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Sample records for hydrate stability conditions

  1. P-T stability conditions of methane hydrate in sediment from South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shicai Sun; Yuguang Ye; Changling Liu; Fengkui Xiang; Yah Ma

    2011-01-01

    For reasonable assessment and safe exploitation of marine gas hydrate resource,it is important to determine the stability conditions of gas hydrates in marine sediment.In this paper,the seafloor water sample and sediment sample (saturated with pore water) from Shenhu Area of South China Sea were used to synthesize methane hydrates,and the stability conditions of methane hydrates were investigated by multi-step heating dissociation method.Preliminary experimental results show that the dissociation temperature of methane hydrate both in seafloor water and marine sediment,under any given pressure,is depressed by approximately -1.4 K relative to the pure water system.This phenomenon indicates that hydrate stability in marine sediment is mainly affected by pore water ions.

  2. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments. Gas hydrate growth and stability conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Henry, P.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Thomas, M.

    2000-01-01

    The stability conditions of submarine gas hydrates (methane clathrates) are largely dictated by pressure, temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of the host sediments also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in the pores of a freezing soil, where capillary forces influence the energy balance. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments because of the excess internal phase pressure of small crystals with high surface curvature that coexist with liquid water in small pores. Therefore, the base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature, and so nearer to the seabed than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. The growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, sheets, and lenses in muds; cements in sand and ash layers) can be explained by a requirement to minimize the excess of mechanical and surface energy in the system.

  3. Study of formation and stability conditions of gas hydrates in drilling fluids; Etude des conditions de formation et de stabilite des hydrates de gaz dans les fluides de forage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharrat, M.

    2004-10-15

    Drilling fluids are complex media, in which solid particles are in suspension in a water-in-oil emulsion. The formation of gas hydrates in these fluids during off shore drilling operations has been suspected to be the cause of serious accidents. The purpose of this thesis is the study of the formation conditions as well as the stability of gas hydrates in complex fluids containing water-in-oil emulsions. The technique of high-pressure differential scanning calorimetry was used to characterise the conditions of hydrates formation and dissociation. Special attention has first been given to the validation of thermodynamic measurements in homogeneous solutions, in the pressure range 4 to 12 Mpa; the results were found to be in good agreement with literature data, as well as with modelling results. The method was then applied to water-in-oil emulsion, used as a model for real drilling fluids. It was proven that thermodynamics of hydrate stability are not significantly influenced by the state of dispersion of the water phase. On the other hand, the kinetics of formation and the amount of hydrates formed are highly increased by the dispersion. Applying the technique to real drilling fluids confirmed the results obtained in emulsions. Results interpretation allowed giving a representation of the process of hydrate formation in emulsion. Empirical modelling was developed to compute the stability limits of methane hydrate in the presence of various inhibitors, at pressures ranging from ambient to 70 MPa. Isobaric phase diagrams were constructed, that allow predicting the inhibiting efficiency of sodium chloride and calcium chloride at constant pressure, from 0,25 to 70 MPa. (author)

  4. A non-steady-state condition in sediments at the gas hydrate stability boundary off West Spitsbergen: Evidence for gas hydrate dissociation or just dynamic methane transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treude, Tina; Krause, Stefan; Bertics, Victoria; Steinle, Lea; Niemann, Helge; Liebetrau, Volker; Feseker, Tomas; Burwicz, Ewa; Krastel, Sebastian; Berndt, Christian

    2015-04-01

    In 2008, a large area with several hundred methane plumes was discovered along the West Spitsbergen continental margin at water depths between 150 and 400 m (Westbrook et al. 2009). Many of the observed plumes were located at the boundary of gas hydrate stability (~400 m water depth). It was speculated that the methane escape at this depth was correlated with gas hydrate destabilization caused by recent increases in water temperatures recorded in this region. In a later study, geochemical analyses of authigenic carbonates and modeling of heat flow data combined with seasonal changes in water temperature demonstrated that the methane seeps were active already prior to industrial warming but that the gas hydrate system nevertheless reacts very sensitive to even seasonal temperature changes (Berndt et al. 2014). Here, we report about a methane seep site at the gas hydrate stability boundary (394 m water depth) that features unusual geochemical profiles indicative for non-steady state conditions. Sediment was recovered with a gravity corer (core length 210 cm) and samples were analyzed to study porewater geochemistry, methane concentration, authigenic carbonates, and microbial activity. Porewater profiles revealed two zones of sulfate-methane transition at 50 and 200 cm sediment depth. The twin zones were confirmed by a double peaking in sulfide, total alkalinity, anaerobic oxidation of methane, and sulfate reduction. d18O values sharply increased from around -2.8 ‰ between 0 and 126 cm to -1.2 ‰ below 126 cm sediment depth. While U/Th isotope measurements of authigenic seep carbonates that were collected from different depths of the core illustrated that methane seepage must be occurring at this site since at least 3000 years, the biogeochemical profiles suggest that methane flux must have been altered recently. By applying a multi-phase reaction-transport model using known initial parameters from the study site (e.g. water depth, temperature profile, salinity

  5. Experimental investigation and planetary implications of the stability of clathrate hydrates in aqueous solution at icy satellite conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, M.; Choukroun, M.; Barmatz, M.; Hodyss, R. P.; Smythe, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    Clathrate hydrates consist of hydrogen-bonded water molecules forming cages in which gas molecules are trapped individually. They are among the favored volatile reservoirs in solar system bodies, and are expected to play an important role in many processes: accretion of volatiles in planetesimals, outgassing on Titan, Enceladus, and comets. Their insulating thermal properties and high mechanical strength also bear important implications for understanding the evolution of icy satellites like Europa. However, the conditions allowing for their formation and/or their dissociation and the release of volatiles to the atmosphere (Titan) or the plumes (Enceladus) are still poorly understood. This is mainly because of a lack of knowledge on the stability of mixed clathrate hydrates in presence of anti-freeze agents such as ammonia. We have developed a high-pressure cryogenic calorimeter to address this deficiency in the literature. This liquid nitrogen - cooled Setaram BT2.15 calorimeter is located at the JPL Ice Physics Laboratory. The temperature range achievable with this instrument is 77-473 K. This calorimeter uses Calvet elements (3D arrays of thermocouples) to measure the heat flow required to follow a predefined heating rate within a sample and a reference cell with a resolution of 0.1 μW. A gas handling system has been designed and fabricated in house to reach pressures up to 100 bars, corresponding to several km depth in icy satellites. The thermodynamic properties of CO2 and CH4 clathrates with ammonia are under investigation, and the results will be used to constrain a statistical thermodynamic model of clathrates for applications to planetary environments. Preliminary results will be shown at the meeting. This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Support from the Minnesota Space Grant Consortium, the NASA Outer Planets Research program, and government sponsorship are gratefully

  6. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  7. Prediction of Refrigerant Gas Hydrates Formation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deqing Liang; Ruzhu Wang; Kaihua Guo; Shuanshi Fan

    2001-01-01

    A fugacity model was developed for prediction of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates formation conditions based on the molecule congregation and solution theories. In this model, g as hydrates were regarded as non-ideal solid solution composed of water groups and guest molecules, and the expressions of fugacity of guest molecules in hydrate phase was proposed accordingly. It has been shown that the developed model can indicate successfully the effect of guest-guest molecule interaction. The results showed that the model can describe better the characteristics of phase equilibrium of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates and predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  9. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  10. Controls on gas hydrate stability in methane depleted sediments: Laboratory and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, L.; Chanton, J.; Martens, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits are the Earth’s largest reservoir of the powerful greenhouse gas methane and thus a key future energy resource. However, hydrate stability in sedimentary environments featuring highly variable methane concentrations needs to be understood to allow resource estimation and recovery. Hydrates are at chemical equilibrium and therefore stable where high pressures, low temperatures, and moderate salinities coexist with methane-saturated pore waters. When all of these conditions are not met, hydrates should dissociate or dissolve, releasing methane to the overlying water and possibly the atmosphere. In addition, other natural factors may control the kinetics of their degradation complicating models for hydrate stability and occurrence. Our measurements indicate that the pore-waters surrounding some shallow buried hydrates are not methane-saturated suggesting that dissolution should occur relatively rapidly. Yet, these hydrate deposits are known to persist relatively unchanged for years. We hypothesize that, once formed, hydrate deposits may be stabilized by natural factors inhibiting dissolution, including oil or microbial biofilm coatings. While most studies have focused on pressure and temperature changes where hydrates occur, relatively few have included measurements of in situ methane concentration gradients because of the difficulties inherent to making such measurements. Here we present recent measurements of methane concentration and stable carbon isotope gradients immediately adjacent to undisturbed hydrate surfaces obtained through deployments of novel seafloor instruments. Our results suggest that the hydrates studied are relatively stable when exposed to overlying and pore-waters that are undersaturated with methane. Concurrent laboratory measurements of methane concentration gradients next to artificial hydrate surfaces were utilized to test our protective coating hypothesis. After a stable dissolution rate for hydrate samples was

  11. Hexosome and hexagonal phases mediated by hydration and polymeric stabilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar-Yuli, Idit; Wachtel, Ellen; Shoshan, Einav Ben; Danino, Dganit; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2007-03-27

    In this research, we studied the factors that control formation of GMO/tricaprylin/water hexosomes and affect their inner structure. As a stabilizer of the soft particles dispersed in the aqueous phase, we used the hydrophilic nonionic triblock polymer Pluronic 127. We demonstrate how properties of the hexosomes, such as size, structure, and stability, can be tuned by their internal composition, polymer concentration, and processing conditions. The morphology and inner structure of the hexosomes were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering, cryo-transmission electron microscope, and dynamic light scattering. The physical stability (to creaming, aggregation, and coalescence) of the hexosomes was further examined by the LUMiFuge technique. Two competing processes are presumed to take place during the formation of hexosomes: penetration of water from the continuous phase during dispersion, resulting in enhanced hydration of the head groups, and incorporation of the polymer chains into the hexosome structure while providing a stabilizing surface coating for the dispersed particles. Hydration is an essential stage in lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) formation. The polymer, on the other hand, dehydrates the lipid heads, thereby introducing disorder into the LLC and reducing the domain size. Yet, a critical minimum polymer concentration is necessary in order to form stable nanosized hexosomes. These competing effects require the attention of those preparing hexosomes. The competition between these two processes can be controlled. At relatively high polymer concentrations (1-1.6 wt % of the total formulation of the soft particles), the hydration process seems to occur more rapidly than polymer adsorption. As a result, smaller and more stable soft particles with high symmetry were formed. On the other hand, when the polymer concentration is fixed at lower levels (<1.0 wt %), the homogenization process encourages only partial polymer adsorption during the dispersion

  12. Conditional solvation of isoleucine in model extended and helical peptides: context dependence of hydrophobic hydration and the failure of the group-transfer model

    OpenAIRE

    Tomar, Dheeraj; Weber, Valéry; Pettitt, B M; Asthagiri, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hydration thermodynamics of the GXG tripeptide relative to the reference GGG is often used to define the conditional hydration contribution of X. This quantity or the hydration thermodynamics of a small molecule analog of the side-chain or some combination of such estimates, have anchored the interpretation of seminal experiments on protein stability and folding. We show that such procedures to model protein hydration have significant limitations. We study the conditional hydration thermo...

  13. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    observed. In summary, the study indicates that the early stability of the sediment (i.e., when any hydrate is still present) is governed by the intensity of a heat source and the thermal conductivity of sediments. Later, the excess pore fluid pressure diffused from the dissociation region destabilizes the shallower sediments. In critical cases, an effective drainage path is necessary to prevent instability problems such as blow-up of sediments or buckling of a well.

  14. Structural stability of methane hydrate at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, J.; Chen, X.; Chou, I.-Ming; Yang, W.; Hu, Jiawen; Hemley, R.J.; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2011-01-01

    The structural stability of methane hydrate under pressure at room temperature was examined by both in-situ single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques on samples with structure types I, II, and H in diamond-anvil cells. The diffraction data for types II (sII) and H (sH) were refined to the known structures with space groups Fd3m and P63/mmc, respectively. Upon compression, sI methane hydrate transforms to the sII phase at 120 MPa, and then to the sH phase at 600 MPa. The sII methane hydrate was found to coexist locally with sI phase up to 500 MPa and with sH phase up to 600 MPa. The pure sH structure was found to be stable between 600 and 900 MPa. Methane hydrate decomposes at pressures above 3 GPa to form methane with the orientationally disordered Fm3m structure and ice VII (Pn3m). The results highlight the role of guest (CH4)-host (H2O) interactions in the stabilization of the hydrate structures under pressure. ?? 2011, China University of Geosciences (Beijing) and Peking University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Stability Analysis of Methane Hydrate-Bearing Soils Considering Dissociation

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    Hiromasa Iwai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the methane hydrate dissociation process may lead to unstable behavior such as large ground deformations, uncontrollable gas production, etc. A linear instability analysis was performed in order to investigate which variables have a significant effect on the onset of the instability behavior of methane hydrate-bearing soils subjected to dissociation. In the analysis a simplified viscoplastic constitutive equation is used for the soil sediment. The stability analysis shows that the onset of instability of the material system mainly depends on the strain hardening-softening parameter, the degree of strain, and the permeability for water and gas. Then, we conducted a numerical analysis of gas hydrate-bearing soil considering hydrate dissociation in order to investigate the effect of the parameters on the system. The simulation method used in the present study can describe the chemo-thermo-mechanically coupled behaviors such as phase changes from hydrates to water and gas, temperature changes and ground deformation. From the numerical results, we found that basically the larger the permeability for water and gas is, the more stable the simulation results are. These results are consistent with those obtained from the linear stability analysis.

  16. Synthesis of polycrystalline methane hydrate, and its phase stability and mechanical properties at elevated pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Test specimens of methane hydrate were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with H2O ice grains, then warming the system to promote the reaction CH4 (g) + 6H2O (s???l) ??? CH4??6H2O. Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above 271.5 K and up to 289 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 hours. The resulting material is pure methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random texture. Fabrication conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature before reaction completed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, verified that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting is easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably at temperatures well above its melting point. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T= 140-200 K, Pc= 50-100 MPa, and ????= 10-4-10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to a higher degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing stoichiometry under pressure during plastic deformation; x-ray analyses showed that methane hydrate undergoes a process of solid-state disproportionation or exsolution during deformation at conditions well within its conventional stability field.

  17. Are seafloor pockmarks on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand, linked to CO2 hydrates? Gas hydrate stability considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, I. A.; Davy, B. W.; Rose, P. S.; Coffin, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Vast areas of the Chatham Rise east of New Zealand are covered by seafloor pockmarks. Pockmark occurrence appears to be bathymetrically controlled with a band of smaller pockmarks covering areas between 500 and 700 m and large seafloor depressions beneath 800 m water depth. The current depth of the top of methane gas hydrate stability in the ocean is about 500 m and thus, we had proposed that pockmark formation may be linked to methane gas hydrate dissociation during sealevel lowering. However, while seismic profiles show strong indications of fluid flow, geochemical analyses of piston cores do not show any evidence for current or past methane flux. The discovery of Dawsonite, indicative of significant CO2 flux, in a recent petroleum exploration well, together with other circumstantial evidence, has led us to propose that instead of methane hydrate, CO2 hydrate may be linked to pockmark formation. We here present results from CO2 hydrate stability calculations. Assuming water temperature profiles remain unchanged, we predict the upper limit of pockmark occurrence to coincide with the top of CO2 gas hydrate stability during glacial-stage sealevel lowstands. CO2 hydrates may therefore have dissociated during sealevel lowering leading to gas escape and pockmark formation. In contrast to our previous model linking methane hydrate dissociation to pockmark formation, gas hydrates would dissociate beneath a shallow base of CO2 hydrate stability, rather than on the seafloor following upward "grazing" of the top of methane hydrate stability. Intriguingly, at the water depths of the larger seafloor depressions, the base of gas hydrate stability delineates the phase boundary between CO2 hydrates and super-saturated CO2. We caution that because of the high solubility of CO2, dissociation from hydrate to free gas or super-saturated CO2 would imply high concentrations of CO2 and speculate that pockmark formation may be linked to CO2 hydrate dissolution rather than dissociation

  18. Stabilization of ammonia-rich hydrate inside icy planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naden Robinson, Victor; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming; Hermann, Andreas

    2017-08-22

    The interior structure of the giant ice planets Uranus and Neptune, but also of newly discovered exoplanets, is loosely constrained, because limited observational data can be satisfied with various interior models. Although it is known that their mantles comprise large amounts of water, ammonia, and methane ices, it is unclear how these organize themselves within the planets-as homogeneous mixtures, with continuous concentration gradients, or as well-separated layers of specific composition. While individual ices have been studied in great detail under pressure, the properties of their mixtures are much less explored. We show here, using first-principles calculations, that the 2:1 ammonia hydrate, (H2O)(NH3)2, is stabilized at icy planet mantle conditions due to a remarkable structural evolution. Above 65 GPa, we predict it will transform from a hydrogen-bonded molecular solid into a fully ionic phase O(2-)([Formula: see text])2, where all water molecules are completely deprotonated, an unexpected bonding phenomenon not seen before. Ammonia hemihydrate is stable in a sequence of ionic phases up to 500 GPa, pressures found deep within Neptune-like planets, and thus at higher pressures than any other ammonia-water mixture. This suggests it precipitates out of any ammonia-water mixture at sufficiently high pressures and thus forms an important component of icy planets.

  19. Conditional solvation of isoleucine in model extended and helical peptides: context dependence of hydrophobic hydration and the failure of the group-transfer model

    CERN Document Server

    Tomar, Dheeraj; Pettitt, B M; Asthagiri, D

    2013-01-01

    The hydration thermodynamics of the GXG tripeptide relative to the reference GGG defines the \\textit{conditional} hydration contribution of X. This quantity or the hydration thermodynamics of a small molecule analog of the side-chain or some combination of such estimates, have anchored the interpretation of many of the seminal experiments on protein stability and folding and in the genesis of the current views on dominant interactions stabilizing proteins. We show that such procedures to model protein hydration have significant limitations. We study the conditional hydration thermodynamics of the isoleucine side-chain in an extended pentapeptide and in helical deca-peptides, using as appropriate an extended penta-glycine or appropriate helical deca-peptides as reference. Hydration of butane in the gauche conformation provides a small molecule reference for the side-chain. We use the quasichemical theory to parse the hydration thermodynamics into chemical, packing, and long-range interaction contributions. The...

  20. Thermal stability and hydration behavior of ritonavir sulfate: A vibrational spectroscopic approach

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    Kaweri Gambhir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ritonavir sulfate is a protease inhibitor widely used in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In order to elucidate the inherent stability and sensitivity characteristics of ritonavir sulfate, it was investigated under forced thermal and hydration stress conditions as recommended by the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. In addition, competency of vibrational (infrared and Raman spectroscopy was assessed to identify structural changes of the drug symbolizing its stress degradation. High performance liquid chromatography was used as a confirmatory technique for both thermal and hydration stress study, while thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis and atomic force microscopy substantiated the implementation of vibrational spectroscopy in this framework. The results exhibited high thermal stability of the drug as significant variations were observed in the diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectra only after the drug exposure to thermal radiations at 100 °C. Hydration behavior of ritonavir sulfate was evaluated using Raman spectroscopy and the value of critical relative humidity was found to be >67%. An important aspect of this study was to utilize vibrational spectroscopic technique to address stability issues of pharmacological molecules, not only for their processing in pharmaceutical industry, but also for predicting their shelf lives and suitable storage conditions.

  1. Thermal stability and hydration behavior of ritonavir sulfate:A vibrational spectroscopic approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaweri Gambhir; Parul Singh; Deepak K Jangir; Ranjana Mehrotra

    2015-01-01

    abstract Ritonavir sulfate is a protease inhibitor widely used in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In order to elucidate the inherent stability and sensitivity characteristics of ritonavir sulfate, it was investigated under forced thermal and hydration stress conditions as recommended by the Inter-national Conference on Harmonization guidelines. In addition, competency of vibrational (infrared and Raman) spectroscopy was assessed to identify structural changes of the drug symbolizing its stress de-gradation. High performance liquid chromatography was used as a confirmatory technique for both thermal and hydration stress study, while thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis and atomic force microscopy substantiated the implementation of vibrational spectroscopy in this frame-work. The results exhibited high thermal stability of the drug as significant variations were observed in the diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectra only after the drug exposure to thermal ra-diations at 100 °C. Hydration behavior of ritonavir sulfate was evaluated using Raman spectroscopy and the value of critical relative humidity was found to be 4 67%. An important aspect of this study was to utilize vibrational spectroscopic technique to address stability issues of pharmacological molecules, not only for their processing in pharmaceutical industry, but also for predicting their shelf lives and suitable storage conditions.

  2. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments 1. Conceptual model of gas hydrate growth conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Henry, P.; Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of submarine gas hydrates is largely dictated by pressure and temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of deep marine sediments may also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our conceptual model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in a freezing soil. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments by a combination of reduced pore water activity in the vicinity of hydrophilic mineral surfaces, and the excess internal energy of small crystals confined in pores. The excess energy can be thought of as a "capillary pressure" in the hydrate crystal, related to the pore size distribution and the state of stress in the sediment framework. The base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature (nearer to the seabed) than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. Capillary effects or a build up of salt in the system can expand the phase boundary between hydrate and free gas into a divariant field extending over a finite depth range dictated by total methane content and pore-size distribution. Hysteresis between the temperatures of crystallization and dissociation of the clathrate is also predicted. Growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, and lenses in muds; cements in sands) can largely be explained by capillary effects, but kinetics of nucleation and growth are also important. The formation of concentrated gas hydrates in a partially closed system with respect to material transport, or where gas can flush through the system, may lead to water depletion in the host sediment. This "freeze-drying" may be detectable through physical changes to the sediment (low water content and overconsolidation) and/or chemical anomalies in the pore waters and metastable

  3. Basin-Wide Temperature Constraints On Gas Hydrate Stability In The Gulf Of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Reagan, M. T.; Guinasso, N. L.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.

    2012-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits commonly occur at the seafloor-water interface on marine margins. They are especially prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico where they are associated with natural oil seeps. The stability of these deposits is potentially challenged by fluctuations in bottom water temperature, on an annual time-scale, and under the long-term influence of climate change. We mapped the locations of natural oil seeps where shallow gas hydrate deposits are known to occur across the entire Gulf of Mexico basin based on a comprehensive review of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data (~200 images). We prepared a bottom water temperature map based on the archive of CTD casts from the Gulf (~6000 records). Comparing the distribution of gas hydrate deposits with predicted bottom water temperature, we find that a broad area of the upper slope lies above the theoretical stability horizon for structure 1 gas hydrate, while all sites where gas hydrate deposits occur are within the stability horizon for structure 2 gas hydrate. This is consistent with analytical results that structure 2 gas hydrates predominate on the upper slope (Klapp et al., 2010), where bottom water temperatures fluctuate over a 7 to 10 C range (approx. 600 m depth), while pure structure 1 hydrates are found at greater depths (approx. 3000 m). Where higher hydrocarbon gases are available, formation of structure 2 gas hydrate should significantly increase the resistance of shallow gas hydrate deposits to destabilizing effects variable or increasing bottom water temperature. Klapp, S.A., Bohrmann, G., Kuhs, W.F., Murshed, M.M., Pape, T., Klein, H., Techmer, K.S., Heeschen, K.U., and Abegg, F., 2010, Microstructures of structure I and II gas hydrates from the Gulf of Mexico: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v. 27, p. 116-125.Bottom temperature and pressure for Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate outcrops and stability horizons for sI and sII hydrate.

  4. The specific surface area of methane hydrate formed in different conditions and manners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The specific surface area of methane hydrates, formed both in the presence and absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and processed in different manners (stirring, compacting, holding the hydrates at the formation conditions for different periods of time, cooling the hydrates for different periods of time before depressurizing them), was measured under atmospheric pressure and temperatures below ice point. It was found that the specific surface area of hydrate increased with the decreasing temperature. The methane hydrate in the presence of SDS was shown to be of bigger specific surface areas than pure methane hydrates. The experimental results further demonstrated that the manners of forming and processing hydrates affected the specific surface area of hydrate samples. Stirring or compacting made the hydrate become finer and led to a bigger specific surface area.

  5. Stability Conditions for Online Learnability

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Stability is a general notion that quantifies the sensitivity of a learning algorithm's output to small change in the training dataset (e.g. deletion or replacement of a single training sample). Such conditions have recently been shown to be more powerful to characterize learnability in the general learning setting under i.i.d. samples where uniform convergence is not necessary for learnability, but where stability is both sufficient and necessary for learnability. We here show that similar stability conditions are also sufficient for online learnability, i.e. whether there exists a learning algorithm such that under any sequence of examples (potentially chosen adversarially) produces a sequence of hypotheses that has no regret in the limit with respect to the best hypothesis in hindsight. We introduce online stability, a stability condition related to uniform-leave-one-out stability in the batch setting, that is sufficient for online learnability. In particular we show that popular classes of online learners...

  6. Thermal Stability and Proton Conductivity of Rare Earth Orthophosphate Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2014-01-01

    Hydrated orthophosphate powders of three rare earth metals, lanthanum, neodymium and gadolinium, were prepared and studied as potential proton conducting materials for intermediate temperature electrochemical applications. The phosphates undergo a transformation from the rhabdophane structure...

  7. Gas Hydrate Stability and Sampling: The Future as Related to the Phase Diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dendy Sloan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The phase diagram for methane + water is explained, in relation to hydrate applications, such as in flow assurance and in nature. For natural applications, the phase diagram determines the regions for hydrate formation for two- and three-phase conditions. Impacts are presented for sample preparation and recovery. We discuss an international study for “Round Robin” hydrate sample preparation protocols and testing.

  8. Thermodynamic Stability of Structure H Hydrates Based on the Molecular Properties of Large Guest Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Ohmura

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper report analyses of thermodynamic stability of structure-H clathrate hydrates formed with methane and large guest molecules in terms of their gas phase molecular sizes and molar masses for the selection of a large guest molecule providing better hydrate stability. We investigated the correlation among the gas phase molecular sizes, the molar masses of large molecule guest substances, and the equilibrium pressures. The results suggest that there exists a molecular-size value for the best stability. Also, at a given molecule size, better stability may be available when the large molecule guest substance has a larger molar mass.

  9. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-01-01

    rinds in perlites, measuring hundreds of microns, preserve the original D/H values of hydrating water as a recorder of paleoclimate conditions. Measured δD values in perlitic lavas are −150 to −191 or 20–40 ‰ lower than glass hydrated by modern Yellowstone waters. This suggests that Yellowstone perlites record the low-δD signature of glacial ice. Cooling calculations, combined with the observed high water diffusion coefficients noted for 60–150 °C, suggest that if sufficient hot water or steam is available, any rhyolite flow greater than ~5 m thick can develop the observed ~250-µm hydration rinds within the expected timescale of cooling (weeks–years). As the process of hydration involves shattering of 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers to expose unhydrated rhyolite glass, the time required for hydration may be even shorter. Rapid hydration and formation of relatively thick-walled glass shards allow perlites to provide a snapshot view of the meteoric water (and thus climate) at the time of initial alteration. Perlites retain their initial hydration D/H signal better than thin-walled ash, which in contrast hydrates over many thousands of years with time-averaged precipitation.

  10. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-11-01

    Hydration of silicic volcanic glass forms perlite, a dusky, porous form of altered glass characterized by abundant "onion-skin" fractures. The timing and temperature of perlite formation are enigmatic and could plausibly occur during eruption, during post-eruptive cooling, or much later at ambient temperatures. To learn more about the origin of natural perlite, and to fingerprint the hydration waters, we investigated perlitic glass from several synglacial and interglacial rhyolitic lavas and tuffs from the Yellowstone volcanic system. Perlitic cores are surrounded by a series of conchoidal cracks that separate 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers, likely formed in response to hydration-induced stress. H2O and D/H profiles confirm that most D/H exchange happens together with rapid H2O addition but some smoother D/H variations may suggest separate minor exchange by deuterium atom interdiffusion following hydration. The hydrated rinds (2-3 wt% H2O) transition rapidly (within 30 µm, or by 1 wt% H2O per 10 µm) to unhydrated glass cores. This is consistent with quenched "hydration fronts" where H2O diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on H2O concentrations. The chemical, δ18O, and δD systematics of bulk glass records last equilibrium between 110 and 60 °C without chemical exchange but with some δ18O exchange. Similarly, the δ18O of water extracted from glass by rapid heating suggests that water was added to the glass during cooling at 400 °C) experimental data. The thick hydration rinds in perlites, measuring hundreds of microns, preserve the original D/H values of hydrating water as a recorder of paleoclimate conditions. Measured δD values in perlitic lavas are -150 to -191 or 20-40 ‰ lower than glass hydrated by modern Yellowstone waters. This suggests that Yellowstone perlites record the low-δD signature of glacial ice. Cooling calculations, combined with the observed high water diffusion coefficients noted for 60-150 °C, suggest that if sufficient hot

  11. The condition for dynamic stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL; Gazendam, MGJ; Sinke, WE

    The well-known condition for standing stability in static situations is that the vertical projection of the centre of mass (CoM) should be within the base of support (BoS). On the basis of a simple inverted pendulum model, an extension of this rule is proposed for dynamical situations: the position

  12. The condition for dynamic stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL; Gazendam, MGJ; Sinke, WE

    2005-01-01

    The well-known condition for standing stability in static situations is that the vertical projection of the centre of mass (CoM) should be within the base of support (BoS). On the basis of a simple inverted pendulum model, an extension of this rule is proposed for dynamical situations: the position

  13. The influence of SO2 and NO2 impurities on CO2 gas hydrate formation and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeskow-Strauch, Bettina; Schicks, Judith M; Spangenberg, Erik; Erzinger, Jörg

    2011-04-11

    The sequestration of industrially emitted CO(2) in gas hydrate reservoirs has been recently discussed as an option to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas. This CO(2) contains, despite much effort to clean it, traces of impurities such as SO(2) and NO(2) . Here, we present results of a pilot study on CO(2) hydrates contaminated with 1% SO(2) or 1% NO(2) and show the impact on hydrate formation and stability. Microscopic observations show similar hydrate formation rates, but an increase in hydrate stability in the presence of SO(2). Laser Raman spectroscopy indicates a strong enrichment of SO(2) in the liquid and hydrate phase and its incorporation in both large and small cages of the hydrate lattice. NO(2) is not verifiable by laser Raman spectroscopy, only the presence of nitrate ions could be confirmed. Differential scanning calorimetry analyses show that hydrate stability and dissociation enthalpy of mixed CO(2)-SO(2) hydrates increase, but that only negligible changes arise in the presence of NO(2) impurities. X-ray diffraction data reveal the formation of sI hydrate in all experiments. The conversion rates of ice+gas to hydrate increase in the presence of SO(2), but decrease in the presence of NO(2). After hydrate dissociation, SO(2) and NO(2) dissolved in water and form strong acids.

  14. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krason, J.; Finley, P.

    1988-01-01

    The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

  15. Furfural stability in various conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Oreiro Muzas, Olaya

    2011-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the study of the furfural stability to determine the influence of some conditions in furfural degradation. The aim of the study is to decrease furfural degradation and thus improve furfural yield in furfural production. The thesis consists of a literature review and laboratory experiments. Attention has been paid to the furfural description and properties as well as the background of the research and traditional methods to produce furfural. In the experiments, w...

  16. An Analysis on Stability and Deposition Zones of Natural Gas Hydrate in Dongsha Region, North of South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuan Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose several physical/chemical causes to support the seismic results which find presence of Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR at site 1144 and site 1148 in Dongsha Region, North of South China Sea. At site 1144, according to geothermal gradient, the bottom of stability zone of conduction mode is in agreement with BSR. At site 1148, however, the stability zone of conduction mode is smaller than the natural gas presence zone predicted by the BSR. We propose three causes, that is, mixed convection and conduction thermal flow mode, multiple composition of natural gas and overpressure in deep sediment to explain the BSR presence or gas hydrate presence. Further, our numerical simulation results suggest yet another reason for the presence of BSR at site 1144 and site 1148. Because the temperatures in deep sediment calculated from the mixed convection and conduction thermal flow mode are lower than that from the single conduction mode, the bottom of gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ is deeper than the bottom of gas hydrate deposition zone (GHDZ or BSR. The result indicates that occurrence zone of natural is decided by the condition that natural gas concentrate in the zone is greater than its solubility.

  17. Methane hydrate stability in the presence of water-soluble hydroxyalkyl cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mohammad-Taheri; A. Zarringhalam Moghaddam; K. Nazari; N. Gholipour Zanjani

    2012-01-01

    The effect of low-dosage water-soluble hydroxyethyl cellulose (approximate Mw~90,000 and 250,000) as a member ofhydroxyalkyl cellulosic polymer group on methane hydrate stability was investigated by monitoring hydrate dissociation at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure in a closed vessel.In particular,the influence of molecular weight and mass concentration of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) was studied with respect to hydrate formation and dissociation.Methane hydrate formation was performed at 2 ℃ and at a pressure greater than 100 bar.Afterwards,hydrate dissociation was initiated by step heating from - 10 ℃ at a mild pressure of 13 bar to -3 ℃,0 ℃ and 2 ℃.With respect to the results obtained for methane hydrate formation/dissociation and the amount of gas uptake,we concluded that HEC 90,000 at 5000 ppm is suitable for long-term gas storage and transportation under a mild pressure of 13 bar and at temperatures below the freezing point.

  18. Lattice constants and expansivities of gas hydrates from 10 K up to the stability limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, T. C. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Falenty, A.; Kuhs, W. F. [GZG, Abt. Kristallographie, Universität Göttingen, Goldschmidtstrasse 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-02-07

    The lattice constants of hydrogenated and deuterated CH{sub 4}-, CO{sub 2}-, Xe- (clathrate structure type I) and N{sub 2}-hydrates (clathrate structure type II) from 10 K up to the stability limit were established in neutron- and synchrotron diffraction experiments and were used to derive the related thermal expansivities. The following results emerge from this analysis: (1) The differences of expansivities of structure type I and II hydrates are fairly small. (2) Despite the larger guest-size of CO{sub 2} as compared to methane, CO{sub 2}-hydrate has the smaller lattice constants at low temperatures, which is ascribed to the larger attractive guest-host interaction of the CO{sub 2}-water system. (3) The expansivity of CO{sub 2}-hydrate is larger than for CH{sub 4}-hydrate which leads to larger lattice constants for the former at temperatures above ∼150 K; this is likely due to the higher motional degrees of freedom of the CO{sub 2} guest molecules. (4) The cage occupancies of Xe- and CO{sub 2}-hydrates affect significantly the lattice constants. (5) Similar to ice Ih, the deuterated compounds have generally slightly larger lattice constants which can be ascribed to the somewhat weaker H-bonding. (6) Compared to ice Ih, the high temperature expansivities are about 50% larger; in contrast to ice Ih and the empty hydrate, there is no negative thermal expansion at low temperature. (7) A comparison of the experimental results with lattice dynamical work, with models based on an Einstein oscillator model, and results from inelastic neutron scattering suggest that the contribution of the guest atoms’ vibrational energy to thermal expansion is important, most prominently for CO{sub 2}- and Xe-hydrates.

  19. Development of salt hydrate eutectics as latent heat storage for air conditioning and cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efimova, Anastasia [Brandenburgische Technische Universität (BTU) Cottbus – Senftenberg, Chair of Inorganic Chemistry, Großenhainer Str. 57, 01968 Senftenberg (Germany); Pinnau, Sebastian; Mischke, Matthias; Breitkopf, Cornelia [Technische Universität Dresden, Chair of Technical Thermodynamics, Helmholtzstr. 14, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Ruck, Michael [Technische Universität Dresden, Chair of Inorganic Chemistry, Bergstr. 66, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Peer, E-mail: peer.schmidt@hs-lausitz.de [Brandenburgische Technische Universität (BTU) Cottbus – Senftenberg, Chair of Inorganic Chemistry, Großenhainer Str. 57, 01968 Senftenberg (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Inorganic salt hydrates. • Latent heat thermal energy storage. • Thermal behavior of melting and crystallization. • Cycling stability. • Nucleation. - Abstract: Sustainable air conditioning systems require heat reservoirs that operate between 4 and 20 °C. A systematic search for binary and ternary eutectics of inorganic salts and salt hydrates with melting temperatures in this temperature regime and with high enthalpies of fusion has been performed by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Promising results were obtained for the pseudo-ternary system Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O, Mn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O, and KNO{sub 3} with the melting temperature range 18–21 °C and the enthalpy of fusion of about 110 kJ kg{sup −1}. Suitable nucleating and thickening agents have been found and tested to prevent the mixture from supercooling and phase separation.

  20. Stabilization and anomalous hydration of collagen fibril under heating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasun G Gevorkian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type I collagen is the most common protein among higher vertebrates. It forms the basis of fibrous connective tissues (tendon, chord, skin, bones and ensures mechanical stability and strength of these tissues. It is known, however, that separate triple-helical collagen macromolecules are unstable at physiological temperatures. We want to understand the mechanism of collagen stability at the intermolecular level. To this end, we study the collagen fibril, an intermediate level in the collagen hierarchy between triple-helical macromolecule and tendon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: When heating a native fibril sample, its Young's modulus decreases in temperature range 20-58°C due to partial denaturation of triple-helices, but it is approximately constant at 58-75°C, because of stabilization by inter-molecular interactions. The stabilization temperature range 58-75°C has two further important features: here the fibril absorbs water under heating and the internal friction displays a peak. We relate these experimental findings to restructuring of collagen triple-helices in fibril. A theoretical description of the experimental results is provided via a generalization of the standard Zimm-Bragg model for the helix-coil transition. It takes into account intermolecular interactions of collagen triple-helices in fibril and describes water adsorption via the Langmuir mechanism. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We uncovered an inter-molecular mechanism that stabilizes the fibril made of unstable collagen macromolecules. This mechanism can be relevant for explaining stability of collagen.

  1. Physicochemical properties and thermal stability of quercetin hydrates in the solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghetti, G.S., E-mail: greicefarm@yahoo.com.br [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Carini, J.P. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Honorato, S.B.; Ayala, A.P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, CEP 60.455-970, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Moreira, J.C.F. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Instituto de Ciencias Basicas da Saude, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600, CEP 90035-003, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Bassani, V.L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin raw materials may present different degree of hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal stability of quercetin in the solid state depends on its degree of hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin dehydrate is thermodynamically more stable than the other crystal forms. - Abstract: In the present work three samples of quercetin raw materials (QCTa, QCTb and QCTc), purchased from different Brazilian suppliers, were characterized employing scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, simultaneous thermogravimetry and infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and variable temperature-powder X-ray diffraction, in order to know their physicochemical properties, specially the thermal stability in solid state. The results demonstrated that the raw materials of quercetin analyzed present distinct crystalline structures, ascribed to the different degree of hydration of their crystal lattice. The thermal stability of these quercetin raw materials in the solid state was highly dependent on their degree of hydration, where QCTa (quercetin dihydrate) was thermodynamically more stable than the other two samples.

  2. Stability of permafrost and gas hydrates in Arctic coastal lowlands and on the Eurasian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubberten, H. W.; Lantuit, H.; Overduin, P. P.; Romanovskii, N.; Wetterich, S.

    2011-12-01

    During the last Glacial period thick continuous permafrost developed on the Siberian coastal lowlands and large shelf areas due to the up to 120 m lower sea level and the exposure of these areas to cold temperatures. With the beginning of the Holocene transgression, complex interaction processes of sea water with the permafrost landscape occurred. The occurrence of gas hydrates captured in permafrost is a characteristic feature of the the Eurasian Arctic shelf areas, especially on the shelf of the Kara, Laptev and East Siberia seas. In some of the shelf areas oceanic rift zones stretch to the continent, as for example in the Laptev Sea area where the Gakkel Ridge continues into the land. Great differences in geothermal heat flow values and in the properties of the sediments and rocks have to be assumed in undisturbed lithosphere block and in fault zones like as in continental rifts (such as Momskii and Baikalskii rifts, etc.). As a result differences in the thickness of permafrost and the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) within these structures are expected. The thickness of permafrost and the GHSZ change essentially and irregularly in the stages of regressions and transgressions of the sea. Models show that the thickness of offshore (subsea) permafrost in the stages of climatic warming and transgressions essentially decrease however, rather irregular. The possibilities and the boundary conditions for the occurrence of open taliks, which may result in an emission of greenhouse gases from sub-permafrost gases and hydrates, have been estimated. Ice-bearing and ice-bonded permafrost in the northern regions of Arctic lowlands and in the inner shelf zone, have been preserved during at least four Pleistocene climatic and glacial-eustatic cycles. Presently, they are subjected to degradation from the bottom under the impact of geothermal heat flux as well as from interaction with warmer sea water at the top. Subsea permafrost formed on the arctic continental shelves that

  3. Cross-nucleation between clathrate hydrate polymorphs: assessing the role of stability, growth rate, and structure matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Andrew H; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-02-28

    Cross-nucleation is a phenomenon where a new crystal nucleates and grows upon the surface of a different polymorph. Previous studies indicate that faster growth rate of the new crystal is a necessary but not sufficient condition for cross-nucleation. The thermodynamic stability of the different polymorphs can also affect cross-nucleation by modulating the rates of crystal growth. The interplay between thermodynamic stability of the polymorphs involved, the growth rate of the crystals, and the need for creation of an interfacial transition layer that seamlessly connects the two structures has not yet been fully elucidated. Predicting cross-nucleation is particularly challenging for clathrate hydrates, for which there are sometimes several polymorphs with similar stability and for which growth rates are not known. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate which factor (stability, growth rate, or formation of interfacial transition layer) controls cross-nucleation between the four known Frank-Kasper clathrate hydrate polymorphs: sI, sII, TS, and HS-I. We investigate the growth and cross-nucleation of these four hydrates filled with a set of guest molecules that produce different order of stabilities for the four crystal structures. We determine that the growth rate of sII clathrate is the fastest, followed by TS, HS-I, and sI. We find that cross-nucleation into or from sII clathrates is preceded by the formation of an interfacial transition layer at the seed crystal/liquid interface because sII does not share a crystal plane with sI, HS-I, or TS. Cross-nucleation between the latter three can occur seamlessly and is determined only by their growth rates. Our results indicate that nucleation of an interfacial transition layer between non-matching polymorphs can control cross-nucleation or lack thereof under conditions of small driving force. Under conditions of sufficient supercooling clathrate hydrate polymorphs cross-nucleate into the fastest

  4. Optical-cell evidence for superheated ice under gas-hydrate-forming conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Hogenboom, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.; Chou, I.-Ming

    1998-01-01

    We previously reported indirect but compelling evidence that fine-grained H2O ice under elevated CH4 gas pressure can persist to temperatures well above its ordinary melting point while slowly reacting to form methane clathrate hydrate. This phenomenon has now been visually verified by duplicating these experiments in an optical cell while observing the very slow hydrate-forming process as the reactants were warmed from 250 to 290 K at methane pressures of 23 to 30 MPa. Limited hydrate growth occurred rapidly after initial exposure of the methane gas to the ice grains at temperatures well within the ice subsolidus region. No evidence for continued growth of the hydrate phase was observed until samples were warmed above the equilibrium H2O melting curve. With continued heating, no bulk melting of the ice grains or free liquid water was detected anywhere within the optical cell until hydrate dissociation conditions were reached (292 K at 30 MPa), even though full conversion of the ice grains to hydrate requires 6-8 h at temperatures approaching 290 K. In a separate experimental sequence, unreacted portions of H2O ice grains that had persisted to temperatures above their ordinary melting point were successfully induced to melt, without dissociating the coexisting hydrate in the sample tube, by reducing the pressure overstep of the equilibrium phase boundary and thereby reducing the rate of hydrate growth at the ice-hydrate interface. Results from similar tests using CO2 as the hydrate-forming species demonstrated that this superheating effect is not unique to the CH4-H2O system.

  5. Calculation of the eroei coefficient for natural gas hydrates in laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siažik, Ján; Malcho, Milan; Čaja, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    In the 1960s, scientists discovered that methane hydrate existed in the gas field in Siberia. Gas hydrates are known to be stable under conditions of high pressure and low temperature that have been recognized in polar regions and in the uppermost part of deep -water sediments below the sea floor. The article deals with the determination of the EROEI coefficient to generate the natural gas hydrate in the device under specific temperature and pressure conditions. Energy returned on energy invested expresses ratio of the amount of usable energy delivered from a particular energy resource to the amount of exergy used to obtain that energy resource. Gas hydrates have been also discussed before decades like potential source mainly for regions with restricted access to conventional hydrocarbons also tactic interest in establishing alternative gas reserves.

  6. Selective and reactive hydration of nitriles to amides in water using silver nanoparticles stabilized by organic ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Koji [Hokkaido University, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Japan); Kawakami, Hayato [Miyoshi Oil & Fat Co., Ltd. (Japan); Narushima, Takashi; Yonezawa, Tetsu, E-mail: tetsu@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Water-dispersible silver nanoparticles stabilized by silver–carbon covalent bonds were prepared. They exhibited high catalytic activities for the selective hydration of nitriles to amides in water. The activation of a nitrile group by the functional groups of the substrates and the hydrophobic layer on the nanoparticles influenced the catalyzed reaction were confirmed. Alkyl nitriles could also be selectively hydrated.

  7. A Numerical Model for the Thermomechanical Conditions During Hydration of Early-age Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper; Thorborg, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, a macroscopic numerical model for the thermomechanical conditions during hydration of early-age concrete is presented. The formulation is based on a semi-coupled, incremental thermomechanical model where the heat production from the hydration process is expressed in terms of...... analytical solutions are carried out as well as examples of analysis of real concrete structures. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved....

  8. Prediction of Gas Hydrate Formation Conditions in Aqueous Solutions of Single and Mixed Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuo, You-Xiang; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, the extended Patel-Teja equation of state was modified to describe non-ideality of the liquid phase containing water and electrolytes accurately. The modified Patel-Teja equation of state (MPT EOS) was utilized to develop a predictive method for gas hydrate equilibria. The new method...... employs the Barkan and Sheinin hydrate model for the description of the hydrate phase, the original Patel-Teja equation of state for the vapor phase fugacities, and the MPT EOS (instead of the activity coefficient model) for the activity of water in the aqueous phase. The new method has succesfully...... predicted the gas hydrate formation conditions in aqueous solutions of single and mixed electrolytes. The agreement between experimental data and predictions was found to be excellent....

  9. Prediction of Gas Hydrate Formation Conditions in Aqueous Solutions of Single and Mixed Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuo, You-Xiang; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, the extended Patel-Teja equation of state was modified to describe non-ideality of the liquid phase containing water and electrolytes accurately. The modified Patel-Teja equation of state (MPT EOS) was utilized to develop a predictive method for gas hydrate equilibria. The new method...... employs the Barkan and Sheinin hydrate model for the description of the hydrate phase, the original Patel-Teja equation of state for the vapor phase fugacities, and the MPT EOS (instead of the activity coefficient model) for the activity of water in the aqueous phase. The new method has succesfully...... predicted the gas hydrate formation conditions in aqueous solutions of single and mixed electrolytes. The agreement between experimental data and predictions was found to be excellent....

  10. Molecular mechanisms of decomposition of hydrated Na+Cl- ion pairs under planar nanopore conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevkunov, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    The decomposition of Na+Cl- ion pairs under the conditions of a nanoscopic planar pore with structureless walls in a material contact with water vapor at 298 K is simulated by Monte Carlo method. The transition from the state of a contact ion pair (CIP) to the state of solvent-separated ion pair (SSIP) is shown to occur as a result of an increase in the vapor pressure over a pore after exceeding the threshold number of molecules in a hydrate shell. It is found that the planar form of a molecular cluster under the conditions of a narrow pore does not level an abrupt structural transition and the formation of hydrogen bonds in the hydrate shell starts after three molecules are added. The hydrogen bond length under pore conditions is found to be resistant to variations in the hydrate shell size and coincides with that in water under normal conditions.

  11. Transition-metal-free hydration of nitriles using potassium tert-butoxide under anhydrous conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midya, Ganesh Chandra; Kapat, Ajoy; Maiti, Subhadip; Dash, Jyotirmayee

    2015-04-17

    Potassium tert-butoxide acts as a nucleophilic oxygen source during the hydration of nitriles to give the corresponding amides under anhydrous conditions. The reaction proceeds smoothly for a broad range of substrates under mild conditions, providing an efficient and economically affordable synthetic route to the amides in excellent yields. This protocol does not need any transition-metal catalyst or any special experimental setup and is easily scalable to bulk scale synthesis. A single-electron-transfer radical mechanism as well as an ionic mechanism have been proposed for the hydration process.

  12. Storing natural gas as frozen hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Khokhar, A.A. (Univ. of Trondheim (Norway)); Parlaktuna, M. (Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    1994-02-01

    The formation of natural gas hydrates is a well-known problem in the petroleum and natural gas industries. Hydrates are solid materials that form when liquid water and natural gas are brought in contact under pressure. Hydrate formation need not be a problem. On the contrary, it can be an advantage. The volume of hydrates is much less than that of natural gas. At standard conditions, hydrates occupy 150 to 170 times less volume than the corresponding gas. Typically, natural gas hydrates contain 15% gas and 85% water by mass. It follows that hydrates can be used for large-scale storage of natural gas. Benesh proposed using hydrates to improve the load factor of natural gas supply systems. The author suggested that hydrates could be produced by bringing liquid water into contact with natural gas at the appropriate temperature and high pressure. The hydrate then would be stored at a temperature and pressure where it was stable. When gas was needed for the supply system, the hydrate would be melted at low pressure. The stability of a natural gas hydrate during storage at atmospheric pressure and below-freezing temperatures was studied in the laboratory. The gas hydrate was produced in a stirred vessel at 2- to 6-MPa pressure and temperatures from 0 to 20 C. The hydrate was refrigerated and stored in deep freezers at [minus]5, [minus]10, and [minus]18 C for up to 10 days. The natural gas hydrate remained stable when kept frozen at atmospheric pressure.

  13. Size and stability of liposomes: a possible role of hydration and osmotic forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabín, J; Prieto, G; Ruso, J M; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R; Sarmiento, F

    2006-08-01

    Dynamic light scattering and electrophoretic mobility measurements have been used to characterize the size, size distribution and zeta potentials (zeta-potentials) of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC) liposomes in the presence of monovalent ions ( Na(+) and K(+)). To study the stability of liposomes the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory has been extended by introducing the hydrated radius of the adsorbed ions onto the liposome surfaces. The decrease of liposome size is explained on the basis of the membrane impermeability to some ions which generate osmotic forces, which leads to evacuate water from liposome inside.

  14. Measurement of Clathrate Hydrate Thermodynamic Stability in the Presence of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Marc

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of data available for the stability of clathrate hydrates in the presence of ammonia for low-to-moderate pressures in the 0-10 MPa range. Providing such data will allow for a better understanding of natural mass transfer processes on celestial bodies like Titan and Enceladus, on which destabilization of clathrates may be responsible for replenishment of gases in the atmosphere. The experimental process utilizes a custom-built gas handling system (GHS) and a cryogenic calorimeter to allow for the efficient testing of samples under varying pressures and gas species.

  15. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project, Northern Alaska Province (001). Petroleum Systems and Geologic Assessment of Gas Hydrates in Northern Alaska – 2008. Limits of the Gas Hydrate stability zone contour lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The limits of Gas Hydrate (GH) stability zone contour lines (GH stability thickness zero) shown here is a geographic boundary defined and mapped on basis of U.S....

  16. Degree of Hydration of OPC and OPC/Fly ash Paste Samples Conditioned at Different Relative Humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Shafiq

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Degree of hydration of cement paste controls many properties of hardened concrete and/or mortar such as compressive strength. During the drying process, the degree and the rate of hydration of cement paste in concrete/mortar samples are significantly affected by the ambient relative humidity of the exposure conditions. There are various parameters such as the amount of calcium hydroxide, Ca(OH2 in the paste, quantity of the chemically bound water, specific gravity of the paste, fraction of un-hydrated cement, liberated heat of hydration and strength of the hydrated cement may be used to determine the degree of hydration of the cement paste. This paper presents the results of the experimental investigation for the determination of the degree of hydration of 100% cement paste and fly ash blended cement pastes. After 28 days moist curing, the samples were conditioned in 100%, 75%, 65%, 40% and 12% relative humidity. Conditioning of samples in different relative humidity had significant effects on the compressive strength of the mortar samples and the degree of hydration of the paste samples. Conditioning of samples in 100% RH resulted in higher compressive strength and the degree of hydration. Because of the 28 days moist curing and 12 weeks moisture conditioning in different RH, fly ash based samples showed better compressive strength than the OPC samples.

  17. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability. Progress report, June 16--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krason, J.; Finley, P.

    1988-12-31

    The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

  18. Causal Stability Conditions for General Relativistic Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, E M

    2016-01-01

    A brief overview of some open questions in general relativity with important consequences for causality theory is presented, aiming to a better understanding of the causal structure of the spacetime. Special attention is accorded to the problem of fundamental causal stability conditions. Several questions are raised and some of the potential consequences of recent results regarding the causality problem in general relativity are presented. A key question is whether causality violating regions are locally allowed. The new concept of almost stable causality is introduced; meanwhile, related conditions and criteria for the stability and almost stability of the causal structure are discussed.

  19. A study on gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byoung Jae; Jung, Tae Jin; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Sufficient documents were reviewed to understand solid components of water and gaseous hydrocarbon known as gas hydrates, which represent an important potential energy resource of the future. The review provides us with valuable information on crystal structures, kinetics, origin and distribution of gas hydrates. In addition, the review increased our knowledge of exploration and development methods of gas hydrates. Large amounts of methane, the principal component of natural gas, in the form of solid gas hydrate are found mainly offshore in outer continental margin sediment and, to a lesser extent, in polar regions commonly associated with permafrost. Natural gas hydrates are stable in some environments where the hydrostatic pressure exerted by overlying water column is sufficient for hydrate formation and stability. The required high pressures generally restrict gas hydrate to sediments beneath water of approximately 400 m. Higher sediment temperatures at greater subbottom depths destabilize gas hydrates. Based on the pressure- temperature condition, the outer continental margin of East Sea where water depth is deep enough to form gas hydrate is considered to have high potential of gas hydrate accumulations. (author). 56 refs., tabs., figs.

  20. Thermodynamic and kinetic stability of zwitterionic histidine: Effects of gas phase hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Sik; Kim, Ju-Young; Han, Yuna; Shim, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Sungyul

    2015-09-01

    We present calculations for histidine-(H2O)n (n = 0-6) to examine the effects of micro-hydrating water molecules on the relative stability of the zwitterionic vs. canonical forms of histidine. We calculate the structures and Gibbs free energies of the conformers at wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. We find that six water molecules are required to produce the thermodynamically stable histidine zwitterion. By calculating the barriers of canonical ↔ zwitterionic transformation, we predict that both the most stable canonical and zwitterionic forms of histidine-(H2O)6 may be observed in low temperature gas phase environment.

  1. Conditions for equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Daniela J; de Folter, Julius W J; Luigjes, Bob; Castillo, Sonja I R; Sacanna, Stefano; Philipse, Albert P; Kegel, Willem K

    2010-08-19

    Particular types of solid-stabilized emulsions can be thermodynamically stable as evidenced by their spontaneous formation and monodisperse droplet size, which only depends on system parameters. Here, we investigate the generality of these equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions with respect to the basic constituents: aqueous phase with ions, oil, and stabilizing particles. From systematic variations of these constituents, we identify general conditions for the spontaneous formation of monodisperse solid-stabilized emulsions droplets. We conclude that emulsion stability is achieved by a combination of solid particles as well as amphiphilic ions adsorbed at the droplet surface, and low interfacial tensions of the bare oil-water interface of order 10 mN/m or below. Furthermore, preferential wetting of the colloidal particles by the oil phase is necessary for thermodynamic stability. We demonstrate the sufficiency of these basic requirements by extending the observed thermodynamic stability to emulsions of different compositions. Our findings point to a new class of colloid-stabilized meso-emulsions with a potentially high impact on industrial emulsification processes due to the associated large energy savings.

  2. Solidification/stabilization and leaching behavior of PbCl₂ in fly-ash hydrated silicate matrix and fly-ash geopolymer matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Gao, Xingbao; Wang, Qi; He, Jie; Yan, Dahai

    2015-05-01

    Fly ash (FA) for reuse as a construction material is activated using two methods, to produce hydrated silicate and geopolymer gels. We investigated the solidification/stabilization and leaching behavior of PbCl2 in a geopolymer matrix (GM) and hydrated silicate matrix (HSM), based on FA as the source material, to evaluate the environmental and health risks. The GM and HSM synthetic conditions were 60 °C, 20 % relative humidity (RH), and 12 wt% (6 mol/L) NaOH, and 20 ± 2 °C, ≥ 90 % RH, and 30 wt.%, respectively, based on their compressive strength performances. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that Pb participated in hydration and geopolymerization, and was incorporated in the structural components of the hydrated silicate and geopolymer. In leaching experiments, the solidification/stabilization effects of Pb and Cl in the HSM and GM improved with increasing curing time. After long-term curing (28 days), the immobility of Pb in the GM was better than that in the HSM. Sodalite improved the Cl-stabilizing ability of the GM compared with that of the HSM. In static monolithic leaching experiments, HSM and GM had the same Pb-leaching behaviors. Based on the changes in the location of the neutral sphere layer with decreasing acid-neutralizing capacity, Pb release was divided into alkaline-release, stagnation, and acid-release stages. The neutral sphere layer contained the highest Pb concentration during permeation toward the block center from the block edge. This behavior regulation could also apply to other amphoteric metals immobilized by GMs and HSMs.

  3. Aminopentol, a possible novel biomarker tracer for methane hydrate stability in sedimentary records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, L.; Talbot, H. M.; Cooke, M. P.; Wagner, T.

    2009-04-01

    perturbations in local climate with relation to these previously unrecognized methane emission events. The aerobic oxidation of methane is thought to be intrinsically linked with methane gas hydrate dissolution. Thus, the variability in amino-BHP abundance could provide an indicator for past methane emission events, directly linking key aspects of structural geology with gas hydrate stability, deep ocean processes, and methane cycling.

  4. Long-term stability of hydrogen isotope ratios in hydrated volcanic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Elizabeth J.; Breecker, Daniel O.

    2017-03-01

    The advancement of conceptual and numerical geodynamic models necessitates quantitative, orogen-scale paleoelevation data. Felsic volcanic glasses, which record the hydrogen isotope compositions (δD) of meteoric water shortly after deposition, provide several advantages as a paleoelevation proxy. Questions remain, however, about the reliability of this relatively new proxy, including the effect of hydrofluoric (HF) acid abrasion in the preparation of glass shards for hydrogen isotope analysis and the stability of hydrogen isotope ratios in hydrated glass shards over geologic time (106-107 years). HF acid abrasion of natural ancient glass shards results in systematic shifts in glass δD values away from modern water δD values. To evaluate the effectiveness of HF acid abrasion, we treated 70-150 μm glass shards separated from various natural tephras with deuterium-labeled water (DLW; δD = +18,205‰) for up to 400 days. For all glasses, this treatment resulted in elevated δD values in comparison to untreated samples. HF acid abrasion after DLW exposure, however, removed this effect and restored glass shards to their original untreated δD values in samples older than 104 years. HF acid abrasion removes hydrous alteration precipitates at the glass surface without measurably changing the δD values of the underlying hydrated glass, regardless of abrasion duration or glass composition. Additionally, 45-34 Ma glasses record δD values that directly reflect their depositional environments as determined by stratigraphy: glasses from tuffs deposited in demonstrably evaporative lacustrine environments have relatively high δD values compared to glasses from contemporaneous tuffs deposited in nearby fluvial environments, which have much lower δD values. The preservation of δD values that systematically vary with original depositional environment, despite >30 Myr of post-hydration exposure to the same meteoric water, indicates that these volcanic glasses resisted

  5. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute.

  6. Controls on evolution of gas-hydrate system in the Krishna-Godavari basin, offshore India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Badesab, F.K.; Dewangan, P.; Usapkar, A.; Kocherla, M.; Peketi, A.; Mohite, K.; Sangode, S.J.; Deenadayalan, K.

    magnetic minerals in the studied samples. 5.5. Can magnetic record be used as a potential tracer to identify the fossil gas hydrate zone in the K-G basin? In marine settings, the dissociation of gas hydrates takes place whenever P-T condition changes..., whenever the suitable P-T conditions prevail, hydrate nucleation takes place leaving the former boundary of gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) as a fossil gas hydrate horizon. In K-G basin, the present base of GHSZ calculated using hydrate stability...

  7. Glycerol and urea can be used to increase skin permeability in reduced hydration conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Sebastian; Engblom, Johan; Thuresson, Krister; Sparr, Emma

    2013-12-18

    The natural moisturizing factor (NMF) is a group of hygroscopic molecules that is naturally present in skin and protects from severe drying. Glycerol and urea are two examples of NMF components that are also used in skin care applications. In the present study, we investigate the influence of glycerol and urea on the permeability of a model drug (metronidazole, Mz) across excised pig skin membranes at different hydrating conditions. The degree of skin hydration is regulated by the gradient in water activity across the membrane, which in turn depends on the water activity of the formulation in contact with the skin membrane. Here, we determine the water activity of all formulations employed using an isothermal calorimetric method. Thus, the gradient in water activity is controlled by a novel experimental set-up with well-defined boundary conditions on both sides of the skin membrane. The results demonstrate that glycerol and urea can retain high steady state flux of Mz across skin membranes at dehydrating conditions, which otherwise would decrease the permeability due to dehydration. X-ray diffraction measurements are performed to give insight into the effects of glycerol and urea on SC molecular organization. The novel steady state flux results can be related to the observation that water, glycerol, and urea all affect the structural features of the SC molecular components in a similar manner.

  8. Pyrite Stability Under Venus Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, E.; Craig, P.; Port, S.; Chevrier, V.; Johnson, N.

    2015-12-01

    Radar mapping of the surface of Venus shows areas of high reflectivity in the Venusian highlands, increasing to 0.35 ± 0.04 to 0.43 ± 0.05 in the highlands from the planetary average of 0.14 ± 0.03. Iron sulfides, specifically pyrite (FeS2), can explain the observed high reflectivity. However, several studies suggest that pyrite is not stable under Venusian conditions and is destroyed on geologic timescales. To test the stability of pyrite on the Venusian surface, pyrite was heated in the Venus simulation chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to average Venusian surface conditions, and separately to highland conditions under an atmosphere of pure CO2 and separately under an atmosphere of 96.5% CO2, 3.5% N2 and 150 ppm SO2. After each run, the samples were weighed and analyzed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) to identify possible phase changes and determine the stability of pyrite under Venusian surface conditions. Under a pure CO2 atmosphere, the Fe in pyrite oxidizes to form hematite which is more stable at higher temperatures corresponding to the Venusian lowlands. Magnetite is the primary iron oxide that forms at lower temperatures corresponding to the radar-bright highlands. Our experiments also showed that the presence of atmospheric SO2 inhibits the oxidation of pyrite, increasing its stability under Venusian conditions, especially those corresponding to the highlands. This indicates that the relatively high level of SO2 in the Venusian atmosphere is key to the stability of pyrite, making it a possible candidate for the bright radar signal in the Venusian highlands.

  9. Stability condition of semisolid continuous casting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The major unsteady phenomena in semisolid continuous casting process are the breakage and breakout. The essential reasons for them are the passageway blocking or the solidified shell too thin to endure the withdrawal force because of the remained shell formed at the beginning and its developing afterwards. Through theoretically analyzing the crack filling and the remained shell developing, stability conditions were presented. The essential one of them is that the stress acted on the semisolid slurry must be larger than the yield stress of it. The condition without breakage is to build a balance between the increase of the remained shell resulted in solidifying and the decrease of it resulted in flowing of the semisolid slurry. The condition without breakout is to ensure the solidified thickness larger than the safe thickness. The corresponding mathematical formulas of these conditions were set up and the verification experiments show that these conditions are reliable in applications.

  10. An Outlook on Biothermodynamics: Needs, Problems, and New Developments. I. Stability and Hydration of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jürgen U.

    2008-12-01

    The application of concepts, principles, and methods of thermodynamics of equilibria and processes to bioengineering systems has led to a new and growing field: engineering biothermodynamics. This article, which is meant as the first in a series, gives an outline of basic aspects, changes, and actual examples in this field. After a few introductory remarks, the basic concepts and laws of thermodynamics extended to systems with internal variables, which serve as models for biofluids and other biosystems, are given. The method of thermodynamics is then applied to the problem of thermal stability of aqueous protein solutions, especially to that of myoglobin solutions. After this, the phenomenon of hydration of proteins by adsorption and intrusion of water molecules is considered. Several other phenomena like the adsorption of proteins on solid surfaces or cell membranes and their temperature and pressure-related behavior represented by an equation of state, or the thermodynamics of bacterial solutions including chemical reactions like wine fermentation, etc., will be presented in Parts II and III of this article.

  11. Gas Hydrate Stability at Low Temperatures and High Pressures with Applications to Mars and Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, G. M.; Kargel, J. S.; Catling, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Gas hydrates are implicated in the geochemical evolution of both Mars and Europa [1- 3]. Most models developed for gas hydrate chemistry are based on the statistical thermodynamic model of van der Waals and Platteeuw [4] with subsequent modifications [5-8]. None of these models are, however, state-of-the-art with respect to gas hydrate/electrolyte interactions, which is particularly important for planetary applications where solution chemistry may be very different from terrestrial seawater. The objectives of this work were to add gas (carbon dioxide and methane) hydrate chemistries into an electrolyte model parameterized for low temperatures and high pressures (the FREZCHEM model) and use the model to examine controls on gas hydrate chemistries for Mars and Europa.

  12. Differential gene expression in Pyropia columbina (Bangiales, Rhodophyta under natural hydration and desiccation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loretto Contreras-Porcia

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In rocky shores, desiccation is triggered by daily tide changes, and experimental evidence suggests that local distribution of algal species across the intertidal rocky zone is related to their capacity to tolerate desiccation. In this context, the permanence of Pyropia columbina in the high intertidal rocky zone is explained by its exceptional physiological tolerance to desiccation. This study explored the metabolic pathways involved in tolerance to desiccation in the Chilean P. columbina, by characterizing its transcriptome under contrasting conditions of hydration. We obtained 1,410 ESTs from two subtracted cDNA libraries in naturally hydrated and desiccated fronds. Results indicate that transcriptome from both libraries contain transcripts from diverse metabolic pathways related to tolerance. Among the transcripts differentially expressed, 15% appears involved in protein synthesis, processing and degradation, 14.4% are related to photosynthesis and chloroplast, 13.1% to respiration and mitochondrial function (NADH dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase proteins, 10.6% to cell wall metabolism, and 7.5% are involved in antioxidant activity, chaperone and defense factors (catalase, thioredoxin, heat shock proteins, cytochrome P450. Both libraries highlight the presence of genes/proteins never described before in algae. This information provides the first molecular work regarding desiccation tolerance in P. columbina, and helps, to some extent, explaining the classical patterns of ecological distribution described for algae across the intertidal zone.

  13. XPS Study on the Stability and Transformation of Hydrate and Carbonate Phases within MgO Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Rheinheimer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MgO cements have great potential for carbon sequestration as they have the ability to carbonate and gain strength over time. The hydration of reactive MgO occurs at a similar rate as ordinary Portland cement (PC and forms brucite (Mg(OH2, magnesium hydroxide, which reacts with CO2 to form a range of hydrated magnesium carbonates (HMCs. However, the formation of HMCs within the MgO–CO2–H2O system depends on many factors, such as the temperature and CO2 concentration, among others, which play an important role in determining the rate and degree of carbonation, the type and stability of the produced HMCs and the associated strength development. It is critical to understand the stability and transformation pathway of HMCs, which are assessed here through the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The effects of the CO2 concentration (in air or 10% CO2, exposure to high temperatures (up to 300 °C and curing period (one or seven days are reported. Observed changes in the binding energy (BE indicate the formation of different components and the transformation of the hydrated carbonates from one form to another, which will influence the final performance of the carbonated blends.

  14. Methane in shallow subsurface sediments at the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone offshore western Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Carolyn A.; James, Rachael H.; Sapart, Célia Julia; Stott, Andrew W.; Wright, Ian C.; Berndt, Christian; Westbrook, Graham K.; Connelly, Douglas P.

    2017-02-01

    Offshore western Svalbard plumes of gas bubbles rise from the seafloor at the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (LLGHSZ; ∼400 m water depth). It is hypothesized that this methane may, in part, come from dissociation of gas hydrate in the underlying sediments in response to recent warming of ocean bottom waters. To evaluate the potential role of gas hydrate in the supply of methane to the shallow subsurface sediments, and the role of anaerobic oxidation in regulating methane fluxes across the sediment-seawater interface, we have characterised the chemical and isotopic compositions of the gases and sediment pore waters. The molecular and isotopic signatures of gas in the bubble plumes (C1/C2+ = 1 × 104; δ13C-CH4 = -55 to -51‰; δD-CH4 = -187 to -184‰) are similar to gas hydrate recovered from within sediments ∼30 km away from the LLGHSZ. Modelling of pore water sulphate profiles indicates that subsurface methane fluxes are largely at steady state in the vicinity of the LLGHSZ, providing no evidence for any recent change in methane supply due to gas hydrate dissociation. However, at greater water depths, within the GHSZ, there is some evidence that the supply of methane to the shallow sediments has recently increased, which is consistent with downslope retreat of the GHSZ due to bottom water warming although other explanations are possible. We estimate that the upward diffusive methane flux into shallow subsurface sediments close to the LLGHSZ is 30,550 mmol m-2 yr-1, but it is <20 mmol m-2 yr-1 in sediments further away from the seafloor bubble plumes. While anaerobic oxidation within the sediments prevents significant transport of dissolved methane into ocean bottom waters this amounts to less than 10% of the total methane flux (dissolved + gas) into the shallow subsurface sediments, most of which escapes AOM as it is transported in the gas phase.

  15. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  16. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. New Sufficient LMI Conditions for Static Output Stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adegas, Fabiano Daher

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents new linear matrix inequality conditions to the static output feedback stabilization problem. Although the conditions are only sufficient, numerical experiments show excellent success rates in finding a stabilizing controller.......This paper presents new linear matrix inequality conditions to the static output feedback stabilization problem. Although the conditions are only sufficient, numerical experiments show excellent success rates in finding a stabilizing controller....

  18. Stability of prostacyclin analogues: an unusual lack of reactivity in acid-catalyzed alkene hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, A; O'Yang, C; Powell, M F

    1988-04-01

    Prostacyclin analogue 5 undergoes specific acid-catalyzed hydration (kH+ = 1.9 x 10(-7)M-1 sec-1 at 25 degrees C) and a pH-independent oxidation reaction (k0 = 1.2 x 10(-10) sec-1 at 25 degrees C) above pH approximately 5. The hydration reaction for 5 is much slower than for other structurally similar exocyclic alkenes, even though the rate-determining step is proton transfer. This slowness of reaction and an analysis of the pH-rate profile show that 5 does not exhibit significant intramolecular general acid catalysis, as does prostacyclin.

  19. GULF OF MEXICO SEAFLOOR STABILITY AND GAS HYDRATE MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Robin C. Buchannon

    2004-11-01

    The gas hydrates research Consortium (HRC), established and administered at the University if Mississippi's Center for Marine Research and Environmental Technology (CMRET) has been active on many fronts in FY 03. Extension of the original contract through March 2004, has allowed completion of many projects that were incomplete at the end of the original project period due, primarily, to severe weather and difficulties in rescheduling test cruises. The primary objective of the Consortium, to design and emplace a remote sea floor station for the monitoring of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005 remains intact. However, the possibility of levering HRC research off of the Joint Industries Program (JIP) became a possibility that has demanded reevaluation of some of the fundamental assumptions of the station format. These provisions are discussed in Appendix A. Landmark achievements of FY03 include: (1) Continuation of Consortium development with new researchers and additional areas of research contribution being incorporated into the project. During this period, NOAA's National Undersea Research Program's (NURP) National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST) became a Consortium funding partner, joining DOE and Minerals Management Service (MMS); (2) Very successful annual and semiannual meetings in Oxford Mississippi in February and September, 2003; (3) Collection of piston cores from MC798 in support of the effort to evaluate the site for possible monitoring station installation; (4) Completion of the site evaluation effort including reports of all localities in the northern Gulf of Mexico where hydrates have been documented or are strongly suspected to exist on the sea floor or in the shallow subsurface; (5) Collection and preliminary evaluation of vent gases and core samples of hydrate from sites in Green Canyon and Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico; (6) Monitoring of gas activity on the sea floor, acoustically

  20. CHARACTER ANALYSIS OF THE MARINE GAS HYDRATE STABILITY ZONE%海底天然气水合物稳定带的特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方银霞; 黎明碧; 金翔龙; 申屠海港

    2001-01-01

    水合物稳定带(HSZ)控制着海底天然气水合物的成矿作用和分布规律,其厚度及分布范围决定了天然气水合物的蕴藏量,所以水合物稳定带的分析对天然气水合物的成矿与分布规律、成因与演化机制以及资源评价研究具有重要的指导意义。水合物稳定带本身受海底温度、压力和甲烷量等因素的影响,其变化会影响水合物稳定带的范围、稳定带底界的位置,并制约着天然气水合物的稳定性和甲烷气的释放。%Hydrate stability zone(HSZ)controls the deposition and the distribution of marine gas hydrate,and its thickness and distribution range determines the reserves of the marine gas hydrate.So the analysis of hydrate stability zone(HSZ) is useful to the study of the deposition,distribution,genesis,evolving mechanism and the resource evaluation of the marine gas hydrate.This paper systematically introduced the main characters of hydrate stability zone(HSZ),such as its formation,its temperature-pressure characters,and its geologic charactes.The paper also discussed the relationship between hydrate stability zone(HSZ) and hydrate deposition zone,the relationship between the base of hydrate stability zone and the top of free gas,the changes of hydrate stability zone and its influential factors.

  1. CALCIUM ORTHOPHOSPHATES HYDRATES: FORMATION, STABILITY AND INFLUENCE ON STANDARD PROPERTIES OF PORTLAND CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaziliunas A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of phosphogypsum to produce the binders requires a much higher input than preparation of natural gypsum stone. This makes it uncompetitive material. The investigations presented therein are meant to reduce this input by looking for the ways of rendering impurities harmless. Soluble acid orthophosphates are the main harmful impurity of phosphogypsum. The studies show that dry insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates (1.09 % and 2.18 % P2O5 in gypsum have little effect on W/C, setting times and soundness of Portland cement pastes. Insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates {CaHPO4∙2H2O, Ca8(HPO42(PO44∙5H2O and Ca9(HPO4(PO45(OH∙4H2O} formed in acidic medium (pH = 4.2 - 5.9 have been destroyed in alkaline medium and reduce standard compressive strength of cement up to 28 %. Calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group are stable in alcaline medium, while in dry state they reduce the standard compressive strength of cement until 10 %, but their suspensions prolong setting times of Portland cement as soluble orthophosphates – 2 - 3 times. Alkalis in cement increase pH of paste, but do not change the process of formation of calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group: it takes place through an intermediate phase - CaHPO4·2H2O, whose transformation into apatite lasts for 2 - 3 months.

  2. Ice nucleation activity of diesel soot particles at Cirrus relevant conditions: Effects of hydration, secondary organics coating, hydration, soot morphology, and coagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; China, Swarup; Liu, Shang; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Sharma, Noopur; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Aiken, A. C.; Chand, Duli; Laskin, Alexander; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shilling, John E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2016-04-16

    The role of atmospheric relevant soot particles that are processed in the atmosphere toward ice nucleation at cirrus cloud condition is poorly understood. In this study, the ice nucleating properties of diesel soot particles subjected to various physical and chemical aging treatments were investigated at temperatures ranging from -40 to -50 °C. We show that bare soot particles nucleate ice in deposition mode, but coating with secondary organics suppresses the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of soot particles requiring homogeneous freezing threshold conditions. However, the ice nucleation efficiency of soot particles coated with an aqueous organic layer was similar to bare soot particles. Hydration of bare soot particles slightly enhanced the ice nucleation efficiency, and the IN abilities of compact soot particles (roundness = ~ 0.6) were similar to bare lacey soot particles (roundness = ~ 0.4). These results indicate that ice nucleation properties are sensitive to the various aging treatments.

  3. Stability of melt crystal growth under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarchenko, V. A.

    The conception of dynamic stability of melt crystal growth has been developed. The method based on the Lyapunov stability theory has been used to the study stability of crystallization by capillary shaping techniques including Czokhralsky, Stepanov, Kiropoulos, Verneuil and floating zone methods. Preliminary results of the stability analysis of crystallization by floating zone technique under microgravity conditions are presented here.

  4. 油藏流体中H型水合物生成条件的计算%Prediction of Structure-H Gas Hydrate Formation Conditions for Reservoir Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马庆兰; 陈光进; 郭天民; 张坤; Julian Y.Zuo; Dan Zhang; Heng-Joo Ng

    2005-01-01

    In this work, a thermodynamic model is developed for prediction of structure H hydrate formation. The model combines the Peng-Robinson equation of state for the vapor, liquid and aqueous phases with the extended Ng-Robinson hydrate model for gas hydrate formation of all three structures. The parameters of 14 structureH hydrate formers are determined based on the experimental data of structure-H hydrates in the literature. The expression of fugacity of water in the empty hydrate phase is correlated for calculating structure-H hydrate formation conditions in the absence of free water. The model is tested by predicting hydrate formation conditions of a number of structure-H hydrate forming systems which are in good agreement with the experimental data. The proposed model is also applied to the prediction of hydrate formation conditions for various reservoir fluids such as natural gas and gas condensate.

  5. Remodeling of leaf cellular glycerolipid composition under drought and re-hydration conditions in grasses from the Lolium-Festuca complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Perlikowski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Drought tolerant plant genotypes are able to maintain stability and integrity of cellular membranes in unfavorable conditions, and to regenerate damaged membranes after stress cessation. The profiling of cellular glycerolipids during drought stress performed on model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana does not fully cover the picture of lipidome in monocots, including grasses. Herein, two closely related introgression genotypes of Lolium multiflorum (Italian ryegrass × Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue were used as a model for other grass species to describe lipid rearrangements during drought and re-hydration. The genotypes differed in their level of photosynthetic capacity during drought, and in their capacity for membrane regeneration after stress cessation. A total of 120 lipids, comprising the classes of monogalactosyldiacyloglycerol, digalactosyldiacyloglycerol, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, diacylglicerol and triacylglicerol, were analyzed. The results clearly showed that water deficit had a significant impact on lipid metabolism in studied forage grasses. It was revealed that structural and metabolic lipid species changed their abundance during drought and re-watering periods and some crucial genotype-dependent differences were also observed. The introgression genotype characterized by an ability to regenerate membranes after re-hydration demonstrated a higher accumulation level of most chloroplast and numerous extra-chloroplast membrane lipid species at the beginning of drought. Furthermore, this genotype also revealed a significant reduction in the accumulation of most chloroplast lipids after re-hydration, compared with the other introgression genotype without the capacity for membrane regeneration. The potential influence of observed lipidomic alterations on a cellular membrane stability and photosynthetic capacity, are

  6. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  7. Reduced Numerical Model for Methane Hydrate Formation under Conditions of Variable Salinity. Time-Stepping Variants and Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Peszynska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a reduced computational model of methane hydrate formation in variable salinity conditions, and give details on the discretization and phase equilibria implementation. We describe three time-stepping variants: Implicit, Semi-implicit, and Sequential, and we compare the accuracy and efficiency of these variants depending on the spatial and temporal discretization parameters. We also study the sensitivity of the model to the simulation parameters and in particular to the reduced phase equilibria model.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, solubility and stability studies of hydrate cocrystal of antitubercular Isoniazid with antioxidant and anti-bacterial Protocatechuic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashhadi, Syed Muddassir Ali; Yunus, Uzma; Bhatti, Moazzam Hussain; Ahmed, Imtiaz; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2016-08-01

    Isoniazid is an important component used in "triple therapy" to combat tuberculosis. It has reduced Tabletting formulations stability. Anti-oxidants are obligatory to counter oxidative stress, pulmonary inflammation, and free radical burst from macrophages caused in tuberculosis and other diseases. In the present study a hydrate cocrystal of Isoniazid with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial Protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) in 1:1 is reported. This Cocrystal may have improved tabletting stability and anti-oxidant properties. Cocrystal structure analysis confirmed the existence of pyridine-carboxylic acid synthon in the Cocrystal. Other synthons of different graph sets involving Nsbnd H···O and Osbnd H···N bonds are formed between hydrazide group of isoniazid and coformer. Solubility studies revealed that cocrystal is less soluble as compared to isoniazid in buffer at pH 7.4 at 22 °C while stability studies at 80 °C for 24 h period disclosed the fact that cocrystal has higher stability than that of isoniazid.

  9. Impact of Isotonic Beverage on the Hydration Status of Healthy Chinese Adults in Air-Conditioned Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siow, Phei Ching; Tan, Wei Shuan Kimberly; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2017-03-07

    People living in tropical climates spend much of their time in confined air-conditioned spaces, performing normal daily activities. This study investigated the effect of distilled water (W) or isotonic beverage (IB) on the hydration status in subjects living under these conditions. In a randomized crossover design, forty-nine healthy male subjects either consumed beverage or IB over a period of 8 h (8 h) in a controlled air-conditioned environment. Blood, urine, and saliva samples were collected at baseline and after 8 h. Hydration status was assessed by body mass, urine output, blood and plasma volume, fluid retention, osmolality, electrolyte concentration and salivary flow rate. In the IB group, urine output (1862 ± 86 mL vs. 2104 ± 98 mL) was significantly lower and more fluids were retained (17% ± 3% vs. 7% ± 3%) as compared to W (p environments, performing routine activities and even without excessive sweating, isotonic beverages may be more effective at retaining fluids and maintaining hydration status by up to 10% compared to distilled water.

  10. Stability of Hydrated Methylamine: Structural Characteristics and H2N···H–O Hydrogen Bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Sha-Sha; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Feng, Ya-Juan; Jiang, Shuai; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-23

    Methylamine is the simplest aliphatic amine found in human urine, blood, and tissues. It is thought to play a significant part in central nervous system disturbances observed during renal and hepatic disease. In this work we have investigated the methylamine hydration clusters using a basin hopping (BH) algorithm with the density functional theory (DFT). The results presented herein yield a detailed understanding of the structure and stability for a system consisting of one methylamine molecule and up to seven waters: the most stable geometries arise from a fusion of tetramer or pentamer rings; by the geometrical parameters and topological parameters analysis, the strengths of the H2N···H–O hydrogen bonds of the global minima increase as the sizes of clusters increase, except for n = 5 where there is a slight fluctuation. This work may shed light on the form mechanism of methylamine existing in organisms and the hydration structures of larger molecules containing amino functional groups and their interaction with the water molecules nearby.

  11. A Numerical Model for the Thermomechanical Conditions During Hydration of Early-age Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper; Thorborg, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    of the maturity and the thermal activation is expressed by the Arrhenius principle. The material properties are assumed to depend on the hydration process via the maturity. The discretization of the governing equations is accomplished by a control volume formulation involving a time-splitting scheme for the heat...

  12. Effect of Mono- and Di-hydration on the Intramolecular Proton Transfers and Stability of Cyanuric Acid Isomers: A DFT Study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YOUNES VALADBEIGI

    2016-08-01

    Structural and thermodynamic properties of 10 isomers of cyanuric acid were studied in aqueous and gas phases, employing B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. The aromaticities of these isomers were evaluated using nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) index. The calculations showed that as the number of the ketogroups increases the stability of the isomers increases and the aromaticity decreases. Mono- and di-hydrations of the isomers did not change the stability trend, so that the tri-keto isomer was the most stable isomer amongthe hydrated and non-hydrated isomers. The activation energies (Ea) of the intramolecular proton transfers (tautomerisms) and energy barriers of H-rotations around its C-O axis in enolic isomers were calculated. The energy barriers were smaller than 45 kJ/mol for the H-rotations while the Ea values of the proton transfers were in the range of 130-210 kJ/mol. Effect of micro-hydrations on the transition state structures and the energy barriers of the tautomerisms were investigated. The mono- and di-hydrations lower the activation energies to100-130 kJ/mol and 110-145 kJ/mol, respectively.

  13. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  14. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, K., E-mail: tsukada@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T. [The Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Bito, Y. [Central Research Lab., Hitachi. Ltd., 1-280 Higashi-Koigakubo, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8601 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization–magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility.

  15. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, K.; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Bito, Y.

    2014-05-01

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization-magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility.

  16. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  17. Stability conditions of complex switched systems with unstable subsystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖扬

    2004-01-01

    New stability conditions for complex switched systems are presented. We propose the concepts of attractive region and semi-attractive region, which are used as a tool for analyzing the stability of switched systems with unstable subsystems. Based on attractive region the sufficient conditions with less conservative for stability of switched systems have been established, there is no limitation for all members of the system set to be stable. Since our results have considered and utilized the decreasing span of oscillating solutions of the switched systems, they are more practical than the other presented ones of stability of switched systems, and need not resort to multiple Lyapunov functions.

  18. The role of heat transfer time scale in the evolution of the subsea permafrost and associated methane hydrates stability zone during glacial cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakhova, Valentina V.; Eliseev, Alexey V.

    2017-10-01

    Climate warming may lead to degradation of the subsea permafrost developed during Pleistocene glaciations and release methane from the hydrates, which are stored in this permafrost. It is important to quantify time scales at which this release is plausible. While, in principle, such time scale might be inferred from paleoarchives, this is hampered by considerable uncertainty associated with paleodata. In the present paper, to reduce such uncertainty, one-dimensional simulations with a model for thermal state of subsea sediments forced by the data obtained from the ice core reconstructions are performed. It is shown that heat propagates in the sediments with a time scale of ∼ 10-20 kyr. This time scale is longer than the present interglacial and is determined by the time needed for heat penetration in the unfrozen part of thick sediments. We highlight also that timings of shelf exposure during oceanic regressions and flooding during transgressions are important for simulating thermal state of the sediments and methane hydrates stability zone (HSZ). These timings should be resolved with respect to the contemporary shelf depth (SD). During glacial cycles, the temperature at the top of the sediments is a major driver for moving the HSZ vertical boundaries irrespective of SD. In turn, pressure due to oceanic water is additionally important for SD ≥ 50 m. Thus, oceanic transgressions and regressions do not instantly determine onsets of HSZ and/or its disappearance. Finally, impact of initial conditions in the subsea sediments is lost after ∼ 100 kyr. Our results are moderately sensitive to intensity of geothermal heat flux.

  19. Impact of Isotonic Beverage on the Hydration Status of Healthy Chinese Adults in Air-Conditioned Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phei Ching Siow

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available People living in tropical climates spend much of their time in confined air-conditioned spaces, performing normal daily activities. This study investigated the effect of distilled water (W or isotonic beverage (IB on the hydration status in subjects living under these conditions. In a randomized crossover design, forty-nine healthy male subjects either consumed beverage or IB over a period of 8 h (8 h in a controlled air-conditioned environment. Blood, urine, and saliva samples were collected at baseline and after 8 h. Hydration status was assessed by body mass, urine output, blood and plasma volume, fluid retention, osmolality, electrolyte concentration and salivary flow rate. In the IB group, urine output (1862 ± 86 mL vs. 2104 ± 98 mL was significantly lower and more fluids were retained (17% ± 3% vs. 7% ± 3% as compared to W (p < 0.05 after 8 h. IB also resulted in body mass gain (0.14 ± 0.06 kg, while W led to body mass loss (−0.04 ± 0.05 kg (p = 0.01. A significantly smaller drop in blood volume and lower free water clearance was observed in IB (−1.18% ± 0.43%; 0.55 ± 0.26 mL/min compared to W (−2.11% ± 0.41%; 1.35 ± 0.24 mL/min (p < 0.05. IB increased salivary flow rate (0.54 ± 0.05 g/min 0.62 ± 0.04 g/min. In indoor environments, performing routine activities and even without excessive sweating, isotonic beverages may be more effective at retaining fluids and maintaining hydration status by up to 10% compared to distilled water.

  20. Impact of Isotonic Beverage on the Hydration Status of Healthy Chinese Adults in Air-Conditioned Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siow, Phei Ching; Tan, Wei Shuan Kimberly; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2017-01-01

    People living in tropical climates spend much of their time in confined air-conditioned spaces, performing normal daily activities. This study investigated the effect of distilled water (W) or isotonic beverage (IB) on the hydration status in subjects living under these conditions. In a randomized crossover design, forty-nine healthy male subjects either consumed beverage or IB over a period of 8 h (8 h) in a controlled air-conditioned environment. Blood, urine, and saliva samples were collected at baseline and after 8 h. Hydration status was assessed by body mass, urine output, blood and plasma volume, fluid retention, osmolality, electrolyte concentration and salivary flow rate. In the IB group, urine output (1862 ± 86 mL vs. 2104 ± 98 mL) was significantly lower and more fluids were retained (17% ± 3% vs. 7% ± 3%) as compared to W (p < 0.05) after 8 h. IB also resulted in body mass gain (0.14 ± 0.06 kg), while W led to body mass loss (−0.04 ± 0.05 kg) (p = 0.01). A significantly smaller drop in blood volume and lower free water clearance was observed in IB (−1.18% ± 0.43%; 0.55 ± 0.26 mL/min) compared to W (−2.11% ± 0.41%; 1.35 ± 0.24 mL/min) (p < 0.05). IB increased salivary flow rate (0.54 ± 0.05 g/min 0.62 ± 0.04 g/min). In indoor environments, performing routine activities and even without excessive sweating, isotonic beverages may be more effective at retaining fluids and maintaining hydration status by up to 10% compared to distilled water. PMID:28272337

  1. A note on the stability condition for a spinning shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Rath

    1959-10-01

    Full Text Available It is proved that in the absence of any cross-Magnus-effects, the motion of a spinning artillery shell is stable if, s>=(v+h/Sup2 (1+gamma/sub2 /4vh. where S is the usual stability factor, gamma, h and gamma/sub2 are factors of certain aerodynamic forces acting on the projectile. The above condition is obtained by applying Fowler's method of approximation to Nielsen and Synge stability conditions. If the cross force due to cross spin be neglected (i.e.gamma/sub2=0, this goes over to the usual Nielsen and Synge condition of stability.

  2. Thermal Stability of Certain Hydrated Phases in Systems Made Using Portland Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    underlying it (Lea 1971, pp 397-398; Smith 1978, Mindess and Young 1981, p 530; Carette et al 1982), consequently it will not be dealt with further here as it...34Stability of Ettringite on Heating," Jan 1972, Journal of the * American Ceramic Society, Vol 55, pp 55-56. Mindess , Sidney and J. Francis Young

  3. New Stability Conditions for Linear Differential Equations with Several Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Berezansky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available New explicit conditions of asymptotic and exponential stability are obtained for the scalar nonautonomous linear delay differential equation x˙(t+∑k=1mak(tx(hk(t=0 with measurable delays and coefficients. These results are compared to known stability tests.

  4. A DFT-based comparative equilibrium study of thermal dehydration and hydrolysis of CaCl₂ hydrates and MgCl₂ hydrates for seasonal heat storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Amar Deep; Nedea, Silvia; Zondag, Herbert; Rindt, Camilo; Smeulders, David

    2016-04-21

    Salt hydrates store solar energy in chemical form via a reversible dehydration-hydration reaction. However, as a side reaction to dehydration, hydrolysis (HCl formation) may occur in chloride based salt hydrates (specially in MgCl2 hydrates), affecting the durability of the storage system. The mixture of CaCl2 and MgCl2 hydrates has been shown experimentally to have exceptional cycle stability and improved kinetics. However, the optimal operating conditions for the mixture are unknown. To understand the appropriate balance between dehydration and hydrolysis kinetics in the mixtures, it is essential to gain in-depth insight into the mixture components. We present a GGA-DFT level study to investigate the various gaseous structures of CaCl2 hydrates and to understand the relative stability of their conformers. The hydration strength and relative stability of conformers are dominated by electrostatic interactions. A wide network of intramolecular homonuclear and heteronuclear hydrogen bonds is observed in CaCl2 hydrates. Equilibrium product concentrations are obtained during dehydration and hydrolysis reactions under various temperature and pressure conditions. The trend of the dehydration curve with temperature in CaCl2 hydrates is similar to the experiments. Comparing these results to those of MgCl2 hydrates, we find that CaCl2 hydrates are more resistant towards hydrolysis in the temperature range of 273-800 K. Specifically, the present study reveals that the onset temperatures of HCl formation, a crucial design parameter for MgCl2 hydrates, are lower than for CaCl2 hydrates except for the mono-hydrate.

  5. Gepner type stability conditions on graded matrix factorizations

    CERN Document Server

    Toda, Yukinobu

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of Gepner type Bridgeland stability conditions on triangulated categories, which depends on a choice of an autoequivalence and a complex number. We conjecture the existence of Gepner type stability conditions on the triangulated categories of graded matrix factorizations of weighted homogeneous polynomials. Such a stability condition may give a natural stability condition for Landau-Ginzburg B-branes, and correspond to the Gepner point of the stringy Kahler moduli space of a quintic 3-fold. The main result is to show our conjecture when the variety defined by the weighted homogeneous polynomial is a complete intersection of hyperplanes in a Calabi-Yau manifold with dimension less than or equal to two.

  6. Conditions of asymptotic stability for linear homogeneous switched systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Gennady; Alferov, Gennady; Sharlay, Artem; Efimova, Polina

    2017-07-01

    In this article the authors prove the theorems giving the necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of robotic and mechatronic systems motion in terms of Lyapunov functions theory with the use of set-theoretic approach.

  7. Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 10, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Aleutian Trench and the Bering Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

    1987-01-01

    Four major areas with inferred gas hydrates are the subject of this study. Two of these areas, the Navarin and the Norton Basins, are located within the Bering Sea shelf, whereas the remaining areas of the Atka Basin in the central Aleutian Trench system and the eastern Aleutian Trench represent a huge region of the Aleutian Trench-Arc system. All four areas are geologically diverse and complex. Particularly the structural features of the accretionary wedge north of the Aleutian Trench still remain the subjects of scientific debates. Prior to this study, suggested presence of the gas hydrates in the four areas was based on seismic evidence, i.e., presence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). Although the disclosure of the BSRs is often difficult, particularly under the structural conditions of the Navarin and Norton basins, it can be concluded that the identified BSRs are mostly represented by relatively weak and discontinuous reflectors. Under thermal and pressure conditions favorable for gas hydrate formation, the relative scarcity of the BSRs can be attributed to insufficient gas supply to the potential gas hydrate zone. Hydrocarbon gas in sediment may have biogenic, thermogenic or mixed origin. In the four studied areas, basin analysis revealed limited biogenic hydrocarbon generation. The migration of the thermogenically derived gases is probably diminished considerably due to the widespread diagenetic processes in diatomaceous strata. The latter processes resulted in the formation of the diagenetic horizons. The identified gas hydrate-related BSRs seem to be located in the areas of increased biogenic methanogenesis and faults acting as the pathways for thermogenic hydrocarbons.

  8. On the mechanical stability of uranyl peroxide hydrates: Implications for nuclear fuel degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Buck, Edgar C.

    2015-09-11

    The mechanical properties and stability of studtite, (UO2)(O2)(H2O)2·2H2O, and metastudtite, (UO2)(O2)(H2O)2, two important corrosion phases observed on spent nuclear fuel exposed to water, have been investigated using density functional perturbation theory. While (UO2)(O2)(H2O)2 satisfies the necessary and sufficient Born criteria for mechanical stability, (UO2)(O2)(H2O)2·2H2O is found to be mechanically metastable, which might be the underlying cause of the irreversibility of the studtite to metastudtite transformation. According to Pugh’s and Poisson’s ratios and the Cauchy pressure, both phases are considered ductile and shear modulus is the parameter limiting their mechanical stability. Debye temperatures of 294 and 271 K are predicted for polycrystalline (UO2)(O2)(H2O)2·2H2O and (UO2)(O2)(H2O)2, suggesting a lower micro-hardness of metastudtite.

  9. Study on gas hydrate as a new energy resource in the twenty first century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Byung Jae; Kim, Won Sik; Oh, Jae Ho [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)] [and others

    1998-12-01

    Methane hydrate, a special type of clathrate hydrates, is a metastable solid compound mainly consisted of methane and water and generally called as gas hydrate. It is stable in the specific low- temperature/high-pressure conditions. Very large amount of methane that is the main component of natural gas, is accumulated in the form of methane hydrate subaquatic areas. Methane hydrate are the major reservoir of methane on the earth. On the other hand, the development and transmission through pipeline of oil and natural gas in the permafrost and deep subaquatic regions are significantly complicated by formation and dissociation of methane hydrate. The dissociation of natural methane hydrates caused by increasing temperature and decreasing pressure could cause the atmospheric pollution and geohazard. The formation, stable existence and dissociation of natural methane hydrates depend on the temperature, pressure, and composition of gas and characteristics of the interstitial waters. For the study on geophysical and geological conditions for the methane hydrate accumulation and to find BSR in the East Sea, Korea, the geophysical surveys using air-gun system, multibeam echo sounder, SBP were implemented in last September. The water temperature data vs. depth were obtained to determine the methane hydrate stability zone in the study area. The experimental equilibrium condition of methane hydrate was also measured in 3 wt.% sodium chloride solution. The relationship between Methane hydrate formation time and overpressure was analyzed through the laboratory work. (author). 49 refs., 6 tabs., 26 figs.

  10. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediment in Offshore Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Holditch; Tad Patzek; Jonny Rutqvist; George Moridis; Richard Plumb

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this multi-year, multi-institutional research project was to develop the knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus was on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. We have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. We also investigated the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. The objective of the UC Berkeley work was to develop a grain-scale model of hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation alters the strength of HBS. In particular, transformation of hydrate clusters into gas and liquid water weakens the skeleton and, simultaneously, reduces the effective stress by increasing the pore pressure. The large-scale objective of the study is evaluation of geomechanical stability of offshore oil and gas production infrastructure. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have developed the numerical model TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate how the formation and disassociation of hydrates in seafloor sediments affects seafloor stability. Several technical papers were published using results from this model. LBNL also developed laboratory equipment and methods to produce realistic laboratory samples of sediments containing gas hydrates so that mechanical properties could be measured in the laboratory. These properties are required to run TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate seafloor stability issues. At Texas A&M University we performed a detailed literature review to determine what gas hydrate formation properties had been measured and reported in the literature. We

  11. Hydration Repulsion between Carbohydrate Surfaces Mediated by Temperature and Specific Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsieh; Cox, Jason R.; Ow, Hooisweng; Shi, Rena; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-06-01

    Stabilizing colloids or nanoparticles in solution involves a fine balance between surface charges, steric repulsion of coating molecules, and hydration forces against van der Waals attractions. At high temperature and electrolyte concentrations, the colloidal stability of suspensions usually decreases rapidly. Here, we report a new experimental and simulation discovery that the polysaccharide (dextran) coated nanoparticles show ion-specific colloidal stability at high temperature, where we observed enhanced colloidal stability of nanoparticles in CaCl2 solution but rapid nanoparticle-nanoparticle aggregation in MgCl2 solution. The microscopic mechanism was unveiled in atomistic simulations. The presence of surface bound Ca2+ ions increases the carbohydrate hydration and induces strongly polarized repulsive water structures beyond at least three hydration shells which is farther-reaching than previously assumed. We believe leveraging the binding of strongly hydrated ions to macromolecular surfaces represents a new paradigm in achieving absolute hydration and colloidal stability for a variety of materials, particularly under extreme conditions.

  12. Insights into the role of hydration in protein structure and stability obtained through hydrostatic pressure studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Royer

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of protein structure and stability requires that we elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of both temperature and pressure on protein conformational transitions. While temperature effects are relatively well understood and the change in heat capacity upon unfolding has been reasonably well parameterized, the state of understanding of pressure effects is much less advanced. Ultimately, a quantitative parameterization of the volume changes (at the basis of pressure effects accompanying protein conformational transitions will be required. The present report introduces a qualitative hypothesis based on available model compound data for the molecular basis of volume change upon protein unfolding and its dependence on temperature.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of cells and tissues under fully hydrated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiberge, Stephan; Nechushtan, Amotz; Sprinzak, David; Gileadi, Opher; Behar, Vered; Zik, Ory; Chowers, Yehuda; Michaeli, Shulamit; Schlessinger, Joseph; Moses, Elisha

    2004-03-09

    A capability for scanning electron microscopy of wet biological specimens is presented. A membrane that is transparent to electrons protects the fully hydrated sample from the vacuum. The result is a hybrid technique combining the ease of use and ability to see into cells of optical microscopy with the higher resolution of electron microscopy. The resolution of low-contrast materials is approximately 100 nm, whereas in high-contrast materials the resolution can reach 10 nm. Standard immunogold techniques and heavy-metal stains can be applied and viewed in the fluid to improve the contrast. Images present a striking combination of whole-cell morphology with a wealth of internal details. A possibility for direct inspection of tissue slices transpires, imaging only the external layer of cells. Simultaneous imaging with photons excited by the electrons incorporates data on material distribution, indicating a potential for multilabeling and specific scintillating markers.

  14. Methane Gas Hydrate Stability Models on Continental Shelves in Response to Glacio-Eustatic Sea Level Variations: Examples from Canadian Oceanic Margins

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We model numerically regions of the Canadian continental shelves during successive glacio-eustatic cycles to illustrate past, current and future marine gas hydrate (GH) stability and instability. These models indicated that the marine GH resource has dynamic features and the formation age and resource volumes depend on the dynamics of the ocean-atmosphere system as it responds to both natural (glacial-interglacial) and anthropogenic (climate change) forcing. Our models focus on the interval b...

  15. New global stability conditions for a class of difference equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiaki MUROYA; Emiko ISHIWATA; Nicola GUGLIELMIa

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider some classes of difference equations,including the well-known Clark model,and study the stability of their solutions. In order to do that we introduce a property,namely semicontractivity,and study relations between 'semi-contractive' functions and sufficient conditions for the solution of the difference equation to be globally asymptotically stable.Moreover,we establish new sufficient conditions for the solution to be globally asymptotically stable,and we improve the '3/2criteria' type stability conditions.

  16. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  17. Critical condition study of borehole stability during air drilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Jingen; Zou Linzhan; Tan Qiang; Yan Wei; Gao Deli; Zhang Hanlin; Yan Xiuliang

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish the existence of the critical condition of borehole stability during air drilling.Rock Failure Process Analysis Code2D was used to set up a damage model of the borehole excavated in strain-softening rock.Damage evolution around the borehole was studied by tracking acoustic emission.The study indicates that excavation damaged zone (EDZ) is formed around borehole because of stress concentration after the borehole is excavated.There is a critical condition for borehole stability; the borehole will collapse when the critical damage condition is reached.The critical condition of underground excavation exists not only in elastic and ideal plastic material but in strain-softening material as well.The research is helpful to developing an evaluation method of borehole stability during air drilling.

  18. Gas hydrates stability zone thickness map of Indian deep offshore areas - A GIS based approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rastogi, A.; Deka, B.; Bhattacharya, G.C.; Ramprasad, T.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Srinivas, K.; Murty, G.P.S.; Chaubey, A.K.; Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Desa, M.; Paropkari, A.L.; Menezes, A.A.A.; Murty, V.S.N.; Antony, M.K.; SubbaRaju, L.V.; Desa, E.; Veerayya, M.

    under limited range of temperature and pressure conditions, which normally exist within few hundred meters of ocean sediments, in water depths greater than about 300 m. For the first time, GIS software has been used to map potential areas for the gas...

  19. The interaction of climate change and methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Kessler, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Gas hydrate, a frozen, naturally-occurring, and highly-concentrated form of methane, sequesters significant carbon in the global system and is stable only over a range of low-temperature and moderate-pressure conditions. Gas hydrate is widespread in the sediments of marine continental margins and permafrost areas, locations where ocean and atmospheric warming may perturb the hydrate stability field and lead to release of the sequestered methane into the overlying sediments and soils. Methane and methane-derived carbon that escape from sediments and soils and reach the atmosphere could exacerbate greenhouse warming. The synergy between warming climate and gas hydrate dissociation feeds a popular perception that global warming could drive catastrophic methane releases from the contemporary gas hydrate reservoir. Appropriate evaluation of the two sides of the climate-methane hydrate synergy requires assessing direct and indirect observational data related to gas hydrate dissociation phenomena and numerical models that track the interaction of gas hydrates/methane with the ocean and/or atmosphere. Methane hydrate is likely undergoing dissociation now on global upper continental slopes and on continental shelves that ring the Arctic Ocean. Many factors—the depth of the gas hydrates in sediments, strong sediment and water column sinks, and the inability of bubbles emitted at the seafloor to deliver methane to the sea-air interface in most cases—mitigate the impact of gas hydrate dissociation on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations though. There is no conclusive proof that hydrate-derived methane is reaching the atmosphere now, but more observational data and improved numerical models will better characterize the climate-hydrate synergy in the future.

  20. More relaxed conditions for model predictive control with guaranteed stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin LIU; Yugeng XI

    2005-01-01

    For the model predictive controller,terminal state satisfying a certain inequality can guarantee the stability but it is somewhat conservative.In this paper,we give a more relaxed stability condition by considering the effect of the initial state.Based on that we propose an algorithm to guarantee that the closed loop system is asymptotically stable.Finally,the conclusions are verified by a simulation.

  1. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  2. GLOBAL ASYMPTOTIC STABILITY CONDITIONS OF DELAYED NEURAL NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Dong-ming; CAO Jin-de; ZHANG Li-ming

    2005-01-01

    Utilizing the Liapunov functional method and combining the inequality of matrices technique to analyze the existence of a unique equilibrium point and the global asymptotic stability for delayed cellular neural networks (DCNNs), a new sufficient criterion ensuring the global stability of DCNNs is obtained. Our criteria provide some parameters to appropriately compensate for the tradeoff between the matrix definite condition on feedback matrix and delayed feedback matrix. The criteria can easily be used to design and verify globally stable networks. Furthermore, the condition presented here is independent of the delay parameter and is less restrictive than that given in the references.

  3. Widespread oxidized and hydrated amorphous silicates in CR chondrites matrices: Implications for alteration conditions and H2 degassing of asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, Corentin; Changela, Hitesh G.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2015-06-01

    The CR chondrites carry one of the most pristine records of the solar nebula materials that accreted to form planetesimals. They have experienced very variable degrees of aqueous alteration, ranging from incipient alteration in their matrices to the complete hydration of all of their components. In order to constrain their chemical alteration pathways and the conditions of alteration, we have investigated the mineralogy and Fe oxidation state of silicates in the matrices of 8 CR chondrites, from type 3 to type 1. Fe-L edge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) was performed on matrix FIB sections using synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratio of submicron silicate particles was obtained and coordinated with TEM observations. In all the least altered CR chondrites (QUE 99177, EET 87770, EET 92042, LAP 02342, GRA 95229 and Renazzo), we find that the matrices consist of abundant submicron Fe-rich hydrated amorphous silicate grains, mixed with nanometer-sized phyllosilicates. The Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratios of both amorphous and nanocrystalline regions are very high with values ranging from 68 to 78%. In the most altered samples (Al Rais and GRO 95577), fine-grained phyllosilicates also have a high Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratio (around 70%), whereas the coarse, micrometer-sized phyllosilicates are less oxidized (down to 55%) and have a lower iron content. These observations suggest the following sequence: submicron Fe2+-amorphous silicate particles were the building blocks of CR matrices; after accretion they were quickly hydrated and oxidized, leading to a metastable, amorphous gel-like phase. Nucleation and growth of crystalline phyllosilicates was kinetically-limited in most type 3 and 2 CRs, but increased as alteration became more extensive in Al Rais and GRO 95577. The decreasing Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratio is interpreted as a result of the transfer of Fe3+ from silicates to oxides during growth, while aqueous alteration progressed

  4. Observations of CO{sub 2} clathrate hydrate formation and dissolution under deep-ocean disposal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Holder, G.D. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Disposal of anthropogenic emissions of CO{sub 2} may be required to mitigate rises in atmospheric levels of this greenhouse gas if other measures are ineffective and the worst global warming scenarios begin to occur. Long-term storage of large quantities of CO{sub 2} has been proposed, but the feasibility of large land and ocean disposal options remains to be established. Determining the fate of liquid CO{sub 2} injected into the ocean at depths greater than 500 m is complicated by uncertainties associated with the physical behavior of CO{sub 2} under these conditions, in particular the possible formation of the ice-like CO{sub 2} clathrate hydrate. Resolving this issue is key to establishing the technical feasibility of this option. Experimental and theoretical work in this area is reported.

  5. Magnetite Nanoparticles Stabilized Under Physiological Conditions for Biomedical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdãº, A.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bica, D.; Vékás, L.

    The biomedical application of water based magnetic fluids (MFs) is of great practical importance. Their colloidal stability under physiological conditions (blood pH ˜ 7.2-7.4 and salt concentration ˜0.15 M) and more in high magnetic field gradient is crucial. Magnetite or maghemite nanoparticles are used in general. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles were stabilized with different compounds (citric acid (CA) and phosphate) and sodium oleate (NaO) as the most used surfactant in the stabilization of MFs. The adsorption and overcharging effect were quantified, and the enhancement in salt tolerance of stabilized systems was studied. Adsorption, electrophoretic mobility and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements were performed. The electrolyte tolerance was tested in coagulation kinetic measurements. Above the adsorption saturation, the nanoparticles are stabilized in a way of combined steric and electrostatic effects. The aim was to research these two important effects and demonstrate that none of them alone is enough. The phosphate was not able to stabilize the ferrofluid in spite of our expectation, but the other two additives proved to be effective stabilizing agents. The magnetite was well stabilized by the surface complexation of CA above pH ˜ 5, however, the salt tolerance of citrate stabilized MFs remained much below the concentration of physiological salt solution, and more the dissolution of magnetite nanocrystals was enhanced due to Fe-CA complexation in aqueous medium, which may cause problems in vivo. The oleate double layers were able to stabilize magnetite nanoparticles perfectly at pH ˜ 6 preventing particle aggregation effectively even in physiological salt solution.

  6. Properties of wind turbine wakes under various atmospheric stability conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shengbai; Archer, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) are performed to study the properties of wind turbine wakes under various atmospheric stability conditions. The Wind Turbine and Turbulence Simulator (WiTTS), a 4th-order finite-difference LES code is used for stable, neutral, and unstable conditions. The Coriolis forcing is also considered. Three cases are studied: isolated turbine, finite-size turbine array, and infinite wind farm. The results show strong correlations with stability. For the stable condition, the power extraction by an isolated turbine is highest, but the wake is also longest, thus the relative performance inside the array is lowest. In contrast, although the single-turbine power extraction is low for the unstable condition, the performance of downstream turbines is improved due to faster wake recovery. The wake shape is distorted by the stability-related wind veering. Therefore, the self-similar Gaussian wake deficit is not accurate. Here, a new wake model is proposed for correction. The infinite wind-farm case shows that the temperature near the ground is warmed by about 1 K for the stable condition, but the influence is almost negligible for the unstable and neutral conditions. For all conditions, the near-ground shear stress is reduced.

  7. Effect of hydration on the stability of the collagen-like triple-helical structure of [4(R)-hydroxyprolyl-4(R)-hydroxyprolylglycine]10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Nishi, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Shota; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Nakazawa, Takashi; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2005-12-06

    X-ray analysis has been carried out on a crystal of the collagen model peptide (Hyp(R)-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 [where Hyp(R) is 4(R)-hydroxyproline] with 1.5 A resolution. The triple-helical structure of (Hyp(R)-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 has the same helical parameters and Rich and Crick II hydrogen bond patterns as those of other collagen model peptides. However, our full-length crystal structure revealed that almost all consecutive Hyp(R) residues take the up-up pucker in contrast to putative down-up puckering propensities of other collagen model peptides. The unique feature of thermodynamic parameters associated with the conformational transition of this peptide from triple helix to single coil is that both enthalpy and entropy changes of the transition are much smaller than those of other model peptides such as (Pro-Pro-Gly)10 and (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)10. To corroborate the precise structural information including main- and side-chain dihedral angles and intra- and interwater bridge networks, we estimated the degrees of hydration by comparing molecular volumes observed experimentally in solution to those calculated ones from the crystal structure. The results showed that the degree of hydration of (Hyp(R)-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 is comparable to that of (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 in the triple-helical state, but the former was more highly hydrated than (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 in the single-coil state. Because hydration reduces the enthalpy due to the formation of a hydrogen bond with a water molecule and diminishes the entropy due to the restriction of water molecules surrounding a peptide molecule, we concluded that the high thermal stability of (Hyp(R)-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 is able to be described by its high hydration in the single-coil state.

  8. C-C stretching Raman spectra and stabilities of hydrocarbon molecules in natural gas hydrates: a quantum chemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Ojamäe, Lars

    2014-12-11

    The presence of specific hydrocarbon gas molecules in various types of water cavities in natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are governed by the relative stabilities of these encapsulated guest molecule-water cavity combinations. Using molecular quantum chemical dispersion-corrected hybrid density functional computations, the interaction (ΔE(host--guest)) and cohesive energies (ΔE(coh)), enthalpies, and Gibbs free energies for the complexes of host water cages and hydrocarbon guest molecules are calculated at the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2d,2p) level of theory. The zero-point energy effect of ΔE(host-guest) and ΔE(coh) is found to be quite substantial. The energetically optimal host-guest combinations for seven hydrocarbon gas molecules (CH4, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, C4H8, i-C4H10, and n-C4H10) and various water cavities (D, ID, T, P, H, and I) in NGHs are found to be CH4@D, C2H6@T, C3H6@T, C3H8@T, C4H8@T/P/H, i-C4H10@H, and n-C4H10@H, as the largest cohesive energy magnitudes will be obtained with these host-guest combinations. The stabilities of various water cavities enclosing hydrocarbon molecules are evaluated from the computed cohesive Gibbs free energies: CH4 prefers to be trapped in a ID cage; C2H6 prefer T cages; C3H6 and C3H8 prefer T and H cages; C4H8 and i-C4H10 prefer H cages; and n-C4H10 prefer I cages. The vibrational frequencies and Raman intensities of the C-C stretching vibrational modes for these seven hydrocarbon molecules enclosed in each water cavity are computed. A blue shift results after the guest molecule is trapped from gas phase into various water cages due to the host-guest interactions between the water cage and hydrocarbon molecule. The frequency shifts to the red as the radius of water cages increases. The model calculations support the view that C-C stretching vibrations of hydrocarbon molecules in the water cavities can be used as a tool to identify the types of crystal phases and guest molecules in NGHs.

  9. Core stability training: applications to sports conditioning programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willardson, Jeffrey M

    2007-08-01

    In recent years, fitness practitioners have increasingly recommended core stability exercises in sports conditioning programs. Greater core stability may benefit sports performance by providing a foundation for greater force production in the upper and lower extremities. Traditional resistance exercises have been modified to emphasize core stability. Such modifications have included performing exercises on unstable rather than stable surfaces, performing exercises while standing rather than seated, performing exercises with free weights rather than machines, and performing exercises unilaterally rather than bilaterally. Despite the popularity of core stability training, relatively little scientific research has been conducted to demonstrate the benefits for healthy athletes. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to critically examine core stability training and other issues related to this topic to determine useful applications for sports conditioning programs. Based on the current literature, prescription of core stability exercises should vary based on the phase of training and the health status of the athlete. During preseason and in-season mesocycles, free weight exercises performed while standing on a stable surface are recommended for increases in core strength and power. Free weight exercises performed in this manner are specific to the core stability requirements of sports-related skills due to moderate levels of instability and high levels of force production. Conversely, during postseason and off-season mesocycles, Swiss ball exercises involving isometric muscle actions, small loads, and long tension times are recommended for increases in core endurance. Furthermore, balance board and stability disc exercises, performed in conjunction with plyometric exercises, are recommended to improve proprioceptive and reactive capabilities, which may reduce the likelihood of lower extremity injuries.

  10. A constitutive mechanical model for gas hydrate bearing sediments incorporating inelastic mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Sánchez, Marcelo

    2016-11-30

    Gas hydrate bearing sediments (HBS) are natural soils formed in permafrost and sub-marine settings where the temperature and pressure conditions are such that gas hydrates are stable. If these conditions shift from the hydrate stability zone, hydrates dissociate and move from the solid to the gas phase. Hydrate dissociation is accompanied by significant changes in sediment structure and strongly affects its mechanical behavior (e.g., sediment stiffenss, strength and dilatancy). The mechanical behavior of HBS is very complex and its modeling poses great challenges. This paper presents a new geomechanical model for hydrate bearing sediments. The model incorporates the concept of partition stress, plus a number of inelastic mechanisms proposed to capture the complex behavior of this type of soil. This constitutive model is especially well suited to simulate the behavior of HBS upon dissociation. The model was applied and validated against experimental data from triaxial and oedometric tests conducted on manufactured and natural specimens involving different hydrate saturation, hydrate morphology, and confinement conditions. Particular attention was paid to model the HBS behavior during hydrate dissociation under loading. The model performance was highly satisfactory in all the cases studied. It managed to properly capture the main features of HBS mechanical behavior and it also assisted to interpret the behavior of this type of sediment under different loading and hydrate conditions.

  11. Algebraic stability criteria and symbolic derivation of stability conditions for feedback control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongming

    2012-10-01

    This article provides algebraic settings of the stability criteria of Nyquist and Popov and the circle criterion for closed-loop linear control systems with linear or nonlinear feedback whose transfer functions are rational ones with integer coefficients. The proposed settings make use of algebraic methods of parametric curve implicitisation, real root isolation, symbolic integration and quantifier elimination and allow one to derive exact stability conditions for feedback control systems with symbolic computation. An example is presented to illustrate the algebraic approach and its effectiveness. Some numerical stability results obtained previously are confirmed.

  12. Stability boundaries and sufficient stability conditions for stably stratified, monotonic shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Makoto; Morrison, Philip J.

    2016-05-01

    Linear stability of inviscid, parallel, and stably stratified shear flow is studied under the assumption of smooth strictly monotonic profiles of shear flow and density, so that the local Richardson number is positive everywhere. The marginally unstable modes are systematically found by solving a one-parameter family of regular Sturm-Liouville problems, which can determine the stability boundaries more efficiently than solving the Taylor-Goldstein equation directly. By arguing for the non-existence of a marginally unstable mode, we derive new sufficient conditions for stability, which generalize the Rayleigh-Fjørtoft criterion for unstratified shear flows.

  13. Effects of Tween 80 on cellulase stability under agitated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, Shohei; Ikeo, Makoto; Ueno, Yoshiki; Taneda, Daisuke

    2013-08-01

    The mechanism of the increase in the hydrolysis rate and yield by the addition of Tween 80 to the hydrolysis reaction of filter paper was investigated under static and agitated conditions. The increase in the hydrolysis rate by addition of Tween 80 was observed under the agitated condition only. The effects of Tween 80 on the changes in the protein concentration of individual cellulase components were investigated in the absence of substrates. Agitation of the enzyme solution resulted in the drastic decrease of SDS-PAGE bands intensity of CBH2 (cellobiohydrolase 2). The addition of Tween 80 prevented this. Thus, the Tween 80 functions to stabilize instable cellulase components under the agitated condition. Moreover, addition of Tween 80 completely suppressed the decrease of CBH2 intensity by agitation at 30°C. Results suggest that Tween 80 stabilizes instable cellulase components not only during hydrolysis, but during enzyme production also.

  14. On Short Wave Stability and Sufficient Conditions for Stability in the Extended Rayleigh Problem of Hydrodynamic Stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Subbiah; V Ganesh

    2010-06-01

    We consider the extended Rayleigh problem of hydrodynamic stability dealing with the stability of inviscid homogeneous shear flows in sea straits of arbitrary cross section. We prove a short wave stability result, namely, if $k>0$ is the wave number of a normal mode then $k>k_c$ (for some critical wave number $k_c$) implies the stability of the mode for a class of basic flows. Furthermore, if $K(z)=\\frac{-({U''}_0-T_0{U'}_0)}{U_0-U_{0s}}$, where $U_0$ is the basic velocity, $T_0$ (a constant) the topography and prime denotes differentiation with respect to vertical coordinate then we prove that a sufficient condition for the stability of basic flow is $0 < K(z)≤\\left(\\frac{^2}{D^2}+\\frac{T^2_0}{4}\\right)$, where the flow domain is $0≤ z≤ D$.

  15. Stability boundaries and sufficient stability conditions for stably stratified, monotonic shear flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Makoto, E-mail: hirota@dragon.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Morrison, Philip J. [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2016-05-06

    Highlights: • New stability criteria of stably stratified shear flow are discovered. • Our criteria substantially improve the Howard–Miles criterion (1961). • Our criteria also generalize Rayleigh's inflection point theorem. • The novel approach we found is also efficient as a numerical approach. - Abstract: Linear stability of inviscid, parallel, and stably stratified shear flow is studied under the assumption of smooth strictly monotonic profiles of shear flow and density, so that the local Richardson number is positive everywhere. The marginally unstable modes are systematically found by solving a one-parameter family of regular Sturm–Liouville problems, which can determine the stability boundaries more efficiently than solving the Taylor–Goldstein equation directly. By arguing for the non-existence of a marginally unstable mode, we derive new sufficient conditions for stability, which generalize the Rayleigh–Fjørtoft criterion for unstratified shear flows.

  16. 0℃以下含SDS的甲烷水合物生成方式及过程对其分解速率的影响%The Dependence of the Dissociation Rate of Methane-SDS Hydrate below Ice Point on Its Manners of Forming and Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀林; 陈卫东; 陈光进; 孙长宇; 杨兰英; 马庆兰; 陈俊; 刘鹏; 唐绪龙; 赵焕伟

    2009-01-01

    The dissociation rates of methane hydrates formed with and without the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (methane-SDS hydrates), were measured under atmospheric pressure and temperatures below ice point to investigate the influence of the hydrate production conditions and manners upon its dissociation kinetic behavior. The experimental results demonstrated that the dissociation rate of methane hydrate below ice point is strongly dependent on the manners of hydrate formation and processing. The dissociation rate of hydrate formed quiescently was lower than that of hydrate formed with stirring; the dissociation rate of hydrate formed at lower pressure was higher than that of hydrate formed at higher pressure; the compaction of hydrate after its formation lowered its sta-bility, i.e., increased its dissociation rate. The stability of hydrate could be increased by prolonging the time period for which hydrate was held at formation temperature and pressure before it was cooled down, or by prolonging the time period for which hydrate was held at dissociation temperature and formation pressure before it was depressurized to atmospheric pressure. It was found that the dissociation rate of methane hydrate varied with the temperature (ranging from 245.2 to 272.2 K) anomalously as reported on the dissociation of methane hydrate without the presence of surfactant as kinetic promoter. The dissociation rate at 268 K was found to be the lowest when the manners and conditions at which hydrates were formed and processed were fixed.

  17. Chemical heat pumping - a rapid experimental procedure for investigating the suitability of salt hydrates under dynamic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jan; Azoulay, Michel; Pablo, J. de

    A rapid experimental procedure of interest in determining the suitability of salt hydrates to be used in chemical heat pumping is described. Thermogravimetry under controlled water vapour pressure is utilized as the key diagnostic method. The test procedure relies largely on two critical tests: a cycling and an inhibition test. The former gives information on the stoichiometric reversibility and hysteresis between the dehydration and rehydration branches, while the inhibition test yields more quantitative information about the extent of inhibition. The latter represents a source of irreversibility inherent to the salt hydrate system. The test procedure is discussed and illustrated using four different salt hydrates: barium chloride, sodium sulphide, magnesium chloride and lithium hydroxide.

  18. Preliminary discussion on gas hydrate reservoir system of Shenhu Area, North Slope of South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, N.; Yang, S.; Liang, J.; Wang, H.; Fu, S. [Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, H. [China Geological Survey, Beijing (China); Su, X. [China Univ. of Geosciences, Beijing (China)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrate is a type of ice-like solid substance formed by the combination of certain low-molecular-weight gases such as methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide with water. Gas hydrate primarily occurs naturally in sediments beneath the permafrost and the sediments of the continental slope with the water depth greater than 300 m. Marine gas hydrate geological systems are important because they may be sufficiently concentrated in certain locations to be an economically viable fossil fuel resource. However, gas hydrates can cause geo-hazards through large-scale slope destabilization and can release methane, a potential greenhouse gas, into the environment. This paper discussed the hydrate drilling results from a geological and geophysical investigation of the gas hydrate reservoir system of the Shenhu Area, located in the north slope of South China Sea. The paper identified the basic formation conditions, and discussed the pore-water geochemical features of shallow sediments and their inflected gas sources, gas hydrate distribution and seismic characteristics. It was concluded that the gas hydrate was heterogeneously distributed in space, and mainly distributed in certain ranges above the bottom of the gas hydrate stability zone. It was also concluded that methane gas that formed hydrate was likely from in-situ micro-biogenic methane. Last, it was found that distributed and in-situ micro-biogenic methane resulted in low methane flux, and formed the distributed pattern of gas hydrate system with the features of differential distribution and saturation. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  19. Hydration, Ionic Valence and Cross-Linking Propensities of Cations Determine the Stability of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Agrinaldo; Pontes, Frederico J.; Lins, Roberto D.; Soares, Thereza A.

    2013-10-29

    The supra-molecular structure of LPS aggregates governs outer membrane permeability and activation of the host immune response during Gram-negative bacterial infections. Molecular dynamics simulations unveil at atomic resolution 10 the subtle balance between cation hydration and cross-link ability in modulating phase transitions of LPS membranes.

  20. Standard Model Vacuum Stability and Weyl Consistency Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antipin, Oleg; Gillioz, Marc; Krog, Jens;

    2013-01-01

    At high energy the standard model possesses conformal symmetry at the classical level. This is reflected at the quantum level by relations between the different beta functions of the model. These relations are known as the Weyl consistency conditions. We show that it is possible to satisfy them...... order by order in perturbation theory, provided that a suitable coupling constant counting scheme is used. As a direct phenomenological application, we study the stability of the standard model vacuum at high energies and compare with previous computations violating the Weyl consistency conditions....

  1. Mechanical and electromagnetic properties of northern Gulf of Mexico sediments with and without THF hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.Y.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2008-01-01

    impact of core retrieval on specimen properties, it is also important to consider how far removed hydrate-bearing samples are from hydrate stability conditions. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The effects of silica fume and hydrated lime on the strength development and durability characteristics of concrete under hot water curing condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is considered to be highly important for preserving continued industrial growth and human development. Concrete, being the world’s largest manufacturing material comprises cement as an essential binding component for strength development. However, excessive production of cement due to high degree of construction practices around the world frames cement as a leading pollutant of releasing significant amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere. To overcome this environmental degradation, silica fume and hydrated lime are used as partial replacements to cement. This paper begins with the examination of the partial replacement levels of hydrated lime and silica fume in concrete and their influence on the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete. The effect of hot water curing on concrete incorporated with both silica fume and hydrated lime is also investigated in this paper. The results reported in this paper show that the use of silica fume as a partial replacement material improved both the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete due to the formation of calcium silica hydrate crystals through the pozzolanic reaction. Although the hydrated lime did not significantly contribute in the development of strength, its presence enhanced the durability of concrete especially at long-term. The results also showed that hot water curing enhanced the strength development of concrete incorporated with silica fume due to the accelerated rate of both the hydration and pozzolanic reaction that takes place between silica fume and calcium hydroxide of the cement matrix particularly at early times. The results reported in this paper have significant contribution in the development of sustainable concrete. The paper does not only address the use of alternative binders as a partial replacement material in concrete but also suggest proper curing conditions for the proposed replacement materials. These practices

  3. Deep-ocean field test of methane hydrate formation from a remotely operated vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Peter G.; Orr, Franklin M., Jr.; Friederich, Gernot; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Orange, Daniel L.; McFarlane, James; Kirkwood, William

    1997-05-01

    We have observed the process of formation of clathrate hydrates of methane in experiments conducted on the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Ventana in the deep waters of Monterey Bay. A tank of methane gas, acrylic tubes containing seawater, and seawater plus various types of sediment were carried down on Ventana to a depth of 910 m where methane gas was injected at the base of the acrylic tubes by bubble stream. Prior calculations had shown that the local hydrographic conditions gave an upper limit of 525 m for the P-T boundary defining methane hydrate formation or dissociation at this site, and thus our experiment took place well within the stability range for this reaction to occur. Hydrate formation in free seawater occurred within minutes as a buoyant mass of translucent hydrate formed at the gas-water interface. In a coarse sand matrix the filling of the pore spaces with hydrate turned the sand column into a solidified block, which gas pressure soon lifted and ruptured. In a fine-grained black mud the gas flow carved out flow channels, the walls of which became coated and then filled with hydrate in larger discrete masses. Our experiment shows that hydrate formation is rapid in natural seawater, that sediment type strongly influences the patterns of hydrate formation, and that the use of ROV technologies permits the synthesis of large amounts of hydrate material in natural systems under a variety of conditions so that fundamental research on the stability and growth of these substances is possible.

  4. Stability of plasma treated superhydrophobic surfaces under different ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Faze; Liu, Jiyu; Cui, Yao; Huang, Shuai; Song, Jinlong; Sun, Jing; Xu, Wenji; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-15

    Plasma hydrophilizing of superhydrophobic substrates has become an important area of research, for example, superhydrophobic-(super)hydrophilic patterned surfaces have significant practical applications such as lab-on-chip systems, cell adhesion, and control of liquid transport. However, the stability of plasma-induced hydrophilicity is always considered as a key issue since the wettability tends to revert back to the untreated state (i.e. aging behavior). This paper focuses on the stability of plasma treated superhydrophobic surface under different ambient conditions (e.g. temperature and relative humidity). Water contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to monitor the aging process. Results show that low temperature and low relative humidity are favorable to retard the aging process and that pre-storage at low temperature (-10°C) disables the treated surface to recover superhydrophobicity. When the aging is performed in water, a long-lasting hydropholicity is obtained. As the stability of plasma-induced hydrophilcity over a desired period of time is a very important issue, this work will contribute to the optimization of storage conditions of plasma treated superhydrophobic surfaces.

  5. The impact of increased sedimentation rates associated with the decay of the Fennoscandian ice-sheet on gas hydrate stability and focused fluid flow at the Nyegga pockmark field, offshore mid-Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstens, Jens; Haflidason, Haflidi; Becker, Lukas; Petter Sejrup, Hans; Berndt, Christian; Planke, Sverre; Dahlgreen, Torbjørn

    2016-04-01

    Climatic changes since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) have affected the stability of gas hydrate systems on glaciated margins by sea-level changes, bottom water temperature changes, isostatic uplift or subsidence and variability in sedimentation rates. While subsidence and sea-level rise stabilize gas hydrate deposits, bottom water temperature warming, uplift and enhanced sedimentation have the opposite effect. The response of gas hydrate systems to post-glaciation warming is therefore a complex phenomenon and highly depends on the timing and magnitude of each of these processes. While the impact of bottom water warming on the dissociation of gas hydrates have been addressed in numerous studies, the potential of methane release due to basal gas hydrate dissociation during periods of warming has received less attention. Here, we present results from numerical simulations which show that rapid sedimentation associated with the decay of the Fennoscandian ice-sheet was capable of causing significant basal gas hydrate dissociation. The modeling is constrained by a high-resolution three-dimensional sedimentation rate reconstruction of the Nyegga pockmark field, offshore mid-Norway, obtained by integrating chrono-stratigraphic information derived from sediments cores and a seismo-stratigraphic framework. The model run covers the period between 28,000 and 15,000 calendar years before present and predict that the maximum sedimentation rate-related gas hydrate dissociation coincides temporally and spatially with enhanced focused fluid flow activity in the study area. Basal gas hydrate dissociation due to rapid sedimentation may have occurred as well in other glaciated continental margins after the LGM and may have caused the release of significant amounts of methane to the hydrosphere and atmosphere. The major post glaciation deposition centers are the location of some of the largest known submarine slide complexes. The release of free gas due to basal gas hydrate

  6. EXTERNAL-LOOP AIRLIFT MAGNETICALLY STABILIZED BED--MINIMUM STABILIZATION AND FLUIDIZATION CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jordan Hristov

    2005-01-01

    Experimental study of an airlift with a magnetically stabilized bed in the riser bottom has been performed.External magnetic field allows easy control of magnetized bed structure and liquid circulation rate. Minimum stabilization and fluidization conditions have been determined experimentally and by a three-line graphical method. Semi-empirical data correlations of sections of the experimental curves have been performed. Scaling relationships known from non-magnetic airlift are applicable too, but with the assumption that the magnetic field affects the loop friction coefficient only.

  7. Parametric study of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sand, silt, and clay sediments: 2. Small-strain mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. Y.; Francisca, F. M.; Santamarina, J. C.; Ruppel, C.

    2010-11-01

    The small-strain mechanical properties (e.g., seismic velocities) of hydrate-bearing sediments measured under laboratory conditions provide reference values for calibration of logging and seismic exploration results acquired in hydrate-bearing formations. Instrumented cells were designed for measuring the compressional (P) and shear (S) velocities of sand, silts, and clay with and without hydrate and subject to vertical effective stresses of 0.01 to 2 MPa. Tetrahydrofuran (THF), which is fully miscible in water, was used as the hydrate former to permit close control over the hydrate saturation Shyd and to produce hydrate from dissolved phase, as methane hydrate forms in most natural marine settings. The results demonstrate that laboratory hydrate formation technique controls the pattern of P and S velocity changes with increasing Shyd and that the small-strain properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are governed by effective stress, σ'v and sediment specific surface. The S velocity increases with hydrate saturation owing to an increase in skeletal shear stiffness, particularly when hydrate saturation exceeds Shyd≈ 0.4. At very high hydrate saturations, the small strain shear stiffness is determined by the presence of hydrates and becomes insensitive to changes in effective stress. The P velocity increases with hydrate saturation due to the increases in both the shear modulus of the skeleton and the bulk modulus of pore-filling phases during fluid-to-hydrate conversion. Small-strain Poisson's ratio varies from 0.5 in soft sediments lacking hydrates to 0.25 in stiff sediments (i.e., subject to high vertical effective stress or having high Shyd). At Shyd ≥ 0.5, hydrate hinders expansion and the loss of sediment stiffness during reduction of vertical effective stress, meaning that hydrate-rich natural sediments obtained through pressure coring should retain their in situ fabric for some time after core retrieval if the cores are maintained within the hydrate

  8. Inferred gas hydrate and permafrost stability history models linked to climate change in the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin, Arctic Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Majorowicz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric methane from episodic gas hydrate (GH destabilization, the "clathrate gun" hypothesis, is proposed to affect past climates, possibly since the Phanerozoic began or earlier. In the terrestrial Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin (BMB, GHs occur commonly below thick ice-bearing permafrost (IBP, but they are rare within it. Two end-member GH models, where gas is either trapped conventionally (Case 1 or where it is trapped dynamically by GH formation (Case 2, were simulated using profile (1-D models and a 14 Myr ground surface temperature (GST history based on marine isotopic data, adjusted to the study setting, constrained by deep heat flow, sedimentary succession conductivity, and observed IBP and Type I GH contacts in Mallik wells. Models consider latent heat effects throughout the IBP and GH intervals. Case 1 GHs formed at ~0.9 km depth only ~1 Myr ago by in situ transformation of conventionally trapped natural gas. Case 2 GHs begin to form at ~290–300 m ~6 Myr ago in the absence of lithological migration barriers. During glacial intervals Case 2 GH layers expand both downward and upward as the permafrost grows downward through and intercalated with GHs. The distinctive model results suggest that most BMB GHs resemble Case 1 models, based on the observed distinct and separate occurrences of GHs and IBP and the lack of observed GH intercalations in IBP. Case 2 GHs formed >255 m, below a persistent ice-filled permafrost layer that is as effective a seal to upward methane migration as are Case 1 lithological seals. All models respond to GST variations, but in a delayed and muted manner such that GH layers continue to grow even as the GST begins to increase. The models show that the GH stability zone history is buffered strongly by IBP during the interglacials. Thick IBP and GHs could have persisted since ~1.0 Myr ago and ~4.0 Myr ago for Cases 1 and 2, respectively. Offshore BMB IBP and GHs formed terrestrially during Pleistocene sea level low

  9. Infinite slope stability under steady unsaturated seepage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, N.; Godt, J.

    2008-01-01

    [1] We present a generalized framework for the stability of infinite slopes under steady unsaturated seepage conditions. The analytical framework allows the water table to be located at any depth below the ground surface and variation of soil suction and moisture content above the water table under steady infiltration conditions. The framework also explicitly considers the effect of weathering and porosity increase near the ground surface on changes in the friction angle of the soil. The factor of safety is conceptualized as a function of the depth within the vadose zone and can be reduced to the classical analytical solution for subaerial infinite slopes in the saturated zone. Slope stability analyses with hypothetical sandy and silty soils are conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the framework. These analyses indicate that for hillslopes of both sandy and silty soils, failure can occur above the water table under steady infiltration conditions, which is consistent with some field observations that cannot be predicted by the classical infinite slope theory. A case study of shallow slope failures of sandy colluvium on steep coastal hillslopes near Seattle, Washington, is presented to examine the predictive utility of the proposed framework. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Stability of Numerical Interface Conditions for Fluid/Structure Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, J W; Sjogreen, B

    2009-08-13

    In multi physics computations, where a compressible fluid is coupled with a linearly elastic solid, it is standard to enforce continuity of the normal velocities and of the normal stresses at the interface between the fluid and the solid. In a numerical scheme, there are many ways that the velocity- and stress-continuity can be enforced in the discrete approximation. This paper performs a normal mode analysis to investigate the stability of different numerical interface conditions for a model problem approximated by upwind type of finite difference schemes. The analysis shows that depending on the ratio of densities between the solid and the fluid, some numerical interface conditions are stable up to the maximal CFL-limit, while other numerical interface conditions suffer from a severe reduction of the stable CFL-limit. The paper also presents a new interface condition, obtained as a simplified charcteristic boundary condition, that is proved to not suffer from any reduction of the stable CFL-limit. Numerical experiments in one space dimension show that the new interface condition is stable also for computations with the non-linear Euler equations of compressible fluid flow coupled with a linearly elastic solid.

  11. Investigating the Metastability of Clathrate Hydrates for Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Carolyn Ann [Colorado School of Mines

    2014-11-18

    Important breakthrough discoveries have been achieved from the DOE award on the key processes controlling the synthesis and structure-property relations of clathrate hydrates, which are critical to the development of clathrate hydrates as energy storage materials. Key achievements include: (i) the discovery of key clathrate hydrate building blocks (stable and metastable) leading to clathrate hydrate nucleation and growth; (ii) development of a rapid clathrate hydrate synthesis route via a seeding mechanism; (iii) synthesis-structure relations of H2 + CH4/CO2 binary hydrates to control thermodynamic requirements for energy storage and sequestration applications; (iv) discovery of a new metastable phase present during clathrate hydrate structural transitions. The success of our research to-date is demonstrated by the significant papers we have published in high impact journals, including Science, Angewandte Chemie, J. Am. Chem. Soc. Intellectual Merits of Project Accomplishments: The intellectual merits of the project accomplishments are significant and transformative, in which the fundamental coupled computational and experimental program has provided new and critical understanding on the key processes controlling the nucleation, growth, and thermodynamics of clathrate hydrates containing hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and other guest molecules for energy storage. Key examples of the intellectual merits of the accomplishments include: the first discovery of the nucleation pathways and dominant stable and metastable structures leading to clathrate hydrate formation; the discovery and experimental confirmation of new metastable clathrate hydrate structures; the development of new synthesis methods for controlling clathrate hydrate formation and enclathration of molecular hydrogen. Broader Impacts of Project Accomplishments: The molecular investigations performed in this project on the synthesis (nucleation & growth)-structure-stability relations of clathrate

  12. Geometrical and physical conditions for skyrmion stability in a nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Chui

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Skyrmions are promising information carriers in the next-generation storage and transmission devices. Appropriate design of the nanowire that permits the flow of skyrmions is, however, seldom studied. In this work, the geometrical and material parameters have been varied to investigate the favorable conditions for skyrmion formation and stability in a nanowire through micromagnetic simulations. It is found that the minimum planar dimensions have to be satisfied in order to stabilize a skyrmion. Furthermore, the nanowire thickness is also important for establishing a skyrmion. The temperature effect in the competition between the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI limits the skyrmion formation in a well-defined phase. On the other hand, fine tuning of the exchange stiffness and the Gilbert damping constant sustain a specified portion of the phase diagram that allows for skyrmion formation. Our study also indicates that the stabilized magnetization pattern is dependent on the initial skyrmion state. These results shed light on the possible configurations that are suitable for the design of skyrmionic devices.

  13. Hydration state of goats transported by road for 12 hours during the hot-dry conditions and the modulating role of ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minka, Salka Ndazo; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of 12 hr of road transportation during the hot-dry conditions and the modulating role of ascorbic acid (AA) on the hydration state of goats. Twenty goats who served as treatment goats received oral administration of 100 mg/kg body weight of AA, whereas another 20 control goats received sterile water; thereafter, the goats were loaded and transported. The study determined changes in skin thickness; albumin (Alb); total protein (TP); elimination of the gut content; fecal water; urine specific gravity (SG); and pH before, during, and after the transportation. The result obtained in the control goats showed significant (p .05). In conclusion, 12-hr road transportation of goats induced dehydration, which may affect the welfare and health status of the goats. The administration of AA ameliorated the risk of adverse effects of handling, loading, transportation, and hot-dry conditions on hydration state of goats.

  14. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  15. A note on stability conditions for planar switched systems

    CERN Document Server

    Balde, Moussa; Mason, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the stability problem for the planar linear switched system $\\dot x(t)=u(t)A_1x(t)+(1-u(t))A_2x(t)$, where the real matrices $A_1,A_2\\in \\R^{2\\times 2}$ are Hurwitz and $u(\\cdot) [0,\\infty[\\to\\{0,1\\}$ is a measurable function. We give coordinate-invariant necessary and sufficient conditions on $A_1$ and $A_2$ under which the system is asymptotically stable for arbitrary switching functions $u(\\cdot)$. The new conditions unify those given in previous papers and are simpler to be verified since we are reduced to study 4 cases instead of 20. Most of the cases are analyzed in terms of the function $\\Gamma(A_1,A_2)={1/2}(\\tr(A_1) \\tr(A_2)- \\tr(A_1A_2))$.

  16. Modeling DNA hydration: comparison of calculated and experimental hydration properties of nuclic acid bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltev, V I; Malenkov, G G; Gonzalez, E J; Teplukhin, A V; Rein, R; Shibata, M; Miller, J H

    1996-02-01

    Hydration properties of individual nucleic acid bases were calculated and compared with the available experimental data. Three sets of classical potential functions (PF) used in simulations of nucleic acid hydration were juxtaposed: (i) the PF developed by Poltev and Malenkov (PM), (ii) the PF of Weiner and Kollman (WK), which together with Jorgensen's TIP3P water model are widely used in the AMBER program, and (iii) OPLS (optimized potentials for liquid simulations) developed by Jorgensen (J). The global minima of interaction energy of single water molecules with all the natural nucleic acid bases correspond to the formation of two water-base hydrogen bonds (water bridging of two hydrophilic atoms of the base). The energy values of these minima calculated via PM potentials are in somewhat better conformity with mass-spectrometric data than the values calculated via WK PF. OPLS gave much weaker water-base interactions for all compounds considered, thus these PF were not used in further computations. Monte Carlo simulations of the hydration of 9-methyladenine, 1-methyluracil and 1-methylthymine were performed in systems with 400 water molecules and periodic boundary conditions. Results of simulations with PM potentials give better agreement with experimental data on hydration energies than WK PF. Computations with PM PF of the hydration energy of keto and enol tautomers of 9-methylguanine can account for the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium of guanine in aqueous media to a dominance of the keto form in spite of nearly equal intrinsic stability of keto and enol tautomers. The results of guanine hydration computations are discussed in relation to mechanisms of base mispairing errors in nucleic acid biosynthesis. The data presented in this paper along with previous results on simulation of hydration shell structures in DNA duplex grooves provide ample evidence for the advantages of PM PF in studies of nucleic-acid hydration.

  17. The Stability Conditions of the Pump Structure Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassir Hassan Abdul Hussain Al Hariri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The general approach of this research is to assume that the small nonlinearity can be separated from the linear part of the equation of motion. The effect of the dynamic fluid force on the pump structure system is considered vibrates at its natural frequency but the amplitude is determined by the initial conditions. If the motion of the system tends to increase the energy of the pump structure system, the vibration amplitude will increase and the pump structure system is considered to be unstable. A suitable MATLAB program was used to predict the stability conditions of the pump structure vibration. The present research focuses on fluid pump problems, namely, the role played by damping coefficient C, damping factor D and angular speed ? (termed the ratio ( and the determining stability of a centrifugal pump structure. The data demonstrate substantial rotor dynamic effects, a destabilizing chart appears to be inversely proportional to the D, C, and ?, and resonance changes significantly with flow rate.

  18. RESEARCH ON COUPLED RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HYDRATION NUMBER WITH RAMAN SPECTRUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Huaiyan; LIU Zhihong; FAN Shuanshi; XU Maoquan; GUAN Baocong

    2003-01-01

    As we know, there are three structures-sⅠ, sⅡ, and sH, with hydrocarbonate gas hydrate.Because of those special structures characteristics and potentail large fossil energy resource, gas hydrate play an important role in natural carbonate cycle system. In this paper, CH4, CO2, C3H8, and CH4 +CO2 system have been experimental performed in order to model hydrate formation and discomposition and to obtain hydrate stability conditions of tempreature and pressure. The results from laboratory using Raman spectra show that Raman spectrascopy is a effective tool to identify hydrate structure. Raman spectra of clathrate hydrate guest molecules are presented for two structure (sⅠ and sⅡ) in the following systems: CH4, CO2, C3 H8. Relatively occupancy of CH4 in the large and small cavities of sⅠ were determined by deconvoluting the v1 symmetric bands, resulting in hydration numbers of 6.04±0.03. The freqyuency of the v1 bands for CH4 in structures Ⅰ and Ⅱ differ statistically. The large cavities were measured to be almost fully occupied by CH4 and CO2, whereas only a small fraction of the small cavities are occupied by CH4. No CO2 was found in the small cavities.

  19. Stability conditions of diatomic molecules in Heisenbergs picture: inspired from the stability theory of lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Jahanpanah, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational motion equations of both homo and hetero-nuclei diatomic molecules are here derived for the first time. A diatomic molecule is first considered as a one dimensional quantum mechanics oscillator. The second and third-order Hamiltonian operators are then formed by substituting the number operator for the quantum number in the corresponding vibrational energy eigenvalues. The expectation values of relative position and linear momentum operators of two oscillating atoms are calculated by solving Heisenbergs equations of motion. Subsequently, the expectation values of potential and kinetics energy operators are evaluated in all different vibrational levels of Morse potential. On the other hand, the stability theory of optical oscillators (lasers) is exploited to determine the stability conditions of an oscillating diatomic molecule.It is peculiarly turned out that the diatomic molecules are exactly dissociated at the energy level in which their equations of motion become unstable. We also determine...

  20. Stability of a flexible structure with destabilizing boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubov, M.; Shubov, V.

    2016-07-01

    The Euler-Bernoulli beam model with non-dissipative boundary conditions of feedback control type is investigated. Components of the two-dimensional input vector are shear and moment at the right end, and components of the observation vector are time derivatives of displacement and slope at the right end. The codiagonal matrix depending on two control parameters relates input and observation. The paper contains five results. First, asymptotic approximation for eigenmodes is derived. Second, `the main identity' is established. It provides a relation between mode shapes of two systems: one with non-zero control parameters and the other one with zero control parameters. Third, when one control parameter is positive and the other one is zero, `the main identity' yields stability of all eigenmodes (though the system is non-dissipative). Fourth, the stability of eigenmodes is extended to the case when one control parameter is positive, and the other one is sufficiently small. Finally, existence and properties of `deadbeat' modes are investigated.

  1. Development of Carbon Sequestration Options by Studying Carbon Dioxide-Methane Exchange in Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Kristine Nicole

    Gas hydrates form naturally at high pressures (>4 MPa) and low temperatures (climate change point of view, a 100 ppm increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels over the past century is of urgent concern. A potential solution to both of these issues is to simultaneously exchange CH4 with CO 2 in natural hydrate reserves by forming more stable CO2 hydrates. This approach would minimize disturbances to the host sediment matrix of the seafloor while sequestering CO2. Understanding hydrate growth over time is imperative to prepare for large scale CH4 extraction coupled with CO2 sequestration. In this study, we performed macroscale experiments in a 200 mL high-pressure Jerguson cell that mimicked the pressure-temperature conditions of the seafloor. A total of 13 runs were performed under varying conditions. These included the formation of CH4 hydrates, followed by a CO2 gas injection and CO2 hydrate formation followed by a CH4 gas injection. Results demonstrated that once gas hydrates formed, they show "memory effect" in subsequent charges, irrespective of the two gases injected. This was borne out by the induction time data for hydrate formation that reduced from 96 hours for CH4 and 24 hours for CO2 to instant hydrate formation in both cases upon injection of a secondary gas. During the study of CH4-CO2 exchange where CH4 hydrates were first formed and CO2 gas was injected into the system, gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of the cell indicated a pure CH4 gas phase, i.e., all injected CO2 gas entered the hydrate phase and remained trapped in hydrate cages for several hours, though over time some CO2 did enter the gas phase. Alternatively, during the CH 4-CO2 exchange study where CO2 hydrates were first formed, the injected CH4 initially entered the hydrate phase, but quickly gaseous CO2 exchanged with CH4 in hydrates to form more stable CO2 hydrates. These results are consistent with the better thermodynamic stability of CO2 hydrates, and this appears to be a

  2. CO2 capture from simulated fuel gas mixtures using semiclathrate hydrates formed by quaternary ammonium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungwon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Youngjun; Seo, Yongwon

    2013-07-02

    In order to investigate the feasibility of semiclathrate hydrate-based precombustion CO2 capture, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic studies were undertaken on the semiclathrate hydrates formed from a fuel gas mixture of H2 (60%) + CO2 (40%) in the presence of quaternary ammonium salts (QASs) such as tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB) and fluoride (TBAF). The inclusion of QASs demonstrated significantly stabilized hydrate dissociation conditions. This effect was greater for TBAF than TBAB. However, due to the presence of dodecahedral cages that are partially filled with water molecules, TBAF showed a relatively lower gas uptake than TBAB. From the stability condition measurements and compositional analyses, it was found that with only one step of semiclathrate hydrate formation with the fuel gas mixture from the IGCC plants, 95% CO2 can be enriched in the semiclathrate hydrate phase at room temperature. The enclathration of both CO2 and H2 in the cages of the QAS semiclathrate hydrates and the structural transition that results from the inclusion of QASs were confirmed through Raman and (1)H NMR measurements. The experimental results obtained in this study provide the physicochemical background required for understanding selective partitioning and distributions of guest gases in the QAS semiclathrate hydrates and for investigating the feasibility of a semiclathrate hydrate-based precombustion CO2 capture process.

  3. Drilling Gas Hydrates on hydrate Ridge, Oregon continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A. M.; Bohrmann, G.; Leg 204 Science Party

    2002-12-01

    During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which gas hydrate is forming. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: 1) that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally

  4. Preliminary Experimental Examination Of Controls On Methane Expulsion During Melting Of Natural Gas Hydrate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Flemings, P. B.; Bryant, S. L.; You, K.; Polito, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Global climate change will cause warming of the oceans and land. This will affect the occurrence, behavior, and location of subseafloor and subterranean methane hydrate deposits. We suggest that in many natural systems local salinity, elevated by hydrate formation or freshened by hydrate dissociation, may control gas transport through the hydrate stability zone. We are performing experiments and modeling the experiments to explore this behavior for different warming scenarios. Initially, we are exploring hydrate association/dissociation in saline systems with constant water mass. We compare experiments run with saline (3.5 wt. %) water vs. distilled water in a sand mixture at an initial water saturation of ~0.5. We increase the pore fluid (methane) pressure to 1050 psig. We then stepwise cool the sample into the hydrate stability field (~3 degrees C), allowing methane gas to enter as hydrate forms. We measure resistivity and the mass of methane consumed. We are currently running these experiments and we predict our results from equilibrium thermodynamics. In the fresh water case, the modeled final hydrate saturation is 63% and all water is consumed. In the saline case, the modeled final hydrate saturation is 47%, the salinity is 12.4 wt. %, and final water saturation is 13%. The fresh water system is water-limited: all the water is converted to hydrate. In the saline system, pore water salinity is elevated and salt is excluded from the hydrate structure during hydrate formation until the salinity drives the system to three phase equilibrium (liquid, gas, hydrate) and no further hydrate forms. In our laboratory we can impose temperature gradients within the column, and we will use this to investigate equilibrium conditions in large samples subjected to temperature gradients and changing temperature. In these tests, we will quantify the hydrate saturation and salinity over our meter-long sample using spatially distributed temperature sensors, spatially distributed

  5. The impact of permafrost-associated microorganisms on hydrate formation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Liebner, Susanne; Spangenberg, Erik; Wagner, Dirk; Schicks, Judith M.

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between gas hydrates, microorganisms and the surrounding sediment is extremely complex: On the one hand, microorganisms producing methane provide the prerequisite for gas hydrate formation. As it is known most of the gas incorporated into natural gas hydrates originates from biogenic sources. On the other hand, as a result of microbial activity gas hydrates are surrounded by a great variety of organic compounds which are not incorporated into the hydrate structure but may influence the formation or degradation process. For gas hydrate samples from marine environments such as the Gulf of Mexico a direct association between microbes and gas hydrates was shown by Lanoil et al. 2001. It is further assumed that microorganisms living within the gas hydrate stability zone produce biosurfactants which were found to enhance the hydrate formation process significantly and act as nucleation centres (Roger et al. 2007). Another source of organic compounds is sediment organic matter (SOM) originating from plant material or animal remains which may also enhance hydrate growth. So far, the studies regarding this relationship were focused on a marine environment. The scope of this work is to extend the investigations to microbes originating from permafrost areas. To understand the influence of microbial activity in a permafrost environment on the methane hydrate formation process and the stability conditions of the resulting hydrate phase we will perform laboratory studies. Thereby, we mimic gas hydrate formation in the presence and absence of methanogenic archaea (e.g. Methanosarcina soligelidi) and other psychrophilic bacteria isolated from permafrost environments of the Arctic and Antarctic to investigate their impact on hydrate induction time and formation rates. Our results may contribute to understand and predict the occurrences and behaviour of potential gas hydrates within or adjacent to the permafrost. Lanoil BD, Sassen R, La Duc MT, Sweet ST, Nealson KH

  6. Olive oil stability under deep-frying conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Susana; Malheiro, Ricardo; Sendas, Artur; Oliveira, Beatriz P P; Pereira, José Alberto

    2010-10-01

    The suitability of different commercial olive oil categories for domestic frying was investigated. Oil samples were taken every 3h of frying and evaluated for free acidity, peroxide and p-anisidine values, specific extinction coefficients, oxidative stability, fatty acids, vitamin E, β-carotene and total phenols, until the total polar compounds achieved the maximum legal value (25%). All olive oils were fried during more time than the commercial vegetable oil blend taken for comparison (from 24 to 27 h, against 15 h). The extra-virgin Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) olive oil was characterized by reduced levels of oxidation and hydrolysis, and superior amounts of minor antioxidant compounds. The "olive oil" commercial category behaves similarly, but "Cobrançosa" olive oils performance was slightly worse, and clearly different between years, highlighting the importance of blending different cultivars. The vegetable oil, despite containing significantly higher amounts of vitamin E, was highly susceptible to oxidation under frying conditions when compared to all olive oils. The results also show that the chemical composition of olive oils, particularly the amount of natural antioxidants, are important parameters in their predictive behavior along the frying process, but mostly that olive oil is clearly resistant to frying conditions, independently to the commercial category chosen.

  7. Study on gas hydrate as a new energy resource in the 21th century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Byeong-Jae; Kwak Young-Hoon; Kim, Won-Sik [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (KR)] (and others)

    1999-12-01

    Natural gas hydrate, a special type of clathrate hydrates, is a metastable solid compound which mainly consists of methane and water, and generally called as gas hydrate. It is stable in the specific low-temperature/high-pressure conditions. Gas hydrates play an important role as major reservoir of methane on the earth. On the other hand, the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates could cause the plugging in pipeline, gas kick during production, atmospheric pollution and geohazard. To understand the formation and dissociation of the gas hydrate, the experimental equilibrium conditions of methane hydrate were measured in pure water, 3 wt.% NaCl and MgCl{sub 2} solutions. The equilibrium conditions of propane hydrates were also measured in pure water. The relationship between methane hydrate formation time and overpressure was also analyzed through the laboratory work. The geophysical surveys using air-gun system and multibeam echo sounder were implemented to develop exploration techniques and to evaluate the gas hydrate potential in the East Sea, Korea. General indicators of submarine gas hydrates on seismic data is commonly inferred from the BSR developed parallel to the see floor, amplitude blanking at the upper part of the BSR, and phase reversal and decrease of the interval velocity at BSR. The field data were processed using Geobit 2.9.5 developed by KIGAM to detect the gas hydrate indicators. The accurate velocity analysis was performed by XVA (X-window based Velocity Analysis). Processing results show that the strong reflector occurred parallel to the sea floor were shown at about 1800 ms two way travel time. The interval velocity decrease at this strong reflector and at the reflection phase reversal corresponding to the reflection at the sea floor. Gas hydrate stability field in the study area was determined using the data of measured hydrate equilibrium condition, hydrothermal gradient and geothermal gradient. The depth of BSR detected in the seismic

  8. Stability of Magnesite under the Lower Mantle Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isshiki, M.; Irifune, T.; Kurio, A.; Hirose, K.; Ono, S.; Nishibori, E.; Ohishi, Y.; Watanuki, T.

    2002-12-01

    MgCO3 magnesite is an important mineral of some sedimentary rocks, and is probably the only stable carbonate in the deep mantle [1]. It was suggested that magnesite disproportionates to form an assemblage of MgO + C (diamond) + O2 at pressures above 40-50 GPa [2]. We have examined this hypothesis and investigated stability of magnesite under the lower mantle conditions using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell with a synchrotron radiation [3]. The sample was a mixture of natural magnesite and a small amount of the platinum black powders. The latter powder was used as a heat absorber in laser heating as well as a pressure marker at high temperature. An Al203 powder was used as a thermal insulator between the sample and the diamond anvil. The sample was enclosed in a hole of a Re gasket. All experiments were carried out under the condition of 15-110GPa and 1800-3000K at the SPring-8 high pressure beamline BL10XU. The x-ray beam was monochromatized to the wavelength of 0.3571-0.4130 angstrom and was collimated to 20 micrometer in diameter. In spite of the proposed stability limit of magnesite, we did not see any evidence for the dissociation at the investigated pressures and temperatures. On the other hand, although magnesite with a trigonal structure was stable at pressures up to 110GPa, it transformed to an unknown phase with an orthorhombic structure at 110GPa and 2200K. The present results show that magnesite is stable down to depths of 2500km and remains the major host phase of carbon throughout the most part of the lower mantle. The newly found phase could be stable at deeper parts, and may play an important role in the slab-mantle-core interactions. [1] T. Katsura et al., Proc. Japan Acad. B67, 57 (1991) [2] L. Liu, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 134, 170 (1999) [3] T. Watanuki et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 1289 (2001)

  9. Ice nucleation activity of diesel soot particles at cirrus relevant temperature conditions: Effects of hydration, secondary organics coating, soot morphology, and coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar; China, Swarup; Liu, Shang; Nandasiri, Manjula; Sharma, Noopur; Wilson, Jacqueline; Aiken, Allison C.; Chand, Duli; Laskin, Alexander; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Pekour, Mikhail; Shilling, John; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2016-04-01

    Ice formation by diesel soot particles was investigated at temperatures ranging from -40 to -50°C. Size-selected soot particles were physically and chemically aged in an environmental chamber, and their ice nucleating properties were determined using a continuous flow diffusion type ice nucleation chamber. Bare (freshly formed), hydrated, and compacted soot particles, as well as α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA)-coated soot particles at high relative humidity conditions, showed ice formation activity at subsaturation conditions with respect to water but below the homogeneous freezing threshold conditions. However, SOA-coated soot particles at dry conditions were observed to freeze at homogeneous freezing threshold conditions. Overall, our results suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of freshly emitted diesel soot particles are sensitive to some of the aging processes that soot can undergo in the atmosphere.

  10. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  11. Hydrate Evolution in Response to Ongoing Environmental Shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempel, Alan [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Natural gas hydrates have the potential to become a vital domestic clean-burning energy source. However, past changes in environmental conditions have caused hydrates to become unstable and trigger both massive submarine landslides and the development of crater-like pockmarks, thereby releasing methane into the overlying seawater and atmosphere, where it acts as a powerful greenhouse gas. This project was designed to fill critical gaps in our understanding of domestic hydrate resources and improve forecasts for their response to environmental shifts. Project work can be separated into three interrelated components, each involving the development of predictive mathematical models. The first project component concerns the role of sediment properties on the development and dissociation of concentrated hydrate anomalies. To this end, we developed numerical models to predict equilibrium solubility of methane in twophase equilibrium with hydrate as a function of measureable porous medium characteristics. The second project component concerned the evolution of hydrate distribution in heterogeneous reservoirs. To this end, we developed numerical models to predict the growth and decay of anomalies in representative physical environments. The third project component concerned the stability of hydrate-bearing slopes under changing environmental conditions. To this end, we developed numerical treatments of pore pressure evolution and consolidation, then used "infinite-slope" analysis to approximate the landslide potential in representative physical environments, and developed a "rate-and-state" frictional formulation to assess the stability of finite slip patches that are hypothesized to develop in response to the dissociation of hydrate anomalies. The increased predictive capabilities that result from this work provide a framework for interpreting field observations of hydrate anomalies in terms of the history of environmental forcing that led to their development. Moreover

  12. Stability of antibiotics under growth conditions for thermophilic anaerobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peteranderl, R.; Shotts, E.B. Jr.; Wiegel, J. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

    1990-06-01

    It was shown that the inhibitory effect of kanamycin and streptomycin in a growing culture of Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum JW 102 is of limited duration. To screen a large number of antibiotics, their stability during incubation under the growth conditions of thermophilic clostridia was determined at 72 and 50C by using a 0.2% yeast extract-amended prereduced mineral medium with a pH of 7.3 or 5.0. Half-lives were determined in a modified MIC test with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus megaterium as indicator strains. All compounds tested were similar at the two temperatures or more stable at 50 than at 72C. The half-life (t{sub 1/2}) at pH 7.3 and 72C ranged from 3.3 h (k = 7.26 day{sup {minus}1}, where k (degradation constant) = 1/t{sub 1/2}) for ampicillin to no detectable loss of activity for kanamycin, neomycin, and other antibiotics. Apparently some compounds became more potent during incubation. A change to pH 5.0 caused some compounds to become more labile to become more stable than at pH 7.3.

  13. Stability conditions and mechanism of cream soaps: role of glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagitani, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids, fatty acid potassium soaps, glycerol and water are essential ingredients in the production of stable cream soaps. In this study, the behavior of these components in solution was investigated to elucidate the stability conditions and mechanism of cream soaps. It was determined that the cream soaps were a dispersion of 1:1 acid soap (1:1 molar ratio of potassium soap/fatty acid) crystals in the lamellar gel phase, which has confirmed from the phase behavior diagrams and small angle X-ray scattering data. Glycerol was crucial ingredient in the formation of the lamellar gel phase. The cleansing process of the cream soaps was also evaluated using the same diagrams. The structure of the continuous phase in cream soaps changed from lamellar gel to a micellar aqueous solution upon the addition of water. This structural change during the washing process is important in producing the foaming activity of acid soaps to wash away dirt or excess fats from the skin surface.

  14. Tetrahydrofuran hydrate decomposition characteristics in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongchen; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Mingjun

    2016-12-01

    Many tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate properties are similar to those of gas hydrates. In the present work THF hydrate dissociation in four types of porous media is studied. THF solution was cooled to 275.15 K with formation of the hydrate under ambient pressure, and then it dissociated under ambient conditions. THF hydrate dissociation experiments in each porous medium were conducted three times. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to obtain images. Decomposition time, THF hydrate saturation and MRI mean intensity (MI) were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the hydrate decomposition time in BZ-4 and BZ-3 was similar and longer than that in BZ-02. In each dissociation process, the hydrate decomposition time of the second and third cycles was shorter than that of the first cycle in BZ-4, BZ-3, and BZ-02. The relationship between THF hydrate saturation and time is almost linear.

  15. Differential stability of 2'F-ANA*RNA and ANA*RNA hybrid duplexes: roles of structure, pseudohydrogen bonding, hydration, ion uptake and flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jonathan K; Martín-Pintado, Nerea; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Portella, Guillem; Orozco, Modesto; González, Carlos; Damha, Masad J

    2010-04-01

    Hybrids of RNA with arabinonucleic acids 2'F-ANA and ANA have very similar structures but strikingly different thermal stabilities. We now present a thorough study combining NMR and other biophysical methods together with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations on a fully modified 10-mer hybrid duplex. Comparison between the solution structure of 2'F-ANA*RNA and ANA*RNA hybrids indicates that the increased binding affinity of 2'F-ANA is related to several subtle differences, most importantly a favorable pseudohydrogen bond (2'F-purine H8) which contrasts with unfavorable 2'-OH-nucleobase steric interactions in the case of ANA. While both 2'F-ANA and ANA strands maintained conformations in the southern/eastern sugar pucker range, the 2'F-ANA strand's structure was more compatible with the A-like structure of a hybrid duplex. No dramatic differences are found in terms of relative hydration for the two hybrids, but the ANA*RNA duplex showed lower uptake of counterions than its 2'F-ANA*RNA counterpart. Finally, while the two hybrid duplexes are of similar rigidities, 2'F-ANA single strands may be more suitably preorganized for duplex formation. Thus the dramatically increased stability of 2'F-ANA*RNA and ANA*RNA duplexes is caused by differences in at least four areas, of which structure and pseudohydrogen bonding are the most important.

  16. Thermodynamic Properties of Hydrogen + Tetra-n-Butyl Ammonium Bromide Semi-Clathrate Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Hashimoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic stability and hydrogen occupancy on the hydrogen + tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide semi-clathrate hydrate were investigated by means of Raman spectroscopic and phase equilibrium measurements under the three-phase equilibrium condition. The structure of mixed gas hydrates changes from tetragonal to another structure around 95 MPa and 292 K depending on surrounding hydrogen fugacity. The occupied amount of hydrogen in the semi-clathrate hydrate increases significantly associated with the structural transition. Tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide semi-clathrate hydrates can absorb hydrogen molecules by a pressure-swing without destroying the hydrogen bonds of hydrate cages at 15 MPa or over.

  17. Conditional stability of diatomic molecule driven by a weak laser field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Gui-Shu; Hai Wen-Hua; Xie Qiong-Tao

    2005-01-01

    Using a direct perturbation method, we investigate the stability of a diatomic molecule modelled by a weakly laser-driven Morse oscillator. It is shown that stationary state solution of the system is stable in the sense of Lyapunov and the periodical one possesses conditional stability, namely its stability depends on the initial conditions and system parameters. The corresponding sufficient and necessary conditions are established that indicate the stable states associated with some discrete energies. The results reveal how a diatomic molecule can be stabilized or dissociated with a weak laser, and demonstrate that the mathematical conditional stability works in the considered physical system.

  18. Controls on methane expulsion during melting of natural gas hydrate systems. Topic area 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flemings, Peter [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-01-14

    1.1. Project Goal The project goal is to predict, given characteristic climate-induced temperature change scenarios, the conditions under which gas will be expelled from existing accumulations of gas hydrate into the shallow ocean or directly to the atmosphere. When those conditions are met, the fraction of the gas accumulation that escapes and the rate of escape shall be quantified. The predictions shall be applicable in Arctic regions and in gas hydrate systems at the up dip limit of the stability zone on continental margins. The behavior shall be explored in response to two warming scenarios: longer term change due to sea level rise (e.g. 20 thousand years) and shorter term due to atmospheric warming by anthropogenic forcing (decadal time scale). 1.2. Project Objectives During the first budget period, the objectives are to review and categorize the stability state of existing well-studied hydrate reservoirs, develop conceptual and numerical models of the melting process, and to design and conduct laboratory experiments that dissociate methane hydrate in a model sediment column by systematically controlling the temperature profile along the column. The final objective of the first budget period shall be to validate the models against the experiments. In the second budget period, the objectives are to develop a model of gas flow into sediment in which hydrate is thermodynamically stable, and conduct laboratory experiments of this process to validate the model. The developed models shall be used to quantify the rate and volume of gas that escapes from dissociating hydrate accumulations. In addition, specific scaled simulations characteristic of Arctic regions and regions near the stability limit at continental margins shall be performed. 1.3. Project Background and Rationale The central hypothesis proposed is that hydrate melting (dissociation) due to climate change generates free gas that can, under certain conditions, propagate through the gas hydrate stability

  19. Extraction of compositional and hydration information of sulfates from laser-induced plasma spectra recorded under Mars atmospheric conditions - Implications for ChemCam investigations on Curiosity rover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobron, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.sobron@asc-csa.gc.ca [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Wang, Alian [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Sobron, Francisco [Unidad Asociada UVa-CSIC a traves del Centro de Astrobiologia, Parque Tecnologico de Boecillo, Parcela 203, Boecillo (Valladolid), 47151 (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    Given the volume of spectral data required for providing accurate compositional information and thereby insight in mineralogy and petrology from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements, fast data processing tools are a must. This is particularly true during the tactical operations of rover-based planetary exploration missions such as the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, which will carry a remote LIBS spectrometer in its science payload. We have developed: an automated fast pre-processing sequence of algorithms for converting a series of LIBS spectra (typically 125) recorded from a single target into a reliable SNR-enhanced spectrum; a dedicated routine to quantify its spectral features; and a set of calibration curves using standard hydrous and multi-cation sulfates. These calibration curves allow deriving the elemental compositions and the degrees of hydration of various hydrous sulfates, one of the two major types of secondary minerals found on Mars. Our quantitative tools are built upon calibration-curve modeling, through the correlation of the elemental concentrations and the peak areas of the atomic emission lines observed in the LIBS spectra of standard samples. At present, we can derive the elemental concentrations of K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Al, S, O, and H in sulfates, as well as the hydration degrees of Ca- and Mg-sulfates, from LIBS spectra obtained in both Earth atmosphere and Mars atmospheric conditions in a Planetary Environment and Analysis Chamber (PEACh). In addition, structural information can be potentially obtained for various Fe-sulfates. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Routines for LIBS spectral data fast automated processing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of elements and determination of the elemental composition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calibration curves for sulfate samples in Earth and Mars atmospheric conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe curves probably related to the crystalline

  20. Effects of mannose, fructose, and fucose on the structure, stability, and hydration of lysozyme in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, Abdoul; Peters, Günther H.J.; Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2013-01-01

    The bio-protective properties of monosaccharaides, namely mannose, fructose and fucose, on the stability and dynamical properties of the NMR determined hen egg-white lysozyme structure have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature in aqueous solution and in...

  1. Synthetic petroleum stability under thermobaric conditions of the Earth crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serovaiskii, Aleksandr; Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays there are several dozens of large crude oil deposits at the depth more than 10 km (Kutcherov and Krayushkin, 2010). The existence of such deep oil fields at the depth exceeding conventional "oil window" could be explained by the migration of the deep fluid from the asthenosphere. This fluid migrates up to the surface and forms oil and gas deposits in different kind of rocks in the on various depths of the Earth's crust. Crude oil consists of a great numbers of different hydrocarbons. Its precise molecular composition is impossible to investigate nowadays. Instead of the natural hydrocarbons mixture synthetic petroleum with simpler composition was used in the experiments. The synthetic petroleum stability was investigated at the Earth crust thermobaric conditions corresponding to the depth down to 50 km. The experiments were carried out in Diamond Anvil Cells (DAC) with the internal resistive heating. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the petroleum composition. The analysis of the sample was made in situ during the experiment. Ruby and Sm:YAG Raman shifts were the controllers of the temperature and pressure inside the sample (Trots et al., 2012; Mao et al., 1986). Three series of the experiments were carried out at 320°C and 0.7GPa, 420°C and 1.2GPa, 450°C and 1.4GPa. After the experiment the Raman spectra of the sample was compared to the reference spectra of the petroleum before the experiment. The comparison showed no changes in the sample's composition after the experiment. Obtained data may explain the existence of deep oil fields located deeper than the "oil window". It can broaden the knowledge about the existing range of depths for the crude oil and natural gas deposits in the Earth crust. The evidence of the petroleum existence in the Earth low crust may support the existence of unconventional, deep abyssal hydrocarbons source.

  2. Separation of SF6 from gas mixtures using gas hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Inuk; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Gang-woo; Seo, Yongwon

    2010-08-15

    This study aims to examine the thermodynamic feasibility of separating sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), which is widely used in various industrial fields and is one of the most potent greenhouse gases, from gas mixtures using gas hydrate formation. The key process variables of hydrate phase equilibria, pressure-composition diagram, formation kinetics, and structure identification of the mixed gas hydrates, were closely investigated to verify the overall concept of this hydrate-based SF(6) separation process. The three-phase equilibria of hydrate (H), liquid water (L(W)), and vapor (V) for the binary SF(6) + water mixture and for the ternary N(2) + SF(6) + water mixtures with various SF(6) vapor compositions (10, 30, 50, and 70%) were experimentally measured to determine the stability regions and formation conditions of pure and mixed hydrates. The pressure-composition diagram at two different temperatures of 276.15 and 281.15 K was obtained to investigate the actual SF(6) separation efficiency. The vapor phase composition change was monitored during gas hydrate formation to confirm the formation pattern and time needed to reach a state of equilibrium. Furthermore, the structure of the mixed N(2) + SF(6) hydrate was confirmed to be structure II via Raman spectroscopy. Through close examination of the overall experimental results, it was clearly verified that highly concentrated SF(6) can be separated from gas mixtures at mild temperatures and low pressure conditions.

  3. 3-D basin-scale reconstruction of natural gas hydrate system of the Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwicz, Ewa; Reichel, Thomas; Wallmann, Klaus; Rottke, Wolf; Haeckel, Matthias; Hensen, Christian

    2017-05-01

    Our study presents a basin-scale 3-D modeling solution, quantifying and exploring gas hydrate accumulations in the marine environment around the Green Canyon (GC955) area, Gulf of Mexico. It is the first modeling study that considers the full complexity of gas hydrate formation in a natural geological system. Overall, it comprises a comprehensive basin reconstruction, accounting for depositional and transient thermal history of the basin, source rock maturation, petroleum components generation, expulsion and migration, salt tectonics, and associated multistage fault development. The resulting 3-D gas hydrate distribution in the Green Canyon area is consistent with independent borehole observations. An important mechanism identified in this study and leading to high gas hydrate saturation (>80 vol %) at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) is the recycling of gas hydrate and free gas enhanced by high Neogene sedimentation rates in the region. Our model predicts the rapid development of secondary intrasalt minibasins situated on top of the allochthonous salt deposits which leads to significant sediment subsidence and an ensuing dislocation of the lower GHSZ boundary. Consequently, large amounts of gas hydrates located in the deepest parts of the basin dissociate and the released free methane gas migrates upward to recharge the GHSZ. In total, we have predicted the gas hydrate budget for the Green Canyon area that amounts to ˜3256 Mt of gas hydrate, which is equivalent to ˜340 Mt of carbon (˜7 × 1011 m3 of CH4 at STP conditions), and consists mostly of biogenic hydrates.

  4. Physical property changes in hydrate-bearingsediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, Timothy; Waite, W.F.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2008-06-01

    Physical property measurements of sediment cores containing natural gas hydrate are typically performed on material exposed at least briefly to non-in situ conditions during recovery. To examine effects of a brief excursion from the gas-hydrate stability field, as can occur when pressure cores are transferred to pressurized storage vessels, we measured physical properties on laboratory-formed sand packs containing methane hydrate and methane pore gas. After depressurizing samples to atmospheric pressure, we repressurized them into the methane-hydrate stability field and remeasured their physical properties. Thermal conductivity, shear strength, acoustic compressional and shear wave amplitudes and speeds are compared between the original and depressurized/repressurized samples. X-ray computed tomography (CT) images track how the gas-hydrate distribution changes in the hydrate-cemented sands due to the depressurization/repressurization process. Because depressurization-induced property changes can be substantial and are not easily predicted, particularly in water-saturated, hydrate-bearing sediment, maintaining pressure and temperature conditions throughout the core recovery and measurement process is critical for using laboratory measurements to estimate in situ properties.

  5. Physical property changes in hydrate-bearing sediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Physical property measurements of sediment cores containing natural gas hydrate are typically performed on material exposed, at least briefly, to non-in situ conditions during recovery. To examine the effects of a brief excursion from the gas-hydrate stability field, as can occur when pressure cores are transferred to pressurized storage vessels, we measured physical properties on laboratory-formed sand packs containing methane hydrate and methane pore gas. After depressurizing samples to atmospheric pressure, we repressurized them into the methane-hydrate stability field and remeasured their physical properties. Thermal conductivity, shear strength, acoustic compressional and shear wave amplitudes, and speeds of the original and depressurized/repressurized samples are compared. X-ray computed tomography images track how the gas-hydrate distribution changes in the hydrate-cemented sands owing to the depressurizaton/repressurization process. Because depressurization-induced property changes can be substantial and are not easily predicted, particularly in water-saturated, hydrate-bearing sediment, maintaining pressure and temperature conditions throughout the core recovery and measurement process is critical for using laboratory measurements to estimate in situ properties.

  6. Infrared Spectra of Hydrated Magnesium Salts and their Role in the Search for Possible Life Conditions on Jupiter Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Galina; Huo, Winifred M.; Lee, Timothy J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent observations from the Galileo satellite indicate that three of the Jupiter moons, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, may have subsurface oceans. Possible existence of such ocean and the nature of its composition are of great interest to astrobiologists. Data from Galileo's NIMS spectrometer indicate the possibility of hydrated salts on Europa's surface. To aid in the design of future missions, we investigated infrared spectra of MgSO4-nH20, n=1-3 using ab initio calculations. Geometry, energetics, dipole moments, vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of pure and hydrated MgSO4 salts were determined. Significant differences are found between vibrational spectra of water molecules in complexes with MgSO4 and pure water. Some of the O-H stretching frequencies in the complexes are shifted to the red by up to 1,500 - 2,000 per cm. In addition, the SO2 stretching vibrations are found at lower frequency regions than the water vibrations. The calculated bands of water and SO2 fragments can serve as markers for the existence of the salt-water complexes on the surface of Jupiter's moon.

  7. On sufficient stability conditions of the Couette — Poiseuille flow of monodisperse mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, D. I.; Sagalakov, A. M.; Nikitenko, N. G.

    2011-06-01

    The stability of the Couette — Poiseuille flow of a monodisperse mixture is considered. Sufficient stability conditions are derived. Results of the computation of the spectrum are presented. A considerable stabilization of the flow with particles admixture to small disturbances is observed. It is found that the regions of instability generation may have complex geometry. The influence of the main velocity profile and admixture parameters on the stability conditions is considered.

  8. An equivalent condition for stability properties of Lotka-Volterra systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu Tianguang [Intelligent Control Laboratory, Center for Systems and Control, School of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: chutg@pku.edu.cn

    2007-08-20

    We give a solvable Lie algebraic condition for the equivalence of four typical stability notions (asymptotic stability, D-stability, total stability, and Volterra-Lyapunov stability) concerning Lotka-Volterra systems. Our approach makes use of the decomposition of the interaction matrix into symmetric and skew-symmetric parts, which may be related to the cooperative and competitive interaction pattern of a Lotka-Volterra system. The present result covers a known condition and can yield a larger set of interaction matrices for equivalence of the stability properties.

  9. Simulation of subsea gas hydrate exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several subsea sediments and permafrost regions around the world is a promising perspective to overcome future shortages in natural gas supply. Being aware that conventional natural gas resources are limited, research is going on to develop technologies for the production of natural gas from such new sources. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, India, and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop required technologies. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of CO2 from combustion processes to reduce climate impact. While different natural or man-made reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid CO2, the storage of CO2 as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in the form of hydrates. Regarding technological implementation many problems have to be overcome. Especially mixing, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR« different technological approaches for the optimized exploitation of gas hydrate deposits are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical processes are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs. Simulations based on geological field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the potential of gas production from turbidites and their fitness for CO2 storage. The effects occurring during gas production and CO2 storage within

  10. Modeling of stability of gas hydrates under permafrost in an environment of surface climatic change – terrestrial case, Beaufort-Mackenzie basin, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Majorowicz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of the onset of permafrost formation and succeeding gas hydrate formation in the changing surface temperature environment has been done for the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin (BMB. Numerical 1-D modeling is constrained by deep heat flow from deep well bottom hole temperatures, deep conductivity, present permafrost thickness and thickness of Type I gas hydrates. Latent heat effects were applied to the model for the entire ice bearing permafrost and Type I hydrate intervals. Modeling for a set of surface temperature forcing during the glacial-interglacial history including the last 14 Myr was performed. Two scenarios of gas formation were considered; case 1: formation of gas hydrate from gas entrapped under deep geological seals and case 2: formation of gas hydrate from gas in a free pore space simultaneously with permafrost formation. In case 1, gas hydrates could have formed at a depth of about 0.9 km only some 1 Myr ago. In case 2, the first gas hydrate formed in the depth range of 290–300 m shortly after 6 Myr ago when the GST dropped from −4.5 °C to −5.5. °C. The gas hydrate layer started to expand both downward and upward subsequently. These models show that the gas hydrate zone, while thinning persists under the thick body of BMB permafrost through the current interglacial warming periods.

  11. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  12. On the influence of hydrated imidazolium-based ionic liquid on protein structure stability: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qiang

    2013-09-01

    The structure stability of three α-helix bundle (the B domain of protein A) in an imidazolium-based ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM-Cl)) is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Consistent with previous experiments, the present simulation results show that the native structure of the protein is consistently stabilized in BMIM-Cl solutions with different concentrations. It is observed that BMIM+ cations have a strong tendency to accumulate on protein surface whereas Cl- anions are expelled from protein. BMIM+ cations cannot only have electrostatic interactions with the carbonyl groups on backbone and the carboxylate groups on negatively charged side chains, but also have hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of non-polar residues. In the meanwhile, the accumulation of large-size BMIM+ cations on protein surface could remove the surrounding water molecules, reduce the hydrogen bonding from water to protein, and thus stabilize the backbone hydrogen bonds. In summary, the present study could improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of the impact of water-miscible ionic liquid on protein structure.

  13. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    and the role it plays in the global climate and the future of fuels. Russia, Japan, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Pakistan, Indonesia, Korea, etc are various countries who are perusing the gas hydrates studies as a future resource for fuel. Indian Initiative..., 1993, Free gas at the base of the gas hydrate zone in the vicinity of the Chile Triple junction: Geology, v. 21, pp. 905-908. Borowski, W.S., C.K. Paull, and U. William, III, 1999, Global and local variations of interstitial sulfate gradients...

  14. Methane Gas Hydrate Stability Models on Continental Shelves in Response to Glacio-Eustatic Sea Level Variations: Examples from Canadian Oceanic Margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Safanda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We model numerically regions of the Canadian continental shelves during successive glacio-eustatic cycles to illustrate past, current and future marine gas hydrate (GH stability and instability. These models indicated that the marine GH resource has dynamic features and the formation age and resource volumes depend on the dynamics of the ocean-atmosphere system as it responds to both natural (glacial-interglacial and anthropogenic (climate change forcing. Our models focus on the interval beginning three million years ago (i.e., Late Pliocene-Holocene. They continue through the current interglacial and they are projected to its anticipated natural end. During the current interglacial the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ thickness in each region responded uniquely as a function of changes in water depth and sea bottom temperature influenced by ocean currents. In general, the GHSZ in the deeper parts of the Pacific and Atlantic margins (≥1316 m thinned primarily due to increased water bottom temperatures. The GHSZ is highly variable in the shallower settings on the same margins (~400–500 m. On the Pacific Margin shallow GH dissociated completely prior to nine thousand years ago but the effects of subsequent sea level rise reestablished a persistent, thin GHSZ. On the Atlantic Margin Scotian Shelf the warm Gulf Stream caused GHSZ to disappear completely, whereas in shallow water depths offshore Labrador the combination of the cool Labrador Current and sea level rise increased the GHSZ. If future ocean bottom temperatures remain constant, these general characteristics will persist until the current interglacial ends. If the sea bottom warms, possibly in response to global climate change, there could be a significant reduction to complete loss of GH stability, especially on the shallow parts of the continental shelf. The interglacial GH thinning rates constrain rates at which carbon can be transferred between the GH reservoir and the atmosphere

  15. Transformation of γ-Ray-Formed Methyl Radicals in Methane Hydrate at 10 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Tani, Atsushi; Otsuka, Takahiro; Nakashima, Satoru

    2007-01-01

    The stability of methyl radicals formed in synthetic methane hydrate by γ-ray irradiation at 77 K was studied at 200-273 K and 10 MPa. The methyl radicals decayed under these conditions, despite the stability of methane hydrate, and changed into other molecules that could not be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR). Decay products were investigated by gas cell infrared (IR) spectroscopy by measuring the decomposed gas from the γ-irradiated methane hydrate. Only ethane molecules were detected from the irradiated sample, while these were absent in an unirradiated sample. The molar ratio of ethane to methane (C2H6/CH4) was 12± 1 ppm, which did not contradict with that of methyl radical to methane (CH3{}\\bullet/CH4) in the literature. Hence, most of the methyl radicals generated by irradiation were supposed to be transformed to ethane in methane hydrate.

  16. Invasion of drilling mud into gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. Part I: effect of drilling mud properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Fulong; Zhang, Keni; Wu, Nengyou; Zhang, Ling; Li, Gang; Jiang, Guosheng; Yu, Yibing; Liu, Li; Qin, Yinghong

    2013-06-01

    To our knowledge, this study is the first to perform a numerical simulation and analysis of the dynamic behaviour of drilling mud invasion into oceanic gas-hydrate-bearing sediment (GHBS) and to consider the effects of such an invasion on borehole stability and the reliability of well logging. As a case study, the simulation background sets up the conditions of mud temperature over hydrate equilibrium temperature and overbalanced drilling, considering the first Chinese expedition to drill gas hydrate (GMGS-1). The results show that dissociating gas may form secondary hydrates in the sediment around borehole by the combined effects of increased pore pressure (caused by mud invasion and flow resistance), endothermic cooling that accompanies hydrate dissociation compounded by the Joule-Thompson effect and the lagged effect of heat transfer in sediments. The secondary hydrate ring around the borehole may be more highly saturated than the in situ sediment. Mud invasion in GHBS is a dynamic process of thermal, fluid (mud invasion), chemical (hydrate dissociation and reformation) and mechanical couplings. All of these factors interact and influence the pore pressure, flow ability, saturation of fluid and hydrates, mechanical parameters and electrical properties of sediments around the borehole, thereby having a strong effect on borehole stability and the results of well logging. The effect is particularly clear in the borehole SH7 of GMGS-1 project. The borehole collapse and resistivity distortion were observed during practical drilling and wireline logging operations in borehole SH7 of the GMGS-1.mud density (i.e. the corresponding borehole pressure), temperature and salinity have a marked influence on the dynamics of mud invasion and on hydrate stability. Therefore, perhaps well-logging distortion caused by mud invasion, hydrate dissociation and reformation should be considered for identifying and evaluating gas hydrate reservoirs. And some suitable drilling

  17. On the conditional total stability of equilibrium for mechanical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Salvadori

    1991-05-01

    Full Text Available In connection with the problem of observability, properties of total stability restricted to classes of perturbations of the governing equations are discussed for the equilibrium of holonomic mechanical systems. These systems are subject to positional conservative and dissipative forces. The particular case of a null dissipation is included. The perturbations to which the total stability is restricted are those obtained by modifying the kinetic energy, the potential of the conservative force, and the dissipative terms, without altering the Lagrangian form of the equations of the motion.

  18. Effect of regular hydration on gas phase structural stability of [zwitterionic alanine+M{sup +}] (M{sup +} = Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) complexes: A quantum chemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, Nidhi [Department of Physics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad 211 004 (India); Ojha, Animesh K., E-mail: animesh@mnnit.ac.in [Department of Physics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad 211 004 (India)

    2011-04-28

    Graphical abstract: We have examined the gas phase structural stability of Ala-M{sup +}.(W){sub n=0-5} and ZAla-M{sup +}.(W){sub n=0-5} (M{sup +} = Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) complexes. We found that the five water molecules are needed to stabilize the -OO coordinated structure of ZAla-M{sup +} over the -NO/OH coordinated structure of Ala-M{sup +}. The negative and large values of entropies of hydrated species also confirm that hydrated species are more stable over the nonhydrated species. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Effect of regular hydration on gas phase structural stability of differently coordinated Ala-M{sup +} and ZAla-M{sup +} (M{sup +} = Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) complexes has been studied. {yields} Five water molecules are needed to stabilize the -OO coordinated structure of ZAla-M{sup +} over-NO/OH coordinated structures of Ala-M{sup +} complex. {yields} Planarity of the ZAla-M{sup +} complexes does not change by the addition of five water molecules. {yields} Loss of entropy by the stepwise addition of water molecules confirms that the hydrated species are more stable. - Abstract: In the present study, we have examined the effect of coordination of metal cations (M{sup +} = Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) and water molecules (W) on the gas phase structural stability of D-alanine (Ala) and zwitterionic alanine (ZAla). The -NO/OH and -OO coordinated structures of Ala-M{sup +}.(W){sub n=0-5} and ZAla-M{sup +}.(W){sub n=0-5}, respectively were optimized in gas phase at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. In complexes, Ala-Li{sup +} and Ala-Na{sup +} the structures where Li{sup +} and Na{sup +} coordinated to -NO/OO modes of Ala were more stable. However, in case of Ala-K{sup +}, the structure where K{sup +} coordinated to -OH mode was found to be more stable. Stepwise addition of water molecules changes the order of stability of hydrate species of Ala-M{sup +} and ZAla-M{sup +} complexes and we found that five water molecules

  19. Intact stability analysis of dead ship conditions using FORM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Ju Hyuck; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Kristensen, Hans Otto Holmegaard

    2017-01-01

    The IMO Weather Criterion has proven to be the governing stability criteria regarding minimum GM for e.g. small ferries and large passenger ships. The formulation of the Weather Criterion is based on some empirical relations derived many years ago for vessels not necessarily representative for cu...

  20. Some stability conditions for scalar Volterra difference equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Berezansky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New explicit stability results are obtained for the following scalar linear difference equation \\[x(n+1-x(n=-a(nx(n+\\sum_{k=1}^n A(n,kx(k+f(n\\] and for some nonlinear Volterra difference equations.

  1. Stability of llama heavy chain antibody fragments under extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, E.

    2004-01-01

    Camelids have next to their normal antibodies, a unique subset of antibodies lacking light chains. The resulting single binding domain, VHH, of these heavy chain antibodies consequently have unique properties. A high stability is one of these properties, which was investigated in this thesis. The a

  2. A Non-Steady-State Condition in Sediments at the Gashydrate Stability Boundary off West Spitsbergen: Evidence for Gashydrate Dissociation or Just Dynamic Methane Transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treude, T.; Krause, S.; Bertics, V. J.; Steinle, L.; Niemann, H.; Liebetrau, V.; Feseker, T.; Burwicz, E.; Krastel, S.; Berndt, C.

    2014-12-01

    In 2008, a large area with several hundred methane plumes was discovered along the West Spitsbergen continental margin at water depths between 150 and 400 m (Westbrook et al. 2009, GRL 36, doi:10.1029/2009GL039191). Many of the observed plumes were located at the boundary of gas hydrate stability (~400 m water depth). It was speculated that the methane escape at this depth was correlated with gas hydrate destabilization caused by recent increases in water temperatures recorded in this region. In a later study, geochemical analyses of authigenic carbonates and modeling of heat flow data combined with seasonal changes in water temperature demonstrated that the methane seeps were active already prior to industrial warming but that the gas hydrate system nevertheless reacts very sensitive to even seasonal temperature changes (Berndt et al. 2014, Science 343: 284-287). Here, we report about a methane seep site at the gas hydrate stability boundary (394 m water depth) that features unusual geochemical profiles indicative for non-steady state conditions. Sediment was recovered with a gravity corer (core length 210 cm) and samples were analyzed to study porewater geochemistry, methane concentration, authigenic carbonates, and microbial activity. Porewater profiles revealed two zones of sulfate-methane transition at 50 and 200 cm sediment depth. The twin zones were confirmed by a double peaking in sulfide, total alkalinity, anaerobic oxidation of methane, and sulfate reduction. δ18O values sharply increased from around -2.8 ‰ between 0 and 126 cm to -1.2 ‰ below 126 cm sediment depth. While U/Th isotope measurements of authigenic seep carbonates that were collected from different depths of the core illustrated that methane seepage must be occurring at this site since at least 3000 years, the biogeochemical profiles suggest that methane flux must have been altered recently. By applying a multi-phase reaction-transport model using known initial parameters from the study

  3. Stability of lysozyme in aqueous extremolyte solutions during heat shock and accelerated thermal conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Avanti

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the stability of lysozyme in aqueous solutions in the presence of various extremolytes (betaine, hydroxyectoine, trehalose, ectoine, and firoin under different stress conditions. The stability of lysozyme was determined by Nile red Fluorescence Spectroscopy and a bioactivity assay. During heat shock (10 min at 70°C, betaine, trehalose, ectoin and firoin protected lysozyme against inactivation while hydroxyectoine, did not have a significant effect. During accelerated thermal conditions (4 weeks at 55°C, firoin also acted as a stabilizer. In contrast, betaine, hydroxyectoine, trehalose and ectoine destabilized lysozyme under this condition. These findings surprisingly indicate that some extremolytes can stabilize a protein under certain stress conditions but destabilize the same protein under other stress conditions. Therefore it is suggested that for the screening extremolytes to be used for protein stabilization, an appropriate storage conditions should also be taken into account.

  4. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  5. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  6. Relict gas hydrates as possible reason of gas emission from shallow permafrost at the northern part of West Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvilin, Evgeny; Bukhanov, Boris; Tumskoy, Vladimir; Istomin, Vladimir; Tipenko, Gennady

    2017-04-01

    Intra-permafrost gas (mostly methane) is represent a serious geological hazards during exploration and development of oil and gas fields. Special danger is posed by large methane accumulations which usually confined to sandy and silty sand horizons and overlying in the frozen strata on the depth up to 200 meters. Such methane accumulations are widely spread in a number of gas fields in the northern part of Western Siberia. According to indirect indicators this accumulations can be relic gas hydrates, that formed earlier during favorable conditions for hydrate accumulation (1, 2). Until now, they could be preserved in the frozen sediments due to geological manifestation of the self-preservation effect of gas hydrates at temperatures below zero. These gas hydrate formations, which are lying above the gas hydrate stability zone today, are in a metastable state and are very sensitive to various anthropogenic impacts. During drilling and operation of production wells in the areas where the relic of gas hydrates can occur, there are active gas emission and gas explosion, that can lead to various technical complications up to the accident. Mathematical and experimental simulations were were conducted to evaluate the possibility of existence of relic gas hydrates in the northern part of West Siberia. The results of math simulations revealed stages of geological history when the gas hydrate stability zone began virtually from the ground surface and saturated in shallow permafrost horizons. Later permafrost is not completely thaw. Experimental simulations of porous gas hydrate dissociation in frozen soils and evaluation of self-preservation manifestation of gas hydrates at negative temperatures were carried out for identification conditions for relic gas hydrates existence in permafrost of northern part of West Siberia. Sandy and silty sand sediments were used in experimental investigations. These sediments are typical of most gas-seeping (above the gas hydrate stability

  7. Deep-ocean field test of methane hydrate formation from a remotely operated vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, P.G.; Orr, F.M.; Friederich, G.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Orange, D.L.; McFarlane, J.; Kirkwood, W.

    1997-01-01

    We have observed the process of formation of clathrate hydrates of methane in experiments conducted on the remotely operated vehicle (ROY) Ventana in the deep waters of Monterey Bay. A tank of methane gas, acrylic tubes containing seawater, and seawater plus various types of sediment were carried down on Ventana to a depth of 910 m where methane gas was injected at the base of the acrylic tubes by bubble stream. Prior calculations had shown that the local hydrographic conditions gave an upper limit of 525 m for the P-T boundary defining methane hydrate formation or dissociation at this site, and thus our experiment took place well within the stability range for this reaction to occur. Hydrate formation in free sea-water occurred within minutes as a buoyant mass of translucent hydrate formed at the gas-water interface. In a coarse sand matrix the Filling of the pore spaces with hydrate turned the sand column into a solidified block, which gas pressure soon lifted and ruptured. In a fine-grained black mud the gas flow carved out flow channels, the walls of which became coated and then filled with hydrate in larger discrete masses. Our experiment shows that hydrate formation is rapid in natural seawater, that sediment type strongly influences the patterns of hydrate formation, and that the use of ROV technologies permits the synthesis of large amounts of hydrate material in natural systems under a variety of conditions so that fundamental research on the stability and growth of these substances is possible.

  8. PHASE STABILITY OF MONOATOMIC ALCOHOL-GASOLINE MIXTURES FOR DIFFERENT COMPOSITIONS AND HYDRODYNAMIC CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerian Cerempei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates phase stability for the mixtures of monoatomic alcohols (ethanol, butanol with gasoline in the presence of water. There have been determined the optimal storage conditions of mixtures depending on their composition and mixing conditions. The positive influence of butanol on the phase stability of ethanol-gasoline mixtures was detected.

  9. Hydration behaviour of polyhydroxylated fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Zavala, J G [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario de Los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon S/N, 47460 Jalisco (Mexico); Barajas-Barraza, R E [Departamento de Matematicas y Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente, Periferico Sur, Manuel Gomez MorIn No 8585, 45604 Jalisco (Mexico); Padilla-Osuna, I; Guirado-Lopez, R A, E-mail: jgrz@culagos.udg.mx, E-mail: ebarajas@iteso.mx, E-mail: ismael@ifisica.uaslp.mx, E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Fisica ' Manuel Sandoval Vallarta' , Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2011-10-28

    We have performed semi-empirical as well as density functional theory calculations in order to analyse the hydration properties of both bare C{sub 60} and highly hydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes. In all of our calculations, a total of 42 and 98 water molecules are always surrounding our here-considered carbon nanostructures. We found different wetting properties as a function of the chemical composition and structure of the OH-molecular over-layer covering the fullerene surface. In the case of bare C{sub 60}, water adsorption reveals that the H{sub 2}O species are not uniformly arranged around the carbon network but rather forms water droplets of different sizes, clearly revealing the hydrophobic nature of the C{sub 60} structure. In contrast, in the polyhydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes, the degree of wetting is strongly influenced by the precise location of the hydroxyl groups. We found that different adsorbed configurations for the OH-molecular coating can lead to the formation of partially hydrated or completely covered C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} compounds, a result that could be used to synthesize fullerene materials with different degrees of wettability. By comparing the relative stability of our hydroxylated structures in both bare and hydrated conditions we obtain that the energy ordering of the C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomers can change in the presence of water. The radial distribution function of our hydrated fullerenes reveals that water near these kinds of surfaces is densely packed. In fact, by counting the number of H{sub 2}O molecules which are adsorbed, by means of hydrogen bonds, to the surface of our more stable C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomer, we found that it varies in the range of 5-10, in good agreement with experiments. Finally, by comparing the calculated optical absorption spectra of various C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} structures in the presence and absence of water molecules, we note that only slight variations in the position and

  10. Evaluation of Heat Induced Methane Release from Methane Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, J.; Elwood-Madden, M.; Phelps, T. J.; Rawn, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Clathrates, or gas hydrates, structurally are guest gas molecules populating a cavity in a cage of water molecules. Gas hydrates naturally occur on Earth under low temperature and moderate pressure environments including continental shelf, deep ocean, and permafrost sediments. Large quantities of methane are trapped in hydrates, providing significant near-surface reserves of carbon and energy. Thermodynamics predicts that hydrate deposits may be destabilized by reducing the pressure in the system or raising the temperature. However, the rate of methane release due to varying environmental conditions remains relatively unconstrained and complicated by natural feedback effects of clathrate dissociation. In this study, hydrate dissociation in sediment due to localized increases in temperature was monitored and observed at the mesoscale (>20L) in a laboratory environment. Experiments were conducted in the Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to simulate heat induced dissociation. The SPS, containing a column of Ottawa sand saturated with water containing 25mg/L Sno-Max to aid nucleation, was pressurized and cooled well into the hydrate stability field. A fiber optic distributed sensing system (DSS) was embedded at four depths in the sediment column. This allowed the temperature strain value (a proxy for temperature) of the system to be measured with high spatial resolution to monitor the clathrate formation/dissociation processes. A heat exchanger embedded in the sediment was heated using hot recirculated ethylene glycol and the temperature drop across the exchanger was measured. These experiments indicate a significant and sustained amount of heat is required to release methane gas from hydrate-bearing sediments. Heat was consumed by hydrate dissociated in a growing sphere around the heat exchanger until steady state was reached. At steady state all heat energy entering the system was consumed in maintaining the temperature profile

  11. Studies on the stability of preservatives under subcritical water conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapalavavi, B; Marple, R; Gamsky, C; Yang, Y

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this work was to further validate the subcritical water chromatography (SBWC) methods for separation and analysis of preservatives through the evaluation of analyte stability in subcritical water. In this study, the degradation of preservatives was investigated at temperatures of 100-200°C using two different approaches. First, the peak areas obtained by SBWC at high temperatures were compared with those achieved using the traditional high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at 25°C. In the second approach, several preservatives and water were loaded into a vessel and heated at high temperatures for 30 or 60 min. The heated mixtures were then analysed by GC/MS to determine the stability of preservatives. The t- and F-test on the results of the first approach reveal that the peak areas achieved by HPLC and SBWC are not significantly different at the 95% confidence level, meaning that the preservatives studied are stable during the high-temperature SBWC runs. Although the results of the second approach show approximately 10% degradation of preservatives into mainly p-hydroxybenzoic acid and phenol at 200°C, the preservatives studied are stable at 100 and 150°C. This is in good agreement with the validation results obtained by the first approach. The findings of this work confirm that SBWC methods at temperatures up to 150°C are reliable for separation and analysis of preservatives in cosmetic and other samples. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  12. A generalized model for stability of trees under impact conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattola, Giuseppe; Crosta, Giovanni; Castellanza, Riccardo; di Prisco, Claudio; Canepa, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Stability of trees to external actions involve the combined effects of stem and tree root systems. A block impacting on the stem or an applied force pulling the stem can cause a tree instability involving stem bending or failure and tree root rotation. So different contributions are involved in the stability of the system. The rockfalls are common natural phenomena that can be unpredictable in terms of frequency and magnitude characteristics, and this makes difficult the estimate of potential hazard and risk for human lives and activities. In mountain areas a natural form of protection from rockfalls is provided by forest growing. The difficulties in the assessment of the real capability of this natural barrier by means of models is an open problem. Nevertheless, a large amount of experimental data are now available which provides support for the development of advanced theoretical framework and corresponding models. The aim of this contribution consists in presenting a model developed to predict the behavior of trees during a block impact. This model describes the tree stem by means of a linear elastic beam system consisting of two beams connected in series and with an equivalent geometry. The tree root system is described via an equivalent foundation, whose behavior is modelled through an elasto-plastic macro-element model. In order to calibrate the model parameters, simulations reproducing a series of winching tests, are performed. These numerical simulations confirm the capability of the model to predict the mechanical behavior of the stem-root system in terms of displacement vs force curves. Finally, numerical simulations of the impact of a boulder with a tree stem are carried out. These simulations, done under dynamic regime and with the model parameters obtained from the previous set of simulations, confirm the capability of the model to reproduce the effects on the stem-roots system generated by impulsive loads.

  13. Stability Conditions and Mechanism of Cream Soaps: Effect of Polyols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagitani, Hiromichi; Komoriya, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids, fatty acid potassium soaps, polyols and water are essential ingredients for producing stable cream soaps. The solution behavior of the above four components system has been studied to elucidate the effect of four sorts of polyols (glycerol, 1,3-butylene glycol, polyethylene glycol 400 and dipropylene glycol) on the stability of cream soaps. It has been revealed that the lamellar liquid crystalline one-phase converted to a two-phase of a lamellar phase and an isotropic aqueous solution by the addition of a few percent of 1,3-butylene glycol, polyethylene glycol 400 and dipropylene glycol, whereas the lamellar one-phase was remained by about 50 wt% of glycerol in the aqueous solution. The X-ray data at room temperature showed that the existence of 1:1 acid soap (1:1 mole ratio of potassium soap/fatty acid) crystals in the 1,3-butylene glycol, polyethylene glycol 400 and dipropylene glycol systems, whereas that the coexistence of 1:1 acid soap crystal and a lamellar gel phase (swelled lamellar gel structure) in the glycerol system. The phase transition peaks from coagel to gel (Tgel) and from gel to liquid state (Tc) were appeared in the above four polyol systems by DSC measurements. It was confirmed from the combined data of SAXS and DSC that the existence of anhydrous 1:1 acid soap gels (or with small amount of bound water) in the all polyol systems, whereas the coexistence of the anhydrate gel and the swelled gel with a lot of intermediate water in the only glycerol system. This swelled gel structure would be contributed to stabilize the dispersed anhydrate acid soap crystals in cream soaps.

  14. LMI Conditions for Global Stability of Fractional-Order Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuo; Yu, Yongguang; Yu, Junzhi

    2016-08-02

    Fractional-order neural networks play a vital role in modeling the information processing of neuronal interactions. It is still an open and necessary topic for fractional-order neural networks to investigate their global stability. This paper proposes some simplified linear matrix inequality (LMI) stability conditions for fractional-order linear and nonlinear systems. Then, the global stability analysis of fractional-order neural networks employs the results from the obtained LMI conditions. In the LMI form, the obtained results include the existence and uniqueness of equilibrium point and its global stability, which simplify and extend some previous work on the stability analysis of the fractional-order neural networks. Moreover, a generalized projective synchronization method between such neural systems is given, along with its corresponding LMI condition. Finally, two numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the established LMI conditions.

  15. Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Archer; Bruce Buffett

    2011-12-31

    We produced a two-dimensional geological time- and basin-scale model of the sedimentary margin in passive and active settings, for the simulation of the deep sedimentary methane cycle including hydrate formation. Simulation of geochemical data required development of parameterizations for bubble transport in the sediment column, and for the impact of the heterogeneity in the sediment pore fluid flow field, which represent new directions in modeling methane hydrates. The model is somewhat less sensitive to changes in ocean temperature than our previous 1-D model, due to the different methane transport mechanisms in the two codes (pore fluid flow vs. bubble migration). The model is very sensitive to reasonable changes in organic carbon deposition through geologic time, and to details of how the bubbles migrate, in particular how efficiently they are trapped as they rise through undersaturated or oxidizing chemical conditions and the hydrate stability zone. The active margin configuration reproduces the elevated hydrate saturations observed in accretionary wedges such as the Cascadia Margin, but predicts a decrease in the methane inventory per meter of coastline relative to a comparable passive margin case, and a decrease in the hydrate inventory with an increase in the plate subduction rate.

  16. Quantum MIMO n-Systems and Conditions for Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Mansourbeigi, Seyed M H

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present some conditions for the (strong) stabilizability of an n-D Quantum MIMO system P(X). It contains two parts. The first part is to introduce the n-D Quantum MIMO systems where the coefficients vary in the algebra of Q-meromorphic functions. Then we introduce some conditions for the stabilizability of these systems. The second part is to show that this Quantum system has the n-D system as its quantum limit and the results for the SISO,SIMO,MISO,MIMO are obtained again as special cases.

  17. Stability of anaerobic reactors under micro-aeration conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Polanco, M.; Perez, S.; Diaz, I.; Fernandez-Polanco, F.

    2009-07-01

    Oxidation of sulphide in anaerobic bioreactors by introducing limited amounts of oxygen provides a relatively simple strategy for reducing the levels of sulphite in anaerobic digesters (biogas and effluent). The introduction of limited amounts of air is a general practice in agricultural anaerobic digesters, it is estimated that worldwide over 3.000 units are operated under such conditions. (Author)

  18. Significance and occurrence of gas hydrates in offshore areas; Bedeutung und Vorkommen von Gashydraten im Offshore-Bereich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, H.; Faber, E. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The present contribution describes the boundary and stability conditions under which gas hydrates are able to exist. It also discusses the occurrence and genesis of gas hydrates and their role as an energy raw material of the future. Furthermore, it deals with the possibility of gas hydrates being the cause of submarine slumps and with their influence on the climate. (MSK) [Deutsch] Die Rand-und Stabilitaetsbedingungen unter denen die Gashydrate existent sein koennen werden beschrieben. Ebenso wird das Vorkommen von Gashydraten, ihre Genese und ihre Rolle als Energierohstoff der Zukunft diskutiert. Darueberhinaus werden die Gashydrate als moegliche Ursache fuer untermeerische Rutschungen und ihr Einfluss auf Klimaaenderungen erlaeutert.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  20. Assessing desertification risk using system stability condition analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure for evaluating the desertification risk in threatened areas. The procedure is based on an eight-equation dynamic model of a generic human–resource system that can be applied to different desertification syndromes. For each application, interest focuses on finding all the possible long-term final states of the system and on defining the conditions that mark out sustainability and long-term desertification by means of unambiguous specific parameter relations. Th...

  1. Asymptotic stability of the Boltzmann equation with Maxwell boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, Marc; Guo, Yan

    2016-12-01

    In a general C1 domain, we study the perturbative Cauchy theory for the Boltzmann equation with Maxwell boundary conditions with an accommodation coefficient α in (√{ 2 / 3 } , 1 ], and discuss this threshold. We consider polynomial or stretched exponential weights m (v) and prove existence, uniqueness and exponential trend to equilibrium around a global Maxwellian in Lx,v∞ (m). Of important note is the fact that the methods do not involve contradiction arguments.

  2. Pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures: effect of bone-implant interface conditions on fracture stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamdan, Ron; Liebergall, Meir; Gefen, Amit; Symanovsky, Naum; Peleg, Eran

    2013-12-01

    Closed reduction and percutaneous fixation with Kirschner wires (KWs) is the standard of care of pediatric supra-condylar humerus fractures (SCHFs). Failure modes leading to loss of reduction are not clear and have not been quantified. Multiple factors may weaken the KW-bone interface bonding conditions. To the best of our knowledge, the possible effect of this decrease on different KW configurations and fracture stability has never been studied. To investigate the effect of bone-KW friction conditions on SCHF post-operative mechanical stability and to formulate clinical guidelines for KW configuration under different conditions. Finite element-based model of a fixated SCHF was used to simulate structure stability for two lateral divergent versus crossed lateral and medial KW configurations under varying KW-bone friction conditions. Finite element simulations demonstrated that crossed KWs provide superior stability compared with the divergent configuration when KW-bone bonding is compromised. When KW-bone bonding conditions are adequate, crossed and divergent KW configurations provide similar, sufficient fracture stability. Under normal bone-implant interface conditions, the two diverging lateral KW configuration offers satisfactory mechanical stability and may be the preferred choice of SCHF fixation. When KW-bone bonding is suboptimal, as when one or more of the lateral KWs are re-drilled, addition of a medial KW should be considered in order to improve stability despite risk to ulnar nerve.

  3. Effects of Salinity and Sea Level Change on Permafrost-Hosted Methane Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood-Madden, M.

    2010-12-01

    seawater infiltration into permafrost accelerates hydrate decomposition, resulting in high methane fluxes from submerged permafrost-hosted hydrate reservoirs over the near term. Salinity-induced hydrate destabilization experiments combined with geochemical modeling of seawater encroachment into permafrost will predict the rate and magnitude of methane release from submerged permafrost reservoirs. P-T diagram of hydrate stability and geothermal conditions in permafrost regions. CH4 hydrate stability in pure water from Sloan (1998), seawater stability from Dickens and Quinby-Hunt (1997).

  4. Influence of sodium borate on the early age hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champenois, Jean-Baptiste; Dhoury, Mélanie [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Cau Dit Coumes, Céline, E-mail: celine.cau-dit-coumes@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Mercier, Cyrille [LMCPA, Université de Valenciennes et du Hainaut Cambrésis, 59600 Maubeuge (France); Revel, Bertrand [Centre Commun de Mesure RMN, Université Lille1 Sciences Technologies, Cité Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Le Bescop, Patrick [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Damidot, Denis [Ecole des Mines de Douai, LGCgE-GCE, 59508 Douai (France)

    2015-04-15

    Calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements are potential candidates for the conditioning of radioactive wastes with high sodium borate concentrations. This work thus investigates early age hydration of two CSA cements with different gypsum contents (0 to 20%) as a function of the mixing solution composition (borate and NaOH concentrations). Gypsum plays a key role in controlling the reactivity of cement. When the mixing solution is pure water, increasing the gypsum concentration accelerates cement hydration. However, the reverse is observed when the mixing solution contains sodium borate. Until gypsum exhaustion, the pore solution pH remains constant at ~ 10.8, and a poorly crystallized borate compound (ulexite) precipitates. A correlation is established between this transient precipitation and the hydration delay. Decreasing the gypsum content in the binder, or increasing the sodium content in the mixing solution, are two ways of reducing the stability of ulexite, thus decreasing the hydration delay.

  5. A study of the stability of polyacrylamide solutions under laboratory and field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, I.; Kissne, G.M.; Lakatosne, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Questions are examined of thermal, mechanical and microbiological stability of polyacrylamide solutions used in the processes of oil expulsion and formation treatment. Results are given from experiments performed with nonhydrolyzed and partially hydrolyzed domestic and foreign polyacrylamides under laboratory and field conditions. Attention is drawn to the fact that problems of stability are varied. The economic aspect of field use of the processes must not be underestimated. Stability of polymers can be ensured by effective chemical microbiological protection.

  6. Stability condition of FAST TCP in high speed network Oil the basis of control theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Fuzhe; Zhou Jianzhong; Luo Zhimeng; Xiao Yang

    2008-01-01

    Considering the instability of data transferred existing in high speed network.a near method is proposed for improving the stability using control theory.Under this method,the mathematical model of such a network is established.Stability condition is derived from the mathematical model.Several sivaulation experiments are performed.The results show that the method can increase the stability of data transferred in terms of the congestion window,queue size,and sending rate of the source.

  7. Role of Cations in CO 2 Adsorption, Dynamics, and Hydration in Smectite Clays under in Situ Supercritical CO 2 Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Schaef, H. Todd; Loring, John S.; Hoyt, David W.; Burton, Sarah D.; Walter, Eric D.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    2017-01-12

    This paper explores the molecular-scale interactions between CO2 and the representative smectite mineral hectorite under supercritical conditions (90 bar, 50°C) using novel in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the roles of the smectite charge balancing cation (CBC) and H O in these interactions. The data show that supercritical CO2 (scCO2) can be adsorbed on external surfaces and in the confined interlayer spaces of hectorite at 50°C and 90 bar, with the uptake of CO2 into the interlayer favored at low H2O content and when the basal spacing is similar to a monolayer hydrate of hectorite (1WL, ~12.5 Å). These results are in agreement with published spectroscopic and molecular modeling data for the related smectite Na-montmorillonite.Charge balancing cations with small radii, large hydration energies, and low polarizabilities tend to scavenge H2O from humid scCO2 or retain the H2O they held before scCO2 exposure, swelling spontaneously to a bilayer hydrate (2WL) dominated state that largely prevents CO2-ion interactions and influences the extent of CO2 intercalation into the interlayer. In contrast, ions with large radii, low hydration energies, and large polarizabilities more readily form close associations with CO2 with the energetics enabling coexistence of CO2 and H2O in the interlayer over a wide range of scCO2 humidities. Integrating our results with those from molecular dynamics simulations of wet CO2-bearing montmorillonites suggest that adsorbed CO2 in 1WL-type interlayers is oriented with its long axis parallel to the clay sheets and experiences dynamics dominated by anisotropic rotation about the axis perpendicular to the CO2

  8. Preparation conditions and hydration process of metakaolin geopolymer%偏高岭土地聚物制备条件及其水化过程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    简家成; 刘峥; 赖丽燕; 杨宏斌; 黄红霞

    2014-01-01

    The optimum preparation conditions and hydration process of Qingdao metakaolin geopolymer are studied,focusing on the influence of water cement ratio,mixing amount of alkali activator and water glass mod-ulus,to the compressive strength of geopolymer.Compressive strength increased when the water cement ratio was 0.35 ,the content of alkali activator to metakaolin was 2 1%and the modulus of the activator molar ratio of SiO2/Na2O was 1.4.The compressive strength of this sample was 71 MPa when cured at 50 ℃for 9 d followed by 25 ℃ for 19 d.The hydration process is studied by XRD and SEM.The changing of the microstructure of geopolymer in different time is shown in the test.In the hydration process of geopolymer,they were dehydrated and condensed to form small geopolymer precursors,then changed into big ones.The geopolymer precursors were finally connected into a network structure,forming a dense structure.The main hydration product is net-work silica alumina gel which is amorphous and its XRD diffraction ranges from 20°to 30°.%研究了青岛高岭土制备地聚物的最佳条件和地聚物的水化过程。重点考察了水灰比、碱激发剂掺量、水玻璃模数等因素对地聚物抗压强度的影响。结果表明:以高岭土煅烧得到的偏高岭土为原料制备地聚物,当水灰比为0.35、碱激发剂掺量为21%、水玻璃模数为1.4时,地聚物具有较高的强度。由此制备的地聚物试块在50℃下用保鲜膜包裹养护9 d 再自然养护19 d,其抗压强度为71 MPa。通过XRD、SEM对地聚物的水化过程进行了研究,揭示了地聚物不同水化时间的微观结构变化,结果表明:地聚物在水化过程中,先脱水缩聚生成小颗粒地聚物前驱体,然后进一步生成相对较大的分子,最后连接成网状结构,形成致密结构;其水化产物主要是网状无定型的硅铝凝胶,对应的XRD衍射区域为20°~30°。

  9. Motion of the Tippe Top : Gyroscopic Balance Condition and Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, Takahiro(Nikhef Theory Group, Science Park 105, 1098 XG, Amsterdam, The Netherlands); Sasaki, Ken; Watanabe, Shinsuke

    2005-01-01

    We reexamine a very classical problem, the spinning behavior of the tippe top on a horizontal table. The analysis is made for an eccentric sphere version of the tippe top, assuming a modified Coulomb law for the sliding friction, which is a continuous function of the slip velocity $\\vec v_P$ at the point of contact and vanishes at $\\vec v_P=0$. We study the relevance of the gyroscopic balance condition (GBC), which was discovered to hold for a rapidly spinning hard-boiled egg by Moffatt and S...

  10. Investigation on the effects of natural gas hydrate formation on slurry flow stability%天然气水合物的生成对浆液流动稳定性影响综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁麟; 史博会; 吕晓方; 柳杨; 阮超宇; 宋尚飞; 宫敬

    2016-01-01

    In the hydrate risk management strategy in deep-sea oil/gas transportation pipeline,hydrates are allowed to form in the pipe line,and the petroleum products are transported in the liquid-solid slurry form. Therefore,to ensure the flow safety in deep-sea pipeline,the hydrate volume fraction and degree of agglomeration must be controlled in a safe value. The liquid-solid slurry has complex flow properties due to the introduction of the hydrate solid phase. The present work reviewed the effects of hydrate particles on the flow stability and plug mechanism in both pseudo single phase system and the gas-liquid multiphase system. The hydrate growth and deposition on pipe wall,the inter-couple of natural gas hydrate and gas-liquid multiphase flow pattern and the different plug mechanisms indifferent systems were discussed emphatically. Besides,an introduction of the software simulation of the hydrates slurry flow was made. Finally,based on the reviewing,this paper proposed that study on the microscopic property and quantitative description of the hydrate growth and deposition,the critical velocities of different patterns of particles distribution,and the hydrate formation and slurry flow property in different flow patterns were the main issues to be researched in the future.%目前在海底混输管道的水合物风险控制策略中,允许水合物在管道内的生成,以液固浆液流动的形式对海底油气产物进行输送。其中主要通过控制浆液中水合物的生成量和聚集程度,来实现对海底集输管线的流动安全保障。液固浆液流动具有相当复杂的流动特性,固相颗粒的引入对于流体的流动特性影响很大。本文分别综述了拟单相流动体系和气液多相流动体系中水合物颗粒对于管输体系流动稳定性的影响以及水合物对混输管道堵管特性的影响。着重讨论了水合物在管道壁面的生长和沉积特性、水合物与气液流型的耦合关系以及不

  11. Sufficient Conditions for Dynamical Output Feedback Stabilization Via the Circle Criterion

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This paper suggests sufficient conditions for asymptotically stable dynamical output feedback controller design based on the circle criterion. It is shown that a dynamic output feedback stabilization problem with impending problems of finite escape time, previously attacked by observer-based design, can be successfully solved using circle criterion design. Stability of the closed-loop system is global and robust to parameter uncertainty.

  12. Stability of Difference Schemes for Fractional Parabolic PDE with the Dirichlet-Neumann Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Cakir

    2012-01-01

    boundary conditions are presented. Stability estimates and almost coercive stability estimates with ln (1/(+|ℎ| for the solution of these difference schemes are obtained. A procedure of modified Gauss elimination method is used for solving these difference schemes of one-dimensional fractional parabolic partial differential equations.

  13. Stability of lysozyme in aqueous extremolyte solutions during heat shock and accelerated thermal conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avanti, Christina; Saluja, Vinay; Van Streun, Erwin L. P.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the stability of lysozyme in aqueous solutions in the presence of various extremolytes (betaine, hydroxyectoine, trehalose, ectoine, and firoin) under different stress conditions. The stability of lysozyme was determined by Nile red Fluorescence Spectrosc

  14. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  15. Explicit Conditions for Stability of Nonlinear Scalar Delay Impulsive Difference Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sufficient conditions are obtained for the uniform stability and global attractivity of the zero solution of nonlinear scalar delay impulsive difference equation, which extend and improve the known results in the literature. An example is also worked out to verify that the global attractivity condition is a sharp condition.

  16. The stability of collected human scent under various environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Davia T; Curran, Allison M; Furton, Kenneth G

    2009-11-01

    Human scent evidence collected from objects at a crime scene is used for scent discrimination with specially trained canines. Storage of the scent evidence is usually required yet no optimized storage protocol has been determined. Storage containers including glass, polyethylene, and aluminized pouches were evaluated to determine the optimal medium for storing human scent evidence of which glass was determined to be the optimal storage matrix. Hand odor samples were collected on three different sorbent materials, sealed in glass vials and subjected to different storage environments including room temperature, -80 degrees C conditions, dark storage, and UVA/UVB light exposure over a 7-week period. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the headspace of the samples were extracted and identified using solid-phase micro-extraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS). Three-dimensional covariance mapping showed that glass containers subjected to minimal UVA/UVB light exposure provide the most stable environment for stored human scent samples.

  17. Montmorillonite stability. With special respect to KBS-3 conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Birgersson, Martin [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2006-08-15

    The basic advantageous properties, e.g. low hydraulic conductivity and high swelling pressure, of the bentonite buffer in a KBS- repository stem from a strong interaction between water and the montmorillonite mineral in the bentonite. Minerals similar in structure but with substantially lower mineral-water interaction exist in nature. Transformations from montmorillonite to such minerals are observed e.g. in burial diagenesis and in contact metamorphism. A thermodynamic consideration confirms that medium and low charged montmorillonite is not in chemical equilibrium with quartz. From a safety assessment perspective it is therefore of vital importance to quantify the montmorillonite transformation under KBS- conditions. Silica release from the montmorillonite tetrahedral layers is the initial process for several possible transformations. Replacement of silica by aluminum increases the layer charge but maintains the basic atomic structure. A sufficiently high layer charge results in an irreversible collapse of the clay-water structure, i.e. a non-swelling mineral is formed. Compared to other cations, potassium as counter ion leads to a collapse at lower layer charge and the produced phase is generally termed illite. Montmorillonite-to-illite transformation is the most frequently found alteration process in nature. Three different kinetic illitization models are reviewed and the model proposed by Huang et al. is considered the most suitable for quantification in a KBS- repository, since the kinetic rate expression and its associated parameters are systematically determined by laboratory work. The model takes into account temperature, montmorillonite fraction and potassium concentration, but do not include relevant parameters such as pH, temperature gradients and water content. Calculations by use of the Huang illitization model applied for repository conditions yield insignificant montmorillonite transformation also under very pessimistic assumptions. Other non

  18. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Riciputi, Lee R [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Elam, J. Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  19. Obsidian hydration: A new paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Riciputi, Lee R.; Cole, David R.; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-07-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  20. Characterization of H/V Spectral Ratios for the Assessment of Slope Stability in the Gas Hydrate-rich Area: an Example from Offshore SW Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. Y.; Tsia, C. H.; Cheng, W. B.; Chin, S. J.; Lin, S. S.; Liang, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Nakamura's method, which calculates the ratios between horizontal and vertical component spectra of seismic signals (H/V), is widely used in the inland area. However, few related estimations were performed for the offshore area and little knowledge for the marine sediments were obtained. From 2013 to 2015, three passive ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) experiments were conducted in gas hydrate-rich area offshore SW Taiwan in the aim of acquiring information related to the physical properties of seafloor sediments. The H/V of the seafloor sediments in the three areas were estimated by using the ambient noise and seismic signal recorded by OBSs. The resonance frequency of each site was estimated from the main peak of H/V distribution and a range between 5 and 10 Hz were obtained. Based on the empirical law, this resonance frequency range should correspond to a sediment thickness of approximately several to ten of meters. This estimation is consistent with the thickness of the sedimentary cover imaged by chirp sonar survey, suggesting that the site response of seafloor is dominantly controlled by the unconsolidated sedimentary layer on the top of the sea bed. Remarkably, the H/V ratios obtained in our study area are much larger than that calculated for the inland areas. The magnification can reach as high as 50 to more than 100. This observation infers that the sea water movement might emphasize the horizontal motion of the marine sediments, which is crucial for the slope stability assessment. Moreover, for most stations located in the active margin, no distinct peak is observed for the H/V pattern calculated during earthquakes. However, in the passive margin, the H/V peak calculated from ambient noise and earthquakes is mostly identical. This phenomenon may suggest that relatively unclear sedimentary boundary exist in the active margin environment. Estimating H/V spectral ratios of data recorded by the OBSs deployed in the southwest Taiwan offshore area offers a

  1. Thermal stability conditions of a weakly interacting Fermi gas in a weak magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fudian Men; Hui Liu; Houyu Zhu

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the results derived from pseudopotential method and ensemble theory,thermal stability of a weakly interacting Fermi gas in a weak magnetic field is studied by using analytical method of thermodynamics.The exact analytical expressions of stability conditions at different temperatures are given,and the effects of interactions as well as magnetic field on the stability of the system are discussed.It is shown that there is an upper-limit magnetic field for the stability of the system at low temperatures,and there is an attractive dividing value at high temperatures.If attractive interaction is lower than the critical value,the stability of the system has no request for magnetic field,but if attractive interaction is higher than the dividing value,a lower-limit magnetic field exists for the stability of the system.

  2. Using Hydrated Salt Phase Change Materials for Residential Air Conditioning Peak Demand Reduction and Energy Conservation in Coastal and Transitional Climates in the State of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Ok

    The recent rapid economic and population growth in the State of California have led to a significant increase in air conditioning use, especially in areas of the State with coastal and transitional climates. This fact makes that the electric peak demand be dominated by air conditioning use of residential buildings in the summer time. This extra peak demand caused by the use of air conditioning equipment lasts only a few days out of the year. As a result, unavoidable power outages have occurred when electric supply could not keep up with such electric demand. This thesis proposed a possible solution to this problem by using building thermal mass via phase change materials to reduce peak air conditioning demand loads. This proposed solution was tested via a new wall called Phase Change Frame Wall (PCFW). The PCFW is a typical residential frame wall in which Phase Change Materials (PCMs) were integrated to add thermal mass. The thermal performance of the PCFWs was first evaluated, experimentally, in two test houses, built for this purpose, located in Lawrence, KS and then via computer simulations of residential buildings located in coastal and transitional climates in California. In this thesis, a hydrated salt PCM was used, which was added in concentrations of 10% and 20% by weight of the interior sheathing of the walls. Based on the experimental results, under Lawrence, KS weather, the PCFWs at 10% and 20% of PCM concentrations reduced the peak heat transfer rates by 27.0% and 27.3%, on average, of all four walls, respectively. Simulated results using California climate data indicated that PCFWs would reduce peak heat transfer rates by 8% and 19% at 10% PCM concentration and 12.2% and 27% at 20% PCM concentration for the coastal and transitional climates, respectively. Furthermore, the PCFWs, at 10% PCM concentration, would reduce the space cooling load and the annual energy consumption by 10.4% and 7.2%, on average in both climates, respectively.

  3. Gas hydrate as a proxy for contemporary climate change and shallow heat flow on the US east coast and north slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phrampus, Benjamin J.

    Methane hydrates, ice-like solids that sequester large quantities of methane in their crystal structure, are stable at moderate pressures and low temperature. The methane contained within these naturally occurring deposits is typically derived from organic matter that is broken down by thermogenic or biogenic activity. Methane hydrate is found world-wide on nearly every continental margin on Earth where the thermodynamic conditions and methane gas permit the formation of hydrate. Hydrate potentially represents the largest reservoir of hydrocarbon on the planet, yet their response to evolving thermodynamic conditions are poorly understood. This dissertation is a summary of several projects that investigate the unique properties of gas hydrate, and the information we can gain from detailed analysis of these natural deposits. Gas hydrate response to contemporary warming is currently poorly understood. Determining if current or past warming trends are having direct effects on the hydrate stability regime is a region of active interest. The observed zone of hydrate stability is deduced from the current distribution of hydrate. Using current geologic and hydrologic conditions, we can compare the model-predicted zone of hydrate stability and directly compare the data with the observed stability regime. Due to the low thermal diffusivity of sediments, heat conduction is slow, thus if the thermodynamic conditions changed recently, the observed zone of stability will not have time to reach equilibrium and will appear anomalous compared with the predicted stability zone. Using this technique, combined with observations of recent changes in ocean temperatures, I identify two regions currently experiencing ocean warming induced hydrate dissociation: The U.S. East Coast (N. Atlantic) and the North Slope of Alaska (Beaufort Sea). These regions are currently experiencing hydrate dissociation due to contemporary climate forcing. Hydrates also offer unique insights into the

  4. The stability of gas hydrate field in the northeastern continental slope of Sakhalin Island, Sea of Okhotsk, as inferred from analysis of heat flow data and its implications for slope failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Lee, S.; Jin, Y.; Baranov, B.; Obzhirov, A.; Salomatin, A.; Shoji, H.

    2012-12-01

    The sudden release of methane in shallow water due to ocean warming and/or sea level drop, leading to extensive mass wasting at continental margins, has been suggested as a possible cause of global climate change. In the northeastern continental slope of the Sakhalin Island (Sea of Okhotsk), numerous gas hydrate-related manifestations occur, including hydroacoustic anomaly (gas flare) in the water column, pockmarks and mounds on the seafloor, seepage structures and bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs). The gas hydrate found at 385 mbsl represents the shallowest occurrence ever recorded in the Okhotsk Sea. In this study, we modeled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) using methane gas composition, water temperature and geothermal gradient to see if it is consistent with the observed depth of BSR. An important distinction can be made between the seafloor containing seepage features and normal seafloor in terms of their thermal structure. The depth of BSR matches well with the base of GHSZ estimated from the background heat flow (geothermal gradient). A large slope failure feature is found in the northern Sakhalin continental slope. We explore the possibility that this failure was caused by gas hydrate dissociation, based on the past climate change history and inference from the GHSZ modeling. Prediction of the natural landslide is difficult; however, new stratigraphic evidence from subbottom profiles suggests that the landslide occurred at 20 ka which is roughly consistent with the period of sea level drop during the Last Glacial Maximum. Furthermore, this region has witnessed a rapid sea water temperature increase (~0.6°C) in the last 50 years. If such a trend continues, additional slope failure can be expected in the near future in this region.

  5. Sulfate Hydration States in Interpretation of Martian Mineral Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Remote spectral data and surface-measured chemical associations with S indicate widespread distribution of Mg-, Ca-, and Fe-sulfate salts on Mars. These salts are identified at least in part as hydrates, but spectral data and the low temperatures and low pH2O of Mars suggest that hydration states vary with origin, latitude, and exposure history. An understanding of stability limits and dehydration/rehydration rates is vital to understanding occurrences that may be interpreted variously as lacustrine, alteration via groundwater or discharge with evaporation, surface weathering, thermal brine systems, eolian recycling, or others. Different sulfates on Mars have varied susceptibility to desiccation at relatively warm, low-RH conditions or to hydration at cold, high-RH conditions. This variability provides a potent tool for interpreting exposure history. Among Ca-sulfates, gypsum and insoluble anhydrite should be stable and remain, respectively, fully hydrated or water-free at most latitudes and through diurnal and seasonal cycles, but bassanite is more sensitive to transient hydration. Mg-sulfates may have various values of n in the formula MgSO4.nH2O, and rehydration of desiccated forms often produces metastable phases. At low pH2O, unlike Ca- sulfates, amorphous forms appear with low values of n dependent, in part, on temperature. Kieserite resists dehydration but may hydrate in conditions where ice is stable at the surface. Fe-sulfates have more complex dehydration and rehydration properties. Jarosite is very resilient because of the lack of H2O molecules and presence of OH. Other Fe-sulfates are not so durable, e.g., coquimbite (Fe2 (SO4)3.9H2O) has independent H2O and dehydration on heating to 30 °C produces an amorphous product that does not rehydrate. Copiapite is similarly susceptible to dehydration. Modest heating of many H2O-bearing ferric sulfates can be destructive, and degradation can produce both cemented solids and viscous liquids. Sulfate salt

  6. Clathrate hydrates in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Keith C; Brewer, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.

  7. A DFT based equilibrium study of a chemical mixture Tachyhydrite and their lower hydrates for long term heat storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A. D.; Nedea, S. V.; Zondag, H. A.; Rindt, C. C. M.; Smeulders, D. M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Chloride based salt hydrates are promising materials for seasonal heat storage. However, hydrolysis, a side reaction, deteriorates, their cycle stability. To improve the kinetics and durability, we have investigated the optimum operating conditions of a chemical mixture of CaCl2 and MgCl2 hydrates. In this study, we apply a GGA-DFT to gain insight into the various hydrates of CaMg2Cl6. We have obtained the structural properties, atomic charges and vibrational frequencies of CaMg2Cl6 hydrates. The entropic contribution and the enthalpy change are quantified from ground state energy and harmonic frequencies. Subsequently, the change in the Gibbs free energy of thermolysis was obtained under a wide range of temperature and pressure. The equilibrium product concentration of thermolysis can be used to design the seasonal heat storage system under different operating conditions.

  8. Crystallite size distributions of marine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapp, S.A.; Bohrmann, G.; Abegg, F. [Bremen Univ., Bremen (Germany). Research Center of Ocean Margins; Hemes, S.; Klein, H.; Kuhs, W.F. [Gottingen Univ., Gottingen (Germany). Dept. of Crystallography

    2008-07-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to determine the crystallite size distributions of natural gas hydrate samples retrieved from the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Sea, and a hydrate ridge located near offshore Oregon. Synchrotron radiation technology was used to provide the high photon fluxes and high penetration depths needed to accurately analyze the bulk sediment samples. A new beam collimation diffraction technique was used to measure gas hydrate crystallite sizes. The analyses showed that gas hydrate crystals were globular in shape. Mean crystallite sizes ranged from 200 to 400 {mu}m for hydrate samples taken from the sea floor. Larger grain sizes in the hydrate ridge samples suggested differences in hydrate formation ages or processes. A comparison with laboratory-produced methane hydrate samples showed half a lognormal curve with a mean value of 40{mu}m. Results of the study showed that a cautious approach must be adopted when transposing crystallite-size sensitive physical data from laboratory-made gas hydrates to natural settings. It was concluded that crystallite size information may also be used to resolve the formation ages of gas hydrates when formation processes and conditions are constrained. 48 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  9. Reliable Selection and Holistic Stability Evaluation of Reference Genes for Rice Under 22 Different Experimental Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohai; Wang, Ya; Yang, Jing; Hu, Keke; An, Baoguang; Deng, Xiaolong; Li, Yangsheng

    2016-07-01

    Stable and uniform expression of reference genes across samples plays a key role in accurate normalization of gene expression by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). For rice study, there is still a lack of validation and recommendation of appropriate reference genes with high stability depending on experimental conditions. Eleven candidate reference genes potentially owning high stability were evaluated by geNorm and NormFinder for their expression stability in 22 various experimental conditions. Best combinations of multiple reference genes were recommended depending on experimental conditions, and the holistic stability of reference genes was also evaluated. Reference genes would become more variable and thus needed to be critically selected in experimental groups of tissues, heat, 6-benzylamino purine, and drought, but they were comparatively stable under cold, wound, and ultraviolet-B stresses. Triosephosphate isomerase (TI), profilin-2 (Profilin-2), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 (UBC), endothelial differentiation factor (Edf), and ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) were stable in most of our experimental conditions. No universal reference gene showed good stability in all experimental conditions. To get accurate expression result, suitable combination of multiple reference genes for a specific experimental condition would be a better choice. This study provided an application guideline to select stable reference genes for rice gene expression study.

  10. Statistical analysis for long-term stability studies with multiple storage conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Almalik, Osama; Nijhuis, Michiel B.; Warner, Edward I.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the shelf life of new medicinal products, long-term stability studies are conducted of at least three registration batches at multiple storage conditions. It is common practice to perform a statistical analysis on the resulting data separately for each storage condition. Although this i

  11. Seismic imaging of a fractured gas hydrate system in the Krishna-Godavari Basin offshore India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, M.; Collett, T.S.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.V.; Cook, A.

    2010-01-01

    Gas hydrate was discovered in the Krishna-Godavari (KG) Basin during the India National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 1 at Site NGHP-01-10 within a fractured clay-dominated sedimentary system. Logging-while-drilling (LWD), coring, and wire-line logging confirmed gas hydrate dominantly in fractures at four borehole sites spanning a 500m transect. Three-dimensional (3D) seismic data were subsequently used to image the fractured system and explain the occurrence of gas hydrate associated with the fractures. A system of two fault-sets was identified, part of a typical passive margin tectonic setting. The LWD-derived fracture network at Hole NGHP-01-10A is to some extent seen in the seismic data and was mapped using seismic coherency attributes. The fractured system around Site NGHP-01-10 extends over a triangular-shaped area of ~2.5 km2 defined using seismic attributes of the seafloor reflection, as well as " seismic sweetness" at the base of the gas hydrate occurrence zone. The triangular shaped area is also showing a polygonal (nearly hexagonal) fault pattern, distinct from other more rectangular fault patterns observed in the study area. The occurrence of gas hydrate at Site NGHP-01-10 is the result of a specific combination of tectonic fault orientations and the abundance of free gas migration from a deeper gas source. The triangular-shaped area of enriched gas hydrate occurrence is bound by two faults acting as migration conduits. Additionally, the fault-associated sediment deformation provides a possible migration pathway for the free gas from the deeper gas source into the gas hydrate stability zone. It is proposed that there are additional locations in the KG Basin with possible gas hydrate accumulation of similar tectonic conditions, and one such location was identified from the 3D seismic data ~6 km NW of Site NGHP-01-10. ?? 2010.

  12. THCM Coupled Model for Hydrate-Bearing Sediments: Data Analysis and Design of New Field Experiments (Marine and Permafrost Settings)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Marcelo J. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Santamarina, J. Carlos [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-02-14

    Gas hydrates are solid compounds made of water molecules clustered around low molecular weight gas molecules such as methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Methane hydrates form under pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions that are common in sub-permafrost layers and in deep marine sediments. Stability conditions constrain the occurrence of gas hydrates to submarine sediments and permafrost regions. The amount of technically recoverable methane trapped in gas hydrate may exceed 104tcf. Gas hydrates are a potential energy resource, can contribute to climate change, and can cause large-scale seafloor instabilities. In addition, hydrate formation can be used for CO2 sequestration (also through CO2-CH4 replacement), and efficient geological storage seals. The experimental study of hydrate bearing sediments has been hindered by the very low solubility of methane in water (lab testing), and inherent sampling difficulties associated with depressurization and thermal changes during core extraction. This situation has prompted more decisive developments in numerical modeling in order to advance the current understanding of hydrate bearing sediments, and to investigate/optimize production strategies and implications. The goals of this research has been to addresses the complex thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical THCM coupled phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments, using a truly coupled numerical model that incorporates sound and proven constitutive relations, satisfies fundamental conservation principles. Analytical solutions aimed at verifying the proposed code have been proposed as well. These tools will allow to better analyze available data and to further enhance the current understanding of hydrate bearing sediments in view of future field experiments and the development of production technology.

  13. CO2 Reaction with Hydrated Class H Well Cement under Geologic Sequestration Conditions: Effects of Flyash Admixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutchko, Barbara G. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Strazisar, Brian R. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Huerta, Nicolas [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Lowry, Gregory V. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Dzombak, David A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Thaulow, Niels [RJ Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The rate and mechanism of reaction of pozzolan-amended Class H cement exposed to both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine were determined under geologic sequestration conditions to assess the potential impact of cement degradation in existing wells on CO2 storage integrity. The pozzolan additive chosen, Type F flyash, is the most common additive used in cements for well sealing in oil-gas field operations. The 35:65 and 65:35 (v/v) pozzolancement blends were exposed to supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine and underwent cement carbonation. Extrapolation of the carbonation rate for the 35:65 case suggests a penetration depth of 170-180 mm far both the CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2 after 30 years. Despite alteration in both pozzolan systems, the reacted cement remained relatively impermeable to fluid flow after exposure to brine solution saturated with CO2, with values well below the American Petroleum Institute recommended maximum well cement permeability of 200 mu D. Analyses of 50:50 pozzolan-cement cores from a production well in a sandstone reservoir exhibited carbonation and low permeability to brine solution saturated with CO2, which are consistent with our laboratory findings.

  14. CO{sub 2} reaction with hydrated class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions: effects of flyash admixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara G. Kutchko; Brian R. Strazisar; Nicolas Huerta; Gregory V. Lowry; David A. Dzombak; Niels Thaulow [United States Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2009-05-15

    The rate and mechanism of reaction of pozzolan-amended Class H cement exposed to both supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-saturated brine were determined under geologic sequestration conditions to assess the potential impact of cement degradation in existing wells on CO{sub 2} storage integrity. The pozzolan additive chosen, Type F flyash, a by-product of coal combustion, is the most common additive used in cements for well sealing in oil-gas field operations. The 35:65 and 65:35 (v/v) pozzolan-cement blends were exposed to supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-saturated brine and underwent cement carbonation. Extrapolation of the carbonation rate for the 35:65 case suggests a penetration depth of 170-180 mm for both the CO{sub 2}-saturated brine and supercritical CO{sub 2} after 30 years. Despite alteration in both pozzolan systems, the reacted cement remained relatively impermeable to fluid flow after exposure to brine solution saturated with CO{sub 2}, with values well below the American Petroleum Institute recommended maximum well cement permeability of 200 {mu}D. Analyses of 50:50 pozzolan-cement cores from a production well in a sandstone reservoir exhibited carbonation and low permeability to brine solution saturated with CO{sub 2}, which are consistent with our laboratory findings. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. CO2 reaction with hydrated class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions: effects of flyash admixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutchko, Barbara G; Strazisar, Brian R; Huerta, Nicolas; Lowry, Gregory V; Dzombak, David A; Thaulow, Niels

    2009-05-15

    The rate and mechanism of reaction of pozzolan-amended Class H cement exposed to both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine were determined under geologic sequestration conditions to assess the potential impact of cement degradation in existing, wells on CO2 storage integrity. The pozzolan additive chosen, Type F flyash, is the most common additive used in cements for well sealing in oil-gas field operations. The 35:65 and 65:35 (v/v) pozzolan-cement blends were exposed to supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine and underwent cement carbonation. Extrapolation of the carbonation rate for the 35:65 case suggests a penetration depth of 170-180 mm for both the CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2 after 30 years. Despite alteration in both pozzolan systems, the reacted cement remained relatively impermeable to fluid flow after exposure to brine solution saturated with CO2, with values well below the American Petroleum Institute recommended maximum well cement permeability of 200 microD. Analyses of 50: 50 pozzolan-cement cores from a production well in a sandstone reservoir exhibited carbonation and low permeability to brine solution saturated with CO2, which are consistent with our laboratory findings.

  16. Effect of slip boundary conditions on interfacial stability of two-layer viscous fluids under shear

    CERN Document Server

    Patlazhan, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    The traditional approach in the study of hydrodynamic stability of stratified fluids includes the stick boundary conditions between layers. However, this rule may be violated in polymer systems and as a consequence various instabilities may arise. The main objective of this paper is to analyze theoretically the influence of slip boundary conditions on the hydrodynamic stability of the interface between two immiscible viscous layers subjected to simple shear flow. It is found that the growth rate of long-wave disturbances is fairly sensitive to the slip at the interface between layers as well as at the external boundary. These phenomena are shown to give different contributions to the stability of shear flow depending on viscosity, thickness, and density ratios of the layers. Particularly, the interfacial slip can increase the perturbation growth rate and lead to unstable flow. An important consequence of this effect is the violation of stability for sheared layers with equal viscosities and densities in a bro...

  17. Improving Delay-Range-Dependent Stability Condition for Systems with Interval Time-Varying Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the delay-range-dependent stability for systems with interval time-varying delay. Through defining the new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and estimating the derivative of the LKF by introducing new vectors, using free matrices and reciprocally convex approach, the new delay-range-dependent stability conditions are obtained. Two well-known examples are given to illustrate the less conservatism of the proposed theoretical results.

  18. Influence of Storage Conditions on Geotechnical Properties of Ariake Clay and on its Chemical Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    シナ, コスラナント; SINAT, KOSLANANT

    2006-01-01

    Influence of storage conditions on geotechnical properties of Ariake clay and on its chemical stabilization is investigated to make use of the surplus clay as construction materials. The influence factors in lime and cement stabilization including salts, diatom and clay minerals were studied. The experiments were set up by mixing clays with various proportions of studied factors. As a result, for Bangkok clay, Kaolin and Bentonite, the factors improving the unconfined compressive strength of...

  19. Political stability in conditions of overtaking modernisation: challenges and reference points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Mantashyan

    2017-07-01

    To sum up, compensatory mechanisms of the political stability in conditions of the ongoing modernization should accelerate the development of civil society within the absence of a stable and adaptive political community. Challenges to political stability should be compensated by creativity and optimality of the authorities’ activities. Prospects for further consideration of problems, being raised in this paper, are as following: to determine the socio-cultural constraints of the institutional adaptability of the political system.

  20. The effect of actual and imaginary handgrip on postural stability during different balance conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderHill, M S; Wolf, E E; Langenderfer, J E; Ustinova, K I

    2014-09-01

    The stabilizing effect of holding an object on upright posture has been demonstrated in a variety of settings. The mechanism of this effect is unknown but could be attributed to either additional sensorimotor activity triggered by a hand contact or cognitive efforts related to performance of a supra-postural task. A potential mechanism was investigated by comparing postural stability in young healthy individuals while gripping a custom instrumented wooden stick with a 5N force and while imagining holding the same stick in the hand. Twenty subjects were tested during three standing balance conditions: on a stationary surface, on a freely moving rockerboard, and with an unexpected perturbation of 10° forward rockerboard tipping. Postural stability was evaluated as velocity of the center of mass (COM) and center of pressure (COP) compared across all experimental conditions. COM and COP velocities were equally reduced when subjects gripped the stick and imagined gripping while standing stationary and on the rockerboard. When perturbed, subjects failed to show any postural stability improvements regardless of handgrip task. Results indicate a stabilizing effect of focusing attention on motor task performance. This cognitive strategy does not appear to contribute any additional stabilization when subjects are perturbed. This study adds to the current understanding of postural stabilization strategies.

  1. Dynamic stability margin using a marker based system and Tekscan: a comparison of four gait conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugade, Vipul; Kaufman, Kenton

    2014-01-01

    Stability during gait is maintained through control of the center of mass (CoM) position and velocity in relation to the base of support (BoS). The dynamic stability margin, or the interaction of the extrapolated center of mass with the closest boundary of the BoS, can reveal possible control errors during gait. The purpose of this study was to investigate a marker based method for defining the BoS, and compare the dynamic stability margin throughout gait in comparison to a BoS defined from foot pressure sensors. The root mean squared difference between these two methodologies ranged from 0.9 cm to 3.5 cm, when walking under four conditions: plantigrade, equinus, everted, and inverted. As the stability margin approaches -35 cm prior to contralateral heel strike, there was approximately 90% agreement between the two systems at this time point. Underestimation of the marker based dynamic stability margin or overestimation of the pressure based dynamic stability margin was due to inaccuracies in defining the medial boundary of the BoS. Overall, care must be taken to ensure similar definitions of the BoS are utilized when comparing the dynamic stability margin between participants and gait conditions.

  2. Physical properties of gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliner, J.T.R.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring, solid crystalline compounds (clathrates) that encapsulate gas molecules inside the lattices of hydrogen bonded water molecules within a specific temperature-pressure stability zone. Estimates of the total quantity of available methane gas in natural occurring hydrates are based on twice the energy content of known conventional fossil fuels reservoirs. Accurate and reliable in-situ quantification techniques are essential in determining the economic viability of this potential energy yield, which is dependent upon several factors such as sensitivity of the temperature-pressure stability zone, sediment type, porosity, permeability, concentration/abundance of free gas, spatial distribution in pore spaces, specific cage occupancy, and the influence of inhibitors. Various techniques like acoustic P and S waves, time domain reflectometry, and electrical resistance have been used to analyze the quantity and spatial distribution of the gas hydrate samples. These techniques were reviewed and the results obtained in the course of gas hydrate research were presented. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Conditional Solvation Thermodynamics of Isoleucine in Model Peptides and the Limitations of the Group-Transfer Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tomar, Dheeraj S.; Weber, Valéry; Pettitt, B. Montgomery; Asthagiri, D.

    2014-01-01

    The hydration thermodynamics of the amino acid X relative to the reference G (glycine) or the hydration thermodynamics of a small-molecule analog of the side chain of X is often used to model the contribution of X to protein stability and solution thermodynamics. We consider the reasons for successes and limitations of this approach by calculating and comparing the conditional excess free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of hydration of the isoleucine side chain in zwitterionic isoleucine, in ex...

  5. Stability of sucrose fatty acid esters under acidic and basic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Haruo; Kitazawa, Naoki; Wada, Shoichi; Hotta, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The stability of sucrose fatty acid monoesters toward hydrolysis under acidic and basic conditions was evaluated. Mass spectrometric analysis of hydrolysates showed that the glycosidic bond was preferentially hydrolyzed under acidic conditions, whereas the ester bond was selectively hydrolyzed under basic conditions. Under both conditions, the rate of hydrolysis depended on the pH of the solution, the concentration of sucrose monoesters, and the acylated position of the sucrose monoesters. The hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond under acidic conditions was shown to be a first-order process. The rate constants for hydrolysis at various temperatures were measured, and the activation energies were calculated from the slope of the Arrhenius plots. The lifetime of sucrose monoesters estimated from the first-order rate constant for the hydrolysis reaction revealed that the sucrose monoesters have excellent long-term stability over a pH range of 5 to 7 at room temperature.

  6. Hydro-bio-geomechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments from Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamarina, J.C.; Dai, Shifeng; Terzariol, M.; Jang, Jeonghwan; Waite, William F.; Winters, William J.; Nagao, J.; Yoneda, J.; Konno, Y.; Fujii, T.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-01-01

    Natural hydrate-bearing sediments from the Nankai Trough, offshore Japan, were studied using the Pressure Core Characterization Tools (PCCTs) to obtain geomechanical, hydrological, electrical, and biological properties under in situ pressure, temperature, and restored effective stress conditions. Measurement results, combined with index-property data and analytical physics-based models, provide unique insight into hydrate-bearing sediments in situ. Tested cores contain some silty-sands, but are predominantly sandy- and clayey-silts. Hydrate saturations Sh range from 0.15 to 0.74, with significant concentrations in the silty-sands. Wave velocity and flexible-wall permeameter measurements on never-depressurized pressure-core sediments suggest hydrates in the coarser-grained zones, the silty-sands where Sh exceeds 0.4, contribute to soil-skeletal stability and are load-bearing. In the sandy- and clayey-silts, where Sh < 0.4, the state of effective stress and stress history are significant factors determining sediment stiffness. Controlled depressurization tests show that hydrate dissociation occurs too quickly to maintain thermodynamic equilibrium, and pressure–temperature conditions track the hydrate stability boundary in pure-water, rather than that in seawater, in spite of both the in situ pore water and the water used to maintain specimen pore pressure prior to dissociation being saline. Hydrate dissociation accompanied with fines migration caused up to 2.4% vertical strain contraction. The first-ever direct shear measurements on never-depressurized pressure-core specimens show hydrate-bearing sediments have higher sediment strength and peak friction angle than post-dissociation sediments, but the residual friction angle remains the same in both cases. Permeability measurements made before and after hydrate dissociation demonstrate that water permeability increases after dissociation, but the gain is limited by the transition from hydrate saturation

  7. Stability conditions for one-dimensional optical solitons in cubic-quintic-septimal media

    CERN Document Server

    Reyna, Albert S; de Araujo, Cid B

    2015-01-01

    Conditions for stable propagation of one-dimensional bright spatial solitons in media exhibiting optical nonlinearities up to the seventh-order are investigated. The results show well-defined stability regions even when all the nonlinear terms are focusing. Conditions for onset of the supercritical collapse of the optical beam are identified too. A variational approximation is used to predict dependence of the soliton propagation constant on the norm, and respective stability regions are identified using the Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion. Analytical results obtained by means of the variational approximation are corroborated by numerical simulations of the cubic-quintic-septimal nonlinear Schroedinger equation.

  8. [Stability of high-dose etoposide dilutions for use in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation conditioning regimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauters, T; Vandenbroucke, J; Commeyne, S

    2015-12-01

    High-dose etoposide is used in conditioning regimens for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The limited stability of the drug induces barriers for its use for pharmacists, nurses and patients. When using a concentration of 10 mg/mL etoposide in physiologic saline, limitations can be overcome. This study provides stability data for etoposide in a high concentration that can be used in conditioning regimens. The solution was stable for 48h at 5°C, for 48h at 5°C followed by 8h at 25°C and for 24 h at 25°C.

  9. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  10. Gas hydrate dissociation structures in submarine slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidley, I.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Studies have suggested that gas hydrates may play a role in submarine slope failures. However, the mechanics surrounding such failures are poorly understood. This paper discussed experimental tests conducted on a small-scale physical model of submarine soils with hydrate inclusions. The laboratory tests investigated the effects of slope angle and depth of burial of the hydrate on gas escape structures and slope stability. Laponite was used to model the soils due to its ability to swell and produce a clear, colorless thixotropic gel when dispersed in water. An R-11 refrigerant was used to form hydrate layers and nodules. The aim of the experiment was to investigate the path of the fluid escape structures and the development of a subsequent slip plane caused by the dissociation of the R-11 hydrates. Slope angles of 5, 10, and 15 degrees were examined. Slopes were examined using high-resolution, high-speed imaging techniques. Hydrate placement and slope inclinations were varied in order to obtain stability data. Results of the study showed that slope angle influenced the direction of travel of the escaping gas, and that the depth of burial affected sensitivity to slope angle. Theoretical models developed from the experimental data have accurately mapped deformations and stress states during testing. Further research is being conducted to investigate the influence of the size, shape, and placement of the hydrates. 30 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Geochemical Monitoring Of The Gas Hydrate Production By CO2/CH4 Exchange In The Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Production Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T. D.; Collett, T. S.; Ignik Sikumi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocarbon gases, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and water were collected from production streams at the Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate production test well (TD, 791.6 m), drilled on the Alaska North Slope. The well was drilled to test the feasibility of producing methane by carbon dioxide injection that replaces methane in the solid gas hydrate. The Ignik Sikumi well penetrated a stratigraphically-bounded prospect within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation. Regionally, the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation overlies the more deeply buried Prudhoe Bay, Milne Point, and Kuparuk River oil fields and is restricted to the up-dip portion of a series of nearshore deltaic sandstone reservoirs in the Sagavanirktok Formation. Hydrate-bearing sandstones penetrated by Ignik Sikumi well occur in three primary horizons; an upper zone, ("E" sand, 579.7 - 597.4 m) containing 17.7 meters of gas hydrate-bearing sands, a middle zone ("D" sand, 628.2 - 648.6 m) with 20.4 m of gas hydrate-bearing sands and a lower zone ("C" sand, 678.8 - 710.8 m), containing 32 m of gas hydrate-bearing sands with neutron porosity log-interpreted average gas hydrate saturations of 58, 76 and 81% respectively. A known volume mixture of 77% nitrogen and 23% carbon dioxide was injected into an isolated section of the upper part of the "C" sand to start the test. Production flow-back part of the test occurred in three stages each followed by a period of shut-in: (1) unassisted flowback; (2) pumping above native methane gas hydrate stability conditions; and (3) pumping below the native methane gas hydrate stability conditions. Methane production occurred immediately after commencing unassisted flowback. Methane concentration increased from 0 to 40% while nitrogen and carbon dioxide concentrations decreased to 48 and 12% respectively. Pumping above the hydrate stability phase boundary produced gas with a methane concentration climbing above 80% while the carbon dioxide and nitrogen concentrations fell to 2 and 18

  12. In situ study of mass transfer in aqueous solutions under high pressures via Raman spectroscopy: A new method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of methane in water near hydrate formation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.J.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Yang, M.Z.

    2006-01-01

    A new method was developed for in situ study of the diffusive transfer of methane in aqueous solution under high pressures near hydrate formation conditions within an optical capillary cell. Time-dependent Raman spectra of the solution at several different spots along the one-dimensional diffusion path were collected and thus the varying composition profile of the solution was monitored. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least squares method based on the variations in methane concentration data in space and time in the cell. The measured diffusion coefficients of methane in water at the liquid (L)-vapor (V) stable region and L-V metastable region are close to previously reported values determined at lower pressure and similar temperature. This in situ monitoring method was demonstrated to be suitable for the study of mass transfer in aqueous solution under high pressure and at various temperature conditions and will be applied to the study of nucleation and dissolution kinetics of methane hydrate in a hydrate-water system where the interaction of methane and water would be more complicated than that presented here for the L-V metastable condition. ?? 2006 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  13. Phase diagrams for clathrate hydrates of methane, ethane, and propane from first-principles thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Yingying; Li, Wenbo; Zheng, Zhaoyang; Jiang, Xue; Su, Yan; Zhao, Jijun; Liu, Changling

    2016-01-28

    Natural gas hydrates are inclusion compounds composed of major light hydrocarbon gaseous molecules (CH4, C2H6, and C3H8) and a water clathrate framework. Understanding the phase stability and formation conditions of natural gas hydrates is crucial for their future exploitation and applications and requires an accurate description of intermolecular interactions. Previous ab initio calculations on gas hydrates were mainly limited by the cluster models, whereas the phase diagram and equilibrium conditions of hydrate formation were usually investigated using the thermodynamic models or empirical molecular simulations. For the first time, we construct the chemical potential phase diagrams of type II clathrate hydrates encapsulated with methane/ethane/propane guest molecules using first-principles thermodynamics. We find that the partially occupied structures (136H2O·1CH4, 136H2O·16CH4, 136H2O·20CH4, 136H2O·1C2H6, and 136H2O·1C3H8) and fully occupied structures (136H2O·24CH4, 136H2O·8C2H6, and 136H2O·8C3H8) are thermodynamically favorable under given pressure-temperature (p-T) conditions. The theoretically predicted equilibrium pressures for pure CH4, C2H6 and C3H8 hydrates at the phase transition point are consistent with the experimental data. These results provide valuable guidance for establishing the relationship between the accurate description of intermolecular noncovalent interactions and the p-T equilibrium conditions of clathrate hydrates and other molecular crystals.

  14. Hydration of polyethylene glycol-grafted liposomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tirosh, O; Barenholz, Y.; Katzhendler, J; Priev, A

    1998-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the effect of polyethylene glycol of 2000 molecular weight (PEG2000) attached to a dialkylphosphatidic acid (dihexadecylphosphatidyl (DHP)-PEG2000) on the hydration and thermodynamic stability of lipid assemblies. Differential scanning calorimetry, densitometry, and ultrasound velocity and absorption measurements were used for thermodynamic and hydrational characterization. Using a differential scanning calorimetry technique we showed that each molecule of PEG...

  15. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  16. Asymptotic stability and blow up for a semilinear damped wave equation with dynamic boundary conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Gerbi, Stéphane

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we consider a multi-dimensional wave equation with dynamic boundary conditions, related to the KelvinVoigt damping. Global existence and asymptotic stability of solutions starting in a stable set are proved. Blow up for solutions of the problem with linear dynamic boundary conditions with initial data in the unstable set is also obtained. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pricing Strategy, Pricing Stability and Financial Condition in the Defense Aerospace Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Johnstone, Jeffrey Carl; Keavney, Patrick Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited The purpose of this research is to determine if pricing strategy and pricing stability for products in the defense aerospace industry can be predicted based on a firm's financial condition. The sample for this research includes 17 contractors and 52 missile and aircraft programs. Two separate issues are addressed. The first issue concerns the relationship between financial condition and contractor pricing strategy. The second concerns the...

  18. Wake meandering under non-neutral atmospheric stability conditions – theory and facts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Machefaux, Ewan; Chougule, Abhijit S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with modelling of wake dynamics under influence of atmospheric stability conditions different from neutral. In particular, it is investigated how the basic split in turbulent scales, on which the Dynamic Wake Meandering model is based, can be utilized to include atmospheric stabi...

  19. SUFFICIENT CONDITIONS FOR STABILITY OF NONLINEAR TIME-VARYING DYNAMIC SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永英; 王铁英

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, some sufficient conditions for the stability of system dx/dt =A(t)x +f(t,x) are given which are based on the assumption of that the eigenvalues of the leading principal submatrix of order r and its complementary submatrix of order m in A(t) all have negative real parts.

  20. Ebola Virus RNA Stability in Human Blood and Urine in West Africa's Environmental Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, Frédéric; Delaune, Deborah; Poyot, Thomas; Valade, Eric; Mérens, Audrey; Rollin, Pierre E; Foissaud, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    We evaluated RNA stability of Ebola virus in EDTA blood and urine samples collected from infected patients and stored in West Africa's environmental conditions. In blood, RNA was stable for at least 18 days when initial cycle threshold values were <30, but in urine, RNA degradation occurred more quickly.

  1. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  2. Influence of the redox state on the neptunium sorption under alkaline conditions. Batch sorption studies on titanium dioxide and calcium silicate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tits, Jan; Laube, Andreas; Wieland, Erich [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Waste Management; Gaona, Xavier [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    2014-07-01

    Wet chemistry experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the redox state and aqueous speciation on the uptake of neptunium by titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and by calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) under alkaline conditions. TiO{sub 2} was chosen as a reference sorbent to determine the surface complexation behaviour of neptunium under alkaline conditions. C-S-H phases are important constituents of cement and concrete. They may contribute significantly to radionuclide retention due to their high recrystallization rates making incorporation the dominating sorption mechanism for many radionuclides (e.g. the actinides) on these materials. The sorption of neptunium on both solids was found to depend strongly on the degree of hydrolysis. On TiO{sub 2}R{sub d} values for Np(IV), Np(V) and Np(VI) are identical at pH = 10 and decrease with progressing hydrolysis in case of Np(V) and Np(VI). On C-S-H phases, R{sub d} values for the three redox states are also identical at pH = 10. While the R{sub d} values for Np(VI) sorption on C-S-H phases decrease with progressing hydrolysis, the R{sub d} values for Np(IV) and Np(V) sorption are not affected by the pH. In addition to the effect of hydrolysis, the presence of Ca is found to promote Np(V) and Np(VI) sorption on TiO{sub 2} whereas on C-S-H phases, the present wet chemistry data do not give unambiguous evidence. Thus, the aqueous speciation appears to have a similar influence on the sorption of the actinides on both types of solids despite the different sorption mechanism. The similar R{sub d} values for Np(IV,V,VI) sorption at pH = 10 can be explained qualitatively by invoking inter-ligand electrostatic repulsion between OH groups in the coordination sphere of Np(V) and Np(VI). This mechanism was proposed earlier in the literature for the prediction of actinide complexation constants with inorganic ligands. A limiting coordination number for each Np redox state, resulting from the inter-ligand electrostatic

  3. Reliability of a Cryoscopic Micro-Osmometer Using 15-µL Plasma Samples to Measure Hydration Status in Varied Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Aaron T.; Richter-Stretton, Gina L.; Madueno, Maria C.; Borges, Nattai R.; Fenning, Andrew S.

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of plasma osmolality (P[subscript osm]) remains popular for assessing hydration status in exercise science. However, a controlled reliability assessment of micro-osmometry using small sample volumes to measure Posm remains to be performed. This study aimed to examine the reliability of a cryoscopic micro-osmometer requiring 15-µL…

  4. Reliability of a Cryoscopic Micro-Osmometer Using 15-µL Plasma Samples to Measure Hydration Status in Varied Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Aaron T.; Richter-Stretton, Gina L.; Madueno, Maria C.; Borges, Nattai R.; Fenning, Andrew S.

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of plasma osmolality (P[subscript osm]) remains popular for assessing hydration status in exercise science. However, a controlled reliability assessment of micro-osmometry using small sample volumes to measure Posm remains to be performed. This study aimed to examine the reliability of a cryoscopic micro-osmometer requiring 15-µL…

  5. Investigation of shallow gas hydrate occurrence and gas seep activity on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Young Keun; Baranov, Boris; Obzhirov, Anatoly; Salomatin, Alexander; Derkachev, Alexander; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Minami, Hrotsugu; Kuk Hong, Jong

    2016-04-01

    The Sakhalin continental slope has been a well-known gas hydrate area since the first finding of gas hydrate in 1980's. This area belongs to the southernmost glacial sea in the northern hemisphere where most of the area sea is covered by sea ice the winter season. Very high organic carbon content in the sediment, cold sea environment, and active tectonic regime in the Sakhalin slope provide a very favorable condition for occurring shallow gas hydrate accumulation and gas emission phenomena. Research expeditions under the framework of a Korean-Russian-Japanese long-term international collaboration projects (CHAOS, SSGH-I, SSGH-II projects) have been conducted to investigate gas hydrate occurrence and gas seepage activities on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia from 2003 to 2015. During the expeditions, near-surface gas hydrate samples at more than 30 sites have been retrieved and hundreds of active gas seepage structures on the seafloor were newly registered by multidisciplinary surveys. The gas hydrates occurrence at the various water depths from about 300 m to 1000 m in the study area were accompanied by active gas seepage-related phenomena in the sub-bottom, on the seafloor, and in the water column: well-defined upward gas migration structures (gas chimney) imaged by high-resolution seismic, hydroacoustic anomalies of gas emissions (gas flares) detected by echosounders, seafloor high backscatter intensities (seepage structures) imaged by side-scan sonar and bathymetric structures (pockmarks and mounds) mapped by single/multi-beam surveys, and very shallow SMTZ (sulphate-methane transition zone) depths, strong microbial activities and high methane concentrations measured in sediment/seawater samples. The highlights of the expeditions are shallow gas hydrate occurrences around 300 m in the water depth which is nearly closed to the upper boundary of gas hydrate stability zone in the area and a 2,000 m-high gas flare emitted from the deep seafloor.

  6. Temperature, pressure, and compositional effects on anomalous or "self" preservation of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on a thermal regime where pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate is preserved metastably in bulk at up to 75 K above its nominal temperature stability limit of 193 K at 0.1 MPa, following rapid release of the sample pore pressure. Large fractions (>50 vol.%) of methane hydrate can be preserved for 2-3 weeks by this method, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this "anomalous preservation" regime. This behavior contrasts that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) isothermal test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Here, we report on recent experiments that further investigate the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on anomalous preservation behavior. All tests conducted on sI methane hydrate yielded self-consistent results that confirm the highly temperature-sensitive but reproducible nature of anomalous preservation behavior. Temperature-stepping experiments conducted between 250 and 268 K corroborate the relative rates measured previously in isothermal preservation tests, and elevated pore-pressure tests showed that, as expected, dissociation rates are further reduced with increasing pressure. Surprisingly, sII methane-ethane hydrate was found to exhibit no comparable preservation effect when rapidly depressurized at 268 K, even though it is thermodynamically stable at higher temperatures and lower pressures than sI methane hydrate. These results, coupled with SEM imaging of quenched sample material from a variety of dissociation tests, strongly support our earlier arguments that ice-"shielding" effects provided by partial dissociation along hydrate grain surfaces do not serve as the primary mechanism for anomalous preservation. The underlying physical-chemistry mechanism(s) of anomalous preservation remains elusive, but appears to be based more on textural or morphological changes within the hydrate

  7. Control of the geomorphology and gas hydrate extent on widespread gas emissions offshore Romania (Black Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboulot, V.; Cattaneo, A.; Sultan, N.; Ker, S.; Scalabrin, C.; Gaillot, A.; Jouet, G.; Marsset, B.; Thomas, Y.; Ballas, G.; Marsset, T.; Garziglia, S.; Ruffine, L.; Boulart, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Romanian sector of the Black Sea deserves attention because the Danube deep-sea fan is one of the largest sediment depositional systems worldwide and is considered the world's most isolated sea, the largest anoxic water body on the planet and a unique energy-rich sea. Due to the high sediment accumulation rate, presence of organic matter and anoxic conditions, the Black sea sediment offshore the Danube delta is rich in gas and thus show BSR. The cartography of the BSR over the last 20 years, exhibits its widespread occurrence, indicative of extensive development of hydrate accumulations and a huge gas hydrate potential. By combining old and new datasets acquired in 2015 during the GHASS expedition, we performed a geomorphological analysis of the continental slope north-east of the Danube canyon that reveals the presence of several landslides inside and outside several canyons incising the seafloor. It is a complex study area presenting sedimentary processes such as seafloor erosion and instability, mass wasting, formation of gas hydrates, fluid migration, gas escape, where the imprint of geomorphology seems to dictate the location where gas seep occurs. . Some 1409 gas seeps within the water column acoustic records are observed between 200 m and 800 m water depth. No gas flares were detected in deeper areas where gas hydrates are stable. Overall, 93% of the all gas seeps observed are above geomorphological structures. 78% are right above escarpment induced by sedimentary destabilizations inside or outside canyons. The results suggest a geomorphological control of degassing at the seafloor and gas seeps are thus constrained by the gas hydrates stability zone. The stability of the gas hydrates is dependent on the salinity gradient through the sedimentary column and thus on the Black Sea recent geological history. The extent and the dynamics of gas hydrates have a probable impact on the sedimentary destabilization observed at the seafloor.

  8. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  9. Frequency-domain L2-stability conditions for time-varying linear and nonlinear MIMO systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihong HUANG; Y. V. VENKATESH; Cheng XIANG; Tong Heng LEE

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the L2-stability analysis of multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) systems, governed by integral equations, with a matrix of periodic/aperiodic time-varying gains and a vector of monotone, non-monotone and quasi-monotone nonlin-earities. For nonlinear MIMO systems that are described by differential equations, most of the literature on stability is based on an application of quadratic forms as Lyapunov-function candidates. In contrast, a non-Lyapunov framework is employed here to derive new and more general L2-stability conditions in the frequency domain. These conditions have the following features:i) They are expressed in terms of the positive definiteness of the real part of matrices involving the transfer function of the linear time-invariant block and a matrix multiplier function that incorporates the minimax properties of the time-varying linear/nonlinear block. ii) For certain cases of the periodic time-varying gain, they contain, depending on the multiplier function chosen, no restrictions on the normalized rate of variation of the time-varying gain, but, for other periodic/aperiodic time-varying gains, they do. Overall, even when specialized to periodic-coefficient linear and nonlinear MIMO systems, the stability conditions are distinct from and less restrictive than recent results in the literature. No comparable results exist in the literature for aperiodic time-varying gains. Furthermore, some new stability results concerning the dwell-time problem and time-varying gain switching in linear and nonlinear MIMO systems with periodic/aperiodic matrix gains are also presented. Examples are given to illustrate a few of the stability theorems.

  10. Dynamic stability conditions for Lotka-Volterra recurrent neural networks with delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhang; Tan, K K

    2002-07-01

    The Lotka-Volterra model of neural networks, derived from the membrane dynamics of competing neurons, have found successful applications in many "winner-take-all" types of problems. This paper studies the dynamic stability properties of general Lotka-Volterra recurrent neural networks with delays. Conditions for nondivergence of the neural networks are derived. These conditions are based on local inhibition of networks, thereby allowing these networks to possess a multistability property. Multistability is a necessary property of a network that will enable important neural computations such as those governing the decision making process. Under these nondivergence conditions, a compact set that globally attracts all the trajectories of a network can be computed explicitly. If the connection weight matrix of a network is symmetric in some sense, and the delays of the network are in L2 space, we can prove that the network will have the property of complete stability.

  11. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  12. Muscular condition and trunk stability in judoka of national and international level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casto Juan-Recio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is theorized that the development of the ability to stabilize the trunk may improve the performance of a judoka because it improves body balance control and optimizes force transmission from the lower extremities to the upper limbs. However, there is a lack of scientific evidence to establish a clear relationship between trunk stability and performance in judo.Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the quantification of trunk stability and muscular strength and endurance allowed differentiation between national level (n = 7 and international level judoka (n = 6. In addition, the relationship between trunk stability and muscular strength and endurance of the muscles involved in trunk stability control was analyzed.Method: To assess trunk stability, trunk responses to sudden loads applied by a pneumatic mechanism were analyzed, as well as trunk postural control through an unstable sitting paradigm. Muscular strength and endurance were assessed via a flexion and extension trunk test using an isokinetic dynamometer.Results/Conclusions: International level judokas showed lower CoP displacement in the most complex task in unstable seat (7.00 ± 1.19 vs 8.93 ± 1.45 mm, T = .025 and higher absolute and relative peak torque in extensor muscles (7.05 ± 0.87 vs 5.74 ± 0.72 Nm, T = .013 than national level judoka. According to these results, core stability and trunk muscular condition are important qualities in the physical training of elite judoka. Correlational analysis found no relation between the analyzed variables, thus muscular strength and endurance appear to have a non-significant effect on performance in the trunk stability tests.

  13. Boundary Conditions for Numerical Stability Analysis of Periodic Solutions of Ordinary Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashige, Sunao

    This paper considers numerical methods for stability analyses of periodic solutions of ordinary differential equations. Stability of a periodic solution can be determined by the corresponding monodromy matrix and its eigenvalues. Some commonly used numerical methods can produce inaccurate results of them in some cases, for example, near bifurcation points or when one of the eigenvalues is very large or very small. This work proposes a numerical method using a periodic boundary condition for vector fields, which preserves a critical property of the monodromy matrix. Numerical examples demonstrate effectiveness and a drawback of this method.

  14. Stability of linear multistep methods for delay differential equations in the light of Kreiss resolvent condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the stability analysis of the linear multistep (LM) methods in the numerical solution of delay differential equations. Here we provide a qualitative stability estimates, pertiment to the classical scalar test problem of the form y'(t) = λy(t) + μy(t - τ) with τ > 0 and λ ,μ are complex, by using (vartiant to) the resolvent condition of Kreiss. We prove that for A-stable LM methods the upper bound for the norm of the n -th power of square matrix grows linearly with the order of the matrix.

  15. Conditions for Emergence, Stability and Change in New Organizations in the Field of Citizens Climate Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, Maria Josefina

    expanding worldwide the weight of expectations can be boiled down to two: One refers to their potential for delivering specific mitigation/adaptation goals; the second refers to their organizational potential, stability and the manner in which they can ultimately affect societal transformational change....... This contribution is concerned with the latter. It proposes that using field analysis it is possible to understand conditions of emergence, stability and change in citizen engagement in climate action. The present contribution offers only a preliminary exploration of possibilities for how using field theory can...

  16. Stability of selected volatile contact allergens in different patch test chambers under different storage conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Kristian Fredløv; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Christensen, Lars Porskjaer

    2012-01-01

    storage conditions. Methods. Petrolatum samples of methyl methacrylate (MMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA), 2-hydroxypropyl acrylate (2-HPA), cinnamal and eugenol in patch test concentrations were stored in three different test chambers (IQ chamber™, IQ Ultimate™, and Van der Bend® transport...... during storage in the refrigerator. For these two chamber systems, the contact allergen concentration dropped below the stability limit in the following order: MMA, cinnamal, 2-HPA, eugenol, and 2-HEMA. In the Van der Bend® transport container, the contact allergens exhibited acceptable stability under...

  17. Global Stabilization of High-Order Time-Delay Nonlinear Systems under a Weaker Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengwei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the weaker condition on the system growth, this paper further investigates the problem of global stabilization by state feedback for a class of high-order nonlinear systems with time-varying delays. By skillfully using the homogeneous domination approach, a continuous state feedback controller is successfully designed, which preserves the equilibrium at the origin and guarantees the global asymptotic stability of the resulting closed-loop system. A simulation example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed design procedure.

  18. Comparison of preservation conditions and environmental impacts between ocean floor and permafrost gas hydrates%海洋和陆域天然气水合物开发的环境影响比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常华进; 曹广超; 陈克龙

    2012-01-01

    我国在南海和青海冻土区发现了天然气水合物矿藏,但正视并研究天然气水合物开发的潜在环境影响风险是安全合理开发利用它的前提.由于海洋和陆域天然气水合物有其自身的赋存条件,它们的环境影响风险必然存在差异:海洋天然气水合物具有气候效应、海洋生态威胁、海底地质灾害等潜在环境影响风险,而陆域天然气水合物的潜在环境影响风险表现在气候效应、冻土层和高寒草甸破坏、陆地生态威胁、地陷和塌方等方面.可以通过采用安全可靠的具有针对性的开发技术并控制工程过程等措施来应对环境影响风险.%Gas hydrate samples were discovered in the northern South China Sea and the Southern Qil- Jan Mountain permafrost of Qinghai Province, and to envisage and to study potential environment impacts associated with gas hydrate exploitation is the precondition to exploit and to utilize it. Because of different existence conditions between ocean and continent permafrost gas hydrates, the impacts on environment of them are different. For ocean gas hydrates, the environment impacts are mainly climate influence, ocean ecological menace, and ocean geologic disaster. For permafrost gas hydrate, environmental impacts are mainly climate influence, permafrost and alpine meadow ecosystem degeneration, and ground collapse and depression. In order to avoid or decrease the risk and achieve benefits of gas hydrate exploitation, we should adopt safe and dependable technologies, and control the engineering process.

  19. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Lall, Malcolm; Mazumdar, Aninda; Ramana, Mangipudi Venkata; Ramprasad, Tammisetti; Riedel, Michael; Sain, Kalachand; Sathe, Arun Vasant; Vishwanath, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 (NGHP-01) is designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate along the passive continental margin of the Indian Peninsula and in the Andaman convergent margin, with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. The NGHP-01 expedition established the presence of gas hydrates in the Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi Basins, and the Andaman Sea. The expedition discovered in the Krishna-Godavari Basin one of the thickest gas hydrate accumulations ever documented, in the Andaman Sea one of the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zones in the world, and established the existence of a fully developed gas hydrate petroleum system in all three basins.

  20. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  1. A new delay-independent condition for global robust stability of neural networks with time delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samli, Ruya

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the problem of robust stability of dynamical neural networks with discrete time delays under the assumptions that the network parameters of the neural system are uncertain and norm-bounded, and the activation functions are slope-bounded. By employing the results of Lyapunov stability theory and matrix theory, new sufficient conditions for the existence, uniqueness and global asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point for delayed neural networks are presented. The results reported in this paper can be easily tested by checking some special properties of symmetric matrices associated with the parameter uncertainties of neural networks. We also present a numerical example to show the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results.

  2. Hydration and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bob

    2007-10-01

    There is a rich scientific literature regarding hydration status and physical function that began in the late 1800s, although the relationship was likely apparent centuries before that. A decrease in body water from normal levels (often referred to as dehydration or hypohydration) provokes changes in cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, metabolic, and central nervous function that become increasingly greater as dehydration worsens. Similarly, performance impairment often reported with modest dehydration (e.g., -2% body mass) is also exacerbated by greater fluid loss. Dehydration during physical activity in the heat provokes greater performance decrements than similar activity in cooler conditions, a difference thought to be due, at least in part, to greater cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain associated with heat exposure. There is little doubt that performance during prolonged, continuous exercise in the heat is impaired by levels of dehydration >or= -2% body mass, and there is some evidence that lower levels of dehydration can also impair performance even during relatively short-duration, intermittent exercise. Although additional research is needed to more fully understand low-level dehydration's effects on physical performance, one can generalize that when performance is at stake, it is better to be well-hydrated than dehydrated. This generalization holds true in the occupational, military, and sports settings.

  3. Prospecting for marine gas hydrate resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Shipp, Craig; Reichel, Thomas; Shelander, Dianna; Saeki, Tetsuo; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; Collett, Timothy S.; McConnell, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As gas hydrate energy assessment matures worldwide, emphasis has evolved away from confirmation of the mere presence of gas hydrate to the more complex issue of prospecting for those specific accumulations that are viable resource targets. Gas hydrate exploration now integrates the unique pressure and temperature preconditions for gas hydrate occurrence with those concepts and practices that are the basis for conventional oil and gas exploration. We have aimed to assimilate the lessons learned to date in global gas hydrate exploration to outline a generalized prospecting approach as follows: (1) use existing well and geophysical data to delineate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), (2) identify and evaluate potential direct indications of hydrate occurrence through evaluation of interval of elevated acoustic velocity and/or seismic events of prospective amplitude and polarity, (3) mitigate geologic risk via regional seismic and stratigraphic facies analysis as well as seismic mapping of amplitude distribution along prospective horizons, and (4) mitigate further prospect risk through assessment of the evidence of gas presence and migration into the GHSZ. Although a wide range of occurrence types might ultimately become viable energy supply options, this approach, which has been tested in only a small number of locations worldwide, has directed prospect evaluation toward those sand-hosted, high-saturation occurrences that were presently considered to have the greatest future commercial potential.

  4. Effects of salinity on methane gas hydrate system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; DingHui; XU; WenYue

    2007-01-01

    Using an approximately analytical formation,we extend the steady state model of the pure methane hydrate system to include the salinity based on the dynamic model of the methane hydrate system.The top and bottom boundaries of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ) and the actual methane hydrate zone (MHZ),and the top of free gas occurrence are determined by using numerical methods and the new steady state model developed in this paper.Numerical results show that the MHZ thickness becomes thinner with increasing the salinity,and the stability is lowered and the base of the MHSZ is shifted toward the seafloor in the presence of salts.As a result,the thickness of actual hydrate occurrence becomes thinner compared with that of the pure water case.On the other hand,since lower solubility reduces the amount of gas needed to form methane hydrate,the existence of salts in seawater can actually promote methane gas hydrate formation in the hydrate stability zone.Numerical modeling also demonstrates that for the salt-water case the presence of methane within the field of methane hydrate stability is not sufficient to ensure the occurrence of gas hydrate,which can only form when the methane concentration dissolved in solution with salts exceeds the local methane solubility in salt water and if the methane flux exceeds a critical value corresponding to the rate of diffusive methane transport.In order to maintain gas hydrate or to form methane gas hydrate in marine sediments,a persistent supplied methane probably from biogenic or thermogenic processes,is required to overcome losses due to diffusion and advection.

  5. A new geotechnical gas hydrates research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates encapsulate natural gas molecules in a very compact form, as ice-like compounds composed of water molecules. Permafrost environments and offshore areas contain vast quantities of gas hydrates within soil and rock. This paper describes the role played by gas hydrates in submarine slope instability, their potential as a sustainable energy source, and their effects on global climate change. A new state-of-the-art laboratory located at the University of Calgary, which was developed to study the geomechanical behaviour of gas hydrate-sediment mixtures, was also presented. A specialized high pressure low temperature triaxial apparatus capable of performing a suite of tests on gas hydrate-sediment mixtures is housed in this laboratory. Extensive renovations were required in order to enable the use of methane gas to simulate natural hydrate formation conditions. The laboratory is specifically designed to examine the properties and behaviour of reconstituted gas hydrate-sediment mixtures and natural gas hydrate core samples. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Geologic controls on gas hydrate occurrence in the Mount Elbert prospect, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, R.; Rose, K.; Collett, T.S.; Lee, M.; Winters, W.; Lewis, K.A.; Agena, W.

    2011-01-01

    formed prior to the imposition of gas hydrate stability conditions. ?? 2009.

  7. Stabilization of mercury in sediment by using biochars under reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W; Finfrock, Y Zou; Gordon, Robert A

    2017-03-05

    Mercury (Hg) is widely distributed in different localities around the world and poses a serious health threat to humans, especially when ingested in the form of methylmercury (MeHg). Efforts have been directed toward decreasing the production of MeHg by converting Hg to stable forms. Activated carbon and biochar have been evaluated as stabilization agents for Hg in contaminated sediments. However, the long-term fate of Hg stabilized by these materials remains unclear. Here, we compare the effectiveness of Hg stabilization using two biochars prepared from switchgrass at 300°C (lowT) and 600°C (highT). Experiments were conducted by co-blending biochars and sediment for >600 d under anaerobic conditions. Aqueous concentrations of total Hg and MeHg were greatly reduced in the presence of biochars, with the exception of a spike in MeHg concentration observed at ∼440 d in the high-T biochar system. Hg co-occurs with S, Fe, Cu, and other elements within the plant structure of low-T biochar particles, but primarily on the outer surfaces of high-T biochar particles. Our results indicate that the stabilization of Hg may be through an early-stage diagenetic process, suggesting that the stabilization of Hg by biochar may be effective over long time frames.

  8. Conditional stability versus ill-posedness for operator equations with monotone operators in Hilbert space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioan Boţ, Radu; Hofmann, Bernd

    2016-12-01

    In the literature on singular perturbation (Lavrentiev regularization) for the stable approximate solution of operator equations with monotone operators in the Hilbert space the phenomena of conditional stability and local well-posedness or ill-posedness are rarely investigated. Our goal is to present some studies which try to bridge this gap. So we present new results on the impact of conditional stability on error estimates and convergence rates for the Lavrentiev regularization and distinguish for linear problems well-posedness and ill-posedness in a specific manner motivated by a saturation result. Taking into account that the behavior of the bias (regularization error in the noise-free case) is crucial, general convergence rates, including logarithmic rates, are derived for linear operator equations by means of the method of approximate source conditions. This allows us to extend well-known convergence rate results for the Lavrentiev regularization that were based on general source conditions to the case of non-selfadjoint linear monotone forward operators for which general source conditions fail. Examples presenting the self-adjoint multiplication operator as well as the non-selfadjoint fractional integral operator and Cesàro operator illustrate the theoretical results. Extensions to the nonlinear case under specific conditions on the nonlinearity structure complete the paper.

  9. Transient seafloor venting on continental slopes from warming-induced methane hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, K. N.; Flemings, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Methane held in frozen hydrate cages within marine sediment comprises one of the largest carbon reservoirs on the planet. Recent submarine observations of widespread methane seepage may record hydrate dissociation due to oceanic warming, which consequently may further amplify climate change. Here we simulate the effect of seafloor warming on marine hydrate deposits using a multiphase flow model. We show that hydrate dissociation, gas migration, and subsequent hydrate formation cangenerate temporary methane venting into the ocean through the hydrate stability zone. Methane seeps venting through the hydrate stability zone on the eastern Atlantic margin may record this process due to warming begun thousands of years ago. Our results contrast with the traditional view that venting occurs only updip of the hydrate stability zone.

  10. A stability condition for turbulence model: From EMMS model to EMMS-based turbulence model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Limin; Li, Jinghai

    2013-01-01

    The closure problem of turbulence is still a challenging issue in turbulence modeling. In this work, a stability condition is used to close turbulence. Specifically, we regard single-phase flow as a mixture of turbulent and non-turbulent fluids, separating the structure of turbulence. Subsequently, according to the picture of the turbulent eddy cascade, the energy contained in turbulent flow is decomposed into different parts and then quantified. A turbulence stability condition, similar to the principle of the energy-minimization multi-scale (EMMS) model for gas-solid systems, is formulated to close the dynamic constraint equations of turbulence, allowing the heterogeneous structural parameters of turbulence to be optimized. We call this model the `EMMS-based turbulence model', and use it to construct the corresponding turbulent viscosity coefficient. To validate the EMMS-based turbulence model, it is used to simulate two classical benchmark problems, lid-driven cavity flow and turbulent flow with forced con...

  11. Coupled Numerical Analysis of the Stability Behaviour of Unsaturated Soil Slopes Under Rainfall Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng-hua(王成华); THOMAS H R

    2003-01-01

    The stability behaviour of unsaturated soil slopes under rainfall conditions is investigated via a parametric finite element analysis, which is a fully coupled flow and deformation approach linked to a dynamic programming technique for determining the minimum factor of safety as well as its corresponding critical slip surface based on the stress fields from the numerical computation. The effects of rainfall features, soil strength parameters and permeability properties on slope stability are studied. The analyses revealed that the soil matric suction decreased during rainfall, especially in slopes with high permeability and/or with high suction angles of unsaturated soils. The influence of rainfall conditions on such slopes is quite obvious, and soil suction drops rapidly, which leads to a consequent quick reduction in the factor of safety.

  12. Microprocessor supervised stability control system for the united power system of Middle Volga in fault conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdnikov, V.I.; Birgel, E.R.; Kovalev, V.D.; Kuznestov, A.N.

    1994-12-31

    The development of the 500 kV UPS of Middle Volga, the complication of its configuration and operating conditions particularly in connection with concentration of the generating power at Balakovo NPS have aggravated the problem of stability of the Middle Volga UPS when high power is transmitted along the 500 kV transient system. In this case the necessity for improving control actions` dosage accuracy has also appeared. This work discusses solution to the above mentioned issue. (author) 3 figs.

  13. Simple stability conditions of linear discrete time systems with multiple delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Sreten B.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have established a new Lyapunov-Krasovskii method for linear discrete time systems with multiple time delay. Based on this method, two sufficient conditions for delay-independent asymptotic stability of the linear discrete time systems with multiple delays are derived in the shape of Lyapunov inequality. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the present approach.

  14. The existence and stability of steady circulations in a conditionally symmetrically unstable basic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin

    1987-01-01

    The existence of steady, nonlinear circulations in a flow susceptible to conditionally symmetric instability is studied, treating the latent heating as an energy source which is implicitly related to the motion field. The viscous nonlinear circulations of symmetrical instability are briefly discussed, and an existence theorem for steady, nonlinear symmetric circulations with bounded rates of latent heat release is given. The uniqueness and stability of these circulations are discussed, and some physical interpretations are given.

  15. On Stability and the Spectrum Determined Growth Condition for Spatially Periodic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    On Stability and the Spectrum Determined Growth Condition for Spatially Periodic Systems Makan Fardad and Bassam Bamieh Abstract— We consider...difficult. This work is partially supported by AFOSR Grant FA9550-04-1-0207. M. Fardad and B. Bamieh are with the Department of Me- chanical and...Environmental Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93105-5070. email: fardad @engineering.ucsb.edu, bamieh@engineering.ucsb.edu. In this

  16. Gas and Gas Hydrate Potential Offshore Amasra,Bartin and Zonguldak and Possible Agent for Multiple BSR Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert Küçük, Hilmi; Dondurur, Derman; Özel, Özkan; Sınayuç, Çağlar; Merey, Şükrü; Parlaktuna, Mahmut; Çifçi, Günay

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, shallow gases and mud volcanoes have been studied intensively in the Black Sea in recent years. Researches have shown that the Black Sea region has an important potential about hydrocarbon. BSR reflections in the seismic sections and seabed sampling studies also have proven the formations of hydrates clearly. In this respect, total of 2400 km multichannel seismic reflection, chirp and multibeam bathymetry data were collected along shelf to abyssal plain in 2010 and 2012 offshore Amasra, Bartın, Zonguldak-Kozlu in the central Black Sea.. Collected data represent BSRs, bright spots and transparent zones. It has been clearly observed that possible gas chimneys cross the base of gas hydrate stability zones as a result of possible weak zones in the gas hydrate bearing sediments. Seabed samples were collected closely to possible gas chimneys due to shallow gas anomalies in the data. Head space gas cromatography was applied to seabed samples to observe gas composition and the gas cromatography results represented hydrocarbon gases such as Methane, Ethane, Propane, i-Butane, n-Butane, i-Pentane, n-Pentane and Hexane. Thermogenic gas production by Turkish Petroleum Corp. from Akçakoca-1 and Ayazlı-1 well is just located at the southwest of the study area and the observations of the study area point out there is also thermogenic gas potential at the eastern side of the Akçakoca. In addition, multiple-BSRs were observed in the study area and it is thought the key point of the multiple-BSRs are different gas compositions. This suggests that hydrate formations can be formed by gas mixtures. Changing of the thermobaric conditions can trigger dissociation of the gas hydrates in the marine sediments due to sedimentary load and changing of the water temperature around seabed. Our gas hydrate modelling study suggest that gas hydrates are behaving while their dissociation process if the gas hydrates are generated by gas mixture. Monitoring of our gas hydrate

  17. Estimates of future warming-induced methane emissions from hydrate offshore west Svalbard for a range of climate models

    OpenAIRE

    Marin-Moreno, Héctor; MINSHULL, Timothy A.; Westbrook, Graham K.; Sinha, Bablu

    2015-01-01

    Methane hydrate close to the hydrate stability limit in seafloor sediment could represent an important source of methane to the oceans and atmosphere as the oceans warm. We investigate the extent to which patterns of past and future ocean-temperature fluctuations influence hydrate stability in a region offshore West Svalbard where active gas venting has been observed. We model the transient behavior of the gas hydrate stability zone at 400–500 m water depth (mwd) in response to past temperatu...

  18. Estimates of future warming-induced methane emissions from hydrate offshore west Svalbard for a range of climate models

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Methane hydrate close to the hydrate stability limit in seafloor sediment could represent an important source of methane to the oceans and atmosphere as the oceans warm. We investigate the extent to which patterns of past and future ocean-temperature fluctuations influence hydrate stability in a region offshore West Svalbard where active gas venting has been observed. We model the transient behavior of the gas hydrate stability zone at 400–500 m water depth (mwd) in response to past temperatu...

  19. Energy conditions and DK stability criterion in the non-local gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Yang, Wei-Qiang; Zhang, Nan; Chen, Bo-Hai

    2016-01-01

    We study and derive the energy conditions and the Dolgov-Kawasaki (DK) stability criterion in non-local gravity, which is the modified theory of general relativity (GR) obtained by adding a term $m^2R\\Box^{-2}R$ to the Einstein-Hilbert action. Moreover, in order to get some insight on the meaning of the energy conditions, we illustrate the evolutions of four energy conditions with the parameter $\\alpha$ and redshift $z$. By analysis we give the constraint on the parameters $\\alpha$, namely, $|\\alpha|\\leq0.26$. Furthermore, by means of the Dolgov-Kawasaki stability criterion in the non-local gravity we find that the effective mass $m_\\text{eff}^2$ of the dynamical field $U$ is negative in any value ranges of parameter $\\alpha$, which is consistent with the result given in [JCAP 1607, 003 (2016)], i.e. the field $U$ is a ghost one. The result shows that the Dolgov-Kawasaki stability criterion cannot give any constraint on the parameter $\\alpha$.

  20. Stability of ranitidine tablets subjected to stress and environmental conditions, by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volonté, M G; Yuln, G; Mandrile, A; Longo, R; Cingolani, A

    2001-01-01

    High Performance Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC) method was applied in this study to comparatively evaluate the stability of tablets in their original package which 150 mg of Ranitidine from six different pharmaceutical laboratories in the market, according to ICH conditions for accelerated testing: 40 degrees C, 75% RH with and without light for six months. The stability at environmental conditions was evaluated for a twelve-month period, with and without light, with the same purpose. Ranitidine is widely used to treat peptic ulcer diseases. Ranitidine is susceptible to degradation under the influence of light, humidity and temperature. The chromatographic conditions were: RP-18 column of 250 mm yen 4 mm ID and a particle size of 5 mm; mobile phase of Acetonitrile-Ammonium acetate solution (0.2 M) (70:30; v/v) (pH*6) adjusted with glacial acetic acid; flow rate of 1 ml min-1; 25 degrees C of temperature; detection at 322 nm; injection volume of 20 ml, using height peak as the integration parameter. The results obtained at six months indicate that the stability of Ranitidine depends on the correct formulation and the primary container. The remaining content of Ranitidine, dissolved percentage in vitro and total impurity percentage were determined by HPLC. Organoleptic characteristics were visually examined. The proposed analytical method was validated and linearity, precision and selectivity were determined. Degradation products were detected.

  1. The effect of lead on the developmental stability of Drosophila subobscura through selection in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurbalija Zorana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry (FA, the increased variation of bilateral symmetry in a sample of individuals, can indicate disturbance in developmental stability caused by environmental and/or genomic stress. This developmental instability was analyzed in Drosophila subobscura maintained for seven generations on two different concentrations of lead in laboratory conditions. The FA4 index showed that the genotypes reared on the higher lead concentration were in developmental homeostasis, except for males in the F7 generation, for both wing size parameters. The results show that different degrees of lead pollution cause different responses to selection of the exposed population in laboratory conditions.

  2. Confined Water in Layered Silicates: The Origin of Anomalous Thermal Expansion Behavior in Calcium-Silicate-Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, N M Anoop; Wang, Bu; Falzone, Gabriel; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Pilon, Laurent; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2016-12-28

    Water, under conditions of nanoscale confinement, exhibits anomalous dynamics, and enhanced thermal deformations, which may be further enhanced when such water is in contact with hydrophilic surfaces. Such heightened thermal deformations of water could control the volume stability of hydrated materials containing nanoconfined structural water. Understanding and predicting the thermal deformation coefficient (TDC, often referred to as the CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion), which represents volume changes induced in materials under conditions of changing temperature, is of critical importance for hydrated solids including: hydrogels, biological tissues, and calcium silicate hydrates, as changes in their volume can result in stress development, and cracking. By pioneering atomistic simulations, we examine the physical origin of thermal expansion in calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the binding agent in concrete that is formed by the reaction of cement with water. We report that the TDC of C-S-H shows a sudden increase when the CaO/SiO2 (molar ratio; abbreviated as Ca/Si) exceeds 1.5. This anomalous behavior arises from a notable increase in the confinement of water contained in the C-S-H's nanostructure. We identify that confinement is dictated by the topology of the C-S-H's atomic network. Taken together, the results suggest that thermal deformations of hydrated silicates can be altered by inducing compositional changes, which in turn alter the atomic topology and the resultant volume stability of the solids.

  3. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 2 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    saturations. Large volumes (of order one pore volume) of gaseous and aqueous phases must be transported into the gas hydrate stability zone. The driver for this transport is the pressure sink induced by a reduction in occupied pore volume that accompanies the formation of hydrate from gas and water. Pore-scale imbibition models and bed-scale multiphase flow models indicate that the rate-limiting step in converting gas to hydrate is the supply of water to the hydrate stability zone. Moreover, the water supply rate is controlled by capillarity-driven flux for conditions typical of the Alaska North Slope. A meter-scale laboratory experiment confirms that significant volumes of fluid phases move into the hydrate stability zone and that capillarity is essential for the water flux. The model shows that without capillarity-driven flux, large saturations of hydrate cannot form. The observations of thick zones of large saturation at Mallik and Mt Elbert thus suggest that the primary control on these systems is the rate of transport of gaseous and aqueous phases, driven by the pressure sink at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. A key finding of our project is the elucidation of ?capillary fracturing? as a dominant gas transport mechanism in low-permeability media. We initially investigate this phenomenon by means of grain-scale simulations in which we extended a discrete element mechanics code (PFC, by Itasca) to incorporate the dynamics of first singlephase and then multiphase flow. A reductionist model on a square lattice allows us to determine some of the fundamental dependencies of the mode of gas invasion (capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and fracturing) on the parameters of the system. We then show that the morphology of the gas-invaded region exerts a fundamental control on the fabric of methane hydrate formation, and on the overpressures caused by methane hydrate dissociation. We demonstrate the existence of the different invasion regimes by means of controlled

  4. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 1 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    saturations. Large volumes (of order one pore volume) of gaseous and aqueous phases must be transported into the gas hydrate stability zone. The driver for this transport is the pressure sink induced by a reduction in occupied pore volume that accompanies the formation of hydrate from gas and water. Pore-scale imbibition models and bed-scale multiphase flow models indicate that the rate-limiting step in converting gas to hydrate is the supply of water to the hydrate stability zone. Moreover, the water supply rate is controlled by capillarity-driven flux for conditions typical of the Alaska North Slope. A meter-scale laboratory experiment confirms that significant volumes of fluid phases move into the hydrate stability zone and that capillarity is essential for the water flux. The model shows that without capillarity-driven flux, large saturations of hydrate cannot form. The observations of thick zones of large saturation at Mallik and Mt Elbert thus suggest that the primary control on these systems is the rate of transport of gaseous and aqueous phases, driven by the pressure sink at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. A key finding of our project is the elucidation of ?capillary fracturing? as a dominant gas transport mechanism in low-permeability media. We initially investigate this phenomenon by means of grain-scale simulations in which we extended a discrete element mechanics code (PFC, by Itasca) to incorporate the dynamics of first single-phase and then multiphase flow. A reductionist model on a square lattice allows us to determine some of the fundamental dependencies of the mode of gas invasion (capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and fracturing) on the parameters of the system. We then show that the morphology of the gas-invaded region exerts a fundamental control on the fabric of methane hydrate formation, and on the overpressures caused by methane hydrate dissociation. We demonstrate the existence of the different invasion regimes by means of controlled

  5. Origin and character of gaseous hydrocarbons in the hydrate and non-hydrate charged sediments on the Norway - Svalbard margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaular, Espen Nesheim

    2011-05-15

    Gas incubated in clathrate water-structures, stabilizes the hydrogen bonded substance termed gas hydrate. In the marine environment vast amount of carbon is stored as gas hydrates within the temperature and pressure zone these ice-like structures are stable. Natural gas hydrate mapping and characterization is important basic research that brings about critical knowledge concerning various topics. Natural gas hydrates is a vital part of the carbon cycle, it is a potential energy resource (and thereby a potential climate agent) and it is a potential geo-hazard. One of the goals the GANS initiative aimed at exploring, was the hydrate bearing sediment of the Norway -Svalbard margins, to investigate the character and expansion of natural gas hydrates. Part of the investigation was to define how the gas in the hydrated sediment was produced and where it came from. As a result this thesis addresses the matter of light hydrocarbon characterization and origin in two Norwegian hydrate deposits. On cruises to Vestnesa on the Svalbard margin and to Nyegga in the mid-Norwegian margin, samples of hydrate charged and non-hydrate charged sediments were obtained and analyzed. Through compositional and isotopic analyses the origin of the hydrate bound gas in the fluid escape feature G11 at Nyegga was determined. The hydrate incubated methane is microbial produced as well as parts of the hydrate bound ethane. The compositional analysis in both the Nyegga area and at the Vestnesa Ridge points at thermogenic contributions in the sediment interstitials and pore water. The two hydrate bearing margins show large differences in hydrocarbon content and microbial activity in the pockmarks investigated. The gravity cores from the penetrated pockmark at Vestnesa showed low hydrocarbon content and thus suggest ceased or periodic venting. The fluid flow escape features at Nyegga show large variety of flux rates based on ROV monitoring and headspace analysis of the sediment and pore water. The

  6. Putting the Deep Biosphere and Gas Hydrates on the Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Janelle J.; Briggs, Brandon R.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial processes in the deep biosphere affect marine sediments, such as the formation of gas hydrate deposits. Gas hydrate deposits offer a large source of natural gas with the potential to augment energy reserves and affect climate and seafloor stability. Despite the significant interdependence between life and geology in the ocean, coverage…

  7. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  8. Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds. Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutken, Carol [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Macelloni, Leonardo [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); D' Emidio, Marco [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Dunbar, John [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Higley, Paul [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This study was designed to investigate temporal variations in hydrate system dynamics by measuring changes in volumes of hydrate beneath hydrate-bearing mounds on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, the landward extreme of hydrate occurrence in this region. Direct Current Resistivity (DCR) measurements were made contemporaneously with measurements of oceanographic parameters at Woolsey Mound, a carbonate-hydrate complex on the mid-continental slope, where formation and dissociation of hydrates are most vulnerable to variations in oceanographic parameters affected by climate change, and where changes in hydrate stability can readily translate to loss of seafloor stability, impacts to benthic ecosystems, and venting of greenhouse gases to the water-column, and eventually, the atmosphere. We focused our study on hydrate within seafloor mounds because the structurally-focused methane flux at these sites likely causes hydrate formation and dissociation processes to occur at higher rates than at sites where the methane flux is less concentrated and we wanted to maximize our chances of witnessing association/dissociation of hydrates. We selected a particularly well-studied hydrate-bearing seafloor mound near the landward extent of the hydrate stability zone, Woolsey Mound (MC118). This mid-slope site has been studied extensively and the project was able to leverage considerable resources from the team’s research experience at MC118. The site exhibits seafloor features associated with gas expulsion, hydrates have been documented at the seafloor, and changes in the outcropping hydrates have been documented, photographically, to have occurred over a period of months. We conducted observatory-based, in situ measurements to 1) characterize, geophysically, the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability, and 2) contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents) to

  9. High stability of Stx2 phage in food and under food-processing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Tone Mari; Axelsson, Lars; Granum, Per Einar; Heir, Even; Holck, Askild; L'abée-Lund, Trine M

    2011-08-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) carrying Shiga toxin genes constitute a major virulence attribute in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). Several EHEC outbreaks have been linked to food. The survival of such strains in different foods has received much attention, while the fate of the mobile Shiga toxin-converting phages (Stx phages) has been less studied. We have investigated the stability of an Stx phage in several food products and examined how storage, food processing, and disinfection influence the infectivity of phage particles. The study involved a recombinant Stx phage (Δstx::cat) of an E. coli O103:H25 strain from a Norwegian outbreak in 2006. Temperature, matrix, and time were factors of major importance for the stability of phage particles. Phages stored at cooling temperatures (4°C) showed a dramatic reduction in stability compared to those stored at room temperature. The importance of the matrix was evident at higher temperatures (60°C). Phages in ground beef were below the detection level when heated to 60°C for more than 10 min, while phages in broth exposed to the same heating conditions showed a 5-log-higher stability. The phages tolerated desiccation poorly but were infective for a substantial period of time in solutions. Under moist conditions, they also had a high ability to tolerate exposure to several disinfectants. In a dry-fermented sausage model, phages were shown to infect E. coli in situ. The results show that Stx phage particles can maintain their infectivity in foods and under food-processing conditions.

  10. Efecto del almacenamiento al ambiente en semillas de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham sometidas a hidratación parcial Effect of storage under ambient conditions on seeds from Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham subject to partial hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda González

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue estudiar el efecto del almacenamiento al ambiente en la germinación de las semillas de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham sometidas a hidratación parcial. Los tratamientos fueron: control, sin escarificación (T0; escarificación térmica (ET con H2O a 80°C, durante dos minutos (T1; ET más hidratación parcial, en bandeja con agua corriente por 28 horas (T2; ET más hidratación parcial, en saco de yute humedecido con agua corriente por 28 horas (T3; ET más hidratación parcial, en bandeja con agua corriente y TMTD al 0,1% (plaguicida por 28 horas (T4; ET más hidratación parcial, en saco de yute humedecido con agua corriente y TMTD al 0,1% (plaguicida por 28 horas (T5. Las semillas hidratadas se deshidrataron durante 72 horas al aire y a la sombra, antes de almacenarlas. Se midió la germinación y la viabilidad a 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 18, 30 y 42 meses. Se utilizó un diseño totalmente aleatorizado y cuatro réplicas por tratamiento. Hubo diferencias significativas (PThe objective of the work was to study the effect of storage under ambient conditions on the germination of seeds from Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham subject to partial hydration. The treatments were: control, no scarification (T0; thermal scarification (TS with H2O at 80ºC, for two minutes (T1; TS plus partial hydration, on tray with tap water for 28 hours (T2; TS plus partial hydration, in jute sac moist with tap water for 28 hours (T3; TS plus partial hydration in tray with tap water and TMTD at 0,1% (pesticide for 28 hours (T4; TS plus partial hydration, in jute sac moist with tap water and TMTD at 0,1% (pesticide for 28 hours (T5. The hydrated seeds were dehydrated during 72 hours exposed to air and under shade, before being stored. Germination and viability were measured after 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 18, 30 and 42 months. A completely randomized design and four replications per treatment were used. There were significant differences (P<0

  11. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  12. High-pressure experiments on the stability of methane hydrates in the H2O-NH3-CH4 system with applications to Titan's cryovolcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukroun, M.; Le Menn, E.; Grasset, O.

    2007-08-01

    The current methane abundance in Titan's thick atmosphere cannot be explained without the existence of replenishment processes. Indeed, the intense photochemistry taking place in the atmosphere would destroy the 2-5% CH4 amounts measured by the GCMS onboard the Huygens probe [1] within 10-100 Myr [e.g. 2]. Among the several hypotheses that could explain this replenishment, release of methane during cryovolcanic events seems highly likely. The VIMS [3] and Radar instruments [4] onboard the Cassini spacecraft have brought substantial evidence for cryovolcanic features on Titan's surface. A numerical model has shown the possibility to release CH4 by dissociating methane clathrate hydrates at depth, due to interaction of a clathrate layer with warm ice intrusions [5]. However, the effect of volatile compounds, dissolved (e.g. N2) or in solution (e.g. NH3), would most certainly play a major role in cryovolcanic processes. High-pressure low-temperature experimental investigations on the effect of ammonia on methane hydrates' dissociation are conducted within an optical sapphire-anvil cell. Preliminary results have been previously presented, which lead to contradictory interpretations so far [6,7]. As further experiments are being performed, the reliability of the experimental measurements and the reasons for observing discrepancies in the results can be adressed with more and more confidence. This poster will discuss the experimental issues encountered in the H2O-NH3-CH4 system, up-todate experimental results, as well as their implications for Titan's cryovolcanism. References: [1] Niemann HB et al., Nature 438, 779-784 (2005). [2] Yung YL et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl., 55, 465-506 (1984). [3] Sotin C et al., Nature 435, 786-789 (2005). [4] Lopes RMC et al., Icarus 186, 395-412 (2007). [5] Tobie G et al., Nature 440 (2), 61-64 (2006). [6] Choukroun M et al., 37th Lunar and Planet. Sci. Conf. Abstract #1640 (2006). [7] Choukroun M et al., 38th Lunar and Planet. Sci. Conf

  13. Structure II gas hydrates found below the bottom-simulating reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganoni, M.; Cartwright, J. A.; Foschi, M.; Shipp, R. C.; Van Rensbergen, P.

    2016-06-01

    Gas hydrates are a major component in the organic carbon cycle. Their stability is controlled by temperature, pressure, water chemistry, and gas composition. The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is the primary seismic indicator of the base of hydrate stability in continental margins. Here we use seismic, well log, and core data from the convergent margin offshore NW Borneo to demonstrate that the BSR does not always represent the base of hydrate stability and can instead approximate the boundary between structure I hydrates above and structure II hydrates below. At this location, gas hydrate saturation below the BSR is higher than above and a process of chemical fractionation of the migrating free gas is responsible for the structure I-II transition. This research shows that in geological settings dominated by thermogenic gas migration, the hydrate stability zone may extend much deeper than suggested by the BSR.

  14. Effect of compositions in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) on skin hydration and occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, CH; Basri, M; Ismail, R; Lau, HLN; Tejo, BA; Kanthimathi, MS; Hassan, HA; Choo, YM

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study the effects of varying lipid concentrations, lipid and oil ratio, and the addition of propylene glycol and lecithin on the long-term physical stability of nanostructured lipid nanocarriers (NLC), skin hydration, and transepidermal water loss. Methods The various NLC formulations (A1–A5) were prepared and their particle size, zeta potential, viscosity, and stability were analyzed. The formulations were applied on the forearms of the 20 female volunteers (one forearm of each volunteer was left untreated as a control). The subjects stayed for 30 minutes in a conditioned room with their forearms uncovered to let the skin adapt to the temperature (22°C ± 2°C) and humidity (50% ± 2%) of the room. Skin hydration and skin occlusion were recorded at day one (before treatment) and day seven (after treatment). Three measurements for skin hydration and skin occlusion were performed in each testing area. Results NLC formulations with the highest lipid concentration, highest solid lipid concentration, and additional propylene glycol (formulations A1, A2, and A5) showed higher physical stability than other formulations. The addition of propylene glycol into an NLC system helped to reduce the particle size of the NLC and enhanced its long-term physical stability. All the NLC formulations were found to significantly increase skin hydration compared to the untreated controls within 7 days. All NLC formulations exhibited occlusive properties as they reduced the transepidermal water loss within 7 days. This effect was more pronounced with the addition of propylene glycol or lecithin into an NLC formulation, whereby at least 60% reduction in transepidermal water loss was observed. Conclusion NLCs with high lipid content, solid lipid content, phospholipid, and lecithin are a highly effective cosmetic delivery system for cosmetic topical applications that are designed to boost skin hydration. PMID:23293516

  15. Study of cements silicate phases hydrated under high pressure and high temperature; Etude des phases silicatees du ciment hydrate sous haute pression et haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meducin, F.

    2001-10-01

    This study concerns the durability of oil-well cementing. Indeed, in oil well cementing a cement slurry is pumped down the steel casing of the well up the annular space between it and the surrounding rock to support and protect the casing. The setting conditions of pressure and temperature may be very high (up to 1000 bar and 250 deg C at the bottom of the oil-well). In this research, the hydration of the main constituent of cement, synthetic tri-calcium silicate Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 2}, often called C{sub 3}S (C = CaO; S = SiO{sub 2} and H H{sub 2}O), is studied. Calcium Silicate hydrates are prepared in high-pressure cells to complete their phase diagram (P,T) and obtain the stability conditions for each species. Indeed, the phases formed in these conditions are unknown and the study consists in the hydration of C{sub 3}S at different temperatures, pressures, and during different times to simulate the oil-well conditions. In a first step (until 120 deg C at ambient pressure) the C-S-H, a not well crystallized and non-stoichiometric phase, is synthesized: it brings adhesion and mechanical properties., Then, when pressure and temperature increase, crystallized phases appear such as jaffeite (Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})(OH){sub 6}) and hillebrandite (Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2}). Silicon {sup 29}Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (using standard sequences MAS, CPMAS) allow us to identify all the silicates hydrates formed. Indeed, {sup 29}Si NMR is a valuable tool to determine the structure of crystallized or not-well crystallized phases of cement. The characterization of the hydrated samples is completed by other techniques: X- Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The following results are found: jaffeite is the most stable phase at C/S=3. To simulate the hydration of real cement, hydration of C{sub 3}S with ground quartz and with or without super-plasticizers is done. In those cases, new phases appear: kilchoanite mainly, and xonotlite. A large amount of

  16. Stability of conditionally invariant sets and controlled uncertain dynamic systems on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmikantham V.

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A basic feedback control problem is that of obtaining some desired stability property from a system which contains uncertainties due to unknown inputs into the system. Despite such imperfect knowledge in the selected mathematical model, we often seek to devise controllers that will steer the system in a certain required fashion. Various classes of controllers whose design is based on the method of Lyapunov are known for both discrete [4], [10], [15], and continuous [3–9], [11] models described by difference and differential equations, respectively. Recently, a theory for what is known as dynamic systems on time scales has been built which incorporates both continuous and discrete times, namely, time as an arbitrary closed sets of reals, and allows us to handle both systems simultaneously [1], [2], [12], [13]. This theory permits one to get some insight into and better understanding of the subtle differences between discrete and continuous systems. We shall, in this paper, utilize the framework of the theory of dynamic systems on time scales to investigate the stability properties of conditionally invariant sets which are then applied to discuss controlled systems with uncertain elements. For the notion of conditionally invariant set and its stability properties, see [14]. Our results offer a new approach to the problem in question.

  17. Effect of ohmic heating processing conditions on color stability of fungal pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Machado, Diederich; Morales-Oyervides, Lourdes; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan C; Aguilar, Cristóbal; Méndez-Zavala, Alejandro; Raso, Javier; Montañez, Julio

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of ohmic heating processing conditions on the color stability of a red pigment extract produced by Penicillium purpurogenum GH2 suspended in a buffer solution (pH 6) and in a beverage model system (pH 4). Color stability of pigmented extract was evaluated in the range of 60-90 ℃. The degradation pattern of pigments was well described by the first-order (fractional conversion) and Bigelow model. Degradation rate constants ranged between 0.009 and 0.088 min(-1) in systems evaluated. Significant differences in the rate constant values of the ohmic heating-treated samples in comparison with conventional thermal treatment suggested a possible effect of the oscillating electric field generated during ohmic heating. The thermodynamic analysis also indicated differences in the color degradation mechanism during ohmic heating specifically when the pigment was suspended in the beverage model system. In general, red pigments produced by P. purpurogenum GH2 presented good thermal stability under the range of the evaluated experimental conditions, showing potential future applications in pasteurized food matrices using ohmic heating treatment.

  18. Microstructure and Physical Properties of Sulfate Hydrate/Ice Eutectic Aggregates in the Binary System Sodium-Sulfate/Water at Planetary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C. M.; Kirby, S.; Durham, W.; Stern, L.

    2004-12-01

    Reflectance spectra data from Mars Odyssey, Galileo and potentially from Cassini suggest the presence of hydrated salts on numerous satellites in environments such as evaporate beds or combined with water ice. Improved mission data on these occurrences indicate that grain structures and properties of such materials merit a closer look using laboratory methods. Here we report the synthesis of a two-phase aggregate of sodium sulfate hydrate and water ice made by eutectic solidification from solution, characterization of its microstructure using cryogenic SEM, and comparison of its physical properties to those of its end-member components. Samples are crystallized from solution using a precision cryobath and seeded growth. The reaction is a "simple" one meaning that there is no solid solution formation in either of the two solid phases. The eutectic composition we studied for the sodium sulfate hydrate is 4wt% Na2SO4, which corresponds to about .06 volume fraction of Na2SO4ṡ10H2O, mirabilite, and .94 ice I. The eutectic microstructure observed with this volume fraction, which is termed "broken lamellar", consists of fairly uniform blade-like mirabilite grains arranged in roughly parallel columns within a water ice matrix. The blades and matrix material form a lamella that alternates with lamellae of pure ice. Energy dispersive spectroscopy of these eutectic mixtures confirms the presence of the two crystalline phases. Also, we find that lamellar spacing decreases with increasing growth rate. Constant-strain-rate tests in compression are carried out in the cryogenic gas deformation apparatus at LLNL in a pressure-temperature range appropriate to the icy satellites. We report the rheology of the two-phase aggregate and compare it to the strength properties of pure water ice and pure mirabilite. With the aid of numerous studies on similar structures in the literature on metals, we analyze the deformation mechanics from the perspective of defect and crack propagation

  19. On plasma edge ideal MHD stability/instability condition in Mercier stable magnetic hill configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepetov, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The stability of peeling modes in zero net current stellarator plasma is studied in high poloidal mode number m \\gg 1 approximation. The vacuum region solution is taken into account. Under these conditions in Mercier stable magnetic hill plasmas internal peeling modes are stable. External peeling modes can be unstable, but several limitations on them are found. It is shown that an analytically derived pressure gradient threshold is in reasonable agreement with the experimental observations and numerical calculations. The threshold decreases with increasing poloidal mode number m. It is shown, however, that higher modes may be stabilized due to finite ion Larmor radius effects. For the sake of definiteness, we have investigated peeling mode behavior in Mercier unstable plasma. It is shown that both external and internal peeling modes can be unstable in this regime. However, external and internal peeling modes in this case are definitely different.

  20. The effect of radiation on stability conditions in $f(R)$ gravity models

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Murli Manohar

    2015-01-01

    We solve the field equations of modified gravity for $f(R)$ model in metric formalism. Further, we obtain the fixed points of the dynamical system in phase space analysis of $f(R)$ models, both with and without the effects of radiation. Stability of these points is studied by invoking perturbations about them. We apply the conditions on the eigenvalues of the matrix obtained in the linearized first-order differential equations for stability of points. Following this, these fixed points are used for the dynamics of different phases of the universe. Certain linear and quadratic forms of $f(R)$ are determined from the geometrical and physical considerations and the dynamics of the scale factor is found for those forms. Further, we determine the Hubble parameter $H(t)$, Ricci scalar $R$ for radiation-, matter- and acceleration-dominated phases of the universe, whose time-ordering may explain an arrow of time throughout the cosmic evolution.

  1. Stability Comparison of Recordable Optical Discs—A Study of Error Rates in Harsh Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Oliver; Lu, Richang; Zheng, Jian; Byers, Fred; Tang, Xiao

    2004-01-01

    The reliability and longevity of any storage medium is a key issue for archivists and preservationists as well as for the creators of important information. This is particularly true in the case of digital media such as DVD and CD where a sufficient number of errors may render the disc unreadable. This paper describes an initial stability study of commercially available recordable DVD and CD media using accelerated aging tests under conditions of increased temperature and humidity. The effect of prolonged exposure to direct light is also investigated and shown to have an effect on the error rates of the media. Initial results show that high quality optical media have very stable characteristics and may be suitable for long-term storage applications. However, results also indicate that significant differences exist in the stability of recordable optical media from different manufacturers. PMID:27366630

  2. Global stability and tumor clearance conditions for a cancer chemotherapy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Paul A.; Starkov, Konstantin E.; Coria, Luis N.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we study the global dynamics of a cancer chemotherapy system presented by de Pillis et al. (2007). This mathematical model describes the interaction between tumor cells, effector-immune cells, circulating lymphocytes and chemotherapy treatment. By applying the localization method of compact invariant sets, we find lower and upper bounds for these three cells populations. Further, we define a bounded domain in R+,04 where all compact invariant sets of the system are located and provide conditions under which this domain is positively invariant. We apply LaSalle's invariance principle and one result concerning two-dimensional competitive systems in order to derive sufficient conditions for tumor clearance and global asymptotic stability of the tumor-free equilibrium point. These conditions are computed by using bounds of the localization domain and they are given in terms of the chemotherapy treatment. Finally, we perform numerical simulations in order to illustrate our results.

  3. Quantifying atmospheric stability conditions at a swine facility and an adjacent corn field in Iowa, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Ramirez, Guillermo; Sauer, Thomas J.; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Prueger, John H.

    2011-10-01

    Atmospheric stability conditions in the atmospheric surface layer control the distance and direction of transport of air contaminants. Near confined animal facilities, transport processes significantly impact air quality as these sites typically act as point sources of dust and odor constituents; however, little information is available on atmospheric stability effects. This study was conducted to assess year-round temporal patterns of atmospheric stability at a swine production facility and an adjacent commercial corn field (CF) in the US Midwest. Two towers of 10 and 20 m heights for continuous micrometeorological measurements were deployed within a CF and between swine buildings (BSB), respectively. Each tower was equipped with an eddy-covariance system at 6.8 m height, infrared thermometers, and six cup anemometers with thermocouples installed at log-distributed heights. Overall results from gradient Richardson number and Monin-Obukhov (z/L) calculations revealed a greater prevalence of unstable conditions for BSB compared with CF. During the 13-month measurement period, unstable cases (z/L ranging from -1 to -0.01) occurred 1.4 times more frequently for BSB than CF (52 vs. 39%, respectively), while stable cases (0.011-0.2) were 1.8 times more frequent for CF than BSB (24 vs. 14%, respectively). These patterns were partly associated with higher surface radiometric temperatures for BSB. Relatively greater diurnal heat capture at BSB (ground and roof surfaces) and a cooling effect in CF through active canopy transpiration during the daytime explain these z/L and radiometric temperature results. Prevalent diurnal atmospheric instability at BSB suggests enhanced ascendant vertical transport of air pollutants perhaps causing greater mixing/dilution with the atmospheric layer and/or their facilitated transport over greater distances when sorbed onto particles. This enhanced understanding of the spatio-temporal patterns of atmospheric stability can be subsequently

  4. The fate of gas hydrates in the Barents Sea and Kara Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzke, Peter; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Schicks, Judith; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Cacace, Mauro; Jacquey, Antoine; Sippel, Judith; Faleide, Jan Inge

    2016-04-01

    The Barents Sea and Kara Sea are located in the European Arctic. Recent seismic lines indicate the presence of gas hydrates in the Barents Sea and Kara Sea region. Natural gas hydrates contain huge amounts of methane. Their stability is mainly sensitive to pressure and temperature conditions which make them susceptible for climate change. When not stable, large volumes of methane will be released in the water column and - depending on the water depth - may also be released into the atmosphere. Therefore, studying the evolution in time and space of the gas hydrates stability zone in the Barents Sea region is of interest for both environmental impact and energy production. In this study, we assess the gas hydrate inventory of the Barents Sea and Kara Sea under the light of increasing ocean bottom temperatures in the next 200 years. Thereby, we make use of an existing 3D structural and thermal model which resolves five sedimentary units, the crystalline crust and the lithospheric mantle. The sedimentary units are characterised by the prevailing lithology and porosity including effects of post-depositional erosion which strongly affect the local geothermal gradient. Governing equations for the conductive 3D thermal field and momentum balance have been integrated in a massively parallel finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly on unstructured meshes. First we calculate the present-day steady-state 3D thermal field. Subsequently, we use the latter as initial condition to calculate the transient 3D thermal field for the next 200 years considering an ocean temperature model as upper boundary. Temperature and load distributions are then used to calculate the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone for each time step. The results show that the gas hydrate stability zone strongly varies in the region due to the local geothermal gradient changes. The latter

  5. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 2 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    saturations. Large volumes (of order one pore volume) of gaseous and aqueous phases must be transported into the gas hydrate stability zone. The driver for this transport is the pressure sink induced by a reduction in occupied pore volume that accompanies the formation of hydrate from gas and water. Pore-scale imbibition models and bed-scale multiphase flow models indicate that the rate-limiting step in converting gas to hydrate is the supply of water to the hydrate stability zone. Moreover, the water supply rate is controlled by capillarity-driven flux for conditions typical of the Alaska North Slope. A meter-scale laboratory experiment confirms that significant volumes of fluid phases move into the hydrate stability zone and that capillarity is essential for the water flux. The model shows that without capillarity-driven flux, large saturations of hydrate cannot form. The observations of thick zones of large saturation at Mallik and Mt Elbert thus suggest that the primary control on these systems is the rate of transport of gaseous and aqueous phases, driven by the pressure sink at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. A key finding of our project is the elucidation of ?capillary fracturing? as a dominant gas transport mechanism in low-permeability media. We initially investigate this phenomenon by means of grain-scale simulations in which we extended a discrete element mechanics code (PFC, by Itasca) to incorporate the dynamics of first singlephase and then multiphase flow. A reductionist model on a square lattice allows us to determine some of the fundamental dependencies of the mode of gas invasion (capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and fracturing) on the parameters of the system. We then show that the morphology of the gas-invaded region exerts a fundamental control on the fabric of methane hydrate formation, and on the overpressures caused by methane hydrate dissociation. We demonstrate the existence of the different invasion regimes by means of controlled

  6. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  7. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  8. Effects of Fluid Saturation on Gas Recovery from Class-3 Hydrate Accumulations Using Depressurization: Case Study of Yuan-An Ridge Site in Southwestern Offshore Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Jyun; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2016-04-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds in which guest gas molecules are trapped in host lattices of ice crystals. In Taiwan, the significant efforts have recently begun to evaluate the reserves of hydrate because the vast accumulations of gas hydrates had been recognized in southwestern offshore Taiwan. Class-3 type hydrate accumulations are referred to an isolated hydrate layer without an underlying zone of mobile fluids, and the entire hydrate layer may be well within the hydrate stability zone. The depressurization method is a useful dissociation method for gas production from Class-3 hydrate accumulations. The dissociation efficiency is controlled by the responses of hydrate to the propagating pressure disturbance, and the pressure propagation is relating to the amount (or saturation) of the mobile fluid in pore space of the hydrate layer. The purpose of this study is to study the effects of fluid saturation on the gas recovery from a class-3 hydrate accumulation using depressurization method. The case of a class-3 hydrate deposit of Yuan-An Ridge in southwestern offshore Taiwan is studied. The numerical method was used in this study. The reservoir simulator we used to study the dissociation of hydrate and the production of gas was the STARS simulator developed by CMG, which coupled heat transfer, geo-chemical, geo-mechanical, and multiphase fluid flow mechanisms. The study case of Yuan-An Ridge is located in southwestern offshore Taiwan. The hydrate deposit was found by the bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). The geological structure of the studied hydrate deposit was digitized to build the geological model (grids) of the case. The formation parameters, phase behavior data, rock and fluid properties, and formation's initial conditions were assigned sequentially to grid blocks, and the completion and operation conditions were designed to wellbore blocks to finish the numerical model. The changes of reservoir pressure, temperature, saturation due to the hydrate

  9. Bioreduction of U(VI) and stability of immobilized uranium under suboxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nan; Ding, De-xin; Li, Shi-mi; Tan, Xiang; Li, Guang-yue; Wang, Yong-dong; Xu, Fei

    2016-04-01

    In order to study the bioreduction of U(VI) and stability of immobilized uranium under suboxic conditions, microcosm were amended with ethanol, lactate and glucose, and incubated under suboxic conditions. During the incubation, total dissolved U in amended microcosms decreased from 0.95 mg/L to 0.03 mg/L. Pyrosequencing results showed that, the proportion of anaerobic microorganisms capable of reducing U(VI) under suboxic conditions was small compared with that under anoxic conditions; the proportion of aerobic and facultative anaerobic microorganisms capable of consuming the dissolved oxygen was large; and some of the facultative anaerobic microorganisms could reduce U(VI). These results indicated that different microbial communities were responsible for the bioreduction of U(VI) under suboxic and anoxic conditions. After the electron donors were exhausted, total dissolved U in the amended microcosms remained unchanged, while the U(VI)/U(IV) ratio in the solid phase of sediments increased obviously. This implied that the performance of bioreduction of the U(VI) can be maintained under suboxic condition.

  10. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Heremans

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  11. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  12. Stability of lycopene in cv. Saladette tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) stored under different conditions

    OpenAIRE

    R.M. Galicia; R. Verde; E. Ponce; R.O. González; C. Saucedo; Guerrero, I

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the concentration of lycopene in cv. Saladette tomato subjected to blanching (thermal treatment), to extract the carotenoid and to evaluate the stability of the pigment in solutions added with and without antioxidants, in conditions of darkness at 4, 20 and 60 °C, and in fluorescent light at 20 °C during 30 days. The concentration of lycopene in non blanched tomatoes was 79.20 ug/g, while in blanched tomatoes it was 75.25 ug/g, none presenting an...

  13. Stability and Bifurcation in a Delayed Reaction-Diffusion Equation with Dirichlet Boundary Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shangjiang; Ma, Li

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of a diffusive equation with time delay subject to Dirichlet boundary condition in a bounded domain. The existence of spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solution is investigated by applying Lyapunov-Schmidt reduction. The existence of Hopf bifurcation at the spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solution is derived by analyzing the distribution of the eigenvalues. The direction of Hopf bifurcation and stability of the bifurcating periodic solution are also investigated by means of normal form theory and center manifold reduction. Moreover, we illustrate our general results by applications to the Nicholson's blowflies models with one- dimensional spatial domain.

  14. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  15. Stability study of propoxur (Baygon) in whole blood and urine stored at varying temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramagiri, Suma; Kosanam, Hari; Sai Prakash, P K

    2006-06-01

    A stability study has been initiated for propoxur (Baygon) in whole blood and urine samples stored over a period of 60 days at four different temperature conditions (room temperature, 4 degrees C, -20 degrees C, and -80 degrees C). Stability data was established on day 0, 1, 7, 14, 28, 42, and 60. Sample purification was done by solid-phase extraction using a weak cation exchange cartridge (Isolute CBA), and quantitation was carried out by a validated high-performance liquid chromatographic method with a photodiode-array UV detector. Propoxur was spiked at two different concentration levels in both blood and urine samples [low concentration (10 microg/L) and high concentration (100 microg/L)]. Isopropoxy phenol was observed as the major degradation product in blood and urine samples and confirmed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. At room temperature, a substantial decrease in concentration of about 95% was observed at the end of the stability study in both blood and urine samples. However, at 4 degrees C, the concentration of propoxur observed after 60 days was around 60% in both samples. A decrease in temperature reduced the degradation, and finally propoxur was found to be stable at -80 degrees C and -20 degrees C for the whole observation period (60 days). The data collected suggests that knowledge about time-dependent decrease of propoxur in urine and blood samples is of considerable significance in forensic toxicology, and, therefore, forensic cases should be interpreted with caution.

  16. Stability of Fe-oxide nanoparticles coated with natural organic matter under relevant environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekli, L; Phuntsho, S; Tijing, L D; Zhou, J L; Kim, J-H; Shon, H K

    2014-01-01

    Manufactured nanoparticles (MNPs) are increasingly released into the environment and thus research on their fate and behaviour in complex environmental samples is urgently needed. The fate of MNPs in the aquatic environment will mainly depend on the physico-chemical characteristics of the medium. The presence and concentration of natural organic matter (NOM) will play a significant role on the stability of MNPs by either decreasing or exacerbating the aggregation phenomenon. In this study, we firstly investigated the effect of NOM concentration on the aggregation behaviour of manufactured Fe-oxide nanoparticles. Then, the stability of the coated nanoparticles was assessed under relevant environmental conditions. Flow field-flow fractionation, an emerging method which is gaining popularity in the field of nanotechnology, has been employed and results have been compared to another size-measurement technique to provide increased confidence in the outcomes. Results showed enhanced stability when the nanoparticles are coated with NOM, which was due to electrosteric stabilisation. However, the presence of divalent cations, even at low concentration (i.e. less than 1 mM) was found to induce aggregation of NOM-coated nanoparticles via bridging mechanisms between NOM and Ca(2+).

  17. Human Serum Albumin Increases the Stability of Green Tea Catechins in Aqueous Physiological Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Zinellu

    Full Text Available Epicatechin (EC, epigallocatechin (EGC, epicatechingallate (ECG and epigallocatechingallate (EGCG are antioxidants present in the green tea, a widely used beverage whose health benefits are largely recognized. Nevertheless, major physicochemical limitations, such as the high instability of catechins, pose important questions concerning their potential pharmacological use. Recent studies indicate that binding of catechins with plasmatic proteins may modulate their plasma concentration, tissue delivery and biological activity. After 5 minutes of incubation with HSA both ECG and EGCG were fully bound to HSA, while after 48h incubation only 41% of EC and 70% of EGC resulted linked. HSA had a strong stabilizing effect on all catechins, which could be found in solution between 29 and 85% even after 48h of incubation. In the absence of HSA, EGC and EGCG disappeared in less than 24h, while ECG and EC were found after 48h at 5 and 50%, respectively. The stabilizing effect of HSA toward EGCG, obtained in aqueous physiological conditions, resulted stronger in comparison to cysteine and HCl, previously reported to stabilize this polyphenol. Because of the multitude of contradictory data concerning in vivo and in vitro antioxidant-based experimentations, we believe our work may shed some light on this debated field of research.

  18. Human Serum Albumin Increases the Stability of Green Tea Catechins in Aqueous Physiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinellu, Angelo; Sotgia, Salvatore; Scanu, Bastianina; Forteschi, Mauro; Giordo, Roberta; Cossu, Annalisa; Posadino, Anna Maria; Carru, Ciriaco; Pintus, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epicatechingallate (ECG) and epigallocatechingallate (EGCG) are antioxidants present in the green tea, a widely used beverage whose health benefits are largely recognized. Nevertheless, major physicochemical limitations, such as the high instability of catechins, pose important questions concerning their potential pharmacological use. Recent studies indicate that binding of catechins with plasmatic proteins may modulate their plasma concentration, tissue delivery and biological activity. After 5 minutes of incubation with HSA both ECG and EGCG were fully bound to HSA, while after 48h incubation only 41% of EC and 70% of EGC resulted linked. HSA had a strong stabilizing effect on all catechins, which could be found in solution between 29 and 85% even after 48h of incubation. In the absence of HSA, EGC and EGCG disappeared in less than 24h, while ECG and EC were found after 48h at 5 and 50%, respectively. The stabilizing effect of HSA toward EGCG, obtained in aqueous physiological conditions, resulted stronger in comparison to cysteine and HCl, previously reported to stabilize this polyphenol. Because of the multitude of contradictory data concerning in vivo and in vitro antioxidant-based experimentations, we believe our work may shed some light on this debated field of research.

  19. Influence of the initial state of carbon nanotubes on their colloidal stability under natural conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwyzer, Irene [Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH-9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Eawag - Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Kaegi, Ralf; Sigg, Laura [Eawag - Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Magrez, Arnaud [EPFL - Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Nowack, Bernd, E-mail: nowack@empa.ch [Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH-9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    The colloidal stability of dry and suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the presence of amphiphilic compounds (i.e. natural organic matter or surfactants) at environmentally realistic concentrations was investigated over several days. The suspensions were analyzed for CNT concentration (UV-vis spectroscopy), particle size (nanoparticle tracking analysis), and CNT length and dispersion quality (TEM). When added in dry form, around 1% of the added CNTs remained suspended. Pre-dispersion in organic solvent or anionic detergent stabilized up to 65% of the added CNTs after 20 days of mild shaking and 5 days of settling. The initial state of the CNTs (dry vs. suspended) and the medium composition hence are critical determinants for the partitioning of CNTs between sediment and the water column. TEM analysis revealed that single suspended CNTs were present in all suspensions and that shaking and settling resulted in a fractionation of the CNTs with shorter CNTs remaining predominantly in suspension. - Highlights: > Individually suspended CNTs are present under environment relevant conditions. > The number of suspended CNTs varies depending on the medium composition. > Surfactants at environmental concentrations have no suspending effect on dry CNTs. > Pre-dispersed CNTs are more stable in suspension than dry CNTs. - The colloidal stability of CNTs varies a lot depending on the initial state of the CNTs (dry vs. pre-dispersed), the applied dispersant for pre-suspension, and the composition of the medium.

  20. Kinetic studies of gas hydrate formation with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pipeline blockage by gas hydrates is a serious problem in the petroleum industry.Low-dosage inhibitors have been developed for its cost-effective and environmentally acceptable characteristics.In a 1.072-L reactor with methane,ethane and propane gas mixture under the pressure of about 8.5 MPa at 4 °C,hydrate formation was investigated with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors PVP and GHI1,the change of the compressibility factor and gas composition in the gas phase was analyzed,the gas contents in hydrates were compared with PVP and GHI1 added,and the inhibition mechanism of GHI1 was discussed.The results show that PVP and GHI1 could effectively inhibit the growth of gas hydrates but not nucleation.Under the experimental condition with PVP added,methane and ethane occupied the small cavities of the hydrate crystal unit and the ability of ethane entering into hydrate cavities was weaker than that of methane.GHI1 could effectively inhibit molecules which could more readily form hydrates.The ether and hydroxy group of diethylene glycol monobutyl ether have the responsibility for stronger inhibition ability of GHI1 than PVP.

  1. Gas Hydrates as a CH4 Source and a CO2 Sink: New Approaches Based on Fundamental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Erzinger, J.

    2007-12-01

    hydrates: Differential scanning calorimetric measurements for the determination of the specific enthalpy of dissociation, determination of stability fields for pure and multicomponent systems, CH4 - CO2 -exchange reaction in clathrate hydrates and CO2 -hydrate formation in sediments under different pressure and temperature conditions were studied. Based on these fundamental data, new concepts for methane production and combined CO2 - sequestration will be presented and discussed. Reference: S.R. Dallimore, T.S. Collet (Eds.), 2005. Scientific Results from the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program, Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada, Geological Survey of Canada, WO H. Lee, Y. Seo, Y.-T. Seo, I.L. Moudrakovski, J.A. Ripmeester, 2003. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 42, 5049-5051 A. Graue, B. Kvamme, 2006. Conference Paper presented at the Offshore Technology Conference in Houston, Texas, U.S.A., 1-4 May 2006 J.M. Schicks, R. Naumann, J. Erzinger, K.C. Hester, Caroly A. Koh, E.D. Sloan, 2006. Journal of Physical Chemistry, 110, 11468-11474

  2. Stability of barakol under hydrolytic stress conditions and its major degradation product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantong, Boonrat; Wongtongtair, Supim; Nusuetrong, Punnee; Sotanaphun, Uthai; Chaichantipyuth, Chaiyo; Meksuriyen, Duangdeun

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the stability of barakol, an anxiolytic constituent extracted from leaves of Senna siamea (Lam.) Irwin & Barneby (syn. Cassia siamea Lam.), under the International Conference on Harmonisation suggested conditions using HPLC with photodiode array detection. Extensive degradation of barakol was found to occur under alkaline conditions through base-catalyzed hydrolysis. Mild degradation of barakol was observed under thermal and oxidative stress while it was stable under acidic conditions. The reaction rate constants (Kobs) of barakol degradation under alkaline conditions at pHs 12 and 13 were 3.0x10(-5) and 9.6x10(-3) min(-1), respectively. The activation energy according to the Arrhenius plot was calculated to be 26.9+/-3.3 kcal/mol at pH 13 and temperatures between 12 and 51 degrees C. The major degradation product of barakol under both alkaline and thermal stress conditions was characterized by LC-MS and NMR as cassiachromone.

  3. Operating conditions and stability of spin torque majority gates: Analytical understanding and numerical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaysset, Adrien; Manfrini, Mauricio; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.; Radu, Iuliana P.; Thean, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    The functionality of a cross-shaped Spin Torque Majority Gate (STMG) is primarily limited by the pinning of a domain wall (DW) at the center of the device. Here, an analytical model is built to calculate the conditions for such a pinning and to deduce the operating range. The assumptions of the model and the conclusions are validated by micromagnetic simulations. The total magnetic energy of the DW state is derived. By minimizing this energy with respect to two degrees of freedom, the DW stability condition is obtained. We find that the lateral length of the STMG is the critical dimension: it must be smaller than about five times the DW width. This result is confirmed by micromagnetic simulations with a high accuracy. In process, we solved a more fundamental problem: the macrospin limit of a finite ferromagnet containing one pinning site. We found the correction of the usual DW width expression due to finite length of wires.

  4. Investigating the Role of Conformational Effects on Laccase Stability and Hyperactivation under Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Valerio; Chernykh, Alexey; Fiorindo, Federica; Kolomytseva, Marina; Sinigoi, Loris; Myasoedova, Nina; Fattor, Diana; Ebert, Cynthia; Golovleva, Ludmila; Gardossi, Lucia

    2015-11-02

    Fungal laccase from Steccherinum ochraceum 1833 displays remarkable stability under different harsh conditions: organic/buffer mixtures, thermal treatment, and microwave radiation. The behavior is particularly significant in the light of the sharp inactivation observed for two different fungal laccases. Laccase from S. ochraceum 1833 also displays hyperactivation under mild thermal treatment (60 °C). Molecular dynamics simulations at 80 °C explained how this laccase retains the geometry of the electron transfer pathway, thereby assuring electron transfer through the copper ions and thus maintaining its catalytic activity at high temperature. Spectroscopic studies revealed that the thermal activation corresponds to specific conformational changes in the protein. The results indicate that this laccase is potentially applicable under denaturing conditions that might be beneficial for the biotransformation of recalcitrant substrates. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Stability of Interfacial Phase Growth in a Slab with Convective Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    The mass transport and energy equations for a semi-infinite porous slab are solved using similarity variables and closed form functions to describe freezing with remelt at the interface. Heat and mass balance analyses give a transcendental equation for the unknown interfacial freezing velocity for solving on the computer. The solutions for the temperature and mass concentration are decoupled and solved analytically. The solution for convective boundary conditions is compared with that for Dirichlet boundary conditions. The progressive development of the solution with material thickness and change of functional time dependence and effect on the stability of nucleation is outlined. A discussion with biological adaptation to extreme cold and possible evolution of molecules in heat transfer regimes is included in light of the above.

  6. A Sufficient Condition for Power Flow Insolvability with Applications to Voltage Stability Margins

    CERN Document Server

    Molzahn, Daniel K; DeMarco, Christopher L

    2012-01-01

    For the nonlinear power flow problem specified with standard PQ, PV, and slack bus equality constraints, we present a sufficient condition under which the specified set of nonlinear algebraic equations has no solution. This sufficient condition is constructed in a framework of an associated feasible, convex optimization problem. The objective employed in this optimization problem yields a measure of distance (in a parameter set) to the power flow solution boundary. In practical terms, this distance is closely related to quantities that previous authors have proposed as voltage stability margins. A typical margin is expressed in terms of the parameters of system loading (injected powers); here we additionally introduce a new margin in terms of the parameters of regulated bus voltages.

  7. Is Submarine Groundwater Discharge a Gas Hydrate Formation Mechanism on the Circum-Arctic Shelf?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrate is an ice-like solid that can sequester large quantities of methane gas in marine sediments along most continental margins where thermodynamic conditions permit its formation. Along the circum-Arctic shelf, relict permafrost-associated methane hydrate deposits formed when non-glaciated portions of the shelf experienced subaerial exposure during ocean transgressions. Gas hydrate stability and the permeability of circum-Arctic shelf sediments to gas migration is closely linked with relict submarine permafrost. Heat flow observations on the Alaskan North Slope and Canadian Beaufort Shelf suggest the movement of groundwater offshore, but direct observations of groundwater flow do not exist. Submarine discharge, an offshore flow of fresh, terrestrial groundwater, can affect the temperature and salinity field in shelf sediments, and may be an important factor in submarine permafrost and gas hydrate evolution on the Arctic continental shelf. Submarine groundwater discharge may also enhance the transport of organic matter for methanogenesis within marine sediments. Because it is buoyancy-driven, the velocity field contains regions with a vertical (upward) component as groundwater flows offshore. This combination of factors makes submarine groundwater discharge a potential mechanism controlling permafrost-associated gas hydrate evolution on the Arctic continental shelf. In this study, we quantitatively investigate the feasibility of submarine groundwater discharge as a control on permafrost-associated gas hydrate formation on the Arctic continental shelf, using the Canadian Beaufort Shelf as an example. We have developed a shelf-scale, two-dimensional numerical model based on the finite volume method for two-phase flow of pore fluid and methane gas within Arctic shelf sediments. The model tracks the evolution of the pressure, temperature, salinity, methane gas, methane hydrate, and permafrost fields given imposed boundary conditions, with latent heat of

  8. Effect of various storage conditions on the stability of quinolones in raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meixia; Wen, Fang; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-07-01

    Research on the storage stability of antibiotic residues in milk is important for method development or validation, milk quality control and risk assessment during screening, confirmation, qualitative or quantitative analysis. This study was conducted using UPLC-MS/MS to determine the stability of six quinolones - ciprofloxacin (CIP), danofloxacin (DAN), enrofloxacin (ENR), sarafloxacin (SAR), difloxacin (DIF) and flumequine (FLU) - in raw milk stored under various conditions to investigate if quinolones degrade during storage of milk, and finally to determine optimal storage conditions for analysis and scientific risk assessment of quinolone residues in raw milk. The storage conditions included different temperatures and durations (4°C for 4, 8, 24 and 48 h; -20°C for 1, 7 and 30 days; -80°C for 1, 7 and 30 days), thawing temperatures (25, 40 and 60°C), freeze-thaw cycles (1-5), and the addition of different preservatives (sodium thiocyanate, sodium azide, potassium dichromate, bronopol and methanal). Most quinolones exhibited high stability at 4°C for up to 24 h, but began to degrade after 48 h. In addition, no degradation of quinolones was seen when milk samples were stored at -20°C for up to 7 days; however, 30 days of storage at -20°C resulted in a small amount of degradation (about 30%). Similar results were seen when samples were stored at -80°C. Moreover, no losses were observed when frozen milk samples were thawed at 25, 40 or 60°C. All the quinolones of interest, except sarafloxacin, were stable when milk samples were thawed at 40°C once and three times, but unstable after five freeze-thaw cycles. Preservatives affected the stability of quinolones, but the effects differed depending on the preservative and quinolone. The results of this study indicate optimum storage protocols for milk samples, so that residue levels reflect those at the time of initial sample analysis, and should improve surveillance programmes for quinolones in raw milk.

  9. Tuning the composition of guest molecules in clathrate hydrates: NMR identification and its significance to gas storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yutaek; Lee, Jong-Won; Kumar, Rajnish; Moudrakovski, Igor L; Lee, Huen; Ripmeester, John A

    2009-08-03

    Gas hydrates represent an attractive way of storing large quantities of gas such as methane and carbon dioxide, although to date there has been little effort to optimize the storage capacity and to understand the trade-offs between storage conditions and storage capacity. In this work, we present estimates for gas storage based on the ideal structures, and show how these must be modified given the little data available on hydrate composition. We then examine the hypothesis based on solid-solution theory for clathrate hydrates as to how storage capacity may be improved for structure II hydrates, and test the hypothesis for a structure II hydrate of THF and methane, paying special attention to the synthetic approach used. Phase equilibrium data are used to map the region of stability of the double hydrate in P-T space as a function of the concentration of THF. In situ high-pressure NMR experiments were used to measure the kinetics of reaction between frozen THF solutions and methane gas, and (13)C MAS NMR experiments were used to measure the distribution of the guests over the cage sites. As known from previous work, at high concentrations of THF, methane only occupies the small cages in structure II hydrate, and in accordance with the hypothesis posed, we confirm that methane can be introduced into the large cage of structure II hydrate by lowering the concentration of THF to below 1.0 mol %. We note that in some preparations the cage occupancies appear to fluctuate with time and are not necessarily homogeneous over the sample. Although the tuning mechanism is generally valid, the composition and homogeneity of the product vary with the details of the synthetic procedure. The best results, those obtained from the gas-liquid reaction, are in good agreement with thermodynamic predictions; those obtained for the gas-solid reaction do not agree nearly as well.

  10. A Stabilized Incompressible SPH Method by Relaxing the Density Invariance Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuteru Asai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A stabilized Incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH is proposed to simulate free surface flow problems. In the ISPH, pressure is evaluated by solving pressure Poisson equation using a semi-implicit algorithm based on the projection method. Even if the pressure is evaluated implicitly, the unrealistic pressure fluctuations cannot be eliminated. In order to overcome this problem, there are several improvements. One is small compressibility approach, and the other is introduction of two kinds of pressure Poisson equation related to velocity divergence-free and density invariance conditions, respectively. In this paper, a stabilized formulation, which was originally proposed in the framework of Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS method, is applied to ISPH in order to relax the density invariance condition. This formulation leads to a new pressure Poisson equation with a relaxation coefficient, which can be estimated by a preanalysis calculation. The efficiency of the proposed formulation is tested by a couple of numerical examples of dam-breaking problem, and its effects are discussed by using several resolution models with different particle initial distances. Also, the effect of eddy viscosity is briefly discussed in this paper.

  11. Norm stability in Jirisan National Park: effects of time, existing conditions, and background characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Oh; Shelby, Bo

    2008-04-01

    Norm stability is an important issue to consider in using the normative approach as a component of resource management decision making. This study examines three major questions related to norm stability: (1) Do norms change over time? (2) Do existing conditions affect norms? (3) Do background characteristics and visitation patterns affect norms? Data used in this study were collected at a campground in the Jirisan National Park (JNP) of Korea in 1993, 1994, and 2003. A total of 396 subjects were used for the study (120 for 1993, 106 for 1994, and 170 for 2003). Changes in the standards for "quiet time" and "seeing others littering" were statistically significant, but there was no change in the standard for "number of other tents." There was little change in norm agreement or norm prevalence. Existing conditions were strongly correlated with standards for number of other tents but results were mixed for the other two indicators. Users' demographic characteristics and visitation patterns were not generally related to norms. Findings of the study are discussed.

  12. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  13. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments in Offshore Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen A. Holditch

    2006-12-31

    The main objective of this study is to develop the necessary knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus is on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. To achieve this objective, we have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. To be sure our geomechanical modeling is realistic, we are also investigating the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. In Phase II of the project, we will review all published core data and generate additional core data to verify the models. To generate data for our models, we are using data from the literature and we will be conducting laboratory studies in 2007 that generate data to (1) evaluate the conceptual pore-scale models, (2) calibrate the mathematical models, (3) determine dominant relations and critical parameters defining the geomechanical behavior of HBS, and (4) establish relationships between the geomechanical status of HBS and the corresponding geophysical signature. The milestones for Phase I of this project are given as follows: Literature survey on typical sediments containing gas hydrates in the ocean (TAMU); Recommendations on how to create typical sediments in the laboratory (TAMU); Demonstrate that typical sediments can be created in a repeatable manner in the laboratory and gas hydrates can be created in the pore space (TAMU); Develop a conceptual pore-scale model based on available data and reports (UCB); Test the developed pore-scale concepts on simple configurations and verify the results against known measurements and observations (UCB

  14. Naphthenic acids hydrates of gases: influence of the water/oil interface on the dispersing properties of an acidic crude oil; Acides naphteniques hydrates de gaz de l'interface eau/huile sur les proprietes dispersantes d'un brut acide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arla, D.

    2006-01-15

    Nowadays, the development of offshore oil production under increasing water depths (high pressures and low temperatures) has led oil companies to focus on gas hydrates risks. Hydrates are crystals containing gas and water molecules which can plug offshore pipelines. It has been shown that some asphaltenic crude oils stabilize water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) during several months and exhibit very good anti-agglomerant properties avoiding hydrate plugs formation. In this work, we have studied the 'anti-hydrate' properties of a West African acidic crude oil called crude AH. This oil contains naphthenic acids, RCOOH hydrocarbons which are sensitive to both the pH and the salinity of the water phase.The emulsifying properties of the crude AH have firstly been explored. It has been shown that heavy resins and asphaltenes are the main compounds of the crude AH responsible for the long term stability of the W/O emulsions whereas the napthenates RCOO{sup -} lead to less stable W/O emulsions. Dealing with hydrates, the crude AH exhibits moderate anti-agglomerant properties due to the presence of heavy resins and asphaltenes. However, the naphthenates RCOO{sup -} drastically increase the formation of hydrate plugs. Moreover, it has been pointed out that hydrate particles agglomeration accelerates the kinetics of hydrate formation and enhances the water/oil separation. In order to explain these behaviours, a mechanism of agglomeration by 'sticking' between a hydrate particle and a water droplet has been proposed. Finally, we have developed a model which describes the physico-chemical equilibria of the naphthenic acids in the binary system water/crude AH, in order to transpose the results obtained in the laboratory to the real oil field conditions. (author)

  15. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    generated of these seismic data with cores, logging, and other well data. Unfortunately, the Hot Ice No. 1 well did not encounter hydrates in the reservoir sands, although brine-saturated sands containing minor amounts of methane were encountered within the hydrate stability zone (HSZ). Synthetic seismograms created from well log data were in agreement with reflectivity data measured by the 3D VSP survey. Modeled synthetic seismograms indicated a detectable seismic response would be expected in the presence of hydrate-bearing sands. Such a response was detected in the 3D VSP data at locations up-dip to the west of the Hot Ice No. 1 wellbore. Results of this project suggest that the presence of hydrate-bearing strata may not be related as simply to HSZ thickness as previously thought. Geological complications of reservoir facies distribution within fluvial-deltaic environments will require sophisticated detection technologies to assess the locations of recoverable volumes of methane contained in hydrates. High-resolution surface seismic data and more rigorous well log data analysis offer the best near-term potential. The hydrate resource potential is huge, but better tools are needed to accurately assess their location, distribution and economic recoverability.

  16. Natural Gas Hydrates as CH4 Source and CO2 Sink - What do SO2 Impurities do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeskow-Strauch, B.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Erzinger, J.

    2009-04-01

    The large amounts of gas hydrates stored in natural reservoirs are thought to be a promising future energy source. The recently discussed idea of methane extraction from these formations, together with the subsequent storage of CO2 in form of gas hydrates is an elegant approach to bring forward. A number of experiments have been performed on lab scale showing the replacement of CH4 by CO2 and vice versa. For instance, Graue and Kvamme (2006) demonstrated with Magnetic Resonance Images of core plug experiments the possibility of CH4 extraction by using liquid CO2. Laser Raman investigations of Schicks et al. (2007) showed, on the other hand, the ineffectiveness and slowness of the CH4 exchange reaction with gaseous CO2. After 120 hours, only 20% CH4 were exchanged for CO2. Natural methane hydrates which include often higher hydrocarbons tend to be even more stable than pure methane hydrates (Schicks et al., 2006). Contrary to lab conditions, industrial emitted CO2 contains - despite much effort to clean it - traces of impurities. For instance, CO2 emitted from the state-of-the-art Vattenfall Oxyfuel pilot plant in Schwarze Pumpe should reach a quality of >99.7% CO2 but still contains small amounts of N2, Ar, O2, SOx and NOx (pers. comm. Dr. Rolland). Here we present a microscopic and laser Raman study in a p-T range of 1 to 4 MPa and 271 to 280K focussing on CO2 hydrate formation and CH4-exchange reaction in the presence of 1% SO2. The experiments have been performed in a small-scale cryocell. The Raman spectra show that CO2 and SO2 occupy both large and small cages of the hydrate lattice. SO2 occurs strongly enriched in the hydrate clathrate, compared to its concentration in the feed gas which causes a strong acidification of the liquid phase after hydrate dissociation. Our study reveals that the hydrate formation rate from impure CO2 is similar to that of pure CO2 hydrate but that the stability of the CO2-SO2-hydrate exceeds that of pure CO2 hydrate. The improved

  17. Conditions for global dynamic stability of a class of resource-bounded model ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Robert M; Knight, Gwenan; Fung, Tak

    2010-11-01

    This paper studies a class of dynamical systems that model multi-species ecosystems. These systems are 'resource bounded' in the sense that species compete to utilize an underlying limiting resource or substrate. This boundedness means that the relevant state space can be reduced to a simplex, with coordinates representing the proportions of substrate utilized by the various species. If the vector field is inward pointing on the boundary of the simplex, the state space is forward invariant under the system flow, a requirement that can be interpreted as the presence of non-zero exogenous recruitment. We consider conditions under which these model systems have a unique interior equilibrium that is globally asymptotically stable. The systems we consider generalize classical multi-species Lotka-Volterra systems, the behaviour of which is characterized by properties of the community (or interaction) matrix. However, the more general systems considered here are not characterized by a single matrix, but rather a family of matrices. We develop a set of 'explicit conditions' on the basis of a notion of 'uniform diagonal dominance' for such a family of matrices, that allows us to extract a set of sufficient conditions for global asymptotic stability based on properties of a single, derived matrix. Examples of these explicit conditions are discussed.

  18. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  19. Stabilization mechanism of clarithromycin tablets under gastric pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Sadahiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Kobayashi, Mika; Miyagishima, Atsuo; Itai, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that tablets of clarithromycin (CAM), a 14-membered macrolide antibiotic, are especially stable under low pH conditions such as in gastric fluid, and showed excellent antibacterial efficiency even though CAM molecules themselves are rapidly decomposed. Therefore, we aimed to clarify the stabilization mechanism of CAM tablets under low pH conditions. From the results of stability and dissolution tests, the optimal decomposition rate constant (K(dec)) and dissolution rate constant (K(dis)) at various pH values were calculated by curve-fitting to consecutive reactions. Consequently, log(K(dec)) increased as pH decreased. On the other hand, log(K(dis)) increased as pH decreased from 3.0 to 1.5, but decreased as pH decreased from 1.5 to 1.0. In addition, the disintegration time of commercially available tablets at pH 1.0 and 1.2 was found to be delayed, resulting in a decrease of K(dis). Furthermore, from powder X-ray diffraction, HPLC and elemental analysis, the delay in disintegration time might be attributable to the formation of a transparent gel, formed by the reaction between CAM molecule and hydrochloric acid under low pH conditions, on the surface of CAM tablet. On the basis of these results, this report can be considered the first case where a transparent gel prevents gastric fluid from penetrating the tablet, resulting in reduced decomposition of CAM following oral administrating.

  20. Stability of serum high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs for preanalytical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Yamada, Hiroya; Taromaru, Nao; Kondo, Kanako; Nagura, Ayuri; Yamazaki, Mirai; Ando, Yoshitaka; Munetsuna, Eiji; Suzuki, Koji; Ohashi, Koji; Teradaira, Ryoji

    2017-01-01

    Background Recently, several studies have shown that microRNAs are present in high-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein-microRNA may be a promising disease biomarker. We investigated the stability of high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs in different storage conditions as this is an important issue for its application to the field of clinical research. Methods microRNAs were extracted from the high-density lipoprotein fraction that was purified from the serum. miR-135 a and miR-223, which are known to be present in high-density lipoprotein, were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. The influence of preanalytical parameters on the analysis of high-density lipoprotein-miRNAs was examined by the effect of RNase, storage conditions, and freezing and thawing. Results The concentrations of microRNA in high-density lipoprotein were not altered by RNase A treatment (0-100 U/mL). No significant change in these microRNAs was observed after storing serum at room temperature or 4℃ for 0-24 h, and there was a similar result in the cryopreservation for up to two weeks. Also, high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs were stable for, at least, up to five freeze-thaw cycles. Conclusions These results demonstrated that high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs are relatively resistant to various storage conditions. This study provides new and important information on the stability of high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs.

  1. Novel conditions on exponential stability of a class of delayed neural networks with state-dependent switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guodong; Shen, Yi

    2015-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the global exponential stability on a class of delayed neural networks with state-dependent switching. Under the novel conditions, some sufficient criteria ensuring exponential stability of the proposed system are obtained. In particular, the obtained conditions complement and improve earlier publications on conventional neural networks with continuous or discontinuous right-hand side. Numerical simulations are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  2. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank R. Rack; Tim Francis; Peter Schultheiss; Philip E. Long; Barry M. Freifeld

    2005-04-01

    The primary activities accomplished during this quarter were continued efforts to develop plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the evolving operational planning for IODP Expedition 311, which will use the JOIDES Resolution to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, offshore Vancouver Island. IODP Expedition 311 has been designed to further constrain the models for the formation of marine gas hydrate in subduction zone accretionary prisms. The objectives include characterizing the deep origin of the methane, its upward transport, its incorporation in gas hydrate, and its subsequent loss to the seafloor. The main attention of this expedition is on the widespread seafloor-parallel layer of dispersed gas hydrate located just above the base of the predicted stability field. In a gas hydrate formation model, methane is carried upward through regional sediment or small-scale fracture permeability, driven by the tectonic consolidation of the accretionary prism. The upward moving methane is incorporated into the gas hydrate clathrate as it enters the methane hydrate stability zone. Also important is the focusing of a portion of the upward methane flux into localized plumes or channels to form concentrations of near-seafloor gas hydrate. The amount of gas hydrate in local concentrations near the seafloor is especially important for understanding the response of marine gas hydrate to climate change. The expedition includes coring and downhole measurements at five sites across the Northern Cascadia accretionary prism. The sites will track the history of methane in an accretionary prism from (1) its production by mainly microbiological processes over a thick sediment vertical extent, (2) its upward transport through regional or locally focused fluid flow, (3) its incorporation in the regional hydrate layer above the BSR or in local concentrations at or near the seafloor, (4) methane loss from the hydrate by upward diffusion, and (5) methane

  3. Evaluation of Gas Hydrate at Alaminos Canyon 810, Northern Gulf of Mexico Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Cook, A.; Sawyer, D.; Hillman, J. I. T.

    2016-12-01

    We characterize the gas hydrate reservoir in Alaminos Canyon Block 810 (AC810) on the northern Gulf of Mexico slope, approximately 400 km southeast of Houston, Texas, USA. Three-dimensional seismic data shows a bottom-simulating-reflection (BSR), over 30 km2, which suggests that a significant gas hydrate accumulation may occur at AC810. Furthermore, logging while drilling (LWD) data acquired from a Statoil well located that penetrated the BSR near the crest of the regional anticline indicates two possible gas hydrate units (Hydrate Unit A and Hydrate Unit B). LWD data in this interval are limited to gamma ray and resistivity only. Resistivity curve separations are observed in Hydrate Unit A (131 to 253 mbsf) suggesting hydrate-filled fractures in marine mud. A spiky high resistivity response in Hydrate Unit B (308 to 354 mbsf) could either be a marine mud or a sand-prone interval. The abrupt decrease (from 7 to 1 Ωm) in resistivity logs at 357 mbsf generally corresponds with the interpreted base of hydrate stability, as the BSR is observed near 350 mbsf on the seismic data. To further investigate the formation characteristics, we generate synthetic traces using general velocity and density trends for marine sediments to match the seismic trace extracted at the Statoil well. We consider models with 1) free gas and 2) water only below the base of hydrate stability. In our free gas-below models, we find the velocity of Hydrate Unit A and Hydrate Unit B is generally low and does not deviate significantly from the general velocity trends, suggesting that gas hydrate is present in a marine mud. In the water-below model, the compressional velocity of Hydrate Unit B ranges from 2450 m/s to 3150 m/s. This velocity is similar to the velocity of high hydrate saturation in sand; typically greater than 2500 m/s. This may indicate that Hydrate Unit B is sand with high hydrate saturation; however, to achieve a suitable match between the water-below synthetic seismogram and the

  4. Material Research on Salt Hydrates for Seasonal Heat Storage Application in a Residential Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferchaud, C.J.; Zondag, H.A.; De Boer, R. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Water vapor sorption in salt hydrates is a promising method to realize seasonal solar heat storage in the residential sector. Several materials already showed promising performance for this application. However, the stability of these materials needs to be improved for long-term (30 year) application in seasonal solar heat storages. The purpose of this article is to identify the influence of the material properties of the salt hydrates on the performance and the reaction kinetics of the sorption process. The experimental investigation presented in this article shows that the two salt hydrates Li2SO4.H2O and CuSO4.5H2O can store and release heat under the operating conditions of a seasonal solar heat storage in a fully reversible way. However, these two materials show differences in terms of energy density and reaction kinetics. Li2SO4.H2O can release heat with an energy density of around 0.80 GJ/m{sup 3} within 4 hours of rehydration at 25C, while CuSO4.5H2O needs around 130 hours at the same temperature to be fully rehydrated and reaches an energy density of 1.85 GJ/m{sup 3}. Since the two salts are dehydrated and hydrated under the same conditions, this difference in behavior is directly related to the intrinsic properties of the materials.

  5. Mechanical properties of sand, silt, and clay containing tetrahydrofuran hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, C.J.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to large strains has relevance for the stability of the seafloor and submarine slopes, drilling and coring operations, and the analysis of certain small-strain properties of these sediments (for example, seismic velocities). This study reports on the results of comprehensive axial compression triaxial tests conducted at up to 1 MPa confining pressure on sand, crushed silt, precipitated silt, and clay specimens with closely controlled concentrations of synthetic hydrate. The results show that the stress-strain behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments is a complex function of particle size, confining pressure, and hydrate concentration. The mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments at low hydrate concentration (probably 50% of pore space), the behavior becomes more independent of stress because the hydrates control both stiffness and strength and possibly the dilative tendency of sediments by effectively increasing interparticle coordination, cementing particles together, and filling the pore space. The cementation contribution to the shear strength of hydrate-bearing sediments decreases with increasing specific surface of soil minerals. The lower the effective confining stress, the greater the impact of hydrate formation on normalized strength.

  6. The Equilibrium and Growth Stability of Winter Wheat Root and Shoot Under Different Soil Water Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhi-hong; CHEN Xiao-yuan; LUO Yuan-pei

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium between root, shoot and growth stability under different soil water conditions were investigated in a tube experiment of winter wheat. The water supplying treatments included: sufficient irrigation at whole growth phase, moderate deficiency irrigation at whole growth phase, serious deficiency irrigation at whole growth phase, sufficient irrigation at jointing stage, tillering stage, flowering stage, and fillering respectively, after moderate and serious water deficit during their previous growth stage. Root and shoot biomass were measured. On the basis of the cooperative root-shoot interactions model, the equilibrium and growth stability were studied on the strength of the kinetics system theory. There was only one varying equilibrium point between the root and shoot over the life time of the winter wheat plant. Water stress prolonged the duration of stable growth, the more serious the water deficit, the longer the period of stable growth.The duration of stable growth was shortened and that of unstable growth was prolonged after water recovery. The growth behavior of the plants exposed to moderate water deficit shifted from stable to unstable until the end of the growth,after rewatering at flowering. In the life-time of the crop, the root and shoot had been adjusting themselves in structure and function so as to maintain an equilibrium, but could not achieve the equilibrium state for long. They were always in an unbalanced state from the beginning to the end of growth. This was the essence of root-shoot equilibrium. Water stress inhibited the function of root and shoot, reduced root shoot interactions, and as a result, the plant growth gradually tended to stabilize. Rewatering enhanced root shoot interactions, prolonged duration of instable growth. Rewatering at flowering could upset the inherent relativity during the long time of stable growth from flowering to filling stage, thus leading to unstable growth and enhanced dry matter accumulating rate

  7. Simulation of gas hydrate dissociation caused by repeated tectonic uplift events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shusaku; Matsubayashi, Osamu; Nagakubo, Sadao

    2016-05-01

    Gas hydrate dissociation by tectonic uplift is often used to explain geologic and geophysical phenomena, such as hydrate accumulation probably caused by hydrate recycling and the occurrence of double bottom-simulating reflectors in tectonically active areas. However, little is known of gas hydrate dissociation resulting from tectonic uplift. This study investigates gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments caused by repeated tectonic uplift events using a numerical model incorporating the latent heat of gas hydrate dissociation. The simulations showed that tectonic uplift causes upward movement of some depth interval of hydrate-bearing sediment immediately above the base of gas hydrate stability (BGHS) to the gas hydrate instability zone because the sediment initially maintains its temperature: in that interval, gas hydrate dissociates while absorbing heat; consequently, the temperature of the interval decreases to that of the hydrate stability boundary at that depth. Until the next uplift event, endothermic gas hydrate dissociation proceeds at the BGHS using heat mainly supplied from the sediment around the BGHS, lowering the temperature of that sediment. The cumulative effects of these two endothermic gas hydrate dissociations caused by repeated uplift events lower the sediment temperature around the BGHS, suggesting that in a marine area in which sediment with a highly concentrated hydrate-bearing layer just above the BGHS has been frequently uplifted, the endothermic gas hydrate dissociation produces a gradual decrease in thermal gradient from the seafloor to the BGHS. Sensitivity analysis for model parameters showed that water depth, amount of uplift, gas hydrate saturation, and basal heat flow strongly influence the gas hydrate dissociation rate and sediment temperature around the BGHS.

  8. [Effect of heat transfer in the packages on the stability of thiamine nitrate under uncontrolled temperature conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toru; Yamaji, Takayuki; Takayama, Kozo

    2013-01-01

    To accurately predict the stability of thiamine nitrate as a model drug in pharmaceutical products under uncontrolled temperature conditions, the average reaction rate constant was determined, taking into account the heat transfer from the atmosphere to the product. The stability tests of thiamine nitrate in the three packages with different heat transfers were performed under non-isothermal conditions. The stability data observed were compared with the predictions based on a newly developed method, showing that the stability was well predicted by the method involving the heat transfer. By contrast, there were some deviations observed from the predicted data, without considering heat transfer in the packages with low heat transfer. The above-mentioned result clearly shows that heat transfer should be considered to ensure accurate prediction of the stability of commercial pharmaceutical products under non-isothermal atmospheres.

  9. STABILIZED CONTROLLER DESIGN FOR ATTITUDE AND ALTITUDE CONTROLLING OF QUAD-ROTOR UNDER DISTURBANCE AND NOISY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hassan Tanveer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a control approach to obtain the better stabilization in attitude and altitude of quad-rotor under different disturbance conditions. In the standard Quad-rotor rotor type UAV, controlling of attitude and altitude is one of the most critical tasks and appropriate controller for stabilization of UAV is essential and necessary. These two controls under various conditions of disturbances was a field of research stimulating for the researchers. The controller proposed is contingent on the PID feedback structure with Extended Kalman Filter (EKF. From Lyapunov Stability Theorem, it is proved that quad-rotor proposed altitude control system is asymptotic as well exponentially stability. Extended Kalman Filter (EKF is used to filter out the sensors and system noises. Finally, the simulations carried out on MATLAB and the result proved the effectiveness of proposed recommended method for stabilization of attitude and altitude of quad-rotor.

  10. Methane to syngas conversion. Part I. Equilibrium conditions and stability requirements of membrane materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade, J. R.; Kharton, V. V.; Yaremchenko, A.; Naumovich, E.

    Thermodynamic data have been used to predict the dependence of methane conversion on temperature and oxygen partial pressure in mixed conducting membrane reactors, and the corresponding fractions of water vapor, H 2, CO and CO 2. The relations between methane conversion, gas composition and oxygen partial pressure were also used to formulate the oxygen balance in mixed conducting membrane reactors, with tubular reactor and continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) configurations. A single dimensionless parameter accounts for the combined effects of geometric parameters of the membrane reactor, the permeability of the membrane material, and flow rate at the entry of the reactor. Selected examples were calculated to illustrate the effects of steam to methane and inert to methane ratios in the gas entering the reactor. The values of oxygen partial pressure required to attain the highest yield of CO and H 2 were also used to estimate the stability requirements to be met by mixed conducting membrane materials. Suitable membrane designs might be needed to bridge the difference between the conditions inside the reactors and the stability limits of known mixed conductors.

  11. Scaling the Shear-flow Stabilized Z-pinch to Reactor Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, H. S.; Schmidt, A.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Cleveau, E.

    2015-11-01

    We present a conceptual design along with scaling calculations for a pulsed fusion reactor based on the shear-flow-stabilized Z-pinch device. Experiments performed on the ZaP device, at the University of Washington, have demonstrated stable operation for durations of 20 usec at ~100kA discharge current for pinches that are ~1 cm in diameter and 100 cm long. The inverse of the pinch diameter and plasma energy density scale strongly with pinch current and calculations show that maintaining stabilization durations of ~7 usec for increased discharge current (~15x) in a shortened pinch (10 cm) results in a pinch diameter of ~200 um and plasma conditions that approach those needed to support significant fusion burn and energy gain (Ti ~ 30keV, density ~ 3e26/m3, ntau ~1.4e20 sec/m3). Compelling features of the concept include operation at modest discharge current (1.5 MA) and voltage (40kV) along with direct adoption of liquid metals for at least one electrode--technological capabilities that have been proven in existing, commercial, pulse power devices such as large ignitrons. LLNL-ABS-674920. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy ARPAe ALPHA Program by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Effect of Surcharge on the Stability of Rock Slope under Complex Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiewen Tu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a general analytical expression for the factor of safety of the rock slope against plane failure is proposed, incorporating most of the practically occurring under complex conditions such as depth of tension crack, depth of water in tension crack, seismic loads and surcharge. Several special cases of this expression are established, which can be found similarly to those reported in the literature. A detailed parametric analysis is presented to study the effect of surcharge on the stability of the rock slope for practical ranges of main parameters such as depth of tension crack, depth of water in tension crack, the horizontal seismic coefficient and the vertical seismic coefficient. The parametric analysis has shown that the factor of safety of the rock slope decreases with increase in surcharge for the range of those parameters in this paper. It is also shown that the horizontal seismic coefficient is the most important factor which effects on the factor of safety in the above four influence factors. The general analytical expression proposed in this paper and the results of the parametric analysis can be used to carry out a quantitative assessment of the stability of the rock slopes by engineers and researchers.

  13. Conditions for circumstellar disc formation - II. Effects of initial cloud stability and mass accretion rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-12-01

    Disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores is investigated using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation with a focus on the effects of the initial cloud stability and the mass accretion rate. The initial cloud stability greatly alters the disc formation process even for prestellar clouds with the same mass-to-flux ratio. A high mass accretion rate on to the disc-forming region is realized in initially unstable clouds, and a large angular momentum is introduced into the circumstellar region in a short time. The region around the protostar has both a thin infalling envelope and a weak magnetic field, which both weaken the effect of magnetic braking. The growth of the rotation-supported disc is promoted in such unstable clouds. Conversely, clouds in an initially near-equilibrium state show lower accretion rates of mass and angular momentum. The angular momentum is transported to the outer envelope before protostar formation. After protostar formation, the circumstellar region has a thick infalling envelope and a strong magnetic field that effectively brakes the disc. As a result, disc formation is suppressed when the initial cloud is in a nearly stable state. The density distribution of the initial cloud also affects the disc formation process. Disc growth strongly depends on the initial conditions when the prestellar cloud has a uniform density, whereas there is no significant difference in the disc formation process in prestellar clouds with non-uniform densities.

  14. Homogenization conditions affect the oxidative stability of fish oil enriched milk emulsions: lipid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Let, Mette B; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit M; Meyer, Anne S

    2007-03-07

    In this study fish oil was incorporated into commercial homogenized milk using different homogenization temperatures and pressures. The main aim was to understand the significance of homogenization temperature and pressure on the oxidative stability of the resulting milks. Increasing homogenization temperature from 50 to 72 degrees C decreased droplet size only slightly, whereas a pressure increase from 5 to 22.5 MPa decreased droplet size significantly. Surprisingly, emulsions having small droplets, and therefore large interfacial area, were less oxidized than emulsions having bigger droplets. Emulsions with similar droplet size distributions, but resulting from different homogenization conditions, had significantly different oxidative stabilities, indicating that properties of significance to oxidation other than droplet size itself were affected by the different treatments. In general, homogenization at 72 degrees C appeared to induce protective effects against oxidation as compared to homogenization at 50 degrees C. The results thus indicated that the actual composition of the oil-water interface is more important than total surface area itself.

  15. Modified TOV in gravity’s rainbow: properties of neutron stars and dynamical stability conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendi, S.H. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University,Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM),P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bordbar, G.H. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University,Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center for Excellence in Astronomy and Astrophysics (CEAA-RIAAM)-Maragha,P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha 55177-36698 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panah, B. Eslam [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University,Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panahiyan, S. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University,Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University,Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-09

    In this paper, we consider a spherical symmetric metric to extract the hydrostatic equilibrium equation of stars in (3+1)-dimensional gravity’s rainbow in the presence of cosmological constant. Then, we generalize the hydrostatic equilibrium equation to d-dimensions and obtain the hydrostatic equilibrium equation for this gravity. Also, we obtain the maximum mass of neutron star using the modern equations of state of neutron star matter derived from the microscopic calculations. It is notable that, in this paper, we consider the effects of rainbow functions on the diagrams related to the mass-central mass density (M-ρ{sub c}) relation and also the mass-radius (M-R) relation of neutron star. We also study the effects of rainbow functions on the other properties of neutron star such as the Schwarzschild radius, average density, strength of gravity and gravitational redshift. Then, we apply the cosmological constant to this theory to obtain the diagrams of M-ρ{sub c} (or M-R) and other properties of these stars. Next, we investigate the dynamical stability condition for these stars in gravity’s rainbow and show that these stars have dynamical stability. We also obtain a relation between mass of neutron stars and Planck mass. In addition, we compare obtained results of this theory with the observational data.

  16. Research on stability of the accumulated rock-soil body of reservoir bank under rainfall condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The shear strength parameters property of rock-soil aggregates in embankment slope of reservoir,that is,the relationship between cohesion and gravel content,between friction angle and gravel content,and the relationship between cohesion and water content,between friction angle and water content,is studied based on the direct shear test results,the shear strength change law of the rock-soil aggregates is given,and the unsaturated shear strength formulation of rock-soil aggregates that could consider suction and saturation degree influence is put forward in this paper,through which the sliding or failure physical mechanism of this type of slope under the condition of rainfall infiltration is studied. Also the 3D unsteady saturated-unsaturated seepage field and its FEM resolving mode are established based on the analysis of the slope rainfall infiltration process. Case study with this method indicates that the minimum safety factor of the accumulated rock-soil aggregates dose not arrive at the moment of rainfall cessation,but appears several hours after the rainfall cessation,this phenomenon is in accordance with the practical slope engineering’s failure process and could explain appropriately the slope failure caused by rainfall infiltration. Research results in this paper have an important reference value for the research on stability of the accumulated rock-soil aggregates in embankment slope of reservoir,and can enrich the stability analysis method and relevant theory of reservoir embankment slope.

  17. Influence of environmental conditions on the stability of oil in water emulsions containing droplets stabilized by lecithin-chitosan membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Satoshi; Decker, Eric A; McClements, D Julian

    2003-08-27

    Oil-in-water emulsions containing cationic droplets stabilized by lecithin-chitosan membranes were produced using a two-stage process. A primary emulsion containing anionic lecithin-coated droplets was prepared by homogenizing oil and emulsifier solution using a high-pressure valve homogenizer (5 wt % corn oil, 1 wt % lecithin, 100 mM acetic acid, pH 3.0). A secondary emulsion containing cationic lecithin-chitosan-coated droplets was formed by diluting the primary emulsion with an aqueous chitosan solution (1 wt % corn oil, 0.2 wt % lecithin, 100 mM acetic acid, and 0.036 wt % chitosan). The stabilities of the primary and secondary emulsions with the same oil concentration to thermal processing, freeze-thaw cycling, high calcium chloride concentrations, and lipid oxidation were determined. The results showed that the secondary emulsions had better stability to droplet aggregation during thermal processing (30-90 degrees C for 30 min), freeze-thaw cycling (-10 degrees C for 22 h/30 degrees C for 2 h), and high calcium chloride contents (stability to environmental stresses.

  18. Price stability and balanced public accounts as a condition for sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. CIAMPI

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The article illustrates Italy's economic recovery as part of a process of renewal involving the institutions, every area of the economy and Italian society as a whole. After the turning point in 1992, a general consensus emerged that European integration was necessary and fully consistent with the national interest. In this context, the three components of economic policy - budgetary policy, incomes policy, monetary policy - are working in tandem, ensuring stability, the essential condition from any lasting and sustainable growth. Thus inflation has now been beaten; the balance of payments on current account has recorded increasing and substantial surpluses, and there has been a huge reduction in the budget deficit, with a large primary surplus. The sustainability of these results is ensured by the implementation of structural reforms: tax reform, reform of central government budget, reform of the civil service, pensions reform and reform of Italy’s commercial system.

  19. Failure mechanism and stability control technology of rock surrounding a roadway in complex stress conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yang; Bai Jianbiao; Chen Ke; Wang Xiangyu; Xiao Tongqiang; Chen Yong

    2011-01-01

    To solve the problem of supporting three downhill coal structures in the Yongan Coal Mine of Shanxi Jincheng,we studied the regular development of stress and plastic zones and characteristics of deformation of rock surrounding roadway groups after a period of roadway driving,mining one side as well as mining both sides,we used FLAC3D for our numerical and theoretical analyses.Field test were carried out,where we revealed the deformation mechanism of roadways and its coal pillars in complex stress conditions.We proposed a roadway stability control technology using backwall grouting with high-water rapid hardening material and combined support with bolt and cable anchoring after mining both sides.Our field practices showed that deformation of rock surrounding roadways can be controlled with this technology.

  20. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  1. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  2. LMI-based stability and performance conditions for continuous-time nonlinear systems in Takagi-Sugeno's form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, H K; Leung, Frank H F

    2007-10-01

    This correspondence presents the stability analysis and performance design of the continuous-time fuzzy-model-based control systems. The idea of the nonparallel-distributed-compensation (non-PDC) control laws is extended to the continuous-time fuzzy-model-based control systems. A nonlinear controller with non-PDC control laws is proposed to stabilize the continuous-time nonlinear systems in Takagi-Sugeno's form. To produce the stability-analysis result, a parameter-dependent Lyapunov function (PDLF) is employed. However, two difficulties are usually encountered: 1) the time-derivative terms produced by the PDLF will complicate the stability analysis and 2) the stability conditions are not in the form of linear-matrix inequalities (LMIs) that aid the design of feedback gains. To tackle the first difficulty, the time-derivative terms are represented by some weighted-sum terms in some existing approaches, which will increase the number of stability conditions significantly. In view of the second difficulty, some positive-definitive terms are added in order to cast the stability conditions into LMIs. In this correspondence, the favorable properties of the membership functions and nonlinear control laws, which allow the introduction of some free matrices, are employed to alleviate the two difficulties while retaining the favorable properties of PDLF-based approach. LMI-based stability conditions are derived to ensure the system stability. Furthermore, based on a common scalar performance index, LMI-based performance conditions are derived to guarantee the system performance. Simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  3. The characteristics of gas hydrates recovered from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Lorenson, T.D.; Moudrakovski, I.L.; Ripmeester, J.A.; Collett, T.S.; Hunter, R.B.; Ratcliffe, C.I.

    2011-01-01

    Systematic analyses have been carried out on two gas hydrate-bearing sediment core samples, HYPV4, which was preserved by CH4 gas pressurization, and HYLN7, which was preserved in liquid-nitrogen, recovered from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. Gas hydrate in the studied core samples was found by observation to have developed in sediment pores, and the distribution of hydrate saturation in the cores imply that gas hydrate had experienced stepwise dissociation before it was stabilized by either liquid nitrogen or pressurizing gas. The gas hydrates were determined to be structure Type I hydrate with hydration numbers of approximately 6.1 by instrumentation methods such as powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and solid state 13C NMR. The hydrate gas composition was predominantly methane, and isotopic analysis showed that the methane was of thermogenic origin (mean ??13C=-48.6??? and ??D=-248??? for sample HYLN7). Isotopic analysis of methane from sample HYPV4 revealed secondary hydrate formation from the pressurizing methane gas during storage. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Sarcocystosis of chital-dhole: conditions for evolutionary stability of a predator parasite mutualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watve Milind G

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For parasites with a predator-prey life cycle, the completion of the life cycle often depends on consumption of parasitized prey by the predator. In the case of such parasite species the predator and the parasite have common interests and therefore a mutualistic relationship is possible. Some evidence of a predator-parasite mutualism was reported from spotted deer or chital (Axix axis as a prey species, dhole or Indian wild-dog (Cuon alpinus as the predator and a protozoan (Sarcocystis axicuonis as the parasite. We examine here, with the help of a model, the ecological conditions necessary for the evolution and stability of such a mutualistic relationship. A two – level game theory model was designed in which the payoff of a parasite is decided not only by alternative parasite strategies but also by alternative host strategies and vice versa. Conditions for ESS were examined. Results A tolerant predator strategy and a low or moderately virulent parasite strategy which together constitute mutualism are stable only at a high frequency of recycling of parasite and a substantial prey – capture benefit to the predator. Unlike the preliminary expectation, parasite will not evolve towards reduced virulence, but reach an optimum moderate level of virulence. Conclusion The available data on the behavioral ecology of dhole and chital suggest that they are likely to meet the stability criteria and therefore a predator-parasite mutualism can be stable in this system. The model also points out the gaps in the current data and could help directing further empirical work.

  5. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  6. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas

  7. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  8. Methane hydrate-bearing sediments in the Terrebonne basin, northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meazell, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    We characterize the geological, geophysical, and thermodynamic state of three dipping, hydrate-bearing sands in the Terrebonne mini basin of the northern Gulf of Mexico, and describe three potential drilling locations to sample these hydrate reservoirs. Within the sand bodies, there is a prominent negative polarity seismic reflection (opposite phase to the seafloor reflector) that we interpret to record the boundary between gas hydrate above and free gas below. This anomaly is the Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR) and the base of the Gas Hydrate Stability Zone (BGHSZ). Above the BSR, reflection seismic data record these reservoirs with a positive polarity while below it, they record the reservoirs with a negative polarity event. Within the sand bodies, seismic amplitudes are generally strongest immediately above and below the BSR and weaken in updip and downdip directions. Beneath the BSR, two of the reservoirs have a strong negative amplitude event that parallels structure that we interpret to record a gas-water contact, while the third reservoir does not clearly record this behavior. Much like the seafloor, the BSR is bowl-shaped, occurring at greatest depths in the northwest and rising near salt bodies in the south and east. In the north east area of previous exploration, the BSR is found at a depth of 2868 meters below sealevel, implying a geothermal gradient of 20.1oC/km for type I hydrates. Logging while drilling data reveal that the sands are composed of numerous thin, hydrocarbon-charged, coarse-grained sediments. Hydrate saturation in these sands is greatest near the BGHSZ. Pressure coring is proposed for three wells that will penetrate the reservoirs at different structural elevations in order to further elucidate reservoir conditions of the sands.

  9. Observational Evidence for the Monin-Obukhov Similarity under All Stability Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Shengjie; ZHAO Lijuan; LU Chunsong; YANG Jun; WANG Jing; WANG Weiwei

    2012-01-01

    Data collected in the surface layer in a northern suburban area of Nanjing from 15 November to 29 December 2007 were analyzed to examine the Monin-Obukhov similarity for describing the turbulent fluctuations of 3D winds under all stability conditions and to obtain the turbulence characteristics under different weather conditions.The results show that the dimensionless standard deviations of turbulent velocity components (σu/u*,σv/u*,σω/u*) and dimensionless turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) can be well described by "1/3" power law relationships under stable,neutral,and unstable conditions,with σu/u* > σv/u* > σω/u*.Land use and land cover changes mainly impact dimensionless standard deviations of horizontal component fluctuations,but they have very little on those of the vertical component.The dimensionless standard deviations of wind components and dimensionless TKE are remarkably affected by different weather conditions;the deviations of horizontal wind component and dimensionless TKE present fog day > clear sky > overcast > cloudy; the trend of the vertical wind component is the reverse.The surface drag coefficient at a Nanjing suburban measurement site during the observation period was obviously higher than at other reported plains and plateau areas,and was approximately one order larger in magnitude than the reported plains areas.Dimensionless standard deviation of temperature declined with increasing |z'/L| with an approximate "-1/3" slope in unstable stratification and "-2/3" slope in stable stratification.

  10. Methane Production and Carbon Capture by Hydrate Swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Liang; von Solms, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    gas molecules in the structural lattice. In this work, we quantitatively investigate the swapping behavior from injection of pure carbon dioxide and the (CO2 + N2) binary gas mixture through artificial hydrate-bearing sandstone samples by use of a core-flooding experimental apparatus. A total of 13...... of pure carbon dioxide in swapping methane from its hydrate phase; the methane recovery efficiency in brine water systems is enhanced relative to pure water systems. The replenishment of a fresh (CO2 + N2) gas mixture into the vapor phase can be considered as an efficient extraction method because 46...... in small hydrate cages, as long as the equilibrium formation pressure of (CO2 + N2) binary gas hydrate is below that of methane hydrate, even though adding nitrogen to carbon dioxide reduces the thermodynamic driving force for the formation of a new hydrate. When other conditions are similar, the methane...

  11. [Raman spectroscopic investigation of hydrogen storage in nitrogen gas hydrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qing-guo; Liu, Chang-ling; Ye, Yu-guang; Li, Cheng-feng

    2012-08-01

    Recently, hydrogen storage using clathrate hydrate as a medium has become a hotspot of hydrogen storage research In the present paper, the laser Raman spectroscopy was used to study the hydrogen storage in nitrogen hydrate. The synthetic nitrogen hydrate was reacted with hydrogen gas under relatively mild conditions (e.g., 15 MPa, -18 degrees C). The Raman spectra of the reaction products show that the hydrogen molecules have enclathrated the cavities of the nitrogen hydrate, with multiple hydrogen cage occupancies in the clathrate cavities. The reaction time is an important factor affecting the hydrogen storage in nitrogen hydrate. The experimental results suggest that nitrogen hydrates are expected to be an effective media for hydrogen storage.

  12. STUDY FOR NATURAL GAS HYDRATE CONVERSED FROM ICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shengjie; SHEN Jiandong; HAO Miaoli; LIU Furong

    2003-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are crystalline clathrate compounds composed of water and gases of small molecular diameters that can be used for storage and transport of natural gas as a novel method. In the paper a series of experiments of aspects and kinetics for hydrate formed from natural gas and ice were carried out on the industrial small scale production apparatus. The experimental results show that formation conditions of hydrate conversed from ice are independent of induction time, and bigger degrees of supersaturation and supercooling improved the driving force and advanced the hydrate formation.Superpressure is also favorable for ice particle conversion to hydrate. In addition, it was found there have an optimal reaction time during hydrate formation.

  13. Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, T.S. (USGS); Riedel, M. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec, Canada); Cochran, J.R. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY); Boswell, R.M.; Kumar, Pushpendra (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd., Navi Mumbai, India); Sathe, A.V. (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd., Uttaranchal, INDIA)

    2008-07-01

    Studies of geologic and geophysical data from the offshore of India have revealed two geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences: the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 was designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. NGHP Expedition 01 established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna- Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. The expedition discovered one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented (Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin), documented the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known (Site 17 in Andaman Sea), and established the existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin (Site 19).

  14. The Water Retention Curves in THF Hydrate-Bearing Sediments - Experimental Measurement and Pore Scale Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, N.; Zheng, X.; Dai, S.; Seol, Y.; Zapata, C.; Yun, T.; Jang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The water retention curve (WRC) of hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behaviour of hydrate dissociation for gas production. Most gas hydrates in marine environment have been formed from an aqueous phase (gas-dissolved water). However, the gas hydrate formation from an aqueous phase in a laboratory requires long period due to low gas solubility in water and is also associated with many experimental difficulties such as hydrate dissolution, difficult hydrate saturation control, and dynamic hydrate dissolution and formation. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is chosen to form THF hydrate because the formation process is faster than gas hydrate formation and hydrate saturation is easy to control. THF hydrate is formed at water-excess condition. Therefore, there is only water in the pore space after a target THF hydrate saturation is obtained. The pore habit of THF hydrate is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel and X-ray computed tomography images; and the water retention curves are obtained under different THF hydrate saturation conditions. Targeted THF hydrate saturations are Sh=0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8. Results shown that at a given water saturation the capillary pressure increases as THF hydrate saturation increases. And the gas entry pressure increases with increasing hydrate saturation. The WRC obtained by experiments is also compared with the results of a pore-network model simulation and Lattice Boltzmann Method. The fitting parameters of van Genuchten equation for different hydrate saturation conditions are suggested for the use as input parameters of reservoir simulators.

  15. Clathrate Hydrates of Isopentane + Carbon Dioxide and Isopentane + Methane: Experimental Measurements of Dissociation Conditions Hydrates (clathrates d’isopentane + dioxyde de carbone et d’isopentane + méthane : Déterminations expérimentales des conditions de dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi A.H.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, experimental dissociation data for clathrate hydrates of isopentane + carbon dioxide and isopentane + methane are reported in the temperature ranges of (273.5-282.4 and (275.5-285.7 K, respectively. The experimental data were generated using an isochoric pressure-search method. The reliability of this method is examined by generating new dissociation data for clathrate hydrates of isopentane + methane and comparing them with the experimental data reported in the literature. The acceptable agreement demonstrates the reliability of the experimental method used in this work. The experimental data for all measured systems are finally compared with the corresponding experimental data in the absence of isopentane reported in the literature to identify its promotion effects. Des données expérimentales de dissociation d’hydrates d’isopentane + dioxyde de carbone et d’isopentane + méthane sont respectivement présentées ici dans les gammes de température (273.5-282.4 et (275.5-285.7 K. Ces valeurs expérimentales ont été générées en utilisant une méthode isochore de recherche d’une discontinuité de pression. La fiabilité de cette méthode est examinée grâce à la production de données nouvelles pour la dissociation des hydrates de méthane + isopentane et à leur comparaison à des données expérimentales disponibles dans la littérature. L’accord tout à fait acceptable permet de garantir la fiabilité de la méthode expérimentale utilisée. Les valeurs expérimentales de tous les systèmes mesurés sont finalement comparées aux données expérimentales correspondantes de la littérature, obtenues toutefois en l’absence d’isopentane, et ce afin de quantifier ses effets promoteurs de formation d’hydrates.

  16. Kinetics of hydrate formation using gas bubble suspended in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马昌峰; 陈光进; 郭天民

    2002-01-01

    An innovative experimental technique, which was devised to study the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate of hydrate formation at the surface of a gas bubble suspended in a stagnant water phase, was adapted in this work. Under such conditions, the hydrate-growth process is free from dynamic mass transfer factors. The rate of hydrate formation of methane and carbon dioxide has been systematically studied. The measured hydrate-growth data were correlated by using the molar Gibbs free energy as driving force. In the course of the experiments, some interesting surface phenomena were observed.

  17. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  18. Ethylene Separation via Hydrate Formation in W/O Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Pan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An hybrid absorption-hydration method was adopted to recover C2H4 from C2H4/CH4 binary gas mixtures and the hydrate formation conditions of C2H4/CH4 mixtures was studied experimentally in diesel in water (w/o emulsions. Span 20 at a concentration of 1.0 wt% in the aqueous phase was added to form water in diesel emulsions before hydrate formation and then hydrate in diesel slurry was separated after hydrate formation. The influences of initial gas-liquid volume ratio (53–142, pressure (3.4–5.4 MPa, temperature (274.15–278.15 K, water cuts (10–30 vol%, and the mole fraction of C2H4 in feed gas (13.19–80.44 mol% upon the C2H4 separation efficiency were systematically investigated. The experimental results show that ethylene can be enriched in hydrate slurry phase with high separation factor (S and recovery ratio (R. Most hydrate formation finished in 20 min, after that, the hydrate formation rate became very slow. The conclusion is useful for determining the suitable operation conditions when adopting an absorption-hydration method to separate C2H4/CH4.

  19. Continuous production of CO2 hydrate slurry added antifreeze proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Y.; Ota, M.; Murakami, K. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Ferdows, M. [Dhaka Univ., Dhaka (Bangladesh). Dept. of Mathematics; Endou, H. [Technova Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Ocean storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) hydrate is possible in deep seas where low temperature and high pressure conditions exist. However, when hydrates are produced in large quantities, they can plug pipelines. The addition of antifreeze proteins (AFPs) can prevent hydrate crystals from forming. The hydrate may then behave like a slurry which can be transported from a production place to a place of storage with minimal pressure loss. This study developed a production method for a CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry and presented the prospect of the inhibition effect for CO{sub 2} hydrate formation by adding AFPs. It revealed the shift in induction time, the formation rate and the torque of the agitator under conditions of AFPs at 0.01 mg/ml. It was concluded that compared to pure water, the induction time for hydrate production increased 244 per cent, the formation rate decreased 76 per cent and the ratio of the torque decreased 48 per cent by adding AFPs. The AFPs rendered the hydrate particles small and well dispersed. It was concluded that type 3 AFPs can effectively inhibit the production of structure s1 type hydrates. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Effects of Annealing Conditions on Mixed Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells and Their Thermal Stability Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haifeng; Zhang, Jincheng; Chang, Jingjing; Lin, Zhenhua; Chen, Dazheng; Xi, He; Hao, Yue

    2017-01-01

    In this work, efficient mixed organic cation and mixed halide (MA0.7FA0.3Pb(I0.9Br0.1)3) perovskite solar cells are demonstrated by optimizing annealing conditions. AFM, XRD and PL measurements show that there is a better perovskite film quality for the annealing condition at 100 °C for 30 min. The corresponding device exhibits an optimized PCE of 16.76% with VOC of 1.02 V, JSC of 21.55 mA/cm2 and FF of 76.27%. More importantly, the mixed lead halide perovskite MA0.7FA0.3Pb(I0.9Br0.1)3 can significantly increase the thermal stability of perovskite film. After being heated at 80 °C for 24 h, the PCE of the MA0.7FA0.3Pb(I0.9Br0.1)3 device still remains at 70.00% of its initial value, which is much better than the control MAPbI3 device, where only 46.50% of its initial value could be preserved. We also successfully fabricated high-performance flexible mixed lead halide perovskite solar cells based on PEN substrates. PMID:28773199

  1. Effects of Annealing Conditions on Mixed Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells and Their Thermal Stability Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haifeng; Zhang, Jincheng; Zhang, Chunfu; Chang, Jingjing; Lin, Zhenhua; Chen, Dazheng; Xi, He; Hao, Yue

    2017-07-21

    In this work, efficient mixed organic cation and mixed halide (MA0.7FA0.3Pb(I0.9Br0.1)₃) perovskite solar cells are demonstrated by optimizing annealing conditions. AFM, XRD and PL measurements show that there is a better perovskite film quality for the annealing condition at 100 °C for 30 min. The corresponding device exhibits an optimized PCE of 16.76% with VOC of 1.02 V, JSC of 21.55 mA/cm² and FF of 76.27%. More importantly, the mixed lead halide perovskite MA0.7FA0.3Pb(I0.9Br0.1)₃ can significantly increase the thermal stability of perovskite film. After being heated at 80 °C for 24 h, the PCE of the MA0.7FA0.3Pb(I0.9Br0.1)₃ device still remains at 70.00% of its initial value, which is much better than the control MAPbI₃ device, where only 46.50% of its initial value could be preserved. We also successfully fabricated high-performance flexible mixed lead halide perovskite solar cells based on PEN substrates.

  2. Global stability of stretched jets: conditions for the generation of monodisperse micro-emulsions using coflows

    CERN Document Server

    Gordillo, José Manuel; Campo-Cortés, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we reveal the physics underlying the conditions needed for the generation of emulsions composed of uniformly sized drops of micrometric or submicrometric diameters when two immiscible streams flow in parallel under the so-called tip streaming regime after Suryo & Basaran (2006). Indeed, when inertial effects in both liquid streams are negligible, the inner to outer flow-rate and viscosity ratios are small enough and the capillary number is above an experimentally determined threshold which is predicted by our theoretical results with small relative errors, a steady micron-sized jet is issued from the apex of a conical drop. Under these conditions, the jet disintegrates into drops with a very well defined mean diameter, giving rise to a monodisperse micro-emulsion. Here, we demonstrate that the regime in which uniformly-sized drops are produced corresponds to values of the capillary number for which the cone-jet system is globally stable. Interestingly enough, our general stability theory rev...

  3. Coalescence of the crystallites under hydrothermal conditions (II) --The morphology and stability energy calculation of cuprite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈之战; 施尔畏; 元如林; 郑燕青; 李汶军; 赵同荣

    2003-01-01

    Cuprite (Cu2O) particles are synthesized by hydrothermal method. Most crystalline particles have long column morphology. Particles which are regarded as assembling of the crystallites in definite directions are observed. The typical example is the particles formed by assembling six columns in three perpendicular directions. The cone surfaces are visible at the tops of the columns. The results revealed that the coalescence of the crystallites did happen under hydrothermal conditions in which the crystallite connected with other crystallite on certain structure compatible surfaces to form a crystalline particle with a special morphology. This phenomenon is called the second kind of coalescence. The Cu2O structure unit is determined by its crystal structure. It is concluded that the tetragonal prism and three tetragonal prism-like growth units are the favorable units after stability energy calculation was performed on different kinds of growth units. It is believed that the first kind of coalescence exists commonly. The second kind of coalescence is unlikely to occur for all crystallites under hydrothermal conditions. The occurrence is dependent on the crystal structure.

  4. Stability and mixing conditions for HIV/AIDS models with regional compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Richard

    Compartmental models have been adapted to derive temporal epidemic forecasting systems for imitating the transfer of HIV infection between those with different behaviours or rates of risk activity. Alternatively, models with regional compartments, which forecast disease incidence in both space and time, have emerged as a response to the challenge of anticipating the pandemic pathways of this infection. This paper combines these frameworks to obtain properties for a multiregion model that also contains demographic compartments. Section 2 begins by showing how the stability conditions (starting thresholds) for a purely regional model are a special case of the existing conditions that have been derived for the general compartmental framework. Then, these results are extended to encompass a regions with compartments design. Section 3 presents an analysis of the population mixing relationships that are embedded in all these specifications. Here, the topics include the maintenance of contact symmetry, the representation of alternative partner selection behaviours, and the identification of core populations for the diffusion of HIV infection. The discussion considers how these theoretical findings might be applied to disease prevention.

  5. Role of dispersion conditions on grindability of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ramanathan; K P Krishna Kumar; P K De; S Banerjee

    2005-04-01

    A precursor for zirconia – 8 mole% yttria (YSZ–ZrO2–8 m% Y2O3) powder was prepared by coprecipitation and the calcination temperature was fixed as 900°C from TG–DTA and XRD studies. The calcined powder could be dry ground only to a mean particle size (50) of 6 m containing substantial amount of coarse agglomerates in the size range 10–100 m. The dispersion conditions for its wet grinding were evaluated through zeta-potential and viscosity studies. The zeta-potential variation with pH of the aqueous suspensions of the powder exhibited maximum numerical values at 3 and 11 pH, exhibiting the ideal pHs for dispersion stability through electrostatic columbic repulsion mechanism. Slurries of dry ground powders with solid concentration in the range 15–30 vol.% exhibited pseudo-plastic flow characteristics, indicating presence of flocculates. With progress of grinding, the increase in viscosity of the slurries became less significant with decreasing solid concentration. Even though the particle size of the ground slurries decreased with decreasing solid content, there was little change in it for slurries with solid content < 20 vol.%. Grinding conditions for formation of sinter-active powders of YSZ with sub-micron size (50\\ ∼ 0.7 m free of agglomerates of size > 5 m) were established. Compacts from this powder could be sintered at 1400°C to translucent bodies with 99% theoretical density.

  6. Fundamental challenges to methane recovery from gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servio, P.; Eaton, M.W.; Mahajan, D.; Winters, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental challenges, the location, magnitude, and feasibility of recovery, which must be addressed to recover methane from dispersed hydrate sources, are presented. To induce dissociation of gas hydrate prior to methane recovery, two potential methods are typically considered. Because thermal stimulation requires a large energy input, it is less economically feasible than depressurization. The new data will allow the study of the effect of pressure, temperature, diffusion, porosity, tortuosity, composition of gas and water, and porous media on gas-hydrate production. These data also will allow one to improve existing models related to the stability and dissociation of sea floor hydrates. The reproducible kinetic data from the planned runs together with sediment properties will aid in developing a process to economically recover methane from a potential untapped hydrate source. The availability of plentiful methane will allow economical and large-scale production of methane-derived clean fuels to help avert future energy crises.

  7. Investigating a dynamic gas hydrate system in disequilibrium in the Danube Delta, Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Jess; Bialas, Joerg; Klaucke, Ingo; Feldman, Howard; Drexler, Tina

    2017-04-01

    Gas hydrates are known to be extensive across the Danube Delta, as indicated by the presence of bottom simulating reflections (BSRs). The shelf break in this region is characterised by several incised submarine canyons, the largest of which is the Viteaz Canyon, and numerous slope failures. BSRs often coincide with submarine landslides, and it has been proposed that hydrates may play a role in triggering, or facilitating such events. This study focuses on a seafloor canyon (the S2 Canyon) to the north-east of the main Viteaz Canyon, where geophysical survey data and sediment cores were acquired in 2014. Active venting from the seafloor is known to be occurring at this site as multiple flares were been imaged in the water column. The location of these flares coincides with a significant slope failure adjacent to the canyon, and some can be correlated to subsurface gas chimneys, indicating a complex 'plumbing system' of gas migration pathways. This site is of particular interest as the 'present-day' BSR imaged in seismic data is not at equilibrium with the present-day seafloor conditions. Using high resolution 2D seismic data, a P-cable 3D seismic volume and ocean bottom seismometer data we investigate potential gas migration pathways and the complex gas hydrate system in the vicinity of the S2 Canyon. In addition, we use stratigraphic interpretation based on regional 2D seismic lines to constrain the relative ages of the channel levee systems. Through detailed mapping of the BSR, possible paleo-seafloor surfaces and gas migration features we are able to provide estimates of equilibrium conditions for the hydrate system, and examine the controlling factors affecting gas migration pathways and hydrate formation. The results of this study provide new insight into a geologically complex setting with a dynamic hydrate system. Characterising the hydrate system here may help to explain why it is in disequilibrium with the present day seafloor, and provide a better

  8. Composite model to reproduce the mechanical behaviour of methane hydrate bearing soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydrate bearing sediments (MHBS) are naturally-occurring materials containing different components in the pores that may suffer phase changes under relative small temperature and pressure variations for conditions typically prevailing a few hundreds of meters below sea level. Their modelling needs to account for heat and mass balance equations of the different components, and several strategies already exist to combine them (e.g., Rutqvist & Moridis, 2009; Sánchez et al. 2014). These equations have to be completed by restrictions and constitutive laws reproducing the phenomenology of heat and fluid flows, phase change conditions and mechanical response. While the formulation of the non-mechanical laws generally includes explicitly the mass fraction of methane in each phase, which allows for a natural update of parameters during phase changes, mechanical laws are, in most cases, stated for the whole solid skeleton (Uchida et al., 2012; Soga et al. 2006). In this paper, a mechanical model is proposed to cope with the response of MHBS. It is based on a composite approach that allows defining the thermo-hydro-mechanical response of mineral skeleton and solid hydrates independently. The global stress-strain-temperature response of the solid phase (grains + hydrate) is then obtained by combining both responses according to energy principle following the work by Pinyol et al. (2007). In this way, dissociation of MH can be assessed on the basis of the stress state and temperature prevailing locally within the hydrate component. Besides, its structuring effect is naturally accounted for by the model according to patterns of MH inclusions within soil pores. This paper describes the fundamental hypothesis behind the model and its formulation. Its performance is assessed by comparison with laboratory data presented in the literature. An analysis of MHBS response to several stress-temperature paths representing potential field cases is finally presented. References

  9. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    up-flow and down-flow of fluid at rates that range between 0.5 to 214 cm/yr and 2-162 cm/yr, respectively. The fluid flow system at the mound and background sites are coupled having opposite polarities that oscillate episodically between 14 days to {approx}4 months. Stability calculations suggest that despite bottom water temperature fluctuations, of up to {approx}3 C, the Bush Hill gas hydrate mound is presently stable, as also corroborated by the time-lapse video camera images that did not detect change in the gas hydrate mound. As long as methane (and other hydrocarbon) continues advecting at the observed rates the mound would remain stable. The {_}{sup 13}C-DIC data suggest that crude oil instead of methane serves as the primary electron-donor and metabolic substrate for anaerobic sulfate reduction. The oil-dominated environment at Bush Hill shields some of the methane bubbles from being oxidized both anaerobically in the sediment and aerobically in the water column. Consequently, the methane flux across the seafloor is higher at Bush hill than at non-oil rich seafloor gas hydrate regions, such as at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia. The methane flux across the ocean/atmosphere interface is as well higher. Modeling the methane flux across this interface at three bubble plumes provides values that range from 180-2000 {_}mol/m{sup 2} day; extrapolating it over the Gulf of Mexico basin utilizing satellite data is in progress.

  10. Quality and stability of artemether-lumefantrine stored under ambient conditions in rural Mali

    OpenAIRE

    Gitua, John; Beck, Aaron; Rovers, John

    2014-01-01

    Background The quality and stability of anti-malarial drugs in the Global South has long been of significant concern. Drug quality can be affected by poor or fraudulent manufacturing processes, while drug stability is affected by temperature and humidity. Knowledge of drug quality and stability is often the unique contribution of pharmacists volunteering on short-term medical mission trips. Objective To determine the quality and stability of artemether-lumefantrine 20/120 mg under ambient sto...

  11. Stability of silver nanoparticles: agglomeration and oxidation in biological relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Laura E.; Giacomelli, Carla E.

    2017-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are the most used nanomaterial in consumer products due to the intrinsic antimicrobial capacity of silver. However, Ag-NP may be also harmful to algae, aquatic species, mammalian cells, and higher plants because both Ag+ and nanoparticles are responsible of cell damages. The oxidative dissolution of Ag-NP would proceed to completion under oxic conditions, but the rate and extent of the dissolution depend on several factors. This work correlates the effect of the capping agent (albumin and citrate) with the stability of Ag-NP towards agglomeration in simulated body fluid (SBF) and oxidation in the presence of ROS species (H2O2). Capping provides colloidal stability only through electrostatic means, whereas albumin acts as bulky ligands giving steric and electrostatic repulsion, inhibiting the agglomeration in SBF. However, citrate capping protects Ag-NP from dissolution to a major extent than albumin does because of its reducing power. Moreover, citrate in solution minimizes the oxidation of albumin-coated Ag-NP even after long incubation times. H2O2-induced dissolution proceeds to completion with Ag-NP incubated in SBF, while incubation in citrate leads to an incomplete oxidation. In short, albumin is an excellent capping agent to minimize Ag-NP agglomeration whereas citrate provides a mild-reductive medium that prevents dissolution in biological relevant media as well as in the presence of ROS species. These results provide insight into how the surface properties and media composition affect the release of Ag+ from Ag-NP, related to the cell toxicity and relevant to the storage and lifetime of silver-containing nanomaterials.

  12. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  13. Methane Hydrate Field Program. Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, Tim [U.S. Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States); Bahk, Jang-Jun [Korea Inst. of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon (Korea); Frye, Matt [U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Sterling, VA (United States); Goldberg, Dave [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States); Husebo, Jarle [Statoil ASA, Stavenger (Norway); Koh, Carolyn [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Malone, Mitch [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shipp, Craig [Shell International Exploration and Production Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States); Torres, Marta [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Myers, Greg [Consortium For Ocean Leadership Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Divins, David [Consortium For Ocean Leadership Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Morell, Margo [Consortium For Ocean Leadership Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-12-31

    This topical report represents a pathway toward better understanding of the impact of marine methane hydrates on safety and seafloor stability and future collection of data that can be used by scientists, engineers, managers and planners to study climate change and to assess the feasibility of marine methane hydrate as a potential future energy resource. Our understanding of the occurrence, distribution and characteristics of marine methane hydrates is incomplete; therefore, research must continue to expand if methane hydrates are to be used as a future energy source. Exploring basins with methane hydrates has been occurring for over 30 years, but these efforts have been episodic in nature. To further our understanding, these efforts must be more regular and employ new techniques to capture more data. This plan identifies incomplete areas of methane hydrate research and offers solutions by systematically reviewing known methane hydrate “Science Challenges” and linking them with “Technical Challenges” and potential field program locations.

  14. Thermodynamics of clathrate hydrate at low and high pressures with application to the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, J. I.; Stevenson, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of clathrate hydrate is calculated to predict the formation conditions corresponding to a range of solar system parameters. The calculations were performed using the statistical mechanical theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw (1959) and existing experimental data concerning clathrate hydrate and its components. Dissociation pressures and partition functions (Langmuir constants) are predicted at low pressure for CO clathrate (hydrate) using the properties of chemicals similar to CO. It is argued that nonsolar but well constrained noble gas abundances may be measurable by the Galileo spacecraft in the Jovian atmosphere if the observed carbon enhancement is due to bombardment of the atmosphere by clathrate-bearing planetesimals sometime after planetary formation. The noble gas abundances of the Jovian satellite Titan are predicted, assuming that most of the methane in Titan is accreted as clathrate. It is suggested that under thermodynamically appropriate conditions, complete clathration of water ice could have occurred in high-pressure nebulas around giant planets, but probably not in the outer solar nebula. The stability of clathrate in other pressure ranges is also discussed.

  15. Apparatus investigates geological aspects of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Dillon, William P.

    1999-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed a laboratory research system which allows the study of the creation and dissociation of gas hydrates under deepwater conditions and with different sediment types and pore fluids. The system called GHASTLI (gas hydrate and sediment test laboratory instrument) comprises a pressure chamber which holds a sediment specimen, and which can simulate water depths to 2,500m and different sediment overburden. Seawater and gas flow through a sediment specimen can be precisely controlled and monitored. It can simulate a wide range of geology and processes and help to improve understanding of gas hydrate processes and aid prediction of geohazards, their control and potential use as an energy source. This article describes GHASTLI and how it is able to simulate natural conditions, focusing on fluid volume, acoustic velocity-compressional and shear wave, electric resistance, temperature, pore pressure, shear strength, and permeability.

  16. Guest-Host Interaction Study in Clathrate Hydrates Using Lattice Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maofeng Jing; Shunle Dong

    2005-01-01

    Lattice dynamics simulation of several gas hydrates (helium, argon, and methane) with different occupancy rates has been performed using TIP3P potential model. Results show that the coupling between the guest and host is not simple as depicted by the conventional viewpoints. For clathrate hydrate enclosing small guest, the small cages are dominantly responsible for the thermodynamic stability of clathrate hydrates. And the spectrum of methane hydrate is studied compared with argon hydrate,then as a result, shrink effect from positive hydrogen shell is proposed.

  17. Effect of compositions in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC on skin hydration and occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loo CH

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CH Loo,1,2 M Basri,2 R Ismail,1 HLN Lau,1 BA Tejo,2 MS Kanthimathi,3 HA Hassan,1 YM Choo11Malaysian Palm Oil Board, Bandar Baru Bangi, 2Department of Chemistry, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, 3Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaPurpose: To study the effects of varying lipid concentrations, lipid and oil ratio, and the addition of propylene glycol and lecithin on the long-term physical stability of nanostructured lipid nanocarriers (NLC, skin hydration, and transepidermal water loss.Methods: The various NLC formulations (A1–A5 were prepared and their particle size, zeta potential, viscosity, and stability were analyzed. The formulations were applied on the forearms of the 20 female volunteers (one forearm of each volunteer was left untreated as a control. The subjects stayed for 30 minutes in a conditioned room with their forearms uncovered to let the skin adapt to the temperature (22°C ± 2°C and humidity (50% ± 2% of the room. Skin hydration and skin occlusion were recorded at day one (before treatment and day seven (after treatment. Three measurements for skin hydration and skin occlusion were performed in each testing area.Results: NLC formulations with the highest lipid concentration, highest solid lipid concentration, and additional propylene glycol (formulations A1, A2, and A5 showed higher physical stability than other formulations. The addition of propylene glycol into an NLC system helped to reduce the particle size of the NLC and enhanced its long-term physical stability. All the NLC formulations were found to significantly increase skin hydration compared to the untreated controls within 7 days. All NLC formulations exhibited occlusive properties as they reduced the transepidermal water loss within 7 days. This effect was more pronounced with the addition of propylene glycol or lecithin into an NLC formulation, whereby at least 60% reduction in transepidermal water loss was observed

  18. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  19. Interaction Study of Guest with Host in Clathrate Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Wang; Shunle Dong

    2007-01-01

    Lattice dynamical simulations of noble gas hydrate structures I and II have been performed. Potential energies were investigated to study the influence of guest species on the stability of the hydrate structure. Results show that when the diameter of inclusion molecules is between 3 A and 4.2 A, such as Ar and Kr, the critical role of the 512 cage in the stabilization of hydrates becomes effective. For Xe hydrates SI and SII, with the help of lattice dynamical calculations, the modes attributions are identified directly. We proposed the resonant effect of the fingerprint frequency at about 7 meV and 10 meV which arise from the coupling of Xe molecules in the 512 cage with the host lattice.

  20. Characteristics of shallow gas hydrate in Okhotsk Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUAN XiWu; JIN YoungKeun; Anatoly OBZHIROV; YUE BaoJing

    2008-01-01

    Multidisciplinary field investigations were carried out in Okhotsk Sea by R/V Akademik M.A. Lavrentyev (LV) of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) in May 2006, supported by funding agencies from Korea, Russia, Japan and China. Geophysical data including echo-sounder, bottom profile, side-scansonar, and gravity core sample were obtained aimed to understand the characteristics and formation mechanism of shallow gas hydrates. Based on the geophysical data, we found that the methane flare detected by echo-sounder was the evidence of free gas in the sediment, while the dome structure detected by side-scan sonar and bottom profile was the root of gas venting. Gas hydrate retrieved from core on top of the dome structure which was interbedded as thin lamination or lenses with thickness varying from a few millimeters to 3 cm. Gas hydrate content in hydrate-bearing intervals visually amounted to 5%-30% of the sediment volume. This paper argued that gases in the sediment core were not all from gas hydrate decomposition during the gravity core lifting process, free gases must existed in the gas hydrate stability zone, and tectonic structure like dome structure in this paper was free gas central, gas hydrate formed only when gases over-saturated in this gas central, away from these struc tures, gas hydrate could not form due to low gas concentration.

  1. Characteristics of shallow gas hydrate in Okhotsk Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anatoly; OBZHIROV

    2008-01-01

    Multidisciplinary field investigations were carried out in Okhotsk Sea by R/V Akademik M.A. Lavrentyev (LV) of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) in May 2006, supported by funding agencies from Ko- rea, Russia, Japan and China. Geophysical data including echo-sounder, bottom profile, side-scan- sonar, and gravity core sample were obtained aimed to understand the characteristics and formation mechanism of shallow gas hydrates. Based on the geophysical data, we found that the methane flare detected by echo-sounder was the evidence of free gas in the sediment, while the dome structure de- tected by side-scan sonar and bottom profile was the root of gas venting. Gas hydrate retrieved from core on top of the dome structure which was interbedded as thin lamination or lenses with thickness varying from a few millimeters to 3 cm. Gas hydrate content in hydrate-bearing intervals visually amounted to 5%―30% of the sediment volume. This paper argued that gases in the sediment core were not all from gas hydrate decomposition during the gravity core lifting process, free gases must existed in the gas hydrate stability zone, and tectonic structure like dome structure in this paper was free gas central, gas hydrate formed only when gases over-saturated in this gas central, away from these struc- tures, gas hydrate could not form due to low gas concentration.

  2. Scientific results from Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project Leg 1 drilling: introduction and overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, C.; Boswell, R.; Jones, E.

    2008-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project (JIP) is a consortium of production and service companies and some government agencies formed to address the challenges that gas hydrates pose for deepwater exploration and production. In partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy and with scientific assistance from the U.S. Geological Survey and academic partners, the JIP has focused on studies to assess hazards associated with drilling the fine-grained, hydrate-bearing sediments that dominate much of the shallow subseafloor in the deepwater (>500 m) Gulf of Mexico. In preparation for an initial drilling, logging, and coring program, the JIP sponsored a multi-year research effort that included: (a) the development of borehole stability models for hydrate-bearing sediments; (b) exhaustive laboratory measurements of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; (c) refinement of new techniques for processing industry-standard 3-D seismic data to constrain gas hydrate saturations; and (d) construction of instrumentation to measure the physical properties of sediment cores that had never been removed from in situ hydrostatic pressure conditions. Following review of potential drilling sites, the JIP launched a 35-day expedition in Spring 2005 to acquire well logs and sediment cores at sites in Atwater Valley lease blocks 13/14 and Keathley Canyon lease block 151 in the northern Gulf of Mexico minibasin province. The Keathley Canyon site has a bottom simulating reflection at ???392 m below the seafloor, while the Atwater Valley location is characterized by seafloor mounds with an underlying upwarped seismic reflection consistent with upward fluid migration and possible shoaling of the base of the gas hydrate stability (BGHS). No gas hydrate was recovered at the drill sites, but logging data, and to some extent cores, suggest the occurrence of gas hydrate in inferred coarser-grained beds and fractures, particularly between 220 and 330 m below the seafloor

  3. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  4. Applications of Conditional Nonlinear Optimal Perturbation to the Study of the Stability and Sensitivity of the Jovian Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A two-layer quasi-geostrophic model is used to study the stability and sensitivity of motions on small-scale vortices in Jupiter's atmosphere. Conditional nonlinear optimal perturbations (CNOPs) and linear singular vectors (LSVs) are both obtained numerically and compared in this paper. The results show that CNOPs can capture the nonlinear characteristics of motions in small-scale vortices in Jupiter's atmosphere and show great difference from LSVs under the condition that the initial constraint condition is large or the optimization time is not very short or both. Besides, in some basic states, local CNOPs are found.The pattern of LSV is more similar to local CNOP than global CNOP in some cases. The elementary application of the method of CNOP to the Jovian atmosphere helps us to explore the stability of variousscale motions of Jupiter's atmosphere and to compare the stability of motions in Jupiter's atmosphere and Earth's atmosphere further.

  5. The impact of hydrate saturation on the mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of hydrate-bearing sand, silts, and clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamarina, J.C. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Ruppel, C. [United States Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    A study was conducted to provide an internally-consistent, systematically-acquired database that could help in evaluating gas hydrate reservoirs. Other objectives were to assist in geomechanical analyses, hazards evaluation and the development of methane hydrate production techniques in sandy lithologies and fine-grained sediments that exist in the northern Gulf of Mexico. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments facilitates the interpretation of geophysical field data, borehole and slope stability analyses, and reservoir simulation and production models. This paper reported on the key findings derived from 5 years of laboratory experiments conducted on synthetic samples of sand, silts, or clays subjected to various confining pressures. The samples contained controlled saturations of tetrahydrofuran hydrate formed from the dissolved phase. This internally-consistent data set was used to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the trends in geophysical and geotechnical properties as a function of hydrate saturation, soil characteristics, and other parameters. The experiments emphasized measurements of seismic velocities, electrical conductivity and permittivity, large strain deformation and strength, and thermal conductivity. The impact of hydrate formation technique on the resulting physical properties measurements were discussed. The data set was used to identify systematic effects of sediment characteristics, hydrate concentration, and state of stress. The study showed that the electrical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are less sensitive to the method used to form hydrate in the laboratory than to hydrate saturation. It was concluded that mechanical properties are strongly influenced by both soil properties and the hydrate loci. Since the thermal conductivity depends on the interaction of several factors, it cannot be readily predicted by volume average formulations. 23 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  6. M-matrix-based stability conditions for genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays and noise perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li-Ping; Shi, Zhong-Ke; Liu, Li-Zhi; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2013-10-01

    Stability is essential for designing and controlling any dynamic systems. Recently, the stability of genetic regulatory networks has been widely studied by employing linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach, which results in checking the existence of feasible solutions to high-dimensional LMIs. In the previous study, the authors present several stability conditions for genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays, based on M-matrix theory and using the non-smooth Lyapunov function, which results in determining whether a low-dimensional matrix is a non-singular M-matrix. However, the previous approach cannot be applied to analyse the stability of genetic regulatory networks with noise perturbations. Here, the authors design a smooth Lyapunov function quadratic in state variables and employ M-matrix theory to derive new stability conditions for genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays. Theoretically, these conditions are less conservative than existing ones in some genetic regulatory networks. Then the results are extended to genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays and noise perturbations. For genetic regulatory networks with n genes and n proteins, the derived conditions are to check if an n × n matrix is a non-singular M-matrix. To further present the new theories proposed in this study, three example regulatory networks are analysed.

  7. Structural stability of coprecipitated natural organic matter and ferric iron under reducing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneberry, Yumiko K.; Kraus, Tamara E.C.; Nico, Peter S.; Horwath, William R.

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to assess the interaction of Fe coprecipitated with dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its effect on Fe (hydr)oxide crystallinity and DOM retention under abiotic reducing conditions. A Fe-based coagulant was reacted with DOM from an agricultural drain and the resulting precipitate (floc) was exposed to S(-II) and Fe(II). Solution concentrations of Fe(II/III) and DOM were monitored, floc crystallinity was determined using X-ray diffraction, and the composition and distribution of functional groups were assessed using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Results indicate coprecipitation of Fe(III) with DOM forms a non-crystalline floc that withstands crystallization regardless of change in pH, Fe:DOM ratio and type of reductant added. There was no evidence that exposure to reducing conditions led to release of DOM from the floc, indicating that coprecipitation with complex natural DOM in aquatic environments may stabilize Fe (hydr)oxides against crystallization upon reaction with reduced species and lead to long term sequestration of the DOM. STXM analysis identified spatially distinct regions with remarkable functional group purity, contrary to the model of DOM as a relatively uniform complex polymer lacking identifiable organic compounds. Polysaccharide-like OM was strongly and directly correlated with the presence of Fe but showed different Fe binding strength depending on the presence of carboxylic acid functional groups, whereas amide and aromatic functional groups were inversely correlated with Fe content.

  8. Effect of substrate storage conditions on the stability of "Smart" films used for mammalian cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestein, Blake M.; Reed, Jamie A.; Canavan, Heather E.

    2017-01-01

    When poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (pNIPAM) is tethered to a surface, it can induce the spontaneous release of a sheet of mammalian cells. The release of cells is a result of the reversible phase transition the polymer undergoes at its lower critical solution temperature (LCST). Many techniques are used for the deposition of pNIPAM onto cell culture substrates. Previously, we compared two methods of deposition (plasma polymerization, and co-deposition with a sol-gel). We proved that although both were technically appropriate for obtaining thermoresponsive pNIPAM films, the surfaces that were co-deposited with a sol-gel caused some disruption in cell activity. The variation of cell behavior could be due to the delamination of pNIPAM films leaching toxic chemicals into solution. In this work, we assessed the stability of these pNIPAM films by manipulating the storage conditions and analyzing the surface chemistry using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements over the amount of time required to obtain confluent cell sheets. From XPS, we demonstrated that ppNIPAM (plasma polymerized NIPAM) films remains stable across all storage conditions while sol-gel deposition show large deviations after 48 h of storage. Cell response of the deposited films was assessed by investigating the cytotoxicity and biocompatibility. The 37 °C and high humidity storage affects sol-gel deposited films, inhibiting normal cell growth and proper thermoresponse of the film. Surface chemistry, thermoresponse and cell growth remained similar for all ppNIPAM surfaces, indicating these substrates are more appropriate for mammalian cell culture applications.

  9. The Structural Properties and Stability of Monoclonal Antibodies at Freezing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevozchikova, Tatiana; Zarraga, Isidro; Scherer, Thomas; Wagner, Norman; Liu, Yun

    2013-03-01

    Monoclonal Antibodies (MAb) have become a crucial therapeutic agent in a number of anti-cancer treatments. Due to the inherent unstable nature of proteins in an aqueous formulation, a freeze-drying method has been developed to maintain long-term stability of biotherapeutics. The microstructural changes in Mabs during freezing, however, remain not fully described, and it was proposed that the formed morphology of freeze drying samples could affect the final product quality after reconstitution. Furthermore, it is well known that proteins tend to aggregate during the freezing process if a careful processing procedure is not formulated. Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a powerful tool to investigate the structural properties and interactions of Mabs during various stages of lyophilization in situ. Here we present the SANS results of freeze-thaw studies on two MAbs at several different freezing temperatures. While the chosen proteins share a significant sequence homology, their freezing properties are found to be strikingly distinctive. We also show the effect of excipients, concentration and quenching speed on the final morphology of the frozen samples. These findings provide critical information for more effective lyophilization schemes for therapeutic proteins, as well as increase our understanding on structural properties of proteins under cryogenic conditions.

  10. Stability and reliability of anodic biofilms under different feedstock conditions: Towards microbial fuel cell sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiseon You

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stability and reliability of microbial fuel cell anodic biofilms, consisting of mixed cultures, were investigated in a continuously fed system. Two groups of anodic biofilm matured with different substrates, acetate and casein for 20–25 days, reached steady states and produced 80–87 μW and 20–29 μW consistently for 3 weeks, respectively. When the substrates were swapped, the casein-enriched group showed faster response to acetate and higher power output, compared to the acetate-enriched group. Also when the substrates were switched back to their original groups, the power output of both groups returned to the previous levels more quickly than when the substrates were swapped the first time. During the substrate change, both MFC groups showed stable power output once they reached their steady states and the output of each group with different substrates was reproducible within the same group. Community level physiological profiling also revealed the possibility of manipulating anodic biofilm metabolisms through exposure to different feedstock conditions.

  11. Functionalization of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Enhanced Stability under Humid Carbon Dioxide Capture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andirova, Dinara; Lei, Yu; Zhao, Xiaodan; Choi, Sunho

    2015-10-26

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been highlighted recently as promising materials for CO2 capture. However, in practical CO2 capture processes, such as capture from flue gas or ambient air, the adsorption properties of MOFs tend to be harmed by the presence of moisture possibly because of the hydrophilic nature of the coordinatively unsaturated sites (CUSs) within their framework. In this work, the CUSs of the MOF framework are functionalized with amine-containing molecules to prevent structural degradation in a humid environment. Specifically, the framework of the magnesium dioxybenzenedicarboxylate (Mg/DOBDC) MOF was functionalized with ethylenediamine (ED) molecules to make the overall structure less hydrophilic. Structural analysis after exposure to high-temperature steam showed that the ED-functionalized Mg/DOBDC (ED-Mg/DOBDC) is more stable under humid conditions, than Mg/DOBDC, which underwent drastic structural changes. ED-Mg/DOBDC recovered its CO2 adsorption capacity and initial adsorption rate quite well as opposed to the original Mg/DOBDC, which revealed a significant reduction in its capture capacity and kinetics. These results suggest that the amine-functionalization of the CUSs is an effective way to enhance the structural stability of MOFs as well as their capture of humid CO2 .

  12. On the stability conditions for theories of modified gravity coupled to matter fields

    CERN Document Server

    De Felice, Antonio; Papadomanolakis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    We present a thorough stability analysis of modified gravity theories when the coupling to matter fields is considered. We use the Effective Field Theory framework for Dark Energy and Modified Gravity to retain a general approach for the gravity sector and a Sorkin-Schutz action for the matter one. Then, we work out the proper viability conditions to guarantee in the scalar sector the absence of ghosts, gradient and tachyonic instabilities. The absence of ghosts can be achieved by demanding a positive kinetic matrix, while the lack of a gradient instability is ensured by imposing a positive speed of propagation for all the scalar modes. In case of tachyonic instability, the mass eigenvalues have been studied and we work out the appropriate expressions. For the latter, an instability occurs only when the negative mass eigenvalue is much larger, in absolute value, than the Hubble parameter. We discuss the results for the minimally coupled quintessence model showing for a particular set of parameters two typical...

  13. Conditions that Stabilize Membrane Domains Also Antagonize n-Alcohol Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machta, Benjamin B.; Gray, Ellyn; Nouri, Mariam; McCarthy, Nicola L. C.; Gray, Erin M.; Miller, Ann L.; Brooks, Nicholas J.; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2016-08-01

    Diverse molecules induce general anesthesia with potency strongly correlated both with their hydrophobicity and their effects on certain ion channels. We recently observed that several n-alcohol anesthetics inhibit heterogeneity in plasma membrane derived vesicles by lowering the critical temperature ($T_c$) for phase separation. Here we exploit conditions that stabilize membrane heterogeneity to further test the correlation between the anesthetic potency of n-alcohols and effects on $T_c$. First we show that hexadecanol acts oppositely to n-alcohol anesthetics on membrane mixing and antagonizes ethanol induced anesthesia in a tadpole behavioral assay. Second, we show that two previously described `intoxication reversers' raise $T_c$ and counter ethanol's effects in vesicles, mimicking the findings of previous electrophysiological and behavioral measurements. Third, we find that hydrostatic pressure, long known to reverse anesthesia, also raises $T_c$ in vesicles with a magnitude that counters the effect of butanol at relevant concentrations and pressures. Taken together, these results demonstrate that $\\Delta T_c$ predicts anesthetic potency for n-alcohols better than hydrophobicity in a range of contexts, supporting a mechanistic role for membrane heterogeneity in general anesthesia.

  14. Human synthetic sebum formulation and stability under conditions of use and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, P W

    2009-02-01

    The human skin surface and hair are generally coated with a thin film of liquid phase sebaceous lipids. This surface lipid film contributes to the cosmetic properties of the skin. Synthetic sebum has been used for studies on properties of skin and hair. However, there has been no standardized formulation of synthetic sebum and many of the synthetic sebum formulations that have been used do not closely resemble actual sebum. In this study, a formulation for a standardized and inexpensive synthetic sebum is proposed, and the chemical stability of this lipid mixture is demonstrated under conditions of use and storage. The proposed synthetic sebum consists of 17% fatty acid, 44.7% triglyceride, 25% wax monoester (jojoba oil) and 12.4% squalene. This lipid mixture takes up approximately 6% of its weight in water when equilibrated in an atmosphere saturated with water vapour. It is stable on exposure to the atmosphere at 32 degrees C for at least 48 h, and it is also stable on storage at 4 or -20 degrees C, either dry or in chloroform : methanol solution for at least 6 months. This synthetic sebum could be useful in studies on cosmetic properties of the skin surface or hair, on penetration of chemicals into the skin or in development of standardized tests of laundry detergent performance.

  15. Thermal stabilities of drops of burning thermoplastics under the UL 94 vertical test conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Jun

    2013-02-15

    The properties of polymer melts will strongly affect the fire hazard of the pool induced by polymer melt flow. In this study the thermal stabilities of eight thermoplastic polymers as well as their melting drops generated under the UL 94 vertical burning test conditions were investigated by thermogravimetric experiments. It was found that the kinetic compensation effect existed for the decomposition reactions of the polymers and their drops. For polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), high impact polystyrene (HIPS), poly(acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) (ABS), polyamide 6 (PA6), polypropylene (PP) and low density polyethylene (LDPE), the onset decomposition temperature and the two decomposition kinetic parameters (the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy) of the drop were less than those of the polymer. However, the onset decomposition temperature and the two kinetic parameters of PC's drop were greater than those of polycarbonate (PC). Interestingly, for polyethylenevinylacetate (EVA18) the drop hardly contained the vinyl acetate chain segments. Similarly, for the PMMA/LDPE blends and the PMMA/PP blends, when the volume fraction of PMMA was less than 50% the drop hardly contained PMMA, implying that the blend would not drip until PMMA burned away and its surface temperature approached the decomposition temperature of the continuous phase composed of LDPE or PP.

  16. Stability study of simvastatin under hydrolytic conditions assessed by liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Lueje, Alejandro; Valenzuela, Christian; Squella, Juan Arturo; Núñez-Vergara, Luis Joaquín

    2005-01-01

    In this work, a liquid chromatography stability-indicating method was developed and applied to study the hydrolytic behavior of simvastatin in different pH values and temperatures. The selected chromatographic conditions were a C18 column; acetonitrile-28 mM phosphate buffer solution, pH 4 (65 + 35) as the mobile phase; 251 degrees C column temperature; and flow rate 1 mL/min. The developed method exhibited an adequate repeatability and reproducibility (coefficient of variation 0.54 and 0.74%, respectively) and a recovery higher than 98%. Furthermore, the detection and quantification limits were 9.1 x 10(-7) and 2.8 x 10(-6) M, respectively. The degradation of simvastatin fitted to pseudo-first order kinetics. The degradation was pH dependent, being much higher at alkaline pH than at acid pH. Activation energy, kinetic rate constants (k) at different temperatures, the half life (t1/2) and the time for 10% degradation to occur (t90) values are also reported.

  17. On the stability conditions for theories of modified gravity in the presence of matter fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Antonio; Frusciante, Noemi; Papadomanolakis, Georgios

    2017-03-01

    We present a thorough stability analysis of modified gravity theories in the presence of matter fields. We use the Effective Field Theory framework for Dark Energy and Modified Gravity to retain a general approach for the gravity sector and a Sorkin-Schutz action for the matter one. Then, we work out the proper viability conditions to guarantee in the scalar sector the absence of ghosts, gradient and tachyonic instabilities. The absence of ghosts can be achieved by demanding a positive kinetic matrix, while the lack of a gradient instability is ensured by imposing a positive speed of propagation for all the scalar modes. In case of tachyonic instability, the mass eigenvalues have been studied and we work out the appropriate expressions. For the latter, an instability occurs only when the negative mass eigenvalue is much larger, in absolute value, than the Hubble parameter. We discuss the results for the minimally coupled quintessence model showing for a particular set of parameters two typical behaviours which in turn lead to a stable and an unstable configuration. Moreover, we find that the speeds of propagation of the scalar modes strongly depend on matter densities, for the beyond Horndeski theories. Our findings can be directly employed when testing modified gravity theories as they allow to identify the correct viability space.

  18. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  19. Simulation of natural gas production from submarine gas hydrate deposits combined with carbon dioxide storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2013-04-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several submarine sediments and permafrost regions around the world so far is considered to be a promising measure to overcome future shortages in natural gas as fuel or raw material for chemical syntheses. Being aware that natural gas resources that can be exploited with conventional technologies are limited, research is going on to open up new sources and develop technologies to produce methane and other energy carriers. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, South Korea, India, China and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop technologies to destabilize the hydrates and obtain the pure gas. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of carbon dioxide from combustion processes to reduce climate change. While different natural or manmade reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid carbon dioxide, the storage of carbon dioxide as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in form of hydrates. This has been shown in several laboratory tests and simulations - technical field tests are still in preparation. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR«, different technological approaches are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical effects are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs like CMG STARS and COMSOL Multiphysics. New simulations based on field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the evaluation of the gas production

  20. Global exponential stability conditions for generalized state-space systems with time-varying delays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, K.-W. [Department of Marine Engineering, National Kaohsiung Marine University, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kwyu@mail.nkmu.edu.tw; Lien, C.-H. [Department of Marine Engineering, National Kaohsiung Marine University, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chlien.ee@msa.hinet.net

    2008-05-15

    A unified approach is proposed to deal with the exponential stability for generalized state-space systems with time-varying delays. Many systems models can be regarded as special cases of the considered systems; such as neutral time-delay systems and delayed cellular neural networks. Delay-dependent stability criteria are proposed to guarantee the global exponential stability for generalized state-space systems with two cases of uncertainties. Two numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of our method.

  1. Methane storage in dry water gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixing; Bray, Christopher L; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2008-09-03

    Dry water stores 175 v(STP)/v methane at 2.7 MPa and 273.2 K in a hydrate form which is close to the Department of Energy volumetric target for methane storage. Dry water is a silica-stabilized free-flowing powder (95% wt water), and fast methane uptakes were observed (90% saturation uptake in 160 min with no mixing) as a result of the relatively large surface-to-volume ratio of this material.

  2. Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos Nur

    2009-01-08

    We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

  3. The scientific objectives and program of the Japanese offshore methane hydrate production test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Fujii, T.; Noguchi, S.; Nagao, J.

    2012-12-01

    A gas production attempt from deepwater marine methane hydrate deposits is planned in early 2013 in the AT1 site in the north slope Daini-Atsumi Knoll in the Eastern Nankai Trough. The scientific goal of this production test is to understand the behavior of methane hydrate dissociation under an in-situ condition. The program includes one to several weeks of gas flow by applying depressurization technique. Drilling operations for the production test started in February 2012 at the test location, and two monitoring boreholes and part of production well have been drilled and completed. Reservoir characterization study is an essential part of the science program. For this purpose, intensive geophysical logging and coring programs are included in the drilling program. The logging data were mainly obtained from a hole named AT1-MC. The well was drilled with LWD tools, wireline logging suits were run subsequently. Also pressure-preserved cores were recovered from methane hydrate-concentrated and overburden sections in a dedicated borehole (AT1-C). To keep the pressure and temperature of cores under gas hydrate stability condition all the time, pressure core analysis and transfer system (PCATS) was used. Also the PCATS-triaxial device that can make mechanical and physical property measurements possible under tri-axial effective stress conditions was utilized. The physical, hydraulic and mechanical properties obtained from core and log data will be used for modeling works, and given to the numerical simulator MH21-HYDRES for methane hydrate production modeling as input parameters for forward analysis and inversion (history matching) to understand the in-situ processes. The monitoring of the methane hydrate dissociation processes is another important subject. The two monitoring holes have temperature sensors to detect temperature drop and recovery due to gas hydrate dissociation and heat transfer. Also, one of the monitoring holes is kept re-accessible to allow cased

  4. Nitrogen-assisted Three-phase Equilibrium in Hydrate Systems Composed of Water, Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, K.; Flemings, P. B.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Guest molecule exchange is a new and promising methane hydrate production technique in which methane gas is produced by injection of another gas without requiring depressurization or thermal stimulation. The technique is generally associated with injection of carbon dioxide, but injection of nitrogen and carbon dioxide mixtures are the most efficient and economical. However, thermodynamic behavior of injection mixtures is poorly understood, and it is unclear how nitrogen affects the exchange process. Here, we describe thermodynamic stability of hydrate systems that contain water, methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen. We present a series of ternary and quaternary phase diagrams and show the impact nitrogen has on hydrate stability. Our results demonstrate that nitrogen can either stabilize hydrate, de-stabilize hydrate, or produce three-phase equilibrium (gas, water, and hydrate) depending on its relative abundance. At low abundance nitrogen forms hydrate and directly contributes to the exchange process. At high abundance nitrogen de-stabilizes hydrate akin to traditional hydrate inhibitors, such as salt, alcohol, or mono-ethylene glycol. We show how the dual properties of nitrogen lead to three-phase equilibrium and how three-phase equilibrium may explain much of the behavior observed in methane production from nitrogen-rich injections. We apply our analysis to laboratory experiments and the methane hydrate field test on the northern Alaskan slope at Ignik Sikumi. These results can be extended to analyze dynamic evolution of mixed hydrate systems.

  5. Carbamide peroxide gel stability under different temperature conditions: is manipulated formulation an option?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Martini Bonesi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the use of gel containing carbamide peroxide (CP prepared in Pharmacy is a normal practice in the population. However, the quality of this product is questionable concerning its stability. The aim of this study is was to synthesize and to analyze this drug alone or associated to Carbopol gel through analytical methodology compatible with the routine of the Pharmacies. The reaction between urea and hydrogen peroxide was carried out at different resting times: 24 hours (CP 24 powder and 48 hours (CP48 powder after the mixture. Both products were associated with Carbopol 940® gel 1.5% (G generating G24 and G48 samples. The stability of powders (CP24 e CP48 and the formulations (G24 and G48 were evaluated as a function of time (15, 40 and 45 days and thermal variation (refrigeration: 8 °C±1; thermal shock 32 °C±1 /8 °C±1; stove: 32 °C±1, using a standard titration method. As a result, only under refrigeration the CP24 and CP48 contents remained stable during the period of 45 days. An interesting finding was that G24 and G48 presented greater stability for at least 45-days under refrigeration and thermal shock conditions, and up to 30 days under stove conditions. The results for the G24 and G48 were slightly higher than those obtained for the control. Therefore, we were able to conclude that association with Carbopol 940® Gel 1.5 % provided greater CP stability and that manipulated formulations containing CP may be viable for use in a period of 45 days under refrigeration conditions. The titration proved to be an effective technique for the analysis of CP with or without Carbopol 940® gel 1.5%.Atualmente, a utilização de gel contendo peróxido de carbamida manipulado em Farmácia é uma prática comum na população. No entanto, a qualidade deste produto é questionada, sobretudo no que se refere à estabilidade deste fármaco. O objetivo deste trabalho consiste na avaliação da viabilidade de sintetizar e analisar

  6. Complexation of arsenite with dissolved organic matter: conditional distribution coefficients and apparent stability constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong

    2010-11-01

    The complexation of arsenic (As) with dissolved organic matter (DOM), although playing an important role in regulating As mobility and transformation, is poorly characterized, as evidenced by scarce reporting of fundamental parameters of As-DOM complexes. The complexation of arsenite (AsIII) with Aldrich humic acid (HA) at different pHs was characterized using a recently developed analytical technique to measure both free and DOM-bound As. Conditional distribution coefficient (KD), describing capacity of DOM in binding AsIII from the mass perspective, and apparent stability constant (Ks), describing stability of resulting AsIII-DOM complexes, were calculated to characterize AsIII-DOM complexation. LogKD of AsIII ranged from 3.7 to 2.2 (decreasing with increase of As/DOM ratio) at pH 5.2, from 3.6 to 2.6 at pH 7, and from 4.3 to 3.2 at pH=9.3, respectively. Two-site ligand binding models can capture the heterogeneity of binding sites and be used to calculate Ks by classifying the binding sites into strong (S1) and weak (S2) groups. LogKs for S1 sites are 7.0, 6.5, and 5.9 for pH 5.2, 7, and 9.3, respectively, which are approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than for weak S2 sites. The results suggest that AsIII complexation with DOM increases with pH, as evidenced by significant spikes in concentrations of DOM-bound AsIII and in KD values at pH 9.3. In contrary to KD, logKs decreased with pH, in particular for S1 sites, probably due to the presence of negatively charged H2AsO3- and the involvement of metal-bridged AsIII-DOM complexation at pH 9.3.

  7. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  8. Natural Gas Evolution in a Gas Hydrate Melt: Effect of Thermodynamic Hydrate Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujith, K S; Ramachandran, C N

    2017-01-12

    Natural gas extraction from gas hydrate sediments by injection of hydrate inhibitors involves the decomposition of hydrates. The evolution of dissolved gas from the hydrate melt is an important step in the extraction process. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we study the evolution of dissolved methane from its hydrate melt in the presence of two thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors, NaCl and CH3OH. An increase in the concentration of hydrate inhibitors is found to promote the nucleation of methane nanobubbles in the hydrate melt. Whereas NaCl promotes bubble formation by enhancing the hydrophobic interaction between aqueous CH4 molecules, CH3OH molecules assist bubble formation by stabilizing CH4 bubble nuclei formed in the solution. The CH3OH molecules accumulate around the nuclei leading to a decrease in the surface tension at their interface with water. The nanobubbles formed are found to be highly dynamic with frequent exchange of CH4 molecules between the bubble and the surrounding liquid. A quantitative analysis of the dynamic behavior of the bubble is performed by introducing a unit step function whose value depends on the location of CH4 molecules with respect to the bubble. It is observed that an increase in the concentration of thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors reduces the exchange process, making the bubble less dynamic. It is also found that for a given concentration of the inhibitor, larger bubbles are less dynamic compared to smaller ones. The dependence of the dynamic nature of nanobubbles on bubble size and inhibitor concentration is correlated with the solubility of CH4 and the Laplace pressure within the bubble. The effect of CO2 on the formation of nanobubble in the CH4-CO2 mixed gas hydrate melt in the presence of inhibitors is also examined. The simulations show that the presence of CO2 molecules significantly reduces the induction time for methane nanobubble nucleation. The role of CO2 in the early nucleation of bubble is explained

  9. The Effect of Small Cosolutes that Mimic Molecular Crowding Conditions on the Stability of Triplexes Involving Duplex DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Aviñó

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Triplex stability is studied in crowding conditions using small cosolutes (ethanol, acetonitrile and dimethylsulfoxide by ultraviolet (UV, circular dichroism (CD and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopies. The results indicate that the triplex is formed preferentially when the triplex forming oligonucleotide (TFO is RNA. In addition, DNA triplexes (D:D·D are clearly less stable in cosolute solutions while the stability of the RNA triplexes (R:D·D is only slightly decreased. The kinetic of triplex formation with RNA-TFO is slower than with DNA-TFO and the thermal stability of the triplex is increased with the salt concentration in EtOH-water solutions. Accordingly, RNA could be considered a potential molecule to form a stable triplex for regulatory purposes in molecular crowding conditions.

  10. Postural stability in children with hemiplegia estimated for three postural conditions: standing, sitting and kneeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, Andrzej; Domagalska-Szopa, Małgorzata

    2015-04-01

    Postural control deficit is one of the most important problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The purpose of the presented study was to compare the effects of body posture asymmetry alone (i.e., in children with mild scoliosis) with the effects of body posture impairment (i.e., in children with hemiplegia) on postural stability. Forty-five outpatients with hemiplegia and 51 children with mild scoliosis were assessed using a posturography device. The examination comprised two parts: (1) analysis of the static load distribution; and (2) a posturographic test (CoP measurements) conducted in three postural conditions: standing, sitting and kneeling. Based on the asymmetry index of the unaffected/affected body sides while standing, the children with hemiplegia were divided into two different postural patterns: a pro-gravitational postural pattern (PGPP) and an anti-gravitational postural pattern (AGPP) (Domagalska-Szopa & Szopa (2013). BioMed Research International, 2013, 462094; (2014). Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, 10, 113). The group of children with mild scoliosis, considered as a standard for static body weight distribution, was used as the reference group. The results of present study only partially confirmed that children with hemiplegia have increased postural instability. Strong weight distribution asymmetry was found in children with an AGPP, which induced larger lateral-medial CoP displacements compared with children with scoliosis. In children with hemiplegia, distinguishing between their postural patterns may be useful to improve the guidelines for early therapy children with an AGPP before abnormal patterns of weight-bearing asymmetry are fully established.

  11. Metal ion coordination, conditional stability constants, and solution behavior of chelating surfactant metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanedal, Ida; Boija, Susanne; Almesåker, Ann; Persson, Gerd; Andersson, Fredrik; Hedenström, Erik; Bylund, Dan; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Håkan

    2014-04-29

    Coordination complexes of some divalent metal ions with the DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid)-based chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) have been examined in terms of chelation and solution behavior. The headgroup of 4-C12-DTPA contains eight donor atoms that can participate in the coordination of a metal ion. Conditional stability constants for five transition metal complexes with 4-C12-DTPA were determined by competition measurements between 4-C12-DTPA and DTPA, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Small differences in the relative strength b