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Sample records for hydride transfer reaction

  1. Insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of the hydride transfer reactions between quinones and lumiflavin: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Clorice R; Jaglinski, Tanner C; Kastenschmidt, Ashly M; Song, Eun H; Gross, Adam K; Krause, Alyssa J; Gollmar, Jonathan M; Meise, Kristin J; Stenerson, Zachary S; Weibel, Tyler J; Dison, Andrew; Finnegan, Mackenzie R; Griesi, Daniel S; Heltne, Michael D; Hughes, Tom G; Hunt, Connor D; Jansen, Kayla A; Xiong, Adam H; Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics and equilibrium of the hydride transfer reaction between lumiflavin and a number of substituted quinones was studied using density functional theory. The impact of electron withdrawing/donating substituents on the redox potentials of quinones was studied. In addition, the role of these substituents on the kinetics of the hydride transfer reaction with lumiflavin was investigated in detail under the transition state (TS) theory assumption. The hydride transfer reactions were found to be more favorable for an electron-withdrawing substituent. The activation barrier exhibited a quadratic relationship with the driving force of these reactions as derived under the formalism of modified Marcus theory. The present study found a significant extent of electron delocalization in the TS that is stabilized by enhanced electrostatic, polarization, and exchange interactions. Analysis of geometry, bond-orders, and energetics revealed a predominant parallel (Leffler-Hammond) effect on the TS. Closer scrutiny reveals that electron-withdrawing substituents, although located on the acceptor ring, reduce the N-H bond order of the donor fragment in the precursor complex. Carried out in the gas-phase, this is the first ever report of a theoretical study of flavin's hydride transfer reactions with quinones, providing an unfiltered view of the electronic effect on the nuclear reorganization of donor-acceptor complexes.

  2. Steric Effect for Proton, Hydrogen-Atom, andHydride Transfer Reactions with Geometric Isomers of NADH-Model Ruthenium Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita E.; Cohen, B.W.; Polyansky, D.E.; Achord, P.; Cabelli, D.; Muckerman, J.T.; Tanaka, K.; Thummel, R.P.; Zong, R.

    2012-01-01

    Two isomers, [Ru(1)]{sup 2+} (Ru = Ru(bpy){sub 2}, bpy = 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, 1 = 2-(pyrid-2{prime}-yl)-1-azaacridine) and [Ru(2)]{sup 2+} (2 = 3-(pyrid-2{prime}-yl)-4-azaacridine), are bio-inspired model compounds containing the nicotinamide functionality and can serve as precursors for the photogeneration of C-H hydrides for studying reactions pertinent to the photochemical reduction of metal-C{sub 1} complexes and/or carbon dioxide. While it has been shown that the structural differences between the azaacridine ligands of [Ru(1)]{sup 2+} and [Ru(2)]{sup 2+} have a significant effect on the mechanism of formation of the hydride donors, [Ru(1HH)]{sup 2+} and [Ru(2HH)]{sup 2+}, in aqueous solution, we describe the steric implications for proton, net-hydrogen-atom and net-hydride transfer reactions in this work. Protonation of [Ru(2{sup {sm_bullet}-})]{sup +} in aprotic and even protic media is slow compared to that of [Ru(1{sup {sm_bullet}-})]{sup +}. The net hydrogen-atom transfer between *[Ru(1)]{sup 2+} and hydroquinone (H{sub 2}Q) proceeds by one-step EPT, rather than stepwise electron-proton transfer. Such a reaction was not observed for *[Ru(2)]{sup 2+} because the non-coordinated N atom is not easily available for an interaction with H{sub 2}Q. Finally, the rate of the net hydride ion transfer from [Ru(1HH)]{sup 2+} to [Ph{sub 3}C]{sup +} is significantly slower than that of [Ru(2HH)]{sup 2+} owing to steric congestion at the donor site.

  3. Oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions: insights from quantum chemistry calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hujun; Liu, Chengcheng; Yuan, Ying; Zhou, Tao; Fan, Ting; Lei, Qunfang; Fang, Wenjun

    2016-01-21

    The mechanisms for the oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5) by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions have been systematically studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the basis of the calculations, we investigated the original mechanism proposed by Hillhouse and co-workers for the activation of N2O. The calculations showed that the complex with an initial O-coordination of N2O to the coordinatively unsaturated Hf center is not a local minimum. Then we proposed a new reaction mechanism to investigate how N2O is activated and why N2O selectively oxidize phenyl and hydride ligands of . Frontier molecular orbital theory analysis indicates that N2O is activated by nucleophilic attack by the phenyl or hydride ligand. Present calculations provide new insights into the activation of N2O involving the direct oxygen atom transfer from nitrous oxide to metal-ligand bonds instead of the generally observed oxygen abstraction reaction to generate metal-oxo species.

  4. Computational Replication of the Primary Isotope Dependence of Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effects in Solution Hydride Transfer Reactions: Supporting the Isotopically Different Tunneling Ready State Conformations

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported a study of the steric effect on the 1° isotope dependence of 2° KIEs for several hydride transfer reactions in solution (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 6653). The unusual 2° KIEs decrease as the 1° isotope changes from H to D, and more in the sterically hindered systems. These were explained in terms of a more crowded tunneling ready state (TRS) conformation in D-tunneling, which has a shorter donor-acceptor distance (DAD), than in H-tunneling. In order to examine the isoto...

  5. Concerted proton-coupled electron transfer from a metal-hydride complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrez, Marc; Steinmetz, Romain; Ott, Sascha; Gloaguen, Frederic; Hammarström, Leif

    2014-02-01

    Metal hydrides are key intermediates in the catalytic reduction of protons and CO2 as well as in the oxidation of H2. In these reactions, electrons and protons are transferred to or from separate acceptors or donors in bidirectional protoncoupled electron transfer (PCET) steps. The mechanistic interpretation of PCET reactions of metal hydrides has focused on the stepwise transfer of electrons and protons. A concerted transfer may, however, occur with a lower reaction barrier and therefore proceed at higher catalytic rates. Here we investigate the feasibility of such a reaction by studying the oxidation–deprotonation reactions of a tungsten hydride complex. The rate dependence on the driving force for both electron transfer and proton transfer—employing different combinations of oxidants and bases—was used to establish experimentally the concerted, bidirectional PCET of a metal-hydride species. Consideration of the findings presented here in future catalyst designs may lead to more-efficient catalysts.

  6. Experimental comparison on heat transfer-enhancing component of metal hydride bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun-goo, E-mail: hgkang@nfri.re.kr; Chung, Dong-you; Oh, Yun Hee; Chang, Min Ho; Yun, Sei-Hun

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Two small ZrCo metal hydride beds were developed. • Copper foam or fin as heat transfer-enhancing component are experimentally compared. • Copper foam bed is more efficient for uniform and rapid heating of metal hydride. • Copper foam bed is more efficient in removal of reaction heat during absorption. - Abstract: Metal hydride bed will be one of the key components for safe handling of tritium in fusion fuel cycle. In case of normal or emergency shutdown of fuel cycle, metal hydride bed installed in storage and delivery system (SDS) of tritium plant will absorb tritium gas in the system as soon as possible. Supply of hydrogen isotope gas to fueling system of fusion reactor will start from the metal hydride beds. Rapid delivery, rapid recovery including rapid heating and cooling are key issues. For better performance of metal hydride bed, various forms of heat transfer enhancing component or design can be applied. This study aims to help the selection of heat transfer enhancing component. Two small ZrCo beds with copper foam and copper fin were developed and experimented with hydrogen gas. Recovery and delivery performance, heating and cooling performance are compared. Experimental results show metal hydride bed with copper foam has improved performance. Uniform heating of metal hydride during desorption and removal of reaction heat during absorption are more efficient with copper foam bed than copper fin bed.

  7. Iron Hydride Detection and Intramolecular Hydride Transfer in a Synthetic Model of Mono-Iron Hydrogenase with a CNS Chelate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgaprasad, Gummadi; Xie, Zhu-Lin; Rose, Michael J

    2016-01-19

    We report the identification and reactivity of an iron hydride species in a synthetic model complex of monoiron hydrogenase. The hydride complex is derived from a phosphine-free CNS chelate that includes a Fe-C(NH)(═O) bond (carbamoyl) as a mimic of the active site iron acyl. The reaction of [((O═)C(HN)N(py)S(Me))Fe(CO)2(Br)] (1) with NaHBEt3 generates the iron hydride intermediate [((O═)C(HN)N(py)S(Me))Fe(H)(CO)2] (2; δFe-H = -5.08 ppm). Above -40 °C, the hydride species extrudes CH3S(-) via intramolecular hydride transfer, which is stoichiometrically trapped in the structurally characterized dimer μ2-(CH3S)2-[((O═)C(HN)N(Ph))Fe(CO)2]2 (3). Alternately, when activated by base ((t)BuOK), 1 undergoes desulfurization to form a cyclometalated species, [((O═)C(NH)NC(Ph))Fe(CO)2] (5); derivatization of 5 with PPh3 affords the structurally characterized species [((O═)C(NH)NC)Fe(CO)(PPh3)2] (6), indicating complex 6 as the common intermediate along each pathway of desulfurization.

  8. Solvent influence on the thermodynamics for hydride transfer from bis(diphosphine) complexes of nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly Robinson, Samantha J; Zall, Christopher M; Miller, Deanna L; Linehan, John C; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-06-14

    The thermodynamic hydricity of a metal hydride can vary considerably between solvents. This parameter can be used to determine the favourability of a hydride-transfer reaction, such as the reaction between a metal hydride and CO2 to produce formate. Because the hydricities of these species do not vary consistently between solvents, reactions that are thermodynamically unfavourable in one solvent can be favourable in others. The hydricity of a water-soluble, bis-phosphine nickel hydride complex was compared to the hydricity of formate in water and in acetonitrile. Formate is a better hydride donor than [HNi(dmpe)2](+) by 7 kcal mol(-1) in acetonitrile, and no hydride transfer from [HNi(dmpe)2](+) to CO2 occurs in this solvent. The hydricity of [HNi(dmpe)2](+) is greatly improved in water relative to acetonitrile, in that reduction of CO2 to formate by [HNi(dmpe)2](+) was found to be thermodynamically downhill by 8 kcal mol(-1). Catalysis for the hydrogenation of CO2 was pursued, but the regeneration of [HNi(dmpe)2] under catalytic conditions was unfavourable. However, the present results demonstrate that the solvent dependence of thermodynamic parameters such as hydricity and acidity can be exploited in order to produce systems with balanced or favourable overall thermodynamics. This approach should be advantageous for the design of future water-soluble catalysts.

  9. Hydrogen and Dihydrogen Bonds in the Reactions of Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkova, Natalia V; Epstein, Lina M; Filippov, Oleg A; Shubina, Elena S

    2016-08-10

    The dihydrogen bond-an interaction between a transition-metal or main-group hydride (M-H) and a protic hydrogen moiety (H-X)-is arguably the most intriguing type of hydrogen bond. It was discovered in the mid-1990s and has been intensively explored since then. Herein, we collate up-to-date experimental and computational studies of the structural, energetic, and spectroscopic parameters and natures of dihydrogen-bonded complexes of the form M-H···H-X, as such species are now known for a wide variety of hydrido compounds. Being a weak interaction, dihydrogen bonding entails the lengthening of the participating bonds as well as their polarization (repolarization) as a result of electron density redistribution. Thus, the formation of a dihydrogen bond allows for the activation of both the MH and XH bonds in one step, facilitating proton transfer and preparing these bonds for further transformations. The implications of dihydrogen bonding in different stoichiometric and catalytic reactions, such as hydrogen exchange, alcoholysis and aminolysis, hydrogen evolution, hydrogenation, and dehydrogenation, are discussed.

  10. Comparison between different reactions of group IV hydride with H

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Shaolong; ZHANG; Xuqiang; ZHANG; Qinggang; ZHANG; Yici

    2006-01-01

    The four-dimensional time-dependent quantum dynamics calculations for reactions of group IV hydride with H are carried out by employing the semirigid vibrating rotor target model and the time-dependent wave packet method. The reaction possibility, cross section and rate constants for reactions (H+SiH4 and H+GeH4) in different initial vibrational and rotational states are obtained. The common feature for such kind of reaction process is summarized. The theoretical result is consistent with available measurement, which indicates the credibility of this theory and the potential energy surface.

  11. Equilibrium composition for the reaction of plutonium hydride with air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    There are six independent constituents with 4 chemical elements, i.e. PuH2.7(s), PuN(s), Pu2O3(s), N2, O2 and H2, therefore , the system described involves of 2 independent reactions ,both those of the experimental, which indicates that the chemical equilibrium is nearly completely approached. Therefore, it is believed that the reaction rate of plutonium hydride with air is extremely rapid. The present paper has briefly discussed the simultaneous reactions and its thermodynamic coupling effect.

  12. Designing metal hydride complexes for water splitting reactions: a molecular electrostatic potential approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, K S; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2014-08-28

    The hydridic character of octahedral metal hydride complexes of groups VI, VII and VIII has been systematically studied using molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) topography. The absolute minimum of MESP at the hydride ligand (Vmin) and the MESP value at the hydride nucleus (VH) are found to be very good measures of the hydridic character of the hydride ligand. The increasing/decreasing electron donating feature of the ligand environment is clearly reflected in the increasing/decreasing negative character of Vmin and VH. The formation of an outer sphere metal hydride-water complex showing the HH dihydrogen interaction is supported by the location and the value of Vmin near the hydride ligand. A higher negative MESP suggested lower activation energy for H2 elimination. Thus, MESP features provided a way to fine-tune the ligand environment of a metal-hydride complex to achieve high hydridicity for the hydride ligand. The applicability of an MESP based hydridic descriptor in designing water splitting reactions is tested for group VI metal hydride model complexes of tungsten.

  13. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  14. A thermodynamic and kinetic study of hydride transfer of a caffeine derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaozhen; Hao, Weifang; Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Parker, Vernon D

    2012-08-03

    One representative type of heterocyclic compound that can release a hydride ion is 7,8-dihydro-9-methylcaffeine (CAFH). The one-electron oxidation potential of CAFH [-0.294 (V vs Fc(+/0))] and the one-electron reduction potential of CAF(+) [-2.120 (V vs Fc(+/0))] were obtained using two different methods, CV and OSWV. Applying titration calorimetry data in thermodynamic cycles, the enthalpies of CAFH releasing a hydride ion [57.6 kcal/mol] and releasing a hydrogen atom [80.3 kcal/mol] and of its radical cation CAFH(•+) releasing a proton [33.0 kcal/mol] and releasing a hydrogen atom [38.4 kcal/mol] have been determined. Several conclusions can be drawn from the thermodynamic results: (1) CAFH is a very good single-electron donor whose single-electron oxidation potential is much less positive than that of NAD(P)H model compound BNAH [E(ox) = 0.219 V vs Fc(+/0)]. (2) The single-electron reduction potential of CAF(+) is much more negative than that of BNA(+) [E(red) = -1.419 V], which means that CAF(+) is not a good electron acceptor. Furthermore, CAFH is a very good hydride donor compared to BNAH. The results of non-steady-state kinetic studies, for the reaction of CAFH and AcrH(+)ClO(4)(-), show that the ratio of t(0.50)/t(0.05) is larger than 13.5 and the ratio of k(init)/k(pfo) is larger than 1. The pseudo-first-order rate constants obtained at different reaction stages decrease with the time, and the kinetic isotope was observed to be small at a short reaction time and slowly increases to 3.72 with the progress of the reaction. These kinetic results clearly display that the hydride transfer of CAFH to AcrH(+) in acetonitrile is not a one-step mechanism, while the thermodynamic results show that CAFH is a very good electron donor. The combination of the kinetic results with the thermodynamics analysis shows that the hydride transfer of the caffeine derivative CAFH takes place by a two-step reversible mechanism and there is an intermediate in the reaction.

  15. Rules and trends of metal cation driven hydride-transfer mechanisms in metal amidoboranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Young; Lee, Han Myoung; Seo, Jongcheol; Shin, Seung Koo; Kim, Kwang S

    2010-01-01

    Group I and II metal amidoboranes have been identified as one of the promising families of materials for efficient H(2) storage. However, the underlying mechanism of the dehydrogenation of these materials is not well understood. Thus, the mechanisms and kinetics of H(2) release in metal amidoboranes are investigated using high level ab initio calculations and kinetic simulations. The metal plays the role of catalyst for the hydride transfer with formation of a metal hydride intermediate towards the dehydrogenation. In this process, with increasing ionic character of the metal hydride bond in the intermediate, the stability of the intermediate decreases, while the dehydrogenation process involving ionic recombination of the hydridic H with the protic H proceeds with a reduced barrier. Such correlations lead directly to a U-shaped relationship between the activation energy barrier for H(2) elimination and the ionicity of metal hydride bond. Oligomerized intermediates are formed by the chain reaction of the size-driven catalytic effects of metals, competing with the non-oligomerization pathway. The kinetic rates at low temperatures are determined by the maximum barrier height in the pathway (a Lambda-shaped relation), while those at moderately high temperatures are determined by most of multiple-barriers. This requires kinetic simulations. At the operating temperatures of proton exchange membrane fuel cells, the metal amidoboranes with lithium and sodium release H(2) along both oligomerization and non-oligomerization paths. The sodium amidoboranes show the most accelerated rates, while others release H(2) at similar rates. In addition, we predict that the novel metal amidoborane-based adducts and mixtures would release H(2) with accelerated rates as well as with enhanced reversibility. This comprehensive study is useful for further developments of active metal-based better hydrogen storage materials.

  16. Another Look at the Mechanisms of Hydride Transfer Enzymes with Quantum and Classical Transition Path Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierlenga, Michael W; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven D

    2015-04-02

    The mechanisms involved in enzymatic hydride transfer have been studied for years, but questions remain due, in part, to the difficulty of probing the effects of protein motion and hydrogen tunneling. In this study, we use transition path sampling (TPS) with normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) to calculate the barrier to hydride transfer in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and human heart lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Calculation of the work applied to the hydride allowed for observation of the change in barrier height upon inclusion of quantum dynamics. Similar calculations were performed using deuterium as the transferring particle in order to approximate kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). The change in barrier height in YADH is indicative of a zero-point energy (ZPE) contribution and is evidence that catalysis occurs via a protein compression that mediates a near-barrierless hydride transfer. Calculation of the KIE using the difference in barrier height between the hydride and deuteride agreed well with experimental results.

  17. Organocatalytic Synthesis of Tetrahydroquinolines from α,β-Unsaturated Ketones via 1,5-Hydride Transfer/Cyclization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Young [Soonchunhyang Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    We have presented the example of a organo-catalytic enantioselective hydride transfer/cyclization reaction cascade from cyclic amines containing α,β-unsaturated ketones. The synthetically useful ring-fused tetrahydroquinoline derivatives were obtained in moderate to high yields with moderate to high diastereoselectivities. Further investigations for an asymmetric version of this organocatalytic intramolecular redox reaction of α,β-unsaturated ketones are currently underway in our laboratory. The development for direct functionalization of sp{sup 3} C-H bonds has become an area of intense interest in synthetic organic chemistry. Because such reactions offer practical methods for the construction of structurally complex and biologically active organic molecules with atom- and step economy. The 1,5-hydride transfer and subsequent cyclization process is a well-known sp{sup 3} C-H bond function-alization strategy and has attracted considerable interest for its application in the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds.

  18. Heat transfer analysis of metal hydrides in metal-hydrogen secondary batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onischak, M.; Dharia, D.; Gidaspow, D.

    1976-01-01

    The heat transfer between a metal-hydrogen secondary battery and a hydrogen-storing metal hydride was studied. Temperature profiles of the endothermic metal hydrides and the metal-hydrogen battery were obtained during discharging of the batteries assuming an adiabatic system. Two hydride materials were considered in two physical arrangements within the battery system. In one case the hydride is positioned in a thin annular region about the battery stack; in the other the hydride is held in a tube down the center of the stack. The results show that for a typical 20 ampere-hour battery system with lanthanum pentanickel hydride as the hydrogen reservoir the system could perform successfully.

  19. Hydrogenation reaction characteristics and properties of its hydrides for magnetic regenerative material HoCu2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金滔; 吴梦茜; 黄迦乐; 汤珂; 陈立新

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogenation reaction characteristics and the properties of its hydrides for the magnetic regenerative material HoCu2 (CeCu2-type) of a cryocooler were investigated. The XRD testing reveals that the hydrides of HoCu2 were a mixture of Cu, unknown hydride I, and unknown hydride II. Based on the PCT (pressure−concentration−temperature) curves under different reaction temperatures, the relationships among reaction temperature, equilibrium pressure, and maximum hydrogen absorption capacity were analyzed and discussed. The enthalpy changeΔH and entropy changeΔS as a result of the whole hydrogenation process were also calculated from the PCT curves. The magnetization and volumetric specific heat capacity of the hydride were also measured by SQUID magnetometer and PPMS, respectively.

  20. Hydride transfer made easy in the oxidation of alcohols catalyzed by choline oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadda, G.; Orville, A.; Pennati, A.; Francis, K.; Quaye, O.; Yuan, H.; Rungsrisuriyachai, K.; Finnegan, S.; Mijatovic, S.; Nguyen, T.

    2008-06-08

    Choline oxidase (E.C. 1.1.3.17) catalyzes the two-step, four-electron oxidation of choline to glycine betaine with betaine aldehyde as enzyme-associated intermediate and molecular oxygen as final electron acceptor (Scheme 1). The gem-diol, hydrated species of the aldehyde intermediate of the reaction acts as substrate for aldehyde oxidation, suggesting that the enzyme may use similar strategies for the oxidation of the alcohol substrate and aldehyde intermediate. The determination of the chemical mechanism for alcohol oxidation has emerged from biochemical, mechanistic, mutagenetic, and structural studies. As illustrated in the mechanism of Scheme 2, the alcohol substrate is initially activated in the active site of the enzyme by removal of the hydroxyl proton. The resulting alkoxide intermediate is then stabilized in the enzyme-substrate complex via electrostatic interactions with active site amino acid residues. Alcohol oxidation then occurs quantum mechanically via the transfer of the hydride ion from the activated substrate to the N(5) flavin locus. An essential requisite for this mechanism of alcohol oxidation is the high degree of preorganization of the activated enzyme-substrate complex, which is achieved through an internal equilibrium of the Michaelis complex occurring prior to, and independently from, the subsequent hydride transfer reaction. The experimental evidence that support the mechanism for alcohol oxidation shown in Scheme 2 is briefly summarized in the Results and Discussion section.

  1. Cytochrome P450BM-3 reduces aldehydes to alcohols through a direct hydride transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspera, Ruediger; Sahele, Tariku; Lakatos, Kyle [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Washington, Box 357610, Seattle, WA 98195-7610 (United States); Totah, Rheem A., E-mail: rtotah@u.washington.edu [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Washington, Box 357610, Seattle, WA 98195-7610 (United States)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytochrome P450BM-3 reduced aldehydes to alcohols efficiently (k{sub cat} {approx} 25 min{sup -1}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduction is a direct hydride transfer from R-NADP{sup 2}H to the carbonyl moiety. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer P450 domain variants enhance reduction through potential allosteric/redox interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel reaction will have implications for metabolism of xenobiotics. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450BM-3 catalyzed the reduction of lipophilic aldehydes to alcohols efficiently. A k{sub cat} of {approx}25 min{sup -1} was obtained for the reduction of methoxy benzaldehyde with wild type P450BM-3 protein which was higher than in the isolated reductase domain (BMR) alone and increased in specific P450-domain variants. The reduction was caused by a direct hydride transfer from preferentially R-NADP{sup 2}H to the carbonyl moiety of the substrate. Weak substrate-P450-binding of the aldehyde, turnover with the reductase domain alone, a deuterium incorporation in the product from NADP{sup 2}H but not D{sub 2}O, and no inhibition by imidazole suggests the reductase domain of P450BM-3 as the potential catalytic site. However, increased aldehyde reduction by P450 domain variants (P450BM-3 F87A T268A) may involve allosteric or redox mechanistic interactions between heme and reductase domains. This is a novel reduction of aldehydes by P450BM-3 involving a direct hydride transfer and could have implications for the metabolism of endogenous substrates or xenobiotics.

  2. Hydrogen bonding to carbonyl hydride complex Cp*Mo(PMe(3))(2)(CO)H and its role in proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dub, Pavel A; Filippov, Oleg A; Belkova, Natalia V; Daran, Jean-Claude; Epstein, Lina M; Poli, Rinaldo; Shubina, Elena S

    2010-02-28

    The interaction of the carbonyl hydride complex Cp*Mo(PMe(3))(2)(CO)H with Brønsted (fluorinated alcohols, (CF(3))(n)CH(3-n)OH (n = 1-3), and CF(3)COOH) and Lewis (Hg(C(6)F(5))(2), BF(3).OEt(2)) acids was studied by variable temperature IR and NMR ((1)H, (31)P, (13)C) spectroscopies in combination with DFT/B3LYP calculations. Among the two functionalities potentially capable of the interaction - carbonyl and hydride ligands - the first was found to be the preferential binding site for weak acids, yielding CO...HOR or CO...Hg complexes as well as CO...(HOR)(2) adducts. For stronger proton donors ((CF(3))(3)COH, CF(3)COOH) hydrogen-bonding to the hydride ligand can be revealed as an intermediate of the proton transfer reaction. Whereas proton transfer to the CO ligand is not feasible, protonation of the hydride ligand yields an (eta(2)-H(2)) complex. Above 230 K dihydrogen evolution is observed leading to decomposition. Among the decomposition products compound [Cp*Mo(PMe(3))(3)(CO)](+)[(CF(3))(3)CO.2HOC(CF(3))(3)](-) resulting from a phosphine transfer reaction was characterized by X-ray diffraction. Reaction with BF(3).OEt(2) was found to produce [Cp*Mo(PMe(3))(2)(CO)BF(4)] via initial attack of the hydride ligand.

  3. Using first principles calculations to identify new destabilized metal hydride reactions for reversible hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapati, Sudhakar V; Karl Johnson, J; Sholl, David S

    2007-03-28

    Hydrides of period 2 and 3 elements are promising candidates for hydrogen storage, but typically have heats of reaction that are too high to be of use for fuel cell vehicles. Recent experimental work has focused on destabilizing metal hydrides through mixing metal hydrides with other compounds. A very large number of possible destabilized metal hydride reaction schemes exist, but the thermodynamic data required to assess the enthalpies of these reactions are not available in many cases. We have used density functional theory calculations to predict the reaction enthalpies for more than 300 destabilization reactions that have not previously been reported. The large majority of these reactions are predicted not to be useful for reversible hydrogen storage, having calculated reaction enthalpies that are either too high or too low, and hence these reactions need not be investigated experimentally. Our calculations also identify multiple promising reactions that have large enough hydrogen storage capacities to be useful in practical applications and have reaction thermodynamics that appear to be suitable for use in fuel cell vehicles and are therefore promising candidates for experimental work.

  4. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  5. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  6. Benchmarking Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) Methods on the Thymidylate Synthase-Catalyzed Hydride Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Arafet, Kemel; Kohen, Amnon; Moliner, Vicent

    2017-03-14

    Given the ubiquity of hydride-transfer reactions in enzyme-catalyzed processes, identifying the appropriate computational method for evaluating such biological reactions is crucial to perform theoretical studies of these processes. In this paper, the hydride-transfer step catalyzed by thymidylate synthase (TSase) is studied by examining hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) potentials via multiple semiempirical methods and the M06-2X hybrid density functional. Calculations of protium and tritium transfer in these reactions across a range of temperatures allowed calculation of the temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects (KIE). Dynamics and quantum-tunneling effects are revealed to have little effect on the reaction rate, but are significant in determining the KIEs and their temperature dependence. A good agreement with experiments is found, especially when computed for RM1/MM simulations. The small temperature dependence of quantum tunneling corrections and the quasiclassical contribution term cancel each other, while the recrossing transmission coefficient seems to be temperature-independent over the interval of 5-40 °C.

  7. Heat transfer characteristics of the metal hydride vessel based on the plate-fin type heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Tsutomu; Maki, Kohei; Sakaki, Yoshinori

    Heat transfer characteristics of the metal hydride vessel based on the plate-fin type heat exchanger were investigated. Metal hydride beds were filled with AB 2 type hydrogen-storage alloy's particles, Ti 0.42Zr 0.58Cr 0.78Fe 0.57Ni 0.2Mn 0.39Cu 0.03, with a storage capacity of 0.92 wt.%. Heat transfer model in the metal hydride bed based on the heat transfer mechanism for packed bed proposed by Kunii and co-workers is presented. The time-dependent hydrogen absorption/desorption rate and pressure in the metal hydride vessel calculated by the model were compared with the experimental results. During the hydriding, calculated hydrogen absorption rates agreed with measured ones. Calculated thermal equilibrium hydrogen pressures were slightly lower than the measured hydrogen pressures at the inlet of metal hydride vessel. Taking account of the pressure gradient between the inlet of metal hydride vessel and the metal hydride bed, it is considered that this discrepancy is reasonable. During the dehydriding, there were big differences between the calculated hydrogen desorption rates and measured ones. As calculated hydrogen desorption rates were lower than measured ones, there were big differences between the calculated thermal equilibrium hydrogen pressures and the measured hydrogen pressures at the inlet of metal hydride vessel. It is considered that those differences are due to the differences of the heat transfer characteristics such as thermal conductivity of metal hydride particles and porosity between the assumed and actual ones. It is important to obtain the heat transfer characteristics such as thermal conductivity of metal hydride particles and porosity both during the hydriding and dehydriding to design a metal hydride vessel.

  8. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Aymard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g−1 at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li+/Li0 and the lowest electrode polarization (2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MHx and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MHx + xLi+ + xe− in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths—involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content—were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent

  9. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymard, Luc; Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g(-1) at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li(+)/Li(0)) and the lowest electrode polarization (hydrides Mg2MH x and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MH x + xLi(+) + xe(-) in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths-involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content-were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent nano-research prospects which

  10. Interface reactions and stability of a hydride composite (NaBH4 + MgH2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Bielmann, Michael; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-06-21

    The use of the interaction of two hydrides is a well-known concept used to increase the hydrogen equilibrium pressure of composite mixtures in comparison to that of pure systems. The thermodynamics and reaction kinetics of such hydride composites are reviewed and experimentally verified using the example NaBH(4) + MgH(2). Particular emphasis is placed on the measurement of the kinetics and stability using thermodesorption experiments and measurements of pressure-composition isotherms, respectively. The interface reactions in the composite reaction were analysed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and by simultaneously probing D(2) desorption from NaBD(4) and H(2) desorption from MgH(2). The observed destabilisation is in quantitative agreement with the calculated thermodynamic properties, including enthalpy and entropy. The results are discussed with respect to kinetic limitations of the hydrogen desorption mechanism at interfaces. General aspects of modifying hydrogen sorption properties via hydride composites are given.

  11. "Long-range" metal-ligand cooperation in H2 activation and ammonia-promoted hydride transfer with a ruthenium-acridine pincer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunanathan, Chidambaram; Gnanaprakasam, Boopathy; Iron, Mark A; Shimon, Linda J W; Milstein, David

    2010-10-27

    The acridine-based pincer complex 1 exhibits an unprecedented mode of metal-ligand cooperation involving a "long-range" interaction between the distal acridine C9 position and the metal center. Reaction of 1 with H(2)/KOH results in H(2) splitting between the Ru center and C9 with concomitant dearomatization of the acridine moiety. DFT calculations show that this process involves the formation of a Ru dihydride intermediate bearing a bent acridine ligand in which C9 is in close proximity to a hydride ligand followed by through-space hydride transfer. Ammonia induces transfer of a hydride from the Ru center of 1 to C9 of the flexible acridine pincer ligand, forming an unusual dearomatized fac-acridine PNP complex.

  12. Neutral transition metal hydrides as acids in hydrogen bonding and proton transfer: media polarity and specific solvation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levina, Vladislava A; Filippov, Oleg A; Gutsul, Evgenii I; Belkova, Natalia V; Epstein, Lina M; Lledos, Agusti; Shubina, Elena S

    2010-08-18

    Structural, spectroscopic, and electronic features of weak hydrogen-bonded complexes of CpM(CO)(3)H (M = Mo (1a), W (1b)) hydrides with organic bases (phosphine oxides R(3)PO (R = n-C(8)H(17), NMe(2)), amines NMe(3), NEt(3), and pyridine) are determined experimentally (variable temperature IR) and computationally (DFT/M05). The intermediacy of these complexes in reversible proton transfer is shown, and the thermodynamic parameters (DeltaH degrees , DeltaS degrees ) of each reaction step are determined in hexane. Assignment of the product ion pair structure is made with the help of the frequency calculations. The solvent effects were studied experimentally using IR spectroscopy in CH(2)Cl(2), THF, and CH(3)CN and computationally using conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) calculations. This complementary approach reveals the particular importance of specific solvation for the hydrogen-bond formation step. The strength of the hydrogen bond between hydrides 1 and the model bases is similar to that of the M-H...X hydrogen bond between 1 and THF (X = O) or CH(3)CN (X = N) or between CH(2)Cl(2) and the same bases. The latter competitive weak interactions lower the activities of both the hydrides and the bases in the proton transfer reaction. In this way, these secondary effects shift the proton transfer equilibrium and lead to the counterintuitive hampering of proton transfer upon solvent change from hexane to moderately polar CH(2)Cl(2) or THF.

  13. Direct generation of oxygen-stabilized radicals by H• transfer from transition metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jonathan L; Hartung, John; Han, Arthur; Norton, Jack R

    2015-01-28

    Transition-metal hydrides generate α-alkoxy radicals by H• transfer to enol ethers. We have measured the rate constant for transfer from CpCr(CO)3H to n-butyl vinyl ether and have examined the chemistry of radicals generated by such transfers. Radicals from appropriate substrates undergo 5-exo cyclization, with higher diastereoselectivity than the analogous all-carbon radicals. From such radicals it is straightforward to make substituted tetrahydrofurans.

  14. Cross-Species Analysis of Protein Dynamics Associated with Hydride and Proton Transfer in the Catalytic Cycle of the Light-Driven Enzyme Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeven, Robin; Hardman, Samantha J O; Heyes, Derren J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-02-16

    Experimental interrogation of the relationship between protein dynamics and enzyme catalysis is challenging. Light-activated protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) is an excellent model for investigating this relationship because photoinitiation of the reaction cycle enables coordinated turnover in a "dark-assembled" ternary enzyme-substrate complex. The catalytic cycle involves sequential hydride and proton transfers (from NADPH and an active site tyrosine residue, respectively) to the substrate protochlorophyllide. Studies with a limited cross-species subset of POR enzymes (n = 4) have suggested that protein dynamics associated with hydride and proton transfer are distinct [Heyes, D. J., Levy, C., Sakuma, M., Robertson, D. L., and Scrutton, N. S. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 11849-11854]. Here, we use steady-state assays and single-turnover laser flash spectroscopy to analyze hydride and proton transfer dynamics in an extended series of POR enzymes taken from many species, including cyanobacteria, algae, embryophytes, and angiosperms. Hydride/proton transfer in all eukaryotic PORs is faster compared to prokaryotic PORs, suggesting active site architecture has been optimized in eukaryotic PORs following endosymbiosis. Visible pump-probe spectroscopy was also used to demonstrate a common photoexcitation mechanism for representative POR enzymes from different branches of the phylogenetic tree. Dynamics associated with hydride transfer are localized to the active site of all POR enzymes and are conserved. However, dynamics associated with proton transfer are variable. Protein dynamics associated with proton transfer are also coupled to solvent dynamics in cyanobacterial PORs, and these networks are likely required to optimize (shorten) the donor-acceptor distance for proton transfer. These extended networks are absent in algal and plant PORs. Our analysis suggests that extended networks of dynamics are disfavored, possibly through natural selection. Implications for

  15. Theoretical kinetic isotope effects for the hydride-transfer step in lactate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, J.; Moliner, V.; Safont, V.S. (Universitat Jaume I, Castellon (Spain). Dept. die Ciencies Experimentals)

    1994-06-21

    The transition-state (TS) structure for the hydride transfer in lactate dehydrogenase (LHD) enzyme has been calculated with analytical gradients at MNDO, AM1 and PM3 semiempirical levels. The TS is a first-order saddle point on the hypersurface. (Author).

  16. Hydriding and microstructure nanocrystallization of ZK60 Mg alloy by reaction milling in hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Yuan; WANG Heng; HU Lian-xi; SUN Hong-fei; FANG Wen-bin

    2009-01-01

    The hydriding of as-cast Mg-5.5%Zn-0.6%Zr (ZK60 Mg) (mass fraction) alloy was achieved by room-temperature reaction milling in hydrogen, with the mechanical energy serving as the driving force for the process. The hydriding progress during milling was examined by hydrogen absorption measurement, and the microstructure change was characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The results show that, by room-temperature reaction milling in hydrogen, the as-cast ZK60 Mg alloy can be fully hydrided to form a nanocrystalline MgH2 single-phase microstructure. In particular, the average grain size of the MgH2 phase obtained by room-temperature reaction milling in hydrogen for 16.2 h is about 8-10 nm, and the average particle size of the as-milled hydrided powders is 2-3 μm.

  17. Transition-metal-free coupling reaction of vinylcyclopropanes with aldehydes catalyzed by tin hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieki, Ryosuke; Kani, Yuria; Tsunoi, Shinji; Shibata, Ikuya

    2015-04-13

    Donor-acceptor cyclopropanes are useful building blocks for catalytic cycloaddition reactions with a range of electrophiles to give various cyclic products. In contrast, relatively few methods are available for the synthesis of homoallylic alcohols through coupling of vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs) with aldehydes, even with transition-metal catalysts. Here, we report that the hydrostannation of vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs) was effectively promoted by dibutyliodotin hydride (Bu2 SnIH). The resultant allylic tin compounds reacted easily with aldehydes. Furthermore, the use of Bu2 SnIH was effectively catalytic in the presence of hydrosilane as a hydride source, which established a coupling reaction of VCPs with aldehydes for the synthesis of homoallylic alcohols without the use of transition-metal catalysts. In contrast to conventional catalytic reactions of VCPs, the presented method allowed the use of several VCPs in addition to conventional donor-acceptor cyclopropanes.

  18. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedner, Eric S; Chambers, Matthew B; Pitman, Catherine L; Bullock, R Morris; Miller, Alexander J M; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bond-breaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H(-)). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H2 in the presence of a base, and the potential-pKa method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen.

  19. Kinetic equation for the reaction of titanium tetrachloride with hydride functional groups of diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, A.B.; Smirnov, E.P.

    1989-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the kinetics of the reaction of titanium tetrachloride with the hydride functional groups of diamond. The research was performed on submicron powders of ASM 0.7/0.3 grade synthetic diamond with a specific surface area of 8.0 m/sup 2//g as measured from the adsorption of nitrogen. The reaction was carried out in a flow-through quartz reactor in a flow of dry He. The content of the titanium in the samples was determined by a photocolorimetric method. A kinetic equation for the reaction of diamond with titanium tetrachloride was found on the basis of a statistical approach.

  20. A variety of electrostatic interactions and adducts can activate NAD(P) cofactors for hydride transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Rob; Cedergren-Zeppezauer, Eila

    2009-03-16

    In NAD(P)-dependent enzymes the coenzyme gives or takes a hydride ion, but how the nicotinamide ring is activated to form the transition state for hydride transfer is not clear. On the basis of ultra-high resolution X-ray crystal structures of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) in complex with NADH and a number of substrate analogues we proposed that the activation of NADH is an integral part of the enzyme mechanism of aldehyde reduction [R. Meijers, R.J. Morris, H.W. Adolph, A. Merli, V.S. Lamzin, E.S. Cedergren-Zeppezauer, On the enzymatic activation of NADH, The Journal of Biological Chemistry 276(12) (2001) 9316-9321, %U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11134046; R. Meijers, H.-W. Adolph, Z. Dauter, K.S. Wilson, V.S. Lamzin, E.S. Cedergren-Zeppezauer, Structural evidence for a ligand coordination switch in liver alcohol dehydrogenase, Biochemistry 46(18) (2007) 5446-5454, %U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17429946]. We observed a nicotinamide with a severely distorted pyridine ring and a water molecule in close proximity to the ring. Quantum chemical calculations indicated that (de)protonation of the water molecule can be directly coupled to activation of NADH for hydride transfer. A systematic search of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for atoms that come within van der Waals distance of the pyridine ring of the nicotinamide reveals that a large number of NAD(P)-containing protein complexes are involved in electrostatic interactions with the enzymatic environment. Using the deposited diffraction data to analyze the cofactor and its surroundings, we observe several adducts between protein atoms and the pyridine ring that were not previously reported. This further indicates that the enzymatic activation of NAD(P) induced by electrostatic interactions is an essential part of the hydride transfer mechanism.

  1. Coenzyme binding and hydride transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus ferredoxin/flavodoxin NADP(H) oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Ana; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Goñi, Guillermina; Medina, Milagros; Hermoso, Juan A; Carrillo, Néstor; Cortez, Néstor

    2009-02-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases catalyse the reversible hydride/electron exchange between NADP(H) and ferredoxin/flavodoxin, comprising a structurally defined family of flavoenzymes with two distinct subclasses. Those present in Gram-negative bacteria (FPRs) display turnover numbers of 1-5 s(-1) while the homologues of cyanobacteria and plants (FNRs) developed a 100-fold activity increase. We investigated nucleotide interactions and hydride transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus FPR comparing them to those reported for FNRs. NADP(H) binding proceeds as in FNRs with stacking of the nicotinamide on the flavin, which resulted in formation of charge-transfer complexes prior to hydride exchange. The affinity of FPR for both NADP(H) and 2'-P-AMP was 100-fold lower than that of FNRs. The crystal structure of FPR in complex with 2'-P-AMP and NADP(+) allowed modelling of the adenosine ring system bound to the protein, whereas the nicotinamide portion was either not visible or protruding toward solvent in different obtained crystals. Stabilising contacts with the active site residues are different in the two reductase classes. We conclude that evolution to higher activities in FNRs was partially favoured by modification of NADP(H) binding in the initial complexes through changes in the active site residues involved in stabilisation of the adenosine portion of the nucleotide and in the mobile C-terminus of FPR.

  2. Numerical simulation and performance test of metal hydride hydrogen storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hsiang Yen, Bin-Hao Chen, Bao-Dong Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride reactors are widely used in many industrial applications, such as hydrogen storage, thermal compression, heat pump, etc. According to the research requirement of metal hydride hydrogen storage, the thermal analyses have been implemented in the paper. The metal hydride reaction beds are considered as coupled cylindrical tube modules which combine the chemical absorption and desorption in metal hydride. The model is then used metal hydride LaNi5 as an example to predict the performance of metal hydride hydrogen storage devices, such as the position of hydration front and the thermal flux. Under the different boundary condition the characteristics of heat transfer and mass transfer in metal hydride have influence on the hydrogen absorption and desorption. The researches revealed that the scroll design can improve the temperature distribution in the reactor and the porous tube for directing hydrogen can increase the penetration depth of hydride reaction to decrease the hydrogen absorption time.

  3. Photochemistry of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perutz, Robin N; Procacci, Barbara

    2016-08-10

    Photochemical reactivity associated with metal-hydrogen bonds is widespread among metal hydride complexes and has played a critical part in opening up C-H bond activation. It has been exploited to design different types of photocatalytic reactions and to obtain NMR spectra of dilute solutions with a single pulse of an NMR spectrometer. Because photolysis can be performed on fast time scales and at low temperature, metal-hydride photochemistry has enabled determination of the molecular structure and rates of reaction of highly reactive intermediates. We identify five characteristic photoprocesses of metal monohydride complexes associated with the M-H bond, of which the most widespread are M-H homolysis and R-H reductive elimination. For metal dihydride complexes, the dominant photoprocess is reductive elimination of H2. Dihydrogen complexes typically lose H2 photochemically. The majority of photochemical reactions are likely to be dissociative, but hydride complexes may be designed with equilibrated excited states that undergo different photochemical reactions, including proton transfer or hydride transfer. The photochemical mechanisms of a few reactions have been analyzed by computational methods, including quantum dynamics. A section on specialist methods (time-resolved spectroscopy, matrix isolation, NMR, and computational methods) and a survey of transition metal hydride photochemistry organized by transition metal group complete the Review.

  4. Bio-inspired transition metal-organic hydride conjugates for catalysis of transfer hydrogenation: experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSkimming, Alex; Chan, Bun; Bhadbhade, Mohan M; Ball, Graham E; Colbran, Stephen B

    2015-02-09

    Taking inspiration from yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (yADH), a benzimidazolium (BI(+) ) organic hydride-acceptor domain has been coupled with a 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) metal-binding domain to afford a novel multifunctional ligand (L(BI+) ) with hydride-carrier capacity (L(BI+) +H(-) ⇌L(BI) H). Complexes of the type [Cp*M(L(BI) )Cl][PF6 ]2 (M=Rh, Ir) have been made and fully characterised by cyclic voltammetry, UV/Vis spectroelectrochemistry, and, for the Ir(III) congener, X-ray crystallography. [Cp*Rh(L(BI) )Cl][PF6 ]2 catalyses the transfer hydrogenation of imines by formate ion in very goods yield under conditions where the corresponding [Cp*Ir(L(BI) )Cl][PF6 ] and [Cp*M(phen)Cl][PF6 ] (M=Rh, Ir) complexes are almost inert as catalysts. Possible alternatives for the catalysis pathway are canvassed, and the free energies of intermediates and transition states determined by DFT calculations. The DFT study supports a mechanism involving formate-driven RhH formation (90 kJ mol(-1) free-energy barrier), transfer of hydride between the Rh and BI(+) centres to generate a tethered benzimidazoline (BIH) hydride donor, binding of imine substrate at Rh, back-transfer of hydride from the BIH organic hydride donor to the Rh-activated imine substrate (89 kJ mol(-1) barrier), and exergonic protonation of the metal-bound amide by formic acid with release of amine product to close the catalytic cycle. Parallels with the mechanism of biological hydride transfer in yADH are discussed.

  5. On Transition Structures for Hydride Transfer Step in Enzyme Catalysis. A Comparative Study on Models of Glutathione Reductase Derived from Semiempirical, HF, and DFT Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Juan; Moliner, Vicente; Safont, Vicent S.; Domingo, Luís R.; Picher, María T.

    1996-11-01

    As a model of the chemical reactions that take place in the active site of gluthatione reductase, the nature of the molecular mechanism for the hydride transfer step has been characterized by means of accurate quantum chemical characterizations of transition structures. The calculations have been carried out with analytical gradients at AM1 and PM3 semiempirical procedures, ab initio at HF level with 3-21G, 4-31G, 6-31G, and 6-31G basis sets and BP86 and BLYP as density functional methods. The results of this study suggest that the endo relative orientation on the substrate imposed by the active site is optimal in polarizing the C4-Ht bond and situating the system in the neighborhood of the quadratic region of the transition structure associated to the hydride transfer step on potential energy surface. The endo arrangement of the transition structure results in optimal frontier HOMO orbital interaction between NADH and FAD partners. The geometries of the transition structures and the corresponding transition vectors, that contain the fundamental information relating reactive fluctuation patterns, are model independent and weakly dependent on the level of theory used to determine them. A comparison between simple and complex molecular models shows that there is a minimal set of coordinates describing the essentials of hydride transfer step. The analysis of transition vector components suggests that the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects can be strongly coupled, and this prompted the calculation of deuterium and tritium primary, secondary, and primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects. The results obtained agree well with experimental data and demonstrate this coupling.

  6. Recent Developments in Electron Transfer Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Rudolph A.

    1987-01-01

    Earlier results and more recent developments in electron transfer reactions are reviewed. The more recent results include inverted behavior, electronic orientation effects on reaction rates, solvent dynamics, early steps in photosynthesis, and light emission from metal electrodes.

  7. Large-scale screening of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage from first-principles calculations based on equilibrium reaction thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Chul; Kulkarni, Anant D; Johnson, J Karl; Sholl, David S

    2011-04-21

    Systematic thermodynamics calculations based on density functional theory-calculated energies for crystalline solids have been a useful complement to experimental studies of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides. We report the most comprehensive set of thermodynamics calculations for mixtures of light metal hydrides to date by performing grand canonical linear programming screening on a database of 359 compounds, including 147 compounds not previously examined by us. This database is used to categorize the reaction thermodynamics of all mixtures containing any four non-H elements among Al, B, C, Ca, K, Li, Mg, N, Na, Sc, Si, Ti, and V. Reactions are categorized according to the amount of H(2) that is released and the reaction's enthalpy. This approach identifies 74 distinct single step reactions having that a storage capacity >6 wt.% and zero temperature heats of reaction 15 ≤ΔU(0)≤ 75 kJ mol(-1) H(2). Many of these reactions, however, are likely to be problematic experimentally because of the role of refractory compounds, B(12)H(12)-containing compounds, or carbon. The single most promising reaction identified in this way involves LiNH(2)/LiH/KBH(4), storing 7.48 wt.% H(2) and having ΔU(0) = 43.6 kJ mol(-1) H(2). We also examined the complete range of reaction mixtures to identify multi-step reactions with useful properties; this yielded 23 multi-step reactions of potential interest.

  8. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion.

  9. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Hydride Cluster Anions and Their Roles in Hydrogenation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Bowen, Kit

    The interaction between transition metals and hydrogen has been an intriguing research topic for such applications as hydrogen storage and catalysis of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation. Special bonding features between TM and hydrogen are interesting not only because they are scarcely reported but also because they could help to discover and understand the nature of chemical bonding. Very recently, we discovered a PtZnH5- cluster which possessed an unprecedented planar pentagonal coordination between the H5- moiety and Pt, and exhibited special σ-aromaticity. The H5-kernel as a whole can be viewed as a η5-H5 ligand for Pt. As the second example, an H2 molecule was found to act as a ligand in the PdH3-cluster, in which two H atoms form a η2-H2 type of ligation to Pd. These transition metal hydride clusters were considered to be good hydrogen sources for hydrogenation. The reactions between PtHn- and CO2 were investigated. We observed formate in the final product H2Pt(HCO2)- .

  10. Synthesis of ruthenium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovnikov, M. A.; Tkacz, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ruthenium hydride was synthesized at a hydrogen pressure of about 14 GPa in a diamond-anvil cell. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to monitor the ruthenium crystal structure as a function of hydrogen pressure up to 30 GPa. The hydride formation was accompanied by phase transition from the original hcp structure of the pristine metal to the fcc structure. Our results confirmed the theoretical prediction of ruthenium hydride formation under hydrogen pressure. The standard Gibbs free energy of the ruthenium hydride formation reaction was calculated assuming the pressure of decomposition as the equilibrium pressure.

  11. Highly regioselective hydride transfer, oxidative dehydrogenation, and hydrogen-atom abstraction in the thermal gas-phase chemistry of [Zn(OH)](+)/C3H8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Nan; Zhao, Hai-Tao; Li, Jilai; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2014-12-28

    The thermal reactions of [Zn(OH)](+) with C3H8 have been studied by means of gas-phase experiments and computational investigation. Two types of C-H bond activation are observed in the experiment, and pertinent mechanistic features include inter alia: (i) the metal center of [Zn(OH)](+) serves as active site in the hydride transfer to generate [i-C3H7](+) as major product, (ii) generally, a high regioselectivity is accompanied by remarkable chemoselectivity: for example, the activation of a methyl C-H bond results mainly in the formation of water and [Zn(C3,H7)](+). According to computational work, this ionic product corresponds to [HZn(CH3CH=CH2)](+). Attack of the zinc center at a secondary C-H bond leads preferentially to hydride transfer, thus giving rise to the generation of [i-C3H7](+); (iii) upon oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH), liberation of CH3CH2=CH2 occurs to produce [HZn(H2O)](+). Both, ODH as well as H2O loss proceed through the same intermediate which is characterized by the fact that a methylene hydrogen atom from the substrate is transferred to the zinc and one hydrogen atom from the methyl group to the OH group of [Zn(OH)](+). The combined experimental/computational gas-phase study of C-H bond activation by zinc hydroxide provides mechanistic insight into related zinc-catalyzed large-scale processes and identifies the crucial role that the Lewis-acid character of zinc plays.

  12. Hydrogen bonding and proton transfer to ruthenium hydride complex CpRuH(dppe): metal and hydride dichotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silantyev, Gleb A; Filippov, Oleg A; Tolstoy, Peter M; Belkova, Natalia V; Epstein, Lina M; Weisz, Klaus; Shubina, Elena S

    2013-02-18

    The combination of variable temperature (190-297 K) IR and NMR spectroscopy studies with quantum-chemical calculations at the DFT/B3PW91 and AIM level had the aim to determine the mechanism of proton transfer to CpRuH(dppe) (1, dppe = Ph(2)P(CH(2))(2)PPh(2)) and the structures of intermediates. Dihydrogen bond (DHB) formation was established in the case of interaction with weak proton donors like CF(3)CH(2)OH. Low-temperature protonation (at about 200 K) by stronger proton donors leads via DHB complex to the cationic nonclassical complex [CpRu(η(2)-H(2))(dppe)](+) (2). Thermodynamic parameters of DHB formation (for CF(3)CH(2)OH: ΔH°(HB) = -4.9 ± 0.2 kcal·mol(-1), ΔS°(HB) = -17.8 ± 0.7 cal·mol(-1)·K(-1)) and proton transfer (for (CF(3))(2)CHOH: ΔH°(PT) = -5.2 ± 0.3 kcal·mol(-1), ΔS°(PT) = -23 ± 1 cal·mol(-1)·K(-1)) were determined. Above 240 K 2 transforms into trans-[CpRu(H)(2)(dppe)](+) (3) yielding a mixture of 2 and 3 in 1:2 ratio. Kinetic analysis and activation parameters for the "[Ru(η(2)-H(2))](+) → trans-[Ru(H)(2)](+)" transformation indicate reversibility of this process in contrast to irreversible intramolecular isomerization of the Cp* analogue. Calculations show that the driving force of this process is greater stability (by 1.5 kcal·mol(-1) in ΔE scale) of the dihydride cation in comparison with the dihydrogen complex. The calculations of the potential energy profile indicate the low barrier for deprotonation of 2 suggesting that the formation of trans-[CpRu(H)(2)(dppe)](+) proceeds via deprotonation of [Ru(η(2)-H(2))](+) to DHB complex, formation of hydrogen bond with Ru atom and subsequent proton transfer to the metal site.

  13. Transfer reactions as a doorway to fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, P.R.S.; Maciel, A.M.M.; Anjos, R.M.; Moraes, S.B.; Liguori Neto, R.; Cabezas, R.; Muri, C.; Santos, G.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Litoranea s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, RJ, 24210-340 (Brazil); Liang, J.F. [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This paper discusses the role played by transfer reactions on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement. A semiclassical formalism is used to derive the transfer form factors, that are used in coupled-channel calculations. It is shown that transfer reactions that take place at small distances may be an important doorway to fusion. The relation between this formalism and the long-range absorptive fusion potential is also discussed. Results of calculations for the {sup 16}O+{sup A}Sm, {sup 32}S+{sup 100}Mo and {sup 16}O+{sup 59}Co systems are presented. (author)

  14. Activity and Stability of Rare Earth-Based Hydride Alloys as Catalysts of Hydrogen Absorption-Oxidation Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Taokai(应桃开); Gao Xueping(高学平); Hu Weikang(胡伟康); Noréus Dag

    2004-01-01

    Rare earth-based AB5-type hydrogen storage alloys as catalysts of hydrogen-diffusion electrodes for hydrogen absorption and oxidation reactions in alkaline fuel cells were investigated. It is demonstrated that the meta-hydride hydrogen-diffusion electrodes could be charged by hydrogen gas and electrochemically discharged at the same time to retain a stable oxidation potential for a long period. The catalytic activities and stability are almost comparable with a Pt catalyst on the active carbon. Further improvement of performances is expected via reduction of catalyst size into nanometers.

  15. Infrared spectra of the ethynyl metal hydrides produced in reactions of laser-ablated Mn and Re atoms with acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han-Gook; Andrews, Lester

    2011-05-19

    The ethynyl metal hydride molecules (HM-C≡CH) are identified in the matrix infrared spectra from reactions of laser-ablated Mn and Re atoms with acetylene using D and (13)C isotopic substitution and density functional computed frequencies. The assignment of strong M-H as well as C≡C bond stretching product absorptions suggests oxidative C-H insertion during reagent codeposition and subsequent photolysis. The unique linear structure calculated for HMn-C≡CH is parallel to C(3v) structures found recently for Mn complexes including CH(3)-MnF.

  16. Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogen Transfer Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Ourida; Williams, Jonathan M. J.

    This chapter describes the application of iridium complexes to catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions. Transfer hydrogenation reactions provide an alternative to direct hydrogenation for the reduction of a range of substrates. A hydrogen donor, typically an alcohol or formic acid, can be used as the source of hydrogen for the reduction of carbonyl compounds, imines, and alkenes. Heteroaromatic compounds and even carbon dioxide have also been reduced by transfer hydrogenation reactions. In the reverse process, the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds can be achieved by iridium-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions, where a ketone or alkene is used as a suitable hydrogen acceptor. The reversible nature of many hydrogen transfer processes has been exploited for the racemization of alcohols, where temporary removal of hydrogen generates an achiral ketone intermediate. In addition, there is a growing body of work where temporary removal of hydrogen provides an opportunity for using alcohols as alkylating agents. In this chemistry, an iridium catalyst "borrows" hydrogen from an alcohol to give an aldehyde or ketone intermediate, which can be transformed into either an imine or alkene under the reaction conditions. Return of the hydrogen from the catalyst provides methodology for the formation of amines or C-C bonds where the only by-product is typically water.

  17. Mononuclear Phenolate Diamine Zinc Hydride Complexes and Their Reactions With CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Neil J; Harris, Jonathon E; Yin, Xinning; Silverwood, Ian; White, Andrew J P; Kazarian, Sergei G; Hellgardt, Klaus; Shaffer, Milo S P; Williams, Charlotte K

    2014-03-10

    The synthesis, characterization, and zinc coordination chemistry of the three proligands 2-tert-butyl-4-[tert-butyl (1)/methoxy (2)/nitro (3)]-6-{[(2'-dimethylaminoethyl)methylamino]methyl}phenol are described. Each of the ligands was reacted with diethylzinc to yield zinc ethyl complexes 4-6; these complexes were subsequently reacted with phenylsilanol to yield zinc siloxide complexes 7-9. Finally, the zinc siloxide complexes were reacted with phenylsilane to produce the three new zinc hydride complexes 10-12. The new complexes 4-12 have been fully characterized by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and elemental analyses. The structures of the zinc hydride complexes have been probed using VT-NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments. These data indicate that the complexes exhibit mononuclear structures at 298 K, both in the solid state and in solution (d8-toluene). At 203 K, the NMR signals broaden, consistent with an equilibrium between the mononuclear and dinuclear bis(μ-hydrido) complexes. All three zinc hydride complexes react rapidly and quantitatively with carbon dioxide, at 298 K and 1 bar of pressure over 20 min, to form the new zinc formate complexes 13-15. The zinc formate complexes have been analyzed by NMR spectroscopy and VT-NMR studies, which reveal a temperature-dependent monomer-dimer equilibrium that is dominated by the mononuclear species at 298 K.

  18. Transfer reaction code with nonlocal interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Titus, L J; Nunes, F M

    2016-01-01

    We present a suite of codes (NLAT for nonlocal adiabatic transfer) to calculate the transfer cross section for single-nucleon transfer reactions, $(d,N)$ or $(N,d)$, including nonlocal nucleon-target interactions, within the adiabatic distorted wave approximation. For this purpose, we implement an iterative method for solving the second order nonlocal differential equation, for both scattering and bound states. The final observables that can be obtained with NLAT are differential angular distributions for the cross sections of $A(d,N)B$ or $B(N,d)A$. Details on the implementation of the T-matrix to obtain the final cross sections within the adiabatic distorted wave approximation method are also provided. This code is suitable to be applied for deuteron induced reactions in the range of $E_d=10-70$ MeV, and provides cross sections with $4\\%$ accuracy.

  19. Transfer reaction code with nonlocal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, L. J.; Ross, A.; Nunes, F. M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a suite of codes (NLAT for nonlocal adiabatic transfer) to calculate the transfer cross section for single-nucleon transfer reactions, (d , N) or (N , d) , including nonlocal nucleon-target interactions, within the adiabatic distorted wave approximation. For this purpose, we implement an iterative method for solving the second order nonlocal differential equation, for both scattering and bound states. The final observables that can be obtained with NLAT are differential angular distributions for the cross sections of A(d , N) B or B(N , d) A. Details on the implementation of the T-matrix to obtain the final cross sections within the adiabatic distorted wave approximation method are also provided. This code is suitable to be applied for deuteron induced reactions in the range of Ed =10-70 MeV, and provides cross sections with 4% accuracy.

  20. Multinucleon transfer reactions: Present status and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradi, L., E-mail: corradi@lnl.infn.it [INFN – Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Szilner, S. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pollarolo, G. [INFN and Università di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Montanari, D. [INFN and Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Fioretto, E.; Stefanini, A.M.; Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [INFN – Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Farnea, E.; Michelagnoli, C.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Ur, C.A. [INFN and Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Mijatović, T.; Jelavić Malenica, D.; Soić, N. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Haas, F. [IPHC, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The last generation large solid angle magnetic spectrometers for very heavy ions. • Transfer of multiple pairs, providing valuable information on nucleon-nucleon correlations. • The study of the properties of the heavy binary partner via transfer reactions. -- Abstract: Significant advances have been achieved in the last years in the field of multinucleon transfer reactions. The advent of the last generation large solid angle magnetic spectrometers pushed the detection efficiency more than an order of magnitude above previous limits, with a significant gain in mass resolution for very heavy ions. Further, the coupling of these spectrometers to large gamma arrays allowed to perform gamma-particle coincidences. One can thus detect the transfer strength to the lowest excited levels of binary products and perform gamma spectroscopy for nuclei moderately far from stability, especially in the neutron-rich region. Via transfer of multiple pairs valuable information on nucleon-nucleon correlations can also be derived, especially from measurements performed below the Coulomb barrier. There is growing interest in the study of the properties of the heavy binary partner, since the transfer mechanism may allow the production of (moderately) neutron rich nuclei in the Pb and in the actinides regions, crucial also for astrophysics. Present studies are relevant for future studies with radioactive beams.

  1. Photogeneration of Hydride Donors and Their Use Toward CO2 Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita,E.; Muckerman, J.T.; Polyansky, D.E.

    2009-06-07

    Despite substantial effort, no one has succeeded in efficiently producing methanol from CO2 using homogeneous photocatalytic systems. We are pursuing reaction schemes based on a sequence of hydride-ion transfers to carry out stepwise reduction of CO2 to methanol. We are using hydride-ion transfer from photoproduced C-H bonds in metal complexes with bio-inspired ligands (i.e., NADH-like ligands) that are known to store one proton and two electrons.

  2. Intramolecular energy transfer reactions in polymetallic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, J.

    1990-11-01

    This report is concerned with intramolecular, energy-transfer reactions. The concept of preparing synthetically a complex molecular species, capable of absorbing a photon at one metal center (antenna fragment), transferring that energy to a second metal center (reactive fragment) via a bridging ligand was first reported by our group in 1979. It is now apparent that a major emphasis in inorganic chemistry in the future will involve these types of molecular ensembles. Complexes discussed include Rh, Ru, and Cu complexes. 23 refs., 14 tabs.

  3. The role of solvent on the mechanism of proton transfer to hydride complexes: the case of the [W(3)PdS(4)H(3)(dmpe)(3)(CO)](+) cubane cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarra, Andrés G; Basallote, Manuel G; Feliz, Marta; Fernández-Trujillo, M Jesús; Llusar, Rosa; Safont, Vicent S

    2010-02-01

    The kinetics of reaction of the [W(3)PdS(4)H(3)(dmpe)(3)(CO)](+) hydride cluster (1(+)) with HCl has been measured in dichloromethane, and a second-order dependence with respect to the acid is found for the initial step. In the presence of added BF(4) (-) the second-order dependence is maintained, but there is a deceleration that becomes more evident as the acid concentration increases. DFT calculations indicate that these results can be rationalized on the basis of the mechanism previously proposed for the same reaction of the closely related [W(3)S(4)H(3)(dmpe)(3)](+) cluster, which involves parallel first- and second-order pathways in which the coordinated hydride interacts with one and two acid molecules, and ion pairing to BF(4) (-) hinders formation of dihydrogen bonded adducts able to evolve to the products of proton transfer. Additional DFT calculations are reported to understand the behavior of the cluster in neat acetonitrile and acetonitrile-water mixtures. The interaction of the HCl molecule with CH(3)CN is stronger than the W-H...HCl dihydrogen bond and so the reaction pathways operating in dichloromethane become inefficient, in agreement with the lack of reaction between 1(+) and HCl in neat acetonitrile. However, the attacking species in acetonitrile-water mixtures is the solvated proton, and DFT calculations indicate that the reaction can then go through pathways involving solvent attack to the W centers, while still maintaining the coordinated hydride, which is made possible by the capability of the cluster to undergo structural changes in its core.

  4. A coupled transport and solid mechanics formulation with improved reaction kinetics parameters for modeling oxidation and decomposition in a uranium hydride bed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloum, Maher N.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of reacting flows in porous media has become particularly important with the increased interest in hydrogen solid-storage beds. An advanced type of storage bed has been proposed that utilizes oxidation of uranium hydride to heat and decompose the hydride, releasing the hydrogen. To reduce the cost and time required to develop these systems experimentally, a valid computational model is required that simulates the reaction of uranium hydride and oxygen gas in a hydrogen storage bed using multiphysics finite element modeling. This SAND report discusses the advancements made in FY12 (since our last SAND report SAND2011-6939) to the model developed as a part of an ASC-P&EM project to address the shortcomings of the previous model. The model considers chemical reactions, heat transport, and mass transport within a hydride bed. Previously, the time-varying permeability and porosity were considered uniform. This led to discrepancies between the simulated results and experimental measurements. In this work, the effects of non-uniform changes in permeability and porosity due to phase and thermal expansion are accounted for. These expansions result in mechanical stresses that lead to bed deformation. To describe this, a simplified solid mechanics model for the local variation of permeability and porosity as a function of the local bed deformation is developed. By using this solid mechanics model, the agreement between our reacting bed model and the experimental data is improved. Additionally, more accurate uranium hydride oxidation kinetics parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental results from a pure uranium hydride oxidation measurement to the ones obtained from the coupled transport-solid mechanics model. Finally, the coupled transport-solid mechanics model governing equations and boundary conditions are summarized and recommendations are made for further development of ARIA and other Sandia codes in order for them to sufficiently implement the model.

  5. Structure and mechanism of styrene monooxygenase reductase: new insight into the FAD-transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Eliot; Kantz, Auric; Gassner, George T; Sazinsky, Matthew H

    2013-09-03

    The two-component flavoprotein styrene monooxygenase (SMO) from Pseudomonas putida S12 catalyzes the NADH- and FAD-dependent epoxidation of styrene to styrene oxide. In this study, we investigate the mechanism of flavin reduction and transfer from the reductase (SMOB) to the epoxidase (NSMOA) component and report our findings in light of the 2.2 Å crystal structure of SMOB. Upon rapidly mixing with NADH, SMOB forms an NADH → FADox charge-transfer intermediate and catalyzes a hydride-transfer reaction from NADH to FAD, with a rate constant of 49.1 ± 1.4 s(-1), in a step that is coupled to the rapid dissociation of NAD(+). Electrochemical and equilibrium-binding studies indicate that NSMOA binds FADhq ∼13-times more tightly than SMOB, which supports a vectoral transfer of FADhq from the reductase to the epoxidase. After binding to NSMOA, FADhq rapidly reacts with molecular oxygen to form a stable C(4a)-hydroperoxide intermediate. The half-life of apoSMOB generated in the FAD-transfer reaction is increased ∼21-fold, supporting a protein-protein interaction between apoSMOB and the peroxide intermediate of NSMOA. The mechanisms of FAD dissociation and transport from SMOB to NSMOA were probed by monitoring the competitive reduction of cytochrome c in the presence and absence of pyridine nucleotides. On the basis of these studies, we propose a model in which reduced FAD binds to SMOB in equilibrium between an unreactive, sequestered state (S state) and more reactive, transfer state (T state). The dissociation of NAD(+) after the hydride-transfer reaction transiently populates the T state, promoting the transfer of FADhq to NSMOA. The binding of pyridine nucleotides to SMOB-FADhq shifts the FADhq-binding equilibrium from the T state to the S state. Additionally, the 2.2 Å crystal structure of SMOB-FADox reported in this work is discussed in light of the pyridine nucleotide-gated flavin-transfer and electron-transfer reactions.

  6. A combined experimental, theoretical, and Van't Hoff model study for identity methyl, proton, hydrogen atom, and hydride exchange reactions. Correlation with three-center four-, three-, and two-electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Henk M.

    We have studied carbon transfer reactions following an SN2 reaction profile. With ab initio calculations and experimental geometries concerning the nature of the various complexes indicated as stable, intermediate, and transition state we were able to show the additional value of van't Hoff's tetrahedral configuration by changing its geometry via a trigonal pyramid into a trigonal bipyramid. The ratio of the apical bond and corresponding tetrahedral bond distances is then nearly 1.333. The relevance of this approach has also been shown for identity proton-(hydrogen atom-, and hydride-) in-line reactions. The use of this geometrical transmission will be demonstrated for the hydrogen bonding distances in e.g., DNA duplexes and other biological (supra) molecular systems.

  7. Thermochemical Energy Storage through De/Hydrogenation of Organic Liquids: Reactions of Organic Liquids on Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Ulrich; Cholewa, Martin; Diemant, Thomas; Bonatto Minella, Christian; Dittmeyer, Roland; Behm, R Jürgen; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2016-06-08

    A study of the reactions of liquid acetone and toluene on transition metal hydrides, which can be used in thermal energy or hydrogen storage applications, is presented. Hydrogen is confined in TiFe, Ti0.95Zr0.05Mn1.49V0.45Fe0.06 ("Hydralloy C5"), and V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 after contact with acetone. Toluene passivates V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 completely for hydrogen desorption while TiFe is only mildly deactivated and desorption is not blocked at all in the case of Hydralloy C5. LaNi5 is inert toward both organic liquids. Gas chromatography (GC) investigations reveal that CO, propane, and propene are formed during hydrogen desorption from V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 in liquid acetone, and methylcyclohexane is formed in the case of liquid toluene. These reactions do not occur if dehydrogenated samples are used, which indicates an enhanced surface reactivity during hydrogen desorption. Significant amounts of carbon-containing species are detected at the surface and subsurface of acetone- and toluene-treated V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The modification of the surface and subsurface chemistry and the resulting blocking of catalytic sites is believed to be responsible for the containment of hydrogen in the bulk. The surface passivation reactions occur only during hydrogen desorption of the samples.

  8. Novel fuel cell stack with coupled metal hydride containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Li, Yan; Bu, Qingyuan; Guzy, Christopher J.; Li, Qi; Chen, Weirong; Wang, Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Air-cooled, self-humidifying hydrogen fuel cells are often used for backup and portable power sources, with a metal hydride used as the hydrogen storage material. To provide a stable hydrogen flow to the fuel cell stack, heat must be provided to the metal hydride. Conventionally, the heat released from the exothermic reaction of hydrogen and oxygen in the fuel cell stack to the exhaust air is used to heat a separate metal hydride container. In this case, the heat is only partially used instead of being more closely coupled because of the heat transfer resistances in the system. To achieve better heat integration, a novel scheme is proposed whereby hydrogen storage and single fuel cells are more closely coupled. Based on this idea, metal hydride containers in the form of cooling plates were assembled between each pair of cells in the stack so that the heat could be directly transferred to a metal hydride container of much larger surface-to-volume ratio than conventional separate containers. A heat coupled fuel cell portable power source with 10 cells and 11 metal hydride containers was constructed and the experimental results show that this scheme is beneficial for the heat management of fuel cell stack.

  9. Transfer to the continuum and Breakup reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Moro, A M

    2006-01-01

    A standard approach for the calculation of breakup reactions of exotic nuclei into two fragments is to consider inelastic excitations into the single particle continuum of the projectile. Alternatively one can also consider the transfer to the continuum of a system composed of the light fragment and the target. In this work we make a comparative study of the two approaches, underline the different inputs, and identify the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. Our test cases consist of the breakup of $^{11}$Be on a proton target at intermediate energies, and the breakup of $^8$B on $^{58}$Ni at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  10. Computational Approach to Electron Charge Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn

    -molecular mechanics scheme, and tools to analyse statistical data and generate relative free energies and free energy surfaces. The methodology is applied to several charge transfer species and reactions in chemical environments - chemical in the sense that solvent, counter ions and substrate surfaces are taken...... in to account - which directly influence the reactants and resulting reaction through both physical and chemical interactions. All methods are though general and can be applied to different types of chemistry. First, the basis of the various theoretical tools is presented and applied to several test systems...... to show general (or expected) properties. Properties such as in the physical and (semi-)chemical interface between classical and quantum systems and the effects of molecular bond length constraints on the temperature during simulations. As a second step the methodology is applied to the symmetric...

  11. Effects of Nonlocality on Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Titus, Luke J

    2016-01-01

    We solved the nonlocal scattering and bound state equations using the Perey-Buck type interaction, and compared to local equivalent calculations. Using the distorted wave Born approximation we construct the T-matrix for (p,d) transfer on 17O, 41Ca, 49Ca, 127Sn, 133Sn, and 209Pb at 20 and 50 MeV. Additionally we studied (p,d) reactions on 40Ca using the the nonlocal dispersive optical model. We have also included nonlocality consistently into the adiabatic distorted wave approximation and have investigated the effects of nonlocality on on (d,p) transfer reactions for deuterons impinged on 16O, 40Ca, 48Ca, 126Sn, 132Sn, 208Pb at 10, 20, and 50 MeV. We found that for bound states the Perry corrected wave functions resulting from the local equation agreed well with that from the nonlocal equation in the interior region, but discrepancies were found in the surface and peripheral regions. Overall, the Perey correction factor was adequate for scattering states, with the exception for a few partial waves. Nonlocality...

  12. New insights into the mechanism of proton transfer to hydride complexes: kinetic and theoretical evidence showing the existence of competitive pathways for protonation of the cluster [W3S4H3(dmpe)3]+ with acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarra, Andrés G; Basallote, Manuel G; Feliz, Marta; Fernández-Trujillo, M Jesús; Llusar, Rosa; Safont, Vicent S

    2006-02-01

    The reaction of the hydride cluster [W3S4H3(dmpe)3]+ (1, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphanyl)ethane) with acids (HCl, CF3COOH, HBF4) in CH2Cl2 solution under pseudo-first-order conditions of excess acid occurs with three kinetically distinguishable steps that can be interpreted as corresponding to successive formal substitution processes of the coordinated hydrides by the anion of the acid (HCl, CF3COOH) or the solvent (HBF4). Whereas the rate law for the third step changes with the nature of the acid, the first two kinetic steps always show a second-order dependence on acid concentration. In contrast, a single kinetic step with a first-order dependence with respect to the acid is observed when the experiments are carried out with a deficit of acid. The decrease in the T1 values for the hydride NMR signal of 1 in the presence of added HCl suggests the formation of an adduct with a W-H...H-Cl dihydrogen bond. Theoretical calculations for the reaction with HCl indicate that the kinetic results in CH2Cl2 solution can be interpreted on the basis of a mechanism with two competitive pathways. One of the pathways consists of direct proton transfer within the W-H...H-Cl adduct to form W-Cl and H2, whereas the other requires the presence of a second HCl molecule to form a W-H...H-Cl...H-Cl adduct that transforms into W-Cl, H2 and HCl in the rate-determining step. The activation barriers and the structures of the transition states for both pathways were also calculated, and the results indicate that both pathways can be competitive and that the transition states can be described in both cases as a dihydrogen complex hydrogen-bonded to Cl- or HCl2(-).

  13. Formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons revisited: diffusion-controlled reactions and hydrogen atom losses in solid noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanskanen, Hanna; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Lignell, Antti; Räsänen, Markku; Johansson, Susanna; Khyzhniy, Ivan; Savchenko, Elena

    2008-02-07

    UV photolysis and annealing of C2H2/Xe, C2H2/Xe/Kr, and HBr/Xe matrices lead to complicated photochemical processes and reactions. The dominating products in these experiments are noble-gas hydrides with general formula HNgY (Ng = noble-gas atom, Y = electronegative fragment). We concentrate on distinguishing the local and global mobility and losses of H atoms, barriers of the reactions, and the decay of solvated protons. Different deposition temperatures change the amount of lattice imperfections and thus the amount of traps for H atoms. The averaged distance between reacting species influencing the reaction kinetics is controlled by varying the precursor concentration. A number of solid-state processes connected to the formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons are discussed using a simple kinetic model. The most efficient formation of noble-gas hydrides is connected with global (long-range) mobility of H atoms leading to the H + Xe + Y reaction. The highest concentration of noble-gas hydrides was obtained in matrices of highest optical quality, which probably have the lowest concentration of defects and H-atom losses. In matrices with high amount of geometrical imperfections, the product formation is inefficient and dominated by a local (short-range) process. The decay of solvated protons is rather local than a global process, which is different from the formation of noble-gas molecules. However, the present data do not allow distinguishing local proton and electron mobilities. Our previous results indicate that these are electrons which move to positively-charged centers and neutralize them. It is believed that the image obtained here for solid xenon is applicable to solid krypton whereas the case of argon deserves special attention.

  14. Non-oxidative coupling reaction of methane to ethane and hydrogen catalyzed by the silica-supported tantalum hydride: ([triple bond]SiO)2Ta-H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulivong, Daravong; Norsic, Sébastien; Taoufik, Mostafa; Copéret, Christophe; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean; Chakka, Sudhakar; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2008-04-16

    Silica-supported tantalum hydride, (SiO)2Ta-H (1), proves to be the first single-site catalyst for the direct non-oxidative coupling transformation of methane into ethane and hydrogen at moderate temperatures, with a high selectivity (>98%). The reaction likely involves the tantalum-methyl-methylidene species as a key intermediate, where the methyl ligand can migrate onto the tantalum-methylidene affording the tantalum-ethyl.

  15. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical impedance responses for different laboratory type metal hydride electrodes were successfully modeled and fitted to experimental data for AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys as well as one MgNi type electrode. The models fitted the experimental data remarkably well. Several AC......, explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction. To approximate the experimental data, equations describing the current distribution in porous electrodes were needed. Indications of one or more parallel reduction/oxidation processes competing with the electrochemical hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction were...

  16. [Investigation of enhancing effect for hydride generation-atomic fluorescence of transition metal elements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Han-Wen; Suo, Ran

    2008-11-01

    A mechanism of hydride generation based on disassembly reaction of hydrogen-transferred interim state [M(BH4)m]* was developed by investigating the effect of reaction medium acidity on hydride generation. The effects of Co2+ and Ni2+, phenanthroline and 8-hydroxyquinoline on hydride generation-atomic fluorescence signals of Zn, Cd, Cu and Ni were studied, respectively, and their enhancing mechnism was discussed. The enhancing effect Co2+ and Ni2+ on the fluorescence signals of Zn and Cd was due to the increase in transmission efficiency of hydride of Zn and Cd. There was a synergic enhancing effect between phenanthroline or 8-hydroxyquinoline and Co2+ on the fluorescence signals of Zn and Cd, however no synergic enhancing effect between phenanthroline and 8-hydroxyquinoline on the fluorescence signals of Zn and Cd. The simulative action of cationic surfactant, anion surfactant and non-ionic surfactant surfactant to hydride generation was investigated. It is shown that both cationic surfactant and non-ionic surfactant have obvious enhancing effect on the fluorescence signals of analytes because of the decrease in surface tension of reaction solution. The release characteristics of hydride from the absorption solution containing surfactant was ulteriorly examined by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, and the mechanism of enhancing effect of surfactant on hydride generation and transmission was proposed.

  17. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  18. A New Reducing Regent: Dichloroindium Hydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. BABA; I. SHIBATA; N. HAYASHI

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Among the hydride derivatives of group 13 elements, various types of aluminum hydrides and boron hydrides have been employed as powerful reduction tools. Indium hydrides have not received much attention,whereas the synthesis of indium trihydride (InH3) was reported several decades ago[1]. There have been no precedents for monometallic indium hydrides having practical reactivity, while activated hydrides such as an ate complex LiPhn InH4-n (n = 0- 2) and phosphine-coordinated indium hydrides readily reduce carbonyl compounds. In view of this background, we focused on the development of dichloroindium hydrides (Cl2InH) as novel reducing agents that bear characteristic features in both ionic and radical reactions.

  19. H{sub 2} thermal desorption and hydride conversion reactions in Li cells of TiH{sub 2}/C amorphous nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitucci, F.M., E-mail: francesco.vitucci@roma1.infn.it [CNR-ISC, U.O.S. La Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Paolone, A. [CNR-ISC, U.O.S. La Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Brutti, S. [CNR-ISC, U.O.S. La Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze, Univ. Basilicata, V.le Ateneo Lucano, 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Munaò, D.; Silvestri, L.; Panero, S. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Sapienza Univ. Roma, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Reale, P. [ENEA – Centro Ricerche Casaccia,via Anguillarese 301, 00100 Roma (Italy)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Galvanostatic measurements on amorphous TiH{sub 2} is reported. • Variation of ball milling pre-treatment vary the first discharge capacity. • Relation between thermal H{sub 2} desorption and electrochemical properties is proposed. - Abstract: Here we investigate the properties of amorphous TiH{sub 2}/carbon nanocomposites as possible active material in lithium cells. Several TiH{sub 2}/C mixtures are prepared by a mechanochemical route, by varying the carbon/hydride ratio. Materials are tested in electrochemical cells versus lithium metal in EC:DMC LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte by galvanostatic cycling (GC) and are characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry. Thermal dehydrogenation processes are altered by the mechanochemical treatment of the sample: milling decreases the hydrogen content of the hydride. On the other hand, the mechanochemical grinding increases the specific capacity delivered during the first GC discharge. We suggest that the electrochemical process is the result of a delicate balance between the absolute quantity of hydrogen and its availability for the hydride conversion reaction.

  20. Metal Hydrides for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valoeen, Lars Ole

    2000-03-01

    current. For applications involving the utilisation of high currents, the activation to the required level could be as high as 100 cycles, whereas for low current applications, 5-10 activation cycles could be sufficient when the same current was used for the activation (pretreatment of the alloy might enhance the activation considerably). When an electrode made of an alloy with a relatively high hydrogen equilibrium (plateau) pressure was cycled under a moderate external inert gas pressure, a new activation process was observed when the pressure was increased. This indicated that the activated state was dependent on several factors, which indicated the need of examining each factor individually as well as combined in order to gain a complete understanding of the process. The characterization of metal hydride electrodes by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, showed that this technique when used properly and in combination with other characterization techniques can be very useful in determining the significance of the different sub-processes in the overall process. The impedance response for different laboratory metal hydride electrodes were successfully modelled and fitted to experimental data for both AB{sub 5} type alloys and a MgNi type electrode. The following sub processes were found to be significant for the overall reaction rate: charge transfer resistance, double layer capacitance and impedance resulting from hydrogen diffusion within the metal lattice. The diffusion process was best modelled when using a spherical diffusion geometry. To fit the experimental data, equations describing the current distribution in porous electrodes were required. To account for possible parallel hydrogen evolution during charging, it was necessary to include this step in the model for electrodes having a more negative open circuit potential than the reversible hydrogen evolution potential. Indications of one or more parallel reduction/oxidation processes competing with

  1. Metal Hydrides for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valoeen, Lars Ole

    2000-03-01

    current. For applications involving the utilisation of high currents, the activation to the required level could be as high as 100 cycles, whereas for low current applications, 5-10 activation cycles could be sufficient when the same current was used for the activation (pretreatment of the alloy might enhance the activation considerably). When an electrode made of an alloy with a relatively high hydrogen equilibrium (plateau) pressure was cycled under a moderate external inert gas pressure, a new activation process was observed when the pressure was increased. This indicated that the activated state was dependent on several factors, which indicated the need of examining each factor individually as well as combined in order to gain a complete understanding of the process. The characterization of metal hydride electrodes by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, showed that this technique when used properly and in combination with other characterization techniques can be very useful in determining the significance of the different sub-processes in the overall process. The impedance response for different laboratory metal hydride electrodes were successfully modelled and fitted to experimental data for both AB{sub 5} type alloys and a MgNi type electrode. The following sub processes were found to be significant for the overall reaction rate: charge transfer resistance, double layer capacitance and impedance resulting from hydrogen diffusion within the metal lattice. The diffusion process was best modelled when using a spherical diffusion geometry. To fit the experimental data, equations describing the current distribution in porous electrodes were required. To account for possible parallel hydrogen evolution during charging, it was necessary to include this step in the model for electrodes having a more negative open circuit potential than the reversible hydrogen evolution potential. Indications of one or more parallel reduction/oxidation processes competing with

  2. In situ μ+SR measurements on the hydrogen desorption reaction of magnesium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umegaki, I.; Nozaki, H.; Harada, M.; Higuchi, Y.; Noritake, T.; Matsumoto, M.; Towata, S.-i.; Ansaldo, E. J.; Brewer, J. H.; Koda, A.; Miyake, Y.; Sugiyama, J.

    2014-12-01

    In order to clarify the reason why the hydrogen desorption temperature (Td) of MgH2 is lowered by milling, we have studied the change in a local nuclear magnetic field with temperature by means of μ+SR. We have found a very clear oscillation in the ZF-spectrum at 2 K for the "milled" and "milled with Nb2O5" samples, while such oscillation is weaker for the "as prepared" MgH2. It was also found that the oscillation signal is stable up to 250 K and is assigned mainly due to the formation of a H-μ-H system. At temperatures above ambient T, we also found that the ZF-μ+SR spectrum exhibits a static Kubo-Toyabe behavior due to the nuclear magnetic field of 1H. Furthermore, it was clarified that rapid H diffusion starts well below Td only in the milled samples, leading to the conclusion that the consequent enhanced diffusion rate in MgH2 is essential to accelerate the desorption reaction and to decrease Td.

  3. Rational Design in Catalysis: A Mechanistic Study of β-Hydride Eliminations in Gold(I) and Gold(III) Complexes Based on Features of the Reaction Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiñeira Reis, Marta; López, Carlos Silva; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter; Faza, Olalla Nieto

    2016-09-01

    β-Hydride eliminations for ethylgold(III) dichloride complexes are identified as reactions with an unusually long prechemical stage corresponding to the conformational preparation of the reaction complex and spanning six phases. The prechemical process is characterized by a geared rotation of the L-Au-L group (L = Cl) driving methyl group rotation and causing a repositioning of the ligands. This requires more than 28 kcal/mol of the total barrier of 34.0 kcal/mol, according to the unified reaction valley approach, which also determines that the energy requirements of the actual chemical process leading to the β-elimination product are only about 5.5 kcal/mol. A detailed mechanistic analysis was used as a basis for a rational design of substrates (via substituents on the ethyl group) and/or ligands, which can significantly reduce the reaction barrier. This strategy takes advantage of either a higher trans activity of the ligands or a tuned electronic demand of the ethyl group. The β-hydride elimination of gold(I) was found to suffer from strong Coulomb and exchange repulsion when a positively charged hydrogen atom enforces a coordination position in a d(10)-configured gold atom, thus triggering an unassisted σ-π Au(I)-C conversion.

  4. Density functional investigations of electronic structure and dehydrogenation reactions of Al- and Si-substituted magnesium hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, Tuhina; Pal, Sourav; Kanhere, Dilip G

    2008-04-21

    The effect on the hydrogen storage attributes of magnesium hydride (MgH(2)) of the substitution of Mg by varying fractions of Al and Si is investigated by an ab initio plane-wave pseuodopotential method based on density functional theory. Three supercells, namely, 2 x 2 x 2, 3 x 1 x 1 and 5 x 1 x 1 are used for generating configurations with varying amounts (fractions x=0.0625, 0.1, and 0.167) of impurities. The analyses of band structure and density of states (DOS) show that, when a Mg atom is replaced by Al, the band gap vanishes as the extra electron occupies the conduction band minimum. In the case of Si-substitution, additional states are generated within the band gap of pure MgH(2)-significantly reducing the gap in the process. The reduced band gaps cause the Mg--H bond to become more susceptible to dissociation. For all the fractions, the calculated reaction energies for the stepwise removal of H(2) molecules from Al- and Si-substituted MgH(2) are much lower than for H(2) removal from pure MgH(2). The reduced stability is also reflected in the comparatively smaller heats of formation (DeltaH(f)) of the substituted MgH(2) systems. Si causes greater destabilization of MgH(2) than Al for each x. For fractions x=0.167 of Al, x=0.1, 0.167 of Si (FCC) and x=0.0625, 0.1 of Si (diamond), DeltaH(f) is much less than that of MgH(2) substituted by a fraction x=0.2 of Ti (Y. Song, Z. X. Guo, R. Yang, Mat. Sc. & Eng. A 2004, 365, 73). Hence, we suggest the use of Al or Si instead of Ti as an agent for decreasing the dehydrogenation reaction and energy, consequently, the dehydrogenation temperature of MgH(2), thereby improving its potential as a hydrogen storage material.

  5. Hydrogen release reactions of Al-based complex hydrides enhanced by vibrational dynamics and valences of metal cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Daemen, L; Cheng, Y-Q; Tomiyasu, K; Takagi, S; Orimo, S

    2016-09-27

    Hydrogen release from Al-based complex hydrides composed of metal cation(s) and [AlH4](-) was investigated using inelastic neutron scattering viewed from vibrational dynamics. The hydrogen release followed the softening of translational and [AlH4](-) librational modes, which was enhanced by vibrational dynamics and the valence(s) of the metal cation(s).

  6. Marcus Electron Transfer Reactions with Bulk Metallic Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y N

    2015-01-01

    Electron transfer organic reaction rates are considered employing the classic physical picture of Marcus wherein the heats of reaction are deposited as the energy of low frequency mechanical oscillations of reconfigured molecular positions. If such electron transfer chemical reaction events occur in the neighborhood of metallic plates, then electrodynamic interface fields must also be considered in addition to mechanical oscillations. Such electrodynamic interfacial electric fields in principle strongly effect the chemical reaction rates. The thermodynamic states of the metal are unchanged by the reaction which implies that metallic plates are purely catalytic chemical agents.

  7. Liquid drop effects in subbarrier transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.J.

    1990-08-01

    Reaction products from a multitude of binary channels are observed to emerge at large c.m. angles at subbarrier energies for the {sup 50}Ti {plus} {sup 93}Nb system. The energy spectra of these products and the distance where they first emerge indicate that these reaction products result from the neck which is formed outside the Coulomb barrier. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Heavy ion transfer reactions: Status and perspectives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Corradi

    2010-07-01

    With the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer (PRISMA) coupled to the -array (CLARA), extensive investigations of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics have been carried out. In the present paper aspects of these studies will be presented, focussing more closely on the reaction mechanism, in particular on the properties of quasielastic and deep inelastic processes and on measurements at energies far below the Coulomb barrier.

  9. Predicting formation enthalpies of metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.

    2004-01-01

    In order for the hydrogen based society viz. a society in which hydrogen is the primary energy carrier to become realizable an efficient way of storing hydrogen is required. For this purpose metal hydrides are serious candidates. Metal hydrides are formedby chemical reaction between hydrogen...... and metal and for the stable hydrides this is associated with release of heat (#DELTA#H_f ). The more thermodynamically stable the hydride, the larger DHf, and the higher temperature is needed in order to desorphydrogen (reverse reaction) and vice versa. For practical application the temperature needed...

  10. Coinage Metal Hydrides: Synthesis, Characterization, and Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Abraham J; Lalic, Gojko; Sadighi, Joseph P

    2016-08-10

    Hydride complexes of copper, silver, and gold encompass a broad array of structures, and their distinctive reactivity has enabled dramatic recent advances in synthesis and catalysis. This Review summarizes the synthesis, characterization, and key stoichiometric reactions of isolable or observable coinage metal hydrides. It discusses catalytic processes in which coinage metal hydrides are known or probable intermediates, and presents mechanistic studies of selected catalytic reactions. The purpose of this Review is to convey how developments in coinage metal hydride chemistry have led to new organic transformations, and how developments in catalysis have in turn inspired the synthesis of reactive new complexes.

  11. Kinematical coincidence method in transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, L.; Amorini, F. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Auditore, L. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina (Italy); Berceanu, I. [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Cardella, G., E-mail: cardella@ct.infn.it [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Chatterjiee, M.B. [Saha Institute for Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); De Filippo, E. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Francalanza, L.; Gianì, R. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Grassi, L. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Grzeszczuk, A. [Institut of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); La Guidara, E. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Facoltà di Ingegneria e Architettura, Università Kore, Enna (Italy); Lombardo, I. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II and INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Loria, D.; Minniti, T. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina (Italy); Pagano, E.V. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); and others

    2013-07-01

    A new method to extract high resolution angular distributions from kinematical coincidence measurements in binary reactions is presented. Kinematics is used to extract the center of mass angular distribution from the measured energy spectrum of light particles. Results obtained in the case of {sup 10}Be+p→{sup 9}Be+d reaction measured with the CHIMERA detector are shown. An angular resolution of few degrees in the center of mass is obtained. The range of applicability of the method is discussed.

  12. Probing cluster structures through sub-barrier transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafferty D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleon transfer probabilities and excitation energy distributions have been measured in 16,18O, 19F + 208Pb at energies between 90% - 100% of the Coulomb barrier. A strong 2p2n enhancement is observed for all reactions, though most spectacularly in the 18O induced reaction. Results are interpreted in terms of the Semiclassical model, which seems to suggest α-cluster transfer in all studied systems. The relation to cluster-states in the projectile is discussed, with the experimental results consistent with previous structure studies. Dissipation of energy in the collisions of 18O is compared between different reaction modes, with cluster transfer associated with dissipation over a large number of internal states. Cluster transfer is shown to be a long range dissipation mechanism, which will inform the development of future models to treat these dynamic processes in reactions.

  13. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  14. One-nucleon transfer reactions and the optical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Nunes, F M; Ross, A; Titus, L J; Charity, R J; Dickhoff, W H; Mahzoon, M H; Sarich, J; Wild, S M

    2015-01-01

    We provide a summary of new developments in the area of direct reaction theory with a particular focus on one-nucleon transfer reactions. We provide a status of the methods available for describing (d,p) reactions. We discuss the effects of nonlocality in the optical potential in transfer reactions. The results of a purely phenomenological potential and the optical potential obtained from the dispersive optical model are compared; both point toward the importance of including nonlocality in transfer reactions explicitly. Given the large ambiguities associated with optical potentials, we discuss some new developments toward the quantification of this uncertainty. We conclude with some general comments and a brief account of new advances that are in the pipeline.

  15. Parallel proton transfer pathways in aqueous acid-base reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, M.J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the mechanism of proton transfer (PT) between the photoacid 8-hydroxy-1,3, 6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (HPTS) and the base chloroacetate in aqueous solution. We investigate both proton and deuteron transfer reactions in solutions with base concentrations ranging from 0.25M to 4M. Using femtose

  16. Transfer reactions at the neutron dripline with triton target

    CERN Document Server

    Borge, M J G; Fynbo, H O U; Gomez Camacho, J; Johansen, J; Johansson, H T; Jonson, B; Krücken, R; Kurcewicz, J; Martel, I; Moro, A; Mücher, D; Nilsson, T; Nyman, G; Raabe, R; Randisi, G; Riisager, K; Sambi, S; Sanchez-Benitez, AM; Tengblad, O

    2012-01-01

    Two-neutron transfer to $^{9}$Li will populate the ground state of $^{11}$Li as well as low-lying resonances in a way that is complementary to studies of these states performed at higher beam energies. We aim at detecting the charged particles from the transfer reactions as well as neutrons coming from the decay of possible $^{11}$Li resonances.

  17. Transfer reactions at the neutron dripline with triton target

    CERN Multimedia

    Two-neutron transfer to $^{9}$Li will populate the ground state of $^{11}$Li as well as low-lying resonances in a way that is complementary to studies of these states performed at higher beam energies. We aim at detecting the charged particles from the transfer reactions as well as neutrons coming from the decay of possible $^{11}$Li resonances.

  18. Use of reversible hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darriet, B.; Pezat, M.; Hagenmuller, P.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of metals or alloys whose hydrides have a high dissociation pressure allows a considerable increase in the hydrogenation rate of magnesium. The influence of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the reaction rate were studied. Results concerning the hydriding of magnesium rich alloys such as Mg2Ca, La2Mg17 and CeMg12 are presented. The hydriding mechanism of La2Mg17 and CeMg12 alloys is given.

  19. Inhibited solid propellant composition containing beryllium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An object of this invention is to provide a composition of beryllium hydride and carboxy-terminated polybutadiene which is stable. Another object of this invention is to provide a method for inhibiting the reactivity of beryllium hydride toward carboxy-terminated polybutadiene. It was found that a small amount of lecithin inhibits the reaction of beryllium hydride with the acid groups in carboxy terminated polybutadiene.

  20. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjulstok, Emil Sjulstok; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling...... which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between...... quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment...

  1. Links between potential energy structures and quantum cumulative reaction probabilities of double proton transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsten, H.F. von [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Olshausenstrasse 40, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Hartke, B. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Olshausenstrasse 40, 24098 Kiel (Germany)], E-mail: hartke@phc.uni-kiel.de

    2007-09-25

    Double proton transfer reactions of pyrazole-guanidine species exhibit unusual energy profiles of a plateau form, different from the standard single and double barrier shapes. We have demonstrated earlier that this leads to a characteristically different quantum dynamical behavior of plateau reactions, when measured appropriately. Here we show that these differences also carry over to traditional measures of reaction probability.

  2. Reactant-Product Quantum Coherence in Electron Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kominis, I K

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the physical meaning of quantum superposition states between reactants and products in electron transfer reactions. We show that such superpositions are strongly suppressed and to leading orders of perturbation theory do not pertain in electron transfer reactions. This is because of the intermediate manifold of states separating the reactants from the products. We provide an intuitive description of these considerations with Feynman diagrams. We also discuss the relation of such quantum coherences to understanding the fundamental quantum dynamics of spin-selective radical-ion-pair reactions.

  3. Variation of kinetic isotope effect in multiple proton transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Saritha; M Durga Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we had suggested that the motion along the promoter mode in the first part of the IRC of proton transfer reaction enhances the delocalization of electrons on the acceptor atom into the * orbital of the donor-hydrogen covalent bond, and as a consequence weakens it. This leads to a reduction of the barrier to the proton transfer as well as the stretching frequency of donor-hydrogen bond. An extension of this to the concerted multiple proton transfer reactions implies that the kinetic isotope effect in such reaction depends exponentially on the number of protons that are being transferred. Computational evidence on three systems, (HF)3, formic acid dimer, and (H2O) clusters is provided to support this assertion.

  4. Research on Metal Hydride Compressor System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Ti-Zr series Laves phase hydrogen storage alloys with good hydrogen storage properties, such as large hydrogen capacity, rapid hydriding and dehydriding rate, high compression ratio, gentle plateau, small hysteresis, easily being activated and long cyclic stability etc. for metal hydride compressor have been investigated. In addition, a hydride compressor with special characteristics, namely, advanced filling method, good heat transfer effect and reasonable structural design etc. has also been constructed. A hydride compressor cryogenic system has been assembled coupling the compressor with a J-T micro-throttling refrigeration device and its cooling capacity can reach 0.4 W at 25 K.

  5. Intrinsic barriers for H-atom transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Autrey, S.T.; Franz, J.A.

    1994-08-01

    Hydrogen transfer reactions play a well-recognized role in coal liquefaction. While H-abstraction reactions between radicals and H-donors have been well-studied, understanding of structure-reactivity relationships remains surprisingly incomplete. Another form of hydrogen transfer known as radical hydrogen transfer (radical donation of H to an unsaturated compound) is currently the subject of much speculation. The barriers for identity reactions are key parameters in the Evans-Polanyi equation for estimating reaction barriers and are fundamentally significant for the insight they provide about bond reorganization energies for formation of transition state structures. Although knowable from experiment, relatively few H-abstraction identity barriers and no barriers for hydrocarbon radical hydrogen transfer reactions have been measured. This paper seeks to supplement and extend existing experimental data with results obtained by calculation. The authors have used ab initio and semiempirical molecular orbital methods (MNDO-PM3) to calculate barriers for a series of H-atom abstraction and radical-hydrogen-transfer identity reactions for alkyl, alkenyl, arylalkyl and hydroaryl systems. Details of this methodology and analyses of how barrier heights correlate with reactant and transition state properties will be presented and discussed.

  6. Optimization of Internal Cooling Fins for Metal Hydride Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi Krishna Kukkapalli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride alloys are considered as a promising alternative to conventional hydrogen storage cylinders and mechanical hydrogen compressors. Compared to storing in a classic gas tank, metal hydride alloys can store hydrogen at nearly room pressure and use less volume to store the same amount of hydrogen. However, this hydrogen storage method necessitates an effective way to reject the heat released from the exothermic hydriding reaction. In this paper, a finned conductive insert is adopted to improve the heat transfer in the cylindrical reactor. The fins collect the heat that is volumetrically generated in LaNi5 metal hydride alloys and deliver it to the channel located in the center, through which a refrigerant flows. A multiple-physics modeling is performed to analyze the transient heat and mass transfer during the hydrogen absorption process. Fin design is made to identify the optimum shape of the finned insert for the best heat rejection. For the shape optimization, use of a predefined transient heat generation function is proposed. Simulations show that there exists an optimal length for the fin geometry.

  7. Vibrational control of electron-transfer reactions: a feasibility study for the fast coherent transfer regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, P; Ma, Z; Zhang, P; Beratan, D N; Skourtis, S S

    2015-12-14

    Molecular vibrations and electron-vibrational interactions are central to the control of biomolecular electron and energy-transfer rates. The vibrational control of molecular electron-transfer reactions by infrared pulses may enable the precise probing of electronic-vibrational interactions and of their roles in determining electron-transfer mechanisms. This type of electron-transfer rate control is advantageous because it does not alter the electronic state of the molecular electron-transfer system or irreversibly change its molecular structure. For bridge-mediated electron-transfer reactions, infrared (vibrational) excitation of the bridge linking the electron donor to the electron acceptor was suggested as being capable of influencing the electron-transfer rate by modulating the bridge-mediated donor-to-acceptor electronic coupling. This kind of electron-transfer experiment has been realized, demonstrating that bridge-mediated electron-transfer rates can be changed by exciting vibrational modes of the bridge. Here, we use simple models and ab initio computations to explore the physical constraints on one's ability to vibrationally perturb electron-transfer rates using infrared excitation. These constraints stem from the nature of molecular vibrational spectra, the strengths of the electron-vibrational coupling, and the interaction between molecular vibrations and infrared radiation. With these constraints in mind, we suggest parameter regimes and molecular architectures that may enhance the vibrational control of electron transfer for fast coherent electron-transfer reactions.

  8. Kinetics of hydride front in Zircaloy-2 and H release from a fractional hydrided surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, M.; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, A.; Moya, J. S.; Remartinez, B.; Perez, S.; Sacedon, J. L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Iberdrola, Tomas Redondo 3, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    The authors study the hydriding process on commercial nuclear fuel claddings from their inner surface using an ultrahigh vacuum method. The method allows determining the incubation and failure times of the fuel claddings, as well as the dissipated energy and the partial pressure of the desorbed H{sub 2} from the outer surface of fuel claddings during the hydriding process. The correlation between the hydriding dissipated energy and the amount of zirconium hydride (formed at different stages of the hydriding process) leads to a near t{sup 1/2} potential law corresponding to the time scaling of the reaction for the majority of the tested samples. The calibrated relation between energy and hydride thickness allows one to calculate the enthalpy of the {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} phase. The measured H{sub 2} desorption from the external surface is in agreement with a proposed kinetic desorption model from the hydrides precipitated at the surface.

  9. Graphene Charge Transfer, Spectroscopy, and Photochemical Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brus, Louis [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2017-01-31

    This project focused on the special electronic and optical properties of graphene and adsorbed molecular species. Graphene makes an excellent substrate for current collection in nanostructured photovoltaic designs. Graphene is almost transparent, and can be used as a solar cell window. It also has no surface states, and thus current is efficiently transported over long distances. Progress in graphene synthesis indicates that there will soon be practical methods for making large pieces of graphene for devices. We now need to understand exactly what happens to both ground state and electronically excited molecules and Qdots near graphene, if we are going to use them to absorb light in a nano-structured photovoltaic device using graphene to collect photocurrent. We also need to understand how to shift the graphene Fermi level, to optimize the kinetics of electron transfer to graphene. And we need to learn how to convert local graphene areas to semiconductor structure, to make useful spatially patterned graphenes. In this final report, we describe how we addressed these goals. We explored the question of possible Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy from molecular Charge Transfer onto Graphene substrates. We observed strong hole doping of graphene by adsorbed halogens as indicated by the shift of the graphene G Raman band. In the case of iodine adsorption, we also observed the anionic species made by hole doping. At low frequency in the Raman spectrum, we saw quite intense lines from I3- and I5- , suggesting possible SERS. We reported on Fresnel calculations on this thin film system, which did not show any net electromagnetic field enhancement.

  10. Preparation of neuroprotective condensed 1,4-benzoxazepines by regio- and diastereoselective domino Knoevenagel–[1,5]-hydride shift cyclization reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László Tóth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Condensed O,N-heterocycles containing tetrahydro-1,4-benzoxazepine and tetrahydroquinoline moieties were prepared by a regio- and diastereoselective domino Knoevenagel–[1,5]-hydride shift cyclization reaction of a 4-aryl-2-phenyl-1,4-benzoxazepine derivative obtained from flavanone. The relative configuration of products were determined by the correlation of 3JH,H coupling data with the geometry of major conformers accessed by DFT conformational analysis. Separated enantiomers of the products were characterized by HPLC-ECD data, which allowed their configurational assignment on the basis of TDDFT-ECD calculation of the solution conformers. Two compounds showed neuroprotective activities against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 or β-amyloid25–35 (Aβ25–35-induced cellular injuries in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells in the range of those of positive controls.

  11. Preparation of neuroprotective condensed 1,4-benzoxazepines by regio- and diastereoselective domino Knoevenagel-[1,5]-hydride shift cyclization reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, László; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Hai Yan; Mándi, Attila; Kövér, Katalin E; Illyés, Tünde-Zita; Kiss-Szikszai, Attila; Balogh, Balázs; Kurtán, Tibor; Antus, Sándor; Mátyus, Péter

    2014-01-01

    Condensed O,N-heterocycles containing tetrahydro-1,4-benzoxazepine and tetrahydroquinoline moieties were prepared by a regio- and diastereoselective domino Knoevenagel-[1,5]-hydride shift cyclization reaction of a 4-aryl-2-phenyl-1,4-benzoxazepine derivative obtained from flavanone. The relative configuration of products were determined by the correlation of (3) J H,H coupling data with the geometry of major conformers accessed by DFT conformational analysis. Separated enantiomers of the products were characterized by HPLC-ECD data, which allowed their configurational assignment on the basis of TDDFT-ECD calculation of the solution conformers. Two compounds showed neuroprotective activities against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or β-amyloid25-35 (Aβ25-35)-induced cellular injuries in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells in the range of those of positive controls.

  12. A STUDY OF FUNDAMENTAL REACTION PATHWAYS FOR TRANSITION METAL ALKYL COMPLEXES. I. THE REACTION OF A NICKEL METHYL COMPLEX WITH ALKYNES. II. THE MECHANISM OF ALDEHYDE FORMATION IN THE REACTION OF A MOLYBDENUM HYDRIDE WITH MOLYBDENUM ALKYLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huggins, John Mitchell

    1980-06-01

    mixed dimers MeCpMo(CO){sub 3}-(CO){sub 3}MoCp (3b) and MeCpMo(CO){sub 2}{triple_bond}(CO){sub 2}MoCp (4b) are the predominant kinetic products of the reaction. Additionally labeling the carbonyl ligands of 1a with {sup 13}CO led to the conclusion that all three of the carbonyl ligands in 1a end up in the tetracarbonyl dimers 4a if the reaction is carried out under a continuous purge of argon Trapping studies failed to find any evidence for the intermediacy of either [CpMo(CO){sub 3}]{sup -} or [CpMo(CO){sub 3}]{sup +} in this reaction. A mechanism is proposed that involves the initial migration of the alkyl ligand in 2 to CO forming an unsaturated acyl complex which reacts with 1a to give a binuclear complex containing a three center-two electron Mo-H-Mo bond. This complex then selectively looses a carbonyl from the acyl molybdenum, migrates the hydride to that same metal, and forms a metal-metal bond. This binuclear complex with the hydride and acyl ligands on one metal reductively eliminates aldehyde, and migrates a carbonyl ligand, to give 4a directly. The other product 3a is formed by addition of two molecules of free CO to 4a.

  13. Molecular rare-earth-metal hydrides in non-cyclopentadienyl environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegler, Waldemar; Venugopal, Ajay; Kramer, Mathias; Okuda, Jun

    2015-02-02

    Molecular hydrides of the rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as counterparts of solid-state interstitial hydrides. Structurally well-characterized non-metallocene-type hydride complexes allow the study of elementary reactions that occur at rare-earth-metal centers and of catalytic reactions involving bonds between rare-earth metals and hydrides. In addition to neutral hydrides, cationic derivatives have now become available.

  14. Parallel proton transfer pathways in aqueous acid-base reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, M. J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the mechanism of proton transfer (PT) between the photoacid 8-hydroxy-1,3, 6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (HPTS) and the base chloroacetate in aqueous solution. We investigate both proton and deuteron transfer reactions in solutions with base concentrations ranging from 0.25M to 4M. Using femtosecond midinfrared spectroscopy, we probe the vibrational responses of HPTS, its conjugate photobase, the hydrated proton/deuteron, and chloroacetate. The measurement of these four resonances allows ...

  15. Intrinsic barriers for H-atom transfer reactions involving hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Autrey, S.T.; Franz, J.A.

    1994-08-01

    Intrinsic barriers (formally the barrier in the absence of driving force) for H-atom transfer reactions are key parameters in Evans-Polyanyi and Marcus equations for estimating exothermic reaction barriers and are fundamentally significant for the insight they provide about bond reorganization energies for formation of transition state structures. Although knowable from experiment, relatively few of these barriers have been measured due to experimental difficulties in measuring rates for identity reactions. Thus, the authors have used semiempirical Molecular Orbital theoretical methods (MNDO/PM3) to calculate barriers for a series of H-atom transfer identity reactions involving alkyl, alkenyl, arylalkyl and hydroaryl radicals and donors. Briefly stated, they find that barriers decrease with the degree of alkyl substitution at the radical site whereas barriers increase with the degree of conjugation with the radical site. Details of the methodology and analyses of how these barrier heights correlate with reactant and transition state properties will be presented and discussed.

  16. Efficient transfer hydrogenation reaction Catalyzed by a dearomatized PN 3P ruthenium pincer complex under base-free Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    He, Lipeng

    2012-03-01

    A dearomatized complex [RuH(PN 3P)(CO)] (PN 3PN, N′-bis(di-tert-butylphosphino)-2,6-diaminopyridine) (3) was prepared by reaction of the aromatic complex [RuH(Cl)(PN 3P)(CO)] (2) with t-BuOK in THF. Further treatment of 3 with formic acid led to the formation of a rearomatized complex (4). These new complexes were fully characterized and the molecular structure of complex 4 was further confirmed by X-ray crystallography. In complex 4, a distorted square-pyramidal geometry around the ruthenium center was observed, with the CO ligand trans to the pyridinic nitrogen atom and the hydride located in the apical position. The dearomatized complex 3 displays efficient catalytic activity for hydrogen transfer of ketones in isopropanol. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Performance of Frozen Density Embedding for Modeling Hole Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, Pablo; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out a thorough benchmark of the FDE-ET method for calculating hole transfer couplings. We have considered 10 exchange-correlation functionals, 3 non-additive kinetic energy functionals and 3 basis sets. Overall, we conclude that with a 7% mean relative unsigned error, the PBE functional coupled with the PW91k non-additive Kinetic energy functional and a TZP basis set constitutes the most stable, and accurate level of theory for hole-transfer coupling calculations. The FDE-ET method is found to be an excellent tool for computing diabatic couplings for hole transfer reactions.

  18. A twist on facial selectivity of hydride reductions of cyclic ketones: twist-boat conformers in cyclohexanone, piperidone, and tropinone reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeldt, Sharon R; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Comins, Daniel L; Houk, K N

    2014-12-05

    The role of twist-boat conformers of cyclohexanones in hydride reductions was explored. The hydride reductions of a cis-2,6-disubstituted N-acylpiperidone, an N-acyltropinone, and tert-butylcyclohexanone by lithium aluminum hydride and by a bulky borohydride reagent were investigated computationally and compared to experiment. Our results indicate that in certain cases, factors such as substrate conformation, nucleophile bulkiness, and remote steric features can affect stereoselectivity in ways that are difficult to predict by the general Felkin-Anh model. In particular, we have calculated that a twist-boat conformation is relevant to the reactivity and facial selectivity of hydride reduction of cis-2,6-disubstituted N-acylpiperidones with a small hydride reagent (LiAlH4) but not with a bulky hydride (lithium triisopropylborohydride).

  19. Catalytic Proton Coupled Electron Transfer from Metal Hydrides to Titanocene Amides, Hydrazides and Imides: Determination of Thermodynamic Parameters Relevant to Nitrogen Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Iraklis; Chirik, Paul J

    2016-10-03

    The hydrogenolysis of titanium-nitrogen bonds in a series of bis(cyclopentadienyl) titanium amides, hydrazides and imides by proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) is described. Twelve different N-H bond dissociation free energies (BDFEs) among the various nitrogen-containing ligands were measured or calculated, and effects of metal oxidation state and N-ligand substituent were determined. Two metal hydride complexes, (η(5)-C5Me5)(py-Ph)Rh-H (py-Ph = 2-pyridylphenyl, [Rh]-H) and (η(5)-C5R5)(CO)3Cr-H ([Cr](R)-H, R= H, Me) were evaluated for formal H atom transfer reactivity and were selected due to their relatively weak M-H bond strengths yet ability to activate and cleave molecular hydrogen. Despite comparable M-H BDFEs, disparate reactivity between the two compounds was observed and was traced to the vastly different acidities of the M-H bonds and overall redox potentials of the molecules. With [Rh]-H, catalytic syntheses of ammonia, silylamine and N,N-dimethylhydrazine have been accomplished from the corresponding titanium(IV) complex using H2 as the stoichiometric H atom source. The data presented in this study provides the thermochemical foundation for the synthesis of NH3 by proton coupled electron transfer at a well-defined transition metal center.

  20. Potential Energy Diagrams: A Conceptual Tool in the Study of Electron Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nita A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes how the potential energy diagram may be used to theoretically describe the processes involved in a system undergoing electron transfer. Examines factors important in electron transfer reactions and discusses several classes of electron transfer reactions. (CS)

  1. Saponification reaction system: a detailed mass transfer coefficient determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečar, Darja; Goršek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The saponification of an aromatic ester with an aqueous sodium hydroxide was studied within a heterogeneous reaction medium in order to determine the overall kinetics of the selected system. The extended thermo-kinetic model was developed compared to the previously used simple one. The reaction rate within a heterogeneous liquid-liquid system incorporates a chemical kinetics term as well as mass transfer between both phases. Chemical rate constant was obtained from experiments within a homogeneous medium, whilst the mass-transfer coefficient was determined separately. The measured thermal profiles were then the bases for determining the overall reaction-rate. This study presents the development of an extended kinetic model for considering mass transfer regarding the saponification of ethyl benzoate with sodium hydroxide within a heterogeneous reaction medium. The time-dependences are presented for the mass transfer coefficient and the interfacial areas at different heterogeneous stages and temperatures. The results indicated an important role of reliable kinetic model, as significant difference in k(L)a product was obtained with extended and simple approach.

  2. Mechanisms for control of biological electron transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Heather R; Dow, Brian A; Davidson, Victor L

    2014-12-01

    Electron transfer (ET) through and between proteins is a fundamental biological process. The rates and mechanisms of these ET reactions are controlled by the proteins in which the redox centers that donate and accept electrons reside. The protein influences the magnitudes of the ET parameters, the electronic coupling and reorganization energy that are associated with the ET reaction. The protein can regulate the rates of the ET reaction by requiring reaction steps to optimize the system for ET, leading to kinetic mechanisms of gated or coupled ET. Amino acid residues in the segment of the protein through which long range ET occurs can also modulate the ET rate by serving as staging points for hopping mechanisms of ET. Specific examples are presented to illustrate these mechanisms by which proteins control rates of ET reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Boron Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-07-01

    of direct interest could be b.P.4d. ’Thus the discovory of a now proj.ect, since silano is probably too readily infla-zmablo for practical usc’ this...devoted, ho specc4fie compounds vhitih a’-ould be tocdte at prescnt arc: nron tiy * silano , %;2.SiFi3 , diothyl sila~no, (C2 115 )2 Si112, mono r.-rop; ! (n...Bcrohydrido or Li h.... I .A-4A- The prepuation of Silano med of Stannane by the interaction or lithium aluzirun hydride v-ithl silicon tetrtchiorido and

  4. On the slope anomaly in heavy-ion transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Marta, H D; Fernández-Niello, J O; Pacheco, A J

    2002-01-01

    We discuss a semiclassical model of transfer reactions in heavy-ion collisions, in which the nuclei are assumed to move along classical trajectories governed by the Coulomb and the real part of the optical potential. The model, originally proposed for the case of spherical nuclei, is here extended to deformed ones. It takes into account tunneling around the point of closest approach of the collision partners, and the effect of other channels is included as an absorption due to the imaginary part of the optical potential. The interplay between absorption and tunneling effects explains both the observed energy dependence of the transfer probabilities at large distances, and the so-called 'slope anomaly' in neutron transfer reactions.

  5. Multinucleon transfer reactions in closed-shell nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Szilner, S; Corradi, L; Marginean, N; Pollarolo, G; Stefanini, A M; Beghini, S; Behera, B R; Fioretto, E; Gadea, A; Guiot, B; Latina, A; Mason, P; Montagnoli, G; Scarlassara, F; Trotta, M; de Angelis, G; Della Vedova, F; Farnea, E; Haas, F; Lenzi, S; Lunardi, S; Marginean, R; Menegazzo, R; Napoli, D R; Nespolo, M; Pokrovsky, I V; Recchia, F; Romoli, M; Salsac, M -D; Soic, N; Valiente-Dobon, J J

    2007-01-01

    Multinucleon transfer reactions in 40Ca+96Zr and 90Zr+208Pb have been measured at energies close to the Coulomb barrier in a high resolution gamma-particle coincidence experiment. The large solid angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA coupled to the CLARA gamma-array has been employed. Trajectory reconstruction has been applied for the complete identification of transfer products. Mass and charge yields, total kinetic energy losses, gamma transitions of the binary reaction partners, and comparison of data with semiclassical calculations are reported. Specific transitions in 95Zr populated in one particle transfer channels are discussed in terms of particle-phonon couplings. The gamma decays from states in 42Ca in the excitation energy region expected from pairing vibrations are also observed.

  6. Pairing interaction and two-nucleon transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Potel, Gregory; Barranco, Francisco; Vigezzi, Enrico; Broglia, Ricardo A

    2014-01-01

    Making use of the fact that the collective modes associated with the spontaneous (static and dynamic) violation of gauge invariance in atomic nuclei (pairing rotations and pairing vibrations) are amenable to a simple, quite accurate nuclear structure description (BCS and QRPA respectively), it is possible to quantitatively test the reaction mechanism which is at the basis of two-nucleon transfer reactions, specific probe of pairing in nuclei. With the help of the static and dynamic mean field spectroscopic amplitudes, taking into account successive and simultaneous transfer channels properly corrected because of non-orthogonality effects, as well as describing the associated elastic channels in terms of experimentally determined optical potentials, one obtains absolute, two-particle transfer differential cross sections which provide an overall account of the data within experimental errors. One of the first results connected with such quantitative studies of pairing correlations in nuclei is the observation o...

  7. Neutron transfer reactions in the fp-shell region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahgoub, Mahmoud

    2008-06-26

    Neutron transfer reactions were used to study the stability of the magic number N=28 near {sup 56}Ni. On one hand the one-neutron pickup (d,p) reaction was used for precision spectroscopy of single-particle levels in {sup 55}Fe. On the other hand we investigated the two-neutron transfer mechanism into {sup 56}Ni using the pickup reaction {sup 58}Ni((vector)p,t){sup 56}Ni. In addition the reliability of inverse kinematics reactions at low energy to study exotic nuclei was tested by the neutron transfer reactions t({sup 40}Ar,p){sup 42}Ar and d({sup 54}Fe,p){sup 55}Fe using tritium and deuterium targets, respectively, and by comparing the results with those of the normal kinematics reactions. The experimental data, differential cross-section and analyzing powers, are compared to DWBA and coupled channel calculations utilizing the code CHUCK3. By performing the single-neutron stripping reaction ((vector)d,p) on {sup 54}Fe the 1f{sub 7/2} shell in the ground state configuration was found to be partly broken. The instability of the 1f{sub 7/2} shell and the magic number N=28 was confirmed once by observing a number of levels with J{sup {pi}} = 7/2{sup -} at low excitation energies, which should not be populated if {sup 54}Fe has a closed 1f{sub 7/2} shell, and also by comparing our high precision experimental data with a large scale shell model calculation using the ANTOINE code [5]. Calculations including a partly broken 1f{sub 7/2} shell show better agreement with the experiment. The instability of the 1f{sub 7/2} shell was confirmed also by performing the two-neutron pick-up reaction ((vector)p,t) on {sup 58}Ni to study {sup 56}Ni, where a considerable improvement in the DWBA calculation was observed after considering 1f{sub 7/2} as a broken shell. To prove the reliability of inverse kinematics transfer reactions at low energies ({proportional_to} 2 AMeV), the aforementioned single-neutron transfer reaction (d,p) was repeated using a beam of {sup 54}Fe ions and a

  8. Trialkylborane-Assisted CO(2) Reduction by Late Transition Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexander J M; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2011-01-01

    Trialkylborane additives promote reduction of CO(2) to formate by bis(diphosphine) Ni(II) and Rh(III) hydride complexes. The late transition metal hydrides, which can be formed from dihydrogen, transfer hydride to CO(2) to give a formate-borane adduct. The borane must be of appropriate Lewis acidity: weaker acids do not show significant hydride transfer enhancement, while stronger acids abstract hydride without CO(2) reduction. The mechanism likely involves a pre-equilibrium hydride transfer followed by formation of a stabilizing formate-borane adduct.

  9. Reactivity patterns of transition metal hydrides and alkyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, W.D. II

    1979-05-01

    The complex PPN/sup +/ CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ (Cp=eta/sup 5/-C/sub 5/H/sub 5/ and PPN = (Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 2/) was prepared in 70% yield and its physical properties and chemical reactions investigated. PPN/sup +/ CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ reacts with a wide range of organic halides. The organometallic products of these reactions are the vanadium halides PPN/sup +/(CpV(C)/sub 3/X)/sup -/ and in some cases the binuclear bridging hydride PPN/sup +/ (CpV(CO)/sub 3/)/sub 2/H/sup -/. The borohydride salt PPN/sup +/(CpV(CO)/sub 3/BH/sub 4/)/sup -/ has also been prepared. The reaction between CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ and organic halides was investigated and compared with halide reductions carried out using tri-n-butyltin hydride. Results demonstrate that in almost all cases, the reduction reaction proceeds via free radical intermediates which are generated in a chain process, and are trapped by hydrogen transfer from CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/. Sodium amalgam reduction of CpRh(CO)/sub 2/ or a mixture of CpRh(CO)/sub 2/ and CpCo(CO)/sub 2/ affords two new anions, PPN/sup +/ (Cp/sub 2/Rh/sub 3/(CO)/sub 4/)/sup -/ and PPN/sup +/(Cp/sub 2/RhCo(CO)/sub 2/)/sup -/. CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H reacts with CpMo(CO)/sub 3/R (R=CH/sub 3/,C/sub 2/H/sub 5/, CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/) at 25 to 50/sup 0/C to produce aldehyde RCHO and the dimers (CpMo(CO)/sub 3/)/sub 2/ and (CpMo(CO)/sub 2/)/sub 2/. In general, CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ appears to transfer a hydrogen atom to the metal radical anion formed in an electron transfer process, whereas CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H transfers hydride in a 2-electron process to a vacant coordination site. The chemical consequences are that CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ generally reacts with metal alkyls to give alkanes via intermediate alkyl hydride species whereas CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H reacts with metal alkyls to produce aldehyde, via an intermediate acyl hydride species.

  10. Reactivity patterns of transition metal hydrides and alkyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, W.D. II

    1979-05-01

    The complex PPN/sup +/ CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ (Cp=eta/sup 5/-C/sub 5/H/sub 5/ and PPN = (Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 2/) was prepared in 70% yield and its physical properties and chemical reactions investigated. PPN/sup +/ CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ reacts with a wide range of organic halides. The organometallic products of these reactions are the vanadium halides PPN/sup +/(CpV(C)/sub 3/X)/sup -/ and in some cases the binuclear bridging hydride PPN/sup +/ (CpV(CO)/sub 3/)/sub 2/H/sup -/. The borohydride salt PPN/sup +/(CpV(CO)/sub 3/BH/sub 4/)/sup -/ has also been prepared. The reaction between CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ and organic halides was investigated and compared with halide reductions carried out using tri-n-butyltin hydride. Results demonstrate that in almost all cases, the reduction reaction proceeds via free radical intermediates which are generated in a chain process, and are trapped by hydrogen transfer from CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/. Sodium amalgam reduction of CpRh(CO)/sub 2/ or a mixture of CpRh(CO)/sub 2/ and CpCo(CO)/sub 2/ affords two new anions, PPN/sup +/ (Cp/sub 2/Rh/sub 3/(CO)/sub 4/)/sup -/ and PPN/sup +/(Cp/sub 2/RhCo(CO)/sub 2/)/sup -/. CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H reacts with CpMo(CO)/sub 3/R (R=CH/sub 3/,C/sub 2/H/sub 5/, CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/) at 25 to 50/sup 0/C to produce aldehyde RCHO and the dimers (CpMo(CO)/sub 3/)/sub 2/ and (CpMo(CO)/sub 2/)/sub 2/. In general, CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ appears to transfer a hydrogen atom to the metal radical anion formed in an electron transfer process, whereas CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H transfers hydride in a 2-electron process to a vacant coordination site. The chemical consequences are that CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ generally reacts with metal alkyls to give alkanes via intermediate alkyl hydride species whereas CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H reacts with metal alkyls to produce aldehyde, via an intermediate acyl hydride species.

  11. Quenching of Cross Sections in Nucleon Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kay, B P; Freeman, S J

    2013-01-01

    Cross sections for proton knockout observed in (e,e'p) reactions are apparently quenched by a factor of ~0.5, an effect attributed to short-range correlations between nucleons. Here we demonstrate that such quenching is not restricted to proton knockout, but a more general phenomenon associated with any nucleon transfer. Measurements of absolute cross sections on a number of targets between 16O and 208Pb were analyzed in a consistent way, with the cross sections reduced to spectroscopic factors through the distorted-wave Born approximation with global optical potentials. Across the 124 cases analyzed here, induced by various proton- and neutron-transfer reactions and with angular momentum transfer l=0-7, the results are consistent with a quenching factor of 0.55. This is an apparently uniform quenching of single-particle motion in the nuclear medium. The effect is seen not only in (d,p) reactions but also in reactions with A=3 and 4 projectiles, when realistic wave functions are used for the projectiles.

  12. Tem holder for sample transfer under reaction conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    and temperature, which usually are far from the operando conditions of e.g. heterogeneous catalysis. Our efforts focus on bridging these gaps by establishing in situ sample transfer between complementary measurement techniques. To fully exploit the capabilities of ETEM complementary experiments...... and characterization techniques are beneficial. Normally, the complementary measurements are done in parallel with experiments separated in time and space [3] or by mimicking a reactor bed by changing the feed gas composition according to reactivity and conversion measured in dedicated catalyst set-ups [4...... (XRD) setup and subsequently successfully transferred under reaction conditions to the ETEM....

  13. Laser controlled charge-transfer reaction at low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    We study the low-temperature charge transfer reaction between a neutral atom and an ion under the influence of near-resonant laser light. By setting up a multi-channel model with field-dressed states we demonstrate that the reaction rate coefficient can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude with laser intensities of $10^6$ W/cm$^2$ or larger. In addition, depending on laser frequency one can induce a significant enhancement or suppression of the charge-exchange rate coefficient. For our intensities multi-photon processes are not important.

  14. Investigation of the unbound 21C nucleus via transfer reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukui Tokuro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The cross section of the transfer reaction 20C(d,p21C at 30.0 MeV is investigated. The continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC is used in order to obtain the final state wave function. The smoothing procedure of the transition matrix and the channel-coupling effect on the cross section are discussed.

  15. Unusual Reaction of β-Hydroxy α-Diazo Carbonyl Compounds with Trichloroacetonitrile (CI3CCN) and Sodium Hydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wei-Feng; JIANG Nan; WANG Jian-Bo

    2003-01-01

    @@ In the process of preparing α-diazo carbonyl compound 2 by imidation of 1, we unexpectedly observed a direct conversion of the hydroxyl group into trichloroacetylamino group. In this presentation, we report this unprecedented reaction, as well as the Rh2(OAc)4-catalyzed reaction of the resulting β-(trichloroacetyl)amino β-diazo carbonylcompounds 3. [ 1

  16. Analysis of transfer reactions: determination of spectroscopic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeley, N. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee (DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN), 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); The Andrzej So an Institute for Nuclear Studies, Dept. of Nuclear Reactions, Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-01

    An overview of the most popular models used for the analysis of direct reaction data is given, concentrating on practical aspects. The 4 following models (in order of increasing sophistication): the distorted wave born approximation (DWBA), the adiabatic model, the coupled channels born approximation, and the coupled reaction channels are briefly described. As a concrete example, the C{sup 12}(d,p)C{sup 13} reaction at an incident deuteron energy of 30 MeV is analysed with progressively more physically sophisticated models. The effect of the choice of the reaction model on the spectroscopic information extracted from the data is investigated and other sources of uncertainty in the derived spectroscopic factors are discussed. We have showed that the choice of the reaction model can significantly influence the nuclear structure information, particularly the spectroscopic factors or amplitudes but occasionally also the spin-parity, that we wish to extract from direct reaction data. We have also demonstrated that the DWBA can fail to give a satisfactory description of transfer data but when the tenets of the theory are fulfilled DWBA can work very well and will yield the same results as most sophisticated models. The use of global rather than fitted optical potentials can also lead to important differences in the extracted spectroscopic factors.

  17. Neutron Transfer reactions induced by 8Li on 9Be

    CERN Document Server

    Guimarães, V; Amro, H; Assunção, M; Barioni, A; Becchetti, F D; Carmargo, O; Garcia, H; Jiang, H; Kolata, J J; Lichtenthäler, R; Lizcano, D; Martines-Quiroz, E; Jiang, Hao

    2007-01-01

    Angular distributions for the elastic scattering of 8Li on 9Be and the neutron transfer reactions 9Be(8Li,7Li)10Be and 9Be(8Li,9Li)8Be have been measured with a 27 MeV 8Li radioactive nuclear beam. Spectroscopic factors for 8Li|n=9Li and 7Li|n=8Li bound systems were obtained from the comparison between the experimental differential cross section and finite-range DWBA calculations with the code FRESCO. The spectroscopic factors obtained are compared to shell model calculations and to other experimental values from (d,p) reactions. Using the present values for the spectroscopic factor, cross sections for the direct neutron-capture reactions 7Li(n,g)8Li and 8Li(n,g)9Li were calculated in the framework of a potential model.

  18. Electron Transfer Reactions: Generalized Spin-Boson Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Merkli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a mathematically rigorous analysis of a generalized spin-boson system for the treatment of a donor-acceptor (reactant-product) quantum system coupled to a thermal quantum noise. The donor/acceptor probability dynamics describes transport reactions in chemical processes in presence of a noisy environment -- such as the electron transfer in a photosynthetic reaction center. Besides being rigorous, our analysis has the advantages over previous ones that (1) we include a general, non energy-conserving system-environment interaction, and that (2) we allow for the donor or acceptor to consist of multiple energy levels lying closely together. We establish explicit expressions for the rates and the efficiency (final donor-acceptor population difference) of the reaction. In particular, we show that the rate increases for a multi-level acceptor, but the efficiency does not.

  19. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  20. Hydride, hydrogen, proton, and electron affinities of imines and their reaction intermediates in acetonitrile and construction of thermodynamic characteristic graphs (TCGs) of imines as a "molecule ID card".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Qiao-Yun; Chen, Qiang; Mei, Lian-Rui

    2010-02-01

    A series of 61 imines with various typical structures were synthesized, and the thermodynamic affinities (defined as enthalpy changes or redox potentials in this work) of the imines to abstract hydride anions, hydrogen atoms, and electrons, the thermodynamic affinities of the radical anions of the imines to abstract hydrogen atoms and protons, and the thermodynamic affinities of the hydrogen adducts of the imines to abstract electrons in acetonitrile were determined by using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The pure heterolytic and homolytic dissociation energies of the C=N pi-bond in the imines were estimated. The polarity of the C=N double bond in the imines was examined using a linear free-energy relationship. The idea of a thermodynamic characteristic graph (TCG) of imines as an efficient "Molecule ID Card" was introduced. The TCG can be used to quantitatively diagnose and predict the characteristic chemical properties of imines and their various reaction intermediates as well as the reduction mechanism of the imines. The information disclosed in this work could not only supply a gap of thermodynamics for the chemistry of imines but also strongly promote the fast development of the applications of imines.

  1. Thermodynamic diagnosis of the properties and mechanism of dihydropyridine-type compounds as hydride source in acetonitrile with "Molecule ID Card".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Tan, Yue; Cao, Chao-Tun

    2010-02-11

    A series of 45 dihydropyridine-type organic compounds as hydride source were designed and synthesized. The thermodynamic driving forces (defined as enthalpy changes or redox potentials in this work) of the dihydropyridines to release hydride anions, hydrogen atoms (hydrogen for short), and electrons in acetonitrile, the thermodynamic driving forces of the radical cations of the dihydropyridines to release protons and hydrogens in acetonitrile, and the thermodynamic driving forces of the neutral pyridine-type radicals of the dihydropyridines to release electron in acetonitrile were determined by using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The rates and activation parameters of hydride transfer from the dihydropyridines to acridinium perclorate, a well-known hydride acceptor, were determined by using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy technique. The relationship between the thermodynamic driving forces and kinetic rate of the hydride transfer was examined. Thermodynamic characteristic graph (TCG) of the dihydropyridines as an efficient "Molecule ID Card" was introduced. The TCG can be used to quantitatively diagnose or predict the characteristic chemical properties of the dihydropyridines and their various reaction intermediates. The mechanism of hydride transfer from the dihydropyridines to acridinium perclorate was diagnosed and elucidated by using the determined thermodynamic parameters and the activation parameters.

  2. Effects of delocalization on intrinsic barriers for H-atom transfer: Implications for the radical hydrogen transfer reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Autrey, S.T.; Ferris, K.F.; Franz, J.A.

    1992-08-01

    PM3 calculations of transition states (TS) for both normal H-atom transfer and radical hydrogen transfer (RHT) reactions of a a wide-variety of hydrocarbon structures have enabled development of quantitative structure-reactivity relationships. Results indicate that activation barriers for RHT reactions are large enough that thermoneutral and endothermic reactions should not compete with alternative multistep pathways.

  3. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  4. Advanced Hydride Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T.

    1989-01-01

    Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, cold,'' process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility's metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

  5. Advanced Hydride Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T.

    1989-12-31

    Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, ``cold,`` process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility`s metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

  6. Consistency in Quenching of ``Absolute'' Spectroscopic Factors from Transfer Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, J. P.; Kay, B. P.; Freeman, S. J.

    2013-04-01

    The strengths of single-particle transitions in (e,e'p) knockout reactions on closed-shell nuclei are lower than expected,footnotetextG. J. Kramer et al., Nucl. Phys. A679, 267 (2001). due to limitations of the mean-field description imposed by correlations. This quenching of single-particle strength by ˜0.5 appeared to be a general property of nuclei from ^16O to ^208Pb. In our work, the combined sums of neutron-adding and neutron-removing strengths from (d,p) and (p,d) transfer reactions on four Ni isotopes yield very similar quenching factors of ˜0.53 (varying by ˜10% with reasonable choices of optical-model parameters).footnotetextJ. P. Schiffer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 022501 (2012). Recently, spectroscopic overlaps between ^4He and ^3He were extracted from GFMC calculations.footnotetextI. Brida et al., Phys. Rev. C 84, 024319 (2011). With these, our data on (α,^3He) and (^3He,α) on the Ni isotopes yields ˜0.62. Additional data for proton transfer on Ni and transfer on other nuclei are also being analyzed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and the U.K. Science and Technology Facilities Council.

  7. Kinetic behaviour of low-Co AB{sub 5}-type metal hydride electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tliha, M., E-mail: Mohamed.Tliha@esstt.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes, ESSTT, 5 Avenue Taha Hussein, 1008 Tunis (Tunisia); Boussami, S.; Mathlouthi, H.; Lamloumi, J. [Laboratoire de Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes, ESSTT, 5 Avenue Taha Hussein, 1008 Tunis (Tunisia); Percheron-Guegan, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie Metallurgique des Terres Rares, GLVT, 2-8 Rue Henri Dunant 94320, Thiais Cedex (France)

    2010-11-15

    The kinetic behaviour of the LaNi{sub 3.55}Mn{sub 0.4}Al{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 0.35} metal hydride, used as a negative electrode in the nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH) batteries, was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at different state of charge (SOC). Impedance measurements were performed in the frequency range from 50 kHz to 1 mHz. Electrochemical impedance spectrum of the metal hydride electrode was interpreted by an equivalent circuit including the different electrochemical processes taking place on the interface between the MH electrode and the electrolyte. Electrochemical kinetic parameters such as the charge-transfer resistance R{sub tc}, the exchange current density I{sub 0} and the hydrogen diffusion coefficient D{sub H} were determined at different state of charge. The results of EIS measurements indicate that the electrochemical reaction activity of the LaNi{sub 3.55}Mn{sub 0.4}Al{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 0.35} metal hydride electrode was markedly improved with increasing state of charge (SOC). The transformation {alpha}-{beta} is probably a limiting step in the mechanisms of hydrogenation of metal hydride electrode.

  8. Multinucleon transfer reactions in the 40Ar+208Pb system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijatović, T.; Szilner, S.; Corradi, L.; Montanari, D.; Pollarolo, G.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Goasduff, A.; Malenica, D. Jelavić; Mǎrginean, N.; Milin, M.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Soić, N.; Stefanini, A. M.; Ur, C. A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    We measured multinucleon transfer reactions in the 40Ar+208Pb system at an energy close to the Coulomb barrier, by employing the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer. We extracted differential and total cross sections of the different transfer channels, with a careful investigation of the total kinetic energy loss distributions. Comparisons between different systems having the same 208Pb target and with projectiles going from neutron-poor to neutron-rich nuclei, i.e., 40Ca, 58Ni, and 40Ar, as well as between the data and GRAZING calculations have been carried out. The neutron-rich (stable) 40Ar beam allowed us to get access to the channels involving proton pickup, whose behavior in connection with the production of neutron-rich heavy partner has been outlined.

  9. Pentanidium-catalyzed enantioselective phase-transfer conjugate addition reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Ting

    2011-03-09

    A new chiral entity, pentanidium, has been shown to be an excellent chiral phase-transfer catalyst. The enantioselective Michael addition reactions of tert-butyl glycinate-benzophenone Schiff base with various α,β- unsaturated acceptors provide adducts with high enantioselectivities. A successful gram-scale experiment at a low catalyst loading of 0.05 mol % indicates the potential for practical applications of this methodology. Phosphoglycine ester analogues can also be utilized as the Michael donor, affording enantioenriched α-aminophosphonic acid derivatives and phosphonic analogues of (S)-proline. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  10. A New Reaction-controlled Phase-transfer Catalyst System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Qiang LI; Xi Gao JIAN; Gui Mei WANG; Yan YU

    2004-01-01

    A new reaction-controlled phase-transfer catalyst system was designed and synthesized. In this system, heteropolytungstate [C7H7N(CH3)3]9PW9O34 was used for catalytic epoxidation of cyclohexene with H2O2 as the oxidant. The conversion of H2O2 was 100% and the yield of cyclohexene oxide was 87.1% based on cyclohexene. Infrared spectra showed that both fresh catalyst and the recovered catalyst do have completely same absorption peak, indicating the structure of catalyst is very stability and can be recycled.

  11. Quantum Transition State Theory for proton transfer reactions in enzymes

    CERN Document Server

    Bothma, Jacques P; McKenzie, Ross H

    2009-01-01

    We consider the role of quantum effects in the transfer of hyrogen-like species in enzyme-catalysed reactions. This study is stimulated by claims that the observed magnitude and temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects imply that quantum tunneling below the energy barrier associated with the transition state significantly enhances the reaction rate in many enzymes. We use a path integral approach which provides a general framework to understand tunneling in a quantum system which interacts with an environment at non-zero temperature. Here the quantum system is the active site of the enzyme and the environment is the surrounding protein and water. Tunneling well below the barrier only occurs for temperatures less than a temperature $T_0$ which is determined by the curvature of potential energy surface near the top of the barrier. We argue that for most enzymes this temperature is less than room temperature. For physically reasonable parameters quantum transition state theory gives a quantitative descr...

  12. Electron transfer pathway analysis in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center

    CERN Document Server

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    A new computational scheme to analyze electron transfer (ET) pathways in large biomolecules is presented with applications to ETs in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. It consists of a linear combination of fragment molecular orbitals and an electron tunneling current analysis, which enables an efficient first-principles analysis of ET pathways in large biomolecules. The scheme has been applied to the ET from menaquinone to ubiquinone via nonheme iron complex in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. It has revealed that not only the central Fe$^{2+}$ ion but also particular histidine ligands are involved in the ET pathways in such a way to mitigate perturbations that can be caused by metal ion substitution and depletion, which elucidates the experimentally observed insensitivity of the ET rate to these perturbations.

  13. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Titov, S. V.; Mitina, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/kBT where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. Fiz. Khim. 124, 213 (1959); J. Ulstrup, Charge Transfer in Condensed Media (Springer, Berlin, 1979); M. Bixon and J. Jortner, Adv. Chem. Phys. 106, 35 (1999)] underlying it is discussed and illustrated by the results of computations for practically important target systems.

  14. P-hydrogen-substituted 1,3,2-diazaphospholenes: molecular hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burck, Sebastian; Gudat, Dietrich; Nieger, Martin; Du Mont, Wolf-Walther

    2006-03-29

    P-Hydrogen-substituted 1,3,2-diazaphospholenes 1 were prepared by an improved procedure from diazadienes and were characterized by spectroscopy and in one case by X-ray diffraction. A unique hydride-type reactivity of the P-H bonds was documented by extensive reactivity studies. Aldehydes and ketones were readily reduced to diazaphospholene derivatives of the corresponding alcohols, with alkyl-substituted ketones being converted at much lower rates than aldehydes or diaryl ketones. Reactions with the tetrachlorides of group 14 elements proceeded via hydride/chloride metathesis to give either partially chlorinated derivatives EH(n)Cl(4-n) (n = 0-3 for E = C, Si) or HCl and phosphenium salts 16c[ECl3] (for E = Ge, Sn) which were characterized by spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction studies. Tin dichloride was readily reduced to the element. Reactions of 1c with the P-chloro-diazaphospholene 3c and the salt 16c[OTf] allowed the first experimental detection of intermolecular exchange of a hydride, rather than a proton, between phosphine derivatives. Computational studies indicated that the hydride transfer between 1c and the cation 16c involves a transient H-bridged species with bonding properties similar to those of B2H7-. The preference for the formation of these bridged intermediates over P-P bonded phosphenium-phosphine adducts is attributed to the low electrophilicity of the diazaphospholenium cations and characterizes a novel reaction mode for phosphenium ions.

  15. Nano-engineering approach to destabilization of magnesium hydride (MgH2) by solid-state reaction with Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrzycki, J; Polanski, M; Plocinski, T

    2009-06-01

    We studied a possibility of destabilization of MgH2 by chemical reaction with Si by using a nano-engineering method for reducing diffusion distances and increasing surface area. The structure, morphology, chemical composition and dehydriding properties were investigated by XRD, SEM, EDS, DTA-TG and the volumetric Sievert method. The commercial MgH2 and Si powder mixture corresponded to the stoichiometry of the ideal Mg2Si intermetallic compound was ball-milled under argon atmosphere to reach a nanocrystalline composite structure (MgH2-Si mixture leads to the formation only a small amount of the Mg2Si compound. Microstructural studies showed that Si after ball-milling is heterogeneously distributed on the surface of MgH2 particles and incorporated in the nanocrystalline MgH2 matrix, forming a nanocomposite structure. The sluggish destabilization of MgH2 by solid-state reaction with Si forming the Mg2Si intermetallic compound was observed at 250 degrees C. The XRD and EDS analysis confirmed that the Mg2Si compound is formed after the dehydrogenation of the synthesized MgH2-Si composite. The activation energy of the destabilization reaction for the investigated composite significantly decreased (162 kJ/mol) as compared with unmilled MgH2-Si powder mixture (213 kJ/mol).

  16. Three-Body Model Analysis of Subbarrier alpha Transfer Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Tokuro; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2011-01-01

    Subbarrier alpha transfer reaction 13C(6Li,d)17O(6.356 MeV, 1/2+) at 3.6 MeV is analyzed with a alpha + d + 13C three-body model, and the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for alpha + 13C --> 17O(6.356 MeV, 1/2+), which essentially determines the reaction rate of 13C(alpha,n)16O, is extracted. Breakup effects of 6Li in the initial channel and those of 17O in the final channel are investigated with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC). The former is found to have a large back-coupling to the elastic channel, while the latter turns out significantly small. The transfer cross section calculated with Born approximation to the transition operator, including breakup states of 6Li, gives (C_{alpha 13C}{17O*})^2 =1.03 \\pm 0.29 fm^{-1}. This result is consistent with the value obtained by the previous DWBA calculation.

  17. Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Tengborn, E

    Research on the structure of exotic nuclei is one of the most intriguing topics in present day nuclear physics. With the use of facilities for isotope separation on-line, such as ISOLDE at CERN, short-lived isotopes can be studied experimentally. Since 2002, the REX-ISOLDE facility enables radioactive ions produced by ISOLDE to be post-accelerated, increasing the energy of the ions enough to do nuclear transfer reactions in inverse kinematics. In this thesis, transfer reactions are used to study the structure of neutron-rich lithium isotopes through a series of experiments at REX-ISOLDE. The first experiment used a 9Li beam at 2.36 MeV/u impinging on a deuterated polyethylene target to study 10Li, 9Li and 8Li. For the (d,p)-channel the resonance ground state and a first excited state are observed and the results agree with theoretical calculations. The elastic channel agrees with Optical Model, OM, calculations. For the (d,t)-channel the shape of the angular distribution agrees with Distorted Wave Born Approx...

  18. Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, J.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The research focus in this group is state-to-state dynamics of reaction and energy transfer in collisions of free radicals such as H, OH, and CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2}, alkanes, alcohols and other hydrogen-containing molecules. The motivation for the work is the desire to provide a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of prototype reactions that are important in the production and utilization of energy sources, most importantly in combustion. The work is primarily experimental, but with an important and growing theoretical/computational component. The focus of this research program is now on reactions in which at least one of the reactants and one of the products is polyatomic. The objective is to determine how the high dimensionality of the reactants and products differentiates such reactions from atom + diatom reactions of the same kinematics and energetics. The experiments use highly time-resolved laser spectroscopic methods to prepare reactant states and analyze the states of the products on a single-collision time scale. The primary spectroscopic tool for product state analysis is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. CARS is used because of its generality and because the extraction of quantum state populations from CARS spectra is straightforward. The combination of the generality and easy analysis of CARS makes possible absolute cross section measurements (both state-to-state and total), a particularly valuable capability for characterizing reactive and inelastic collisions. Reactant free radicals are produced by laser photolysis of appropriate precursors. For reactant vibrational excitation stimulated Raman techniques are being developed and implemented.

  19. Probing the pairing interaction through two-neutron transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margueron J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of the pairing interaction in mean-field-based models is addressed. In particular, the possibility to use pair transfers as A tool to better constrain this interaction is discussed. First, pairing inter-actions with various density dependencies (surface/volume mixing are used in the microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov + quasiparticle random-phase approximation model to generate the form factors to be used in reaction calculations. Cross sections for (p,t two-neutron transfer reactions are calculated in the one-step zero-range distorted-wave Born approximation for some Tin isotopes and for incident proton energies from 15 to 35 MeV. Three different surface/volume mixings of A zero-range density-dependent pairing interaction are employed in the microscopic calculations and the sensitivity of the cross sections to the different mixings is analyzed. Differences among the three different theoretical predictions are found espacially for the nucleus 136Sn and they are more important at the incident proton energy of 15 MeV. We thus indicate (p,t two-neutron transfer reactions with very neutron-rich Sn isotopes and at proton energies around 15 MeV as good experimental cases where the surface/volume mixing of the pairing interaction may be probed. In the second part of the manuscript, ground-state to ground-state transitions are investigated. Approximations made to estimate two-nucleon transfer probabilities in ground-state to ground-state transitions and the physical interpretation of these probabilities are discussed. Probabilities are often calculated by approximating both ground states of the initial nucleus A and of the final nucleus A±2 by the same quasiparticle vacuum. We analyze two improvements of this approach. First, the effect of using two different ground states with average numbers of particles A and A±2 is quantified. Second, by using projection techniques, the role of particle number restoration is analyzed. Our analysis

  20. Determination of the Astrophysical S(E) Factors or Rates for Radiative Capture Reaction with One Nucleon Transfer Reaction%Determination of the Astrophysical S(E) Factors or Rates for Radiative Capture Reaction with One Nucleon Transfer Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志宏; 郭冰; 李云居; 苏俊; 李二涛; 白希祥; 王友宝; 曾晟; 王宝祥; 颜胜权; 李志常; 刘建成; 连钢; 金孙均; 刘鑫; 柳卫平

    2012-01-01

    The radiative capture reaction plays an important role in nuclear astrophysics. We have indirectly measured the astrophysical S(E) factors for some proton capture reactions and reaction rates for several neutron capture reactions with one nucleon transfer reactions at HI-13 tandem accelerator in recent years. Some of them are compiled into IAEA EXFOR database and JINA REACLIB project, and used in the network calculations of Big Bang nucleosynthesis and type-I X-ray bursts.

  1. Sensitive detection of n-alkanes using a mixed ionization mode proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador-Muñoz, Omar; Misztal, Pawel K.; Weber, Robin; Worton, David R.; Zhang, Haofei; Drozd, Greg; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2016-11-01

    Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a technique that is widely used to detect volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with proton affinities higher than water. However, n-alkanes generally have a lower proton affinity than water and therefore proton transfer (PT) by reaction with H3O+ is not an effective mechanism for their detection. In this study, we developed a method using a conventional PTR-MS to detect n-alkanes by optimizing ion source and drift tube conditions to vary the relative amounts of different primary ions (H3O+, O2+, NO+) in the reaction chamber (drift tube). There are very few studies on O2+ detection of alkanes and the mixed mode has never been proposed before. We determined the optimum conditions and the resulting reaction mechanisms, allowing detection of n-alkanes from n-pentane to n-tridecane. These compounds are mostly emitted by evaporative/combustion process from fossil fuel use. The charge transfer (CT) mechanism observed with O2+ was the main reaction channel for n-heptane and longer n-alkanes, while for n-pentane and n-hexane the main reaction channel was hydride abstraction (HA). Maximum sensitivities were obtained at low E / N ratios (83 Td), low water flow (2 sccm) and high O2+ / NO+ ratios (Uso = 180 V). Isotopic 13C contribution was taken into account by subtracting fractions of the preceding 12C ion signal based on the number of carbon atoms and the natural abundance of 13C (i.e., 5.6 % for n-pentane and 14.5 % for n-tridecane). After accounting for isotopic distributions, we found that PT cannot be observed for n-alkanes smaller than n-decane. Instead, protonated water clusters of n-alkanes (M ṡ H3O+) species were observed with higher abundance using lower O2+ and higher water cluster fractions. M ṡ H3O+ species are probably the source for the M + H+ species observed from n-decane to n-tridecane. Normalized sensitivities to O2+ or to the sum of O2++ NO+ were determined to be a good metric with which to

  2. Preparation of a sample with a single MgH2 phase by horizontal ball milling and the first hydriding reaction of 90 wt% Mg-10 wt% MgH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong-Hyeon; Song, Myoung Youp

    2015-03-01

    In order to prepare an additive-free sample with a single MgH2 phase, 90 wt% Mg-10 wt% MgH2 (named 90Mg-10MgH2) was milled under a hydrogen atmosphere in a horizontal ball mill, and then hydrided. The hydrogen absorption and desorption properties of the prepared samples were investigated, and compared with those of milled pure Mg and purchased MgH2. X-ray diffraction analysis, measurement of specific BET surface areas, and observation of the prepared samples by scanning electron microscope were performed. The 90Mg-10MgH2 sample after hydriding-dehydriding cycling had small and large particles with fine particles on their surfaces, and had much finer particles and more defects than the milled pure Mg sample after hydridingdehydriding cycling. The specific BET surface areas of the milled Mg and 90Mg-10MgH2 were measured as 7.81 and 99.81 m2/g, respectively. A sample that had almost a single MgH2 phase could be prepared by horizontal ball milling and the first hydriding reaction of 90Mg-10MgH2. 90Mg-10MgH2 released 5.82 wt% H for about 70 min, while unmilled MgH2 (Aldrich) released 6.04 wt% H for about 100 min, at 648 K.

  3. Development of a metal hydride refrigeration system as an exhaust gas-driven automobile air conditioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Feng; Chen, Jiangping; Chen, Zhijiu [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Lu, Manqi; Yang, Ke [Engineering Center, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110016 (China); Zhou, Yimin [Research Center, Zhejiang Yinlun Machinery Co. Ltd., Tiantai County, Zhejiang Province 317200 (China)

    2007-10-15

    Aiming at developing exhaust gas-driven automobile air conditioners, two types of systems varying in heat carriers were preliminarily designed. A new hydride pair LaNi{sub 4.61}Mn{sub 0.26}Al{sub 0.13}/La{sub 0.6}Y{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 4.8}Mn{sub 0.2} was developed working at 120-200 C/20-50 C/-10-0 C. P-C isotherms and reaction kinetics were tested. Reaction enthalpy, entropy and theoretical cycling coefficient of performance (COP) were deducted from Van't-Hoff diagram. Test results showed that the hydride pair has flat plateau slopes, fast reaction dynamics and small hystereses; the reaction enthalpy of the refrigeration hydride is -27.1 kJ/mol H{sub 2} and system theoretical COP is 0.711. Mean particle sizes during cycles were verified to be an intrinsic property affected by constitution, heat treatment and cycle numbers rather than initial grain sizes. Based on this work pair, cylindrical reactors were designed and a function proving metal hydride intermittent refrigeration system was constructed with heat conducting oil as heat source and water as heat sink. The reactor equivalent thermal conductivity is merely 1.3 W/(m K), which still has not meet practical requirement. Intermittent refrigeration cycles were achieved and the average cooling power is 84.6 W at 150 C/30 C/0 C with COP being 0.26. The regulations of cycling performance and minimum refrigeration temperature (MRT) were determined by altering heat source temperature. Results showed that cooling power and system COP increase while MRT decreases with the growth of heat source temperature. This study develops a new hydride pair and confirms its application in automobile refrigeration systems, while their heat transfer properties still need to be improved for better performance. (author)

  4. Electron transfer reactions of macrocyclic compounds of cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1978-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of reduction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, and I/sub 2/ by various macrocyclic tetraaza complexes of cobalt(II), including Vitamin B/sub 12r/, were studied. The synthetic macrocycles studied were all 14-membered rings which varied in the degree of unsaturation,substitution of methyl groups on the periphery of the ring, and substitution within the ring itself. Scavenging experiments demonstrated that the reductions of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produce free hydroxyl radicals only in the case of Co((14)ane)/sup 2 +/ but with none of the others. In the latter instances apparently H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ simultaneously oxidizes the metal center and the ligand. The reductions of Br/sub 2/ and I/sub 2/ produce an aquohalocobalt(III) product for all reductants (except B/sub 12r/ + Br/sub 2/, which was complicated by bromination of the corrin ring). The mechanism of halogen reduction was found to involve rate-limiting inner-sphere electron transfer from cobalt to halogen to produce a dihalide anion coordinated to the cobalt center. This intermediate subsequently decomposes in rapid reactions to halocobalt(III) and halogen atom species or reacts with another cobalt(II) center to give two molecules of halocobalt(III). The reductions of halomethylcobaloximes and related compounds and diamminecobaloxime by Cr/sup 2 +/ were also studied. The reaction was found to be biphasic in all cases with the reaction products being halomethane (for the halomethylcobaloximes), Co/sup 2 +/ (in less than 100 percent yield), a Cr(III)-dimethylglyoxime species, a small amount of free dmgH/sub 2/, and a highly-charged species containing both cobalt and chromium. The first-stage reaction occurs with a stoichiometry of 1:1 producing an intermediate with an absorption maximum at 460 nm for all starting reagents. The results were interpreted in terms of inner-sphere coordination of the cobaloxime to the Cr(II) and electron transfer through the oxime N-O bond.

  5. Mass transfer in porous media with heterogeneous chemical reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza S.M.A.G.Ulson de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the modeling of the mass transfer process in packed-bed reactors is presented and takes into account dispersion in the main fluid phase, internal diffusion of the reactant in the pores of the catalyst, and surface reaction inside the catalyst. The method of volume averaging is applied to obtain the governing equation for use on a small scale. The local mass equilibrium is assumed for obtaining the one-equation model for use on a large scale. The closure problems are developed subject to the length-scale constraints and the model of a spatially periodic porous medium. The expressions for effective diffusivity, hydrodynamic dispersion, total dispersion and the Darcy's law permeability tensors are presented. Solution of the set of final equations permits the variations of velocity and concentration of the chemical species along the packed-bed reactors to be obtained.

  6. Exclusive photon-induced hadronic reactions at large momentum transfers

    CERN Document Server

    Schweiger, W

    1995-01-01

    It is generally assumed that due to factorization of long- and short-distance dynamics perturbative QCD can be applied to exclusive hadronic reactions at large momentum transfers. Within such a perturbative approach diquarks turn out to be a useful phenomenological device to model non-perturbative effects still observable in the kinematic range accessible by present-days experiments. The basic ingredients of the perturbative formalism with diquarks, i.e. Feynman rules for diquarks and quark-diquark wave functions of baryons, are briefly summarized. Applications of the diquark model to the electromagnetic form factors of the proton in the space- as well as time-like region, Compton-scattering off protons, gamma-gamma -> p-pbar, and photoproduction of Kaons are discussed.

  7. Storing hydrogen in the form of light alloy hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, E.; Gillerm, C.

    1981-01-01

    Different hydrides are investigated to find a system with a sufficiently high storage density (at least 3%). The formation of hydrides with light alloys is examined. Reaction kinetics for hydride formation were defined and applied to the systems Mg-Al-H, Mg-Al-Cu-H, Ti-Al-H, Ti-Al-Cu-H, and Ti-Al-Ni-H. Results indicate that the addition of Al destabilizes MgH2 and TiH2 hydrides while having only a limited effect on the storage density.

  8. Intermolecula transfer and elimination of molecular hydrogen in thermal reactions of unsaturated organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suria, Sabartanty [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-02-10

    Two reactions which are important to coal liquefaction include intermolecular transfer and the elimination of two hydrogen atoms. We have designed several model reactions to probe the viability of several hydrogen transfer and elimination pathways. This report described studies on these reactions using organic model compounds.

  9. "Hydro-metathesis" of olefins: A catalytic reaction using a bifunctional single-site tantalum hydride catalyst supported on fibrous silica (KCC-1) nanospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2011-02-18

    Tantalizing hydrocarbons: Tantalum hydride supported on fibrous silica nanospheres (KCC-1) catalyzes, in the presence of hydrogen, the direct conversion of olefins into alkanes that have higher and lower numbers of carbon atoms (see scheme). This catalyst shows remarkable catalytic activity and stability, with excellent potential of regeneration. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  11. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Mitina, E. A. [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, Novatorov ul., Moscow (Russian Federation); Odinokov, A. V. [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, Novatorov ul., Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” 31, Kashirskoye shosse, Moscow (Russian Federation); Titov, S. V. [Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, 3-1/12, Building 6, Obuha pereulok, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ{sub 0}=ℏω{sub 0}/k{sub B}T where ω{sub 0} is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ{sub 0} < 1 − 3) and for low (ξ{sub 0}≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T→ 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the

  12. Iron Group Hydrides in Noyori Bifunctional Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robert H

    2016-12-01

    This is an overview of the hydride-containing catalysts prepared in the Morris group for the efficient hydrogenation of simple ketones, imines, nitriles and esters and the asymmetric hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation of prochiral ketones and imines. The work was inspired by and makes use of Noyori metal-ligand bifunctional concepts involving the hydride-ruthenium amine-hydrogen HRuNH design. It describes the synthesis and some catalytic properties of hydridochloro, dihydride and amide complexes of ruthenium and in one case, osmium, with monodentate, bidentate and tetradentate phosphorus and nitrogen donor ligands. The iron hydride that has been identified in a very effective asymmetric transfer hydrogenation process is also mentioned. The link between the HMNH structure and the sense of enantioinduction is demonstrated by use of simple transition state models.

  13. Trimethylsilyl-Substituted Hydroxycyclopentadienyl Ruthenium Hydrides as Benchmarks to Probe Ligand and Metal Effects on the Reactivity of Shvo Type Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P; Guan, Hairong

    2012-01-01

    The bis(trimethylsilyl)-substituted hydroxycyclopentadienyl ruthenium hydride [2,5-(SiMe(3))(2)-3,4-(CH(2)OCH(2))(η(5)-C(4)COH)]Ru(CO)(2)H (10) is an efficient catalyst for hydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones. Because 10 transfers hydrogen rapidly to aldehydes and ketones and because it does not form an inactive bridging hydride during reaction, hydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones can be performed at room temperature under relatively low hydrogen pressure (3 atm); this is a significant improvement compared with previously developed Shvo type catalysts. Kinetic and (2)H NMR spectroscopic studies of the stoichiometric reduction of aldehydes and ketones by 10 established a two-step process for the hydrogen transfer: (1) rapid and reversible hydrogen bond formation between OH of 10 and the oxygen of the aldehyde or ketone, (2) followed by slow transfer of both proton and hydride from 10 to the aldehyde or ketone. The stoichiometric and catalytic activities of complex 10 are compared to those of other Shvo type ruthenium hydrides and related iron hydrides.

  14. Stereoselectivity in electron-transfer reactions in chiral media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Deborah; Hua, Xaio; Osvath, Peter; Lappin, A Graham

    2010-02-07

    The oxidation of [Co(edta)](2-) by [IrCl(6)](2-) proceeds by both inner-sphere and outer-sphere electron-transfer pathways. In the presence of added [Co(en)(3)](3+), the outer-sphere pathway is enhanced. When optically active [Co(en)(3)](3+) is used, the [Co(edta)](-) formed is optically active, reflecting a 1.5% DeltaLambda selectivity. It is proposed that the selectivity arises from preferential formation and reactivity of the DeltaLambda ion pair, {[Co(edta)](2-),[Co(en)(3)](3+)}. Direct reaction of [Co(edta)](-) with [Co(en)(3)](2+) has also been investigated in the optically active solvent, (S)-(-)-1,2-propylene carbonate. The induction is small, forming 0.75% Delta-[Co(en)(3)](3+), consistent with the important role for hydrogen bonding in determining the precursor stereoselectivity to the exclusion of solvent.

  15. Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

  16. Mechanism of the reaction of the [W3S4H3(dmpe)3]+ cluster with acids: evidence for the acid-promoted substitution of coordinated hydrides and the effect of the attacking species on the kinetics of protonation of the metal-hydride bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basallote, Manuel G; Feliz, Marta; Fernández-Trujillo, M Jesús; Llusar, Rosa; Safont, Vicent S; Uriel, Santiago

    2004-03-19

    The cluster [W(3)S(4)H(3)(dmpe)(3)](+) (1) (dmpe=1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane) reacts with HX (X=Cl, Br) to form the corresponding [W(3)S(4)X(3)(dmpe)(3)](+) (2) complexes, but no reaction is observed when 1 is treated with an excess of halide salts. Kinetic studies indicate that the hydride 1 reacts with HX in MeCN and MeCN-H(2)O mixtures to form 2 in three kinetically distinguishable steps. In the initial step, the W-H bonds are attacked by the acid to form an unstable dihydrogen species that releases H(2) and yields a coordinatively unsaturated intermediate. This intermediate adds a solvent molecule (second step) and then replaces the coordinated solvent with X(-) (third step). The kinetic results show that the first step is faster with HCl than with solvated H(+). This indicates that the rate of protonation of this metal hydride is determined not only by reorganization of the electron density at the M-H bonds but also by breakage of the H-X or H(+)-solvent bonds. It also indicates that the latter process can be more important in determining the rate of protonation.

  17. Communication: Charge transfer dominates over proton transfer in the reaction of nitric acid with gas-phase hydrated electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Jozef; Med, Jakub; Slavíček, Petr; Beyer, Martin K.

    2017-09-01

    The reaction of HNO3 with hydrated electrons (H2O)n- (n = 35-65) in the gas phase was studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetic analysis of the experimental data shows that OH-(H2O)m is formed primarily via a reaction of the hydrated electron with HNO3 inside the cluster, while proton transfer is not observed and NO3-(H2O)m is just a secondary product. The reaction enthalpy was determined using nanocalorimetry, revealing a quite exothermic charge transfer with -241 ± 69 kJ mol-1. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that proton transfer is an allowed reaction pathway, but the overall thermochemistry favors charge transfer.

  18. Catalyzed light hydride nanomaterials embedded in a micro-channels hydrogen storage container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehouche, Zahir; Peretti, Hernán A; Yoo, Yeong; Belkacemi, Khaled; Goyette, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Activated alloys synthesized by arc-melting were examined as catalysts for improving the hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured magnesium hydride, proposed as a reversible hydrogen storage material. The MgH(2)-catalyst absorbing materials were prepared by ball milling of pure MgH(2) with hydrided Zr(47)Ni(53), Zr(9)Ni(11), and other alloys investigated. The nanostructured MgH(2)-intermetallic systems were tested at 250 degrees C and catalyst addition of eutectoid Zr(47)Ni(53) resulted in the fastest desorption time and highest initial desorption rate. The catalyzed Mg-hydride with activated Zr(9)Ni(11) and Zr(7)Ni(10) phases showed fast desorption kinetics. Moreover, the results demonstrated that the composition of dispersed Zr(x)Ni(y)catalysts has a strong influence on the amount of accumulated hydrogen and desorption rate of Mg-nanocomposite. Part two covers advanced micro-channels hydrogen storage module design based on the results of semi-empirical computer simulations of heat and mass transfers in the container. The micro-channels reservoir concept offers many advantages over the conventional metal hydride hydrogen storage system. It is a micro-structured system that can pack a lot of power into a small space and dissipate effectively the heat of the sorption reactions. This review summarizes recent patents related to CNTS.

  19. Investigations of the structural stability of metal hydride composites by in-situ neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbrig, Kai; Pohlmann, Carsten; Gondek, Łukasz; Figiel, Henryk; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Manke, Ingo; Banhart, John; Kieback, Bernd; Röntzsch, Lars

    2015-10-01

    Metal hydride composites (MHC) with expanded natural graphite (ENG) exhibiting enhanced thermal conductivity and reduced porosity compared to metal hydride powders can enable a reversible, compact and safe way for hydrogen storage. In this study, neutron imaging during cyclic hydrogenation was utilized to investigate the structural stability and the spatial-temporal hydrogen concentration of application-oriented MHC with 40 mm in diameter compared to a loose metal hydride powder. In particular, swelling and shrinking effects of a radially confined MHC which could freely expand upwards were studied. It was found that the loose powder bed was easily torn apart during dehydrogenation, which leads to increased thermal resistance within the hydride bed. In contrast, the thermal resistance between MHC and container wall was minimized since the initial gap closes during initial hydrogenation and does not reopen thereafter. Further cyclic hydrogenation caused MHC volume changes, i.e. an almost reversible swelling/shrinking (so-called ;MHC breathing;). Moreover, neutron imaging allowed for the observation of reaction fronts within the MHC and the powder bed that are governed by the heat transfer.

  20. The $^{136}$Xe + $^{208}$Pb reaction: A test of models of multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, J S; Loveland, W; Zhu, S; Ayangeakaa, A D; Carpenter, M P; Greene, J P; Janssens, R V F; Lauritsen, T; McCutchan, E A; Sonzogni, A A; Chiara, C J; Harker, J L; Walters, W B

    2015-01-01

    The yields of over 200 projectile-like fragments (PLFs) and target-like fragments (TLFs) from the interaction of (E$_{c.m.}$=450 MeV) $^{136}$Xe with a thick target of $^{208}$Pb were measured using Gammasphere and off-line $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy, giving a comprehensive picture of the production cross sections in this reaction.The measured yields were compared to predictions of the GRAZING model and the predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner using a quantitative metric, the theory evaluation factor, {\\bf tef}. The GRAZING model predictions are adequate for describing the yields of nuclei near the target or projectile but grossly underestimate the yields of all other products. The predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner correctly describe the magnitude and maxima of the observed TLF transfer cross sections for a wide range of transfers ($\\Delta$Z = -8 to $\\Delta$Z = +2). However for $\\Delta$Z =+4, the observed position of the maximum in the distribution is four neutrons richer than the predicted maximum. The pre...

  1. New Oxime Ligand with Potential for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deville, Claire; Sundberg, Jonas; McKenzie, Christine Joy

    Proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) is found in a range of oxidation-reduction reactions in biology.1 This mechanism is of interest for applications in energy conversion processes. The PCET reaction has been shown to be facilitated when the proton is transferred to an intramolecular basic sit...

  2. Coupled-channels description of the 40Ca+58,64Ni transfer and fusion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Scamps, G; Hagino, K; Haas, F; Courtin, S

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary experimental data for nucleon transfer reactions of the 40Ca+58Ni and 40Ca+64Ni systems are analyzed with the coupled- channels approach. It is shown that a simple treatment for the transfer in the coupled-channels method cannot reproduce simultaneously the transfer probabilities and the sub-barrier enhancement of fusion cross sections.

  3. Role of transfer reactions in heavy-ion collisions at the Coulomb barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollarolo Giovanni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One and two neutron transfer reactions are discussed in the semiclassical formalism. The twoneutrons transfer cross sections are calculated in the successive approximation. Comparisons with new experimental data below the Coulomb barrier are discussed in term of transfer probabilities as a function of the distance of closest approach for Coulomb scattering.

  4. Neutron Transfer Reactions for Deformed Nuclei Using Sturmian Basis

    CERN Document Server

    Gueorguiev, V G; Escher, J E; Dietrich, F S

    2007-01-01

    We study the spin-parity distribution P(J$^{\\pi}$,E) of $^{156}$Gd excited states above the neutron separation energy that are expected to be populated via the neutron pickup reaction $^{157}$Gd($^{3}$He,$^{4}$He)$^{156}$Gd. In general, modeling of the spin-parity distribution is important for the applicability of the surrogate reaction technique as a method of deducing reaction cross sections. We model excited states in $^{156}$Gd as rotational states built on intrinsic states consisting of a hole in the core where the hole represents neutron removal form a deformed single particle state. The reaction cross section to each excited state is calculated using standard reaction code that uses spherical reaction form-factor input. The spectroscopic factor associated with each form-factor is the expansion coefficient of the deformed neutron state in a spherical Sturmian basis consisting of the spherical reaction form-factors.

  5. Versatile cooperative ligand effects in group 9 transition metal catalysis: Applications in transfer hydrogenation & hydrogen autotransfer reactions, ketene & ketene imine synthesis and hydroformylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative ligand effects of transition metal complexes have a profound impact on the reaction outcome of catalytic reactions, and development of (new) cooperative metal-ligand systems is a hot topic in current catalysis research. Conventional ligands with hydride-accepting/delivering activities ar

  6. Laser ion source for multi-nucleon transfer reaction products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Y.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Imai, N.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Miyatake, H.; Oyaizu, M.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Sonoda, T.; Wada, M.; Huyse, M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Van Duppen, P.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a laser ion source for the target-like fragments (TLFs) produced in multi-nucleon transfer (MNT) reactions. The operation principle of the source is based on the in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) approach. In the source TLFs are thermalized and neutralized in high pressure and high purity argon gas, and are extracted after being selectively re-ionized in a multi-step laser resonance ionization process. The laser ion source has been implemented at the KEK Isotope Separation System (KISS) for β-decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich isotopes with N = 126 of nuclear astrophysical interest. The simulations of gas flow and ion-beam optics have been performed to optimize the gas cell for efficient thermalization and fast transporting the TLFs, and the mass-separator for efficient transport with high mass-resolving power, respectively. To confirm the performances expected at the design stage, off-line experiments have been performed by using 56Fe atoms evaporated from a filament in the gas cell. The gas-transport time of 230 ms in the argon cell and the measured KISS mass-resolving power of 900 are consistent with the designed values. The high purity of the gas-cell system, which is extremely important for efficient and highly-selective production of laser ions, was achieved and confirmed from the mass distribution of the extracted ions. After the off-line tests, on-line experiments were conducted by directly injecting energetic 56Fe beam into the gas cell. After thermalization of the injected 56Fe beam, laser-produced singly-charged 56Fe+ ions were extracted. The extraction efficiency and selectivity of the gas cell in the presence of plasma induced by 56Fe beam injection as well as the time profile of the extracted ions were investigated; extraction efficiency of 0.25%, a beam purity of >99% and an extraction time of 270 ms. It has been confirmed that the performance of the KISS laser ion source is satisfactory to start the measurements of

  7. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive ...... vibrational frequency changes, local mode anharmonicity, and rotational reorganization, in both diabatic and adiabatic limits. Systems for which this formalism is appropriate are discussed....

  8. Hydrogen storage systems based on magnesium hydride: from laboratory tests to fuel cell integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rango, P.; Marty, P.; Fruchart, D.

    2016-02-01

    The paper reviews the state of the art of hydrogen storage systems based on magnesium hydride, emphasizing the role of thermal management, whose effectiveness depends on the effective thermal conductivity of the hydride, but also depends of other limiting factors such as wall contact resistance and convective exchanges with the heat transfer fluid. For daily cycles, the use of phase change material to store the heat of reaction appears to be the most effective solution. The integration with fuel cells (1 kWe proton exchange membrane fuel cell and solid oxide fuel cell) highlights the dynamic behaviour of these systems, which is related to the thermodynamic properties of MgH2. This allows for "self-adaptive" systems that do not require control of the hydrogen flow rate at the inlet of the fuel cell.

  9. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  10. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  11. Observation of the one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C.L.; Rehm, K.E.; Gehring, J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    It was suggested many years ago that when two heavy nuclei are in contact during a grazing collision, the transfer of several correlated neutron-pairs could occur. Despite considerable experimental effort, however, so far only cross sections for up to four-neutron transfers have been uniquely identified. The main difficulties in the study of multi-neutron transfer reactions are the small cross sections encountered at incident energies close to the barrier, and various experimental uncertainties which can complicate the analysis of these reactions. We have for the first time found evidence for multi-neutron transfer reactions covering the full sequence from one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 100}Mo.

  12. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  13. Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Magnesium-Alloy Hydrides Reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirugnasambandam G. Manivasagam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As potential hydrogen storage media, magnesium based hydrides have been systematically studied in order to improve reversibility, storage capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics. The present article deals with the electrochemical and optical properties of Mg alloy hydrides. Electrochemical hydrogenation, compared to conventional gas phase hydrogen loading, provides precise control with only moderate reaction conditions. Interestingly, the alloy composition determines the crystallographic nature of the metal-hydride: a structural change is induced from rutile to fluorite at 80 at.% of Mg in Mg-TM alloy, with ensuing improved hydrogen mobility and storage capacity. So far, 6 wt.% (equivalent to 1600 mAh/g of reversibly stored hydrogen in MgyTM(1-yHx (TM: Sc, Ti has been reported. Thin film forms of these metal-hydrides reveal interesting electrochromic properties as a function of hydrogen content. Optical switching occurs during (dehydrogenation between the reflective metal and the transparent metal hydride states. The chronological sequence of the optical improvements in optically active metal hydrides starts with the rare earth systems (YHx, followed by Mg rare earth alloy hydrides (MgyGd(1-yHx and concludes with Mg transition metal hydrides (MgyTM(1-yHx. In-situ optical characterization of gradient thin films during (dehydrogenation, denoted as hydrogenography, enables the monitoring of alloy composition gradients simultaneously.

  14. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  15. Examining the effect of nonlocality in (d ,n ) transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A.; Titus, L. J.; Nunes, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    Background: In the past year we have been exploring the effect of the explicit inclusion of nonlocality in (d ,p ) reactions. Purpose: The goal of this paper is to extend previous studies to (d ,n ) reactions, which, although similar to (d ,p ) reactions, have specific properties that merit inspection. Method: We apply our methods (both the distorted-wave Born approximation and the adiabatic wave approximation) to (d ,n ) reactions on 16O,40Ca,48Ca,126Sn,132Sn , and 208Pb at 20 and 50 MeV. Results: We look separately at the modifications introduced by nonlocality in the final bound and scattering states as well as the consequences reflected on the differential angular distributions. The cross sections obtained when using nonlocality explicitly are significantly different than those using the local approximation, just as in (d ,p ) reactions. Due to the particular role of the Coulomb force in the bound state, often we found the effects of nonlocality to be larger in (d ,n ) than in (d ,p ) reactions. Conclusions: Our results confirm the importance of including nonlocality explicitly in deuteron-induced reactions.

  16. Metal hydride work pair development and its application on automobile air conditioning systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Feng; CHEN Jiang-ping; ZHANG Wen-feng; CHEN Zhi-jiu

    2007-01-01

    Aiming at developing exhaust gas driving automobile air conditioning systems, a hydride pair LaNi4.61Mn0.26A10.13/La0.6Y0.4Ni4.8Mn0.2 was developed working at 393~473 K/293~323 K/263~273 K. Property tests showed that both alloys have flat plateau slopes and small hystereses; system theoretical coefficient of performance (COP) is 0.711. Based on this work pair, a function proving automobile metal hydride refrigeration system was constructed. The equivalent thermal conductivities of the activated reaction beds were merely 1.1~1.6 W/(m·K), which had not met practical requirement. Intermittent refrigeration cycles were achieved and the average cooling power was 84.6 W at 423 K/303 K/273 K with COP being 0.26. By altering cycling parameters, experiment data showed that cooling power and system COP increase with the growth of heat source temperature as well as pre-heating and regeneration time while decrease with heat sink temperature increment. This study confirms the feasibility of automobile metal hydride refrigeration systems, while heat transfer properties of reaction beds still need to be improved for better performance.

  17. ORNL Interim Progress Report on Hydride Reorientation CIRFT Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yan, Yong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-28

    A systematic study of H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) vibration integrity was performed in Phase I project under simulated transportation environments, using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2013–14. The data analysis on the as-irradiated HBR SNF rods demonstrated that the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods. However, previous studies have shown that the hydrogen content and hydride morphology has an important effect on zirconium alloy mechanical properties. To address the effect of radial hydrides in SNF rods, in Phase II a test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of elevated temperatures, pressures, and stresses during transfer-drying operations. Pressurized and sealed fuel segments were heated to the target temperature for a preset hold time and slow-cooled at a controlled rate. The procedure was applied to both non-irradiated/prehydrided and high-burnup Zircaloy-4 fueled cladding segments using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission-recommended 400°C maximum temperature limit at various cooling rates. Before testing high-burnup cladding, four out-of-cell tests were conducted to optimize the hydride reorientation (R) test condition with pre-hydride Zircaloy-4 cladding, which has the same geometry as the high burnup fuel samples. Test HR-HBR#1 was conducted at the maximum hoop stress of 145 MPa, at a 400°C maximum temperature and a 5°C/h cooling rate. On the other hand, thermal cycling was performed for tests HR-HBR#2, HR-HBR#3, and HR-HBR#4 to generate more radial hydrides. It is clear that thermal cycling increases the ratio of the radial hydride to circumferential hydrides. The internal pressure also has a significant effect on the radial hydride morphology. This report describes a procedure and experimental results of the four out-of-cell hydride reorientation tests of

  18. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  19. Photoinduced electron transfer reactions of ruthenium(II)-complexes containing amino acid with quinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswaran, Rajkumar; Kalayar, Swarnalatha; Paulpandian, Muthu Mareeswaran; Seenivasan, Rajagopal

    2014-05-01

    With the aim of mimicking, at basic level the photoinduced electron transfer process in the reaction center of photosystem II, ruthenium(II)-polypyridyl complexes, carrying amino acids were synthesized and studied their photoinduced electron transfer reactions with quinones by steady state and time resolved measurements. The reaction of quinones with excited state of ruthenium(II)-complexes, I-V in acetonitrile has been studied by luminescence quenching technique and the rate constant, k(q), values are close to the diffusion controlled rate. The detection of the semiquinone anion radical in this system using time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy confirms the electron transfer nature of the reaction. The semiclassical theory of electron transfer has been successfully applied to the photoluminescence quenching of Ru(II)-complexes with quinones.

  20. Charge-Transfer Reaction of Cediranib with 2,3-Dichloro- 3,5 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Purpose: To investigate the charge-transfer (CT) reaction between cediranib (CRB) and 2, 3 - dichloro- ... Conclusion: The developed assay has high throughput and consumed minimum volume of organic solvent ..... radical ions…

  1. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  2. Role of core excitation in (d,p) transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Deltuva, A; Norvaišas, E; Nunes, F M

    2016-01-01

    [Background:] Recent work found that core excitation can be important in extracting structure information from (d,p) reactions. [Purpose:] Our objective is to systematically explore the role of core excitation in (d,p) reactions, and understand the origin of the dynamical effects. [Method:] Based on the particle-rotor model of $n+^{10}$Be, we generate a number of models with a range of separation energies ($S_n=0.1-5.0$ MeV), while maintaining a significant core excited component. We then apply the latest extension of the momentum-space based Faddeev method, including dynamical core excitation in the reaction mechanism to all orders, to the $^{10}$Be(d,p)$^{11}$Be like reactions, and study the excitation effects for beam energies from $E_d=15-90$ MeV. [Results:] We study the resulting angular distributions and the differences between the spectroscopic factor that would be extracted from the cross sections, when including dynamical core excitation in the reaction, to that of the original structure model. We al...

  3. Role of core excitation in (d ,p ) transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deltuva, A.; Ross, A.; Norvaišas, E.; Nunes, F. M.

    2016-10-01

    Background: Recent work found that core excitations can be important in extracting structure information from (d ,p ) reactions. Purpose: Our objective is to systematically explore the role of core excitation in (d ,p ) reactions and to understand the origin of the dynamical effects. Method: Based on the particle-rotor model of n +10Be , we generate a number of models with a range of separation energies (Sn=0.1 -5.0 MeV), while maintaining a significant core excited component. We then apply the latest extension of the momentum-space-based Faddeev method, including dynamical core excitation in the reaction mechanism to all orders, to the 10Be(d ,p )11Be -like reactions, and study the excitation effects for beam energies Ed=15 -90 MeV. Results: We study the resulting angular distributions and the differences between the spectroscopic factor that would be extracted from the cross sections, when including dynamical core excitation in the reaction, and that of the original structure model. We also explore how different partial waves affect the final cross section. Conclusions: Our results show a strong beam-energy dependence of the extracted spectroscopic factors that become smaller for intermediate beam energies. This dependence increases for loosely bound systems.

  4. Electron transfer reactions, cyanide and O2 binding of truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Esther; Larsson, Jonas T.; McLean, Kirsty J.

    2013-01-01

    in trHb-Bs shifted −59 mV per pH unit at pH higher than 7, consistently with a 1e−/1 H+ – transfer reaction. The heterogeneous rate constant ks for a quasi-reversible 1e− – 1H+ – transfer reaction between graphite and trHb-Bs was 10.1 ± 2.3 s−1. Upon reversible cyanide binding the ks doubled, while...

  5. Recyclable Polystyrene-Supported Siloxane-Transfer Agent for Palladium-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The rational design, synthesis, and validation of a significantly improved insoluble polymer-supported siloxane-transfer agent has been achieved that permits efficient palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. The cross-linked polystyrene support facilitates product purification with excellent siloxane recycling. Drawbacks of a previous polymer-supported siloxane-transfer agent, relating to reaction efficiency and polymer stability after repeated cycles, have been addressed. PMID:24661113

  6. Synthesis and Reactions of Five-Membered Heterocycles Using Phase Transfer Catalyst (PTC Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase transfer catalysts (PTCs have been widely used for the synthesis of organic compounds particularly in both liquid-liquid and solid-liquid heterogeneous reaction mixtures. They are known to accelerate reaction rates by facilitating formation of interphase transfer of species and making reactions between reagents in two immiscible phases possible. Application of PTC instead of traditional technologies for industrial processes of organic synthesis provides substantial benefits for the environment. On the basis of numerous reports it is evident that phase-transfer catalysis is the most efficient way for generation and reactions of many active intermediates. In this review we report various uses of PTC in syntheses and reactions of five-membered heterocycles compounds and their multifused rings.

  7. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Frutos, Luis Manuel, E-mail: luisma.frutos@uah.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad de Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Acuña, A. Ulises [Instituto de Química Física “Rocasolano”, C.S.I.C., Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.

  8. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed addenda heteropolytungstovanadophosphates with NADH

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ponnusamy Sami; Kasi Rajasekaran

    2009-03-01

    The coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) undergoes facile electron transfer reaction with vanadium (V) substituted Keggin-type heteropolyanions (HPA) [PVVW11O40]4- (PV1) and [PV$^{V}_{2}$W10O40]5- (PV2) in aqueous phosphate buffer of pH 6 at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and optical studies show that the stoichiometry of the reaction is 1 : 2 (NADH : HPA). EPR and optical studies show that HPA act as one electron acceptor and the products of electron transfer reactions are one electron reduced heteropoly blues (HPB), viz. [PVIVW11O40]5- and [PVIVVVW10O40]6-. Oxygraph measurements show that there is no uptake of molecular oxygen during the course of reaction. The reaction proceeds through multi-step electron-proton-electron transfer mechanism, with rate limiting initial one electron transfer from NADH to HPA by outer sphere electron transfer process. Bimolecular rate constant for electron transfer reaction between NADH and PV2 in phosphate buffer of pH = 6 has been determined spectrophotometrically.

  9. Effect of lanthanum hydride on microstructures and hydrogen storage performances of 2LiNH2-MgH2 system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱惜林; 韩树民; 赵鑫; 李媛; 刘宝忠

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen storage properties of 2LiNH2-MgH2 system were improved by adding lanthanum hydride (LaH3), and the role of LaH3 in hydrogen sorption process of Li-Mg-N-H system was investigated. Temperature programmed sorption results showed that the addition of lanthanum hydride reduced the dehydriding/hydriding onset temperature of 2LiNH2-MgH2 system by at least 15 K. Moreover, A 0.053 wt.%/min average rate was determined for the hydrogen desorption of 2LiNH2-MgH2-0.05LaH3 composite, while it was only 0.035 wt.%/min for 2LiNH2-MgH2 system. Hydrogen absorption capacity increased from 1.62 wt.% to 2.12 wt.% within 200 min by adding LaH3 into 2LiNH2-MgH2 system at 383 K. In the dehydrogenation of 2LiNH2-MgH2-0.05LaH3 composite, LaH2 transferred to LaN phase, which reversed to LaH2 in the following hydrogen adsorption process. The reversible reaction of LaH2 ef-fectively promoted the hydrogen sorption of Li-Mg-N-H system. Moreover, the homogenous distribution of fine La hydride was fa-vorable to improving effect of lanthanum hydride.

  10. Synthesis of Renewable Energy Materials, Sodium Aluminum Hydride by Grignard Reagent of Al

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-qin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research on hydrogen generation and application has attracted widespread attention around the world. This paper is to demonstrate that sodium aluminum hydride can be synthesized under simple and mild reaction condition. Being activated through organics, aluminum powder reacts with hydrogen and sodium hydride to produce sodium aluminum hydride under atmospheric pressure. The properties and composition of the sample were characterized by FTIR, XRD, SEM, and so forth. The results showed that the product through this synthesis method is sodium aluminum hydride, and it has higher purity, perfect crystal character, better stability, and good hydrogen storage property. The reaction mechanism is also discussed in detail.

  11. A semiclassical theory of electron transfer reactions in Condon approximation and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Sokolov, V. V.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the modulation of the electronic wave functions by configurational fluctuations of the molecular environment on the kinetic parameters of electron transfer reactions is discussed. A self-consistent algorithm for the calculation of the potential profile along the reaction coordinate...

  12. Lewis acid mediated vinyl-transfer reaction of alkynes to N-alkylimines by using the N-alkyl residue as a sacrificial hydrogen donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakar, Chandi C; Stas, Sara; Herrebout, Wouter; Abbaspour Tehrani, Kourosch

    2013-10-11

    A variety of N-alkyl-α,α-dichloroaldimines were vinylated by terminal acetylenes in the presence of Lewis acids such as In(OTf)3 or BF3 ⋅OEt2 and hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) as an additive. The reaction proceeds at ambient temperature and leads to geometrically pure allylic β,β-dichloroamines. This approach is complementary to previously reported transition-metal-catalyzed vinyl-transfer methods, which are not applicable to aliphatic imines and are restricted to imines that contain an electron-withdrawing nitrogen substituent. In the present approach, terminal alkynes were used as a source of the vinyl residue, and the N-alkyl moiety of the imine acts as a sacrificial hydrogen donor. The additional advantage of this methodology is the fact that no external toxic or hazardous reducing agents or molecular hydrogen has to be used. This new methodology nicely combines a C(sp(2) )C(sp) bond formation, hydride transfer, and an unusual cleavage of an unactivated CN bond, thereby giving rise to functionalized primary allylic amines. A detailed experimental study supported by DFT calculations of the mechanism has been done. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The thermodynamics of charge transfer in DNA photolyase: using thermodynamic integration calculations to analyse the kinetics of electron transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapf, Sebastian; Koslowski, Thorsten; Steinbrecher, Thomas

    2010-08-28

    DNA Photolyases are light sensitive oxidoreductases present in many organisms that participate in the repair of photodamaged DNA. They are capable of electron transfer between a bound cofactor and a chain of tryptophan amino acid residues. Due to their unique mechanism and important function, photolyases have been subject to intense study in recent times, with both experimental and computational efforts. In this work, we present a novel application of classical molecular dynamics based free energy calculations, combined with quantum mechanical computations, to biomolecular charge transfer. Our approach allows for the determination of all reaction parameters in Marcus' theory of charge transport. We were able to calculate the free energy profile for the movement of a positive charge along protein sidechains involved in the biomolecule's function as well as charge-transfer rates that are in good agreement with experimental results. Our approach to simulate charge-transfer reactions explicitly includes the influence of protein flexibility and solvent dynamics on charge-transfer energetics. As applied here to a biomolecular system of considerable scientific interest, we believe the method to be easily adaptable to the study of charge-transfer phenomena in biochemistry and other fields.

  14. Two-neutron transfer reactions investigating shell stability and inverse kinematics capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahgoub, Mahmoud; Bildstein, Vinzenz; Faestermann, Thomas; Gernhaeuser, Roman; Kroell, Thorsten; Kruecken, Reiner; Maier, Ludwig; Wirth, Hans [Physik-Department E12, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Bohlen, Hans-Gerhard; Kokalova, Tzanka; Oertzen, Wolfram von; Wheldon, Carl [HMI, Berlin (Germany); Bucurescu, Dorel [NIPNE, Bucharest (Romania); Dorsch, Tatiana [Physik-Department E12, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); HMI, Berlin (Germany); Hertenberger, Ralf [Sektion Physik, LMU Muenchen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Neutron transfer reactions were used to study the stability of the magic number N=28. We investigated neutron pairing correlations using the two-neutron pickup reaction {sup 58}Ni((vector)p,t){sup 56}Ni depending on the fact that nuclei with high neutron pairing are good magic nuclei. The capability of inverse kinematics reactions to study exotic nuclei was tested by the neutron transfer reactions t({sup 40}Ar,p){sup 42} Ar using a tritium target and comparing the results and conclusions with the normal kinematics reactions. The results for the reactions on Ni and Ar compared to DWBA calculations will be presented. Future possibilities for the use of inverse kinematics to study exotic nuclei with radioactive beams are discussed.

  15. Observation of new neutron-deficient isotopes with Z≥92 in multinucleon transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Devaraja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In deep inelastic multinucleon transfer reactions of 48Ca + 248Cm we observed about 100 residual nuclei with proton numbers between Z=82 and Z=100. Among them, there are five new neutron-deficient isotopes: 216U, 219Np, 223Am, 229Am and 233Bk. As separator for the transfer products we used the velocity filter SHIP of GSI while the isotope identification was performed via the α decay chains of the nuclei. These first results reveal that multinucleon transfer reactions together with here applied fast and sensitive separation and detection techniques are promising for the synthesis of new isotopes in the region of heaviest nuclei.

  16. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J.

    2017-06-20

    A method is provided for extracting hydrogen from lithium hydride. The method includes (a) heating lithium hydride to form liquid-phase lithium hydride; (b) extracting hydrogen from the liquid-phase lithium hydride, leaving residual liquid-phase lithium metal; (c) hydriding the residual liquid-phase lithium metal to form refined lithium hydride; and repeating steps (a) and (b) on the refined lithium hydride.

  17. Neutron Transfer Reactions: Surrogates for Neutron Capture for Basic and Applied Nuclear Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizewski, J. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Adekola, A.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Becker, J. A.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K. A.; Erikson, L.; Gaddis, A.; Harlin, C.; Hatarik, R.; Howard, J.; Jandel, M.; Johnson, M. S.; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, F.; Livesay, R. J.; Ma, Z.; Matei, C.; Matthews, C.; Moazen, B.; Nesaraja, C. D.; O'Malley, P.; Patterson, N.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Pelham, T.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, D.; Rogers, J.; Schmitt, K.; Shapira, D.; Shriner, J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, M. S.; Swan, T.; Thomas, J. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, G. L.

    2009-03-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on 130,132Sn, 134Te and 75As are discussed.

  18. Neutron transfer reactions: Surrogates for neutron capture for basic and applied nuclear science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cizewski, J. A. [Rutgers University; Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Pain, Steven D [ORNL; Peters, W. A. [Rutgers University; Adekola, Aderemi S [ORNL; Allen, J. [Rutgers University; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Becker, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee; Chipps, K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Erikson, Luke [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Gaddis, A. L. [Furman University; Harlin, Christopher W [ORNL; Hatarik, Robert [Rutgers University; Howard, Joshua A [ORNL; Jandel, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Johnson, Micah [ORNL; Kapler, R. [University of Tennessee; Krolas, W. [University of Warsaw; Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Livesay, Jake [ORNL; Ma, Zhanwen [ORNL; Matei, Catalin [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Matthews, C. [Rutgers University; Moazen, Brian [University of Tennessee; Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; O' Malley, Patrick [Rutgers University; Patterson, N. P. [University of Surrey, UK; Paulauskas, Stanley [University of Tennessee; Pelham, T. [University of Surrey, UK; Pittman, S. T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Radford, David C [ORNL; Rogers, J. [Tennessee Technological University; Schmitt, Kyle [University of Tennessee; Shapira, Dan [ORNL; ShrinerJr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological University; Sissom, D. J. [Tennessee Technological University; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Swan, T. P. [University of Surrey, UK; Thomas, J. S. [Rutgers University; Vieira, D. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wilhelmy, J. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wilson, Gemma L [ORNL

    2009-04-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  19. Synthesis of new transuranium isotopes in multinucleon transfer reactions using a velocity filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, S.; Beliuskina, O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Devaraja, H.M.; Gupta, M. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Comas, V.; Hofmann, S.; Muenzenberg, G.; Ackermann, D.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Maurer, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Hornung, C. [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Henderson, R.A.; Moody, K.J.; Shaughnessy, D.A.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Hessberger, F.P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Nishio, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai Ibaraki (Japan); Popeko, A.G.; Yeremin, A.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    Recently, we reported the observation of several new isotopes with proton numbers Z ≥ 92 in low-energy collisions of {sup 48}Ca + {sup 248}Cm. The peculiarity is that the nuclei were produced in multinucleon transfer reactions, a method which is presently discussed as a possible new way to enter so far unknown regions in the upper part of the Chart of Nuclides. For separation of the transfer products we used a velocity filter, the Separator for Heavy Ion Reaction Products SHIP at GSI. The resulting strong background suppression allowed us to detect nuclei with cross-sections down to the sub-nanobarn scale. Beside the new isotopes we identified about 100 further target-like transfer products and determined their cross-sections. The results together with previous measurements strongly indicate that multinucleon transfer reactions are a viable pathway to the production of new transuranium isotopes. (orig.)

  20. 9,10-Diphenylanthracene as a matrix for MALDI-MS electron transfer secondary reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutaghou, M Nazim; Cole, Richard B

    2012-08-01

    The most common secondary-ionization mechanism in positive ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) involves a proton transfer reaction to ionize the analyte. Peptides and proteins are molecules that have basic (and acidic) sites that make them susceptible to proton transfer. However, non-polar, aprotic compounds that lack basic sites are more difficult to protonate, and creating charged forms of this type of analyte can pose a problem when conventional MALDI matrices are employed. In this case, forming a radical molecular ion through electron transfer is a viable alternative, and certain matrices may facilitate the process. In this work, we investigate the performance of a newly developed electron-transfer secondary reaction matrix: 9,10-diphenylanthracene (9,10-DPA). The use of 9,10-DPA as matrix for MALDI analysis has been tested using several model compounds. It appears to promote ionization through electron transfer in a highly efficient manner as compared to other potential matrices. Thermodynamic aspects of the observed electron transfers in secondary-ionization reactions were also considered, as was the possibility for kinetically controlled/endothermic, electron-transfer reactions in the MALDI plume.

  1. The structure of ([W3Q4X3(dmpe)3]+, Y-) ion pairs (Q = S, Se; X = H, OH, Br; Y = BF4, PF6, dmpe = Me2PCH2CH2PMe2) in dichloromethane solution and the effect of ion-pairing on the kinetics of proton transfer to the hydride cluster [W3S4H3(dmpe)3]+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarra, Andrés G; Basallote, Manuel G; Fernandez-Trujillo, M Jesús; Llusar, Rosa; Safont, Vicent S; Vicent, Cristian

    2006-07-24

    The 1H,19F HOESY spectra of the title compounds in CD2Cl2 solution indicate that the cluster cations form ion pairs with the BF4- and PF6- anions with a well-defined interionic structure that appears to be basically determined essentially by the nature of the X- ligand. For the clusters with X = H and OH, the structure of the ion pairs is such that the counteranion (Y-) and the X- ligands are placed close to each other. However, when the size and electron density of X- increase (X = Br), Y- is forced to move to a different site, far away from X-. The relevance of ion-pairing on the chemistry of these compounds is clearly seen through a decrease in the rate of proton transfer from HCl to the hydride cluster [W3S4H3(dmpe)3]+ in the presence of an excess of BF4-. The kinetic data for this reaction can be rationalized by considering that the ([W3S4H3(dmpe)3]+, BF4-) ion pairs are unproductive in the proton-transfer process. Theoretical calculations indicate that the real behavior can be more complex. Although the cluster can still form adducts with HCl in the presence of BF4-, the structures of the most-stable BF4--containing HCl adducts show H...H distances too large to allow the subsequent release of H2. In addition, the effective concentration of HCl is also reduced because of the formation of adducts as ClH...BF4-. As a consequence of both effects, the proton transfer takes place more slowly than for the case of the dihydrogen-bonded HCl adduct resulting from the unpaired cluster.

  2. Development of Novel Electrode Materials for the Electrocatalysis of Oxygen-Transfer and Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Brett Kimball [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Throughout this thesis, the fundamental aspects involved in the electrocatalysis of anodic O-transfer reactions and cathodic H-transfer reactions have been studied. The investigation into anodic O-transfer reactions at undoped and Fe(III)[doped MnO2 films] revealed that MnO2 film electrodes prepared by a cycling voltammetry deposition show improved response for DMSO oxidation at the film electrodes vs. the Au substrate. Doping of the MnO2 films with Fe(III) further enhanced electrode activity. Reasons for this increase are believed to involve the adsorption of DMSO by the Fe(III) sites. The investigation into anodic O-transfer reactions at undoped and Fe(III)-doped RuO2 films showed that the Fe(III)-doped RuO2-film electrodes are applicable for anodic detection of sulfur compounds. The Fe(III) sites in the Fe-RuO2 films are speculated to act as adsorption sites for the sulfur species while the Ru(IV) sites function for anodic discharge of H2O to generate the adsorbed OH species. The investigation into cathodic H-transfer reactions, specifically nitrate reduction, at various pure metals and their alloys demonstrated that the incorporation of metals into alloy materials can create a material that exhibits bifunctional properties for the various steps involved in the overall nitrate reduction reaction. The Sb10Sn20Ti70, Cu63Ni37 and Cu25Ni75 alloy electrodes exhibited improved activity for nitrate reduction as compared to their pure component metals. The Cu63Ni37 alloy displayed the highest activity for nitrate reduction. The final investigation was a detailed study of the electrocatalytic activity of cathodic H-transfer reactions (nitrate reduction) at various compositions of Cu-Ni alloy electrodes. Voltammetric response for NO3- at the Cu-Ni alloy electrode is superior to

  3. In situ electrochemical investigations of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of nickel-metal hydride traction batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao Guang; Liaw, Bor Yann

    Although large ampere hour nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) traction batteries are in the stage of being commercialized for electric and hybrid vehicle applications, little is known about their performance characteristics. By using a standard Hg/HgO reference electrode in a commercial Ni-MH battery, we were able to conduct in situ measurements to determine both kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the system, including the characteristics of individual electrodes. Using the galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT), we simultaneously and effectively determined the open-circuit voltage of the battery, the equilibrium electrode potentials, and the diffusion coefficient of proton and hydrogen in the nickel and metal hydride electrode, respectively, as a function of the states of charge (SOC). Using the current-step excitation technique, we found that the internal resistance of the battery primarily comes from the metal hydride electrode, which is greater by one order of magnitude than that of the Ni electrode. The cyclic linear micro-polarization experiments, on the other hand, showed that the charge-transfer resistance of the electrochemical reaction at the metal hydride electrode is about twice larger than that of the Ni counterpart above 20% SOC. In comparison, the internal resistance is an order of magnitude smaller than those of the electrochemical charge-transfer reactions. The micro-polarization technique also allowed us to calculate the exchange current densities of the respective electrode electrochemical reactions and the associated specific exchange current densities. These in situ, simple but detailed, characterizations of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the Ni-MH system provided valuable information for better understanding of the battery performance.

  4. Reaction dynamics and proton coupled electron transfer: studies of tyrosine-based charge transfer in natural and biomimetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In bioenergetic reactions, electrons are transferred long distances via a hopping mechanism. In photosynthesis and DNA synthesis, the aromatic amino acid residue, tyrosine, functions as an intermediate that is transiently oxidized and reduced during long distance electron transfer. At physiological pH values, oxidation of tyrosine is associated with a deprotonation of the phenolic oxygen, giving rise to a proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. Tyrosine-based PCET reactions are important in photosystem II, which carries out the light-induced oxidation of water, and in ribonucleotide reductase, which reduces ribonucleotides to form deoxynucleotides. Photosystem II contains two redox-active tyrosines, YD (Y160 in the D2 polypeptide) and YZ (Y161 in the D1 polypeptide). YD forms a light-induced stable radical, while YZ functions as an essential charge relay, oxidizing the catalytic Mn₄CaO₅ cluster on each of four photo-oxidation reactions. In Escherichia coli class 1a RNR, the β2 subunit contains the radical initiator, Y122O•, which is reversibly reduced and oxidized in long range electron transfer with the α2 subunit. In the isolated E. coli β2 subunit, Y122O• is a stable radical, but Y122O• is activated for rapid PCET in an α2β2 substrate/effector complex. Recent results concerning the structure and function of YD, YZ, and Y122 are reviewed here. Comparison is made to recent results derived from bioengineered proteins and biomimetic compounds, in which tyrosine-based charge transfer mechanisms have been investigated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Oxidation of Group 8 transition-Metal Hydrides and Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kjell-Tore

    1996-08-01

    Transition-metal hydrides have received considerable attention during the last decades because of their unusual reactivity and their potential as homogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation and other reactions of organic substrates. An important class of catalytic processes where transition-metal hydrides are involved is the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkenes, alkynes, ketones, aldehydes, arenes and nitro compounds. This thesis studies the oxidation of Group 8 transition-metal hydrides and the ionic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes.

  6. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications--metal hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bédard, Stéphane

    2007-03-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software.

  7. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bedard, Stephane [Victhom Human Bionics Inc., Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures, QC (Canada)

    2007-03-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  8. Significance Of Deuteron Breakup In A Halo Transfer Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Yilmaz, M; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Gonul, Bulent

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the quasi-adiabatic approximations to the three-body wavefunction in breakup processes, clarifying the assumptions underlying the model. This suggests alternative approximation schemes. Using different theoretical three-body models, calculated differential cross section angular distributions for the Be-11(p,d) reaction,for which new preliminary data have been reported at 35 MeV, are presented. We show that calculations are sensitive to the inclusion of deuteron breakup and to the breakup model used, particularly if used to deduce absolute spectroscopic information on the 0{+} and 2{+} Be-10 core state parentages. There is also considerable sensitivity to the model used in calculations of the relative cross sections to the two states.

  9. The kinetics of electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride in different solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Rehana; Nadeem, Syed Muhammad Saqib

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride was investigated in different solvents by spectrophotometry at different temperatures. The the reaction rate was determined by monitoring the absorbance as a function of time at λmax 655 nm. The reaction is pseudo-first order, dependent only on the concentration of titanium trichloride at a fixed concentration of methylene green. The effect of an aqueous alcoholic solvent was studied in the acidic range of pH from 4 to 7. It was observed that the reaction rate increased with an increase in polarity of the reaction medium. The the reaction rate was high in acidic conditions and decreased with a further increase in acidity. The increase in temperature increased the rate of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride. The activation energy ( E a) was calculated by the Arrhenius relation. The absence of any reaction intermediate was confirmed by spectroscopic and kinetic investigations. A plausible mechanism for the reaction in line with outer-sphere reaction pathway has been proposed. Thermodynamic parameters such as the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H), free energy change (Δ G), and entropy change (Δ S) were also evaluated

  10. Filiform-mode hydride corrosion of uranium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. A.; Schulze, R. K.; Bingert, J. F.; Field, R. D.; McCabe, R. J.; Papin, P. A.

    2013-11-01

    Hydride nucleation and growth has previously been studied in uranium with an air-formed oxide. Preferred directional growth of uranium hydride has not been observed, presumably due to the constraint of the oxide layer and/or the presence of a surface layer distorted by mechanical grinding and polishing. Instead, hydrides typically first form as subsurface blisters that do not exhibit preferred growth directionality. By eliminating the strained surface layer through electropolishing, removing the natural oxide through ion sputtering, avoiding exposure of the uranium to air, and then exposing uranium to high purity hydrogen in an environmental cell, hydride growth patterns emerge that correspond to defect structures within the microstructure. These hydride growth patterns are similar to filiform corrosion, a type of corrosion that frequently forms under thin protective films. This work describes the first reported observation of filiform-like corrosion in uranium. The uranium hydride initiates at defects, but grows into filaments up to 20 μm wide, and tends to form in straight lines, largely propagating along twin boundaries. Propagation is driven by hydrogen reaction at the filament head, promoted by more efficient delivery of reactant. However, this phenomenon does not involve an electrochemical process associated with conventional filiform corrosion and is therefore described as filiform-like. Hydride growth was observed using optical microscopy for a period of nearly three years. Sample characterization included automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements to determine growth directions. Observation of this anomalous hydride growth provides clues as to the mechanisms operating in uranium hydriding for more conventionally prepared sample surfaces.

  11. Significantly improved electrochemical hydrogen storage properties of magnesium nickel hydride modified with nano-nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhu, Yunfeng; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Jiguang; Li, Menghuai; Li, Liquan

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium nickel hydride (Mg2NiH4) used as negative electrode material in nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) secondary battery is modified by nano-nickel via mechanical milling. In this paper, we systematically investigate the microstructure and electrochemical properties of the modified system with different milling durations. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analyses confirm the amorphous transformation of Mg2Ni-based hydride and a novel NiH0.75 nanocrystalline with a diameter of about 5 nm embedding or covering on the surface of the base particle has been observed. Its formation mechanism and positive effects on electrochemical properties of the Mg2NiH4 have also been elaborated. Electrochemical measurements show that the 5 h milled composite possesses markedly increased discharge capacity up to 896 mAh g-1. With prolonging the milling duration from 5 h to 40 h, the discharge capacity at the 10th cycle increases from 99 mAh g-1 to 359 mAh g-1. Besides, the discharging procedure changes from stepwise processes to one single-step process with increasing the milling duration. Tafel polarization test shows that the nano-nickel modified system exhibits a much better anti-corrosion ability during charging/discharging cycles. Meanwhile, both the charge-transfer reaction on the alloy surface and hydrogen diffusion inside the alloy bulk are enhanced with nano-nickel modification.

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

    2011-07-14

    Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

  13. Theoretical studies on proton transfer reaction of 3(5)-substituted pyrazoles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alireza Najafi Chermahini; Abbas Teimouri

    2014-01-01

    The inter and intra molecular proton transfer reactions of a series of pyrazole derivatives have been studied by using density functional theory (DFT) andMP2 methods implementing 6-311++G(d,p) atomic basis set. The substituents have been selected to cover a wide range of electronic effects. Proton transfer process was studied for mechanisms including single proton transfer, double proton transfer and proton transfer assisted by a water or ammonia molecule. The results showed single proton transfer reactions for interconversion pyrazole derivatives need highest activation energies in the range of 45.7−51.59 and 49.4−53.96 kcal/mol at B3LYP and MP2 levels, respectively. It was found that for the 3-substituted pyrazoles, electron withdrawing groups form stronger dimers but in the 5-substituted tautomers electron donating groups form stronger hydrogen bond. The double proton transfer reactions between dimers were studied and transition states calculated. The ranges of activation energies were found to be 17.51−19.36 and 17.02−17.80 kcal/mol for the C → E and D → D reactions respectively. In addition, the activation energies for the proton transfer reaction assisted by water or ammonia molecules were found to be in the range of 26.62−31.78 and 17.25−22.46 kcal/mol, respectively, calculated at MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory.

  14. Removal of Hg~0 with sodium chlorite solution and mass transfer reaction kinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The absorption behavior of Hg0 was studied experimentally by using sodium chlorite solution(NaClO2) as the absorbent in a bubble reactor.Primary influencing factors on removal efficiency of Hg0 such as NaClO2 concentration,pH,reaction temperature and the concentration of Hg0 were investigated.The results indicated that 72.91% of Hg0 removal efficiency could be achieved in acidic NaClO2 solution.The removal mechanism of Hg0 was proposed by analyzing of Hg2+ concentration in ab-sorption solution after reaction and comparing the electrode potentials between NaClO2 species and Hg2+/Hg0.The experimental results of mass transfer-reaction kinetics on oxidation of Hg0 by NaClO2 solution showed that with the increase of NaClO2 concentration and the decrease of pH value,the enhancement factor(E) and ratio of KG(Hg0)/kG(Hg0) increased and the liquid phase mass transfer resistance decreased,which is benefit to the mass transfer adsorption reaction.Although the increase of reaction temperature could improve the enhancement factor(E),but the ratio of KG(Hg0)/kG(Hg0) decreased;as a result,the liquid phase mass transfer resistance increased,therefore,the reaction rate for removal of Hg0 decreased.

  15. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS FOR HYDRIDING IN METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN STORAGE TANK%金属氢化物储氢器吸氢过程的数值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶建华; 蒋利军; 李志念; 刘晓鹏; 王树茂

    2011-01-01

    Based on the principle of hydride adsorption, a one-dimensional mathematical model for hydriding in a cylindrical metal hydride hydrogen storage tank was established. The heat and mass transfer of metal hydride beds was computed by finite difference method. The variation in temperature and hydrogen concentration at different radial positions of the hydride layer was analyzed during the process of hydriding. The effects of supply pressure, heat convection coefficient and hydride layer radial thickness on the hydriding was studied. It is shown that hydride formation initially takes place uniformly all over the metal hydride layer, but with the process of hydriding, the hydriding rate at the core region is gradually slower than one at surface region. The increase of supply pressure and heat convection coefficient can accelerate the hydriding of the hydrogen storage tank. The effect of hydride layer radial thickness is significant on the hydriding rate, and the thinner hydride layer, the higher the hydriding rate.%基于金属氢化物吸氢基本特性,建立圆柱形金属氢化物储氢器吸氢过程的-维数学物理模型.采用有限差分法对金属氢化物床体的传热传质进行计算.分别研究金属氢化物床体各处温度和氢含量在吸氢过程中的变化以及氢气压力、对流传热系数和金属氢化物床体径向厚度对金属氢化物吸氢过程的影响.计算结果表明:初始阶段金属氢化物床均匀吸氢,但随着氢化过程的进行,其中心区域的吸氢速率逐渐低于边缘区域;增加吸氢压力、提高对流传热系数均可促进储氢器的吸氢;金属氢化物床的径向厚度对吸氢速率影响很大,金属氢化物床越薄,氢化反应的速度越快.

  16. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile: Solvent isotope effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tuhin Pradhan; Piue Ghoshal; Ranjit Biswas

    2009-01-01

    Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in deuterated and normal methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile has been studied in order to investigate the solvent isotope effects on reaction rates and yields. These quantities (reaction rates and yields) along with several other properties such as quantum yield and radiative rates have been found to be insensitive to the solvent isotope substitution in all these solvents. The origin of the solvent isotope insensitivity of the reaction is discussed and correlated with the observed slowing down of the solvation dynamics upon isotope substitution.

  17. Disentangling the transfer and breakup contributions from the inclusive ^{8}Li+ ^{208}Pb reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Moro, A M; García-Martínez, H; Aguilera, E F; Martínez-Quiroz, E; Gómez-Camacho, J

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the elastic and one-neutron removal channel for the reaction (^{8})Li+(^{208})Pb reaction at energies around the Coulomb barrier is presented. For the elastic scattering, an optical model analysis of the experimental data is performed. The observed (^{7})Li is interpreted as the superposition of the one-neutron transfer reaction, (^{208})Pb((^{8})Li,(^{7} )Li)(^{209})Pb, and the breakup reaction. The separate contribution of each one of these processes has been calculated within the DWBA formalism. The sum of both contributions explains adequately the experimental angular distribution of (^{7})Li.

  18. Materials science of Mg-Ni-based new hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orimo, S.; Fujii, H. [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences

    2001-02-01

    One of the advantageous functional properties of Mg alloys (or compounds) is to exhibit the reversible hydriding reaction. In this paper, we present our systematic studies regarding the relationship between nanometer- or atomistic-scale structures and the specific hydriding properties of the Mg-Ni binary system, such as(1) nanostructured (n)-Mg{sub 2}Ni, (2) a mixture of n-Mg{sub 2}Ni and amorphous (a)-MgNi,(3) pure a-MgNi, and(4) n-MgNi{sub 2}. Further studies on(5) an a-MgNi-based system for clarifying the effect of the short-range ordering on the structural and hydriding properties and(6) a MgNi{sub 2}-based system for synthesizing the new Laves phase structure are also presented. The materials science of Mg-Ni-based new hydrides will provide indispensable knowledge for practically developing the Mg alloys as hydrogen-storage materials. (orig.)

  19. Observing Proton Transfer Reactions Inside the MALDI Plume: Experimental and Theoretical Insight into MALDI Gas-Phase Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, Mario F.; Zenobi, Renato

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated the contribution of gas-phase in-plume proton transfer reactions to the formation of protonated and deprotonated molecules in the MALDI process. A split sample holder was used to separately deposit two different samples, which avoids any mixing during sample preparation. The two samples were brought very close to each other and desorbed/ionized by the same laser pulse. By using a combination of deuterated and non-deuterated matrices, it was possible to observe exclusively in-plume proton transfer processes. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics were evaluated by varying the delayed extraction (DE) time, allowing the desorbed ions and neutrals to interact inside the plume for a variable period of time before being extracted and detected. Quantum mechanical calculations showed that the HDX energy barriers are relatively low for such reactions, corroborating the importance of gas-phase proton transfer in the MALDI plume. The experimental results, supported by theoretical simulations, confirm that the plume is a very reactive environment, where HDX reactions could be observed from 0 ns up to 400 ns after the laser pulse. These results could be used to evaluate the relevance of previously proposed (and partially conflicting) ionization models for MALDI.

  20. Theoretical study on hydrogenation catalysts containing a metal hydride as additional hydrogen supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, E.D.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1992-01-01

    A hypothetical hydrogenation catalyst consisting of porous, catalytically active particles embedded with metal hydride powder was evaluated. The metal hydride provides temporarily additional hydrogen if the mass transfer rate of the hydrogen to the internal of the particle is not sufficient. A numer

  1. Near resonant charge transfer in the reaction F(+) + CO - F + CO(+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunoki, I.; Ishikawa, T.

    1985-06-01

    Charge transfer reactions in the F(+) + CO system were investigated using a F(+) ion beam in the energy range 10-300 eVlab. The electronically excited product CO(+) A2Pi(i) was observed by the emission from the A-X transitions. At low collisional energy the dominant product is in the vibrational level v' = 5. The reaction cross section sigma(5) is about 1 A-sq at 12 eVc.m. and decreases with increasing collision energy. The large cross section at v' = 5 can be interpreted by near-resonant charge-transfer reactions. The rotational temperature of the product is about 300 K, which is the temperature of the reactant CO gas. For the resonant charge transfer, the translational energy is not effective, but the electronic and vibrational energy couple with each other strongly.

  2. Quantum Coherence as a Witness of Vibronically Hot Energy Transfer in Bacterial Reaction Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Paleček, David; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Zigmantas, Donatas

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic proteins have evolved over billions of years so as to undergo optimal energy transfer to the sites of charge separation. Based on spectroscopically detected quantum coherences, it has been suggested that this energy transfer is partially wavelike. This conclusion critically depends on assignment of the coherences to the evolution of excitonic superpositions. Here we demonstrate for a bacterial reaction centre protein that long-lived coherent spectroscopic oscillations, which bear canonical signatures of excitonic superpositions, are essentially vibrational excited state coherences shifted to the ground state of the chromophores . We show that appearance of these coherences is brought about by release of electronic energy during the energy transfer. Our results establish how energy migrates on vibrationally hot chromophores in the reaction centre and they call for a re-examination of claims of quantum energy transfer in photosynthesis.

  3. Successive heterolytic cleavages of H2 achieve N2 splitting on silica-supported tantalum hydrides: A DFT proposed mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Soláns, Xavier Luis

    2012-07-02

    DFT(B3PW91) calculations have been carried out to propose a pathway for the N2 cleavage by H2 in the presence of silica-supported tantalum hydride complexes [(≡ SiO)2TaHx] that forms [(≡SiO)2Ta(NH)(NH2)] (Science2007, 317, 1056). The calculations, performed on the cluster models {μ-O[(HO)2SiO] 2}TaH1 and {μ-O[(HO)2SiO] 2}TaH3, labelled as (≡SiO)2TaH x (x = 1, 3), show that the direct hydride transfers to coordinated N-based ligands in (≡SiO)2TaH(η2-N2) and (≡SiO)2TaH(η2-HNNH) have high energy barrier barriers. These high energy barriers are due in part to a lack of energetically accessible empty orbitals in the negatively charged N-based ligands. It is shown that a succession of proton transfers and reduction steps (hydride transfer or 2 electron reduction by way of dihydride reductive coupling) to the nitrogen-based ligands leads to more energetically accessible pathways. These proton transfers, which occur by way of heterolytic activation of H2, increase the electrophilicity of the resulting ligand (diazenido, N 2H-, and hydrazido, NHNH2-, respectively) that can thus accept a hydride with a moderate energy barrier. In the case of (≡SiO)2TaH(η2-HNNH), the H 2 molecule that is adding across the Ta-N bond is released after the hydride transfer step by heterolytic elimination from (≡SiO) 2TaH(NH2)2, suggesting that dihydrogen has a key role in assisting the final steps of the reaction without itself being consumed in the process. This partly accounts for the experimental observation that the addition of H2 is needed to convert an intermediate, identified as a diazenido complex [(≡SiO)2TaH(η 2-HNNH)] from its ν(N-H) stretching frequency of 3400 cm -1, to the final product. Throughout the proposed mechanism, the tantalum remains in its preferred high oxidation state and avoids redox-type reactions, which are more energetically demanding. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Main Group Lewis Acid-Mediated Transformations of Transition-Metal Hydride Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Ayan; Teets, Thomas S

    2016-08-10

    This Review highlights stoichiometric reactions and elementary steps of catalytic reactions involving cooperative participation of transition-metal hydrides and main group Lewis acids. Included are reactions where the transition-metal hydride acts as a reactant as well as transformations that form the metal hydride as a product. This Review is divided by reaction type, illustrating the diverse roles that Lewis acids can play in mediating transformations involving transition-metal hydrides as either reactants or products. We begin with a discussion of reactions where metal hydrides form direct adducts with Lewis acids, elaborating the structure and dynamics of the products of these reactions. The bulk of this Review focuses on reactions where the transition metal and Lewis acid act in cooperation, and includes sections on carbonyl reduction, H2 activation, and hydride elimination reactions, all of which can be promoted by Lewis acids. Also included is a section on Lewis acid-base secondary coordination sphere interactions, which can influence the reactivity of hydrides. Work from the past 50 years is included, but the majority of this Review focuses on research from the past decade, with the intent of showcasing the rapid emergence of this field and the potential for further development into the future.

  5. Deceleration of the electron transfer reaction in the photosynthetic reaction centre as a manifestation of its structure fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knox P. P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To extract information on the nature of protein structural relaxation from the kinetics of electron transfer reaction in the photosynthetic reaction centre (RC. Methods. The kinetic curves obtained by absorption spectroscopy are processed by a maximum entropy method to get the spectrum of relaxation times. Results. A series of distinctive peaks of this spectrum in the interval from 0.1 s to hundreds of seconds is revealed. With the time of exposure of the sample to actinic light increasing, the positions of the peak maxima grow linearly. Conclusions. Theoretical analysis of these results reveals the formation of several structural states of the RC protein. Remarkably, in each of these states the slow reaction kinetics follow the same fractional power law that reflects the glass-like properties of the protein.

  6. Selective Hydrogen Transfer Reaction in FCC Process:Characterization and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Beiyan; He Mingyuan; Da Zhijian

    2003-01-01

    The product distribution and gasoline quality of FCC process, especially the olefin content,heavily depends on the catalyst performance in terms of selective/non-selective hydrogen transfer reaction selectivity. A reliable experimental protocol has been established by using n-dodecane as a probe molecule to characterize the selective hydrogen transfer ability of catalytic materials. The results obtained have been correlated with the performance of the practical catalysts.

  7. Adiabatic criteria for outer-sphere bimolecular electron-transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented for outer-sphere bimolecular electron-transfer reactions which is correct in the adiabatic, nonadiabatic, and intermediate dynamical regimes for an overdamped solvent coordinate. From this model, the conditions for the transfer to be adiabatic or nonadiabatic are deduced. The time-scale separations needed to adequately describe the process as an average over (distant dependent) unimolecular rates are described.

  8. The 2H(e, e' p)n reaction at large energy transfers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willering, Hendrik Willem

    2003-01-01

    At the ELSA accelerator facillity in Bonn, Germany, we have measured the deutron "breakup" reaction 2H(e,e' p)n at four-momentum transfers around Q2 = -0 .20(GeV/c)2 with an electron beam energy of E0 = 1.6 GeV. The cross section has been determined for energy transfers extending from the quasielast

  9. Construction of cyclic enones via gold-catalyzed oxygen transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald B. Hammond

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, gold-catalyzed reactions have become a tour de force in organic synthesis. Recently, the gold-, Brønsted acid- or Lewis acid-catalyzed oxygen transfer from carbonyl to carbon–carbon triple bond, the so-called alkyne–carbonyl metathesis, has attracted much attention because this atom economical transformation generates α,β-unsaturated carbonyl derivatives which are of great interest in synthetic organic chemistry. This mini-review focuses on the most recent achievements on gold-catalyzed oxygen transfer reactions of tethered alkynones, diynes or alkynyl epoxides to cyclic enones. The corresponding mechanisms for the transformations are also discussed.

  10. A Novel Micro-hole Electrode Used to Investigate Electron Transfer Reactions at ITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel micro-hole electrode was fabricated to investigate the electron transfer reaction at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES). The electron transfer reaction between ferro/ferricyanide in aqueous phase (W) and ferrocene in 1, 2-dichloroethane (O) phase was studied as a test experiment. The results showed that the diffusion coefficient obtained from the micro-hole electrode was consistent with that obtained at macro-interface. Due to its simplicity and the very small IR drop it will be a useful tool for the study of ITIES systems.

  11. A Novel Micro—hole Electrode Used to Investigate Electron Transfer Reactions at ITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongPingZHAN; BingLiangWU

    2002-01-01

    A novel micro-hole electrode was fabricated to investigate the electron transfer reaction at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES). The electron transfer reaction between feero/ferricyanide in aqueous phase(W) and ferrocene in 1,2-dichloroethane (O) phase was studied as a test experiment. The results showed that the diffusion coefficient obtained from the micro-hole electrode was consistent with that obtained at macro-interface. Due to its simplicity and the very small IR drop it will be a useful tool for the study of ITIES systems.

  12. Diagnostic criteria for the characterization of quasireversible electron transfer reactions by cyclic square wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Megan A; Helfrick, John C; Bottomley, Lawrence A

    2014-08-19

    Theory for cyclic square wave voltammetry of quasireversible electron transfer reactions is presented and experimentally verified. The impact of empirical parameters on the shape of the current-voltage curve is examined. From the trends, diagnostic criteria enabling the use of this waveform as a tool for mechanistic analysis of electrode reaction processes are presented. These criteria were experimentally confirmed using Eu(3+)/Eu(2+), a well-established quasireversible analyte. Using cyclic square wave voltammetry, both the electron transfer coefficient and rate were calculated for this analyte and found to be in excellent agreement with literature. When properly applied, these criteria will enable nonexperts in voltammetry to assign the electrode reaction mechanism and accurately measure electrode reaction kinetics.

  13. Theoretical Study on the NO2 + NO2- Electron Transfer Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU,Zheng-Yu(周正宇); GAO,Hong-Wei(高洪伟); XING,Yu-Mei(邢玉梅); GUO,Li(郭丽); QU,Yu-Hui(曲玉辉)

    2002-01-01

    The NO2 + NO2- electron transfer reaction was studied with DFT-B3LYP method at 6-311 + G* basis set level for the eight selected structures: four species favor the strucure of "head to head". The geometry of transition state was obtained by the linear coordinate method. Three parameters, non-adiahatic activation energy (Ead), coupling matrix element (Hif) and reorganization energy (λ) for electron transfer reaction can be calculated. According to the reorganization energy of the ET reaction, the values obtained from George-Griffith-Marcus (GGM) method (the contribution only from diagonal elements of force constant matrix) are larger than those obtained from Hessian matrix method (including the contribution from both diagonal and off-diagonal elements), which suggests that the coupling interactions between different vibrational modes are important to the inner-sphere reogrganization energy for the ET reactions in gaseous phase. The value of rate constant was obtained by using above three activation parameters.

  14. Assessing nanoparticle size effects on metal hydride thermodynamics using the Wulff construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Chul; Dai, Bing; Karl Johnson, J; Sholl, David S

    2009-05-20

    The reaction thermodynamics of metal hydrides are crucial to the use of these materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In addition to altering the kinetics of metal hydride reactions, the use of nanoparticles can also change the overall reaction thermodynamics. We use density functional theory to predict the equilibrium crystal shapes of seven metals and their hydrides via the Wulff construction. These calculations allow the impact of nanoparticle size on the thermodynamics of hydrogen release from these metal hydrides to be predicted. Specifically, we study the temperature required for the hydride to generate a H(2) pressure of 1 bar as a function of the radius of the nanoparticle. In most, but not all, cases the hydrogen release temperature increases slightly as the particle size is reduced.

  15. Air and metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, M.; Noponen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    The main goal of the air and metal hydride battery project was to enhance the performance and manufacturing technology of both electrodes to such a degree that an air-metal hydride battery could become a commercially and technically competitive power source for electric vehicles. By the end of the project it was possible to demonstrate the very first prototype of the air-metal hydride battery at EV scale, achieving all the required design parameters. (orig.)

  16. Well-Defined Molecular Magnesium Hydride Clusters : Relationship between Size and Hydrogen-Elimination Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Intemann, Julia; Spielmann, Jan; Sirsch, Peter; Harder, Sjoerd

    A new tetranuclear magnesium hydride cluster, [{NN-(MgH)2}2], which was based on a NN-coupled bis--diketiminate ligand (NN2-), was obtained from the reaction of [{NN-(MgnBu)2}2] with PhSiH3. Its crystal structure reveals an almost-tetrahedral arrangement of Mg atoms and two different sets of hydride

  17. Multiconfigurational electronic wavefunctions in the full optimized reaction space: the isomerization of nitrosyl hydride to nitrogen hydroxide in the lowest singlet and triplet states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dombek, M. G.

    1977-12-01

    Energy curves are determined for the lowest singlet and triplet states of the HNO molecule. The geometry is varied in that the hydrogen moves through 13 positions around the NO core to describe the isomerization reaction HNO yields HON. Quantitatively determined are the stable and metastable equilibrium positions in both states, the energy differences between these two equilibrium positions and between the two states, and the barriers with respect to isomerization. The calculations are carried out using a novel configuration interaction approach called the Full Optimized Reaction Space method, which involves multiconfigurational self-consistent field calculations as an integral part. In order to interpret the bonding changes occurring during the reaction, a novel type of orbital is developed and calculated. These are called Directed Localized Reaction Orbitals. With their help it proves possible to give an interpretation of the isomerization in terms of concepts which fit chemical intuition.

  18. Numerical study of a magnesium hydride tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhomme, Baptiste; de Rango, Patricia; Marty, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen storage in metal hydride tanks (MHT) is a very promising solution. Several experimental tanks, studied by different teams, have already proved the feasibility and the interesting performances of this solution. However, in much cases, an optimization of tank geometry is still needed in order to perform fast hydrogen loading. The development of efficient numerical tools is a key issue for MHT design and optimization. We propose a simple model representing a metal hydride tank exchanging its heat of reaction with a thermal fluid flow. In this model, the radial and axial discretisations have been decoupled by using Matlab® one-dimensional tools. Calculations are compared to experimental results obtained in a previous study. A good agreement is found for the loading case. The discharging case shows some discrepancies, which are discussed in this paper.

  19. Offline thermal-desorption proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry to study composition of organic aerosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timkovsky, J.; Dusek, U.; Henzing, J. S.; Kuipers, T. L.; Röckmann, T.; Holzinger, R.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel approach to study the organic composition of aerosol filter samples using thermal-desorption proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (TD-PTR-MS) in the laboratory. The method is tested and validated based on the comparison with in situ TD-PTR-MS measurements. In general, we obs

  20. Phthalimides as exceptionally efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reductive coupling reactions promoted by samarium diiodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, Tatiana; Alvarez, Eleuterio; Chiara, Jose Luis

    2007-12-20

    Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that phthalimides are highly efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reactions promoted by samarium diiodide, affording ketyl radical anion intermediates, which participate in high-yielding inter- and intramolecular reductive coupling processes with different radicophiles including imides, oxime ethers, nitrones, and Michael acceptors.

  1. Multinucleon transfer reactions studied with the heavy-ion magnetic spectrometer PRISMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradi, L.; Stefanini, A.M.; Behera, B.R.; Gadea, A.; Fioretto, E.; Latina, A.; Marginean, N. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Szilner, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Ur, C. [Universita di Padova and INFN, Sezione di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Padova (Italy); Haas, F. [IN2P3-CNRS-Universite Louis Pasteur, Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg (France); Pollarolo, G. [Universita di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Torino (Italy); Trotta, M. [INFN - Sezione di Napoli and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Napoli, Napoli (Italy)

    2005-09-01

    Recent inclusive measurements on multinucleon transfer reactions reveal important information on the interplay between single-particle and nucleon pair degrees of freedom. More detailed studies are being performed with the new magnetic spectrometer PRISMA, coupled to the CLARA {gamma}-array. (orig.)

  2. Marcus Theory: Thermodynamics CAN Control the Kinetics of Electron Transfer Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is generally true that thermodynamics do not influence kinetics, this is NOT the case for electron transfer reactions in solution. Marcus Theory explains why this is so, using straightforward physical chemical principles such as transition state theory, Arrhenius' Law, and the Franck-Condon Principle. Here the background and…

  3. Proton transfer reactions in carbon nanotubes endohedrally functionalized with selected polar amino acid sidechains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abi, T.G. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Taraphder, Srabani, E-mail: srabani@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2012-09-11

    Graphical abstract: Free Energies of activation and reaction for intramolecular proton transfer between polar amino acid sidechains and hydroxyl groups inside the core of endohedrally functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EVB based free energy simulation of proton transfer in hydrophobic confinement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aminoacid sidechain and OH group suspended within carbon nanotube act as reactants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Donors like His and Glu are efficient in confinement aided by local hydrogen bonds. -- Abstract: We use the empirical-valence-bond (EVB) theory to investigate intramolecular proton transfer reactions between a selected set of polar amino acid sidechains and hydroxyl groups suspended inside carbon nanotubes to model the effect of hydrophobic confinement on the energetics of proton transfer involving (i) translocation of an excess protonic charge (with protonated histidine sidechain as donor) and (ii) transformation of a neutral reactant state to a charge-separated product state (with sidechains of Asp, Glu, Ser and Thr as donor). In both the cases, confinement in hydrophobic medium is found to change the associated free energies compared to their respective values in the bulk solution phase. Presence of stable hydrogen bonding within the pore is found to have a significant effect on both free energies of reaction and activation and thus governs the thermodynamic and kinetic feasibilities of these intramolecular reactions in hydrophobic confinement.

  4. Synthesis, characterisation, and oxygen atom transfer reactions involving the first gold(I)-alkylperoxo complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Alba; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Oonishi, Yoshihiro; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

    2013-11-25

    The synthesis of a new class of organogold species containing a peroxo moiety is reported. Complexes [Au(IPr)(OO(t)Bu)] and [Au(SIPr)(OO(t)Bu)] have been synthesised via a straightforward methodology using the parent gold(I) hydroxide complexes as synthons. These complexes have been successfully used in oxygen-transfer reactions to triphenylphosphine.

  5. Long-range proton transfer in aqueous acid-base reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siwick, B.J.; Cox, M.J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the mechanism of proton transfer (PT) in the aqueous acid−base reaction between the photoacid 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (HPTS) and acetate by probing the vibrational resonances of HPTS, acetate, and the hydrated proton with femtosecond mid-infrared laser pulses. We find that PT

  6. Beyond frontier molecular orbital theory: a systematic electron transfer model (ETM) for polar bimolecular organic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Katharine J; Johnson, Richard P

    2013-03-01

    Polar bimolecular reactions often begin as charge-transfer complexes and may proceed with a high degree of electron transfer character. Frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory is predicated in part on this concept. We have developed an electron transfer model (ETM) in which we systematically transfer one electron between reactants and then use density functional methods to model the resultant radical or radical ion intermediates. Sites of higher reactivity are revealed by a composite spin density map (SDM) of odd electron character on the electron density surface, assuming that a new two-electron bond would occur preferentially at these sites. ETM correctly predicts regio- and stereoselectivity for a broad array of reactions, including Diels-Alder, dipolar and ketene cycloadditions, Birch reduction, many types of nucleophilic additions, and electrophilic addition to aromatic rings and polyenes. Conformational analysis of radical ions is often necessary to predict reaction stereochemistry. The electronic and geometric changes due to one-electron oxidation or reduction parallel the reaction coordinate for electrophilic or nucleophilic addition, respectively. The effect is more dramatic for one-electron reduction.

  7. Near-resonant versus nonresonant chemiluminescent charge-transfer reactions of atomic ions with HCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenewinkel-Meyer, Th.; Ottinger, Ch.

    1994-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions of C+, O+, F+, Ar+ and some other atomic ions with hydrogen chloride were investigated at collision energies between eVc.m.. This may be due to formation of a long-lived collision complex (Ar-HCl)+.

  8. Mechanism of the Primary Charge Transfer Reaction in the Cytochrome bc1 Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barragan, Angela M; Schulten, Klaus; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2016-01-01

    , the quinol-protein interaction, which initiates the Q-cycle, has not yet been completely described. Furthermore, the initial charge transfer reactions of the Q-cycle lack a physical description. The present investigation utilizes classical molecular dynamics simulations in tandem with quantum density...

  9. Cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams: a spectroscopic tool for neutron-rich nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086156; Raabe, Riccardo; Bracco, Angela

    In this thesis work, an exploratory experiment to investigate cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics is presented. The aim of the experiment was to test the potential of cluster-transfer reactions at the Coulomb barrier, as a possible mean to perform $\\gamma$ spectroscopy studies of exotic neutron-rich nuclei at medium-high energies and spins. The experiment was performed at ISOLDE (CERN), employing the heavy-ion reaction $^{98}$Rb + $^{7}$Li at 2.85 MeV/A. Cluster-transfer reaction channels were studied through particle-$\\gamma$ coincidence measurements, using the MINIBALL Ge array coupled to the charged particle Si detectors T-REX. Sr, Y and Zr neutron-rich nuclei with A $\\approx$ 100 were populated by either triton- or $\\alpha$ transfer from $^{7}$Li to the beam nuclei and the emitted complementary charged fragment was detected in coincidence with the $\\gamma$ cascade of the residues, after few neutrons evaporation. The measured $\\gamma$ spectra were studied in detail and t...

  10. Single-drop reactive extraction/extractive reaction with forced convective diffusion and interphase mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Leonid S.; Red, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for time-dependent forced convective diffusion-reaction having convection by a recirculating flow field within the drop that is hydrodynamically coupled at the interface with a convective external flow field that at infinity becomes a uniform free-streaming flow. The concentration field inside the droplet is likewise coupled with that outside by boundary conditions at the interface. A chemical reaction can take place either inside or outside the droplet, or reactions can take place in both phases. The algorithm has been implemented, and for comparison results are shown here for the case of no reaction in either phase and for the case of an external first order reaction, both for unsteady behavior. For pure interphase mass transfer, concentration isocontours, local and average Sherwood numbers, and average droplet concentrations have been obtained as a function of the physical properties and external flow field. For mass transfer enhanced by an external reaction, in addition to the above forms of results, we present the enhancement factor, with the results now also depending upon the (dimensionless) rate of reaction.

  11. Single-drop reactive extraction/extractive reaction with forced convective diffusion and interphase mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Leonid S.; Reed, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the forced convective diffusion-reaction problem for convection inside and outside a droplet by a recirculating flow field hydrodynamically coupled at the droplet interface with an external flow field that at infinity becomes a uniform streaming flow. The concentration field inside the droplet is likewise coupled with that outside by boundary conditions at the interface. A chemical reaction can take place either inside or outside the droplet or reactions can take place in both phases. The algorithm has been implemented and results are shown here for the case of no reaction and for the case of an external first order reaction, both for unsteady behavior. For pure interphase mass transfer, concentration isocontours, local and average Sherwood numbers, and average droplet concentrations have been obtained as a function of the physical properties and external flow field. For mass transfer enhanced by an external reaction, in addition to the above forms of results, we present the enhancement factor, with the results now also depending upon the (dimensionless) rate of reaction.

  12. Photoinduced Electron Transfer Reaction between Poly-guanylic Acid (5`) with Anthraquinone-2-sulfonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The electron transfer reaction between triplet anthraquinone-2-sulfonate with poly-guanylic acid (5) (poly[G]) in acetonitrile-H2O has been investigated by 248 nm laser flash photolysis. The transient absorption spectra of radical cation of poly[G] and radical anion of anthraqunione-2-sulfonate(AQS) arising from electron transfer reaction has been observed simultaneously for the first time. The formation processes of radical cation of poly[G] and radical anion of anthraquinone-2-sulfonate as well as the decay processes of triplet anthraquinone-2-sulfonate have also been observed, the apparent rate constants for the formation and decay of transient species have been determined. The free energy changes in the process of the electron transfer was also calculated.

  13. Promotion of multi-electron transfer for enhanced photocatalysis: A review focused on oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changhua; Zhang, Xintong; Liu, Yichun

    2015-12-01

    Semiconductor photocatalysis has attracted significant interest for solar light induced environmental remediation and solar fuel generation. As is well known, photocatalytic performance is determined by three steps: photoexcitation, separation and transport of photogenerated charge carriers, and surface reactions. To achieve higher efficiency, significant efforts have been made on improvement of efficiency of above first two steps, which have been well documented in recent review articles. In contrast, this review intends to focus on strategies moving onto the third step of improvement for enhanced photocatalysis wherein active oxygen species including superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical are in situ detected. Particularly, surface electron-transfer reduction of oxygen over single component photocatalysts is reviewed and systems enabling multi-electron transfer induced oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are highlighted. It is expected this review could provide a guideline for readers to better understand the critical role of ORR over photocatalyst in charge carrier separation and transfer and obtain reliable results for enhanced aerobic photocatalysis.

  14. Barrier heights of hydrogen-transfer reactions with diffusion quantum monte carlo method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaojun; Wang, Fan

    2017-04-30

    Hydrogen-transfer reactions are an important class of reactions in many chemical and biological processes. Barrier heights of H-transfer reactions are underestimated significantly by popular exchange-correlation functional with density functional theory (DFT), while coupled-cluster (CC) method is quite expensive and can be applied only to rather small systems. Quantum Monte-Carlo method can usually provide reliable results for large systems. Performance of fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte-Carlo method (FN-DMC) on barrier heights of the 19 H-transfer reactions in the HTBH38/08 database is investigated in this study with the trial wavefunctions of the single-Slater-Jastrow form and orbitals from DFT using local density approximation. Our results show that barrier heights of these reactions can be calculated rather accurately using FN-DMC and the mean absolute error is 1.0 kcal/mol in all-electron calculations. Introduction of pseudopotentials (PP) in FN-DMC calculations improves efficiency pronouncedly. According to our results, error of the employed PPs is smaller than that of the present CCSD(T) and FN-DMC calculations. FN-DMC using PPs can thus be applied to investigate H-transfer reactions involving larger molecules reliably. In addition, bond dissociation energies of the involved molecules using FN-DMC are in excellent agreement with reference values and they are even better than results of the employed CCSD(T) calculations using the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Technical and economic evaluation of hydrogen storage systems based on light metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepsen, Julian

    2014-07-01

    Novel developments regarding materials for solid-state hydrogen storage show promising prospects. These complex hydrides exhibit high mass-related storage capacities and thus great technical potential to store hydrogen in an efficient and safe way. However, a comprehensive evaluation of economic competitiveness is still lacking, especially in the case of the LiBH4 / MgH2 storage material. In this study, an assessment with respect to the economic feasibility of implementing complex hydrides as hydrogen storage materials is presented. The cost structure of hydrogen storage systems based on NaAlH4 and LiBH4 / MgH2 is discussed and compared with the conventional high pressure (700 bar) and liquid storage systems. Furthermore, the properties of LiBH4 / MgH2, so-called Li-RHC (Reactive Hydride Composite), are scientifically compared and evaluated on the lab and pilot plant scale. To enhance the reaction rate, the addition of TiCl3 is investigated and high energy ball milling is evaluated as processing technique. The effect of the additive in combination with the processing technique is described in detail. Finally, an optimum set of processing parameters and additive content are identified and can be applied for scaled-up production of the material based on simple models considering energy input during processing. Furthermore, thermodynamic, heat transfer and kinetic properties are experimentally determined by different techniques and analysed as a basis for modelling and designing scaled-up storage systems. The results are analysed and discussed with respect to the reaction mechanisms and reversibility of the system. Heat transfer properties are assessed with respect to the scale-up for larger hydrogen storage systems. Further improvements of the heat transfer were achieved by compacting the material. In this regard, the influence of the compaction pressure on the apparent density, thermal conductivity and sorption behaviour, was investigated in detail. Finally, scaled

  16. Controlling an electron-transfer reaction at a metal surface by manipulating reactant motion and orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Nils; Krüger, Bastian C; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Schäfer, Tim

    2014-12-08

    The loss or gain of vibrational energy in collisions of an NO molecule with the surface of a gold single crystal proceeds by electron transfer. With the advent of new optical pumping and orientation methods, we can now control all molecular degrees of freedom important to this electron-transfer-mediated process, providing the most detailed look yet into the inner workings of an electron-transfer reaction and showing how to control its outcome. We find the probability of electron transfer increases with increasing translational and vibrational energy as well as with proper orientation of the reactant. However, as the vibrational energy increases, translational excitation becomes unimportant and proper orientation becomes less critical. One can understand the interplay of all three control parameters from simple model potentials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Stereochemistry of 1,2-elimination and proton-transfer reactions: toward a unified understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrig, Jerry R

    2013-07-16

    Many mechanistic and stereochemical studies have focused on the breaking of the C-H bond through base-catalyzed elimination reactions. When we began our research, however, chemists knew almost nothing about the stereospecificity of addition-elimination reactions involving conjugated acyclic carbonyl compounds, even though the carbonyl group is a pivotal functional group in organic chemistry. Over the last 25 years, we have studied the addition-elimination reactions of β-substituted acyclic esters, thioesters, and ketones in order to reach a comprehensive understanding of how electronic effects influence their stereochemistry. This Account brings together our understanding of the stereochemistry of 1,2-elimination and proton-transfer reactions, describing how each study has built upon previous work and contributed to our understanding of this field. When we began, chemists thought that anti stereospecificity in base-catalyzed 1,2-elimination reactions occurred via concerted E2 mechanisms, which provide a smooth path for anti elimination. Unexpectedly, we discovered that some E1cBirrev reactions produce the same anti stereospecificity as E2 reactions even though they proceed through diffusionally equilibrated, "free" enolate-anion intermediates. This result calls into question the conventional wisdom that anti stereochemistry must result from a concerted mechanism. While carrying out our research, we developed insights ranging from the role of historical contingency in the evolution of hydratase-dehydratase enzymes to the influence of buffers on the stereochemistry of H/D exchange in D2O. Negative hyperconjugation is the most important concept for understanding our results. This idea provides a unifying view for the largely anti stereochemistry in E1cBirrev elimination reactions and a basis for understanding the stereoelectronic influence of electron-withdrawing β-substituents on proton-transfer reactions.

  18. Thermodynamics of electron transfer in oxygenic photosynthetic reaction centers: volume change, enthalpy, and entropy of electron-transfer reactions in manganese-depleted photosystem II core complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J M; Boichenko, V A; Diner, B A; Mauzerall, D

    2001-06-19

    We have previously reported the thermodynamic data of electron transfer in photosystem I using pulsed time-resolved photoacoustics [Hou et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 7109-7116]. In the present work, using preparations of purified manganese-depleted photosystem II (PS II) core complexes from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we have measured the DeltaV, DeltaH, and estimated TDeltaS of electron transfer on the time scale of 1 micros. At pH 6.0, the volume contraction of PS II was determined to be -9 +/- 1 A3. The thermal efficiency was found to be 52 +/- 5%, which corresponds to an enthalpy change of -0.9 +/- 0.1 eV for the formation of the state P680+Q(A-) from P680*. An unexpected volume expansion on pulse saturation of PS II was observed, which is reversible in the dark. At pH 9.0, the volume contraction, the thermal efficiency, and the enthalpy change were -3.4 +/- 0.5 A3, 37 +/- 7%, and -1.15 +/- 0.13 eV, respectively. The DeltaV of PS II, smaller than that of PS I and bacterial centers, is assigned to electrostriction and analyzed using the Drude-Nernst equation. To explain the small DeltaV for the formation of P680+Q(A-) or Y(Z*)Q(A-), we propose that fast proton transfer into a polar region is involved in this reaction. Taking the free energy of charge separation of PS II as the difference between the energy of the excited-state P680* and the difference in the redox potentials of the donor and acceptor, the apparent entropy change (TDeltaS) for charge separation of PS II is calculated to be negative, -0.1 +/- 0.1 eV at pH 6.0 (P680+Q(A-)) and -0.2 +/- 0.15 eV at pH 9.0 (Y(Z*)Q(A-)). The thermodynamic properties of electron transfer in PS II core reaction centers thus differ considerably from those of bacterial and PS I reaction centers, which have DeltaV of approximately -27 A3, DeltaH of approximately -0.4 eV, and TDeltaS of approximately +0.4 eV.

  19. In Situ Catalyst Modification in Atom Transfer Radical Reactions with Ruthenium Benzylidene Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juneyoung; Grandner, Jessica M; Engle, Keary M; Houk, K N; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-06-08

    Ruthenium benzylidene complexes are well-known as olefin metathesis catalysts. Several reports have demonstrated the ability of these catalysts to also facilitate atom transfer radical (ATR) reactions, such as atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). However, while the mechanism of olefin metathesis with ruthenium benzylidenes has been well-studied, the mechanism by which ruthenium benzylidenes promote ATR reactions remains unknown. To probe this question, we have analyzed seven different ruthenium benzylidene complexes for ATR reactivity. Kinetic studies by (1)H NMR revealed that ruthenium benzylidene complexes are rapidly converted into new ATRA-active, metathesis-inactive species under typical ATRA conditions. When ruthenium benzylidene complexes were activated prior to substrate addition, the resulting activated species exhibited enhanced kinetic reactivity in ATRA with no significant difference in overall product yield compared to the original complexes. Even at low temperature, where the original intact complexes did not catalyze the reaction, preactivated catalysts successfully reacted. Only the ruthenium benzylidene complexes that could be rapidly transformed into ATRA-active species could successfully catalyze ATRP, whereas other complexes preferred redox-initiated free radical polymerization. Kinetic measurements along with additional mechanistic and computational studies show that a metathesis-inactive ruthenium species, generated in situ from the ruthenium benzylidene complexes, is the active catalyst in ATR reactions. Based on data from (1) H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, we suspect that this ATRA-active species is a RuxCly(PCy3)z complex.

  20. Probing surface distribution of $\\alpha$-cluster in $^{20}$Ne via $\\alpha$-transfer reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Tokuro; Suhara, Tadahiro; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Direct evidence of the $\\alpha$-cluster development in bound states has not been obtained yet although a number of experimental studies were carried out to extract the information of the clustering. In particular in conventional analyses of $\\alpha$-transfer reactions, there exist a few significant problems on reaction models, which are insufficient to qualitatively discuss the cluster structure. We aim to verify the development of the $\\alpha$-cluster structure from observables. As the first application, it is argued to extract the spatial information of the cluster structure of the $^{20}$Ne nucleus in its ground state through the cross section of the $\\alpha$-transfer reaction $^{16}$O($^6$Li,~$d$)$^{20}$Ne. For the analysis of the transfer reaction, we work with the coupled-channels Born approximation (CCBA) approach, in which the breakup effect of $^6$Li is explicitly taken into account by means of the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC) based on the three-body $\\alpha + d + {}^{16}$O mo...

  1. Design and Fabricate a Metallic Hydride Heat Pump with a Cooling Capacity of 9000 BTU/H

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-07

    I ERGENICS, INC. N 681 Lawl Ins Road Wyckoff. NJ 07481 DESIGN AND FABRICATE A METALLIC HYDRIDE HEAT PUMP WITH A COOLING CAPACITY OF 9000 BTU/H...air conditioning unit employing a metal hydride heat pump and a silicone heat transfer fluid. The contract was subsequently modified on 29 September 3...for thermally driven ECE systems. Metal hydride heat pumps were proposed as for this application.. However, only laboratory bench experiments have

  2. Optimization of o-phtaldialdehyde/2-mercaptoethanol postcolumn reaction for the hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography determination of memantine utilizing a silica hydride stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douša, Michal; Pivoňková, Veronika; Sýkora, David

    2016-08-01

    A rapid procedure for the determination of memantine based on hydrophilic interaction chromatography with fluorescence detection was developed. Fluorescence detection after postcolumn derivatization with o-phtaldialdehyde/2-mercaptoethanol was performed at excitation and emission wavelengths of 345 and 450 nm, respectively. The postcolumn reaction conditions such as reaction temperature, derivatization reagent flow rate, and reagents concentration were studied due to steric hindrance of amino group of memantine. The derivatization reaction was applied for the hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography method which was based on Cogent Silica-C stationary phase with a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of 10 mmol/L citric acid and 10 mmol/L o-phosphoric acid (pH 6.0) with acetonitrile using an isocratic composition of 2:8 v/v. The benefit of the reported approach consists in a simple sample pretreatment and a quick and sensitive hydrophilic interaction chromatography method. The developed method was validated in terms of linearity, accuracy, precision, and selectivity according to the International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. The developed method was successfully applied for the analysis of commercial memantine tablets.

  3. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-12-22

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  4. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.

    2015-12-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  5. Minor actinide fission induced by multi-nucleon transfer reaction in inverse kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taieb J.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of nuclear waste incineration and design of new generation nuclear reactors, experimental data on fission probabilities and on fission fragment yields of minor actinides are crucial to design prototypes. Transfer-induced fission has proven to be an efficient method to study fission probabilities of actinides which cannot be investigated with standard techniques due to their high radioactivity. We report on the preliminary results of an experiment performed at GANIL that investigates fission probabilities with multi-nucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics between a 238U beam on a 12C target. Actinides from U to Cm were produced with an excitation energy range from 0 to 30 MeV. In addition, inverse kinematics allowed to characterize the fission fragments in mass and charge. A key point of the analysis resides in the identification of the actinides produced in the different transfer channels. The new annular telescope SPIDER was used to tag the target-like recoil nucleus of the transfer reaction and to determine the excitation energy of the actinide. The fission probability for each transfer channel is accessible and the preliminary results for 238U are promising.

  6. Studies on electron transfer reactions: Reduction of heteropoly 10-tungstodivanadophosphate by thioglycolic acid in aqueous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ponnusamy Sami; Natarajan Mariselvi; Kandasamy Venkateshwari; Arunachalam Sarathi; Kasi Rajasekaran

    2010-05-01

    Rates of electron transfer reaction of thioglycolic acid with vanadium(V) substituted Keggintype heteropolyanion, [PVVVVW10O40]5-, in acetate-acetic acid buffers have been measured spectrophotometrically at 25°C. The order of the reaction with respect to substrate and oxidant is unity. The reaction shows simple second order kinetics at constant pH. The rate of the reaction increases with increase of pH of the medium. The mono-anion HSCH2COO- and di-anion -SCH2COO- are found to be the reactive species. Rate constants for mono-anion and di-anion are evaluated from rate law derived from the mechanism. By applying Rehm-Weller relationship, self exchange rate constant for the -SCH2COO-/S$^{\\bullet}$ CH2COO- couple was evaluated as 3.3 × 103 dm3 mol-1 s-1 at 25°C.

  7. Theoretical Study on the Kinetics of Electron Transfer for Bond-breaking Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING,Yu-Mei(邢玉梅); ZHOU,Zheng-Yu(周正宇); GAO,Hong-Wei(高洪伟)

    2002-01-01

    To test the theory of dissociative electron transfer, a simple model describing the kinetics of electron transfer bond-breaking reactions was used. The Hamiltonian of the system was given.The homogeneous and heterogeneous kinetic data fit reasonably well with an activation-driving force relatiobship derived from the Marcus quadratic theory. In the heterogeneous case, there is a good agreement between the theoretical calculation amd the experimental result, while in the homogeneous case, a good a greement is only observed for the tertiary halides. This is due to the stability of tertiary radical resulting from the sterical effect.

  8. Discovery of the shape coexisting 0$^{+}$ state in $^{32}$Mg by a two neutron transfer reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Wimmer, K; Krücken, R; Bildstein, V; Gernhäuser, R; Bastin, B; Bree, N; Diriken, J; Van Duppen, P; Huyse, M; Patronis, N; Vermaelen, P; Voulot, D; Van de Walle, J; Wenander, F; Fraile, L M; Chapman, R; Hadinia, B; Orlandi, R; Smith, J F; Lutter, R; Thirolf, P G; Labiche, M; Blazhev, A; Kalkühler, M; Reiter, P; Seidlitz, M; Warr, N; Macchiavelli, A O; Jeppesen, H B; Fiori, E; Georgiev, G; Schrieder, G; Gupta, S Das; Bianco, G Lo; Nardelli, S; Butterworth, J; Johansen, J; Riisager, K

    2010-01-01

    The Island of Inversion nucleus $^{32}$Mg has been studied by a (t,p) two neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE. The shape coexistent excited 0$^{+}$ state in $^{32}$Mg has been identified by the characteristic angular distribution of the protons of the $\\Delta$L = 0 transfer. The excitation energy of 1058 keV is much lower than predicted by any theoretical model. The low $\\gamma$-ray intensity observed for the decay of this 0$^{+}$ state indicates a lifetime of more than 10 ns. Deduced spectroscopic amplitudes are compared with occupation numbers from shell model calculations.

  9. Functions of MgH2 in hydrogen storage reactions of the 6LiBH4-CaH2 reactive hydride composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yifan; Liu, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2012-08-28

    A significant improvement of hydrogen storage properties was achieved by introducing MgH(2) into the 6LiBH(4)-CaH(2) system. It was found that ~8.0 wt% of hydrogen could be reversibly stored in a 6LiBH(4)-CaH(2)-3MgH(2) composite below 400 °C and 100 bar of hydrogen pressure with a stepwise reaction, which is superior to the pristine 6LiBH(4)-CaH(2) and LiBH(4) samples. Upon dehydriding, MgH(2) first decomposed to convert to Mg and liberate hydrogen with an on-set temperature of ~290 °C. Subsequently, LiBH(4) reacted with CaH(2) to form CaB(6) and LiH in addition to further hydrogen release. Hydrogen desorption from the 6LiBH(4)-CaH(2)-3MgH(2) composite finished at ~430 °C in non-isothermal model, a 160 °C reduction relative to the 6LiBH(4)-CaH(2) sample. JMA analyses revealed that hydrogen desorption was a diffusion-controlled reaction rather than an interface reaction-controlled process. The newly produced Mg of the first-step dehydrogenation possibly acts as the heterogeneous nucleation center of the resultant products of the second-step dehydrogenation, which diminishes the energy barrier and facilitates nucleation and growth, consequently reducing the operating temperature and improving the kinetics of hydrogen storage.

  10. Superior catalytic activity derived from a two-dimensional Ti3C2 precursor towards the hydrogen storage reaction of magnesium hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Du, Hufei; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-01-14

    The superior catalytic effects derived from a 2D Ti3C2 (MXene), synthesized by the exfoliation of Ti3AlC2 powders, towards the hydrogen storage reaction of MgH2 were demonstrated. The 5 wt% Ti3C2-containing MgH2 releases 6.2 wt% H2 within 1 min at 300 °C and absorbs 6.1 wt% H2 within 30 s at 150 °C, exhibiting excellent dehydrogenation/hydrogenation kinetics.

  11. GALS - setup for production and study of multinucleon transfer reaction products: present status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlyanoy, S.; Zagrebaev, V.; Kozulin, E.; Kudryavtsev, Yu; Fedosseev, V.; Bark, R.; Janas, Z.

    2016-06-01

    This is a brief report on the current status of the new GAs cell based Laser ionization Setup (GALS) at Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) - JINR, Dubna. GALS is planned to exploit available beams from the U-400M cyclotron in low energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions to study exotic neutron-rich nuclei located in the "north-east" region of nuclear map. Products from 4.5 to 9 MeV/nucleon heavy-ion collisions, such as 136Xe on 208Pb, are to be captured in a gas cell and selectively laser-ionized in a sextupole (quadrupole) ion guide extraction system.

  12. Cathodic Aromatic C,C Cross-Coupling Reaction via Single Electron Transfer Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Tateno, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Yoshimasa; Kashiwagi, Tsuneo; Atobe, Mahito

    2017-03-07

    We have successfully developed a novel cathodic cross-coupling reaction of aryl halides with arenes. Utilization of the cathodic single electron transfer (SET) mechanism for activation of aryl halides enables the cross-coupling reaction to proceed without the need for any transition metal catalysts or single electron donors in a mild condition. The SET from a cathode to an aryl halide initiates a radical chain by giving an anion radical of the aryl halide. The following propagation cycle also consists entirely of anion radical intermediates.

  13. Analysis of the role of neutron transfer in asymmetric fusion reactions at subbarrier energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogloblin, A. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Zhang, H. Q.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M. [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Khlebnikov, S. V. [Khlopin Radium Institute (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, E. A.; Danilov, A. N.; Demyanova, A. S. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Trzaska, W. H. [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Physics (Finland); Xu, X. X. [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Yang, F. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Sargsyan, V. V., E-mail: sargsyan@theor.jinr.ru; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Scheid, W. [Institüt für Theoretische Physik der Justus-Liebig-Universität (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The excitation functions were measured for the {sup 28}Si + {sup 208}Pb complete-fusion (capture) reaction at deep subbarrier energies. The results were compared with the cross sections predicted within the quantum diffusion approach. The role of neutron transfer in the case of positive Q values in the {sup 28}Si + {sup 124}Sn, {sup 208}Pb; {sup 30}Si + {sup 124}Sn, {sup 208}Pb; {sup 20}Ne + {sup 208}Pb; {sup 40}Ca + {sup 96}Zr; and {sup 134}Te + {sup 40}Ca complete-fusion (capture) reactions is discussed.

  14. Cathodic Aromatic C,C Cross-Coupling Reaction via Single Electron Transfer Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Qu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully developed a novel cathodic cross-coupling reaction of aryl halides with arenes. Utilization of the cathodic single electron transfer (SET mechanism for activation of aryl halides enables the cross-coupling reaction to proceed without the need for any transition metal catalysts or single electron donors in a mild condition. The SET from a cathode to an aryl halide initiates a radical chain by giving an anion radical of the aryl halide. The following propagation cycle also consists entirely of anion radical intermediates.

  15. Temperature-dependent kinetics of charge transfer, hydrogen-atom transfer, and hydrogen-atom expulsion in the reaction of CO+ with CH4 and CD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melko, Joshua J; Ard, Shaun G; Johnson, Ryan S; Shuman, Nicholas S; Guo, Hua; Viggiano, Albert A

    2014-09-18

    We have determined the rate constants and branching ratios for the reactions of CO(+) with CH4 and CD4 in a variable-temperature selected ion flow tube. We find that the rate constants are collisional for all temperatures measured (193-700 K for CH4 and 193-500 K for CD4). For the CH4 reaction, three product channels are identified, which include charge transfer (CH4(+) + CO), H-atom transfer (HCO(+) + CH3), and H-atom expulsion (CH3CO(+) + H). H-atom transfer is slightly preferred to charge transfer at low temperature, with the charge-transfer product increasing in contribution as the temperature is increased (H-atom expulsion is a minor product for all temperatures). Analogous products are identified for the CD4 reaction. Density functional calculations on the CO(+) + CH4 reaction were also conducted, revealing that the relative temperature dependences of the charge-transfer and H-atom transfer pathways are consistent with an initial charge transfer followed by proton transfer.

  16. Anomalously High Isotope Ratio 3He/4He and Tritium in Deuterium-Loaded Metal: Evidence for Nuclear Reaction in Metal Hydrides at Low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Song-Sheng; HE Ming; WU Shao-Yong; QI Bu-Jia

    2012-01-01

    Anomalous 3He/4He ratios in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are observed to be about 1-4x10-1, much greater than the values (<10~4) in natural objects. Control experiments with the deuterium-unloaded titanium sample and original industrial deuterium gas are also carried out, but no anomalous 3He/4He values are observed. In addition, anomalous tritium in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are also observed. To explain the excess 3He and tritium in the deuterium-loaded titanium samples, it is required that the deuteron-induced nuclear reaction occurs in the samples at low temperature.%Anomalous 3He/4He ratios in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are observed to be about 1-4×10-1,much greater than the values (≤10-4) in natural objects.Control experiments with the deuterium-unloaded titanium sample and original industrial deuterium gas are also carried out,but no anomalous 3He/4He values are observed.In addition,anomalous tritium in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are also observed.To explain the excess 3He and tritium in the deuterium-loaded titanium samples,it is required that the deuteron-induced nuclear reaction occurs in the samples at low temperature.

  17. Ab-initio study of transition metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ramesh [Dept. of Physics, Feroze Gandhi Insititute of Engineering and Technology, Raebareli-229001 (India); Shukla, Seema, E-mail: sharma.yamini62@gmail.com; Dwivedi, Shalini, E-mail: sharma.yamini62@gmail.com; Sharma, Yamini, E-mail: sharma.yamini62@gmail.com [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Dept. of Physics Feroze Gandhi College, Raebareli-229001 (India)

    2014-04-24

    We have performed ab initio self consistent calculations based on Full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method to investigate the optical and thermal properties of yttrium hydrides. From the band structure and density of states, the optical absorption spectra and specific heats have been calculated. The band structure of Yttrium metal changes dramatically due to hybridization of Y sp orbitals with H s orbitals and there is a net charge transfer from metal to hydrogen site. The electrical resistivity and specific heats of yttrium hydrides are lowered but the thermal conductivity is slightly enhanced due to increase in scattering from hydrogen sites.

  18. X-ray Crystal Structures Elucidate the Nucleotidyl Transfer Reaction of Transcript Initiation Using Two Nucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Gleghorn; E Davydova; R Basu; L Rothman-Denes; K Murakami

    2011-12-31

    We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of the pre- and postcatalytic forms of the initiation complex of bacteriophage N4 RNA polymerase that provide the complete set of atomic images depicting the process of transcript initiation by a single-subunit RNA polymerase. As observed during T7 RNA polymerase transcript elongation, substrate loading for the initiation process also drives a conformational change of the O helix, but only the correct base pairing between the +2 substrate and DNA base is able to complete the O-helix conformational transition. Substrate binding also facilitates catalytic metal binding that leads to alignment of the reactive groups of substrates for the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. Although all nucleic acid polymerases use two divalent metals for catalysis, they differ in the requirements and the timing of binding of each metal. In the case of bacteriophage RNA polymerase, we propose that catalytic metal binding is the last step before the nucleotidyl transfer reaction.

  19. Two-Phase Reactions in Microdroplets without the Use of Phase-Transfer Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Cheng, Heyong; Zare, Richard N

    2017-02-22

    Many important chemical transformations occur in two-phase reactions, which are widely used in chemical, pharmaceutical, and polymer manufacturing. We present an efficient method for performing two-phase reactions in microdroplets sheared by sheath gas without using a phase-transfer catalyst. This avoids disadvantages such as thermal instability, high cost, and, especially, the need to separate and recycle the catalysts. We show that various alcohols can be oxidized to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones within milliseconds in moderate to good yields (50-75 %). The scale-up of the present method was achieved at an isolated rate of 1.2 mg min(-1) for the synthesis of 4-nitrobenzylaldehyde from 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol in the presence of sodium hypochlorite. The biphasic nature of this process, which avoids use of a phase-transfer catalyst, greatly enhances synthetic effectiveness.

  20. Thermal ammonia activation by cationic transition-metal hydrides of the first row--small but mighty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Robert; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2012-06-01

    The thermal reactions of cationic 3d transition-metal hydrides MH(+) (M=Sc-Zn, except V and Cu) with ammonia have been studied by gas-phase experiments and computational methods. There are three primary reaction channels: 1) H(2) elimination by N-H bond activation, 2) ligand exchange under the formation of M(NH(3))(+), and 3) proton transfer to yield NH(4)(+). Computational studies of these three reaction channels have been performed for the couples MH(+)/NH(3) (M=Sc-Zn) to elucidate mechanistic aspects and characteristic reaction patterns of the first row. For N-H activation, σ-bond metathesis was found to be operative.

  1. Dynamic Solvent Effects in Alcohol Solutions for Electron Transfer Reactions Involving the Metallocenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-15

    Transfer Reactions Involving the Metallocenes by W.R. Fawcett and C.A. Foss, Jr. Prepared for Presentation at The Electrochemical Society Meeting...Technical 800 N. Quincy Arlington, VA 22217-5000 &UL OWaep "W" Prepared for presentation at The" Electrochemical Society Meeting, Montreal Canada, tlay...Extended Abstract must be submitted with the 75-Ward Abstract by December 1, 1969 Montreal, Quebec, Canada-May 6-11, 1990 Submit to: The Electrochemical

  2. Ruthenium(II) pincer complexes with oxazoline arms for efficient transfer hydrogenation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2012-08-01

    Well-defined P NN CN pincer ruthenium complexes bearing both strong phosphine and weak oxazoline donors were developed. These easily accessible complexes exhibit significantly better catalytic activity in transfer hydrogenation of ketones compared to their PN 3P analogs. These reactions proceed under mild and base-free conditions via protonation- deprotonation of the \\'NH\\' group in the aromatization-dearomatization process. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transfer reactions on light exotic nuclei studied with CHIMERA detector at LNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardella Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The kinematical coincidence method is used to extract angular distribution of elastic scattering and transfer reactions. The detected light particle energy spectra are used to extract the angular distribution with around 1° resolution in the Center of Mass (CM system. Examples with 10Be beam are presented. In the case of proton scattering, γ-ray coincidences are used to discriminate excited levels population from elastic scattering.

  4. Solvent Effects on Simple Electron Transfer Reactions. A Comparison of Results for Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    Electroanalytical Chemistry Department of Chemistry University of California . Davis, CA 95616 \\ JUN2 0 1989 May 1, 1989 C2 E Reproduction in whole or in...0541 Davis, CA 95616 . O 0 Office of Naval Research 800 N. Quincy Arlington, VA 22217-5000 Prepared for Publication in: Journal of Electroanalytical ... Chemistry 1& A (U fm M Solvent effects on the rate constants for both homogeneous and hetero- geneous electron transfer reactions have been analyzed on

  5. Mechanism of electron transfer reaction for xanthene dye-sensitized formation of methyl viologen radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usui, Y.; Misawa, H.; Sakuragi, H.; Tokumaru, K.

    1987-05-01

    Sensitized reduction of methyl viologen, MV/sup 2 +/, occurs efficiently through electron transfer from triplet xanthene dyes to MV/sup 2 +/ followed by electron transfer to the resulting semioxidized dyes from a reductant like triethanolamine. Unreactive ion pair complexes between these dyes and MV/sup 2 +/ are formed (formation constant: 1.2 x 10/sup 3/ M/sup -1/ for Eosine Y and MV/sup 2 +/ in 50% aqueous ethanol solution). The quantum yield for the reduced methyl viologen radical depends on the concentrations of MV/sup 2 +/ and the amine and on the ionic strength of solution. The efficiency of the electron transfer from triplet dyes to MV/sup 2 +/ is increased by addition of alcohol, and solvent effects on the reaction mechanism are discussed. 38 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Spectroscopy of $^{46}$Ar by the (t,p) two-neutron transfer reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, K.; Hellgartner, S.; Mücher, D.; Bildstein, V.; Diriken, J.; Elseviers, J.; Gaffney, L.P.; Gernhäuser, R.; Iwanicki, J.; Johansen, J.G.; Huyse, M.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, T.; Lutter, R.; Orlandi, R.; Pakarinen, J.; Raabe, R.; Reiter, P.; Roger, T.; Schrieder, G.; Seidlitz, M.; Sorlin, O.; Van Duppen, P.; Warr, N.; De Witte, H.; Zielinska, M.

    2016-01-01

    States in the $N=28$ nucleus $^{46}$Ar have been studied by a two-neutron transfer reaction at REX-ISOLDE (CERN). A beam of radioactive $^{44}$ at an energy of 2.16~AMeV and a tritium loaded titanium target were used to populate $^{46}$ by the t($^{44}$,p) two-neutron transfer reaction. Protons emitted from the target were identified in the T-REX silicon detector array. The excitation energies of states in $^{46}$ have been reconstructed from the measured angles and energies of recoil protons. Angular distributions for three final states were measured and based on the shape of the differential cross section an excited state at 3695~keV has been identified as $J^\\pi = 0^+$. The angular differential cross section for the population of different states are compared to calculations using a reaction model employing both sequential and direct transfer of two neutrons. Results are compared to shell model calculations using state-of-the-art effective interactions.

  7. Electrocatalysis of anodic oxygen-transfer reactions at modified lead dioxide electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Yun-Lin.

    1990-09-21

    The electrocatalytic activities were compared for pure and chloride-doped beta-PbO{sub 2} (Cl-PbO{sub 2}) films on gold and platinum substrates. Rate constants were increased significantly for oxidations of Mn{sup 2+}, toluene, benzyl alcohol, dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) and benzaldehyde in acidic media by the incorporation of Cl{sup {minus}} into the oxide films. These reactions are concluded to occur by the electrocatalytic transfer of oxygen from H{sub 2}O to the reaction products. Results of x-ray diffraction studies indicate the Cl-PbO{sub 2} film continues to have the slightly distorted rutile structure of pure beta-PbO{sub 2}. The observed electrocatalytic phenomena are concluded to be the beneficial consequence of surface defects generated when Cl{sup {minus}} serves for charge compensation within the surface matrix and, thereby, increases the number of surface sites capable of adsorbing hydroxyl radicals which are transferred in the electrocatalytic O-transfer reactions. 91 refs., 44 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Enhancement in dehydriding performance of magnesium hydride by iron incorporation: A combined experimental and theoretical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haipeng; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Qianqian; Liu, Bogu; Liu, Pei; Zhou, Xinpei; Han, Zongying; Zhou, Shixue

    2016-08-01

    Structural change and dehydriding mechanism of MgH2 with atomic Fe incorporation from reactive ball milling are characterized and simulated by first-principles calculation. Two kinds of hydrides β- and γ-MgH2 are formed from Mg powders under hydrogen atmosphere by 3.0 h of milling with pretreated anthracite as milling aid. Experimental studies suggest that the atomic Fe can be incorporated onto MgH2 surface by the shearing effect of Fe-based milling balls on Mg/MgH2 particles. The incorporated Fe has a high dispersity on MgH2 surface and can form atomic clusters FeH4/FeH2 by combining with H anions. The dehydriding reaction of the Fe-incorporated MgH2 begins at hydride surface and shows an enhanced performance with apparent activation energy of 110.3 kJ mol-1. Theoretical studies suggest that the incorporated Fe can act as a bridge that contributes to electron transfer from H anion to Mg cation before H2 molecule formation. The intrinsic reason of atomic Fe in catalyzing dehydriding reaction of MgH2 lies in its moderate strength of electron attraction.

  9. Hydrogen adsorption on palladium and palladium hydride at 1 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Skulason, Egill; Nielsen, Gunver

    2010-01-01

    The dissociative sticking probability for H-2 on Pd films supported on sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) has been derived from measurements of the rate of the H-D exchange reaction at 1 bar. The sticking probability for H-2, S. is higher on Pd hydride than on Pd (a factor of 1...

  10. Well-defined transition metal hydrides in catalytic isomerizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, Evgeny; Li, Houhua; Mazet, Clément

    2014-09-07

    This Feature Article intends to provide an overview of a variety of catalytic isomerization reactions that have been performed using well-defined transition metal hydride precatalysts. A particular emphasis is placed on the underlying mechanistic features of the transformations discussed. These have been categorized depending upon the nature of the substrate and in most cases discussed following a chronological order.

  11. Transient W-band EPR study of sequential electron transfer in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Utschig, L.M.; Poluektov, O.; Thurnauer, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

    1999-06-17

    The key reaction of photosynthetic solar energy conversion involves the photoexcitation of a primary donor (P) followed by rapid, sequential electron transfer to a series of acceptors resulting in charge separation. Electron-spin polarized (ESP) EPR spectra at W-band (95 GHz) were obtained for deuterated Fe-removed/Zn-substituted photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers (RCs) to investigate the influence of the rate of charge separation on the observed P{sup +}Q{sub A}{sup {minus}} charge separated state. Temperature dependent ESP EPR spectra for kinetically characterized Zn-substituted RCs from Rb. sphaeroides R-26 having different rates (k{sub Q}) of the electron transfer from the bacteriopheophytin to the quinone acceptor were obtained. The Zn-RCs exhibited either the native fast (200 ps){sup {minus}1} k{sub Q} or a slow (3--6 ns){sup {minus}1} k{sub Q} at 298 K as determined from transient optical measurements. Sequential electron-transfer polarization modeling of the polarized W-band EPR spectra obtained with these samples was used to address the reason for the differences in the electron-transfer rates. Here, the authors report the k{sub Q} rate constant, the temperature dependence of k{sub Q}, and the reorganization energy for the P{sup +}H{sup {minus}}Q{sub A} and P{sup +}HQ{sub A}{sup {minus}} electron-transfer step determined from SETP modeling of the experimental spectra. The reorganization energy for the electron-transfer process between P{sup +}H{sup {minus}}Q{sub A} and P{sup +}HQ{sub A}{sup {minus}}, and not structural changes in the donor or acceptor, was found to be the dominant factor that is altered during Fe-removal procedures.

  12. Application of Magnetic Dicationic Ionic Liquid Phase Transfer Catalyst in Nuclophilic Substitution Reactions of Benzyl Halids in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Manouchehr Aghajeri; Ali Reza Kiasat; Bijan Mombeni Goodajdar

    2016-01-01

    magnetic dicationic ionic liquid (MDIL) was successfully prepared and evaluated as phase-transfer catalyst for nucleophilic substitution reactions. The reactions was occurred in water and furnished the corresponding benzyl derivatives in high yields. No evidence for the formation of by-product for example benzyl alcohol of the reaction was observed and the products were obtained in pure form without further purification.

  13. Determination of arsenic and selenium by hydride generation and headspace solid phase microextraction coupled with optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyburska, Anna; Jankowski, Krzysztof, E-mail: kj@ch.pw.edu.pl; Rodzik, Agnieszka

    2011-07-15

    A hydride generation headspace solid phase microextraction technique has been developed in combination with optical emission spectrometry for determination of total arsenic and selenium. Hydrides were generated in a 10 mL volume septum-sealed vial and subsequently collected onto a polydimethylsiloxane/Carboxen solid phase microextraction fiber from the headspace of sample solution. After completion of the sorption, the fiber was transferred into a thermal desorption unit and the analytes were vaporized and directly introduced into argon inductively coupled plasma or helium microwave induced plasma radiation source. Experimental conditions of hydride formation reaction as well as sorption and desorption of analytes have been optimized showing the significant effect of the type of the solid phase microextraction fiber coating, the sorption time and hydrochloric acid concentration of the sample solution on analytical characteristics of the method developed. The limits of detection of arsenic and selenium were 0.1 and 0.8 ng mL{sup -1}, respectively. The limit of detection of selenium could be improved further using biosorption with baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for analyte preconcentration. The technique was applied for the determination of total As and Se in real samples.

  14. Thermal proton transfer reactions in ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kuan Yu; Lee, Sheng; Tsai, Ming-Tsang; Lu, I-Chung; Dyakov, Yuri A; Lai, Yin Hung; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2014-03-01

    One of the reasons that thermally induced reactions are not considered a crucial mechanism in ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (UV-MALDI) is the low ion-to-neutral ratios. Large ion-to-neutral ratios (10(-4)) have been used to justify the unimportance of thermally induced reactions in UV-MALDI. Recent experimental measurements have shown that the upper limit of the total ion-to-neutral ratio is approximately 10(-7) at a high laser fluence and less than 10(-7) at a low laser fluence. Therefore, reexamining the possible contributions of thermally induced reactions in MALDI may be worthwhile. In this study, the concept of polar fluid was employed to explain the generation of primary ions in MALDI. A simple model, namely thermal proton transfer, was used to estimate the ion-to-neutral ratios in MALDI. We demonstrated that the theoretical calculations of ion-to-neutral ratios exhibit the same trend and similar orders of magnitude compared with those of experimental measurements. Although thermal proton transfer may not generate all of the ions observed in MALDI, the calculations demonstrated that thermally induced reactions play a crucial role in UV-MALDI.

  15. Photochemical Hydrogen Abstraction and Electron Transfer Reactions of Tetrachlorobenzoquinone with Pyrimidine Nucleobases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun-hui Liu; Li-dan Wu; Xiao-ran Zou; Wen Yang; Qian Du; Hong-mei Su

    2011-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol,a widespread environmental pollutant that is possibly carcinogenic to humans,is metabolically oxidized to tetrachloroquinone (TCBQ) which can result in DNA damage.We have investigated the photochemical reaction dynamics of TCBQ with two pyrimidine type nucleobases (thymine and uracil) upon UVA (355 nm) excitation using the technique of nanosecond time-resolved laser flash photolysis.It has been found that 355 nm excitation populates TCBQ molecules to their triplet state 3TCBQ*,which are highly reactive towards thymine or uracil and undergo two parallel reactions,the hydrogen abstraction and electron transfer,leading to the observed photoproducts of TCBQH.and TCBQ.- in transient absorption spectra.The concomitantly produced nucleobase radicals and radical cations are expected to induce a series of oxidative or strand cleavage damage to DNA afterwards.By characterizing the photochemical hydrogen abstraction and electron transfer reactions,our results provide potentially important molecular reaction mechanisms for understanding the carcinogenic effects of pentachlorophenol and its metabolites TCBQ.

  16. Dinuclear Tetrapyrazolyl Palladium Complexes Exhibiting Facile Tandem Transfer Hydrogenation/Suzuki Coupling Reaction of Fluoroarylketone

    KAUST Repository

    Dehury, Niranjan

    2016-07-18

    Herein, we report an unprecedented example of dinuclear pyrazolyl-based Pd complexes exhibiting facile tandem catalysis for fluoroarylketone: Tetrapyrazolyl di-palladium complexes with varying Pd-Pd distances efficiently catalyze the tandem reaction involving transfer hydrogenation of fluoroarylketone to the corresponding alcohol and Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling reaction of the resulting fluoroarylalcohol under moderate reaction conditions, to biaryl alcohol. The complex with the shortest Pd-Pd distance exhibits the highest tandem activity among its di-metallic analogues, and exceeds in terms of activity and selectivity the analogous mononuclear compound. The kinetics of the reaction indicates clearly that reductive transformation of haloarylketone into haloaryalcohol is the rate determining step in the tandem reaction. Interestingly while fluoroarylketone undergoes the multistep tandem catalysis, the chloro- and bromo-arylketones undergo only a single step C-C coupling reaction resulting in biarylketone as the final product. Unlike the pyrazole based Pd compounds, the precursor PdCl2 and the phosphine based relevant complexes (PPh3)2PdCl2 and (PPh3)4Pd are found to be unable to exhibit the tandem catalysis.

  17. Effects of acid concentration on intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(azetidinyl) benzonitrile in solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Guchhait; Tuhin Pradhan; Ranjit Biswas

    2014-01-01

    Effects of acid concentration on excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in aprotic (acetonitrile and ethyl acetate) and protic (ethanol) solvents have been studied by means of steady state absorption and fluorescence, and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. While absorption and fluorescence bands of P4C have been found to be shifted towards higher energy with increasing acid concentration in acetonitrile and ethyl acetate, no significant dependence has been observed in ethanolic solutions. Reaction rate becomes increasingly slower with acid concentration in acetonitrile and ethyl acetate. In contrast, acid in ethanolic solutions does not produce such an effect on reaction rate. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations have been performed to understand the observed spectroscopic results.

  18. Charge-transfer reactions between C{sub 60} and hydrophilic solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrijevic, N.M.; Nedeljkovic, J.M.; Saponjic, Z.V. [Institute for Nuclear Sciences ``Vinca``, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1998-10-01

    Two different procedures for dissolving fullerene molecule C{sub 60} into aqueous solutions have been developed. Embedding C{sub 60} clusters into a water-soluble host molecule of {gamma}-cyclodextrin resulted in relatively low concentration of C{sub 60} (5-10 {mu}M). Prepare of a stable ionic surfactant/water/oil microemulsion provided a method for dissolving C{sub 60} in relatively high concentrations (1 mM). In both cases charge-transfer reactions between hydrophobic molecule of C{sub 60} and hydrophilic solutes were examined. Anion radical C{sub 60}{sup -} was detected in reaction with radiolytically produced radicals (e{sub aq}{sup -}, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COH or MV{sup +}), and in reaction with excess electrons stored onto nanometer-sized metal (Ag) or quantized semiconductor (TiO{sub 2}) particles. (orig.) 33 refs.

  19. Proton transfer reactions between nitric acid and acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde in the solid phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasne, Jérôme; Laffon, Carine; Parent, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    The heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions of acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde with solid nitric acid (HNO(3)) films have been studied with Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (RAIRS) under Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) conditions in the 90-170 K temperature range. In the bulk or at the surface of the films, nitric acid transfers its proton to the carbonyl function of the organic molecules, producing protonated acetone-H(+), hydroxyacetone-H(+), acetaldehyde-H(+) and benzaldehyde-H(+), and nitrate anions NO(3)(-), a reaction not observed when nitric acid is previously hydrated [J. Lasne, C. Laffon and Ph. Parent, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 697]. This provides a molecular-scale description of the carbonyl protonation reaction in an acid medium, the first step of the acid-catalyzed condensation of carbonyl compounds, fuelling the growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere.

  20. Proton and charge transfer reactions dynamics of a hydroxyflavone derivative in a polar solvent and in a cyclodextrin nanocavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, M.; Organero, J.A. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Seccion de Quimicas, Facultad de Ciencias del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Avda. Carlos III, S.N., 45071 Toledo (Spain); Douhal, A. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Seccion de Quimicas, Facultad de Ciencias del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Avda. Carlos III, S.N., 45071 Toledo (Spain)], E-mail: Abderrazzak.douhal@uclm.es

    2007-09-25

    In this work, we report on the observation of ultrafast intramolecular charge- and proton-transfer reactions of 4'-dimethylaminoflavonol (DMAF) in N,N-dimethyl formamide and in {gamma}-cyclodextrin ({gamma}-CD) solution. Upon femtosecond excitation an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) reaction takes place to produce an ICT structure in {approx}200 fs. This structure may undergo a proton transfer reaction to generate a zwitterionic (Z) form in 2-3 ps, or relaxes in its potential energy well, to later equilibrate with that of Z in hundreds of ps. Addition of {gamma}-CD does not significantly affect the fast dynamics of the formed anion. The fs-emission signals of the parent molecule, 3-hydroxyflavone, indicate that the dimethyl amino group in DMAF enhances the rate constant of intermolecular proton-transfer and intramolecular charge-transfer reactions.

  1. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  2. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries.

  3. Exploring "aerogen-hydride" interactions between ZOF2 (Z = Kr, Xe) and metal hydrides: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a new σ-hole interaction formed between ZOF2 (Z = Kr and Xe) as the Lewis acid and a series of metal-hydrides HMX (M = Be, Mg, Zn and X = H, F, CN, CH3) is reported. The nature of this interaction, called "aerogen-hydride" interaction, is unveiled by molecular electrostatic potential, non-covalent interaction, quantum theory of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. Our results indicate that the aerogen-hydride interactions are quite strong and can be comparable in strength to other σ-hole bonds. An important charge-transfer interaction is also associated with the formation of OF2Z⋯HMX complexes.

  4. Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System for Concentrating Solar Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zidan, Ragaiy [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hardy, B. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Corgnale, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Teprovich, J. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Ward, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Motyka, Ted [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-01-31

    The objective of this research was to evaluate and demonstrate a metal hydride-based TES system for use with a CSP system. A unique approach has been applied to this project that combines our modeling experience with the extensive material knowledge and expertise at both SRNL and Curtin University (CU). Because of their high energy capacity and reasonable kinetics many metal hydride systems can be charged rapidly. Metal hydrides for vehicle applications have demonstrated charging rates in minutes and tens of minutes as opposed to hours. This coupled with high heat of reaction allows metal hydride TES systems to produce very high thermal power rates (approx. 1kW per 6-8 kg of material). A major objective of this work is to evaluate some of the new metal hydride materials that have recently become available. A problem with metal hydride TES systems in the past has been selecting a suitable high capacity low temperature metal hydride material to pair with the high temperature material. A unique aspect of metal hydride TES systems is that many of these systems can be located on or near dish/engine collectors due to their high thermal capacity and small size. The primary objective of this work is to develop a high enthalpy metal hydride that is capable of reversibly storing hydrogen at high temperatures (> 650 °C) and that can be paired with a suitable low enthalpy metal hydride with low cost materials. Furthermore, a demonstration of hydrogen cycling between the two hydride beds is desired.

  5. Single-Site Tetracoordinated Aluminum Hydride Supported on Mesoporous Silica. From Dream to Reality!

    KAUST Repository

    Werghi, Baraa

    2016-09-26

    The reaction of mesoporous silica (SBA15) dehydroxylated at 700 °C with diisobutylaluminum hydride, i-Bu2AlH, gives after thermal treatment a single-site tetrahedral aluminum hydride with high selectivity. The starting aluminum isobutyl and the final aluminum hydride have been fully characterized by FT-IR, advanced SS NMR spectroscopy (1H, 13C, multiple quanta (MQ) 2D 1H-1H, and 27Al), and elemental analysis, while DFT calculations provide a rationalization of the occurring reactivity. Trimeric i-Bu2AlH reacts selectively with surface silanols without affecting the siloxane bridges. Its analogous hydride catalyzes ethylene polymerization. Indeed, catalytic tests show that this single aluminum hydride site is active in the production of a high-density polyethylene (HDPE). © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  6. A study of advanced magnesium-based hydride and development of a metal hydride thermal battery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengshang

    Metal hydrides are a group of important materials known as energy carriers for renewable energy and thermal energy storage. A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides is studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilizes a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The hot hydride that is identified and developed is catalyzed MgH2 due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics. TiV0.62Mn1.5, TiMn2, and LaNi5 alloys are selected as the matching cold hydride. A systematic experimental survey is carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. The results show that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Solid solution alloys of magnesium are exploited as a way to destabilize magnesium hydride thermodynamically. Various elements are alloyed with magnesium to form solid solutions, including indium and aluminum. Thermodynamic properties of the reactions between the magnesium solid solution alloys and hydrogen are investigated, showing that all the solid solution alloys that are investigated in this work have higher equilibrium hydrogen pressures than that of pure magnesium. Cyclic stability of catalyzed MgH2 is characterized and analyzed using a PCT Sievert-type apparatus. Three systems, including MgH2-TiH 2, MgH2-TiMn2, and MgH2-VTiCr, are examined. The hydrogenating and dehydrogenating kinetics at 300°C are stable after 100 cycles. However, the low temperature (25°C to 150°C) hydrogenation kinetics suffer a severe degradation during hydrogen cycling. Further experiments confirm that the low temperature kinetic degradation can be mainly related the extended hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Proof

  7. CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-04-28

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface.

  8. Proton transfer reactions associated with the reaction of the fully reduced, purified cytochrome C oxidase with molecular oxygen and ferricyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Nazzareno; Capitanio, Giuseppe; De Nitto, Emanuele; Boffoli, Domenico; Papa, Sergio

    2003-04-29

    A study is presented on proton transfer associated with the reaction of the fully reduced, purified bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase with molecular oxygen or ferricyanide. The proton consumption associated with aerobic oxidation of the four metal centers changed significantly with pH going from approximately 3.0 H(+)/COX at pH 6.2-6.3 to approximately 1.2 H(+)/COX at pH 8.0-8.5. Rereduction of the metal centers was associated with further proton uptake which increased with pH from approximately 1.0 H(+)/COX at pH 6.2-6.3 to approximately 2.8 H(+)/COX at pH 8.0-8.5. Anaerobic oxidation of the four metal centers by ferricyanide resulted in the net release of 1.3-1.6 H(+)/COX in the pH range 6.2-8.2, which were taken up by the enzyme on rereduction of the metal centers. The proton transfer elicited by ferricyanide represents the net result of deprotonation/protonation reactions linked to anaerobic oxidoreduction of the metal centers. Correction for the ferricyanide-induced pH changes of the proton uptake observed in the oxidation and rereduction phase of the reaction of the reduced oxidase with oxygen gave a measure of the proton consumption in the reduction of O(2) to 2H(2)O. The results show that the expected stoichiometric proton consumption of 4H(+) in the reduction of O(2) to 2H(2)O is differently associated, depending on the actual pH, with the oxidation and reduction phase of COX. Two H(+)/COX are initially taken up in the reduction of O(2) to two OH(-) groups bound to the binuclear Fe a(3)-Cu(B) center. At acidic pHs the third and fourth protons are also taken up in the oxidative phase with formation of 2H(2)O. At alkaline pHs the third and fourth protons are taken up with formation of 2H(2)O only upon rereduction of COX.

  9. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  10. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Sandrock, G. [SunaTech, Inc., Ringwood, NJ (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  11. Evidence of coupled photoinduced proton transfer and intramolecular charge transfer reaction in para-N,N-dimethylamino orthohydroxy benzaldehyde: Spectroscopic and theoretical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahanta, Subrata; Singh, Rupashree Balia; Kar, Samiran [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)], E-mail: nguchhait@yahoo.com

    2008-12-10

    Steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations have been used to study excited state properties of para-N,N-dimethylamino orthohydroxy benzaldehyde (PDOHBA). Spectral characteristics of PDOHBA support the existence of both donor-acceptor charge transfer (CT) and proton transfer (PT) reaction in the excited state. Structural calculations at Hartree Fock and Density Functional Theory (DFT) levels and theoretical potential energy surfaces (PESs) along the proton transfer and donor twisting coordinates using DFT and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory point towards the possibility of barrierless PT and CT reaction in the first excited state of PDOHBA.

  12. pH-dependent electron transfer reaction and direct bioelectrocatalysis of the quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kouta [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya [Department of Biomaterial Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Yoshida, Makoto [Department of Environmental and Natural Resource Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro [Department of Biomaterial Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Ohno, Hiroyuki [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuhumi, E-mail: nobu1@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    A pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea (CcPDH) is an extracellular quinohemoeprotein, which consists a b-type cytochrome domain, a pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) domain, and a family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module. The electron transfer reaction of CcPDH was studied using some electron acceptors and a carbon electrode at various pH levels. Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) reacted directly at the PQQ domain, whereas cytochrome c (cyt c) reacted via the cytochrome domain of intact CcPDH. Thus, electrons are transferred from reduced PQQ in the catalytic domain of CcPDH to heme b in the N-terminal cytochrome domain, which acts as a built-in mediator and transfers electron to a heterogenous electron transfer protein. The optimal pH values of the PMS reduction (pH 6.5) and the cyt c reduction (pH 8.5) differ. The catalytic currents for the oxidation of L-fucose were observed within a range of pH 4.5 to 11. Bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH based on direct electron transfer demonstrated that the pH profile of the biocatalytic current was similar to the reduction activity of cyt c characters. - Highlights: • pH dependencies of activity were different for the reduction of cyt c and DCPIP. • DET-based bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH was observed. • The similar pH-dependent profile was found with cyt c and electrode. • The present results suggested that IET reaction of CcPDH shows pH dependence.

  13. Metal hydride air conditioner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Ke; DU; Ping; LU; Man-qi

    2005-01-01

    The relationship among the hydrogen storage properties, cycling characteristics and thermal parameters of the metal hydride air conditioning systems was investigated. Based on a new alloy selection model, three pairs of hydrogen storage alloys, LaNi4.4 Mn0.26 Al0.34 / La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1, LaNi4.61Mn0. 26 Al0.13/La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1 and LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0.13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0. 2, were selected as the working materials for the metal hydride air conditioning system. Studies on the factors affecting the COP of the system showed that higher COP and available hydrogen content need the proper operating temperature and cycling time,large hydrogen storage capacity, flat plateau and small hysterisis of hydrogen alloys, proper original input hydrogen content and mass ratio of the pair of alloys. It also needs small conditioning system was established by using LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0. 13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 alloys as the working materials, which showed that under the operating temperature of 180℃/40℃, a low temperature of 13℃ was reached, with COP =0.38 and Wnet =0.09 kW/kg.

  14. Multinucleon transfer reactions for the sup 50 Ti+ sup 93 Nb system at sub- and near-barrier energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.J.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Shapira, D.; Stelson, P.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Napoli, D.; Scarlassara, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionale di Legnaro); D' Onofrio, A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy)); Wieleczko, J.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA) CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

    1990-06-01

    A significant yield of multinucleon-transfer products is observed at back angles in quasielastic reactions between {sup 50}Ti and {sup 93}Nb at sub- and near-barrier energies. A variety of nuclidic species that require transfers of up to four nucleons are observed for E{sub c.m.} {ge} 103.9 MeV. The internuclear separation distance where the multinucleon-transfer products first emerge nearly coincides with the closest approach distance of the experimentally established fusion threshold energy, indicating a common origin for the fusion enhancement and multinucleon-transfer reactions.

  15. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model

    CERN Document Server

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model.

  16. First-principles study of superabundant vacancy formation in metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changjun; Alavi, Ali

    2005-07-13

    Recent experiments have established the generality of superabundant vacancies (SAV) formation in metal hydrides. Aiming to elucidate this intriguing phenomenon and to clarify previous interpretations, we employ density-functional theory to investigate atomic mechanisms of SAV formation in fcc hydrides of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, and Au. We have found that upon H insertion, vacancy formation energies reduce substantially. This is consistent with experimental suggestions. We demonstrate that the entropy effect, which has been proposed to explain SAV formation, is not the main cause. Instead, it is the drastic change of electronic structure induced by the H in the SAV hydrides, which is to a large extent responsible. Interesting trends in systems investigated are also found: ideal hydrides of 5d metals and noble metals are unstable compared to the corresponding pure metals, but the SAV hydrides are more stable than the corresponding ideal hydrides, whereas opposite results exist in the cases of Ni, Rh, and Pd. These trends of stabilities of the SAV hydrides are discussed in detail and a general understanding for SAV formation is provided. Finally, we propose an alternative reaction pathway to generate a SAV hydride from a metal alloy.

  17. The electron-transfer reaction between azurin and the cytochrome c oxidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, S R; Barber, D; Greenwood, C; Brunori, M

    1977-11-01

    A stopped-flow investigation of the electron-transfer reaction between oxidized azurin and reduced Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c-551 oxidase and between reduced azurin and oxidized Ps. aeruginosa cytochrome c-551 oxidase was performed. Electrons leave and enter the oxidase molecule via its haem c component, with the oxidation and reduction of the haem d1 occurring by internal electron transfer. The reaction mechanism in both directions is complex. In the direction of oxidase oxidation, two phases assigned on the basis of difference spectra to haem c proceed with rate constants of 3.2 X 10(5)M-1-S-1 and 2.0 X 10(4)M-1-S-1, whereas the haem d1 oxidation occurs at 0.35 +/- 0.1S-1. Addition of CO to the reduced enzyme profoundly modifies the rate of haem c oxidation, with the faster process tending towards a rate limit of 200S-1. Reduction of the oxidase was similarly complex, with a fast haem c phase tending to a rate limit of 120S-1, and a slower phase with a second-order rate of 1.5 X 10(4)M-1-S-1; the internal transfer rate in this direction was o.25 +/- 0.1S-1. These results have been applied to a kinetic model originally developed from temperature-jump studies.

  18. Effect of positive Q-value neutron transfers on sub-barrier fusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Pei-Wei; Feng, Zhao-Qing; Zhang, Fan; Li, Cheng; Lin, Cheng-Jian; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2017-06-01

    The role of positive Q-value neutron transfers in sub-barrier fusion reactions has been studied with a modified quantum coupled channels model with all order couplings (CCFULL model). Neutron rearrangement related only to the dynamical matching condition with no free parameters is implemented in the model, which provides a way to understand especially the Q-value dependence of sub-barrier fusion reactions. The fusion cross sections of the collision systems 40Ca+94, 96Zr have been calculated and analyzed. The general trend of experimental data can be reproduced well with additional channels for neutron rearrangement. We find that enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross sections is closely related to the Q-value of the transferred neutrons, in particular for channels with sequential even number transferred neutrons. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11635003, 11025524, 11161130520, 11175218, U1332207) National Basic Research Program of China (2010CB832903) European Commission’s 7th Framework Programme (Fp7-PEOPLE-2010-IRSES) Agreement Project (269131)

  19. Femtosecond dynamics of fundamental reaction processes in liquids: Proton transfer, geminate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Benjamin Joel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured and effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied. The proton transfer takes place in ~240 fsec in nonpolar environments, but becomes faster than instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solution. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH2I2 and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of geminate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a ~350 fsec time scale. Results show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. Data show no simple correlation between hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes, implying that the isomerization does not provide a suitable for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial steps of the photochromic reaction process occur extremely rapidly. Laser system and computer codes for data analysis are discussed.

  20. Síntese de 2-iodobenzamidas e 3-(iodoacetamidobenzamidas ligadas à D-galactose e suas reações de carbociclização radicalar mediadas por hidreto de tri-n-butilestanho Synthesis of 2-iodobenzamides and 3-(iodoacetamidobenzamides linked to D-galactose and their tri-n-butyltin hydride-mediated radical carbocyclization reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Henriques Soares Leal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from methyl 6-O-allyl-4-azido-2,3-di-O-benzyl-4-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside, four new derivatives containing 2-iodobenzamido and 3-(iodoacetamidobenzamido groups were synthesized. These four compounds were submitted to tri-n-butyltin hydride mediated radical cyclization reactions, resulting in two macrolactams from 11- and 15-endo aryl radical cyclization. The corresponding four hydrogenolysis products were also obtained. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by ¹H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, DEPT, COSY, HMQC and HMBC experiments.

  1. In situ Regeneration of NADH via Lipoamide Dehydrogenase-catalyzed Electron Transfer Reaction Evidenced by Spectroelectrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Tsz Kin; Chen, Baowei; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2012-08-01

    NAD/NADH is a coenzyme found in all living cells, carrying electrons from one reaction to another. We report on characterizations of in situ regeneration of NADH via lipoamide dehydrogenase (LD)-catalyzed electron transfer reaction to regenerate NADH using UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and maximum velocity (Vmax) of NADH regeneration were measured as 0.80 {+-} 0.15 mM and 1.91 {+-} 0.09 {micro}M s-1 in a 1-mm thin-layer spectroelectrochemical cell using gold gauze as the working electrode at the applied potential -0.75 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The electrocatalytic reduction of the NAD system was further coupled with the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate by lactate dehydrogenase to examine the coenzymatic activity of the regenerated NADH. Although the reproducible electrocatalytic reduction of NAD into NADH is known to be difficult compared to the electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH, our spectroelectrochemical results indicate that the in situ regeneration of NADH via LD-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is fast and sustainable and can be potentially applied to many NAD/NADH-dependent enzyme systems.

  2. Monitoring Chemical and Biological Electron Transfer Reactions with a Fluorogenic Vitamin K Analogue Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Mei-Ni; Godin, Robert; Durantini, Andrés M; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2016-12-21

    We report herein the design, synthesis, and characterization of a two-segment fluorogenic analogue of vitamin K, B-VKQ, prepared by coupling vitamin K3, also known as menadione (a quinone redox center), to a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) fluorophore (a lipophilic reporter segment). Oxidation-reduction reactions, spectroelectrochemical studies, and enzymatic assays conducted in the presence of DT-diaphorase illustrate that the new probe shows reversible redox behavior on par with that of vitamin K, provides a high-sensitivity fluorescence signal, and is compatible with biological conditions, opening the door to monitor remotely (i.e., via imaging) redox processes in real time. In its oxidized form, B-VKQ is non-emissive, while upon reduction to the hydroquinone form, B-VKQH2, BODIPY fluorescence is restored, with emission quantum yield values of ca. 0.54 in toluene. Density functional theory studies validate a photoinduced electron transfer intramolecular switching mechanism, active in the non-emissive quinone form and deactivated upon reduction to the emissive dihydroquinone form. Our results highlight the potential of B-VKQ as a fluorogenic probe to study electron transfer and transport in model systems and biological structures with optimal sensitivity and desirable chemical specificity. Use of such a probe may enable a better understanding of the role that vitamin K plays in biological redox reactions ubiquitous in key cellular processes, and help elucidate the mechanism and pathological significance of these reactions in biological systems.

  3. Gamma ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich actinides after multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Andreas; Birkenbach, Benedikt; Reiter, Peter; Hess, Herbert; Lewandowski, Lars; Steinbach, Tim [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany); Collaboration: LNL 11.22-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Excited states in neutron-rich Th and U nuclei were investigated after multi-nucleon transfer reactions employing the AGATA demonstrator and PRISMA setup at LNL (INFN, Italy). A primary {sup 136}Xe beam of 1 GeV hitting a {sup 238}U target was used to produce the nuclei of interest in the actinide region. Beam-like reaction products in the Xe-Ba-region were identified and selected by the PRISMA spectrometer. Kinematic coincidences between the binary reaction products of beam-like and target-like nuclei are detected with an additional MCP detector. Those coincidences allow clean conditions for in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy. Background contributions from excited fission fragments are successfully discriminated. γ-rays from excited states in beam- and target-like particles were measured with the position sensitive AGATA HPGe detectors. Improved energy resolution after Doppler correction is based on the novel γ-ray tracking technique which was successfully exploited to increase the quality of the γ-spectra. γ-ray spectra of the produced beam-like isotopes in the one-proton and two-proton transfer channels will be presented. Corresponding results from the hard-to-reach neutron-rich isotopes beyond {sup 232}Th will focus on their collective properties and cross section limits for their production.

  4. Mechanism of electron transfer reaction of ternary dipicolinatochromium(III) complex involving oxalate as secondary ligand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hassan Amroun Ewais; Iqbal Mohamed Ibrhium Ismail

    2013-09-01

    Mechanism of electron transfer reaction of ternary Mechanism of the oxidation of [CrIII(DPA)(OX)(H2O)]− (DPA = dipicolinate and OX = oxalate) by periodate in aqueous acidic medium has been studied spectrophotometrically over the pH range of 4.45-5.57 at different temperatures. The reaction is first order with respect to both [IO$^{−}_{4}$] and the complex concentration, and it obeys the following rate law: $$d[{\\text Cr}^{\\text{VI}}]/dt = k_6K_4K_6[{\\text IO}^−_4][{\\text{Cr}}^{\\text{III}}]_{\\text{T}}/\\{([H^+] + K_4) + (K_5[H+] + K_6K_4)[{\\text{IO}}^{−}_{4}]\\}.$$ The rate of the reaction increases with increasing pH due to the deprotonation equilibria of the complex. The experimental rate law is consistent with a mechanism in which the deprotonated form [CrIII(DPA)(OX)(OH)]2− is more reactive than the conjugated acid. It is proposed that electron transfer proceeds through an inner-sphere mechanism via coordination of IO$^{−}_{4}$ to chromium(III). Thermodynamic activation parameters were calculated using the transition state theory equation.dipicolinatochromium(III) complex involving oxalate as secondary ligand

  5. Release of hydrogen from nanoconfined hydrides by application of microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Moral, Luis Miguel; Navarrete, Alexander; Sturm, Guido; Link, Guido; Rueda, Miriam; Stefanidis, Georgios; Martín, Ángel

    2017-06-01

    The release of hydrogen from solid hydrides by thermolysis can be improved by nanoconfinement of the hydride in a suitable micro/mesoporous support, but the slow heat transfer by conduction through the support can be a limitation. In this work, a C/SiO2 mesoporous material has been synthesized and employed as matrix for nanoconfinement of hydrides. The matrix showed high surface area and pore volume (386 m2/g and 1.41 cm3/g), which enabled the confinement of high concentrations of hydride. Furthermore, by modification of the proportion between C and SiO2, the dielectric properties of the complex could be modified, making it susceptible to microwave heating. As with this heating method the entire sample is heated simultaneously, the heat transfer resistances associated to conduction were eliminated. To demonstrate this possibility, ethane 1,2-diaminoborane (EDAB) was embedded on the C/SiO2 matrix at concentrations ranging from 11 to 31%wt using a wet impregnation method, and a device appropriate for hydrogen release from this material by application of microwaves was designed with the aid of a numerical simulation. Hydrogen liberation tests by conventional heating and microwaves were compared, showing that by microwave heating hydrogen release can be initiated and stopped in shorter times.

  6. Theoretical predictions on production of neutron-deficient nuclei with Z ≥ 93 in multinucleon transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Long; Su, Jun; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2017-08-01

    Within the framework of dinuclear system model, the transfer reactions 58Ni + 233U, 58Ni + 238U, and 64Ni + 238U are investigated. The influences of projectile and target neutron numbers on cross sections of producing neutron-deficient actinide nuclei in transfer reactions are studied. It is found that the system 58Ni + 233U with smaller neutron excess is favorable to produce neutron-deficient nuclei. We predict the production cross sections of neutron-deficient nuclei with Z = 93- 98 in transfer reactions 58Ni + 233U and 40Ca + 245Cm with different incident energies. We find the transfer reactions 58Ni + 233U and 40Ca + 245Cm are feasible for producing neutron-deficient actinide nuclei in future experiments.

  7. Learned cardiac control with heart rate biofeedback transfers to emotional reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Peira

    Full Text Available Emotions involve subjective feelings, action tendencies and physiological reactions. Earlier findings suggest that biofeedback might provide a way to regulate the physiological components of emotions. The present study investigates if learned heart rate regulation with biofeedback transfers to emotional situations without biofeedback. First, participants learned to decrease heart rate using biofeedback. Then, inter-individual differences in the acquired skill predicted how well they could decrease heart rate reactivity when later exposed to negative arousing pictures without biofeedback. These findings suggest that (i short lasting biofeedback training improves heart rate regulation and (ii the learned ability transfers to emotion challenging situations without biofeedback. Thus, heart rate biofeedback training may enable regulation of bodily aspects of emotion also when feedback is not available.

  8. On the theory of electron transfer reactions at semiconductor electrode/liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi Qin; Georgievskii, Yuri; Marcus, R. A.

    2000-02-01

    Electron transfer reaction rate constants at semiconductor/liquid interfaces are calculated using the Fermi Golden Rule and a tight-binding model for the semiconductors. The slab method and a z-transform method are employed in obtaining the electronic structures of semiconductors with surfaces and are compared. The maximum electron transfer rate constants at Si/viologen2+/+ and InP/Me2Fc+/0 interfaces are computed using the tight-binding type calculations for the solid and the extended-Hückel for the coupling to the redox agent at the interface. These results for the bulk states are compared with the experimentally measured values of Lewis and co-workers, and are in reasonable agreement, without adjusting parameters. In the case of InP/liquid interface, the unusual current vs applied potential behavior is additionally interpreted, in part, by the presence of surface states.

  9. Learned cardiac control with heart rate biofeedback transfers to emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peira, Nathalie; Pourtois, Gilles; Fredrikson, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Emotions involve subjective feelings, action tendencies and physiological reactions. Earlier findings suggest that biofeedback might provide a way to regulate the physiological components of emotions. The present study investigates if learned heart rate regulation with biofeedback transfers to emotional situations without biofeedback. First, participants learned to decrease heart rate using biofeedback. Then, inter-individual differences in the acquired skill predicted how well they could decrease heart rate reactivity when later exposed to negative arousing pictures without biofeedback. These findings suggest that (i) short lasting biofeedback training improves heart rate regulation and (ii) the learned ability transfers to emotion challenging situations without biofeedback. Thus, heart rate biofeedback training may enable regulation of bodily aspects of emotion also when feedback is not available.

  10. Electronic shift register memory based on molecular electron-transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a shift register memory at the molecular level is described in detail. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules incorporated on a very large scale integrated (VLSI) substrate, and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. The design requirements for such a system are discussed, and several realistic strategies for synthesizing these systems are presented. The immediate advantage of such a hybrid molecular/VLSI device would arise from the possible information storage density. The prospect of considerable savings of energy per bit processed also exists. This molecular shift register memory element design solves the conceptual problems associated with integrating molecular size components with larger (micron) size features on a chip.

  11. Electron transfer reactions of osmium(II) complexes with phenols and phenolic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Velayudham, Murugesan; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-07-01

    Three [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes (NN = polypyridine) with ligands of varying hydrophobicity were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectral techniques. The geometry of the molecules are optimized by DFT calculations. The interaction between [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes and phenolate ion in ground state is confirmed by absorption spectral study and the binding constant values are in the range of 3-740 M-1. The photoinduced electron transfer reaction of these [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes with phenols and phenolic acids at pH 12.5 leads to the formation of phenoxyl radical confirmed through transient absorption spectral study. Binding constants and electron transfer rate constants within the [Os(NN)3]2+-phenolate ion adduct account for the change for the overall quenching constant with the change of structure of reactants.

  12. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  13. Physics of hydride fueled PWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganda, Francesco

    The first part of the work presents the neutronic results of a detailed and comprehensive study of the feasibility of using hydride fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWR). The primary hydride fuel examined is U-ZrH1.6 having 45w/o uranium: two acceptable design approaches were identified: (1) use of erbium as a burnable poison; (2) replacement of a fraction of the ZrH1.6 by thorium hydride along with addition of some IFBA. The replacement of 25 v/o of ZrH 1.6 by ThH2 along with use of IFBA was identified as the preferred design approach as it gives a slight cycle length gain whereas use of erbium burnable poison results in a cycle length penalty. The feasibility of a single recycling plutonium in PWR in the form of U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 has also been assessed. This fuel was found superior to MOX in terms of the TRU fractional transmutation---53% for U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 versus 29% for MOX---and proliferation resistance. A thorough investigation of physics characteristics of hydride fuels has been performed to understand the reasons of the trends in the reactivity coefficients. The second part of this work assessed the feasibility of multi-recycling plutonium in PWR using hydride fuel. It was found that the fertile-free hydride fuel PuH2-ZrH1.6, enables multi-recycling of Pu in PWR an unlimited number of times. This unique feature of hydride fuels is due to the incorporation of a significant fraction of the hydrogen moderator in the fuel, thereby mitigating the effect of spectrum hardening due to coolant voiding accidents. An equivalent oxide fuel PuO2-ZrO2 was investigated as well and found to enable up to 10 recycles. The feasibility of recycling Pu and all the TRU using hydride fuels were investigated as well. It was found that hydride fuels allow recycling of Pu+Np at least 6 times. If it was desired to recycle all the TRU in PWR using hydrides, the number of possible recycles is limited to 3; the limit is imposed by positive large void reactivity feedback.

  14. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argabright, T.A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 110/sup 0/C (160 to 230/sup 0/F) for the source heat and 140 to 190/sup 0/C (280 to 375/sup 0/F) for the product heat. These ranges are applicable to many processes in industries such as food, textile, paper and pulp, and chemical. The hydride pair well suited for these temperatures is LaNi/sub 5//LaNi/sub 4/ /sub 5/Al/sub 0/ /sub 5/. The EDTU was designed for the upgrade cycle. It is a compact finned tube arrangement enclosed in a pressure vessel. This design incorporates high heat transfer and low thermal mass in a system which maximizes the coefficient of performance (COP). It will be constructed in Phase II. Continuation of this effort is recommended.

  15. Heat and mass transfer in unsteady rotating fluid flow with binary chemical reaction and activation energy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiz G Awad

    Full Text Available In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations.

  16. Effects of mass transfer on MHD flow of casson fluid with chemical reaction and suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Shehzad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Effect of mass transfer in the magnetohydrodynamic flow of a Casson fluid over a porous stretching sheet is addressed in the presence of a chemical reaction. A series solution for the resulting nonlinear flow is computed. The skin friction coefficient and local Sherwood number are analyzed through numerical values for various parameters of interest. The velocity and concentration fields are illustrated for several pertinent flow parameters. We observed that the Casson parameter and Hartman number have similar effects on the velocity in a qualitative sense. We further analyzed that the concentration profile decreases rapidly in comparison to the fluid velocity when we increased the values of the suction parameter.

  17. Luminescence from low-energy He/sup +//Xe charge-transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E.G.; Hughes, B.M.; Fee, D.C.; Tiernan, T.O.

    1977-04-01

    Optical emissions produced by collision of 100-eV He/sup +/ ions with Xe atoms have been studied over the spectral range from 40 to 900 nm. All of the major lines in the emission spectrum can be assigned to transitions in Xe II resulting from charge-transfer reactions. Emission cross sections for the major lines in the vacuum-ultraviolet and visible spectral regions are reported and the importance of cascading is assessed. The kinetic energy dependence is discussed for several of these lines.

  18. Studies of Nuclei Close to 132Sn Using Single-Neutron Transfer Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Pain, S. D. [Rutgers University; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Adekola, Aderemi S [ORNL; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Catford, Wilton N [ORNL; Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chipps, K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Cizewski, J. A. [Rutgers University; Erikson, Luke [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Gaddis, A. L. [Furman University; Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Grzywacz, R. K. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Harlin, Christopher W [ORNL; Hatarik, Robert [Rutgers University; Howard, Joshua A [ORNL; James, J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Kapler, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Krolas, W. [University of Warsaw; Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Ma, Zhanwen [ORNL; Matei, Catalin [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Moazen, Brian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; O' Malley, Patrick [Rutgers University; Patterson, N. P. [University of Surrey, UK; Paulauskas, Stanley [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shapira, Dan [ORNL; ShrinerJr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological University; Sikora, M. [Rutgers University; Sissom, D. J. [Tennessee Technological University; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Swan, T. P. [University of Surrey, UK; Thomas, J. S. [Rutgers University; Wilson, Gemma L [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Neutron transfer reactions were performed in inverse kinematics using radioactive ion beams of 132Sn, 130Sn, and 134Te and deuterated polyethylene targets. Preliminary results are presented. The Q-value spectra for 133Sn, 131Sn and 135Te reveal a number of previously unobserved peaks. The angular distributions are compatible with the expected lf7/2 nature of the ground state of 133Sn, and 2p3/2 for the 3.4 MeV state in 131Sn.

  19. Relayed 13C magnetization transfer: Detection of malate dehydrogenase reaction in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jehoon; Shen, Jun

    2007-02-01

    Malate dehydrogenase catalyzes rapid interconversion between dilute metabolites oxaloacetate and malate. Both oxaloacetate and malate are below the detection threshold of in vivo MRS. Oxaloacetate is also in rapid exchange with aspartate catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase, the latter metabolite is observable in vivo using 13C MRS. We hypothesized that the rapid turnover of oxaloacetate can effectively relay perturbation of magnetization between malate and aspartate. Here, we report indirect observation of the malate dehydrogenase reaction by saturating malate C2 resonance at 71.2 ppm and detecting a reduced aspartate C2 signal at 53.2 ppm due to relayed magnetization transfer via oxaloacetate C2 at 201.3 ppm. Using this strategy the rate of the cerebral malate dehydrogenase reaction was determined to be 9 ± 2 μmol/g wet weight/min (means ± SD, n = 5) at 11.7 Tesla in anesthetized adult rats infused with [1,6- 13C 2]glucose.

  20. Characterization of ferritin core on redox reactions as a nanocomposite for electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kwang Min [Center for Bio-Artificial Muscle and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Watt, Richard K.; Watt, Gerald D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Choi, Sang H. [Advanced Materials and Processing Branch, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Kim, Hyug-Han [Department of Chemistry, School of Advanced Science, Dankook University, Chonan 330-180 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun I. [Center for Bio-Artificial Muscle and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Jeong, E-mail: sjk@hanyang.ac.k [Center for Bio-Artificial Muscle and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-01

    The kinetics of the change in mass related to the release from and deposition onto the cavities of a ferritin in the SWCNT nanocomposite by electrochemical redox reactions, and the effects of the SWCNT on the kinetics of the variation in mass of the ferritin nanocomposite were characterized using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance. The change in mass of reconstituted ferritin in the SWCNT nanocomposite shows reversible variation and stability of the ferritin/SWCNT nanocomposite on redox reactions was confirmed by using a coreless apoferritin and a Fe{sup 2+} chelating agent. The ferritin/SWCNT nanocomposite is a good candidate for applications based on electron transfer, such as biosensor, biobatteries and electrodes for biofuel cell.

  1. Lifetime and g-factor measurements of excited states using Coulomb excitation and alpha transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara, Z. E., E-mail: zjguevaram@unal.edu.co; Torres, D. A., E-mail: datorresg@unal.edu.co [Physics Department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    In this contribution the challenges in the use of a setup to simultaneously measure lifetimes and g-factor values will be presented. The simultaneous use of the transient field technique and the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, to measure magnetic moments and lifetimes respectively, allows to obtain a complete characterization of the currents of nucleons and the deformation in excited states close to the ground state. The technique is at the moment limited to Coulomb excitation and alpha-transfer reactions, what opens an interesting perspective to consider this type of experiments with radioactive beams. The use of deep-inelastic and fusion-evaporation reactions will be discussed. An example of a setup that makes use of a beam of {sup 106}Cd to study excited states of {sup 110}Sn and the beam nuclei itself will be presented.

  2. Insights into dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols and amines catalyzed by a (PNN)-Ru(II) hydride complex: unusual metal-ligand cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guixiang; Li, Shuhua

    2011-11-07

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to elucidate the mechanism of dehydrogenative coupling of primary alcohols and amines mediated by a PNN-Ru(II) hydride complex (PNN = (2-(di-tert-butylphosphinomethyl)-6-(diethylaminomethyl)pyridine)). A plausible reaction pathway was proposed which contains three stages: (1) The alcohol dehydrogenation reaction to generate the aldehyde and H(2); (2) The aldehyde-amine condensation reaction to form the hemiaminal intermediate; (3) The dehydrogenation process of the hemiaminal intermediate to yield the final amide product with the liberation of H(2). The first and third stages occur via a similar pathway: (a) Proton transfer from the substrate to the PNN ligand; (b) Intramolecular rearrangement of the deprotonated substrate to form an anagostic complex; (c) Hydride transfer from the deprotonated substrate to the Ru center to yield the trans-dihydride intermediate and the aldehyde (or amide); (d) Benzylic proton migration from the PNN ligand to the metal center forming a dihydrogen complex and subsequent H(2) liberation to regenerate the catalyst. In all these steps, the metal-ligand cooperation plays an essential role. In proton transfer steps (a) and (d), the metal-ligand cooperation is achieved through the aromatization/dearomatization processes of the PNN ligand. While in steps (b) and (c), their collaboration are demonstrated by the formation of an anagostic interaction between Ru and the C-H bond and two ionic hydrogen bonds supported by the PNN ligand.

  3. Diagnostic Criteria for the Characterization of Electrode Reactions with Chemically Coupled Reactions Preceding the Electron Transfer by Cyclic Square Wave Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrick, John C; Mann, Megan A; Bottomley, Lawrence A

    2016-08-18

    Theory for cyclic square wave voltammetry of electrode reactions with chemical reactions preceding the electron transfer is presented. Theoretical voltammograms were calculated following systematic variation of empirical parameters to assess their impact on the shape of the voltammogram. From the trends obtained, diagnostic criteria for this mechanism were deduced. When properly applied, these criteria will enable non-experts in voltammetry to assign the electrode reaction mechanism and accurately measure reaction kinetics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Insertion of Group 12-16 Hydrides into NHCs: A Theoretical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Kalon J; Dutton, Jason L; Wilson, David

    2017-03-06

    The endocyclic ring expansion of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) rings by transition metal (Group 12) and main group (Group 13-16) element hydrides has been investigated in a computational study. In addition to previously reported insertion reactivity with Si, B, Be and Zn, similar reactivity is predicted to be feasible for heavier group 13 elements (Al, Ga, In, Tl), with the reaction barriers for Al-Tl calculated to be lower than for boron. Insertion is not expected with group 15-16 element hydrides, as the initial adduct formation is thermodynamically unfavourable. The reaction pathway with group 12 hydrides is calculated to be more favourable with two NHCs rather than a single NHC (analogous to Be), however hydride ring insertion with metal dihydrides is not feasible, but rather a reduced NHC is thermodynamically favoured. For group 14, ring-insertion reactivity is predicted to be feasible with the heavier dihydrides. Trends in reactivity of element hydrides may be related to the protic or hydridic character of the element hydrides.

  5. Oxygen atom transfer reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. A bonding evolution theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Navarrete, Patricio; Sensato, Fabricio R; Andrés, Juan; Longo, Elson

    2014-08-07

    In this research, a comprehensive theoretical investigation has been conducted on oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. The joint use of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool to analyze the evolution of chemical events along a reaction pathway. The progress of the reaction has been monitored by structural stability domains from ELF topology while the changes between them are controlled by turning points derived from CT which reveal that the reaction mechanism can be separated in several steps: first, a rupture of the peroxo O1-O2 bond, then a rearrangement of lone pairs of the sulfur atom occurs and subsequently the formation of S-O1 bond. The OAT process involving the oxidation of sulfides and sulfoxides is found to be an asynchronous process where O1-O2 bond breaking and S-O1 bond formation processes do not occur simultaneously. Nucleophilic/electrophilic characters of both dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfoxide, respectively, are sufficiently described by our results, which hold the key to unprecedented insight into the mapping of electrons that compose the bonds while the bonds change.

  6. A Stefan model for mass transfer in a rotating disk reaction vessel

    KAUST Repository

    BOHUN, C. S.

    2015-05-04

    Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015. In this paper, we focus on the process of mass transfer in the rotating disk apparatus formulated as a Stefan problem with consideration given to both the hydrodynamics of the process and the specific chemical reactions occurring in the bulk. The wide range in the reaction rates of the underlying chemistry allows for a natural decoupling of the problem into a simplified set of weakly coupled convective-reaction-diffusion equations for the slowly reacting chemical species and a set of algebraic relations for the species that react rapidly. An analysis of the chemical equilibrium conditions identifies an expansion parameter and a reduced model that remains valid for arbitrarily large times. Numerical solutions of the model are compared to an asymptotic analysis revealing three distinct time scales and chemical diffusion boundary layer that lies completely inside the hydrodynamic layer. Formulated as a Stefan problem, the model generalizes the work of Levich (Levich and Spalding (1962) Physicochemical hydrodynamics, vol. 689, Prentice-Hall Englewood Cliffs, NJ) and will help better understand the natural limitations of the rotating disk reaction vessel when consideration is made for the reacting chemical species.

  7. Conformity between IBM and TQM (SU(6) quadrupole phonon model) in treating two-nucleon transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrchev, G.; Paar, V.

    1983-03-01

    It is shown that TQM is capable of treating two-nucleon transfer (TNT) reactions in an analogous manner to IBM. A proof that the IBM two-nucleon transfer amplitudes can be identically converted into standard matrix elements for TQM, is presented, using the relation between the Schwinger and Holstein-Primakoff representations of the SU(6) generators.

  8. Conformational gating of the electron transfer reaction QA−⋅QB → QAQB−⋅ in bacterial reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides determined by a driving force assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graige, M. S.; Feher, G.; Okamura, M. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of the electron transfer reaction, QA−⋅QB → QAQB−⋅, was studied in isolated reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides by replacing the native Q10 in the QA binding site with quinones having different redox potentials. These substitutions are expected to change the intrinsic electron transfer rate by changing the redox free energy (i.e., driving force) for electron transfer without affecting other events that may be associated with the electron transfer (e.g., protein dynamics or protonation). The electron transfer from QA−⋅ to QB was measured by three independent methods: a functional assay involving cytochrome c2 to measure the rate of QA−⋅ oxidation, optical kinetic spectroscopy to measure changes in semiquinone absorption, and kinetic near-IR spectroscopy to measure electrochromic shifts that occur in response to electron transfer. The results show that the rate of the observed electron transfer from QA−⋅ to QB does not change as the redox free energy for electron transfer is varied over a range of 150 meV. The strong temperature dependence of the observed rate rules out the possibility that the reaction is activationless. We conclude, therefore, that the independence of the observed rate on the driving force for electron transfer is due to conformational gating, that is, the rate limiting step is a conformational change required before electron transfer. This change is proposed to be the movement, controlled kinetically either by protein dynamics or intermolecular interactions, of QB by ≈5 Å as observed in the x-ray studies of Stowell et al. [Stowell, M. H. B., McPhillips, T. M., Rees, D. C., Soltis, S. M., Abresch, E. & Feher, G. (1997) Science 276, 812–816]. PMID:9751725

  9. Hydride Olefin complexes of tantalum and niobium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klazinga, Aan Hendrik

    1979-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations on low-valent tantalum and niobium hydride and alkyl complexes, particularly the dicyclopentadienyl tantalum hydride olefin complexes Cp2Ta(H)L (L=olefin). ... Zie: Summary

  10. Complex and liquid hydrides for energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callini, Elsa; Atakli, Zuleyha Özlem Kocabas; Hauback, Bjørn C.; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jensen, Craig; Dornheim, Martin; Grant, David; Cho, Young Whan; Chen, Ping; Hjörvarsson, Bjørgvin; de Jongh, Petra; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Baricco, Marcello; Paskevicius, Mark; Jensen, Torben R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Autrey, Thomas S.; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-03-10

    The research on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage was imitated by the discovery of Ti as a hydrogen sorption catalyst in NaAlH4 by Boris Bogdanovic in 1996. A large number of new complex hydride materials in various forms and combinations have been synthesized and characterized and the knowledge on the properties of complex hydrides and the synthesis methods has grown enormously since then. A significant part of the research groups active in the field of complex hydrides are collaborators in the IEA task 32. This paper reports about the important issues in the field of the complex hydride research, i.e. the synthesis of borohydrides, the thermodynamics of complex hydrides and their thermodynamic properties, the effects of size and confinement, the hydrogen sorption mechanism and the complex hydride composites as well as the properties of liquid complex hydrides. This paper is the result of the collaboration of several groups and excellent summary of the recent achievements.

  11. On the chemistry of hydrides of N atoms and O$^+$ ions

    CERN Document Server

    Awad, Zainab; Williams, David A

    2016-01-01

    Previous work by various authors has suggested that the detection by Herschel/HIFI of nitrogen hydrides along the low density lines of sight towards G10.6-0.4 (W31C) cannot be accounted for by gas-phase chemical models. In this paper we investigate the role of surface reactions on dust grains in diffuse regions, and we find that formation of the hydrides by surface reactions on dust grains with efficiency comparable to that for H$_2$ formation reconciles models with observations of nitrogen hydrides. However, similar surface reactions do not contribute significantly to the hydrides of O$^+$ ions detected by Herschel/HIFI present along many sight lines in the Galaxy. The O$^+$ hydrides can be accounted for by conventional gas-phase chemistry either in diffuse clouds of very low density with normal cosmic ray fluxes or in somewhat denser diffuse clouds with high cosmic ray fluxes. Hydride chemistry in dense dark clouds appears to be dominated by gas-phase ion-molecule reactions.

  12. Well-Defined Silica Supported Aluminum Hydride: Another Step Towards the Utopian Single Site Dream?

    KAUST Repository

    Werghi, Baraa

    2015-07-17

    Reaction of triisobutylaluminum with SBA15700 at room temperature occurs by two parallel pathways involving either silanol or siloxane bridges. It leads to the formation of a well-defined bipodal [(≡SiO)2Al-CH2CH(CH3)2] 1a, silicon isobutyl [≡Si-CH2CH(CH3)2] 1b and a silicon hydride [≡Si-H] 1c. Their structural identity was characterized by FT-IR and advance solid-state NMR spectroscopies (1H, 13C, 29Si, 27Al and 2D multiple quantum), elemental and gas phase analysis, and DFT calculations. The reaction involves the formation of a highly reactive monopodal intermediate: [≡SiO-Al-[CH2CH(CH3)2]2], with evolution of isobutane. This intermediate undergoes two parallel routes: Transfer of either one isobutyl fragment or of one hydride to an adjacent silicon atom. Both processes occur by opening of a strained siloxane bridge, ≡Si-O-Si≡ but with two different mechanisms, showing that the reality of “single site” catalyst may be an utopia: DFT calculations indicate that isobutyl transfer occurs via a simple metathesis between the Al-isobutyl and O-Si bonds, while hydride transfer occurs via a two steps mechanism, the first one is a ß-H elimination to Al with elimination of isobutene, whereas the second is a metathesis step between the formed Al-H bond and a O-Si bond. Thermal treatment of 1a (at 250 °C) under high vacuum (10-5 mbar) generates Al-H through a ß-H elimination of isobutyl fragment. These supported well-defined Al-H which are highly stable with time, are tetra, penta and octa coordinated as demonstrated by IR and 27Al–1H J-HMQC NMR spectroscopy. All these observations indicate that surfaces atoms around the site of grafting play a considerable role in the reactivity of a single site system.

  13. Pro duction of Exotic Nuclei in Low-Energy Multi-Nucleon Transfer Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VI Zagrebaev; Walter Greiner

    2015-01-01

    Multinucleon transfer processes in low-energy heavy ion collisions open a new field of re-search in nuclear physics, namely, production and studying properties of heavy neutron rich nuclei. This not-yet-explored area of the nuclear map is extremely important for understanding the astrophysical nu-cleosynthesis and the origin of heavy elements. Beams of very heavy U-like ions are needed to produce new long-living isotopes of transfermium and superheavy elements located very close to the island of sta-bility. The calculated cross sections are high enough to perform the experiments at available accelerators. Beams of medium-mass ions (such as 136Xe, 192Os, 198Pt) can be used for the production of neutron rich nuclei located along the neutron closed shell N=126 (the last waiting point) having the largest impact on the astrophysical r-process. The Low-energy multinucleon transfer reactions is a very efficient tool also for the production and spectroscopic study of light exotic nuclei. The corresponding cross sections are 2 or 3 orders of magnitude larger as compared with high energy fragmentation reactions.

  14. Peroxyl Radical Reactions in Water Solution: A Gym for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorati, Riccardo; Baschieri, Andrea; Morroni, Gloria; Gambino, Rossana; Valgimigli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The reactions of alkylperoxyl radicals with phenols have remained difficult to investigate in water. We describe herein a simple and reliable method based on the inhibited autoxidation of water/THF mixtures, which we calibrated against pulse radiolysis. With this method we measured the rate constants kinh for the reactions of 2-tetrahydrofuranylperoxyl radicals with reference compounds: urate, ascorbate, ferrocenes, 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethyl-6-chromanol, Trolox, 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-acetic acid, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol, catechol and 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. The role of pH was investigated: the value of kinh for Trolox and 4-methoxyphenol increased 11- and 50-fold from pH 2.1 to 12, respectively, which indicate the occurrence of a SPLET-like mechanism. H(D) kinetic isotope effects combined with pH and solvent effects suggest that different types of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanisms are involved in water: less electron-rich phenols react at low pH by concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT) to the peroxyl radical, whereas more electron-rich phenols and phenoxide anions react by multi-site EPT in which water acts as proton relay.

  15. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  16. "Inverse sodium hydride": a crystalline salt that contains H(+) and Na(-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redko, Mikhail Y; Vlassa, Mircea; Jackson, James E; Misiolek, Andrzej W; Huang, Rui H; Dye, James L

    2002-05-29

    A crystalline salt has been synthesized that contains H(+) and Na(-) rather than the usual hydride oxidation states of H(-) and Na(+). The key is irreversible encapsulation of H(+) within the cage of 3(6)adamanzane (Adz). The internal proton is kinetically inert to reduction by Na(-) in solution in NH(3)-MeNH(2) mixtures. Synthesis of the sodide is accomplished by a metathesis reaction between Na and AdzH(+)X(-) in which X(-) is a sacrificial anion such as glycolate, isethionate, or nitrate. Reduction or deprotonation of the sacrificial anion forms insoluble byproducts and AdzH(+)Na(-) in solution. After solvent removal, the sodide is dissolved in dimethyl ether and transferred through a frit into a separate chamber for crystallization. The compound was characterized as the sodide by analysis, NMR spectra, and optical absorption spectroscopy.

  17. Theoretical study of intermolecular proton transfer reaction in isolated 5-hydroxyisoxazole-water complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ping G. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan 411201 (China); Liang, Yong H. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan 411201 (China)], E-mail: yonghliang@hotmail.com; Tang, Zhen Q. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan 411201 (China)

    2006-03-20

    A systematic investigation in isolated 5-hydroxyisoxazole-water complexes (5-HIO . (H{sub 2}O) {sub n} n = 1-3) is performed at the DFT level, employing B3LYP/6-31G(d, p) basis set. Single-point energy calculations are also performed at the MP2 level using B3LYP/6-31G(d, p) optimized geometries and the 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. The computational results show that the keto tautomer K{sub 2} is the most stable isomer in the gas phase, and the tautomer K{sub 1} to be the next most stable tautomer. Hydrogen bonding between HIO and the water molecule(s) will dramatically lower the barrier by a concerted multiple proton transfer mechanism. The proton transfer process of 3WE {sub cis} {r_reversible} 3WK{sub 1} and 2WE {sub trans} {r_reversible} 2WK{sub 2} is found to be more efficient in two tautomerization, and the barrier heights are 7.03 and 14.15 kcal/mol at B3LYP/6-31G(d, p) level, respectively. However, the proton transfer reaction between E {sub cis} and K{sub 1} cannot happen without solvent-assisted.

  18. Excited-state charge coupled proton transfer reaction in dipole-functionalized salicylideneaniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kew-Yu, E-mail: kyuchen@fcu.edu.tw; Hu, Jiun-Wei

    2015-03-15

    Based on design and synthesis of salicylideneaniline derivatives 1–4, we demonstrate an exceedingly useful system to investigate the excited-state intramolecular charge transfer (ESICT) coupled with excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction via the dipolar functionality of Schiff base salicylideneaniline. In solid and aprotic solvents 1–4 exist mainly as E conformers that possess a strong intramolecular six-membered-ring hydrogen bond. Compounds 2–4 exhibit solely a long-wavelength proton-transfer tautomer emission, while dipole-functionalized Schiff base 1 exhibits remarkable dual emission due to the different solvent-polarity environments between ESICT and ESIPT states. Moreover, the geometric structures, frontier molecular orbitals (MOs) and the potential energy curves for 1–4 in the ground and the first singlet excited state were fully rationalized by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations. - Highlights: • A dipole-functionalized salicylideneaniline derivative was synthesized. • The Schiff base exhibits remarkable dual emission. • A novel ESICT/ESIPT coupled system was created.

  19. Intramolecular proton transfer and tunnelling reactions of hydroxyphenylbenzoxazole derivatives in Xenon at 15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walla, Peter J. [Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department 010, Spectroscopy and Photochemical Kinetics, Am Fassberg 11, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany) and Department for Biophysical Chemistry, Technical University of Brunswick, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Hans-Sommerstr. 10, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)]. E-mail: pwalla@gwdg.de; Nickel, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department 010, Spectroscopy and Photochemical Kinetics, Am Fassberg 11, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2005-06-06

    We investigated the site dependence and the tunnelling processes of the intramolecular proton and deuteron transfer in the triplet state of the compounds 2-(2'-hydroxy-4'-methylphenyl)benzoxazole (m-MeHBO) and 2-(2'-hydroxy-3'-methylphenyl)benzoxazoles (o-MeHBO) and their deuterio-oxy analogues in a solid xenon matrix. After singlet excitation there occurs an ultrafast intramolecular enol {yields} keto proton transfer and subsequent intersystem crossing mainly to the keto triplet state. In the triplet state of m-MeHBO, the proton transfer back to the lower enol triplet state is governed by tunnelling processes. In o-MeHBO, however, the enol triplet state is higher and therefore normally no tunnel reaction can be observed. Because of the external heavy atom-effect in a xenon matrix, we were able to investigate the reverse enol-keto-tunnelling after exciting directly the enol triplet state of deuterated o-MeHBO. The time constants of the reverse enol-keto tautomerization are similar to those of the normal keto-enol tautomerization. In a xenon matrix, the observed site-selective phosphorescence spectra are very well-resolved vibrationally. This allowed the study of the tunnel rates in different well-defined sites. The vibrational energies obtained in the spectra are in good agreement with vibrational energies found in resonant Raman and IR spectra of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO)

  20. Hydrogen atom transfer reactions in thiophenol: photogeneration of two new thione isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, Igor; Nowak, Maciej J; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui

    2015-02-21

    Photoisomerization reactions of monomeric thiophenol have been investigated for the compound isolated in low-temperature argon matrices. The initial thiophenol population consists exclusively of the thermodynamically most stable thiol form. Phototransformations were induced by irradiation of the matrices with narrowband tunable UV light. Irradiation at λ > 290 nm did not induce any changes in isolated thiophenol molecules. Upon irradiation at 290-285 nm, the initial thiol form of thiophenol converted into its thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione. This conversion occurs by transfer of an H atom from the SH group to a carbon atom at the ortho position of the ring. Subsequent irradiation at longer wavelengths (300-427 nm) demonstrated that this UV-induced hydrogen-atom transfer is photoreversible. Moreover, upon irradiation at 400-425 nm, the cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione product converts, by transfer of a hydrogen atom from the ortho to para position, into another thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,5-diene-1-thione. The latter thione isomer is also photoreactive and is consumed if irradiated at λ atom-transfer isomerization reactions dominate the unimolecular photochemistry of thiophenol confined in a solid argon matrix. A set of low-intensity infrared bands, observed in the spectra of UV irradiated thiophenol, indicates the presence of a phenylthiyl radical with an H- atom detached from the SH group. Alongside the H-atom-transfer and H-atom-detachment processes, the ring-opening photoreaction occurred in cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione by the cleavage of the C-C bond at the alpha position with respect to the thiocarbonyl C[double bond, length as m-dash]S group. The resulting open-ring conjugated thioketene adopts several isomeric forms, differing by orientations around single and double bonds. The species photogenerated upon UV irradiation of thiophenol were identified by comparison of their experimental infrared spectra with the spectra theoretically calculated for

  1. Validated spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate based on charge transfer complexation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belal, Tarek S.; El-Kafrawy, Dina S.; Mahrous, Mohamed S.; Abdel-Khalek, Magdi M.; Abo-Gharam, Amira H.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents the development, validation and application of four simple and direct spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate (VP) through charge transfer complexation reactions. The first method is based on the reaction of the drug with p-chloranilic acid (p-CA) in acetone to give a purple colored product with maximum absorbance at 524 nm. The second method depends on the reaction of VP with dichlone (DC) in dimethylformamide forming a reddish orange product measured at 490 nm. The third method is based upon the interaction of VP and picric acid (PA) in chloroform resulting in the formation of a yellow complex measured at 415 nm. The fourth method involves the formation of a yellow complex peaking at 361 nm upon the reaction of the drug with iodine in chloroform. Experimental conditions affecting the color development were studied and optimized. Stoichiometry of the reactions was determined. The proposed spectrophotometric procedures were effectively validated with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, specificity, robustness, detection and quantification limits. Calibration curves of the formed color products with p-CA, DC, PA and iodine showed good linear relationships over the concentration ranges 24-144, 40-200, 2-20 and 1-8 μg/mL respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the assay of sodium valproate in tablets and oral solution dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. Assay results were statistically compared to a reference pharmacopoeial HPLC method where no significant differences were observed between the proposed methods and reference method.

  2. Method of producing a chemical hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-11-13

    A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

  3. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  4. Application of Magnetic Dicationic Ionic Liquid Phase Transfer Catalyst in Nuclophilic Substitution Reactions of Benzyl Halids in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Aghajeri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available magnetic dicationic ionic liquid (MDIL was successfully prepared and evaluated as phase-transfer catalyst for nucleophilic substitution reactions. The reactions was occurred in water and furnished the corresponding benzyl derivatives in high yields. No evidence for the formation of by-product for example benzyl alcohol of the reaction was observed and the products were obtained in pure form without further purification.

  5. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming, E-mail: gmhuang@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-03-31

    Graphical abstract: Direct and humidity independent mass spectrometry analysis of gas phase chemicals could be achieved via ambient proton transfer ionization, ion intensity was found to be stable with humidity ranged from ∼10% to ∼100%. - Highlights: • A humidity independent mass spectrometric method for gas phase samples analysis. • A universal and good sensitivity method. • The method can real time identify plant released raw chemicals. - Abstract: In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m{sup −3}, ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages.

  6. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  7. Direct hydride derivatization of methyl- and ethylmercury chlorides in aqueous solution with KBH4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A convenient hydride derivatization procedure of methyl-and ethylmercury chlorides to volatile hydrides was reported. In sealed vials methylmercury and ethylmercury compounds in acidic aqueous solutions were converted into their volatile forms by the reaction with potassium tetrahydroborate(KBH4) and elvolved to the headspace of the vials. The gaseous analytes in the headspace were extracted and concentrated by solid phase microextraction(SPME) and injected into gas chromatography (GC) for separation and identified by mass selective detector(MS).

  8. Investigation of metal hydride nanoparticles templated in metal organic frameworks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Herberg, Julie L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Highley, Aaron M.; Grossman, Jeffrey (MIT, Cambridge, MA); Wagner, Lucas (MIT, Cambridge, MA); Bhakta, Raghu; Peaslee, D. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO); Allendorf, Mark D.; Liu, X. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO); Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO)

    2010-11-01

    Hydrogen is proposed as an ideal carrier for storage, transport, and conversion of energy. However, its storage is a key problem in the development of hydrogen economy. Metal hydrides hold promise in effectively storing hydrogen. For this reason, metal hydrides have been the focus of intensive research. The chemical bonds in light metal hydrides are predominantly covalent, polar covalent or ionic. These bonds are often strong, resulting in high thermodynamic stability and low equilibrium hydrogen pressures. In addition, the directionality of the covalent/ionic bonds in these systems leads to large activation barriers for atomic motion, resulting in slow hydrogen sorption kinetics and limited reversibility. One method for enhancing reaction kinetics is to reduce the size of the metal hydrides to nano scale. This method exploits the short diffusion distances and constrained environment that exist in nanoscale hydride materials. In order to reduce the particle size of metal hydrides, mechanical ball milling is widely used. However, microscopic mechanisms responsible for the changes in kinetics resulting from ball milling are still being investigated. The objective of this work is to use metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as templates for the synthesis of nano-scale NaAlH4 particles, to measure the H2 desorption kinetics and thermodynamics, and to determine quantitative differences from corresponding bulk properties. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offer an attractive alternative to traditional scaffolds because their ordered crystalline lattice provides a highly controlled and understandable environment. The present work demonstrates that MOFs are stable hosts for metal hydrides and their reactive precursors and that they can be used as templates to form metal hydride nanoclusters on the scale of their pores (1-2 nm). We find that using the MOF HKUST-1 as template, NaAlH4 nanoclusters as small as 8 formula units can be synthesized inside the pores. A detailed picture of

  9. Multinucleon transfer in O,1816,19F+208Pb reactions at energies near the fusion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, D. C.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Wakhle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear reactions are complex, involving collisions between composite systems where many-body dynamics determines outcomes. Successful models have been developed to explain particular reaction outcomes in distinct energy and mass regimes, but a unifying picture remains elusive. The irreversible transfer of kinetic energy from the relative motion of the collision partners to their internal states, as is known to occur in deep inelastic collisions, has yet to be successfully incorporated explicitly into fully quantal reaction models. The influence of these processes on fusion is not yet quantitatively understood. Purpose: To investigate the population of high excitation energies in transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies, which are precursors to deep inelastic processes, and their dependence on the internuclear separation. Methods: Transfer probabilities and excitation energy spectra have been measured in collisions of O,1816,19F+208Pb , at various energies below and around the fusion barrier, by detecting the backscattered projectile-like fragments in a Δ E -E telescope. Results: The relative yields of different transfer outcomes are strongly driven by Q values, but change with the internuclear separation. In 16O+208Pb , single nucleon transfer dominates, with a strong contribution from -2 p transfer close to the Coulomb barrier, though this channel becomes less significant in relation to the -2 p 2 n transfer channel at larger separations. For 18O+208Pb , the -2 p 2 n channel is the dominant charge transfer mode at all separations. In the reactions with 19F,-3 p 2 n transfer is significant close to the barrier, but falls off rapidly with energy. Multinucleon transfer processes are shown to lead to high excitation energies (up to ˜15 MeV), which is distinct from single nucleon transfer modes which predominantly populate states at low excitation energy. Conclusions: Kinetic energy is transferred into internal excitations following transfer, with this

  10. One nucleon transfer reactions around $^{68}$Ni at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    Blazhev, A A; Kruecken, R; Mertzimekis, T; Darby, I G; Lagogiannis, A; Habs, D; Diriken, J V J; Patronis, N

    2008-01-01

    We intend to investigate the single particle properties of the neutron-rich Ni isotopes in the mass region around $^{68}$Ni and at a later stage towards the doubly-magic $^{78}$Ni. As a first experiment we propose to study the single particle character of the ground and first excited states of $^{67}$Ni. This nucleus will be the projectile-like reaction product for the one-neutron transfer reaction. A $^{66}$Ni beam at 3A MeV delivered from REX-ISOLDE will be directed on a CD$_{2}$ target. Protons produced from the (d,p) reaction will be detected either in singles or in coincidence with ${\\gamma}$-rays recorded by the MINIBALL array. The particles will be detected by the newly-built Si position-sensitive barrel configuration. The objectives of this work are the unambiguous determination of the spins and parities of the first excited states of $^{67}$Ni and measurement of the relative spectroscopic factors of those states as well as of the ground state. The experimental results will be compared with those from...

  11. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming

    2015-03-31

    In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m(-3), ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages.

  12. Study of the Ne(^3P_2) + CH_3F Electron Transfer Reaction below 1 Kelvin

    CERN Document Server

    Jankunas, Justin; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the dynamics of electron transfer reactions at low collision energy. We present a study of Penning ionization of ground state methyl fluoride molecules by electronically excited neon atoms in the 13 $\\mu$eV--4.8 meV (150 mK--56 K) collision energy range, using a neutral-neutral merged beam setup. Relative cross sections have been measured for three Ne($^3P_2$)+ CH$_3$F reaction channels by counting the number of CH$_3$F$^+$, CH$_2$F$^+$, and CH$_3^+$ product ions, as a function of relative velocity between the neon and methyl fluoride molecular beams. Experimental cross sections markedly deviate from the Langevin capture model at collision energies above 20 K. The branching ratios are constant. In other words, the chemical shape of the CH$_3$F molecule, as seen by Ne($^3P_2$) atom, appears not to change as the collision energy is varied, in contrast to related Ne($^3P_J$) + CH$_3$X (X=Cl and Br) reactions at higher collision energies.

  13. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today......’s hydride batteries, but a much poorer stability towards repeated charge/discharge cycling. The aim was to see if the cycleability of CaNi5 could be enhanced enough by modifications to make the compound a suitable electrode material. An alloying method based on mechanical alloying in a planetary ball mill...... by annealing at 700°C for 12 hours. The alloys appeared to be nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size around 10 nm before annealing. Special steel containers was developed for the annealing of the metal powders in inert atmosphere. The use of various annealing temperatures was investigated...

  14. Effect of mass transfer on the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by platinum dendrimer encapsulated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Ioana; Crooks, Richard M

    2012-07-17

    Here we report on the effect of the mass transfer rate (k(t)) on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyzed by Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) comprised of 147 and 55 atoms (Pt(147) and Pt(55)). The experiments were carried out using a dual-electrode microelectrochemical device, which enables the study of the ORR under high k(t) conditions with simultaneous detection of H(2)O(2). At low k(t) (0.02 to 0.12 cm s(-1)) the effective number of electrons involved in ORR, n(eff), is 3.7 for Pt(147) and 3.4 for Pt(55). As k(t) is increased, the mass-transfer-limited current for the ORR becomes significantly lower than the value predicted by the Levich equation for a 4-electron process regardless of catalyst size. However, the percentage of H(2)O(2) detected remains constant, such that n(eff) barely changes over the entire k(t) range explored (0.02 cm s(-1)). This suggests that mass transfer does not affect n(eff), which has implications for the mechanism of the ORR on Pt nanoparticles. Interestingly, there is a significant difference in n(eff) for the two sizes of Pt DENs (n(eff) = 3.7 and 3.5 for Pt(147) and Pt(55), respectively) that cannot be assigned to mass transfer effects and that we therefore attribute to a particle size effect.

  15. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-28

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water-acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is -10.6 kcal mol(-1). On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol(-1). The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  16. Development of a component design tool for metal hydride heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Essene L.

    Given current demands for more efficient and environmentally friendly energy sources, hydrogen based energy systems are an increasingly popular field of interest. Within the field, metal hydrides have become a prominent focus of research due to their large hydrogen storage capacity and relative system simplicity and safety. Metal hydride heat pumps constitute one such application, in which heat and hydrogen are transferred to and from metal hydrides. While a significant amount of work has been done to study such systems, the scope of materials selection has been quite limited. Typical studies compare only a few metal hydride materials and provide limited justification for the choice of those few. In this work, a metal hydride component design tool has been developed to enable the targeted down-selection of an extensive database of metal hydrides to identify the most promising materials for use in metal hydride thermal systems. The material database contains over 300 metal hydrides with various physical and thermodynamic properties included for each material. Sub-models for equilibrium pressure, thermophysical data, and default properties are used to predict the behavior of each material within the given system. For a given thermal system, this tool can be used to identify optimal materials out of over 100,000 possible hydride combinations. The selection tool described herein has been applied to a stationary combined heat and power system containing a high-temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, a hot water tank, and two metal hydride beds used as a heat pump. A variety of factors can be used to select materials including efficiency, maximum and minimum system pressures, pressure difference, coefficient of performance (COP), and COP sensitivity. The targeted down-selection of metal hydrides for this system focuses on the system's COP for each potential pair. The values of COP and COP sensitivity have been used to identify pairs of highest interest for

  17. Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen Storage Capacity Hydride by weight (%) [1) by volume (g/ml) [2] MgH2 7.00 0.101 Mg2NiH4 3.84 0,081 Mg2CuH4 2.04 - - 27 ...Include Security Classification) Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydrides (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) DelaRosa, Mark J. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME...objective of this program was to develop an economical process for pr-ducing a lightweight hydrogen storage medium by the chemical vapor infiltration

  18. Femtosecond Dynamics of Fundamental Reaction Processes in Liquids: Proton Transfer, Geminate Recombination, Isomerization and Vibrational Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Benjamin Joel

    Femtosecond and picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy are used to probe several fundamental aspects of chemical reactivity in the condensed phase including proton transfer, germinate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation. The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured for the first time, and the effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied in detail. The proton transfer takes place in ~240 fsec in non-polar environments, but becomes faster than the instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solutions. A simple model is proposed to explain these results. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH _2I_2 and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of germinate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a ~350 fsec time scale. Results also show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the molecular details of the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with the surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. The data show no simple correlation between the hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes. This strongly implies that the isomerization of these systems does not provide a suitable testing ground for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in the photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial

  19. Synthesis of hydrides by interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, Boris P., E-mail: tarasov@icp.ac.ru [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Fokin, Valentin N.; Fokina, Evelina E. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Yartys, Volodymyr A., E-mail: volodymyr.yartys@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller NO 2027 (Norway); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim NO 7491 (Norway)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Interaction of the intermetallics A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} with NH{sub 3} was studied. • The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia is temperature-dependent. • Hydrides, hydridonitrides, disproportionation products or metal–N–H compounds are formed. • NH{sub 4}Cl was used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallics. • Interaction with ammonia results in the synthesis of the nanopowders. - Abstract: Interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia was studied as a processing route to synthesize hydrides and hydridonitrides of intermetallic compounds having various stoichiometries and types of crystal structures, including A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} (A = Mg, Ti, Zr, Sc, Nd, Sm; B = transition metals, including Fe, Co, Ni, Ti and nontransition elements, Al and B). In presence of NH{sub 4}Cl used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallic alloys, their interaction proceeds at rather mild P–T conditions, at temperatures 100–200 °C and at pressures of 0.6–0.8 MPa. The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia appears to be temperature-dependent and, following a rise of the interaction temperature, it leads to the formation of interstitial hydrides; interstitial hydridonitrides; disproportionation products (binary hydride; new intermetallic hydrides and binary nitrides) or new metal–nitrogen–hydrogen compounds like magnesium amide Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}. The interaction results in the synthesis of the nanopowders where hydrogen and nitrogen atoms become incorporated into the crystal lattices of the intermetallic alloys. The nitrogenated materials have the smallest particle size, down to 40 nm, and a specific surface area close to 20 m{sup 2}/g.

  20. Hypochlorous acid-mediated protein oxidation: how important are chloramine transfer reactions and protein tertiary structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, David I; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J

    2007-08-28

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a powerful oxidant generated from H2O2 and Cl- by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase, which is released from activated leukocytes. HOCl possesses potent antibacterial properties, but excessive production can lead to host tissue damage that occurs in numerous human pathologies. As proteins and amino acids are highly abundant in vivo and react rapidly with HOCl, they are likely to be major targets for HOCl. In this study, two small globular proteins, lysozyme and insulin, have been oxidized with increasing excesses of HOCl to determine whether the pattern of HOCl-mediated amino acid consumption is consistent with reported kinetic data for isolated amino acids and model compounds. Identical experiments have been carried out with mixtures of N-acetyl amino acids (to prevent reaction at the alpha-amino groups) that mimic the protein composition to examine the role of protein structure on reactivity. The results indicate that tertiary structure facilitates secondary chlorine transfer reactions of chloramines formed on His and Lys side chains. In light of these data, second-order rate constants for reactions of Lys side chain and Gly chloramines with Trp side chains and disulfide bonds have been determined, together with those for further oxidation of Met sulfoxide by HOCl and His side chain chloramines. Computational kinetic models incorporating these additional rate constants closely predict the experimentally observed amino acid consumption. These studies provide insight into the roles of chloramine formation and three-dimensional structure on the reactions of HOCl with isolated proteins and demonstrate that kinetic models can predict the outcome of HOCl-mediated protein oxidation.

  1. Structural and dynamical control of the reaction rate in protein electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabin, Ilya A.

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions in proteins are key steps in many vital bioenergetic processes, and the reaction rate is known to be highly sensitive to the protein structure in some cases. For most bioenergetic reactions, as described by the Fermi Golden rule, the rate is proportional to a product of the average square of the effective electronic donor to acceptor coupling and a Franck-Condon factor, which accounts for the nuclear control of the energy gap. The nuclear factor is reasonably well described in Marcus theory and its modifications, and this work is focused on the mechanisms that control the effective coupling. About ten years ago, the Pathways model described for the first time how protein environment may control the effective coupling. In this work, a novel theoretical approach is developed to explore the mechanisms of structural and dynamical control beyond the qualitative level of the Pathways model. In Chapter 1, the assumptions of the Pathways model, its limitations and effects of the structure and the electronic Hamiltonian are investigated for model chain-like bridges using the Dyson's equations. In Chapter II, the framework to explore the sensitivity of the effective coupling to quality of the electronic Hamiltonian, the interference among the dominant pathways and the bridge dynamics is presented. This analysis employs the Green's function technique and includes combined molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. Finally, in Chapter III, this framework is tested on the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center, and the mechanisms of the structural and dynamical control for different ET steps are discussed.

  2. Crystallography of shear transformations in zirconium hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, Michael Philip [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The crystallography and substructure of the transformations which have been hypothesized as involving a martensitic shear, and which occur between zirconium hydrides were investigated. Specifically, the formation of gamma zirconium hydride from delta hydride and the delta hydride to epsilon hydride transformation were studied. The habit planes, orientation relationships, lattice invariant shears, and interface structures were determined by transmission electron microscopy and diffraction. Surface tilts were observed and measured with an interference microscope. The direction and magnitude of the shape strain produced by the formation of gamma were determined by the measurement of fiducial scratch displacements. These results were compared with the phenomenological crystallographic theory of martensitic transformations.

  3. Characteristics and Applications of Metal Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, G. J.; Lynch, F. E.

    1987-01-01

    Report discusses engineering principles of uses of metal hydrides in spacecraft. Metal hydrides absorb, store, pump, compress, and expand hydrogen gas. Additionally, they release or absorb sizeable amounts of heat as they form and decompose - property adapted for thermal-energy management or for propulsion. Describes efforts to: Identify heat sources and sinks suitable for driving metal hydride thermal cycles in spacecraft; develop concepts for hydride subsystems employing available heating and cooling methods; and produce data base on estimated sizes, masses, and performances of hydride devices for spacecraft.

  4. Pin-point chemical modification of RNA with diverse molecules through the functionality transfer reaction and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Shibata, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Yosuke; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2011-05-07

    The internal modification of RNA has been successfully achieved by the functionality transfer reaction (FTR) and following click chemistry with diverse azide compounds. The benefits of the FTR have been demonstrated by its specificity, rapidity, broad applicability, and procedure simplicity. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  5. Numerical simulation of ultrasonic enhancement on mass transfer in liquid-solid reaction by a new computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qingbin; Bayanheshig; Tan, Xin; Zhu, Jiwei

    2014-03-01

    Mass transfer coefficient is an important parameter in the process of mass transfer. It can reflect the degree of enhancement of mass transfer process in liquid-solid reaction and in non-reactive systems like dissolution and leaching, and further verify the issues by experiments in the reaction process. In the present paper, a new computational model quantitatively solving ultrasonic enhancement on mass transfer coefficient in liquid-solid reaction is established, and the mass transfer coefficient on silicon surface with a transducer at frequencies of 40 kHz, 60 kHz, 80 kHz and 100 kHz has been numerically simulated. The simulation results indicate that mass transfer coefficient increases with the increasing of ultrasound power, and the maximum value of mass transfer coefficient is 1.467 × 10(-4) m/s at 60 kHz and the minimum is 1.310 × 10(-4) m/s at 80 kHz in the condition when ultrasound power is 50 W (the mass transfer coefficient is 2.384 × 10(-5) m/s without ultrasound). The extrinsic factors such as temperature and transducer diameter and distance between reactor and ultrasound source also influence the mass transfer coefficient on silicon surface. Mass transfer coefficient increases with the increasing temperature, with the decreasing distance between silicon and central position, with the decreasing of transducer diameter, and with the decreasing of distance between reactor and ultrasound source at the same ultrasonic power and frequency. The simulation results indicate that the computational model can quantitatively solve the ultrasonic enhancement on mass transfer coefficient.

  6. Characterization of hydrides and delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qiang

    This thesis tries to fill some of the missing gaps in the study of zirconium hydrides with state-of-art experiments, cutting edge tomographical technique, and a novel numerical algorithm. A new hydriding procedure is proposed. The new anode material and solution combination overcomes many drawbacks of the AECLRTM hydriding method and leads to superior hydriding result compared to the AECL RTM hydriding procedure. The DHC crack growth velocity of as-received Excel alloy and Zr-2.5Nb alloy together with several different heat treated Excel alloy samples are measured. While it already known that the DHC crack growth velocity increases with the increase of base metal strength, the finding that the transverse plane is the weaker plane for fatigue crack growth despite having higher resistance to DHC crack growth was unexpected. The morphologies of hydrides in a coarse grained Zircally-2 sample have been studied using synchrotron x-rays at ESRF with a new technique called Diffraction Contrast Tomography that uses simultaneous collection of tomographic data and diffraction data to determine the crystallographic orientation of crystallites (grains) in 3D. It has been previously limited to light metals such as Al or Mg (due to the use of low energy x-rays). Here we show the first DCT measurements using high energy x-rays (60 keV), allowing measurements in zirconium. A new algorithm of a computationally effcient way to characterize distributions of hydrides - in particular their orientation and/or connectivity - has been proposed. It is a modification of the standard Hough transform, which is an extension of the Hough transform widely used in the line detection of EBSD patterns. Finally, a basic model of hydrogen migration is built using ABAQUS RTM, which is a mature finite element package with tested modeling modules of a variety of physical laws. The coupling of hydrogen diffusion, lattice expansion, matrix deformation and phase transformation is investigated under

  7. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solution based upon a mixed quantum–classical approximation. II. Proton transfer reaction in non-polar solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, H.; Yamada, A.; Okazaki, S., E-mail: okazaki@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    The intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in neon solvent has been investigated by mixed quantum–classical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations and fully classical molecular dynamics (FCMD) calculations. Comparing these calculated results with those for malonaldehyde in water reported in Part I [A. Yamada, H. Kojima, and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084509 (2014)], the solvent dependence of the reaction rate, the reaction mechanism involved, and the quantum effect therein have been investigated. With FCMD, the reaction rate in weakly interacting neon is lower than that in strongly interacting water. However, with QCMD, the order of the reaction rates is reversed. To investigate the mechanisms in detail, the reactions were categorized into three mechanisms: tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing. Then, the quantum and solvent effects were analyzed from the viewpoint of the reaction mechanism focusing on the shape of potential energy curve and its fluctuations. The higher reaction rate that was found for neon in QCMD compared with that found for water solvent arises from the tunneling reactions because of the nearly symmetric double-well shape of the potential curve in neon. The thermal activation and barrier vanishing reactions were also accelerated by the zero-point energy. The number of reactions based on these two mechanisms in water was greater than that in neon in both QCMD and FCMD because these reactions are dominated by the strength of solute–solvent interactions.

  8. Transfer hydrogenation reactions catalyzed by chiral half-sandwich Ruthenium complexes derived from Proline

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ARUN KUMAR PANDIA KUMAR; ASHOKA G SAMUELSON

    2016-09-01

    Chiral ruthenium half-sandwich complexes were prepared using a chelating diamine made from proline with a phenyl, ethyl, or benzyl group, instead of hydrogen on one of the coordinating arms. Three of these complexes were obtained as single diastereoisomers and their configuration identified by X-ray crystallography. The complexes are recyclable catalysts for the reduction of ketones to chiral alcohols in water. A ruthenium hydride species is identified as the active species by NMR spectroscopy and isotopic labelling experiments.Maximum enantio-selectivity was attained when a phenyl group was directly attached to the primary amine on the diamine ligand derived from proline.

  9. Hydride encapsulation by molecular alkali-metal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Joanna; Wheatley, Andrew E H

    2008-07-14

    The sequential treatment of group 12 and 13 Lewis acids with alkali-metal organometallics is well established to yield so-called ''ate' complexes, whereby the Lewis-acid metal undergoes nucleophilic attack to give an anion, at least one group 1 metal acting to counter this charge. However, an alternative, less well recognised, reaction pathway involves the Lewis acid abstracting hydride from the organolithium reagent via a beta-elimination mechanism. It has recently been shown that in the presence of N,N'-bidentate ligands this chemistry can be harnessed to yield a new type of molecular main-group metal cluster in which the abstracted LiH is effectively trapped, with the hydride ion occupying an interstitial site in the cluster core. Discussion focuses on the development of this field, detailing advances in our understanding of the roles of Lewis acid, organolithium, and amine substrates in the syntheses of these compounds. Structure-types are discussed, as are efforts to manipulate cluster geometry and composition as well as hydride-coordination. Embryonic mechanistic studies are reported, as well as attempts to generate hydride-encapsulation clusters under catalytic control.

  10. New recoil transfer chamber for thermalization of heavy ions produced in fusion–evaporation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, M.C. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77842 (United States); Tereshatov, E.E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); DeVanzo, M.J. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Geosciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252 (United States); Sefcik, J.A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Physics and Geosciences, Angelo State University, San Angelo, TX 76909 (United States); Bennett, M.E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Mayorov, D.A.; Werke, T.A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77842 (United States); Folden, C.M., E-mail: Folden@comp.tamu.edu [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2015-10-21

    A new Recoil Transfer Chamber (RTC) has been designed, fabricated, and characterized at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. The design is based on a gas stopper that was previously in routine use at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. This new RTC uses He gas to stop ions, and a combination of a static electric field and gas flow to maximize the extraction efficiency. In offline experiments, a {sup 228}Th source was used to produce {sup 216}Po which was successfully extracted even though it has a short half-life. In online experiments using the products of the {sup 118}Sn({sup 40}Ar, 6n){sup 152}Er reaction, an efficiency of several tens of percent was measured.

  11. Effect of phenol and halogenated phenols on energy transfer reactions of rat liver mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izushi,Fumio

    1988-02-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro effects of phenol and p-halogenated phenols on mitochondrial energy transfer reactions were examined using isolated rat liver mitochondria. The relationship between physiochemical properties of phenolic compounds and their effects on mitochondria were studied. Phenol and p-halogenated phenols induced the release of K+ ions from mitochondria, suggesting a change in permeability to K+ ions. A decrease in the respiratory control index, an increase in K+ release and stimulation of latent ATPase activity were observed with these compounds in the descending order of p-iodophenol, p-bromophenol, p-chlorophenol, p-fluorophenol and phenol. The concentrations of the phenolic compounds resulting in fifty percent inhibition of the respiratory control index and those resulting in fifty percent release of K+ ions significantly correlated with Hammett's substituent constant (sigma and the hydrophobic binding constant (pi of the compounds.

  12. Neutron spectroscopic factors of 55Ni hole-states from (p,d transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sanetullaev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopic information has been extracted on the hole-states of 55Ni, the least known of the quartet of nuclei (55Ni, 57Ni, 55Co and 57Cu, one nucleon away from 56Ni, the N=Z=28 double magic nucleus. Using the H1(Ni56,dNi55 transfer reaction in inverse kinematics, neutron spectroscopic factors, spins and parities have been extracted for the f7/2, p3/2 and the s1/2 hole-states of 55Ni. These new data provide a benchmark for large basis calculations that include nucleonic orbits in both the sd and pf shells. State of the art calculations have been performed to describe the excitation energies and spectroscopic factors of the s1/2 hole-state below Fermi energy.

  13. Determination of Reactive Intermediates During Anodic Oxygen-transfer Reactions at Lead Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Shi-yun; ZHANG Wen; GAO Meng-nan; GU Fen-lin; WANG Qing-jiang; JIN Li-tong

    2004-01-01

    The anodic discharge of water to produce adsorbed hydroxyl free radicals(*OH) is considered to be a prerequisite to anodic O-transfer reactions at a PbO2 electrode. In this work, a method was studied by means of high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC) combined with electrochemical detection(ED) so as to investigate the production of hydroxyl free radicals(*OH) in the process of the anodic discharge of H2O at a PbO2 electrode. The voltammetric data obtained at the PbO2 electrode for the oxidation of salicylic acid to salicylate hydroxylation products(DHBAs) and the detection of DHBAs by means of HPLC-ED confirm the proposed mechanism.

  14. Neutron spectroscopic factors of {sup 55}Ni hole-states from (p,d) transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanetullaev, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Tsang, M.B., E-mail: tsang@nscl.msu.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Lynch, W.G.; Lee, Jenny; Bazin, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Chan, K.P. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Physics Department, Hong Kong Chinese University, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Coupland, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Rogers, A.M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Sun, Z.Y. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Youngs, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G. [Department of Chemistry, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Famiano, M. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Hudan, S. [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Shapira, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Peters, W.A. [Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Barbieri, C. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-09-07

    Spectroscopic information has been extracted on the hole-states of {sup 55}Ni, the least known of the quartet of nuclei ({sup 55}Ni, {sup 57}Ni, {sup 55}Co and {sup 57}Cu), one nucleon away from {sup 56}Ni, the N=Z=28 double magic nucleus. Using the {sup 1}H({sup 56}Ni,d){sup 55}Ni transfer reaction in inverse kinematics, neutron spectroscopic factors, spins and parities have been extracted for the f{sub 7/2}, p{sub 3/2} and the s{sub 1/2} hole-states of {sup 55}Ni. These new data provide a benchmark for large basis calculations that include nucleonic orbits in both the sd and pf shells. State of the art calculations have been performed to describe the excitation energies and spectroscopic factors of the s{sub 1/2} hole-state below Fermi energy.

  15. Neutron spectroscopic factors of $^{55}$Ni hole-states from (p,d) transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sanetullaev, A; Lynch, W G; Lee, Jenny; Bazin, D; Chan, K P; Coupland, D; Henzl, V; Henzlova, D; Kilburn, M; Rogers, A M; Sun, Z Y; Youngs, M; Charity, R J; Sobotka, L G; Famiano, M; Hudan, S; Shapira, D; Peters, W A; Barbieri, C; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Horoi, M; Otsuka, T; Suzuki, T; Utsuno, Y

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic information has been extracted on the hole-states of $^{55}$Ni, the least known of the quartet of nuclei ($^{55}$Ni, $^{57}$Ni, $^{55}$Co and $^{57}$Co), one neutron away from $^{56}$Ni, the N=Z=28 double magic nucleus. Using the $^{1}$H($^{56}$Ni,d)$^{55}$Ni transfer reaction in inverse kinematics, neutron spectroscopic factors, spins and parities have been extracted for the f$_{7/2}$, p$_{3/2}$ and the s$_{1/2}$ hole-states of $^{55}$Ni. This new data provides a benchmark for large basis calculations that include nucleonic orbits in both the sd and pf shells. State of the art calculations have been performed to describe the excitation energies and spectroscopic factors of the s$_{1/2}$ hole-state below Fermi energy.

  16. Neutron spectroscopic factors of 55Ni hole-states from (p,d) transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanetullaev, A.; Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Lee, Jenny; Bazin, D.; Chan, K. P.; Coupland, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Youngs, M.; Charity, R. J.; Sobotka, L. G.; Famiano, M.; Hudan, S.; Shapira, D.; Peters, W. A.; Barbieri, C.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Horoi, M.; Otsuka, T.; Suzuki, T.; Utsuno, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Spectroscopic information has been extracted on the hole-states of 55Ni, the least known of the quartet of nuclei (55Ni, 57Ni, 55Co and 57Cu), one nucleon away from 56Ni, the N=Z=28 double magic nucleus. Using the H1(Ni56,d)Ni55 transfer reaction in inverse kinematics, neutron spectroscopic factors, spins and parities have been extracted for the f7/2, p3/2 and the s1/2 hole-states of 55Ni. These new data provide a benchmark for large basis calculations that include nucleonic orbits in both the sd and pf shells. State of the art calculations have been performed to describe the excitation energies and spectroscopic factors of the s1/2 hole-state below Fermi energy.

  17. First Measurement of Transferred Polarization in the Exclusive e→p→e'K+Λ→ Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, D. S.; Joo, K.; Mestayer, M. D.; Raue, B. A.; Adams, G.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Armstrong, D. S.; Asavapibhop, B.; Audit, G.; Auger, T.; Avakian, H.; Bagdasaryan, H.; Ball, J. P.; Barrow, S. P.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bellis, M.; Bennhold, C.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchigny, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Butuceanu, C.; Calarco, J. R.; Carnahan, B.; Cazes, A.; Cetina, C.; Ciciani, L.; Clark, R.; Cole, P. L.; Coleman, A.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crannell, H.; Cummings, J. P.; Desanctis, E.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Denizli, H.; Dennis, L.; Devita, R.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dhuga, K. S.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dytman, S.; Dzyubak, O. P.; Eckhause, M.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Eugenio, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedotov, G.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Ficenec, J.; Forest, T. A.; Funsten, H.; Gaff, S. J.; Gai, M.; Garçon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gilad, S.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girard, P.; Golovach, E.; Gordon, C. I.; Griffioen, K.; Grimes, S.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hakobyan, R. S.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Heimberg, P.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, K.; Hicks, R. S.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ishkhanov, B.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Kelley, J. H.; Kellie, J. D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A. V.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L. H.; Kuang, Y.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuhn, J.; Lachniet, J.; Laget, J. M.; Lawrence, D.; Li, J.; Livingston, K.; Longhi, A.; Lukashin, K.; Manak, J. J.; Marchand, C.; Mart, T.; McAleer, S.; McCarthy, J.; McNabb, J. W.; Mecking, B. A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Melone, J. J.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Mokeev, V.; Morand, L.; Morrow, S. A.; Mozer, M. U.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Murphy, L. Y.; Mutchler, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Nasseripour, R.; Nelson, S. O.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Niyazov, R. A.; Nozar, M.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Opper, A. K.; Osipenko, M.; Park, K.; Paschke, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peterson, G.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Pozdniakov, S.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Ronchetti, F.; Rossi, P.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P.; Sabatié, F.; Sabourov, K.; Salgado, C.; Santoro, J.; Sapunenko, V.; Schumacher, R. A.; Serov, V. S.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Simionatto, S.; Skabelin, A. V.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, L. C.; Sober, D. I.; Spraker, M.; Stavinsky, A.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Todor, L.; Tur, C.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weller, H.; Weygand, D. P.; Whisnant, C. S.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yun, J.; Zhang, B.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2003-04-01

    The first measurements of the transferred polarization for the exclusive e→p→e'K+Λ→ reaction have been performed at Jefferson Laboratory using the CLAS spectrometer. A 2.567GeV beam was used to measure the hyperon polarization over Q2 from 0.3 to 1.5 (GeV/c)2, W from 1.6 to 2.15GeV, and over the full K+ center-of-mass angular range. Comparison with predictions of hadrodynamic models indicates strong sensitivity to the underlying resonance contributions. A nonrelativistic quark-model interpretation of our data suggests that the ss¯ quark pair is produced with spins predominantly antialigned. Implications for the validity of the most widely used quark-pair creation operator are discussed.

  18. Proton-transfer reaction dynamics and energetics in calcification and decalcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Ryota; Hatta, Masayuki; Ichikawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-10-13

    CaCO3 -saturated saline waters at pH values below 8.5 are characterized by two stationary equilibrium states: reversible chemical calcification/decalcification associated with acid dissociation, Ca(2+) +HCO3 (-) ⇌CaCO3 +H(+) ; and reversible static physical precipitation/dissolution, Ca(2+) +CO3 (2-) ⇌CaCO3 . The former reversible reaction was determined using a strong base and acid titration. The saturation state described by the pH/PCO2 -independent solubility product, [Ca(2+) ][CO3 (2-) ], may not be observed at pH below 8.5 because [Ca(2+) ][CO3 (2-) ]/([Ca(2+) ][HCO3 (-) ]) ≪1. Since proton transfer dynamics controls all reversible acid dissociation reactions in saline waters, the concentrations of calcium ion and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were expressed as a function of dual variables, pH and PCO2 . The negative impact of ocean acidification on marine calcifying organisms was confirmed by applying the experimental culture data of each PCO2 /pH-dependent coral polyp skeleton weight (Wskel) to the proton transfer idea. The skeleton formation of each coral polyp was performed in microspaces beneath its aboral ectoderm. This resulted in a decalcification of 14 weight %, a normalized CaCO3 saturation state Λ of 1.3 at PCO2 ≈400 ppm and pH ≈8.0, and serious decalcification of 45 % and Λ 2.5 at PCO2 ≈1000 ppm and pH ≈7.8.

  19. Electron transfer reduction of nitriles using SmI2-Et3N-H2O: synthetic utility and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Michal; Sautier, Brice; Spain, Malcolm; Procter, David J

    2014-02-21

    The first general reduction of nitriles to primary amines under single electron transfer conditions is demonstrated using SmI2 (Kagan's reagent) activated with Lewis bases. The reaction features excellent functional group tolerance and represents an attractive alternative to the use of pyrophoric alkali metal hydrides. Notably, the electron transfer from Sm(II) to CN functional groups generates imidoyl-type radicals from bench stable nitrile precursors.

  20. Effects of metastability on hydrogen sorption in fluorine substituted hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinatel, E.R.; Corno, M.; Ugliengo, P.; Baricco, M., E-mail: marcello.baricco@unito.it

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Fluorine substitution in simple metal hydrides has been modelled. • The stability of the MH{sub (1−x)}F{sub x} solid solutions has been discussed. • Conditions for reversibility of sorption reactions have been suggested. - Abstract: In this work ab initio calculations and Calphad modelling have been coupled to describe the effect of fluorine substitution on the thermodynamics of hydrogenation–dehydrogenation in simple hydrides (NaH, AlH{sub 3} and CaH{sub 2}). These example systems have been used to discuss the conditions required for the formation of a stable hydride–fluoride solid solution necessary to obtain a reversible hydrogenation reaction.

  1. Observation of three behaviors in confined liquid water within a nanopool hosting proton-transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douhal, Abderrazzak; Angulo, Gonzalo; Gil, Michal; Organero, Juan Angel; Sanz, Mikel; Tormo, Laura

    2007-05-17

    In this contribution, we report on studies of rotational and diffusional dynamics of 7-hydroxyquinoline (7HQ) within a reverse micelle (RM) containing different amounts of water. Analyzed in terms of the wobbling-in-a-cone model, the data reveal structural and dynamical properties of the nanopool. We clearly observed three regions in the behavior of confined water molecules within the RM hosting a double proton-transfer reaction between the probe and water. This observation remarkably reproduces the change of calculated water density within this life-mimicking medium. The number of water molecules per AOT head in the transition regions changes from 2 to 5, the latter being very near to the full solvation number (6) of the RM heads. Moreover, the H-bonds breaking and making within the RM to give new structures of the probe strongly affect the environment fluidization in different extents, reflected in different relaxation times of these structures; however, they are of similar sizes. We discuss the role of RM confinement and the proton-transfer dynamics on the behavior of water and their relationships to the packing of water molecules in the studied range of concentrations.

  2. Three-Body Model Calculation of Spin Distribution in Two-Nucleon Transfer Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ogata, Kazuyuki; Chiba, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The differential cross sections of two-nucleon transfer reactions 238U(18O,16O)240U around 10 MeV per nucleon are calculated by one-step Born-approximation with a 16O+2n+238U three-body model. The three-body wave function in the initial channel is obtained with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method, and that in the final channel is evaluated with adiabatic approximation. The resulting cross sections have a peak around the grazing angle, and the spin distribution, i.e., the cross section at the peak as a function of the transferred spin, is investigated. The shape of the spin distribution is found not sensitive to the incident energies, optical potentials, and treatment of the breakup channels both in the initial and final states, while it depends on the excitation energy of the residual nucleus 240U. The peak of the spin distribution moves to the large-spin direction as the excitation energy increases. To fulfill the condition that the peak position should not exceeds 10 hbar, which is necessary f...

  3. Proton-transfer reactions of acridine in water-containing ionic-liquid-rich mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Pandey, Ashish; Pandey, Siddharth

    2013-12-02

    To assess the potential of ionic liquids (ILs) as a solubilizing media that facilitates proton-transfer reactions, acridine prototropism is investigated using UV/Vis molecular absorbance as well as steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence with different ILs in the presence of a small amount of dilute acid or base. It is found that protonation and deprotonation of acridine, when dissolved in different ILs, can be triggered by the addition of a small amount of dilute aqueous HCl and NaOH, respectively, in both the ground and excited states, irrespective of the identity of the IL. However, the amount of dilute acid/base needed to protonate/deprotonate acridine dissolved in different ILs is found to vary from one IL to another. Steady-state fluorescence measurements also imply the presence of interactions between the acidic proton(s) of IL cation and excited acridine. The interconversion of neutral and protonated acridine, as well as the presence of a weakly fluorescent complex between excited acridine and the acidic proton(s) of the IL cation, is further corroborated by the parameters recovered from the fitting of the excited-state intensity-decay data. It is established that ILs as solubilizing media readily support facile proton transfer in both ground and excited states.

  4. A Langevin equation approach to electron transfer reactions in the diabatic basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, XiaoGeng; Wang, Haobin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2008-10-14

    A linear Langevin equation that governs the population dynamics of electron transfer reactions is derived. The noise in the Langevin equation is eliminated by treating the diabatic population fluctuations as the relevant variables, leaving only the memory kernel responsible for the population relaxation. Within the memory kernel, the diabatic coupling is treated perturbatively and a second order expansion is found to give a simple closed form expression for the kernel. The accuracy of the second order truncation is maximized by performing a fixed rotation of the diabatic electronic states that minimizes the first order free energy of the system and thus minimizes the effect of the perturbation on the thermodynamics. The resulting two-hop Langevin equation (THLE) is then validated by applying it to a simple spin-boson model, where exact results exist. Excellent agreement is found in a wide parameter range, even where the perturbation is moderately strong. Results obtained in the rotated electronic basis are found to be consistently more accurate than those from the unrotated basis. These benchmark calculations also allow us to demonstrate the advantage of treating the population fluctuations instead of the populations as the relevant variables, as only the former lead to reliable results at long time. Thus, the THLE appears to provide a viable alternative to established methods--such as Ehrenfest dynamics or surface hopping--for the treatment of nonadiabatic effects in electron transfer simulations.

  5. Influence of mass transfer and chemical reaction on ozonation of azo dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, I.S.; Wiesmann, U. [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Technical Univ. of Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Azo dyes can be only mineralised by chemical oxidation. In this paper the oxidation of reactive black 5 (RB 5) and reactive orange 96 (RO 96) with concentrations between 35 and 5700 mgL{sup -1} (RB 5) and between 20 and 2050 mgL{sup -1} (RO 96) is investigated. A lab scale bubble column was used, which was gassed by a mixture of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3}. The oxidation rate was influenced by mass transfer for all dye concentrations used. For lower dye concentrations mass transfer alone was decisive for reaction rate showing an enhancement factor of E {approx} 1. However, in the region of higher dye concentrations, the slope of the decreasing ozone concentration inside the liquid boundary layer increases more and more with increasing dye concentration as a result of a chemical oxidation. Therefore, the enhancement factor depends on the kind and concentration of the azo dyes. For RB 5 as an diazo dye an enhancement factor of E = 9 was observed for 3800 mgL{sup -1}, RO 96 as a mono azo dye with a remarkable higher chemical oxidation rate shows an E = 17 already for 2050 mgL{sup -1}. (orig.)

  6. The protein's role in triplet energy transfer in bacterial reaction centers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laible, P. D.

    1998-08-14

    When photosynthetic organisms are subjected to high-light conditions in nature, electron transfer becomes blocked as the rate of conversion of light into charge-separated states in the reaction center (RC) exceeds the capacity of the soluble carriers involved in cyclic electron transfer. In that event, a well-characterized T{sub 0}-polarized triplet state {sup T}P, is formed on the primary donor, P, from the P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} state (reviewed in [1]). In an aerobic or semi-aerobic environment, the major role of the carotenoid (C), also bound by the RC, is to quench {sup T}P prior to its sensitization of the {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g} singlet state of oxygen--a potentially damaging biological oxidant. The carotenoid performs this function efficiently in most bacterial RCs by rapidly accepting the triplet state from P and dissipating this excited-state energy into heat through internal conversion. The lowest-lying triplet states of P and the carotenoid are sufficiently different that {sup T}P can promote oxygen to its excited singlet state whereas {sup T}C can quench the {sup T}P state (reviewed in [2]).

  7. Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics, an experimental approach for fission investigations

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C; Derkx, X; Caamaño, M; Delaune, O; Schmidt, K -H; Clément, E; Dijon, A; Heinz, A; Roger, T; Audouin, L; Benlliure, J; Casarejos, E; Cortina, D; Doré, D; Fernández-Domínguez, B; Jacquot, B; Jurado, 1 B; Navin, A; Paradela, C; Ramos, D; Romain, P; Salsac, M D; Schmitt, C

    2013-01-01

    Inelastic and multi-nucleon transfer reactions between a $^{238}$U beam, accelerated at 6.14 MeV/u, and a $^{12}$C target were used for the production of neutron-rich, fissioning systems from U to Cm. A Si telescope, devoted to the detection of the target-like nuclei, provided a characterization of the fissioning systems in atomic and mass numbers, as well as in excitation energy. Cross-sections, angular and excitation-energy distributions were measured for the inelastic and transfer channels. Possible excitations of the target-like nuclei were experimentally investigated for the first time, by means of g -ray measurements. The decays from the first excited states of $^{12}$C, $^{11}$B and $^{10}$Be were observed with probabilities of 0.12 - 0.14, while no evidence for the population of higher-lying states was found. Moreover, the fission probabilities of $^{238}$U, $^{239}$Np and $^{240,241,242}$Pu and $^{244}$Cm were determined as a function of the excitation energy.

  8. The 2H(e, e' p)n reaction at large energy transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willering, Hendrik Willem

    2003-04-01

    At the ELSA accelerator facillity in Bonn, Germany, we have measured the deutron breakup reaction 2H(e, e' p)n at four-momentum transfers around Q2 = -0 .20(GeV/c)2 with an electron beam energy of E0 = 1.6 GeV. The cross section has been determined for energy transfers extending from the quasielastic region to just below the Delta(1232)-resonance, and for proton polar angles up to Thetanp = 145 o in the center-of-momentum system. This angular range represents missing momenta up to pm = 1000 MeV/c. By detecting the scattered protons in two segmented 3 3 m2 scintillator time-of-flight detectors, we have covered a considerable part of the out-of-plane region. The clearly visible variation of the cross section with the proton azimuthal angle fnp has enabled us to extract values for the longitudinal-transverse interference form factor fLT and for a combination of the non-interference form factors fL and fT for proton angles up to Thetanp = 40o in the center-of-momentum system. The experimental results have been compared to the full model calculations by Arenhövel et al. For the major part of our kinematical range the shape of the cross section and of the form factors is reproduced by the model, but some differences remain in the normalization, especially at higher energy transfers. Our results corroborate the conclusions from other recent experiments concerning the importance of subnuclear degrees-of-freedom beyond the quasielastic region, but the discrepancy indicates that the model can still be improved

  9. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyk, Oksana; Samish, Ilan; Matěnová, Martina; Dulebo, Alexander; Poláková, Helena; Kaftan, David; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-03-01

    Interquinone QA- → QB electron-transfer (ET) in isolated photosystem II reaction centers (PSII-RC) is protein-gated. The temperature-dependent gating frequency “k” is described by the Eyring equation till levelling off at T ≥ 240 °K. Although central to photosynthesis, the gating mechanism has not been resolved and due to experimental limitations, could not be explored in vivo. Here we mimic the temperature dependency of “k” by enlarging VD1-208, the volume of a single residue at the crossing point of the D1 and D2 PSII-RC subunits in Synechocystis 6803 whole cells. By controlling the interactions of the D1/D2 subunits, VD1-208 (or 1/T) determines the frequency of attaining an ET-active conformation. Decelerated ET, impaired photosynthesis, D1 repair rate and overall cell physiology upon increasing VD1-208 to above 130 Å3, rationalize the >99% conservation of small residues at D1-208 and its homologous motif in non-oxygenic bacteria. The experimental means and resolved mechanism are relevant for numerous transmembrane protein-gated reactions.

  10. Integration of Ultraviolet Photodissociation with Proton Transfer Reactions and Ion Parking for Analysis of Intact Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Dustin D; McGee, William M; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2016-01-05

    We report the implementation of proton transfer reactions (PTR) and ion parking on an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. PTR/ion parking allows charge states of proteins to be focused into a single lower charge state via sequential deprotonation reactions with a proton scavenging reagent, in this case, a nitrogen-containing adduct of fluoranthene. Using PTR and ion parking, we evaluate the charge state dependence of fragmentation of ubiquitin (8.6 kDa), myoglobin (17 kDa), and carbonic anhydrase (29 kDa) upon higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD) or ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD). UVPD exhibited less charge state dependence, thus yielding more uniform distributions of cleavages along the protein backbone and consequently higher sequence coverage than HCD. HCD resulted in especially prominent cleavages C-terminal to amino acids containing acidic side-chains and N-terminal to proline residues; UVPD did not exhibit preferential cleavage adjacent to acidic residues but did show enhancement next to proline and phenylalanine.

  11. Pore to Core Scale Simulation of the Mass Transfer with Mineral Reaction in Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekri S.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pore Network Model (PNM is used to simulate mass transfer with mineral reaction in a single phase flow through porous medium which is here a sandstone sample from the reservoir formation of the Pakoslaw gas field. The void space of the porous medium is represented by an idealized geometry of pore-bodies joined by pore-throats. Parameters defining the pore-bodies and the pore-throats distribution are determined by an optimization process aiming to match the experimental Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure (MICP curve and petrophysical properties of the rock such as intrinsic permeability and formation factor. The generated network is used first to simulate the multiphase flow by solving Kirchhoff’s laws. The capillary pressure and relative permeability curves are derived. Then, reactive transport is addressed under asymptotic regime where the solute concentration undergoes an exponential evolution with time. The porosity/permeability relationship and the three phenomenological coefficients of transport, namely the solute velocity, the dispersion and the mean reaction rate are determined as functions of Peclet and Peclet-Damköhler dimensionless numbers. Finally, the role of the dimensionless numbers on the reactive flow properties is highlighted.

  12. Study of fluorescence characteristics of the charge-transfer reaction of quinolone agents with bromanil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Fang; Xuan, Chun-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    A spectrofluorimetric method was discussed for the determination of three antibacterial quinolone derivatives, ofloxacin (OFL), norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) through charge-transfer complexation (CTC) with 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-1,4-benzoquinone (bromanil, TBBQ). The method was based on the reaction of these drugs as n-electron donors with the π-acceptor TBBQ. TBBQ was found to react with these drugs to produce a kind of yellow complexes and the fluorescence intensities of the complexes were enhanced by 29-36 times more than those of the corresponding monomers. UV-vis, 1H NMR and XPS techniques were used to study the complexes formed. The various experimental parameters affecting the fluorescence intensity were studied and optimized. Under optimal reaction conditions, the rectilinear calibration graphs were obtained in the concentration range of 0.021-2.42 μg mL -1, 0.017-2.63 μg mL -1 and 0.019-2.14 μg mL -1 for OFL, NOR and CIP, respectively. The methods developed were applied successfully to the determination of the subject drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage forms with good precision and accuracy compared to official and reported methods as revealed by t- and F-tests.

  13. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyk, Oksana; Samish, Ilan; Matěnová, Martina; Dulebo, Alexander; Poláková, Helena; Kaftan, David; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-01-01

    Interquinone QA− → QB electron-transfer (ET) in isolated photosystem II reaction centers (PSII-RC) is protein-gated. The temperature-dependent gating frequency “k” is described by the Eyring equation till levelling off at T ≥ 240 °K. Although central to photosynthesis, the gating mechanism has not been resolved and due to experimental limitations, could not be explored in vivo. Here we mimic the temperature dependency of “k” by enlarging VD1-208, the volume of a single residue at the crossing point of the D1 and D2 PSII-RC subunits in Synechocystis 6803 whole cells. By controlling the interactions of the D1/D2 subunits, VD1-208 (or 1/T) determines the frequency of attaining an ET-active conformation. Decelerated ET, impaired photosynthesis, D1 repair rate and overall cell physiology upon increasing VD1-208 to above 130 Å3, rationalize the >99% conservation of small residues at D1-208 and its homologous motif in non-oxygenic bacteria. The experimental means and resolved mechanism are relevant for numerous transmembrane protein-gated reactions. PMID:28300167

  14. OH clock determination by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry at an environmental chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmet, P.; Dommen, J.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Tritscher, T.; Praplan, A. P.; Platt, S. M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2012-03-01

    The hydroxyl free radical (OH) is the major oxidizing species in the lower atmosphere. Measuring the OH concentration is generally difficult and involves elaborate, expensive, custom-made experimental setups. Thus other more economical techniques, capable of determining OH concentrations at environmental chambers, would be valuable. This work is based on an indirect method of OH concentration measurement, by monitoring an appropriate OH tracer by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). 3-pentanol, 3-pentanone and pinonaldehyde (PA) were used as OH tracers in α-pinene (AP) secondary organic aerosol (SOA) aging studies. In addition we tested butanol-d9 as a potential "universal" OH tracer and determined its reaction rate constant with OH: kbutanol-d9 = 3.4(±0.88) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. In order to make the chamber studies more comparable among each other as well as to atmospheric measurements we suggest the use of a chemical (time) dimension: the OH clock, which corresponds to the integrated OH concentration over time.

  15. OH clock determination by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry at an environmental chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barmet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl free radical (OH is the major oxidizing species in the lower atmosphere. Measuring the OH concentration is generally difficult and involves elaborate, expensive, custom-made experimental setups. Thus other more economical techniques, capable of determining OH concentrations at environmental chambers, would be valuable. This work is based on an indirect method of OH concentration measurement, by monitoring an appropriate OH tracer by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS. 3-pentanol, 3-pentanone and pinonaldehyde (PA were used as OH tracers in α-pinene (AP secondary organic aerosol (SOA aging studies. In addition we tested butanol-d9 as potential "universal" OH tracer and determined its reaction rate constant with OH: kbutanol-d9 = 3.4(±0.88 · 10−12 cm3molecule−1s−1. In order to make the chamber studies more comparable among each other as well as to atmospheric measurements we suggest the use of a chemical (time dimension:~the OH clock, which corresponds to the integrated OH concentration over time.

  16. OH clock determination by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry at an environmental chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barmet

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl free radical (OH is the major oxidizing species in the lower atmosphere. Measuring the OH concentration is generally difficult and involves elaborate, expensive, custom-made experimental setups. Thus other more economical techniques, capable of determining OH concentrations at environmental chambers, would be valuable. This work is based on an indirect method of OH concentration measurement, by monitoring an appropriate OH tracer by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS. 3-pentanol, 3-pentanone and pinonaldehyde (PA were used as OH tracers in α-pinene (AP secondary organic aerosol (SOA aging studies. In addition we tested butanol-d9 as a potential "universal" OH tracer and determined its reaction rate constant with OH: kbutanol-d9 = 3.4(±0.88 × 10−12 cm3 molecule−1 s−1. In order to make the chamber studies more comparable among each other as well as to atmospheric measurements we suggest the use of a chemical (time dimension: the OH clock, which corresponds to the integrated OH concentration over time.

  17. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D; Tulk, Christopher A; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Ivanov, Ilia N; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-09-19

    Acetonitrile (CH3 CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. It is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp(2) and sp(3) bonded carbon. Finally, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst.

  18. Aluminum Hydride as a Fuel Supplement to NanoThermites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    explosives and as a hydrogen storage medium. There are as many as six crystalline phases of alane, of which α-alane is themost stable and is also the...a pure nanoaluminum-corresponding metal oxide thermite. As Fig. 2 shows, the addition ofmicron-scale aluminum hydride to a nanoaluminum–copper-oxide... hydrogen does not participate in the thermite reaction. It is quite possible that the hydrogen may react with oxygen and or the metal oxide as an

  19. Measurement of atmospheric sesquiterpenes by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guenther

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to measure sesquiterpenes (SQT; C15H24 by a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS was investigated. SQT calibration standards were prepared by a capillary diffusion method and the PTR-MS-estimated mixing ratios were derived from the counts of product ions and proton transfer reaction constants. These values were compared with mixing ratios determined by a calibrated Gas Chromatograph (GC coupled to a Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID. Product ion distributions from soft-ionization occurring in a selected ion drift tube via proton transfer were measured as a function of collision energies. Results after the consideration of the mass discrimination of the PTR-MS system suggest that quantitative SQT measurements within 20% accuracy can be achieved with PTR-MS if two major product ions (m/z 149+ and 205+, out of seven major product ions (m/z 81+, 95+, 109+, 123+, 135+, 149+ and 205+, are accounted for. Considerable fragmentation of bicyclic sesquiterpenes, i.e. β-caryophyllene and α-humulene, cause the accuracy to be reduced to 50% if only the parent ion (m/z 205+ is considered. These findings were applied to a field dataset collected above a deciduous forest at the PROPHET (Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emissions, and Transport research station in 2005. Inferred average daytime ecosystem scale mixing ratios (fluxes of isoprene, sum of monoterpenes (MT, and sum of SQT exhibited values of 15 μg m−3 (4.5 mg m−2 h−1, 1.2 μg m−3 (0.21 mg m−2 h−1, and 0.0016 μg m−3 (0.10 mg m−2 h−1, respectively. A range of MT and SQT reactivities with respect to the OH radical was calculated and compared to an earlier study inferring significantly

  20. Measurement of atmospheric sesquiterpenes by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kim

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to measure sesquiterpenes (SQT; C15H24 by a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS was investigated with SQT standards, prepared by a capillary diffusion method, and the estimated mixing ratios, derived from the counts of product ions and proton transfer reaction constants were intercompared with measured mixing ratios, measured by a complementary Gas Chromatograph (GC coupled to a Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID. Product ion distributions due to soft-ionization occurring in a selected ion drift tube via proton transfer were measured as a function of collision energies. Results after the consideration of the mass discrimination of the PTR-MS system suggest that quantitative SQT measurements within 20% accuracy can be achieved with PTR-MS if two major product ions (m/z 149+ and 205+ out of seven major product ions (m/z 81+, 95+, 109+, 123+, 135+, 149+ and 205+ are accounted for. Bicyclic sesquiterpenes, i.e. β-caryophyllene and α-humulene, showed considerable fragmentation causing the accuracy of their analysis to be reduced to 50% if only the parent ion (m/z 205 is considered. These findings were applied to a field dataset collected above a deciduous forest at the PROPHET (Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emissions, and Transport research station in 2005. Inferred Average daytime ecosystem scale mixing ratios (fluxes of isoprene, sum of monoterpenes (MT, and sum of SQT exhibited values of 15 μg m−3 (4.5 mg m−2 h−1, 1.2 μg m−3 (0.21 mg m−2 h−1 and 0.0016 μg m−3 (0.10 mgm−2 h−1 respectively. A range of MT and SQT reactivities with respect to the OH radical was calculated and compared to an earlier study inferring significantly underestimated OH

  1. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Patrick L. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  2. Comparisons of phosphorothioate with phosphate transfer reactions for a monoester, diester, and triester: isotope effect studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrina, Irina E; Hengge, Alvan C

    2003-06-25

    Phosphorothioate esters are sometimes used as surrogates for phosphate ester substrates in studies of enzymatic phosphoryl transfer reactions. To gain better understanding of the comparative inherent chemistry of the two types of esters, we have measured equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects for several phosphorothioate esters of p-nitrophenol (pNPPT) and compared the results with data from phosphate esters. The primary (18)O isotope effect at the phenolic group ((18)k(bridge)), the secondary nitrogen-15 isotope effect ((15)k) in the nitro group, and (for the monoester and diester) the secondary oxygen-18 isotope effect ((18)k(nonbridge)) in the phosphoryl oxygens were measured. The equilibrium isotope effect (EIE) (18)k(nonbridge) for the deprotonation of the monoanion of pNPPT is 1.015 +/- 0.002, very similar to values previously reported for phosphate monoesters. The EIEs for complexation of Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) with the dianion pNPPT(2-) were both unity. The mechanism of the aqueous hydrolysis of the monoanion and dianion of pNPPT, the diester ethyl pNPPT, and the triester dimethyl pNPPT was probed using heavy atom kinetic isotope effects. The results were compared with the data reported for analogous phosphate monoester, diester, and triester reactions. The results suggest that leaving group bond fission in the transition state of reactions of the monoester pNPPT is more advanced than for its phosphate counterpart pNPP, while alkaline hydrolysis of the phosphorothioate diester and triester exhibits somewhat less advanced bond fission than that of their phosphate ester counterparts.

  3. Speculations on the existence of hydride ions in proton conducting oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, F.W.

    2001-01-01

    The chemical and physical nature of the hydride ion is briefly treated. Several reactions of the hydride ion in oxides or oxygen atmosphere are given, A number of perovskites and inverse perovskites are listed. which contain the H- ion on the oxygen or B-anion sites in the archetype ABO(3) System....... H- is stable with respect to oxide and halide anions but, among cations only with respect to oxides and halides of strongly electropositive metals such as alkaline, alkaline-earth and main group III metals. H- is only stable in combination with transition metal ions of certain elements...... in their lowest positive oxidation state. Mixed oxide/hydride containing perovskites may thus exist. Steinsvik et al. have recently suggested a defect model for a perovskite including substitutional hydride ions on the oxygen site, H-O(.), and protons associated with a lattice oxygen, OHO.. The defect equations...

  4. Activation and discharge kinetics of metal hydride electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Stein Egil

    2003-07-01

    Potential step chronoamperometry and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (eis) measurements were performed on single metal hydride particles. For the {alpha}-phase, the bulk diffusion coefficient and the absorption/adsorption rate parameters were determined. Materials produced by atomisation, melt spinning and conventional casting were investigated. The melt spun and conventional cast materials were identical and the atomised material similar in composition. The particles from the cast and the melt spun material were shaped like parallelepipeds. A corresponding equation, for this geometry, for diffusion coupled to an absorption/adsorption reaction was developed. It was found that materials produced by melt spinning exhibited lower bulk diffusion (1.7E-14 m2/s) and absorption/adsorption reaction rate (1.0E-8 m/s), compared to materials produced by conventionally casting (1.1E-13 m2/s and 5.5E-8 m/s respectively). In addition, the influence of particle active surface and relative diffusion length were discussed. It was concluded that there are uncertainties connected to these properties, which may explain the large distribution in the kinetic parameters measured on metal hydride particles. Activation of metal hydride forming materials has been studied and an activation procedure, for porous electrodes, was investigated. Cathodic polarisation of the electrode during a hot alkaline surface treatment gave the maximum discharge capacity on the first discharge of the electrode. The studied materials were produced by gas atomisation and the spherical shape was retained during the activation. Both an AB{sub 5} and an AB{sub 2} alloy was successfully activated and discharge rate properties determined. The AB{sub 2} material showed a higher maximum discharge capacity, but poor rate properties, compared to the AB{sub 5} material. Reduction of surface oxides, and at the same time protection against corrosion of active metallic nickel, can explain the satisfying results of

  5. Brønsted-Lowry Acid Strength of Metal Hydride and Dihydrogen Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robert H

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydride complexes are usually amphoteric, not only acting as hydride donors, but also as Brønsted-Lowry acids. A simple additive ligand acidity constant equation (LAC for short) allows the estimation of the acid dissociation constant Ka(LAC) of diamagnetic transition metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes. It is remarkably successful in systematizing diverse reports of over 450 reactions of acids with metal complexes and bases with metal hydrides and dihydrogen complexes, including catalytic cycles where these reactions are proposed or observed. There are links between pKa(LAC) and pKa(THF), pKa(DCM), pKa(MeCN) for neutral and cationic acids. For the groups from chromium to nickel, tables are provided that order the acidity of metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes from most acidic (pKa(LAC) -18) to least acidic (pKa(LAC) 50). Figures are constructed showing metal acids above the solvent pKa scales and organic acids below to summarize a large amount of information. Acid-base features are analyzed for catalysts from chromium to gold for ionic hydrogenations, bifunctional catalysts for hydrogen oxidation and evolution electrocatalysis, H/D exchange, olefin hydrogenation and isomerization, hydrogenation of ketones, aldehydes, imines, and carbon dioxide, hydrogenases and their model complexes, and palladium catalysts with hydride intermediates.

  6. Influence of lanthanon hydride catalysts on hydrogen storage properties of sodium alanates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhe; CHEN Lixin; XIAO Xuezhang; FAN Xiulin; LI Shouquan; WANG Qidong

    2013-01-01

    NaAlH4 complex hydrides doped with lanthanon hydrides were prepared by hydrogenation of the ball-milled NaH/Al+xmol.% RE-H composites (RE=La,Ce; x=2,4,6) using NaHl and A1 powder as raw materials.The influence of lanthanon hydride catalysts on the hydriding and dehydriding behaviors of the as-synthesized composites were investigated.It was found that the composite doped with 2 mol.% La.H3.01 displayed the highest hydrogen absorption capacity of 4.78 wt.% and desorption capacity of 4.66wt.%,respectively.Moreover,the composite doped with 6 mol% CeH2.51 showed the best hydriding/dehydriding reaction kinetics.The proposed catalytic mechanism for reversible hydrogen storage properties of the composite was attributed to the presence of active LaH3.01 and CeH2.51 particles,which were scattering on the surface of NaH and A1 particles,acting as the catalytic active sites for hydrogen diffusion and playing an important catalytic role in the improved hydriding/dehydriding reaction.

  7. Response function of the magnetic spectrometer PRISMA for the multinucleon transfer reaction {sup 40}Ar+{sup 208}Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijatovic, T.; Szilner, S.; Corradi, L.; Courtin, S.; Farnea, E.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Goasduff, A.; Haas, F.; Jelavic-Malenica, D.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Pollarolo, G.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Soic, N.; Stefanini, A. M. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); IPHC, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); and others

    2012-10-20

    Multinucleon transfer reaction {sup 40}Ar+{sup 208}Pb has been investigated with the PRISMA-CLARA experimental setup in LNL, INFN, Italy. The experimental differential cross sections have been obtained for different transfer channels by measuring more than {Delta}{theta}{sub lab} = 20 Degree-Sign covered by three angular settings of PRISMA. Results have been compared with the semiclassical calculation GRAZING. Since the understanding of the reaction mechanism depends strongly on the determination of absolute cross section, effect of transport of ions through PRISMA has been studied via a Monte Carlo simulation code.

  8. Iron-Catalyzed Regioselective Transfer Hydrogenative Couplings of Unactivated Aldehydes with Simple Alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan-Long; Liu, Yan-Yao; Wu, Yi-Mei; Wang, Yin-Xia; Lin, Yu-Tong; Ye, Mengchun

    2016-05-17

    An FeBr3 -catalyzed reductive coupling of various aldehydes with alkenes that proceeds through a direct hydride transfer pathway has been developed. With (i) PrOH as the hydrogen donor under mild conditions, previously challenging coupling reactions of unactivated alkyl and aryl aldehydes with simple alkenes, such as styrene derivatives and α-olefins, proceeded smoothly to furnish a diverse range of functionalized alcohols with complete linear regioselectivity.

  9. Theoretical Study on Proton-Transfer Reaction of Intracellular Second-messenger 3',5'-Cyclic Nucleotide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ai-Hua; YANG Bao-Hua; LI Zong-He

    2008-01-01

    The gas-phase proton-transfer reaction mechanism of intracellular second-messenger 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide (cAMPm) has been theoretically investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. One or two H2O molecules have been used to simulate the catalyst. It is found that H shift reaction between conformation Bm and conformation Dm of cAMPm involves a cyclic transition state with one or two water molecules as a shuttle. Furthermore, H shift reac- tion proceeds easily with the participation of two water molecules. The results provide evidence in theory to study proton-transfer reaction mechanism of related phosphodiesters. Our present calculations have rationalized all the possible reaction channels.

  10. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(morpholenyl) benzonitrile in solution: Effects of hetero atom in the donor moiety

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tuhin Pradhan; Harun Al Rasid Gazi; Ranjit Biswas

    2010-07-01

    An intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) molecule with an extra hetero atom in its donor moiety has been synthesized in order to investigate how ICT reaction is affected by hetero atom replacement. Photo-physical and photo-dynamical properties of this molecule, 4-(morpholenyl)benzonitrile (M6C), have been studied in 20 different solvents. The correlation between the reaction driving force (- ) and activation barrier ( #) has been explored in order to understand the solvent effects (static and dynamic) on the photo-excited ICT reaction in this molecule. A Kramer’s model analysis of the experimentally observed reaction rate constants indicates a solvent-averaged activation barrier of ∼ 4 in the absence of solvent dynamical control. The reaction in M6C is therefore not a barrier-less reaction but close to the limit where conventional kinetics might break down.

  11. Formation and physical properties of uranium hydride under conditions relevant to metallic fuel and nuclear waste storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Robin; Godfrey, Hugh; Broan, Chris; Goddard, Dave; Woodhouse, Guy; Durham, Peter; Diggle, Andrew; Bradshaw, John

    2016-08-01

    The formation of uranium hydride is recognised as a hazard during the storage of uranium metal owing to its potentially pyrophoric properties. This study has assessed the influence of water vapour on the potential for uranium hydride to form at low temperatures and shows that it increases the duration of the induction period but does not necessarily prevent uranium hydride formation and also does not significantly change the reaction rate with hydrogen. It is further shown that the α-UH3 fraction in the uranium hydride gradually increases at decreasing temperatures and is likely to be the dominant phase formed under typical storage conditions. Particle morphology and specific surface area of uranium hydride prepared between 30 °C and 200 °C have also been characterised but show only modest variation compared with the phase composition.

  12. Quantum Chemical Study on a New Mechanism of One-carbon Unit Transfer Reaction:The Water-assisted Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO,Qing-An(乔青安); CAI,Zheng-Ting(蔡政亭); FENG,Da-Cheng(冯大诚)

    2004-01-01

    It is a theoretical study on the water-assisted mechanism of one-carbon unit transfer reaction, in which the energy barrier for each transition state lowered by about 80-100 kJ/mol when compared with the one in no-water-involved mechanism. The water-assisted path 4 is the favorite reaction way. Our results well explained the presumption from experiments.

  13. A molecular Debye-Hückel approach to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions in an electric cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Tiejun; Song, Xueyu

    2014-10-07

    Electron transfer near an electrode immersed in ionic fluids is studied using the linear response approximation, namely, mean value of the vertical energy gap can be used to evaluate the reorganization energy, and hence any linear response model that can treat Coulomb interactions successfully can be used for the reorganization energy calculation. Specifically, a molecular Debye-Hückel theory is used to calculate the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions in an electric cell. Applications to electron transfer near an electrode in molten salts show that the reorganization energies from our molecular Debye-Hückel theory agree well with the results from MD simulations.

  14. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    mole of Si. We compare our silicon nanoparticles (˜10nm diameter) with commercial silicon nanopowder (hydrogen production rate increased by a factor of 150. However, in all cases, silicon requires a base (e.g. NaOH, KOH, hydrazine) to catalyze its reaction with water. Metal hydrides are also promising hydrogen storage materials. The optimum metal hydride would possess high hydrogen storage density at moderate temperature and pressure, release hydrogen safely and controllably, and be stable in air. Alkali metal hydrides have high hydrogen storage density, but exhibit high uncontrollable reactivity with water. In an attempt to control this explosive nature while maintaining high storage capacity, we mixed our silicon nanoparticles with the hydrides. This has dual benefits: (1) the hydride- water reaction produces the alkali hydroxide needed for base-catalyzed silicon oxidation, and (2) dilution with 10nm coating by, the silicon may temper the reactivity of the hydride, making the process more controllable. Initially, we analyzed hydrolysis of pure alkali metal hydrides and alkaline earth metal hydrides. Lithium hydride has particularly high hydrogen gravimetric density, along with faster reaction kinetics than sodium hydride or magnesium hydride. On analysis of hydrogen production we found higher hydrogen yield from the silicon nanoparticle—metal hydride mixture than from pure hydride hydrolysis. The silicon-hydride mixtures using our 10nm silicon nanoparticles produced high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical yield. Some evidence of slowing of the hydride reaction rate upon addition of silicon nanoparticles was observed.

  15. The ^2H(e,e'p)n Reaction at High Four-Momentum Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan Ibrahim

    2006-12-31

    This dissertation presents the highest four-momentum transfer, Q^2,quasielastic (x_Bj = 1) results from Experiment E01-020 which systematically explored the 2He(e,e'p)n reaction ("Electro-disintegration" of the deuteron) at three different four-momentum transfers, Q^2 = 0.8, 2.1, and 3.5 GeV^2 and missing momenta, P_miss = 0, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 GeV including separations of the longitudinal-transverse interference response function, R_LT, and extractoin of the longitudinal-transverse asymmetry, A_LT. This systematic approach will help to understand the reaction mechanism and the deuteron structure down to the short range part of the nucleon-nucleon interaction which is one of the fundamental missions of nuclear physics. By studying the very short distance structure of the deuteron, one may also determine whether or to what extent the description of nuclei in terms of nucleon/meson degrees of freedom must be supplemented by inclusion of explicit quark effects. The unique combination of energy, current, duty factor, and control of systematics for Hall A at Jefferson Lab made Jefferson Lab the only facility in the world where these systematic studies of the deuteron can be undertaken. This is especially true when we want to understand the short range structure of the deuteron where high energies and high luminosity/duty factor are needed. All these features of Jefferson Lab allow us to examine large missing momenta (short range scales) at kinematics where the effects of final state interactions (FSI), meson exchange currents (MEC), and isobar currents (IC) are minimal, making the extraction of the deuteron structure less model-dependent. Jefferson Lab also provides the kinematical flexibility to perform the separation of R_LT over a broad range of missing momenta and momentum transfers. Experiment E01-020 use the standard Hall A equipment in coincidence configuration in addition to the cryogenic target system. The low and middle Q^2 kinematics were

  16. Application of thermal electrochemical equation to metal-hydride half-cell system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Kai-yu; HUANG Bai-yun; ZHANG Ping-min; HE Yue-hui; ZHOU Ke-chao; SU Geng

    2006-01-01

    Application of thermal electrochemical equation to metal-hydride half-cell system was investigated, and the influence of state of charge on the thermal electrochemical performance of hydrogen storage materials was studied. The results show that both the absolute value of the molar enthalpy change and the internal resistance of evolution hydrogen reaction are less than that of absorption hydrogen reaction at the same state of charge. The molar reaction enthalpy change of absorption and evolution of hydride electrode change contrarily with the enhancement of filling degree of hydrogen in hydride electrode. The relation curve of molar reaction enthalpy change to state of charge, both absorption and evolution hydrogen reaction, is close to a constant when the state of charge is 10%-60%, and during state of charge below 10% or state of charge above 60%, the molar reaction enthalpy change varies sharply. Meanwhile, the internal resistance of electrode reaction has an ascending trend with the enhancement on filling degree of hydrogen in hydride electrode in both absorption and evolution hydrogen reaction.

  17. Mass Transfer and Chemical Reaction Approach of the Kinetics of the Acetylation of Gadung Flour using Glacial Acetic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andri Cahyo Kumoro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation is one of the common methods of modifying starch properties by introducing acetil (CH3CO groups to starch molecules at low temperatures. While most acetylation is conducted using starch as anhidroglucose source and acetic anhydride or vinyl acetate as nucleophilic agents, this work employ reactants, namely flour and glacial acetic acid. The purpose of this work are to study the effect of pH reaction and GAA/GF mass ratio on the rate of acetylation reaction and to determine its rate constants. The acetylation of gadung flour with glacial acetic acid in the presence of sodium hydroxide as a homogenous catalyst was studied at ambient temperature with pH ranging from 8-10 and different mass ratio of acetic acid : gadung flour (1:3; 1:4; and 1:5. It was found that increasing pH, lead to increase the degree of substitution, while increasing GAA/GF mass ratio caused such decreases in the degree of substitution, due to the hydrolysis of the acetylated starch. The desired starch acetylation reaction is accompanied by undesirable hydrolysis reaction of the acetylated starch after 40-50 minutes reaction time. Investigation of kinetics of the reaction observed that the value of mass transfer rate constant (Kcs is smaller than the surface reaction rate constant (k. Thus, it can be concluded that rate controlling step is mass transfer.  © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 7th August 2014; Revised: 8th September 2014; Accepted: 14th September 2014How to Cite: Kumoro, A.C., Amelia, R. (2015. Mass Transfer and Chemical Reaction Approach of the Kinetics of the Acetylation of Gadung Flour using Glacial Acetic Acid. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (1: 30-37. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7181.30-37Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7181.30-37

  18. Quantification of diesel exhaust gas phase organics by a thermal desorption proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Erickson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new approach was developed to measure the total abundance of long chain alkanes (C12 and above in urban air using thermal desorption with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS. These species are emitted in diesel exhaust and may be important precursors to secondary organic aerosol production in urban areas. Long chain alkanes undergo dissociative proton transfer reactions forming a series of fragment ions with formula CnH2n+1. The yield of the fragment ions is a function of drift conditions. At a drift field strength of 80 Townsends, the most abundant ion fragments from C10 to C16 n-alkanes were m/z 57, 71 and 85. The PTR-MS is insensitive to n-alkanes less than C8 but displays an increasing sensitivity for larger alkanes. Higher drift field strengths yield greater normalized sensitivity implying that the proton affinity of the long chain n-alkanes is less than H2O. Analysis of diesel fuel shows the mass spectrum was dominated by alkanes (CnH2n+1, monocyclic aromatics, and an ion group with formula CnH2n−1 (m/z 97, 111, 125, 139. The PTR-MS was deployed in Sacramento, CA during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study field experiment in June 2010. The ratio of the m/z 97 to 85 ion intensities in ambient air matched that found in diesel fuel. Total diesel exhaust alkane concentrations calculated from the measured abundance of m/z 85 ranged from the method detection limit of ~1 μg m−3 to 100 μg m−3 in several air pollution episodes. The total diesel exhaust alkane concentration determined by this method was on average a factor of 10 greater than the sum of alkylbenzenes associated with spark ignition vehicle exhaust.

  19. Control and Automation of Fluid Flow, Mass Transfer and Chemical Reactions in Microscale Segmented Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Milad

    Flowing trains of uniformly sized bubbles/droplets (i.e., segmented flows) and the associated mass transfer enhancement over their single-phase counterparts have been studied extensively during the past fifty years. Although the scaling behaviour of segmented flow formation is increasingly well understood, the predictive adjustment of the desired flow characteristics that influence the mixing and residence times, remains a challenge. Currently, a time consuming, slow and often inconsistent manual manipulation of experimental conditions is required to address this task. In my thesis, I have overcome the above-mentioned challenges and developed an experimental strategy that for the first time provided predictive control over segmented flows in a hands-off manner. A computer-controlled platform that consisted of a real-time image processing module within an integral controller, a silicon-based microreactor and automated fluid delivery technique was designed, implemented and validated. In a first part of my thesis I utilized this approach for the automated screening of physical mass transfer and solubility characteristics of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a physical solvent at a well-defined temperature and pressure and a throughput of 12 conditions per hour. Second, by applying the segmented flow approach to a recently discovered CO2 chemical absorbent, frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), I determined the thermodynamic characteristics of the CO2-FLP reaction. Finally, the segmented flow approach was employed for characterization and investigation of CO2-governed liquid-liquid phase separation process. The second part of my thesis utilized the segmented flow platform for the preparation and shape control of high quality colloidal nanomaterials (e.g., CdSe/CdS) via the automated control of residence times up to approximately 5 minutes. By introducing a novel oscillatory segmented flow concept, I was able to further extend the residence time limitation to 24 hours. A case study of a

  20. Eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by electron transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sintermann

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A system for fast ammonia (NH3 measurements based on a commercial Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer is presented. It uses electron transfer reaction (eTR as ionisation pathway and features a drift tube of polyetheretherketone (PEEK and silica-coated steel. Heating the instrumental inlet and the drift tube to 180° C enabled an effective time resolution of ~1 s and made it possible to apply the eTR-MS for eddy covariance (EC measurements. EC fluxes of NH3 were measured over two agricultural fields in Oensingen, Switzerland, following fertilisations with cattle slurry. Air was aspirated close to a sonic anemometer at a flow of 100 STP L min−1 and was directed through a 23 m long 1/2" PFA tube heated to 150°C to an air-conditioned trailer where the eTR-MS sub-sampled from the large bypass stream. This setup minimised damping of fast NH3 concentration changes between the sampling point and the actual measurement. High-frequency attenuation loss of the NH3 fluxes of 20 to 40% was quantified and corrected for using an empirical ogive method. The instrumental NH3 background signal showed a minor interference with H2O which was characterised in the laboratory. The resulting correction of the NH3 flux after slurry spreading was less than 1‰. The flux detection limit of the EC system was about 5 ng m−2 s−1 while the accuracy of individual flux measurements was estimated 16% for the high-flux regime during these experiments. The NH3 emissions after broad spreading of the slurry showed an initial maximum of 150 μg m2 s−1 with a fast decline in the following hours.

  1. The renaissance of hydrides as energy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana; Orimo, Shin-Ichi

    2017-02-01

    Materials based on hydrides have been the linchpin in the development of several practical energy storage technologies, of which the most prominent example is nickel-metal hydride batteries. Motivated by the need to meet the future's energy demand, the past decade has witnessed substantial advancements in the research and development of hydrides as media for hydrogen energy storage. More recently, new and rapidly evolving discoveries have positioned hydrides as highly promising materials for future electrochemical energy storage, such as electrolytes for mono- and divalent batteries, and anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In addition, the potential of hydrides in efficient power transmission has been recently revealed. In this Review, we highlight key advances and illustrate how the versatility of hydrides has not only yielded a meaningful past, but also ensures a very bright future.

  2. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  3. Fusion and neutron transfer reactions with weakly bound nuclei within time-dependent and coupled channel approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarin, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation and the coupled channel approach based on the method of perturbed stationary two-center states are used to describe nucleon transfers and fusion in low-energy nuclear reactions. Results of the cross sections calculation for the formation of the 198Au and fusion in the 6He+197Au reaction and for the formation of the 65Zn in 6He+64Zn reaction agree satisfactorily with the experimental data near the barrier. The Feynman's continual integrals calculations for a few-body systems were used for the proposal of the new form of the shell model mean field for helium isotopes.

  4. Thin-film metal hydrides for solar energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mongstad, Trygve Tveiteraas

    2012-11-01

    Thin-film metal hydrides may become important solar energy materials in the future. This thesis demonstrates interesting material properties of metal hydride films, relevant for applications as semiconducting materials for photovoltaic (PV) solar cells and for regulation of light using smart window technology.The work presented here has comprised an experimental study, focusing on three different materials: Magnesium hydride (MgH2), magnesium nickel hydride (Mg2NiH4) and yttrium hydride (YHx). Reactive sputter deposition was used to prepare the metal hydride film samples.This synthesis method is relatively uncommon for metal hydrides. Here,the first demonstration of reactive sputtering synthesis for YHx and Mg2NiH4 is given. Different challenges in forming singlephase, pure metal hydrides were identified: MgH2 could not be deposited without 3-16% metallic Mg present in the films, and YHx was found to react strong-ly to oxygen (O) during the deposition process. On the other hand, Mg2NiH4 films formed easily and apparently without major metallic clusters and with low O content.Mg2NiH4 is a semiconductor with an optical band gap that is suitable for PV solar cells. This study has showed that films with promising electrical and optical properties can be synthesized using reactive cosputtering of Mg and Ni. Using optical methods, the band gap for the as deposited samples was estimated to 1.54-1.76 eV, depending on the Mg-Ni composition. The asdeposited films were amorphous or nano-crystalline, but could be crystallized into the high-temperature fcc structure of Mg2NiH4 using heat treatment at 523 K. The band gap of the crystalline films was 2.1-2.2 eV, depending on the composition.A pronounced photochromic reaction to visible and UV light was observed for transparent yttrium hydride (T-YHx) samples. The optical transmission was reduced when the samples were illuminated, and the original optical transmission was restored when the samples were kept under dark conditions

  5. Detection of trace gases from fermentation processes using photoacoustic spectroscopy and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boamfă-Ivan, Elena Iuliana

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents novel interdisciplinary Physics - Biology research work that employed Photoacoustic Spectroscopy and Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Both techniques were used in biological studies of trace gasses emitted by crop plants and fruit under stress situations. The findings

  6. Diphenylbutadienes Syntheses by Means of the Wittig Reaction: Experimental Introduction to the Use of Phase Transfer Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillois, J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis of 1,4-diphenylbutadiene by means of the Wittig reaction is presented as suitable for organic chemistry students at the end of a basic laboratory program to apply laboratory skills and display understanding of the use of phase transfer catalysis and its application in syntheses. (CS)

  7. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry volatile organic compound fingerprinting for monovarietal extra virgin olive oil identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Samblas, C.; Tres, A.; Koot, A.H.; Ruth, van S.M.; Gonzalez-Casado, A.; Cuadros-Rodriguez, L.

    2012-01-01

    Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new technique that allows the fast and accurate qualification of the volatile organic compound (VOC) fingerprint. This paper describes the analysis of thirty samples of extra virgin olive oil, of five different varieties of olive

  8. A Short Account of RRKM Theory of Unimolecular Reactions and of Marcus Theory of Electron Transfer in a Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The RRKM Theory of Unimolecular Reactions and Marcus Theory of Electron Transfer are here briefly discussed in a historical perspective. In the final section, after a general discussion on the educational usefulness of teaching chemistry in a historical framework, hints are given on how some characteristics of Marcus' work could be introduced in…

  9. Phase transfer reagent promoted tandem ring-opening and ring-closing reactions of unique 3-(1-alkynyl) chromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Jin, Shiyu; Huang, Liping; Hu, Youhong

    2015-05-01

    A phase transfer reagent promoted tandem ring-opening and ring-closing reaction of 3-(1-alkynyl) chromones has been developed. This process remarkably generates functionalized 3-acyl-2-substituted chromones. Interestingly, when 3-(hepta-1,6-diyn-1-yl)chromone derivatives are applied, a novel tetracyclic chromone scaffold can be obtained by a further intramolecular 4 + 2 cyclization.

  10. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry volatile organic compound fingerprinting for monovarietal extra virgin olive oil identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Samblas, C.; Tres, A.; Koot, A.H.; Ruth, van S.M.; Gonzalez-Casado, A.; Cuadros-Rodriguez, L.

    2012-01-01

    Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new technique that allows the fast and accurate qualification of the volatile organic compound (VOC) fingerprint. This paper describes the analysis of thirty samples of extra virgin olive oil, of five different varieties of olive fr

  11. Geographical provenancing of purple grape juices from different farming systems by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry using supervised statistical techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granato, Daniel; Koot, Alex; Ruth, van S.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organic, biodynamic and conventional purple grape juices (PGJ; n = 79) produced in Brazil and Europe were characterized by volatile organic compounds (m/z 20-160) measured by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), and classification models were built using supervised sta

  12. A Short Account of RRKM Theory of Unimolecular Reactions and of Marcus Theory of Electron Transfer in a Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The RRKM Theory of Unimolecular Reactions and Marcus Theory of Electron Transfer are here briefly discussed in a historical perspective. In the final section, after a general discussion on the educational usefulness of teaching chemistry in a historical framework, hints are given on how some characteristics of Marcus' work could be introduced in…

  13. A simple approach to the solvent reorganisation Gibbs free energy in electron transfer reactions of redox metalloproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulstrup, Jens

    1999-01-01

    We discuss a simple model for the environmental reorganisation Gibbs free energy, E-r, in electron transfer between a metalloprotein and a small reaction partner. The protein is represented as a dielectric globule with low dielectric constant, the metal centres as conducting spheres, all embedded...

  14. First half-reaction mechanism of nitric oxide synthase: the role of proton and oxygen coupled electron transfer in the reaction by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung-Bin; Carvajal, Maria Angels; Shaik, Sason

    2009-01-08

    The first half-reaction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is investigated by means of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. An energetically feasible arginine hydroxylation path was found only when the iron-oxy complex accepted one proton from an external source. The so formed species has not been considered in heme chemistry; it is described as Por(+*)Fe(III)-OOH and is characterized by the same molecular constituency as the more known ferric-hydroperoxide species, compound 0, but has a cation-radical porphyrin moiety. The reaction itself is found to involve proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) and oxygen coupled electron transfer (OCET) steps en route to the formation of compound I and the ultimate monooxygenation of arginine. The cofactor H(4)B turns out to be a key player in the mechanism acting alternatively as an electron donor (when neutral) and an electron sink (when in its radical-cation state) and, thereby, providing the electron transfer component in the various coupled proton and oxygen transfer steps (see Scheme 4 ). The various pieces of this mechanism account for many of the experimental observations, such as the following: (a) the origins of the second proton supplied to the heme, (b) the elusiveness of compound I, (c) the inactivity of peroxide-shunt pathways in NOS first half-reaction, (d) the inhibition of the H(4)B analogue 4-amino-H(4)B due to protonation at the N3 position, (e) the roles of Trp188 (iNOS numbering) and the crystal water at the active site (W115), and so on. Alternative mechanistic hypotheses are tested and excluded, and a new mechanism for the NOS second half-reaction is proposed.

  15. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  16. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  17. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    by annealing at 700°C for 12 hours. The alloys appeared to be nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size around 10 nm before annealing. Special steel containers was developed for the annealing of the metal powders in inert atmosphere. The use of various annealing temperatures was investigated......This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today...... was developed. The parameters milling time, milling intensity, number of balls and form of the alloying metals were investigated. Based on this a final alloying technique for the subsequent preparation of electrode materials was established. The technique comprises milling for 4 hours twice possibly followed...

  18. Searching for the minimum energy path in the sulfuryl transfer reaction catalyzed by human estrogen sulfotransferase: Role of enzyme dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ping; Yang, Weitao; Pedersen, Lars C.; Negishi, Masa; Pedersen, Lee G.

    The enzymatic transfer of a sulfuryl group from the ubiquitous biological source of sulfate 3?-phosphoadenosine 5?-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to estrogen is investigated by the pseudo-bond quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method (QM/MM) method. Calculations of the reaction path are performed starting with models based on two crystal structures, which differ in information about the cofactor and substrates. In addition, a subsequent relaxation of the enzyme was performed with the found transition state frozen, followed by redetermination of the path. An activation barrier of 22 kcal/mol is estimated. The reaction mechanism features a proton transfer from the estrogen to a catalytic histidine followed by the rate determining SO3 transfer. The mechanism found is largely dissociative.

  19. Reaction-diffusion systems in natural sciences and new technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, André A.

    2012-12-01

    Diffusion mechanisms in natural sciences and innovation management involve partial differential equations (PDEs). This is due to their spatio-temporal dimensions. Functional semi-discretized PDEs (with lattice spatial structures or time delays) may be even more adapted to real world problems. In the modeling process, PDEs can also formalize behaviors, such as the logistic growth of populations with migration, and the adopters’ dynamics of new products in innovation models. In biology, these events are related to variations in the environment, population densities and overcrowding, migration and spreading of humans, animals, plants and other cells and organisms. In chemical reactions, molecules of different species interact locally and diffuse. In the management of new technologies, the diffusion processes of innovations in the marketplace (e.g., the mobile phone) are a major subject. These innovation diffusion models refer mainly to epidemic models. This contribution introduces that modeling process by using PDEs and reviews the essential features of the dynamics and control in biological, chemical and new technology transfer. This paper is essentially user-oriented with basic nonlinear evolution equations, delay PDEs, several analytical and numerical methods for solving, different solutions, and with the use of mathematical packages, notebooks and codes. The computations are carried out by using the software Wolfram Mathematica®7, and C++ codes.

  20. Experimental study of the $^{66}$Ni$(d,p)^{67}$Ni one-neutron transfer reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Diriken, J.; Andreyev, A.N.; Antalic, S.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Darby, I.G.; De Witte, H.; Eberth, J.; Elseviers, J.; Fedosseev, V.N.; Flavigny, F.; Fransen, Ch.; Georgiev, G.; Gernhauser, R.; Hess, H.; Huyse, M.; Jolie, J.; Kröll, Th.; Krücken, R.; Lutter, R.; Marsh, B.A.; Mertzimekis, T.; Muecher, D.; Orlandi, R.; Pakou, A.; Raabe, R.; Randisi, G.; Reiter, P.; Roger, T.; Seidlitz, M.; Seliverstov, M.; Sotty, C.; Tornqvist, H.; Van De Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.

    2015-01-01

    The quasi-SU(3) sequence of the positive parity $νg_{9/2}, d_{5/2}, s_{1/2}$ orbitals above the N=40 shell gap are assumed to induce strong quadrupole collectivity in the neutron-rich Fe (Z=26) and Cr (Z=24) isotopes below the nickel region. In this paper the position and strength of these single-particle orbitals are characterized in the neighborhood of $^{68}$Ni (Z=28,N=40) through the $^{66}$Ni($d,p$)$^{67}$Ni one-neutron transfer reaction at 2.95 MeV/nucleon in inverse kinematics, performed at the REX-ISOLDE facility in CERN. A combination of the Miniball $\\gamma$-array and T-REX particle-detection setup was used and a delayed coincidence technique was employed to investigate the 13.3-$\\mu$s isomer at 1007 keV in $^{67}$Ni. Excited states up to an excitation energy of 5.8 MeV have been populated. Feeding of the $νg_{9/2}$ (1007 keV) and $νd_{5/2}$ (2207 keV and 3277 keV) positive-parity neutron states and negative parity ($νpf$) states have been observed at low excitation energy. The extracted relativ...

  1. Rapid tomato volatile profiling by using proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farneti, Brian; Cristescu, Simona M; Costa, Guglielmo; Harren, Frans J M; Woltering, Ernst J

    2012-05-01

    The availability of rapid and accurate methods to assess fruit flavor is of utmost importance to support quality control especially in the breeding phase. Breeders need more information and analytical tools to facilitate selection for complex multigenic traits such as flavor quality. In this study, it is shown that proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a suitable method to monitor at high sensitivity the emission of volatiles determining the tomato aromatic profile such as hexanal, hexenals, methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde. The volatiles emitted by 14 tomato varieties (at red stage) were analyzed by 2 solvent-free headspace methods: solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography MS and PTR-MS. Multivariate statistics (principal component analysis and cluster analysis) of the PTR-MS results allow an unambiguous separation between varieties, especially with a clear fingerprinting separation between the different tomato types: round truss, cocktail, and cherry tomatoes. PTR-MS was also successfully used to monitor the changes in volatile profiles during postharvest ripening and storage.

  2. Static and dynamic headspace analysis of instant coffee blends by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Andrea; Gaysinsky, Sylvia; Czepa, Andreas; Del Pulgar, José Sanchez; Cappellin, Luca; Biasioli, Franco

    2015-09-01

    Instant coffee is a widespread product, generally related to a high consumer acceptability, also because of its ease of preparation. The present work addresses the characterization of the headspace of freshly brewed instant coffees resulting from different blends, during and immediately after preparation. The sample set consisted of 10 coffees, obtained by mixing three different blends in different proportions. The employment of Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) allowed for direct and real-time sampling from the headspace, under conditions that mimic those that are encountered above the cup during and right after brewing. Different coffee brews were separated on the basis of the respective volatile profiles, and data showed good consistency with the respective blend compositions. When the headspace evolution was monitored during preparation, similar results were obtained in terms of blend separation; moreover, different blends displayed different and reproducible 'signatures' in terms of time evolution. A straightforward method for the prediction of headspace composition is proposed, allowing to predict the volatile profiles of two-component and three-component blends on the basis of the respective parent components. Overall, the results constitute a successful example of the applicability of PTR-MS as a tool for product development in food science. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A REVIEW: THE EFFECT OF OPERATING CONDITIONS AND THERMAL MANAGEMENT ON THE PERFORMANCES OF METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN STORAGE TANK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taurista Perdana Syawitri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For safety and operability concerns, the use of metal hydrides to store hydrogen appears to be particularly promising option for alternative energy at present. However, the process of adding, removing and distributing heat during the hydrogen charging/ discharging process is problematic due to the poor effective thermal conductivity of the metal hydride porous bed and the high enthalpies of H2 adsorption/desorption. Therefore, heat transfer is a critical factor affecting the performance of metal hydride hydrogen (MHR storage tanks. Over decade, many researches focused on MHR’s operating conditions and its thermal management to improve its performance.

  4. Deuteron-induced nucleon transfer reactions within an ab initio framework: First application to p-shell nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Raimondi, Francesco; Navrátil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low-energy transfer reactions in which a proton is stripped from a deuteron projectile and dropped into a target play a crucial role in the formation of nuclei in both primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis, as well as in the study of exotic nuclei using radioactive beam facilities and inverse kinematics. Ab initio approaches have been successfully applied to describe the $^3$H$(d,n)^4$He and $^3$He$(d,p)^4$He fusion processes. Purpose: An ab initio treatment of transfer reactions would also be desirable for heavier targets. In this work, we extend the ab initio description of $(d,p)$ reactions to processes with light $p$-shell nuclei. As a first application, we study the elastic scattering of deuterium on $^7$Li and the ${}^{7}$Li($d$,$p$)${}^{8}$Li transfer reaction based on a two-body Hamiltonian. Methods: We use the no-core shell model to compute the wave functions of the nuclei involved in the reaction, and describe the dynamics between targets and projectiles with the help of microscopic-clu...

  5. Crystal structure of gold hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtyareva, Valentina F., E-mail: degtyar@issp.ac.ru

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Volume expansion of metal hydrides is due to the increase in the s-band filling. • AuH structure is similar to that of Hg having one more s electron compared to Au. • Structure stability of both Hg and AuH is governed by the Hume-Rothery rule. - Abstract: A number of transition metal hydrides with close-packed metal sublattices of fcc or hcp structures with hydrogen in octahedral interstitial positions were obtained by the high-pressure-hydrogen technique described by Ponyatovskii et al. (1982). In this paper we consider volume increase of metals by hydrogenation and possible crystal structure of gold hydride in relation with the structure of mercury, the nearest neighbor of Au in the Periodic table. Suggested structure of AuH has a basic tetragonal body-centered cell that is very similar to the mercury structure Hg-t I 2. The reasons of stability for this structure are discussed within the model of Fermi sphere–Brillouin zone interactions.

  6. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  7. Residual Water Modulates QA−-to-QB Electron Transfer in Bacterial Reaction Centers Embedded in Trehalose Amorphous Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Francesco; Palazzo, Gerardo; Mallardi, Antonia; Cordone, Lorenzo; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    The role of protein dynamics in the electron transfer from the reduced primary quinone, QA−, to the secondary quinone, QB, was studied at room temperature in isolated reaction centers (RC) from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides by incorporating the protein in trehalose water systems of different trehalose/water ratios. The effects of dehydration on the reaction kinetics were examined by analyzing charge recombination after different regimes of RC photoexcitation (single laser pulse, double flash, and continuous light) as well as by monitoring flash-induced electrochromic effects in the near infrared spectral region. Independent approaches show that dehydration of RC-containing matrices causes reversible, inhomogeneous inhibition of QA−-to-QB electron transfer, involving two subpopulations of RCs. In one of these populations (i.e., active), the electron transfer to QB is slowed but still successfully competing with P+QA− recombination, even in the driest samples; in the other (i.e., inactive), electron transfer to QB after a laser pulse is hindered, inasmuch as only recombination of the P+QA− state is observed. Small residual water variations (∼7 wt %) modulate fully the relative fraction of the two populations, with the active one decreasing to zero in the driest samples. Analysis of charge recombination after continuous illumination indicates that, in the inactive subpopulation, the conformational changes that rate-limit electron transfer can be slowed by >4 orders of magnitude. The reported effects are consistent with conformational gating of the reaction and demonstrate that the conformational dynamics controlling electron transfer to QB is strongly enslaved to the structure and dynamics of the surrounding medium. Comparing the effects of dehydration on P+QA−→PQA recombination and QA−QB→QAQB− electron transfer suggests that conformational changes gating the latter process are distinct from those stabilizing the primary

  8. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and

  9. Influence of Milling Conditions on the Hydriding Properties of Mg-C Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristina Stoyadinova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mg75 at.%, CB25 at.% (CB: carbon black composites were synthesized at different ball milling conditions (milling energy, milling duration, and environment and their hydriding properties were characterized by high-pressure DSC. The SEM observations revealed that the samples consist of 5–15 μm Mg particles, surrounded and in some cases coated by carbon particles. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the Mg phase of all as-obtained composite powders is nanocrystalline with average crystallite size in the range 20–30 nm, depending on the milling conditions. The best hydriding properties, expressed in low-temperature hydriding (below 150°C and improved cycle life, showed the composites milled at dry conditions. This is obviously due mainly to the successful Mg surface protection by the carbon. Additional decrease of the hydriding temperature (<100°C was achieved applying higher-energy milling, but at the same time the cycling stability deteriorated, due to the extremely fine particles and microstructure achieved under these conditions. The composites milled in the presence of heptane showed rapid capacity decline during cycling as well. The observed difference in the hydriding behavior of the Mg-CB composites is attributed to the different coating efficiency of the carbon milled under different conditions with Mg, which is supposed to protect magnesium from oxidation and plays a catalytic role for the hydriding reaction.

  10. Carbene-metal hydrides can be much less acidic than phosphine-metal hydrides: significance in hydrogenations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ye; Fan, Yubo; Burgess, Kevin

    2010-05-05

    Acidities of iridium hydride intermediates were shown to be critical in some transformations mediated by the chiral analogues of Crabtree's catalyst, 1-3. To do this, several experiments were undertaken to investigate the acidities of hydrogenation mixtures formed using these iridium-oxazoline complexes. DFT calculations indicated that the acidity difference for Ir-H intermediates in these hydrogenations were astounding; iridium hydride from the N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst 1 was calculated to be around seven pK(a) units less acidic than those from the P-based complexes 2 and 3. Consistent with this, the carbene complex 1 was shown to be more effective for hydrogenations of acid-sensitive substrates. In deuteration experiments, less "abnormal" deuteration was observed, corresponding to fewer complications from acid-mediated alkene isomerization preceding the D(2)-addition step. Finally, simple tests with pH indicators provided visual evidence that phosphine-based catalyst precursors give significantly more acidic reaction mixtures than the corresponding N-heterocyclic carbene ones. These observations indicate carbene-for-phosphine (and similar) ligand substitutions may impact the outcome of catalytic reactions by modifying the acidities of the metal hydrides formed.

  11. Alkyl and Hydride-Olefin Complexes of Niobocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klazinga, A.H.; Teuben, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Reactions of Cp2NbCl2 with RMgCl (R = n-C3H7, i-C3H7, n-C4H9, s-C4H9 and n-C5H11) give niobocene hydride olefin complexes Cp2Nb(H)L (L = C3H6, C4H8 and C5H10). The last step of the reaction probably proceeds via a stereospecific β-H elimination from the monoalkyl species Cp2NbR. Decomposition of n-a

  12. Deuteron-induced nucleon transfer reactions within an ab initio framework: First application to p -shell nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Francesco; Hupin, Guillaume; Navrátil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia

    2016-05-01

    Background: Low-energy transfer reactions in which a proton is stripped from a deuteron projectile and dropped into a target play a crucial role in the formation of nuclei in both primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis, as well as in the study of exotic nuclei using radioactive beam facilities and inverse kinematics. Ab initio approaches have been successfully applied to describe the 3H (d ,n )4He and 3He(d ,p )4He fusion processes. Purpose: An ab initio treatment of transfer reactions would also be desirable for heavier targets. In this work, we extend the ab initio description of (d ,p ) reactions to processes with light p -shell nuclei. As a first application, we study the elastic scattering of deuterium on 7Li and the 7Li(d ,p )8Li transfer reaction based on a two-body Hamiltonian. Methods: We use the no-core shell model to compute the wave functions of the nuclei involved in the reaction, and describe the dynamics between targets and projectiles with the help of microscopic-cluster states in the spirit of the resonating group method. Results: The shapes of the excitation functions for deuterons impinging on 7Li are qualitatively reproduced up to the deuteron breakup energy. The interplay between d -7Li and p -8Li particle-decay channels determines some features of the 9Be spectrum above the d +7Li threshold. Our prediction for the parity of the 17.298 MeV resonance is at odds with the experimental assignment. Conclusions: Deuteron stripping reactions with p -shell targets can now be computed ab initio, but calculations are very demanding. A quantitative description of the 7Li(d ,p )8Li reaction will require further work to include the effect of three-nucleon forces and additional decay channels and to improve the convergence rate of our calculations.

  13. Protonation equilibrium and hydrogen production by a dinuclear cobalt-hydride complex reduced by cobaltocene with trifluoroacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sukanta; Shikano, Shinya; Yamada, Yusuke; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Llobet, Antoni; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-10-16

    A dinuclear Co complex with bis(pyridyl)pyrazolato (bpp(-)) and terpyridine (trpy) ligands, [Co(III)2(trpy)2(μ-bpp)(OH)(OH2)](4+) (1(4+)), undergoes three-electron reduction by cobaltocene in acetonitrile to produce 1(+), which is in the protonation equilibrium with the Co(II)Co(III)-hydride complex, and the further protonation of the hydride by trifluoroacetic acid yields hydrogen quantitatively. The kinetic study together with the detection of the Co(II)Co(III)-hydride complex revealed the mechanism of the hydrogen production by the reaction of 1(+) with trifluoroacetic acid.

  14. The Electron Transfer Reaction between p-Nitrobenzoates and β-N, N-Dimethylaminonaphthalene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A few of p-nitrobenzoates were synthesized, and the electron transfer of them with β-N, N-dimethylaminonaphthalene (DMAN) in methanol solution was studied. Steady-state fluore-scence results showed the cyclodextrin moiety in p-nitrobenzoyl-β-cyclodextrin would block the electron transfer pathway from DMAN compared with other electron acceptors, thus, reduced the electron transfer efficiency.

  15. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ytterbium: Electron-transfer reactions with organotransition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Phillip Thomas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    The divalent lanthanide complex, (Me5C5)2Yb, reacts with methylcopper to produce the base-free, ytterbium-methyl complex, (Me5C5)2YbMe. This product forms a asymmetric, methyl-bridged dimer in the solid state. The bulky alkyl complex, (Me5C5)2YbCH(SiMe3)2, displays similar chemistry to (Me5C5)2YbMe, but at a reduced reaction rate due to the limited accessibility of the metal in (Me5C5)3YbCH(SiMe5)2. Copper and silver halide salts react with (Me5C5)2V to produce the trivalent halide derivatives, (Me5C5)2VX (X + F, Cl, Br, I). The chloride complex, (Me5C5)2VCl, reacts with lithium reagents to form the phenyl and borohydride species. Nitrous oxide transfers an oxygen atom to (Me5C5)2V producing the vanadium-oxo complex, (Me5Ce5)2VO. The trivalent titanium species, (Me5C5)2TiX (X = Cl, Br, Me, BH4), form bimetallic coordination complexes with (Me5C5)2Yb. The magnetic behavior of the products indicates that electron transfer has not occurred. The solid state structures of the chloride and bromide complexes show unusual bend angles for the halide bridges between ytterbium and titanium. A model based on frontier orbital theory has been proposed to account for the bending behavior in these species. The bimetallic methyl complex contains a linear methyl bridge between ytterbium and titanium.

  16. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ytterbium: Electron-transfer reactions with organotransition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, P.T.

    1991-11-01

    The divalent lanthanide complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb, reacts with methylcopper to produce the base-free, ytterbium-methyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe. This product forms a asymmetric, methyl-bridged dimer in the solid state. The bulky alkyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, displays similar chemistry to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe, but at a reduced reaction rate due to the limited accessibility of the metal in (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. Copper and silver halide salts react with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V to produce the trivalent halide derivatives, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VX (X + F, Cl, Br, I). The chloride complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VCl, reacts with lithium reagents to form the phenyl and borohydride species. Nitrous oxide transfers an oxygen atom to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V producing the vanadium-oxo complex, (Me{sub 5}Ce{sub 5}){sub 2}VO. The trivalent titanium species, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}TiX (X = Cl, Br, Me, BH{sub 4}), form bimetallic coordination complexes with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb. The magnetic behavior of the products indicates that electron transfer has not occurred. The solid state structures of the chloride and bromide complexes show unusual bend angles for the halide bridges between ytterbium and titanium. A model based on frontier orbital theory has been proposed to account for the bending behavior in these species. The bimetallic methyl complex contains a linear methyl bridge between ytterbium and titanium.

  17. Transient kinetics of electron transfer reactions of flavodoxin: ionic strength dependence of semiquinone oxidation by cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and ferric ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and computer modeling of reaction complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simondsen, R P; Weber, P C; Salemme, F R; Tollin, G

    1982-12-07

    Electron transfer reactions between Clostridum pasteurianum flavodoxin semiquinone and various oxidants [horse heart cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and ferric ethylenediaminetetraacetic [horse heart cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and ferric ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)] have been studied as a function of ionic strength by using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The cytochrome c reaction is complicated by the existence of two cytochrome species which react at different rates and whose relative concentrations are ionic strength dependent. Only the faster of these two reactions is considered here. At low ionic strength, complex formation between cytochrome c and flavodoxin is indicated by a leveling off of the pseudo-first-order rate constant at high cytochrome c concentration. This is not observed for either ferricyanide or ferric EDTA. For cytochrome c, the rate and association constants for complex formation were found to increase with decreasing ionic strength, consistent with negative charges on flavodoxin interacting with the positively charged cytochrome electron transfer site. Both ferricyanide and ferric EDTA are negatively charged oxidants, and the rate data respond to ionic strength changes as would be predicted for reactants of the same charge sign. These results demonstrate that electrostatic interactions involving negatively charged groups are important in orienting flavodoxin with respect to oxidants during electron transfer. We have also carried out computer modeling studies of putative complexes of flavodoxin with cytochrome c and ferricyanide, which relate their structural properties to both the observed kinetic behavior and some more general features of physiological electron transfer processes. The results of this study are consistent with the ionic strength behavior described above.

  18. Elastic scattering and cluster-transfer reactions of 98Rb on 7Li at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Bouma, Jake

    Exotic nuclei are nuclei with unusual proton to neutron ratios that exist far away from stability. Due to their instability, these nuclei are only available for nuclear reactions as radioactive ion beams. Experiments must therefore be performed in inverse kinematics at advanced radioactive isotope separation and acceleration facilities. REX-ISOLDE at CERN is one such facility, capable of producing post-accelerated radioactive ion beams with energies up to 2.85 MeV/u. Cluster-transfer reactions in inverse kinematics with a $^{7}$Li target are proposed as a tool for the study of exotic nuclei at REX-ISOLDE. In these reactions, either the $\\alpha$ or triton clusters that make up the weakly bound $^{7}$Li nucleus can be transfered to the beam nucleus. The remaining cluster that is not transferred can be detected, and identifies the particular transfer channel. Through this mechanism it is possible to populate states of very high spin, which is useful for $\\gamma$-spectroscopy in poorly known exotic regions. Speci...

  19. Digallane with redox-active diimine ligand: dualism of electron-transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Chudakova, Valentina A; Bazyakina, Natalia L; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy V; Fukin, Georgy K

    2014-05-19

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1), which consists of redox-active ligand 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene (dpp-Bian), has been studied. The reaction of 1 with I2 proceeds via one-electron oxidation of each of two dpp-Bian ligands to a radical-anionic state and affords complex (dpp-Bian)IGa-GaI(dpp-Bian) (2). Dissolution of complex 2 in pyridine (Py) gives monomeric compound (dpp-Bian)GaI(Py) (3) as a result of a solvent-induced intramolecular electron transfer from the metal-metal bond to the dpp-Bian ligands. Treatment of compound 3 with B(C6F5)3 leads to removal of pyridine and restores compound 2. The reaction of compound 1 with 3,6-di-tert-butyl-ortho-benzoquinone (3,6-Q) proceeds with oxidation of all the redox-active centers in 1 (the Ga-Ga bond and two dpp-Bian dianions) and results in mononuclear catecholate (dpp-Bian)Ga(Cat) (4) (Cat = [3,6-Q](2-)). Treatment of 4 with AgBF4 gives a mixture of [(dpp-Bian)2Ag][BF4] (5) and (dpp-Bian)GaF(Cat) (6), which both consist of neutral dpp-Bian ligands. The reduction of benzylideneacetone (BA) with 1 generates the BA radical-anions, which dimerize, affording (dpp-Bian)Ga-(BA-BA)-Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). In this case the Ga-Ga bond remains unchanged. Within 10 min at 95 °C in solution compound 7 undergoes transformation to paramagnetic complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(BA-BA) (8) and metal-free compound C36H40N2 (9). The latter is a product of intramolecular addition of the C-H bond of one of the iPr groups to the C═N bond in dpp-Bian. Diamagnetic compounds 3, 5, 6, and 9 have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and paramagnetic complexes 2, 4, 7, and 8 by ESR spectroscopy. Molecular structures of 2-7 and 9 have been established by single-crystal X-ray analysis.

  20. Calibration and intercomparison of acetic acid measurements using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, K.B.; Keene, W.C.; Pszenny, A.A.P.; Mayne, H.R.; Talbot, R.W.; Sive, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Acetic acid is one of the most abundant organic acids in the ambient atmosphere, with maximum mixing ratios reaching into the tens of parts per billion by volume (ppbv) range. The identities and associated magnitudes of the major sources and sinks for acetic acid are poorly characterized, due in part to the limitation in available measurement techniques. This paper demonstrates that Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) can reliably quantify acetic acid vapor in ambient air. Three different PTR-MS configurations were calibrated at low ppbv mixing ratios using permeation tubes, which yielded calibration factors between 7.0 and 10.9 normalized counts per second per ppbv (ncps ppbv−1) at a drift tube field strength of 132 townsend (Td). Detection limits ranged from 0.06 to 0.32 ppbv with dwell times of 5 s. These calibration factors showed negligible humidity dependence. Using the experimentally determined calibration factors, PTR-MS measurements of acetic acid during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) campaign were validated against results obtained using Mist Chambers coupled with Ion Chromatography (MC/IC). An orthogonal least squares linear regression of paired data yielded a slope of 1.14 ± 0.06 (2σ), an intercept of 0.049 ± 20 (2σ) ppbv, and an R2 of 0.78. The median mixing ratio of acetic acid on Appledore Island, ME during the ICARTT campaign was 0.530 ± 0.025 ppbv with a minimum of 0.075 ± 0.004 ppbv, and a maximum of 3.555 ± 0.171 ppbv.