WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrated iron oxide

  1. The sorption of inorganic arsenic on modified sepiolite: Effect of hydrated iron(III-oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Nikola I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of inorganic arsenic species, As(III and As(V, from water by sepiolite modified with hydrated iron(III oxide was investigated at 25 °C through batch studies. The influence of the initial pH value, the initial As concentrations, the contact time and types of water on the sorption capacity was investigated. Two types of water were used, deionized and groundwater. The maximal sorption capacity for As(III from deionized water was observed at initial and final pH value 7.0, while the bonding of As(V was observed to be almost pH independent for pH value in the range from 2.0 to 7.0, and the significant decrease in the sorption capacity was observed at pH values above 7.0. The sorption capacity at initial pH 7.0 was about 10 mg gˉ1 for As(III and 4.2 mg gˉ1 for As(V in deionized water. The capacity in groundwater was decreased by 40 % for As(III and by 20 % for As(V. The Langmuir model and pseudo-second order kinetic model revealed good agreement with the experimental results. The results show that Fe(III-modified sepiolite exhibits significant affinity for arsenic removal and it has a potential for the application in water purification processes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45019, III 43009 i TR 37010

  2. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate...

  3. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  4. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including the...

  6. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent ......Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate...... these findings provide new information to further the understanding of molecular processes involved in iron biomineralization by anaerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria and offer potential signatures of those metabolisms that can be looked for in the geological record. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform in...

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of ultrasonic-assisted magnesium oxide hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Nie, Yixing; Jin, Qi; Guo, Lin; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2018-01-01

    The kinetics of ultrasonic-assisted magnesium oxide (MgO) hydration was investigated in the present paper. The degree of hydration at different temperature (298-338K) and reaction time (0.25-3h) was determined by thermal gravity analysis (TGA). And the products of the hydration were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and Particle Size Distribution analysis (PSD). A coupling model based on characteristic equations for chemical reaction control and inward diffusion control was employed to describe the hydration process. The experimental data indicated that the degree of hydration at 2h under ultrasound reaction condition was 18-25% higher than that of mechanical stirring reaction condition. However, the value was nearly the same at the first hour. Combined with the analysis results of degree of hydration, characterization of products and model fitting, the hydration process was supposed to be a mixed model, which controlled by both chemical reaction and inward diffusion. A reaction mechanism emphasized on the physical effect of ultrasound was proposed, assuming that the hydration product layer was broken and regenerated during the process. The calculated activation energy of 24.2kJmol(-1) corroborated the mechanism proposed in this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Rust in the Apollo 16 rocks. [hydration and oxidation processes in lunar environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L. A.; Mao, H. K.; Bell, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    Apollo 16 samples of all four rock types and from all stations contain evidence for hydration and oxidation - i.e., the presence of hydrated iron oxide, probably goethite. Rock 66095 contains native FeNi grains with a characteristic intergrowth of schreibersite and, to lesser extents, of cohenite. Troilite also contains sphalerite. The goethite contains 1.5-4.6 wt.% chlorine and occurs mainly on the edges of FeNi metal, causing a rust color in the cracks and space around the native metal grains, which also contain abundant chlorine. This observation suggests the presence of lawrencite (FeCl2), a phase that deliquesces and oxidizes very rapidly upon exposure to water or to a moist atmosphere.

  10. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the surface area of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  11. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taifeng Zhuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iron supplements (e.g., 10× RDA or more for oral supplements or direct iron supplementation via injection or addition to the cell culture medium for a short or long duration will induce DNA damage. Higher heme-iron intake or iron status measured by various biomarkers, especially serum ferritin, might contribute to greater risk of gestational diabetes, which may be mediated by iron oxidative stress though lipid oxidation and/or DNA damage. However, information is lacking about the effect of low dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily on lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and gestational diabetes. Randomized trials of low-dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily for pregnant women are warranted to test the relationship between iron oxidative stress and insulin resistance/gestational diabetes, especially for iron-replete women.

  12. Kinetics of iron oxidation upon polyphenol binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Nathan R; Wang, Hsiao C; Deguire, Sean N; Jenkins, Michael; Lawson, Mereze; Brumaghim, Julia L

    2010-11-07

    Polyphenol prevention of iron-mediated DNA damage occurs primarily through iron binding. Once bound, iron in the Fe(2+)-polyphenol complex autooxidizes to Fe(3+) in the presence of O(2). To determine the correlation between the rate of Fe(2+)-polyphenol autooxidation and polyphenol antioxidant ability, kinetic studies at pH = 6.0 in the presence of oxygen were performed using UV-vis spectrophotometry. Initial rates of iron-polyphenol complex oxidation for epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), methyl-3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoate (MEGA), gallic acid (GA), epicatechin (EC), and methyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (MEPCA) were in the range of 0.14-6.7 min(-1). Polyphenols with gallol groups have faster rates of iron oxidation than their catechol analogs, suggesting that stronger iron binding results in faster iron oxidation. Concentrations of polyphenol, Fe(2+), and O(2) were varied to investigate the dependence of the Fe(2+)-polyphenol autooxidation on these reactants for MEGA and MEPCA. For these analogous gallate and catecholate complexes of Fe(2+), iron oxidation reactions were first order in Fe(2+), polyphenol, and O(2), but gallate complexes show saturation behavior at much lower Fe(2+) concentrations. Thus, gallol-containing polyphenols promote iron oxidation at a significantly faster rate than analogous catechol-containing compounds, and iron oxidation rate also correlates strongly with polyphenol inhibition of DNA damage for polyphenol compounds with a single iron-binding moiety.

  13. Mechanistic Study of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanocrystals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moreover, thermal analysis of the iron oleate complex was performed to explain the heating up process. Based on the findings, theoretical arguments were constructed to mechanistically describe the thermal decomposition process. Keywords: iron (III) oleate, thermal decomposition, iron oxide nanocrystal, Ostwald ripening, ...

  14. Ferrite grade iron oxides from ore rejects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Iron oxyhydroxides and hydroxides were synthesized from chemically beneficiated high SiO2/Al2O3 low-grade iron ore (57⋅49% Fe2O3) rejects and heated to get iron oxides of 96–99⋅73% purity. The infrared band positions, isothermal weight loss and thermogravimetric and chemical analysis established the ...

  15. Ferrite grade iron oxides from ore rejects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Iron oxyhydroxides and hydroxides were synthesized from chemically beneficiated high SiO2/Al2O3 low-grade iron ore (57.49% Fe2O3) rejects and heated to get iron oxides of 96–99.73% purity. The infrared band positions, isothermal weight loss and thermogravimetric and chemical analysis established the chemical ...

  16. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume; Kappler, Andreas; Bernard, Sylvain; Obst, Martin; Férard, Céline; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Posth, Nicole; Galvez, Matthieu; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Guyot, François

    2009-02-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II) using electron microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). All detected minerals consisted mainly of amorphous iron phosphates, but based on their morphology and localization, three types of precipitates could be discriminated: (1) mineralized filaments at distance from the cells, (2) globules of 100 ± 25 nm in diameter, at the cell surface and (3) a 40-nm thick mineralized layer within the periplasm. All of those phases were shown to be intimately associated with organic molecules. Periplasmic encrustation was accompanied by an accumulation of protein moieties. In the same way, exopolysaccharides were associated with the extracellular mineralized filaments. The evolution of cell encrustation was followed by TEM over the time course of a culture: cell encrustation proceeded progressively, with rapid precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria and in the extracellular precipitates reached complete oxidation within 6 days. While a progressive oxidation of Fe in the bacteria and in the medium could be observed, spatial redox (oxido-reduction state) heterogeneities were detected at the cell poles and in the extracellular precipitates after 1 day. All these findings provide new information to further the understanding of molecular processes involved in iron biomineralization by anaerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria and

  17. Tannin biosynthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Becerra, R.; Rius, J. L.; Zorrilla, C.

    2010-08-01

    In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized with gallic acid and tannic acid are characterized using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Its size, form, and structure are compared with nanoparticles obtained previously using alfalfa biomass in order to find a simpler, consistent, and environmentally friendly method in the production of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  18. Synthesis engineering of iron oxide raspberry-shaped nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, O; Pichon, B P; Ihiawakrim, D; Florea, I; Moldovan, S; Ersen, O; Begin, D; Grenèche, J-M; Lemonnier, S; Barraud, E; Begin-Colin, S

    2017-01-07

    Magnetic porous nanostructures consisting of oriented aggregates of iron oxide nanocrystals display very interesting properties such as a lower oxidation state of magnetite, and enhanced saturation magnetization in comparison with individual nanoparticles of similar sizes and porosity. However, the formation mechanism of these promising nanostructures is not well understood, which hampers the fine tuning of their magnetic properties, for instance by doping them with other elements. Therefore the formation mechanism of porous raspberry shaped nanostructures (RSNs) synthesized by a one-pot polyol solvothermal method has been investigated in detail from the early stages by using a wide panel of characterization techniques, and especially by performing original in situ HR-TEM studies in temperature. A time-resolved study showed the intermediate formation of an amorphous iron alkoxide phase with a plate-like lamellar structure (PLS). Then, the fine investigation of PLS transformation upon heating up to 500 °C confirmed that the synthesis of RSNs involves two iron precursors: the starting one (hydrated iron chlorides) and the in situ formed iron alkoxide precursor which decomposes with time and heating and contributes to the growth step of nanostructures. Such an understanding of the formation mechanism of RSNs is necessary to envision efficient and rational enhancement of their magnetic properties.

  19. Nanosized Iron Oxide Colloids Strongly Enhance Microbial Iron Reduction▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Julian; Heister, Katja; Hofmann, Thilo; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial iron reduction is considered to be a significant subsurface process. The rate-limiting bioavailability of the insoluble iron oxyhydroxides, however, is a topic for debate. Surface area and mineral structure are recognized as crucial parameters for microbial reduction rates of bulk, macroaggregate iron minerals. However, a significant fraction of iron oxide minerals in the subsurface is supposed to be present as nanosized colloids. We therefore studied the role of colloidal iron oxides in microbial iron reduction. In batch growth experiments with Geobacter sulfurreducens, colloids of ferrihydrite (hydrodynamic diameter, 336 nm), hematite (123 nm), goethite (157 nm), and akaganeite (64 nm) were added as electron acceptors. The colloidal iron oxides were reduced up to 2 orders of magnitude more rapidly (up to 1,255 pmol h−1 cell−1) than bulk macroaggregates of the same iron phases (6 to 70 pmol h−1 cell−1). The increased reactivity was not only due to the large surface areas of the colloidal aggregates but also was due to a higher reactivity per unit surface. We hypothesize that this can be attributed to the high bioavailability of the nanosized aggregates and their colloidal suspension. Furthermore, a strong enhancement of reduction rates of bulk ferrihydrite was observed when nanosized ferrihydrite aggregates were added. PMID:19915036

  20. Carbon-Supported Iron Oxide Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meaz, T.; Mørup, Steen; Koch, C. Bender

    1996-01-01

    A carbon black ws impregnated with 6 wt% iron using an aqueous solution of iron nitrate. The impregnated carbon was initially dried at 125 C. The effect of heating of the iron oxide phase was investigated at temperatures between 200 and 600 C using Mossbauer spectroscopy. All heat treatments were...... done in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. Ferrihydrite is formed and is stable at and below a temperature of 300 C. At 600 C small particles of maghemite is the dominant iron oxide. A transformation reaction is suggested....

  1. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies of electrochromic hydrated nickel oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, P.C.; Nazri, G.; Lampert, C.M.

    1986-07-01

    The electrochromic properties of hydrated nickel oxide thin films electrochemically deposited by anodization onto doped tin oxide-coated glass have been studied by transmittance measurements, cyclic voltammetry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and ion-backscattering spectrometry. The spectral transmittance is reported for films switched in both the bleached and colored states. The photopic transmittance (T/sub p/) can be switched from T/sub p/(bleached) = 0.77 to T/sub p/(colored) = 0.21, and the solar transmittance (T/sub S/) can be switched from T/sub S/(bleached) = 0.73 to T/sub S/(colored = 0.35. Also reported is the near-infrared transmittance (T/sub NIR/), which was found to switch from T/sub NIR/(bleached) = 0.72 to T/sub NIR/(colored) = 0.55 for a film thickness of 500 A. The bleached condition is noted to have very low solar absorption in both the visible and solar regions. Ion-backscattering spectrometry was performed on the hydrated nickel oxide film, yielding a composition of NiO/sub 1.0/ (dehydrated). Cyclic voltammetry showed that, for films in the bleached or colored state, the reversible reaction is Ni(OH)/sub 2/ ..-->.. NiOOH + H/sup +/ + e/sup -/. Voltammetry also showed that the switching of the film is controlled by the diffusion of protons, where OH/sup -/ plays a role in the reaction mechanism. Analysis of the hydrated nickel-oxide thin films by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that both the bleached and colored states contain lattice water and hydroxyl groups. The surface hydroxyl groups play an important role in the coloration and bleaching of the anodically deposited nickel oxide thin films.

  2. Ferroxidase-Mediated Iron Oxide Biomineralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeth, Kornelius; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Okuda, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide biomineralization occurs in all living organisms and typically involves protein compartments ranging from 5 to 100nm in size. The smallest iron-oxo particles are formed inside dodecameric Dps protein cages, while the structurally related ferritin compartments consist of twice as many...... identical protein subunits. The largest known compartments are encapsulins, icosahedra made of up to 180 protein subunits that harbor additional ferritin-like proteins in their interior. The formation of iron-oxo particles in all these compartments requires a series of steps including recruitment of iron......, translocation, oxidation, nucleation, and storage, that are mediated by ferroxidase centers. Thus, compartmentalized iron oxide biomineralization yields uniform nanoparticles strictly determined by the sizes of the compartments, allowing customization for highly diverse nanotechnological applications....

  3. Core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.

    2004-01-01

    We present studies of the magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. By combining Mossbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy we have been able to measure the change from a Fe3O4-like to a gamma-Fe2O3-like composition from the interface to the surface. Furthermore, we have...... observed exchange interactions across the core-shell interface. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  4. Thermochemically active iron titanium oxide materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, Eric Nicholas; Miller, James E.

    2018-01-16

    A thermal oxidation-reduction cycle is disclosed that uses iron titanium oxide as the reactive material. The cycle may be used for the thermal splitting of water and/or carbon dioxide to form hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide. The formed compounds may be used as syngas precursors to form fuels.

  5. The Irony of Iron - Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity.

  6. Iron oxides stimulate sulfate-driven anaerobic methane oxidation in seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Orit; Antler, Gilad; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Marlow, Jeffrey J.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2014-10-01

    Seep sediments are dominated by intensive microbial sulfate reduction coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Through geochemical measurements of incubation experiments with methane seep sediments collected from Hydrate Ridge, we provide insight into the role of iron oxides in sulfate-driven AOM. Seep sediments incubated with 13C-labeled methane showed co-occurring sulfate reduction, AOM, and methanogenesis. The isotope fractionation factors for sulfur and oxygen isotopes in sulfate were about 40‰ and 22‰, respectively, reinforcing the difference between microbial sulfate reduction in methane seeps versus other sedimentary environments (for example, sulfur isotope fractionation above 60‰ in sulfate reduction coupled to organic carbon oxidation or in diffusive sedimentary sulfate-methane transition zone). The addition of hematite to these microcosm experiments resulted in significant microbial iron reduction as well as enhancing sulfate-driven AOM. The magnitude of the isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in sulfate from these incubations was lowered by about 50%, indicating the involvement of iron oxides during sulfate reduction in methane seeps. The similar relative change between the oxygen versus sulfur isotopes of sulfate in all experiments (with and without hematite addition) suggests that oxidized forms of iron, naturally present in the sediment incubations, were involved in sulfate reduction, with hematite addition increasing the sulfate recycling or the activity of sulfur-cycling microorganisms by about 40%. These results highlight a role for natural iron oxides during bacterial sulfate reduction in methane seeps not only as nutrient but also as stimulator of sulfur recycling.

  7. Water clustering on nanostructured iron oxide films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merte, Lindsay Richard; Bechstein, Ralf; Peng, G.

    2014-01-01

    , but it is not well-understood how these hydroxyl groups and their distribution on a surface affect the molecular-scale structure at the interface. Here we report a study of water clustering on a moire-structured iron oxide thin film with a controlled density of hydroxyl groups. While large amorphous monolayer...... islands form on the bare film, the hydroxylated iron oxide film acts as a hydrophilic nanotemplate, causing the formation of a regular array of ice-like hexameric nanoclusters. The formation of this ordered phase is localized at the nanometre scale; with increasing water coverage, ordered and amorphous...

  8. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Yang, Ralph T.

    1980-01-01

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  9. Defluoridation by Bacteriogenic Iron Oxides: Sorption Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, K.; Ferris, F.

    2009-05-01

    At concentrations above 1 mg/L, fluoride in drinking water can lead to dental and skeletal fluorosis, a disease that causes mottling of the teeth, calcification of ligaments, crippling bone deformities and many other physiological disorders that can, ultimately, lead to death. Conservative estimates are that fluorosis afflicts tens of millions of people worldwide. As there is no treatment for fluorosis, prevention is the only means of controlling the disease. While numerous defluoridation techniques have been explored, no single method has been found to be both effective and inexpensive enough to implement widely. Our research began in India, with a large-scale geochemical study of the groundwater in a fluoride-contaminated region of Orissa. Having developed a better understanding of the geochemical relationships that exist between fluoride and other parameters present in an affected area, as well as the complex relationships that arise among those parameters that can impact the presence of fluoride, we began investigating certain remediation scenarios involving iron oxides. A common approach to remediation involves the partitioning of fluoride from groundwater by sorption onto a variety of materials, one of the most effective of which is iron oxide whose surface area acts as a scavenger for fluoride. In the presence of iron oxidizing bacteria, the oxidation rate of iron has been shown to be ˜6 times greater than in their absence; fluoride should, therefore, be removed from an aqueous environment by bacteriogenic iron oxides (BIOS) much more quickly than by abiotic iron oxides. Most recently, sorption studies have been conducted using both BIOS and synthetic hydrous ferric oxides in order to compare the behavior between biotic and abiotic sorbents. These studies have provided sorption isotherms that allow comparison of fluoride removed by sorption to BIOS versus synthetic iron oxides. Sorption affinity constants have also been determined, which allow for the

  10. Kinetics of iron oxidation in silicate melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnien, V.; Neuville, D.R.; Cormier, L.; Mysen, B.O.; Pinet, O.; Richet, P

    2004-07-01

    High-temperature XANES experiments at the Fe K-edge have been used to study the kinetics of iron oxidation in a supercooled melt of Fe-bearing pyroxene composition. These experiments, made just above the glass transition between 600 and 700 deg C, show that variations in relative abundances of ferric and ferrous iron can be determined in situ at such temperatures. The kinetics of iron oxidation do not vary much with temperature down to the glass transition. This suggests that rate-limiting factor in this process is not oxygen diffusion, which is coupled to relaxation of the silicate network, but diffusion of network modifying cations along with a counter flux of electrons. To give a firmer basis to redox determinations made from XANES spectroscopy, the redox state of a series of a samples was first determined from wet chemical, Moessbauer spectroscopy and electron microprobe analyses. (authors)

  11. Mixed iron-manganese oxide nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Jriuan; Shafi, Kurikka V.P.M.; Ulman, Abraham; Loos, Katja; Yang, Nan-Loh; Cui, Min-Hui; Vogt, Thomas; Estournès, Claude; Locke, Dave C.

    2004-01-01

    Designing nanoparticles for practical applications requires knowledge and control of how their desired properties relate to their composition and structure. Here, we present a detailed systematic study of mixed iron-manganese oxide nanoparticles, showing that ultrasonication provides the high-energy

  12. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized inside highly ordered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanosized iron oxide, a moderately large band-gap semiconductor and an essential component of optoelectrical and magnetic devices, has been prepared successfully inside the restricted internal pores of mesoporous silica material through in-situ reduction during impregnation. The samples were characterized by ...

  13. Preparation of iron oxides and oxihydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Štyriaková

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxides are common minerals that occur in the environment, either naturally or as a result of human activities.The most common Fe(III-hydroxides and -oxides include ferrihydrite (Fe5HO8 .4H2O that transforms to hematite (a-Fe2O3 and/or goethite (a-FeOOH.That depends on the solution composition, temperature and pH. Depending on the composition of the solid and solution, oxidation can transform the green rust (a product formed by a metal corrosion to lepidocrocite (γ -FeOOH or magnetite (Fe(IIFe(III 2O4 . Weathering can degrade magnetite to maghemite (γ –Fe2O3 and all of the Fe-oxides are subject to an attack and dissolution by organic acids and ligands that are formed during the breakdown of biological material. Iron oxides can be prepared by hydrolysis of acidic Fe3+ solutions or by controlled oxidation of Fe2+ solutions. Goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite were prepared by oxidation of Fe2+ solutions under slightly different values of pH, Fe concentrations and rates of oxidation. Maghemite was prepared by a thermal transformation from synthetic lepidocrocite heated in a furnace at 250 °C for 2h. Hematite was prepared by forced hydrolysis of Fe3+ solution from a chlorine system (FeCl3 at the temperature close to 100 °C under strongly acidic conditions (pH 1-2. Main mineral phases were confirmed by the RTG diffraction and IR spectroscopy method. Iron oxides are excellent, renewable adsorbents, and often control free metals through adsorption reaction.

  14. Proteomic indicators of oxidation and hydration state in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Dick

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New integrative approaches are needed to harness the potential of rapidly growing datasets of protein expression and microbial community composition in colorectal cancer. Chemical and thermodynamic models offer theoretical tools to describe populations of biomacromolecules and their relative potential for formation in different microenvironmental conditions. The average oxidation state of carbon (ZC can be calculated as an elemental ratio from the chemical formulas of proteins, and water demand per residue ( ${\\overline{n}}_{{\\mathrm{H}}_{2}\\mathrm{O}}$ n ¯ H 2 O is computed by writing the overall formation reactions of proteins from basis species. Using results reported in proteomic studies of clinical samples, many datasets exhibit higher mean ZC or ${\\overline{n}}_{{\\mathrm{H}}_{2}\\mathrm{O}}$ n ¯ H 2 O of proteins in carcinoma or adenoma compared to normal tissue. In contrast, average protein compositions in bacterial genomes often have lower ZC for bacteria enriched in fecal samples from cancer patients compared to healthy donors. In thermodynamic calculations, the potential for formation of the cancer-related proteins is energetically favored by changes in the chemical activity of H2O and fugacity of O2 that reflect the compositional differences. The compositional analysis suggests that a systematic change in chemical composition is an essential feature of cancer proteomes, and the thermodynamic descriptions show that the observed proteomic transformations in host tissue could be promoted by relatively high microenvironmental oxidation and hydration states.

  15. Surface Engineering of Core/Shell Iron/Iron Oxide Nanoparticles from Microemulsions for Hyperthermia

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guandong; Liao, Yifeng; Baker, Ian

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and surface engineering of core/shell-type iron/iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy. Iron/iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized from microemulsions of NaBH4 and FeCl3, followed by surface modification in which a thin hydrophobic hexamethyldisilazane layer - used to protect the iron core - replaced the CTAB coating on the particles. Phosphatidylcholine was then assembled on the nanoparticle surface. The resulting nanocomposit...

  16. Inhibited phase behavior of gas hydrates in graphene oxide: influences of surface and geometric constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeok; Kim, Dae Woo; Lim, Hyung-Kyu; Jeon, Jiwon; Kim, Hyungjun; Jung, Hee-Tae; Lee, Huen

    2014-11-07

    Porous materials have provided us unprecedented opportunities to develop emerging technologies such as molecular storage systems and separation mechanisms. Pores have also been used as supports to contain gas hydrates for the application in gas treatments. Necessarily, an exact understanding of the properties of gas hydrates in confining pores is important. Here, we investigated the formation of CO2, CH4 and N2 hydrates in non-interlamellar voids in graphene oxide (GO), and their thermodynamic behaviors. For that, low temperature XRD and P-T traces were conducted to analyze the water structure and confirm hydrate formation, respectively, in GO after its exposure to gaseous molecules. Confinement and strong interaction of water with the hydrophilic surface of graphene oxide reduce water activity, which leads to the inhibited phase behavior of gas hydrates.

  17. Nitric oxide and changes of iron metabolism in exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhong Ming

    2002-11-01

    Accumulated data imply that exercise itself might not lead to a true iron deficiency or 'sport anaemia' in a healthy athlete who has adequate iron intake. The higher prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in younger female athletes might be not due to exercise itself, but probably results from dietary choices, inadequate iron intake and menstruation. These factors can also induce iron deficiency or anaemia in the general population. However, exercise does affect iron metabolism, leading to low or sub-optimal iron status. The underlying mechanism is unknown. In this review, recent advances in the study of the effect of exercise on iron metabolism and nitric oxide, and the relationship between nitric oxide and iron status in exercise are discussed. A hypothesis that increased production of nitric oxide might contribute to sub-optimal iron status in exercise is proposed.

  18. Uptake and metabolism of iron and iron oxide nanoparticles in brain astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Dringen, Ralf

    2013-12-01

    Astrocytes are considered key regulators of the iron metabolism of the brain. These cells are able to rapidly accumulate iron ions and various iron-containing compounds, store iron efficiently in ferritin and also export iron. The present short review summarizes our current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the handling of iron by astrocytes. Cultured astrocytes efficiently take up iron as ferrous or ferric iron ions or as haem by specific iron transport proteins in their cell membrane. In addition, astrocytes accumulate large amounts of iron oxide nanoparticles by endocytotic mechanisms. Despite the rapid accumulation of high amounts of iron from various iron-containing sources, the viability of astrocytes is hardly affected. A rather slow liberation of iron from accumulated haem or iron oxide nanoparticles as well as the strong up-regulation of the synthesis of the iron storage protein ferritin are likely to contribute to the high resistance of astrocytes to iron toxicity. The efficient uptake of extracellular iron by cultured astrocytes as well as their strong up-regulation of ferritin after iron exposure also suggests that brain astrocytes deal well with an excess of iron and protect the brain against iron-mediated toxicity.

  19. Deactivation of iron oxide used in the steam-iron process to produce hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, M.F.; Veringa, H.J.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2009-01-01

    In the steam-iron process pure hydrogen can be produced from any hydrocarbon feedstock by using a redox cycle of iron oxide. One of the main problems connected to the use of the iron oxide is the inherent structural changes that take place during oxygen loading and unloading leading to severe

  20. Microanalysis of iron oxidation state in iron oxides using X Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, S. R.; Delaney, J.; Bajt, S.; Rivers, M. L.; Smith, J. V.

    1993-01-01

    An exploratory application of x ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis using the synchrotron x ray microprobe was undertaken to obtain Fe XANES spectra on individual sub-millimeter grains in conventional polished sections. The experiments concentrated on determinations of Fe valence in a suite of iron oxide minerals for which independent estimates of the iron speciation could be made by electron microprobe analysis and x ray diffraction.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of iron, iron oxide and iron carbide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snovski, Ron; Grinblat, Judith; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Margel, Shlomo

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3) and iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles of different geometrical shapes: cubes, spheres, rods and plates, have been prepared by thermal decomposition of a mixture containing the metal precursor Fe(CO)5 and the stabilizer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) at 300 °C in a sealed cell under inert atmosphere. The thermal decomposition process was performed for 4 or 24 h at ([PVP]/[Fe(CO)5]) (w/v) ratio of 1:1 or 1:5. Elemental iron nanospheres embedded within a mixture of amorphous and graphitic carbon coating were obtained by hydrogen reduction of the prepared iron oxide and iron carbide nanoparticles at 450 °C. The formation of the graphitic carbon phase at such a low temperature is unique and probably obtained by catalysis of the elemental iron nanoparticles. Changing the annealing time period and the ([PVP]/[Fe(CO)5]) ratio allowed control of the composition, size, size distribution, crystallinity, geometrical shape and magnetic properties of the different magnetic nanoparticles.

  2. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... million. Mercury (as Hg) , not more than 1 part per million. (2) Synthetic iron oxide for dog and cat food... food. (2) Synthetic iron oxide may be safely used for the coloring of dog and cat foods in an amount... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food...

  3. Water Clustering on Nanostructured Iron Oxide Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merte, L. R.; Bechstein, Ralf; Peng, Guowen; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A.; Zeuthen, Helene; Knudsen, Jan; Laegsgaard, E.; Wendt, Stefen; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Fleming

    2014-06-30

    The adhesion of water to solid surfaces is characterized by the tendency to balance competing molecule–molecule and molecule–surface interactions. Hydroxyl groups form strong hydrogen bonds to water molecules and are known to substantially influence the wetting behaviour of oxide surfaces, but it is not well-understood how these hydroxyl groups and their distribution on a surface affect the molecular-scale structure at the interface. Here we report a study of water clustering on a moire´-structured iron oxide thin film with a controlled density of hydroxyl groups. While large amorphous monolayer islands form on the are film, the hydroxylated iron oxide film acts as a hydrophilic nanotemplate, causing the formation of a regular array of ice-like hexameric nanoclusters. The formation of this ordered phase is localized at the nanometre scale; with increasing water coverage, ordered and amorphous water are found to coexist at adjacent hydroxylated and hydroxyl-free domains of the moire´ structure.

  4. Water clustering on nanostructured iron oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merte, Lindsay R.; Bechstein, Ralf; Peng, Guowen; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A.; Zeuthen, Helene; Knudsen, Jan; Lægsgaard, Erik; Wendt, Stefan; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2014-06-01

    The adhesion of water to solid surfaces is characterized by the tendency to balance competing molecule-molecule and molecule-surface interactions. Hydroxyl groups form strong hydrogen bonds to water molecules and are known to substantially influence the wetting behaviour of oxide surfaces, but it is not well-understood how these hydroxyl groups and their distribution on a surface affect the molecular-scale structure at the interface. Here we report a study of water clustering on a moiré-structured iron oxide thin film with a controlled density of hydroxyl groups. While large amorphous monolayer islands form on the bare film, the hydroxylated iron oxide film acts as a hydrophilic nanotemplate, causing the formation of a regular array of ice-like hexameric nanoclusters. The formation of this ordered phase is localized at the nanometre scale; with increasing water coverage, ordered and amorphous water are found to coexist at adjacent hydroxylated and hydroxyl-free domains of the moiré structure.

  5. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas-liquid-solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid-solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH)2 precipitation, Mg(OH)2 peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface.

  6. Iron Oxide Nanozyme: A Multifunctional Enzyme Mimetic for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lizeng; Fan, Kelong; Yan, Xiyun

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been widely used in many important fields due to their excellent nanoscale physical properties, such as magnetism/superparamagnetism. They are usually assumed to be biologically inert in biomedical applications. However, iron oxide nanoparticles were recently found to also possess intrinsic enzyme-like activities, and are now regarded as novel enzyme mimetics. A special term, "Nanozyme", has thus been coined to highlight the intrinsic enzymatic properties of such nanomaterials. Since then, iron oxide nanoparticles have been used as nanozymes to facilitate biomedical applications. In this review, we will introduce the enzymatic features of iron oxide nanozyme (IONzyme), and summarize its novel applications in biomedicine.

  7. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  8. Neutrophilic iron oxidizers adapted to highly oxic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    carbon) while oxygen (O2) is the electron acceptor provided during the aeration process. Numerous previous studies have described neutrophilic iron oxidizers as a bacterial guild with a special niche preference, especially the transition zone between aerobic and anoxic regions, where abiotic chemical...... oxidation of iron would be retarded. For that reason, no attempts have been documented to describe the density and diversity of iron oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) in oxic neutrophilic environments. Under low temperatures (5 to 10°C) conditions, as typically found in groundwater, extremely low rates of chemical...... iron oxidation (t1/2: 315min.) have been documented. This assumed slow chemical oxidation of Fe2 + in rapid sand filters may allow certain bacteria to oxidize iron concurrently with the ongoing slow chemical oxidation. Hence, we aimed to investigate the abundance, diversity, and spatial distribution...

  9. Hydration, hydration, hydration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Veronica S; Bates, Graham P

    2010-01-01

    .... Although the importance of adequate hydration in combating heat stress is universally recognized, studies in a range of worker groups have demonstrated a disturbingly poor hydration level in a high...

  10. A Diatom Ferritin Optimized for Iron Oxidation but Not Iron Storage*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaffen, Stephanie; Bradley, Justin M.; Abdulqadir, Raz; Firme, Marlo R.; Moore, Geoffrey R.; Le Brun, Nick E.; Murphy, Michael E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin from the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (PmFTN) plays a key role in sustaining growth in iron-limited ocean environments. The di-iron catalytic ferroxidase center of PmFTN (sites A and B) has a nearby third iron site (site C) in an arrangement typically observed in prokaryotic ferritins. Here we demonstrate that Glu-44, a site C ligand, and Glu-130, a residue that bridges iron bound at sites B and C, limit the rate of post-oxidation reorganization of iron coordination and the rate at which Fe3+ exits the ferroxidase center for storage within the mineral core. The latter, in particular, severely limits the overall rate of iron mineralization. Thus, the diatom ferritin is optimized for initial Fe2+ oxidation but not for mineralization, pointing to a role for this protein in buffering iron availability and facilitating iron-sparing rather than only long-term iron storage. PMID:26396187

  11. Shifts in oxidation states of cerium oxide nanoparticles detected inside intact hydrated cells and organelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanski, Craig J.; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Mihai, Cosmin; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Gilles, Marry K.; Tyliszczak, T.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Orr, Galya

    2015-09-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have been shown to induce diverse biological effects, ranging from toxic to beneficial. The beneficial effects have been attributed to the potential antioxidant activity of CNPs via certain redox reactions, depending on their oxidation state or Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio. However, this ratio is strongly dependent on the environment and age of the nanoparticles and it is unclear whether and how the complex intracellular environment impacts this ratio and the possible redox reactions of CNPs. To identify any changes in the oxidation state of CNPs in the intracellular environment and better understand their intracellular reactions, we directly quantified the oxidation states of CNPs outside and inside intact hydrated cells and organelles using correlated scanning transmission x-ray and super resolution fluorescence microscopies. By analyzing hundreds of small CNP aggregates, we detected a shift to a higher Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio in CNPs inside versus outside the cells, indicating a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment. We further found a similar ratio in the cytoplasm and in the lysosomes, indicating that the net reduction occurs earlier in the internalization pathway. Together with oxidative stress and toxicity measurements, our observations identify a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment, which is consistent with their involvement in potentially beneficial oxidation reactions, but also point to interactions that can negatively impact the health of cells.

  12. Effects of coating spherical iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milosevic, Irena; Motte, Laurence; Aoun, Bachir; Li, Tao; Ren, Yang; Sun, Chengjun; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of several coatings applied in biomedical applications to iron oxide nanoparticles on the size, structure and composition of the particles. The four structural techniques employed - TEM, DLS, VSM, SAXS and EXAFS - show no significant effects of the coatings on the spherical shape of the bare nanoparticles, the average sizes or the local order around the Fe atoms. The NPs coated with hydroxylmethylene bisphosphonate or catechol have a lower proportion of magnetite than the bare and citrated ones, raising the question whether the former are responsible for increasing the valence state of the oxide on the NP surfaces and lowering the overall proportion of magnetite in the particles. VSM measurements show that these two coatings lead to a slightly higher saturation magnetization than the citrate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazu and Dr. Federica Migliardo.

  13. Structure and morphology of ultrathin iron and iron oxide films on Ag(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruns, Daniel

    2012-10-15

    This work investigates the initial growth of iron and iron oxides on Ag(001). Surface structure and morphology of both post deposition annealed Fe films (in UHV and O{sub 2} atmosphere) as well as reactive grown iron oxide films will be analyzed in detail by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The stoichiometry at the surface of the iron oxide films is determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The main focus of this work is to shed light on the question whether the growth of iron oxide films on Ag(001) is accompanied by the formation of strain reducing dislocation networks, or superstructures as found for other metal substrates in former studies. Here, we distinguish between Fe films which were post deposition annealed in a thin O{sub 2} atmosphere and reactively grown iron oxide films.

  14. Insight into the evolution of the iron oxidation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilbert, Marianne; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2013-02-01

    Iron is a ubiquitous element in the universe. Ferrous iron (Fe(II)) was abundant in the primordial ocean until the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere led to its widespread oxidation and precipitation. This change of iron bioavailability likely put selective pressure on the evolution of life. This element is essential to most extant life forms and is an important cofactor in many redox-active proteins involved in a number of vital pathways. In addition, iron plays a central role in many environments as an energy source for some microorganisms. This review is focused on Fe(II) oxidation. The fact that the ability to oxidize Fe(II) is widely distributed in Bacteria and Archaea and in a number of quite different biotopes suggests that the dissimilatory Fe(II) oxidation is an ancient energy metabolism. Based on what is known today about Fe(II) oxidation pathways, we propose that they arose independently more than once in evolution and evolved convergently. The iron paleochemistry, the phylogeny, the physiology of the iron oxidizers, and the nature of the cofactors of the redox proteins involved in these pathways suggest a possible scenario for the timescale in which each type of Fe(II) oxidation pathways evolved. The nitrate dependent anoxic iron oxidizers are likely the most ancient iron oxidizers. We suggest that the phototrophic anoxic iron oxidizers arose in surface waters after the Archaea/Bacteria-split but before the Great Oxidation Event. The neutrophilic oxic iron oxidizers possibly appeared in microaerobic marine environments prior to the Great Oxidation Event while the acidophilic ones emerged likely after the advent of atmospheric O(2). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles against osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Sifeng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital (China); Jia Jingfu [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (China); Guo Xiaokui [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Institutes of Medical Sciences (China); Zhao Yaping [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (China); Liu Boyu [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Institutes of Medical Sciences (China); Chen Desheng; Guo Yongyuan; Zhang Xianlong, E-mail: zhangxianlong20101@163.com [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital (China)

    2012-09-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been widely used for tissue repair, magnetic resonance imaging, immunoassays and drug delivery. They are very promising in orthopaedic applications and several magnetic nanoparticles have been exploited for the treatment of orthopaedic disease. Here, we conducted an in vitro study to examine the interaction of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with human osteoblasts to evaluate the dose-related toxicity of the nanoparticles on osteoblasts. A transmission electron microscope was used to visualise the internalised magnetic nanoparticles in osteoblasts. The CCK-8 results revealed increased cell viability (107.5 % vitality compared with the control group) when co-cultured at a low concentration (20 {mu}g/mL) and decreased cell viability (59.5 % vitality in a concentration of 300 {mu}g/mL and 25.9 % in 500 {mu}g/mL) when co-cultured in high concentrations. The flow cytometric detection revealed similar results with 5.48 % of apoptosis in a concentration of 20 {mu}g/mL, 23.40 % of apoptosis in a concentration of 300 {mu}g/mL and 28.49 % in a concentration of 500 {mu}g/mL. The disrupted cytoskeleton of osteoblasts was also revealed using a laser scanning confocal microscope. We concluded that use of a low concentration of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles is important to avoid damage to osteoblasts.

  16. Bismuth iron oxide thin films using atomic layer deposition of alternating bismuth oxide and iron oxide layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puttaswamy, Manjunath; Vehkamäki, Marko [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Kukli, Kaupo, E-mail: kaupo.kukli@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); University of Tartu, Institute of Physics, W. Ostwald 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia); Dimri, Mukesh Chandra [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, EE-12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Kemell, Marianna; Hatanpää, Timo; Heikkilä, Mikko J. [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Mizohata, Kenichiro [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Stern, Raivo [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, EE-12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2016-07-29

    Bismuth iron oxide films with varying contributions from Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared using atomic layer deposition. Bismuth (III) 2,3-dimethyl-2-butoxide, was used as the bismuth source, iron(III) tert-butoxide as the iron source and water vapor as the oxygen source. The films were deposited as stacks of alternate Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers. Films grown at 140 °C to the thickness of 200–220 nm were amorphous, but crystallized upon post-deposition annealing at 500 °C in nitrogen. Annealing of films with intermittent bismuth and iron oxide layers grown to different thicknesses influenced their surface morphology, crystal structure, composition, electrical and magnetic properties. Implications of multiferroic performance were recognized in the films with the remanent charge polarization varying from 1 to 5 μC/cm{sup 2} and magnetic coercivity varying from a few up to 8000 A/m. - Highlights: • Bismuth iron oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition at 140 °C. • The major phase formed in the films upon annealing at 500 °C was BiFeO{sub 3}. • BiFeO{sub 3} films and films containing excess Bi favored electrical charge polarization. • Slight excess of iron oxide enhanced saturative magnetization behavior.

  17. Battles with Iron: Manganese in Oxidative Stress Protection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, J. Dafhne; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2012-01-01

    The redox-active metal manganese plays a key role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress. As a cofactor for manganese superoxide dismutase or through formation of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants, this metal can combat oxidative damage without deleterious side effects of Fenton chemistry. In either case, the antioxidant properties of manganese are vulnerable to iron. Cellular pools of iron can outcompete manganese for binding to manganese superoxide dismutase, and through Fenton chemistry, iron may counteract the benefits of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants. In this minireview, we highlight ways in which cells maximize the efficacy of manganese as an antioxidant in the midst of pro-oxidant iron. PMID:22247543

  18. Synthesis and characterization of composites of mixed oxides of iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanocomposites of mixed oxides of iron and neodymium in polymer matrix of anilineformaldehyde are reported. The composites have been obtained by treating the aqueous solution of aniline, hydrochloric acid and formaldehyde with halide of iron and neodymium oxide. The infra-red spectra show broad peaks at ∼ 590 ...

  19. Investigation of carrier oil stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation method. The polyunsaturated carrier oil (flaxseed oil) is used as a stabilizing agent for iron oxide nanoparticles. Kirby Bauer method was used to investigate the antibiotic sensitivity of carrier oil stabilized and uncoated SPIONs at 10 and 20 μg/L on Gram-positive ...

  20. Strain induced anomalous red shift in mesoscopic iron oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nonspherical mesoscopic iron oxide particles are also candidate materials for studying the shape, size and strain induced modifications of various physical properties viz. optical, magnetic and structural. Spherical and nonspherical iron oxides having an aspect ratio, ∼2, are synthesized by employing starch and ethylene ...

  1. Effect of Graphene Oxide (GO) on the Morphology and Microstructure of Cement Hydration Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shupeng; Zheng, Dapeng; Yang, Haibin; Cui, Hongzhi; Li, Dongxu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effects of graphene oxide (GO) on the microstructure of cement mortars were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric (TG), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Cement mortar samples with different proportions of GO (0.02, 0.04, 0.06, and 0.08 wt % based on the weight of cement) were prepared. The test results showed that GO affected the crystallization of cement hydration products, C–S–H (calcium silicate hydrate is the main hydrate product) and CH (calcium hydroxide). The morphology of hydration products changed with the increase of GO content. Furthermore, the results of XRD analyses showed that the diffraction peak intensity and the crystal grain size of CH (001), (100), (101), and (102) for GO samples increased considerably compared with the control sample. Based on the results, it can be understood that GO can modify the crystal surface of CH, leading to the formation of larger crystals. PMID:29206157

  2. Effect of Graphene Oxide (GO on the Morphology and Microstructure of Cement Hydration Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of graphene oxide (GO on the microstructure of cement mortars were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric (TG, and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. Cement mortar samples with different proportions of GO (0.02, 0.04, 0.06, and 0.08 wt % based on the weight of cement were prepared. The test results showed that GO affected the crystallization of cement hydration products, C–S–H (calcium silicate hydrate is the main hydrate product and CH (calcium hydroxide. The morphology of hydration products changed with the increase of GO content. Furthermore, the results of XRD analyses showed that the diffraction peak intensity and the crystal grain size of CH (001, (100, (101, and (102 for GO samples increased considerably compared with the control sample. Based on the results, it can be understood that GO can modify the crystal surface of CH, leading to the formation of larger crystals.

  3. Facile Synthesis and Special Phase Transformation of Hydrophilic Iron Oxides Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, LiQiao; Long, Yunqian; Leng, Zhe; Hu, Jinfei; Yu, Xuan; Yu, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), γ-Fe2O3, with hydrophilic surfaces are fabricated in ethylene glycol solutions, without surfactant or additive, by solvothermal process from α-Fe2O3 nanoparticle as precursors. With the addition of a trace of hydrazine hydrate, the cubic phase Fe3O4 nanoparticles are obtained instead of γ-Fe2O3. The saturation magnetization value of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles is up to 74.3 emu/g. This study provides a low cost, safe, and universal route to serve...

  4. Bio-inspired Iron Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Oxidations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Que, Jr., Lawrence [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-03-22

    Stereoselective oxidation of C–H and C=C bonds are catalyzed by nonheme iron enzymes. Inspired by these bioinorganic systems, our group has been exploring the use of nonheme iron complexes as catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons using H2O2 as an environmentally friendly and atom-efficient oxidant in order to gain mechanistic insights into these novel transformations. In particular, we have focused on clarifying the nature of the high-valent iron oxidants likely to be involved in these transformations.

  5. Microbially Induced Iron Oxidation: What, Where, How

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHIERMEYER,ELISA M.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; NORTHUP,DIANA E.

    2000-08-15

    From the results of the different bacterial cells seen, it is fairly certain that Gallionella is present because of the bean-shaped cells and twisted stalks found with the TEM. The authors cannot confirm, though, what other iron-oxidizing genera exist in the tubes, since the media was only preferential and not one that isolated a specific genus of bacteria. Based on the environment in which they live and the source of the water, they believe their cultures contain Gallionella, Leptothrix, and possibly Crenothrix and Sphaerotilus. They believe the genus Leptothrix rather than Sphaerotilus exist in the tubes because the water source was fresh, unlike the polluted water in which Sphaerotilus are usually found. The TEM preparations worked well. The cryogenic method rapidly froze the cells in place and allowed them to view their morphology. The FAA method, as stated previously, was the best of the three methods because it gave the best contrast. The gluteraldehyde samples did not come out as well. It is possible that the gluteraldehyde the authors prepared was still too concentrated and did not mix well. Although these bacteria were collected from springs and then cultured in an environment containing a presumably pure iron-bearing metal, it seems the tube already containing Manganese Gradient Medium could be used with a piece of metal containing these bacteria. A small piece of corroding metal could then be inserted into the test tube and cultured to study the bacteria.

  6. Iron oxide nanoparticle enhancement of radiation cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Courtney M.; Tate, Jennifer A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Gladstone, David J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been investigated as a promising means for inducing tumor cell-specific hyperthermia. Although the ability to generate and use nanoparticles that are biocompatible, tumor specific, and have the ability to produce adequate cytotoxic heat is very promising, significant preclinical and clinical development will be required for clinical efficacy. At this time it appears using IONP-induced hyperthermia as an adjunct to conventional cancer therapeutics, rather than as an independent treatment, will provide the initial IONP clinical treatment. Due to their high-Z characteristics, another option is to use intracellular IONPs to enhance radiation therapy without excitation with AMF (production of heat). To test this concept IONPs were added to cell culture media at a concentration of 0.2 mg Fe/mL and incubated with murine breast adenocarcinoma (MTG-B) cells for either 48 or 72 hours. Extracellular iron was then removed and all cells were irradiated at 4 Gy. Although samples incubated with IONPs for 48 hrs did not demonstrate enhanced post-irradiation cytotoxicity as compared to the non-IONP-containing cells, cells incubated with IONPs for 72 hours, which contained 40% more Fe than 48 hr incubated cells, showed a 25% decrease in clonogenic survival compared to their non-IONP-containing counterparts. These results suggest that a critical concentration of intracellular IONPs is necessary for enhancing radiation cytotoxicity.

  7. Modified iron oxide nanomaterials: Functionalization and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Samira; Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili Muhd

    2016-10-15

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have aroused the interest of researchers of materials' chemistry due to its exceptional properties such as decent magnetic, electric, catalytic, biocompatibility, and low toxicity. However, these magnetic nanoparticles are predisposed towards aggregation and forming larger particles, due to its strong anisotropic dipolar interactions, particularly in the aqueous phase, consequently depriving them of dispersibility and particular properties, ultimately degrading their performance. Hence, this review focuses on modified magnetic nanoparticles that are stable, easily synthesized, possess a high surface area and could be facile-separated via magnetic forces, and are of low toxicity and costs for applications such as catalyst/catalyst support, food security, biomedical, and pollutant remediation. - Highlights: • Nanomagnetite is interesting due to its exceptional properties. • Nanomagnetite is predisposed towards aggregation and forming larger particles. • Modified nanomagnetite are stable, easily synthesized, possess high surface area. • Modified nanomagnetite got applications as catalyst/catalyst support.

  8. Washing effect on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Karina Mireles

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Much recent research on nanoparticles has occurred in the biomedical area, particularly in the area of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs; one such area of research is in their use as magnetically directed prodrugs. It has been reported that nanoscale materials exhibit properties different from those of materials in bulk or on a macro scale [1]. Further, an understanding of the batch-to-batch reproducibility and uniformity of the SPION surface is essential to ensure safe biological applications, as noted in the accompanying article [2], because the surface is the first layer that affects the biological response of the human body. Here, we consider a comparison of the surface chemistries of a batch of SPIONs, before and after the supposedly gentle process of dialysis in water.

  9. Multiple hearth furnace for reducing iron oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandon, Mark M [Charlotte, NC; True, Bradford G [Charlotte, NC

    2012-03-13

    A multiple moving hearth furnace (10) having a furnace housing (11) with at least two moving hearths (20) positioned laterally within the furnace housing, the hearths moving in opposite directions and each moving hearth (20) capable of being charged with at least one layer of iron oxide and carbon bearing material at one end, and being capable of discharging reduced material at the other end. A heat insulating partition (92) is positioned between adjacent moving hearths of at least portions of the conversion zones (13), and is capable of communicating gases between the atmospheres of the conversion zones of adjacent moving hearths. A drying/preheat zone (12), a conversion zone (13), and optionally a cooling zone (15) are sequentially positioned along each moving hearth (30) in the furnace housing (11).

  10. Washing effect on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, Laura-Karina; Sacher, Edward; Yahia, L'Hocine; Laurent, Sophie; Stanicki, Dimitri

    2016-06-01

    Much recent research on nanoparticles has occurred in the biomedical area, particularly in the area of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs); one such area of research is in their use as magnetically directed prodrugs. It has been reported that nanoscale materials exhibit properties different from those of materials in bulk or on a macro scale [1]. Further, an understanding of the batch-to-batch reproducibility and uniformity of the SPION surface is essential to ensure safe biological applications, as noted in the accompanying article [2], because the surface is the first layer that affects the biological response of the human body. Here, we consider a comparison of the surface chemistries of a batch of SPIONs, before and after the supposedly gentle process of dialysis in water.

  11. Controlling barrier penetration via exothermic iron oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Daniel G; Brown, Marc B; Jones, Stuart A

    2011-02-14

    Exothermic iron oxidation is an elegant means to generate heat, with the potential to modulate barrier penetration if reaction kinetics can be controlled. This aim of this study was to gain a fundamental understanding of how these temperature change kinetics influenced barrier diffusion rate. Lidocaine transport through a hydrophilic carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) gel was compared using two rapid iron oxidation reactions initiated by water (ExoRap(50), T(max)-47.7 ± 0.6 °C, t(max)-3.3 ± 0.6 min, ExoRap(60), T(max)-60.4 ± 0.3 °C, t(max)-9.3 ± 0.6 min) and a slower reaction initiated by oxygen (ExoSl(45)T(max)-ca. 44 °C, t(max) ca. 240 min). Temperature change induced by the oxygen initiated reaction (ExoSl(45)) was almost double those initiated by water (over 4h), but lidocaine diffusion was approximately 4 times higher for the latter (ExoRap(50), 555.61 ± 22.04 μg/cm(2)/h; ExoRap(60), 663.1 ± 50.95 μg/cm(2)/h; compared to ExoSl(45), 159.36 ± 29.44 μg/cm(2)/h). The large influence of temperature change kinetics on lidocaine diffusion suggested that transport was heavily dependent on temperature induced structural changes of the barrier. CMC, like many polymers adsorbs more water when exposed to moderate increases in temperature and this appeared to be a critical determinant of lidocaine barrier diffusion rate. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron-Oxide-Filled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cava, Carlos Eduardo

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are recognized as one of the most important materials in the recent history of nanotechnology. In the last 25 years, intensive studies about this material have led to new ideas for the use of nanomaterials in many technological products. The unique properties presented by this material allow its use in a wide range of applications. Known as a crystalline material, CNTs can, however, interact with many materials in different manners, making it easy to use as a composite. One interesting aspect is the possibility of filling the CNT hollow core with a foreign material, forming a filled CNT. This composite can be achieved in situ using chemical vapor deposition and arc-discharge or after the synthesis, by chemical methods. The technique choice to achieve the filled CNT depends on the material inside the CNT. The resulting material can provide new electrical, optical, and mechanical features due to the synergistic effect between the CNTs themselves and the filling, which can originate new multifunctional materials. Concerning the electrical conductivity and the gas sensing, the possible interaction between the CNT and the filling can modify the electronic structure of the material and, consequently, affect the kind of interaction between the CNT and different gases. Commonly, the filled CNTs are obtained with magnetic materials inside the tube, which are also precursors in their syntheses; this feature brings new possibilities to magnetic devices, such as memories. Among them, iron-oxide-filled carbon nanotubes have been suggested as a technological material for use in magnetic, electrical, and medical applications. Therefore, this kind of nanocomposite material can be useful in the preparation of versatile and durable solid-state sensors, memory devices, with simple manufacturing and in a proper size. In this chapter, an introduction about the production and application of iron-oxide-filled CNTs in its many different forms will be presented.

  13. Kinetics of zero valent iron nanoparticle oxidation in oxygenated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Lauren F; Torrey, Jessica D; Amaro, Robert L; Shaw, Justin M

    2012-12-04

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) nanoparticles are versatile in their ability to remove a wide variety of water contaminants, and ZVI-based bimetallic nanoparticles show increased reactivity above that of ZVI alone. ZVI nanoparticles degrade contaminants through the reactive species (e.g., OH*, H(2(g)), H(2)O(2)) that are produced during iron oxidation. Measurement and modeling of aqueous ZVI nanoparticle oxidation kinetics are therefore necessary to optimize nanoparticle design. Stabilized ZVI and iron-nickel nanoparticles of approximately 150 nm in diameter were synthesized through solution chemistry, and nanoparticle oxidation kinetics were determined via measured mass change using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Under flowing aerated water, ZVI nanoparticles had an initial exponential growth behavior indicating surface-dominated oxidation controlled by migration of species (H(2)O and O(2)) to the surface. A region of logarithmic growth followed the exponential growth which, based on the Mott-Cabrera model of thin oxide film growth, suggests a reaction dominated by movement of species (e.g., iron cations and oxygen anions) through the oxide layer. The presence of ethanol or a nickel shell on the ZVI nanoparticles delayed the onset of iron oxidation and reduced the extent of oxidation. In oxygenated water, ZVI nanoparticles oxidized primarily to the iron oxide-hydroxide lepidocrocite.

  14. Ultrafine ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Facile synthesis by low temperature decomposition of iron glycerolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartůněk, Vilém, E-mail: vilem.bartunek@vscht.cz [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Průcha, David [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Švecová, Marie [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Ulbrich, Pavel [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Huber, Štěpán; Sedmidubský, David; Jankovský, Ondřej [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2016-09-01

    We synthesized dark colored ultrafine – sub 10 nm iron oxide nanoparticles by a facile and low temperature process based on thermal decomposition of an affordable precursor – iron glycerolate. Simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) was used to study the thermal behaviour during the decomposition. The iron glycerolate was thoroughly analysed by various methods. The size of the iron nanoparticles was determined from XRD patterns and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and their composition has been confirmed by XPS. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were studied by vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared single phase material exhibiting ferromagnetic properties is usable in a wide range of applications and may be suitable even for large scale industrial applications. - Highlights: • Iron glycerolate prepared and characterised. • Iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by thermal decomposition of iron glycerolate. • STA used to study the decomposition. • Products characterised by XRD, XPS, FT-IR, SEM and TEM. • Magnetic behaviour of monophasic samples determined.

  15. Effects of coating spherical iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Irena; Motte, Laurence; Aoun, Bachir; Li, Tao; Ren, Yang; Sun, Chengjun; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of several coatings applied in biomedical applications to iron oxide nanoparticles on the size, structure and composition of the particles. The four structural techniques employed - TEM, DLS, VSM, SAXS and EXAFS - show no significant effects of the coatings on the spherical shape of the bare nanoparticles, the average sizes or the local order around the Fe atoms. The NPs coated with hydroxylmethylene bisphosphonate or catechol have a lower proportion of magnetite than the bare and citrated ones, raising the question whether the former are responsible for increasing the valence state of the oxide on the NP surfaces and lowering the overall proportion of magnetite in the particles. VSM measurements show that these two coatings lead to a slightly higher saturation magnetization than the citrate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetization measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated iron oxide and core-shell iron/iron-oxide nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Pearce, Carolyn; McCloy, John S.

    2014-12-02

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) and core-shell iron/iron-oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) nanomaterials prepared by a cluster deposition system were irradiated with 5.5 MeV Si2+ ions and the structures determined by x-ray diffraction as consisting of 100% magnetite and 36/64 wt% Fe/FeO, respectively. However, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) indicates similar surfaces in the two samples, slightly oxidized and so having more Fe3+ than the expected magnetite structure, with XMCD intensity much lower for the irradiated core-shell samples indicating weaker magnetism. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data lack the signature for FeO, but the irradiated core-shell system consists of Fe-cores with ~13 nm of separating oxide crystallite, so it is likely that FeO exists deeper than the probe depth of the XAS (~5 nm). Exchange bias (Hex) for both samples becomes increasingly negative as temperature is lowered, but the irradiated Fe3O4 sample shows greater sensitivity of cooling field on Hex. Loop asymmetries and Hex sensitivities of the irradiated Fe3O4 sample are due to interfaces and interactions between grains which were not present in samples before irradiation as well as surface oxidation. Asymmetries in the hysteresis curves of the irradiated core/shell sample are related to the reversal mechanism of the antiferromagnetic FeO and possibly some near surface oxidation.

  17. Redox and electrochemical water splitting catalytic properties of hydrated metal oxide modified electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Richard L; Godwin, Ian J; Brandon, Michael P; Lyons, Michael E G

    2013-09-07

    This paper presents a review of the redox and electrocatalytic properties of transition metal oxide electrodes, paying particular attention to the oxygen evolution reaction. Metal oxide materials may be prepared using a variety of methods, resulting in a diverse range of redox and electrocatalytic properties. Here we describe the most common synthetic routes and the important factors relevant to their preparation. The redox and electrocatalytic properties of the resulting oxide layers are ascribed to the presence of extended networks of hydrated surface bound oxymetal complexes termed surfaquo groups. This interpretation presents a possible unifying concept in water oxidation catalysis - bridging the fields of heterogeneous electrocatalysis and homogeneous molecular catalysis.

  18. High rate flame synthesis of highly crystalline iron oxide nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchan-Merchan, W.; Saveliev, A. V.; Taylor, A. M.

    2008-03-01

    Single-step flame synthesis of iron oxide nanorods is performed using iron probes inserted into an opposed-flow methane oxy-flame. The high temperature reacting environment of the flame tends to convert elemental iron into a high density layer of iron oxide nanorods. The diameters of the iron oxide nanorods vary from 10 to 100 nm with a typical length of a few microns. The structural characterization performed shows that nanorods possess a highly ordered crystalline structure with parameters corresponding to cubic magnetite (Fe3O4) with the [100] direction oriented along the nanorod axis. Structural variations of straight nanorods such as bends, and T-branched and Y-branched shapes are frequently observed within the nanomaterials formed, opening pathways for synthesis of multidimensional, interconnected networks.

  19. Oxidative Stress and the Homeodynamics of Iron Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresgen, Nikolaus; Eckl, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron and oxygen share a delicate partnership since both are indispensable for survival, but if the partnership becomes inadequate, this may rapidly terminate life. Virtually all cell components are directly or indirectly affected by cellular iron metabolism, which represents a complex, redox-based machinery that is controlled by, and essential to, metabolic requirements. Under conditions of increased oxidative stress—i.e., enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)—however, this machinery may turn into a potential threat, the continued requirement for iron promoting adverse reactions such as the iron/H2O2-based formation of hydroxyl radicals, which exacerbate the initial pro-oxidant condition. This review will discuss the multifaceted homeodynamics of cellular iron management under normal conditions as well as in the context of oxidative stress. PMID:25970586

  20. Oxidation state of iron in plagioclase from lunar basalts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, S. S.; Virgo, D.; Warburton, D.

    1971-01-01

    Determination of the oxidation state of iron in the plagioclase from the coarse-grained basalts 10044 and 12021, using Mossbauer spectroscopy. The location of iron in the crystal structure was also investigated. The spectra show that iron is in the high-spin ferrous state, and they located at least two distinct positions with different coordination numbers. Some excess resonant absorption is probably due to Fe(3+), although the Fe(3+) doublet could not be positively resolved.

  1. Synthesis of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Cidália; Veiga, Luís; Drazic, Goran; Silva, Adrián; Gomes, Helder

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized by an hydrothermal method using three different iron precursors. The yield of synthesis was determined for all samples and found to be dependent on the iron precursor, solution pH and reaction time. The synthesized nanoparticles will be characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis and their suitability for biomedical applications, with particular focus on the hyperthermia method, will be studied.

  2. Effect of waste plastics addition on the reduction of iron oxide by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HDPE)) addition on the production of premium grade iron nuggets from iron oxide using metallurgical coke as reducing agent. Composite pellets were formed from mixtures of iron oxide and carbonaceous materials consisting of coke, HDPE and ...

  3. Body iron is a contributor to oxidative damage of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Loft, Steffen; Nyyssönen, Kristiina

    2007-01-01

    The transition metal iron is catalytically highly active in vitro, and not surprisingly, body iron has been suggested to promote oxidative stress in vivo. In the current analysis we studied the association of serum ferritin concentration and serum soluble transferrin receptor concentration with d...

  4. Composition of MBE-grown iron oxide films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, F.C; Hibma, T; Smulders, P.J M; Niesen, L

    A wide range of iron oxides have been grown epitaxially on MgO(100) substrates using a dual beam technique in which the deposited iron is oxidised by a beam of NO2 particles. At high fluxes magnetite (Fe3-deltaO4) phases with compositions between near-stoichiometric magnetite (Fe3O4, delta = 0) and

  5. The interaction of DNA with phytoferritin during iron oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Yang, Senpei; Liao, Xiayun; Deng, Jianjun; Zhao, Guanghua

    2014-06-15

    Phytoferritin from legume seeds is considered an iron supplement with great potential. Phytoferritin co-exists with plastid DNA in amyloplasts of legume seed cells where Fe(2+) is oxidized into Fe(3+), followed by storage within the inner cavity of the protein. In this study, the interaction of plasmid DNA with black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seed ferritin (BSF) during iron oxidation was studied. Results indicated that iron ions facilitated formation of apoBSF aggregates at a high iron loading (>48 Fe(2+)/shell). Interestingly, the co-existence of DNA and ferritin has a pronounced effect on iron uptake by ferritin. This view is confirmed by a pronounced increase in the rate of iron oxidation catalysed by apoBSF in the presence of DNA. On the other hand, the apoBSF exhibited a marked DNA-protective function against oxidative damage at a low loading of Fe(2+) (⩽ 48 Fe(2+)/shell). However, outside this ratio, such an effect gradually decreased, because the added iron exceeded the iron binding capacity of ferritin. The current study advances the understanding of the interaction among multi-components in foodstuffs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles of narrow size distribution on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Diffuse reflectance UV–vis spectra values show that the template is completely removed from the final iron .... Starch is a complex carbohydrate which is insoluble in water; it is used by plants as a way to store excess glu- .... The X-ray diffraction pattern for iron oxide particles syn- thesized in the absence/presence of starch is ...

  7. Iron Oxide Nanocrystals for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale L. Huber

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanocrystals have been investigated extensively in the past several years for several potential applications, such as information technology, MRI contrast agents, and for drug conjugation and delivery. A specific property of interest in biomedicine is magnetic hyperthermia—an increase in temperature resulting from the thermal energy released by magnetic nanocrystals in an external alternating magnetic field. Iron oxide nanocrystals of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power using frequencies of 111.1 kHz and 629.2 kHz, and corresponding magnetic field strengths of 9 and 25 mT. Polymorphous nanocrystals as well as spherical nanocrystals and nanowires in paramagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited good heating power. A remarkable 30 °C temperature increase was observed in a nanowire sample at 111 kHz and magnetic field of 25 mT (19.6 kA/m, which is very close to the typical values of 100 kHz and 20 mT used in medical treatments.

  8. Engineering Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Clinical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitziber L. Cortajarena

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs occupy a privileged position among magnetic nanomaterials with potential applications in medicine and biology. They have been widely used in preclinical experiments for imaging contrast enhancement, magnetic resonance, immunoassays, cell tracking, tissue repair, magnetic hyperthermia and drug delivery. Despite these promising results, their successful translation into a clinical setting is strongly dependent upon their physicochemical properties, toxicity and functionalization possibilities. Currently, IONPs-based medical applications are limited to the use of non-functionalized IONPs smaller than 100 nm, with overall narrow particle size distribution, so that the particles have uniform physical and chemical properties. However, the main entry of IONPs into the scene of medical application will surely arise from their functionalization possibilities that will provide them with the capacity to target specific cells within the body, and hence to play a role in the development of specific therapies. In this review, we offer an overview of their basic physicochemical design parameters, giving an account of the progress made in their functionalization and current clinical applications. We place special emphasis on past and present clinical trials.

  9. Photocatalytic water oxidation with iron oxide hydroxide (rust) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Timothy L.; Bensema, Bronwyn L.; Brune, Nicholas K.; Wong, Christopher; Yeh, Max; Osterloh, Frank E.

    2017-01-01

    Hematite has attracted considerable interest as a photoanode material for water oxidation under visible illumination. Here, we explore the limits of photocatalytic water oxidation activity with iron (III) oxide hydroxide nanocrystals and NaIO4 as a sacrificial electron acceptor (E=1.63 V NHE at pH=0.5). The sol was prepared by hydrolysis of FeCl3 in boiling 0.002-M HCl solution and confirmed to mainly consist of ß-FeO(OH) (akaganéite) particles with 5 to 15 nm diameter. From a 0.01 M aqueous NaIO4 solution, the sol evolves between 4.5 and 35.2 μmol O2 h-1, depending on pH, light intensity (>400 nm, 290 to 700 mW cm-2), ß-FeO(OH), and NaIO4 concentration. The activity increases with pH, and depends linearly on light intensity and photocatalyst amount, and it varies with sacrificial electron donor concentration. Under optimized conditions, the apparent quantum efficiency is 0.19% (at 400 nm and 460 mW cm-2), and the turnover number is 2.58 based on total ß-FeO(OH). Overall, the efficiency of the ß-FeO(OH)/NaIO4 photocatalytic system is limited by electron hole recombination and by particle aggregation over longer irradiation times (24 h). Lastly, surface photovoltage measurements on ß-FeO(OH) films on fluorine doped tin oxide substrate confirm a 2.15 eV effective band gap for the material.

  10. Iron Oxide Nanozyme: A Multifunctional Enzyme Mimetic for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Lizeng; Fan, Kelong; Yan, Xiyun

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been widely used in many important fields due to their excellent nanoscale physical properties, such as magnetism/superparamagnetism. They are usually assumed to be biologically inert in biomedical applications. However, iron oxide nanoparticles were recently found to also possess intrinsic enzyme-like activities, and are now regarded as novel enzyme mimetics. A special term, ?Nanozyme?, has thus been coined to highlight the intrinsic enzymatic properties of such...

  11. Modified Nanoemulsions with Iron Oxide for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyi Fan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A nanoemulsion (NE is a surfactant-based, oil-in-water, nanoscale, high-energy emulsion with a mean droplet diameter of 400–600 nm. When mixed with antigen and applied nasally, a NE acts as a mucosal adjuvant and induces mucosal immune responses. One possible mechanism for the adjuvant effect of this material is that it augments antigen uptake and distribution to lymphoid tissues, where the immune response is generated. Biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles have been used as a unique imaging approach to study the dynamics of cells or molecular migration. To study the uptake of NEs and track them in vivo, iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and dispersed in soybean oil to make iron oxide-modified NEs. Our results show that iron oxide nanoparticles can be stabilized in the oil phase of the nanoemulsion at a concentration of 30 µg/μL and the iron oxide-modified NEs have a mean diameter of 521 nm. In vitro experiments demonstrated that iron oxide-modified NEs can affect uptake by TC-1 cells (a murine epithelial cell line and reduce the intensity of magnetic resonance (MR images by shortening the T2 time. Most importantly, in vivo studies demonstrated that iron oxide-modified NE could be detected in mouse nasal septum by both transmission electron microscopy and MR imaging. Altogether these experiments demonstrate that iron oxide-modified NE is a unique tool that can be used to study uptake and distribution of NEs after nasal application.

  12. Iron Oxide Silica Derived from Sol-Gel Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Diniz da Costa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work we investigate the effect of iron oxide embedded in silica matrices as a function of Fe/Si molar ratio and sol pH. To achieve homogeneous dispersion of iron oxide particles, iron nitrate nonahydrate was dissolved in hydrogen peroxide and was mixed with tetraethyl orthosilicate and ethanol in a sol-gel synthesis method. Increasing the calcination temperature led to a reduction in surface area, although the average pore radius remained almost constant at about 10 Å, independent of the Fe/Si molar ratio or sol pH. Hence, the densification of the matrix was accompanied by similar reduction in pore volume. However, calcination at 700 °C resulted in samples with similar surface area though the iron oxide content increased from 5% to 50% Fe/Si molar ratio. As metal oxide particles have lower surface area than polymeric silica structures, these results strongly suggest that the iron oxides opposed the silica structure collapse. The effect of sol pH was found to be less significant than the Fe/Si molar ratio in the formation of molecular sieve structures derived from iron oxide silica.

  13. Genomic insights into microbial iron oxidation and iron uptake strategies in extremely acidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy, Violaine; Holmes, David S

    2012-07-01

    This minireview presents recent advances in our understanding of iron oxidation and homeostasis in acidophilic Bacteria and Archaea. These processes influence the flux of metals and nutrients in pristine and man-made acidic environments such as acid mine drainage and industrial bioleaching operations. Acidophiles are also being studied to understand life in extreme conditions and their role in the generation of biomarkers used in the search for evidence of existing or past extra-terrestrial life. Iron oxidation in acidophiles is best understood in the model organism Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. However, recent functional genomic analysis of acidophiles is leading to a deeper appreciation of the diversity of acidophilic iron-oxidizing pathways. Although it is too early to paint a detailed picture of the role played by lateral gene transfer in the evolution of iron oxidation, emerging evidence tends to support the view that iron oxidation arose independently more than once in evolution. Acidic environments are generally rich in soluble iron and extreme acidophiles (e.g. the Leptospirillum genus) have considerably fewer iron uptake systems compared with neutrophiles. However, some acidophiles have been shown to grow as high as pH 6 and, in the case of the Acidithiobacillus genus, to have multiple iron uptake systems. This could be an adaption allowing them to respond to different iron concentrations via the use of a multiplicity of different siderophores. Both Leptospirillum spp. and Acidithiobacillus spp. are predicted to synthesize the acid stable citrate siderophore for Fe(III) uptake. In addition, both groups have predicted receptors for siderophores produced by other microorganisms, suggesting that competition for iron occurs influencing the ecophysiology of acidic environments. Little is known about the genetic regulation of iron oxidation and iron uptake in acidophiles, especially how the use of iron as an energy source is balanced with its need to take up

  14. Body iron is a contributor to oxidative damage of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuomainen, T.P.; Loft, Steffen Huitfeldt; Nyyssonen, K.

    2007-01-01

    with daily urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine excretion, a marker of oxidative stress, in 48 mildly dyslipidemic men in East Finland. In multivariate linear regression analyses allowing for age, smoking, body mass index and physical exercise, serum ferritin concentration predicted the excretion rate at B = 0......The transition metal iron is catalytically highly active in vitro, and not surprisingly, body iron has been suggested to promote oxidative stress in vivo. In the current analysis we studied the association of serum ferritin concentration and serum soluble transferrin receptor concentration.......17 (95% CI 0.08-0.26, P = 0.001), and serum soluble transferrin receptor to ferritin concentration ratio (TfR/ferritin) predicted the excretion rate at B = - 0.13 (95% CI - 0.21 to - 0.05, P = 0.002). Our data suggest that body iron contributes to excess oxidative stress already at non-iron overload...

  15. Iron accumulation with age, oxidative stress and functional decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinze Xu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Identification of biological mediators in sarcopenia is pertinent to the development of targeted interventions to alleviate this condition. Iron is recognized as a potent pro-oxidant and a catalyst for the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems. It is well accepted that iron accumulates with senescence in several organs, but little is known about iron accumulation in muscle and how it may affect muscle function. In addition, it is unclear if interventions which reduced age-related loss of muscle quality, such as calorie restriction, impact iron accumulation. We investigated non-heme iron concentration, oxidative stress to nucleic acids in gastrocnemius muscle and key indices of sarcopenia (muscle mass and grip strength in male Fischer 344 X Brown Norway rats fed ad libitum (AL or a calorie restricted diet (60% of ad libitum food intake starting at 4 months of age at 8, 18, 29 and 37 months of age. Total non-heme iron levels in the gastrocnemius muscle of AL rats increased progressively with age. Between 29 and 37 months of age, the non-heme iron concentration increased by approximately 200% in AL-fed rats. Most importantly, the levels of oxidized RNA in gastrocnemius muscle of AL rats were significantly increased as well. The striking age-associated increase in non-heme iron and oxidized RNA levels and decrease in sarcopenia indices were all attenuated in the calorie restriction (CR rats. These findings strongly suggest that the age-related iron accumulation in muscle contributes to increased oxidative damage and sarcopenia, and that CR effectively attenuates these negative effects.

  16. Inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Chitosan Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Munmun; De, Sirshendu

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the potent opportunistic pathogens associated with respiratory and urinary tract infection. The bacterium owes its pathogenicity due to the intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and disinfectants. The present study is focused on the synthesis of antibacterial chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles for rapid inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We have discussed the relevant patents on synthesis and antibacterial potential of metallic nanoparticles and chitosan. Chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method at room temperature using non-toxic chitosan and iron salts in alkali media. The particles were characterized and evaluated for antibacterial property against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The average size of the particles was measured as 52 nm. The surface area of the coated particles was as high as 90 ±5 m2/g. FTIR spectra confirmed the coating of chitosan on nanoparticles. The coated particles showed excellent antibacterial activity against the bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the coated particles was 105)µg mol-1. The morphological alteration and cytoplasmic leakage of bacteria were confirmed by SEM image and release of intracellular constituents, respectively. Higher 260 nm absorbance value confirmed stronger antibacterial activity of the coated nanoparticles as compared to pure chitosan and bare iron oxide nanoparticles. The study indicated that chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles have superior antibacterial property as compared to pure chitosan and iron oxide nanoparticles.

  17. One step paired electrochemical synthesis of iron and iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ordoukhanian Juliet

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new one step paired electrochemical method is developed for simultaneous synthesis of iron and iron oxide nanoparticles. iron and iron oxide are prepared as cathodic and anodic products from iron (ii sulfate aqueous solution in a membrane divided electrolytic cell by the pulsed current electrosynthesis. Because of organic solvent-free and electrochemical nature of the synthesis, the process could be considered as green and environmentally friendly. The reduction of energy consumption and low cost are the other significant advantages of this new method that would have a great application potential in the chemical industry. The nanostructure of prepared samples was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The magnetic properties were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VsM.

  18. A Diatom Ferritin Optimized for Iron Oxidation but Not Iron Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaffen, Stephanie; Bradley, Justin M; Abdulqadir, Raz; Firme, Marlo R; Moore, Geoffrey R; Le Brun, Nick E; Murphy, Michael E P

    2015-11-20

    Ferritin from the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (PmFTN) plays a key role in sustaining growth in iron-limited ocean environments. The di-iron catalytic ferroxidase center of PmFTN (sites A and B) has a nearby third iron site (site C) in an arrangement typically observed in prokaryotic ferritins. Here we demonstrate that Glu-44, a site C ligand, and Glu-130, a residue that bridges iron bound at sites B and C, limit the rate of post-oxidation reorganization of iron coordination and the rate at which Fe(3+) exits the ferroxidase center for storage within the mineral core. The latter, in particular, severely limits the overall rate of iron mineralization. Thus, the diatom ferritin is optimized for initial Fe(2+) oxidation but not for mineralization, pointing to a role for this protein in buffering iron availability and facilitating iron-sparing rather than only long-term iron storage. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Band energy control of molybdenum oxide by surface hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Keith T., E-mail: k.t.butler@bath.ac.uk; Walsh, Aron [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Crespo-Otero, Rachel [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Buckeridge, John; Scanlon, David O. [University College London, Kathleen Lonsdale Materials Chemistry, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Bovill, Edward; Lidzey, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-07

    The application of oxide buffer layers for improved carrier extraction is ubiquitous in organic electronics. However, the performance is highly susceptible to processing conditions. Notably, the interface stability and electronic structure is extremely sensitive to the uptake of ambient water. In this study we use density functional theory calculations to asses the effects of adsorbed water on the electronic structure of MoO{sub x}, in the context of polymer-fullerene solar cells based on PCDTBT. We obtain excellent agreement with experimental values of the ionization potential for pristine MoO{sub 3} (010). We find that IP and EA values can vary by as much as 2.5 eV depending on the oxidation state of the surface and that adsorbed water can either increase or decrease the IP and EA depending on the concentration of surface water.

  20. Structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.

    2002-01-01

    magnetite (Fe3O4). We observed that the nanoparticles were stable against further oxidation, and Mossbauer spectroscopy at high applied magnetic fields and low temperatures revealed a stable form of partly oxidized magnetite. The nanocrystalline structure of the oxide shell results in strong canting......We present studies of the structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. alpha-Fe nanoparticles were fabricated by sputtering and subsequently covered with a protective nanocrystalline oxide shell consisting of either maghaemite (gamma-Fe2O3) or partially oxidized...... of the spin structure in the oxide shell, which thereby modifies the magnetic properties of the core-shell nanoparticles....

  1. Sulfur-Driven Iron Reduction Coupled to Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Peng; Li, Guo-Xiang

    2017-06-20

    A new biogeochemical pathway has been suggested to be present in terrestrial ecosystems, linking the nitrogen and iron cycles via ferric iron reduction coupled to anaerobic ammonium oxidation. However, the underlying microbiological process has not been demonstrated to date. Here we report a stable consortium, HJ-4, composed of Anaerospora hongkongensis (85%) and facultative anaerobe, Comamonadaceae (15%), which can process ferrihydrite reduction coupled to anaerobic ammonium oxidation driven by sulfur redox cycling. In this process, A. hongkongensis reduces elemental sulfur, sulfite, and polysulfides to sulfide, which fuels ferrihydrite reduction. Sulfide, elemental sulfur, sulfite, and polysulfides serve as electron shuttles, completing the sulfur cycle between A. hongkongensis and ferrihydrite. In addition, Comamonadaceae shows ammonium oxidation potential under aerobic conditions, with nitrite as the main product. We inferred that Comamonadaceae mediates simultaneous nitrification-denitrification coupled to iron redox cycling through nitrate/nitrite-dependent ferrous oxidation under anaerobic conditions. Hence, we discovered a novel pathway for ferric iron reduction coupled to ammonium oxidation, highlighting the key role of electron shuttles and nitrate/nitrite-dependent ferrous oxidation in this process. The biogeochemical cycling of sulfur, iron, and nitrogen could be coupled in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.

  2. Physiochemical Characterization of Iodine (V) Oxide: Hydration Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-15

    INTRODUCTION Metal‐oxidizer systems (e.g. thermites ) show promise as alternative energetic materials for explosive applications owing to their higher...and Grubelich, M. C. A Survey of Combustible Metals, Thermites , and Intermetallics for Pyrotechnic Applications. 32nd AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint...Chemistry of Solids 2010, 71, 100‐108 11. Wang, L. L.; Munir, Z. A.; and Maximov, Y. M. Thermite reactions: their utilization in the synthesis and

  3. The Oxidation Of Iron In A Gel Using Consumer Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen W.; Folger, Marsha R.; Quinn, Ryan P.; Sauls, Frederick C.; Krone, Diane

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for the oxidation of iron in a gel using consumer chemicals, which is pertinent to the students' understanding of redox chemistry and of the relative oxidation potentials of various metals. The experiment can be carried out with consumer chemicals that might be purchased at a supermarket and commonly found in the home.

  4. Role of iron oxide impurities in electrocatalysis by multiwall carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The role of iron oxide impurities in the electrocatalytic properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) prepared by catalytic chemical vapour decomposition method (CCVD) is studied in detail. A novel magnetically modified electrodes have been developed by which MWCNTs were immobilized on indium-tin oxide ...

  5. Heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of ofloxacin drug by iron alginate support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titouhi, Hana; Belgaied, Jamel-Eddine

    2016-08-01

    A new catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of ofloxacin antibiotic is presented in this work. The removal was achieved using a biodegradable sodium alginate-iron material. Several parameters were studied such as iron content, drying duration of the catalytic support, temperature, solid amount and initial drug concentration. The process showed a strong oxidative ability; at optimum conditions, a nearly complete removal of the drug (around 98%) has been reached after three h of treatment. A relatively low decrease of support activity (around 10%) has been observed after three successive oxidation runs and a low iron leaching has been detected (1.2% of the incorporated quantity). The removal of the substrate has been also examined in the absence of hydrogen peroxide in order to discriminate between the contributions of simple adsorption and oxidation processes in the drug disappearance. We also discussed the influence of the studied experimental parameters on the removal kinetic.

  6. Biogeochemistry of Iron Oxidation in a Circumneutral Freshwater Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, O.; Homstrom, S.; Pena, J.; Zacharias, E.; Sposito, G.

    2007-12-01

    Iron(II) oxidation in natural waters at circumneutral pH, often regarded as an abiotic process, may be biologically- mediated when it occurs in iron-rich redox gradients. West Berry Creek, a small circumneutral tributary flowing through a mixed coniferous forest in Big Basin State Park, California, contains localized iron (hydr)oxide precipitates at points along its course where anoxic groundwater meets oxygenated creek water. These mixing zones establish redox gradients and iron-rich microbial mats that may create microenvironments that promote active biogeochemical cycling of Fe. Water sampling revealed strong correlations between the concentrations of aqueous inorganic species, suggesting a rock-weathering source for most of these solutes. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detected significant concentrations of organic exudates, including low molecular mass organic acids and siderophores, indicating active biogeochemical cycling of iron is occurring in the creek. X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis showed the iron precipitates to be amorphous minerals, such as ferrihydrite. Microbial biofilm communities are associated with the iron (hydr)oxide deposits. Clone libraries developed from 16s rDNA sequences revealed the presence of microorganisms related to the neutrophilic iron- oxidizing bacteria Gallionella and Siderooxidans; in addition, micrographs suggest the widespread presence of sheath-forming bacteria (e.g., Leptothrix). Sequences from these libraries also indicated the presence of significant populations of organisms related to bacteria in the genera Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, and Nitrospira. These geosymbiotic systems appear to be significant not only for the biogeochemical cycling of iron in the creek, but also for the cycling of organic species, inorganic nutrients, and trace metals.

  7. Formation and Transformation of Iron Oxide-Kaolinite Associations in the Presence of Iron(II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, S.Y.; Liu, F.; Feng, X.H.; Tan, W.F.; Koopal, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    Iron oxide-kaolinite associations are important components of tropical and subtropical soils and have significant influence on the physical and chemical properties of soils. In this study, the formation and transformation of Fe oxide-kaolinite associations as a function of pH, temperature, and time

  8. Synthesis, characterization, applications, and challenges of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Attarad Ali,1 Hira Zafar,1 Muhammad Zia,1 Ihsan ul Haq,2 Abdul Rehman Phull,3 Joham Sarfraz Ali,1 Altaf Hussain4 1Department of Biotechnology, 2Department of Pharmacy, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan; 3Department of Biology, Kongju National University, Kongju, South Korea; 4Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Space Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan Abstract: Recently, iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs have attracted much consideration due to their unique properties, such as superparamagnetism, surface-to-volume ratio, greater surface area, and easy separation methodology. Various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted to synthesize magnetic NPs with suitable surface chemistry. This review summarizes the methods for the preparation of iron oxide NPs, size and morphology control, and magnetic properties with recent bioengineering, commercial, and industrial applications. Iron oxides exhibit great potential in the fields of life sciences such as biomedicine, agriculture, and environment. Nontoxic conduct and biocompatible applications of magnetic NPs can be enriched further by special surface coating with organic or inorganic molecules, including surfactants, drugs, proteins, starches, enzymes, antibodies, nucleotides, nonionic detergents, and polyelectrolytes. Magnetic NPs can also be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumor using an external magnetic field for hyperthermic treatment of patients. Keeping in mind the current interest in iron NPs, this review is designed to report recent information from synthesis to characterization, and applications of iron NPs. Keywords: superparamagnetism, iron oxide nanoparticles, surfactants, hyperthermia, biodistribution, bioelimination

  9. Magnetic composites based on hybrid spheres of aluminum oxide and superparamagnetic nanoparticles of iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Tiago P. [Langmuir - Laboratorio de Adsorcao e Catalise, Departamento de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, CP 6021, CEP 60455-970 Campus do Pici, Fortaleza (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Igor F. [Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza (Brazil); Sasaki, Jose M. [Laboratorio de Raios X, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Campus do Pici, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Fabris, J.D.; Oliveira, Diana Q.L. de [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Valentini, Antoninho, E-mail: valent@ufc.b [Langmuir - Laboratorio de Adsorcao e Catalise, Departamento de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, CP 6021, CEP 60455-970 Campus do Pici, Fortaleza (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    Materials containing hybrid spheres of aluminum oxide and superparamagnetic nanoparticles of iron oxides were obtained from a chemical precursor prepared by admixing chitosan and iron and aluminum hydroxides. The oxides were first characterized with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed the size distribution of the resulting spheres to be highly homogeneous. The occurrence of nano-composites containing aluminum oxides and iron oxides was confirmed from powder X-ray diffraction patterns; except for the sample with no aluminum, the superparamagnetic relaxation due to iron oxide particles were observed from Moessbauer spectra obtained at 298 and 110 K; the onset six line-spectrum collected at 20 K indicates a magnetic ordering related to the blocking relaxation effect for significant portion of small spheres in the sample with a molar ratio Al:Fe of 2:1.

  10. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotman, Irena, E-mail: gotman@technion.ac.il; Gutmanas, Elazar Y., E-mail: gutmanas@technion.ac.il [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 Israel (Israel); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  11. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Characterization of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, T., E-mail: Teodora.Radu@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293, Cluj Napoca (Romania); Iacovita, C. [Department of Pharmaceutical Physics-Biophysics, Faculty of Pharmacy, “Iuliu Hatieganu” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 400349, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Benea, D. [Faculty of Physics, Babes Bolyai University, 400271, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Turcu, R. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293, Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Characterization of three types of iron oxides magnetic nanoparticles. • A correlation between valence band XPS and the degree of iron oxidation is proposed. • Theoretical contributions of Fe in tetragonal and octahedral environment are shown. - Abstract: We report X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results on iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) synthesized using solvothermal reduction in the presence of polyethylene glycol. The magnetite obtained was employed as precursor for the synthesis of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (by oxygen dissociation) which in turn was transformed into α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We confirmed the magnetite, maghemite and hematite structure by Fourier Transformed Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The analysis of the XPS core level and valence band (VB) photoemission spectra for all investigated samples is discussed in terms of the degree of iron oxidation. This is of fundamental importance to better understand the electronic structure of the obtained iron oxide nanoparticles in order to control and improve their quality for specific biomedical applications. Moreover, theoretical band structure calculations are performed for magnetite and the separate contributions of Fe in tetragonal and octahedral environment are shown.

  12. Iron-oxidation processes in an electroflocculation (electrocoagulation) cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Sasson, Moshe; Calmano, Wolfgang; Adin, Avner

    2009-11-15

    The processes of iron oxidation in an electroflocculation cell were investigated for a pH range of 5-9 and electric currents of 0.05-0.4A (equivalent current densities of 8.6-69 A/m(2)). At all pH values and electric currents investigated, it was demonstrated and proven that for all practical purposes, the form of iron that dissolves from the anode is Fe(2+) (ferrous). The difference between the amount of theoretical dissolution as calculated by Faraday's law and the amount of observed dissolved iron ions may indicate two phenomena in electrochemical cells. The first is possible dissolution of the anode even without the operation of an electric current; this led to higher theoretical dissolution rates at lower pH. The second is the participation of some of the electrons of the electric current in reactions other than anode dissolution which led to lower theoretical dissolution rates at higher pH. Those other reactions did not lead to an increase in the local oxidation saturation level near the anode and did not affect iron-oxidation rates in the electroflocculation processes. The oxidation rates of the dissolved Fe(2+) (ferrous) to Fe(3+) (ferric) ions in electroflocculation processes were strongly dependent on the pH and were similar to the known oxidation rates of iron in non-electrochemical cells.

  13. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  14. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Characterization of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, T.; Iacovita, C.; Benea, D.; Turcu, R.

    2017-05-01

    We report X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results on iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle (Fe3O4) synthesized using solvothermal reduction in the presence of polyethylene glycol. The magnetite obtained was employed as precursor for the synthesis of γ-Fe2O3 (by oxygen dissociation) which in turn was transformed into α-Fe2O3. We confirmed the magnetite, maghemite and hematite structure by Fourier Transformed Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The analysis of the XPS core level and valence band (VB) photoemission spectra for all investigated samples is discussed in terms of the degree of iron oxidation. This is of fundamental importance to better understand the electronic structure of the obtained iron oxide nanoparticles in order to control and improve their quality for specific biomedical applications. Moreover, theoretical band structure calculations are performed for magnetite and the separate contributions of Fe in tetragonal and octahedral environment are shown.

  15. Multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles for hybrid biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, Timo; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    Iron oxide core nanoparticles are attractive imaging agents because their material properties allow the tuning of pharmacokinetics as well as the attachment of multiple moieties to their surface. In addition to affinity ligands, these include fluorochromes and radioisotopes for detection with optical and nuclear imaging. As the iron oxide core can be detected by MRI, options for combining imaging modalities are manifold. Already, preclinical imaging strategies have combined noninvasive imaging with higher resolution techniques, such as intravital microscopy, to gain unprecedented insight into steady-state biology and disease. Going forward, hybrid iron oxide nanoparticles will help to merge modalities, creating a synergy that will enable imaging in basic research and, potentially, also in the clinic. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Xiangling; Zhang, Yancong; Sun, Hanwen; Song, Xinfeng; Fu, Chunhua; Dong, Pingxuan

    2015-01-01

    Mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) coated iron oxide nanoparticles have served as a feasible, robust, and functional platform for various biomedical applications. However, there is scarcely a systemic paper reviewed about such functionalising nanomaterials to date. In this review, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles, the mechanism of dopamine self-oxidation, the interaction between iron oxide and dopamine, and the functionality and the safety assessment of dopamine modified iron oxide n...

  17. Electrode-less plasma jet synthesis of core-shell iron/iron oxide nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Hnilica Jaroslav; Kudrle Vít; Jašek Ondřej

    2013-01-01

    We report on core-shell iron and iron oxide nanoparticle prepared by plasma synthesis controlled by process gas mixture. The synthesis was carried out using an atmospheric pressure microwave electrodeless plasma jet. We focused on phase composition control and better passivation. We studied the influence of O2, H2 and N2 admixtures to the Ar process gas on the properties of the prepared nanomaterial. Similarly to thermal process, the oxygen admixture preferentially produced Fe2O3 nanoparticle...

  18. Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    S. Kanagesan; M. Hashim; S Tamilselvan; N. B. Alitheen; I. Ismail; Hajalilou, A.; Ahsanul, K.

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the response of human breast cancer cells' exposure to nanoparticle, iron oxide (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple low temperature combustion method using Fe(NO3)3·9H2O as raw material. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed that the resultant powders are pure α-Fe2O3. Transmission electron microscopy study revealed the spherical shape of the primary particles, and the size of the iron oxide nanoparticles is in the range of 19 nm. The magnetic hysteresis loops...

  19. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  20. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  1. Archaea catalyze iron-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettwig, Katharina F; Zhu, Baoli; Speth, Daan; Keltjens, Jan T; Jetten, Mike S M; Kartal, Boran

    2016-10-24

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is crucial for controlling the emission of this potent greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. Nitrite-, nitrate-, and sulfate-dependent methane oxidation is well-documented, but AOM coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals has so far been demonstrated only in environmental samples. Here, using a freshwater enrichment culture, we show that archaea of the order Methanosarcinales, related to "Candidatus Methanoperedens nitroreducens," couple the reduction of environmentally relevant forms of Fe(3+) and Mn(4+) to the oxidation of methane. We obtained an enrichment culture of these archaea under anaerobic, nitrate-reducing conditions with a continuous supply of methane. Via batch incubations using [(13)C]methane, we demonstrated that soluble ferric iron (Fe(3+), as Fe-citrate) and nanoparticulate forms of Fe(3+) and Mn(4+) supported methane-oxidizing activity. CO2 and ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) were produced in stoichiometric amounts. Our study connects the previous finding of iron-dependent AOM to microorganisms detected in numerous habitats worldwide. Consequently, it enables a better understanding of the interaction between the biogeochemical cycles of iron and methane.

  2. Unprecedented Selective Oxidation of Styrene Derivatives using a Supported Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst in Aqueous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica-type materials have been successfully utilized in the aqueous selective oxidation of alkenes under mild conditions using hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant. Catalysts could be easily recovered after completion of the reac...

  3. Facile Synthesis and Special Phase Transformation of Hydrophilic Iron Oxides Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiao Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs, γ-Fe2O3, with hydrophilic surfaces are fabricated in ethylene glycol solutions, without surfactant or additive, by solvothermal process from α-Fe2O3 nanoparticle as precursors. With the addition of a trace of hydrazine hydrate, the cubic phase Fe3O4 nanoparticles are obtained instead of γ-Fe2O3. The saturation magnetization value of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles is up to 74.3 emu/g. This study provides a low cost, safe, and universal route to serve as excellent biocompatibility magnetic core for future applications in biomedical, agriculture, and horticulture applications.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast of iron oxide nanoparticles developed for hyperthermia is dominated by iron content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabler, Michele; Zhu, Wenlian; Hedayati, Mohammad; Attaluri, Anilchandra; Zhou, Haoming; Mihalic, Jana; Geyh, Alison; DeWeese, Theodore L; Ivkov, Robert; Artemov, Dmitri

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) are used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hyperthermia for cancer treatment. The relationship between MRI signal intensity and cellular iron concentration for many new formulations, particularly MNPs having magnetic properties designed for heating in hyperthermia, is lacking. In this study, we examine the correlation between MRI T2 relaxation time and iron content in cancer cells loaded with various MNP formulations. Human prostate carcinoma DU-145 cells were loaded with starch-coated bionised nanoferrite (BNF), iron oxide (Nanomag® D-SPIO), Feridex™, and dextran-coated Johns Hopkins University (JHU) particles at a target concentration of 50 pg Fe/cell using poly-D-lysine transfection reagent. T2-weighted MRI of serial dilutions of these labelled cells was performed at 9.4 T and iron content quantification was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Clonogenic assay was used to characterise cytotoxicity. No cytotoxicity was observed at twice the target intracellular iron concentration (∼100 pg Fe/cell). ICP-MS revealed highest iron uptake efficiency with BNF and JHU particles, followed by Feridex and Nanomag-D-SPIO, respectively. Imaging data showed a linear correlation between increased intracellular iron concentration and decreased T2 times, with no apparent correlation among MNP magnetic properties. This study demonstrates that for the range of nanoparticle concentrations internalised by cancer cells the signal intensity of T2-weighted MRI correlates closely with absolute iron concentration associated with the cells. This correlation may benefit applications for cell-based cancer imaging and therapy including nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery and hyperthermia.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, applications, and challenges of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Attarad; Zafar, Hira; Zia, Muhammad; ul Haq, Ihsan; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Ali, Joham Sarfraz; Hussain, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Recently, iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted much consideration due to their unique properties, such as superparamagnetism, surface-to-volume ratio, greater surface area, and easy separation methodology. Various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted to synthesize magnetic NPs with suitable surface chemistry. This review summarizes the methods for the preparation of iron oxide NPs, size and morphology control, and magnetic properties with recent bioengineering, commercial, and industrial applications. Iron oxides exhibit great potential in the fields of life sciences such as biomedicine, agriculture, and environment. Nontoxic conduct and biocompatible applications of magnetic NPs can be enriched further by special surface coating with organic or inorganic molecules, including surfactants, drugs, proteins, starches, enzymes, antibodies, nucleotides, nonionic detergents, and polyelectrolytes. Magnetic NPs can also be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumor using an external magnetic field for hyperthermic treatment of patients. Keeping in mind the current interest in iron NPs, this review is designed to report recent information from synthesis to characterization, and applications of iron NPs. PMID:27578966

  6. Iron as a catalyst of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation: Critical factors involved in its oxidant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenna, Domenico; Ciofani, Giuliano; Obletter, Gabriele

    2017-05-01

    Iron-induced human LDL oxidation, which is relevant to atherosclerosis, has not yet been properly investigated. We addressed such issue using iron(II) and (III) basically in the presence of phosphates, which are present in vivo and influence iron oxidative properties, at pH 4.5 and 7.4, representative, respectively, of the lysosomal and plasma environment. In 10mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS), iron(II) induces substantial LDL oxidation at pH 4.5 at low micromolar concentrations, while at pH 7.4 has low oxidative effects; iron(III) promotes small LDL oxidation only at pH 4.5. In 10mM sodium acetate/NaCl buffer, pH 4.5, iron-induced LDL oxidation is far higher than in PBS, highlighting the relevance of phosphates in the inhibitory modulation of iron-induced LDL oxidation. LDL oxidation is related to iron binding to the protein and lipid moiety of LDL, and requires the presence of iron(II) bound to LDL together with iron(III). Chemical modification of LDL carboxyl groups, which could bind iron especially at pH 4.5, decreases significantly iron binding to LDL and iron-induced LDL oxidation. Hydroxyl radical scavengers are ineffective on iron-induced LDL oxidation, which is inhibited by metal chelation, scavengers of alkoxyl/peroxyl radicals, or removal of LDL lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH). Overall, substantial human LDL oxidation is induced LOOH-dependently by iron(II) at pH 4.5 even in the presence of phosphates, suggesting the occurrence of iron(II)-induced LDL oxidation in vivo within lysosomes, where pH is about 4.5, iron(II) and phosphates coexist, plasma with its antioxidants is absent, and glutathione peroxidase is poorly expressed resulting in LOOH accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Iron Oxidation and Core Formation in Recombinant Heteropolymeric Human Ferritins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlenbacher, Matthew; Poli, Maura; Arosio, Paolo; Santambrogio, Paolo; Levi, Sonia; Chasteen, N Dennis; Bou-Abdallah, Fadi

    2017-08-01

    In animals, the iron storage and detoxification protein, ferritin, is composed of two functionally and genetically distinct subunit types, H (heavy) and L (light), which co-assemble in various ratios with tissue specific distributions to form shell-like protein structures of 24 subunits within which a mineralized iron core is stored. The H-subunit possesses a ferroxidase center (FC) that catalyzes Fe(II) oxidation, whereas the L-subunit does not. To assess the role of the L-subunit in iron oxidation and core formation, two human recombinant heteropolymeric ferritins, designated H-rich and L-rich with ratios of ∼20H:4L and ∼22L:2H, respectively, were employed and compared to the human homopolymeric H-subunit ferritin (HuHF). These heteropolymeric ferritins have a composition similar to the composition of those found in hearts and brains (i.e., H-rich) and in livers and spleens (i.e., L-rich). As for HuHF, iron oxidation in H-rich ferritin was found to proceed with a 2:1 Fe(II):O2 stoichiometry at an iron level of 2 Fe(II) atoms/H-subunit with the generation of H2O2. The H2O2 reacted with additional Fe(II) in a 2:1 Fe(II):H2O2 ratio, thus avoiding the production of hydroxyl radical. A μ-1,2-peroxo-diFe(III) intermediate was observed at the FC of H-rich ferritin as for HuHF. Importantly, the H-rich protein regenerated full ferroxidase activity more rapidly than HuHF did and additionally formed larger iron cores, indicating dual roles for the L-subunit in facilitating iron turnover at the FC and in mineralization of the core. The L-rich ferritin, while also facilitating iron oxidation at the FC, additionally promoted oxidation at the mineral surface once the iron binding capacity of the FC was exceeded.

  8. Microbial diversity and iron oxidation at Okuoku-hachikurou Onsen, a Japanese hot spring analog of Precambrian iron formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, L M; Idei, A; Terajima, S; Kakegawa, T; Fischer, W W; McGlynn, S E

    2017-11-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) are rock deposits common in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic (and regionally Neoproterozoic) sedimentary successions. Multiple hypotheses for their deposition exist, principally invoking the precipitation of iron via the metabolic activities of oxygenic, photoferrotrophic, and/or aerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria. Some isolated environments support chemistry and mineralogy analogous to processes involved in BIF deposition, and their study can aid in untangling the factors that lead to iron precipitation. One such process analog system occurs at Okuoku-hachikurou (OHK) Onsen in Akita Prefecture, Japan. OHK is an iron- and CO2 -rich, circumneutral hot spring that produces a range of precipitated mineral textures containing fine laminae of aragonite and iron oxides that resemble BIF fabrics. Here, we have performed 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of microbial communities across the range of microenvironments in OHK to describe the microbial diversity present and to gain insight into the cycling of iron, oxygen, and carbon in this ecosystem. These analyses suggest that productivity at OHK is based on aerobic iron-oxidizing Gallionellaceae. In contrast to other BIF analog sites, Cyanobacteria, anoxygenic phototrophs, and iron-reducing micro-organisms are present at only low abundances. These observations support a hypothesis where low growth yields and the high stoichiometry of iron oxidized per carbon fixed by aerobic iron-oxidizing chemoautotrophs like Gallionellaceae result in accumulation of iron oxide phases without stoichiometric buildup of organic matter. This system supports little dissimilatory iron reduction, further setting OHK apart from other process analog sites where iron oxidation is primarily driven by phototrophic organisms. This positions OHK as a study area where the controls on primary productivity in iron-rich environments can be further elucidated. When compared with geological data, the metabolisms and mineralogy at

  9. From iron coordination compounds to metal oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail Iacob

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Various types, shapes and sizes of iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained depending on the nature of the precursor, preparation method and reaction conditions. The mixed valence trinuclear iron acetate, [Fe2IIIFeIIO(CH3COO6(H2O3]·2H2O (FeAc1, μ3-oxo trinuclear iron(III acetate, [Fe3O(CH3COO6(H2O3]NO3∙4H2O (FeAc2, iron furoate, [Fe3O(C4H3OCOO6(CH3OH3]NO3∙2CH3OH (FeF, iron chromium furoate, FeCr2O(C4H3OCOO6(CH3OH3]NO3∙2CH3OH (FeCrF, and an iron complex with an original macromolecular ligand (FePAZ were used as precursors for the corresponding oxide nanoparticles. Five series of nanoparticle samples were prepared employing either a classical thermal pathway (i.e., thermal decomposition in solution, solvothermal method, dry thermal decomposition/calcination or using a nonconventional energy source (i.e., microwave or ultrasonic treatment to convert precursors into iron oxides. The resulting materials were structurally characterized by wide-angle X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared, Raman, energy-dispersive X-ray, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. The morphology was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The parameters were varied within each route to fine tune the size and shape of the formed nanoparticles.

  10. Strain induced anomalous red shift in mesoscopic iron oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Dallas et al 2006). They are bio- compatible and inexpensive. From a fundamental point of view, magnetic iron oxides are ideal templates for study- ing ferrimagnetism at the nano level since they possess an ideal two sub-lattice with magnetic ...

  11. Serum Iron and Nitric Oxide Production in Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infected rats, treated and untreated, were sacrificed daily for the serum iron levels and nitric oxide synthase activities. For haematological parameters, infected and uninfected but treated rats were sacrificed on days 7 and 12 along with untreated rats. Results showed that tetracycline brought about a significant reduction in ...

  12. Identification of Spinel Iron Oxide Nanoparticles by 57Fe NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SangGap Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have synthesized and studied monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles of smaller than 10 nm to identify between the two spinel phases, magnetite and maghemite. It is shown that 57Fe NMR spectroscopy is a promising tool for distinguishing between the two phases.

  13. Benzene Removal by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Decorated Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, carbon nanotubes (CNTs impregnated with iron oxide nanoparticles were employed for the removal of benzene from water. The adsorbents were characterized using scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, and thermogravimetric analysis. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out to study the adsorptive removal of benzene and the effect of parameters such as pH, contact time, and adsorbent dosage. The maximum removal of benzene was 61% with iron oxide impregnated CNTs at an adsorbent dosage 100 mg, shaking speed 200 rpm, contact time 2 hours, initial concentration 1 ppm, and pH 6. However, raw CNTs showed only 53% removal under same experimental conditions. Pseudo-first-order kinetic model was found well to describe the obtained data on benzene removal from water. Initial concentration was varied from 1 to 200 mg/L for isotherms study. Langmuir isotherm model was observed to best describe the adsorption data. The maximum adsorption capacities were 987.58 mg/g and 517.27 mg/g for iron oxide impregnated CNTs and raw CNTs, respectively. Experimental results revealed that impregnation with iron oxide nanoparticles significantly increased the removal efficiency of CNTs.

  14. Oxidation resistant iron and nickel alloys for high temperature use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, V. L.; Misra, S. K.; Wheaton, H. L.

    1970-01-01

    Iron-base and nickel-base alloys exhibit good oxidation resistance and improved ductility with addition of small amounts of yttrium, tantalum /or hafnium/, and thorium. They can be used in applications above the operating temperatures of the superalloys, if high strength materials are not required.

  15. Role of iron oxide impurities in electrocatalysis by multiwall carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The role of iron oxide impurities in the electrocatalytic properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes. (MWCNTs) prepared by catalytic chemical vapour decomposition method (CCVD) is studied in detail. A novel magnetically modified electrodes have been developed by which MWCNTs were immobilized on indium-tin ...

  16. Dielectrical and structural characterization of iron oxide added to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Dielectrical and structural characterization of iron oxide added to hydroxyapatite. C C SILVA*, F P FILHO, M F P GRAÇA, M A VALENTE and A S B SOMBRA. Physics Department, Aveiro University, Aveiro, Portugal. MS received 10 July 2007; revised 19 May 2008. Abstract. In this work we report preparation, structural ...

  17. Diverging geometric and magnetic size distributions of iron oxide nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luigjes, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31412330X; Woudenberg, S.M.C.; de Groot, R.; Meeldijk, J.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323921647; Torres Galvis, H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314116249; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; Philipse, A.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073532894; Erné, B.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/141937378

    2011-01-01

    An important reason to prepare magnetic nanoparticles of uniform size and shape is to ensure uniform magnetic properties. However, here, we demonstrate that magnetic iron oxide crystals of 20 nm or less with a low polydispersity of the geometric size can nevertheless have a strikingly broad

  18. Thermal Plasma Synthesis of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lei, P.Y.; Boies, A.M.; Calder, S.A.; Girshick, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by injecting ferrocene vapor and oxygen into an argon/helium DC thermal plasma. Size distributions of particles in the reactor exhaust were measured online using an aerosol extraction probe interfaced to a scanning mobility particle sizer,

  19. Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles of narrow size distribution on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diffuse reflectance UV–vis spectra values show that the template is completely removed from the final iron oxide particles and powder XRD measurements show that the peaks of the diffractogram are in agreement with the theoretical data of hematite. The salient observations of our study shows that there occurs a direct ...

  20. Hybrid Adsorptive and Oxidative Removal of Natural Organic Matter Using Iron Oxide-Coated Pumice Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehnaz Sule Kaplan Bekaroglu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to combine adsorptive and catalytic properties of iron oxide surfaces in a hybrid process using hydrogen peroxide and iron oxide-coated pumice particles to remove natural organic matter (NOM in water. Experiments were conducted in batch, completely mixed reactors using various original and coated pumice particles. The results showed that both adsorption and catalytic oxidation mechanisms played role in the removal of NOM. The hybrid process was found to be effective in removing NOM from water having a wide range of specific UV absorbance values. Iron oxide surfaces preferentially adsorbed UV280-absorbing NOM fractions. Furthermore, the strong oxidants produced from reactions among iron oxide surfaces and hydrogen peroxide also preferentially oxidized UV280-absorbing NOM fractions. Preloading of iron oxide surfaces with NOM slightly reduced the further NOM removal performance of the hybrid process. Overall, the results suggested that the tested hybrid process may be effective for removal of NOM and control disinfection by-product formation.

  1. Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangling Gu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA coated iron oxide nanoparticles have served as a feasible, robust, and functional platform for various biomedical applications. However, there is scarcely a systemic paper reviewed about such functionalising nanomaterials to date. In this review, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles, the mechanism of dopamine self-oxidation, the interaction between iron oxide and dopamine, and the functionality and the safety assessment of dopamine modified iron oxide nanoparticles as well as the biomedical application of such nanoparticles are discussed. To enlighten the future research, the opportunities and the limitations of functionalising iron oxide nanoparticles coated with PDA are also analyzed.

  2. Iron Kinetics and Evolution of Microbial Populations in Low-pH, Ferrous Iron-Oxidizing Bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rose M; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-08-02

    Iron-rich, acidic wastewaters are commonplace pollutants associated with metal and coal mining. Continuous-flow bioreactors were commissioned and tested for their capacities to oxidize ferrous iron in synthetic and actual acid mine drainage waters using (initially) pure cultures of the recently described acidophilic, iron-oxidizing heterotrophic bacterium Acidithrix ferrooxidans grown in the presence of glucose and yeast extract. The bioreactors became rapidly colonized by this bacterium, which formed macroscopic streamer growths in the flowing waters. Over 97% of ferrous iron in pH 2.0-2.2 synthetic mine water was oxidized (at up to 225 mg L(-1) h(-1)) at dilution rates (D) of 0.6 h(-1). Rates of iron oxidation decreased with pH but were still significant, with influent liquors as low as pH 1.37. When fed with actual mine water, >90% of ferrous iron was oxidized at D values of 0.4 h(-1), and microbial communities within the bioreactors changed over time, with Atx. ferrooxidans becoming increasingly displaced by the autotrophic iron-oxidizing acidophiles Ferrovum myxofaciens, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans (which were all indigenous to the mine water), although this did not have a negative impact on net ferrous-iron oxidation. The results confirmed the potential of using a heterotrophic acidophile to facilitate the rapid commissioning of iron-oxidizing bioreactors and illustrated how microbial communities within them can evolve without compromising the performances of the bioreactors.

  3. Biogeochemistry of pyrite and iron sulfide oxidation in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schippers, A.; Jørgensen, BB

    2002-01-01

    Pyrite (FeS2) and iron monosulfide (FeS) play a central role in the sulfur and iron cycles of marine sediments, They may be buried in the sediment or oxidized by O-2 after transport by bioturbation to the sediment surface. FeS2 and FeS may also be oxidized within the anoxic sediment in which NO3......-, Fe(III) oxides, or MnO2 are available as potential electron acceptors. In chemical experiments, FeS2 and FeS were oxidized by MnO2 but not with NO3- or amorphous Fe(III) oxide (Schippers and Jørgensen, 2001). Here we also show that in experiments with anoxic sediment slurries, a dissolution of tracer......-marked (FeS2)-Fe-55 occurred with MnO2 but not with NO3- or amorphous Fe(III) oxide as electron acceptor. To study a thermodynamically possible anaerobic microbial FeS, and FeS oxidation with NO3- or amorphous Fe(III) oxide as electron acceptor, more than 300 assays were inoculated with material from several...

  4. In vitro study on the effects of iron sucrose, ferric gluconate and iron dextran on redox-active iron and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Brigitte; Steinkellner, Hannes; Ternes, Nina; Goldenberg, Hans; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Concerns exist that administration of intravenous (i.v.) iron preparations is associated with oxidative stress. Therefore iron sucrose (CAS 8047-67-4), ferric gluconate (CAS 34098-81-1) and iron dextran (CAS 9004-66-4) were assessed for redox-active iron by a dichlorofluorescein assay and for intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Examining each i.v. iron preparation at its maximum concentration achieved following clinically frequently used doses in a 70 kg individual in in vitro experiments, redox-active iron was highest with ferric gluconate, followed by iron dextran and iron sucrose. Interestingly, when the i.v. iron preparations were diluted in human serum instead of buffer, redox-active iron was highest with iron dextran, followed by iron sucrose, and practically disappeared with ferric gluconate. ROS production in HepG2 cells was increased by all i.v. iron preparations. However, in the neutral red cytotoxicity assay all i.v. iron preparations were non-toxic. In conclusion, ferric gluconate showed the highest increase in intracellular ROS-production in HepG2 cells and the highest amount of redox-active iron in buffer in the in vitro assays. In contrast to the other i.v. iron preparations, redox-active iron from ferric gluconate was rendered completely redox-inactive by serum, indicating that redox-active iron in the various preparations has different chemical properties.

  5. Simultaneous reductive dissolution of iron oxide and oxidation of iodide in ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kitae; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-04-01

    Iron is an important trace element controlling the metabolism and growth of all kinds of living species. Especially, the bio-availability of iron has been regarded as the limiting factor for primary productivity in HNLC (High Nutrients Low Chlorophyll) regions including Southern ocean. The dissolution of iron oxide provides enhanced the bio-availability of iron for phytoplankton growth. The halogen chemistry in polar regions is related to various important environmental processes such as Antarctic Ozone Depletion Event(ODE), mercury depletion, oxidative processes in atmosphere, and the formation of CCN (Cloud Condensation Nuclei). In this study, we investigated the reductive dissolution of iron oxide particles to produce Fe(II)aq and simultaneous oxidation of I- (iodide) to I3- (tri-iodide) in ice phase under UV irradiation or dark condition. The reductive generation of Fe(II)aq from iron oxides and oxidation of iodide to I3- were negligible in water but significantly accelerated in frozen solution both in the presence and absence of light. The enhanced reductive generation of Fe(II)aq and oxidative formation of I3- in ice were observed regardless of the various types of iron oxides [hematite (α-Fe2O3) maghemite (γ- Fe2O3), goethite (α-FeOOH), lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and, magnetite (Fe3O4)]. We explained that the enhanced redox production of Fe(II)aq and I3- in ice is contributed to the freeze concentration of iodides, protons, and dissolved oxygen in the unfrozen solution. When the concentration of both iodides and protons were raised by 10-fold each, the formation of Fe(II)aq in water under UV irradiation was approached to those in ice. The outdoor experiments were carried out under ambient solar radiation in winter season of mid-latitude (Pohang, Korea: 36°N latitude) and also confirmed that the production of Fe(II)aq via reductive dissolution of iron oxide and I3- generation via I- oxidation were enhanced in frozen solution. These results suggest that iron

  6. Oxidation of Dodecanoate Intercalated Iron(II)–Iron(III) Layered Double Hydroxide to Form 2D Iron(III) (Hydr)oxide Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Li‐Zhi; Ayala‐Luis, Karina B.; Fang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    .00(OH)5.31(C12H23O2)0.66(SO4)0.51 and FeIII3O2.18(OH)3.13(C12H23O2)0.56(SO4)0.47, respectively. oxGRC12 has the same planar layer structure as GRC12, as revealed by identical powder X‐ray diffraction patterns. The electrostatic interactions between the interlayer dodecanoate (C12) anions and the iron...... between the alkyl chains of the intercalated dodecanoate anions play a crucial role in stabilizing the structure and hindering the collapse of the iron(II)–iron(III) (hydr)oxide structure during oxidation. This is the first report describing the formation of a stable planar layered octahedral iron...

  7. Hydration characteristics of zirconium oxide replaced Portland cement for use as a root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Cutajar, A; Mallia, B

    2011-08-01

    Zirconium oxide can be added to dental materials rendering them sufficiently radiopaque. It can thus be used to replace the bismuth oxide in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Replacement of Portland cement with 30% zirconium oxide mixed at a water/cement ratio of 0.3 resulted in a material with adequate physical properties. This study aimed at investigating the microstructure, pH and leaching in physiological solution of Portland cement replaced zirconium oxide at either water-powder or water-cement ratios of 0.3 for use as a root-end filling material. The hydration characteristics of the materials which exhibited optimal behavior were evaluated. Portland cement replaced by zirconium oxide in varying amounts ranging from 0 to 50% in increments of 10 was prepared and divided into two sets. One set was prepared at a constant water/cement ratio while the other set at a constant water/powder ratio of 0.3. Portland cement and MTA were used as controls. The materials were analyzed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the hydration products were determined. X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX) was used to analyze the elemental composition of the hydration products. The pH and the amount of leachate in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) were evaluated. A material that had optimal properties that satisfied set criteria and could replace MTA was selected. The microstructure of the prototype material and Portland cement used as a control was assessed after 30 days using SEM and atomic ratio diagrams of Al/Ca versus Si/Ca and S/Ca versus Al/Ca were plotted. The hydration products of Portland cement replaced with 30% zirconium oxide mixed at water/cement ratio of 0.3 were calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide and minimal amounts of ettringite and monosulphate. The calcium hydroxide leached in HBSS solution resulted in an increase in the pH value. The zirconium oxide acted as inert filler and exhibited no reaction with the hydration by-products of Portland

  8. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  9. Microbial Oxidation of Iron Sulfides in Anaerobic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaclavkova, Sarka

    Abstract (shortened): Iron sulfides (FeSx), representing 0.04-10 % of Danish dry soil weight, oxidize in a presence of oxygen, releasing sulfuric acid and free iron. Environmental impact of FeSx oxidation is commonly seen on agricultural sites cultivated by drainage as acid sulfate soil formation....... MISON was found to count for about 1/3 of the net NO3- reduction in MISON active environments, despite the presence of alternative electron donor, organic carbon. The rate of MISON was found to be dependent on the available reactive surface area of FeSx and on the microorganism involved. The findings...... environments including sandy aquifer, freshwater peatland and moderately brackish muddy marine sediment. An apparent salinity limitation of MISON was shown in heavily brackish sediment, where FeSx oxidation was inhibited while other NO3-reduction processes did not appear to be affected by the salinity levels...

  10. How fast is the reaction of hydrated electrons with graphene oxide in aqueous dispersions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahnt, Axel; Flyunt, Roman; Laube, Christian; Knolle, Wolfgang; Eigler, Siegfried; Hermann, Ralf; Naumov, Sergej; Abel, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the mechanism of the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) is a key-question in graphene related materials science. Here, we investigate the kinetics of the reaction of radiolytically generated hydrated electrons with GO in water. The electron transfer proceeds on the ns time scale and not on the ps time scale, as recently reported by Gengler et al. (Nat. Commun., 2013, 4, 2560).Understanding the mechanism of the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) is a key-question in graphene related materials science. Here, we investigate the kinetics of the reaction of radiolytically generated hydrated electrons with GO in water. The electron transfer proceeds on the ns time scale and not on the ps time scale, as recently reported by Gengler et al. (Nat. Commun., 2013, 4, 2560). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Absorption spectrum of GO, pulse radiolysis and laser photolysis transient absorption spectra, kinetic simulation, frontier molecular orbitals, and possible reaction pathways induced by photoexcitation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03444b

  11. In vivo biodistribution of iron oxide nanoparticles: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Jennifer A.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2011-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles present a promising alternative to conventional energy deposition-based tissue therapies. The success of such nanoparticles as a therapeutic for diseases like cancer, however, depends heavily on the particles' ability to localize to tumor tissue as well as provide minimal toxicity to surrounding tissues and key organs such as those involved in the reticuloendothelial system (RES). We present here the results of a long term clearance study where mice injected intravenously with 2 mg Fe of 100 nm dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were sacrificed at 14 and 580 days post injection. Histological analysis showed accumulation of the nanoparticles in some RES organs by the 14 day time point and clearance of the nanoparticles by the 580 day time point with no obvious toxicity to organs. An additional study reported herein employs 20 nm and 110 nm starch-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at 80 mg Fe/kg mouse in a size/biodistribution study with endpoints at 4, 24 and 72 hours. Preliminary results show nanoparticle accumulation in the liver and spleen with some elevated iron accumulation in tumoral tissues with differences between the 20 nm and the 110 nm nanoparticle depositions.

  12. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  13. Arsenate adsorption onto iron oxide amended rice husk char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Christopher O; Webster, Damon S; Sabatini, David A

    2014-08-01

    In this study, rice husks were charred at 550 °C in a partially sealed ceramic vessel for 30minutes to create a high specific surface area (SSA) rice husk char (RHC). The RHC was then amended with iron oxides using dissolved ferric nitrate, Fe(NO3)3⋅9H2O, to provide a surface chemistry conducive to arsenic adsorption. The 550 °C iron oxide amended rice husk char's (550 IOA-RHC's) SSA was nearly 2.5 orders of magnitude higher and the arsenate adsorptive level was nearly 2 orders of magnitude higher than those reported for iron oxide amended sand, thus indicating a positive relationship between post-amendment SSA and arsenate adsorptive levels. Rice husks were then charred at temperatures ranging from 450 °C to 1050 °C to create an even higher SSA material, which might further increase arsenate adsorptive levels. The 950 °C RHC was chosen for amendment due to its high SSA and feasibility of being produced in the field. Once amended, the 950 °C iron oxide amended rice husk char (950 IOA-RHC) improved the arsenate adsorption capacity by thus confirming a positive relationship, though not a linear relationship, between post-amendment SSA and arsenic adsorptive capacity. Further study demonstrated that post-amendment mesoporous volume and mesoporous surface area appear to be better indicators of arsenic adsorptive capacity than SSA or iron content. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermodynamics of Uranyl Minerals: Enthalpies of Formation of Uranyl Oxide Hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Kubatko; K. Helean; A. Navrotsky; P.C. Burns

    2005-05-11

    The enthalpies of formation of seven uranyl oxide hydrate phases and one uranate have been determined using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry: [(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O(OH){sub 6}](H{sub 2}O){sub 5}, metaschoepite; {beta}-UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}; CaUO{sub 4}; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}, becquerelite; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}; Na(UO{sub 2})O(OH), clarkeite; Na{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}, the sodium analogue of compreignacite and Pb{sub 3}(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, curite. The enthalpy of formation from the binary oxides, {Delta}H{sub f-ox}, at 298 K was calculated for each compound from the respective drop solution enthalpy, {Delta}H{sub ds}. The standard enthalpies of formation from the elements, {Delta}H{sub f}{sup o}, at 298 K are -1791.0 {+-} 3.2, -1536.2 {+-} 2.8, -2002.0 {+-} 3.2, -11389.2 {+-} 13.5, -6653.1 {+-} 13.8, -1724.7 {+-} 5.1, -10936.4 {+-} 14.5 and -13163.2 {+-} 34.4 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. These values are useful in exploring the stability of uranyl oxide hydrates in auxiliary chemical systems, such as those expected in U-contaminated environments.

  15. Selective Inhibition of the Oxidation of Ferrous Iron or Sulfur in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Harahuc, Lesia; Lizama, Hector M.; Suzuki, Isamu

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of either ferrous iron or sulfur by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was selectively inhibited or controlled by various anions, inhibitors, and osmotic pressure. Iron oxidation was more sensitive than sulfur oxidation to inhibition by chloride, phosphate, and nitrate at low concentrations (below 0.1 M) and also to inhibition by azide and cyanide. Sulfur oxidation was more sensitive than iron oxidation to the inhibitory effect of high osmotic pressure. These differences were evident not...

  16. Oxidative stress response in neural stem cells exposed to different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pongrac, I. M.; Pavičić, I.; Milić, M.; Brkić Ahmed, L.; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Vinković Vrček, I.; Gajović, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, 26 April (2016), s. 1701-1715 ISSN 1176-9114 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC16-01128J EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316120 - GLOWBRAIN Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles * biocompatibility * oxidative stress Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  17. Biogenic nanosized iron oxides obtained from cultivation of iron bacteria from the genus Leptothrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedkov, I; Slavov, L; Angelova, R; Blagoev, B; Kovacheva, D; Abrashev, M V; Iliev, M; Groudeva, V

    2016-10-01

    A detailed investigation of nanostructured iron oxides/(oxy)hydroxides gathered after cultivation of bacteria from the genus Leptothrix as iron (II) oxidizers is presented. A specific type of medium is selected for the cultivation of the bacteria. Results for sediment powder and bio-film on glass substrate samples from the same media are discussed. XRD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, and TEM images and PPMS measurements are used to prove the exact composition of the biogenic products and to interpret the oxidation process. Analysis of the data collected shows that around 80 % of the iron (II) from the growth medium has been transformed into iron (III) in the form of different (oxy)hydroxides, with the rest found to be in a mixed 2,5 valence in magnetite. Our investigation shows that the bio-film sample has a phase content different from that of the powdered biomass and that lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) is the predominant and the initial biogenic phase in both samples. Magnetite nanoparticles are a secondary product in the bio-film, part of which possesses a defective quasi-maghemite surface layer. In the powdered biomass, the oxidation steps are not fully completed. The initial products are non-stoichiometric and due to the mixed ferric and ferrous ions present, they develop into: (i) lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) as a basic sediment, (ii) magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) and (iii) goethite (α-FeOOH) in small quantities. The average size of all iron-bearing particles is found to be below 30 nm. The magnetic measurements performed show a superparamagnetic behavior of the material at room temperature.

  18. Intratumoral iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and radiation cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, P. J.; Strawbridge, R. R.; Gibson, U. J.; Zeng, Q.; Pierce, Z. E.; Savellano, M.; Tate, J. A.; Ogden, J. A.; Baker, I.; Ivkov, R.; Foreman, A. R.

    2007-02-01

    The potential synergism and benefit of combined hyperthermia and radiation for cancer treatment is well established, but has yet to be optimized clinically. Specifically, the delivery of heat via external arrays /applicators or interstitial antennas has not demonstrated the spatial precision or specificity necessary to achieve appropriate a highly positive therapeutic ratio. Recently, antibody directed and possibly even non-antibody directed iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia has shown significant promise as a tumor treatment modality. Our studies are designed to determine the effects (safety and efficacy) of iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and external beam radiation in a murine breast cancer model. Methods: MTG-B murine breast cancer cells (1 x 106) were implanted subcutaneous in 7 week-old female C3H/HeJ mice and grown to a treatment size of 150 mm3 +/- 50 mm3. Tumors were then injected locally with iron oxide nanoparticles and heated via an alternating magnetic field (AMF) generator operated at approximately 160 kHz and 400 - 550 Oe. Tumor growth was monitored daily using standard 3-D caliper measurement technique and formula. specific Mouse tumors were heated using a cooled, 36 mm diameter square copper tube induction coil which provided optimal heating in a 1 cm wide region in the center of the coil. Double dextran coated 80 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (Triton Biosystems) were used in all studies. Intra-tumor, peri-tumor and rectal (core body) temperatures were continually measured throughout the treatment period. Results: Preliminary in vivo nanoparticle-AMF hyperthermia (167 KHz and 400 or 550 Oe) studies demonstrated dose responsive cytotoxicity which enhanced the effects of external beam radiation. AMF associated eddy currents resulted in nonspecific temperature increases in exposed tissues which did not contain nanoparticles, however these effects were minor and not injurious to the mice. These studies also suggest that iron oxide nanoparticle

  19. Altering the structure and properties of iron oxide nanoparticles and graphene oxide/iron oxide composites by urea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naghdi, Samira [Physics department, Bu-Ali Sina University, 65174 Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 446-701 Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Kyong Yop, E-mail: rheeky@khu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 446-701 Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Jaleh, Babak [Physics department, Bu-Ali Sina University, 65174 Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Park, Soo Jin [Chemistry, Colloge of Natural Science, Inha University, 402-751 Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles were directly grown on graphene oxide (GO) using a facile microwave assistant method. • The effect of urea concentration on Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles and GO/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite was examined. • Increasing urea concentration altered the morphology and decreased the particle size. • The increased concentration of urea induced a larger surface area with more active sites in the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. • The increase in urea concentration led to decreased thermal stability of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. - Abstract: Iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles were grown on graphene oxide (GO) using a simple microwave-assisted method. The effects of urea concentration on Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles and GO/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite were examined. The as-prepared samples were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were uniformly developed on GO sheets. The results showed that urea affects both Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} morphology and particle size. In the absence of urea, the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures exhibited a rod-like morphology. However, increasing urea concentration altered the morphology and decreased the particle size. The Raman results of GO/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed that the intensity ratio of D band to G band (I{sub D}/I{sub G}) was decreased by addition of urea, indicating that urea can preserve the GO sheets during synthesis of the composite from exposing more defects. The surface area and thermal stability of GO/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were compared using the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller method and thermal gravimetric analysis, respectively. The results showed that the increased concentration of urea induced a larger surface area with more active sites in the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. However, the increase in urea

  20. High temperature oxidation of iron-chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, Lars

    2003-06-15

    The high temperature oxidation of the ferritic alloy Fe78Cr22 has been investigated in the present work. The effect of small alloying additions of cerium and/or silicon was also investigated. The alloys were oxidized at 973, 1173 and 1373 K in either air or a hydrogen/argon mixture. The various reaction atmospheres contained between 0.02 and 50% water vapour. The oxide scales formed on the various alloys at 973 K consisted of thin chromia layers. The oxide scales grown on the alloys at 1173 K also consisted of a chromia layer. The microstructure of the chromia scales was found to depend on the reaction atmosphere. The chromia scales grown in hydrogen/argon atmospheres formed oxide whiskers and oxide ridges at the surface of the scales, while the chromia scales grown in air formed larger oxide grains near the surface. This difference in oxide microstructure was due to the vaporization of chromium species from the chromia scales grown in air. Two different growth mechanisms are proposed for the growth of oxide whiskers. The growth rate of the chromia scales was independent of the oxygen activity. This is explained by a growth mechanism of the chromia scales, where the growth is governed by the diffusion of interstitial chromium. The addition of silicon to the iron-chromium alloy resulted in the formation of silica particles beneath the chromia scale. The presence of silicon in the alloy was found to decrease the growth rate of the chromia scale. This is explained by a blocking mechanism, where the silica particles beneath the chromia scale partly block the outwards diffusion of chromium from the alloy to the chromia scale. The addition of cerium to the iron-chromium alloy improved the adhesion of the chromia scale to the alloy and decreased the growth rate of chromia. It was observed that the minimum concentration of cerium in the alloy should be 0.3 at.% in order to observe an effect of the cerium addition. The effect of cerium is explained by the &apos

  1. Iron-mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane in brackish coastal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Matthias; Rasigraf, Olivia; Sapart, Célia J; Jilbert, Tom; Jetten, Mike S M; Röckmann, Thomas; van der Veen, Carina; Bândă, Narcisa; Kartal, Boran; Ettwig, Katharina F; Slomp, Caroline P

    2015-01-06

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and its biological conversion in marine sediments, largely controlled by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), is a crucial part of the global carbon cycle. However, little is known about the role of iron oxides as an oxidant for AOM. Here we provide the first field evidence for iron-dependent AOM in brackish coastal surface sediments and show that methane produced in Bothnian Sea sediments is oxidized in distinct zones of iron- and sulfate-dependent AOM. At our study site, anthropogenic eutrophication over recent decades has led to an upward migration of the sulfate/methane transition zone in the sediment. Abundant iron oxides and high dissolved ferrous iron indicate iron reduction in the methanogenic sediments below the newly established sulfate/methane transition. Laboratory incubation studies of these sediments strongly suggest that the in situ microbial community is capable of linking methane oxidation to iron oxide reduction. Eutrophication of coastal environments may therefore create geochemical conditions favorable for iron-mediated AOM and thus increase the relevance of iron-dependent methane oxidation in the future. Besides its role in mitigating methane emissions, iron-dependent AOM strongly impacts sedimentary iron cycling and related biogeochemical processes through the reduction of large quantities of iron oxides.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructure hydrous iron-titanium binary mixed oxide for arsenic sorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Kaushik [Presidency College, Department of Chemistry (India); Saha, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamalsaha@yahoo.co [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Nano-Science Unit (India); Ghosh, Uday Chand, E-mail: ucghosh@yahoo.co.i [Presidency College, Department of Chemistry (India)

    2008-12-15

    Synthesis of nanostructure hydrous iron-titanium binary mixed oxide (NHITBMO) had been reported by a simple method, and characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analysis, transmission electron microscope (TEM), Foeurier Transform Infrared (FTIR), surface area, and zero surface charge pH (pHzpc). The synthetic oxide was hydrated and microcrystalline with 77.8 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} BET surface area. The particle size (nm) calculated using XRD peak table and TEM image was {approx}10-13 and 6-8, respectively. The pH{sub zpc} value was 6.0 ({+-}0.05) for the oxide. The NHITBMO showed pH dependent good sorption affinity for arsenic from the aqueous solution and, the Langmuir monolayer capacity (mg g{sup -1}) was 80.0 and 14.6, respectively, for the As(III) and As(V). The pseudo-second order equation described the room temperature arsenic sorption kinetic data well. The minimum dose required was 1.6 g NHITBMO per L of water (As{sub total} = 0.24 mg L{sup -1}) to reduce the arsenic level below 0.01 mg L{sup -1} in batch treatment process.

  3. Iron oxide and iron carbide particles produced by the polyol method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Y., E-mail: yyasu@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp; Shimizu, R. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [The University of Electro-Communications, Graduate School of Informatics and Engineering (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Iron oxide (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and iron carbide (Fe{sub 3}C) particles were produced by the polyol method. Ferrocene, which was employed as an iron source, was decomposed in a mixture of 1,2-hexadecandiol, oleylamine, and 1-octadecene. Particles were characterized using Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that oleylamine acted as a capping reagent, leading to uniform-sized (12-16 nm) particles consisting of γ-Fe {sub 2}O{sub 3}. On the other hand, 1-octadecene acted as a non-coordinating solvent and a carbon source, which led to particles consisting of Fe{sub 3}C and α-Fe with various sizes.

  4. Tetragonal-Like Phase in Core–Shell Iron Iron-Oxide Nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; McCloy, John S.; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Pearce, Carolyn; Tucek, Jiri; Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark; Arenholz, Elke; Qiang, You

    2017-05-11

    Two sizes of iron/iron-oxide (Fe/Fe-oxide) nanoclusters (NCs) of 10 nm and 35 nm diameters were prepared using a cluster deposition technique. Both these NCs displayed XRD peaks due to body-centered cubic (bcc) Fe0 and magnetite-like phase. Mossbauer spectroscopy (MS) measurements: a) confirmed the core-shell nature of the NCs, b) the Fe-oxide shell to be nanocrystalline and partially oxidized, and c) the Fe-oxide spins are significantly canted. In addition to the bcc Fe and magnetite-like phases, a phase similar to tetragonal σ-Fe-Cr (8% Cr) was CLEARLY evident in the larger NC, based on X-ray diffraction. Origin of the tetragonallike phase in the larger NC was not clear but could be due to significant distortion of the Fe0 core lattice planes; subtle peaks due to this phase were also apparent in the smaller NC. Unambiguous evidence for the presence of such a phase, however, was not clear from MS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, nor transmission electron microscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of tetragonallike phase in the Fe/Fe-oxide core-shell systems.

  5. Characterization of iron oxide-dextran magnetic nanoparticle suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, J.; Bai, R.; Chiou, W.; Briber, R. M.; Borchers, J. A.; Dennis, C. L.; Gruettner, C.

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles, with structures from core-shell to nanocrystallites in a matrix, are candidates for use in biomedical applications. ``Superparamagnetic iron oxide'' (SPIO) nanoparticles are nanocrystallites of iron oxide in a dextran matrix, with sizes between 20nm and 250nm. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and hysteresis measurements were used for structural and magnetic characterization. Additionally, cryoquench-TEM was performed, allowing direct imaging without false aggregation from drying. The DLS-determined size of the particles is 250nm, but cryoquench-TEM yields a smaller size of 150nm. In addition, the particles are relatively well-dispersed, but dimers and trimers are observed. This corresponds with the evidence of weak interactions in magnetic hysteresis measurements. Further magnetic characterization will provide information on how the magnetic properties of these SPIO particles correlate with their size and structure.

  6. Reflection spectra and magnetochemistry of iron oxides and natural surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic properties and spectral characteristics of iron oxides are distinctive. Diagnostic features in reflectance spectra (0.5 to 2.4 micron) for alpha Fe2O3, gamma Fe2O3, and FeOOH include location of Fe3(+) absorption features, intensity ratios at various wavelengths, and the curve shape between 1.2 micron and 2.4 micron. The reflection spectrum of natural rock surfaces are seldom those of the bulk rock because of weathering effects. Coatings are found to be dominated by iron oxides and clay. A simple macroscopic model of rock spectra (based on concepts of stains and coatings) is considered adequate for interpretation of LANDSAT data. The magnetic properties of materials associated with specific spectral types and systematic changes in both spectra and magnetic properties are considered.

  7. Exchange Bias Effects in Iron Oxide-Based Nanoparticle Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Alonso, Javier; Khurshid, Hafsa; Lampen-Kelley, Paula; Chandra, Sayan; Stojak Repa, Kristen; Nemati, Zohreh; Das, Raja; Iglesias, Óscar; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of exchange bias (EB) on the nanoscale provides a novel approach to improving the anisotropic properties of magnetic nanoparticles for prospective applications in nanospintronics and nanomedicine. However, the physical origin of EB is not fully understood. Recent advances in chemical synthesis provide a unique opportunity to explore EB in a variety of iron oxide-based nanostructures ranging from core/shell to hollow and hybrid composite nanoparticles. Experimental and atomistic Monte Carlo studies have shed light on the roles of interface and surface spins in these nanosystems. This review paper aims to provide a thorough understanding of the EB and related phenomena in iron oxide-based nanoparticle systems, knowledge of which is essential to tune the anisotropic magnetic properties of exchange-coupled nanoparticle systems for potential applications. PMID:28335349

  8. Dendronized iron oxide colloids for imaging the sentinel lymph node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhannaud, J.; Garofalo, A.; Felder-Flesch, D.; Pourroy, G.

    2015-03-01

    Various methods have been used in medicine for more than one century to explore the lymphatic system. Radioactive colloids (RuS labelled with 99mTc) or/and Vital Blue dye are injected around the primary tumour and detected by means of nuclear probe or visual colour inspection respectively. The simultaneous clinical use of both markers (dye and radionuclide) improves the sensitivity of detection close to 100%. Superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) are currently receiving much attention as strong T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents that can be potentially used for preoperative localization of sentinel nodes, but also for peroperative detection of sentinel node using hand-held probes. In that context, we present the elaboration of dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles elaborated at the Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Materials of Strasbourg.

  9. Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kanagesan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the response of human breast cancer cells' exposure to nanoparticle, iron oxide (α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple low temperature combustion method using Fe(NO33·9H2O as raw material. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed that the resultant powders are pure α-Fe2O3. Transmission electron microscopy study revealed the spherical shape of the primary particles, and the size of the iron oxide nanoparticles is in the range of 19 nm. The magnetic hysteresis loops demonstrated that the sample exposed ferromagnetic behaviors with a relatively low coercivity. The cytotoxicity of α-Fe2O3 nanoparticle was also evaluated on human breast cancer cells to address the current deficient knowledge of cellular response to nanoparticle exposure.

  10. Promising iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh; Vo, Toi Van; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2012-12-01

    For the past few decades biomedical engineering has imprinted its significant impact on the map of science through its wide applications on many other fields. An important example obviously proving this fact is the versatile application of magnetic nanoparticles in theranostics. Due to preferable properties such as biocompatibility, non-toxicity compared to other metal derivations, iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles was chosen to be addressed in this review. Aim of this review is to give the readers a whole working window of these magnetic nanoparticles in the current context of science. Thus, preparation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the so-far techniques, methods of characterizing the nanoparticles as well as their most recent biomedical applications will be stated.

  11. Magnetic Deposits of Iron Oxides in the Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makohusová Miroslava

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Deposits of iron oxides in the human brain (globus pallidus are visible under electron microscopy as object of regular and or/irregular shape but giving sharp diffraction patterns in the transmission mode. The SQUID magnetometry reveals that the magnetization curves decline form an ideal Langevin function due to the dominating diamagnetism of organic tissue. The fitting procedure yields the quantitative characteristics of the overall magnetization curves that were further processed by statistical multivariate methods

  12. Engineered MRI nanoprobes based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, Susana Isabel Conde Jesus

    2015-01-01

    This project aimed to engineer new T2 MRI contrast agents for cell labeling based on formulations containing monodisperse iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) coated with natural and synthetic polymers. Monodisperse MNP capped with hydrophobic ligands were synthesized by a thermal decomposition method, and further stabilized in aqueous media with citric acid or meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) through a ligand exchange reaction. Hydrophilic MNP-DMSA, with optimal hydrodynamic ...

  13. Magmatic origin of giant 'Kiruna-type' apatite-iron-oxide ores in central Sweden

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jonsson, Erik; Troll, Valentin R; Högdahl, Karin; Harris, Chris; Weis, Franz; Nilsson, Katarina P; Skelton, Alasdair

    2013-01-01

    Iron is the most important metal for modern industry and Sweden is by far the largest iron-producer in Europe, yet the genesis of Sweden's main iron-source, the 'Kiruna-type' apatite-iron-oxide ores, remains enigmatic...

  14. Liquid Plasma Synthesis of Carbon Coated Iron Oxide Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygun, Aysegul; Hershkowitz, Noah; Eren, Esin; Uygun, Emre; Celik Cogal, Gamze; Yurdabak Karaca, Gozde; Manolache, Sorin; Sundaram, Gunasekaran; Sadak, Omer; Oksuz, Lutfi

    2017-10-01

    Recently, magnetic metal or metal oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in carbon are important in biomedical applications. The relevant reason to study toxicity of the magnetic nanoparticles coated by carbon is that they have great potential to contribute to cancer treatment. In this work, the synthesis of iron oxide nano-particles coated by graphitic carbon shells using pulsed plasma in liquid method. Short duration of RF plasma discharge, low electrical energy and fast quenching of the surrounding media can let to synthesize various kinds of pure nanoparticles. Corresponding author: ayseguluygun@sdu.edu.tr, lutfioksuz@sdu.edu.tr.

  15. Gentamicin coated iron oxide nanoparticles as novel antibacterial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Proma; Neogi, Sudarsan

    2017-09-01

    Applications of different types of magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical purposes started a long time back. The concept of surface functionalization of the iron oxide nanoparticles with antibiotics is a novel technique which paves the path for further application of these nanoparticles by virtue of their property of superparamagnetism. In this paper, we have synthesized novel iron oxide nanoparticles surface functionalized with Gentamicin. The average size of the particles, concluded from the HR-TEM images, came to be around 14 nm and 10 nm for unmodified and modified nanoparticles, respectively. The magnetization curve M(H) obtained for these nanoparticles are typical of superparamagnetic nature and having almost zero values of coercivity and remanance. The release properties of the drug coated nanoparticles were studied; obtaining an S shaped profile, indicating the initial burst effect followed by gradual sustained release. In vitro investigations against various gram positive and gram negative strains viz Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis indicated significant antibacterial efficiency of the drug-nanoparticle conjugate. The MIC values indicated that a small amount like 0.2 mg ml-1 of drug capped particles induce about 98% bacterial death. The novelty of the work lies in the drug capping of the nanoparticles, which retains the superparamagnetic nature of the iron oxide nanoparticles and the medical properties of the drug simultaneously, which is found to extremely blood compatible.

  16. Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brullot, W., E-mail: ward.brullot@fys.kuleuven.be [Department of Chemistry, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Reddy, N.K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Willem de Croylaan 46, 3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Wouters, J.; Valev, V.K.; Goderis, B. [Department of Chemistry, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Vermant, J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Willem de Croylaan 46, 3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Verbiest, T. [Department of Chemistry, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-06-15

    Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a facile protocol and thoroughly characterized. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using a modified forced hydrolysis method were functionalized with polyethylene glycol silane (PEG silane), precipitated and dried. These functionalized particles are dispersable in a range of solvents and concentrations depending on the desired properties. Examples of tunable properties are magnetic behavior, optical and magneto-optical response, thermal features and rheological behavior. As such, PEG silane functionalized particles represent a platform for the development of new materials that have broad applicability in e.g. biomedical, industrial or photonic environments. Magnetic, optical, magneto-optical, thermal and rheological properties of several ferrofluids based on PEG coated particles with different concentrations of particles dispersed in low molecular mass polyethylene glycol were investigated, establishing the applicability of such materials. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic, optical, magneto-optical, thermal and rheological characterization of ferrofluids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tunable properties of versatile polyethylene glycol stabilized ferrofluids.

  17. Linear-chain assemblies of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhak, Prasanta; Kim, Min-Kwan; Lee, Jae Hyeok; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Sang-Koog, E-mail: sangkoog@snu.ac.kr

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Hydrothermal synthesis of pure phase 200 nm Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • Studies of linear-chain assemblies of iron oxide nanosphere by FESEM. • Micromagnetic simulations showed the presence of 3D vortex states. • The B.E. for different numbers of particles in linear chain assemblies were calculated. - Abstract: We synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles using a simple hydrothermal approach and found several types of segments of their linear-chain self-assemblies as observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements confirm a well-defined single-phase FCC structure. Vibrating sample magnetometry measurements exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior. Micromagnetic numerical simulations show magnetic vortex states in the nanosphere model. Also, calculations of binding energies for different numbers of particles in the linear-chain assemblies explain a possible mechanism responsible for the self-assemblies of segments of the linear chains of nanoparticles. This work offers a step towards linear-chain self-assemblies of iron oxide nanoparticles and the effect of magnetic vortex states in individual nanoparticles on their binding energy.

  18. Distribution and diversity of gallionella-like neutrophilic iron oxidizers in a tidal freshwater marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Vollrath, S.; Behrends, T.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Muyzer, G.; Den Oudsten, F.; Meima-Franke, M.; Cappellen, P.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial iron oxidation is an integral part of the iron redox cycle in wetlands. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about the composition and ecology of iron-oxidizing communities in the soils and sediments of wetlands. In this study, sediment cores were collected across a freshwater tidal

  19. Distribution and diversity of Gallionella-like neutrophilic iron oxidizers in a tidal freshwater marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Vollrath, S.; Behrends, T.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Muyzer, G.; Meima-Franke, M.; den Oudsten, F.; van Cappellen, P.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial iron oxidation is an integral part of the iron redox cycle in wetlands. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about the composition and ecology of iron-oxidizing communities in the soils and sediments of wetlands. In this study, sediment cores were collected across a freshwater tidal

  20. Ligand-Enhanced Abiotic Iron Oxidation and the Effects of Chemical versus Biological Iron Cycling in Anoxic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Kopf, Sebastian H.; Henny, Cynthia; Newman, Dianne K.

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a newly isolated, genetically tractable bacterium ( Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain MAI-1) and explores the extent to which its nitrate-dependent iron-oxidation activity is directly biologically catalyzed. Specifically, we focused on the role of iron chelating ligands in promoting chemical oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrite under anoxic conditions. Strong organic ligands such as nitrilotriacetate and citrate can substantially enhance chemical oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrite at ...

  1. The Impact of Magnesium Oxide on the Hydratation and Features of Mechanicaly Activated Phosphogypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrejus Jefimovas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Extractive hemihydrate phosphogypsum (E-PG is the most popular mineral waste in Lithuania. The dumps of that are rapidly growing and the question of possible use still remains open. Phosphogypsum is obtained during the process of extracting phosphoric acid from apatite using sulphuric acid. Due to low activity and contamination with acidic mineral admixtures (phosphorus and fluorine compounds, this technogenic product cannot be used for producing construction materials. Instead of present energy consuming processes used for neutralisation, another method – mechanical activation neutralizing acid admixtures with cement and opoka mix is offered. Whereas cement and opoka are grey, the items made of phosphogypsum (neutralised using these admixtures are dark. Research was made trying to find out the possibility of gaining the white binder from phosphogypsum. In order to achieve that magnesium oxide was chosen to neutralise phosphogypsum and its impact on E-PG, hydratation and features were studied.Article in Lithuanian

  2. Deep oxidation of 1,2-dichlorobenzene over Ti-doped iron oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaodong; Suo, Xueyue; Cao, Huiqin; Guo, Jie; Lv, Lu; Sun, Hongwen; Zheng, Meihua

    2014-07-07

    Ti-doped iron oxides with worm-like mesopores were successfully prepared using CTAB as the structure-directing agent. The as-prepared catalysts were characterized by XRD, Raman, H2-TPR, XPS, TEM, and N2 adsorption/desorption. The catalytic properties for oxidation of 1,2-dichlorobenzene (o-DCB) were investigated. The results showed that Fe18Ti2Ox with 10 mol% Ti-doping shows the best catalytic activity, and the total conversion of o-DCB can be obtained at 350 °C. Moreover, Fe18Ti2Ox exhibits higher stability, CO2 selectivity and lower apparent activation energy. The high activity of Fe18Ti2Ox could be ascribed to the combined factors including a smaller crystallite size, excellent low-temperature reducibility, high surface active oxygen concentration and a synergic effect between TiO2 and mixed iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3 and α-Fe2O3). Acetate and formate species as intermediates were detected by in situ FTIR spectroscopy. A two-step redox mechanism of o-DCB decomposition on the surface of Ti-doped iron oxides was proposed. These results demonstrated that Ti-doped iron oxides could be developed as environmentally friendly catalysts for the deep oxidation of chlorinated volatile organic pollutants.

  3. Particle interactions of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated iron oxide particles as magnetic drug delivery agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşçi, Sevim; İşçi, Yavuz; Bekaroğlu, Maide Gökçe

    2017-08-01

    Iron oxide particles have been recently researched for the potential applications of targeted drug delivery due to their magnetic properties. The surfaces of the iron oxide particles must be modified to reduce the toxicity and to load the drug to the particles. Biopolymers are good surface modifiers of colloidal particles such as iron oxide particles. The degree of surface coverage of the colloidal iron oxide particles affects the stability, toxicity, magnetic properties and drug loading efficiency. In this study, the interactions of iron oxide (Fe3O4) particles and PVP were determined according to the colloidal properties. The proper concentration of PVP for the whole coverage of the iron oxide particles was found for the possible magnetic drug delivery applications by controlling the colloidal properties of the dispersions. The magnetic properties and toxicity of the fully covered bioiron oxide was also determined for possible applications.

  4. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onysko, S.J.; Kleinmann, R.L.P.; Erickson, P.M.

    1984-07-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans promote indirect oxidation of pyrite through the catalysis of the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron, which is an effective oxidant of pyrite. These bacteria also may catalyze direct oxidation of pyrite by oxygen. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage microorganisms. In this study, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate at low concentrations (5 to 10 mg/liter) each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low-pH, sterile batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations (5 to 50 mg/liter) of any of the compounds.

  5. New Insight into Microbial Iron Oxidation as Revealed by the Proteomic Profile of an Obligate Iron-Oxidizing Chemolithoautotroph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, Roman A; Emerson, David; Sylvan, Jason B; Orcutt, Beth N; Jacobson Meyers, Myrna E; Ramírez, Gustavo A; Zhong, John D; Edwards, Katrina J

    2015-09-01

    Microaerophilic, neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) grow via the oxidation of reduced Fe(II) at or near neutral pH, in the presence of oxygen, making them relevant in numerous environments with elevated Fe(II) concentrations. However, the biochemical mechanisms for Fe(II) oxidation by these neutrophilic FeOB are unknown, and genetic markers for this process are unavailable. In the ocean, microaerophilic microorganisms in the genus Mariprofundus of the class Zetaproteobacteria are the only organisms known to chemolithoautotrophically oxidize Fe and concurrently biomineralize it in the form of twisted stalks of iron oxyhydroxides. The aim of this study was to identify highly expressed proteins associated with the electron transport chain of microaerophilic, neutrophilic FeOB. To this end, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 was cultivated, and its proteins were extracted, assayed for redox activity, and analyzed via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for identification of peptides. The results indicate that a cytochrome c4, cbb3-type cytochrome oxidase subunits, and an outer membrane cytochrome c were among the most highly expressed proteins and suggest an involvement in the process of aerobic, neutrophilic bacterial Fe oxidation. Proteins associated with alternative complex III, phosphate transport, carbon fixation, and biofilm formation were abundant, consistent with the lifestyle of Mariprofundus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Altering the structure and properties of iron oxide nanoparticles and graphene oxide/iron oxide composites by urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, Samira; Rhee, Kyong Yop; Jaleh, Babak; Park, Soo Jin

    2016-02-01

    Iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles were grown on graphene oxide (GO) using a simple microwave-assisted method. The effects of urea concentration on Fe2O3 nanoparticles and GO/Fe2O3 composite were examined. The as-prepared samples were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The Fe2O3 nanoparticles were uniformly developed on GO sheets. The results showed that urea affects both Fe2O3 morphology and particle size. In the absence of urea, the Fe2O3 nanostructures exhibited a rod-like morphology. However, increasing urea concentration altered the morphology and decreased the particle size. The Raman results of GO/Fe2O3 showed that the intensity ratio of D band to G band (ID/IG) was decreased by addition of urea, indicating that urea can preserve the GO sheets during synthesis of the composite from exposing more defects. The surface area and thermal stability of GO/Fe2O3 and Fe2O3 were compared using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and thermal gravimetric analysis, respectively. The results showed that the increased concentration of urea induced a larger surface area with more active sites in the Fe2O3 nanoparticles. However, the increase in urea concentration led to decreased thermal stability of the Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The magnetic properties of Fe2O3 nanoparticles were characterized by a vibrating sample magnetometer and results revealed that the magnetic properties of Fe2O3 nanoparticles are affected by the morphology.

  7. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents by zero-valent iron, iron oxide and iron sulfide minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The degradation of chlorinated solvents by reduction at the surface of zero-valent metals and bimetallic systems has emerged as an important approach to the in-situ remediation of ground water. Reduction by iron metal was studied in batch and column systems to develop a mechanistic understanding of the reaction chemistry and to determine the factors that affect dechlorination rate and long term performance in field applications.

  8. Oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, R.G.; Cheng, H.H.; Harsh, J.B.

    Phenolic acids are intermediary metabolites of many aromatic chemicals and may be involved in humus formation, allelopathy, and nutrient availability. Depending on their structures, six phenolic acids were shown to react at different rates with oxidized forms of Fe and Mn in a Palouse soil (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxeroll). Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring of phenolic acids increased the reaction rate. Reaction rate was also increased for longer carboxyl-containing side chains. After 4 h reaction, little of the applied (10 mg kg/sup -1/ soil) p-hydroxybenzoic or p-coumaric acids had reacted, while 0 to 5, 70, 90, and 100% of the vanillic, ferulic, syringic, and sinapic acids, respectively, had reacted. After 72 h under conditions limiting microbial growth, none of the p-hydroxybenzoic, 30% of the p-coumaric, and 50% of the vanillic acids had reacted. The reaction was shown to be predominantly chemical, and not biological, since phenolic acid extractabilities were similar for Palouse soil and for Palouse soil pretreated with LiOBr to remove organic matter. When the Palouse soil was pretreated with a sodium dithionite-citrate solution to remove Fe and Mn oxides, none of the phenolic acids reacted after 1 h. The reaction of sinapic acid with Palouse soil was shown to produce Fe(II) and soluble Mn as reaction products. The reaction of phenolic acids with soil was thus shown to be an oxidation of the phenolic acids, coupled with a reduction of soil Fe and Mn oxides.

  9. High-performance silver nanoparticles coupled with monolayer hydrated tungsten oxide nanosheets: The structural effects in photocatalytic oxidation of cyclohexane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yepeng; Liu, Jincheng; Mai, Jijin; Pan, Chenqian; Cai, Xiaolan; Fang, Yanxiong

    2018-02-01

    The photocatalytic properties of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) coupled with tungsten oxide (WO 3 ) nanocrystals are investigated to understand structural effects of the WO 3 nanocrystals in selective oxidation of cyclohexane (CyH). The photocatalytic activity of monolayer hydrated WO 3 nanosheet - Ag nanoparticle composites (WO 3 NSs-Ag NPs) is 1.3 times higher than that of WO 3 nanocube - Ag nanoparticle composites (WO 3 NCs-Ag NPs). The highest cyclohexane conversion of 40.2% with cyclohexanol and cylohexanone (KA oil) selectivity of 97.0% is achieved by the photocatalyst of WO 3 NSs-Ag NPs under solar-light irradiation at room temperature. The WO 3 NSs-Ag NPs shows good photocatalytic stability without evident decline of catalytic activity after ten cycles. The improved photocatalytic activity in the oxidation of cyclohexane by WO 3 NSs-Ag NPs is mainly due to the facilitated generation of high-reactive hydroxyl radical (OH), which is caused by the enhanced light absorption by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of Ag NPs, and the effective charge transfer on the surface of WO 3 monolayer structure. The design and structural analysis of the WO 3 NSs-Ag NPs in this research may provide a novel approach for the further development of high-performance photocatalyst. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Factors affecting radium removal using mixed iron-manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, H.V. Singh, S.; Kondapally, V.R. (South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Batch experiments confirmed that sorption of radium by a mixed iron-manganese oxide solid phase shows promise for treating radium-contaminated water. The capacities of these mixed oxides for sorption of radium depend on the composition of the solid phase, the pH of the aqueous solution, and the presence of competing cations. The removal of the oxide-radium complexes from aqueous suspension by manganese greensand filtration was also investigated. It was found that influent radium concentrations of 100 pCi/L were reduced to 2--9 pCi/L by this process. Additional study of the fate of radium in manganese greensand filters is recommended before this procedure is used for drinking water treatment.

  11. New bio-nanocomposites based on iron oxides and polysaccharides applied to oxidation and alkylation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daily Rodríguez-Padrón

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharides from natural sources and iron precursors were applied to develop new bio-nanocomposites by mechanochemical milling processes. The proposed methodology was demonstrated to be advantageous in comparison with other protocols for the synthesis of iron oxide based nanostructures. Additionally, mechanochemistry has enormous potential from an environmental point-of-view since it is able to reduce solvent issues in chemical syntheses. The catalytic activity of the obtained nanocatalysts was investigated in both the oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde and in the alkylation of toluene with benzyl chloride. The microwave-assisted oxidation of benzyl alcohol reached 45% conversion after 10 min. The conversion of the alkylation of toluene in both microwave-assisted and conventional heating methods was higher than 99% after 3 min and 30 min, respectively. The transformation of benzyl alcohol and toluene into valuable product in both the oxidation and alkylation reaction reveals a potential method for the valorization of lignocellulosic biomass.

  12. New bio-nanocomposites based on iron oxides and polysaccharides applied to oxidation and alkylation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Padrón, Daily; Balu, Alina M; Romero, Antonio A; Luque, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Polysaccharides from natural sources and iron precursors were applied to develop new bio-nanocomposites by mechanochemical milling processes. The proposed methodology was demonstrated to be advantageous in comparison with other protocols for the synthesis of iron oxide based nanostructures. Additionally, mechanochemistry has enormous potential from an environmental point-of-view since it is able to reduce solvent issues in chemical syntheses. The catalytic activity of the obtained nanocatalysts was investigated in both the oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde and in the alkylation of toluene with benzyl chloride. The microwave-assisted oxidation of benzyl alcohol reached 45% conversion after 10 min. The conversion of the alkylation of toluene in both microwave-assisted and conventional heating methods was higher than 99% after 3 min and 30 min, respectively. The transformation of benzyl alcohol and toluene into valuable product in both the oxidation and alkylation reaction reveals a potential method for the valorization of lignocellulosic biomass.

  13. RGD-conjugated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S W; Huang, M; Hong, R Y; Deng, S M; Cheng, L F; Gao, B; Badami, D

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a specific targeting magnetic nanoparticle probe for magnetic resonance imaging and therapy in the form of local hyperthermia. Carboxymethyl dextran-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxyl groups were coupled to cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic peptides for integrin α(v)β₃ targeting. The particle size, magnetic properties, heating effect, and stability of the arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide were measured. The arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide demonstrates excellent stability and fast magneto-temperature response. Magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity of Bcap37 cells incubated with arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide was significantly decreased compared with that incubated with plain ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide. The preferential uptake of arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide by target cells was further confirmed by Prussian blue staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  14. Liquid Phase Plasma Synthesis of Iron Oxide/Carbon Composite as Dielectric Material for Capacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide/carbon composite was synthesized using a liquid phase plasma process to be used as the electrode of supercapacitor. Spherical iron oxide nanoparticles with the size of 5~10 nm were dispersed uniformly on carbon powder surface. The specific capacitance of the composite increased with increasing quantity of iron oxide precipitate on the carbon powder up to a certain quantity. When the quantity of the iron oxide precipitate exceeds the threshold, however, the specific capacitance was rather reduced by the addition of precipitate. The iron oxide/carbon composite containing an optimum quantity (0.33 atomic % of iron oxide precipitate exhibited the smallest resistance and the largest initial resistance slope.

  15. Hybrid dextran-iron oxide thin films deposited by laser techniques for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predoi, D.; Ciobanu, C.S. [National Institute for Physics of Materials, P.O. Box MG 07, Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Radu, M.; Costache, M.; Dinischiotu, A. [Molecular Biology Center, University of Bucharest, 91-95 Splaiul Independentei, 76201, Bucharest 5 (Romania); Popescu, C.; Axente, E.; Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiations Physics, P. O. Box MG 36, 77125 Bucharest (Romania); Gyorgy, E., E-mail: egyorgy@cin2.es [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiations Physics, P. O. Box MG 36, 77125 Bucharest (Romania); Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Centre d' Investigacions en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (CSIC-CIN2), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2012-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by chemical co-precipitation method. The nanoparticles were mixed with dextran in distilled water. The obtained solutions were frozen in liquid nitrogen and used as targets during matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation for the growth of hybrid, iron oxide nanoparticles-dextran thin films. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations revealed that the obtained films preserve the structure and composition of the initial, non-irradiated iron oxide-dextran composite material. The biocompatibility of the iron oxide-dextran thin films was demonstrated by 3-(4.5 dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2.5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide-based colorimetric assay, using human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid, dextran-iron oxide nanoparticles and thin films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser immobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biocompatibility of dextran-iron oxide nanoparticles.

  16. The effect of cationic polymer treatment on adhesion of iron oxide to eyelashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, S; Roh, Y H; Choo, J H; Jang, S H; Han, S H; Jang, H G

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of iron oxide application on improving the volume of eyelashes. Iron oxide, having a negative surface charge in its natural form, was coated with commercial cationic polymers to increase its adhesion. The iron oxides coated with different types and concentrations of these polymers were incorporated into a basic mascara formula to test their volume effects by means of the weight difference of eyelashes.The results indicated that the type and concentration of coating materials affect the surface zeta potential and particle cluster size of iron oxides. The type of cationic polymer, especially, was shown to modify both factors of iron oxide. The obtained results also suggested that the volume effect of mascara increases with a higher positive surface zeta potential and a smaller particle cluster size of the coated iron oxides.

  17. Acute oxidative stress following intravenous iron injection in patients on chronic hemodialysis: a comparison of iron-sucrose and iron-dextran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefánsson, Bergur V; Haraldsson, Börje; Nilsson, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    Intravascular iron release from parenteral iron formulations can catalyze various harmful oxidative reactions. These topics have mainly been investigated in vivo with iron-sucrose (IS). The aim of our study was to compare IS and iron-dextran (ID) regarding iron release and induction of oxidative stress. Twenty hemodialysis patients were enrolled. Plasma iron and oxidative stress parameters were measured before and 10 min after intravenous (IV) injection of 100 mg IS and ID, respectively. Intravascular iron increased significantly more after IS. The mean ± SD changes in plasma iron were 314 ± 172% after IS versus 90 ± 44% after ID (p iron were 86 ± 42 versus 45 ± 45%, respectively (p < 0.05). Plasma ascorbic free radical did not change following ID (-1.8 ± 11.2%) but increased by 29 ± 31.3% after IS (p < 0.01). Further, protein carbonyls increased following IS (p < 0.05) but not after ID. Increased oxidative stress was found only after IV injection with IS. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Greenlighting Photoelectrochemical Oxidation of Water by Iron Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Riha, Shannon C.; DeMarco, Erica J.; Martinson, Alex B. F.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2014-12-23

    Hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) is one of just a few candidate electrode materials that possess all of the following photocatalyst-essential properties for scalable application to water oxidation: excellent stability, earth-abundance, suitability positive valence-band-edge energy, and significant visible light absorptivity. Despite these merits, hematites modest oxygen evolution reaction kinetics and its poor efficiency in delivering photogenerated holes, especially holes generated by green photons, to the electrode/solution interface, render it ineffective as a practical water-splitting catalyst. Here we show that hole delivery and catalytic utilization can be substantially improved through Ti alloying, provided that the alloyed material is present in ultrathin-thin-film form. Notably, the effects are most pronounced for charges photogenerated by photons with energy comparable to the band gap for excitation of Fe(3d) -> Fe(3d) transitions (i.e., green photons). Additionally, at the optimum Ti substitution level the lifetimes of surface-localized holes, competent for water oxidation, are extended. Together these changes explain an overall improvement in photoelectrochemical performance, especially enhanced internal quantum efficiencies, observed upon Ti(IV) incorporation.

  19. Tunability of Size and Magnetic Moment of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Synthesized by Forced Hydrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sutens, Ben; Swusten, Tom; Zhong, Kuo; Jochum, Johanna K; Van Bael, Margriet J; Van der Eycken, Erik; Brullot, Ward; Bloemen, Maarten; Verbiest, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    To utilize iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedical applications, a sufficient magnetic moment is crucial. Since this magnetic moment is directly proportional to the size of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles, synthesis methods of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with tunable size are desirable. However, most existing protocols are plagued by several drawbacks. Presented here is a one-pot synthesis method resulting in monodisperse superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with a con...

  20. Iron oxide-based nanomagnets in nanomedicine: fabrication and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Meng Lin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide-based nanomagnets have attracted a great deal of attention in nanomedicine over the past decade. Down to the nanoscale, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can only be magnetized in the presence of an external magnetic field, which makes them capable of forming stable colloids in a physio-biological medium. Their superparamagnetic property, together with other intrinsic properties, such as low cytotoxicity, colloidal stability, and bioactive molecule conjugation capability, makes such nanomagnets ideal in both in-vitro and in-vivo biomedical applications. In this review, a chemical, physical, and biological synthetic approach to prepare iron oxide-based nanomagnets with different physicochemical properties was illustrated and compared. The growing interest in iron oxide-based nanomagnets with multifunctionalities was explored in cancer diagnostics and treatment, focusing on their combined roles in a magnetic resonance contrast agent, hyperthermia, and magnetic force assisted drug delivery. Iron oxides as magnetic carriers in gene therapy were reviewed with a focus on the sophisticated design and construction of magnetic vectors. Finally, the iron oxide-based nanomagnet also represents a very promising tool in particle/cell interfacing in controlling cellular functionalities, such as adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and cell patterning, in stem cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. Meng Meng Lin received a BSc in biotechnology at the University of Hong Kong, China in 2004 and an MSc in biomedical nanotechnology at Newcastle University, UK, in 2005. She is currently working toward her PhD at the Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, UK. She was a visiting student at the Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, in 2006. Her research interests include nanoparticles preparation, cell/nanomaterials interface, and cancer-oriented drug delivery. Hyung-Hwan Kim received an MSc degree in

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Zinc Oxide and Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Using Sesbania grandiflora Leaf Extract as Reducing Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendran, Sorna Prema; Sengodan, Kandasamy

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this present study are to synthesize iron oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles from different concentrations of Sesbania grandiflora leaf extract (5–20%) using zinc nitrate and ferrous chloride as precursor materials and synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectrometer, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, and SEM. The results showed that synthesized zinc oxide and iron oxide nanoparticles exhibited UV-visible absorption peaks at 235 nm and 220 nm, respectively, ...

  2. Hydration effects on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts: A combined IR, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, D.E.; Visser, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/110288327; Soulimani, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313889449; Koningsberger, D.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073704342; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2007-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts with loadings of 1–16 wt.% V has been systematically investigated by infrared, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS spectroscopy. IR and Raman spectra recorded during hydration revealed the formation of V–OH groups,

  3. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: magnetic nanoplatforms as drug carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahajuddin; Arora, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    A targeted drug delivery system is the need of the hour. Guiding magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the help of an external magnetic field to its target is the principle behind the development of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as novel drug delivery vehicles. SPIONs are small synthetic γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite) or Fe3O4 (magnetite) particles with a core ranging between 10 nm and 100 nm in diameter. These magnetic particles are coated with certain biocompatible polymers, such as dextran or polyethylene glycol, which provide chemical handles for the conjugation of therapeutic agents and also improve their blood distribution profile. The current research on SPIONs is opening up wide horizons for their use as diagnostic agents in magnetic resonance imaging as well as for drug delivery vehicles. Delivery of anticancer drugs by coupling with functionalized SPIONs to their targeted site is one of the most pursued areas of research in the development of cancer treatment strategies. SPIONs have also demonstrated their efficiency as nonviral gene vectors that facilitate the introduction of plasmids into the nucleus at rates multifold those of routinely available standard technologies. SPION-induced hyperthermia has also been utilized for localized killing of cancerous cells. Despite their potential biomedical application, alteration in gene expression profiles, disturbance in iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and altered cellular responses are some SPION-related toxicological aspects which require due consideration. This review provides a comprehensive understanding of SPIONs with regard to their method of preparation, their utility as drug delivery vehicles, and some concerns which need to be resolved before they can be moved from bench top to bedside. PMID:22848170

  4. Iron (II) ions induced oxidation of ascorbic acid and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlakar, A; Batna, A; Dudda, A; Spiteller, G

    1996-12-01

    Lipid peroxidation (LPO) of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is suspected to be involved in the generation of chronic diseases. A model reaction for LPO is the air oxidation of PUFAs initiated by Fe2+ and ascorbic acid. In the course of such model reactions glycolaldehyde (GLA) was detected as main aldehydic product. Since it is difficult to explain the generat on of GLA by oxidation of PUFAs, it was suspected that GLA might be derived by oxidation of ascorbic acid. This assumption was verified by treatment of ascorbic acid with Fe2+. Produced aldehydic compounds were trapped by addition of pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA-HCl), trimethylsilylated and finally identified by gas chromatography/mass spectronetry (GC/MS). Oxidation of ascorbic acid with O2 in presence of iron ions produced not only glycolaldehyde (GLA), but also glyceraldehyde (GA), dihydroxyacetone (DA) and formaldehyde. Glyoxal (GO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were detected as trace compounds. The yield of the aldehydic compounds was increased by addition of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) or H2O2. The buffer influenced the reaction considerably: Iron ions react with Tris buffer by producing dihydroxyacetone (DA). Since ascorbic acid is present in biological systems and Fe2+ ions are obviously generated by cell damaging processes, the production of GLA and other aldehydic components might add to the damaging effects of LPO. Glucose suffers also oxidation to short-chain aldehydic compounds in aqueous solution, but this reaction requires addition of equimolar amounts of Fe2+ together with equimolar amounts of H2O2 or 13-hydroperoxy -9-cis-11-trans-octadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE). Therefore this reaction, also influenced by the buffer system, seems to be not of biological relevance.

  5. Enriched Iron(III)-Reducing Bacterial Communities are Shaped by Carbon Substrate and Iron Oxide Mineralogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentini, Christopher J; Wankel, Scott D; Hansel, Colleen M

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe) oxides exist in a spectrum of structures in the environment, with ferrihydrite widely considered the most bioavailable phase. Yet, ferrihydrite is unstable and rapidly transforms to more crystalline Fe(III) oxides (e.g., goethite, hematite), which are poorly reduced by model dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms. This begs the question, what processes and microbial groups are responsible for reduction of crystalline Fe(III) oxides within sedimentary environments? Further, how do changes in Fe mineralogy shape oxide-hosted microbial populations? To address these questions, we conducted a large-scale cultivation effort using various Fe(III) oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite) and carbon substrates (glucose, lactate, acetate) along a dilution gradient to enrich for microbial populations capable of reducing Fe oxides spanning a wide range of crystallinities and reduction potentials. While carbon source was the most important variable shaping community composition within Fe(III)-reducing enrichments, both Fe oxide type and sediment dilution also had a substantial influence. For instance, with acetate as the carbon source, only ferrihydrite enrichments displayed a significant amount of Fe(III) reduction and the well-known dissimilatory metal reducer Geobacter sp. was the dominant organism enriched. In contrast, when glucose and lactate were provided, all three Fe oxides were reduced and reduction coincided with the presence of fermentative (e.g., Enterobacter spp.) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g., Desulfovibrio spp.). Thus, changes in Fe oxide structure and resource availability may shift Fe(III)-reducing communities between dominantly metal-respiring to fermenting and/or sulfate-reducing organisms which are capable of reducing more recalcitrant Fe phases. These findings highlight the need for further targeted investigations into the composition and activity of speciation-directed metal-reducing populations within natural environments.

  6. Biomedical properties and preparation of iron oxide-dextran nanostructures by MAPLE technique

    OpenAIRE

    Ciobanu Carmen; Iconaru Simona; Gyorgy Eniko; Radu Mihaela; Costache Marieta; Dinischiotu Anca; Le Coustumer Philippe; Lafdi Khalid; Predoi Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In this work the chemical structure of dextran-iron oxide thin films was reported. The films were obtained by MAPLE technique from composite targets containing 10 wt. % dextran with 1 and 5 wt.% iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). The IONPs were synthesized by co-precipitation method. A KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM≅25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) was used for the growth of the hybrid, iron oxide NPs-dextran thin films. Results Dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles thin f...

  7. Cellular level loading and heating of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalambur, Venkat S; Longmire, Ellen K; Bischof, John C

    2007-11-20

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) hold promise for a variety of biomedical applications due to their properties of visualization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), heating with radio frequency (rf), and movement in an external magnetic field. In this study, the cellular loading (uptake) mechanism of dextran- and surfactant-coated iron oxide NPs by malignant prostate tumor cells (LNCaP-Pro5) has been studied, and the feasibility of traditional rf treatment and a new laser heating method was evaluated. The kinetics of cell loading was quantified using magnetophoresis and a colorimetric assay. The results showed that loading of surfactant-coated iron oxide NPs with LNCaP-Pro5 was saturable with time (at 24 h) and extracellular concentration (11 pg Fe/cell at 0.5 mg Fe/mL), indicating that the particles are taken up by an "adsorptive endocytosis" pathway. Dextran-coated NPs, however, were taken up less efficiently (1 pg Fe/cell at 0.5 mg Fe/mL). Loading did not saturate with concentration suggesting uptake by fluid-phase endocytosis. Magnetophoresis suggests that NP-loaded cells can be held using external magnetic fields in microcirculatory flow velocities in vivo or in an appropriately designed extracorporeal circuit. Loaded cells were heated using traditional rf (260A, 357 kHz) and a new laser method (532 nm, 7 ns pulse duration, 0.03 J/pulse, 20 pulse/s). Iron oxide in water was found to absorb sufficiently strongly at 532 nm such that heating of individual NPs and thus loaded cells (1 pg Fe/cell) was effective (10 pg Fe/cell) and longer duration (30 min) when compared to laser to accomplish cell destruction (50% viability at 10 pg Fe/cell). Scaling calculations show that the pulsed laser method can lead to single-cell (loaded with NPs) treatments (200 degrees C temperature change at the surface of an individual NP) unlike traditional rf heating methods which can be used only for bulk tissue level treatments. In a mixture of normal and NP

  8. Iron oxide hydroxide nanoflower assisted removal of arsenic from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raul, Prasanta Kumar, E-mail: prasanta.drdo@gmail.com [Defence Research Laboratory, Post Bag No. 2, Tezpur 784001, Assam (India); Devi, Rashmi Rekha; Umlong, Iohborlang M. [Defence Research Laboratory, Post Bag No. 2, Tezpur 784001, Assam (India); Thakur, Ashim Jyoti [Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University, Napaam, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India); Banerjee, Saumen; Veer, Vijay [Defence Research Laboratory, Post Bag No. 2, Tezpur 784001, Assam (India)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Non-magnetic polycrystalline iron oxide hydroxide nanoparticle with flower like morphology is found to play as an effective adsorbent media to remove As(III) from 300 μg L{sup −1} to less than 10 μg L{sup −1} from drinking water over wide range of pH. TEM image clearly reveals that the nanoparticle looks flower like morphology with average particle size less than 20 nm. The maximum sorption capacity of the sorbent is found to be 475 μg g{sup −1} for arsenic at room temperature and the data fitted to different isotherm models indicate the heterogeneity of the adsorbent surface. The material can be regenerated up to 70% using dilute hydrochloric acid and it would be utilized for de-arsenification purposes. - Highlights: • The work includes synthesis of iron oxide hydroxide nanoflower and its applicability for the removal of arsenic from water. • The nanoparticle was characterized using modern instrumental methods like FESEM, TEM, BET, XRD, etc. • The maximum sorption capacity of the sorbent is found to be 475 μg g{sup −1} for arsenic at room temperature. • The sorption is multilayered on the heterogeneous surface of the nano adsorbent. • The mechanism of arsenic removal of IOH nanoflower follows both adsorption and ion-exchange. - Abstract: Non-magnetic polycrystalline iron oxide hydroxide nanoparticle with flower like morphology is found to play as an effective adsorbent media to remove As(III) from 300 μg L{sup −1} to less than 10 μg L{sup −1} from drinking water over wide range of pH. The nanoparticle was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD), BET surface area, FTIR, FESEM and TEM images. TEM image clearly reveals flower like morphology with average particle size less than 20 nm. The nanoflower morphology is also supported by FESEM images. The maximum sorption capacity of the sorbent is found to be 475 μg g{sup −1} for arsenic and the data fitted to different isotherm models indicate the

  9. Cast iron zinc galvanizing improved by high temperature oxidation process

    OpenAIRE

    D. Jędrzejczyk; M. Hajduga

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate influence of the high-temperature oxidation, as the preliminary stage previous to coating with zinc on the change of surface layer structure as well as subsurface layer of cast iron with flake, vermicular and nodular graphite.Design/methodology/approach: The experiment was led in the temperature range: 850-1050ºC in ambient air. Samples have been taken out from the furnace separately after: 2-12 hours. After scale layer removal the hot dip zinc coating in industrial condi...

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Holmium-Doped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Bloemen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rare earth atoms exhibit several interesting properties, for example, large magnetic moments and luminescence. Introducing these atoms into a different matrix can lead to a material that shows multiple interesting effects. Holmium atoms were incorporated into an iron oxide nanoparticle and the concentration of the dopant atom was changed in order to determine its influence on the host crystal. Its magnetic and magneto-optical properties were investigated by vibrating sample magnetometry and Faraday rotation measurements. The luminescent characteristics of the material, in solution and incorporated in a polymer thin film, were probed by fluorescence experiments.

  11. Exposure of aconitase to smoking-related oxidants results in iron loss and increased iron response protein-1 activity: potential mechanisms for iron accumulation in human arterial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talib, Jihan; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Smokers have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, but the origin(s) of this increased risk are incompletely defined. Evidence supports an accumulation of the oxidant-generating enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the inflamed artery wall, and smokers have high levels of SCN−, a preferred MPO...... of the cytosolic isoform to iron response protein-1, which regulates intracellular iron levels. We show that exposure of isolated aconitase to increasing concentrations of HOSCN releases iron from the aconitase [Fe-S]4 cluster, and decreases enzyme activity. This is associated with protein thiol loss...... and modification of specific Cys residues in, and around, the [Fe-S]4 cluster. Exposure of HCAEC to HOSCN resulted in increased intracellular levels of chelatable iron, loss of aconitase activity and increased iron response protein-1 (IRP-1) activity. These data indicate HOSCN, an oxidant associated with oxidative...

  12. Thermo-electric oxidization of iron in lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, Matthias

    2007-07-01

    Lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO{sub 3}) are a promising material for nonlinear-optical applications like frequency conversion to generate visible light, e.g., in laser displays, but their achievable output power is greatly limited by the ''optical damage'', i.e., light-induced refractive-index changes caused by excitation of electrons from iron impurities and the subsequent retrapping in unilluminated areas of the crystal. The resulting space-charge fields modify the refractive indices due to the electro-optic effect. By this ''photorefractive effect'' the phase-matching condition, i.e., the avoidance of destructive interference between light generated at different crystal positions due to the dispersion of the fundamental wave and the converted wave, is disturbed critically above a certain light intensity threshold. The influence of annealing treatments conducted in the presence of an externally applied electric field (''thermo-electric oxidization'') on the valence state of iron impurities and thereby on the optical damage is investigated. It is observed that for highly iron-doped LiNbO{sub 3} crystals this treatment leads to a nearly complete oxidization from Fe{sup 2+} to Fe{sup 3+} indicated by the disappearance of the absorption caused by Fe{sup 2+}. During the treatment an absorption front forms that moves through the crystal. The absorption in the visible as well as the electrical conductivity are decreased by up to five orders of magnitude due to this novel treatment. The ratio of the Fe{sup 2+} concentration to the total iron concentration - a measure for the strength of the oxidization - is in the order of 10{sup -6} for oxidized crystals whereas it is about 10{sup -1} for untreated samples. Birefringence changes are observed at the absorption front that are explained by the removal of hydrogen and lithium ions from the crystal that compensate for the charges of the also removed electrons from

  13. Evidence for equilibrium iron isotope fractionation by nitrate-reducing iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappler, A.; Johnson, C.M.; Crosby, H.A.; Beard, B.L.; Newman, D.K.

    2010-01-01

    Iron isotope fractionations produced during chemical and biological Fe(II) oxidation are sensitive to the proportions and nature of dissolved and solid-phase Fe species present, as well as the extent of isotopic exchange between precipitates and aqueous Fe. Iron isotopes therefore potentially constrain the mechanisms and pathways of Fe redox transformations in modern and ancient environments. In the present study, we followed in batch experiments Fe isotope fractionations between Fe(II)aq and Fe(III) oxide/hydroxide precipitates produced by the Fe(III) mineral encrusting, nitrate-reducing, Fe(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. Isotopic fractionation in 56Fe/54Fe approached that expected for equilibrium conditions, assuming an equilibrium Δ56FeFe(OH)3 – Fe(II)aq fractionation factor of +3.0 ‰. Previous studies have shown that Fe(II) oxidation by this Acidovorax strain occurs in the periplasm, and we propose that Fe isotope equilibrium is maintained through redox cycling via coupled electron and atom exchange between Fe(II)aq and Fe(III) precipitates in the contained environment of the periplasm. In addition to the apparent equilibrium isotopic fractionation, these experiments also record the kinetic effects of initial rapid oxidation, and possible phase transformations of the Fe(III) precipitates. Attainment of Fe isotope equilibrium between Fe(III) oxide/hydroxide precipitates and Fe(II)aq by neutrophilic, Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria or through abiologic Fe(II)aq oxidation is generally not expected or observed, because the poor solubility of their metabolic product, i.e. Fe(III), usually leads to rapid precipitation of Fe(III) minerals, and hence expression of a kinetic fractionation upon precipitation; in the absence of redox cycling between Fe(II)aq and precipitate, kinetic isotope fractionations are likely to be retained. These results highlight the distinct Fe isotope fractionations that are produced by different pathways of biological and

  14. Macroscopic and microscopic biodistribution of intravenously administered iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Adwiteeya; Petryk, Alicia A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) are being developed for use as a cancer treatment. They have demonstrated efficacy when used either as a monotherapy or in conjunction with conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The success of IONP as a therapeutic tool depends on the delivery of a safe and controlled cytotoxic thermal dose to tumor tissue following activation with an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Prior to clinical approval, knowledge of IONP toxicity, biodistribution and physiological clearance is essential. This preliminary time-course study determines the acute toxicity and biodistribution of 110 nm dextran-coated IONP (iron) in mice, 7 days post systemic, at doses of 0.4, 0.6, and 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight. Acute toxicity, manifested as changes in the behavior of mice, was only observed temporarily at 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight, the highest dose administered. Regardless of dose, mass spectrometry and histological analysis demonstrated over 3 mg Fe/g tissue in organs within the reticuloendotheilial system (i.e. liver, spleen, and lymph nodes). Other organs (brain, heart, lungs, and kidney) had less than 0.5 mg Fe/g tissue with iron predominantly confined to the organ vasculature.

  15. Morphology and phase control of iron oxide polymorph nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongtao; Wang, Li; Shi, Min; Li, Yanhong

    2017-04-01

    In this work, lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) nanobundles were prepared by a facile NH4F assisted epoxide precipitation route. The reactions between epoxide and [Fe(H2O)6]2+ promoted the hydrolysis and condensation of [Fe(H2O)6]2+, resulting in the formation of iron oxyhydroxide. After calcination of γ-FeOOH nanobundles at 400 °C, the produced α-Fe2O3 still kept the bundle morphology. Due to the unique chemistry of epoxide, the morphology and phase of iron oxide polymorph nanoparticles (goethite, akaganeite, lepidocrocite, magnetite) were well-controlled through controlling reaction conditions such as Fe2+ concentration, NH4F additive and reaction temperature. It is particularly interesting that NH4F working as phase controlling agent is able to control the phase development of iron oxyhydroxides. This phase control effect of NH4F is attributed to the promoted reaction rate of epoxide originating from the higher electronegativity of fluoride ions than chloride ions. Based on the results in this work and our other preliminary works, it is considered that this route can be used as a general strategy for controlling the morphology and phase of transition element compounds.

  16. Improved Aeration Process - Catalytic Role Of The Iron Oxides In Arsenic Oxidation And Coprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Krysztof; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2013-01-01

    Demands for a better drinking water quality, especially concerning arsenic, a compound with many adverse health effects, put a pressure on the utilities to ensure the best treatment technologies that meet nowadays and possible future quality standards. The aim of this paper is to introduce...... an improved aeration process that can also help in developing better arsenic removal treatment. The results present advantages of arsenic oxidation in an aeration process in the presence of ferrihydrite surface that have been shown to adsorb arsenic simultaneously to its oxidation. The presence...... of precipitated (ferrihydrite surface) and dissolved iron enhanced arsenic oxidation in comparison to solution with absence of precipitated iron in laboratory scale experiments. However, in the pilot scale studies the adsorption of arsenite on ferrihydrite was found to be the main process occurring during...

  17. MRI based on iron oxide nanoparticles contrast agents: effect of oxidation state and architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Yasir; Akhtar, Kanwal; Anwar, Hafeez; Jamil, Yasir

    2017-11-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) extensively employed beyond regenerative medicines to imaging disciplines because of their great constituents for magneto-responsive nano-systems. The unique superparamagnetic behavior makes IONPs very suitable for hyperthermia and imaging applications. From the last decade, versatile functionalization with surface capabilities, efficient contrast properties and biocompatibilities make IONPs an essential imaging contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). IONPs have shown signals for both longitudinal relaxation and transverse relaxation; therefore, negative contrast as well as dual contrast can be used for imaging in MRI. In the current review, we have focused on different oxidation state of iron oxides, i.e., magnetite, maghemite and hematite for their T1 and T2 contrast enhancement properties. We have also discussed different factors (synthesis protocols, biocompatibility, toxicity, architecture, etc.) that can affect the contrast properties of the IONPs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Formation of nitrous oxide (N2O) hydrate in soil mineral suspensions with electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung, D.; Enkh-Amgalan, T.; Lee, W.

    2013-05-01

    We have identified the effects of solid surface (illite, nontronite, sphalerite, kaolinite) and electrolyte (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2) types on the formation of N2O hydrate in this study. The hydrate formation experiments were conducted at hydrate forming condition (273.3K and 30 bar) by injecting N2O gas into the soil mineral suspensions with and without electrolytes in a 50mL pressurized vessel. The formation of N2O hydrate in aqueous electrolyte solutions was slower than that in deionized water. Ion charge and size were significant factors affecting N2O hydrate formation kinetic in electrolytes solutions. The addition of soil mineral suspensions accelerated the formation of N2O hydrate in the electrolyte solutions. Surface area and ionic strength of soil minerals highly influenced on formation kinetic of N2O hydrate. The hydrate formation times in the solid suspensions without electrolytes were very similar to that in the deionized water. The results obtained from this research could be indirectly applied to the fate of N2O sequestered into geological formations as well as its storage as a form of N2O hydrate.

  19. Iron and oxygen isotope fractionation during iron UV photo-oxidation: Implications for early Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Nicole X.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Greenwood, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) contain appreciable amounts of ferric iron (Fe3+). The mechanism by which ferrous iron (Fe2+) was oxidized into Fe3+ in an atmosphere that was globally anoxic is highly debated. Of the three scenarios that have been proposed to explain BIF formation, photo-oxidation by UV photons is the only one that does not involve life (the other two are oxidation by O2 produced by photosynthesis, and anoxygenic photosynthesis whereby Fe2+ is directly used as electron donor in place of water). We experimentally investigated iron and oxygen isotope fractionation imparted by iron photo-oxidation at a pH of 7.3. The iron isotope fractionation between precipitated Fe3+-bearing lepidocrocite and dissolved Fe2+ follows a Rayleigh distillation with an instantaneous 56Fe/54Fe fractionation factor of + 1.2 ‰. Such enrichment in the heavy isotopes of iron is consistent with the values measured in BIFs. We also investigated the nature of the mass-fractionation law that governs iron isotope fractionation in the photo-oxidation experiments (i.e., the slope of the δ56Fe-δ57Fe relationship). The experimental run products follow a mass-dependent law corresponding to the high-T equilibrium limit. The fact that a ∼3.8 Gyr old BIF sample (IF-G) from Isua (Greenland) falls on the same fractionation line confirms that iron photo-oxidation in the surface layers of the oceans was a viable pathway to BIF formation in the Archean, when the atmosphere was largely transparent to UV photons. Our experiments allow us to estimate the quantum yield of the photo-oxidation process (∼0.07 iron atom oxidized per photon absorbed). This yield is used to model iron oxidation on early Mars. As the photo-oxidation proceeds, the aqueous medium becomes more acidic, which slows down the reaction by changing the speciation of iron to species that are less efficient at absorbing UV-photons. Iron photo-oxidation in centimeter to meter-deep water ponds would take months to years to

  20. Microemulsion Synthesis of Iron Core/Iron Oxide Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles and Their Physicochemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Koo, Katherine; Zeitchick, Evan; Baker, Ian

    Iron magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized under an inert atmosphere via the reaction between FeCl3 and NaBH4 in droplets of water in a microemulsion consisting of octane with cetyl trimethylammonium bromide and butanol as surfactants. A thin Fe3O4 layer was produced on the iron nanoparticles using slow, controlled oxidation at room temperature. A silica shell was deposited on the Fe3O4 using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane following the method of Zhang et al. [Mater. Sci. Eng. C 30 (2010) 92-97]. The structure and chemistry of the resulting nanoparticles were studied using variety of methods and their magnetic properties were determined. The diameter of the iron core was typically 8-16 nm, while the thickness of the Fe3O4 shell was 2-3 nm. The presence of the silica layer was confirmed using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and the number of NH2-groups on each nanoparticle was determined based on colorimetric tests using ortho-phthalaldehyde.

  1. Crystallization process and magnetic properties of amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phu, N D; Luong, N H; Chau, N; Hai, N H [Center for Materials Science, Hanoi University of Science, Vietnam National University, Hanoi, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Ngo, D T [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Hoang, L H, E-mail: nhhai@vnu.edu.v [Faculty of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuanthuy, Caugiay, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2011-08-31

    This paper studied the crystallization process, phase transition and magnetic properties of amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by the microwave heating technique. Thermal analysis and magnetodynamics studies revealed many interesting aspects of the amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles. The as-prepared sample was amorphous. Crystallization of the maghemite {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (with an activation energy of 0.71 eV) and the hematite {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (with an activation energy of 0.97 eV) phase occurred at around 300 deg. C and 350 deg. C, respectively. A transition from the maghemite to the hematite occurred at 500 deg. C with an activation energy of 1.32 eV. A study of the temperature dependence of magnetization supported the crystallization and the phase transformation. Raman shift at 660 cm{sup -1} and absorption band in the infrared spectra at 690 cm{sup -1} showed the presence of disorder in the hematite phase on the nanoscale which is supposed to be the origin of the ferromagnetic behaviour of that antiferromagnetic phase.

  2. Homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological oxidation of iron(II) in rapid sand filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van C.G.E.M.; Hiemstra, T.; Hofs, B.; Nederlof, M.M.; Paassen, van J.A.M.; Reijnen, G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological oxidation may precipitate iron(II) as iron(III) hydroxides. In this paper we evaluate the conditions under which each of these processes is dominant in rapid sand filtration (RSF). It is demonstrated that in the presence of iron(III) hydroxide precipitates

  3. Mapping the Iron Oxidation State in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M.; Treimann, A. H.; Righter, K.

    2017-01-01

    Several types of Martian igneous meteorites have been identified: clinopyroxenites (nakhlites), basaltic shergottites, peridotitic shergottites, dunites (chassignites) and orthopyroxenites [1,2]. In order to constrain the heterogeneity of the Martian mantle and crust, and their evolution through time, numerous studies have been performed on the iron oxidation state of these meteorites [3,4,5,6,7,8,9]. The calculated fO2 values all lie within the FMQ-5 to FMQ+0.5 range (FMQ representing the Fayalite = Magnetite + Quartz buffer); however, discrepancies appear between the various studies, which are either attributed to the choice of the minerals/melts used, or to the precision of the analytical/calculation method. The redox record in volcanic samples is primarily related to the oxidation state in the mantle source(s). However, it is also influenced by several deep processes: melting, crystallization, magma mixing [10], assimilation and degassing [11]. In addition, the oxidation state in Martian meteorites is potentially affected by several surface processes: assimilation of sediment/ crust during lava flowing at Mars' surface, low temperature micro-crystallization [10], weathering at the surface of Mars and low temperature reequilibration, impact processes (i.e. high pressure phase transitions, mechanical mixing, shock degassing and melting), space weathering, and weathering on Earth (at atmospheric conditions different from Mars). Decoding the redox record of Martian meteorites, therefore, requires large-scale quantitative analysis methods, as well as a perfect understanding of oxidation processes.

  4. Hydration effects on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts: A combined IR, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS study

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, D.E.; Visser, T; Soulimani, F.; Koningsberger, D. C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts with loadings of 1–16 wt.% V has been systematically investigated by infrared, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS spectroscopy. IR and Raman spectra recorded during hydration revealed the formation of V–OH groups, characterized by a band at 3660 cm−1. Hydroxylation was found to start instantaneously upon exposure to traces of water, reflecting a very high sensitivity of the supported vanadium oxide catalysts ...

  5. Potential for microbial oxidation of ferrous iron in basaltic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mai Yia; Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Roden, Eric E

    2015-05-01

    Basaltic glass (BG) is an amorphous ferrous iron [Fe(II)]-containing material present in basaltic rocks, which are abundant on rocky planets such as Earth and Mars. Previous research has suggested that Fe(II) in BG can serve as an energy source for chemolithotrophic microbial metabolism, which has important ramifications for potential past and present microbial life on Mars. However, to date there has been no direct demonstration of microbially catalyzed oxidation of Fe(II) in BG. In this study, three different culture systems were used to investigate the potential for microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in BG, including (1) the chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing "Straub culture"; (2) the mixotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing organism Desulfitobacterium frappieri strain G2; and (3) indigenous microorganisms from a streambed Fe seep in Wisconsin. The BG employed consisted of clay and silt-sized particles of freshly quenched lava from the TEB flow in Kilauea, Hawaii. Soluble Fe(II) or chemically reduced NAu-2 smectite (RS) were employed as positive controls to verify Fe(II) oxidation activity in the culture systems. All three systems demonstrated oxidation of soluble Fe(II) and/or structural Fe(II) in RS, whereas no oxidation of Fe(II) in BG material was observed. The inability of the Straub culture to oxidize Fe(II) in BG was particularly surprising, as this culture can oxidize other insoluble Fe(II)-bearing minerals such as biotite, magnetite, and siderite. Although the reason for the resistance of the BG toward enzymatic oxidation remains unknown, it seems possible that the absence of distinct crystal faces or edge sites in the amorphous glass renders the material resistant to such attack. These findings have implications with regard to the idea that Fe(II)-Si-rich phases in basalt rocks could provide a basis for chemolithotrophic microbial life on Mars, specifically in neutral-pH environments where acid-promoted mineral dissolution and

  6. Phenol oxidation kinetics in water solution using iron(3)-oxide-based nano-catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelmanov, Grigory; Semiat, Raphael

    2008-08-01

    The influence of inorganic ions (HCO(3), PO(4)/HPO(4)/H(2)PO(4), Cl, SO(4), Ca, Na and Mg) on the advanced chemical oxidation process of organic compounds dissolved in water is reported here. The catalytic behavior of iron(3)-oxide-based nano-particles was investigated together with inorganic ions and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, and pH level. Phenol was chosen as a typical organic contaminant for this study as a simulating pollutant. The limiting concentrations of radical scavengers making the oxidation process inefficient were identified. The strong effect of concentration of radical scavengers HCO(3), PO(4)/HPO(4)/H(2)PO(4), the nano-catalyst and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, and pH on the phenol oxidation rate and lag time period before reaction starts was determined. It was shown that Cl, SO(4), Ca, Na and Mg ions had no significant effect on the kinetics of phenol oxidation.

  7. Effect of dietary iron and copper on performance and oxidative stability in broiler leg meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J A; Pérez-Vendrell, A M; Esteve-Garcia, E

    2000-05-01

    1. An experiment was carried out to determine the effect of removal of supplemental iron and copper from broiler diets during the last 3 weeks before slaughter on broiler performance, tissue vitamin E concentrations and oxidation values in raw; cooked and stored broiler leg meat. 2. Removal of supplemental iron and copper from the diet slightly decreased food efficiency; the differences were significant only when both minerals were removed simultaneously 3. Effect of iron withdrawal on iron concentration in tissue was low. However, total copper concentration in tissue was reduced in animals deprived of iron or both minerals simultaneously. 4. Removal of dietary iron and copper did not affect vitamin E concentration in raw and cooked meat, while stored meat showed lower concentrations in animals deprived of iron and copper simultaneously. 5. The removal of iron and copper from the diet reduced oxidation values in cooked broiler leg meat as measured by the thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances method (TBARS).

  8. Iron induced RNA-oxidation in the general population and in mouse tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvanovic, Vanja; Kjær, Laura Kofoed; Bergholdt, Helle Kirstine Mørup

    2017-01-01

    randomization indicated a causal pathway between genetically elevated iron biomarkers (assessed by ferritin and TS) and high levels of 8-oxoGuo. The ex vivo experiments showed a monotonically increase in 8-oxoGuo with increased iron concentration (ANOVA: P = 0.0008) that was prevented with iron chelation (P = 0......Iron promotes formation of hydroxyl radicals by the Fenton reaction, subsequently leading to potential oxidatively generated damage of nucleic acids. Oxidatively generated damage to RNA, measured as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) in urine, is increased in patients with genetic iron overload......, which have led us to test the hypothesis that high iron status, assessed by iron biomarkers and genetic disposition, increases urinary excretion of 8-oxoGuo. In a general Danish population study we used a Mendelian randomization design with HFE genotypes as a proxy for iron status and supplemented...

  9. The production of magnetic nanoparticles of Iron Oxide by arc discharge in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Hamid Reza; Fathollah, Sara; Nikeyn, Maryam; Khatami, Shohreh

    2012-10-01

    Nanoparticles can be utilized for any practical application. In recent years; considerable attention has been paid to iron oxide magnetic. Iron oxide nanoparticles are the class of nanoparticle which can have useful magnetic properties. In this research, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were produced by Arc discharge method in water. Structural analysis carried out by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Spectrophotometer. Various magnetic nanoparticles like iron carbide (Fe3c), magnetic iron oxide (magnetite /maghemite) are obtained by arc discharge method in water. In this work have been showed, the influence of the time duration on the number of magnetic nanoparticles and the influence of the gap between the two electrodes on particle structure and size distribution. Furthermore, when iron nanoparticles are used under applied magnetic field, the particles would move in the direction of magnetic field. When the magnetic field is removed, the particles stop moving and still remain stably suspend in the dielectric liquid.

  10. [Neutrophilic lithotrophic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the biogeochemical processes of the iron cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Biology of lithotrophic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the processes of the biogeochemical cycle of iron are discussed. This group of microorganisms is phylogenetically, taxonomically, and physiologically heterogeneous, comprising three metabolically different groups: aerobes, nitrate-dependent anaerobes, and phototrophs; the latter two groups have been revealed relatively recently. Their taxonomy and metabolism are described. Materials on the structure and functioning of the electron transport chain in the course of Fe(II) oxidation by members of various physiological groups are discussed. Occurrence of iron oxidizers in freshwater and marine ecosystems, thermal springs, areas of hydrothermal activity, and underwater volcanic areas are considered. Molecular genetic techniques were used to determine the structure of iron-oxidizing microbial communities in various natural ecosystems. Analysis of stable isotope fractioning of 56/54Fe in pure cultures and model experiments revealed predominance of biological oxidation over abiotic ones in shallow aquatic habitats and mineral springs, which was especially pronounced under microaerobic conditions at the redox zone boundary. Discovery of anaerobic bacterial Fe(II) oxidation resulted in development of new hypotheses concerning the possible role of microorganisms and the mechanisms of formation of the major iron ore deposits in Precambrian and early Proterozoic epoch. Paleobiological data are presented on the microfossils and specific biomarkers retrieved from ancient ore samples and confirming involvement of anaerobic biogenic processes in their formation.

  11. A Combined Experimental and Numerical Approach to a Discrete Description of Indirect Reduction of Iron Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Bernhard; Hoffmann, F.; Senk, D.; Babich, A.; Hausemer, L.; Simoes, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Blast furnaces are complex counter-current reactors designed to reduce chemically iron oxides and melt them to liquid iron. The complex processes in blast furnace iron making involve various aspects of thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, chemistry and physics. Physical, thermal and chemical phenomena occurring within the process are highly coupled in time and space. In order to generate a more detailed understanding of the indirect reduction of iron ore, the innovative approach of the Extended D...

  12. Magnetic and Mössbauer spectroscopy studies of nanocrystalline iron oxide aerogels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpenter, E.E.; Long, J.W.; Rolison, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    A sol-gel synthesis was used to produce iron oxide aerogels. These nanocrystalline aerogels have a pore-solid structure similar to silica aerogels but are composed entirely of iron oxides. Mössbauer experiments and x-ray diffraction showed that the as-prepared aerogel is an amorphous or poorly...

  13. Iron catalyzed oxidation chemistry : from C-H bond activation to DNA cleavag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Tieme Adriaan van den

    2008-01-01

    The synthetic iron complex Fe(N4Py) can be employed as a catalyst in the aerobic oxidation of DNA. The resulting oxidized DNA strand is rather unstable and results in cleavage of the DNA strand into two pieces. As for now, it was only possible with Fe(N4Py) or other synthetic iron complexes as

  14. Revealing the interparticle magnetic interactions of iron oxide nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes hybrid materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douvalis, A.P.; Georgakilas, V.; Tsoufis, T.; Gournis, D.; Kooi, B.; Bakas, T.

    2010-01-01

    Spinel iron oxide nanoparticles capped with organic molecules have been successfully prepared and used to produce iron oxide nanoparticles-single wall carbon nanotubes hybrid materials, which were characterized by a number of experimental techniques. The nanoparticles in both samples have an average

  15. Synthesis and applications of nano-structured iron oxides/hydroxides

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nano iron oxides have been synthesized by almost all the known wet chemical methods which include precipitation at ambient/elevated temperatures, surfactant mediation, emulsion/micro-emulsion, electro-deposition etc. Iron oxides in nano-scale have exhibited great potential for their applications as catalytic ...

  16. Magnetic properties of iron-oxide passivated iron nanoparticles synthesized by a gas condensation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Colin C.

    Gas phase synthesis processes involve the generation of metal atoms through various means, and the homogeneous nucleation and subsequent condensation and coagulation of nanoparticles. Inert gas condensation (IGC) is a desirable process for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles because it is a relatively simple process capable of producing large quantities of nanoparticles, and since it utilizes vacuum deposition, it offers high purity particles and does not require hazardous chemicals. In this research, the results of the IGC synthesis of iron nanoparticles are presented. The iron nanoparticles are passivated in-situ by slowly introducing oxygen into the chamber to form ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 gamma-Fe2O3 shell/alpha-Fe ferromagnetic core nanoparticles. The magnetic properties of these particles are investigated as a function of passivation layer thickness and particle concentration. The oxide-passivated particles exhibit an exchange bias when cooled below a blocking temperature, which depends on the thickness of the oxide layer present. It was found that the exchange bias increased with oxide thickness. Similarly the blocking temperature also increased with oxide layer thickness. The blocking temperature in all cases, however, was found to be much lower than the Neel temperature for Fe-oxides. The nanoparticles also exhibit a spin glass transition below a characteristic freezing temperature, as evident by a sharp increase in the magnetic moment of the samples. Fe nanoparticle-polymer composite films were also obtained by spin casting mixtures of nanoparticles and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The magnetic properties of these composites were compared to those of particles compressed into pellets. It was observed that when the particles were dispersed into the nanocomposite, the coercivity was increased, suggesting a heightened anisotropy barrier. Similarly, the magnetic relaxation results indicated that the particles dispersed in the PMMA exhibited significantly

  17. Iron oxide/cassava starch-supported Ziegler-Natta catalysts for in situ ethylene polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancharoenrith, Sittikorn; Kamonsatikul, Choavarit; Namkajorn, Montree; Kiatisevi, Supavadee; Somsook, Ekasith

    2015-03-06

    Iron oxide nanoparticles were used as supporters for in situ polymerization to produce polymer nanocomposites with well-dispersed fillers in polymer matrix. Iron oxide could be sustained as colloidal solutions by cassava starch to produce a good dispersion of iron oxide in the matrix. New supports based on iron oxide/cassava starch or cassava starch for Ziegler-Natta catalysts were utilized as heterogeneous supporters for partially hydrolyzed triethylaluminum. Then, TiCl4 was immobilized on the supports as catalysts for polymerization of ethylene. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites were obtained by the synthesized catalysts. A good dispersion of iron oxide/cassava starch particles was observed in the synthesized polymer matrix promoting to good mechanical properties of HDPE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Iron(3) oxide-based nanoparticles as catalysts in advanced organic aqueous oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelmanov, Grigory; Semiat, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    Water contaminated with dissolved organic matter is an important issue to resolve for all-purpose uses. The catalytic behavior of iron-based nanocatalysts was investigated for the treatment of contaminated water in the advanced chemical oxidation process. In this study, typical organic contaminants, such as ethylene glycol and phenol, were chosen to simulate common contaminants. It was shown that the two substances are efficiently destroyed by the Fenton-like reaction using iron(3) oxide-based nanocatalysts in the presence of hydrogen peroxide without the need for UV or visible radiation sources at room temperature. A strong effect of nanocatalyst concentration on reaction rate was shown. The kinetic reaction was found and the reaction rate coefficient k was calculated.

  19. Dietary iron concentration may influence aging process by altering oxidative stress in tissues of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Lorena Fernandes; Arruda, Sandra Fernandes; Campos, Natália Aboudib; de Valencia, Fernando Fortes; Siqueira, Egle Machado de Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential element. However, in its free form, iron participates in redox-reactions, leading to the production of free radicals that increase oxidative stress and the risk of damaging processes. Living organisms have an efficient mechanism that regulates iron absorption according to their iron content to protect against oxidative damage. The effects of restricted and enriched-iron diets on oxidative stress and aging biomarkers were investigated. Adult Wistar rats were fed diets containing 10, 35 or 350 mg/kg iron (adult restricted-iron, adult control-iron and adult enriched-iron groups, respectively) for 78 days. Rats aged two months were included as a young control group. Young control group showed higher hemoglobin and hematocrit values, lower levels of iron and lower levels of MDA or carbonyl in the major studied tissues than the adult control group. Restricted-iron diet reduced iron concentrations in skeletal muscle and oxidative damage in the majority of tissues and also increased weight loss. Enriched-iron diet increased hematocrit values, serum iron, gamma-glutamyl transferase, iron concentrations and oxidative stress in the majority of tissues. As expected, young rats showed higher mRNA levels of heart and hepatic L-Ferritin (Ftl) and kidneys SMP30 as well as lower mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and interleukin-1 beta (Il1b) and also lower levels of liver protein ferritin. Restricted-iron adult rats showed an increase in heart Ftl mRNA and the enriched-iron adult rats showed an increase in liver nuclear factor erythroid derived 2 like 2 (Nfe2l2) and Il1b mRNAs and in gut divalent metal transporter-1 mRNA (Slc11a2) relative to the control adult group. These results suggest that iron supplementation in adult rats may accelerate aging process by increasing oxidative stress while iron restriction may retards it. However, iron restriction may also impair other physiological processes that are not associated with aging.

  20. Processing, Microstructure, and Oxidation Behavior of Iron Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeji; Noh, Yoonsook; Choi, Hyelim; Hong, Kicheol; Kwon, Kyungjung; Choe, Heeman

    2016-09-01

    With its historically long popularity in major structural applications, the use of iron (Fe) has also recently begun to be explored as an advanced functional material. For this purpose, it is more advantageous to use Fe as a porous structure, simply because it can provide a greater surface area and a higher reaction rate. This study uses a freeze-casting method, which consists of simple and low-cost processing steps, to produce Fe foam with a mean pore size of 10 μm. We examine the influences of various parameters ( i.e., mold bottom temperature, powder content, and sintering time) on the processing of Fe foam, along with its oxidation kinetics at 823 K (550 °C) with various heat-treatment times. We confirm that Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 oxide layers are successfully formed on the surface of Fe foam. With the Fe oxide layers as an active anode material, the Fe foam can potentially be used as a three-dimensional anode current collector for an advanced lithium-ion battery.

  1. Effect of particle size on iron nanoparticle oxidation state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Lysaght, Andrew C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Road, 97 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269-3139 (United States); Goberman, Daniel G. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States); Chiu, Wilson K.S., E-mail: wchiu@engr.uconn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Road, 97 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269-3139 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Selecting catalyst particles is a very important part of carbon nanotube growth, although the properties of these nanoscale particles are unclear. In this article iron nanoparticles are analyzed through the use of atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in order to understand how the size affects the chemical composition of nanoparticles and thus their physical structure. Initially, atomic force microscopy was used to confirm the presence of iron particles, and to determine the average size of the particles. Next an analytical model was developed to estimate particle size as a function of deposition time using inputs from atomic force microscopy measurement. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was then performed with a focus on the spectra relating to the 2p Fe electrons to study the chemical state of the particles as a function of time. It was shown that as the size of nanoparticles decreased, the oxidation state of the particles changed due to a high proportion of atoms on the surface.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and mechanistic insights of mycogenic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargava, Arpit; Jain, Navin; Manju Barathi L [Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Centre for Biotechnology, Department of Biological Sciences (India); Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed [Jimma University, Department of Applied Microbiology, College of Natural Sciences (Ethiopia); Yun, Yeoung-Sang [Chonbuk National University, Division of Environmental and Chemical Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Panwar, Jitendra, E-mail: drjitendrapanwar@yahoo.co.in [Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Centre for Biotechnology, Department of Biological Sciences (India)

    2013-11-15

    In the present study, extracellular synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) was achieved using Aspergillus japonicus isolate AJP01. The isolate demonstrated its ability to hydrolyze the precursor salt solution, a mixture of iron cyanide complexes, under ambient conditions. Hydrolysis of these complexes released ferric and ferrous ions, which underwent protein-mediated coprecipitation and controlled nucleation resulting in the formation of IONPs. Transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction pattern, energy dispersive spectroscopy and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the mycosynthesis of IONPs. The synthesized particles were cubic in shape with a size range of 60–70 nm with crystal structure corresponding to magnetite. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed the absence of IONPs on fungal biomass surface, indicating the extracellular nature of synthesis. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of proteins on as-synthesised IONPs, which may confer their stability. Preliminary investigation indicated the role of proteins in the synthesis and stabilization of IONPs. On the basis of present findings, a probable mechanism for synthesis of IONPs is suggested. The simplicity and versatility of the present approach can be utilized for the synthesis of other nanomaterials.

  3. Efficient Low-pH Iron Removal by a Microbial Iron Oxide Mound Ecosystem at Scalp Level Run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grettenberger, Christen L; Pearce, Alexandra R; Bibby, Kyle J; Jones, Daniel S; Burgos, William D; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2017-04-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a major environmental problem affecting tens of thousands of kilometers of waterways worldwide. Passive bioremediation of AMD relies on microbial communities to oxidize and remove iron from the system; however, iron oxidation rates in AMD environments are highly variable among sites. At Scalp Level Run (Cambria County, PA), first-order iron oxidation rates are 10 times greater than at other coal-associated iron mounds in the Appalachians. We examined the bacterial community at Scalp Level Run to determine whether a unique community is responsible for the rapid iron oxidation rate. Despite strong geochemical gradients, including a >10-fold change in the concentration of ferrous iron from 57.3 mg/liter at the emergence to 2.5 mg/liter at the base of the coal tailings pile, the bacterial community composition was nearly constant with distance from the spring outflow. Scalp Level Run contains many of the same taxa present in other AMD sites, but the community is dominated by two strains of Ferrovum myxofaciens, a species that is associated with high rates of Fe(II) oxidation in laboratory studies.IMPORTANCE Acid mine drainage pollutes more than 19,300 km of rivers and streams and 72,000 ha of lakes worldwide. Remediation is frequently ineffective and costly, upwards of $100 billion globally and nearly $5 billion in Pennsylvania alone. Microbial Fe(II) oxidation is more efficient than abiotic Fe(II) oxidation at low pH (P. C. Singer and W. Stumm, Science 167:1121-1123, 1970, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.167.3921.1121). Therefore, AMD bioremediation could harness microbial Fe(II) oxidation to fuel more-cost-effective treatments. Advances will require a deeper understanding of the ecology of Fe(II)-oxidizing microbial communities and the factors that control their distribution and rates of Fe(II) oxidation. We investigated bacterial communities that inhabit an AMD site with rapid Fe(II) oxidation and found that they were dominated by two

  4. Super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle modified mancozeb imprinted polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2017-05-01

    An electrochemical sensor for detection of mancozeb from soil and vegetable sample using molecularly imprinted star polymer modified with iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) is described in this work. We have prepared SPIONS by hydrothermal method and modified with vinyl silane to introduce double bond at their surface. The vinyl group modified SPIONs were used to form mancozeb imprinted star polymer (ISP). The ISPs have specific recognition ability high adsorption capacity towards their template molecule and could be easily extracted from complex matrices using a simple magnet. The prepared polymer was well characterized by field emissive scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Under the optimum condition, the prepared sensor shows good response for mancozeb in the range of 5.96 to 222.39 µg L-1 (detection limit=0.98 µg L-1). The proposed sensors have highly selective for detection of mancozeb in soil and vegetable samples also.

  5. Genotoxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Granulosa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Pöttler

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles that are aimed at targeting cancer cells, but sparing healthy tissue provide an attractive platform of implementation for hyperthermia or as carriers of chemotherapeutics. According to the literature, diverse effects of nanoparticles relating to mammalian reproductive tissue are described. To address the impact of nanoparticles on cyto- and genotoxicity concerning the reproductive system, we examined the effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs on granulosa cells, which are very important for ovarian function and female fertility. Human granulosa cells (HLG-5 were treated with SPIONs, either coated with lauric acid (SEONLA only, or additionally with a protein corona of bovine serum albumin (BSA; SEONLA-BSA, or with dextran (SEONDEX. Both micronuclei testing and the detection of γH2A.X revealed no genotoxic effects of SEONLA-BSA, SEONDEX or SEONLA. Thus, it was demonstrated that different coatings of SPIONs improve biocompatibility, especially in terms of genotoxicity towards cells of the reproductive system.

  6. Ca alginate as scaffold for iron oxide nanoparticles synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Finotelli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, nanotechnology has developed to a stage that makes it possible to process magnetic nanoparticles for the site-specific delivery of drugs. To this end, it has been proposed as biomaterial for drug delivery system in which the drug release rates would be activated by a magnetic external stimuli. Alginate has been used extensively in the food, pharmaceutical and biomedical industries for their gel forming properties in the presence of multivalent cations. In this study, we produced iron oxide nanoparticles by coprecipitation of Fe(III and Fe(II. The nanoparticles were entrapped in Ca alginate beads before and after alginate gelation. XRD analysis showed that particles should be associated to magnetite or maghemite with crystal size of 9.5 and 4.3 nm, respectively. Studies using Mössbauer spectroscopy corroborate the superparamagnetic behavior. The combination of magnetic properties and the biocompatibility of alginate suggest that this biomaterial may be used as biomimetic system.

  7. Synthesis of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanoparticles without Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Chen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles could be successfully synthesized with two kinds of precipitants through a precipitation method. As-prepared nanoparticles in the size around 10 nm with regular spherical-like shape were achieved by adjusting pH values. NaOH and NH3·H2O were used as two precipitants for comparison. The average size of nanoparticles with NH3·H2O precipitant got smaller and represented better dispersibility, while nanoparticles with NaOH precipitant represented better magnetic property. This work provided a simple method without using any organic solvents, organic metal salts, or surfactants which could easily obtain monodisperse nanoparticles with tunable morphology.

  8. Biotic and abiotic oxidation and reduction of iron at circumneutral pH are inseparable processes under natural conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ionescu, Danny; Heim, Christine; Polerecky, L.; Thiel, Volker; de Beer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation and reduction of iron can occur through abiotic (chemical) and biotic (microbial) processes. Abiotic iron oxidation is a function of pH and O2 concentration. Biotic iron oxidation is carried out by a diverse group of bacteria, using O2 or NO3 as terminal electron acceptors. At

  9. A Holistic Model That Physicochemically Links Iron Oxide - Apatite and Iron Oxide - Copper - Gold Deposits to Magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A. C.; Reich, M.; Knipping, J.; Bilenker, L.; Barra, F.; Deditius, A.; Lundstrom, C.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) and iron oxide-copper-gold deposits (IOCG) are important sources of their namesake metals and increasingly for rare earth metals in apatite. Studies of natural systems document that IOA and IOCG deposits are often spatially and temporally related with one another and coeval magmatism. However, a genetic model that accounts for observations of natural systems remains elusive, with few observational data able to distinguish among working hypotheses that invoke meteoric fluid, magmatic-hydrothermal fluid, and immiscible melts. Here, we use Fe and O isotope data and high-resolution trace element (e.g., Ti, V, Mn, Al) data of individual magnetite grains from the world-class Los Colorados (LC) IOA deposit in the Chilean Iron Belt to elucidate the origin of IOA and IOCG deposits. Values of d56Fe range from 0.08‰ to 0.26‰, which are within the global range of ~0.06‰ to 0.5‰ for magnetite formed at magmatic conditions. Values of δ18O for magnetite and actinolite are 2.04‰ and 6.08‰, respectively, consistent with magmatic values. Ti, V, Al, and Mn are enriched in magnetite cores and decrease systematically from core to rim. Plotting [Al + Mn] vs. [Ti + V] indicates that magnetite cores are consistent with magmatic and/or magmatic-hydrothermal (i.e., porphyry) magnetites. Decreasing Al, Mn, Ti, V is consistent with a cooling trend from porphyry to Kiruna to IOCG systems. The data from LC are consistent with the following new genetic model for IOA and IOCG systems: 1) magnetite cores crystallize from silicate melt; 2) these magnetite crystals are nucleation sites for aqueous fluid that exsolves and scavenges inter alia Fe, P, S, Cu, Au from silicate melt; 3) the magnetite-fluid suspension is less dense that the surrounding magma, allowing ascent; 4) as the suspension ascends, magnetite grows in equilibrium with the fluid and takes on a magmatic-hydrothermal character (i.e., lower Al, Mn, Ti, V); 5) during ascent, magnetite, apatite and

  10. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onysko, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is formed by the weathering or oxidation of pyritic material exposed during coal mining. The rate of pyritic material oxidation can be greatly accelerated by certain acidophilic bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which catalyse the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage micro-organisms. Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), an anionic surfactant has proved effective in this respect. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid and SLS at low concentrations, each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of T. ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low pH, sterile, batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations of any of the compounds.

  11. Wet chemical synthesis of zinc-iron oxide nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Honami; Amagasa, Shota; Nishida, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2017-11-01

    Zinc-iron oxide nanoparticles (ZnxFe3-xO4 and δ-ZnxFe1-xOOH) were successfully synthesized by room temperature chemical reaction of a solution containing ZnCl2 and FeCl2 in the presence of gelatin. The composition of products could be controlled by variation of the Zn/Fe mixture ratio of the starting material. ZnxFe3-xO4 nanoparticles were obtained from a solution with a high Zn/Fe ratio, whereas Zn-doped feroxyhyte ( δ-ZnxFe1-xOOH) nanoparticles were obtained from a solution with a low Zn/Fe ratio. The ZnxFe3-xO4 nanoparticles were spherical with diameters of approximately 10 nm, and the δ-ZnxFe1-xOOH particles were needle-like with lengths of approximately 100 nm. Mössbauer spectra measured at room temperature indicated superparamagnetic behavior of the nanoparticles, whereas the magnetic components were observed at low temperature. The Zn content of the intermediate species (( {Zn}^{ {II}}x {Fe}^{ {II}}_{1-x} {Fe}^{ {III}}2O4)) plays an important role in the oxidation process. When the Zn concentration was high, the content of Fe2+ in the intermediate species was small, and Zn2+ prevented further oxidation of the nanoparticles. When the starting material had low Zn concentration, the amount of Fe2+ in the intermediate species became large and was rapidly oxidized into δ-ZnxFe1-xOOH while rinsing under the ambient atmosphere.

  12. Heterogeneous Photo-Fenton Reaction Catalyzed by Nanosized Iron Oxides for Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Great efforts have been exerted in overcoming the drawbacks of the Fenton reaction for water treatment applications. The drawbacks include pH confinement, handling of iron sludge, slow regeneration of Fe(II, and so forth. This paper highlights the recent developments in the heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction which utilizes nanosized iron oxides as catalyst for maximizing the activity due to the enhanced physical or chemical properties brought about by the unique structures. This paper also summarizes the fundamentals of the Fenton reaction, which determine the inherent drawbacks and associated advances, to address the advantages of iron oxides and nanosized iron oxides. Tips for applying this method in water treatment are also provided. Given that the environmental effect of nanosized iron oxides is not yet well established, rapid research growth may occur in the near future to advance this promising technology toward water treatment once it is smartly coupled with conventional technologies.

  13. Dopamine promotes cellular iron accumulation and oxidative stress responses in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichtl, Stefanie; Haschka, David; Nairz, Manfred; Seifert, Markus; Volani, Chiara; Lutz, Oliver; Weiss, Günter

    2017-12-02

    Iron is essential for many biological functions including neurotransmitter synthesis, where the metal is a co-factor of tyrosine hydroxylase, which converts tyrosine to dopamine and further to norepinephrine. As the shared chemical structure, called catechol, may potentially bind iron we questioned whether tyrosine derived hormones would impact on cellular iron homeostasis in macrophages, which are central for the maintenance of body iron homeostasis. Using murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), we investigated the effect of catecholamines and found that only dopamine but neither tyrosine, nor norepinephrine, affected cellular iron homeostasis. Exposure of macrophages to dopamine increased the uptake of non-transferrin bound iron into cells. The expansion of intracellular iron upon dopamine treatment resulted in oxidative stress responses as evidenced by increased expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and hypoxia inducible factor-1α. As a consequence, the transcriptional expression of stress response genes such as heme oxygenase-1 and the iron export protein ferroportin1 were significantly increased. Genetic deletion of Nrf2 abolished these effects of dopamine. Dopamine directly affects cellular iron homeostasis by increasing iron incorporation into macrophages and subsequently promoting intracellular oxidative stress responses. Our observations are of interest for disorders involving dopamine and iron dyshomeostasis such as Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, partly enlightening the underlying pathology or the therapeutic efficacy of dopamine agonists to overcome neuronal iron deficiency. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Biological iron oxidation by Gallionella spp. in drinking water production under fully aerated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vet, W W J M; Dinkla, I J T; Rietveld, L C; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2011-11-01

    Iron oxidation under neutral conditions (pH 6.5-8) may be a homo- or heterogeneous chemically- or a biologically-mediated process. The chemical oxidation is supposed to outpace the biological process under slightly alkaline conditions (pH 7-8). The iron oxidation kinetics and growth of Gallionella spp. - obligatory chemolithotrophic iron oxidizers - were assessed in natural, organic carbon-containing water, in continuous lab-scale reactors and full-scale groundwater trickling filters in the Netherlands. From Gallionella cell numbers determined by qPCR, balances were made for all systems. The homogeneous chemical iron oxidation occurred in accordance with the literature, but was retarded by a low water temperature (13 °C). The contribution of the heterogeneous chemical oxidation was, despite the presence of freshly formed iron oxyhydroxides, much lower than in previous studies in ultrapure water. This could be caused by the adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) on the iron oxide surfaces. In the oxygen-saturated natural water with a pH ranging from 6.5 to 7.7, Gallionella spp. grew uninhibited and biological iron oxidation was an important, and probably the dominant, process. Gallionella growth was not even inhibited in a full-scale filter after plate aeration. From this we conclude that Gallionella spp. can grow under neutral pH and fully aerated conditions when the chemical iron oxidation is retarded by low water temperature and inhibition of the autocatalytic iron oxidation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Iron Enriched Bread Intake on the Oxidative Stress Indices in Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharareh Heidari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Contrary to the proven benefits of iron, few concerns in producing the oxidative stress is remained problematic. Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the oxidative stress in the male Wistar rats fed bread supplemented with iron in different doses i.e., 35 (basic, 70 (two fold, 140 (four fold, and 210 mg/kg (six fold with or without NaHCO3 (250 mg/kg. Methods In this experimental study Iron, ceruloplasmin, ferritin, total iron binding capacity (TIBC, albumin, total protein, uric acid and plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX, catalase (CAT, malondialdehyde (MDA, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC, were evaluated in 30 rats at the first and last day of the experiment (day 30. In addition, phytic acid levels were detected in all baked breads. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and t test procedure though SPSS statistical software version 20. Results Serum iron level in rats that received basic level of iron plus NaHCO3 decreased significantly in the last day of the trial. Higher level of serum iron was seen in rats that received iron twofold, fourfold and sixfold and rats that received iron fourfold plus NaHCO3. Serum ceruloplasmin and ferritin in groups of rats that received fourfold level of iron plus NaHCO3 and rats that received iron sixfold showed a significant increase (P ≤ 0.05. Serum total protein and uric acid in rats that received basic level of iron plus NaHCO3 and rats that received twofold level of iron showed a significant decrease. Serum total protein levels in rats that received fourfold level of iron showed a significant decrease. Bread with NaHCO3 showed higher phytic acid levels than other groups. Conclusions These results indicate that oxidative stress was not induced, whereas some antioxidant activities were significantly changed in rats that received iron-enriched bread.

  16. Iron Oxide as an Mri Contrast Agent for Cell Tracking: Supplementary Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Korchinski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide contrast agents have been combined with magnetic resonance imaging for cell tracking. In this review, we discuss coating properties and provide an overview of ex vivo and in vivo labeling of different cell types, including stem cells, red blood cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, we provide examples of applications of cell tracking with iron contrast agents in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cancer, arteriovenous malformations, and aortic and cerebral aneurysms. Attempts at quantifying iron oxide concentrations and other vascular properties are examined. We advise on designing studies using iron contrast agents including methods for validation.

  17. Uncoupling and oxidative stress in liver mitochondria isolated from rats with acute iron overload

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo Andreu, G.L. [Centro de Quimica Farmaceutica, Departamento de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba); Inada, N.M.; Vercesi, A.E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Departamento de Patologia Clinica, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Curti, C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2009-01-15

    One hypothesis for the etiology of cell damage arising from iron overload is that its excess selectively affects mitochondria. Here we tested the effects of acute iron overload on liver mitochondria isolated from rats subjected to a single dose of i.p. 500 mg/kg iron-dextran. The treatment increased the levels of iron in mitochondria (from 21{+-}4 to 130{+-}7 nmol/mg protein) and caused both lipid peroxidation and glutathione oxidation. The mitochondria of iron-treated rats showed lower respiratory control ratio in association with higher resting respiration. The mitochondrial uncoupling elicited by iron-treatment did not affect the phosphorylation efficiency or the ATP levels, suggesting that uncoupling is a mitochondrial protective mechanism against acute iron overload. Therefore, the reactive oxygen species (ROS)/H{sup +} leak couple, functioning as a mitochondrial redox homeostatic mechanism could play a protective role in the acutely iron-loaded mitochondria. (orig.)

  18. Biocompatible capped iron oxide nanoparticles for Vibrio cholerae detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    We report the studies relating to fabrication of an efficient immunosensor for Vibrio cholerae detection. Magnetite (iron oxide (Fe3O4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and capped by citric acid (CA). These NPs were electrophoretically deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate and used for immobilization of monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) for Vibrio cholerae detection using an electrochemical technique. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and CA-Fe3O4/ITO were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, CA-Fe3O4 nanoparticles obtained were about 29 ± 1 nm and 37 ± 1 nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles was found to be 77.35 nm (Fe3O4) and 189.51 nm (CA-Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/CA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits a good detection range of 12.5-500 ng mL-1 with a low detection limit of 0.32 ng mL-1, sensitivity 0.03 Ω/ng ml-1 cm-2, and reproducibility more than 11 times.

  19. Evaluation of the properties of iron oxide-filled castor oil polyurethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Mussatti

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to obtain and evaluate the electrical, thermal and mechanical properties of iron oxide-filled castor oil polyurethane (PU/Fe2O3. The iron oxide used in this study was a residue derived from the steel pickling process of a Brazilian steel rolling industry. Polymeric composites with different iron oxide volume fractions (2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5% were prepared through the casting process followed by compression molding at room temperature. The composites were analyzed by FTIR, XRD and densities, tensile strength, Young's modulus, electrical and thermal conductivities measurements. By increasing the iron oxide content, the apparent density, tensile strength, Young's modulus and electrical conductivity values of the composites were also increased. The iron oxide additions did not change significantly the value of thermal conductivity (from 0.191 W.mK-1 for PU up to 0.340 W.mK-1 for PU enriched with 12.5% v/v of iron oxide. Thus, even at the higher iron oxide concentration, the compounds as well as the pure polyurethane can be classified as thermal insulators.

  20. Iron oxide/hydroxide nanoparticles with negatively charged shells show increased uptake in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Markus R; Nawroth, Thomas; Fütterer, Sören; Wolfrum, Uwe; Kolb, Ute; Langguth, Peter

    2012-06-04

    The absorption of commonly used ferrous iron salts from intestinal segments at neutral to slightly alkaline pH is low, mainly because soluble ferrous iron is easily oxidized to poorly soluble ferric iron and because ferrous iron, but not ferric iron, is carried by the divalent metal transporter DMT-1. Moreover, ferrous iron frequently causes gastrointestinal side effects. Iron hydroxide nanoparticles with neutral and hydrophilic carbohydrate shells are alternatively used to ferrous salts. In these formulations gastrointestinal side effects are rare because hundreds of ferric iron atoms are safely packed in nanoscaled cores surrounded by the solubilizing shell; nevertheless, iron bioavailability is even worse compared to ferrous salts. In this study the cell uptake of iron hydroxide and iron oxide nanoparticles (FeONP) with negatively charged shells of different chemical types and sizes was compared to the uptake of those with neutral hydrophilic shells, ferrous sulfate and ferric chloride. The nanoparticle uptake was measured in Caco-2 cells with the iron detecting ferrozine method and visualized by transmission electron microscopy. The toxicity was evaluated using the MTT assay. For nanoparticles with a negatively charged shell the iron uptake was about 40 times higher compared to those with neutral hydrophilic carbohydrate shell or ferric chloride and in the same range as ferrous sulfate. However, in contrast to ferrous sulfate, nanoparticles with negatively charged shells showed no toxicity. Two different uptake mechanisms were proposed: diffusion for hydroxide nanoparticles with neutral hydrophilic shell and adsorptive endocytosis for nanoparticles with negatively charged shells. It needs to be determined whether iron hydroxide nanoparticles with negatively charged shells also show improved bioavailability in iron-deficient patients compared to iron hydroxide nanoparticles with a neutral hydrophilic shell, which exist in the market today.

  1. Chemical synthesis and assembly of uniformly sized iron oxide nanoparticles for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Daishun; Lee, Nohyun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been extensively investigated for their various biomedical applications including diagnostic imaging, biological sensing, drug, cell, and gene delivery, and cell tracking. Recent advances in the designed synthesis and assembly of uniformly sized iron oxide nanoparticles have brought innovation in the field of nanomedicine. This Account provides a review on the recent progresses in the controlled synthesis and assembly of uniformly sized iron oxide nanoparticles for medical applications. In particular, it focuses on three topics: stringent control of particle size during synthesis via the "heat-up" process, surface modification for the high stability and biocompatibility of the nanoparticles for diagnostic purposes, and assembly of the nanoparticles within polymers or mesoporous silica matrices for theranostic applications. Using extremely small 3 nm sized iron oxide nanoparticles (ESION), a new nontoxic T1 MRI contrast agent was realized for high-resolution MRI of blood vessels down to 0.2 mm. Ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (FION) that are larger than 20 nm exhibit extremely large magnetization and coercivity values. The cells labeled with FIONs showed very high T2 contrast effect so that even a single cell can be readily imaged. Designed assembly of iron oxide nanoparticles with mesoporous silica and polymers was conducted to fabricate multifunctional nanoparticles for theranostic applications. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles are excellent scaffolds for iron oxide nanoparticles, providing magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging modalities as well as the functionality of the drug delivery vehicle. Polymeric ligands could be designed to respond to various biological stimuli such as pH, temperature, and enzymatic activity. For example, we fabricated tumor pH-sensitive magnetic nanogrenades (termed PMNs) composed of self-assembled iron oxide nanoparticles and pH-responsive ligands. They were utilized to visualize

  2. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Samir A., E-mail: salama.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11751 (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and GTMR Unit, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Omar, Hany A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Maghrabi, Ibrahim A. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); AlSaeed, Mohammed S. [Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); EL-Tarras, Adel E. [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  3. Biosynthesis of stable iron oxide nanoparticles in aqueous extracts of Hordeum vulgare and Rumex acetosa plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Valentin V; Makarova, Svetlana S; Love, Andrew J; Sinitsyna, Olga V; Dudnik, Anna O; Yaminsky, Igor V; Taliansky, Michael E; Kalinina, Natalia O

    2014-05-27

    We report the synthesis and characterization of amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles from iron salts in aqueous extracts of monocotyledonous (Hordeum vulgare) and dicotyledonous (Rumex acetosa) plants. The nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, absorbance spectroscopy, SAED, EELS, XPS, and DLS methods and were shown to contain mainly iron oxide and iron oxohydroxide. H. vulgare extracts produced amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters of up to 30 nm. These iron nanoparticles are intrinsically unstable and prone to aggregation; however, we rendered them stable in the long term by addition of 40 mM citrate buffer pH 3.0. In contrast, amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles (diameters of 10-40 nm) produced using R. acetosa extracts are highly stable. The total protein content and antioxidant capacity are similar for both extracts, but pH values differ (H. vulgare pH 5.8 vs R. acetosa pH 3.7). We suggest that the presence of organic acids (such oxalic or citric acids) plays an important role in the stabilization of iron nanoparticles, and that plants containing such constituents may be more efficacious for the green synthesis of iron nanoparticles.

  4. Mechanism of ferrous iron binding and oxidation by ferritin from a pennate diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaffen, Stephanie; Abdulqadir, Raz; Le Brun, Nick E; Murphy, Michael E P

    2013-05-24

    A novel ferritin was recently found in Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (PmFTN), a marine pennate diatom that plays a major role in global primary production and carbon sequestration into the deep ocean. Crystals of recombinant PmFTN were soaked in iron and zinc solutions, and the structures were solved to 1.65-2.2-Å resolution. Three distinct iron binding sites were identified as determined from anomalous dispersion data from aerobically grown ferrous soaked crystals. Sites A and B comprise the conserved ferroxidase active site, and site C forms a pathway leading toward the central cavity where iron storage occurs. In contrast, crystal structures derived from anaerobically grown and ferrous soaked crystals revealed only one ferrous iron in the active site occupying site A. In the presence of dioxygen, zinc is observed bound to all three sites. Iron oxidation experiments using stopped-flow absorbance spectroscopy revealed an extremely rapid phase corresponding to Fe(II) oxidation at the ferroxidase site, which is saturated after adding 48 ferrous iron to apo-PmFTN (two ferrous iron per subunit), and a much slower phase due to iron core formation. These results suggest an ordered stepwise binding of ferrous iron and dioxygen to the ferroxidase site in preparation for catalysis and a partial mobilization of iron from the site following oxidation.

  5. Mechanism of Ferrous Iron Binding and Oxidation by Ferritin from a Pennate Diatom*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaffen, Stephanie; Abdulqadir, Raz; Le Brun, Nick E.; Murphy, Michael E. P.

    2013-01-01

    A novel ferritin was recently found in Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (PmFTN), a marine pennate diatom that plays a major role in global primary production and carbon sequestration into the deep ocean. Crystals of recombinant PmFTN were soaked in iron and zinc solutions, and the structures were solved to 1.65–2.2-Å resolution. Three distinct iron binding sites were identified as determined from anomalous dispersion data from aerobically grown ferrous soaked crystals. Sites A and B comprise the conserved ferroxidase active site, and site C forms a pathway leading toward the central cavity where iron storage occurs. In contrast, crystal structures derived from anaerobically grown and ferrous soaked crystals revealed only one ferrous iron in the active site occupying site A. In the presence of dioxygen, zinc is observed bound to all three sites. Iron oxidation experiments using stopped-flow absorbance spectroscopy revealed an extremely rapid phase corresponding to Fe(II) oxidation at the ferroxidase site, which is saturated after adding 48 ferrous iron to apo-PmFTN (two ferrous iron per subunit), and a much slower phase due to iron core formation. These results suggest an ordered stepwise binding of ferrous iron and dioxygen to the ferroxidase site in preparation for catalysis and a partial mobilization of iron from the site following oxidation. PMID:23548912

  6. Synthesis and characterization of barium iron oxide and bismuth iron oxide epitaxial films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender Bennett, Charlee J.

    Much interest exists in perovskite oxide materials and the potential they have in possessing two or more functional properties. In recent years, research on developing new materials with simultaneous ferromagnetic and ferroelectric behavior is the key to addressing possible challenges of new storage information applications. This work examines the fundamental properties of a perovskite oxide, namely BaFeO3, and the investigation of properties of a solid solution between BaFeO3 and BiFeO3. The growth and properties of epitaxial BaFeO3 thin films in the metastable cubic perovskite phase are examined. BaFeO3 films were grown on (012) LaAlO3 and (001) SrTiO3 single crystal substrates by pulsed-laser deposition. X-ray diffraction shows that in situ growth at temperatures between 650-850°C yields an oxygen-deficient BaFeO 2.5+x pseudo-cubic perovskite phase that is insulating and paramagnetic. Magnetization measurements on the asdeposited BaFeO3 films indicate non-ferromagnetic behavior. Annealing these films in 1 atm oxygen ambient converts the films into a pseudo-cubic BaFeO3-x phase that is ferromagnetic with a Curie temperature of 235 K. The observation of ferromagnetism with increasing oxygen content is consistent with superexchange coupling of Fe +4-O-Fe+4. The effects of anneal conditions on BaFeO3 are studied. X-ray characterization, such as reciprocal space maps, show more complex structure for as-grown BaFeO3-x epitaxial films. Epitaxial films grown at low laser energies are highly crystalline. However, they decompose after annealing. When grown at high laser energies, films exhibit complex structure which "cleans up" to a single pseudocubic or tetragonal structure upon ex situ anneal in oxygen ambient environment. Superlattices of BaFeO 3/SrTiO3 were synthesized to explore the nature of "cracking" in annealed BaFeO3, which occurs due to large change in lattice parameter. Magnetization of ex situ annealed BaFeO3-x epitaxial films were examined as a function of

  7. Acicular iron nanoparticles protected against sintering with aluminium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozas, R.

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Acicular iron nanoparticles have been obtained by thermal reduction with hydrogen of a goethite precursor protected against sintering with Al cations, either by doping during the synthesis or by a further coating and the relation between microstructure and magnetic properties of the final Fe particles has been studied in order to evaluate the efficiency of both protecting methods. Uniform goethite and Al-doped goethite precursors were prepared by oxidation with air of FeSO4 solutions, containing Al(NO33 when required, previously precipitated with Na2CO3, while the Al oxide coating on the undoped goethite precursor was carried out by heterocoagulation. In both protecting methods, Al cations were mainly concentrated in the particle outer layers of the goethite precursors and the final iron. Due to this Al enrichment, the growth of iron crystals during the reduction process is minimised resulting Fe particles with improved coercivity and squareness. Nevertheless, the coating procedure seems to be more effective giving rise to the iron particles with the largest coercivity, probably due to a better preservation of the acicular morphology in this case.

    Se han obtenido nanopartículas aciculares de hierro por reducción térmica con hidrógeno de un precursor acicular de goetita que fue protegido frente a la sinterización por la adición de cationes Al mediante dopado durante su síntesis o por recubrimiento posterior, estudiándose la relación entre la microestructura y las propiedades magnéticas de las partículas finales de α-Fe con objeto de evaluar la eficacia de ambos métodos de protección. Los precursores uniformes de goetita y de goetita dopada con Al se prepararon por oxidación con aire de disoluciones de FeSO4 o de FeSO4 y Al(NO33, previamente precipitadas por la adición de Na2CO3, mientras que el recubrimiento con óxido de aluminio sobre las partículas de goetita fue llevado a cabo por un procedimiento de heterocoagulaci

  8. Iron(II) Initiation of Lipid and Protein Oxidation in Pork: The Role of Oxymyoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feibai; Jongberg, Sisse; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Weizheng; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-08

    Iron(II), added as FeSO4·7H2O, was found to increase the rate of oxygen depletion as detected electrochemically in a pork homogenate from Longissimus dorsi through an initial increase in metmyoglobin formation from oxymyoglobin and followed by formation of primary and secondary lipid oxidation products and protein oxidation as detected as thiol depletion in myofibrillar proteins. Without added iron(II), under the same conditions at 37 °C, oxygen consumption corresponded solely to the slow oxymyoglobin autoxidation. Long-lived myofibrillar protein radicals as detected by ESR spectroscopy in the presence of iron(II) were formed subsequently to oxymyoglobin oxidation, and their level was increased by lipid oxidation when oxygen was completely depleted. Similarly, the time profile for formation of lipid peroxide indicated that oxymyoglobin oxidation initiates both protein oxidation and lipid oxidation.

  9. Effect of Iron Oxides (Ordinary and Nano and Municipal Solid Waste Compost (MSWC Coated Sulfur on Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Plant Iron Concentration and Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mazaherinia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A greenhouse study was conducted to compare the effects of ordinary iron oxide (0.02-0.06 mm and nano iron oxide (25-250 nm and five levels of both iron oxides (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 %w/w and two levels of sulfurous granular compost (MSW (0 and 2% w/w on plant height, spike length, grain weight per spike, total plant dry matter weight and thousands grain weight of wheat. The experimental factors were combined in factorial arrangement in a completely randomized design with 3 replications. Results showed that nano iron oxide was superior over ordinary iron oxide in all parameters studied. Fe concentration, spike length, plant height, grain weight per spike, total plant dry weight and thousands grain weight showed increasing trend per increase in both of iron oxides levels. Also, all parameters studied in sulfurous granular compost (MSW treatment were superior over granular compost without sulfurous (MSW. This increase in all parameters were significantly higher when urban solid waste compost coated with sulfur coupled with nano iron oxide compared to urban sulfurous granular compost (MSW along with ordinary iron oxide. Keywords: Sulfurous granular compost (MSW, Nano and ordinary iron oxides, Wheat

  10. Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Rashid

    1989-01-01

    A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis.

  11. Reductive roasting of iron-rich manganese oxide ore with elemental sulfur for selective manganese extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Z.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is very important to selectively reduce manganese oxide over iron oxide for extraction of Mn from iron-rich manganese ore. In this study, reductive roasting of an iron-rich manganese oxide ore with elemental sulfur as reductant was investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that manganese dioxide can be selectively reduced with elemental sulfur and extracted via acid leaching, which was largely depended on the sulfur addition. Lower sulfur addition (S/Mn molar ratio2.0 and the roasting temperature exerted a significant impact on the phase composition of roasted product.

  12. Chromium Elimination from Water by use of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Absorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Shokraei

    2014-09-01

    Results: results showed that best absorbent is soil absorbent and iron oxide nanoparticles, with maximum removal percent equal to 96.2%. Also best turnover was obtained from 8837 ppm of primary concentration of heavy metal. In other hand, in other experiments that used from iron oxide nanoparticles, adding of nanoparticles caused to increase in chrome absorption and conversion of Cr6+ to Cr3+. Conclusion: with use of the results of this study can be said that Combining of iron oxide nanoparticles with chrome removal filters can be convert Cr6+ to Cr3+, and process turnover will increased.

  13. Environment friendly route of iron oxide nanoparticles from Zingiber officinale (ginger) root extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin Hui, Yau; Yi Peng, Teoh; Wei Wen, Liu; Zhong Xian, Ooi; Peck Loo, Kiew

    2016-11-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared from the reaction between the Zingiber officinale (ginger) root extracts and ferric chloride solution at 50°C for 2 h in mild stirring condition. The synthesized powder forms of nanoparticles were further characterized by using UV-Vis spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction spectrometry. UV-Vis analysis shows the absorption peak of iron oxide nanoparticles is appeared at 370 nm. The calculation of crystallite size from the XRD showed that the average particle size of iron oxide nanoparticles was 68.43 nm. Therefore, this eco-friendly technique is low cost and large scale nanoparticles synthesis to fulfill the demand of various applications.

  14. Using Demonstrations Involving Combustion and Acid-Base Chemistry to Show Hydration of Carbon Dioxide, Sulfur Dioxide, and Magnesium Oxide and Their Relevance for Environmental Climate Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, C. Frank, III; Webb, James W.; Rothenberger, Otis

    2016-01-01

    The nature of acidic and basic (alkaline) oxides can be easily illustrated via a series of three straightforward classroom demonstrations for high school and general chemistry courses. Properties of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and magnesium oxide are revealed inexpensively and safely. Additionally, the very different kinetics of hydration of…

  15. The crystal chemistry and structural analysis of uranium oxide hydrates. Final report, May 15, 1995--December 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.L.; Ewing, R.C.

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this research program was to develop a thorough understanding of the crystal-chemical and crystal-structural systematics of uranyl oxide hydrates which are the initial corrosion products of the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel and the principal phases in which actinides occur in the near surface environment. The scope of this program has been expanded to include all inorganic phases in which U{sup 6+} plays a significant structural role; currently 183 phases with known crystal structures.

  16. HREM investigation of the constitution and the crystallography of thin thermal oxide layers on iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graat, P.C.J.; Brongers, M.P.H.; Zandbergen, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    /ferrite and a Shoji-Nishiyama-type orientation relationship for hematite/magnetite were observed. At several locations cracks close to and parallel to the interface with the substrate were observed within Fe3O4. Oxidation of iron samples that were covered with an (hydro)oxide film prior to oxidation yielded thin...

  17. Iron-mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane in brackish coastal sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, Matthias|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372629199; Rasigraf, Olivia; Sapart, Célia|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31400596X; Jilbert, Tom|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304835714; Jetten, Mike S M; Roeckmann, Thomas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838233; van der Veen, Carina; Banda, Narcisa|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/352222158; Kartal, Boran; Ettwig, Katharina; Slomp, Caroline|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/159424003

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and its biological conversion in marine sediments, largely controlled by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), is a crucial part of the global carbon cycle. However, little is known about the role of iron oxides as an oxidant for AOM. Here we provide the first

  18. Effect of selective removal of organic matter and iron oxides on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of selective removal of organic matter and amorphous and crystalline iron oxides on N2-BET specific surface areas of some soil clays was evaluated. Clay fractions from 10 kaolinitic tropical soils were successively treated to remove organic matter by oxidation with Na hypochlorite, amorphous Fe oxide with acid ...

  19. Ultrafast electron and energy transfer in dye-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Huse, Nils

    2013-01-01

    An emerging area in chemical science is the study of solid-phase redox reactions using ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. We have used molecules of the photoactive dye 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) anchored to the surface of iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles to create iron(ii) surface atoms via...... photo-initiated interfacial electron transfer. This approach enables time-resolved study of the fate and mobility of electrons within the solid phase. However, complete analysis of the ultrafast processes following dye photoexcitation of the sensitized iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles has not been reported....... We addressed this topic by performing femtosecond transient absorption (TA) measurements of aqueous suspensions of uncoated and DCF-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles, and an aqueous iron(iii)–dye complex. Following light absorption, excited state relaxation times of the dye of 115...

  20. Synthesis and characterization of iron oxide nanoparticles using electrical discharge in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Mohammadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized for the first time using electrical arc discharge between a pair of highly pure titanium electrode without using metallic iron electrodes in iron chloride salt solution. The produced nanoparticles were characterized using various analyses such as X-ray Diffraction (XRD and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS. XRD and XPS analyses showed formation of α-Fe2O3 phase. Microscopic studies on the obtained samples revealed formation of rice like iron oxide nanostructures at 10 minutes of electrical discharge which changed to semi-spherical shape after calcination at 600 oC for 2 hours. The results of Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS analysis demonstrated formation of 24 nm particles with almost narrow distribution of 11nm, which are increased in size and distribution width by heat treatment. The obtained results verify the potential ability of this technique to achieve monodispersed iron oxide nanoparticles with narrow distribution in a very short time

  1. The Influence of Iron Ions on the Aqueous Photocatalytic Oxidation of Deicing Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klauson

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental research into aqueous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO of the deicing compounds, 2-ethoxyethanol (2-EE, diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (DEGMME, and ethylene glycol (EG was undertaken. The addition of iron ions to the acidic aqueous solutions to be treated displayed complex influence on the oxidation efficiency of the above mentioned substances, resulting in a sharp increase of the PCO efficiency at smaller concentrations of iron ions followed by a drastic decrease with the increasing iron ion concentrations. The phenomena observed can be explained by the electron scavenging effect of the iron ions and the competitive adsorption of iron ions and the oxidized substances on titanium dioxide surface. The carbonic acids determined as the PCO by-products allow outlining some reaction pathways for the substances under consideration.

  2. Hawaiian submarine manganese-iron oxide crusts - A dating tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.G.; Clague, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Black manganese-iron oxide crusts form on most exposed rock on the ocean floor. Such crusts are well developed on the steep lava slopes of the Hawaiian Ridge and have been sampled during dredging and submersible dives. The crusts also occur on fragments detached from bedrock by mass wasting, on submerged coral reefs, and on poorly lithified sedimentary rocks. The thickness of the crusts was measured on samples collected since 1965 on the Hawaiian Ridge from 140 dive or dredge localities. Fifty-nine (42%) of the sites were collected in 2001 by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). The thinner crusts on many samples apparently result from post-depositional breakage, landsliding, and intermittent burial of outcrops by sediment. The maximum crust thickness was selected from each dredge or dive site to best represent crusts on the original rock surface at that site. The measurements show an irregular progressive thickening of the crusts toward the northwest-i.e., progressive thickening toward the older volcanic features with increasing distance from the Hawaiian hotspot. Comparison of the maximum crust thickness with radiometric ages of related subaerial features supports previous studies that indicate a crust-growth rate of about 2.5 mm/m.y. The thickness information not only allows a comparison of the relative exposure ages of two or more features offshore from different volcanoes, but also provides specific age estimates of volcanic and landslide deposits. The data indicate that some of the landslide blocks within the south Kona landslide are the oldest exposed rock on Mauna Loa, Kilauea, or Loihi volcanoes. Crusts on the floors of submarine canyons off Kohala and East Molokai volcanoes indicate that these canyons are no longer serving as channelways for downslope, sediment-laden currents. Mahukona volcano was approximately synchronous with Hilo Ridge, both being younger than Hana Ridge. The Nuuanu landslide is considerably older than the Wailau landslide. The Waianae

  3. Ligand-enhanced abiotic iron oxidation and the effects of chemical versus biological iron cycling in anoxic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, Sebastian H; Henny, Cynthia; Newman, Dianne K

    2013-03-19

    This study introduces a newly isolated, genetically tractable bacterium ( Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain MAI-1) and explores the extent to which its nitrate-dependent iron-oxidation activity is directly biologically catalyzed. Specifically, we focused on the role of iron chelating ligands in promoting chemical oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrite under anoxic conditions. Strong organic ligands such as nitrilotriacetate and citrate can substantially enhance chemical oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrite at circumneutral pH. We show that strain MAI-1 exhibits unambiguous biological Fe(II) oxidation despite a significant contribution (∼30-35%) from ligand-enhanced chemical oxidation. Our work with the model denitrifying strain Paracoccus denitrificans further shows that ligand-enhanced chemical oxidation of Fe(II) by microbially produced nitrite can be an important general side effect of biological denitrification. Our assessment of reaction rates derived from literature reports of anaerobic Fe(II) oxidation, both chemical and biological, highlights the potential competition and likely co-occurrence of chemical Fe(II) oxidation (mediated by microbial production of nitrite) and truly biological Fe(II) oxidation.

  4. Reactivity of an iron-oxygen oxidant generated upon oxidative decarboxylation of biomimetic iron(II) α-hydroxy acid complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paria, Sayantan; Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2014-03-17

    Three biomimetic iron(II) α-hydroxy acid complexes, [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(mandelate)(H2O)] (1), [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(benzilate)] (2), and [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(HMP)] (3), together with two iron(II) α-methoxy acid complexes, [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(MPA)] (4) and [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(MMP)] (5) (where HMP = 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanoate, MPA = 2-methoxy-2-phenylacetate, and MMP = 2-methoxy-2-methylpropanoate), of a facial tridentate ligand Tp(Ph2) [where Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenylpyrazole-1-yl)borate] were isolated and characterized to study the mechanism of dioxygen activation at the iron(II) centers. Single-crystal X-ray structural analyses of 1, 2, and 5 were performed to assess the binding mode of an α-hydroxy/methoxy acid anion to the iron(II) center. While the iron(II) α-methoxy acid complexes are unreactive toward dioxygen, the iron(II) α-hydroxy acid complexes undergo oxidative decarboxylation, implying the importance of the hydroxyl group in the activation of dioxygen. In the reaction with dioxygen, the iron(II) α-hydroxy acid complexes form iron(III) phenolate complexes of a modified ligand (Tp(Ph2)*), where the ortho position of one of the phenyl rings of Tp(Ph2) gets hydroxylated. The iron(II) mandelate complex (1), upon decarboxylation of mandelate, affords a mixture of benzaldehyde (67%), benzoic acid (20%), and benzyl alcohol (10%). On the other hand, complexes 2 and 3 react with dioxygen to form benzophenone and acetone, respectively. The intramolecular ligand hydroxylation gets inhibited in the presence of external intercepting agents. Reactions of 1 and 2 with dioxygen in the presence of an excess amount of alkenes result in the formation of the corresponding cis-diols in good yield. The incorporation of both oxygen atoms of dioxygen into the diol products is confirmed by (18)O-labeling studies. On the basis of reactivity and mechanistic studies, the generation of a nucleophilic iron-oxygen intermediate upon decarboxylation of the coordinated α-hydroxy acids is

  5. Biomedical properties and preparation of iron oxide-dextran nanostructures by MAPLE technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, Carmen Steluta; Iconaru, Simona Liliana; Gyorgy, Eniko; Radu, Mihaela; Costache, Marieta; Dinischiotu, Anca; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Lafdi, Khalid; Predoi, Daniela

    2012-03-13

    In this work the chemical structure of dextran-iron oxide thin films was reported. The films were obtained by MAPLE technique from composite targets containing 10 wt. % dextran with 1 and 5 wt.% iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). The IONPs were synthesized by co-precipitation method. A KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM≅25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) was used for the growth of the hybrid, iron oxide NPs-dextran thin films. Dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles thin films were indexed into the spinel cubic lattice with a lattice parameter of 8.36 Å. The particle sized calculated was estimated at around 7.7 nm. The XPS shows that the binding energy of the Fe 2p3/2 of two thin films of dextran coated iron oxide is consistent with Fe3+ oxides. The atomic percentage of the C, O and Fe are 66.71, 32.76 and 0.53 for the films deposited from composite targets containing 1 wt.% maghemite and 64.36, 33.92 and 1.72 respectively for the films deposited from composite targets containing 5 wt.% maghemite. In the case of cells cultivated on dextran coated 5% maghemite γ-Fe2O3, the number of cells and the level of F-actin were lower compared to the other two types of thin films and control. The dextran-iron oxide continuous thin films obtained by MAPLE technique from composite targets containing 10 wt.% dextran as well as 1 and 5 wt.% iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method presented granular surface morphology. Our data proved a good viability of Hep G2 cells grown on dextran coated maghemite thin films. Also, no changes in cells morphology were noticed under phase contrast microscopy. The data strongly suggest the potential use of iron oxide-dextran nanocomposites as a potential marker for biomedical applications.

  6. Carboxymethyl cellulose coating decreases toxicity and oxidizing capacity of nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Thanh, Thao Le; Gong, Jianyu; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Eun-Ju; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) with modified surface via coating with organic stabilizers has been documented with enhanced colloidal stability and dispersity. Therefore, the expanded application potential and accompanying intrinsic exposure of such nanoparticle can be anticipated. In our study, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-stabilized NZVI (CNZVI) exerted minimized oxidative stress response and slower disruption of cell membrane integrity, resulting in mitigated cytotoxicity towards bacteria Agrobacterium sp. PH-08 as compared with the uncoated counterpart. The corrosive oxidation of both nanoparticles in oxygenic water provided a better understanding of coating effect. The decreased oxidative degradation of probe 4-chlorophenol with CNZVI than NZVI implicated a weaker oxidizing capacity, which might overweight massive adhesion-mediated redox damage and explain the different exposure outcome. However, enhanced evolution of iron oxide as well as the promoted production of hydrogen peroxide adversely demonstrated CMC-coating facilitated iron corrosion by oxygen, suggesting CMC was most likely to act as a radical scavenger and compete with organics or bacteria for oxidants. Moreover, XRD, XPS and TEM results showed that the spherical NZVI was oxidized to form needle-shaped iron oxide-hydroxide (γFeOOH) with no detectable oxidative stress for PH-08, alleviating worries regarding exotoxicological impact of iron nanotechnology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spectroscopic investigation and direct comparison of the reactivities of iron pyridyl oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Mayes, Howard G.; Queensen, Matthew J.; Bauer, Eike B.; Dupureur, Cynthia M.

    2017-03-01

    The growing interest in green chemistry has fueled attention to the development and characterization of effective iron complex oxidation catalysts. A number of iron complexes are known to catalyze the oxidation of organic substrates utilizing peroxides as the oxidant. Their development is complicated by a lack of direct comparison of the reactivities of the iron complexes. To begin to correlate reactivity with structural elements, we compare the reactivities of a series of iron pyridyl complexes toward a single dye substrate, malachite green (MG), for which colorless oxidation products are established. Complexes with tetradentate, nitrogen-based ligands with cis open coordination sites were found to be the most reactive. While some complexes reflect sensitivity to different peroxides, others are similarly reactive with either H2O2 or tBuOOH, which suggests some mechanistic distinctions. [Fe(S,S-PDP)(CH3CN)2](SbF6)2 and [Fe(OTf)2(tpa)] transition under the oxidative reaction conditions to a single intermediate at a rate that exceeds dye degradation (PDP = bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl) bipyrrolidine; tpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine). For the less reactive [Fe(OTf)2(dpa)] (dpa = dipicolylamine), this reaction occurs on a timescale similar to that of MG oxidation. Thus, the spectroscopic method presented herein provides information about the efficiency and mechanism of iron catalyzed oxidation reactions as well as about potential oxidative catalyst decomposition and chemical changes of the catalyst before or during the oxidation reaction.

  8. Soluble Iron in Alveolar Macrophages Modulates Iron Oxide Particle-Induced Inflammatory Response via Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambient particulate matter (PM)-associated metals have been shown to play an important role in cardiopulmonary health outcomes. To study the modulation of inflammation by PM-associated soluble metal, we investigated intracellular solubility of radiolabelled iron oxide (59

  9. Corrosion Behavior of Pipeline Carbon Steel under Different Iron Oxide Deposits in the District Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Sang Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of pipeline steel covered by iron oxides (α-FeOOH; Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 was investigated in simulated district heating water. In potentiodynamic polarization tests; the corrosion rate of pipeline steel is increased under the iron oxide but the increaseing rate is different due to the differnet chemical reactions of the covered iron oxides. Pitting corrosion was only observed on the α-FeOOH-covered specimen; which is caused by the crevice corrosion under the α-FeOOH. From Mott-Schottky and X-ray diffraction results; the surface reaction and oxide layer were dependent on the kind of iron oxides. The iron oxides deposit increases the failure risk of the pipeline and localized corrosion can be occurred under the α-FeOOH-covered region of the pipeline. Thus, prevention methods for the iron oxide deposit in the district pipeline system such as filtering or periodic chemical cleaning are needed.

  10. Sulfur Versus Iron Oxidation in an Iron-Thiolate Model Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A McDonald; M Bukowski; E Farquhar; T Jackson; K Koehntop; M Seo; R De Hont; A Stubna; J Halfen; E Munck

    2011-12-31

    In the absence of base, the reaction of [Fe{sup II}(TMCS)]PF{sub 6} (1, TMCS = 1-(2-mercaptoethyl)-4,8,11-trimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) with peracid in methanol at -20 C did not yield the oxoiron(IV) complex (2, [Fe{sup IV}(O)(TMCS)]PF{sub 6}), as previously observed in the presence of strong base (KO{sup t}Bu). Instead, the addition of 1 equiv of peracid resulted in 50% consumption of 1. The addition of a second equivalent of peracid resulted in the complete consumption of 1 and the formation of a new species 3, as monitored by UV-vis, ESI-MS, and Moessbauer spectroscopies. ESI-MS showed 3 to be formulated as [Fe{sup II}(TMCS) + 2O]{sup +}, while EXAFS analysis suggested that 3 was an O-bound iron(II)-sulfinate complex (Fe-O = 1.95 {angstrom}, Fe-S = 3.26 {angstrom}). The addition of a third equivalent of peracid resulted in the formation of yet another compound, 4, which showed electronic absorption properties typical of an oxoiron(IV) species. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirmed 4 to be a novel iron(IV) compound, different from 2, and EXAFS (Fe{double_bond}O = 1.64 {angstrom}) and resonance Raman ({nu}{sub Fe{double_bond}O} = 831 cm{sup -1}) showed that indeed an oxoiron(IV) unit had been generated in 4. Furthermore, both infrared and Raman spectroscopy gave indications that 4 contains a metal-bound sulfinate moiety ({nu}{sub s}(SO{sub 2}) {approx} 1000 cm{sup -1}, {nu}{sub as}(SO{sub 2}) {approx} 1150 cm{sup -1}). Investigations into the reactivity of 1 and 2 toward H{sup +} and oxygen atom transfer reagents have led to a mechanism for sulfur oxidation in which 2 could form even in the absence of base but is rapidly protonated to yield an oxoiron(IV) species with an uncoordinated thiol moiety that acts as both oxidant and substrate in the conversion of 2 to 3.

  11. Metal Ions-Stimulated Iron Oxidation in Hydroxylases Facilitates Stabilization of HIF-1α Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Monika; Cachau, Raul E.; Topol, Igor A.; Kasprzak, Kazimierz S.; Ghio, Andy; Salnikow, Konstantin

    2009-01-01

    The exposure of cells to several metal ions stabilizes HIF-1α protein. However, the molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. They may involve inhibition of hydroxylation by either substitution of iron by metal ions or by iron oxidation in the hydroxylases. Here we provide evidence supporting the latter mechanism. We show that HIF-1α stabilization in human lung epithelial cells occurred following exposure to various metal and metalloid ions, including those that cannot substitute for iron in the hydroxylases. In each case addition of the reducing agent ascorbic acid (AA)* abolished HIF-1α protein stabilization. To better understand the role of iron oxidation in hydroxylase inhibition and to define the role of AA in the enzyme recovery we applied molecular modeling techniques. Our results indicate that the energy required for iron substitution by Ni(II) in the enzyme is high and unlikely to be achieved in a biological system. Additionally, computer modeling allowed us to identify a tridentate coordination of AA with the enzyme-bound iron, which explains the specific demand for AA as the iron reductant. Thus, the stabilization of HIF-1α by numerous metal ions that cannot substitute for iron in the enzyme, the alleviation of this effect by AA, and our computer modeling data support the hypothesis of iron oxidation in the hydroxylases following exposure to metal ions. PMID:19074761

  12. Biological iron(II) oxidation as pre-treatment to limestone neutralisation of acid water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maree, JP

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron (II) should be oxidised to iron (III) before the neutralisation of acid water with limestone, otherwise the oxidation will occur downstream of the neutralisation plant with the formation of acid (reactions 1 and 2). This study aimed...

  13. Aggregation, organic matter, and iron oxide morphology in oxisols from Minas Gerais, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muggler, C.C.; Griethuysen, van C.; Buurman, P.; Pape, T.

    1999-01-01

    The characteristic strong aggregation observed in Oxisols is usually attributed to the presence of free aluminium or iron compounds. Previous investigation of Oxisols from Minas Gerais, Brazil, suggested that iron oxide minerals do not necessarily play a role in aggregation. Oxisol profiles

  14. Readily Accessible Bulky Iron Catalysts exhibiting Site Selectivity in the Oxidation of Steroidal Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font, David; Canta, Mercè; Milan, Michela; Cussó, Olaf; Ribas, Xavi; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/166032646; Costas, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    Bulky iron complexes are described that catalyze the site-selective oxidation of alkyl C-H bonds with hydrogen peroxide under mild conditions. Steric bulk at the iron center is introduced by appending trialkylsilyl groups at the meta-position of the pyridines in tetradentate aminopyridine ligands,

  15. Mechanism of oxidation of L-methionine by iron(III)-1,10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of L-methionine by iron(III)–1,10- phenanthroline complex have been studied in perchloric acid medium. The reaction is first order each in iron(III) and methionine. Increase in [phenanthroline] increases the rate while increase in [HClO4] decreases it. While the reactive species ...

  16. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of glycine by iron (III)-1, 10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of glycine by iron(III)-1,10-phenanthroline complex has been studied in perchloric acid medium. The reaction is first order with respect to iron(III) and glycine. An increase in (phenanthroline) increases the rate, while increase in [H+] decreases the rate. Hence it can be inferred that the ...

  17. Prominent occurrence of iron oxides at KTB mass extinction: a review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the basis of iridium anomaly at a number of KTB sites it has been established that the cause of extinction was impact with an extraterrestrial bollide. The iron oxide/oxyhydroxide and iron minerals such as illite, phyllosilicate, jarosite etc. present in the rock samples from KTB form a major part. One can study different ...

  18. Synthesis and characterization of diblock copolymer templated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcora, Pinar

    2005-07-01

    separation and magnetic properties were also investigated. The knowledge gained from understanding the templating mechanism in block copolymer/iron oxide nanocomposites can be applied to other similar systems for a variety of biological and catalyst applications.

  19. Quantification of the internalization patterns of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with opposite charge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schweiger, Christoph; Hartmann, Raimo; Zhang, Feng; Parak, Wolfgang J; Kissel, Thomas H; Rivera Gil, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    .... This technique was applied to relate the internalization patterns of nanoparticles i.e. superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with distinct physicochemical characteristics with their uptake mechanism, rate and intracellular...

  20. Colloidosome-based synthesis of a multifunctional nanostructure of silver and hollow iron oxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Yue

    2010-03-16

    Nanoparticles that self-assemble on a liquid-liquid interface serve as the building block for making heterodimeric nanostructures. Specifically, hollow iron oxide nanoparticles within hexane form colloidosomes in the aqueous solution of silver nitrate, and iron oxide exposed to the aqueous phase catalyzes the reduction of silver ions to afford a heterodimer of silver and hollow iron oxide nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectroscopy, and SQUID were used to characterize the heterodimers. Interestingly, the formation of silver nanoparticles helps the removal of spinglass layer on the hollow iron oxide nanoparticles. This work demonstrates a powerful yet convenient strategy for producing sophisticated, multifunctional nanostructures. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Calcium-Sensitive MRI Contrast Agents Based on Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Calmodulin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tatjana Atanasijevic; Maxim Shusteff; Peter Fam; Alan Jasanoff

    2006-01-01

    We describe a family of calcium indicators for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), formed by combining a powerful iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast mechanism with the versatile calciumsensing protein calmodulin and its targets...

  2. Synthesis of pseudopolyrotaxanes-coated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as new MRI contrast agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosseini, F.; Panahifar, A.; Adeli, M.; Amiri, H.; Lascialfari, A.; Orsini, F.; Doschak, M.R.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized and coated with pseudopolyrotaxanes (PPRs) and proposed as a novel hybrid nanostructure for medical imaging and drug delivery. PPRs were prepared by addition of alpha-cyclodextrin rings to functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG)

  3. Effects of Iron Oxides on the Rheological Properties of Cementitious Slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chul-Woo; Chun, Jaehun; Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2014-04-02

    Iron oxide has been considered a promising host for immobilizing and encapsulating radioactive 99Tc (t1/2=2.1x105 year), which significantly enhances the stability of 99Tc within a cementitious waste form. However, the flow behavior of cementitious slurry containing iron oxide has never been investigated to ensure its workability, which directly influences the preparation and performance of the cementitious waste form monolith. Variation in the rheological properties of the cementitious slurry were studied using rheometry and ultrasonic wave reflection to understand the effects of various iron oxides (magnetite, hematite, ferrihydrite, and goethite) during the cement setting and stiffening processes. The rheological behavior significantly varied with the addition of different chemical compounds of iron oxides. Complementary microscopic characteristics such as colloidal vibration currents, morphology, and particle size distributions further suggest that the most adverse alteration of cement setting and stiffening behavior caused by the presence of goethite may be attributed to its acicular shape.

  4. Relation of iron stores to oxidative stress in type 2 diabetes | Kundu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    onset type 2 diabetes. Further studies proved ferritin to be an important and independent predictor of the development of diabetes. The link between hyperglycemia, enhanced free radical activity (oxidative stress) and serum iron and its stores ...

  5. Characterization, Quantification, and Determination of the Toxicity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles to the Bone Marrow Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Yeol-Rim Paik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs have been used to develop iron supplements for improving the bioavailability of iron in patients with iron deficiency, which is one of the most serious nutritional deficiencies in the world. Accurate information about the characteristics, concentration, and cytotoxicity of IONPs to the developmental and reproductive cells enables safe use of IONPs in the supplement industry. The objective of this study was to analyze the physicochemical properties and cytotoxicity of IONPs in bone marrow cells. We prepared three different types of iron samples (surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles (SMNPs, IONPs, and iron citrate and analyzed their physicochemical properties such as particle size distribution, zeta potential, and morphology. In addition, we examined the cytotoxicity of the IONPs in various kinds of bone marrow cells. We analyzed particle size distribution, zeta potential, iron levels, and subcellular localization of the iron samples in bone marrow cells. Our results showed that the iron samples were not cytotoxic to the bone marrow cells and did not affect the expression of cell surface markers and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced the secretion of cytokines by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs. Our results may be used to investigate the interactions between nanoparticles and cells and tissues and the developmental toxicity of nanoparticles.

  6. Electron impact ionisation cross sections of iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stefan E.; Mauracher, Andreas; Sukuba, Ivan; Urban, Jan; Maihom, Thana; Probst, Michael

    2017-12-01

    We report electron impact ionisation cross sections (EICSs) of iron oxide molecules, FexOx and FexOx+1 with x = 1, 2, 3, from the ionisation threshold to 10 keV, obtained with the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) methods. The maxima of the EICSs range from 3.10 to 9 . 96 × 10-16 cm2 located at 59-72 eV and 5.06 to 14.32 × 10-16 cm2 located at 85-108 eV for the DM and BEB approaches, respectively. The orbital and kinetic energies required for the BEB method are obtained by employing effective core potentials for the inner core electrons in the quantum chemical calculations. The BEB cross sections are 1.4-1.7 times larger than the DM cross sections which can be related to the decreasing population of the Fe 4s orbitals upon addition of oxygen atoms, together with the different methodological foundations of the two methods. Both the DM and BEB cross sections can be fitted excellently to a simple analytical expression used in modelling and simulation codes employed in the framework of nuclear fusion research. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-80308-2.

  7. Synthesizing Iron Oxide Nanostructures: The Polyethylenenemine (PEI) Role

    KAUST Repository

    Mozo, Sergio Lentijo

    2017-01-12

    Controlled synthesis of anisotropic iron oxide nanoparticles is a challenge in the field of nanomaterial research that requires an extreme attention to detail. In particular, following up a previous work showcasing the synthesis of magnetite nanorods (NRs) using a two-step approach that made use of polyethylenenemine (PEI) as a capping ligand to synthesize intermediate β-FeOOH NRs, we studied the effect and influence of the capping ligand on the formation of β-FeOOH NRs. By comparing the results reported in the literature with those we obtained from syntheses performed (1) in the absence of PEI or (2) by using PEIs with different molecular weight, we showed how the choice of different PEIs determines the aspect ratio and the structural stability of the β-FeOOH NRs and how this affects the final products. For this purpose, a combination of XRD, HRTEM, and direct current superconducting quantum interference device (DC SQUID) magnetometry was used to identify the phases formed in the final products and study their morphostructural features and related magnetic behavior.

  8. Synthesizing Iron Oxide Nanostructures: The Polyethylenenemine (PEI Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Lentijo Mozo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled synthesis of anisotropic iron oxide nanoparticles is a challenge in the field of nanomaterial research that requires an extreme attention to detail. In particular, following up a previous work showcasing the synthesis of magnetite nanorods (NRs using a two-step approach that made use of polyethylenenemine (PEI as a capping ligand to synthesize intermediate β-FeOOH NRs, we studied the effect and influence of the capping ligand on the formation of β-FeOOH NRs. By comparing the results reported in the literature with those we obtained from syntheses performed (1 in the absence of PEI or (2 by using PEIs with different molecular weight, we showed how the choice of different PEIs determines the aspect ratio and the structural stability of the β-FeOOH NRs and how this affects the final products. For this purpose, a combination of XRD, HRTEM, and direct current superconducting quantum interference device (DC SQUID magnetometry was used to identify the phases formed in the final products and study their morphostructural features and related magnetic behavior.

  9. Effects of iron oxidation state on viscosity, lunar composition 15555

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukierman, M.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The viscous flow behavior of a 9.6-kg lunar rock containing 22.5 wt.% FeO was studied in the temperature ranges from 620 to 700 C and from 1215 to 1400 C. The material was synthesized under mildy reducing conditions to simulate the Fe(2+)/total Fe ratio of the lunar environment. The effect of iron oxidation state on flow behavior in the high viscosity region is studied for specimens of the 15555 composition with Fe(2+) concentration ratios of 0.94, 0.76, and 0.20. A change in ratio from 0.94 to 0.76 had no observable effect on viscosity, whereas a change from 0.76 to 0.20 was accompanied by a drastic increase in viscosity (some three orders of magnitude) at a given temperature, but without changing the form of the variation of viscosity with temperature. The flow behavior is analyzed as a function of the structural features of the glasses.

  10. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Based Delivery Systems for Biotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Hyejung; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION)-based carrier systems have many advantages over other nanoparticle-based systems. They are biocompatible, biodegradable, facilely tunable, and superparamagnetic and thus controllable by an external magnetic field. These attributes enable their broad biomedical applications. In particular, magnetically-driven carriers are drawing considerable interest as an emerging therapeutic delivery system because of their superior delivery efficiency. Area covered This article reviews the recent advances in use of SPION-based carrier systems to improve the delivery efficiency and target specificity of biotherapeutics. We examine various formulations of SPION-based delivery systems, including SPION micelles, clusters, hydrogels, liposomes, and micro/nanospheres, as well as their specific applications in delivery of biotherapeutics. Expert opinion Recently, biotherapeutics including therapeutic cells, proteins and genes have been studied as alternative treatments to various diseases. Despite the advantages of high target specificity and low adverse effects, clinical translation of biotherapeutics has been hindered by the poor stability and low delivery efficiency compared to chemical drugs. Accordingly, biotherapeutic delivery systems that can overcome these limitations are actively pursued. SPION-based materials can be ideal candidates for developing such delivery systems because of their excellent biocompatibility and superparamagnetism that enables long-term accumulation/retention at target sites by utilization of a suitable magnet. In addition, synthesis technologies for production of finely-tuned, homogeneous SPIONs have been well developed, which may promise their rapid clinical translation. PMID:23199200

  11. Size-Dependent Heating of Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Sheng; Quinto, Christopher A; Zhang, Linlin; Mohindra, Priya; Bao, Gang

    2017-07-25

    The ability to generate heat under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) makes magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) an ideal heat source for biomedical applications including cancer thermoablative therapy, tissue preservation, and remote control of cell function. However, there is a lack of quantitative understanding of the mechanisms governing heat generation of MIONs, and the optimal nanoparticle size for magnetic fluid heating (MFH) applications. Here, we show that MIONs with large sizes (>20 nm) have a specific absorption rate (SAR) significantly higher than that predicted by the widely used linear theory of MFH. The heating efficiency of MIONs in both the superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic regimes increased with size, which can be accurately characterized with a modified dynamic hysteresis model. In particular, the 40 nm ferromagnetic nanoparticles have an SAR value approaching the theoretical limit under a clinically relevant AMF. An in vivo study further demonstrated that the 40 nm MIONs could effectively heat tumor tissues at a minimal dose. Our experimental results and theoretical analysis on nanoparticle heating offer important insight into the rationale design of MION-based MFH for therapeutic applications.

  12. Transformation of iron oxides on PI electrospun membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Penggang; Lv, Fengzhu, E-mail: lfz619@cugb.edu.cn; Liu, Leipeng; Ding, Ling; Zhang, Yihe, E-mail: zyh@cugb.edu.cn

    2016-09-15

    Iron oxides/PI fiber membranes, especially magnetic PI membranes, are important flexible porous materials available application in the field of wave absorption, magnetic recording, membrane separation and catalysts. Therefore, α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} loaded PI composite fibers were prepared by electrospinning of poly(amic acid) PAA solution followed by loading Fe{sup 3+} on the PAA membrane by ion-exchange and then imidization. Then the α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} on PI membrane were reduced by H{sub 2} to give magnetic PI membranes. The content of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} on PI can be controlled by adjustment the ion-exchange time. The saturation magnetization of the composite membranes can reach up to 4 emu/g and the final composite membranes have magnetic response ability. - Highlights: • The content of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} on PI can be controlled. • The saturation magnetization of the composite membranes can reach up to 4 emu/g. • The composite membranes have magnetic response ability.

  13. Glycoconjugated chitosan stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles as a multifunctional nanoprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remant Bahadur, K.C.; Lee, So Min; Yoo, Eun Soo; Choi, Jin Hyun [Department of Advanced Organic Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ghim, Han Do, E-mail: hdghim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Organic Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-01

    Surface modification of iron oxide nanoparticles (IOPs) with functional polymer can be used for the preparation of multifunction nanoprobes. The present study dealt with the preparation of glycoconjugated chitosan (GC) stabilized IOPs (GC-IOPs). GC was prepared by direct coupling of lactobionic acid (LA) on chitosan. GC was subsequently grafted onto the surface of IOPs to enhance colloid stability. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), electrophoretic light scattering (ELS) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurements were performed to investigate the properties of nanoparticles. FT-IR and XRD analysis of GC-IOPs showed that backbone and side chain functionality of chitosan and phase purity of IOPs remained intact during conjugation. TEM observations revealed that GC-IOPs were spherical (8-10 nm) but the dispersibility and stability in acetated buffer (pH 7.4) linearly increased with degree of substitution (DS) of chitosan. The specific magnetization of GC-IOPs was varied with DS from 19.50 to 41.56 emu/g. This variation in colloid stability and specific magnetization suggests that DS can be varied to tailor the degree of dispersion and magnetic properties of IOPs. The advantage of GC-IOPS is the ability to achieve a homogeneous nanosize particle distribution and specific surface functionality for bioconjugation. These characteristics make the GC-IOPs a potential candidate for biomedical research and clinical diagnosis.

  14. Oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by iron oxide nanoparticles in cultured human umbilical endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mo-Tao; Wang, Yun; Feng, Wei-Yue; Wang, Bing; Wang, Meng; Ouyang, Hong; Chai, Zhi-Fang

    2010-12-01

    Recent epidemiologic researches indicate that exposure to ultrafine particles (nanoparticles) is an independent risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases. The induction of endothelial injuries is hypothesized to be an attractive mechanism involved in these cardiovascular diseases. To investigate this hypothesis, the widely used iron nanomaterials, ferric oxide (Fe2O3) and ferriferrous oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were incubated with human umbilical endothelial cells (ECV304 cells) at different concentrations of 2, 20, 100 microg/mL. The cell viability, the rate of apoptosis, the apoptotic nuclear morphology and the mitochondria membrane potential were measured to estimate the cell necrosis and apoptosis caused by the nanoparticle exposure. The stimulation of superoxide anion (O2*-) and nitric oxide (NO) were examined to evaluate the stress responses of endothelial cells. Our results indicated that both the Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles could generate oxidative stress as well as the significant increase of nitric oxide in ECV304 cells. The loss of mitochondria membrane potential and the apoptotic chromatin condensation in the nucleus were observed as the early signs of apoptosis. It is inferred the stress response might be an important mechanism involving in endothelial cells apoptosis and death, and these injuries in endothelial cells might play a key role in downstream cardiovascular diseases such as atheroscelerosis, hypertension and myocardial infarction (MI).

  15. An experimental study for enhancing the catalytic effects of various copper forms on the oxidation of ferrous iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babak, Manizhe Moradi Shahre; Goharrizi, Ataallah Soltani; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Roayaei, Emad

    2013-01-01

    In this research the catalytic effect of copper compounds (ionic, oxide and oxide nanopowder) on the oxidation of ferrous iron by aeration was studied experimentally. When copper exists in solution, the oxidation rate of iron(II) will increase. The experimental results showed that the oxidation rate increases with an increasing copper concentration. From the experimental data it can be determined that the copper oxide nanopowder is the most effective for the oxidation reaction among the used copper forms. Aeration is the most economical oxidation method when water exhibits a high ferrous iron concentration.

  16. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin; Fiskal, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface....... Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling...... campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations>300 nM. At the boundary between...

  17. Hybrid dextran-iron oxide thin films deposited by laser techniques for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Predoi, Daniela; Ciobanu, Carmen Steluta; Mihaela RADU; Costache, Marieta; Dinischiotu, Anca; Gyorgy, Eniko

    2012-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by chemical co-precipitation method. The nanoparticles were mixed with dextran in distilled water. The obtained solutions were frozen in liquid nitrogen and used as targets during matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation for the growth of hybrid, iron oxide nanoparticles-dextran thin films. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations revealed that the obtained films preserve the structure and composition of the initial, n...

  18. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Delivery of Peptides to the Brain: Reversal of Anxiety during Drug Withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan Vinzant; Scholl, Jamie L.; Chia-Ming Wu; Trevor Kindle; Ranjit Koodali; Gina L. Forster

    2017-01-01

    Targeting neuropeptide systems is important for future advancements in treatment of neurological and psychiatric illnesses. However, many of the peptides and their analogs do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) efficiently. Nanoparticles such as iron oxide can cross the BBB, and here we describe a novel method for the conjugation of a peptide antisauvagine-30 (ASV-30) to iron oxide nanoparticles. Previous research has shown that direct infusion of ASV-30 into the brain reduces anxiety-lik...

  19. Redox-Reversible Iron Orthovanadate Cathode for Solid Oxide Steam Electrolyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lizhen; Ye, Lingting; Ruan, Cong; Chen, Shigang; Xie, Kui

    2016-02-01

    A redox-reversible iron orthovanadate cathode is demonstrated for a solid oxide electrolyser with up to 100% current efficiency for steam electrolysis. The iron catalyst is grown on spinel-type electronic conductor FeV2O4 by in situ tailoring the reversible phase change of FeVO4 to Fe+FeV2O4 in a reducing atmosphere. Promising electrode performances have been obtained for a solid oxide steam electrolyser based on this composite cathode.

  20. Coupling Graphene Sheets with Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Energy Storage and Microelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-18

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0002 Coupling Graphene Sheets with Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Energy Storage and Microelectronics Kwang-Sup Lee HANNAM...SUBTITLE Coupling Graphene Sheets with Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Energy Storage and Microelectronics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-12-1-4010...superparamagnetic γ-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) to grapheme-based materials. The distance of the ligands to the graphene derivative surface can be

  1. Ferrous Iron Oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: Inhibition with Benzoic Acid, Sorbic Acid, and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onysko, Steven J.; Kleinmann, Robert L. P.; Erickson, Patricia M.

    1984-01-01

    Benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate at low concentrations (5 to 10 mg/liter) each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low-pH, sterile batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations (5 to 50 mg/liter) of any of the compounds. PMID:16346592

  2. Tunable room-temperature ferromagnet using an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Aigu L.

    2015-06-23

    Magnetic materials have found wide application ranging from electronics and memories to medicine. Essential to these advances is the control of the magnetic order. To date, most room-temperature applications have a fixed magnetic moment whose orientation is manipulated for functionality. Here we demonstrate an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite based device that acts as a tunable ferromagnet at room temperature. Not only can we tune its transition temperature in a wide range of temperatures around room temperature, but the magnetization can also be tuned from zero to 0.011 A m2/kg through an initialization process with two readily accessible knobs (magnetic field and electric current), after which the system retains its magnetic properties semi-permanently until the next initialization process. We construct a theoretical model to illustrate that this tunability originates from an indirect exchange interaction mediated by spin-imbalanced electrons inside the nanocomposite. © 2015 Scientific Reports.

  3. Electrodeposition of Polypyrrole/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Iron Oxide Nanocomposite as Supercapacitor Electrode Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Eeu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypyrrole (PPy was reinforced with reduced graphene oxide (RGO and iron oxide to achieve electrochemical stability and enhancement. The ternary nanocomposite film was prepared using a facile one-pot chronoamperometry approach, which is inexpensive and experimentally friendly. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM image shows a layered morphology of the ternary nanocomposite film as opposed to the dendritic structure of PPy, suggesting hybridization of the three materials during electrodeposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD profile shows the presence of Fe2O3 in the ternary nanocomposite. Cyclic voltammetry (CV analysis illustrates enhanced current for the nanocomposite by twofold and fourfold compared to its binary (PPy/RGO and individual (PPy counterparts, respectively. The ternary nanocomposite film exhibited excellent specific capacitance retention even after 200 cycles of charge/discharge.

  4. Effect of the Surfactant on the Growth and Oxidation of Iron Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Ruíz-Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe nanoparticles and branched nanostructures of iron oxide were synthesized by chemical reduction in aqueous phase. The mechanism of formation of iron oxides as a function of the amount of surfactant employed during the synthesis process was studied. Specifically Fe, Fe2O3, and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were obtained. The oxidation of Fe to Fe3O4 and finally to Fe2O3 was carried out by oxidative etching process, decreasing the amount of stabilizer agent. The structures obtained were characterized by high resolution (HRTEM and scanning/transmission (STEM electron microcopies, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and optical spectroscopy (UV-Vis and IR.

  5. Synthesis of phase-pure and monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufschmid, Ryan; Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R Matthew; Gonzales, Marcela; Teeman, Eric; Brush, Lucien N; Browning, Nigel D; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2015-07-07

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are used for a wide range of biomedical applications requiring precise control over their physical and magnetic properties, which are dependent on their size and crystallographic phase. Here we present a comprehensive template for the design and synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles with control over size, size distribution, phase, and resulting magnetic properties. We investigate critical parameters for synthesis of monodisperse SPIONs by organic thermal decomposition. Three different, commonly used, iron containing precursors (iron oleate, iron pentacarbonyl, and iron oxyhydroxide) are evaluated under a variety of synthetic conditions. We compare the suitability of these three kinetically controlled synthesis protocols, which have in common the use of iron oleate as a starting precursor or reaction intermediate, for producing nanoparticles with specific size and magnetic properties. Monodisperse particles were produced over a tunable range of sizes from approximately 2-30 nm. Reaction parameters such as precursor concentration, addition of surfactant, temperature, ramp rate, and time were adjusted to kinetically control size and size-distribution, phase, and magnetic properties. In particular, large quantities of excess surfactant (up to 25 : 1 molar ratio) alter reaction kinetics and result in larger particles with uniform size; however, there is often a trade-off between large particles and a narrow size distribution. Iron oxide phase, in addition to nanoparticle size and shape, is critical for establishing magnetic properties such as differential susceptibility (dm/dH) and anisotropy. As an example, we show the importance of obtaining the required size and iron oxide phase for application to Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI), and describe how phase purity can be controlled. These results provide much of the information necessary to determine which iron oxide synthesis protocol is best suited to a particular

  6. Adsorption of poly(vinyl formamide-co-vinyl amine) (PVFA-co-PVAm) polymers on zinc, zinc oxide, iron, and iron oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Susan; Simon, Frank; Baumann, Giesela; Hietschold, Michael; Seifert, Andreas; Spange, Stefan

    2011-12-06

    The adsorption of poly(vinyl formamide) (PVFA) and the statistic copolymers poly(vinyl formamide-co-vinyl amine) (PVFA-co-PVAm) onto zinc and iron metal particles as well as their oxides was investigated. The adsorbates were characterized by means of XPS, DRIFT spectroscopy, wet chemical analysis, and solvatochromic probes. Dicyano-bis-(1,10-phenanthroline)-iron(II) (1), 3-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)-7-phenyl-benzo-[1,2-b:4,5-b']difuran-2,6-dione (2), and 4-tert-butyl-2-(dicyano-methylene)-5-[4-(diethylamino)-benzylidene]-Δ(3)-thiazoline (3) as solvatochromic probes were coadsorbed onto zinc oxide to measure various effects of surface polarity. The experimental findings showed that the adsorption mechanism of PVFA and PVFA-co-PVAm strongly depends on the degree of hydrolysis of PVFA and pH values and also on the kind of metal or metal oxide surfaces that were employed as adsorbents. The adsorption mechanism of PVFA/PVFA-co-PVAm onto zinc oxide and iron oxide surfaces is mainly affected by electrostatic interactions. Particularly in the region of pH 5, the adsorption of PVFA/PVFA-co-PVAm onto zinc and iron metal particles is additionally influenced by redox processes, dissolution, and complexation reactions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Cytotoxic Effect of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells by MTT Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Mohseni Kouchesfehani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the wide range of applications, there is a serious lack of information on the impact of the nanoparticles on human health and the environment. The present study was done to determine the range of dangerous concentrations of iron oxide nanoparticle and their effects on mouse embryonic stem cells. Methods: Iron oxide nanoparticles with less than 20 nanometers diameter were encapsulated by a PEG-phospholipid. The suspension of iron oxide nanoparticles was prepared using the culture media and cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Results: MTT assay was used to examine the cytotoxicity of iron oxide nanoparticle s. Royan B1 cells were treated with medium containing different concentrations (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60µg/ml of the iron oxide nanoparticle. Cell viability was determined at 12 and 24 hours after treatment which showed significant decreases when concentration and time period increased. Conclusion: The main mechanism of nanoparticles action is still unknown, but in vivo and in vitro studies in different environments suggest that they are capable of producing reactive oxygen species (ROS. Therefore, they may have an effect on the concentration of intracellular calcium, activation of transcription factors, and changes in cytokine. The results of this study show that the higher concentration and duration of treatment of cells with iron oxide nanoparticles increase the rate of cell death.

  8. Iron oxide deposits associated with the ectosymbiotic bacteria in the hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Compère

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The Rimicaris exoculata shrimp is considered as a primary consumer that dominates the fauna of most Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR hydrothermal ecosystems. These shrimps harbour in their gill chambers an important ectosymbiotic community of chemoautotrophic bacteria associated with iron oxide deposits. The structure and elemental composition of the mineral concretions associated with these bacteria have been investigated by using LM, ESEM, TEM STEM and EDX microanalyses. The nature of the iron oxides in shrimps obtained from the Rainbow vent field has also been determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. This multidisciplinary approach has revealed that the three layers of mineral crust in the Rimicaris exoculata shrimps consist of large concretions formed by aggregated nanoparticles of two-line ferrihydrite and include other minor elements as Si, Ca, Mg, S and P, probably present as silicates cations, sulphates or phosphates respectively that may contribute to stabilise the ferrihydrite form of iron oxides. TEM-observations on the bacteria have revealed their close interactions with these minerals. Abiotic and biotic precipitation could occur within the gill chamber of Rimicaris exoculata, suggesting the biologically-mediated formation of the iron oxide deposits. The difference of the bacterial density in the three-mineral crust layers could be correlated to the importance of the iron oxide concretions and suggest that the first mineral particles precipitates on the lower layer which could be considered as the most likely location of iron-oxidizing bacteria.

  9. In vitro toxicity assessment of chitosan oligosaccharide coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeep Shukla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles (INPs have potential biological, biomedical and environmental applications. These applications require surface modification of the iron oxide nanoparticles, which makes it non-toxic, biocompatible, stable and non-agglomerative in natural and biological surroundings. In the present study, iron oxide nanoparticles (INPs and chitosan oligosaccharide coated iron oxide nanoparticles (CSO-INPs were synthesized to evaluate the effect of surface coating on the stability and toxicity of nanoparticles. Comparative in vitro cytotoxicity of nanoparticles was evaluated in HeLa (human cervix carcinoma, A549 (human lung carcinoma and Hek293 (human embryonic kidney cells by using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay along with flow cytometry study for cell viability, membrane integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP and reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Morphological alteration in nanoparticles treated cells was analyzed by Acridine orange/ethidium bromide double staining and electron microscopy. Synthesized nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape, well dispersed and stable at various pH values, making them suitable for biomedical and environmental applications. The present study also indicates that the chitosan oligosaccharide coating on iron oxide nanoparticles results in the decrease in cellular damage and moderate ROS production, thereby, significantly decreasing the cytotoxic impact of bare iron oxide nanoparticles.

  10. Vapour phase approach for iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis from solid precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mandeep; Ulbrich, Pavel; Prokopec, Vadym [Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Svoboda, Pavel [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Šantavá, Eva [Institute of Physics ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Štěpánek, František, E-mail: Frantisek.Stepanek@vscht.cz [Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2013-04-15

    A new non-solution mediated approach to the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles directly from solid FeCl{sub 2} salt precursors has been developed. The method is rapid, simple and scalable. The structural properties and the phase of the resulting iron oxide particles has been determined by a range of methods including XRD, FT-IR and Mössbauer spectroscopy, and the phase is shown to be maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The magnetic properties of the iron oxide particles have been measured using SQUID, confirming superparamagnetic behaviour of the powder and a saturation magnetization of 53.0 emu g{sup −1} at 300 K. Aqueous dispersions at increasing concentrations were prepared and their heating rate under a 400 kHz alternating magnetic field measured. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of the iron oxide was found to be 84.8 W g{sup −1}, which makes the material suitable for the formulation of ferrofluids or ferrogels with RF heating properties. - Graphical Abstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles obtained by a novel vapour phase approach. Highlights: ► Novel vapour phase (non-solvent) approach for iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis. ► Attractive alternative approach to the present co-precipitation method. ► Better magnetic properties with high coercivity of nanoparticles. ► A high specific absorption rate (SAR) for hyperthermia applications.

  11. In situ estimates of iron-oxidation and accretion rates for iron-oxidizing bacterial mats at Lō'ihi Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, David; Scott, Jarrod J.; Leavitt, Anna; Fleming, Emily; Moyer, Craig

    2017-08-01

    It is increasingly recognized that diffuse, hydrothermal venting is an important source of iron to the deep-sea that can influence oceanic iron dynamics and abundance. Lithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are dominant at diffuse hydrothermal vent sites, producing microbial iron mats that are often centimeters or more thick. At present, little is known about in situ growth rates of FeOB, specific Fe-oxidation rates, or accretion rates for iron mats. An in situ productivity chamber was developed that took advantage of the unique mineral morphotypes produced by FeOB to estimate rates of Fe-oxidation and accretion. Chambers were placed at two diffuse vents (1179 and 1300 mbsl) at Lō'ihi Seamount where they were colonized by FeOB for different amounts of time. From this analysis, it was estimated that Fe-oxidation rates could range from 8.2 to 51.9 × 10-6 mol h-1, and that iron mats could accrete at around 2.2 cm. yr-1. Molecular analysis indicated that the relative abundance of Zetaproteobacteria, a group of known FeOB, accounted for 80-90% of the bacteria colonizing the chambers. There was a distinct difference between populations at the 1179 m site (Pohaku), and the 1300 m site (North Hiolo Ridge). Microscope slides placed within the productivity chambers were colonized by different morphotypes of FeOB. The cells responsible for one common morphotype that produces a Y-shaped filament were identified as Zetaproteobacteria by use of a small subunit rRNA probe. This work confirms the importance of FeOB in the formation of chemosynthetic iron mats, and provides the first estimates for in situ Fe-oxidation rates and mat accretion rates.

  12. Renal functional and structural integrity in infants with iron deficiency anemia: relation to oxidative stress and response to iron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shimi, Mohamed S; El-Farrash, Rania A; Ismail, Eman A; El-Safty, Ibrahim A; El-Safty, A; Nada, Ahmed S; El-Gamel, Omayma A; Salem, Yomna M; Shoukry, Sara M

    2015-10-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare renal functional and structural integrity in 50 infants with IDA and 50 healthy controls and to assess the relation between IDA and oxidative stress and response to iron therapy. This was a prospective study in which peripheral blood samples were collected from all study subjects and the following laboratory investigations performed: serum iron profile, urinary microalbumin, urinary leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), fractional excretion of sodium (FeNa), serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC), serum malondialdehyde (MDA), serum and urinary trace elements (iron, copper, zinc, calcium and magnesium). All patients received oral iron therapy and were followed-up for 3 months. The levels of baseline urinary markers were higher among the patients with IDA than among the controls (p < 0.05). Patients had a lower pre-therapy TAC and lower serum zinc and magnesium levels than controls as well as higher MDA and serum copper levels (p < 0.05). MDA level was positively correlated to microalbumin and LAP level (p < 0.05). Urinary LAP concentration was positively correlated to urinary trace element concentrations (p < 0.05). A significant decrease in microalbumin, LAP, FeNa, and urinary trace elements was observed post-iron therapy while hemoglobin and ferritin levels were increased (p < 0.05). Among the study subjects, IDA had an adverse influence on renal functional and structural integrity which could be reversed with iron therapy. Oxidative stress played an important role in the pathogenesis of renal injury in IDA.

  13. Size dependence of inter- and intra-cluster interactions in core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; McCloy, John S.; Jiang, Weilin; Yao, Qi; Qiang, You

    2012-06-15

    The room temperature magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters (NCs) synthesized by a cluster deposition system have been investigated, and their dependence on mean cluster size has been discussed. In this study, the surface/boundary spins of clusters were not frozen and were thermally activated during the measurements. The inter-cluster interactions between clusters and intra-cluster interactions between the iron core (ferromagnetic) and iron oxide shell (ferrimagnetic) have been investigated by field dependent isothermal remanent magnetization and dc demagnetization measurements at room temperature. The Henkel plot and delta M plot support the existence of dipolar inter-cluster interactions which become stronger with the growth of cluster size. The derivative of the initial magnetization curve implies that smaller clusters require less field and time than the bigger ones to overcome various energy barriers before aligning along the field direction. Coercive field and magnetization are also correlated with the interaction parameters. To compare the room temperature magnetic results, one system was studied at low temperature, where exchange coupling at the interface between the oxide and metallic phases was observed through bias effect and anisotropy enhancement.

  14. Removal of iron and arsenic (III) from drinking water using iron oxide-coated sand and limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Rashmi R.; Umlong, Iohborlang M.; Das, Bodhaditya; Borah, Kusum; Thakur, Ashim J.; Raul, Prasanta K.; Banerjee, Saumen; Singh, Lokendra

    2014-06-01

    A method for removal of iron and arsenic (III) from contaminated water using iron oxide-coated sand and limestone has been developed for drinking water. For the intended use, sand was coated with ferric chloride and used as filtering media. Limestone was added onto the coated sand and the effect of limestone addition on removal efficiency of iron and arsenic was monitored. Both batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the efficiency of coated sand and limestone as filtering media. Maximum removal of iron (99.8 %) was obtained with coated sand at a dose of 5 g/100 ml and by adding 0.2 g/100 ml of limestone at pH 7.3. Arsenic (III) removal efficiency increased with the increased dose of coated sand and was best removed at pH 7.12. The maximum adsorption capacity for arsenic (III) obtained from Langmuir model was found to be 0.075 mg/g and the kinetics data followed pseudo-first order better than pseudo-second order. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis and FT-IR study proved the removal of iron and arsenic. Column experiment showed removal of iron and arsenic (III) to arsenic).

  15. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Delivery of Peptides to the Brain: Reversal of Anxiety during Drug Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinzant, Nathan; Scholl, Jamie L.; Wu, Chia-Ming; Kindle, Trevor; Koodali, Ranjit; Forster, Gina L.

    2017-01-01

    Targeting neuropeptide systems is important for future advancements in treatment of neurological and psychiatric illnesses. However, many of the peptides and their analogs do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) efficiently. Nanoparticles such as iron oxide can cross the BBB, and here we describe a novel method for the conjugation of a peptide antisauvagine-30 (ASV-30) to iron oxide nanoparticles. Previous research has shown that direct infusion of ASV-30 into the brain reduces anxiety-like behavior in animal models via actions on corticotropin releasing factor type 2 (CRF2) receptors. Therefore, we tested whether iron oxide+ASV-30 complexes cross the BBB of rats and then determined whether iron oxide+ASV-30 nanoparticles are localized with CRF2-expressing neurons. Finally we tested the hypothesis that systemic infusion of iron oxide+ASV-30 can reduce anxiety-like behavior. First we describe the synthesis and demonstrate the stability of iron oxide-peptide nanoparticle complexes. Next, nanoparticles (87.7 μg/kg Fe2O3) with or without ASV-30 (200 μg/kg, ip) were injected into male rats 30 min prior to transcardial perfusion and brain fixation for immunohistochemical analysis, or before testing on the elevated plus maze (EPM) in an amphetamine withdrawal model of anxiety. Systemically administered iron oxide+ASV-30 particles were present in the brain and associated with neurons, including those that express CRF2 receptors, but did not localize with the iron storage protein ferritin. Furthermore, systemic administration of ironoxide+ASV-30 reduced amphetamine withdrawal-induced anxiety without affecting locomotion, suggesting that the anxiolytic effects of ASV-30 were preserved and the bioavailability of ASV-30 was sufficient. The findings demonstrate a novel approach to peptide delivery across the BBB and provide insight as to the neural distribution and efficacy of this nanotechnology. PMID:29163012

  16. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Delivery of Peptides to the Brain: Reversal of Anxiety during Drug Withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Vinzant

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Targeting neuropeptide systems is important for future advancements in treatment of neurological and psychiatric illnesses. However, many of the peptides and their analogs do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB efficiently. Nanoparticles such as iron oxide can cross the BBB, and here we describe a novel method for the conjugation of a peptide antisauvagine-30 (ASV-30 to iron oxide nanoparticles. Previous research has shown that direct infusion of ASV-30 into the brain reduces anxiety-like behavior in animal models via actions on corticotropin releasing factor type 2 (CRF2 receptors. Therefore, we tested whether iron oxide+ASV-30 complexes cross the BBB of rats and then determined whether iron oxide+ASV-30 nanoparticles are localized with CRF2-expressing neurons. Finally we tested the hypothesis that systemic infusion of iron oxide+ASV-30 can reduce anxiety-like behavior. First we describe the synthesis and demonstrate the stability of iron oxide-peptide nanoparticle complexes. Next, nanoparticles (87.7 μg/kg Fe2O3 with or without ASV-30 (200 μg/kg, ip were injected into male rats 30 min prior to transcardial perfusion and brain fixation for immunohistochemical analysis, or before testing on the elevated plus maze (EPM in an amphetamine withdrawal model of anxiety. Systemically administered iron oxide+ASV-30 particles were present in the brain and associated with neurons, including those that express CRF2 receptors, but did not localize with the iron storage protein ferritin. Furthermore, systemic administration of ironoxide+ASV-30 reduced amphetamine withdrawal-induced anxiety without affecting locomotion, suggesting that the anxiolytic effects of ASV-30 were preserved and the bioavailability of ASV-30 was sufficient. The findings demonstrate a novel approach to peptide delivery across the BBB and provide insight as to the neural distribution and efficacy of this nanotechnology.

  17. An inorganic geochemical argument for coupled anaerobic oxidation of methane and iron reduction in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedinger, N; Formolo, M J; Lyons, T W; Henkel, S; Beck, A; Kasten, S

    2014-03-01

    Here, we present results from sediments collected in the Argentine Basin, a non-steady state depositional marine system characterized by abundant oxidized iron within methane-rich layers due to sediment reworking followed by rapid deposition. Our comprehensive inorganic data set shows that iron reduction in these sulfate and sulfide-depleted sediments is best explained by a microbially mediated process-implicating anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to iron reduction (Fe-AOM) as the most likely major mechanism. Although important in many modern marine environments, iron-driven AOM may not consume similar amounts of methane compared with sulfate-dependent AOM. Nevertheless, it may have broad impact on the deep biosphere and dominate both iron and methane cycling in sulfate-lean marine settings. Fe-AOM might have been particularly relevant in the Archean ocean, >2.5 billion years ago, known for its production and accumulation of iron oxides (in iron formations) in a biosphere likely replete with methane but low in sulfate. Methane at that time was a critical greenhouse gas capable of sustaining a habitable climate under relatively low solar luminosity, and relationships to iron cycling may have impacted if not dominated methane loss from the biosphere. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effect of Oral Iron on Markers of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Status in Children with Iron Deficiency Anaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Mohammad; Ahmad, Syed Moiz; Islam, Najmul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Conflicting reports are available on the relationship of Iron Deficiency Anaemia (IDA) and iron therapy with oxidative stress. Aim To study the levels of markers of oxidative stress and anti-oxidant status in children with IDA and to assess the effect of iron therapy on the same. Materials and Methods This prospective, single centre, hospital based study was a sub-study of a randomized controlled trial conducted in the Department of Paediatrics, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh in collaboration with the Department of Biochemistry (of the same institution) between October 2009 to February 2011. The sub-study was conducted in two parts: in the first part, levels of a biomarker of oxidative stress {Malondialdehyde (MDA)} and anti-oxidant enzymes {Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), Catalase (CAT), Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx)} were assessed and compared between 67 children with IDA and 31 non-anaemic controls; in the second part, the effect of oral iron (6mg/kg/day) for eight weeks on these markers was studied in a subset of 35 children with IDA. The Bivariate correlations procedure was used to compute pair wise associations for a set of variables. T-tests (Independent samples t-test/Paired sample t-test) and Non-parametric tests (Mann–Whitney test/Wilcoxon signed-rank test) were applied as applicable for normally and non-normally distributed data, respectively. Results Levels of anti-oxidant enzymes were significantly lower (p<0.001) in children with IDA as compared to controls, viz., SOD {median, 8.63 (IQR, 8.60-8.66) vs. 9.46 (IQR, 9.14-9.62) units/mg protein}, CAT {median, 8.49 (IQR, 8.46-8.50) vs. 9.10 (IQR, 9.04-9.14) μmol H2O2/min/mg protein} and GPx {median, 49.19 (IQR, 48.99-49.60) vs. 56.94(IQR, 56.80-57.14) mol NADPH oxidized /min/ mg protein}. Whereas, levels of MDA were significantly higher (p<0.001) in IDA group {median, 1.50 (IQR, 1.48-1.52) vs. 1.24 (IQR, 1.20-1.27) moles/ml of serum}. Levels

  19. Indefinitely stable iron(IV) cage complexes formed in water by air oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomyn, Stefania; Shylin, Sergii I.; Bykov, Dmytro; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Gumienna-Kontecka, Elzbieta; Bon, Volodymyr; Fritsky, Igor O.

    2017-01-01

    In nature, iron, the fourth most abundant element of the Earth's crust, occurs in its stable forms either as the native metal or in its compounds in the +2 or +3 (low-valent) oxidation states. High-valent iron (+4, +5, +6) compounds are not formed spontaneously at ambient conditions, and the ones obtained synthetically appear to be unstable in polar organic solvents, especially aqueous solutions, and this is what limits their studies and use. Here we describe unprecedented iron(IV) hexahydrazide clathrochelate complexes that are assembled in alkaline aqueous media from iron(III) salts, oxalodihydrazide and formaldehyde in the course of a metal-templated reaction accompanied by air oxidation. The complexes can exist indefinitely at ambient conditions without any sign of decomposition in water, nonaqueous solutions and in the solid state. We anticipate that our findings may open a way to aqueous solution and polynuclear high-valent iron chemistry that remains underexplored and presents an important challenge.

  20. Heterogeneous biomimetic catalysis using iron porphyrin for cyclohexane oxidation promoted by chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Guan, E-mail: huangg66@126.com; Liu, Yao; Cai, Jing Li; Chen, Xiang Feng; Zhao, Shu Kai; Guo, Yong An; Wei, Su Juan; Li, Xu

    2017-04-30

    Graphical abstract: A biomimetic catalyst of iron-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin immobilized on powdered chitosan achieves efficient cyclohexane oxidation with high ketone and alcohol yields. - Highlights: • Fe (TPPS)/pd-CTS is an excellent catalyst for cyclohexane oxidation. • Amino ligation alters the electron cloud density around the iron cation. • Amino coordination likely reduces the activation energy of Fe (TPPS). • The catalyst achieved 22.9 mol% yields of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. - Abstract: This study investigates how ligands modulate metalloporphyrin activity with the goal of producing a practical biomimetic catalyst for use in the chemical industry. We immobilized iron porphyrinate [iron-tetrakis-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphyrin; Fe(III) (TPPS)] on powdered chitosan (pd-CTS) to form an immobilized catalyst Fe(III) (TPPS)/pd-CTS, which was characterized using modern spectroscopic techniques and used for catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane with O{sub 2}. Amino coordination to iron porphyrin in Fe(III) (TPPS)/pd-CTS altered the electron cloud density around the iron cation, probably by reducing the activation energy of Fe(III) (TPPS) and raising the reactivity of the iron ion catalytic center, thereby improving the catalytic efficiency. One milligram of Fe(III) (TPPS) catalyst can be reused three times for the oxidation reaction to yield an average of 22.9 mol% of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol.

  1. Oxidation states of iron in the terrestrial planets: Evidence and implications for accretion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguenin, R. L.; Harris, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses of Mars spectra reveal that primary minerals may be more iron rich than average basalts on Earth, and the oxidation state of iron in the pyroxines suggests equally high or higher oxygen fugacities on Mars than Earth. Analysis of Mercury spectra reveal that silicate iron contents are substantially lower than those on Mars. Mercury, however, probably has a substantial iron core. This is consistent with a lower oxidation state of iron on Mercury than on Mars. These findings are consistent with predictions of models of equilibrium condensation and homogeneous accretion. Those models predict that Mercury would have negligible Fe(2+) in silicates (Fe/Fe+Mg approx. 0.5). For Mercury iron should be virtually all metallic, while for Mars the iron would be all oxidized as FeS and silicate. Surface measurements of Fe/Fe+Mg on Venus, Earth, and Mars further support the predicted relative increase in Fe/Fe+Mg ratio (increased oxidation state) with distance from the Sun. The implied high oxygen fugacities on Mars (Fe(3+) in silicates) provide additional consistence with the model predictions.

  2. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  3. Effect of bicarbonate on iron-mediated oxidation of low-density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Hirofumi; Berlett, Barbara S; Chock, P Boon; Stadtman, Earl R

    2005-07-26

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) may play an important role in atherosclerosis. We studied the effects of bicarbonate/CO2 and phosphate buffer systems on metal ion-catalyzed oxidation of LDL to malondialdehyde (MDA) and to protein carbonyl and MetO derivatives. Our results revealed that LDL oxidation in mixtures containing free iron or heme derivatives was much greater in bicarbonate/CO2 compared with phosphate buffer. However, when copper was substituted for iron in these mixtures, the rate of LDL oxidation in both buffers was similar. Iron-catalyzed oxidation of LDL was highly sensitive to inhibition by phosphate. Presence of 0.3-0.5 mM phosphate, characteristic of human serum, led to 30-40% inhibition of LDL oxidation in bicarbonate/CO2 buffer. Iron-catalyzed oxidation of LDL to MDA in phosphate buffer was inhibited by increasing concentrations of albumin (10-200 microM), whereas MDA formation in bicarbonate/CO2 buffer was stimulated by 10-50 microM albumin but inhibited by higher concentrations. However, albumin stimulated the oxidation of LDL proteins to carbonyl derivatives at all concentrations examined in both buffers. Conversion of LDL to MDA in bicarbonate/CO2 buffer was greatly stimulated by ADP, ATP, and EDTA but only when EDTA was added at a concentration equal to that of iron. At higher than stoichiometric concentrations, EDTA prevented oxidation of LDL. Results of these studies suggest that interactions between bicarbonate and iron or heme derivatives leads to complexes with redox potentials that favor the generation of reactive oxygen species and/or to the generation of highly reactive CO2 anion or bicarbonate radical that facilitates LDL oxidation.

  4. Bubble nucleation and migration in a lead–iron hydr(oxide) core–shell nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Kaiyang; Frolov, Timofey; Xin, Huolin L.; Wang, Junling; Asta, Mark; Zheng, Haimei

    2015-01-01

    Iron hydroxide is found in a wide range of contexts ranging from biominerals to steel corrosion, and it can transform to anhydrous oxide via releasing O2 gas and H2O. However, it is not well understood how gases transport through a crystal lattice. Here, we present in situ observation of the nucleation and migration of gas bubbles in iron (hydr)oxide using transmission electron microscopy. We create Pb–FeOOH model core–shell nanoparticles in a liquid cell. Under electron irradiation, iron hydroxide transforms to iron oxide, during which bubbles are generated, and they migrate through the shell to the nanoparticle surface. Geometric phase analysis of the shell lattice shows an inhomogeneous stain field at the bubbles. Our modeling suggests that the elastic interaction between the core and the bubble provides a driving force for bubble migration. PMID:26438864

  5. Cell adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to iron oxide minerals: Effect of different single crystal faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hochella Michael F

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of experiments designed to test the hypothesis that near-surface molecular structure of iron oxide minerals influences adhesion of dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria are presented. These experiments involved the measurement, using atomic force microscopy, of interaction forces generated between Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells and single crystal growth faces of iron oxide minerals. Significantly different adhesive force was measured between cells and the (001 face of hematite, and the (100 and (111 faces of magnetite. A role for electrostatic interactions is apparent. The trend in relative forces of adhesion generated at the mineral surfaces is in agreement with predicted ferric site densities published previously. These results suggest that near-surface structure does indeed influence initial cell attachment to iron oxide surfaces; whether this is mediated via specific cell surface-mineral surface interactions or by more general interfacial phenomena remains untested.

  6. Microbial iron oxidation in the Arctic tundra and its implications for biogeochemical cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, David; Scott, Jarrod J; Benes, Joshua; Bowden, William B

    2015-12-01

    The role that neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria play in the Arctic tundra is unknown. This study surveyed chemosynthetic iron-oxidizing communities at the North Slope of Alaska near Toolik Field Station (TFS) at Toolik Lake (lat 68.63, long -149.60). Microbial iron mats were common in submerged habitats with stationary or slowly flowing water, and their greatest areal extent is in coating plant stems and sediments in wet sedge meadows. Some Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) produce easily recognized sheath or stalk morphotypes that were present and dominant in all the mats we observed. The cool water temperatures (9 to 11°C) and reduced pH (5.0 to 6.6) at all sites kinetically favor microbial iron oxidation. A microbial survey of five sites based on 16S rRNA genes found a predominance of Proteobacteria, with Betaproteobacteria and members of the family Comamonadaceae being the most prevalent operational taxonomic units (OTUs). In relative abundance, clades of lithotrophic FeOB composed 5 to 10% of the communities. OTUs related to cyanobacteria and chloroplasts accounted for 3 to 25% of the communities. Oxygen profiles showed evidence for oxygenic photosynthesis at the surface of some mats, indicating the coexistence of photosynthetic and FeOB populations. The relative abundance of OTUs belonging to putative Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) averaged around 11% in the sampled iron mats. Mats incubated anaerobically with 10 mM acetate rapidly initiated Fe reduction, indicating that active iron cycling is likely. The prevalence of iron mats on the tundra might impact the carbon cycle through lithoautotrophic chemosynthesis, anaerobic respiration of organic carbon coupled to iron reduction, and the suppression of methanogenesis, and it potentially influences phosphorus dynamics through the adsorption of phosphorus to iron oxides. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Sea-urchin-like iron oxide nanostructures for water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Uk, E-mail: leeho@kbsi.re.kr [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soon Chang [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Chul [Department of Biological Engineering, College of Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Vrtnik, Stane; Kim, Changsoo; Lee, SangGap [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Boo; Nam, Bora [Jeonju Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Won [Department of Energy Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Young; Lee, Sang Moon [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jouhahn, E-mail: jouhahn@kbsi.re.kr [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • The u-MFN were synthesized via a ultrasound irradiation and/or calcinations process. • The u-MFN exhibited excellent adsorption capacities. • The u-MFN also displayed excellent adsorption of organic polluent after recycling. • The u-MFN has the potential to be used as an efficient adsorbent material. -- Abstract: To obtain adsorbents with high capacities for removing heavy metals and organic pollutants capable of quick magnetic separation, we fabricated unique sea-urchin-like magnetic iron oxide (mixed γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase) nanostructures (called u-MFN) with large surface areas (94.1 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and strong magnetic properties (57.9 emu g{sup −1}) using a simple growth process and investigated their potential applications in water treatment. The u-MFN had excellent removal capabilities for the heavy metals As(V) (39.6 mg g{sup −1}) and Cr(VI) (35.0 mg g{sup −1}) and the organic pollutant Congo red (109.2 mg g{sup −1}). The u-MFN also displays excellent adsorption of Congo red after recycling. Because of its high adsorption capacity, fast adsorption rate, and quick magnetic separation from treated water, the u-MFN developed in the present study is expected to be an efficient magnetic adsorbent for heavy metals and organic pollutants in aqueous solutions.

  8. Oxalic acid capped iron oxide nanorods as a sensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Bohidar, H B; Solanki, Pratima R

    2015-08-05

    A label free impedimetric immunosensor has been fabricated using protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) functionalized oxalic acid (OA) capped iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanorods for V. cholerae detection. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4, were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, OA-Fe3O4 nanorods were obtained as about 29±1 and 39±1nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of nanorods is found as 116nm (OA-Fe3O4) and 77nm (Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. Cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4 nanorods has been investigated in the presence of human epithelial kidney (HEK) cell line 293 using MTT assay. The cell viability and proliferation studies reveal that the OA-Fe3O4 nanorods facilitate cell growth. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/OA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits good linearity in the range of 12.5-500ng mL(-1) with low detection limit of 0.5ng mL(-1), sensitivity 0.1Ωng(-1)ml(-1)cm(-2) and reproducibility more than 11 times. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Iron oxide nanoparticles with different polymer coatings for photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia; Fan, Lu; Xu, Yanhong; Xia, Jindong

    2017-10-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) have attracted significant attention in view of their potential applications in biomedicine. Surface coatings or modifications are generally needed to improve the colloidal stability of Fe3O4 NPs in a physiological environment. In this study, Fe3O4 NPs in the size range of 12-15 nm coated with polyacrylic acid (PAA), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and polyethyleneimine (PEI) were synthesized through a mild reduction route to investigate their potential for photothermal therapy. The polymer-coated Fe3O4 NPs dispersed well in water and formed stable colloids; the surface charges of the particles were dependent on the nature of the surface coating. The strong absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region enabled the coated Fe3O4 NPs to be used as agents in photothermal therapy. The photothermal conversion efficiency of PEI-coated Fe3O4 NPs (PEI-Fe3O4 NPs) distinctly decreased when exposed to a cell culture medium. In addition, PEI-Fe3O4 NPs showed higher cytotoxicity and enhanced cellular uptake efficiency when compared to PAA-coated Fe3O4 NPs (PAA-Fe3O4 NPs) and PVA-coated Fe3O4 NPs (PVA-Fe3O4 NPs). This study highlights the importance of optimizing the surface properties of Fe3O4 NPs when using them in biomedical applications and provides guidelines for the design and development of functional Fe3O4 NPs for cancer therapy. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Unravelling Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (IONPs) interactions in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demangeat, E.; Pédrot, M.; Dia, A. N.; Cabello-Hurtado, F.; Le Coz-Bouhnik, M.

    2016-12-01

    Either used as nano-carriers in blood, depolluting agents in groundwaters or nanofertilizers in soils engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are prone to a growing interest that explains their multiple uses as well as their increasing industrial production. The very small size of ENPs (having at least one space dimension <100nm) gives rise to some exceptional physicochemical properties that ensue from their high reactivity. In environmental and agricultural fields, where iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are particularly used, this reactivity is directly related to their adsorption capacity, which is of prime interest regarding soil contamination and soil recovery issues. Considering the peculiar role of copper (Cu) in soils, we investigated the specific relationships that exist between IONPs and Cu. Most particularly, this study aims at understanding how pH, Cu concentration and Fe3O4-NPs natural coatings drive Cu adsorption to IONPs. In a primary step, eight nm-sized Fe3O4-NPs were synthesized using a co-precipitation method and thoroughly characterized with TEM, XRD, FT-IR and BET while in a second stage Cu-adsorption tests were conducted through ultrafiltrations (<2kDa) and monitored with ICP-MS analyses. In these experiments, four types of IONPs were investigated regarding their mineralogy and the nature of their coating. They were tested with four copper concentrations (0.01, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.5mM) and five different pH values (3.5; 5; 6; 7 and 8). According to the results, un-adsorbed Cu decreases with increasing pH values and about 100% of Cu is adsorbed to IONPs at high pH values. Although the trend looks repeatable regardless NPs' coating and Cu concentrations, each NP-type may have its typical pHpzc value and the amount of Cu adsorbed to IONPs is also likely to be related to the number of available adsorption sites.

  11. Scalable high-affinity stabilization of magnetic iron oxide nanostructures by a biocompatible antifouling homopolymer

    KAUST Repository

    Luongo, Giovanni

    2017-10-12

    Iron oxide nanostructures have been widely developed for biomedical applications, due to their magnetic properties and biocompatibility. In clinical application, the stabilization of these nanostructures against aggregation and non-specific interactions is typically achieved using weakly anchored polysaccharides, with better-defined and more strongly anchored synthetic polymers not commercially adopted due to complexity of synthesis and use. Here, we show for the first time stabilization and biocompatibilization of iron oxide nanoparticles by a synthetic homopolymer with strong surface anchoring and a history of clinical use in other applications, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethy phosphorylcholine) (poly(MPC)). For the commercially important case of spherical particles, binding of poly(MPC) to iron oxide surfaces and highly effective individualization of magnetite nanoparticles (20 nm) are demonstrated. Next-generation high-aspect ratio nanowires (both magnetite/maghemite and core-shell iron/iron oxide) are furthermore stabilized by poly(MPC)-coating, with nanowire cytotoxicity at large concentrations significantly reduced. The synthesis approach is exploited to incorporate functionality into the poly(MPC) chain is demonstrated by random copolymerization with an alkyne-containing monomer for click-chemistry. Taking these results together, poly(MPC) homopolymers and random copolymers offer a significant improvement over current iron oxide nanoformulations, combining straightforward synthesis, strong surface-anchoring and well-defined molecular weight.

  12. Iron oxide deposits associated with the ectosymbiotic bacteria in the hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbari, L.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A.; Long, G. J.; Grandjean, F.; Zbinden, M.; Gaill, F.; Compère, P.

    2008-04-01

    The Rimicaris exoculata shrimp is considered a primary consumer that dominates the fauna of most Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) hydrothermal ecosystems. These shrimps harbour in their gill chambers an important ectosymbiotic community of chemoautotrophic bacteria associated with iron oxide deposits. The structure and elemental composition of the minerals associated with these bacteria have been investigated by using X-ray microanalyses, light microscopy, and transmission, environmental scanning and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The nature of the iron oxides in shrimps obtained from the Rainbow vent field at 36°14.0' N, has also been determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. This multidisciplinary approach has revealed that the three step-levels of mineral crust found in the Rimicaris exoculata shrimps consist of heavy concretions formed by nanoparticles of two-line ferrihydrite intermixed with minor inorganic SiO2, (Ca,Mg)SO4, and (Ca,Mg)3(PO4)2 minerals that may stabilise the ferrihydrite form of iron oxides. Morphological observations on the bacteria have revealed their close interactions with these minerals and, thus, indicate the biogenic origin of the iron oxide deposits. The evolution of the bacterial density in the three mineral crust levels is related to the amount of the iron deposits and it is proposed that the lower crust level is the most likely region for the location of the iron-oxidizing bacteria.

  13. The effect of oxidant addition on ferrous iron removal from multi-element acidic sulphate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbedzi, Ndishavhelafhi; Ibana, Don; Dyer, Laurence; Browner, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This study was an investigation on the hydrolytic precipitation of iron from simulated pregnant leach solution (PLS) of nickel laterite atmospheric leaching. The effect of equilibrium pH, temperature and the addition of oxidant on total iron (ferrous (Fe (II)) and ferric (Fe (III)), aluminium and chromium removal was investigated together with the associated nickel and cobalt losses to the precipitate. Systematic variations of the experimental variables revealed ≥99% of the ferric iron can be removed from solution at conditions similar to those used in standard partial neutralisation in zinc and nickel production, pH of 2.5 and temperature less than 100 °C with minimal losses (effect on the magnitude of Fe (III) precipitation but led to a significant increase in aluminium removal from 67% to 95% and improved the filterability of the precipitates. There was no ferrous iron precipitation even at a pH of 3.75 in the absence of an oxidant with its removal (98%) achieved by oxidative precipitation with oxygen gas at pH 3.5. Unlike Fe (III) precipitation, the operating temperature significantly affects oxidative precipitation of Fe (II). Hence, in practical application, the hydrolytic precipitation and oxidation to remove iron must be operated at 85 °C to ensure both ferrous and ferric iron are precipitated.

  14. Light Induced Dissolution of Iron Oxides in the Presence of Siderophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, S. M.; Borer, P.; Sulzberger, B. A.

    2003-12-01

    Iron is a micronutrient that is essential for a range of important enzymatic processes in most organisms. Iron deficiency is thought to be limiting the primary productivity in marine `High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll' (HNLC) regions which has a significant effect on global carbon cycling. Important iron sources in HNLC regions are upwelling and atmospheric dust inputs. However, the iron bioavailability from atmospheric dust is limited by the low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of iron bearing minerals. Marine bacteria are known to facilitate weathering reactions by exudation of substances such as low molecular weight organic ligands including siderophores. We investigated if siderophore promoted photoreductive dissolution constitutes an important pathway for increasing the bioavailability of iron oxides. We used the microbial siderophores aerobactin and desferrioxamine-B (DFO-B). Aerobactin and desferrixoamines are excreted by marine and terrestrial bacteria. Aerobactin is a dihydroxamate siderophore containing the potentially photoreactive group alpha-hydroxy carboxylate. DFO-B is a trihydroxamate siderophore which forms soluble iron complexes that are not photoreactive (BARBEAU et al., 2003). Despite the structural differences, both siderophores accelerate iron oxide dissolution in irradiated suspensions compared to dissolution rates in the dark. This suggests that both siderophores are not involved in a light induced ligand to metal charge transfer reaction, but rather accelerate other photreductive dissolution mechanisms. Similarly it was observed that both ligands accelerate light induced dissolution of iron oxides in the presence of oxalate as a chromophore. The observations suggest that light induced dissolution of iron oxides in the presence of siderophores is an important pathway for bacterial iron acquisition. However, the formation of Fe(II) by this mechanism may also lead to an increase of the availability of iron to phytoplankton that generally

  15. Ecology of neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria in wetland soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Wetland ecosystems are important as sites of rapid biogeochemical cycling of bioactive elements, among which iron features prominently. The redox cycling of iron exerts a strong influence on soil chemistry and the metabolism of plants and microorganisms. Studies have shown that bacteria play an

  16. How Geochemistry Provides Habitability: A Case Study of Iron Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Clair, B.; Shock, E.

    2016-12-01

    Two things have to be true for chemotrophic microbes to gain chemical energy from their environment. First, there must be a source of energy, provided by compounds in differing oxidation states that are out of thermodynamic equilibrium with one another. Second, there must be mechanistic difficulties that are keeping those compounds from reacting, preventing chemical energy from dissipating on its own. Using this energetic reference frame, geochemical habitability requires the combined presence of energy sources and kinetic barriers, which are determined by numerous variables including temperature, pH, and concentrations of reactants and products. Here we present habitable geochemical space visually as habitability diagrams. As an example, the pH and temperature ranges that can sustain life for a specific reaction can be delineated by the aforementioned kinetic and energetic boundaries, together with commonly attainable pH / temperatures of environments at Earth's surface. Other habitability diagrams can be constructed for any combination of relevant geochemical variables to better illustrate the inherently multidimensional problem. We have chosen iron oxidation reactions to illustrate this point, as kinetic and energetic boundaries can be found at conditions readily attainable in natural systems. By calculating energy availability (as affinity, A) in each system from compositional data where concentrations of all reactants and products are known, the energy boundary is defined by A=0. Evaluating the kinetic boundary means measuring the relative rates of the biotic and abiotic processes in situ, which we have done in Yellowstone hot springs, acid mine drainage in Arizona, and cold springs in the Swiss Alps. Many experiments have yielded biological rates, and all have yielded abiotic rates, which range from inconsequential to rates too rapid for biology to compete. These results encompass both sides of the kinetic boundary, defining its trajectory. When plotted in p

  17. Water oxidation catalysis with nonheme iron complexes under acidic and basic conditions: homogeneous or heterogeneous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Dachao; Mandal, Sukanta; Yamada, Yusuke; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Llobet, Antoni; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-08-19

    Thermal water oxidation by cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) was catalyzed by nonheme iron complexes, such as Fe(BQEN)(OTf)2 (1) and Fe(BQCN)(OTf)2 (2) (BQEN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)ethane-1,2-diamine, BQCN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)cyclohexanediamine, OTf = CF3SO3(-)) in a nonbuffered aqueous solution; turnover numbers of 80 ± 10 and 20 ± 5 were obtained in the O2 evolution reaction by 1 and 2, respectively. The ligand dissociation of the iron complexes was observed under acidic conditions, and the dissociated ligands were oxidized by CAN to yield CO2. We also observed that 1 was converted to an iron(IV)-oxo complex during the water oxidation in competition with the ligand oxidation. In addition, oxygen exchange between the iron(IV)-oxo complex and H2(18)O was found to occur at a much faster rate than the oxygen evolution. These results indicate that the iron complexes act as the true homogeneous catalyst for water oxidation by CAN at low pHs. In contrast, light-driven water oxidation using [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) as a photosensitizer and S2O8(2-) as a sacrificial electron acceptor was catalyzed by iron hydroxide nanoparticles derived from the iron complexes under basic conditions as the result of the ligand dissociation. In a buffer solution (initial pH 9.0) formation of the iron hydroxide nanoparticles with a size of around 100 nm at the end of the reaction was monitored by dynamic light scattering (DLS) in situ and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements. We thus conclude that the water oxidation by CAN was catalyzed by short-lived homogeneous iron complexes under acidic conditions, whereas iron hydroxide nanoparticles derived from iron complexes act as a heterogeneous catalyst in the light-driven water oxidation reaction under basic conditions.

  18. Chitosan-iron oxide nanocomposite based electrochemical aptasensor for determination of malathion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakar, Nirmal, E-mail: nirmalprabhakar@gmail.com; Thakur, Himkusha; Bharti, Anu; Kaur, Navpreet

    2016-10-05

    An electrochemical aptasensor based on chitosan-iron oxide nanocomposite (CHIT-IO) film deposited on fluorine tin Oxide (FTO) was developed for the detection of malathion. Iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation method and characterized by Transmission electron microscopy and UV–Visible spectroscopy. The biotinylated DNA aptamer sequence specific to the malathion was immobilized onto the iron oxide doped-chitosan/FTO electrode by using streptavidin as linking molecule. Various characterization studies like Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), and Electrochemical studies were performed to attest the successful fabrication of bioelectrodes. Experimental parameters like aptamer concentration, response time, stability of electrode and reusability studies were optimized. Aptamer immobilized chitosan-iron oxide nanocomposite (APT/SA/CHIT-IO/FTO) bioelectrodes exhibited LOD of about 0.001 ng/mL within 15 min and spike-in studies revealed about 80–92% recovery of malathion from the lettuce leaves and soil sample. - Highlights: • An electrochemical aptasensor for the detection of Malathion has been developed. • Chitosan-iron oxide NP deposited FTO sheets provides platform for aptamer immobilization. • Aptasensor has efficiency to detect malathion upto 0.001 ng/mL within 15 min.

  19. Cadmium removal from aqueous solution by green synthesis iron oxide nanoparticles with tangerine peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrampoush, Mohammad Hassan; Miria, Mohammad; Salmani, Mohammad Hossien; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption process by metal oxide nanoparticles has been investigated an effective agent for removing organic and inorganic contaminants from water and wastewater. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized in the presence of tangerine peel extract as adsorbent for cadmium ions removal from contaminated solution. Iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by co-precipitation method and tangerine peel extract was used to prevent accumulation and reduce the diameter of the particles. Effect of various parameters such as contact time, pH, metal concentration and adsorbent dosage was determined on the removal efficiency. The different concentrations of tangerine peel had an impact on the size of nanoparticles. As, increasing the concentration of tangerine peel extract from 2 to 6 % the average size of synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles decreased 200 nm to 50 nm. The maximum removal of cadmium ions (90 %) occurred at pH of 4 and adsorbent dose of 0.4 g/100 ml. Adsorption of cadmium ions by synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles followed Freundlich adsorption model and pseudo-second-order equation. The cadmium ions are usually soluble in acidic pH and the maximum removal of cadmium by green synthesis iron oxide nanoparticles was obtained in the pH of 4, so these nanoparticles can be a good adsorbent for the removal of cadmium from wastewater.

  20. Discovery of Fe7O9: a new iron oxide with a complex monoclinic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Bykova, Elena; Ovsyannikov, Sergey V.; McCammon, Catherine; Kupenko, Ilya; Ismailova, Leyla; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    Iron oxides are fundamentally important compounds for basic and applied sciences as well as in numerous industrial applications. In this work we report the synthesis and investigation of a new binary iron oxide with the hitherto unknown stoichiometry of Fe7O9. This new oxide was synthesized at high-pressure high-temperature (HP-HT) conditions, and its black single crystals were successfully recovered at ambient conditions. By means of single crystal X-ray diffraction we determined that Fe7O9 adopts a monoclinic C2/m lattice with the most distorted crystal structure among the binary iron oxides known to date. The synthesis of Fe7O9 opens a new portal to exotic iron-rich (M,Fe)7O9 oxides with unusual stoichiometry and distorted crystal structures. Moreover, the crystal structure and phase relations of such new iron oxide groups may provide new insight into the cycling of volatiles in the Earth’s interior.

  1. Non-heme iron catalysts for the benzylic oxidation : a parallel ligand screening approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopstra, M; Hage, R; Kellogg, R.M.; Feringa, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    Ethylbenzene and 4-ethylanisole were used as model substrates for benzylic oxidation with H2O2 or O-2 using a range of non-heme iron catalysts following a parallel ligand screening approach. Effective oxidation was found for Fe complexes based on tetra- and pentadentate nitrogen ligands affording

  2. Assessment of the extent of oxidative stress induced by intravenous ferumoxytol, ferric carboxymaltose, iron sucrose and iron dextran in a nonclinical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toblli, Jorge E; Cao, Gabriel; Oliveri, Leda; Angerosa, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Intravenous (i.v.) iron is associated with a risk of oxidative stress. The effects of ferumoxytol, a recently approved i.v. iron preparation, were compared with those of ferric carboxymaltose, low molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose in the liver, kidneys and heart of normal rats. In contrast to iron sucrose and ferric carboxymaltose, low molecular weight iron dextran and ferumoxytol caused renal and hepatic damage as demonstrated by proteinuria and increased liver enzyme levels. Higher levels of oxidative stress in these tissues were also indicated, by significantly higher levels of malondialdehyde, significantly increased antioxidant enzyme activities, and a significant reduction in the reduced to oxidized glutathione ratio. Inflammatory markers were also significantly higher with ferumoxytol and low molecular weight iron dextran rats than iron sucrose and ferric carboxymaltose. Polarographic analysis suggested that ferumoxytol contains a component with a more positive reduction potential, which may facilitate iron-catalyzed formation of reactive oxygen species and thus be responsible for the observed effects. Only low molecular weight iron dextran induced oxidative stress and inflammation in the heart.

  3. Spectral reflectance properties (0.4-2.5 um) of secondary Fe-oxide, Fe-hydroxide, and Fe-sulfate-hydrate minerals associated with sulfide-bearing mine waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, J.K.; Williams, D.E.; Hammarstrom1, J.M.; Piatak, N.; Mars, J.C.; Chou, I-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Fifteen Fe-oxide, Fe-hydroxide, and Fe-sulphate-hydrate mineral species commonly associated with sulphide bearing mine wastes were characterized by using X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscope methods. Diffuse reflectance spectra of the samples show diagnostic absorption features related to electronic processes involving ferric and/or ferrous iron, and to vibrational processes involving water and hydroxyl ions. Such spectral features enable field and remote sensing based studies of the mineral distributions. Because secondary minerals are sensitive indicators of pH, Eh, relative humidity, and other environmental conditions, spectral mapping of these minerals promises to have important applications to mine waste remediation studies. This report releases digital (ascii) spectra (spectral_data_files.zip) of the fifteen mineral samples to facilitate usage of the data with spectral libraries and spectral analysis software. The spectral data are provided in a two-column format listing wavelength (in micrometers) and reflectance, respectively.

  4. Iron is a signal for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia biofilm formation, oxidative stress response, OMPs expression and virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Adrian Garcia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen. In many bacteria iron availability regulates, trough the Fur system, not only iron homeostasis but also virulence. The aim of this work was to assess the role of iron on S. maltophilia biofilm formation, EPS production, oxidative stress response, OMPs regulation, quorum sensing (QS, and virulence. Studies were done on K279 and its isogenic fur mutant F60 cultured in the presence or absence of dipyridyl. This is the first report of spontaneous fur mutants obtained in S. maltophilia. F60 produced higher amounts of biofilms than K279a and CLSM analysis demonstrated improved adherence and biofilm organization. Under iron restricted conditions, K279a produced biofilms with more biomass and enhanced thickness. In addition, F60 produced higher amounts of EPS than K279a but with a similar composition, as revealed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. With respect to the oxidative stress response, MnSOD was the only SOD isoenzyme detected in K279a. F60 presented higher SOD activity than the wt strain in planktonic and biofilm cultures, and iron deprivation increased K279a SOD activity. Under iron starvation, SDS-PAGE profile from K279a presented two iron-repressed proteins. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed homology with FepA and another putative TonB-dependent siderophore receptor of K279a. In silico analysis allowed the detection of potential Fur boxes in the respective coding genes. K279a encodes the QS diffusible signal factor (DSF. Under iron restriction K279a produced higher amounts of DSF than under iron rich condition. Finally, F60 was more virulent than K279a in the Galleria mellonella killing assay. These results put in evidence that iron levels regulate, likely through the Fur system, S. maltophilia biofilm formation, oxidative stress response, OMPs expression, DSF production and virulence.

  5. Role of manganese in protection against oxidative stress under iron starvation in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Verma, Ekta; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2015-06-01

    The cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was grown in presence and absence of iron to decipher the role of manganese in protection against the oxidative stress under iron starvation and growth, manganese uptake kinetics, antioxidative enzymes, lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, thiol content, total peroxide, proline and NADH content was investigated. Manganese supported the growth of cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 under iron deprived conditions where maximum uptake rate of manganese was observed with lower K(m) and higher V(max) values. Antioxidative enzymes were also found to be elevated in iron-starved conditions. Estimation of lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage depicted the role of manganese in stabilizing the integrity of the membrane which was considered as the prime target of oxygen free radicals in oxidative stress. The levels of total peroxide, thiol, proline and NADH content, which are the representative of oxidative stress response in Anabaena 7120, were also showed increasing trends in iron starvation. Hence, the results discerned, clearly suggested the role of manganese in protection against the oxidative stress in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 under iron starvation either due to its antioxidative properties or involvement as cofactor in a number of antioxidative enzymes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beam, Jake; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, Mark; Jennings, Ryan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Inskeep, William P.

    2016-02-15

    Iron oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous geobiological features on Earth and occur in extant acidic hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA, and form as a result of microbial processes. The relative contribution of different organisms to the development of these mat ecosystems is of specific interest. We hypothesized that chemolithoautotrophic organisms contribute to the early development and production of Fe(III)-oxide mats, which could support later-colonizing heterotrophic microorganisms. Sterile glass slides were incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP, and spatiotemporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and abundance of relevant community members were measured. Lithoautotrophic Hydrogenobaculum spp. were first colonizers and the most abundant taxa identified during early successional stages (7 – 40 days). Populations of M. yellowstonensis colonized after ~ 7 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized after 30 days, and emerge as the dominant functional guild in mature iron oxide mats (1 – 2 cm thick) that form after 70 – 120 days. First-order rate constants of iron oxide accretion ranged from 0.05 – 0.046 day-1, and reflected the absolute amount of iron accreted. Micro- and macroscale microterracettes were identified during iron oxide mat development, and suggest that the mass transfer of oxygen limits microbial growth. This was also demonstrated using microelectrode measurements of oxygen as a function of mat depth, which showed steep gradients in oxygen from the aqueous mat interface to ~ 1 mm. The formation and succession of amorphous Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a predictable pattern of distinct stages and growth. The successional stages and microbial signatures observed in these extant Fe(III)-oxide mat communities may be relevant to other past or present Fe(III)-oxide mineralizing systems.

  7. Exploring an alternative aqueous lubrication concept for biomedical applications: Hydration lubrication based on O/W emulsions combined with graphene oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, J.; Zeng, Xiangqiong; Ren, Tianhui; van der Heide, Emile

    2015-01-01

    Water-based lubrication concepts are of high interest for applications that require friction and wear control in a bio-medical environment. In this work, a concept of aqueous lubrication is presented based on hydration of surface active polymers combined with graphene oxide. Three different kinds of

  8. Iron and manganese oxide mineralization in the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J. R.; Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Manheim, F. T.; Bau, M.; Jung-Keuk, Kang; Lubick, N.

    1997-01-01

    Iron, manganese, and iron-manganese deposits occur in nearly all geomorphologic and tectonic environments in the ocean basins and form by one or more of four processes: (1) hydrogenetic precipitation from cold ambient seawater, (2) precipitation from hydrothermal fluids, (3) precipitation from sediment pore waters that have been modified from bottom water compositions by diagenetic reactions in the sediment column and (4) replacement of rocks and sediment. These processes are discussed.

  9. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dendritic polyglycerols as selective MRI contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmeyer, Daniel; Stumpf, Patrick; Gröger, Dominic; Hofmann, Andreas; Enders, Sven; Riese, Sebastian B.; Dernedde, Jens; Taupitz, Matthias; Rauch, Ursula; Haag, Rainer; Rühl, Eckart; Graf, Christina

    2014-07-01

    Monodisperse small iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) or dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) are prepared. They are highly stable in aqueous solutions as well as physiological media. In particular, oleic acid capped iron oxide particles (core diameter = 11 +/- 1 nm) were modified by a ligand exchange process in a one pot synthesis with dPG and dPGS bearing phosphonate as anchor groups. Dynamic light scattering measurements performed in water and different biological media demonstrate that the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles is only slightly increased by the ligand exchange process resulting in a final diameter of less than 30 nm and that the particles are stable in these media. It is also revealed by magnetic resonance studies that their magnetic relaxivity is reduced by the surface modification but it is still sufficient for high contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Additionally, incubation of dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles with human umbilical vein endothelial cells showed a 50% survival at 85 nM (concentration of nanoparticles). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies demonstrate that the dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles inhibit L-selectin ligand binding whereas the particles containing only dPG do not show this effect. Experiments in a flow chamber with human myelogenous leukemia cells confirmed L-selectin inhibition of the dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and with that the L-selectin mediated leukocyte adhesion. These results indicate that dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles are a promising contrast agent for inflamed tissue probed by MRI.Monodisperse small iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) or dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) are prepared. They are highly stable in aqueous solutions as well as physiological media. In particular, oleic acid capped iron oxide particles (core diameter = 11 +/- 1 nm) were modified by a

  10. Mechanistic elucidation of C-H oxidation by electron rich non-heme iron(IV)-oxo at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Sujoy; Dey, Aniruddha; Maiti, Debabrata

    2015-10-04

    Non-heme iron(IV)-oxo species form iron(III) intermediates during hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) from the C-H bond. While synthesizing a room temperature stable, electron rich, non-heme iron(IV)-oxo compound, we obtained iron(III)-hydroxide, iron(III)-alkoxide and hydroxylated-substrate-bound iron(II) as the detectable intermediates. The present study revealed that a radical rebound pathway was operative for benzylic C-H oxidation of ethylbenzene and cumene. A dissociative pathway for cyclohexane oxidation was established based on UV-vis and radical trap experiments. Interestingly, experimental evidence including O-18 labeling and mechanistic study suggested an electron transfer mechanism to be operative during C-H oxidation of alcohols (e.g. benzyl alcohol and cyclobutanol). The present report, therefore, unveils non-heme iron(IV)-oxo promoted substrate-dependent C-H oxidation pathways which are of synthetic as well as biological significance.

  11. Ceruloplasmin Oxidation, a Feature of Parkinson's Disease CSF, Inhibits Ferroxidase Activity and Promotes Cellular Iron Retention

    KAUST Repository

    Olivieri, S.

    2011-12-14

    Parkinson\\'s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by oxidative stress and CNS iron deposition. Ceruloplasmin is an extracellular ferroxidase that regulates cellular iron loading and export, and hence protects tissues from oxidative damage. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis, we investigated ceruloplasmin patterns in the CSF of human Parkinson\\'s disease patients. Parkinson\\'s disease ceruloplasmin profiles proved more acidic than those found in healthy controls and in other human neurological diseases (peripheral neuropathies, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer\\'s disease); degrees of acidity correlated with patients\\' pathological grading. Applying an unsupervised pattern recognition procedure to the two-dimensional electrophoresis images, we identified representative pathological clusters. In vitro oxidation of CSF in two-dimensional electrophoresis generated a ceruloplasmin shift resembling that observed in Parkinson\\'s disease and co-occurred with an increase in protein carbonylation. Likewise, increased protein carbonylation was observed in Parkinson\\'s disease CSF, and the same modification was directly identified in these samples on ceruloplasmin. These results indicate that ceruloplasmin oxidation contributes to pattern modification in Parkinson\\'s disease. From the functional point of view, ceruloplasmin oxidation caused a decrease in ferroxidase activity, which in turn promotes intracellular iron retention in neuronal cell lines as well as in primary neurons, which are more sensitive to iron accumulation. Accordingly, the presence of oxidized ceruloplasmin in Parkinson\\'s disease CSF might be used as a marker for oxidative damage and might provide new insights into the underlying pathological mechanisms.

  12. Suppressing iron oxide nanoparticle toxicity by vascular targeted antioxidant polymer nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, David B; Wattamwar, Paritosh P; Wydra, Robert; Hilt, J Zach; Anderson, Kimberly W; Eitel, Richard E; Dziubla, Thomas D

    2013-12-01

    The biomedical use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles has been of continued interest in the literature and clinic. Their ability to be used as contrast agents for imaging and/or responsive agents for remote actuation makes them exciting materials for a wide range of clinical applications. Recently, however, concern has arisen regarding the potential health effects of these particles. Iron oxide toxicity has been demonstrated in in vivo and in vitro models, with oxidative stress being implicated as playing a key role in this pathology. One of the key cell types implicated in this injury is the vascular endothelial cells. Here, we report on the development of a targeted polymeric antioxidant, poly(trolox ester), nanoparticle that can suppress oxidative damage. As the polymer undergoes enzymatic hydrolysis, active trolox is locally released, providing a long term protection against pro-oxidant agents. In this work, poly(trolox) nanoparticles are targeted to platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecules (PECAM-1), which are able to bind to and internalize in endothelial cells and provide localized protection against the cytotoxicity caused by iron oxide nanoparticles. These results indicate the potential of using poly(trolox ester) as a means of mitigating iron oxide toxicity, potentially expanding the clinical use and relevance of these exciting systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Novel Synthesis Method of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate Based on the Calcium Oxide/Polyethylene Glycol Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a novel method to prepare porous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH based on the calcium oxide/polyethylene glycol (CaO/PEG2000 composites as the calcium materials. The porosity formation mechanism was revealed via X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. The reactivity of silica materials (SiO2 enhanced by increasing pH value. Ca2+ could not sustain release from CaO/PEG2000 and reacted with caused by silica to form CSH until the hydrothermal temperature reached to 170°C, avoiding the hardly dissolved intermediates formation efficiently. The as-prepared CSH, due to the large specific surface areas, exhibited excellent release capability of Ca2+ and OH−. This porous CSH has potential application in reducing the negative environmental effects of continual natural phosphate resource depletion.

  14. Preparation, characterization and dynamical mechanical properties of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (DIONPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Hatice Kaplan; Kavlak, Serap; ParviziKhosroshahi, Shahed; Güner, Ali

    2017-04-20

    Dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (DIONPs) with appropriate surface chemistry exhibit many interesting properties that can be exploited in a variety of biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement, tissue repair, hyperthermia, drug delivery and in cell separation. This paper reports the experimental detail for preparation, characterization and investigation of thermal and dynamical mechanical characteristics of the dextran-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles. In our work, DIONPs were prepared in a 1:2 ratio of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salt in the HCl solution with NaOH at given temperature. The obtained dextran-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles structure-property correlation was characterized by spectroscopic methods; attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and XRD. Coating dextran on the iron-oxide proof of important peaks can be seen from the ATR-FTIR. Dramatic crystallinity increment can be observed from the XRD pattern of the iron-oxide dextran nanoparticles. The thermal analysis was examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Dynamical mechanical properties of dextran nanoparticles were analysed by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Thermal stability of the iron oxide dextran nanoparticles is higher than that of the dextran.

  15. Adsorption of Cadmium Ions from Water on Double-walled Carbon Nanotubes/Iron Oxide Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima Seffah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A new material (DWCNT/iron oxide for heavy metals removal was developed by combining the adsorption features of double-walled carbon nanotubes with the magnetic properties of iron oxides. Batch experiments were applied in order to evaluate adsorption capacity of the DWCNT/iron oxide composite for cadmium ions. The influence of operating parameters such as pH value, amount of adsorbent, initial adsorbate concentration and agitation speed was studied. The adsorption capacity of the DWCNT/iron oxide adsorbent for Cd2+ ions was 20.8 mg g-1, which is at the state of the art. The obtained results revealed that DWCNT/iron oxide composite is a very promising adsorbent for removal of Cd2+ ions from water under natural conditions. The advantage of the magnetic composite is that it can be used as adsorbent for contaminants in water and can be subsequently controlled and removed from the medium by a simple magnetic process.

  16. Doxorubicin loaded PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayal, S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ramanujan, R.V., E-mail: ramanujan@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2010-04-06

    Magnetic drug targeting is a drug delivery system that can be used in locoregional cancer treatment. Coated magnetic particles, called carriers, are very useful for delivering chemotherapeutic drugs. Magnetic carriers were synthesized by coprecipitation of iron oxide followed by coating with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, TEM, TGA, FTIR and VSM techniques. The magnetic core of the carriers was magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), with average size of 10 nm. The room temperature VSM measurements showed that magnetic particles were superparamagnetic. The amount of PVA bound to the iron oxide nanoparticles were estimated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the attachment of PVA to the iron oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR analysis. Doxorubicin (DOX) drug loading and release profiles of PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles showed that up to 45% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h, the drug release followed the Fickian diffusion-controlled process. The binding of DOX to the PVA was confirmed by FTIR analysis. The present findings show that DOX loaded PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery.

  17. Recycling of a spent iron based catalyst for the complete oxidation of toluene: effect of palladium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Chai; Nah, Jae Woon

    2015-01-01

    Complete oxidation of volatile organic compound (toluene) was carried out to assess the property and activity of the palladium-spent iron based catalyst. The properties of the prepared catalysts were characterized by using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and by conducting temperature-programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field emission transmission electron microscopy. The addition of palladium to the spent iron based catalyst pretreated with oxalic acid shifted the conversion curve for the total oxidation of toluene to lower temperature. An increase in the toluene conversion due to palladium was highly related to the easier lattice oxygen mobility of the catalysts. Instrumental analysis suggested the presence of a strong interaction between palladium and iron oxide species. Moreover, in the case of reducing the Pd/Fe catalyst with hydrogen, palladium accelerated the reducing iron oxides, subsequently decreasing the toluene conversion. As a result, the oxidation states of palladium and iron had an important effect on the catalytic activity.

  18. Removal of fluoride from water using iron oxide-hydroxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raul, Prasanta Kumar; Devi, Rashmi Rekha; Umlong, Iohborlang M; Banerjee, Saumen; Singh, Lokendra; Purkait, Mihir

    2012-05-01

    A novel and facile method for the synthesis of uniform stoichiometric powder form of non-magnetic iron oxide-hydroxide nanoparticles with spherical morphology and its application for defluoridation of drinking water is reported. X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD), BET surface area, FTIR, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images were used to characterize nanoscale iron oxide-hydroxide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image revealed the formation of iron oxide-hydroxide nanoparticles with spherical morphology. The iron oxide-hydroxide nanoparticles showed an excellent ability to remove fluoride (F-) from contaminated water over a wide range of pH. The influences of temperature, stirring speed, pH, adsorbent dose and contact time were studied. The equilibrium data were tested with various isotherm models and finally, a calculation procedure was reported for the calculation of adsorbent requirement. The fluoride adsorbed nanoparticles was regenerated upto 70% using sodium hydroxide or hydrochloric acid solution. The iron oxide-hydroxide nanoparticles can be used as an effective and replicable adsorbent media for defluoridation of water in presence of competing anions like chloride, iodate, iodide and sulphate.

  19. Biomedical microdevices synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles using a microfluidic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Bin; Weng, Chen-Hsun; Cheng, Fong-Yu; Yeh, Chen-Sheng; Lei, Huan-Yao; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2009-02-01

    The preparation of nanoparticles is essential in the application of many nanotechnologies and various preparation methods have been explored in the previous decades. Among them, iron oxide nanoparticles have been widely investigated in applications ranging from bio-imaging to bio-sensing due to their unique magnetic properties. Recently, microfluidic systems have been utilized for synthesis of nanoparticles, which have the advantages of automation, well-controlled reactions, and a high particle uniformity. In this study, a new microfluidic system capable of mixing, transporting and reacting was developed for the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles. It allowed for a rapid and efficient approach to accelerate and automate the synthesis of the iron oxide nanoparticles as compared with traditional methods. The microfluidic system uses micro-electro-mechanical-system technologies to integrate a new double-loop micromixer, two micropumps, and a microvalve on a single chip. When compared with large-scale synthesis systems with commonly-observed particle aggregation issues, successful synthesis of dispersed and uniform iron oxide nanoparticles has been observed within a shorter period of time (15 min). It was found that the size distribution of these iron oxide nanoparticles is superior to that of the large-scale systems without requiring any extra additives or heating. The size distribution had a variation of 16%. This is much lower than a comparable large-scale system (34%). The development of this microfluidic system is promising for the synthesis of nanoparticles for many future biomedical applications.

  20. Magnetic and gravity gradiometry framework for Mesoproterozoic iron oxide-apatite and iron oxide-copper-gold deposits, southeast Missouri, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Phillips, Jeffrey; Driscoll, Rhonda L.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution airborne magnetic and gravity gradiometry data provide the geophysical framework for evaluating the exploration potential of hidden iron oxide deposits in Mesoproterozoic basement rocks of southeast Missouri. The data are used to calculate mineral prospectivity for iron oxide-apatite (IOA) ± rare earth element (REE) and iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits. Results delineate the geophysical footprints of all known iron oxide deposits and reveal several previously unrecognized prospective areas. The airborne data are also inverted to three-dimensional density and magnetic susceptibility models over four concealed deposits at Pea Ridge (IOA ± REE), Boss (IOCG), Kratz Spring (IOA), and Bourbon (IOCG). The Pea Ridge susceptibility model shows a magnetic source that is vertically extensive and traceable to a depth of greater than 2 km. A smaller density source, located within the shallow Precambrian basement, is partly coincident with the magnetic source at Pea Ridge. In contrast, the Boss models show a large (625-m-wide), vertically extensive, and coincident dense and magnetic stock with shallower adjacent lobes that extend more than 2,600 m across the shallow Precambrian paleosurface. The Kratz Spring deposit appears to be a smaller volume of iron oxides and is characterized by lower density and less magnetic rock compared to the other iron deposits. A prospective area identified south of the Kratz Spring deposit shows the largest volume of coincident dense and nonmagnetic rock in the subsurface, and is interpreted as prospective for a hematite-dominant lithology that extends from the top of the Precambrian to depths exceeding 2 km. The Bourbon deposit displays a large bowl-shaped volume of coincident high density and high-magnetic susceptibility rock, and a geometry that suggests the iron mineralization is vertically restricted to the upper parts of the Precambrian basement. In order to underpin the evaluation of the prospectivity and three

  1. Biomarkers of oxidative stress for in vivo assessment of toxicological effects of iron oxide nanoparticles

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    Utkarsh A. Reddy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3-IONPs have revolutionized the industry by significant economic and scientific impacts. Enormous increase in the usage of IONPs has raised concerns about their unseen adverse effects. In the current study, we investigated the effects of IONPs and its bulk on oxidative stress biomarkers, histopathology and biodistribution in rats after 28 days repeated oral treatment at 30, 300 and 1000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.. IONPs size in dry, wet forms and crystallinity was determined using TEM, DLS and XRD. The investigation of oxidative stress biomarkers demonstrated significant increase in lipid peroxidation and decrease in reduced glutathione content in the liver, kidney and the brain of the treated groups in a dose dependant manner. Further, antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione S transferase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities were significantly elevated along with significant decrease in superoxide dismutase activity in treated rat organs. ICP-OES analysis revealed dose and size dependant accumulation of IONPs in the liver followed by kidney and the brain than bulk. Moreover, accumulation of IONPs at high dose brought pathological changes only in liver. A large fraction of IONPs was eliminated in urine. Bulk material was substantially excreted in faeces than IONPs suggesting increased absorption of IONPs. In conclusion accumulated IONPs and bulk in organs trigger free radical generation, leading to the induction of oxidative stress condition in rats. The results obtained highlight the importance of toxicity assessments in evaluating the efficiency of IONPs for the safe implementation for diversified applications.

  2. Tuning reactivity and mechanism in oxidation reactions by mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complexes.

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    Nam, Wonwoo; Lee, Yong-Min; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2014-04-15

    Mononuclear nonheme iron enzymes generate high-valent iron(IV)-oxo intermediates that effect metabolically important oxidative transformations in the catalytic cycle of dioxygen activation. In 2003, researchers first spectroscopically characterized a mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo intermediate in the reaction of taurine: α-ketogultarate dioxygenase (TauD). This nonheme iron enzyme with an iron active center was coordinated to a 2-His-1- carboxylate facial triad motif. In the same year, researchers obtained the first crystal structure of a mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complex bearing a macrocyclic supporting ligand, [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) (TMC = 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecene), in studies that mimicked the biological enzymes. With these breakthrough results, many other studies have examined mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo intermediates trapped in enzymatic reactions or synthesized in biomimetic reactions. Over the past decade, researchers in the fields of biological, bioinorganic, and oxidation chemistry have extensively investigated the structure, spectroscopy, and reactivity of nonheme iron(IV)-oxo species, leading to a wealth of information from these enzymatic and biomimetic studies. This Account summarizes the reactivity and mechanisms of synthetic mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complexes in oxidation reactions and examines factors that modulate their reactivities and change their reaction mechanisms. We focus on several reactions including the oxidation of organic and inorganic compounds, electron transfer, and oxygen atom exchange with water by synthetic mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complexes. In addition, we recently observed that the C-H bond activation by nonheme iron(IV)-oxo and other nonheme metal(IV)-oxo complexes does not follow the H-atom abstraction/oxygen-rebound mechanism, which has been well-established in heme systems. The structural and electronic effects of supporting ligands on the oxidizing power of iron

  3. Deposition of Biogenic Iron Minerals in a Methane Oxidizing Microbial Mat

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    Christoph Wrede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The syntrophic community between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria forms thick, black layers within multi-layered microbial mats in chimney-like carbonate concretions of methane seeps located in the Black Sea Crimean shelf. The microbial consortium conducts anaerobic oxidation of methane, which leads to the formation of mainly two biomineral by-products, calcium carbonates and iron sulfides, building up these chimneys. Iron sulfides are generated by the microbial reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds in the microbial mats. Here we show that sulfate reducing bacteria deposit biogenic iron sulfides extra- and intracellularly, the latter in magnetosome-like chains. These chains appear to be stable after cell lysis and tend to attach to cell debris within the microbial mat. The particles may be important nuclei for larger iron sulfide mineral aggregates.

  4. Microwave-Assisted Combustion Synthesis of Nano Iron Oxide/Iron-Coated Activated Carbon, Anthracite, Cellulose Fiber, and Silica, with Arsenic Adsorption Studies

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    Mallikarjuna N. Nadagouda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was completed within a few minutes. The method used no additional fuel and nitrate, which is present in the precursor itself, to drive the reaction. The obtained samples were then characterized with X-ray mapping, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS, selected area diffraction pattern (SAED, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectroscopy. The size of the iron oxide/iron nanoparticle-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica samples were found to be in the nano range (50–400 nm. The iron oxide/iron nanoparticles mostly crystallized into cubic symmetry which was confirmed by SAED. The XRD pattern indicated that iron oxide/iron nano particles existed in four major phases. That is, γ-Fe2O3, α-Fe2O3, Fe3O4, and Fe. These iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica samples were tested for arsenic adsorption through batch experiments, revealing that few samples had significant arsenic adsorption.

  5. 3-D analysis of bacterial cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using complementary microscopy tomography approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, G; Zeitvogel, F; Hao, L; Ingino, P; Floetenmeyer, M; Stierhof, Y-D; Schroeppel, B; Burkhardt, C J; Kappler, A; Obst, M

    2014-07-01

    The formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates as a consequence of bacterial iron oxidation is an environmentally widespread process with a number of implications for processes such as sorption and coprecipitation of contaminants and nutrients. Whereas the overall appearance of such aggregates is easily accessible using 2-D microscopy techniques, the 3-D and internal structure remain obscure. In this study, we examined the 3-D structure of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using a combination of advanced 3-D microscopy techniques. We obtained 3-D structural and chemical information on different cellular encrustation patterns at high spatial resolution (4-200 nm, depending on the method): more specifically, (1) cells free of iron minerals, (2) periplasm filled with iron minerals, (3) spike- or platelet-shaped iron mineral structures, (4) bulky structures on the cell surface, (5) extracellular iron mineral shell structures, (6) cells with iron mineral filled cytoplasm, and (7) agglomerations of extracellular globular structures. In addition to structural information, chemical nanotomography suggests a dominant role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in controlling the formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates. Furthermore, samples in their hydrated state showed cell-(iron)mineral aggregates in pristine conditions free of preparation (i.e., drying/dehydration) artifacts. All these results were obtained using 3-D microscopy techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tomography, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tomography, scanning transmission (soft) X-ray microscopy (STXM) tomography, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). It turned out that, due to the various different contrast mechanisms of the individual approaches, and due to the required sample preparation steps, only the combination of these techniques was able to provide a

  6. Spectroscopic investigation and direct comparison of the reactivities of iron pyridyl oxidation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Mayes, Howard G; Queensen, Matthew J; Bauer, Eike B; Dupureur, Cynthia M

    2017-03-05

    The growing interest in green chemistry has fueled attention to the development and characterization of effective iron complex oxidation catalysts. A number of iron complexes are known to catalyze the oxidation of organic substrates utilizing peroxides as the oxidant. Their development is complicated by a lack of direct comparison of the reactivities of the iron complexes. To begin to correlate reactivity with structural elements, we compare the reactivities of a series of iron pyridyl complexes toward a single dye substrate, malachite green (MG), for which colorless oxidation products are established. Complexes with tetradentate, nitrogen-based ligands with cis open coordination sites were found to be the most reactive. While some complexes reflect sensitivity to different peroxides, others are similarly reactive with either H2O2 or tBuOOH, which suggests some mechanistic distinctions. [Fe(S,S-PDP)(CH3CN)2](SbF6)2 and [Fe(OTf)2(tpa)] transition under the oxidative reaction conditions to a single intermediate at a rate that exceeds dye degradation (PDP=bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl) bipyrrolidine; tpa=tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine). For the less reactive [Fe(OTf)2(dpa)] (dpa=dipicolylamine), this reaction occurs on a timescale similar to that of MG oxidation. Thus, the spectroscopic method presented herein provides information about the efficiency and mechanism of iron catalyzed oxidation reactions as well as about potential oxidative catalyst decomposition and chemical changes of the catalyst before or during the oxidation reaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case-control study

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    Roggli Victor L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung injury caused by both inhaled dusts and infectious agents depends on increased availability of iron and metal-catalyzed oxidative stress. Because inhaled particles, such as silica, and certain infections can cause secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP, we tested the hypothesis that idiopathic PAP is associated with an altered iron homeostasis in the human lung. Methods Healthy volunteers (n = 20 and patients with idiopathic PAP (n = 20 underwent bronchoalveolar lavage and measurements were made of total protein, iron, tranferrin, transferrin receptor, lactoferrin, and ferritin. Histochemical staining for iron and ferritin was done in the cell pellets from control subjects and PAP patients, and in lung specimens of patients without cardiopulmonary disease and with PAP. Lavage concentrations of urate, glutathione, and ascorbate were also measured as indices of oxidative stress. Results Lavage concentrations of iron, transferrin, transferrin receptor, lactoferrin, and ferritin were significantly elevated in PAP patients relative to healthy volunteers. The cells of PAP patients had accumulated significant iron and ferritin, as well as considerable amounts of extracellular ferritin. Immunohistochemistry for ferritin in lung tissue revealed comparable amounts of this metal-storage protein in the lower respiratory tract of PAP patients both intracellularly and extracellularly. Lavage concentrations of ascorbate, glutathione, and urate were significantly lower in the lavage fluid of the PAP patients. Conclusion Iron homeostasis is altered in the lungs of patients with idiopathic PAP, as large amounts of catalytically-active iron and low molecular weight anti-oxidant depletion are present. These findings suggest a metal-catalyzed oxidative stress in the maintenance of this disease.

  8. Photo-Fenton oxidation of azo dye Reactive Black B using an immobilized iron oxide as heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Ho, Chien-Hung; Huang, Yao-Hui

    2013-04-01

    The heterogeneous oxidation of azo dye Reactive Black B (RBB) by the photo-Fenton system catalyzed with an immobilized iron oxide, B1 (supported with SiO2 grain), was investigated. Reactive Black B oxidation was carried out in an expended-bed reactor in which the effect of B1 dosage on the decolorization and degradation of RBB was examined. Through pseudo-first-order kinetic studies, decolorization was found to be faster than degradation with a fixed rate constant ratio. By determining the iron dissolution from B1, RBB oxidation was supposed to mainly occur on the B1 surface, which catalyzed the generation of hydroxyl radicals in the photo-Fenton reaction. Accordingly, the efficiency of photo-Fenton could reach 100% and 91.2% of decolorization and degradation, respectively, in 300 minutes.

  9. Alginate nanoparticles protect ferrous from oxidation: Potential iron delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katuwavila, Nuwanthi P; Perera, A D L C; Dahanayake, Damayanthi; Karunaratne, V; Amaratunga, Gehan A J; Karunaratne, D Nedra

    2016-11-20

    A novel, efficient delivery system for iron (Fe2+) was developed using the alginate biopolymer. Iron loaded alginate nanoparticles were synthesized by a controlled ionic gelation method and was characterized with respect to particle size, zeta potential, morphology and encapsulation efficiency. Successful loading was confirmed with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric Analysis. Electron energy loss spectroscopy study corroborated the loading of ferrous into the alginate nanoparticles. Iron encapsulation (70%) was optimized at 0.06% Fe (w/v) leading to the formation of iron loaded alginate nanoparticles with a size range of 15-30nm and with a negative zeta potential (-38mV). The in vitro release studies showed a prolonged release profile for 96h. Release of iron was around 65-70% at pH of 6 and 7.4 whereas it was less than 20% at pH 2.The initial burst release upto 8h followed zero order kinetics at all three pH values. All the release profiles beyond 8h best fitted the Korsmeyer-Peppas model of diffusion. Non Fickian diffusion was observed at pH 6 and 7.4 while at pH 2 Fickian diffusion was observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Iron oxide nanoparticles for plant nutrition? A preliminary Mössbauer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homonnay, Z.; Tolnai, Gy.; Fodor, F.; Solti, Á.; Kovács, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Ábrahám, A.; Szabó, E. Gy.; Németh, P.; Szabó, L.; Klencsár, Z.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important micronutrients for plants is iron. We have prepared iron(III) oxyhydroxide and magnetite nanoparticles with the aim to use them as possible nutrition source for plants. The iron(III)-oxide/oxyhydroxide nanoparticles prepared under our experimental conditions as colloidal suspensions proved to be 6-line ferrihydrite nanoparticles as verified by XRD, TEM/SAED and Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra of magnetite nanoparticles prepared under different preparation conditions could be analyzed on the basis of a common model based on the superposition of four sextet components displaying Gaussian-shaped hyperfine magnetic field distributions.

  11. Iron oxide nanoparticles for plant nutrition? A preliminary Mössbauer study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homonnay, Z., E-mail: homonnay@caesar.elte.hu [EötvösLoránd University, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Tolnai, Gy. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (Hungary); Fodor, F.; Solti, Á. [EötvösLoránd University, Institute of Biology (Hungary); Kovács, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Ábrahám, A. [EötvösLoránd University, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Szabó, E. Gy.; Németh, P.; Szabó, L.; Klencsár, Z. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (Hungary)

    2016-12-15

    One of the most important micronutrients for plants is iron. We have prepared iron(III) oxyhydroxide and magnetite nanoparticles with the aim to use them as possible nutrition source for plants. The iron(III)-oxide/oxyhydroxide nanoparticles prepared under our experimental conditions as colloidal suspensions proved to be 6-line ferrihydrite nanoparticles as verified by XRD, TEM/SAED and Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra of magnetite nanoparticles prepared under different preparation conditions could be analyzed on the basis of a common model based on the superposition of four sextet components displaying Gaussian-shaped hyperfine magnetic field distributions.

  12. Galvanic Corrosion of Lead by Iron (Oxyhydr)Oxides: Potential Impacts on Drinking Water Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueman, Benjamin F; Sweet, Gregory A; Harding, Matthew D; Estabrook, Hayden; Bishop, D Paul; Gagnon, Graham A

    2017-06-20

    Lead exposure via drinking water remains a significant public health risk; this study explored the potential effects of upstream iron corrosion on lead mobility in water distribution systems. Specifically, galvanic corrosion of lead by iron (oxyhydr)oxides was investigated. Coupling an iron mineral cathode with metallic lead in a galvanic cell increased lead release by 531 μg L -1 on average-a 9-fold increase over uniform corrosion in the absence of iron. Cathodes were composed of spark plasma sintered Fe 3 O 4 or α-Fe 2 O 3 or field-extracted Fe 3 O 4 and α-FeOOH. Orthophosphate immobilized oxidized lead as insoluble hydroxypyromorphite, while humic acid enhanced lead mobility. Addition of a humic isolate increased lead release due to uniform corrosion by 81 μg L -1 and-upon coupling lead to a mineral cathode-release due to galvanic corrosion by 990 μg L -1 . Elevated lead in the presence of humic acid appeared to be driven by complexation, with 208 Pb and UV 254 size-exclusion chromatograms exhibiting strong correlation under these conditions (R 2 average = 0.87). A significant iron corrosion effect was consistent with field data: lead levels after lead service line replacement were greater by factors of 2.3-4.7 at sites supplied by unlined cast iron distribution mains compared with the alternative, lined ductile iron.

  13. Towards a Mechanistic Understanding of Anaerobic Nitrate Dependent Iron Oxidation: Balancing Electron Uptake and Detoxification

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    Hans Karl Carlson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic oxidation of Fe(II by subsurface microorganisms is an important part of biogeochemical cycling in the environment, but the biochemical mechanisms used to couple iron oxidation to nitrate respiration are not well understood. Based on our own work and the evidence available in the literature, we propose a mechanistic model for anaerobic nitrate dependent iron oxidation. We suggest that anaerobic iron oxidizing microorganisms likely exist along a continuum including: 1 bacteria that inadvertently oxidize Fe(II by abiotic or biotic reactions with enzymes or chemical intermediates in their metabolic pathways (e.g. denitrification and suffer from toxicity or energetic penalty, 2 Fe(II tolerant bacteria that gain little or no growth benefit from iron oxidation but can manage the toxic reactions, and 3 bacteria that efficiently accept electrons from Fe(II to gain a growth advantage while preventing or mitigating the toxic reactions. Predictions of the proposed model are highlighted and experimental approaches are discussed.

  14. Biomedical properties and preparation of iron oxide-dextran nanostructures by MAPLE technique

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    Ciobanu Carmen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this work the chemical structure of dextran-iron oxide thin films was reported. The films were obtained by MAPLE technique from composite targets containing 10 wt. % dextran with 1 and 5 wt.% iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs. The IONPs were synthesized by co-precipitation method. A KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM≅25 ns, ν = 10 Hz was used for the growth of the hybrid, iron oxide NPs-dextran thin films. Results Dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles thin films were indexed into the spinel cubic lattice with a lattice parameter of 8.36 Å. The particle sized calculated was estimated at around 7.7 nm. The XPS shows that the binding energy of the Fe 2p3/2 of two thin films of dextran coated iron oxide is consistent with Fe3+ oxides. The atomic percentage of the C, O and Fe are 66.71, 32.76 and 0.53 for the films deposited from composite targets containing 1 wt.% maghemite and 64.36, 33.92 and 1.72 respectively for the films deposited from composite targets containing 5 wt.% maghemite. In the case of cells cultivated on dextran coated 5% maghemite γ-Fe2O3, the number of cells and the level of F-actin were lower compared to the other two types of thin films and control. Conclusions The dextran-iron oxide continuous thin films obtained by MAPLE technique from composite targets containing 10 wt.% dextran as well as 1 and 5 wt.% iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method presented granular surface morphology. Our data proved a good viability of Hep G2 cells grown on dextran coated maghemite thin films. Also, no changes in cells morphology were noticed under phase contrast microscopy. The data strongly suggest the potential use of iron oxide-dextran nanocomposites as a potential marker for biomedical applications.

  15. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as drug delivery system in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, A., E-mail: marcu@ifin.nipne.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box MG 36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Pop, S. [“Victor Babes” National Institute of Pathology, 99-101 Splaiul Independentei, 050096 Bucharest (Romania); Dumitrache, F. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box MG 36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Mocanu, M.; Niculite, C.M.; Gherghiceanu, M. [“Victor Babes” National Institute of Pathology, 99-101 Splaiul Independentei, 050096 Bucharest (Romania); Lungu, C.P.; Fleaca, C. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box MG 36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ianchis, R. [National Institute for Research and Development in Chemistry and Petrochemistry, 202 Splaiul Independentei, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Barbut, A.; Grigoriu, C.; Morjan, I. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box MG 36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2013-09-15

    Present work was focused on producing improved iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in breast cancer. Nanometric-sized iron oxide particles were synthesized by laser pyrolysis and were morphologically/structurally characterized. These new nanoparticles were compared with some commercial, chemically prepared iron oxide ones. Cytotoxicity and the anti-proliferation effects of nanoparticles were tested in vitro on the breast adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7. Nanoparticles were further coated with the antracyclinic antibiotic Violamycine B1 and tested for the anti-tumor effect on MCF-7 cells. The nanoparticles produced by us seem more effective in vitro than the commercial ones, with respect to cellular uptake and VB1 delivery. Violamycine B1 bound on nanoparticles is as efficient as the free form, but is better delivered into tumor cells.

  16. In situ functionalization and PEO coating of iron oxide nanocrystals using seeded emulsion polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloust, Hauke; Schmidtke, Christian; Feld, Artur; Schotten, Theo; Eggers, Robin; Fittschen, Ursula E A; Schulz, Florian; Pöselt, Elmar; Ostermann, Johannes; Bastús, Neus G; Weller, Horst

    2013-04-16

    Herein we demonstrate that seeded emulsion polymerization is a powerful tool to produce multiply functionalized PEO coated iron oxide nanocrystals. Advantageously, by simple addition of functional surfactants, functional monomers, or functional polymerizable linkers-solely or in combinations thereof-during the seeded emulsion polymerization process, a broad range of in situ functionalized polymer-coated iron oxide nanocrystals were obtained. This was demonstrated by purposeful modulation of the zeta potential of encapsulated iron oxide nanocrystals and conjugation of a dyestuff. Successful functionalization was unequivocally proven by TXRF. Furthermore, the spatial position of the functional groups can be controlled by choosing the appropriate spacers. In conclusion, this methodology is highly amenable for combinatorial strategies and will spur rapid expedited synthesis and purposeful optimization of a broad scope of nanocrystals.

  17. Ex situ integration of iron oxide nanoparticles onto the exfoliated expanded graphite flakes in water suspension

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    Jović Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid structures composed of exfoliated expanded graphite (EG and iron oxide nanocrystals have been produced by an ex situ process. The iron oxide nanoparticles coated with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, or poly(acrylic acid (PAA were integrated onto the exfoliated EG flakes by mixing their aqueous suspensions at room temperature under support of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropylcarbodiimide (EDC and N-hydroxysuccin-nimide (NHS. EG flakes have been used both, naked and functionalized with branched polyethylenimine (PEI. Complete integration of two constituents has been achieved and mainteined stable for more than 12 months. No preferential spatial distribution of anchoring sites for attachement of iron oxide nanoparticles has been observed, regardless EG flakes have been used naked or functionalized with PEI molecules. The structural and physico-chemical characteristics of the exfoliated expanded graphite and its hybrids nanostructures has been investigated by SEM, TEM, FTIR and Raman techniques. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45015

  18. Defective iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by high temperature plasma processing: a magnetic characterisation versus temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, C; Joseph, B; Orpe, P B; Saini, N L; Mukherjee, S; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K; Stanek, J; Di Gioacchino, D; Marcelli, A

    2016-11-04

    Magnetic properties and phase compositions of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by a high temperature arc plasma route have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and high harmonic magnetic AC susceptibility measurements, and correlated with morphological and structural properties for different synthesis conditions. The Mössbauer spectra precisely determined the presence of different iron-oxide fractions in the investigated nanoparticles, while the high harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the occurrence of metastable magnetic phases evolving in temperature and time. This study illustrates magnetic properties and dynamics of the magnetic configurations of iron-oxide nanoparticles grown by high temperature plasma, a process less explored so far but extremely useful for synthesising large numbers of nanoparticles for industrial applications.

  19. Tunability of Size and Magnetic Moment of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Synthesized by Forced Hydrolysis

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    Ben Sutens

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To utilize iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedical applications, a sufficient magnetic moment is crucial. Since this magnetic moment is directly proportional to the size of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles, synthesis methods of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with tunable size are desirable. However, most existing protocols are plagued by several drawbacks. Presented here is a one-pot synthesis method resulting in monodisperse superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with a controllable size and magnetic moment using cost-effective reagents. The obtained nanoparticles were thoroughly characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR measurements. Furthermore, the influence of the size on the magnetic moment of the nanoparticles is analyzed by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID magnetometry. To emphasize the potential use in biomedical applications, magnetic heating experiments were performed.

  20. Preparation and characterization of an iron oxide-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for potential bone cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneha, Murugesan; Sundaram, Nachiappan Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, multifunctional magnetic nanostructures have been found to have potential applications in biomedical and tissue engineering. Iron oxide nanoparticles are biocompatible and have distinctive magnetic properties that allow their use in vivo for drug delivery and hyperthermia, and as T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Hydroxyapatite is used frequently due to its well-known biocompatibility, bioactivity, and lack of toxicity, so a combination of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite materials could be useful because hydroxyapatite has better bone-bonding ability. In this study, we prepared nanocomposites of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite and analyzed their physicochemical properties. The results suggest that these composites have superparamagnetic as well as biocompatible properties. This type of material architecture would be well suited for bone cancer therapy and other biomedical applications.

  1. Directed assembly of bifunctional silica-iron oxide nanocomposite with open shell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Hui Xin; Yeap, Swee Pin; Osman, Mohamed Syazwan; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Lim, JitKang

    2014-10-08

    The synthesis of nanocomposite with controlled surface morphology plays a key role for pollutant removal from aqueous environments. The influence of the molecular size of the polyelectrolyte in synthesizing silica-iron oxide core-shell nanocomposite with open shell structure was investigated by using dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Here, poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) was used to promote the attachment of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) onto the silica surface to assemble a nanocomposite with magnetic and catalytic bifunctionality. High molecular weight PDDA tended to adsorb on silica colloid, forming a more extended conformation layer than low molecular weight PDDA. Subsequent attachment of IONPs onto this extended PDDA layer was more randomly distributed, forming isolated islands with open space between them. By taking amoxicillin, an antibiotic commonly found in pharmaceutical waste, as the model system, better removal was observed for silica-iron oxide nanocomposite with a more extended open shell structure.

  2. Synthesis and Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity of Iron Oxide Glycerol Nanoparticles Obtained by Coprecipitation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Liliana Iconaru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The glycerol iron oxide nanoparticles (GIO-NPs were obtained by an adapted coprecipitation method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD studies demonstrate that GIO-NPs were indexed into the spinel cubic lattice with a lattice parameter of 0.835 nm. The refinement of XRD spectra indicated that no other phases except maghemite were detected. The adsorption of glycerol on iron oxide nanoparticles was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. On the other hand, this work implicated the use of GIO-NPs in antibacterial studies. The results indicate that, in the case of P. aeruginosa  1397 biofilms, at concentrations from 0.01 mg/mL to 0.625 mg/mL, the glycerol iron oxide inhibits the ability of this strain to develop biofilms on the inert substratum.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of PEG-iron oxide core-shell composite nanoparticles for thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wydra, Robert J; Kruse, Anastasia M; Bae, Younsoo; Anderson, Kimberly W; Hilt, J Zach

    2013-12-01

    In this study, core-shell nanoparticles were developed to achieve thermal therapy that can ablate cancer cells in a remotely controlled manner. The core-shell nanoparticles were prepared using atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to coat iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based polymer shell. The iron oxide core allows for the remote heating of the particles in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The coating of iron oxide with PEG was verified through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. A thermoablation (55°C) study was performed on A549 lung carcinoma cells exposed to nanoparticles and over a 10 min AMF exposure. The successful thermoablation of A549 demonstrates the potential use of polymer coated particles for thermal therapy. © 2013.

  4. Reversible immobilization of invertase on Cu-chelated polyvinylimidazole-grafted iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Kerem; Çevik, Emre; Şenel, Mehmet; Baykal, Abdülhadi

    2013-12-01

    Polyvinylimidazole (PVI)-grafted iron oxide nanoparticles (PVIgMNP) were prepared by grafting of telomere of PVI on the iron oxide nanoparticles. Different metal ions (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cr(2+), Ni(2+)) ions were chelated on polyvinylimidazole-grafted iron oxide nanoparticles, and then the metal-chelated magnetic particles were used in the adsorption of invertase. The maximum invertase immobilization capacity of the PVIgMNP-Cu(2+) beads was observed to be 142.856 mg/g (invertase/PVIgMNP) at pH 5.0. The values of the maximum reaction rate (V max) and Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) were determined for the free and immobilized enzymes. The enzyme adsorption-desorption studies, pH effect on the adsorption efficiency, affinity of different metal ions, the kinetic parameters and storage stability of free and immobilized enzymes were evaluated.

  5. Application of Iron Oxide Nanomaterials for the Removal of Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragnesh N. Dave

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century water polluted by heavy metal is one of the environment problems. Various methods for removal of the heavy metal ions from the water have extensively been studied. Application of iron oxide nanaparticles based nanomaterials for removal of heavy metals is well-known adsorbents for remediation of water. Due to its important physiochemical property, inexpensive method and easy regeneration in the presence of external magnetic field make them more attractive toward water purification. Surface modification strategy of iron oxide nanoparticles is also used for the remediation of water increases the efficiency of iron oxide for the removal of the heavy metal ions from the aqueous system.

  6. Ferrous iron oxidation by sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and analysis of the process at the levels of transcription and protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Jiri; Bouchal, Pavel; Lochman, Jan; Potesil, David; Janiczek, Oldrich; Zdrahal, Zbynek; Mandl, Martin

    2013-04-01

    In contrast to iron-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, A. ferrooxidans from a stationary phase elemental sulfur-oxidizing culture exhibited a lag phase in pyrite oxidation, which is similar to its behaviour during ferrous iron oxidation. The ability of elemental sulfur-oxidizing A. ferrooxidans to immediately oxidize ferrous iron or pyrite without a lag phase was only observed in bacteria obtained from growing cultures with elemental sulfur. However, these cultures that shifted to ferrous iron oxidation showed a low rate of ferrous iron oxidation while no growth was observed. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used for a quantitative proteomic analysis of the adaptation process when bacteria were switched from elemental sulfur to ferrous iron. A comparison of total cell lysates revealed 39 proteins whose increase or decrease in abundance was related to this phenotypic switching. However, only a few proteins were closely related to iron and sulfur metabolism. Reverse-transcription quantitative PCR was used to further characterize the bacterial adaptation process. The expression profiles of selected genes primarily involved in the ferrous iron oxidation indicated that phenotypic switching is a complex process that includes the activation of genes encoding a membrane protein, maturation proteins, electron transport proteins and their regulators.

  7. Impact of iron, chelators, and free fatty acids on lipid oxidation in low-moisture crackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Leann; Vollmer, Daniel; Johnson, David; Decker, Eric

    2015-02-18

    This research strove to understand the relationship between physical structure and oxidative stability in crackers since mechanisms of lipid oxidation are poorly understood in low-moisture foods. Confocal microscopy showed that lipids formed a continuous matrix surrounding starch granules, and starch-lipid, lipid-air, and protein-lipid interfaces were observed. Unlike bulk oils, meats, and emulsions, lipid hydroperoxides exhibited greater stability in low-moisture crackers as hexanal formation was delayed >20 d. Iron, added at 10 times the concentrations normally found in enriched flour, did not increase oxidation rates compared to the control. EDTA may reduce endogenous iron activity but not as greatly as in other matrices. Addition of fatty acids up to 1.0% of total lipid weight did not statistically affect lipid oxidation lag phases. The unique structure of low-moisture foods clearly affects their resistance to metal-promoted lipid oxidation.

  8. Internalization of carbon black and maghemite iron oxide nanoparticle mixtures leads to oxidant production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J Michael; Ho, Shu; Hwang, Wonjoong; Zebda, Rema; Cummins, Kyle; Soriaga, Manuel P; Taylor, Robert; Guo, Bing; Sayes, Christie M

    2010-12-20

    The risk of potential human exposure to mixed nanomaterials in consumer, occupational, and medicinal settings is increasing as nanomaterials enter both the workplace and the marketplace. In this study, we investigated the toxicity of mixed engineered carbon black (ECB) and maghemite iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles in a cellular system to understand the mechanism of toxicity and potential methods of toxicity mitigation. Lung epithelial cells (A549) were exposed to mixed Fe(2)O(3) and ECB nanoparticles, mixed Fe(2)O(3) and ECB nanoparticles with the addition of L-ascorbic acid, and mixed Fe(2)O(3) and surface-oxidized engineered carbon black (ox-ECB) nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption surface area measurement (BET), X-ray diffraction, and surface charge measurement. The carbon black nanoparticles were also characterized with a reductive capacity assay and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The cellular uptake of nanoparticles was analyzed via transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy; the cellular uptake of iron was quantified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Both the MTT assay and the ethidium homodimer and calcein AM live/dead assay were used to measure cellular proliferation and cytotoxicity, respectively. The dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay was used to measure the intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species. Results show that both Fe(2)O(3) and ECB (or Fe(2)O(3) and ox-ECB) were co-internalized in intracellular vesicles. Additionally, after exposure to the mixture of nanoparticles, the amount of acidified lysosomes increased over time. The cellular uptake of Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles was unaffected by mixing with ECB. Significant oxidant production occurred in cells exposed to mixed Fe(2)O(3) and ECB, but not in cells exposed to mixed Fe(2)O(3) and ox-ECB or in cells exposed to Fe(2)O(3) and ECB with the

  9. The life cycle of iron Fe(III) oxide: impact of fungi and bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Steeve

    2014-05-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit vast surface areas which bind a large array of trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules hence controlling their mobility/reactivity in the subsurface. In this context, understanding the "life cycle" of iron oxide in soils is paramount to many biogeochemical processes. Soils environments are notorious for their extreme heterogeneity and variability of chemical, physical conditions and biological agents at play. Here, we present studies investigating the role of two biological agents driving iron oxide dynamics in soils, root-associated fungi (mycorrhiza) and bacteria. Mycorrhiza filaments (hypha) grow preferentially around, and on the surface of nutrient-rich minerals, making mineral-fungi contact zones, hot-spots of chemical alteration in soils. However, because of the microscopic nature of hyphae (only ~ 5 µm wide for up to 1 mm long) and their tendency to strongly adhere to mineral surface, in situ observations of this interfacial micro-environment are scarce. In a microcosm, ectomycorrhiza (Paxillus involutus) was grown symbiotically with a pine tree (Pinus sylvestris) in the presence of freshly-cleaved biotite under humid, yet undersaturated, conditions typical of soils. Using spatially-resolved ion milling technique (FIB), transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy (TEM/STEM-EDS), synchrotron based X-ray microscopy (STXM), we were able to quantify the speciation of Fe at the biotite-hypha interface. The results shows that substantial oxidation of biotite structural-Fe(II) into Fe(III) subdomains occurs at the contact zone between mycorrhiza and biotite. Once formed, iron(III) oxides can reductively dissolve under suboxic conditions via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. We aimed here to understand the role of Fe(III) mineral

  10. Synthesis and toxicity characterization of carbon coated iron oxide nanoparticles with highly defined size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rafael Gregorio; Koch, Britta; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; El-Gendy, Ahmed Aboud; Krupskaya, Yulia; Springer, Armin; Klingeler, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Oliver; Büchner, Bernd; Sanchez, Samuel; Rümmeli, Mark Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles hold great promise for future biomedical applications. To this end numerous studies on iron oxide nanoparticles have been conducted. One aspect these studies reveal is that nanoparticle size and shape can trigger different cellular responses through endocytic pathways, cell viability and early apoptosis. However, systematic studies investigating the size dependence of iron oxide nanoparticles with highly defined diameters across multiple cells lines are not available yet. Iron oxide nanoparticles with well-defined size distributions were prepared. All samples were thoroughly characterized and the cytotoxicity for four standard cell lines (HeLa Kyoto, human osteosarcoma (U2OS), mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) and mouse macrophages (J7442)) where investigated. Our findings show that small differences in size distribution (ca. 10nm) of iron oxide nanoparticles do not influence cytotoxicity, while uptake is size dependent. Cytotoxicity is dose-dependent. Broad distributions of nanoparticles are more easily internalized as compared to the narrow distributions for two of the cell lines tested (HeLa Kyoto and mouse macrophages (J7442)). The data indicate that it is not feasible to probe changes in cytotoxicity within a small size range (10nm). However, TEM investigations of the nanoparticles indicate that cellular uptake is size dependent. The present work compares narrow and broad distributions for various samples of carbon-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. The data highlights that cells differentiate between nanoparticle sizes as indicated by differences in cellular uptake. This information provides valuable knowledge to better understand the interaction of nanoparticles and cells. © 2013.

  11. Laser sintering of magnesia with nanoparticles of iron oxide and aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García, L.V.; Mendivil, M.I.; Roy, T.K. Das; Castillo, G.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66451 (Mexico); Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66451 (Mexico); CIIDIT, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser sintered MgO pellets with nanoparticles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Characterized these pellets by XRD, SEM and XPS. • Spinel formations were observed in both cases. • Changes in morphology and structure were analyzed. - Abstract: Nanoparticles of iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 20–40 nm) and aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 50 nm) were mixed in different concentrations (3, 5 and 7 wt%) in a magnesium oxide (MgO) matrix. The mixture pellet was irradiated with 532 nm output from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser using different laser fluence and translation speed for sintering. The refractory samples obtained were analyzed using X-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that the samples irradiated at translation speed of 110 μm/s and energy fluence of 1.7 J/cm{sup 2} with a concentration of 5 and 7 wt% of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} presented the MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel-type phase. With the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles, at a translation speed of 110 μm/s and energy fluence of 1.7 J/cm{sup 2}, there were the formations of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. The changes in morphologies and microstructure due to laser irradiation were analyzed.

  12. Eco-friendly hybrid pigments made of cellulose and iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, M C; Pascoal Neto, C; Trindade, T

    2012-08-01

    The controlled hydrolysis of FeC2O4 in the presence of vegetable cellulose fibres was investigated to produce a pallet of cellulose/iron oxide hybrid colored materials. Distinct iron oxide phases have been deposited at the cellulose fibres surfaces by varying the relative amount of FeC2O4 and NaOH, here used as starting materials, by performing the synthesis in hydrothermal conditions. This is a new chemical strategy for the production of a number of hybrid materials whose coloristic properties have been evaluated aiming their potential use as novel pigments for polymer based products.

  13. Iron oxides, divalent cations, silica, and the early earth phosphorus crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, C.; Nomosatryo, S.; Crowe, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    As a nutrient required for growth, phosphorus regulates the activity of life in the oceans. Iron oxides sorb phosphorus from seawater, and through the Archean and early Proterozoic Eons, massive quantities of iron oxides precipitated from the oceans, producing a record of seawater chemistry...... and silica content of BIFs, we estimate that seawater in the Archean and early Proterozoic Eons likely contained 0.04–0.13 µM phosphorus, on average. These phosphorus limiting conditions could have favored primary production through photoferrotrophy at the expense of oxygenic photosynthesis until upwelling...

  14. Structural effects on the magnetic hyperthermia properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Abenojar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs are heavily explored as diagnostic and therapeutic agents due to their low cost, tunable properties, and biocompatibility. In particular, upon excitation with an alternating current (AC magnetic field, the NPs generate localized heat that can be exploited for therapeutic hyperthermia treatment of diseased cells or pathogenic microbes. In this review, we focus on how structural changes and inter-particle interactions affect the heating efficiency of iron oxide-based magnetic NPs. Moreover, we present an overview of the different approaches to evaluate the heating performance of IONPs and introduce a new theranostic modality based on magnetic imaging guided–hyperthermia.

  15. Textural and Mineralogical Characteristics of Microbial Fossils in Modern and Ancient Iron (oxyhydr)oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation contains extensive alkaline saline lacustrine deposits rich in diagenetic iron (oxyhydr)oxides that are well exposed on the Colorado Plateau of the southwestern USA. These early diagenetic iron (oxyhydr)oxide minerals are associated with preserved diatoms and other algal forms, identified via scanning electron microscope (SEM) in thin sections of representative samples. The minerals are also associated with macroscopic bioturbation features (e.g., charophytes, burrows and fossilized dinosaur bones). Algal forms with cellular elaboration are identified by HF dissolution of bioturbation structures and examination with SEM. Collectively, these features suggest biomediated textures are preserved in early diagenetic iron (oxyhydr)oxides, and can persist for tens of millions of years. Modern microbially precipitated iron (oxyhydr)oxides and ~100ka tufa terraces from a cold spring system along Ten Mile Graben in southern Utah, USA are compared with the Morrison examples to identify modern microbial fossils and document any differences and preservation changes during diagenesis over geologic time. Two distinct suites of elements (1. C, Fe, As and 2. C, S, Se) are associated with microbial fossils in both the modern and ancient tufas, as well as the ancient Morrison specimens. The occurrence of these distinctive trace element configurations in the iron (oxyhydr)oxide minerals suggest the suites could be potential markers for biosignatures. The presence of ferrihydrite in ~100ka fossil microbial mats suggests this thermodynamically unstable mineral may also be used as a biomarker. Diagnostic trace element suites and unusual mineral phases warrant further study for their potential as biomarkers. These terrestrial iron (oxyhydr)oxide examples will: 1) document specific biomediated textures and what their origins might be (related to different processes or species), 2) show how they might persist or respond to

  16. Colloidal Flower-Shaped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis Strategies and Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavilán, Helena; Kowalski, Anja; Heinke, David

    2017-01-01

    -core nanoparticles are determined. In addition, a self-consistent picture that explains the collective magnetic properties exhibited by these complex assemblies is achieved through structural, colloidal, and magnetic means. For this purpose, different strategies to obtain flower-shaped iron oxide assemblies...... in the size range 25–100 nm are examined. The routes are based on the partial oxidation of Fe(OH)2, polyol-mediated synthesis or the reduction of iron acetylacetonate. The nanoparticles are functionalized either with dextran, citric acid, or alternatively embedded in polystyrene and their long-term stability......-shaped nanoparticles....

  17. Iron-sulfur proteins are the major source of protein-bound dinitrosyl iron complexes formed in Escherichia coli cells under nitric oxide stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Aaron P; Duan, Xuewu; Huang, Hao; Ding, Huangen

    2011-06-01

    Protein-bound dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) have been observed in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells under nitric oxide (NO) stress. The identity of proteins that bind DNICs, however, still remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that iron-sulfur proteins are the major source of protein-bound DNICs formed in Escherichia coli cells under NO stress. Expression of recombinant iron-sulfur proteins, but not proteins without iron-sulfur clusters, almost doubles the amount of protein-bound DNICs formed in E. coli cells after NO exposure. Purification of recombinant proteins from the NO-exposed E. coli cells further confirms that iron-sulfur proteins, but not proteins without iron-sulfur clusters, are modified, forming protein-bound DNICs. Deletion of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins IscA and SufA to block the [4Fe-4S] cluster biogenesis in E. coli cells largely eliminates the NO-mediated formation of protein-bound DNICs, suggesting that iron-sulfur clusters are mainly responsible for the NO-mediated formation of protein-bound DNICs in cells. Furthermore, depletion of the "chelatable iron pool" in wild-type E. coli cells effectively removes iron-sulfur clusters from proteins and concomitantly diminishes the NO-mediated formation of protein-bound DNICs, indicating that iron-sulfur clusters in proteins constitute at least part of the chelatable iron pool in cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis, purification and assembly of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Penghe

    , 6 & 7), nanoparticles were assembled into three different hierachical structures through both template-assisted and template-free approaches. In the template-assisted assembly, gold nanorods were aligned into ordered 1D linear pattern by using soft biological filamentous, namely bacteria flagella, as templates. Two different ways of assembling nanorods onto flagella were investigated. In another study, a highly commercialized polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), was discovered for the first time to be able to self-assemble into branched hollow fibers. Based on this discovery, two approaches (one through direct deposition of silica onto the PVP aggregate and the other through co-assembly of PVP covered gold nanoparticles with free PVP molecules) by which the self-assembly behavior of PVP could be exploited to template the formation of branched hollow inorganic fibers were demonstrated. In the template-free assembly, a general method for assembling nanoparticle into clusters (NPCs) in an oil-in-water emulsion system was investigated. Detailed studies on the mechanism of formation of NPCs structure, optimized conditions, scalable production and surface chemistry manipulation were carried out. Besides, comparison of the properties of individual and clustered iron oxide nanoparticles was conducted. It was discovered that due to their collective properties, NPCs are more responsive to an external magnetic field and can potentially serve as better contrast enhancement agents than individually dispersed magnetic NPs in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

  19. Tucum-Do-Cerrado (Bactris setosa Mart.) Consumption Modulates Iron Homeostasis and Prevents Iron-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni-Reis, Adriana M.; Arruda, Sandra F.; Dourado, Lívia P. S.; da Cunha, Marcela S. B.; Siqueira, Egle M. A.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of tucum-do-cerrado consumption in the oxidative status of iron-supplemented rats. Four groups of rats were treated: Control (AIN-93G), Tuc (AIN-93G added of tucum-do-cerrado), Fe (AIN-93G iron-enriched), or TucFe (AIN-93G with tucum-do-cerrado and iron-enriched) diet, for 30 days. Iron-enriched diet increased serum, liver, spleen, and intestine iron levels; transferrin saturation; liver lipid oxidation; mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and Bmp6, and Nrf2 in the intestine. Tucum-do-cerrado consumption reduced spleen lipid and protein oxidation; mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and Ftl, and increased serum antioxidant capacity and hepatic mRNA levels of Bmp6, Hmox1, Nqo1, and Nrf2. TucFe diet consumption abrogated the liver Hamp iron-induced up-regulation, prevented intestinal iron accumulation; hepatic lipid peroxidation; splenic protein damage, and the increase of catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase activity in some tissues. These results suggest that tucum-do-cerrado protects tissues against oxidative damage, by reducing iron availability in liver and consequently inhibiting liver Hamp expression. PMID:26901220

  20. Microwave-assisted combustion synthesis of nano iron oxide/iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica, with arsenic adsorption studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was com...

  1. Risk of Oxidative Damage to Bone from Increased Iron Stores During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, S. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Iron stores are increased secondary to neocytolysis of red blood cells and a high dietary intake of iron during space flight. This raises concerns about the risk of excess iron causing oxidative damage in many tissues, including bone. Biomarkers of iron status, oxidative damage, and bone resorption during space flight were analyzed for 23 (16 M/7 F) International Space Station crewmembers as part of the Nutrition SMO project. Up to 5 in-flight blood samples and 24-h urine pools were collected over the course of the 4-6 month missions. Serum iron increased slightly during space flight and was decreased at landing (P bone mineral density of several bone regions after flight (1). In a separate study (2), a ground-based investigation was conducted that examined the combined effects of radiation exposure and iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury in several physiological systems in 12-wk male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were acclimated to an adequate iron diet (45 mg iron (ferric citrate)/kg diet) for 3 wk and then assigned to one of four groups: adequate iron (Fe) diet/no radiation, adequate Fe diet/ radiation, moderately high Fe diet (650 mg Fe (ferric citrate)/kg diet)/no radiation, and moderately high Fe diet/radiation. Animals remained on the assigned diet for 4 wk. Starting on day 14 of experimental diet treatment, animals were exposed to a fractionated dose (0.375 Gy) of Cs-137 every other day (3 Gy total dose). On day 29 (24 h after last radiation exposure), animals were euthanized. Oxidative stress markers in the liver, bone, eyes, and serum were assessed. There was evidence that the iron diet contributed to DNA damage as well as radiation exposure in the liver, eyes, and bone. Together, the results suggest that increased iron stores do constitute a risk factor for oxidative damage and bone resorption, during space flight and on Earth. Funded by the Human Health and Countermeasures Element of the NASA Human Research Program.

  2. SYNTHESIS OF IRON OXIDE-MONTMORILLONITE COMPOSITE AND STUDY OF ITS STRUCTURAL STABILITY AGAINTS SULFURIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karna Wijaya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and characterization of iron oxide-montmorillonite and its structural stability test with various concentration of sulfuric acid were conducted. Synthesis was performed by treating Na-montmorillonite clay with oligocations of iron, followed by calcinating the intercalation compound of oligocations-montmorillonite at 200oC for 24 hours. Calcined product was then characterized to determine the iron content, basal spacing and its porosities distribution. To test structural stability againts strong acid (i.e. sulfuric acid, the composites were dispersed into solution of sulfuric acid with various concentration, i.e: 1, 2 and 3M for 24 hours. The characterization result, especially from x-ray-diffractometry analysis, demonstrated that modification of montmorillonite using iron (IIIoxide produced so called house of card structure as indicated by its broad, low intensity reflection at 2θ  = 5-6o. The addition of sulphuric acid into composite resulted in probably the formation of face to face arrangements indicated by the appearance of 001 plane reflection. The acid treatment also caused the decrease in the iron content of the iron oxide-montmorillonite as shown by its neutron activated analysis result. The iron content of iron oxide-montmorillonite before the acid treatment was 32,01% w/w, and after the acid treatment was 14.08% w/w (with sulfuric acid of 1M, 6.05% w/w (sulfuric acid of 2M and 5,98% w/w (with sulfuric acid of 3M, respectively. In general, the sulphuric acid treatment to the composite did not distore the 001 planes of the montmorillonite.   Keywords: pillarization, montmorillonite, structure stability

  3. Catechol-functionalized chitosan/iron oxide nanoparticle composite inspired by mussel thread coating and squid beak interfacial chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvarec, Ondrej; Purushotham, Sreekanth; Masic, Admir; Ramanujan, Raju V; Miserez, Ali

    2013-08-27

    Biological materials offer a wide range of multifunctional and structural properties that are currently not achieved in synthetic materials. Herein we report on the synthesis and preparation of bioinspired organic/inorganic composites that mimic the key physicochemical features associated with the mechanical strengthening of both squid beaks and mussel thread coatings using chitosan as an initial template. While chitosan is a well-known biocompatible material, it suffers from key drawbacks that have limited its usage in a wider range of structural biomedical applications. First, its load-bearing capability in hydrated conditions remains poor, and second it completely dissolves at pH < 6, preventing its use in mild acidic microenvironments. In order to overcome these intrinsic limitations, a chitosan-based organic/inorganic biocomposite is prepared that mimics the interfacial chemistry of squid beaks and mussel thread coating. Chitosan was functionalized with catechol moieties in a highly controlled fashion and combined with superparamagnetic iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles to give composites that represent a significant improvement in functionality of chitosan-based biomaterials. The inorganic/organic (γ-Fe2O3/catechol) interfaces are stabilized and strengthened by coordination bonding, resulting in hybrid composites with improved stability at high temperatures, physiological pH conditions, and acid/base conditions. The inclusion of superparamagnetic particles also makes the composites stimuli-responsive.

  4. Iron oxidation stimulates organic matter decomposition in humid tropical forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Steven J; Silver, Whendee L

    2013-09-01

    Humid tropical forests have the fastest rates of organic matter decomposition globally, which often coincide with fluctuating oxygen (O2 ) availability in surface soils. Microbial iron (Fe) reduction generates reduced iron [Fe(II)] under anaerobic conditions, which oxidizes to Fe(III) under subsequent aerobic conditions. We demonstrate that Fe (II) oxidation stimulates organic matter decomposition via two mechanisms: (i) organic matter oxidation, likely driven by reactive oxygen species; and (ii) increased dissolved organic carbon (DOC) availability, likely driven by acidification. Phenol oxidative activity increased linearly with Fe(II) concentrations (P oxidative activity occurred in soils under anaerobic conditions, implying the importance of oxidants such as O2 or hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) in addition to Fe(II). Reactions between Fe(II) and H2 O2 generate hydroxyl radical, a strong nonselective oxidant of organic compounds. We found increasing consumption of H2 O2 as soil Fe(II) concentrations increased, suggesting that reactive oxygen species produced by Fe(II) oxidation explained variation in phenol oxidative activity among samples. Amending soils with Fe(II) at field concentrations stimulated short-term C mineralization by up to 270%, likely via a second mechanism. Oxidation of Fe(II) drove a decrease in pH and a monotonic increase in DOC; a decline of two pH units doubled DOC, likely stimulating microbial respiration. We obtained similar results by manipulating soil acidity independently of Fe(II), implying that Fe(II) oxidation affected C substrate availability via pH fluctuations, in addition to producing reactive oxygen species. Iron oxidation coupled to organic matter decomposition contributes to rapid rates of C cycling across humid tropical forests in spite of periodic O2 limitation, and may help explain the rapid turnover of complex C molecules in these soils. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Transformation of vivianite by anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miot, J; Benzerara, K; Morin, G; Bernard, S; Beyssac, O; Larquet, E; Kappler, A; Guyot, F

    2009-06-01

    In phosphate-rich environments, vivianite (Fe(II)(3)(PO(4))(2), 8H(2)O) is an important sink for dissolved Fe(II) and is considered as a very stable mineral due to its low solubility at neutral pH. In the present study, we report the mineralogical transformation of vivianite in cultures of the nitrate-reducing iron-oxidizing bacterial strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II). Vivianite was first transformed into a greenish phase consisting mostly of an amorphous mixed valence Fe-phosphate. This precipitate became progressively orange and the final product of iron oxidation consisted of an amorphous Fe(III)-phosphate. The sub-micrometer analysis by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy of the iron redox state in samples collected at different stages of the culture indicated that iron was progressively oxidized at the contact of the bacteria and at a distance from the cells in extracellular minerals. Iron oxidation in the extracellular minerals was delayed by a few days compared with cell-associated Fe-minerals. This led to strong differences of Fe redox in between these two types of minerals and finally to local heterogeneities of redox within the sample. In the absence of dissolved Fe(II), vivianite was not significantly transformed by BoFeN1. Whereas Fe(II) oxidation at the cell contact is most probably directly catalyzed by the bacteria, vivianite transformation at a distance from the cells might result from oxidation by nitrite. In addition, processes leading to the export of Fe(III) from bacterial oxidation sites to extracellular minerals are discussed including some involving colloids observed by cryo-transmission electron microscopy in the culture medium.

  6. Iron Oxide Minerals in Dust: New Insights from Magnetism, Spectroscopy, and Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R. L.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Goldstein, H. L.; Cattle, S.; Bristow, C. S.; Berquo, T. S.; Kokaly, R. F.

    2016-12-01

    Although iron oxide minerals typically compose only a few weight percent of bulk atmospheric dust, they exert important effects on weather, climate, melting of snow and ice, and ocean fertilization. Moreover, the partition between hematite and goethite is important to know to improve models for radiative effects of ferric oxide minerals. The combination of magnetic property measurements, Mössbauer spectroscopy, reflectance spectroscopy, chemical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy at 9-nm resolution reveals types, sizes, abundances, and occurrences of iron oxide minerals in samples from the 2009 "Red Dawn" dust storm (Australia), the Bodélé Depression (Chad), and dust and dust-source sediments in the American West. In each case, discrete nano-phase and microcrystalline iron oxides, hematite and (or) goethite were identified on and within clay coatings on composite dust particles. "Red Dawn" dust samples across eastern Australia each contained hematite, goethite, and magnetite. Goethite and hematite composed approximately 25-45% of the Fe-bearing phases as indicated by Mössbauer spectroscopy at 300K and 4.2K. Magnetite concentrations (as much as 0.29 wt %) were much higher in eastern, urban sites than in remote western sites (0.01 wt %), suggesting local addition of magnetite from urban sources. In samples from the Bodélé Depression, dominant goethite and subordinate hematite composed about 2% of yellow-reddish dust-source sediments. Magnetite was ubiquitous (0.002-0.57 wt %). The average iron apportionment was 32% in ferric oxide minerals, 1.4 % in magnetite, and 65% in ferric silicates. In all cases, high abundance of ferric oxides correlated with low reflectance, indicating their capacity to absorb solar radiation. Moreover, the high surface-to-volume ratios of ferric oxide nanoparticles may facilitate atmospheric processing and affect iron solubility and bioavailability in marine ecosystems and in human lungs.

  7. In vitro biological validation and cytocompatibility evaluation of hydrogel iron-oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Enrico

    2017-08-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) have recently been investigated for their excellent biocompatibility as well as multi-purpose biomedical potential with promising results, owing to their ability to be targeted and heated by magnetic fields. In this study, novel hydrogel, chitosan Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized for possible use for induced magnetic hyperthermia, and targeted drug delivery. The coating of iron oxide nanoparticles plays a key-role to efficiently improve internalization of nanoparticles in many cell types. Targeting is also highly desirable for these applications. In this regard hydrophilic coating like chitosan was used to improve drug release. Uncoated (Fe3O4)and chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (CS-Fe3O4) were synthesized and characterized from the biological point of view. The aim of this study was to provide an in vitro evaluation of the cytocompatibility of Fe3O4 and CS-Fe3O4 MNPs by using different in vitro evaluation tests. In this context, the cytocompatibility and cytotoxic effects of uncoated and hydrogel chemically-engineered chitosan-coated iron oxide NPs were investigated according to the ISO standard 10993-5:2009. Fe3O4 and CS-Fe3O4 NPs were tested on human mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) by using direct and not direct contact cytotoxicity evaluation tests, by evaluating influence of the iron particles on the cytoskeleton with phalloidin/DAPI staining and in vitro cellular iron uptake with Perl's Prussian blue staining. The results indicate that uncoated and chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are cytocompatible, without negative influence on the cytoskeleton or higher accumulation of iron in the cytoplasm. Therefore, it is encouraging that our data suggest uncoated and chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles have satisfactory proliferative and viability effects on MCF-10A cells. In conclusion data suggest that both MNP types may be differently aimed in biomedical application in relation

  8. Oxidative stability of a heme iron-fortified bakery product: Effectiveness of ascorbyl palmitate and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Mercedes; Bou, Ricard; Tres, Alba; Polo, Javier; Codony, Rafael; Guardiola, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Fortification of food products with iron is a common strategy to prevent or overcome iron deficiency. However, any form of iron is a pro-oxidant and its addition will cause off-flavours and reduce a product's shelf life. A highly bioavailable heme iron ingredient was selected to fortify a chocolate cream used to fill sandwich-type cookies. Two different strategies were assessed for avoiding the heme iron catalytic effect on lipid oxidation: ascorbyl palmitate addition and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate. Oxidation development and sensory acceptability were monitored in the cookies over one-year of storage at room temperature in the dark. The addition of ascorbyl palmitate provided protection against oxidation and loss of tocopherols and tocotrienols during the preparation of cookies. In general, ascorbyl palmitate, either alone or in combination with the co-spray-dried heme iron, prevented primary oxidation and hexanal formation during storage. The combination of both strategies resulted in cookies that were acceptable from a sensory point of view after 1year of storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Production of hydrogen from methane without CO{sub 2}-emission mediated by indium oxide and iron oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Kiyoshi; Mito, Aiko; Takenaka, Sakae; Yamanaka, Ichiro [Tokyo Institute of Tech., Ookayama, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2001-03-01

    Production of hydrogen without CO{sub 2}-emission and a safe storage method of hydrogen are expected for the fuel-cell era in the next century. In order to meet this expectation, the authors proposed a new method for the storage and production of hydrogen from methane mediated by indium and iron oxides. First, methane is decomposed into carbon and hydrogen on a Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalyst at >673 K. The hydrogen is used for the reduction of metal oxides into reduced metal oxides. The reducing potential of hydrogen is preserved in the reduced oxides that can be stored under open-air at room temperature and transported safely. The contact of the reduced oxides with water vapor at 673 K quickly regenerates pure hydrogen without carbon oxides (CO, CO{sub 2}). (author)

  10. Molecular insights of oxidation process of iron nanoparticles: spectroscopic, magnetic, and microscopic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Auffan, Mélanie; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Rose, Jérôme; Olivi, Luca; Borschneck, Daniel; Kvapil, Petr; Jublot, Michael; Kaifas, Delphine; Malleret, Laure; Doumenq, Pierre; Bottero, Jean-Yves

    2014-12-02

    Oxidation behavior of nano-Fe(0) particles in an anoxic environment was determined using different state-of-the-art analytical approaches, including high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) combined with energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and magnetic measurements. Oxidation in controlled experiments was compared in standard double distilled (DD) water, DD water spiked with trichloroethene (TCE), and TCE contaminated site water. Using HR-TEM and EFTEM, we observed a surface oxide layer (∼3 nm) formed immediately after the particles were exposed to water. XAS analysis followed the dynamic change in total metallic iron concentration and iron oxide concentration for the experimental duration of 35 days. The metallic iron concentration in nano-Fe(0) particles exposed to water, was ∼40% after 35 days; in contrast, the samples containing TCE were reduced to ∼15% and even to nil in the case of TCE contaminated site water, suggesting that the contaminants enhance the oxidation of nano-Fe(0). Frequency dependence measurements confirmed the formation of superparamagnetic particles in the system. Overall, our results suggest that nano-Fe(0) oxidized via the Fe(0) - Fe(OH)2 - Fe3O4 - (γ-Fe2O3) route and the formation of superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles due to disruption of the surface oxide layer.

  11. Hydrogen production by ethanol partial oxidation over nano-iron oxide catalysts produced by chemical vapour synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Wael Ahmed Abou Taleb Sayed

    2011-01-13

    This work presents the experimental results of the synthesis of unsupported and supported SiC iron oxide nanoparticles and their catalytic activity towards ethanol partial oxidation. For comparison, further unsupported iron oxide phases were investigated towards the ethanol partial oxidation. These {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase catalysts were prepared by the CVS method using Fe(CO){sub 5} as precursor, supplied by another author. The {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiC nanoparticles were prepared by the CVS method using a home made hot wall reactor technique at atmospheric pressure. Ferrocene and tetramethylsilane were used as precursor for the production process. Process parameters of precursor evaporation temperature, precursor concentration, gas mixture velocity and gas mixture dilution were investigated and optimised to produce particle sizes in a range of 10 nm. For Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiC catalyst series production, a new hot wall reactor setup was used. The particles were produced by simultaneous thermal decomposition of ferrocene and tetramethylsilane in one reactor from both sides. The production parameters of inlet tube distance inside the reactor, precursor evaporation temperature and carrier gas flow were investigated to produce a series of samples with different iron oxide content. The prepared catalysts composition, physical and chemical properties were characterized by XRD, EDX, SEM, BET surface area, FTIR, XPS and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The catalytic activity for the ethanol gas-phase oxidation was investigated in a temperature range from 260 C to 290 C. The product distributions obtained over all catalysts were analysed with mass spectrometry analysis tool. The activity of bulk Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiC nanoparticles was compared with prepared nano-iron oxide phase catalysts. The reaction parameters, such as reaction temperature and O{sub 2}/ethanol ratio were investigated. The catalysts

  12. Bacterial Oxidation and Reduction of Iron in the Processes of Creation and Treatment of Acid Mining Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kupka

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainages (AMDs arise at the weathering of sulphidic minerals. The occurrence of acidic streams is commonly associated with the human mining activities. Due to the disruption and excavation of sulphide deposits, the oxidation processes have initiated. Acidic products of sulphide oxidation accelerate the degradation of accompanying minerals. AMDs typically contain high concentrations of sulfuric acid and soluble metals and cause serious ecological problems due to the water pollution and the devastation of adjacent country. Microbial life in these extremely acidic environments may be considerably diverse. AMDs are abundant in bacteria capable to oxidize and/or to reduce iron. The rate of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron released from pyrite surfaces is up to one million times faster than the chemical oxidation rate at low pH. Bacterial regeneration of ferric iron maintains the continuity of pyrite oxidation and the production of AMDs. Another group of microorganisms living in these environments are acidophilic ferric iron reducing bacteria. This group of microorganisms has been discovered only relatively recently. Acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria reduce ferric iron in either soluble or solid forms to ferrous iron. The reductive dissolution of ferric iron minerals brings about a mobilization of iron as well as associated heavy metals. The Bacterial oxidation and reduction of iron play an important role in the transformation of either crystalline or amorphous iron-containing minerals, including sulphides, oxides, hydroxysulfates, carbonates and silicates. This work discusses the role of acidophilic bacteria in the natural iron cycling and the genesis of acidic effluents. The possibilities of application of iron bacteria in the remediation of AMDs are also considered.

  13. Destructive behavior of iron oxide in projectile impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Wang; Xiaochen, Wang; Quan, Yang; Zhongde, Shan

    2017-12-01

    The damage strain values of Q235-A surface oxide scale were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS) and universal tensile testing machine. The finite element simulation was carried out to study the destruction effects of oxidation at different impact rates. The results show that the damage value of the oxide strain is 0.08%. With the increase of the projectile velocity, the damage area of the oxide scale is increased, and the damage area is composed of the direct destruction area and the indirect failure area. The indirect damage area is caused by the stress/strain to the surrounding expansion after the impact of the steel body.

  14. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of oxyhemoglobin by biologically active iron thiosemicarbazone complexes: relevance to iron-chelator-induced methemoglobinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Maram T; Rodríguez, Carlos; Richardson, Des R; Martínez, Manuel; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2014-03-01

    The oxidation of oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin has been found to be facilitated by low molecular weight iron(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes. This deleterious reaction, which produces hemoglobin protein units unable to bind dioxygen and occurs during the administration of iron chelators such as the well-known 3-aminopyridine-2-pyridinecarbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP; Triapine), has been observed in the reaction with Fe(III) complexes of some members of the 3-AP structurally-related thiosemicarbazone ligands derived from di-2-pyridyl ketone (HDpxxT series). We have studied the kinetics of this oxidation reaction in vitro using human hemoglobin and found that the reaction proceeds with two distinct time-resolved steps. These have been associated with sequential oxidation of the two different oxyheme cofactors in the α and β protein chains. Unexpected steric and hydrogen-bonding effects on the Fe(III) complexes appear to be the responsible for the observed differences in the reaction rate across the series of HDpxxT ligand complexes used in this study.

  15. Measuring the Kinetics of the Reduction of Iron Oxide with Carbon Monoxide in a Fluidized Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnt, C. D.; Cleeton, J. P.; Miiller, C. M.; Scotr, S. A.; Dennis, J. S.

    Combusting a solid fuel in the presence of a metal oxide rather than air, chemical looping combustion, generates CO2suitable for sequestration and the reduced metal. For the case of iron, the reduced oxide can be re-oxidized with steam to produce high-purity hydrogen. The reduction reactions of iron oxide in carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide mixtures were investigated in a fluidized bed. Activation energies and pre-exponential factors for the reactions (i) 3 Fe2O3+CO⇌2 Fe3O4+CO2 and⇌(ii)0.947 Fe3O4+0.788 CO⇌3 Fe0.947O+0.788 CO2⇌were determined. The reaction order was verified to be unity, and the change in rate with conversion was examined.

  16. The Modification of Carbon with Iron Oxide Synthesized in Electrolysis Using the Arc Discharge Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endah Saraswati, Teguh; Dewi Indah Prasiwi, Oktaviana; Masykur, Abu; Handayani, Nestri; Anwar, Miftahul

    2017-02-01

    The modification of carbon-based nanomaterials with metals is widely studied due to its unique properties. Here, the modification of carbon nanomaterial with iron oxide has been successfully carried out. This modification was achieved using arc discharge in 50% ethanol liquid media. The anode used in the arc discharge was prepared from a mixture of carbon and iron oxide that was synthesized in electrolysis and was then calcined at 250°C with silicon binder with a mass ratio of 3:1:1, and the cathode used was graphite rod. Both electrodes were set in the nearest gap that could provide an arc during arc-discharging, leading to carbon-based nanoparticle formation. The diffractogram pattern of the X-ray diffraction of the fabricated nanoparticles confirmed the typical peak of carbon, iron oxide and iron. The magnetization value of the result analysis of the vibrating sample magnetometer was 9.9 emu/g. The bandgap energy measurement using diffuse reflectance ultra violet was estimated to be 2.18 eV. Using the transmission electron microscopy, the structure of the nanomaterial produced was observed as carbon-encapsulated iron compound nanoparticles.

  17. On the kinetics of the initial oxidation of iron and iron nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graat, P.C.J.; Somers, Marcel A.J.; Mittemeijer, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    The initial oxidation of alfa-Fe and epsilon Fe2N1-x was investigated. Prior to oxidation the sample surfaces were either sputter cleaned with Ar+ ions or sputter cleaned followed by annealing. It was shown that the sputter cleaning pretreatment of epsilon Fe2N1-x led to a reduction of the N...... concentration in the surface region; subsequent annealing at 573 K led to restoration of the N concentration. Oxidation in pure O2 (generally pO2 1•10 4 Pa) was performed at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 600 K. The oxidised samples were investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS......), ellipsometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM). The oxidation kinetics, as determined with ellipsometry, were described theoretically with the model due to Fromhold and Cook, adopting time-dependent work functions of the metal-oxide and oxide-oxygen interfaces. The calculated...

  18. The production of iron oxide during peridotite serpentinization: Influence of pyroxene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifang Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Serpentinization produces molecular hydrogen (H2 that can support communities of microorganisms in hydrothermal fields; H2 results from the oxidation of ferrous iron in olivine and pyroxene into ferric iron, and consequently iron oxide (magnetite or hematite forms. However, the mechanisms that control H2 and iron oxide formation are poorly constrained. In this study, we performed serpentinization experiments at 311 °C and 3.0 kbar on olivine (with <5% pyroxene, orthopyroxene, and peridotite. The results show that serpentine and iron oxide formed when olivine and orthopyroxene individually reacted with a saline starting solution. Olivine-derived serpentine had a significantly lower FeO content (6.57 ± 1.30 wt.% than primary olivine (9.86 wt.%, whereas orthopyroxene-derived serpentine had a comparable FeO content (6.26 ± 0.58 wt.% to that of primary orthopyroxene (6.24 wt.%. In experiments on peridotite, olivine was replaced by serpentine and iron oxide. However, pyroxene transformed solely to serpentine. After 20 days, olivine-derived serpentine had a FeO content of 8.18 ± 1.56 wt.%, which was significantly higher than that of serpentine produced in olivine-only experiments. By contrast, serpentine after orthopyroxene had a slightly higher FeO content (6.53 ± 1.01 wt.% than primary orthopyroxene. Clinopyroxene-derived serpentine contained a significantly higher FeO content than its parent mineral. After 120 days, the FeO content of olivine-derived serpentine decreased significantly (5.71 ± 0.35 wt.%, whereas the FeO content of orthopyroxene-derived serpentine increased (6.85 ± 0.63 wt.% over the same period. This suggests that iron oxide preferentially formed after olivine serpentinization. Pyroxene in peridotite gained some Fe from olivine during the serpentinization process, which may have led to a decrease in iron oxide production. The correlation between FeO content and SiO2 or Al2O3 content in olivine- and

  19. The Effects of Iron Oxidation State on Clay Swelling,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-07

    polyimide . The septum was supported by a PVC washer. A rubber gasket was placed between the washer and the rim of the tube to form an air-tight seal...the sample; (ii) addition of chemical reducing mineral nontronite (API no. H33a), a ferrous con- agents such as hydroxylamine hydrochloride and...total iron der both fluorescent and incandescent li~jhting, which determinations, varying amounts of hydroxylamine emit only wavelengths greater than

  20. Mossbauer Characterization of Iron Oxide Nanoclusters Grown within Aluminosilicate Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    2Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas , Universidad Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Peru. 3Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas , Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. ABSTRACT...Mtssbauer spectroscopy uses the resonant absorption of nuclear radiation by S7Fe to probe the electronic and internal magnetic structure of iron based...nanocomposites. Mtssbauer spectroscopy [7] uses the resonant absorption of nuclear radiation by the 5 Fe-nucleus to probe the electronic and internal magnetic

  1. Biomineralogy and Morphology of the Marine Iron-oxidizing Bacterium Mariprofundus ferrooxydans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C. S.; Emerson, D.; Edwards, K. J.

    2006-12-01

    Mariprofundus ferrooxydans strain PV-1 is a lithoautotrophic iron-oxidizing proteobacterium isolated from the Loihi Seamount in Hawaii. As cells grow, they form filaments upon which iron minerals are deposited. Based on similarities in morphology, these structures appear to accumulate and form the bulk of iron mats at Loihi. Furthermore, Mariprofundus has been observed in a number of other seafloor mat samples (e.g. by microscopy and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of East Pacific Rise samples, C. M. Santelli unpublished data), suggesting that the occurrence of Mariprofundus is widespread. To learn about the effect of Mariprofundus on iron cycling, we are studying the processes by which it oxidizes iron and influences iron mineral formation. We are conducting studies on the spatial relationships between the cells, stalks, and minerals using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Identification and imaging of stalk-bound, nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide minerals is being performed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We have developed sample preparation methods to preserve in vivo spatial relationships, involving direct colonization of sample holders in cultures and in the environment. Method development has been performed on stalk-forming, iron-oxidizing Gallionella ferruginea cultures and terrestrial iron mats. Gallionella is morphologically and physiologically very similar to Mariprofundus, although 16S rRNA gene phylogeny shows that they are not closely related. Comparison of the terrestrial and marine iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) gives us insight into adaptations that are particular to marine iron-oxidizers and those that are common to all FeOB. Light and fluorescence microscopy of Mariprofundus cultures has shown that a single bean-shaped cell lies at the end of each filament. SEM and TEM results have revealed that the filament is ribbon-like, sometimes twisted as with the classic Gallionella stalk, but sometimes not

  2. Preparation and characterization of κ-carrageenase immobilized onto magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Anfeng Xiao; Caiyun Xu; Yan Lin; Hui Ni; Yanbing Zhu; Huinong Cai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized via chemical co-precipitation method and modified with oleic acid which was oxidized by potassium permanganate, and κ-carrageenase from Pseudoalteromonas sp. ASY5 was subsequently immobilized onto them. The immobilization conditions were further optimized, and the characterizations of the immobilized κ-carrageenase were investigated. Results: The κ-carrageenase was immobilized onto magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles...

  3. Study of oxidized iron thin films by non-Rutherford elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Villacorta, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: felixjv@icmm.csic.es; Munoz-Martin, A. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Prieto, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-08-15

    Rutherford and non-Rutherford elastic scattering analyses have been performed to characterize oxidized iron thin films grown by sputtering. The oxygen depth profiles along the thickness of all the samples have been studied in order to unravel the oxidation process of these samples. The oxygen concentration along the film was related to the sample preparation parameters, resulting in a strong dependence of oxygen depth profile on the substrate temperature during deposition.

  4. Nitric oxide maintains cell survival of Trichomonas vaginalis upon iron depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Hung; Huang, Kuo-Yang; Huang, Po-Jung; Hsu, Jo-Hsuan; Fang, Yi-Kai; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Tang, Petrus

    2015-07-25

    Iron plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative agent of highly prevalent human trichomoniasis. T. vaginalis resides in the vaginal region, where the iron concentration is constantly changing. Hence, T. vaginalis must adapt to variations in iron availability to establish and maintain an infection. The free radical signaling molecules reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have been proven to participate in iron deficiency in eukaryotes. However, little is known about the roles of these molecules in iron-deficient T. vaginalis. T. vaginalis cultured in iron-rich and -deficient conditions were collected for all experiments in this study. Next generation RNA sequencing was conducted to investigate the impact of iron on transcriptome of T. vaginalis. The cell viabilities were monitored after the trophozoites treated with the inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (L-NG-monomethyl arginine, L-NMMA) and proteasome (MG132). Hydrogenosomal membrane potential was measured using JC-1 staining. We demonstrated that NO rather than ROS accumulates in iron-deficient T. vaginalis. The level of NO was blocked by MG132 and L-NMMA, indicating that NO production is through a proteasome and arginine dependent pathway. We found that the inhibition of proteasome activity shortened the survival of iron-deficient cells compared with untreated iron-deficient cells. Surprisingly, the addition of arginine restored both NO level and the survival of proteasome-inhibited cells, suggesting that proteasome-derived NO is crucial for cell survival under iron-limited conditions. Additionally, NO maintains the hydrogenosomal membrane potential, a determinant for cell survival, emphasizing the cytoprotective effect of NO on iron-deficient T. vaginalis. Collectively, we determined that NO produced by the proteasome prolonged the survival of iron-deficient T. vaginalis via maintenance of the hydrogenosomal functions. The findings in this

  5. Oxidative stress response in neural stem cells exposed to different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongrac, Igor M; Pavičić, Ivan; Milić, Mirta; Brkić Ahmed, Lada; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Vinković Vrček, Ivana; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Biocompatibility, safety, and risk assessments of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are of the highest priority in researching their application in biomedicine. One improvement in the biological properties of SPIONs may be achieved by different functionalization and surface modifications. This study aims to investigate how a different surface functionalization of SPIONs - uncoated, coated with d-mannose, or coated with poly-l-lysine - affects biocompatibility. We sought to investigate murine neural stem cells (NSCs) as important model system for regenerative medicine. To reveal the possible mechanism of toxicity of SPIONs on NSCs, levels of reactive oxygen species, intracellular glutathione, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell-membrane potential, DNA damage, and activities of SOD and GPx were examined. Even in cases where reactive oxygen species levels were significantly lowered in NSCs exposed to SPIONs, we found depleted intracellular glutathione levels, altered activities of SOD and GPx, hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, dissipated cell-membrane potential, and increased DNA damage, irrespective of the surface coating applied for SPION stabilization. Although surface coating should prevent the toxic effects of SPIONs, our results showed that all of the tested SPION types affected the NSCs similarly, indicating that mitochondrial homeostasis is their major cellular target. Despite the claimed biomedical benefits of SPIONs, the refined determination of their effects on various cellular functions presented in this work highlights the need for further safety evaluations. This investigation helps to fill the knowledge gaps on the criteria that should be considered in evaluating the biocompatibility and safety of novel nanoparticles.

  6. Iron Oxide Arrays Prepared from Ferrocene- and Silsesquioxane-Containing Block Copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raita Goseki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrays of iron oxides as precursors of iron clusters were prepared by oxygen plasma treatment of block copolymer microphase-separated nanostructures in thin films. Block copolymers composed of ferrocene-containing and silsesquioxane-containing polymethacrylate (PMAPOSS-b-PMAHFC were successfully prepared, with different molecular weights and compositions and narrow molecular weight distributions, by living anionic polymerization. The formed microphase-separated nanostructures in the bulk were characterized by wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS and SAXS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Thin films were prepared from a solution of PMAPOSS-b-PMAHFC in tetrahydrofuran by spin coating onto silicon wafers. Fingerprint-type line nanostructures were formed in the PMAPOSS-b-PMAHFCs thin films after solvent annealing with carbon disulfide. Oxygen plasma treatment provided the final line arrays of iron oxides based on the formed nanostructural patterns.

  7. H{sub 2} from biosyngas via iron reduction and oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straus, J.; Terry, P. [H Power Corp., Belleville, NJ (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The production of hydrogen from the steam-oxidation of iron is a long-known phenomenon. The rise in interest in the production and storage of hydrogen justifies the examination of this process (and of the reverse process, the reduction of iron oxide) for commercial use. Under NREL subcontract ZAR-4-13294-02, a process simulation program was developed and used as a design tool to analyze various configurations of the iron-hydrogen purification/storage scheme. Specifically, analyses were performed to determine the effectiveness of this scheme in conjunction with biomass-derived gasified fuel streams (biosyngas). The results of the computer simulations led to a selection of a two-stage iron oxide reduction process incorporating interstage water and CO{sub 2} removal. Thermal analysis shows that the iron-hydrogen process would yield essentially the same quantity of clean hydrogen per unit of biomass as the conventional route. The iron-hydrogen process benefits from the excellent match potentially achievable between the otherwise-unusable energy fraction in the off-gas of the reduction reactor and the parasitic thermal, mechanical and electrical energy needs of some typical gasifier systems. The program simulations and economic analysis suggest that clean hydrogen from biomass feedstock could cost about 20% less via the iron-hydrogen method than by conventional methods of purification (using the same feedstock). Cost analyses show that lower capital costs would be incurred in generating clean hydrogen by utilizing this approach, especially in response to the fluctuating demand profile of a utility.

  8. LA-ICP-MS Allows Quantitative Microscopy of Europium-Doped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and is a Possible Alternative to Ambiguous Prussian Blue Iron Staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharlach, Constantin; Müller, Larissa; Wagner, Susanne; Kobayashi, Yuske; Kratz, Harald; Ebert, Monika; Jakubowski, Norbert; Schellenberger, Eyk

    2016-05-01

    The development of iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications requires accurate histological evaluation. Prussian blue iron staining is widely used but may be unspecific when tissues contain substantial endogenous iron. Here we tested whether microscopy by laser ablation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is sensitive enough to analyze accumulation of very small iron oxide particles (VSOP) doped with europium in tissue sections. For synthesis of VSOP, a fraction of Fe3+ (5 wt%) was replaced by Eu3+, resulting in particles with 0.66 mol% europium relative to iron (Eu-VSOP) but with otherwise similar properties as VSOP. Eu-VSOP or VSOP was intravenously injected into ApoE-/- mice on Western cholesterol diet and accumulated in atherosclerotic plaques of these animals. Prussian blue staining was positive for ApoE-/- mice with particle injection but also for controls. LA-ICP-MS microscopy resulted in sensitive and specific detection of the europium of Eu-VSOP in liver and atherosclerotic plaques. Furthermore, calibration with Eu-VSOP allowed calculation of iron and particle concentrations in tissue sections. The combination of europium-doped iron oxide particles and LA-ICP-MS microscopy provides a new tool for specific and quantitative analysis of particle distribution at the tissue level and allows correlation with other elements such as endogenous iron.

  9. Vulnerability of Prepubertal Mice Testis to Iron Induced Oxidative Dysfunctions In Vivo and Functional Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyagaraju BM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study describes the susceptibility of prepubertal testis of mice toprooxidant induced oxidative impairments both under in vitro and in vivo exposure conditions.Materials and Methods: Following in vitro exposure to iron (5,10 and 25 M, oxidative responsemeasured in terms of lipid peroxidation and hydroperoxide levels in testis of pre pubertal mice (4wk was more robust compared to that of pubertal mice (6 wk.Results: Further, in an in vivo study, pre pubertal mice administered (i.p sub lethal doses (12.5,25 and 50mg/100g bw/d, 5d of Iron dextran, showed significant induction of oxidative stressresponse in testis cytosol and mitochondria manifested as lipid peroxidation, generation of reactiveoxygen species, hydroperoxide levels and enhanced protein carbonyl levels (a measure of proteinoxidation. Diminished levels of GSH and total thiols in both cytosol and mitochondria of testissuggested an altered redox state. Significant perturbations in the activities of antioxidant enzymessuch as glutathione transferase, glutathione peroxidase and SOD were discernible suggesting theongoing oxidative stress in vivo. These oxidative impairments were accompanied by functionalimplications in testis as reflected in the altered activities of dehydrogenases and reduced activitiesof both 3 - and 17 -hydroxysteriod dehydrogenase.Conclusion: Collectively, these data provide an account of the susceptibility of prepubertal testisto iron-induced oxidative stress, associated functional consequences and this model is being furtherexploited for understanding the implications on the physiology of testis and consequent effect onfertility.

  10. Melting and freezing of ice in relation to iron oxidation of meteorites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubá, J.; Kletetschka, Günther

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, Supplement 1 SI (2015) ISSN 1086-9379. [Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society /78./. 27.07.2015-31.07.2015, Berkeley] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : meteorites * iron oxidation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  11. In-Situ Regeneration of Saturated Granular Activated Carbon by an Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) can remove trace organic pollutants and natural organic matter (NOM) from industrial and municipal waters. This paper evaluates an iron nanocatalyst approach, based on Fenton-like oxidation reactions, to regenerate spent GAC within a packed bed con...

  12. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Based Magnetic Ink Development for Fully Printed Tunable Radio-Frequency Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Vaseem, Mohammad

    2018-01-30

    The field of printed electronics is still in its infancy and most of the reported work is based on commercially available nanoparticle-based metallic inks. Although fully printed devices that employ dielectric/semiconductor inks have recently been reported, there is a dearth of functional inks that can demonstrate controllable devices. The lack of availability of functional inks is a barrier to the widespread use of fully printed devices. For radio-frequency electronics, magnetic materials have many uses in reconfigurable components but rely on expensive and rigid ferrite materials. A suitable magnetic ink can facilitate the realization of fully printed, magnetically controlled, tunable devices. This report presents the development of an iron oxide nanoparticle-based magnetic ink. First, a tunable inductor is fully printed using iron oxide nanoparticle-based magnetic ink. Furthermore, iron oxide nanoparticles are functionalized with oleic acid to make them compatible with a UV-curable SU8 solution. Functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles are successfully embedded in the SU8 matrix to make a magnetic substrate. The as-fabricated substrate is characterized for its magnetostatic and microwave properties. A frequency tunable printed patch antenna is demonstrated using the magnetic and in-house silver-organo-complex inks. This is a step toward low-cost, fully printed, controllable electronic components.

  13. Iron Amendment and Fenton Oxidation of MTBE-Spent Granular Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton-driven regeneration of Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves Fe amendment to the GAC to catalyze H2O2 reactions and to enhance the rate of MTBE oxidation and GAC regeneration. Four forms of iron (ferric sulfate, ferric chloride, fer...

  14. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in an iron-rich Danish freshwater lake sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordi, Katrin á; Thamdrup, Bo; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater systems are identified as one of the main natural methane sources, but little is known about the importance of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in these systems. We investigated AOM in a lake sediment characterized by a high reactive iron content, normal sulfate concentrations in t...

  15. Vapour phase approach for iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis from solid precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mandeep; Ulbrich, Pavel; Prokopec, Vadym; Svoboda, Pavel; Šantavá, Eva; Štěpánek, František

    2013-04-01

    A new non-solution mediated approach to the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles directly from solid FeCl2 salt precursors has been developed. The method is rapid, simple and scalable. The structural properties and the phase of the resulting iron oxide particles has been determined by a range of methods including XRD, FT-IR and Mössbauer spectroscopy, and the phase is shown to be maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). The magnetic properties of the iron oxide particles have been measured using SQUID, confirming superparamagnetic behaviour of the powder and a saturation magnetization of 53.0 emu g-1 at 300 K. Aqueous dispersions at increasing concentrations were prepared and their heating rate under a 400 kHz alternating magnetic field measured. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of the iron oxide was found to be 84.8 W g-1, which makes the material suitable for the formulation of ferrofluids or ferrogels with RF heating properties.

  16. Iron oxide impregnated filter paper (Pi test): a review of its development and methodological research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chardon, W.J.; Menon, R.G.; Chien, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    Iron oxide impregnated filter paper (FeO paper) has been used to study the availability of phosphorus (P) to plants and algae, P desorption kinetics and P dynamics in the field. Since its initial development a number of differences in the method of preparation of the paper and its application have

  17. Oxidative damage and photosynthetic impairment in tropical rice cultivars upon exposure to excess iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel de Souza Pinto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Iron plays a pivotal role in the redox reactions of photosynthesis and metabolic processes such as chlorophyll synthesis. Iron availability in waterlogged soils can reach toxic levels and promote oxidative stress. Fe toxicity is the most concerning of stresses for rice in many lowland environments around the world and may cause severe impairments in rice photosynthesis. This study aimed to investigate the extension of oxidative stress after excess Fe exposure and its effects on the photosynthesis of rice cultivars with differential sensitivity. Three Brazilian rice cultivars (EPAGRI 107, BRSMG SELETA and BR IRGA 409 were grown in Hoagland nutrient solution (pH 4.0 with two Fe-EDTA doses corresponding to excess Fe (7 mM and control (0.009 mM treatments. After just three days of excess Fe exposure, there was a significant increase in iron concentration in the shoots. The BR IRGA 409 cultivar exhibited higher Fe accumulation in its shoots, and the EPAGRI 107 cultivar recorded the lowest values, which were below the critical toxicity level, as a resistance strategy. Impairment in light energy partitioning and oxidative damage became evident before changes in stomatal resistance, chlorophyll content, maximal PSII quantum yield or visual symptoms for the most sensitive cultivar (BR IRGA 409. The photosynthesis limitations, in addition to the impairment of excess energy dissipation in rice from iron toxicity, are the results of oxidative damage.

  18. On the use of Mossbauer spectroscopy for characterisation of iron oxides and oxyhydroxides in soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Ostenfeld, Christopher Worsøe

    2001-01-01

    An empirical expression for the dependence of the magnetic hyperfine field on the aluminium content and the particle size in iron oxides and oxyhydroxides is often used in Mossbauer studies of soil samples. According to this expression, the reduction of the hyperfine field in nanometer...

  19. The Oxidation of Iron: Experiment, Simulation, and Analysis in Introductory Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Frederic E.

    2015-01-01

    In this exercise, an actual chemical reaction, oxidation of iron in air, is studied along with a related analogue simulation of that reaction. The rusting of steel wool is carried out as a class effort. The parallel simulation is performed by students working in small groups. The analogue for the reacting gas is a countable set of discrete marble…

  20. Soluble microbial products decrease pyrite oxidation by ferric iron at pH < 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacob, Tesfayohanes; Pandey, Sachin; Silverstein, Joann; Rajaram, Harihar

    2013-08-06

    Research on microbial activity in acid mine drainage (AMD) has focused on transformations of iron and sulfur. However, carbon cycling, including formation of soluble microbial products (SMP) from cell growth and decay, is an important biogeochemical component of the AMD environment. Experiments were conducted to study the interaction of SMP with soluble ferric iron in acidic conditions, particularly the formation of complexes that inhibit its effectiveness as the primary oxidant of pyrite during AMD generation. The rate of pyrite oxidation by ferric iron in sterile suspensions at pH 1.8 was reduced by 87% in the presence of SMP produced from autoclaved cells at a ratio of 0.3 mg DOC per mg total soluble ferric iron. Inhibition of pyrite oxidation by SMP was shown to be comparable to, but weaker than, the effect of a chelating synthetic siderophore, DFAM. Two computational models incorporating SMP complexation were fitted to experimental results. Results suggest that bacterially produced organic matter can play a role in slowing pyrite oxidation.

  1. Relating Magnetic Properties and High Hyperthermia Performance of Iron Oxide Nanoflowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Philipp; Fock, Jeppe; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2018-01-01

    We investigated in depth the interrelations among structure, magnetic properties, relaxation dynamics and magnetic hyperthermia performance of magnetic nanoflowers. The nanoflowers are about 39 nm in size, and consist of densely packed iron oxide cores. They display a remanent magnetization, which...

  2. Toxicity assessment of iron oxide nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio early life stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshan Zhu

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles have been explored recently for their beneficial applications in many biomedical areas, in environmental remediation, and in various industrial applications. However, potential risks have also been identified with the release of nanoparticles into the environment. To study the ecological effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on aquatic organisms, we used early life stages of the zebrafish (Danio rerio to examine such effects on embryonic development in this species. The results showed that ≥10 mg/L of iron oxide nanoparticles instigated developmental toxicity in these embryos, causing mortality, hatching delay, and malformation. Moreover, an early life stage test using zebrafish embryos/larvae is also discussed and recommended in this study as an effective protocol for assessing the potential toxicity of nanoparticles. This study is one of the first on developmental toxicity in fish caused by iron oxide nanoparticles in aquatic environments. The results will contribute to the current understanding of the potential ecotoxicological effects of nanoparticles and support the sustainable development of nanotechnology.

  3. Neutrophilic Iron Oxidizing Bacteria: Occurrence and Relevance in Biological Drinking Water Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    Rapid sand filtration (RSF) is an economical way to treat anoxic groundwater around the world. It consists of groundwater aeration followed by passage through a sand filter. The oxidation and removal of ferrous iron, which is commonly found in anoxic groundwaters, is often believed to be a fully...

  4. Neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria: occurrence and relevance in biological drinking water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Rapid sand filtration (RSF) is an economical way to treat anoxic groundwater around the world. It consists of groundwater aeration followed by passage through a sand filter. The oxidation and removal of ferrous iron, which is commonly found in anoxic groundwaters, is often believed to be a fully...

  5. Integrated iron(II) oxidation and limestone neutralisation of acid mine water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maree, JP

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Volumetric iron (II) oxidation rates exceeding 100 g/(l.d) were achieved by dosing powdered limestone to a bio-reactor treating artificial acid mine water. Neutralisation and partial sulphate removal were achieved as well. The rate is highly...

  6. Iron(III) porphyrin-catalysed oxidation reactions by m-chloro ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Dedicated to the memory of the late Professor Bhaskar G Maiya. *For correspondence. Iron(III) porphyrin-catalysed oxidation reactions by m-chloro- perbenzoic acid: Nature of reactive intermediates. A AGARWALA, V BAGCHI and D BANDYOPADHYAY*. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi ...

  7. Enhanced Adsorption of Selenium Ions from Aqueous Solution Using Iron Oxide Impregnated Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakather, Omer Y; Kayvani Fard, Ahmad; Ihsanullah; Khraisheh, Majeda; Nasser, Mustafa S; Atieh, Muataz Ali

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the potential of raw and iron oxide impregnated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as adsorbents for the removal of selenium (Se) ions from wastewater. The original and modified CNTs with different loadings of Fe2O3 nanoparticles were characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), zeta potential, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The adsorption parameters of the selenium ions from water using raw CNTs and iron oxide impregnated carbon nanotubes (CNT-Fe2O3) were optimized. Total removal of 1 ppm Se ions from water was achieved when 25 mg of CNTs impregnated with 20 wt.% of iron oxide nanoparticles is used. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were used to study the nature of the adsorption process. Pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order models were employed to study the kinetics of selenium ions adsorption onto the surface of iron oxide impregnated CNTs. Maximum adsorption capacity of the Fe2O3 impregnated CNTs, predicted by Langmuir isotherm model, was found to be 111 mg/g. This new finding might revolutionize the adsorption treatment process and application by introducing a new type of nanoadsorbent that has super adsorption capacity towards Se ions.

  8. First enantioselective iron-porphyrin-catalyzed sulfide oxidation with aqueous hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maux, Paul; Simonneaux, Gérard

    2011-06-28

    The asymmetric oxidation of sulfides by H(2)O(2) to give optically active sulfoxides (ee up to 90%) was carried out in methanol and water using chiral water-soluble iron porphyrins as catalysts. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  9. Biocompatible Colloidal Suspensions Based on Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization and Toxicological Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coricovac, Dorina-Elena; Moacă, Elena-Alina; Pinzaru, Iulia; Cîtu, Cosmin; Soica, Codruta; Mihali, Ciprian-Valentin; Păcurariu, Cornelia; Tutelyan, Victor A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Dehelean, Cristina-Adriana

    2017-01-01

    The use of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedicine has evolved intensely in the recent years due to the multiple applications of these nanomaterials, mainly in domains like cancer. The aim of the present study was: (i) to develop biocompatible colloidal suspensions based on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as future theranostic tools for skin pathology and (ii) to test their effects in vitro on human keratinocytes (HaCat cells) and in vivo by employing an animal model of acute dermal toxicity. Biocompatible colloidal suspensions were obtained by coating the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles resulted during the solution combustion synthesis with a double layer of oleic acid, as innovative procedure in increasing bioavailability. The colloidal suspensions were characterized in terms of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in vitro effects of these suspensions were tested by means of Alamar blue assay and the noxious effects at skin level were measured using non-invasive methods. The in vitro results indicated a lack of toxicity on normal human cells induced by the iron oxide nanoparticles colloidal suspensions after an exposure of 24 h to different concentrations (5, 10, and 25 μg·mL -1 ). The dermal acute toxicity test showed that the topical applications of the colloidal suspensions on female and male SKH-1 hairless mice were not associated with significant changes in the quality of barrier skin function.

  10. Anaerobic oxidation of methane alters sediment records of sulfur, iron and phosphorus in the Black Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, M.J.; Kraal, P.; Jilbert, T.S.; Sulu-Gambari, F.A.; Sapart, C.J.; Roeckmann, T.; Slomp, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    The surface sediments in the Black Sea are underlain by extensive deposits of iron (Fe)-oxide-rich lake sediments that were deposited prior to the inflow of marine Mediterranean Sea waters ca. 9000 years ago. The subsequent downward diffusion of marine sulfate into the methane-bearing lake sediments

  11. Antibacterial Efficacy of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles against Biofilms on Different Biomaterial Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Thukkaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm growth on the implant surface is the number one cause of the failure of the implants. Biofilms on implant surfaces are hard to eliminate by antibiotics due to the protection offered by the exopolymeric substances that embed the organisms in a matrix, impenetrable for most antibiotics and immune cells. Application of metals in nanoscale is considered to resolve biofilm formation. Here we studied the effect of iron-oxide nanoparticles over biofilm formation on different biomaterial surfaces and pluronic coated surfaces. Bacterial adhesion for 30 min showed significant reduction in bacterial adhesion on pluronic coated surfaces compared to other surfaces. Subsequently, bacteria were allowed to grow for 24 h in the presence of different concentrations of iron-oxide nanoparticles. A significant reduction in biofilm growth was observed in the presence of the highest concentration of iron-oxide nanoparticles on pluronic coated surfaces compared to other surfaces. Therefore, combination of polymer brush coating and iron-oxide nanoparticles could show a significant reduction in biofilm formation.

  12. Fabrication of iron-cerium mixed oxide: an efficient photocatalyst for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report herein the fabrication of nanostructured and mesoporous iron-cerium mixed oxides for photocatalytic application. Phase, electronic structure and other properties of the products were characterized by both low-angle and wide-angle X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, transmission electron ...

  13. Hydration lubrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klein, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The hydration lubrication paradigm, whereby hydration layers are both strongly held by the charges they surround, and so can support large pressures without being squeezed out, and at the same time...

  14. Controlling lipid oxidation via a biomimetic iron chelating active packaging material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fang; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2013-12-18

    Previously, a siderophore-mimetic metal chelating active packaging film was developed by grafting poly(hydroxamic acid) (PHA) from the surface of polypropylene (PP) films. The objective of the current work was to demonstrate the potential applicability of this PP-g-PHA film to control iron-promoted lipid oxidation in food emulsions. The iron chelating activity of this film was investigated, and the surface chemistry and color intensity of films were also analyzed after iron chelation. In comparison to the iron chelating activity in the free Fe(3+) solution, the PP-g-PHA film retained approximately 50 and 30% of its activity in nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)/Fe(3+) and citric acid/Fe(3+) solutions, respectively (pH 5.0), indicating a strong chelating strength for iron. The ability of PP-g-PHA films to control lipid oxidation was demonstrated in a model emulsion system (pH 3.0). PP-g-PHA films performed even better than ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in preventing the formation of volatile oxidation products. The particle size and ζ potential results of emulsions indicated that PP-g-PHA films had no adverse effects on the stability of the emulsion system. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analysis suggested a non-migratory nature of the PP-g-PHA film surface. These results suggest that such biomimetic, non-migratory metal chelating active packaging films have commercial potential in protecting foods against iron-promoted lipid oxidation.

  15. Iron-Mediated Oxidation of Methoxyhydroquinone under Dark Conditions: Kinetic and Mechanistic Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiu; Davis, James A; Nico, Peter S

    2016-02-16

    Despite the biogeochemical significance of the interactions between natural organic matter (NOM) and iron species, considerable uncertainty still remains as to the exact processes contributing to the rates and extents of complexation and redox reactions between these important and complex environmental components. Investigations on the reactivity of low-molecular-weight quinones, which are believed to be key redox active compounds within NOM, toward iron species, could provide considerable insight into the kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving NOM and iron. In this study, the oxidation of 2-methoxyhydroquinone (MH2Q) by ferric iron (Fe(III)) under dark conditions in the absence and presence of oxygen was investigated within a pH range of 4-6. Although Fe(III) was capable of stoichiometrically oxidizing MH2Q under anaerobic conditions, catalytic oxidation of MH2Q was observed in the presence of O2 due to further cycling between oxygen, semiquinone radicals, and iron species. A detailed kinetic model was developed to describe the predominant mechanisms, which indicated that both the undissociated and monodissociated anions of MH2Q were kinetically active species toward Fe(III) reduction, with the monodissociated anion being the key species accounting for the pH dependence of the oxidation. The generated radical intermediates, namely semiquinone and superoxide, are of great importance in reaction-chain propagation. The kinetic model may provide critical insight into the underlying mechanisms of the thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of metal-organic interactions and assist in understanding and predicting the factors controlling iron and organic matter transformation and bioavailability in aquatic systems.

  16. Conductive iron oxide minerals accelerate syntrophic cooperation in methanogenic benzoate degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Li; Tang, Jia; Wang, Yueqiang; Hu, Min; Zhou, Shungui, E-mail: sgzhou@soil.gd.cn

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Paddy soil contaminated with benzoate incubated with hematite and magnetite. • Iron oxides addition enhanced methanogenic benzoate degradation by 25–53%. • The facilitated syntrophy might involve direct interspecies electron transfer. • Bacillaceae, Peptococcaceae, and Methanobacterium are potentially involved. - Abstract: Recent studies have suggested that conductive iron oxide minerals can facilitate syntrophic metabolism of the methanogenic degradation of organic matter, such as ethanol, propionate and butyrate, in natural and engineered microbial ecosystems. This enhanced syntrophy involves direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) powered by microorganisms exchanging metabolic electrons through electrically conductive minerals. Here, we evaluated the possibility that conductive iron oxides (hematite and magnetite) can stimulate the methanogenic degradation of benzoate, which is a common intermediate in the anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds. The results showed that 89–94% of the electrons released from benzoate oxidation were recovered in CH{sub 4} production, and acetate was identified as the only carbon-bearing intermediate during benzoate degradation. Compared with the iron-free controls, the rates of methanogenic benzoate degradation were enhanced by 25% and 53% in the presence of hematite and magnetite, respectively. This stimulatory effect probably resulted from DIET-mediated methanogenesis in which electrons transfer between syntrophic partners via conductive iron minerals. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that Bacillaceae, Peptococcaceae, and Methanobacterium are potentially involved in the functioning of syntrophic DIET. Considering the ubiquitous presence of iron minerals within soils and sediments, the findings of this study will increase the current understanding of the natural biological attenuation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic environments.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of L-carnosine coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmus, Z. [Department of Chemistry, Fatih University, B. Cekmece, 34500 Istanbul (Turkey); Kavas, H. [Department of Physics, Fatih University, B. Cekmece, 34500 Istanbul (Turkey); Baykal, A., E-mail: hbaykal@fatih.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Fatih University, B. Cekmece, 34500 Istanbul (Turkey); Sozeri, H. [TUBITAK-UME, National Metrology Institute, PO Box 54, 41470 Gebze-Kocaeli (Turkey); Alpsoy, L. [Department of Biology, Fatih University, B. Cekmece, 34500 Istanbul (Turkey); Celik, S.U. [Department of Chemistry, Fatih University, B. Cekmece, 34500 Istanbul (Turkey); Toprak, M.S. [Department of Functional Materials, Royal Institute of Technology, SE16440 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-02-03

    Research highlights: > L-Carnosine coated iron oxide nanoparticles (CCIO NPs) have been prepared via co-precipitation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite) in the presence of L-carnosine. > FTIR analysis showed that the binding of carnosine onto the surface of iron oxide is through unidentate linkage of carboxyl group. > Magnetization measurements revealed that L-carnosine iron oxide composite has immeasurable coercivity and remanence with absence of hysteritic behavior, which implies superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature. > The synthesized amino acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles might be applied to cell separation, diagnosis and targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy. - Abstract: L-Carnosine coated iron oxide nanoparticles (CCIO NPs) have been prepared via co-precipitation of iron oxide in the presence of L-carnosine. Crystalline phase was identified as magnetite with an average crystallite size of 8 nm as estimated from X-ray line profile fitting. Particle size estimated from TEM by log-normal fitting was {approx}11 nm. FTIR analysis showed that the binding of carnosine onto the surface of iron oxide is through unidentate linkage of carboxyl group. CCIO NPs showed superparamagnetic charactersitic at room temperature. The magnetic core size of superparamagnetic CCIO NPs was found slightly smaller than the size obtained from TEM, due to the presence of magnetically dead layer. Magnetization measurements revealed that L-carnosine iron oxide composite has immeasurable coercivity and remanence with absence of hysteritic behavior, which implies superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. The low value of saturation magnetization compared to the bulk magnetite has been explained by spin canting. LDH activity tests showed slight cytotoxicity of high dose of CCIO NPs. The ac conductivity of CCIO NPs was found to be greater than that of carnosine and the effective conduction mechanism was found as correlated barrier hopping (CBH). dc activation energy of the

  18. A comparison of the low frequency electrical signatures of iron oxide versus calcite precipitation in granular zero valent iron columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuxin; Slater, Lee; Versteeg, Roelof; LaBrecque, Douglas

    2008-01-28

    Geophysical methods have been proposed as technologies for non-invasively monitoring geochemical alteration in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). We conducted column experiments to investigate the effect of mineralogy on the electrical signatures resulting from iron corrosion and mineral precipitation in Fe0 columns using (a) Na2SO4, and (b) NaHCO3 plus CaCl2 mixture, solutions. At the influent interface where the reactions were most severe, a contrasting time-lapse electrical response was observed between the two columns. Solid phase analysis confirmed the formation of corrosion halos and increased mineralogical complexity in the corroded sections of the columns compared to the minimal/non-corroded sections. We attribute the contrasting time-lapse signatures to the differences in the electrical properties of the mineral phases formed within the two columns. While newly precipitated/transformed polarizable and semi-conductive iron oxides (mostly magnetite and green rust) increase the polarization and conductivity of the sulfate column, the decrease of both parameters in the bicarbonate column is attributed to the precipitation of non-polarizable and non-conductive calcite. Our results show that precipitate mineralogy is an important factor influencing the electrical properties of the corroded iron cores and must be considered if electrical geophysical methods are to be developed to monitor PRB barrier corrosion processes in situ.

  19. Thermal oxidation synthesis of crystalline iron-oxide nanowires on low-cost steel substrates for solar water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugosch, T.; Chnani, A.; Muralidhar, P.; Schirmer, A.; Biskupek, J.; Strehle, S.

    2017-08-01

    Iron-oxide and in particular its crystallographic phase hematite (α-Fe2O3) is a promising candidate for non-toxic, earth abundant and low cost photo-anodes in the field of photo-electrochemical water splitting. We report here on the synthesis of α-Fe2O3 nanowires by thermal oxidation of low-cost steel substrates. Nanowires grown in this manner exhibit often a blade-like shape but can also possess a wire-like geometry partly decorated at their tip with an iron-rich ellipsoidal head consisting also of crystalline iron-oxide. We show furthermore that these ellipsoidal heads represent suitable growth sites leading in some cases to an additional growth of so-called antenna nanowires. Besides nanowires also nanoflakes were frequently observed at the surface. We discuss the influence of the oxidation temperature and other synthesis parameters as well as dispute the current growth models. Finally, we show that our α-Fe2O3 nanostructures on steel are also photo-electrochemically active supporting in principle their use as photo-anode material.

  20. Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation induced by iron oxide nanoparticle exposure: Risk factors for early atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mo-Tao; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yun; Yuan, Lan; Wang, Hua-Jian; Wang, Meng; Ouyang, Hong; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Feng, Wei-Yue; Zhao, Yu-Liang

    2011-06-10

    More recently, the correlation between exposure to nanoparticles and cardiovascular diseases is of particular concern in nanotoxicology related fields. Nanoparticle-triggered endothelial dysfunction is hypothesized to be a dominant mechanism in the development of the diseases. To test this hypothesis, iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe₂O₃ and Fe₃O₄), as two widely used nanomaterials and the main metallic components in particulate matter, were selected to assess their potential risks on human endothelial system. The direct effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and the possible effects mediated by monocyte (U937 cells) phagocytosis and activation were investigated. In the study, HAECs and U937 cells were exposed to 2, 20, 100 μg/mL of 22-nm-Fe₂O₃ and 43-nm-Fe₃O₄ particles. Our results indicate that cytoplasmic vacuolation, mitochondrial swelling and cell death were induced in HAEC. A significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production was induced which coincided with the elevation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in HAECs. Adhesion of monocytes to the HAECs was significantly enhanced as a consequence of the up-regulation of intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression, all of which are considered as early steps of atheroscelerosis. Phagocytosis and dissolution of nanoparticles by monocytes were found to simultaneously provoke oxidative stress and mediate severe endothelial toxicity. We conclude that intravascular iron oxide nanoparticles may induce endothelial system inflammation and dysfunction by three ways: (1) nanoparticles may escape from phagocytosis that interact directly with the endothelial monolayer; (2) nanoparticles are phagocytized by monocytes and then dissolved, thus impact the endothelial cells as free iron ions; or (3) nanoparticles are phagocytized by monocytes to provoke oxidative stress responses. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Increased endogenous DNA oxidation correlates to increased iron levels in melanocytes relative to keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelle, Edward; Huang, Xi; Zhang, Qi; Pernodet, Nadine; Yarosh, Daniel B; Frenkel, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous oxidative state of normal human epidermal melanocytes was investigated and compared to normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) in order to gain new insight into melanocyte biology. Previously, we showed that NHEKs contain higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than melanocytes and that it can migrate from NHEKs to melanocytes by passive permeation. Nevertheless, despite lower concentrations of H2O2, we now report higher levels of oxidative DNA in melanocytes as indicated by increased levels of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG): 4.49 (±0.55 SEM) 8-oxo-dG/10(6) dG compared to 1.49 (±0.11 SEM) 8-oxo-dG/10(6) dG for NHEKs. An antioxidant biomarker, glutathione (GSH), was also lower in melanocytes (3.14 nmoles (±0.15 SEM)/cell) in comparison to NHEKs (5.98 nmoles (±0.33 SEM)/cell). Intriguingly, cellular bioavailable iron as measured in ferritin was found to be nearly fourfold higher in melanocytes than in NHEKs. Further, ferritin levels in melanocytes were also higher than in hepatocarcinoma cells, an iron-rich cell, and it indicates that higher relative iron levels may be characteristic of melanocytes. To account for the increased oxidative DNA and lower GSH and H2O2 levels that we observe, we propose that iron may contribute to higher levels of oxidation by reacting with H2O2 through a Fenton reaction leading to the generation of DNA-reactive hydroxyl radicals. In conclusion, our data support the concept of elevated oxidation and high iron levels as normal parameters of melanocytic activity. We present new evidence that may contribute to our understanding of the melanogenic process and lead to the development of new skin care products.

  2. Remarkable efficiency of ultrafine superparamagnetic iron(III) oxide nanoparticles toward arsenate removal from aqueous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilianová, Martina; Prucek, Robert; Filip, Jan; Kolařík, Jan; Kvítek, Libor; Panáček, Aleš; Tuček, Jiří; Zbořil, Radek

    2013-11-01

    Arsenates, when present in water resources, constitute a risk to human health. In order to remove them, various technologies have been developed; out of them, sorption approach is widely adopted employing a wide spectrum of suitable sorbent materials. Nanoparticles of iron oxide are frequently used due to a high surface area and ability to control them by external magnetic field. In this work, we report on a simple and cheap synthesis of ultrafine iron(III) oxide nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and their exploitation in the field of arsenate removal from aqueous environment. It is shown that the adsorption capacity is enhanced by a mesoporous nature of nanoparticle arrangement in their system due to strong magnetic interactions they evolve between nanoparticles. A complete arsenate removal is achieved at Fe/As ratio equal to ∼20/1 and at pH in the range from 5 to 7.6. Under these conditions, the arsenates are completely removed within several minutes of treatment. Among iron-oxide-based nanosystems synthesized and employed in arsenate remediation issues so far, our assembly of iron(III) oxide nanoparticles shows the highest Freundlich adsorption coefficient and equilibrium sorption capacity under conditions maintained. Taking into account simple and low-cost preparation procedure, product high yields, almost monodispersed character, room-temperature superparamagnetic behavior, and strong magnetic response under small applied magnetic fields, the synthesized iron(III) oxide nanoparticles can be regarded as a promising candidate for exploitation in the field of removing undesired toxic pollutants from various real water systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Iron-rich Oxides at the Core-mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, J. K.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Bower, D. J.; Zhuravlev, K. K.; Prakapenka, V.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic observations near the base of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) have detected 5-20 km thick patches in which the seismic wave velocities are reduced by up to 30%. These ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) have been interpreted as aggregates of partially molten material (e.g. Williams and Garnero 1996, Hernlund and Jellinek, 2010) or as solid, iron-enriched residues (e.g. Knittle and Jeanloz, 1991; Mao et al., 2006; Wicks et al., 2010), typically based on proposed sources of velocity reduction. The stabilities of these structure types have been explored through dynamic models that have assembled a relationship between ULVZ stability and density (Hernlund and Tackley, 2007; Bower et al., 2010). Now, to constrain the chemistry and mineralogy of ULVZs, more information is needed on the relationship between density and sound velocity of candidate phases. We present the pressure-volume-temperature equation of state of (Mg0.06 57Fe0.94)O determined up to pressures of 120 GPa and temperatures of 2000 K. Volume was measured with X-ray diffraction at beamline 13-ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), where high pressures and temperatures are achieved in a diamond anvil cell with in-situ laser heating. Sample assemblies were prepared using dehydrated NaCl as an insulator and neon as a pressure transmitting medium. We present results with and without iron as a buffer and thermal pressure gauge. We have also determined the room temperature Debye velocity (VD) of (Mg0.06 57Fe0.94)O using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and in-situ X-ray diffraction, up to 80 GPa at 3-ID-B of the APS. The effect of the electronic environment of the iron sites on the velocities was tracked in-situ using synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy. Using our measured equation of state, the seismically relevant compressional (VP) and shear (VS) wave velocities were calculated from the Debye velocities. We combine these studies with a simple mixing model to predict the properties of a solid

  4. Effects of iron-aluminium oxides and organic carbon on aggregate stability of bauxite residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Li, Yubing; Xue, Shengguo; Hartley, William; Wu, Hao

    2016-05-01

    In order to successfully establish vegetation on bauxite residue, properties such as aggregate structure and stability require improvement. Spontaneous plant colonization on the deposits in Central China over the last 20 years has revealed that natural processes may improve the physical condition of bauxite residues. Samples from three different stacking ages were selected to determine aggregate formation and stability and its relationship with iron-aluminium oxides and organic carbon. The residue aggregate particles became coarser in both dry and wet sieving processes. The mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometry mean diameter (GMD) increased significantly, and the proportion of aggregate destruction (PAD) decreased. Natural stacking processes could increase aggregate stability and erosion resistant of bauxite residues. Free iron oxides and amorphous aluminium oxides were the major forms in bauxite residues, but there was no significant correlation between the iron-aluminium oxides and aggregate stability. Aromatic-C, alkanes-C, aliphatic-C and alkenes-C were the major functional groups present in the residues. With increasing stacking age, total organic carbon content and aggregate-associated organic carbon both increased. Alkanes-C, aliphatic-C and alkenes-C increased and were mainly distributed in macro-aggregates, whereas aromatic-C was mainly distributed in aluminium oxides maybe more important for stability of micro-aggregates.

  5. Cold catalytic recovery of loaded activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Altai; Zelmanov, Grigory; Semiat, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach for the recovery of spent activated carbon by an advanced oxidation process using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts was proposed and investigated. Model organic contaminants, such as ethylene glycol and phenol, were chosen for this study as water pollutants. It was shown that there are several advantages in using catalytic oxidation recovery of activated carbon with iron oxide-based nanocatalysts: low temperature reactivity of catalytic recovery without heating; and a relatively large number of adsorption-recovery cycles, without a reduction in the adsorptive properties of the virgin activated carbon or without a performance decrease from the first adsorption-recovery cycle of the new modified adsorptive properties of the activated carbon. The catalytic recovery takes place without ultraviolet light or any visible radiation sources. Results show a high efficiency of catalytic recovery of spent activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts. A 97-99% efficiency of spent activated carbon catalytic regeneration was achieved under chosen conditions after 15-20 min of reaction. The process may be also considered as cold in situ recovery of active carbon.

  6. Concentration and immobilization of 137Cs from liquid radioactive waste using sorbents based on hydrated titanium and zirconium oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, A. V.; Noskova, A. Y.; Gritskevich, E. Y.; Mashkovtsev, M. A.; Semenishchev, V. S.

    2017-09-01

    The possibility of use of sorbents based on hydrated titanium and zirconium oxides (T-3A, T-35, NPF-HTD) for concentration and immobilization of 137Cs from liquid radioactive waste of various chemical composition (fresh water, seawater, solutions containing NaNO3, ammonium acetate, EDTA) was evaluated. It was shown that the NPF-HTD and T-35 sorbents separate 137Cs from fresh water and seawater with distribution coefficients as high as 6.2.104 and 6.1.104, 4.0.105 and 1.6.105 L kg-1 respectively; in 1 M ammonium acetate these values were 2.0.103 and 1.0.103 L kg-1. The NPF-HTD sorbent showed the highest selectivity for cesium in NaNO3 solution: cesium distribution coefficients in 1M NaNO3 was 1.4.106 L kg-1. All studied sorbents are suitable for deactivation of solutions containing EDTA. Cesium distribution coefficients were around 102-103 L kg-1 depending on EDTA concentration. Chemical stability of the sorbents was also studied. It was shown that 137Cs leaching rate from all sorbents meet the requirements for matrix materials.

  7. Nitrogen loss through anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron reduction from paddy soils in a chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Long-Jun; An, Xin-Li; Li, Shun; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-09-16

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron(III) reduction (termed Feammox) with dinitrogen, nitrite, or nitrate as the end-product is a recently discovered process of nitrogen cycling. However, Feammox has not been described in paddy soils, which are rich in iron(III) oxides and subjected to intensive nitrogen fertilization. Here, evidence for Feammox in a paddy soil chronosequence with a gradient of microbially reducible iron(III) levels was obtained in Southern China using (15)N-labeled ammonium-based isotopic tracing and acetylene inhibition techniques. Our study demonstrated the occurrence of Feammox in the chronosequence, and direct dinitrogen production was shown to be the dominant Feammox pathway. Within the chronosequence, three paddy soils with higher microbially reducible iron(III) levels had higher Feammox rates (ranged from 0.17 to 0.59 mg N kg(-1) d(-1)) compared to an uncultivated soil (0.04 mg N kg(-1) d(-1)). It is estimated that a loss of 7.8-61 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) is associated with Feammox in the examined paddy soils. Overall, we discover that rice cultivation could enrich microbially reducible iron(III), accelerate Feammox reaction and thus fuel nitrogen loss from soils, and suggest that Feammox could be a potentially important pathway for nitrogen loss in paddy soils.

  8. Cellular Precipitates Of Iron Oxide in Olivine in a Stratospheric Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The petrology of a massive olivine-sulphide interplanetary dust particle shows melting of Fe,Ni-sulphide plus complete loss of sulphur and subsequent quenching to a mixture of iron-oxides and Fe,Ni-metal. Oxidation of the fayalite component in olivine produced maghemite discs and cellular intergrowths with olivine and rare andradite-rich garnet. Cellular reactions require no long-range solid-state diffusion and are kinetically favourable during pyrometamorphic oxidation. Local melting of the cellular intergrowths resulted in three dimensional symplectic textures. Dynamic pyrometamorphism of this asteroidal particle occurred at approx. 1100 C during atmospheric entry flash (5-15 s) heating.

  9. Large-scale Facile Synthesis of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaehang Lee

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The large-scale synthetic method of hydrophobic soluble Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles was developed with the thermal decomposition technique. From the characteristic analysis with a transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, the obtained iron oxide nanomaterials showed a cubic structure with a size of ca. 2 nm. The oxidation states of the nanoparticles were investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The tetramethylammonium hydroxide treatment might be induced a phase transfer of the iron oxide nanocrystals from a hydrophobic state to a hydrophilic one. The carbon-coated hydrophilic soluble Fe2O3 nanoparticles could be prepared by a solvothermal reaction of the particles, glucose, and H2O.

  10. Conductivity and hydration trends in disordered fluorite and pyrochlore oxides: A study on lanthanum cerate–zirconate based compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besikiotis, Vasileios; Ricote, Sandrine; Jensen, Molly Hjorth

    2012-01-01

    protons become more dominating as charge carrier at temperatures below typically 500°C under wet conditions. The hydration enthalpies were determined by simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The contribution from ionic conductivity increases and the hydration...

  11. Hydroquinone-Mediated Redox Cycling of Iron and Concomitant Oxidation of Hydroquinone in Oxic Waters under Acidic Conditions: Comparison with Iron-Natural Organic Matter Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Garg, Shikha; Waite, T David

    2015-12-15

    Interactions of 1,4-hydroquinone with soluble iron species over a pH range of 3-5 in the air-saturated and partially deoxygenated solution are examined here. Our results show that 1,4-hydroquinone reduces Fe(III) in acidic conditions, generating semiquinone radicals (Q(•-)) that can oxidize Fe(II) back to Fe(III). The oxidation rate of Fe(II) by Q(•-)increases with increase in pH due to the speciation change of Q(•-) with its deprotonated form (Q(•-)) oxidizing Fe(II) more rapidly than the protonated form (HQ(•)). Although the oxygenation of Fe(II) is negligible at pH iron redox transformation by rapidly oxidizing Q(•-) to form benzoquinone (Q). A kinetic model is developed to describe the transformation of quinone and iron under all experimental conditions. The results obtained here are compared with those obtained in our previous studies of iron-Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) interactions in acidic solutions and support the hypothesis that hydroquinone moieties can reduce Fe(III) in natural waters. However, the semiquinone radicals generated in pure hydroquinone solution are rapidly oxidized by dioxygen, while the semiquinone radicals generated in SRFA solution are resistant to oxidation by dioxygen, with the result that steady-state semiquinone concentrations in SRFA solutions are 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than in solutions of 1,4-hydroquinone. As a result, semiquinone moieties in SRFA play a much more important role in iron redox transformations than is the case in solutions of simple quinones such as 1,4-hydroquinone. This difference in the steady-state concentration of semiquinone species has a dramatic effect on the cycling of iron between the +II and +III oxidation states, with iron turnover frequencies in solutions containing SRFA being 10-20 times higher than those observed in solutions of 1,4-hydroquinone.

  12. Magnetic properties of ε iron(III) oxide nanorod arrays functionalized with gold and copper(II) oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccato, Chiara; Carraro, Giorgio; Peddis, Davide; Varvaro, Gaspare; Barreca, Davide

    2018-01-01

    A sequential Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) - Radio Frequency (RF)-sputtering approach was adopted to fabricate supported nanocomposites based on the scarcely investigated ε-iron(III) oxide polymorph. In particular, ε-Fe2O3 nanorod arrays were obtained by CVD, and their subsequent functionalization with Au and CuO nanoparticles (NPs) was carried out by RF-sputtering under mild operational conditions. Beside a multi-technique characterization of material structure, morphology and chemical composition, particular efforts were dedicated to the investigation of their magnetic properties. The pertaining experimental data, discussed in relation to the system chemico-physical characteristics, are directly dependent on the actual chemical composition, as well as on the spatial distribution of Au and CuO nanoparticles. The approach adopted herein can be further implemented to control and tailor different morphologies and phase compositions of iron oxide-based nanomaterials, meeting thus the open requests of a variety of technological utilizations.

  13. Facile synthesis of iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites: application for electromagnetic wave absorption at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Xinxin; Hu, Hongrui; Li, Yang; Wu, Mingzai; Wang, Zhongzhu; Li, Guang; Sun, Zhaoqi; Chen, Changle

    2015-03-19

    Iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites were synthesized by facile thermochemical reactions of graphite oxide and FeSO4 · 7H2O. By adjusting reaction temperature, α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4/reduced graphene oxide composites can be obtained conveniently. Graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide sheets were demonstrated to regulate the phase transition from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 via γ-Fe2O3, which was reported for the first time. The hydroxyl groups attached on the graphene oxide sheets and H2 gas generated during the annealing of graphene oxide are believed to play an important role during these phase transformations. These samples showed good electromagnetic wave absorption performance due to their electromagnetic complementary effect. These samples possess much better electromagnetic wave absorption properties than the mixture of separately prepared Fe3O4 with rGO, suggesting the crucial role of synthetic method in determining the product properties. Also, these samples perform much better than commercial absorbers. Most importantly, the great stability of these composites is highly advantageous for applications as electromagnetic wave absorption materials at high temperatures.

  14. Nanophase iron oxides as a key ultraviolet sunscreen for ancient photosynthetic microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Louris, Stephanie K.; Rogoff, Dana A.; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2006-07-01

    We propose that nanophase iron-oxide-bearing materials provided important niches for ancient photosynthetic microbes on the Earth that ultimately led to the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere and the formation of iron-oxide deposits. Atmospheric oxygen and ozone attenuate ultraviolet radiation on the Earth today providing substantial protection for photosynthetic organisms. With ultraviolet radiation fluxes likely to have been even higher on the early Earth than today, accessing solar radiation was particularly risky for early organisms. Yet, we know that photosynthesis arose early and played a critical role in subsequent evolution. Of primary importance was protection below 290 nm, where peak nucleic acid (~260 nm) and protein (~280 nm) absorptions occur. Nanophase ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide minerals absorb, and thus block, the lethal ultraviolet radiation, while transmitting light through much of the visible and near-infrared regions of interest to photosynthesis (400 to 1100 nm). Furthermore, they were available in early environments, and are synthesized by many organisms. Based on experiments using nanophase ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide minerals as a sunscreen for photosynthetic microbes, we suggest that iron, an abundant element widely used in biological mechanisms, may have provided the protection that early organisms needed in order to be able to use photosynthetically active radiation while being protected from ultraviolet-induced damage. The results of this study are broadly applicable to astrobiology because of the abundance of iron in other potentially habitable bodies and the evolutionary pressure to utilize solar radiation when available as an energy source. This model could apply to a potential life form on Mars or other bodies where liquid water and ultraviolet radiation could have been present at significant levels. Based on ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide spectral properties, likely geologic processes, and the results of experiments with the

  15. Antibacterial activity of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Raid A., E-mail: raidismail@yahoo.com [Laser Physics Division, Applied Science Department, University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Sulaiman, Ghassan M. [Biotechnology Division, Applied Science Department, University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Abdulrahman, Safa A. [Laser Physics Division, Applied Science Department, University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Marzoog, Thorria R. [Biotechnology Division, Applied Science Department, University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, (50–110 nm) magnetic iron oxide (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of iron target in dimethylformamide (DMF) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solutions. The structural properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were investigated by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, UV–VIS absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of laser fluence on the characteristics of these nanoparticles was studied. Antibacterial activities of iron oxide nanoparticles were tested against Gram-positive; Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative; Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The results showed a noteworthy inhibition on both bacterial strains. The preparation conditions were found to affect significantly the antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles were used to capture rapidly S. aureus bacteria under the magnetic field effect. - Highlights: • Synthesis magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation • Antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria • Captured magnetic nanoparticles by S. aureus bacteria under effect of magnetic field.