were (a) rivers, (b... Lake Baringo , Baringo Silted and mud Typha sp. Province, Kenya brown from erosion Lake Naivasha, Photozone 1.5 m, mud Cyperus papyrus, Nakuru...consisted of two phasesi (a)a-vide survey through Tanzania and Kenya, followed by +*r’an intense survey of Lake Tanganyika, including a preliminary study

  18. Ground fracturing at the southern end of Summit Ridge caused by October 17, 1989 Loma Prieta, California, earthquake sequence (maps of Summit Ridge Shear Zones, en echelon tension cracks, complex and compound fractures, and small faults that formed coactively with the earthquake sequence)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martosudarmo, S.Y. [BPP Technologi, Jakarta (Indonesia); Johnson, A.M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Harry Fielding Reid Earthquake Research Lab.; Fleming, R.W. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Loma Prieta earthquake of 17 October 1989 was the first of three large earthquakes that occurred in California in less than 5 years. The main shock of the Loma Prieta earthquake was deep-seated, the rupture zones of the main shock did not reach the surface, and the earthquake produced enigmatic surface ruptures along the frontal faults of the Coast Range and in the epicentral area that were explained in several quite different ways. The Landers earthquake of 28 June 1992 was near surface and produced more than 80 km of spectacular surface rupture of many different kinematic expressions. Detailed study of fractures at Landers has provided a basis for re-evaluating earlier work on fractures produced by the Loma Prieta earthquake. This paper is a description of some of the fractures produced by the Loma Prieta earthquake and a discussion of their causes. Detailed mapping (scale of 1:250) in an area on either side of Summit Road and between Morrell Cutoff Road in the northwest and the intersection of Summit Road and San Jose-Soquel Road in the southeast has provided documentation of fracture orientations and differential displacements required to decipher the ground deformation in that area during the Loma Prieta earthquake.

  19. APA Summit on Medical Student Education Task Force on Informatics and Technology: Steps to Enhance the Use of Technology in Education through Faculty Development, Funding and Change Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M.; Benjamin, Sheldon; Briscoe, Gregory; Hales, Deborah J.; Boland, Robert J.; Luo, John S.; Chan, Carlyle H.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Karlinsky, Harry; Gordon, Daniel B.; Yellowlees, Peter M.; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article provides an overview of how trainees, faculty, and institutions use technology for acquiring knowledge, skills, and attitudes for practicing modern medicine. Method: The authors reviewed the literature on medical education, technology, and change, and identify the key themes and make recommendations for implementing…

  20. Summit crater lake observations, and the location, chemistry, and pH of water samples near Mount Chiginagak volcano, Alaska: 2004-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Janet R.; Scott, William E.; Evans, William C.; Wang, Bronwen; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Mount Chiginagak is a hydrothermally active volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, approximately 170 km south–southwest of King Salmon, Alaska (fig. 1). This small stratovolcano, approximately 8 km in diameter, has erupted through Tertiary to Permian sedimentary and igneous rocks (Detterman and others, 1987). The highest peak is at an elevation of 2,135 m, and the upper ~1,000 m of the volcano are covered with snow and ice. Holocene activity consists of debris avalanches, lahars, and lava flows. Pleistocene pyroclastic flows and block-and-ash flows, interlayered with andesitic lava flows, dominate the edifice rocks on the northern and western flanks. Historical reports of activity are limited and generally describe “steaming” and “smoking” (Coats, 1950; Powers, 1958). Proximal tephra collected during recent fieldwork suggests there may have been limited Holocene explosive activity that resulted in localized ash fall. A cluster of fumaroles on the north flank, at an elevation of ~1,750 m, commonly referred to as the “north flank fumarole” have been emitting gas throughout historical time (location shown in fig. 2). The only other thermal feature at the volcano is the Mother Goose hot springs located at the base of the edifice on the northwestern flank in upper Volcano Creek, at an elevation of ~160 m (fig. 2, near sites H1, H3, and H4). Sometime between November 2004 and May 2005, a ~400-m-wide, 100-m-deep lake developed in the snow- and ice-filled summit crater of the volcano (Schaefer and others, 2008). In early May 2005, an estimated 3 million cubic meters (3×106 m3) of sulfurous, clay-rich debris and acidic water exited the crater through tunnels at the base of a glacier that breaches the south crater rim. More than 27 km downstream, these acidic flood waters reached approximately 1.3 m above normal water levels and inundated a fertile, salmon-spawning drainage, acidifying the entire water column of Mother Goose Lake from its surface waters to its

  1. Diffuse Hydrogen (H2) emissions from the summit crater of Pico do Fogo before the 2014-15 eruption, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionis, Samara; Padrón, Eleazar; Melián, Gladys V.; Asensio-Ramos, María; Fernandes, Paulo; Barrancos, José; Rodríguez, Fátima; Padilla, Germán; Calvo, David; Hernández, Pedro A.; Silva, Sónia; Cabral, Jeremias; Bandomo, Zuleyka; Pereira, José Manuel; Semedo, Helio; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2015-04-01

    Pico do Fogo is an active stratovolcano rising 2,829 m above sea level, situated in Fogo Island (476 km2), Cape Verde. Pico do Fogo has a long eruptive history with about 30 eruptions since its discovery (~1500 AD). On November 23, 2014 a new volcanic eruption started at the southwestern flank of the volcano after 19 years of the last eruptive event on 1995. Diffuse hydrogen (H2) emission from the summit crater of Pico do Fogo has been regularly estimated since 2007 to improve the geochemical monitoring program for the volcano surveillance. H2 is one of the most abundant trace species in volcano-hydrothermal systems and is a key participant in many redox reactions occurring in the volcano-hydrothermal reservoir. Because of its chemical and physical characteristics, H2 moves rapidly though the crust and escapes to the atmosphere. These characteristics make H2 an excellent tracer for processes that occurs in the volcano-hydrothermal systems. The first published data on diffuse H2 degassing rate from Pico do Fogo volcano (37.3 ± 11.3 kg d-1) is related to a field work performed on February 2010 (Dionis et al., 2015). A total of seven diffuse H2 degassing surveys have been carried out during the period 2007-2014. Soil gas H2 concentration measured at 40 cm depth, allowed the computation of its emission rate in about 50 sampling sites selected in the surface environment of Pico do Fogo summit crater (0.14 km2). Both advective (convective) and diffuse components were estimated. The sampling sites were selected to cover homogeneously the study area, allowing the computation of the total H2 emission by sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs). During the study period diffuse H2 emission rate ranged between 2.9 and 163.6 kg d-1. On February 2010, it was observed the first relatively high diffuse H2 emission value which suggests the occurrence of an increase in the heat flow. However, higher observed diffuse H2 emission values than February 2010 were detected on April 2013 (75

  2. Supportive monitoring and disease management through the internet: an internet-delivered intervention strategy for recurrent depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordy, Hans; Backenstrass, Matthias; Hüsing, Johannes; Wolf, Markus; Aulich, Kai; Bürgy, Martin; Puschner, Bernd; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Vedder, Helmut

    2013-11-01

    Major depression is a highly prevalent, disabling disorder associated with loss of quality of life and large economic burden for the society. Depressive disorders often follow a chronic or recurrent course. The risk of relapses increases with each additional episode. The internet-deliverable intervention strategy SUMMIT (SUpportive Monitoring and Disease Management over the InTernet) for patients with recurrent depression has been developed with the main objectives to prolong symptom-free phases and to shorten symptom-loaden phases. This paper describes the study design of a six-sites, three-arm, randomized clinical trial intended to evaluate the efficacy of this novel strategy compared to treatment as usual (TAU). Two hundred thirty six patients who had been treated for their (at least) third depressive episode in one of the six participating psychiatric centers were randomized into one of three groups: 1) TAU plus a twelve-month SUMMIT program participation with personal support or 2) TAU plus a twelve-month SUMMIT program participation without personal support, or 3) TAU alone. Primary outcome of this study is defined as the number of "well weeks" over 24months after index treatment assessed by blind evaluators based on the Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Evaluation. If efficacious, the low monetary and nonmonetary expenditures of this automated, yet individualized intervention may open new avenues for providing an acceptable, convenient, and affordable long-term disease management strategy to people with a chronic mental condition such as recurrent depression. © 2013.

  3. Snow spectral albedo at Summit, Greenland: comparison between in situ measurements and numerical simulations using measured physical and chemical properties of the snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmagnola, C. M.; Domine, F.; Dumont, M.; Wright, P.; Strellis, B.; Bergin, M.; Dibb, J.; Picard, G.; Morin, S.

    2012-12-01

    The albedo of surface snow is determined both by the near-surface profile of the physical and chemical properties of the snowpack and by the spectral and angular characteristics of the incident solar radiation. Simultaneous measurements of the physical and chemical properties of snow were carried out at Summit Camp, Greenland (72°36´ N, 38°25´ W, 3210 m a.s.l.) in May and June 2011, along with spectral albedo measurements. One of the main objectives of the field campaign was to test our ability to predict snow albedo comparing measured snow spectral albedo to the albedo calculated with a radiative transfer model. To achieve this goal, we made daily measurements of the snow spectral albedo in the range 350-2200 nm and recorded snow stratigraphic information down to roughly 80 cm. The snow specific surface area (SSA) was measured using the DUFISSS instrument (DUal Frequency Integrating Sphere for Snow SSA measurement, Gallet et al., 2009). Samples were also collected for chemical analyses including black carbon (BC) and trace elements, to evaluate the impact of light absorbing particulate matter in snow. This is one of the most comprehensive albedo-related data sets combining chemical analysis, snow physical properties and spectral albedo measurements obtained in a polar environment. The surface albedo was calculated from density, SSA, BC and dust profiles using the DISORT model (DIScrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer, Stamnes et al., 1988) and compared to the measured values. Results indicate that the energy absorbed by the snowpack through the whole spectrum considered can be inferred within 1.35%. This accuracy is only slightly better than that which can be obtained considering pure snow, meaning that the impact of impurities on the snow albedo is small at Summit. In the visible region, the discrepancies between measured and simulated albedo are mostly due to the lack of correction of the cosine collector deviation from a true cosine response. In the near

  4. Tracking the seismicity preceding and during the March 2010 Fimmvörduháls fissure eruption and April 2010 summit eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasewicz, J.; Brandsdottir, B.; Hensch, M.; White, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    more explosive, sub-glacial Eyjafjallajökull eruption which started on 14th April in the summit crater some 8 km west of the initial fissure eruption at Fimmvörduháls. Seismicity significantly increased again on the day before the second eruption, this time located under the summit crater.

  5. Work in Unity for the Future Remarks at the Fourth G20 Summit%同心协力共创未来在二十国集团领导人第四次峰会上的讲话

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Dear Colleagues, It gives me great pleasure to attend the fourth G20 Summit in Toronto and discuss with you the important subject of promoting full recovery of the world economy. Let me begin by thanking Prime Minister Harper and the Canadian Government for their active efforts and thoughtful arrangements for this meeting. I also wish to take this opportunity to express thanks to all of you for giving valuable support and assistance to Expo 2010 Shanghai.

  6. Exposure of insects and insectivorous birds to metals and other elements from abandoned mine tailings in three Summit County drainages, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Christine M.; Yang, C.; Crock, J.G.; Shearn-Bochsler, V.; Smith, K.S.; Hageman, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    Concentrations of 31 metals, metalloids, and other elements were measured in insects and insectivorous bird tissues from three drainages with different geochemistry and mining histories in Summit Co., Colorado, in 2003, 2004, and 2005. In insect samples, all 25 elements that were analyzed in all years increased in both Snake and Deer Creeks in the mining impacted areas compared to areas above and below the mining impacted areas. This distribution of elements was predicted from known or expected sediment contamination resulting from abandoned mine tailings in those drainages. Element concentrations in avian liver tissues were in concordance with levels in insects, that is with concentrations higher in mid-drainage areas where mine tailings were present compared to both upstream and downstream locations; these differences were not always statistically different, however. The lack of statistically significant differences in liver tissues, except for a few elements, was due to relatively small sample sizes and because many of these elements are essential and therefore well regulated by the bird's homeostatic processes. Most elements were at background concentrations in avian liver tissue except for Pb which was elevated at mid-drainage sites to levels where ??-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity was inhibited at other mining sites in Colorado. Lead exposure, however, was not at toxic levels. Fecal samples were not a good indication of what elements birds ingested and were potentially exposed to. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  7. Union for International Cancer Control International Session: healthcare economics: the significance of the UN Summit non-communicable diseases political declaration in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Kawahara, Norie; Masui, Tohru; Takeyama, Kunihiko; Nogimori, Masafumi; Roh, Jae Kyung

    2013-06-01

    The Japan National Committee for the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) and UICC-Asia Regional Office (ARO) organized an international session as part of the official program of the 71st Annual Meeting of the Japanese Cancer Association to discuss the topic "Healthcare Economics: The Significance of the UN Summit non-communicable diseases (NCDs) Political Declaration in Asia." The presenters and participants discussed the growing cost of cancer in the Asian region and the challenges that are faced by the countries of Asia, all of which face budgetary and other systemic constraints in tackling and controlling cancer in the region. The session benefited from the participation of various stakeholders, including cancer researchers and representatives of the pharmaceutical industry. They discussed the significance of the UN Political Declaration on the prevention and control of NCDs (2011) as a means of boosting awareness of cancer in the Asian region and also addressed the ways in which stakeholders can cooperate to improve cancer control and treatment. Other issues that were covered included challenges relating to pharmaceutical trials in Asia and how to link knowledge and research outcomes. The session concluded with the recognition that with the onset of a super-aged society in most countries in Asia and an increasing focus on quality of life rather than quantity of life, it is more important than ever for all stakeholders to continue to share information and promote policy dialogue on cancer control and treatment.

  8. Componentry of pyroclastic fall deposits from 2008-2012 small explosive eruptions at Kilauea summit crater: insights into the dynamics of an open basaltic lava column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eychenne, J.; Houghton, B. F.; Swanson, D.; Orr, T. R.; Carey, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Eruptive activity began at Kilauea volcano's summit in March 2008 after 25 years of repose, when a small explosive event opened a 35-m-wide vent on the south wall of Halema`uma`u crater, initiating an eruptive period that extends to the time of writing. The activity has been characterized by: 1) a vigorous outgassing, 2) an unevenly intense spattering of the free surface at the top of the lava column (background activity), and 3) the occurrence of small explosive events consistently triggered by conduit-wall and/or rim collapses. A daily sampling of the pyroclasts ejected from the vent has been organized by the Hawaii Volcano Observatory since 2008. The componentry analyses of samples collected prior to and following different events from 2008 to 2012 allow us to distinguish consistent classes of juvenile particles according to their vesicularity, crystallinity and morphology. The abundances of these different classes vary from background- to explosion-samples, revealing consistent contrasting degassing and fragmentation processes before the disruption of the lava free surface by the rockfalls, and during and soon after the explosive events. These results, for samples collected in 2011-2012 combined with geophysical and visual datasets, give insights into the dynamics of the lava column and particularly into the behavior of the top of the column responding to outgassing and external disruption of the free surface-equilibrium state.

  9. Ice crystal c-axis orientation and mean grain size measurements from the Dome Summit South ice core, Law Dome, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treverrow, Adam; Jun, Li; Jacka, Tim H.

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of crystal c-axis orientations and mean grain area from the Dome Summit South (DSS) ice core drilled on Law Dome, East Antarctica. All measurements were made on location at the borehole site during drilling operations. The data are from 185 individual thin sections obtained between a depth of 117 m below the surface and the bottom of the DSS core at a depth of 1196 m. The median number of c-axis orientations recorded in each thin section was 100, with values ranging from 5 through to 111 orientations. The data from all 185 thin sections are provided in a single comma-separated value (csv) formatted file which contains the c-axis orientations in polar coordinates, depth information for each core section from which the data were obtained, the mean grain area calculated for each thin section and other data related to the drilling site. The data set is also available as a MATLAB™ structure array. Additionally, the c-axis orientation data from each of the 185 thin sections are summarized graphically in figures containing a Schmidt diagram, histogram of c-axis colatitudes and rose plot of c-axis azimuths. All these data are referenced by doi:10.4225/15/5669050CC1B3B and are available free of charge at https://data.antarctica.gov.au" target="_blank">https://data.antarctica.gov.au.<

  10. Mercury in the snow and firn at Summit Station, Central Greenland, and implications for the study of past atmospheric mercury levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Faïn

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous Elemental Mercury (Hg° or GEM was investigated at Summit Station, Greenland, in the interstitial air extracted from the perennial snowpack (firn at depths ranging from the surface to 30 m, during summer 2005 and spring 2006. Photolytic production and destruction of Hg° were observed close to the snow surface during summer 2005 and spring 2006, and we observed dark oxidation of GEM up to 270 cm depth in June 2006. Photochemical transformation of gaseous elemental mercury resulted in diel variations in the concentrations of this gas in the near-surface interstitial air, but destruction of Hg° was predominant in June, and production was the main process in July. This seasonal evolution of the chemical mechanisms involving gaseous elemental mercury produces a signal that propagates downward through the firn air, but is unobservably small below 15 m in depth. As a consequence, multi-annual averaged records of GEM concentration should be well preserved in deep firn air at depths below 15 m, and available for the reconstruction of the past atmospheric history of GEM over the last decades.

  11. Impact of emission control on PM2.5 and the chemical composition change in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei during the APEC summit 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wei; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Chen, Xufeng; Wang, Gang; Li, Song; Wang, Xiaoqi; Liu, Xiaoyu

    2016-03-01

    The success of the emission reduction measures undertaken by authorities in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit 2014 demonstrated that the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei air quality can be improved by introducing integrated emission reduction measures. This paper combines observation data, emission reduction measures, and air quality simulations that were applied before, during, and after the emission control measure implement to analyze the chemical composition change and relationship between emissions and concentrations of pollutants in region. The 24-h PM2.5 samples were collected in the city Beijing, Shijiazhuang, and Tangshan during the period of 20 October to 25 November, 2014. The total PM2.5 mass was measured. PM2.5 samples were used for the analysis of inorganic elements, selected ions, and organic carbon (OC) and element carbon (EC). PM2.5 concentrations during the emission control period were decreased. Total PM2.5 concentrations were reduced by 54, 26, and 39 % when compared to non-emission control period in Beijing, Shijiazhuang, and Tangshan. The average element concentrations were reduced significantly by 75 % in Beijing, 37 % in Shijiazhuang, and 36 % in Tangshan. After the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) conference, the average element concentration increased. At both cities, the concentration secondary water-soluble ions, primary carbon, and element carbon were reduced. However, the concentration of secondary carbon species increased in Beijing due to photochemical oxidants change. More stringent control of regional emissions will be needed for significant reductions of fine particulate pollution in the region to continue to improve air quality.

  12. The second European interdisciplinary Ewing sarcoma research summit – A joint effort to deconstructing the multiple layers of a complex disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Despite multimodal treatment, long term outcome for patients with Ewing sarcoma is still poor. The second “European interdisciplinary Ewing sarcoma research summit” assembled a large group of scientific experts in the field to discuss their latest unpublished findings on the way to the identification of novel therapeutic targets and strategies. Ewing sarcoma is characterized by a quiet genome with presence of an EWSR1-ETS gene rearrangement as the only and defining genetic aberration. RNA-sequencing of recently described Ewing-like sarcomas with variant translocations identified them as biologically distinct diseases. Various presentations adressed mechanisms of EWS-ETS fusion protein activities with a focus on EWS-FLI1. Data were presented shedding light on the molecular underpinnings of genetic permissiveness to this disease uncovering interaction of EWS-FLI1 with recently discovered susceptibility loci. Epigenetic context as a consequence of the interaction between the oncoprotein, cell type, developmental stage, and tissue microenvironment emerged as dominant theme in the discussion of the molecular pathogenesis and inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity of Ewing sarcoma, and the difficulty to generate animal models faithfully recapitulating the human disease. The problem of preclinical development of biologically targeted therapeutics was discussed and promising perspectives were offered from the study of novel in vitro models. Finally, it was concluded that in order to facilitate rapid pre-clinical and clinical development of novel therapies in Ewing sarcoma, the community needs a platform to maintain knowledge of unpublished results, systems and models used in drug testing and to continue the open dialogue initiated at the first two Ewing sarcoma summits. PMID:26802024

  13. Age of the Mt. Ortles ice cores, the Tyrolean Iceman and glaciation of the highest summit of South Tyrol since the Northern Hemisphere Climatic Optimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Paolo; Barbante, Carlo; Bertagna, Giuliano; Bertó, Michele; Binder, Daniel; Carton, Alberto; Carturan, Luca; Cazorzi, Federico; Cozzi, Giulio; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo; Davis, Mary; De Blasi, Fabrizio; Dinale, Roberto; Dragà, Gianfranco; Dreossi, Giuliano; Festi, Daniela; Frezzotti, Massimo; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Galos, Stephan P.; Ginot, Patrick; Heidenwolf, Petra; Jenk, Theo M.; Kehrwald, Natalie; Kenny, Donald; Magand, Olivier; Mair, Volkmar; Mikhalenko, Vladimir; Lin, Ping Nan; Oeggl, Klaus; Piffer, Gianni; Rinaldi, Mirko; Schotterer, Ulrich; Schwikowski, Margit; Seppi, Roberto; Spolaor, Andrea; Stenni, Barbara; Tonidandel, David; Uglietti, Chiara; Zagorodnov, Victor; Zanoner, Thomas; Zennaro, Piero

    2016-11-01

    In 2011 four ice cores were extracted from the summit of Alto dell'Ortles (3859 m), the highest glacier of South Tyrol in the Italian Alps. This drilling site is located only 37 km southwest from where the Tyrolean Iceman, ˜ 5.3 kyrs old, was discovered emerging from the ablating ice field of Tisenjoch (3210 m, near the Italian-Austrian border) in 1991. The excellent preservation of this mummy suggested that the Tyrolean Iceman was continuously embedded in prehistoric ice and that additional ancient ice was likely preserved elsewhere in South Tyrol. Dating of the ice cores from Alto dell'Ortles based on 210Pb, tritium, beta activity and 14C determinations, combined with an empirical model (COPRA), provides evidence for a chronologically ordered ice stratigraphy from the modern glacier surface down to the bottom ice layers with an age of ˜ 7 kyrs, which confirms the hypothesis. Our results indicate that the drilling site has continuously been glaciated on frozen bedrock since ˜ 7 kyrs BP. Absence of older ice on the highest glacier of South Tyrol is consistent with the removal of basal ice from bedrock during the Northern Hemisphere Climatic Optimum (6-9 kyrs BP), the warmest interval in the European Alps during the Holocene. Borehole inclinometric measurements of the current glacier flow combined with surface ground penetration radar (GPR) measurements indicate that, due to the sustained atmospheric warming since the 1980s, an acceleration of the glacier Alto dell'Ortles flow has just recently begun. Given the stratigraphic-chronological continuity of the Mt. Ortles cores over millennia, it can be argued that this behaviour has been unprecedented at this location since the Northern Hemisphere Climatic Optimum.

  14. Airborne particulate organics at the summit (2060 m, a.s.l.) of Mt. Hua in central China during winter: Implications for biofuel and coal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Gehui; Zhou, Bianhong; Cheng, Chunlei; Cao, Junji; Shen, Zhenxing; An, Zhisheng

    2012-03-01

    Sugars, n-alkanes and PAHs in PM 10 and size-segregated samples collected from the summit (2060 m, altitude) of Mt. Hua in Guanzhong Plain, central China during the winter of 2009 were characterized using a GC/MS technique. Concentrations of sugars, n-alkanes and PAHs in PM 10 are 107 ± 52, 121 ± 63, 7.3 ± 3.4 ng m - 3 , respectively. Levoglucosan and fossil fuel derived n-alkanes are more abundant in the air masses transported from southern China than in those from northern China with no spatial difference found for PAHs, suggesting that emissions from biomass burning and vehicle exhausts are more significant in southern part of the country. Dehydrated sugars, fossil fuel derived n-alkanes and PAHs presented a unimode size distribution, peaking at the size of 0.7-1.1 μm, whereas non-dehydrated sugars and plant wax derived n-alkanes showed a bimodal pattern, peaking at 0.7-2.1 and 5.8-9.0 μm, respectively. Principal component analysis showed that biofuel combustion plus plant emission is the most important source in Mt. Hua, being different from the cases in Chinese urban areas where fossil fuel combustion is the major source. By comparison with previous mountain and lowland observations and aircraft measurements we found that wintertime PAHs in China are still characterized by coal burning emissions especially in the inland regions, although in the country increasing rate of SO 2 emission from coal combustion has decreased and emissions of vehicle exhaust has sharply increased.

  15. Carbon in Underland (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, Donald J. (Director, Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2); NCGC Staff

    2011-05-01

    'Carbon in Underland' was submitted by the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (NCGC) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. This video was selected as one of five winners by a distinguished panel of judges for its 'entertaining animation and engaging explanations of carbon sequestration'. NCGC, an EFRC directed by Donald J. DePaolo at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from seven institutions: LBNL (lead) Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis, Ohio State University, and Washington University in St. Louis. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO{sub 2} is 'to use new investigative tools, combined with experiments and computer simulations, to build a fundamental understanding of molecular-to-pore-scale processes in fluid-rock systems, and to demonstrate the ability to control critical aspects of flow, transport, and mineralization in porous rock media as applied to geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Research topics are: bio-inspired, CO{sub 2} (store), greenhouse gas, and interfacial characterization.

  16. Measurements of Mass Concentrations of Black Carbon by Using Four Instruments at the Summit of Mount Tai, in the Center of the North China Plain in June 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Y.; Komazaki, Y.; Pochanart, P.; Liu, Y.; Akimoto, H.; Gao, J.; Wang, T.; Wang, Z.

    2007-12-01

    Although the emission rate of black carbon (BC) aerosols from the North China Plain (NCP) has been estimated to be high and it would impact climate severely, the BC mass concentrations at a regionally representative location in the plain have been scarcely observed. During a comprehensive field campaign performed at the summit of Mount Tai (36.26 N, 117.11 E, 1534 m asl) in June 2006, BC (or elemental carbon, EC) concentrations were measured by four instruments: an Aethalometer, a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometry (MAAP) instrument, a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer, and a semi-continuous ECOC analyzer with two thermal protocols (IMPROVE and NIOSH). The hourly BC concentration (PM2.5) as measured by the MAAP instrument ranged from -0.1 to 40.8 μgC m-3, with an average of 3.7 μgC m-3. For both of the first 20-day and the latter 10-day periods during the campaign, for which all the instruments provided PM1 and PM2.5 measurements, respectively, we found strong correlations (R2 >0.88) for all the pairs with which >30 hours of coincident observations were made. The slopes and the intercept values of regression lines ranged from 1.00 to 1.42 and from -0.2 to +0.8 μgC m-3, respectively. This general agreement suggested that we were able to determine the BC concentrations regionally representative over the NCP with an uncertainty of ±50% and thereby reduce the uncertainty factor of >4 associating with the BC emission rate from China. The temporal variation of BC concentrations in June 2006 was dominated by the influence from crop (winter wheat) residue burning after the harvest. The relative importance of BC in comparison to CO2 in terms of heating of the atmosphere over this region is also discussed.

  17. Determinants of low birthweight, small-for-gestational-age and preterm birth in Lombok, Indonesia: analyses of the birthweight cohort of the SUMMIT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebayang, Susy K; Dibley, Michael J; Kelly, Patrick J; Shankar, Anita V; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2012-08-01

    To examine the determinants of low birthweight (LBW), small-for-gestation (SGA) and preterm births in Lombok, Indonesia, an area of high infant mortality. Data from The Supplementation with Multiple Micronutrient Intervention Trial (SUMMIT), a double-blind cluster-randomised controlled trial, were analysed. The odds ratio of factors known to be associated with LBW, SGA and preterm birth was assessed and adjusted for the cluster design of the trial using hierarchical logistic regression. Determinants included constitutional, demographic and psychosocial factors, toxic exposure, maternal nutrition and obstetric history and maternal morbidity during and prior to pregnancy. Population attributable risks of modifiable determinants were calculated. A cohort of 14,040 singleton births was available for analysis of LBW, with 13,498 observations for preterm births and 13,461 for SGA births. Determinants of LBW and SGA were similar and included infant's sex, woman's education, season at birth, mothers' residence, household wealth, maternal mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), height and a composite variable of birth order and pregnancy interval. Socioeconomic indicators were also related to preterm births and included mother's education, residence and household wealth, while nutritional-related factors including low MUAC and birth order and interval were associated with preterm birth but not maternal height. Nausea was protective of preterm birth, while diarrhoea was associated with higher odds of preterm birth. Oedema during pregnancy was protective of SGA but associated with higher odds of preterm delivery. Around 33%, 13% and 13% of the determinants of LBW, SGA and preterm births were preventable. Women's education, maternal nutrition and household wealth and family planning are key factors to improving birth outcomes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Developing the Storyline for an Advance Care Planning Video for Surgery Patients: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Engagement from Stakeholder Summit to State Fair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslakson, Rebecca A; Schuster, Anne L R; Lynch, Thomas J; Weiss, Matthew J; Gregg, Lydia; Miller, Judith; Isenberg, Sarina R; Crossnohere, Norah L; Conca-Cheng, Alison M; Volandes, Angelo E; Smith, Thomas J; Bridges, John F P

    2017-08-17

    Patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) methods and social learning theory (SLT) require intensive interaction between researchers and stakeholders. Advance care planning (ACP) is valuable before major surgery, but a systematic review found no extant perioperative ACP tools. Consequently, PCOR methods and SLT can inform the development of an ACP educational video for patients and families preparing for major surgery. The objective is to develop and test acceptability of an ACP video storyline. The design is a stakeholder-guided development of the ACP video storyline. Design-thinking methods explored and prioritized stakeholder perspectives. Patients and family members evaluated storyboards containing the proposed storyline. The study was conducted at hospital outpatient surgical clinics, in-person stakeholder summit, and the 2014 Maryland State Fair. Measurements are done through stakeholder engagement and deidentified survey. Stakeholders evaluated and prioritized evidence from an environmental scan. A surgeon, family member, and palliative care physician team iteratively developed a script featuring 12 core themes and worked with a medical graphic designer to translate the script into storyboards. For 10 days, 359 attendees of the 2014 Maryland State Fair evaluated the storyboards and 87% noted that they would be "very comfortable" or "comfortable" seeing the storyboard before major surgery, 89% considered the storyboards "very helpful" or "helpful," and 89% would "definitely recommend" or "recommend" this story to others preparing for major surgery. Through an iterative process utilizing diverse PCOR engagement methods and informed by SLT, storyboards were developed for an ACP video. Field testing revealed the storyline to be highly meaningful for surgery patients and family members.

  19. Training for the NATO Summit in 2012:The Chicago Model%从2012“北约峰会”看芝加哥模式的安保培训①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎文君; 赵佳

    2013-01-01

    The city of Chicago was notiifed that it would have the honor of hosting the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Summit in May 2012. The city would be the ifrst in the United States outside of Washington, D.C., to host a NATO Summit. Since some previous NATO Summit host cities endured violent protests and property damage, the Chicago Police Department’s Education and Training Division needed to put together a comprehensive and effective training program to prepare its offcers. The task was accomplished by dividing the members of the Chicago Police Department into different tiers. A review of the current Chicago Police Department crowd control program was conducted, and it was decided that other crowd control models used throughout the country needed to be studied. The Center for Domestic Preparedness had an ongoing training program relationship with the Chicago Police Department and was contacted so Chicago personnel could determine what crowd control programs were being used throughout the country. The tier-three personnel were trained through distance learning modules. There were two Chicago Police and Fire Department joint training sessions.%芝加哥警察局为2012“北约峰会”组织的安保培训被国际警察界誉为芝加哥模式,其主要有以下特点:将警员分成不同的等级来开展分专题培训;通过演练与模拟训练提高警察对人群管控的能力;有效地利用远程教育形式;警务指挥员学习了解一线队伍的能力;培训其他机构以获得他们的帮助与合作。

  20. Observed changes of the diffuse H_{2} emission at the summit cone of Teide volcano (Tenerife, Canary Islands): a geochemical evidence of processes operating deep in the magmatic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Melián, Gladys V.; Padrón, Eleazar; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Calvo, David; Barrancos, José; Hernández, Pedro A.

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen is one of the most abundant trace species in volcano-hydrothermal systems and is a key participant in many redox reactions occurring in the hydrothermal reservoir gas (Giggenbach 1987; Chiodini and Marini 1998). Because of its chemical and physical characteristics such as low weight and low solubility in groundwater and hydrothermal fluids, H2 moves rapidly within the crust and escapes easily to the atmosphere. These characteristics make H2a potentially excellent tracer of processes operating deep in magmatic systems. Most of the diffuse degassing studies on active volcanic-hydrothermal systems is primarily focused on CO2, the second major component of volcanic gases. Unfortunately however, few studies of surface H2efflux measurements at active volcanoes have been performed to evaluate diffuse H2 emission rates from active volcanic systems. Here, we report a time series on diffuse H2 emission rates from surveys carried out in yearly basis at the summit cone of Teide volcano, where most obvious geothermal features at Tenerife occurs, during the 2006-2016 period. Thousands of samples of volcanic gases from the surface environment, at 40 cm depth, have been collected during this 2006-2016 period to estimate surface H2 efflux values from 150 observation sites selected to cover the 0.5 Km2 area of the summit cone Teide volcano. Most of the surveys showed diffuse H2 emission rate values lower than 40 kgṡd-1 from the summit cone of Teide volcano. On the contrary, an increasing trend of diffuse H2 emission rate from 35 ± 7 to 122 ± 36 kgṡd-1 was observed during the 2006 to 2009 period. This increase trend of diffuse H2 emission rate was detected before a raise of seismic activity in and around Tenerife from November 2009 to June 2011, with about 1176 seismic events recorded by Spanish-IGN in 2010 (Pérez and Schmincke, 2016). The observed increased trend of diffuse H2 emission occurs simultaneously with an increase trend of diffuse CO2 emission at the summit

  1. The Inter-Organizational Summit on Education and Training (ISET) 2010 survey on the influence of the Houston conference training guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Jerry J; Perry, William; Ruff, Ronald M; Shear, Paula K; Breting, Leslie M Guidotti

    2012-11-01

    A conference specific to the education and training of clinical neuropsychology was held in 1997, which led to a report published in the Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology (Hannay, J., Bieliauskas, L., Crosson, B., Hammeke, T., Hamsher, K., & Koffler, S. (1998). Proceedings of the Houston Conference on Specialty Education and Training in Clinical Neuropsychology. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 13, 157-250.). The guidelines produced by this conference have been referred to as the Houston Conference (HC) guidelines. Since that time, there has been considerable discussion, and some disagreement, about whether the HC guidelines produced a positive outcome in the training of neuropsychologists. To explore this question and determine how widely the HC guidelines were implemented, a meeting was held in 2006. Present and past leaders of the American Psychological Association Division 40 (Clinical Neuropsychology), the National Academy of Neuropsychology, and the Association of Postdoctoral Programs in Clinical Neuropsychology met to discuss the possible need for an Inter-Organizational Summit on Education and Training (ISET). A decision was reached to have the ISET Steering Committee conduct a survey of clinical neuropsychologists that could address the extent to which HC guidelines were present in the specialty and whether the influence of the HC guidelines was positive. An online survey was constructed, with data gathered in 2010. The current paper presents and discusses the ISET survey results. Specific findings need to be viewed cautiously due to the relatively low response rate. However, with some direct parallels to a larger recent survey of clinical neuropsychologists, the following general conclusions appear well founded: (a) the demographics of respondents in the ISET survey are comparable with a recent larger professional practice survey and thus may reasonably represent the specialty; (b) the HC guidelines appear to have been widely adopted by training

  2. Dynamics of ozone and nitrogen oxides at Summit, Greenland. II. Simulating snowpack chemistry during a spring high ozone event with a 1-D process-scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Keenan A.; Kramer, Louisa J.; Doskey, Paul V.; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Seok, Brian; Van Dam, Brie; Helmig, Detlev

    2015-09-01

    Observed depth profiles of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) in snowpack interstitial air at Summit, Greenland were best replicated by a 1-D process-scale model, which included (1) geometrical representation of snow grains as spheres, (2) aqueous-phase chemistry confined to a quasi-liquid layer (QLL) on the surface of snow grains, and (3) initialization of the species concentrations in the QLL through equilibrium partitioning with mixing ratios in snowpack interstitial air. A comprehensive suite of measurements in and above snowpack during a high O3 event facilitated analysis of the relationship between the chemistry of snowpack and the overlying atmosphere. The model successfully reproduced 2 maxima (i.e., a peak near the surface of the snowpack at solar noon and a larger peak occurring in the evening that extended down from 0.5 to 2 m) in the diurnal profile of NO2 within snowpack interstitial air. The maximum production rate of NO2 by photolysis of nitrate (NO3-) was approximately 108 molec cm-3 s-1, which explained daily observations of maxima in NO2 mixing ratios near solar noon. Mixing ratios of NO2 in snowpack interstitial air were greatest in the deepest layers of the snowpack at night and were attributed to thermal decomposition of peroxynitric acid, which produced up to 106 molec NO2 cm-3 s-1. Highest levels of NO in snowpack interstitial air were confined to upper layers of the snowpack and observed profiles were consistent with photolysis of NO2. Production of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from NO3- photolysis was estimated to be two orders of magnitude larger than NO production and supports the hypothesis that NO3- photolysis is the primary source of NOx within sunlit snowpack in the Arctic. Aqueous-phase oxidation of formic acid by O3 resulted in a maximum consumption rate of ∼106-107 molec cm-3 s-1 and was the primary removal mechanism for O3.

  3. Toronto Smog Summit Report Card

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This 'report card' provides a summary of actions taken, and progress achieved by the federal government, the provincial government and the City of Toronto, respectively, in response to various previous commitments regarding air quality, sustainable transportation, climate and atmospheric research, investing in green infrastructure (federal government), environmental assessment regulations, transboundary air pollution, improved monitoring and reporting regulations. Ratings also cover efforts in imposing emissions caps on the electric industry, emissions reduction trading system, toll-free public air pollution hotline, regulation of ozone depleting substances (provincial government), public education campaign on smog reduction, energy efficiency initiatives, corporate smog alert response plan, and a number of other environmental issues (City of Toronto).

  4. Summit Station Skiway Cost Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    pass, depend- ing on skiway condition. Total construction time will take approximately 27–30 hours, or 4 working days. Surface maintenance ...ERDC develops innovative solutions in civil and military engineering, geospatial sciences, water resources, and environmental sciences for the...cargo loads. To explore further skiway improvement and cost saving techniques, this report reviews alternative maintenance and construction options

  5. 'Science summit' sets ambitious agenda

    CERN Multimedia

    Dickson, D

    1998-01-01

    The World Conference on Science for the 21st Century will be held in Budapest next June, organised jointly by UNESCO and ICSU. It may be the most important international meeting on the relationship between science and politics for 20 years.

  6. 2011 Information Systems Summit 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    SECURE AGILE DEVELOPMENT · Mr. Jeff Payne, CEO and Founder, Coveros, Inc. LEAN AND KANBAN · Mr. Mike Cox, Senior Consultant, Net...Maryland Suite: Annapolis LEAN AND KANBAN Mr. Mike Cox, Senior Consultant, Net Objectives TRACK B Maryland Suite: Baltimore 4:15 pm - 5:15 pm THANK...Innovation to Transform Army Intel 14 Agile © copyright 2011. Net Objectives, Inc. Lean and Kanban Michael Cox Vice President and Senior

  7. Managing knowledge management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2016-01-01

    This work-in-progress focuses on the management of knowledge management and its socio-material implications. More specifically, it focuses on the management of epistemic objects and objectives in professional health care organisations. One of the main characteristics of professional health care t...

  8. The Copenhagen Climate Summit(Dec. 2009) in the Spanish Media: Journalistic Norms and Narrative Factors; La Cumbre del Clima de Copenhague (dic. 2009) en los Medios de Comunicacion Espanoles: las Reglas de Interaccion Periodistica y los Elementos Narrativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopera, E.

    2011-05-13

    The main aim of this technical report is to analyze the media coverage of the Copenhagen Climate Summit published by selected Spanish media six national and regional newspapers for general and financial information plus the most highly watched Spanish television news -. Quantitative and qualitative researches have been used to address the empirical section of this report including, among others, content analysis, narrative factors and different statistics to estimate the relationship between variables. The most significant results are: 1) between 50 and 80% of the print media coverage comes from wire services; 2) this Climate Summit achieves a good position among the most important media agenda issues but, in the half of the cases, a high position on the agenda does not correspond to a high volume of media coverage; 3) it hasn't been identified any relationship between the media's adherence to interacting journalistic norms and the amount of media coverage; 4) dramatization is the journalistic norm to which media shows more adherence; 5) media publishing more articles from wire services are those showing a higher adherence to journalistic norms; 6) narrative factors are organized following a story line plot with introduction, body (or climax) and ending of the event and actions, receiving climax period the highest levels of media coverage. (Author) 93 refs.

  9. España y Brasil en América latina (1946-2000: de la política de hispanidad franquista a las cumbres iberoamericanas Spain and Brazil in Latin America: from policy of Franco’s «Hispanidad» to the Iberoamerican Summits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno AYLLÓN PINO

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años, Brasil está constituyéndose en el país clave para el éxito o fracaso de las diferentes iniciativas de integración en América del Sur, así como el principal actor en los mecanismos de cooperación política en la región. Sin embargo, falta todavía en el ámbito académico español una reflexión y un estudio sobre la participación de Brasil en las Cumbres Iberoamericanas, desde la perspectiva de los objetivos brasileños en materia de política exterior y desde la consideración de cómo este país ha percibido, históricamente, la política española hacia América Latina en general. Este artículo presenta las percepciones brasileñas sobre las iniciativas españolas desarrolladas en el último medio siglo para lograr articular una Comunidad Iberoame¬ricana de Naciones.In the last years, Brazil has been constituting in the key country for the success or failure of the different attempts of integration in South America, as well as the main actor in the mechanisms of political cooperation within the region. Nevertheless, in the Spanish academic scope there is still a need for an analysis and a study about Brasil’s participation in Iberoamerican Summits, from the perspective of Brazilian goals on matters of foreign policy and from the consideration of how this country has, historically, perceived Spanish policy towards Latin America as a whole. This paper shows the Brazilian perceptions about the Spanish initiatives developed in the last half century to manage to articulate a Iberoamerican Community of Nations.

  10. Silver paper: the future of health promotion and preventive actions, basic research, and clinical aspects of age-related disease--a report of the European Summit on Age-Related Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Franco, Alain; Sommer, Pascal; Baeyens, Jean Pierre; Jankowska, Ewa; Maggi, Adriana; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rys, Andrzej; Szczerbinska, Kataryna; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Milewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-01

    BACKGROUND. In September 2008, under the French Presidency of the European Union and with the support of the Polish Minister of Health, a European Summit on Age-Related Disease was organised inWroclaw (Poland). At this meeting, European politicians, gerontologists and geriatricians gathered to discuss a common approach to future challenges related to age-related disease. Politicians and decision-makers from the European Union and Ministers of Health and their deputies from many European countries raised the problems and difficulties to be tackled in a growing population with a high burden of disease, and asked scientists to write a consensus document with recommendations for future actions and decisions. Scientists and clinicians worked in parallel in three different groups, on health promotion and preventive actions, basic research in age-related disease, and clinical aspects of disease in older people. Beforehand, the format of the paper with recommendations was discussed, and it was finally agreed that, for a better understanding by decision- makers, it would be divided in two different columns: one with facts that were considered settled and agreed by most experts (under the heading We know), and a second with recommendations related to each fact (We recommend). No limit on the number of topics to be discussed was settled. After careful and detailed discussion in each group, which in most cases included the exact wording of each statement, chairpersons presented the results in a plenary session, and new input from all participants was received, until each of the statements and recommendations were accepted by a large majority. Areas with no consensus were excluded from the document. Immediately after the Summit, the chairpersons sent the document both to the main authors and to a list of experts (see footnote) who had made presentations at the summit and agreed to review and critically comment on the final document, which is presented below. As regards the

  11. Sorption of trace metals to an aluminum precipitate in a stream receiving acid rock-drainage; Snake River, Summit County, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, L.A.; Faure, G.; Pride, D.E. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Bigham, J.M. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). School of Natural Resources

    2002-07-01

    The quality of water in streams that are contaminated by acid drainage from mines and from the weathering of mineralized rocks improves as the water flows downstream. The purpose of this study was to investigate the geochemical processes that occur in one such stream and to determine the fate of the trace metals that are removed from the water. The stream chosen for this purpose was the Snake River, Summit County, Colorado, which is affected by natural acid rock-drainage (ARD) containing SO{sub 4}, Al, Fe, and various trace elements such as Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, and others. Most of the Fe in the Snake River is removed from solution by the oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} to Fe{sup 3+} and the subsequent precipitation of Fe-oxyhydroxides that form a massive ferricrete deposit near the springs that feed the river. Further downstream, the Snake River (pH = 3.0) mixes with water from Deer Creek (pH = 7.0) thereby increasing its pH to 6.3 and causing SO{sub 4}-rich precipitates of Al-oxyhydroxide to form. The precipitates and associated organic C complexes sorb trace metals from the water and thus have high concentrations of certain elements, including Zn (540-11,400 ppm), Cu (34-221 ppm), Pb (90-340 ppm), and Ni (11-197 ppm). The concentrations of these elements in the precipitates that coat the streambed rise steeply in the zone of mixing and then decline downstream. The trace element concentrations of the water in the mixing zone at the confluence with Deer Creek decrease by 75% or more and are up to 3 orders of magnitude lower than those of the precipitates. Sorption curves for Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, and SO{sub 4} were derived by stepwise neutralization of a sample of Snake River water (collected above the confluence with Deer Creek) and indicate that the trace metals are sorbed preferentially with increasing pH in the general order Pb, Cu, Zn, and Ni. Sulfate is removed between pH 4 and 5 to form an Al-hydroxysulfate and/or by sorption to microcrystalline gibbsite. The sorption data

  12. Study on livestock management scheme considering national environmental capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jee Yong; Shin, Eun Seong [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    In 'Our Common Future' reported in WCED (World Commission on Environment and Development) in 1983, a sustainable development is defined as 'development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs'. The environmental problem since the 1992 Rio Summit has focused on sustainability. Furthermore agriculture industry also promotes a sustainable agriculture in worldwide. The most focused one among sustainable agriculture is an environmental friendly agriculture including organic agriculture since soil has been acidified due to the abuse of chemical fertilizer for mass production. In this study, it represents an appropriate management scheme for livestock suitable to Korean land by assessing admitted capacity and water quality pollution. 32 refs., 11 figs., 77 tabs.

  13. Managing knowledge management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    The work-in-progress that I would like to present and discuss in the workshop focuses on the management of knowledge management and its socio-material implications. More specifically, my work focuses on how epistemic objects and objectives are managed in professional health care organisations. One...... of knowledge in health care relate to managerial techniques in knowledge management and, thus, form complex epistemic practices in health care organizations. The theoretical approach in this paper draws on perspectives form Social Studies of Science, in particular from Karin Knorr Cetina (2006, 2007......) and colleagues, who stresses that to understand knowledge management practices we need to magnify the space of knowledge in action and consider the presentation and circulation of epistemic objects in extended contexts. In other words, we need to consider that the routes from research to practice...

  14. Managing Fault Management Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougal, John M.

    2010-01-01

    As the complexity of space missions grows, development of Fault Management (FM) capabilities is an increasingly common driver for significant cost overruns late in the development cycle. FM issues and the resulting cost overruns are rarely caused by a lack of technology, but rather by a lack of planning and emphasis by project management. A recent NASA FM Workshop brought together FM practitioners from a broad spectrum of institutions, mission types, and functional roles to identify the drivers underlying FM overruns and recommend solutions. They identified a number of areas in which increased program and project management focus can be used to control FM development cost growth. These include up-front planning for FM as a distinct engineering discipline; managing different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; ensuring the necessary resources for a disciplined, coordinated approach to end-to-end fault management engineering; and monitoring FM coordination across all mission systems.

  15. Management aspects of Gemini's base facility operations project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada, Gustavo; Nitta, Atsuko; Adamson, A. J.; Nunez, Arturo; Serio, Andrew; Cordova, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Gemini's Base Facilities Operations (BFO) Project provided the capabilities to perform routine nighttime operations without anyone on the summit. The expected benefits were to achieve money savings and to become an enabler of the future development of remote operations. The project was executed using a tailored version of Prince2 project management methodology. It was schedule driven and managing it demanded flexibility and creativity to produce what was needed, taking into consideration all the constraints present at the time: Time available to implement BFO at Gemini North (GN), two years. The project had to be done in a matrix resources environment. There were only three resources assigned exclusively to BFO. The implementation of new capabilities had to be done without disrupting operations. And we needed to succeed, introducing the new operational model that implied Telescope and instrumentation Operators (Science Operations Specialists - SOS) relying on technology to assess summit conditions. To meet schedule we created a large number of concurrent smaller projects called Work Packages (WP). To be reassured that we would successfully implement BFO, we initially spent a good portion of time and effort, collecting and learning about user's needs. This was done through close interaction with SOSs, Observers, Engineers and Technicians. Once we had a clear understanding of the requirements, we took the approach of implementing the "bare minimum" necessary technology that would meet them and that would be maintainable in the long term. Another key element was the introduction of the "gradual descent" concept. In this, we increasingly provided tools to the SOSs and Observers to prevent them from going outside the control room during nighttime operations, giving them the opportunity of familiarizing themselves with the new tools over a time span of several months. Also, by using these tools at an early stage, Engineers and Technicians had more time for debugging

  16. Remarks by Yang Jiechi,Minister of Foreign Affairs of the People's Republic Of China,at the Istanbul Summit on Friendship And Cooperation in the Heart of Asia%杨洁箎外长在土耳其阿富汗问题地区峰会上的发言

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ President Gul, President Karzai, President Zadari, Vice President Rahimi, Excellencies and colleagues, It is a distinct pleasure for me to come to the magnificent city of Istanbul and attend the regional summit on Afghanistan as the special representative of President Hu Jintao.

  17. Elaborating on theory with middle managers' experience implementing healthcare innovations in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birken, Sarah A; DiMartino, Lisa D; Kirk, Meredith A; Lee, Shoou-Yih D; McClelland, Mark; Albert, Nancy M

    2016-01-04

    The theory of middle managers' role in implementing healthcare innovations hypothesized that middle managers influence implementation effectiveness by fulfilling the following four roles: diffusing information, synthesizing information, mediating between strategy and day-to-day activities, and selling innovation implementation. The theory also suggested several activities in which middle managers might engage to fulfill the four roles. The extent to which the theory aligns with middle managers' experience in practice is unclear. We surveyed middle managers (n = 63) who attended a nursing innovation summit to (1) assess alignment between the theory and middle managers' experience in practice and (2) elaborate on the theory with examples from middle managers' experience overseeing innovation implementation in practice. Middle managers rated all of the theory's hypothesized four roles as "extremely important" but ranked diffusing and synthesizing information as the most important and selling innovation implementation as the least important. They reported engaging in several activities that were consistent with the theory's hypothesized roles and activities such as diffusing information via meetings and training. They also reported engaging in activities not described in the theory such as appraising employee performance. Middle managers' experience aligned well with the theory and expanded definitions of the roles and activities that it hypothesized. Future studies should assess the relationship between hypothesized roles and the effectiveness with which innovations are implemented in practice. If evidence supports the theory, the theory should be leveraged to promote the fulfillment of hypothesized roles among middle managers, doing so may promote innovation implementation.

  18. Knowledge management

    OpenAIRE

    Jarošová, Milena

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical part: Basic terms of knowledge management, knowledge worker, knowledge creation and conversion process, prerequisites and benefits of knowledge management. Knowledge management and it's connection to organizational culture and structure, result measurements of knowledge management, learning organization and it's connection to knowledge management. Tacit knowledge management tools -- stories -- types, how to create, practical use, communities, coaching. Value Based Organization. Pr...

  19. Managing visitor impacts in parks: A multi-method study of the effectiveness of alternative management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, L.O.; Marion, J.L.; Manning, R.E.; Lawson, S.R.; Jacobi, C.

    2008-01-01

    How can recreation use be managed to control associated environmental impacts? What management practices are most effective and why? This study explored these and related questions through a series of experimental ?treatments? and associated ?controls? at the summit of Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park, a heavily used and environmentally fragile area. The treatments included five management practices designed to keep visitors on maintained trails, and these practices ranged from ?indirect? (information/education) to ?direct? (a fence bordering the trail). Research methods included unobtrusive observation of visitors to determine the percentage of visitors who walked off-trail and a follow-up visitor survey to explore why management practices did or didn?t work. All of the management practices reduced the percentage of visitors who walked off-trail. More aggressive applications of indirect practices were more effective than less aggressive applications, and the direct management practice of fencing was the most effective of all. None of the indirect management practices reduced walking off-trail to a degree that is likely to control damage to soil and vegetation at the study site. Study findings suggest that an integrated suite of direct and indirect management practices be implemented on Cadillac Mountain (and other, similar sites) that includes a) a regulation requiring visitors to stay on the maintained trail, b) enforcement of this regulation as needed, c) unobtrusive fencing along the margins of the trail, d) redesign of the trail to extend it, widen it in key places, and provide short spur trails to key ?photo points?, and e) an aggressive information/education program to inform visitors of the regulation to stay on the trail and the reasons for it. These recommendations are a manifestation of what may be an emerging principle of park and outdoor recreation management: intensive use requires intensive management.

  20. Managing Quality

    CERN Document Server

    Kelemen, Mihaela L

    2002-01-01

    Managing Quality provides a comprehensive review and critical analysis of quality management discourses and techniques by drawing on a number of management disciplines such as operations management, HRM, organizational behaviour, strategy, marketing and organization theory. The book: - introduces readers to key concepts and issues in quality management - provides an overview of both managerial and critical perspectives on quality management - presents the 'wisdom' of quality management gurus - documents the way quality is pursued in manufacturing, service and public sector organizations - comp

  1. Managing Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Managing Epilepsy Language: English Spanish Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... support strategies to use to empower PLWMCC. Managing Epilepsy Well Network The Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network ...

  2. Weight Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Weight Management English English Español Weight Management Obesity is a chronic condition that affects more ... Liver (NASH) Heart Disease & Stroke Sleep Apnea Weight Management Topics About Food Portions Bariatric Surgery for Severe ...

  3. Bladder Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Catheterization • Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Bladder Management [ Download this pamphlet: "Bladder Management" - (PDF, 499KB) ] The ... and medication or surgery may be helpful. Bladder Management Foley or Suprapubic Catheter A tube is inserted ...

  4. Anger Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anger management Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Anger management is the process of learning to recognize signs that you' ... with the situation in a productive way. Anger management doesn't try to keep you from feeling ...

  5. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015.......Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015....

  6. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilkington, Alan; Chai, Kah-Hin; Le, Yang

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the true coverage of PM theory through a bibliometric analysis of the International Journal of Project Management from 1996-2012. We identify six persistent research themes: project time management, project risk management, programme management, large-scale project management......, project success/failure and practitioner development. These differ from those presented in review and editorial articles in the literature. In addition, topics missing from the PM BOK: knowledge management project-based organization and project portfolio management have become more popular topics...

  7. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilkington, Alan; Chai, Kah-Hin; Le, Yang

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the true coverage of PM theory through a bibliometric analysis of the International Journal of Project Management from 1996-2012. We identify six persistent research themes: project time management, project risk management, programme management, large-scale project management......, project success/failure and practitioner development. These differ from those presented in review and editorial articles in the literature. In addition, topics missing from the PM BOK: knowledge management project-based organization and project portfolio management have become more popular topics...

  8. Pesticide Spill Prevention and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    oxidizing agents. Bacillus thuringiensis, 10% (Summit B.t.i. Briquets ) Alkaline conditions above ph 9 may denature product. Boric Acid, aerosol (Perma...and strong oxidizing compounds. The product can corrode iron, steel, tin plate and copper. Methoprene (Altosid XR Briquets ) None. Methoprene... Briquets ) Boric Acid, aerosol (Perma-Dust PT 249) Bifenthrin, 7.9% liquid (Talstar P Professional) YES Carbaryl, 80

  9. CDC's Emergency Management Program activities - worldwide, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    In 2003, recognizing the increasing frequency and complexity of disease outbreaks and disasters and a greater risk for terrorism, CDC established the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), bringing together CDC staff members who respond to public health emergencies to enhance communication and coordination. To complement the physical EOC environment, CDC implemented the Incident Management System (IMS), a staffing structure and set of standard operational protocols and services to support and monitor CDC program-led responses to complex public health emergencies. The EOC and IMS are key components of CDC's Emergency Management Program (EMP), which applies emergency management principles to public health practice. To enumerate activities conducted by the EMP during 2003-2012, CDC analyzed data from daily reports and activity logs. The results of this analysis determined that, during 2003-2012, the EMP fully activated the EOC and IMS on 55 occasions to support responses to infectious disease outbreaks, natural disasters, national security events (e.g., conventions, presidential addresses, and international summits), mass gatherings (e.g., large sports and social events), and man-made disasters. On 109 other occasions, the EMP was used to support emergency responses that did not require full EOC activation, and the EMP also conducted 30 exercises and drills. This report provides an overview of those 194 EMP activities.

  10. Results of the Earth Summit in Rio; Advancement of international environmental law through the 1992 Environment Conference. Ergebnisse des Erdgipfels von Rio; Weiterentwicklung des Umweltvoelkerrechts durch die UN-Umweltkonferenz von 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohmann, H.

    1993-04-15

    The paper shows that the environment summit was by no means a failure and that it proved possible to further advance principles of and duties under international environmental law that are in the process of development and to reach a consensus in most of the pressing issues facing mankind. It gives an outline of the developments since 1972 and valuates the documents of international law that were passed - the Declaration of Rio, Agenda 21, Declaration of Principle on Forest, the conventions for the protection of species and on global climate changes. Particularly the Declaration of Rio will have a lasting influence on customary law and will become known as one of the fundamental texts in the history of international environmental law. Important duties that have evolved through customary law were confirmed, specified and, in part, developed further. The right of development, intergenerational responsibility, sustainable development and the precautionary principle were definitely acknowledged. In summary, a duty to cooperate in a spirit of global partnership is establishing itself. (orig./HSCH)

  11. Strategic Management: Managing Change by Managing Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Overview," op. cit., p. 129. 12 For a particularly good treatment of this subject, see Victor Vroom and Author Jago, The New I Leadership: Managing...Copy (6 4 of 65copies AD-A265 796 IDA DOCUMENT D- 1356 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT: MANAGING CHANGE BY MANAGING PARTICIPATION Paul H . Richanbach Frederick R...any Government Agency. I I U I R DForm Approved PII REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB No. 0704-0188 Putic re rtir•g h ,,cen for tIh colebdin of

  12. Manage Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manage Stress Print This Topic En español Manage Stress Browse Sections The Basics Overview Signs and Health ... and Health Effects What are the signs of stress? When people are under stress, they may feel: ...

  13. Construction management

    CERN Document Server

    Pellicer, Eugenio; Teixeira, José C; Moura, Helder P; Catalá, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The management of construction projects is a wide ranging and challenging discipline in an increasingly international industry, facing continual challenges and demands for improvements in safety, in quality and cost control, and in the avoidance of contractual disputes. Construction Management grew out of a Leonardo da Vinci project to develop a series of Common Learning Outcomes for European Managers in Construction. Financed by the European Union, the project aimed to develop a library of basic materials for developing construction management skills for use in a pan-European context. Focused exclusively on the management of the construction phase of a building project from the contractor's point of view, Construction Management covers the complete range of topics of which mastery is required by the construction management professional for the effective delivery of new construction projects. With the continued internationalisation of the construction industry, Construction Management will be required rea...

  14. Anger Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Managing your anger. Australian Psychological Society. http://www.psychology.org.au/publications/tip_sheets/anger/. Accessed March ... procedures/anger-management/basics/definition/PRC-20014603 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms Any use of ...

  15. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  16. Medical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Medical Management Although there’s no cure for CMT, there are ... individualized physical therapy program. For more on medical management of CMT, see Surgery Sometimes, Bracing Often, Caution ...

  17. Weight Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anger Weight Management Weight Management Smoking and Weight Healthy Weight Loss Being Comfortable in Your Own Skin Your Weight Loss Expectations & Goals Healthier Lifestyle Healthier Lifestyle Physical Fitness Food & Nutrition Sleep, Stress & Relaxation Emotions & Relationships HealthyYouTXT ...

  18. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  19. Manageable creativity

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This article notes a perception in mainstream management theory and practice that creativity has shifted from being disruptive or destructive to 'manageable'. This concept of manageable creativity in business is reflected in a similar rhetoric in cultural policy, especially towards the creative industries. The article argues that the idea of 'manageable creativity' can be traced back to a 'heroic' and a 'structural' model of creativity. It is argued that the 'heroic' model of creativity is be...

  20. How do Category Managers Manage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Kim Sundtoft; Sigurbjornsson, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to explore the managerial role of category managers in purchasing. A network management perspective is adopted. A case based research methodology is applied, and three category managers managing a diverse set of component and service categories in a global production...... of the role of the category manager in purchasing....... firm is observed while providing accounts of their progress and results in meetings. We conclude that the network management classification scheme originally deve loped by Harland and Knight (2001) and Knight and Harland (2005) is a valuable and fertile theoretical framework for the analysis...

  1. Time Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilov, Todor, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The time management is worthy goal of many human activities. It concerns variety problems related to goals definition, assessment of available resources, control of management policies, scheduling of decisions. This book is an attempt to illustrate the decision making process in time management for different success stories, which can be used as…

  2. Knowledge Management

    CERN Document Server

    Gerami, Mohsen

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the important process of knowledge and its management, and differences between tacit and explicit knowledge and understanding the culture as a key issue for the successful implementation of knowledge management, in addition to, this paper is concerned with the four-stage model for the evolution of information technology (IT) support for knowledge management in law firms.

  3. Brand management

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The Thesis shows theoretical approaches of brand management and compares it with best practices used in international and czech companies. There is a picture of brand management impact of brand management into consumption behaviour of university students in Czech republic documented by own desk research.

  4. Time Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilov, Todor, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The time management is worthy goal of many human activities. It concerns variety problems related to goals definition, assessment of available resources, control of management policies, scheduling of decisions. This book is an attempt to illustrate the decision making process in time management for different success stories, which can be used as…

  5. Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Hummel; K. L. O' Hara

    2008-01-01

    Global variation in forests and in human cultures means that a single method for managing forests is not possible. However, forest management everywhere shares some common principles because it is rooted in physical and biological sciences like chemistry and genetics. Ecological forest management is an approach that combines an understanding of universal processes with...

  6. Knowledge management: another management fad?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard J. Ponzi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management is a subject of a growth body of literature. While capturing the interest of practitioners and scholars in the mid-1990s, knowledge management remains a broadly defined concept with faddish characteristics. Based on annual counts of article retrieved from Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index, and ABI Inform referring to three previous recognized management fad, this paper introduces empirical evidence that proposes that a typical management movement generally reveals itself as a fad in approximately five years. In applying this approach and assumption to the case of knowledge management, the findings suggest that knowledge management is at least living longer than typical fads and perhaps is in the process of establishing itself as a new aspect of management. To further the understanding of knowledge management's development, its interdisciplinary activity and breadth are reported and briefly discussed.

  7. Risk Management

    OpenAIRE

    Černák, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Master's Thesis deals with the topic of risk management in a non-financial company. The goal of this Thesis is to create a framework for review of risk management process and to practically apply it in a case study. Objectives of the theoretical parts are: stating the reasons for risk management in non-financial companies, addressing the main parts of risk management and providing guidance for review of risk management process. A special attention is paid to financial risks. The practical...

  8. Incidence and Management Costs of Freshwater Aquatic Nuisance Species at Projects Operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    the occurrence of ANS impacts (Yes or No) from freshwater algae, large aquatic plants, fish , zebra mussels, Asiatic clams, water fleas, crayfish...investment in research and development, especially for nuisance aquatic plants, fresh- water clams, and certain invasive fish species. Even so, aggregate...water hyacinths, hydrilla, common reed, sea lamprey, and the zebra mussel are especially notorious for their costly impacts on freshwater services

  9. Adaptive management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Lucy; Campbell, Bruce Morgan; Frost, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in scientific articles, policy documents and management plans, but both understanding and application of the concept is mixed. This paper reviews recent literature from conservation and natural resource management journals to assess diversity in how the term is used, highlight ambiguities and consider how...... the concept might be further assessed. AM is currently being used to describe many different management contexts, scales and locations. Few authors define the term explicitly or describe how it offers a means to improve management outcomes in their specific management context. Many do not adhere to the idea......Adaptive management (AM) emerged in the literature in the mid-1970s in response both to a realization of the extent of uncertainty involved in management, and a frustration with attempts to use modelling to integrate knowledge and make predictions. The term has since become increasingly widely used...

  10. Podzolização em solos de áreas de depressão de topo dos tabuleiros costeiros do Nordeste brasileiro Podzolization in soils of depressed summit areas on the coastal plains of the brazilian Northeastern region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elen Alvarenga Silva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Os solos associados às depressões de topo dos Tabuleiros Costeiros são diferenciados sob vários aspectos ainda pouco estudados no Brasil. Geralmente, à medida que se aproxima dessas depressões, nota-se que a textura dos solos é mais arenosa e o hidromorfismo, mais acentuado, sendo comum a ocorrência de Espodossolos. Neste contexto, o objetivo deste trabalho foi realizar diferentes extrações de Fe, Al, Si e C orgânico com o intuito de compreender o processo de podzolização em solos associados às depressões de topo dos Tabuleiros Costeiros do Nordeste brasileiro. Foram descritos perfis e coletadas amostras de solo em quatro áreas: Coruripe, AL; Neópolis, SE; Acajutiba, BA; e Nova Viçosa, BA. Nas amostras, determinou-se o teor de Fe, Al e Si pelos extratores ditionito-citrato-bicarbonato de sódio, oxalato de amônio e pirofosfato de sódio e realizou-se o fracionamento químico da matéria orgânica do solo. Os aumentos nos teores de C orgânico e de Fe e Al pelos diferentes extratores nos horizontes iluviais (de acúmulo de cada solo, relativamente aos horizontes eluviais (de perda, refletiram a morfologia de campo e reforçaram a importância do processo de podzolização nos solos estudados. Complexos Al-húmus dominam inteiramente a matriz dos horizontes iluviais associados ao hidromorfismo, enquanto naqueles sem hidromorfismo a influência das diferentes formas de Fe é variável. O perfil de Espodossolo Ferrihumilúvico é o único, dos quatro estudados, que possui horizontes espódicos com subscrito "s" e, portanto, onde os teores de Fe extraídos refletiram-se diferencialmente na morfologia.The soils associated to depressed summits on the Coastal Plains are still little studied in Brazil and are differentiated in several aspects. Generally, the closer a soil is to these depressions, the sandier is the texture and the more accentuated the hydromorphism, where the occurrence of Spodosols is common. The objective of this

  11. Change Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motab Raja Aljohani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Managing change within organizations is a core challenge for the HR professionals as any change concerns people working within the organization. The study of Human Resource Management is based on achievement of goals through corporate strategy and effective management of change within the organization. Change can be successful when it links people job satisfaction and productivity within an organization. Effective change management can result in greater productivity higher work life quality and improved readiness for future changes. Most HR professionals are regularly being asked for developing attitudes and personal skills for change implementation as technical understanding of applying the tools for managing change. This article will outline the challenges faced by Human Resource managers in change implementation. The well-known theories and literature will also be discussed to share light on the importance and change management for HR. Also recommendations and suggestion will be provided for improving change management process within an organizational context. Keywords Change Management Human Resource Management

  12. For certification-registration to ISO14001 `environmental management system`; ISO14001 `kankyo management system` shinsa toroku eno torikumi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terada, H. [Japan Standards Association, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-04-05

    This paper describes the `Environmental management system` of ISO. This standard was made as a part of the contribution of industries to Rio Summit. It was initially an sustaining standard, and was unified by ISO. Some items to be adapted are required for certification-registration. However, the conditions are judged by the completion and adaptation of system and its effectiveness on the basis of three promises, i.e., continuous improvement, observance of laws, and prevention of pollution, in which the current level is not directly considered. It is significant for the system to define the responsibility, authority, and route of report. It is necessary to identify parameters for monitoring and measuring the operation and activity which provide remarkable environmental impact. Principle of the system introduction is top-down. The decision-making is a premise. The certification-registration recognizes that the environmental management system constructed by company or organization satisfies the required standard, but it does not guarantee the environmental performance. It depends on how to achieve the plan and purpose by using the system. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Hotspots and Challenges of Shipping Development Based on the World Shipping Summit 2015%从国际海运年会2015展望航运发展热点与挑战∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯; 袁裕鹏; 严新平; 邹明雷

    2016-01-01

    In view of the advances presented at the World Shipping Summit 201 5,the hotspots and challenges of the shipping development are reviewed under the new circumstances of the modern shipping industry,in order to provide a reference for the perspectives of the industry.The emerging concepts of the modern shipping industry mainly include:the applications of the big data,mobile internet services,and shipping industry based on the"Industry 4.0".The intelligent, high-performance and green ship has been highlighted as the develop trend of modern shipping industry.The major chal-lenges lie in the reduction of operation cost,innovation and upgrading of current business model,etc.%基于国际海运年会2015,从当今航运业发展的新形势出发,展望了航运业发展的热点与挑战,以期为航运业的发展方向提供参考依据。其中,新形势下航运业发展新理念主要体现在大数据应用、基于移动互联的信息共享与服务以及基于工业4.0实现航运发展新蜕变;船舶智能化以及船舶高效绿色化将是新形势下航运业发展的新趋势;而新形势下航运发展的新挑战则主要体现在降成本运营和商业模式创新及升级等方面。

  14. Managing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slavich, Barbara; Velikova, Silviya Svejenova

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at providing definitional clarity on creativity and a systematic understanding of its management in organizations. By drawing on the results of a content analysis of creativity definitions in 440 scholarly publications in the field of management between 1990 and 2014, this study...... clarifies how scholars in the management domain have defined the concept and identifies core categories shared by these definitions. It also brings together these conceptual categories into an integrative multilevel framework of relevance for managing creativity in organizations. The framework outlines...... a view of managing creativity, which involves managing interconnected processes as well as dualities, such as processes-outcomes, individuals-collectives, and permanent-temporary creativity units. Finally, it paves the way to new research frontiers for the domain....

  15. Portfolio Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Enterprise Business Information Services Division (EBIS) supports the Laboratory and its functions through the implementation and support of business information systems on behalf of its business community. EBIS Five Strategic Focus Areas: (1) Improve project estimating, planning and delivery capability (2) Improve maintainability and sustainability of EBIS Application Portfolio (3) Leap forward in IT Leadership (4) Comprehensive Talent Management (5) Continuous IT Security Program. Portfolio Management is a strategy in which software applications are managed as assets

  16. Risk management

    OpenAIRE

    McManus, John

    2009-01-01

    Few projects are completed on time, on budget, and to their original requirement or specifications. Focusing on what project managers need to know about risk in the pursuit of delivering projects, Risk Management covers key components of the risk management process and the software development process, as well as best practices for risk identification, risk planning, and risk analysis. The book examines risk planning, risk analysis responses to risk, the tracking and modelling of risks, intel...

  17. Event Management

    OpenAIRE

    Havlenová, Tereza

    2016-01-01

    Event is an experience that is perceived by all the senses. Event management is a process involving the various activities that are assigned to staffers. Organizing special events became an individual field. If the manager understand the events as a communication platform gets into the hands of a modern, multifunctional and very impressive tool. The procedure to implement a successful event in a particular area is part of this work. The first part explains the issues of event management on th...

  18. Talent management

    OpenAIRE

    Lappyová, Nella

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with talent management. It is divided into two parts, a theoretical one and a practical one. The aim is to provide a comprehensive overview of talent management from a theoretical and practical point of view. The aim of the practical part is also to assess talent management at Alliance Healthcare Ltd. giving my own recommendations on the basis of theoretical knowledge. The theoretical part is based on theoretical knowledge and professional literature. It aims to explain basi...

  19. Portfolio Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Enterprise Business Information Services Division (EBIS) supports the Laboratory and its functions through the implementation and support of business information systems on behalf of its business community. EBIS Five Strategic Focus Areas: (1) Improve project estimating, planning and delivery capability (2) Improve maintainability and sustainability of EBIS Application Portfolio (3) Leap forward in IT Leadership (4) Comprehensive Talent Management (5) Continuous IT Security Program. Portfolio Management is a strategy in which software applications are managed as assets

  20. Practice management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althausen, Peter L; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    The practicing orthopaedic traumatologist must have a sound knowledge of business fundamentals to be successful in the changing healthcare environment. Practice management encompasses multiple topics including governance, the financial aspects of billing and coding, physician extender management, ancillary service development, information technology, transcription utilization, and marketing. Some of these are universal, but several of these areas may be most applicable to the private practice of medicine. Attention to each component is vital to develop an understanding of the intricacies of practice management.