WorldWideScience

Sample records for hybridized boron-carbon nitride

  1. [FTIR spectroscopic studies of inner stress on boron carbon nitride thin films].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Xin; Zheng, Ya-Ru; Song, Zhe; Feng, Ke-Cheng; Zhao, Yong-Nian

    2008-07-01

    Boron carbon nitride thin films were deposited by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique using a 50 mm-diameter composite target consisting of h-BN and graphite in an Ar-N2 gas mixture. The composite target was composed of two semi disks: one of h-BN and the other one of graphite. The distance between the target and the substrate was kept at 50 mm. The chamber base pressure was below 5 x 10(-4) Pa. During the deposition, the mixture of Ar (80%) and N2 (20%) was injected into the vacuum chamber and the total pressure was 1.3 Pa. The films were grown on silicon substrates at different deposition parameters, including sputtering power of 80-130 W, deposition temperature of 300-500 degrees C and deposition time of 1-4 h. The chemical bonding state of the samples was characterized by Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR). The results suggested that all of the films deposited at these deposition parameters are atomic-level hybrids composed of B, C and N atoms. Besides BN and carbons bonds, the boron carbide and carbon nitride bonds were formed in the BCN thin films. And the deposition parameters have important influences on the growth and inner stress of BCN thin films. That is the higher the sputtering power, the larger the inner stress; the higher or lower the deposition temperature, the larger the inner stress; the longer the deposition time, the larger the inner stress. So changing deposition parameters properly is a feasible method to relax the inner stress between the films and substrate. In the conditions of changing one parameter each time, the optimum deposition parameters to prepare BCN thin films with lower inner stress were obtained: sputtering power of 80 W, deposition temperature of 400 degrees C and deposition time of 2 h.

  2. Single-step synthesis of crystalline h-BN quantum- and nanodots embedded in boron carbon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsoso, Boitumelo J.; Ranganathan, Kamalakannan; Mutuma, Bridget K.; Lerotholi, Tsenolo; Jones, Glenn; Coville, Neil J.

    2017-03-01

    Herein we report on the synthesis and characterization of novel crystalline hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) quantum- and nanodots embedded in large-area boron carbon nitride (BCN) films. The films were grown on a Cu substrate by an atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition technique. Methane, ammonia, and boric acid were used as precursors for C, N and B to grow these few atomic layer thick uniform films. We observed that both the size of the h-BN quantum/nanodots and thickness of the BCN films were influenced by the vaporization temperature of boric acid as well as the H3BO3 (g) flux over the Cu substrate. These growth conditions were easily achieved by changing the position of the solid boric acid in the reactor with respect to the Cu substrate. Atomic force microscope (AFM) and TEM analyses show a variation in the h-BN dot size distribution, ranging from nanodots (∼224 nm) to quantum dots (∼11 nm) as the B-source is placed further away from the Cu foil. The distance between the B-source and the Cu foil gave an increase in the C atomic composition (42 at% C–65 at% C) and a decrease in both B and N contents (18 at% B and 14 at% N to 8 at% B and 7 at% N). UV–vis absorption spectra showed a higher band gap energy for the quantum dots (5.90 eV) in comparison with the nanodots (5.68 eV) due to a quantum confinement effect. The results indicated that the position of the B-source and its reaction with ammonia plays a significant role in controlling the nucleation of the h-BN quantum- and nanodots. The films are proposed to be used in solar cells. A mechanism to explain the growth of h-BN quantum/nanodots in BCN films is reported.

  3. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  4. Efficient boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, R Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael W

    2015-03-24

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  5. Efficient Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Nanotube Formation Via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz.

  6. Prediction of boron carbon nitrogen phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sanxi; Zhang, Hantao; Widom, Michael

    We studied the phase diagram of boron, carbon and nitrogen, including the boron-carbon and boron-nitrogen binaries and the boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary. Based on the idea of electron counting and using a technique of mixing similar primitive cells, we constructed many ''electron precise'' structures. First principles calculation is performed on these structures, with either zero or high pressures. For the BN binary, our calculation confirms that a rhmobohedral phase can be stablized at high pressure, consistent with some experimental results. For the BCN ternary, a new ground state structure is discovered and an Ising-like phase transition is suggested. Moreover, we modeled BCN ternary phase diagram and show continuous solubility from boron carbide to the boron subnitride phase.

  7. Predicted phase diagram of boron-carbon-nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hantao; Yao, Sanxi; Widom, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Noting the structural relationships between phases of carbon and boron carbide with phases of boron nitride and boron subnitride, we investigate their mutual solubilities using a combination of first-principles total energies supplemented with statistical mechanics to address finite temperatures. Thus we predict the solid-state phase diagram of boron-carbon-nitrogen (B-C-N). Owing to the large energy costs of substitution, we find that the mutual solubilities of the ultrahard materials diamond and cubic boron nitride are negligible, and the same for the quasi-two-dimensional materials graphite and hexagonal boron nitride. In contrast, we find a continuous range of solubility connecting boron carbide to boron subnitride at elevated temperatures. An electron-precise ternary compound B13CN consisting of B12 icosahedra with NBC chains is found to be stable at all temperatures up to melting. It exhibits an order-disorder transition in the orientation of NBC chains at approximately T =500 K. We also propose that the recently discovered binary B13N2 actually has composition B12.67N2 .

  8. Double Sided Si(Ge)/Sapphire/III-Nitride Hybrid Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    One aspect of the present invention is a double sided hybrid crystal structure including a trigonal Sapphire wafer containing a (0001) C-plane and having front and rear sides. The Sapphire wafer is substantially transparent to light in the visible and infrared spectra, and also provides insulation with respect to electromagnetic radio frequency noise. A layer of crystalline Si material having a cubic diamond structure aligned with the cubic direction on the (0001) C-plane and strained as rhombohedron to thereby enable continuous integration of a selected (SiGe) device onto the rear side of the Sapphire wafer. The double sided hybrid crystal structure further includes an integrated III-Nitride crystalline layer on the front side of the Sapphire wafer that enables continuous integration of a selected III-Nitride device on the front side of the Sapphire wafer.

  9. Enhanced non-radiative energy transfer in hybrid III-nitride structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R. M.; Athanasiou, M.; Bai, J.; Liu, B.; Wang, T., E-mail: t.wang@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-21

    The effect of surface states has been investigated in hybrid organic/inorganic white light emitting structures that employ high efficiency, nearfield non-radiative energy transfer (NRET) coupling. The structures utilize blue emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanorod arrays to minimize the separation with a yellow emitting F8BT coating. Surface states due to the exposed III-nitride surfaces of the nanostructures are found to reduce the NRET coupling rate. The surface states are passivated by deposition of a silicon nitride layer on the III-nitride nanorod surface leading to reduced surface recombination. A low thickness surface passivation is shown to increase the NRET coupling rate by 4 times compared to an un-passivated hybrid structure. A model is proposed to explain the increased NRET rate for the passivated hybrid structures based on the reduction in surface electron depletion of the passivated InGaN/GaN MQW nanorods surfaces.

  10. Enhanced non-radiative energy transfer in hybrid III-nitride structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. M.; Athanasiou, M.; Bai, J.; Liu, B.; Wang, T.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of surface states has been investigated in hybrid organic/inorganic white light emitting structures that employ high efficiency, nearfield non-radiative energy transfer (NRET) coupling. The structures utilize blue emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanorod arrays to minimize the separation with a yellow emitting F8BT coating. Surface states due to the exposed III-nitride surfaces of the nanostructures are found to reduce the NRET coupling rate. The surface states are passivated by deposition of a silicon nitride layer on the III-nitride nanorod surface leading to reduced surface recombination. A low thickness surface passivation is shown to increase the NRET coupling rate by 4 times compared to an un-passivated hybrid structure. A model is proposed to explain the increased NRET rate for the passivated hybrid structures based on the reduction in surface electron depletion of the passivated InGaN/GaN MQW nanorods surfaces.

  11. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called {open_quotes}super diamond,{close_quotes} and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods.

  12. Theoretical investigation of the electronic structures and carrier transport of hybrid graphene and boron nitride nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Tao Sun

    2012-09-01

    graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (C-BN nanostructures receive much research interest due to the complementary electronic properties. Graphene is a zero-gap semiconductor, while hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN is a wide gap semiconductor. Here we studied the electronic structures and carrier transport of hybrid C-BN nanostructures by using first principles calculations and deformation potential theory. We have found that the physical quantities in these systems under study, band gap, effective mass, deformation potential, and carrier mobility, can be categorised into three different families depending on the width of graphene nanoribbon. This family behavior is similar to pristine armchair graphene nanoribbon, but with slight difference from the individual component. New opportunities of designing nanoelectric devices are discussed by utilizing the quantum confinement effect based on such kind of hybrid nanostructures.

  13. Improvement Of Tools Durability By Application Of Hybrid Layer Of Nitrided/PECVD Coating.

    OpenAIRE

    Gronostajski Z.; Kaszuba M.; Paschke H.; Zakrzewski T.; Rogaliński G.

    2015-01-01

    In the process of die hot forging the tools are subjected to three main factors leading to their destruction: the intensive thermal shocks, cyclically variable mechanical loads and intensive friction. The above mentioned factors causing destruction in the process of hot forging and warm forging concern mainly the surface of tools. Hybrid technique nitrided/PECVD belong to the latest methods of modifying the properties of the surface layer. In the paper the application of this technique for fo...

  14. Facile fabrication of boron nitride nanosheets-amorphous carbon hybrid film for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)-amorphous carbon (a-C) hybrid film has been deposited successfully on silicon substrates by simultaneous electrochemical deposition, and showed a good integrity of this B-C-N composite film by the interfacial bonding. This synthesis can potentially provide the facile control of the B-C-N composite film for the potential optoelectronic devices. This journal is

  15. Hybrid Tunnel Junction-Graphene Transparent Conductive Electrodes for Nitride Lateral Light Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liancheng; Cheng, Yan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Yi, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Hongwei; Wang, Guohong

    2016-01-20

    Graphene transparent conductive electrode (TCE) applications in nitride light emitting diodes (LEDs) are still limited by the large contact resistance and interface barrier between graphene and p-GaN. We propose a hybrid tunnel junction (TJ)-graphene TCE approach for nitride lateral LEDs theoretically and experimentally. Through simulation using commercial advanced physical models of semiconductor devices (APSYS), we found that low tunnel resistance can be achieved in the n(+)-GaN/u-InGaN/p(+)-GaN TJ, which has a lower tunneling barrier and an enhanced electric field due to the polarization effect. Graphene TCEs and hybrid graphene-TJ TCEs are then modeled. The designed hybrid TJ-graphene TCEs show sufficient current diffusion length (Ls), low introduced series resistance, and high transmittance. The assembled TJ LED with the triple-layer graphene (TLG) TCEs show comparable optoelectrical performance (3.99 V@20 mA, LOP = 10.8 mW) with the reference LED with ITO TCEs (3.36 V@20 mA, LOP = 12.6 mW). The experimental results further prove that the TJ-graphene structure can be successfully incorporated as TCEs for lateral nitride LEDs.

  16. Hybridizing Poly(ε-caprolactone) and Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles for Broadband Photoresponsive Shape Memory Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Satoshi; Uto, Koichiro; Niiyama, Eri; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Nagao, Tadaaki

    2016-03-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles can confine light in nanoscale and locally heat the surrounding. Here we use titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as broadband plasmonic light absorbers and synthesized a highly photoresponsive hybrid cross-linked polymer from shape memory polymer poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL). The TiN-PCL hybrid is responsive to sunlight and the threshold irradiance was among the lowest when compared with other photoresponsive shape memory polymers studied previously. Sunlight heating with TiN NPs can be applied to other heat responsive smart polymers, thereby contributing to energy-saving smart polymers research for a sustainable society.

  17. Methods of Boron-carbon Deposited Film Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A.; Terentiev, V.; Voituk, A.; Zakharov, A.

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material for in-situ renewable protecting coating for tungsten tiles of the ITER divertor. It is necessary to develop a method of gasification of boron-carbon film which deposits during B4C sputtering. In this paper the results of the first stage investigation of gasification methods of boron-carbon films are presented. Two gasification methods of films are investigated: interaction with the ozone-oxygen mixture and irradiation in plasma with the working gas composed of oxygen, ethanol, and, in some cases, helium. The gasification rate in the ozone-oxygen mixture at 250 °C for B/C films with different B/C ratio and carbon fiber composite (CFC), was measured. For B/C films the gasification rate decreased with increasing B/C ratio (from 45 nm/h at B/C=0.7 to 4 nm/h at B/C=2.1; for CFC - 15 μm/h). Films gasification rates were measured under ion irradiation from ethanol-oxygen-helium plasma at different temperatures, with different ion energies and different gas mixtures. The maximum obtained removal rate was near 230 nm/h in case of ethanol-oxygen plasma and at 150°C of the sample temperature.

  18. A Screened Hybrid DFT Study of Actinide Oxides, Nitrides, and Carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Xiaodong; Martin, Richard L.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Rudin, Sven P.; Batista, Enrique R.

    2013-06-27

    A systematic study of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of actinide oxides, nitrides, and carbides (AnX1–2 with X = C, N, O) is performed using the Heyd–Scuseria–Ernzerhof (HSE) hybrid functional. Our computed results show that the screened hybrid HSE functional gives a good description of the electronic and structural properties of actinide dioxides (strongly correlated insulators) when compared with available experimental data. However, there are still some problems reproducing the electronic properties of actinide nitrides and carbides (strongly correlated metals). In addition, in order to compare with the results by HSE, the structures, electronic, and magnetic properties of these actinide compounds are also investigated in the PBE and PBE+U approximation. Interestingly, the density of states of UN obtained with PBE compares well with the experimental photoemission spectra, in contrast to the hybrid approximation. This is presumably related to the need of additional screening in the Hartree–Fock exchange term of the metallic phases.

  19. Improvement Of Tools Durability By Application Of Hybrid Layer Of Nitrided/PECVD Coating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gronostajski Z.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the process of die hot forging the tools are subjected to three main factors leading to their destruction: the intensive thermal shocks, cyclically variable mechanical loads and intensive friction. The above mentioned factors causing destruction in the process of hot forging and warm forging concern mainly the surface of tools. Hybrid technique nitrided/PECVD belong to the latest methods of modifying the properties of the surface layer. In the paper the application of this technique for forging tools of constant velocity joint body is presented. The durability of the new tools is much better than the tools applied so far.

  20. Oxygen- and Lithium-Doped Hybrid Boron-Nitride/Carbon Networks for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayeganfar, Farzaneh; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2016-12-20

    Hydrogen storage capacities have been studied on newly designed three-dimensional pillared boron nitride (PBN) and pillared graphene boron nitride (PGBN). We propose these novel materials based on the covalent connection of BNNTs and graphene sheets, which enhance the surface and free volume for storage within the nanomaterial and increase the gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen uptake capacities. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations show that these lithium- and oxygen-doped pillared structures have improved gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen capacities at room temperature, with values on the order of 9.1-11.6 wt % and 40-60 g/L. Our findings demonstrate that the gravimetric uptake of oxygen- and lithium-doped PBN and PGBN has significantly enhanced the hydrogen sorption and desorption. Calculations for O-doped PGBN yield gravimetric hydrogen uptake capacities greater than 11.6 wt % at room temperature. This increased value is attributed to the pillared morphology, which improves the mechanical properties and increases porosity, as well as the high binding energy between oxygen and GBN. Our results suggest that hybrid carbon/BNNT nanostructures are an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage, owing to the combination of the electron mobility of graphene and the polarized nature of BN at heterojunctions, which enhances the uptake capacity, providing ample opportunities to further tune this hybrid material for efficient hydrogen storage.

  1. Efficient Boron Nitride Nanotube Formation via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z) The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z).

  2. Metal-free hybrids of graphitic carbon nitride and nanodiamonds for photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Zhang, Huayang; Guo, Xiaochen; Sun, Hongqi; Liu, Shaomin; Tade, Moses O; Wang, Shaobin

    2017-05-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) has been considered as a metal-free, cost-effective, eco-friendly and efficient catalyst for various photoelectrochemical applications. However, compared to conventional metal-based photocatalysts, its photocatalytic activity is still low because of the low mobility of carriers restricted by the polymer nature. Herein, a series of hybrids of g-C3N4 (GCN) and nanodiamonds (NDs) were synthesized using a solvothermal method. The photoelectrochemical performance and photocatalytic efficiency of the GCN/NDs were investigated by means of the generation of photocurrent and photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) solutions under UV-visible light irradiations. In this study, the sample of GCN/ND-33% derived from 0.1g GCN and 0.05g NDs displayed the highest photocatalytic activity and the strongest photocurrent density. The mechanism of enhanced photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic performances was also discussed.

  3. Europium (III) Organic Complexes in Porous Boron Nitride Microfibers: Efficient Hybrid Luminescent Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Feng, Congcong; He, Xin; Wang, Weijia; Fang, Yi; Liu, Zhenya; Li, Jie; Tang, Chengchun; Huang, Yang

    2016-09-01

    We report the design and synthesis of a novel kind of organic-inorganic hybrid material via the incorporation of europium (III) β-diketonate complexes (Eu(TTA)3, TTA = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone) into one-dimensional (1D) porous boron nitride (BN) microfibers. The developed Eu(TTA)3@BN hybrid composites with typical 1D fibrous morphology exhibit bright visible red-light emission on UV illumination. The confinement of Eu(TTA)3 within pores of BN microfibers not only decreases the aggregation-caused quenching in solid Eu(TTA)3, but also improves their thermal stabilities. Moreover, The strong interactions between Eu(TTA)3 and porous BN matrix result in an interesting energy transfer process from BN host to TTA ligand and TTA ligand to Eu3+ ions, leading to the remarkable increase of red emission. The synthetic approach should be a very promising strategy which can be easily expanded to other hybrid luminescent materials based on porous BN.

  4. Europium (III) Organic Complexes in Porous Boron Nitride Microfibers: Efficient Hybrid Luminescent Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Feng, Congcong; He, Xin; Wang, Weijia; Fang, Yi; Liu, Zhenya; Li, Jie; Tang, Chengchun; Huang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and synthesis of a novel kind of organic-inorganic hybrid material via the incorporation of europium (III) β-diketonate complexes (Eu(TTA)3, TTA = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone) into one-dimensional (1D) porous boron nitride (BN) microfibers. The developed Eu(TTA)3@BN hybrid composites with typical 1D fibrous morphology exhibit bright visible red-light emission on UV illumination. The confinement of Eu(TTA)3 within pores of BN microfibers not only decreases the aggregation-caused quenching in solid Eu(TTA)3, but also improves their thermal stabilities. Moreover, The strong interactions between Eu(TTA)3 and porous BN matrix result in an interesting energy transfer process from BN host to TTA ligand and TTA ligand to Eu3+ ions, leading to the remarkable increase of red emission. The synthetic approach should be a very promising strategy which can be easily expanded to other hybrid luminescent materials based on porous BN. PMID:27687246

  5. Hybrid tunnel junction contacts to III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Erin C.; Yonkee, Benjamin P.; Wu, Feng; Oh, Sang Ho; DenBaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate highly doped GaN p-n tunnel junction (TJ) contacts on III-nitride heterostructures where the active region of the device and the top p-GaN layers were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and highly doped n-GaN was grown by NH3 molecular beam epitaxy to form the TJ. The regrowth interface in these hybrid devices was found to have a high concentration of oxygen, which likely enhanced tunneling through the diode. For optimized regrowth, the best tunnel junction device had a total differential resistivity of 1.5 × 10-4 Ω cm2, including contact resistance. As a demonstration, a blue-light-emitting diode on a (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}) GaN substrate with a hybrid tunnel junction and an n-GaN current spreading layer was fabricated and compared with a reference sample with a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer. The tunnel junction LED showed a lower forward operating voltage and a higher efficiency at a low current density than the TCO LED.

  6. A hybrid density functional view of native vacancies in gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Roland; Robertson, John

    2013-10-09

    We investigated the transition energy levels of the vacancy defects in gallium nitride by means of a hybrid density functional theory approach (DFT). We show that, in contrast to predictions from a recent study on the level of purely local DFT, the inclusion of screened exchange stabilizes the triply positive charge state of the nitrogen vacancy for Fermi energies close to the valence band. On the other hand, the defect levels associated with the negative charge states of the nitrogen vacancy hybridize with the conduction band and turn out to be energetically unfavorable, except for high n-doping. For the gallium vacancy, the increased magnetic splitting between up-spin and down-spin bands due to stronger exchange interactions in sX-LDA pushes the defect levels deeper into the band gap and significantly increases the associated charge transition levels. Based on these results, we propose the ϵ(0| - 1) transition level as an alternative candidate for the yellow luminescence in GaN.

  7. Novel Hybrid Nanoparticles of Vanadium Nitride/Porous Carbon as an Anode Material for Symmetrical Supercapacitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunlong Yang; Kuiwen Shen; Ying Liu; Yongtao Tan; Xiaoning Zhao; Jiayu Wu; Xiaoqin Niu; Fen Ran

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid materials of vanadium nitride and porous carbon nanoparticles (VN/PCNPs) were fabricated by a facile pyrolysis process of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) xerogel and melamine at relatively low temperature of 800 ?C for supercapacitor application. The effects of the feed ratio of V2O5 to melamine (r), and nitrogen flow rate on the microstructure and electrochemical performance were also investigated. It was found that the size of the as-synthesized nanoparticles is about 20 nm. Both r value and N2 flow rate have enormous impacts on morphology and microstructure of the nanoparticle, which correspondingly determined the electrochemical performance of the material. The VN/C hybrid nanoparticles exhibited high capacitive properties, and a maximum specific capacitance of 255.0 F g-1 was achieved at a current density of 1.0 A g-1 in 2 M KOH aqueous electrolyte and the potential range from 0 to -1.15 V. In addition, symmetrical supercapacitor fabricated with the as-synthesized VN/PCNPs presents a high specific capacitance of 43.5 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 based on the entire cell, and an energy density of 8.0 Wh kg-1 when the power density was 575 W kg-1. Even when the power density increased to 2831.5 W kg-1, the energy density still remained 6.1 Wh kg-1.

  8. Hybrid tunnel junction contacts to III–nitride light-emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Young, Erin C.

    2016-01-26

    In this work, we demonstrate highly doped GaN p–n tunnel junction (TJ) contacts on III–nitride heterostructures where the active region of the device and the top p-GaN layers were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and highly doped n-GaN was grown by NH3 molecular beam epitaxy to form the TJ. The regrowth interface in these hybrid devices was found to have a high concentration of oxygen, which likely enhanced tunneling through the diode. For optimized regrowth, the best tunnel junction device had a total differential resistivity of 1.5 × 10−4 Ω cm2, including contact resistance. As a demonstration, a blue-light-emitting diode on a ($20\\\\bar{2}\\\\bar{1}$) GaN substrate with a hybrid tunnel junction and an n-GaN current spreading layer was fabricated and compared with a reference sample with a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer. The tunnel junction LED showed a lower forward operating voltage and a higher efficiency at a low current density than the TCO LED.

  9. Design of defect spins in piezoelectric aluminum nitride for solid-state hybrid quantum technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hosung; Govoni, Marco; Galli, Giulia

    2016-02-01

    Spin defects in wide-band gap semiconductors are promising systems for the realization of quantum bits, or qubits, in solid-state environments. To date, defect qubits have only been realized in materials with strong covalent bonds. Here, we introduce a strain-driven scheme to rationally design defect spins in functional ionic crystals, which may operate as potential qubits. In particular, using a combination of state-of-the-art ab-initio calculations based on hybrid density functional and many-body perturbation theory, we predicted that the negatively charged nitrogen vacancy center in piezoelectric aluminum nitride exhibits spin-triplet ground states under realistic uni- and bi-axial strain conditions; such states may be harnessed for the realization of qubits. The strain-driven strategy adopted here can be readily extended to a wide range of point defects in other wide-band gap semiconductors, paving the way to controlling the spin properties of defects in ionic systems for potential spintronic technologies.

  10. Design of defect spins in piezoelectric aluminum nitride for solid-state hybrid quantum technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hosung; Govoni, Marco; Galli, Giulia

    2016-02-15

    Spin defects in wide-band gap semiconductors are promising systems for the realization of quantum bits, or qubits, in solid-state environments. To date, defect qubits have only been realized in materials with strong covalent bonds. Here, we introduce a strain-driven scheme to rationally design defect spins in functional ionic crystals, which may operate as potential qubits. In particular, using a combination of state-of-the-art ab-initio calculations based on hybrid density functional and many-body perturbation theory, we predicted that the negatively charged nitrogen vacancy center in piezoelectric aluminum nitride exhibits spin-triplet ground states under realistic uni- and bi-axial strain conditions; such states may be harnessed for the realization of qubits. The strain-driven strategy adopted here can be readily extended to a wide range of point defects in other wide-band gap semiconductors, paving the way to controlling the spin properties of defects in ionic systems for potential spintronic technologies.

  11. Lattice mismatch induced curved configurations of hybrid boron nitride-carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin

    2016-10-01

    A unique curved configuration is observed in freestanding hybrid boron nitride-carbon nanotubes (BN-CNTs) based on molecular dynamics simulations, which, in previous studies, was tacitly assumed as a straight configuration. The physical fundamentals of this phenomenon are explored by using the continuum mechanics theory, where the curved configuration of BN-CNTs is found to be induced by the bending effect due to the lattice mismatch between the C domain and the BN domain. In addition, our results show that the curvature of the curved BN-CNTs is determined by their radius and composition. The curvature of BN-CNTs decreases with growing radius of BN-CNTs and becomes ignorable when their radius is relatively large. A non-monotonic relationship is detected between the curvature and the composition of BN-CNTs. Specifically, the curvature of BN-CNTs increases with growing BN concentration when the molar fraction of BN atoms is smaller than a critical value 0.52, but decreases with growing BN concentration when the molar fraction of BN atoms is larger than this critical value.

  12. Design of a polymer-filled silicon nitride strip/slot asymmetric hybrid waveguide for realizing both flat dispersion and athermal operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Dandan; Chen, Shaowu; Lei, Xun; Qin, Guanshi; Chen, Zhanguo

    2016-06-20

    An asymmetric strip/slot hybrid silicon nitride waveguide is designed to simultaneously realize athermal operation and flat dispersion. The slot filling and upper cladding materials are negative thermal-optical coefficient (TOC), low refractive index polyurethane acrylate, while the left and right cladding layers are positive TOC, high refractive index silicon nitride. With suitable waveguide parameter selection, an optimum strip/slot hybrid silicon nitride waveguide exhibits an effective TOC of 1.263×10-7/K at 1550 nm, flattened dispersion in the wavelength range from 1200 to 1800 nm with the maximum dispersion of 30.51 ps/(nm·km), and a minimum of 10.89 ps/(nm·km). The proposed hybrid waveguide has great potential in building up broadband athermal microresonator optical frequency combs.

  13. Construction of stable Ta3N5/g-C3N4 metal/non-metal nitride hybrids with enhanced visible-light photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yinhua; Liu, Peipei; Chen, YeCheng; Zhou, Zhengzhong; Yang, Haijian; Hong, Yuanzhi; Li, Fan; Ni, Liang; Yan, Yongsheng; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel Ta3N5/g-C3N4 metal/non-metal nitride hybrid was successfully synthesized by a facile impregnation method. The photocatalytic activity of Ta3N5/g-C3N4 hybrid nitrides was evaluated by the degradation of organic dye rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation, and the result indicated that all Ta3N5/g-C3N4 samples exhibited distinctly enhanced photocatalytic activities for the degradation of RhB than pure g-C3N4. The optimal Ta3N5/g-C3N4 composite sample, with Ta3N5 mass ratio of 2%, demonstrated the highest photocatalytic activity, and its degradation rate constant was 2.71 times as high as that of pure g-C3N4. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of this Ta3N5/g-C3N4 metal/metal-free nitride was predominantly attributed to the synergistic effect which increased visible-light absorption and facilitated the efficient separation of photoinduced electrons and holes. The Ta3N5/g-C3N4 hybrid nitride exhibited excellent photostability and reusability. The possible mechanism for improved photocatalytic performance was proposed. Overall, this work may provide a facile way to synthesize the highly efficient metal/metal-free hybrid nitride photocatalysts with promising applications in environmental purification and energy conversion.

  14. Analysis of Vacancy defects in Hybrid Graphene-Boron Nitride Armchair Nanoribbon based n-MOSFET at Ballistic Limit

    OpenAIRE

    Chanana, Anuja; Sengupta, Amretashis; Mahaptra, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the performance of vacancy affected supercell of a hybrid Graphene-Boron Nitride embedded armchair nanoribbon (a-GNR-BN) based n-MOSFET at its ballistic transport limit using Non Equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) methodology. A supercell is made of the 3p configuration of armchair nanoribbon that is doped on the either side with 6 BN atoms and is also H-passivated. The type of vacancies studied are mono (B removal), di (B and N atom removal) and hole (removal of 6 atoms) for...

  15. Ceramic silicon-boron-carbon fibers from organic silicon-boron-polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Novel high strength ceramic fibers derived from boron, silicon, and carbon organic precursor polymers are discussed. The ceramic fibers are thermally stable up to and beyond 1200 C in air. The method of preparation of the boron-silicon-carbon fibers from a low oxygen content organosilicon boron precursor polymer of the general formula Si(R2)BR(sup 1) includes melt-spinning, crosslinking, and pyrolysis. Specifically, the crosslinked (or cured) precursor organic polymer fibers do not melt or deform during pyrolysis to form the silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fiber. These novel silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fibers are useful in high temperature applications because they retain tensile and other properties up to 1200 C, from 1200 to 1300 C, and in some cases higher than 1300 C.

  16. The Tunable Hybrid Surface Phonon and Plasmon Polariton Modes in Boron Nitride Nanotube and Graphene Monolayer Heterostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yu; Cheng, Jiangtao; Liu, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid modes incorporating surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes in boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes in graphene monolayers are theoretically studied. The combination of the 1D BNNTs and 2D graphene monolayer further improves the modal characteristics with electrical tunability. Superior to the graphene monolayers, the proposed heterostructures supports single mode transmission with lateral optical confinement. The modal characteristics can be shifted from SPP-like toward SPhP-like. Both the figure of merit and field enhancement of hybrid modes are improved over 3 times than those of BNNT SPhP modes, which may further enable sub-wavelength mid-infrared applications.

  17. Gap state related blue light emitting boron-carbon core shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Paviter; Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Bikramjeet; Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2016-05-01

    Boron- carbon core shell structures have been synthesized by solvo-thermal synthesis route. The synthesized material is highly pure. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the reduction of reactants in to boron and carbon. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the shell is uniform with average thickness of 340 nm. Photo luminescence studies showed that the material is blue light emitting with CIE color coordinates: x=0.16085, y=0.07554.

  18. Synthesis of thin films in boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary system by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Ratandeep Singh

    The Boron Carbon Nitorgen (B-C-N) ternary system includes materials with exceptional properties such as wide band gap, excellent thermal conductivity, high bulk modulus, extreme hardness and transparency in the optical and UV range that find application in most fields ranging from micro-electronics, bio-sensors, and cutting tools to materials for space age technology. Interesting materials that belong to the B-C-N ternary system include Carbon nano-tubes, Boron Carbide, Boron Carbon Nitride (B-CN), hexagonal Boron Nitride ( h-BN), cubic Boron Nitride (c-BN), Diamond and beta Carbon Nitride (beta-C3N4). Synthesis of these materials requires precisely controlled and energetically favorable conditions. Chemical vapor deposition is widely used technique for deposition of thin films of ceramics, metals and metal-organic compounds. Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) is especially interesting because of its ability to deposit materials that are meta-stable under the deposition conditions, for e.g. diamond. In the present study, attempt has been made to synthesize beta-carbon nitride (beta-C3N4) and cubic-Boron Nitride (c-BN) thin films by MPECVD. Also included is the investigation of dependence of residual stress and thermal conductivity of the diamond thin films, deposited by MPECVD, on substrate pre-treatment and deposition temperature. Si incorporated CNx thin films are synthesized and characterized while attempting to deposit beta-C3N4 thin films on Si substrates using Methane (CH4), Nitrogen (N2), and Hydrogen (H2). It is shown that the composition and morphology of Si incorporated CNx thin film can be tailored by controlling the sequence of introduction of the precursor gases in the plasma chamber. Greater than 100mum size hexagonal crystals of N-Si-C are deposited when Nitrogen precursor is introduced first while agglomerates of nano-meter range graphitic needles of C-Si-N are deposited when Carbon precursor is introduced first in the

  19. Synthesis and radiation response of BCON: a graphene oxide and hexagonal boron nitride hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimanapati, Ganesh R.; Wetherington, Maxwell; Mahabir, Shawn; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2016-06-01

    Since graphene, there has been a focus on several two-dimensional material systems (e.g. boron nitride, borocarbon nitride (BCN), transition-metal dichalcogenides) that provide an even wider array of unique chemistries and properties to explore future applications. Specifically, tailoring graphene/boron nitride heterostructures—which can theoretically retain the character of a single-atom thick sheet, withstand large physical strains, are easily functionalized, and have entirely different optical and mechanical properties compared to graphene—can provide the foundation for entirely new research avenues. In recent years, it has been shown that because of the similar crystal structure, carbon, boron, and nitrogen can co-exist as atomic sheets in a layered structure. We have developed a facile method of integrating boron nitride (hBN) and graphene oxide (GO) via chemical exfoliation which we refer to as BCON. The study of the stability of this material at different pH conditions indicates a stable and a uniform solution is achievable at pH 4-8. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy helped to identify the new bonds which indicated the formation of BCON linkage. Further, an in situ XPS technique was used to understand the chemical changes while exposing it to ionization radiation specially focusing on the C/O ratio. It was observed that even with a very low energy source, this material is highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, such as neutron, alpha and beta particles.

  20. Hybrids of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Hexagonal Boron Nitride: Lightweight Absorbers with Tunable and Highly Efficient Microwave Attenuation Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yue; Jiang, Zhenhua; Ma, Tian; Chu, Zengyong; Li, Gongyi

    2016-11-30

    Sandwichlike hybrids of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) were prepared via heat treatment of the self-assemblies of graphene oxide (GO) and ammonia borane (AB). TG-DSC-QMS analysis indicate a mutually promoted redox reaction between GO and AB; 900 °C is a proper temperature to transfer the hybrids into inorganic sandwiches. XRD, XPS, and Raman spectra reveal the existence of h-BN embedded into the rGO frameworks. High-resolution SEM and TEM indicate the layer-by-layer structure of the hybrids. The content of h-BN can be increased with increase of the mass ratio of AB and the highest heat treatment temperature. The complex permittivity and the microwave absorption are tunable with the variation of the content of h-BN. When the mass ratio of GO/AB is 1:1, the microwave absorption of the hybrid treated at 900 °C is preferable in the range of 6-18 GHz. A minimum reflection loss, -40.5 dB, was observed at 15.3 GHz for the wax composite filled with 25 wt % hybrids at the thickness of 1.6 mm. The qualified frequency bandwidth reaches 5 GHz at this thickness with a low surface density close to 1.68 kg/m(2). The layer-by-layer structure of the hybrid makes great contributions to the increased approaches and possibilities of electron migrating and hopping, which has both highly efficient dielectric loss and excellent impedance matching for microwave consumption.

  1. Preparation of Poly(p-phenylene sulfi de)/Carbon Composites with Enhanced Thermal Conductivity and Electrical Insulativity via Hybrids of Boron Nitride and Carbon Fillers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jieli; WANG Jinwen; CHEN Feng

    2015-01-01

    The present work enhanced the thermal conductivity of poly(p-phenylene sulfi de)/expanded graphites and poly(p-phenylene sulfi de)/carbon nanotubes, by incorporating composites with hexagonal boron nitride, which simultaneously succeeded in raising the electrical conductivity of the systems. A two-step mechanical processing method which includes rotating solid-state premixing and inner mixing was adopted to improve dispersion of the hybrids, contributing to the formation of an interspered thermal conductive network. Similar synergic effect in thermal conductivity enhancement was discovered in the hybrid systems regardless of the dimension difference between the two carbonfi llers. Such is postulated to be the one satisfying advantage generated by the afore-mentioned network; the other is the insulativity of the hybrid systems given by the effective blockage of hexagonal boron nitride as an insulating material in our network.

  2. Physisorption of Nucleic Acid Bases on Boron Nitride Nanotubes: A new class of Hybrid Nano-Bio Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Scheicher, Ralph H; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the adsorption of the nucleic acid bases, adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), thymine (T) and uracil (U) on the outer wall of a high curvature semiconducting single-walled boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) by first principles density functional theory calculations. The calculated binding energy shows the order: G>A~C~T~U implying that the interaction strength of the (high-curvature) BNNT with the nucleobases, G being an exception, is nearly the same. A higher binding energy for the G-BNNT conjugate appears to result from a stronger hybridization of the molecular orbitals of G and BNNT, since the charge transfer involved in the physisorption process is insignificant. A smaller energy gap predicted for the G-BNNT conjugate relative to that of the pristine BNNT may be useful in application of this class of biofunctional materials to the design of the next generation sensing devices.

  3. Isotope shifts in beryllium-, boron-, carbon-, and nitrogen-like ions from relativistic configuration interaction calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazé, C.; Verdebout, S. [Service de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, CP160/09, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Rynkun, P.; Gaigalas, G. [Vilnius University, Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Godefroid, M., E-mail: mrgodef@ulb.ac.be [Service de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, CP160/09, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Jönsson, P. [Group for Materials Science and Applied Mathematics, Malmö University, 205-06 Malmö (Sweden)

    2014-09-15

    Energy levels, normal and specific mass shift parameters as well as electronic densities at the nucleus are reported for numerous states along the beryllium, boron, carbon, and nitrogen isoelectronic sequences. Combined with nuclear data, these electronic parameters can be used to determine values of level and transition isotope shifts. The calculation of the electronic parameters is done using first-order perturbation theory with relativistic configuration interaction wavefunctions that account for valence, core–valence, and core–core correlation effects as zero-order functions. Results are compared with experimental and other theoretical values, when available.

  4. High performance corrosion and wear resistant composite titanium nitride layers produced on the AZ91D magnesium alloy by a hybrid method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Tacikowski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Composite, diffusive titanium nitride layers formed on a titanium and aluminum sub-layer were produced on the AZ91D magnesium alloy. The layers were obtained using a hybrid method which combined the PVD processes with the final sealing by a hydrothermal treatment. The microstructure, resistance to corrosion, mechanical damage, and frictional wear of the layers were examined. The properties of the AZ91D alloy covered with these layers were compared with those of the untreated alloy and of some engineering materials such as 316L stainless steel, 100Cr6 bearing steel, and the AZ91D alloy subjected to commercial anodizing. It has been found that the composite diffusive nitride layer produced on the AZ91D alloy and then sealed by the hydrothermal treatment ensures the corrosion resistance comparable with that of 316L stainless steel. The layers are characterized by higher electrochemical durability which is due to the surface being overbuilt with the titanium oxides formed, as shown by the XPS examinations, from titanium nitride during the hydrothermal treatment. The composite titanium nitride layers exhibit high resistance to mechanical damage and wear, including frictional wear which is comparable with that of 100Cr6 bearing steel. The performance properties of the AZ91D magnesium alloy covered with the composite titanium nitride coating are substantially superior to those of the alloy subjected to commercial anodizing which is the dominant technique employed in industrial practice.

  5. One-step route to a hybrid TiO2/TixW1−xN nanocomposite by in situ selective carbothermal nitridation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë Schnepp, Martin J Hollamby, Masahiko Tanaka, Yoshitaka Matsushita, Yoshio Katsuya and Yoshio Sakka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide/nitride nanocomposites have many existing and potential applications, e.g. in energy conversion or ammonia synthesis. Here, a hybrid oxide/nitride nanocomposite (anatase/TixW1−xN was synthesized by an ammonia-free sol–gel route. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction, complemented with electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, was used to study the structure, composition and mechanism of formation of the nanocomposite. The nanocomposite contained nanoparticles (<5 nm diameter of two highly intermixed phases. This was found to arise from controlled nucleation and growth of a single oxide intermediate from the gel precursor, followed by phase separation and in situ selective carbothermal nitridation. Depending on the preparation conditions, the composition varied from anatase/TixW1−xN at low W content to an isostructural mixture of Ti-rich and W-rich TixW1−xN at high W content. In situ selective carbothermal nitridation offers a facile route to the synthesis of nitride-oxide nanocomposites. This conceptually new approach is a significant advance from previous methods, which generally require ammonolysis of a pre-synthesized oxide.

  6. Torsional properties of hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and their hybrid structures: A molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-lin Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The torsional mechanical properties of hexagonal single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, and their hybrid structures (SWBN-CNTs are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD simulation. Two approaches - force approach and energy approach, are adopted to calculate the shear moduli of SWBNNTs and SWCNTs, the discrepancy between two approaches is analyzed. The results show that the shear moduli of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs, including SWBNNTs and SWCNTs are dependent on the diameter, especially for armchair SWNTs. The armchair SWNTs show the better ability of resistance the twisting comparable to the zigzag SWNTs. The effects of diameter and length on the critical values of torque of SWNTs are obtained by comparing the torsional behaviors of SWNTs with different diameters and different lengths. It is observed that the MD results of the effect of diameter and length on the critical values of torque agrees well with the prediction of continuum shell model. The shear modulus of SWBN-CNT has a significant dependence on the percentages of SWCNT and the hybrid style has also an influence on shear modulus. The critical values of torque of SWBN-CNTs increase with the increase of the percentages of SWCNT. This phenomenon can be interpreted by the function relationship between the torque of different bonds (B-N-X, C-C-X, C-B-X, C-N-X and the angles of bonds.

  7. Direct electro-optical pumping for hybrid CdSe nanocrystal/III-nitride based nano-light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulics, M.; Arango, Y. C.; Winden, A.; Adam, R.; Hardtdegen, A.; Grützmacher, D.; Plinski, E.; Gregušová, D.; Novák, J.; Kordoš, P.; Moonshiram, A.; Marso, M.; Sofer, Z.; Lüth, H.; Hardtdegen, H.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a device concept for a hybrid nanocrystal/III-nitride based nano-LED. Our approach is based on the direct electro-optical pumping of nanocrystals (secondary excitation) by electrically driven InGaN/GaN nano-LEDs as the primary excitation source. To this end, a universal hybrid optoelectronic platform was developed for a large range of optically active nano- and mesoscopic structures. The advantage of the approach is that the emission of the nanocrystals can be electrically induced without the need of contacting them. The proof of principal was demonstrated for the electro-optical pumping of CdSe nanocrystals. The nano-LEDs with a diameter of 100 nm exhibit a very low current of ˜8 nA at 5 V bias which is several orders of magnitude smaller than for those conventionally used. The leakage currents in the device layout were typically in the range of 8 pA to 20 pA/cm2 at 5 V bias. The photon-photon down conversion efficiency was determined to be 27%. Microphotoluminescence and microelectroluminescence characterization demonstrate the potential for future optoelectronics and highly secure "green" information technology applications.

  8. A first-principles study of lithium-decorated hybrid boron nitride and graphene domains for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zi-Yu [College of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Shao, Xiaohong, E-mail: shaoxh@mail.buct.edu.cn, E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn [College of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Da; Liu, Li-Min, E-mail: shaoxh@mail.buct.edu.cn, E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Johnson, J. Karl [Departments of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    First-principles calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption of hydrogen onto Li-decorated hybrid boron nitride and graphene domains of (BN){sub x}C{sub 1−x} complexes with x = 1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 0, and B{sub 0.125}C{sub 0.875}. The most stable adsorption sites for the nth hydrogen molecule in the lithium-decorated (BN){sub x}C{sub 1−x} complexes are systematically discussed. The most stable adsorption sites were affected by the charge localization, and the hydrogen molecules were favorably located above the C-C bonds beside the Li atom. The results show that the nitrogen atoms in the substrate planes could increase the hybridization between the 2p orbitals of Li and the orbitals of H{sub 2}. The results revealed that the (BN){sub x}C{sub 1−x} complexes not only have good thermal stability but they also exhibit a high hydrogen storage of 8.7% because of their dehydrogenation ability.

  9. Titanium nitride based hybrid plasmonic-photonic waveguides for on-chip plasmonic interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, A.; Saha, S.; Kinsey, N.; Guler, U.; Shalaev, V. M.; Boltasseva, A.

    2017-02-01

    Over the past few decades, photonic technologies have emerged as a promising technology for data communications. They offer advantages such as high data bandwidths at comparable or even lower power consumption than electronics. However, photonic integrated circuits suffer from the diffraction limit of light which is a major obstacle in achieving small device footprints and densely packed on-chip interconnects. In recent years, plasmonics has emerged as a possible solution for densely packed on-chip nanophotonic circuitry. The field of plasmonics deals with oscillations of free electrons in a metal coupled to an electromagnetic field. The large wave-vector associated with these oscillations enables light to be localized in volumes much smaller than the diffraction limit. Consequently, there have been many demonstrations of plasmonic interconnects for on-chip communications, using well known metals such as gold and silver. However these materials are not CMOS compatible and hence their use is not technologically feasible. The growing need for plasmonic materials which are robust, cost-effective, and CMOS-compatible has led to the study of alternate plasmonic materials. For the visible and near infrared ranges, transition metal nitrides have been shown to be suitable metals for plasmonic applications These materials have optical properties comparable to that of gold and are CMOS-compatible, hence, they can be easily integrated into a silicon platform for on-chip applications. In this work, we demonstrate titanium nitride based plasmonic interconnects in an all-solid state geometry which can be easily integrated on a silicon platform.

  10. Composite titanium nitride layers produced on the AZ91D magnesium alloy by a hybrid method including hydrothermal modification of the layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacikowski, M.; Grzonka, J.; Płociński, T.; Jakieła, R.; Pisarek, M.; Wierzchoń, T.

    2015-08-01

    The microstructure and properties of the composite TiN-Ti-Al type titanium nitride surface layer with a sub-layer of titanium and aluminium produced on AZ91D magnesium alloy using a hybrid PVD method including final sealing by hydrothermal treatment were investigated. The results were analysed in terms of the microstructure-properties correlation, to approach the role of the sub-layers and the mechanisms involved in the properties improvement. The microstructure investigations indicate that the composite titanium nitride layers are tight and have nano-crystalline, diffusive character and multi zone microstructure of the type TixOy-TiN-Ti-Al-Al3Mg2-Al12Mg17. The significant corrosion resistance improvement of the AZ91D alloy obtained using the sealed composite titanium nitride layers was found to be the result of a synergistic mechanism which combined hydrothermal treatment of the layer with an action of aluminium sub-layer which is critical to make the sealing effective. The diffusive bonding via Mg-Al zone improves adhesion and the load bearing capacity of titanium nitride layers in wear conditions.

  11. CVD growth of graphene under exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride for vertical hybrid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Min [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT) (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Sung Kyu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) (Korea, Republic of); Song, Young Jae [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungjoo, E-mail: leesj@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT) (Korea, Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO2, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems. - Abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO{sub 2}, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems.

  12. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Ion Sensitive Field-Effect Transistor for pH Measurement and DNA Immobilization/Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Hashim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of ion sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET using silicon nitride (Si3N4 as the sensing membrane for pH measurement and DNA is reported. For the pH measurement, the Ag/AgCl electrode was used as the reference electrode, and different pH values of buffer solution were used in the ISFET analysis. The ISFET device was tested with pH buffer solutions of pH2, pH3, pH7, pH8, and pH9. The results show that the IV characteristic of ISFET devices is directly proportional and the device’s sensitivity was 43.13 mV/pH. The ISFET is modified chemically to allow the integration with biological element to form a biologically active field-effect transistor (BIOFET. It was found that the DNA immobilization activities which occurred on the sensing membrane caused the drain current to drop due to the negatively charged backbones of the DNA probes repelled electrons from accumulating at the conducting channel. The drain current was further decreased when the DNA hybridization took place.

  13. Gold and graphific carbon nitride hybrid plasmonic nanocomposites for photocatalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol and 4-nitrobenzenethiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiao; Xiao, Yuli; Liang, Xiu; Yang, Nan; Zhao, Dongyu; Yin, Penggang

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were deposited on the surface of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via an in situ reduction method using either sodium borohydride or trisodium citrate as the reducing agent. The corresponding hybrid Au/C3N4 nanocatalysts, viz., Au@CN-B or Au@CN-C, exhibited high light-driven catalytic activities toward reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) under either visible-light or ultra violet (UV) irradiation. The photocatalytic efficiency of Au@CN-B was only slightly higher than that of Au@CN-C, most likely owing to the average grain size difference between the both. However, as for plasmon-driven catalytic reactions monitored by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique, an immediate and almost-complete reduction of 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4-NBT) to p,p‧-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) occurred when Au@CN-B was utilized as both the nanocatalyst and SERS substrate, whereas distinct characteristic peaks of 4-NBT still existed for the case of Au@CN-C.

  14. Hybrid boron nitride-natural fiber composites for enhanced thermal conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Changlei; Garcia, Andres C; Shi, Sheldon Q; Qiu, Ying; Warner, Nathaniel; Wu, Yingji; Cai, Liping; Rizvi, Hussain R; D'Souza, Nandika A; Nie, Xu

    2016-10-05

    Thermal conductivity was dramatically increased after adding natural fiber into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN)/epoxy composites. Although natural fiber does not show high-thermal conductivity itself, this study found that the synergy of natural fiber with hBN could significantly improve thermal conductivity, compared with that solely using hBN. A design of mixtures approach using constant fibers with increasing volume fractions of hBN was examined and compared. The thermal conductivity of the composite containing 43.6% hBN, 26.3% kenaf fiber and 30.1% epoxy reached 6.418 W m(-1) K(-1), which was 72.3% higher than that (3.600 W m(-1) K(-1)) of the 69.0% hBN and 31.0% epoxy composite. Using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and micro computed tomography (micro-CT), it was observed that the hBN powders were well distributed and ordered on the fiber surfaces enhancing the ceramic filler's interconnection, which may be the reason for the increase in thermal conductivity. Additionally, the results from mechanical and dynamic mechanical tests showed that performances dramatically improved after adding kenaf fibers into the hBN/epoxy composite, potentially benefiting the composite's use as an engineered material.

  15. Hybrid boron nitride-natural fiber composites for enhanced thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Changlei; Garcia, Andres C.; Shi, Sheldon Q.; Qiu, Ying; Warner, Nathaniel; Wu, Yingji; Cai, Liping; Rizvi, Hussain R.; D’Souza, Nandika A.; Nie, Xu

    2016-10-01

    Thermal conductivity was dramatically increased after adding natural fiber into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN)/epoxy composites. Although natural fiber does not show high-thermal conductivity itself, this study found that the synergy of natural fiber with hBN could significantly improve thermal conductivity, compared with that solely using hBN. A design of mixtures approach using constant fibers with increasing volume fractions of hBN was examined and compared. The thermal conductivity of the composite containing 43.6% hBN, 26.3% kenaf fiber and 30.1% epoxy reached 6.418 W m‑1 K‑1, which was 72.3% higher than that (3.600 W m‑1 K‑1) of the 69.0% hBN and 31.0% epoxy composite. Using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and micro computed tomography (micro-CT), it was observed that the hBN powders were well distributed and ordered on the fiber surfaces enhancing the ceramic filler’s interconnection, which may be the reason for the increase in thermal conductivity. Additionally, the results from mechanical and dynamic mechanical tests showed that performances dramatically improved after adding kenaf fibers into the hBN/epoxy composite, potentially benefiting the composite’s use as an engineered material.

  16. Covalently coupled hybrid of graphitic carbon nitride with reduced graphene oxide as a superior performance lithium-ion battery anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yongsheng; Zhu, Junwu; Hu, Chong; Wu, Xiaodong; Wang, Xin

    2014-11-01

    An in situ chemical synthetic approach has been designed for the fabrication of a covalently coupled hybrid consisting of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with differing g-C3N4/rGO ratio. The epoxy groups of graphene oxide (GO) undergo a nucleophilic substitution reaction with dicyandiamide (C2H4N4) to form the C2H4N4-GO composite via a covalent C-N bond, and then both the in situ polymerization of C2H4N4 and the thermal reduction of GO can be achieved at higher temperatures, forming the covalently coupled g-C3N4-rGO. FT-IR, CP-MAS NMR and XPS analyses, clearly revealed a covalent interaction between the g-C3N4 and rGO sheets. The g-C3N4-rGO exhibits an unprecedented high, stable and reversible capacity of 1525 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) after 50 cycles. Even at a large current density of 1000 mA g(-1), a reversible capacity of 943 mA h g(-1) can still be retained. The superior electrochemical performance of g-C3N4-rGO is attributed to the specific characteristics of the unique nanostructure of g-C3N4-rGO and the concerted effects of g-C3N4 and rGO, including covalent interactions between the two moieties, the good conductivity and high special surface area of the nanocomposite, as well as the template effect of the planar amino group of g-C3N4 for the dispersed decoration of Li(+) ions.

  17. Design and synthesis of palladium/graphitic carbon nitride/carbon black hybrids as high-performance catalysts for formic acid and methanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Huayu; Huang, Huajie; Wang, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Here we report a facile two-step method to synthesize high-performance palladium/graphitic carbon nitride/carbon black (Pd/g-C3N4/carbon black) hybrids for electrooxidizing formic acid and methanol. The coating of g-C3N4 on carbon black surface is realized by a low-temperature heating treatment, followed by the uniform deposition of palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) via a wet chemistry route. Owning to the significant synergistic effects of the individual components, the preferred Pd/g-C3N4/carbon black electrocatalyst exhibits exceptional forward peak current densities as high as 2155 and 1720 mA mg-1Pd for formic acid oxidation in acid media and methanol oxidation in alkaline media, respectively, far outperforming the commercial Pd-C catalyst. The catalyst also shows reliable stability, demonstrating that the newly-designed hybrids have great promise in constructing high-performance portable fuel cell systems.

  18. Temperature-controlled colossal magnetoresistance and perfect spin Seebeck effect in hybrid graphene/boron nitride nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Li, Ruimin; Yao, Kailun

    2017-02-01

    Thermal spin transport properties of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbon heterojunctions have been investigated using density functional theory calculations combined with the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function approach. The results showed that the perfect spin Seebeck effect and analogy negative differential thermoelectric resistance occurred in the device under a temperature difference without a gate or bias voltage. An intriguing thermally induced colossal magnetoresistance without gate regulation was also observed, which can be switched between a positive and negative value with temperature control. It was also found that the unit number of zigzag graphene nanoribbons and boron nitride nanoribbons can tune the electronic band structure and the energy gap of the heterostructure, and then modulate the thermal spin transport properties. The results suggest that graphene and hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbon heterostructures may have potential applications in graphene-based nanodevices.

  19. Interfacial electronic structure and charge transfer of hybrid graphene quantum dot and graphitic carbon nitride nanocomposites: insights into high efficiency for photocatalytic solar water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zuju; Sa, Rongjian; Li, Qiaohong; Wu, Kechen

    2016-01-14

    New metal-free carbon nanodot/carbon nitride (C3N4) nanocomposites have shown to exhibit high efficiency for photocatalytic solar water splitting. (J. Liu, et al., Science, 2015, 347, 970) However, the mechanism underlying the ultrahigh performance of these nanocomposites and consequently the possibilities for further improvements are not at present clear. In this work, we performed hybrid functional calculations and included long-range dispersion corrections to accurately characterize the interfacial electron coupling of the graphene quantum dot-graphitic carbon nitride composites (Gdot/g-C3N4). The results revealed that the band gap of Gdot/g-C3N4 could be engineered by changing the lateral size of Gdots. In particular, the C24H12/g-C3N4 composites present an ideal band gap of 1.92 eV to harvest a large part of solar light. More interestingly, a type-II heterojunction is formed at the interface of the Gdot/g-C3N4 composites, a desirable feature for enhanced photocatalytic activity. The charge redistribution at the interface leads to strong electron depletion above the Gdot sheet and electron accumulation below the g-C3N4 monolayer, potentially facilitating the separation of H2O oxidation and reduction reactions. Furthermore, we suggested that the photocatalytic performance of the Gdot/g-C3N4 nanocomposites can be further improved by decreasing the thickness of Gdots and tuning the size of Gdots.

  20. In situ decoration of plasmonic Au nanoparticles on graphene quantum dots-graphitic carbon nitride hybrid and evaluation of its visible light photocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajender, Gone; Choudhury, Biswajit; Giri, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    This work spotlights the development of a plasmonic photocatalyst showing surface plasmon induced enhanced visible light photocatalytic (PC) performance. Plasmonic Au nanoparticles (NPs) are decorated over the hybrid nanosystem of graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) and graphene quantum dots (GQD) by citrate reduction method. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) induced enhancement of Raman G and 2D band intensity is encountered on excitation of the Plasmonic hybrid at 514.5 nm, which is near to the 532 nm absorption band of Au NPs. Time-resolved photoluminescence and XPS studies show charge transfer interaction between GQD-GCN and Au NPs. Plasmonic hybrid exhibits an enhanced PC activity over the other catalysts in the photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light illumination. Plasmonic photocatalyst displays more than 6 fold enhancement in the photodecomposition rate of MB over GQD and nearly 2 fold improvement over GCN and GQD-GCN. GQD-GCN absorbs mostly in the near visible region and can be photoexcited by visible light of wavelength (λ ) UV–visible light for photocatalysis. Furthermore, plasmonic Au act as antennas for accumulation and enhancement of localized electromagnetic field at the interface with GQD-GCN, and thereby promotes photogeneration of large numbers of carriers on GQD-GCN. The carriers are separated by charge transfer migration from hybrid to Au NPs. Finally, the carriers on the plasmonic Au nanostructures initiate MB degradation under visible light. Our results have shown that plasmon decoration is a suitable strategy to design a carbon based hybrid photocatalyst for solar energy conversion.

  1. Synchronized metal-ion irradiation as a way to control growth of transition-metal nitride alloy films during hybrid HIPIMS/DCMS co-sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greczynski, Grzegorz

    2016-09-01

    High-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is particularly attractive for growth of transition metal (TM) nitride alloys for two reasons: (i) the high ionization degree of the sputtered metal flux, and (ii) the time separation of metal- and gas-ion fluxes incident at the substrate. The former implies that ion fluxes originating from elemental targets operated in HIPIMS are distinctly different from those that are obtained during dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS), which helps to separate the effects of HIPIMS and DCMS metal-ion fluxes on film properties. The latter feature allows one to minimize compressive stress due to gas-ion irradiation, by synchronizing the pulsed substrate bias with the metal-rich-plasma portion of the HIPIMS pulse. Here, we use pseudobinary TM nitride model systems TiAlN, TiSiN, TiTaN, and TiAlTaN to carry out experiments in a hybrid configuration with one target powered by HIPIMS, the other operated in DCMS mode. This allows us to probe the roles of intense and metal-ion fluxes (n = 1 , 2) from HIPIMS-powered targets on film growth kinetics, microstructure, and physical properties over a wide range of M1M2N alloy compositions. TiAlN and TiSiN mechanical properties are shown to be determined by the average metal-ion momentum transfer per deposited atom. Irradiation with lighter metal-ions (M1 =Al+ or Si+ during M1-HIPIMS/Ti-DCMS) yields fully-dense single-phase cubic Ti1-x (M1)x N films. In contrast, with higher-mass film constituent ions such as Ti+, easily exceeds the threshold for precipitation of second phase w-AlN or Si3N4. Based on the above results, a new PVD approach is proposed which relies on the hybrid concept to grow dense, hard, and stress-free thin films with no external heating. The primary targets, Ti and/or Al, operate in DCMS mode providing a continuous flux of sputter-ejected metal atoms to sustain a high deposition rate, while a high-mass target metal, Ta, is driven by HIPIMS to serve as a pulsed source of energetic

  2. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical determination of chromium(VI) in water samples by ion-imprinted/formate anion-incorporated graphitic carbon nitride nanostructured hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tian; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Lizhi; Gong, Jingming

    2016-07-15

    A rapid and highly sensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) method has been proposed for the determination of trace amounts of chromium in water samples under visible-light irradiation. Here, a unique nanostructured hybrid of formate anion incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (F-g-C3N4) is smartly integrated with a Cr(VI) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) as a photoactive electrode (denoted as IIP@F-g-C3N4). The nanohybrid of F-g-C3N4 exhibits an enhanced charge separation with substantially improved PEC responses versus g-C3N4. The newly designed IIP@F-g-C3N4 PEC sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of Cr(VI) because it offers efficient photogenerated electron reduction toward Cr(VI). The PEC analysis is highly linear over Cr(VI) concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100.00ppb with a detection limit of 0.006ppb (S/N=3). Our approach can be used to detect Cr(VI), Cr(III) and the total chromium level in aqueous solution through oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) and the determination of the total chromium as Cr(VI). In practical applications, this low-cost and sensitive assay has been successfully applied for speciation determination of chromium in environmental water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hybrid processing of Ti-6Al-4V using plasma immersion ion implantation combined with plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Maria Margareth da

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the fact that the Ti-6Al-4V alloy has good mechanical properties, excellent resistance to corrosion and also excellent biocompatibility, however with low wear resistance, this work aims to test plasma processes or combination of plasma and ion implantation processes to improve these characteristics. Two types of processing were used: two steps PIII (Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation combined with PN (Plasma Nitriding and single step PIII treatment. According to Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES results, the best solution was obtained by PIII for 150 minutes resulting in ~ 65 nm of nitrogen implanted layer, while the sample treated with PIII (75 minutes and PN (75 minutes reached ~ 35 nm implanted layer. The improvement of surface properties could also be confirmed by the nanoindentation technique, with values of hardness increasing for both processes. AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy characterization showed that the single step PIII process presented greater efficiency than the duplex process (PIII + PN, probably due to the sputtering occurring during the second step (PN removing partially the implanted layer of first step (PIII.

  4. A hybrid MBE-based growth method for large-area synthesis of stacked hexagonal boron nitride/graphene heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Joseph M; Nakhaie, Siamak; Krause, Thilo; Liu, Xianjie; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Hanke, Michael; Riechert, Henning; J Lopes, J Marcelo

    2017-02-27

    Van der Waals heterostructures combining hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene offer many potential advantages, but remain difficult to produce as continuous films over large areas. In particular, the growth of h-BN on graphene has proven to be challenging due to the inertness of the graphene surface. Here we exploit a scalable molecular beam epitaxy based method to allow both the h-BN and graphene to form in a stacked heterostructure in the favorable growth environment provided by a Ni(111) substrate. This involves first saturating a Ni film on MgO(111) with C, growing h-BN on the exposed metal surface, and precipitating the C back to the h-BN/Ni interface to form graphene. The resulting laterally continuous heterostructure is composed of a top layer of few-layer thick h-BN on an intermediate few-layer thick graphene, lying on top of Ni/MgO(111). Examinations by synchrotron-based grazing incidence diffraction, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and UV-Raman spectroscopy reveal that while the h-BN is relaxed, the lattice constant of graphene is significantly reduced, likely due to nitrogen doping. These results illustrate a different pathway for the production of h-BN/graphene heterostructures, and open a new perspective for the large-area preparation of heterosystems combining graphene and other 2D or 3D materials.

  5. Shell-model study of boron, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes based on monopole-based-universal interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Cenxi; Otsuka, Takaharu; Xu, Furong; Tsunoda, Naofumi; 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.064324

    2012-01-01

    We study boron, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes with a newly constructed shell-model Hamiltonian developed from monopole-based-universal interaction ($V_{MU}$). The present Hamiltonian can reproduce well the ground-state energies, energy levels, electric quadrupole properties and spin properties of these nuclei in full psd model space including $(0-3)\\hbar\\omega$ excitations. Especially, it correctly describes the drip lines of carbon and oxygen isotopes and the spins of the ground states of $^{10}$B and $^{18}$N while some former interactions such as WBP and WBT fail. We point out that the inclusion of $2\\hbar\\omega$ excitations is important in reproducing some of these properties. In the present $(0+2)\\hbar\\omega$ calculations small but constant E2 effective charges appear to work quite well. As the inclusion of the $2\\hbar\\omega$ model space makes rather minor change, this seems to be related to the smallness of $^{4}$He core. Similarly, the spin g factors are very close to free values. The applicabil...

  6. Nanostructures of Boron, Carbon and Magnesium Diboride for High Temperature Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, Lisa [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Fang, Fang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Iyyamperumal, Eswarmoorthi [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Keskar, Gayatri [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-12-23

    Direct fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures is achieved by employing metal (Ni,Mg) incorporated MCM-41 in the Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) reaction. Different reaction conditions are tested to optimize the fabrication process. TEM analysis shows the fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures starting at the reaction temperature of 600oC, with the yield of the nanostructures increasing with increasing reaction temperature. The as-synthesized MgxBy nanostructures have the diameters in the range of 3-5nm, which do not increase with the reaction temperature consistent with templated synthesis. EELS analysis of the template removed nanostructures confirms the existence of B and Mg with possible contamination of Si and O. NEXAFS and Raman spectroscopy analysis suggested a concentric layer-by-layer MgxBy nanowire/nanotube growth model for our as-synthesized nanostructures. Ni k-edge XAS indicates that the formation of MgNi alloy particles is important for the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth of MgxBy nanostructures with fine diameters, and the presence of Mg vapor not just Mg in the catalyst is crucial for the formation of Ni-Mg clusters. Physical templating by the MCM-41 pores was shown to confine the diameter of the nanostructures. DC magnetization measurements indicate possible superconductive behaviors in the as-synthesized samples.

  7. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  8. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  9. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2017-02-21

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and one or more borate binders; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and amorphous boron nitride; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material.

  10. Plasma nitriding of steels

    CERN Document Server

    Aghajani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the effect of plasma nitriding on the properties of steels. Parameters of different grades of steels are considered, such as structural and constructional steels, stainless steels and tools steels. The reader will find within the text an introduction to nitriding treatment, the basis of plasma and its roll in nitriding. The authors also address the advantages and disadvantages of plasma nitriding in comparison with other nitriding methods. .

  11. Hyperfine structures and Landé g{sub J}-factors for n=2 states in beryllium-, boron-, carbon-, and nitrogen-like ions from relativistic configuration interaction calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdebout, S.; Nazé, C. [Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, CP160/09, Université Libre de Bruxelles, B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Jönsson, P., E-mail: per.jonsson@mah.se [Faculty of Technology and Society, Group for Materials Science and Applied Mathematics, Malmö University, 205-06 Malmö (Sweden); Rynkun, P. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Godefroid, M. [Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, CP160/09, Université Libre de Bruxelles, B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Gaigalas, G. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2014-09-15

    Energy levels, hyperfine interaction constants, and Landé g{sub J}-factors are reported for n=2 states in beryllium-, boron-, carbon-, and nitrogen-like ions from relativistic configuration interaction calculations. Valence, core–valence, and core–core correlation effects are taken into account through single and double-excitations from multireference expansions to increasing sets of active orbitals. A systematic comparison of the calculated hyperfine interaction constants is made with values from the available literature.

  12. Methods of forming boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  13. Methods of forming boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  14. Structure and properties of diffusive titanium nitride layers produced by hybrid method on AZ91D magnesium alloy%混合法在AZ91D镁合金表面制备的扩散氮化钛涂层的结构及性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MichałTACIKOWSKI; Jerzy MORGIEL; Monika BANASZEK; Konrad CYMERMAN; Tadeusz WIERZCHOŃ

    2014-01-01

    A diffusive titanium nitride layers were produced on AZ91D magnesium alloy by a hybrid method which combines the titanium coating physical vapor deposition (PVD) with subsequent nitriding. The layers are composed of a thin surface zone of titanium nitrides and oxides, an intermediate titanium zone and Ti-Al-Mg type diffusive zone. Since the layers improve the corrosion resistance, the best corrosion resistance is obtained when the layers are produced on aluminum base sub-layer by oxynitriding.%采用钛涂层物理气相沉积法(PVD)和渗氮法结合的混合方法在AZ91D镁合金表面制备扩散氮化钛涂层。涂层由含Ti的氮化物和氧化物的薄的表层区,钛中间区和Ti-Al-Mg型扩散区组成。因涂层改善了合金的耐蚀性能,在铝基亚层上通过氮氧共渗制备涂层时,合金能够得到最好的耐蚀性能。

  15. Gallium nitride optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of bulk gallium nitride crystals was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride. Gallium nitride single crystals up to 2.5 x 0.5 cm in size were produced. The crystals are suitable as substrates for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride. The epitaxial growth of gallium nitride on sapphire substrates with main faces of (0001) and (1T02) orientations was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride in a gas flow system. The grown layers had electron concentrations in the range of 1 to 3 x 10 to the 19th power/cu cm and Hall mobilities in the range of 50 to 100 sq cm/v/sec at room temperature.

  16. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  17. Boron nitride composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  18. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  19. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dissociated ammonia. The nitriding processes were accomplished in four series. The parameters selected in the particular processes were: process temperature (T, time (t, value of nitriding potential (KN, corresponding to known dissociation rate of the ammonia which dissociates during the nitriding process (α. Variable parameters were: nitrogen availability (mN2, composition of the ingoing atmosphere and flow rate of the ingoing atmosphere (FIn.

  20. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  1. Nitride quantum light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, T.; Oliver, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Prototype nitride quantum light sources, particularly single-photon emitters, have been successfully demonstrated, despite the challenges inherent in this complex materials system. The large band offsets available between different nitride alloys have allowed device operation at easily accessible temperatures. A wide range of approaches has been explored: not only self-assembled quantum dot growth but also lithographic methods for site-controlled nanostructure formation. All these approaches face common challenges, particularly strong background signals which contaminate the single-photon stream and excessive spectral diffusion of the quantum dot emission wavelength. If these challenges can be successfully overcome, then ongoing rapid progress in the conventional III-V semiconductors provides a roadmap for future progress in the nitrides.

  2. Structure of high-reflectance La/B-based multilayer mirrors with partial La nitridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, D. S.; Yakshin, A. E.; Sturm, J. M.; van de Kruijs, R. W. E.; Bijkerk, F.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a hybrid thin film deposition procedure that significantly enhances reflectivity of La/B based nanoscale multilayer structures to be used as Extreme UV mirrors at 6.7 nm wavelength and beyond. We have analyzed the La-nitridation process in detail, and proposed a growth mechanism and deposition procedure for full, stoichiometric passivation of La, avoiding the formation of optically unfavorable BN formation at the LaN-on-B interface. A partial nitridation was applied and studied as a function of the nitridation delay.

  3. Analysis of plasma nitrided steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  4. Fatigue modelling for gas nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Weil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to develop an algorithm able to predict the fatigue lifetime of nitrided steels. Linear multi-axial fatigue criteria are used to take into account the gradients of mechanical properties provided by the nitriding process. Simulations on rotating bending fatigue specimens are made in order to test the nitrided surfaces. The fatigue model is applied to the cyclic loading of a gear from a simulation using the finite element software Ansys. Results show the positive contributions of nitriding on the fatigue strength

  5. Titanium Nitride Cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-07-01

    C ermets 7 Effect of Amount of Metal on Strength of TiN-Ni-Cr....26 Cerme ts S Effect of Amount of Metal on Strength of TiN-Co-Cr....27 Cermets 9...Figures 7 and 8. Titanium Nitride-Nickel-Chromium Cerme ts From Figure 7, it can be seen that 2900OF was the better firing temperature. The 20% metal

  6. Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanostructures via Nitridation of Nanopatterned Titanium Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Kim, Jongbum

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures are obtained via nitridation of titanium dioxide. Nanoparticles acquired a cubic shape with sharper edges following the rock-salt crystalline structure of TiN. Lattice constant of the resulting TiN nanoparticles matched well with the tabulated data. Energ...

  7. Gallium nitride electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Siddharth; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-07-01

    In the past two decades, there has been increasing research and industrial activity in the area of gallium nitride (GaN) electronics, stimulated first by the successful demonstration of GaN LEDs. While the promise of wide band gap semiconductors for power electronics was recognized many years before this by one of the contributors to this issue (J Baliga), the success in the area of LEDs acted as a catalyst. It set the field of GaN electronics in motion, and today the technology is improving the performance of several applications including RF cell phone base stations and military radar. GaN could also play a very important role in reducing worldwide energy consumption by enabling high efficiency compact power converters operating at high voltages and lower frequencies. While GaN electronics is a rapidly evolving area with active research worldwide, this special issue provides an opportunity to capture some of the great advances that have been made in the last 15 years. The issue begins with a section on epitaxy and processing, followed by an overview of high-frequency HEMTs, which have been the most commercially successful application of III-nitride electronics to date. This is followed by review and research articles on power-switching transistors, which are currently of great interest to the III-nitride community. A section of this issue is devoted to the reliability of III-nitride devices, an area that is of increasing significance as the research focus has moved from not just high performance but also production-worthiness and long-term usage of these devices. Finally, a group of papers on new and relatively less studied ideas for III-nitride electronics, such as interband tunneling, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and high-temperature electronics is included. These areas point to new areas of research and technological innovation going beyond the state of the art into the future. We hope that the breadth and quality of articles in this issue will make it

  8. Formation and characterization of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Mary; Redmond, Gareth

    2005-01-01

    A versatile method for direct, covalent attachment of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride layers, previously deposited by chemical vapor deposition at silicon wafer substrates, is reported. Each microarray fabrication process step, from silicon nitride substrate deposition, surface cleaning, amino-silanation, and attachment of a homobifunctional cross-linking molecule to covalent immobilization of probe oligonucleotides, is defined, characterized, and optimized to yield consistent probe microarray quality, homogeneity, and probe-target hybridization performance. The developed microarray fabrication methodology provides excellent (high signal-to-background ratio) and reproducible responsivity to target oligonucleotide hybridization with a rugged chemical stability that permits exposure of arrays to stringent pre- and posthybridization wash conditions through many sustained cycles of reuse. Overall, the achieved performance features compare very favorably with those of more mature glass based microarrays. It is proposed that this DNA microarray fabrication strategy has the potential to provide a viable route toward the successful realization of future integrated DNA biochips.

  9. Platinum nitride with fluorite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Rong; Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2005-01-31

    The mechanical stability of platinum nitride has been studied using first-principles calculations. By calculating the single-crystal elastic constants, we show that platinum nitride can be stabilized in the fluorite structure, in which the nitrogen atoms occupy all the tetrahedral interstitial sites of the metal lattice. The stability is attributed to the pseudogap effect from analysis of the electronic structure.

  10. Optical characterization of gallium nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Group III-nitrides have been considered a promising system for semiconductor devices since a few decades, first for blue- and UV-light emitting diodes, later also for high-frequency/high-power applications. Due to the lack of native substrates, heteroepitaxially grown III-nitride layers are usually

  11. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  12. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  13. Effects of Aqueous Vapour Consistence in Nitriding Furnace on the Quality of the Sintered Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGZijiang

    1998-01-01

    If the aqueous vapour consistence is too high(>0.7%),it is very disadvantageous to the sintered products in the nitriding furnace,when silcon nitride bonded silicon carbide products are synthesized by nitridation of silicon.

  14. Shear-induced phase transition of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride to wurtzitic structure at room temperature and lower pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cheng; Levitas, Valery I; Zhu, Hongyang; Chaudhuri, Jharna; Marathe, Archis; Ma, Yanzhang

    2012-11-20

    Disordered structures of boron nitride (BN), graphite, boron carbide (BC), and boron carbon nitride (BCN) systems are considered important precursor materials for synthesis of superhard phases in these systems. However, phase transformation of such materials can be achieved only at extreme pressure-temperature conditions, which is irrelevant to industrial applications. Here, the phase transition from disordered nanocrystalline hexagonal (h)BN to superhard wurtzitic (w)BN was found at room temperature under a pressure of 6.7 GPa after applying large plastic shear in a rotational diamond anvil cell (RDAC) monitored by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. However, under hydrostatic compression to 52.8 GPa, the same hBN sample did not transform to wBN but probably underwent a reversible transformation to a high-pressure disordered phase with closed-packed buckled layers. The current phase-transition pressure is the lowest among all reported direct-phase transitions from hBN to wBN at room temperature. Usually, large plastic straining leads to disordering and amorphization; here, in contrast, highly disordered hBN transformed to crystalline wBN. The mechanisms of strain-induced phase transformation and the reasons for such a low transformation pressure are discussed. Our results demonstrate a potential of low pressure-room temperature synthesis of superhard materials under plastic shear from disordered or amorphous precursors. They also open a pathway of phase transformation of nanocrystalline materials and materials with disordered and amorphous structures under extensive shear.

  15. Shear-induced phase transition of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride to wurtzitic structure at room temperature and lower pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cheng; Levitas, Valery I.; Zhu, Hongyang; Chaudhuri, Jharna; Marathe, Archis; Ma, Yanzhang

    2012-01-01

    Disordered structures of boron nitride (BN), graphite, boron carbide (BC), and boron carbon nitride (BCN) systems are considered important precursor materials for synthesis of superhard phases in these systems. However, phase transformation of such materials can be achieved only at extreme pressure–temperature conditions, which is irrelevant to industrial applications. Here, the phase transition from disordered nanocrystalline hexagonal (h)BN to superhard wurtzitic (w)BN was found at room temperature under a pressure of 6.7 GPa after applying large plastic shear in a rotational diamond anvil cell (RDAC) monitored by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. However, under hydrostatic compression to 52.8 GPa, the same hBN sample did not transform to wBN but probably underwent a reversible transformation to a high-pressure disordered phase with closed-packed buckled layers. The current phase-transition pressure is the lowest among all reported direct-phase transitions from hBN to wBN at room temperature. Usually, large plastic straining leads to disordering and amorphization; here, in contrast, highly disordered hBN transformed to crystalline wBN. The mechanisms of strain-induced phase transformation and the reasons for such a low transformation pressure are discussed. Our results demonstrate a potential of low pressure–room temperature synthesis of superhard materials under plastic shear from disordered or amorphous precursors. They also open a pathway of phase transformation of nanocrystalline materials and materials with disordered and amorphous structures under extensive shear. PMID:23129624

  16. Crystallographic phases and magnetic properties of iron nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guo-Ke [Department of Physics, Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Department of Mathematics and Physics, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043 (China); Liu, Yan; Zhao, Rui-Bin [Department of Physics, Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Shen, Jun-Jie [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043 (China); Wang, Shang; Shan, Pu-Jia; Zhen, Cong-Mian [Department of Physics, Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Hou, Deng-Lu, E-mail: houdenglu@mail.hebtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2015-08-31

    Iron nitride films, including single phase films of α-FeN (expanded bcc Fe), γ′-Fe{sub 4}N, ε-Fe{sub 3−x}N (0 ≤ x ≤ 1), and γ″-FeN, were sputtered onto AlN buffered glass substrates. It was found possible to control the phases in the films merely by changing the nitrogen partial pressure during deposition. The magnetization decreased with increased nitrogen concentration and dropped to zero when the N:Fe ratio was above 0.5. The experimental results, along with spin polarized band calculations, have been used to discuss and analyze the magnetic properties of iron nitrides. It has been demonstrated that in addition to influencing the lattice constant of the various iron nitrides, the nearest N atoms have a significant influence on the exchange splitting of the Fe atoms. Due to the hybridization of Fe-3d and N-2p states, the magnetic moment of Fe atoms decreases with an increase in the number of nearest neighbor nitrogen atoms. - Highlights: • Single phase γ′-Fe{sub 4}N, ε-Fe{sub 3−x}N, and γ″-FeN films were obtained using dc sputtering. • The phases in iron nitride films can be controlled by the nitrogen partial pressure. • The nearest N neighbors have a significant influence on the exchange splitting of Fe.

  17. Study of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cheng; C. X. Li; H. Dong; T. Bell

    2004-01-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a novel nitriding process, which overcomes many of the practical problems associated with the conventional DC plasma nitriding (DCPN). Experimental results showed that the metallurgical characteristics and hardening effect of 722M24 steel nitrided by ASPN at both floating potential and anodic (zero) potential were similar to those nitrided by DCPN. XRD and high-resolution SEM analysis indicated that iron nitride particles with sizes in sub-micron scale were deposited on the specimen surface in AS plasma nitriding. These indicate that the neutral iron nitride particles, which are sputtered from the active screen and transferred through plasma to specimen surface, are considered to be the dominant nitrogen carder in ASPN. The OES results show that NH could not be a critical species in plasma nitriding.

  18. Synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles using mesoporous carbon nitride as reactive template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anna; Müller, Jens Oliver; Antonietti, Markus; Thomas, Arne

    2008-12-23

    Mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride was used as both a nanoreactor and a reactant for the synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles. By infiltration of a mixture of two metal precursors into mesoporous carbon nitride, the pores act first as a nanoconfinement, generating amorphous mixed oxide nanoparticles. During heating and decomposition, the carbon nitride second acts as reactant or, more precisely, as a nitrogen source, which converts the preformed mixed oxide nanoparticles into the corresponding nitride (reactive templating). Using this approach, ternary metal nitride particles with diameters smaller 10 nm composed of aluminum gallium nitride (Al-Ga-N) and titanium vanadium nitride (Ti-V-N) were synthesized. Due to the confinement effect of the carbon nitride matrix, the composition of the resulting metal nitride can be easily adjusted by changing the concentration of the preceding precursor solution. Thus, ternary metal nitride nanoparticles with continuously adjustable metal composition can be produced.

  19. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  20. Hemocompatibility of titanium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, I; Baquey, C; Candelon, B; Monties, J R

    1992-10-01

    The left ventricular assist device is based on the principle of the Maillard-Wenkel rotative pump. The materials which make up the pump must present particular mechanical, tribological, thermal and chemical properties. Titanium nitride (TiN) because of its surface properties and graphite because of its bulk characteristics have been chosen. The present study evaluated the in vitro hemocompatibility of TiN coating deposited by the chemical vapor deposition process. Protein adsorption, platelet retention and hemolysis tests have been carried out. In spite of some disparities, the TiN behavior towards albumin and fibrinogen is interesting, compared with the one of a reference medical grade elastomer. The platelet retention test gives similar results as those achieved with the same elastomer. The hemolysis percentage is near to zero. TiN shows interesting characteristics, as far as mechanical and tribological problems are concerned, and presents very encouraging blood tolerability properties.

  1. Boron nitride nanotubes functionalized with mesoporous silica for intracellular delivery of chemotherapy drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Zhi, Chunyi; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Yamaguchi, Maho; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2013-08-25

    Boron nitride nanotube (BNNT)@mesoporous silica hybrids with controllable surface zeta potential were fabricated for intracellular delivery of doxorubicin. The materials showed higher suspension ability, doxorubicin intracellular endocytosis efficiency, and LNcap prostate cancer cell killing ability compared with naked BNNTs.

  2. Structure of high-reflectance La/B-based multilayer mirrors with partial La nitridation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsov, D.; Yakshin, A.; Sturm, J.M.; Kruijs, van de R.W.E.; Bijkerk, F.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a hybrid thin film deposition procedure that significantly enhances reflectivity of La/B based nanoscale multilayer structures to be used as Extreme UV mirrors at 6.7 nm wavelength and beyond. We have analyzed the La-nitridation process in detail, and proposed a growth mechanism and d

  3. Organic Monolayers from 1-Alkynes Covalently Attached to Chromium Nitride: Alkyl and Fluoroalkyl Termination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujari, S.P.; Scheres, L.M.W.; Lagen, van B.; Zuilhof, H.

    2013-01-01

    Strategies to modify chromium nitride (CrN) surfaces are important because of the increasing applications of these materials in various areas such as hybrid electronics, medical implants, diffusion barrier layers, corrosion inhibition, and wettability control. The present work presents the first sur

  4. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swanepoel, JJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200 °C) chlorination reaction...

  5. Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures for perfect absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Li, Wen-Wei; Kinsey, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material...

  6. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa,R.R.M.; de Araújo, F. O.; J. A. P. da Costa; Brandim,A.S.; R. A. de Brito; C. Alves

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN), in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and...

  7. In vitro bio-functionality of gallium nitride sensors for radiation biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Markus; Howgate, John; Schmid, Martin; Schoell, Sebastian; Sachsenhauser, Matthias; Adigüzel, Denis; Stutzmann, Martin; Sharp, Ian D; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2012-07-27

    There is an increasing interest in the integration of hybrid bio-semiconductor systems for the non-invasive evaluation of physiological parameters. High quality gallium nitride and its alloys show promising characteristics to monitor cellular parameters. Nevertheless, such applications not only request appropriate sensing capabilities but also the biocompatibility and especially the biofunctionality of materials. Here we show extensive biocompatibility studies of gallium nitride and, for the first time, a biofunctionality assay using ionizing radiation. Analytical sensor devices are used in medical settings, as well as for cell- and tissue engineering. Within these fields, semiconductor devices have increasingly been applied for online biosensing on a cellular and tissue level. Integration of advanced materials such as gallium nitride into these systems has the potential to increase the range of applicability for a multitude of test devices and greatly enhance sensitivity and functionality. However, for such applications it is necessary to optimize cell-surface interactions and to verify the biocompatibility of the semiconductor. In this work, we present studies of mouse fibroblast cell activity grown on gallium nitride surfaces after applying external noxa. Cell-semiconductor hybrids were irradiated with X-rays at air kerma doses up to 250 mGy and the DNA repair dynamics, cell proliferation, and cell growth dynamics of adherent cells were compared to control samples. The impact of ionizing radiation on DNA, along with the associated cellular repair mechanisms, is well characterized and serves as a reference tool for evaluation of substrate effects. The results indicate that gallium nitride does not require specific surface treatments to ensure biocompatibility and suggest that cell signaling is not affected by micro-environmental alterations arising from gallium nitride-cell interactions. The observation that gallium nitride provides no bio-functional influence on

  8. Theoretical Compton profile of diamond, boron nitride and carbon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Julio C.; Quevedo, Carlos R.; Gomez, José M.; Di Rocco, Héctor O.

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we used the generalized gradient approximation method to determine the electron wave functions and theoretical Compton profiles of the following super-hard materials: diamond, boron nitride (h-BN), and carbon nitride in its two known phases: βC3N4 and gC3N4 . In the case of diamond and h-BN, we compared our theoretical results with available experimental data. In addition, we used the Compton profile results to determine cohesive energies and found acceptable agreement with previous experiments.

  9. Mathematical Modelling of Nitride Layer Growth of Low Temperature Gas and Plasma Nitriding of AISI 316L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwiyanto A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper present mathematical model which developed to predict the nitrided layer thickness (case depth of gas nitrided and plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel according to Fick’s first law for pure iron by adapting and manipulating the Hosseini’s model to fit the diffusion mechanism where nitrided structure formed by nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. The mathematical model later tested against various actual gas nitriding and plasma nitriding experimental results with varying nitriding temperature and nitriding duration to see whether the model managed to successfully predict the nitrided layer thickness. This model predicted the coexistence of ε-Fe2-3N and γ΄-Fe4N under the present nitriding process parameters. After the validation process, it is proven that the mathematical model managed to predict the nitrided layer growth of the gas nitrided and plasma nitrided of AISI 316L SS up to high degree of accuracy.

  10. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  11. Tl and OSL dosimetry of diamond films CVD pure and unpurified with boron-carbon; Dosimetria Tl y OSL de peliculas de diamante CVD puras e impurificadas con boro-carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendrez, R.; Pedroza M, M.; Chernov, V.; Ochoa N, J.D.; Bernal, R.; Barboza F, M. [CIF, UNISON, A.P. 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Castaneda, B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apdo. Postal 1626, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Goncalves, J.A.N.; Sandonato, G.M. [Laboratorio Associado de Plasma, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais C.P. 515- 12201 -970, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Cruz Z, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Preciado F, S.; Cruz V, C.; Brown, F. [Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales de la Universidad de Sonora, Apdo. Postal 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Schreck, M. [Universitaet Augsburg, Institut fuer Physik D-86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The diamond is a material that possesses extreme physical properties, such as its hardness to the radiation, its low chemical reactivity besides its equivalence to the human tissue, which qualify him as an ideal material for radiation dosimetry. In this work, it was studied the thermal and optically stimulated response (Tl and OSL) of polycrystalline diamond films grown by the technique of CVD pure and contaminated with Boron-carbon (B/C) with the intention of characterizing their efficiency like a dosemeter for radiation in a range of 0 - 3000 Gy. For the case of the films without impurities, the Tl curve presents four main peaks, two of them in an interval of temperatures of 150-200 C and other two additional around of 250-400 C. The dependence of the response of integrated Tl and that of OSL always maintained a lineal relationship with the exhibition dose up to 100 Gy. The behavior of the films contaminated with B/C (2000 - 20000 ppm) was established through experiments that involved the signal of OSL and their relationship with the Tl response. It was found that this processes are correlated, since the electrons caught in the traps of low temperature (50 - 250 C) of the Tl they are the electrons that recombining with more probability to provide the signal of OSL. According to these results it is possible to propose the diamond films as a good candidate for dosimetry to, using the traditional technique of Tl so much as well as the but recent of OSL. (Author)

  12. Cavity piezomechanical strong coupling and frequency conversion on an aluminum nitride chip

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2016-01-01

    Schemes to achieve strong coupling between mechanical modes of aluminum nitride microstructures and microwave cavity modes due to the piezoelectric effect are proposed. We show that the strong coupling regime is feasible for an on-chip aluminum nitride device that is either enclosed by a three-dimensional microwave cavity or integrated with a superconducting coplanar resonator. Combining with optomechanics, the piezomechanical strong coupling permits coherent conversion between microwave and optical modes with high efficiency. Hence, the piezomechanical system will be an efficient transducer for applications in hybrid quantum systems.

  13. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons from Exfoliation of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Two types of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were exfoliated into boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNR), which were identified using transmission electron microscopy: (1) commercial BNNTs with thin tube walls and small diameters. Tube unzipping was indicated by a large decrease of the sample's surface area and volume for pores less than 2 nm in diameter. (2) BNNTs with large diameters and thick walls synthesized at NASA Glenn Research Center. Here, tube unraveling was indicated by a large increase in external surface area and pore volume. For both, the exfoliation process was similar to the previous reported method to exfoliate commercial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN): Mixtures of BNNT, FeCl3, and NaF (or KF) were sequentially treated in 250 to 350 C nitrogen for intercalation, 500 to 750 C air for exfoliation, and finally HCl for purification. Property changes of the nanosized boron nitride throughout this process were also similar to the previously observed changes of commercial hBN during the exfoliation process: Both crystal structure (x-ray diffraction data) and chemical properties (Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy data) of the original reactant changed after intercalation and exfoliation, but most (not all) of these changes revert back to those of the reactant once the final, purified products are obtained.

  14. Quantum Cavity Optomechanics with Phononic Bandgap Shielded Silicon Nitride Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, William Hvidtfelt Padkær

    pressure, andthe achievement of strong correlations between light at mechanics, manifested asponderomotive squeezing. e next step invariably seems to be the incorporationof cavity optomechanical systems in more complex constellations, in some sensemimicking what has already been achieved with atoms.......In this work, we report on the progress of bringing a cavity optomechanicalsystem “up to speed” for the later integration into a hybrid atomic-opticalmechanicalentanglement experiment. The optomechanical system in considerationconsists of a highly stressed stoichiometric silicon-nitride membrane placedbetween...

  15. Tuning the optical response in carbon doped boron nitride nanodots

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2014-09-04

    Time dependent density functional theory and the hybrid B3LYP functional are used to investigate the structural and optical properties of pristine and carbon doped hexagonal boron nitride nanodots. In agreement with recent experiments, the embedded carbon atoms are found to favor nucleation. Our results demonstrate that carbon clusters of different shapes promote an early onset of absorption by generating in-gap states. The nanodots are interesting for opto-electronics due to their tunable optical response in a wide energy window. We identify cluster sizes and shapes with optimal conversion efficiency for solar radiation and a wide absorption range form infrared to ultraviolet. This journal is

  16. Molecular dynamics of halogenated graphene - hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemnes, G. A.; Visan, Camelia; Anghel, D. V.; Manolescu, A.

    2016-08-01

    The hybrid graphene - hexagonal boron nitride (G-hBN) systems offer new routes in the design of nanoscale electronic devices. Using ab initio density functional theory calculations we investigate the dynamics of zig-zag nanoribbons a few interatomic distances wide. Several structures are analyzed, namely pristine graphene, hBN and G-hBN systems. By passivating the nanoribbon edges with hydrogen and different halogen atoms, one may tune the electronic and mechanical properties, like the band gap energies and the natural frequencies of vibration.

  17. Homogeneous dispersion of gallium nitride nanoparticles in a boron nitride matrix by nitridation with urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2010-07-01

    A Gallium Nitride (GaN) dispersed boron nitride (BN) nanocomposite powder was synthesized by heating a mixture of gallium nitrate, boric acid, and urea in a hydrogen atmosphere. Before heat treatment, crystalline phases of urea, boric acid, and gallium nitrate were recognized, but an amorphous material was produced by heat treatment at 400 degrees C, and then was transformed into GaN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) by further heat treatment at 800 degrees C. TEM obsevations of this composite powder revealed that single nanosized GaN particles were homogeneously dispersed in a BN matrix. Homogeneous dispersion of GaN nanoparticles was thought to be attained by simultaneously nitriding gallium nitrate and boric acid to GaN and BN with urea.

  18. Improving durability of hot forging tools by applying hybrid layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Gronostajski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with problems relating to the durability of the dies used for the hot forging of spur gears. The results of industrial tests carried out on dies with a hybrid layer (a nitrided layer (PN + physical vapor deposition (PVD coating applied to improve their durability are presented. Two types of hybrid layers, differing in their PVD coating, were evaluated with regard to their durability improvement effectiveness. The tests have shown that by applying hybrid layers of the nitrided layer/PVD coating type one can effectively increase the durability of hot forging tools.

  19. Investigation into nitrided spur gears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S.; Coban, A.; Nickel, J.; Sunar, M.; Sami, M.; Abdul Aleem, B.J. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-01

    The cold forging method has been widely used in industry to produce machine parts. In general, gears are produced by shaping or hobbing. One of the shaping techniques is precision forging, which has several advantages over hobbing. In the present study, cold forging of spur gears from Ti-6Al-4V material is introduced. To improve the surface properties of the resulting gears, plasma nitriding was carried out. Nuclear reaction analysis was carried out to obtain the nitrogen concentration, while the micro-PIXE technique was used to determine the elemental distribution in the matrix after forging and nitriding processes. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction were used to investigate the metallurgical changes and formation of nitride components in the surface region. Microhardness and friction tests were carried out to measure the hardness depth profile and friction coefficient at the surface. Finally, scoring failure tests were conducted to determine the rotational speed at which the gears failed. Three distinct regions were obtained in the nitride region, and at the initial stages of the scoring tests, failure in surface roughness was observed in the vicinity of the tip of the gear tooth. This occurred at a particular rotational speed and work input.

  20. Investigation into nitrided spur gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Coban, A.; Nickel, J.; Sunar, M.; Sami, M.; Aleem, B. J. Abdul

    1996-12-01

    The cold forging method has been widely used in industry to produce machine parts. In general, gears are produced by shaping or hobbing. One of the shaping techniques is precision forging, which has several advantages over hobbing. In the present study, cold forging of spur gears from Ti-6A1-4V material is introduced. To improve the surface properties of the resulting gears, plasma nitriding was carried out. Nuclear reaction analysis was carried out to obtain the nitrogen concentration, while the micro-PIXE technique was used to determine the elemental distribution in the matrix after forging and nitriding processes. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction were used to investigate the metallurgical changes and formation of nitride components in the surface region. Microhardness and friction tests were carried out to measure the hardness depth profile and friction coefficient at the surface. Finally, scoring failure tests were conducted to determine the rotational speed at which the gears failed. Three distinct regions were obtained in the nitride region, and at the initial stages of the scoring tests, failure in surface roughness was observed in the vicinity of the tip of the gear tooth. This occurred at a particular rotational speed and work input.

  1. The new Polish nitriding and nitriding like processes in the modern technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Has, Z.; Kula, P. [Technical Univ. of Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Modern technological methods for making nitrided layers and low-friction combined layers have been described. The possibilities of structures and properties forming were analyzed as well as the area and examples of application were considered. Nitrided layers are applied in high loaded frictional couples, widely. They can be formed on steel or cast iron machine parts by the classic gas nitriding process or by modern numerous nitriding technologies.

  2. Indium gallium nitride multijunction solar cell simulation using silvaco atlas

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Baldomero

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential use of wurtzite Indium Gallium Nitride as photovoltaic material. Silvaco Atlas was used to simulate a quad-junction solar cell. Each of the junctions was made up of Indium Gallium Nitride. The band gap of each junction was dependent on the composition percentage of Indium Nitride and Gallium Nitride within Indium Gallium Nitride. The findings of this research show that Indium Gallium Nitride is a promising semiconductor for solar cell use. United...

  3. Enhanced light harvesting of nitride-based nanopillars covered with ZnO using indium-tin oxide nanowhiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Lung-Hsing; Lin, Chien-Chung; Lee, Hsin-Ying; Huang, Jhih-Kai; Han, Hau-Vei; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Yu, Peichen; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lee, Ching-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Nitride-based nanopillars were successfully fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. A nanowhisker of indium-tin oxide (ITO) deposited by on oblique evaporation method was investigated in nitride-based nanopillars and thin ZnO layers grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). From the results of field-emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurement, it was found that ITO whiskers grew on nitride-based nanopillars covered with ZnO. Moreover, from the results of UV-visible spectrophotometry and bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) measurements, it was found that this hybrid structure of ITO nanowhiskers above a ZnO medium enhanced the broadband and angle-independent antireflection in the range between 380 and 600 nm. We used the hybrid design of the ITO/ZnO structure to achieve the lowest reflectance value between 3.8 and 10.9% in a quantum well absorption range.

  4. Self-Powered Broadband Photodetector using Plasmonic Titanium Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Amreen A; Sharma, Bikash; Barman, Tapan; Pal, Arup R

    2016-02-17

    We report the demonstration of plasmonic titanium nitride (TiN) for fabrication of an efficient hybrid photodetector. A novel synthesis method based on plasma nanotechnology is utilized for producing air stable plasma polymerized aniline-TiN (PPA-TiN) nanocomposite and its integration in photodetector geometry. The device performs as a self-powered detector that responds to ultraviolet and visible light at zero bias. The photodetector has the advantage of broadband absorption and outcomes an enhanced photoresponse including high responsivity and detectivity under low light conditions. This work opens up a new direction for plasmonic TiN-based hybrid nanocomposite and its exploitation in optoelectronic applications including imaging, light-wave communication and wire-free route for artificial vision.

  5. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, J., E-mail: j.bueno@sron.nl; Baselmans, J. J. A [SRON, Netherlands Institute of Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Visser, P. J. de [SRON, Netherlands Institute of Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Klapwijk, T. M. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Driessen, E. F. C. [Université Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Doyle, S. [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-10

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations.

  6. Phase identification of iron nitrides and iron oxy-nitrides with Mossbauer spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsa, DM; Boerma, DO

    2003-01-01

    The Mossbauer spectroscopy of all known Fe nitrides is the topic of this paper. Most of the data were accumulated during a study of the growth of the various Fe nitride phases using molecular beam epitaxy of Fe in the presence of a flux of atomic N, or by post-nitriding freshly grown Fe layers also

  7. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 11-Mar-2013 to 10-Mar-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Boron nitride nanotubes have been proposed as a...and titanium (Ti) metal clusters with boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT). First-principles density-functional theory plus dispersion (DFT-D) calculations

  8. Analysis of plasma-nitrided steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  9. Hexagonal boron-nitride nanomesh magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, C.; Tagami, R.; Nakanishi, Y.; Iwaki, R.; Nomura, K.; Haruyama, J.

    2016-09-01

    The formation of magnetic and spintronic devices using two-dimensional (2D) atom-thin layers has attracted attention. Ferromagnetisms (FMs) arising from zigzag-type atomic structure of edges of 2D atom-thin materials have been experimentally observed in graphene nanoribbons, hydrogen (H)-terminated graphene nanomeshes (NMs), and few-layer oxygen (O)-terminated black phosphorus NMs. Herein, we report room-temperature edge FM in few-layer hexagonal boron-nitride (hBN) NMs. O-terminated hBNNMs annealed at 500 °C show the largest FM, while it completely disappears in H-terminated hBNNMs. When hBNNMs are annealed at other temperatures, amplitude of the FM significantly decreases. These are highly in contrast to the case of graphene NMs but similar to the cases of black phosphorus NM and suggest that the hybridization of the O atoms with B(N) dangling bonds of zigzag pore edges, formed at the 500 °C annealing, strongly contribute to this edge FM. Room-temperature FM realizable only by exposing hBNNMs into air opens the way for high-efficiency 2D flexible magnetic and spintronic devices without the use of rare magnetic elements.

  10. Polymeric Graphitic Carbon Nitride Doped with CuO Dispersed on Dealuminated Clinoptilolite (CuO/HCP): Synthesis and Characterisation

    OpenAIRE

    Saheed Olalekan Sanni; Omoruyi Gold Idemudia

    2015-01-01

    CuO dispersed on dealuminated clinoptilolite (CuO/HCP) and further doped with polymeric graphitic carbon nitride (CuO/HCP-g-C3N4) was synthesized through 2 facile routes: precipitation method for CuO/HCP and impregnation through ultrasonication method for the hybrid composite material. The hybrid composite material crystalline phase, surface morphology, and structural and thermal properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-r...

  11. Silicon nitride equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert C.; Swaminathan, Pazhayannur K.

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the development of a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4).1 Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonal β-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data that have indicated a complex and slow time dependent phase change to the c-Si3N4 phase. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products; however, the need for a kinetic approach is suggested to combine with the single component solid models to simulate and further investigate the global phase coexistences.

  12. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically......The nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding has been investigated using light microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Initially, the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x on a pure iron surface starts at grain boundaries meeting the surface, from where the nitride grains grow laterally into the iron...

  13. In vitro bio-functionality of gallium nitride sensors for radiation biophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, Markus [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Howgate, John [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schmid, Martin [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Schoell, Sebastian; Sachsenhauser, Matthias [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Adiguezel, Denis [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Stutzmann, Martin; Sharp, Ian D. [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Thalhammer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gallium nitride based sensors show promising characteristics to monitor cellular parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell growth experiments reveal excellent biocompatibiltiy of the host GaN material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a biofunctionality assay using ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA repair is utilized to evaluate material induced alterations in the cellular behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GaN shows no bio-functional influence on the cellular environment. -- Abstract: There is an increasing interest in the integration of hybrid bio-semiconductor systems for the non-invasive evaluation of physiological parameters. High quality gallium nitride and its alloys show promising characteristics to monitor cellular parameters. Nevertheless, such applications not only request appropriate sensing capabilities but also the biocompatibility and especially the biofunctionality of materials. Here we show extensive biocompatibility studies of gallium nitride and, for the first time, a biofunctionality assay using ionizing radiation. Analytical sensor devices are used in medical settings, as well as for cell- and tissue engineering. Within these fields, semiconductor devices have increasingly been applied for online biosensing on a cellular and tissue level. Integration of advanced materials such as gallium nitride into these systems has the potential to increase the range of applicability for a multitude of test devices and greatly enhance sensitivity and functionality. However, for such applications it is necessary to optimize cell-surface interactions and to verify the biocompatibility of the semiconductor. In this work, we present studies of mouse fibroblast cell activity grown on gallium nitride surfaces after applying external noxa. Cell-semiconductor hybrids were irradiated with X-rays at air kerma doses up to 250 mGy and the DNA repair dynamics, cell proliferation, and cell growth

  14. Amber light-emitting diode comprising a group III-nitride nanowire active region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Koleske, Daniel

    2014-07-22

    A temperature stable (color and efficiency) III-nitride based amber (585 nm) light-emitting diode is based on a novel hybrid nanowire-planar structure. The arrays of GaN nanowires enable radial InGaN/GaN quantum well LED structures with high indium content and high material quality. The high efficiency and temperature stable direct yellow and red phosphor-free emitters enable high efficiency white LEDs based on the RGYB color-mixing approach.

  15. Advances in Dilute Nitride Multi-Junction Solar Cells for Space Power Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suarez F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we review the latest performance and qualification results of Solar Junction Corp.’s lattice matched 4J-on-Ge space solar cells and CIC (Cell- Interconnect-Coverglass products incorporating GaInNAsSb dilute nitride material. We also report on the production readiness of these advanced space solar cells manufactured using an optimized hybrid Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE / Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE growth process.

  16. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim;

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bulk...

  17. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for...nitride nanotubes change with the presence of atomic oxygen were also carried out. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS Nanotubes, Boron Nitride, Composites, Theoretical

  18. PECVD silicon nitride diaphragms for condenser microphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeper, P.R.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Bergveld, P.

    1991-01-01

    The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride as a diaphragm material for condenser microphones has been investigated. By means of adjusting the SiH4/NH3 gas-flow composition, silicon-rich silicon nitride films have been obtained with a relatively low tensile s

  19. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  20. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1999-01-01

    , the nitriding result is determined largely by the kinetics of the process. The nitriding kinetics have been shown to be characterised by the occurring local near-equilibria and stationary states at surfaces and interfaces, and the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the various phases, for which new data have...

  1. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  2. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, E.E.; Cohen, M.L.; Hansen, W.L.

    1992-05-05

    Novel crystalline [alpha](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and [beta](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate. 1 figure.

  3. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  4. Solvothermal synthesis: a new route for preparing nitrides

    CERN Document Server

    Demazeau, G; Denis, A; Largeteau, A

    2002-01-01

    Solvothermal synthesis appears to be an interesting route for preparing nitrides such as gallium nitride and aluminium nitride, using ammonia as solvent. A nitriding additive is used to perform the reaction and, in the case of gallium nitride, is encapsulated by melt gallium. The syntheses are performed in the temperature range 400-800 deg. C and in the pressure range 100-200 MPa. The synthesized powders are characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Finely divided gallium nitride GaN and aluminium nitride AlN, both with wurtzite-type structure, can be obtained by this route.

  5. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  6. Method of synthesizing cubic system boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuzu, S.; Sumiya, H.; Degawa, J.

    1987-10-13

    A method is described for synthetically growing cubic system boron nitride crystals by using boron nitride sources, solvents for dissolving the boron nitride sources, and seed crystals under conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature for maintaining the cubic system boron nitride stable. The method comprises the following steps: preparing a synthesizing vessel having at least two chambers, arrayed in order in the synthesizing vessel so as to be heated according to a temperature gradient; placing the solvents having different eutectic temperatures in each chamber with respect to the boron nitride sources according to the temperature gradient; placing the boron nitride source in contact with a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively higher temperature and placing at least a seed crystal in a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively lower temperature; and growing at least one cubic system boron nitride crystal in each of the solvents in the chambers by heating the synthesizing vessel for establishing the temperature gradient while maintaining conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature.

  7. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions. PMID:28303948

  8. Friction Characteristics of Nitrided Layers on AISI 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Obtained by Various Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan AYDIN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of plasma, gas and salt-bath nitriding techniques on the friction coefficient of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was studied in this paper. Samples were plasma nitrided in 80 % N2 + 20 % H2 atmosphere at 450 °C and 520 °C for 8 h at a pressure of 2 mbar, gas nitrided in NH3 and CO2 atmosphere at 570 °C for 13 h and salt-bath nitrided in a cyanide-cyanate salt-bath at 570 °C for 1.5 h. Characterisation of nitrided layers on the ferritic stainless steel was carried out by means of microstructure, microhardness, surface roughness and friction coefficient measurements. Friction characteristics of the nitrided layers on the 430 steel were investigated using a ball-on-disc friction-wear tester with a WC-Co ball as the counter-body under dry sliding conditions. Analysis of wear tracks was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Maximum hardness and maximum case depth were achieved on the plasma nitrided sample at 520 ºC for 8 h. The plasma and salt-bath nitriding techniques significantly decreased the average surface roughness of the 430 ferritic stainless steel. The friction test results showed that the salt-bath nitrided layer had better friction-reducing ability than the other nitrided layers under dry sliding conditions. Furthermore, the friction characteristic of the plasma nitrided layer at 520 ºC was better than that of the plasma nitrided layer at 450 °C.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3819

  9. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer......, developing at the surfce and consisting of iron-based (carbo)nitrides, and the diffusion zone underneath, consisting of iron and alloying element nitrides dispersed in af ferritic matrix. Microstructural features are related directly to the origins of stress buildup and stres relief....

  10. Plasma Nitriding of Low Alloy Sintered Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiva Mansoorzadeh; Fakhreddin Ashrafizadeh; Xiao-Ying Li; Tom Bell

    2004-01-01

    Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-0.3C and Fe-3Cr-1.4Mn-0.5Mo-0.367C sintered alloys were plasma nitrided at different temperatures. Characterization was performed by microhardness measurement, optical microscopy, SEM and XRD. Both materials had similar nitriding case properties. 1.4% manganese did not change the as-sintered microstructure considerably.It was observed that monophase compound layer, γ, formed with increasing temperature. Compound layer thickness increased with increasing temperature while nitriding depth increased up to a level and then decreased. Core softening was more pronounced at higher temperature owing to cementite coarsening.

  11. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer......, developing at the surfce and consisting of iron-based (carbo)nitrides, and the diffusion zone underneath, consisting of iron and alloying element nitrides dispersed in af ferritic matrix. Microstructural features are related directly to the origins of stress buildup and stres relief....

  12. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one precip...... layer between the crystalline nitride and ferrite matrix. Usually precipitates are described as having (semi) coherent or incoherent interfaces, but in this case it is more energetically favourable to create an amorphous layer instead of the incoherent interface....

  13. Synthesis of ternary nitrides by mechanochemical alloying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Zhu, J.J.; Lindelov, H.;

    2002-01-01

    Ternary metal nitrides ( of general formula MxM'N-y(z)) attract considerable interest because of their special mechanical, electrical, magnetic, and catalytic properties. Usually they are prepared by ammonolysis of ternary oxides (MxM'O-y(m)) at elevated temperatures. We show that ternary...... nitrides by mechanochemical alloying of a binary transition metal nitride (MxN) with an elemental transition metal. In this way, we have been able to prepare Fe3Mo3N and Co3Mo3N by ball-milling of Mo2N with Fe and Co, respectively. The transformation sequence from the starting materials ( the binary...

  14. Plasma nitriding of AISI 52100 ball bearing steel and effect of heat treatment on nitrided layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravindra Kumar; J Alphonsa; Ram Prakash; K S Boob; J Ghanshyam; P A Rayjada; P M Raole; S Mukherjee

    2011-02-01

    In this paper an effort has been made to plasma nitride the ball bearing steel AISI 52100. The difficulty with this specific steel is that its tempering temperature (∼170–200°C) is much lower than the standard processing temperature (∼460–580°C) needed for the plasma nitriding treatment. To understand the mechanism, effect of heat treatment on the nitrided layer steel is investigated. Experiments are performed on three different types of ball bearing races i.e. annealed, quenched and quench-tempered samples. Different gas compositions and process temperatures are maintained while nitriding these samples. In the quenched and quench-tempered samples, the surface hardness has decreased after plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding of annealed sample with argon and nitrogen gas mixture gives higher hardness in comparison to the hydrogen–nitrogen gas mixture. It is reported that the later heat treatment of the plasma nitrided annealed sample has shown improvement in the hardness of this steel. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the dominant phases in the plasma nitrided annealed sample are (Fe2−3N) and (Fe4N), whereas in the plasma nitrided annealed sample with later heat treatment only -Fe peak occurs.

  15. Chemical and Bandgap Engineering in Monolayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Kun; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Jingxin; Bao, Jingxian; Xuan, Ningning; Sun, Yangye; Liu, Bing; Xie, Aozhen; Wu, Shiwei; Sun, Zhengzong

    2017-04-01

    Monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses a wide bandgap of ~6 eV. Trimming down the bandgap is technically attractive, yet poses remarkable challenges in chemistry. One strategy is to topological reform the h-BN’s hexagonal structure, which involves defects or grain boundaries (GBs) engineering in the basal plane. The other way is to invite foreign atoms, such as carbon, to forge bizarre hybrid structures like hetero-junctions or semiconducting h-BNC materials. Here we successfully developed a general chemical method to synthesize these different h-BN derivatives, showcasing how the chemical structure can be manipulated with or without a graphene precursor, and the bandgap be tuned to ~2 eV, only one third of the pristine one’s.

  16. Polypropylene Biocomposites with Boron Nitride and Nanohydroxyapatite Reinforcements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai Wang; Wong, Hoi Man; Yeung, Kelvin Wai Kwok; Tjong, Sie Chin

    2015-03-10

    In this study, we develop binary polypropylene (PP) composites with hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) nanoplatelets and ternary hybrids reinforced with hBN and nanohydroxyapatite (nHA). Filler hybridization is a sound approach to make novel nanocomposites with useful biological and mechanical properties. Tensile test, osteoblastic cell culture and dimethyl thiazolyl diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay were employed to investigate the mechanical performance, bioactivity and biocompatibility of binary PP/hBN and ternary PP/hBN-nHA composites. The purpose is to prepare biocomposite nanomaterials with good mechanical properties and biocompatibility for replacing conventional polymer composites reinforced with large hydroxyapatite microparticles at a high loading of 40 vol%. Tensile test reveals that the elastic modulus of PP composites increases, while tensile elongation decreases with increasing hBN content. Hybridization of hBN with nHA further enhances elastic modulus of PP. The cell culture and MTT assay show that osteoblastic cells attach and proliferate on binary PP/hBN and ternary PP/hBN-20%nHA nanocomposites.

  17. Surface modification of titanium by plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapczinski Myriam Pereira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic investigation was undertaken on commercially pure titanium submitted to plasma nitriding. Thirteen different sets of operational parameters (nitriding time, sample temperature and plasma atmosphere were used. Surface analyses were performed using X-ray diffraction, nuclear reaction and scanning electron microscopy. Wear tests were done with stainless steel Gracey scaler, sonic apparatus and pin-on-disc machine. The obtained results indicate that the tribological performance can be improved for samples treated with the following conditions: nitriding time of 3 h; plasma atmosphere consisting of 80%N2+20%H2 or 20%N2+80%H2; sample temperature during nitriding of 600 or 800 degreesC.

  18. Titanium nitride nanoparticles for therapeutic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2014-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles exhibit plasmonic resonances in the biological transparency window where high absorption efficiencies can be obtained with small dimensions. Both lithographic and colloidal samples are examined from the perspective of nanoparticle thermal therapy. © 2014 OSA....

  19. Materials synthesis: Two-dimensional gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koratkar, Nikhil A.

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is used as a capping sheet to synthesize 2D gallium nitride by means of migration-enhanced encapsulation growth. This technique may allow the stabilization of 2D materials that are not amenable to synthesis by traditional methods.

  20. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  1. Reticulated porous silicon nitride-based ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzocchi, Mauro; Medri, Valentina; Guicciardi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The interest towards the production of porous silicon nitride originates from the unique combination of light weight, of mechanical and physical properties typical of this class of ceramics that make them attractive for many engineering applications. Although pores are generally believed to deteriorate the mechanical properties of ceramics (the strength of porous ceramics decreases exponentially with an increase of porosity), the recent literature reports that porous silicon nitride can exhib...

  2. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  3. Modelling of the layer evolution during nitriding processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, U.; Oseguera, J.; Schabes, P. [CEM, Atizapan (Mexico)

    1995-12-31

    The evolution of concomitant layers of nitrides is presented. The layer formation is experimentally achieved through two processes: Nitriding with a weakly ionized plasma and nitrogen post-discharge nitriding. The nitriding processes were performed on samples of pure iron and carbon steel. Nitriding temperatures were close but different from the eutectoid transformation point temperature. The experimental layer growth pattern is compared with a model of mass transfer, in which interface mass balance is considered. In the model the authors have considered the formation of one and two compact nitride layers. For short time of treatment, it is shown that a parabolic profile does not satisfactorily describe the layer growth.

  4. Electrochemical Solution Growth of Magnetic Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monson, Todd C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pearce, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic nitrides, if manufactured in bulk form, would provide designers of transformers and inductors with a new class of better performing and affordable soft magnetic materials. According to experimental results from thin films and/or theoretical calculations, magnetic nitrides would have magnetic moments well in excess of current state of the art soft magnets. Furthermore, magnetic nitrides would have higher resistivities than current transformer core materials and therefore not require the use of laminates of inactive material to limit eddy current losses. However, almost all of the magnetic nitrides have been elusive except in difficult to reproduce thin films or as inclusions in another material. Now, through its ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen, the electrochemical solution growth (ESG) technique can bring highly sought after (and previously inaccessible) new magnetic nitrides into existence in bulk form. This method utilizes a molten salt as a solvent to solubilize metal cations and nitrogen ions produced electrochemically and form nitrogen compounds. Unlike other growth methods, the scalable ESG process can sustain high growth rates (~mm/hr) even under reasonable operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and 500 °C). Ultimately, this translates into a high throughput, low cost, manufacturing process. The ESG process has already been used successfully to grow high quality GaN. Below, the experimental results of an exploratory express LDRD project to access the viability of the ESG technique to grow magnetic nitrides will be presented.

  5. Multi-objective optimization of steel nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cavaliere

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Steel nitriding is a thermo-chemical process largely employed in the machine components production to solve mainly wear and fatigue damage in materials. The process is strongly influenced by many different variables such as steel composition, nitrogen potential (range 0.8–35, temperature (range 350–1200 °C, time (range 2–180 hours. In the present study, the influence of such parameters affecting the nitriding layers' thickness, hardness, composition and residual stress was evaluated. The aim was to streamline the process by numerical–experimental analysis allowing to define the optimal conditions for the success of the process. The optimization software that was used is modeFRONTIER (Esteco, through which was defined a set of input parameters (steel composition, nitrogen potential, nitriding time, etc. evaluated on the basis of an optimization algorithm carefully chosen for the multi-objective analysis. The mechanical and microstructural results belonging to the nitriding process, performed with different processing conditions for various steels, are presented. The data were employed to obtain the analytical equations describing nitriding behavior as a function of nitriding parameters and steel composition. The obtained model was validated through control designs and optimized by taking into account physical and processing conditions.

  6. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  7. Junctions between a boron nitride nanotube and a boron nitride sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Cox, Barry J; Hill, James M

    2008-02-20

    For future nanoelectromechanical signalling devices, it is vital to understand how to connect various nanostructures. Since boron nitride nanostructures are believed to be good electronic materials, in this paper we elucidate the classification of defect geometries for combining boron nitride structures. Specifically, we determine possible joining structures between a boron nitride nanotube and a flat sheet of hexagonal boron nitride. Firstly, we determine the appropriate defect configurations on which the tube can be connected, given that the energetically favourable rings for boron nitride structures are rings with an even number of sides. A new formula E = 6+2J relating the number of edges E and the number of joining positions J is established for each defect, and the number of possible distinct defects is related to the so-called necklace and bracelet problems of combinatorial theory. Two least squares approaches, which involve variation in bond length and variation in bond angle, are employed to determine the perpendicular connection of both zigzag and armchair boron nitride nanotubes with a boron nitride sheet. Here, three boron nitride tubes, which are (3, 3), (6, 0) and (9, 0) tubes, are joined with the sheet, and Euler's theorem is used to verify geometrically that the connected structures are sound, and their relationship with the bonded potential energy function approach is discussed. For zigzag tubes (n,0), it is proved that such connections investigated here are possible only for n divisible by 3.

  8. Structural analysis of nitride layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma surface nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Kezhao, E-mail: liukz@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Bin Ren [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Xiao Hong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Long Zhong [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Hong Zhanglian, E-mail: hong_zhanglian@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yang Hui [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wu Sheng [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nitride layer was formed on uranium by glow plasma surface nitriding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four zones were observed in the nitride layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The chemical states of uranium, nitrogen, and oxygen were identified by AES. - Abstract: The nitride layer was formed on uranium metal by a glow plasma surface nitriding method. The structure and composition of the layer were investigated by X-ray diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. The nitride layer mainly consisted of {alpha}-phase U{sub 2}N{sub 3} nanocrystals with an average grain size about 10-20 nm. Four zones were identified in the layer, which were the oxide surface zone, the nitride mainstay zone, the oxide-existence interface zone, and the nitrogen-diffusion matrix zone. The gradual decrease of binding energies of uranium revealed the transition from oxide to nitride to metal states with the layer depth, while the chemical states of nitrogen and oxygen showed small variation.

  9. Identification of nitriding mechanisms in high purity reaction bonded silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The rapid, low-temperature nitriding results from surface effects on the Si particles beginning with loss of chemisorbed H and sequential formation of thin amorphous Si nitride layers. Rapid complete conversion to Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] during the fast reaction can be inhibited when either too few or too many nuclei form on Si particels. Optimally, [approximately] 10 Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] nuclei form per Si particles under rapid, complete nitridation conditions. Nitridation during the slow reaction period appears to progress by both continued reaction of nonpreferred Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] growth interfaces and direct nitridation of the remaining Si/vapor interfaces.

  10. Identification of nitriding mechanisms in high purity reaction bonded silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The rapid, low-temperature nitriding results from surface effects on the Si particles beginning with loss of chemisorbed H and sequential formation of thin amorphous Si nitride layers. Rapid complete conversion to Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} during the fast reaction can be inhibited when either too few or too many nuclei form on Si particels. Optimally, {approximately} 10 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nuclei form per Si particles under rapid, complete nitridation conditions. Nitridation during the slow reaction period appears to progress by both continued reaction of nonpreferred Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} growth interfaces and direct nitridation of the remaining Si/vapor interfaces.

  11. Marine corrosion protective coatings of hexagonal boron nitride thin films on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Esam; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Taha-Tijerina, Jose Jaime; Vinod, Soumya; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-05-22

    Recently, two-dimensional, layered materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have been identified as interesting materials for a range of applications. Here, we demonstrate the corrosion prevention applications of h-BN in marine coatings. The performance of h-BN/polymer hybrid coatings, applied on stainless steel, were evaluated using electrochemical techniques in simulated seawater media [marine media]. h-BN/polymer coating shows an efficient corrosion protection with a low corrosion current density of 5.14 × 10(-8) A/cm(2) and corrosion rate of 1.19 × 10(-3) mm/year and it is attributed to the hydrofobic, inert and dielectric nature of boron nitride. The results indicated that the stainless steel with coatings exhibited improved corrosion resistance. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic analysis were used to propose a mechanism for the increased corrosion resistance of h-BN coatings.

  12. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average...

  13. Method of manufacture of atomically thin boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-08-06

    The present invention provides a method of fabricating at least one single layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) suspending at least one multilayer boron nitride across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure. The present invention also provides a method of fabricating single layer hexagonal boron nitride. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) providing multilayer boron nitride suspended across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure.

  14. Diffusion kinetics of nitrogen in tantalum during plasma-nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德元; 林勤; 曾卫军; 李放; 许兰萍; 付青峰

    2001-01-01

    The activation energies of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions were calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The activation energy calculated is 148.873±0.390  kJ/mol. The depth increasing of nitriding layer with time follows square root relation. The nitriding process of tantalum is controlled by diffusion of nitrogen atoms in tantalum solid solution.

  15. Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

  16. [The effect of plasma nitriding on tungsten burs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciu, D; Russo, S; Grasso, C

    1989-01-01

    The authors have experimented the nitriding's effects on some cilindrical burs carbide utilized in dentistry after disamination on the applications methodics on plasma nitriding in neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery and in odontotherapy. This reacherys point out that nitriding plasma a durings increase and cutis greater capacity establish.

  17. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  18. Nitridation of chromium powder in ammonia atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Qiang Zhen; Rong Li

    2015-01-01

    CrN powder was synthesized by nitriding Cr metal in ammonia gas flow, and its chemical reaction mechanism and nitridation process were studied. Through thermodynamic calculations, the Cr−N−O predominance diagrams were constructed for different tempera-tures. Chromium nitride formed at 700−1200°C under relatively higher nitrogen and lower oxygen partial pressures. Phases in the products were then investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the Cr2N content varied with reaction temperature and holding time. The results indicate that the Cr metal powder nitridation process can be explained by a diffusion model. Further, Cr2N formed as an intermediate product because of an incomplete reaction, which was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). After nitriding at 1000°C for 20 h, CrN powder with an average grain size of 63 nm was obtained, and the obtained sample was analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  19. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thelma MANNING; Henry GRAU; Paul MATTER; Michael BEACHY; Christopher HOLT; Samuel SOPOK; Richard FIELD; Kenneth KLINGAMAN; Michael FAIR; John BOLOGNINI; Robin CROWNOVER; Carlton P. ADAM; Viral PANCHAL; Eugene ROZUMOV

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  20. Single gallium nitride nanowire lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Justin C; Choi, Heon-Jin; Knutsen, Kelly P; Schaller, Richard D; Yang, Peidong; Saykally, Richard J

    2002-10-01

    There is much current interest in the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires, because the cylindrical geometry and strong two-dimensional confinement of electrons, holes and photons make them particularly attractive as potential building blocks for nanoscale electronics and optoelectronic devices, including lasersand nonlinear optical frequency converters. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor of much practical interest, because it is widely used in electrically pumped ultraviolet-blue light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors. Recent progress in microfabrication techniques has allowed stimulated emission to be observed from a variety of GaN microstructures and films. Here we report the observation of ultraviolet-blue laser action in single monocrystalline GaN nanowires, using both near-field and far-field optical microscopy to characterize the waveguide mode structure and spectral properties of the radiation at room temperature. The optical microscope images reveal radiation patterns that correlate with axial Fabry-Perot modes (Q approximately 10(3)) observed in the laser spectrum, which result from the cylindrical cavity geometry of the monocrystalline nanowires. A redshift that is strongly dependent on pump power (45 meV microJ x cm(-2)) supports the idea that the electron-hole plasma mechanism is primarily responsible for the gain at room temperature. This study is a considerable advance towards the realization of electron-injected, nanowire-based ultraviolet-blue coherent light sources.

  1. Nonlinear conductivity in silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Enis

    2017-08-01

    To better comprehend electrical silicon-package interaction in high voltage applications requires full characterization of the electrical properties of dielectric materials employed in wafer and package level design. Not only the packaging but wafer level dielectrics, i.e. passivation layers, would experience high electric fields generated by the voltage applied pads. In addition the interface between the passivation layer and a mold compound might develop space charge because of the mismatch in electrical properties of the materials. In this contribution electrical properties of a thin silicon nitride (Si3N4) dielectric is reported as a function of temperature and electric field. The measured values later analyzed using different temperature dependent exponential expressions and found that the Mott variable range hopping conduction model was successful to express the data. A full temperature/electric field dependency of conductivity is generated. It was found that the conduction in Si3N4 could be expressed like a field ionization or Fowler-Nordheim mechanism.

  2. Formation and control of stoichiometric hafnium nitride thin films by direct sputtering of hafnium nitride target

    CERN Document Server

    Gotoh, Y; Ishikawa, J; Liao, M Y

    2003-01-01

    Hafnium nitride thin films were prepared by radio-frequency sputter deposition with a hafnium nitride target. Deposition was performed with various rf powers, argon pressures, and substrate temperatures, in order to investigate the influences of these parameters on the film properties, particularly the nitrogen composition. It was found that stoichiometric hafnium nitride films were formed at an argon gas pressure of less than 2 Pa, irrespective of the other deposition parameters within the range investigated. Maintaining the nitrogen composition almost stoichiometric, orientation, stress, and electrical resistivity of the films could be controlled with deposition parameters. (author)

  3. Fracture resistance of surface-nitrided zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feder, A.; Casellas, D.; Llanes, L.; Anglada, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Material Science and Metallurgy

    2002-07-01

    Heat treatments have been conducted at 1650 C for 2 hours in Y-TZP stabilised with 2.5% molar of yttria in two different environments: in air and in nitrogen gas with the specimens embedded in a zirconium nitride powder bed. Relevant microstructural changes were induced by these heat treatments. It is highlighted the formation of a nitrided surface layer of about 400 {mu}m in thickness. Such layer has clear microstructural differences with respect to the bulk, and is formed by different sublayers with cubic and tetragonal phases with distinct degrees of transformability, as revealed by XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The fracture toughness and the hardness of the nitrided surface layer are higher than for the original Y-TZP. (orig.)

  4. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon – hydrogen - nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 µm) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90 -95 % nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form.

  5. Precipitate-Accommodated Plasma Nitriding for Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patama Visittipitukul; Tatsuhiko Aizawa; Hideyuki Kuwahara

    2004-01-01

    Reliable surface treatment has been explored to improve the strength and wear resistance of aluminum alloy parts in automotives. Long duration time as well as long pre-sputtering time are required for plasma nitriding of aluminum or its alloys only with the thickness of a few micrometers. New plasma inner nitriding is proposed to realize the fast-rate nitriding of aluminum alloys. Al-6Cu alloy is employed as a targeting material in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of this plasma nitriding. Mechanism of fast-rate nitriding process is discussed with consideration of the role of Al2Cu precipitates.

  6. Low pressure growth of cubic boron nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming thin films of cubic boron nitride on substrates at low pressures and temperatures. A substrate is first coated with polycrystalline diamond to provide a uniform surface upon which cubic boron nitride can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The cubic boron nitride film is useful as a substitute for diamond coatings for a variety of applications in which diamond is not suitable. any tetragonal or hexagonal boron nitride. The cubic boron nitride produced in accordance with the preceding example is particularly well-suited for use as a coating for ultra hard tool bits and abrasives, especially those intended to use in cutting or otherwise fabricating iron.

  7. Microbial adherence to a nonprecious alloy after plasma nitriding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonugelen, Mehmet; Destan, Uhmut Iyiyapici; Lambrecht, Fatma Yurt; Oztürk, Berran; Karadeniz, Süleyman

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the microbial adherence to the surfaces of a nonprecious metal alloy after plasma nitriding. The plasma-nitriding process was performed to the surfaces of metals prepared from a nickel-chromium alloy. The microorganisms were labeled with technetium-99m. After the labeling procedure, 60 metal disks were treated with a microorganism for each use. The results revealed that the amount of adherence of all microorganisms on surfaces was changed by plasma-nitriding process; adherence decreased substantially (P plasma nitriding time were not significant (P> .05) With the plasma-nitriding process, the surface properties of nonprecious metal alloys can be changed, leading to decreased microbial adherence.

  8. Local heating with titanium nitride nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible.......We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible....

  9. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  10. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  11. Boron nitride nanotubes for spintronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Kamal B; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-09-22

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  12. Ultrahard nanotwinned cubic boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongjun; Xu, Bo; Yu, Dongli; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Jiang, Yingbing; Hu, Wentao; Tang, Chengchun; Gao, Yufei; Luo, Kun; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wang, Li-Min; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan

    2013-01-17

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) is a well known superhard material that has a wide range of industrial applications. Nanostructuring of cBN is an effective way to improve its hardness by virtue of the Hall-Petch effect--the tendency for hardness to increase with decreasing grain size. Polycrystalline cBN materials are often synthesized by using the martensitic transformation of a graphite-like BN precursor, in which high pressures and temperatures lead to puckering of the BN layers. Such approaches have led to synthetic polycrystalline cBN having grain sizes as small as ∼14 nm (refs 1, 2, 4, 5). Here we report the formation of cBN with a nanostructure dominated by fine twin domains of average thickness ∼3.8 nm. This nanotwinned cBN was synthesized from specially prepared BN precursor nanoparticles possessing onion-like nested structures with intrinsically puckered BN layers and numerous stacking faults. The resulting nanotwinned cBN bulk samples are optically transparent with a striking combination of physical properties: an extremely high Vickers hardness (exceeding 100 GPa, the optimal hardness of synthetic diamond), a high oxidization temperature (∼1,294 °C) and a large fracture toughness (>12 MPa m(1/2), well beyond the toughness of commercial cemented tungsten carbide, ∼10 MPa m(1/2)). We show that hardening of cBN is continuous with decreasing twin thickness down to the smallest sizes investigated, contrasting with the expected reverse Hall-Petch effect below a critical grain size or the twin thickness of ∼10-15 nm found in metals and alloys.

  13. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-03-07

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.

  14. Silicon-nitride photonic circuits interfaced with monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Guohua [Applied Physics Program, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Stanev, Teodor K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Czaplewski, David A.; Jung, Il Woong [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Stern, Nathaniel P., E-mail: n-stern@northwestern.edu [Applied Physics Program, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-08-31

    We report on the integration of monolayer molybdenum disulphide with silicon nitride microresonators assembled by visco-elastic layer transfer techniques. Evanescent coupling from the resonator mode to the monolayer is confirmed through measurements of cavity transmission. The absorption of the monolayer semiconductor flakes in this geometry is determined to be 850 dB/cm, which is larger than that of graphene and black phosphorus with the same thickness. This technique can be applied to diverse monolayer semiconductors for assembling hybrid optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors and modulators operating over a wide spectral range.

  15. Performance Analysis of Boron Nitride Embedded Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon MOSFET with Stone Wales Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Chanana, Anuja; Sengupta, Amretashis; Mahapatra, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    We study the performance of a hybrid Graphene-Boron Nitride {GNR-BN} armchair nanoribbon {a-GNR-BN} MOSFET at its ballistic transport limit. We consider three geometric configurations 3p, 3p+1 and 3p+2 of a-GNR-BN with BN atoms embedded on both sides {2, 4 and 6 BN on each side} on the GNR. The material properties like band gap, effective mass and density of states of these H-passivated structures have been evaluated using the Density Functional Theory {DFT}. Using these material parameters, ...

  16. Ab Initio Investigations of Thermoelectric Effects in Graphene – Boron Nitride Nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visan Camelia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectric effects of graphene – hexagonal boron nitride (hBN nanoribbons have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT calculations. Pristine zig-zag nanoribbons are not suited to achieve high thermopower as the transmission function is flat around the chemical potential. By introducing hBN inclusions, the nanoribbon systems exhibit enhanced thermopower, due to the asymmetries introduced in the spin dependent transmission functions. Finite temperature differences between the two contacts are considered. The possibility of a good integration of hBN into graphene, makes the hybrid systems suitable for thermoelectric applications, which may be subject to further optimizations.

  17. Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts Based on Coupled Iron Nitride Nanoparticles with Nitrogen-Doped Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jung Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at developing a highly active and stable non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR, a novel FexNy/NC nanocomposite—that is composed of highly dispersed iron nitride nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon (NC—was prepared by pyrolyzing carbon black with an iron-containing precursor in an NH3 atmosphere. The influence of the various synthetic parameters such as the Fe precursor, Fe content, pyrolysis temperature and pyrolysis time on ORR performance of the prepared iron nitride nanoparticles was investigated. The formed phases were determined by experimental and simulated X-ray diffraction (XRD of numerous iron nitride species. We found that Fe3N phase creates superactive non-metallic catalytic sites for ORR that are more active than those of the constituents. The optimized Fe3N/NC nanocomposite exhibited excellent ORR activity and a direct four-electron pathway in alkaline solution. Furthermore, the hybrid material showed outstanding catalytic durability in alkaline electrolyte, even after 4,000 potential cycles.

  18. Evolution of magnetism by rolling up hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets tailored with superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Da Young; Choi, Kyoung Hwan; Park, Jeong Eon; Suh, Dong Hack

    2017-02-01

    Controlling tunable properties by rolling up two dimensional nanomaterials is an exciting avenue for tailoring the electronic and magnetic properties of materials at the nanoscale. We demonstrate the tailoring of a magnetic nanocomposite through hybridization with magnetic nanomaterials using hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) templates as an effective way to evolve magnetism for the first time. Boron nitride nanosheets exhibited their typical diamagnetism, but rolled-up boron nitride sheets (called nanoscrolls) clearly have para-magnetism in the case of magnetic susceptibility. Additionally, the Fe3O4 NP sample shows a maximum ZFC curve at about 103 K, which indicates well dispersed superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The ZFC curve for the h-BN-Fe3O4 NP scrolls exhibited an apparent rounded maximum blocking temperature at 192 K compared to the Fe3O4 NPs, leading to a dramatic increase in TB. These magnetic nanoscroll derivatives are remarkable materials and should be suitable for high-performance composites and nano-, medical- and electromechanical-devices.

  19. Hybrid Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Page, P R

    2003-01-01

    We review the status of hybrid baryons. The only known way to study hybrids rigorously is via excited adiabatic potentials. Hybrids can be modelled by both the bag and flux-tube models. The low-lying hybrid baryon is N 1/2^+ with a mass of 1.5-1.8 GeV. Hybrid baryons can be produced in the glue-rich processes of diffractive gamma N and pi N production, Psi decays and p pbar annihilation.

  20. Defects in III-nitride microdisk cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, C. X.; Puchtler, T. J.; Zhu, T.; Griffiths, J. T.; Oliver, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    Nitride microcavities offer an exceptional platform for the investigation of light–matter interactions as well as the development of devices such as high efficiency light emitting diodes (LEDs) and low-threshold nanolasers. Microdisk geometries in particular are attractive for low-threshold lasing applications due to their ability to support high finesse whispering gallery modes (WGMs) and small modal volumes. In this article we review the effect of defects on the properties of nitride microdisk cavities fabricated using photoelectrochemical etching of an InGaN sacrificial superlattice (SSL). Threading dislocations originating from either the original GaN pseudosubstrate are shown to hinder the undercutting of microdisk cavities during the photoelectric chemical etching process resulting in whiskers of unetched material on the underside of microdisks. The unetched whiskers provide a pathway for light to escape, reducing microdisk Q-factor if located in the region occupied by the WGMs. Additionally, dislocations can affect the spectral stability of quantum dot emitters, thus hindering their effective integration in microdisk cavities. Though dislocations are clearly undesirable, the limiting factor on nitride microdisk Q-factor is expected to be internal absorption, indicating that the further optimisation of nitride microdisk cavities must incorporate both the elimination of dislocations and careful tailoring of the active region emission wavelength and background doping levels.

  1. Dynamic Characterization of Silicon Nitride Cantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babaei Gavan, K.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments on dynamical characterization of silicon nitride cantilevers. These devices play an important role in micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). They consist of a mechanical part, a sensor or actuator, and an electronic part for readout and

  2. Local residual stress measurements on nitride layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansilla, C.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, local stresses in different nitrided maraging steel samples of high practical interest for industrial applications were studied through the so-called micro-slit milling method using a focused ion beam. The nitrogen concentration profiles were acquired by glow discharge optical emission

  3. Nitridation of silicon by nitrogen neutral beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Yasuhiro, E-mail: yasuhirohara2002@yahoo.co.jp [Organization for Research and Development of Innovative Science and Technology, Kansai University, Yamate-cho 3-3-35, Suita 564-8680, Osaka (Japan); Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shoso [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai University, Yamate-cho 3-3-35, Suita 564-8680, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nitrided silicon was formed by nitrogen neutral beam at room temperature. • Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer was formed at the acceleration voltage more than 20 V. • Formed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer show the effective as the passivation film in the wet etching process. - Abstract: Silicon nitridation was investigated at room temperature using a nitrogen neutral beam (NB) extracted at acceleration voltages of less than 100 V. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the formation of a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer on a Si (1 0 0) substrate when the acceleration voltage was higher than 20 V. The XPS depth profile indicated that nitrogen diffused to a depth of 36 nm for acceleration voltages of 60 V and higher. The thickness of the silicon nitrided layer increased with the acceleration voltages from 20 V to 60 V. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer thickness of 3.1 nm was obtained at an acceleration voltage of 100 V. Moreover, it was proved that the nitrided silicon layer formed by the nitrogen NB at room temperature was effective as the passivation film in the wet etching process.

  4. Alkaline fuel cell with nitride membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shen-Huei; Pilaski, Moritz; Wartmann, Jens; Letzkus, Florian; Funke, Benedikt; Dura, Georg; Heinzel, Angelika

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work is to fabricate patterned nitride membranes with Si-MEMS-technology as a platform to build up new membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEA) for alkaline fuel cell applications. Two 6-inch wafer processes based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were developed for the fabrication of separated nitride membranes with a nitride thickness up to 1 μm. The mechanical stability of the perforated nitride membrane has been adjusted in both processes either by embedding of subsequent ion implantation step or by optimizing the deposition process parameters. A nearly 100% yield of separated membranes of each deposition process was achieved with layer thickness from 150 nm to 1 μm and micro-channel pattern width of 1μm at a pitch of 3 μm. The process for membrane coating with electrolyte materials could be verified to build up MEA. Uniform membrane coating with channel filling was achieved after the optimization of speed controlled dip-coating method and the selection of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as electrolyte solvent. Finally, silver as conductive material was defined for printing a conductive layer onto the MEA by Ink-Technology. With the established IR-thermography setup, characterizations of MEAs in terms of catalytic conversion were performed successfully. The results of this work show promise for build up a platform on wafer-level for high throughput experiments.

  5. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage.

  6. Dynamic Characterization of Silicon Nitride Cantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babaei Gavan, K.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments on dynamical characterization of silicon nitride cantilevers. These devices play an important role in micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). They consist of a mechanical part, a sensor or actuator, and an electronic part for readout and

  7. Powdered Hexagonal Boron Nitride Reducing Nanoscale Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhartishvili, L.; Matcharashvili, T.; Esiava, R.; Tsagareishvili, O.; Gabunia, D.; Margiev, B.; Gachechiladze, A.

    2013-05-01

    A morphology model is suggested for nano-powdered hexagonal boron nitride that can serve as an effective solid additive to liquid lubricants. It allows to estimate the specific surface, that is a hard-to-measure parameter, based on average size of powder particles. The model can be used also to control nanoscale wear processes.

  8. III-nitrides, 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, and their heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Pawan

    2017-04-01

    Group III-nitride materials have attracted great attention for applications in high efficiency electronic and optoelectronics devices such as high electron mobility transistors, light emitting diodes, and laser diodes. On the other hand, group VI transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) in the form of MX2 has recently emerged as a novel atomic layered material system with excellent thermoelectric, electronic and optoelectronic properties. Also, the recent investigations reveal that the dissimilar heterojunctions formed by TMDs and III-nitrides provide the route for novel devices in the area of optoelectronic, electronics, and water splitting applications. In addition, integration of III-nitrides and TMDs will enable high density integrated optoelectronic circuits and the development of hybrid integration technologies. In this work, we have demonstrated kinetically controlled growth processes in plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) for the III-nitrides and their engineered heterostructures. Techniques such as Ga irradiation and nitrogen plasma exposure has been utilized to implement bulk GaN, InGaN and their heterostructures in PAMBE. For the growth of III-nitride based heterostructures, the in-situ surface stoichiometry monitoring (i-SSM) technique was developed and used for implementing stepped and compositionally graded InGaN-based multiple quantum wells (MQWs). Their optical and microstrain analysis in conjunction with theoretical studies confirmed improvement in the radiative recombination rate of the graded-MQWs as compared to that of stepped-MQWs, owing to the reduced strain in graded-MQWs. Our achievement also includes the realization of the p-type MoS2 by engineering pristine MoS2 layers in PAMBE. Mainly, Ga and nitrogen plasma irradiation on the pristine MoS2 in PAMBE has resulted in the realization of the p-type MoS2. Also, GaN epitaxial thin layers were deposited on MoS2/c-sapphire, WSe2/c-sapphire substrates by PAMBE to study the band

  9. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  10. Nitriding behavior of Ni and Ni-based binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonovic, Matej

    2015-01-15

    Gaseous nitriding is a prominent thermochemical surface treatment process which can improve various properties of metallic materials such as mechanical, tribological and/or corrosion properties. This process is predominantly performed by applying NH{sub 3}+H{sub 2} containing gas atmospheres serving as the nitrogen donating medium at temperatures between 673 K and 873 K (400 C and 600 C). NH{sub 3} decomposes at the surface of the metallic specimen and nitrogen diffuses into the surface adjacent region of the specimen whereas hydrogen remains in the gas atmosphere. One of the most important parameters characterizing a gaseous nitriding process is the so-called nitriding potential (r{sub N}) which determines the chemical potential of nitrogen provided by the gas phase. The nitriding potential is defined as r{sub N} = p{sub NH{sub 3}}/p{sub H{sub 2}{sup 3/2}} where p{sub NH{sub 3}} and p{sub H{sub 2}} are the partial pressures of the NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} in the nitriding atmosphere. In contrast with nitriding of α-Fe where the nitriding potential is usually in the range between 0.01 and 1 atm{sup -1/2}, nitriding of Ni and Ni-based alloys requires employing nitriding potentials higher than 100 atm{sup -1/2} and even up to ∞ (nitriding in pure NH{sub 3} atmosphere). This behavior is compatible with decreased thermodynamic stability of the 3d-metal nitrides with increasing atomic number. Depending on the nitriding conditions (temperature, nitriding potential and treatment time), different phases are formed at the surface of the Ni-based alloys. By applying very high nitriding potential, formation of hexagonal Ni{sub 3}N at the surface of the specimen (known as external nitriding) leads to the development of a compound layer, which may improve tribological properties. Underneath the Ni{sub 3}N compound layer, two possibilities exist: (i) alloying element precipitation within the nitrided zone (known as internal nitriding) and/or (ii) development of metastable and

  11. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  12. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  13. Design and Testing of Kinetic Inductance Detectors Made of Titanium Nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Diener, P; Yates, S J C; Lankwarden, Y J Y; Baselmans, J J A

    2013-01-01

    To use highly resistive material for Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID), new designs have to be done, in part due to the impedance match needed between the KID chip and the whole 50 ohms readout circuit. Chips from two new hybrid designs, with an aluminum throughline coupled to titanium nitride microresonators, have been measured and compared to a TiN only chip. In the hybrid chips, parasitic temperature dependent box resonances are absent. The dark KID properties have been measured in a large set of resonators. A surprisingly long lifetime, up to 5.6 ms is observed in a few KIDs. For the other more reproducible devices, the mean electrical Noise Equivalent Power is 5.4 10-19 W.Hz1/2.

  14. Examination of Plasma Nitriding Microstructure with Addition of Rare Earths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张津

    2004-01-01

    Medium-carbon alloy steel was plasma nitrided with rare earths La,Ce and Nd into the nitriding chamber respectively.The nitriding layer microstructures with and without rare earths were compared using optical microscope,normal SEM and high resolution SEM,as well as TEM.It was found that the extent of the influence on plasma nitriding varies with different contents of rare earth.The effect of plasma nitriding is benefit from adding of Ce or Nd.The formation of hard and brittle phase Fe2-3N can be prevented and the butterfly-like structure can be improved by adding Ce or Nd.However,pure La may prevent the diffusion of nitrogen and the formation of iron nitride,and reduce the depth of diffusion layer.

  15. Liquid flow cells having graphene on nitride for microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adiga, Vivekananda P.; Dunn, Gabriel; Zettl, Alexander K.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to liquid flow cells for microscopy. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate having a first and a second oxide layer disposed on surfaces of the substrate. A first and a second nitride layer are disposed on the first and second oxide layers, respectively. A cavity is defined in the first oxide layer, the first nitride layer, and the substrate, with the cavity including a third nitride layer disposed on walls of the substrate and the second oxide layer that define the cavity. A channel is defined in the second oxide layer. An inlet port and an outlet port are defined in the second nitride layer and in fluid communication with the channel. A plurality of viewports is defined in the second nitride layer. A first graphene sheet is disposed on the second nitride layer covering the plurality of viewports.

  16. The Study of Plasma Nitriding of AISI304 Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; JI Shi-jun; GAO Yu-zhou; SUN Jun-cai

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results on the plasma nitriding of AISI 304 stainless steel at different temperatures in NH 3 gas. The working pressure was 100~200 Pa and the discharge voltage was 700~800V. The phase of nitrided layer formed on the surface was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The hardness of the samples was measured by using a Vickers microhardness tester with the load of 50g. After nitriding at about 400 ℃ for two hours a nitrided layer consisting of single γN phase with thickness of 5μm was obtained. Microhardness measurements showed significant increase in the hardness from 240 HV (for untreated samples) up to 950 HV (for nitrided samples at temperature of 420℃). The phase composition, the thickness, the microstructure and the surface topography of the nitrided layer as well as its properties depend essentially on the process parameters.

  17. Wide-bandgap III-Nitride based Second Harmonic Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    Jun-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Wide-bandgap III - Nitride based Second Harmonic Generation The views...Report: Wide-bandgap III - Nitride based Second Harmonic Generation Report Title It was demonstrated that GaN, AlGaN and AlN lateral polar structures can...research have been socialized to the III - Nitride Optoelectronics Center of Excellence (ARL SEDD) and to the 2013 ARO Staff Research Symposium and at

  18. Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot-Pressed Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot-Pressed Aluminum Nitride by Guangli Hu, C. Q. Chen, K. T. Ramesh, and J. W. McCauley ARL-RP-0487...Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-RP-0487 June 2014 Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot-Pressed Aluminum Nitride...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2010–January 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot-Pressed Aluminum Nitride 5a

  19. DFT Perspective on the Thermochemistry of Carbon Nitride Synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Melissen, Sigismund T. A. G.

    2016-10-11

    Graphitic (g)-CxNyHz has become a popular family of photoharvesters in photocatalytic water splitting cells, as well as other applications in chemistry. In this Article, different g-CxNyHz structures were studied thermochemically using DFT. Following a benchmark study with different families of functionals, the B3LYP functional was shown to accurately capture the thermochemistry of carbon nitride synthesis. A triple-ζ polarized basis set, in combination with Civalleri’s modification to Grimme’s D2 formalism (with s6 = 0.5) for dispersion interactions, yielded accurate geometries. Grimme’s D3 formalism with Becke–Johnson damping was used to refine the energetic description of dispersion interactions. The stepwise cycloaddition of cyanamide to form melamine was shown to be exergonic, whereas the stepwise deamination of melamine to form g-C3N4 was shown to be endergonic. Of those structures respecting the [C6N9H3]n chemical formula, the structure commonly known as “melon” was found to be most stable, whereas the sp3-hybridized [C6N9H3]n elucidated by Horvath-Bordon et al. was found to be the least stable. Fully polymerized triazine-based g-C3N4 appeared slightly more stable than heptazine-based g-C3N4.

  20. Thermal transport across graphene and single layer hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingchao, E-mail: zhang@unl.edu, E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn [Holland Computing Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Hong, Yang [Department of Chemistry, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Yue, Yanan, E-mail: zhang@unl.edu, E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China)

    2015-04-07

    As the dimensions of nanocircuits and nanoelectronics shrink, thermal energies are being generated in more confined spaces, making it extremely important and urgent to explore for efficient heat dissipation pathways. In this work, the phonon energy transport across graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) interface is studied using classic molecular dynamics simulations. Effects of temperature, interatomic bond strength, heat flux direction, and functionalization on interfacial thermal transport are investigated. It is found out that by hydrogenating graphene in the hybrid structure, the interfacial thermal resistance (R) between graphene and h-BN can be reduced by 76.3%, indicating an effective approach to manipulate the interfacial thermal transport. Improved in-plane/out-of-plane phonon couplings and broadened phonon channels are observed in the hydrogenated graphene system by analyzing its phonon power spectra. The reported R results monotonically decrease with temperature and interatomic bond strengths. No thermal rectification phenomenon is observed in this interfacial thermal transport. Results reported in this work give the fundamental knowledge on graphene and h-BN thermal transport and provide rational guidelines for next generation thermal interface material designs.

  1. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  2. Magnetism induced by electrochemical nitriding on an austenitic stainless steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watanabe, Takashi; Sagara, Akio; Hishinuma, Yoshimitsu; Takayama, Sadatsugu; Tanaka, Teruya; Sano, Saburo

    2015-01-01

    .... The Nitrogen diffusion layers were predominately formed at nitrogen concentration of 23 at%. The nitriding process drastically also changed its magnetic property from non-magnetic to ferromagnetic...

  3. Synthesis of Uranium nitride powders using metal uranium powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Joo; Oh, Jang Soo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Uranium nitride (UN) is a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because of their high fuel density, high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, and considerable breeding capability in LWRs. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. The carbothermic reduction has an advantage in the production of fine powders. However it has many drawbacks such as an inevitable engagement of impurities, process burden, and difficulties in reusing of expensive N{sup 15} gas. Manufacturing concerns issued in the carbothermic reduction process can be solved by changing the starting materials from oxide powder to metals. However, in nitriding process of metal, it is difficult to obtain fine nitride powders because metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from uranium metal powders. We fabricated uranium metal spherical powder and flake using a centrifugal atomization method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating those metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. We investigated the phase and morphology evolutions of powders during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also a part of the present work.

  4. EXAFS investigation of low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2008-01-01

    Low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 flakes were investigated with EXAFS and X-ray diffraction analysis. The stainless steel flakes were transformed into a mixture of nitrogen expanded austenite and nitride phases. Two treatments were carried out yielding different overall nitrogen...... contents: (1) nitriding in pure NH3 and (2)nitriding in pure NH3 followed by reduction in H2. The majority of the Cr atoms in the stainless steel after treatment 1 and 2 was associated with a nitrogen–chromium bond distance comparable to that of the chemical compound CrN. The possibility of the occurrence...

  5. Comparative infrared study of silicon and germanium nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraton, M. I.; Marchand, R.; Quintard, P.

    1986-03-01

    Silicon and germanium nitride (Si 3N 4 and Ge 3N 4) are isomorphic compounds. They have been studied in the β-phase which crystallises in the hexagonal system. The space group is P6 3/m (C 6h2). The IR transmission spectra of these two nitrides are very similar but the absorption frequencies of germanium nitride are shifted to the lower values in comparison with silicon nitride. We noted that the atomic mass effect is the only cause of this shift for the streching modes but not for the bending modes.

  6. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1997-01-01

    As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... of pure Fe-N phases has not been fully achieved. It is shown that taking into account the ordering of nitrogen in the epsilon and gamma' iron nitride phases leads to an improved understanding of the Fe-N phase diagram. Although consideration of thermodynamics indicates the state the system strives for...... of the International Federation for Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering held in Brighton, UK on 1-5 September 1996. (C) 1997 The Institute of Materials....

  7. Aluminum Reduction and Nitridation of Bauxite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhikuan; ZHANG Dianwei; XU Enxia; HOU Xinmei; DONG Yanling

    2007-01-01

    The application of bauxite with low Al2O3 content has been studied in this paper and β-SiAlON has been obtained from two kinds of bauxites (Al203 content 68.08 mass% and 46.30 mass% respectively) by aluminum reduction and nitridation method.The sequence of reactions has been studied using thermal analysis (TG-DTA),X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDS.Compared with carbon thermal reduction and nitridation of aluminosilicates employed presently,the reaction in the system of bauxite-Al-N2 occurs at lower temperature.β-SiAlON appears as one of the main products from 1573K and exists' stably in the range of the present experimental temperature.The microstructure of β-SiAlON obtained at 1773 K is short column with 5-10μm observed by SEM.

  8. Sheath Characteristic in ECR Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The sheath plasma characteristics changing with the negative bias applied to the substrate during electron cyclotron resonance plasma nitriding are studied. The sheath characteristics obtained by a Langmuir single probe and an ion energy analyzer show that when the negative bias applied to the substrate is increasing, the most probable energy of ions in the sheath and the full width of half maximum of ions energy distribution increase, the thickness of the sheath also increases, whereas the saturation current of ion decreases. It has been found from the optical emission spectrum that there are strong lines of N2 and N2+. Based on our experiment results the mechanism of plasma nitriding is discussed.

  9. Boron nitride encapsulated graphene infrared emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, H. R.; Zossimova, E.; Mahlmeister, N. H.; Lawton, L. M.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Nash, G. R., E-mail: g.r.nash@exeter.ac.uk [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-28

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from devices containing a large area multilayer graphene layer, encapsulated using hexagonal boron nitride, have been investigated. The devices were run continuously in air for over 1000 h, with the emission spectrum covering the absorption bands of many important gases. An approximate solution to the heat equation was used to simulate the measured emission profile across the devices yielding an estimated value of the characteristic length, which defines the exponential rise/fall of the temperature profile across the device, of 40 μm. This is much larger than values obtained in smaller exfoliated graphene devices and reflects the device geometry, and the increase in lateral heat conduction within the devices due to the multilayer graphene and boron nitride layers.

  10. Thermodynamic ground states of platinum metal nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aberg, D; Sadigh, B; Crowhurst, J; Goncharov, A

    2007-10-09

    We have systematically studied the thermodynamic stabilities of various phases of the nitrides of the platinum metal elements using density functional theory. We show that for the nitrides of Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt two new crystal structures, in which the metal ions occupy simple tetragonal lattice sites, have lower formation enthalpies at ambient conditions than any previously proposed structures. The region of stability can extend up to 17 GPa for PtN{sub 2}. Furthermore, we show that according to calculations using the local density approximation, these new compounds are also thermodynamically stable at ambient pressure and thus may be the ground state phases for these materials. We further discuss the fact that the local density and generalized gradient approximations predict different values of the absolute formation enthalpies as well different relative stabilities between simple tetragonal and the pyrite or marcasite structures.

  11. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  12. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  13. New nanoforms of carbon and boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokropivny, V V [Institute for Problems of Materials Science of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (Ukraine); Ivanovskii, A L [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Urals Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)], e-mail: Ivanovskii@ihim.uran.ru

    2008-10-31

    Data on new carbon nanostructures including those based on fullerenes, nanotubes as well monolithic diamond-like nanoparticles, nanofibres, various nanocomposites, etc., published in the last decade are generalised. The experimental and theoretical data on their atomic and electronic structures, the nature of chemical bonds and physicochemical properties are discussed. These data are compared with the results obtained in studies of nanoforms of boron nitride, an isoelectronic analogue of carbon. Potential fields of applications of the new nanostructures are considered.

  14. New nanoforms of carbon and boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokropivny, V. V.; Ivanovskii, A. L.

    2008-10-01

    Data on new carbon nanostructures including those based on fullerenes, nanotubes as well monolithic diamond-like nanoparticles, nanofibres, various nanocomposites, etc., published in the last decade are generalised. The experimental and theoretical data on their atomic and electronic structures, the nature of chemical bonds and physicochemical properties are discussed. These data are compared with the results obtained in studies of nanoforms of boron nitride, an isoelectronic analogue of carbon. Potential fields of applications of the new nanostructures are considered.

  15. Silicon Nitride Balls For Cryogenic Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butner, Myles F.; Ng, Lillian W.

    1990-01-01

    Resistance to wear greater than that of 440C steel. Experiments show lives of ball bearings immersed in liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen increased significantly when 440C steel balls (running on 440C steel races) replaced by balls of silicon nitride. Developed for use at high temperatures, where lubrication poor or nonexistent. Best wear life of any bearing tested to date and ball material spalls without fracturing. Plans for future tests call for use of liquid oxygen as working fluid.

  16. Silicon Nitride Antireflection Coatings for Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.; Wydeven, T.; Donohoe, K.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical-vapor deposition adapted to yield graded index of refraction. Silicon nitride deposited in layers, refractive index of which decreases with distance away from cell/coating interface. Changing index of refraction allows adjustment of spectral transmittance for wavelengths which cell is most effective at converting light to electric current. Average conversion efficiency of solar cells increased from 8.84 percent to 12.63 percent.

  17. Oxygen radical functionalization of boron nitride nanosheets

    OpenAIRE

    MAY, PETER; Coleman, Jonathan; MCGOVERN, IGNATIUS; GOUNKO, IOURI; Satti, Amro

    2012-01-01

    PUBLISHED The covalent chemical functionalization of exfoliated hexagonal boron-nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) is achieved by the solution phase oxygen radical functionalization of boron atoms in the h-BN lattice. This involves a two-step procedure to initially covalently graft alkoxy groups to boron atoms and the subsequent hydrolytic defunctionalisation of the groups to yield hydroxyl-functionalized BNNSs (OH-BNNSs). Characterization of the functionalized-BNNSs using HR-TEM, Raman, UV-Vis, F...

  18. Defects in III-Nitride Microdisk Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, C. X.; Puchtler, T. J.; Zhu, T.; Griffiths, J. T.; R. A. Oliver

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. It is currently under an indefinite embargo pending publication by the Institute of Physics. Nitride microcavities offer an exceptional platform for the investigation of light-matter interactions as well as the development of devices such as high efficiency light emitting diodes (LEDs) and low-threshold nanolasers. Microdisk geometries in particular are attractive for low-threshold lasing applications due to their ability to support high finesse whis...

  19. Formation and Structure of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang ZHANG; Zongquan LI; Jin XU

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes were simply synthesized by heating well-mixed boric acid, urea and iron nitrate powders at 1000℃. A small amount of BN nanowires was also obtained in the resultants. The morphological and structural characters of the BN nanostructures were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Other novel BN nanostructures, such as Y-junction nanotubes and bamboo-like nanotubes, were simultaneously observed. The growth mechanism of the BN nanotubes was discussed briefly.

  20. Hybrid vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, J.G.W. [Electrical Machines (United Kingdom)

    1997-07-01

    The reasons for adopting hybrid vehicles result mainly from the lack of adequate range from electric vehicles at an acceptable cost. Hybrids can offer significant improvements in emissions and fuel economy. Series and parallel hybrids are compared. A combination of series and parallel operation would be the ideal. This can be obtained using a planetary gearbox as a power split device allowing a small generator to transfer power to the propulsion motor giving the effect of a CVT. It allows the engine to run at semi-constant speed giving better fuel economy and reduced emissions. Hybrid car developments are described that show the wide range of possible hybrid systems. (author)

  1. Wetting and infiltration of nitride bonded silicon nitride by liquid silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, V.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.

    2016-04-01

    Nitride bonded silicon nitride (NBSN) is a promising crucible material for the repeated use in the directional solidification of multicrystalline (mc) silicon ingots for photovoltaic applications. Due to wetting and infiltration, however, silicon nitride in its initial state does not offer the desired reusability. In this work the sessile drop method is used to systematically study the wetting and infiltration behavior of NBSN after applying different oxidation procedures. It is found that the wetting of the NBSN crucible by liquid silicon can be prevented by the oxidation of the geometrical surface. The infiltration of liquid silicon into the porous crucible can be suppressed by oxygen enrichment within the volume of the NBSN, i.e. at the pore walls of the crucibles. The realized reusability of the NBSN is demonstrated by reusing a NBSN crucible six times for the directional solidification of undoped multicrystalline silicon ingots.

  2. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...... specific. Often fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces to silicon or silicon dioxide to silicon surfaces is preferred, though Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding is indeed possible and practical for many devices as will be shown in this paper. We present an overview of existing knowledge on Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding and new...... results on bonding of thin and thick Si3N4 layers. The new results include high temperature bonding without any pretreatment, along with improved bonding ability achieved by thermal oxidation and chemical pretreatment. The bonded wafers include both unprocessed and processed wafers with a total silicon...

  3. Gallium nitride based logpile photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Li, Qiming; Lee, Yun-Ju; Figiel, Jeffrey J; Wang, George T; Fischer, Arthur J

    2011-11-09

    We demonstrate a nine-layer logpile three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) composed of single crystalline gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods, ∼100 nm in size with lattice constants of 260, 280, and 300 nm with photonic band gap in the visible region. This unique GaN structure is created through a combined approach of a layer-by-layer template fabrication technique and selective metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These GaN 3DPC exhibit a stacking direction band gap characterized by strong optical reflectance between 380 and 500 nm. By introducing a "line-defect" cavity in the fifth (middle) layer of the 3DPC, a localized transmission mode with a quality factor of 25-30 is also observed within the photonic band gap. The realization of a group III nitride 3DPC with uniform features and a band gap at wavelengths in the visible region is an important step toward realizing complete control of the electromagnetic environment for group III nitride based optoelectronic devices.

  4. Control of Defects in Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al)GaN) Films on Grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    like HEMTs . A nanolayer of AlGaN over GaN provides extra 2DEG charge density because of the piezoelectric effect of the AlGaN layer. The higher...Control of Defects in Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al) GaN ) Films on Grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates by Iskander G. Batyrev, Chi-Chin Wu...Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al) GaN ) Films on Grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates Iskander G. Batyrev and N. Scott Weingarten Weapons and

  5. Development of compound layer of iron (carbo)nitrides during nitriding of steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratajski, J.; Tacikowski, J.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The composition and phase constitution of a compound layer developing during gaseous nitriding was investigated at 853 K for three commercial steels (AISI 120, 4340 and 1090) and Armco iron. The compound layers were characterised by light optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron probe...... microanalysis. The formation of the compound layer occurs along two distinct sequences: alpha-gamma prime-epsilon and/or alpha(theta)-epsilon2-gamma prime-epsilon1. The preferred sequence depends mainly on the chemical composition of steel and on the nitriding potential....

  6. Development of compound layer of iron (carbo)nitrides during nitriding of steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratajski, J.; Tacikowski, J.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The composition and phase constitution of a compound layer developing during gaseous nitriding was investigated at 853 K for three commercial steels (AISI 120, 4340 and 1090) and Armco iron. The compound layers were characterised by light optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron probe...... microanalysis. The formation of the compound layer occurs along two distinct sequences: alpha-gamma prime-epsilon and/or alpha(theta)-epsilon2-gamma prime-epsilon1. The preferred sequence depends mainly on the chemical composition of steel and on the nitriding potential....

  7. All-angle negative refraction of highly squeezed plasmon and phonon polaritons in graphene-boron nitride heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao; Yang, Yi; Rivera, Nicholas; López, Josué J; Shen, Yichen; Kaminer, Ido; Chen, Hongsheng; Zhang, Baile; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin

    2017-06-27

    A fundamental building block for nanophotonics is the ability to achieve negative refraction of polaritons, because this could enable the demonstration of many unique nanoscale applications such as deep-subwavelength imaging, superlens, and novel guiding. However, to achieve negative refraction of highly squeezed polaritons, such as plasmon polaritons in graphene and phonon polaritons in boron nitride (BN) with their wavelengths squeezed by a factor over 100, requires the ability to flip the sign of their group velocity at will, which is challenging. Here we reveal that the strong coupling between plasmon and phonon polaritons in graphene-BN heterostructures can be used to flip the sign of the group velocity of the resulting hybrid (plasmon-phonon-polariton) modes. We predict all-angle negative refraction between plasmon and phonon polaritons and, even more surprisingly, between hybrid graphene plasmons and between hybrid phonon polaritons. Graphene-BN heterostructures thus provide a versatile platform for the design of nanometasurfaces and nanoimaging elements.

  8. All-angle negative refraction of highly squeezed plasmon and phonon polaritons in graphene-boron nitride heterostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Xiao; Rivera, Nicholas; Lopez, Josue J; Shen, Yichen; Kaminer, Ido; Chen, Hongsheng; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental building block for nanophotonics is the ability to achieve negative refraction of polaritons, because this could enable the demonstration of many unique nanoscale applications such as deep-subwavelength imaging, superlens, and novel guiding. However, to achieve negative refraction of highly squeezed polaritons, such as plasmon polaritons in graphene and phonon polaritons in boron nitride (BN) with their wavelengths squeezed by a factor over 100, requires the ability to flip the sign of their group velocity at will, which is challenging. Here we reveal that the strong coupling between plasmon and phonon polaritons in graphene-BN heterostructures can be used to flip the sign of the group velocity of the resulting hybrid (plasmon-phonon-polariton) modes. We predict all-angle negative refraction between plasmon and phonon polaritons, and even more surprisingly, between hybrid graphene plasmons, and between hybrid phonon polaritons. Graphene-BN heterostructures thus provide a versatile platform for t...

  9. Investigation of the influence of hybrid layers on the life time of hot forging dies

    OpenAIRE

    Legutko, S.; Meller, A.; Gajek, M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the issues related in the process of drop forging with special attention paid to the durability of forging tools. It presents the results of industrial investigation of the influence of hybrid layers on hot forging dies. The effectiveness of hybrid layers type nitrided layer/PVD coating applied for extending the life of forging tools whose working surfaces are exposed to such complex exploitation conditions as, among others, cyclically varying high thermal and mechanical ...

  10. Hybrid orientation technology and strain engineering for ultra-high speed MOSFETs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Maiti; C K Maiti

    2012-10-01

    We report here RF MOSFET performance in sub-45-nm hybrid orientation CMOS technology. Based on the combination of hybrid orientation technology (HOT) and process-induced local strain engineering,MOSFET RF performance is investigated using CAD (TCAD) technology. Transistor optimization on (100) substrate via silicon nitride (Si3N4) cap layer thickness for -MOSFETs, Ge mole fraction optimization for -MOSFETs on (110) substrates and channel length scaling have resulted in record RF performance, viz. the cut-off frequency, T.

  11. Constructing Novel Fiber Reinforced Plastic (FRP) Composites through a Biomimetic Approach: Connecting Glass Fiber with Nanosized Boron Nitride by Polydopamine Coating

    OpenAIRE

    XueMei Wen; ZaoZao Xiao; Tao Jiang; Jian Li; Wei Zhang; Lei Zhang; Huaiqi Shao

    2013-01-01

    A biomimetic method was developed to construct novel fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) composites. By mimicking mussel adhesive proteins, a monolayer of polydopamine was coated on glass fiber (GF) surface. The polydopamine-treated GF (D-GF) adsorbed boron nitride (BN) nanoparticles, while obtaining micronano multiscale hybrid fillers BN-D-GF. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that the strong interfacial interaction brought by the polydopamine benefits the loading amount as well ...

  12. A platform for large-scale graphene electronics--CVD growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Jang, Sung Kyu; Jang, Won-Jun; Kim, Minwoo; Park, Seong-Yong; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kahng, Se-Jong; Choi, Jae-Young; Ruoff, Rodney S; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo

    2013-05-21

    Direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) film can suggest a large-scale and high-quality graphene/h-BN film hybrid structure with a defect-free interface. This sequentially grown graphene/h-BN film shows better electronic properties than that of graphene/SiO2 or graphene transferred on h-BN film, and suggests a new promising template for graphene device fabrication.

  13. Phase diagrams and synthesis of cubic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Turkevich, V Z

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of phase equilibria, the lowest temperatures, T sub m sub i sub n , above which at high pressures cubic boron nitride crystallization from melt solution is allowable in terms of thermodynamics have been found for a number of systems that include boron nitride.

  14. Vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan; Fischer, Arthur J.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2017-03-14

    A vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode can hold off high voltages (kV's) when operated under reverse bias. The III-nitride device layers can be grown on a wider bandgap template layer and growth substrate, which can be removed by laser lift-off of the epitaxial device layers grown thereon.

  15. Low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The response of various austenitic and duplex stainless steel grades to low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising was investigated. Gaseous nitriding was performed in ammonia/hydrogen mixtures at temperatures ,723 K; gaseous carburising was carried out in carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures...

  16. Progress in preparation, properties and application of boron nitride nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youjun; Han, Jiaqi; Li, Yanjiao; Chen, Hao

    2017-08-01

    Boron nitride nanomaterials have attracted much and more interest in scientific research workers because of their excellent physical and chemical properties. They have become an important research hotspot in today's materials field. In this paper, boron nitride nanoparticles, "fullerenes", nanotubes, nanoribbons and Nano sheets were reviewed in terms of preparation methods, properties and potential applications.

  17. Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowden, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide.

  18. Modeling the kinetics of the nitriding and nitrocarburizing of iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    1998-01-01

    The growth kinetics of the iron-nitride compound layer during nitriding and nitrocarburizing of pure iron has been investigated for various temperatures and various combinations of imposed nitrogen and carbon activities. The results indicate that no local equilibrium occurs at the gas/solid inter...

  19. Nitrogen ion irradiation of Au(110) : formation of gold nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Šiller, L.; Hunt, M.R.C.; Brown, J.W.; Coquel, J-M.; Rudolf, P.

    2002-01-01

    Often metal nitrides posses unique properties for applications, such as great hardness, high melting points, chemical stability, novel electrical and magnetic properties. One route to the formation of metal nitride films is through ion irradiation of metal surfaces. In this report, the results of ir

  20. Vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan; Fischer, Arthur J.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2017-03-14

    A vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode can hold off high voltages (kV's) when operated under reverse bias. The III-nitride device layers can be grown on a wider bandgap template layer and growth substrate, which can be removed by laser lift-off of the epitaxial device layers grown thereon.

  1. Continuous and discontinuous precipitation in Fe-1 at.%Cr-1 at.%Mo alloy upon nitriding; crystal structure and composition of ternary nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Tobias; Ramudu Meka, Sai; Rheingans, Bastian; Bischoff, Ewald; Waldenmaier, Thomas; Yeli, Guma; Martin, Tomas L.; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Moody, Michael P.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2016-05-01

    The internal nitriding response of a ternary Fe-1 at.%Cr-1 at.%Mo alloy, which serves as a model alloy for many CrMo-based steels, was investigated. The nitrides developing upon nitriding were characterised by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The developed nitrides were shown to be (metastable) ternary mixed nitrides, which exhibit complex morphological, compositional and structural transformations as a function of nitriding time. Analogous to nitrided binary Fe-Cr and Fe-Mo alloys, in ternary Fe-Cr-Mo alloys initially continuous precipitation of fine, coherent, cubic, NaCl-type nitride platelets, here with the composition (Cr½,Mo½)N¾, occurs, with the broad faces of the platelets parallel to the {1 0 0}α-Fe lattice planes. These nitrides undergo a discontinuous precipitation reaction upon prolonged nitriding leading to the development of lamellae of a novel, hexagonal CrMoN2 nitride along {1 1 0}α-Fe lattice planes, and of spherical cubic, NaCl-type (Cr,Mo)Nx nitride particles within the ferrite lamellae. The observed structural and compositional changes of the ternary nitrides have been attributed to the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints for the internal precipitation of (misfitting) nitrides in the ferrite matrix.

  2. Low Temperature Gaseous Nitriding of a Stainless Steel Containing Strong Nitride Formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    Low temperature thermochemical surface hardening of the precipitation hardening austenitic stainless steel A286 in solution treated state was investigated. A286 contains, besides high amounts of Cr, also substantial amounts of strong nitride formers as Ti, Al and V. It is shown that simultaneous ...

  3. Epitaxial aluminum nitride tunnel barriers grown by nitridation with a plasma source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, T.; Lodewijk, C.F.J.; Vercruyssen, N.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Loudkov, D.N.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    High critical current-density (10 to 420 kA/cm2) superconductor-insulator-superconductor tunnel junctions with aluminum nitride barriers have been realized using a remote nitrogen plasma from an inductively coupled plasma source operated in a pressure range of 10−3–10−1 mbar. We find a much better r

  4. Effect of plasma nitriding and titanium nitride coating on the corrosion resistance of titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianli; Bai, Shizhu; Li, Fang; Li, Dongmei; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Min; Zhang, Qian; Tong, Yu; Zhang, Zichuan; Wang, Guowei; Guo, Tianwen; Ma, Chufan

    2016-09-01

    The passive film on the surface of titanium can be destroyed by immersion in a fluoridated acidic medium. Coating with titanium nitride (TiN) may improve the corrosion resistance of titanium. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of duplex treatment with plasma nitriding and TiN coating on the corrosion resistance of cast titanium. Cast titanium was treated with plasma nitriding and TiN coating. The corrosion resistance of the duplex-treated titanium in fluoride-containing artificial saliva was then investigated through electrochemical and immersion tests. The corroded surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy surface scan analysis. The data were analyzed using ANOVA (α=.05) RESULTS: Duplex treatment generated a dense and uniform TiN film with a thickness of 4.5 μm. Compared with untreated titanium, the duplex-treated titanium displayed higher corrosion potential (Ecorr) values (Pplasma nitriding and TiN coating significantly improved the corrosion resistance of cast titanium in a fluoride-containing environment. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gaseous Nitriding Process of Surface Nanocrystallized (SNCed) Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of gaseous nitriding on the surface nanocrystallized (SNCed) steel was investigated. The mild steel discs were SNCed on one side by using the method of ultrasonic shot peening. The opposite side of the discs maintained the original coarse-grained condition. The gaseous nitriding was subsequently carried out at three different temperatures:460, 500 and 560℃. The compound layer growth and diffusion behavior were then studied. It was revealed that SNC pretreatment greatly enhances both diffusion coefficient D and surface reaction rate. As a result, nitriding time could be reduced to the half. It was also found that the growth of compound layer with nitriding time conformed with parabolic relationship from the start of nitriding process in the SNCed samples.

  6. Local Heating with Lithographically Fabricated Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    Titanium nitride is considered a promising alternative plasmonic material and is known to exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances within the near-infrared biological transparency window. Here, local heating efficiencies of disk-shaped nanoparticles made of titanium nitride and gold are compa......Titanium nitride is considered a promising alternative plasmonic material and is known to exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances within the near-infrared biological transparency window. Here, local heating efficiencies of disk-shaped nanoparticles made of titanium nitride and gold...... are compared in the visible and near-infrared regions numerically and experimentally with samples fabricated using e-beam lithography. Results show that plasmonic titanium nitride nanodisks are efficient local heat sources and outperform gold nanodisks in the biological transparency window, dispensing the need...... for complex particle geometries....

  7. Facile Solid-State Synthesis Route to Metal Nitride Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinxiao DU; Ming LEI; Hui YANG

    2008-01-01

    By a facile and efficient solid-state reaction route using an organic reagent cyanamide (CN2H2) as a precursor with another one being metal oxides, we successfully synthesized seven technologically important metal nitrides including cubic VN, CrN, NbN, hexagonal GaN, AIN, BN, and WN at moderate temperatures. The experimental results show that cyanamide (CN2H2) is a powerfully reducing and nitridizing reagent and the metal oxides are completely converted into the corresponding nitride nanoparticles at lower temperatures than that reported in the conventional methods. It is found that CN2H2 can exhibit some interesting condensation processes, and the final products, highly active carbon nitride species, play a crucial role in the reducing and nitridizing processes.

  8. Additive Manufacturing of Dense Hexagonal Boron Nitride Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez Rossy, Andres E [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Elliott, Amy M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2017-05-12

    The feasibility of manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via additive manufacturing techniques was investigated. It was demonstrated that it is possible to hot-extrude thermoplastic filaments containing uniformly distributed boron nitride particles with a volume concentration as high as 60% and that these thermoplastic filaments can be used as feedstock for 3D-printing objects using a fused deposition system. Objects 3D-printed by fused deposition were subsequently sintered at high temperature to obtain dense ceramic products. In a parallel study the behavior of hexagonal boron nitride in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown that the addition of a cationic dispersant to an azeotrope enabled the formulation of slurries with a volume concentration of boron nitride as high as 33%. Although these slurries exhibited complex rheological behavior, the results from this study are encouraging and provide a pathway for manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via robocasting.

  9. Design of nitride semiconductors for solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Nitride semiconductors are a promising class of materials for solar energy conversion applications, such as photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells. Nitrides can have better solar absorption and electrical transport properties than the more widely studied oxides, as well as the potential for better scalability than other pnictides or chalcogenides. In addition, nitrides are also relatively unexplored compared to other chemistries, so they provide a great opportunity for new materials discovery. This paper reviews the recent advances in the design of novel semiconducting nitrides for solar energy conversion technologies. Both binary and multinary nitrides are discussed, with a range of metal chemistries (Cu3N, ZnSnN2, Sn3N4, etc.) and crystal structures (delafossite, perovskite, spinel, etc.), including a brief overview of wurtzite III-N materials and devices. The current scientific challenges and promising future directions in the field are also highlighted.

  10. Safety Assessment of Boron Nitride as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice M; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of boron nitride which functions in cosmetics as a slip modifier (ie, it has a lubricating effect). Boron nitride is an inorganic compound with a crystalline form that can be hexagonal, spherical, or cubic; the hexagonal form is presumed to be used in cosmetics. The highest reported concentration of use of boron nitride is 25% in eye shadow formulations. Although boron nitride nanotubes are produced, boron nitride is not listed as a nanomaterial used in cosmetic formulations. The Panel reviewed available chemistry, animal data, and clinical data and concluded that this ingredient is safe in the present practices of use and concentration in cosmetic formulations.

  11. Ion nitriding; Proceedings of the International Conference, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 15-17, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The present conference discusses plasma-assisted surface coating/modification processes, the applications to date of ion nitriding, the effects of nitrogen on metal surfaces, ion nitriding mechanisms in Cr, Al and Cr + Al-containing 1040 steel, ion nitriding of Al and its alloys, life enhancement for forging dies, novel anode plasma nitriding developments, and a comparative study of the pulsed and dc ion-nitriding behavior in specimens with blind holes. Also discussed are the influence of heating method on ion nitriding, surface hardening of marage steels by ion nitriding without core hardness reduction, plasma nitriding of nodular cast iron sput gears, NbN composites for superconductors, the carburization of tungsten in a glow discharge methane plasma, economic considerations concerning plasma nitriding, and the corrosion properties obtained by ion nitriding.

  12. Method for exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A new method is disclosed for the exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride into mono- and few-layered nanosheets (or nanoplatelets, nanomesh, nanoribbons). The method does not necessarily require high temperature or vacuum, but uses commercially available h-BN powders (or those derived from these materials, bulk crystals) and only requires wet chemical processing. The method is facile, cost efficient, and scalable. The resultant exfoliated h-BN is dispersible in an organic solvent or water thus amenable for solution processing for unique microelectronic or composite applications.

  13. Fe nanowire encapsulated in boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koi, Naruhiro; Oku, Takeo; Nishijima, Masahiko

    2005-11-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes, nanohorns, nanocoils were synthesized by annealing Fe 4N and B powders at 1000 °C for 1 h in nitrogen gas atmosphere. Especially, Fe-filled BN nanotubes were produced, and investigated by high-resolution electron microscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which indicates that the [110] of Fe is parallel to the BN nanotube axis. Formation mechanism of Fe-filled BN nanotube was speculated based on these results.

  14. Silicon nitride film for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El amrani, A.; Menous, I.; Mahiou, L.; Touati, A.; Lefgoum, A. [Silicon Technology Unit. 2, Boulevard Frantz Fanon, BP 140 Alger-7 Merveilles, 16200 Algiers (Algeria); Tadjine, R. [Advanced Technologies Development Centre, Cite 20 Aout 1656, Baba hassen, Algiers (Algeria)

    2008-10-15

    In this work, our aim was to determine the deposition parameters leading to optimal optical properties of Silicon nitride (SiN) film for photovoltaic application. The deposition was performed in an industrial pulsed direct-PECVD using a gas mixture of NH{sub 3}/SiH{sub 4}. After defining the optimum deposition parameters, we have chemically evaluated the film quality in BOE solution. Plasma removal of the optimized SiN films from multicrystalline 4-in solar cells allows highlighting and estimating the emitter passivation and ARC effects on the solar cell electrical performance. (author)

  15. Studies of Organometallic Precursors to Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-09

    adduct undergoes thermal decomposition to a series of intermediate R33Al +NH + R3Al :N~H- + -++ AiN + 3R1I (where at CH3, CAH, C09g, etc.) The...which the initially formed Lewis acid/base adduct undergoes thermal decomposition to a series of Intermediate altylaluminum-amide and -imide species...SIOPPLEM.ENTARY NOTATION to be publ ished in Mats. Res. Soc. Syinp. Proc. (19F86) -IL RU SBR _ Aluminum nitride, organomnetallic precutsors,imcl C7Se1

  16. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  17. Nitride Semiconductors Handbook on Materials and Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Ruterana, Pierre; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor components based on silicon have been used in a wide range of applications for some time now. These elemental semiconductors are now well researched and technologically well developed. In the meantime the focus has switched to a new group of materials: ceramic semiconductors based on nitrides are currently the subject of research due to their optical and electronic characteristics. They open up new industrial possibilities in the field of photosensors, as light sources or as electronic components. This collection of review articles provides a systematic and in-depth overview of t

  18. Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Urgen, Mustafa; Cakir, Ali Fuat; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Kazmanli, Kursat; Keles, Ozgul

    2007-05-01

    An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

  19. Ammonia Decomposition over Bimetallic Nitrides Supported on γ-Al2O3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Shan LU; Xiao Nian LI; Yi Feng ZHU; Hua Zhang LIU; Chun Hui ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    A series of monometallic nitrides and bimetallic nitrides were prepared by temperature-programmed reaction with NH3. The effects of Co, Ni and Fe additives and the synergic action between Fe, Co, Ni and Mo on the ammonia decomposition activity were investigated. TPR-MS, XRD were also carried out to obtain better insight into the structure of the bimetallic nitride. The results of ammonia decomposition activity show that bimetallic nitrides are more active than monometallic nitrides or bimetallic oxides.

  20. GROWTH, MORPHOLOGICAL, STRUCTURAL, ELECTRICAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF NITROGEN DOPED ZINC OXIDE THIN FILM ON POROUS GALLIUM NITRIDE TEMPLATE

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is susceptible of producing efficient display and lighting devices.  Low cost hybrid heterostructured lighting devices are developed by combining zinc oxide (ZnO) with GaN that has gained much more research interest, nowadays.  Porous GaN receives a great deal of attraction by its excellent and improved properties compared with its bulk counterpart.  Several potential applications have been realized, including for serving as a strain-relaxed substrates for...

  1. Microstructure and Properties of Plasma Source Nitrided AISI 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G. Y.; Lei, M. K.

    2016-11-01

    Plasma source nitriding is a relatively new nitriding technology which can overcome those inherent shortcomings associated with conventional direct current plasma nitriding technology such as the arcing surface damage, the edging effect and the hollow cathode effect. There is considerable study on the properties of nitrided samples for laboratorial scale plasma source nitriding system; however, little information has been reported on the industrial-scale plasma source nitriding system. In this work, AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel samples were nitrided by an industrial-scale plasma source nitriding system at various nitriding temperatures (350, 400, 450 and 500 °C) with a floating potential. A high-nitrogen face-centered-cubic phase (γN) formed on the surface of nitrided sample surface. As the nitriding temperature was increased, the γN phase layer thickness increased, varying from 1.5 μm for the lowest nitriding temperature of 350 °C, to 30 μm for the highest nitriding temperature of 500 °C. The maximum Vickers microhardness of the γN phase layer with a peak nitrogen concentration of 20 at.% is about HV 0.1 N 15.1 GPa at the nitriding temperature of 450 °C. The wear and corrosion experimental results demonstrated that the γN phase was formed on the surface of AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel by plasma source nitriding, which exhibits not only high wear resistance, but also good pitting corrosion resistance.

  2. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...

  3. Oxidative Unzipping and Transformation of High Aspect Ratio Boron Nitride Nanotubes into “White Graphene Oxide” Platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Pranjal; Loganathan, Archana; Agrawal, Richa; Boesl, Benjamin; Wang, Chunlei; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-07-01

    Morphological and chemical transformations in boron nitride nanotubes under high temperature atmospheric conditions is probed in this study. We report atmospheric oxygen induced cleavage of boron nitride nanotubes at temperatures exceeding 750 °C for the first time. Unzipping is then followed by coalescence of these densely clustered multiple uncurled ribbons to form stacks of 2D sheets. FTIR and EDS analysis suggest these 2D platelets to be Boron Nitride Oxide platelets, with analogous structure to Graphene Oxide, and therefore we term them as “White Graphene Oxide” (WGO). However, not all BNNTs deteriorate even at temperatures as high as 1000 °C. This leads to the formation of a hybrid nanomaterial system comprising of 1D BN nanotubes and 2D BN oxide platelets, potentially having advanced high temperature sensing, radiation shielding, mechanical strengthening, electron emission and thermal management applications due to synergistic improvement of multi-plane transport and mechanical properties. This is the first report on transformation of BNNT bundles to a continuous array of White Graphene Oxide nanoplatelet stacks.

  4. Investigation of surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Koyuncu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of paper is to investigate surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, surface modification of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy was made at various temperatures by plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding treatment was performed in 80% N2-20% H2 gas mixture, for treatment times of 2-15 h at the temperatures of 700-1000°C. Surface properties of plasma nitrided Ti6Al4V alloy were examined by metallographic inspection, X-Ray diffraction and Vickers hardness.Findings: Two layers were determined by optic inspection on the samples that were called the compound and diffusion layers. Compound layer contain TiN and Ti2N nitrides, XRD results support in this formations. Maximum hardness was obtained at 10h treatment time and 1000°C treatment temperature. Micro hardness tests showed that hardness properties of the nitrided samples depend on treatment time and temperature.Practical implications: Titanium and its alloys have very attractive properties for many industries. But using of titanium and its alloys is of very low in mechanical engineering applications because of poor tribological properties.Originality/value: The nitriding of titanium alloy surfaces using plasma processes has already reached the industrial application stage in the biomedical field.

  5. Thermodynamic Routes to Novel Metastable Nitrogen-Rich Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holder, Aaron M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Arca, Elisabetta [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zakutayev, Andriy A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lany, Stephan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sun, Wenhao [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Orvananos, Bernardo [Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ceder, Gerbrand [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; University of California, Berkeley

    2017-07-17

    Compared to oxides, the nitrides are relatively unexplored, making them a promising chemical space for novel materials discovery. Of particular interest are nitrogen-rich nitrides, which often possess useful semiconducting properties for electronic and optoelectronic applications. However, such nitrogen-rich compounds are generally metastable, and the lack of a guiding theory for their synthesis has limited their exploration. Here, we review the remarkable metastability of observed nitrides, and examine the thermodynamics of how reactive nitrogen precursors can stabilize metastable nitrogen-rich compositions during materials synthesis. We map these thermodynamic strategies onto a predictive computational search, training a data-mined ionic substitution algorithm specifically for nitride discovery, which we combine with grand-canonical DFT-SCAN phase stability calculations to compute stabilizing nitrogen chemical potentials. We identify several new nitrogen-rich binary nitrides for experimental investigation, notably the transition metal nitrides Mn3N4, Cr3N4, V3N4, and Nb3N5, the main group nitride SbN, and the pernitrides FeN2, CrN2, and Cu2N2. By formulating rational thermodynamic routes to metastable compounds, we expand the search space for functional technological materials beyond equilibrium phases and compositions.

  6. Characterization of plasma nitrided layers produced on sintered iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Alves Fontes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nitriding is a thermo-physical-chemical treatment process, which promotes surface hardening, caused by interstitial diffusion of atomic nitrogen into metallic alloys. In this work, this process was employed in the surface modification of a sintered ferrous alloy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses, and wear and microhardness tests were performed on the samples submitted to ferrox treatment and plasma nitriding carried out under different conditions of time and temperature. The results showed that the nitride layer thickness is higher for all nitrided samples than for ferrox treated samples, and this layer thickness increases with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature is a more significant variable. The XRD analysis showed that the nitrided layer, for all samples, near the surface consists in a mixture of γ′-Fe4N and ɛ-Fe3N phases. Both wear resistance and microhardness increase with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature influences both the characteristics the most.

  7. Preparation and Instability of Nanocrystalline Cuprous Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Malinda D; White, Miles A; Thompson, Michelle J; Miller, Gordon J; Vela, Javier

    2015-07-06

    Low-dimensional cuprous nitride (Cu3N) was synthesized by nitridation (ammonolysis) of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanocrystals using either ammonia (NH3) or urea (H2NCONH2) as the nitrogen source. The resulting nanocrystalline Cu3N spontaneously decomposes to nanocrystalline CuO in the presence of both water and oxygen from air at room temperature. Ammonia was produced in 60% chemical yield during Cu3N decomposition, as measured using the colorimetric indophenol method. Because Cu3N decomposition requires H2O and produces substoichiometric amounts of NH3, we conclude that this reaction proceeds through a complex stoichiometry that involves the concomitant release of both N2 and NH3. This is a thermodynamically unfavorable outcome, strongly indicating that H2O (and thus NH3 production) facilitate the kinetics of the reaction by lowering the energy barrier for Cu3N decomposition. The three different Cu2O, Cu3N, and CuO nanocrystalline phases were characterized by a combination of optical absorption, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electronic density of states obtained from electronic structure calculations on the bulk solids. The relative ease of interconversion between these interesting and inexpensive materials bears possible implications for catalytic and optoelectronic applications.

  8. Cubic III-nitrides: potential photonic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onabe, K.; Sanorpim, S.; Kato, H.; Kakuda, M.; Nakamura, T.; Nakamura, K.; Kuboya, S.; Katayama, R.

    2011-01-01

    The growth and characterization of some cubic III-nitride films on suitable cubic substrates have been done, namely, c- GaN on GaAs by MOVPE, c-GaN and c-AlGaN on MgO by RF-MBE, and c-InN and c-InGaN (In-rich) on YSZ by RFMBE. This series of study has been much focused on the cubic-phase purity as dependent on the respective growth conditions and resulting electrical and optical properties. For c-GaN and c-InN films, a cubic-phase purity higher than 95% is attained in spite of the metastable nature of the cubic III-nitrides. However, for c-AlGaN and c-InGaN films, the cubic-phase purity is rapidly degraded with significant incorporation of the hexagonal phase through stacking faults on cubic {111} faces which may be exposed on the roughened growing or substrate surface. It has been shown that the electron mobilities in c-GaN and c-AlGaN films are much related to phase purity.

  9. Structure refinement for tantalum nitrides nanocrystals with various morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lianyun [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Science, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shang Yuan Cun, Haidian District, Beijing 100044 (China); Huang, Kai; Hou, Jungang [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhu, Hongmin, E-mail: hzhu@metall.ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Tantalum nitrides nanocrystals with various phases and morphologies for the first time have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. Highlights: ► The spherical TaN, cuboidal TaN{sub 0.83} and TaN{sub 0.5} nanocrystals have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. ► The crystal structures of different tantalum nitrides were determined by Rietveld refinement on the X-ray diffraction data and the examinations of electron microcopies. ► The specific surface area of the tantalum nitrides powders was around 10 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. ► Tantalum nitrides powders could be suitable for capacitor with high specific capacitance. -- Abstract: Tantalum nitrides (TaN{sub x}) nanocrystals with different phase and morphology have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. The crystal structures of tantalum nitrides were determined by Rietveld refinement based on the X-ray diffraction data. The morphologies of various tantalum nitrides nanocrystals in high quality were analyzed through the electron microcopies examinations. The spherical TaN nanoparticles, cuboidal TaN{sub 0.83} and TaN{sub 0.5} nanocrystals have been selectively prepared at different annealing temperatures. In addition, the specific surface areas of the tantalum nitrides nanocrystals measured by BET method were around 9.87–11.64 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, indicating that such nano-sized tantalum nitrides could be suitable for capacitor with high specific capacitance.

  10. Graphitic carbon nitride/graphene oxide/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for photoluminescence and photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrzak, Malgorzata; Kukulka, Wojciech; Mijowska, Ewa

    2017-03-01

    The study presents a modification of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and investigation of photoluminescent and photocatalytic properties. The influence of GO and rGO lateral sizes used for the modification was investigated. The nanomaterials were characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy (DR-UV-vis) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). PL revealed that pristine graphitic carbon nitride and its nanocomposites with GO and rGO emitted up-converted photoluminescence (UCPL) which could contribute to the improvement of photocatalytic activity of the materials. The photoactivity was evaluated in a process of phenol decomposition under visible light. A hybrid composed of rGO nanoparticles (rGONPs, 4-135 nm) exhibited the highest photoactivity compared to rGO with size of 150 nm-7.2 μm and graphene oxide with the corresponding sizes. The possible reason of the superior photocatalytic activity is the most enhanced UCPL of rGONPs, contributing to the emission of light with higher energy than the incident light, resulting in improved photogeneration of electron-hole pairs.

  11. Conversion of MX Nitrides to Modified Z-Phase in 9-12%Cr Ferritic Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cipolla, Leonardo

    , crystal structure, chemical composition and equivalent diameter of precipitates were assessed over times and temperatures. The mechanism of Z-phase formation was identified in the model alloys; hybrid MX/Z particles were found as mid-stage phases of this conversion. The key-role of niobium as accelerator....... Indeed the fast conversion of finely distributed MX nitrides, which highly promote creep strengthening, to larger and thermodynamically more stable modified Z-phase, Cr(V,Nb)N, led to an unforeseen drop of creep resistance of 12%Cr steels. Since chromium content was confirmed to be the main driving force...... for Z-phase formation, this explains why 12%Cr steels (i.e. P122, VM12, NF12) suffer from fast and abundant Z-phase precipitation, while 9%Cr steels (i.e. Grades 91, 92, 911) do not. In this thesis the role of vanadium and niobium nitrides in the formation of Z-phase in 9-12%Cr steels is investigated...

  12. Application Of Active Screen Method For Ion Nitriding Efficiency Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogórek M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents the research of austenitic steel AISI 304 after ion nitriding at 400°C and at t =4h, for the two different variants of samples distribution in the working plasma reactive chamber tube. In order to assess the effectiveness of ion nitriding variants emission spectroscopy – GDOES, surface hardness tests, microstructure research (LM of nitrided layers were made. It has been found that the use of active screens increases the surface layer thickness and depth of nitrogen diffusion into austenitic steel 304.

  13. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  14. Preparation of Ultra-fine Aluminum Nitride in Thermal Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    漆继红; 罗义文; 印永祥; 代晓雁

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-fine aluminum nitride has been synthesized by the evaporation of aluminum powder at atmospheric-pressure nitrogen plasma in a hot-wall reactor. The average size of aluminum nitride particle is 0.11μm measured by scanning electric mirror (SEM), and the purity is at least over 90% evaluated by X-Ray diffraction (XRD). The conversion of Al powder to aluminum nitride is strongly depended on the injection of NH3. Typical experimental parameters such as the feed rate of raw material, the flow rate of ammonia and the position of injecting aluminum powder into the reactor are given.

  15. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  16. Microstructure of Spark Plasma-Sintered Silicon Nitride Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukianova, O. A.; Novikov, V. Yu.; Parkhomenko, A. A.; Sirota, V. V.; Krasilnikov, V. V.

    2017-04-01

    The microstructure and phase composition of the high-content Al2O3-Y2O3-doped spark plasma-sintered silicon nitride were investigated. Fully dense silicon nitride ceramics with a typical α-Si3N4 equiaxed structure with average grain size from 200 to 530 nm, high elastic modulus of 288 GPa, and high hardness of 2038 HV were spark plasma sintered (SPSed) at 1550 °C. Silicon nitride with elongated β-Si3N4 grains, higher hardness of 1800 HV, density of 3.25 g/cm3, and Young's modulus 300 GPa SPSed at 1650 °C was also reviewed.

  17. Hybrid Metaheuristics

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to provide a state of the art of hybrid metaheuristics. The book provides a complete background that enables readers to design and implement hybrid metaheuristics to solve complex optimization problems (continuous/discrete, mono-objective/multi-objective, optimization under uncertainty) in a diverse range of application domains. Readers learn to solve large scale problems quickly and efficiently combining metaheuristics with complementary metaheuristics, mathematical programming, constraint programming and machine learning. Numerous real-world examples of problems and solutions demonstrate how hybrid metaheuristics are applied in such fields as networks, logistics and transportation, bio-medical, engineering design, scheduling.

  18. Preparation of carbon-nitride bulk samples in the presence of seed carbon-nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. I. [Korea University of Technology and Education, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Zorov, N. B. [Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-05-15

    A procedure was developed for preparing bulk carbon-nitride crystals from polymeric alpha-C{sub 3}N{sub 4.2} at high pressure and high temperature in the presence of seeds of crystalline carbon-nitride films prepared by using a high-voltage discharge plasma combined with pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target. The samples were evaluated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Notably, XPS studies of the film composition before and after thermobaric treatments demonstrated that the nitrogen composition in the alpha-C{sub 3}N{sub 4.2} material, which initially contained more than 58 % nitrogen, decreased during the annealing process and reached a common, stable composition of approx 45 %. The thermobaric experiments were performed at 10 - 77 kbar and 350 - 1200 .deg. C.

  19. High Temperature Oxidation of Boron Nitride. Part 1; Monolithic Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Farmer, Serene; Moore, Arthur; Sayir, Haluk

    1997-01-01

    High temperature oxidation of monolithic boron nitride (BN) is examined. Hot pressed BN and both low and high density CVD BN were studied. It is shown that oxidation rates are quite sensitive to microstructural factors such as orientation, porosity, and degree of crystallinity. In addition small amounts of water vapor lead to volatilization of the B2O3 oxide as H(x)B(y)O(z). For these reasons, very different oxidation kinetics were observed for each type of BN.

  20. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Norizzawati Mohd; Yasui, Kanji; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2014-12-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm2 using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si.

  1. Gallium Nitride, Indium Nitride, and Heterostructure Development Using The MEAglow Growth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binsted, Peter W.

    This thesis presents an in depth study of semiconductor development using a new process termed Migration Enhanced Afterglow (MEAglow). The MEAglow growth reactor is housed in the Lakehead University Semiconductor Research Lab. Thin films of gallium nitride and indium nitride are produced as well as heterostructures comprised of these two films and their ternary alloy InGaN. MEAglow is a form of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) employing migration enhanced epitaxy (MEE). The heterostructure is being developed for a novel field effect transistor (FET) based on the tunnelling of charge carriers which alter the channel conductivity. The configuration of this unique III-Nitride device should allow the FET to function as normally off in either n-type or p-type operation. Due to the difficulties in growing low temperature GaN, test devices of this abstract design were not previously possible. Further details on the device operation and growth parameters are included. Samples produced by the research reactor were characterised through x-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-near infrared-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis-NIR), Auger spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Film growth is accomplished by an improved form of pulsed delivery Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD). The reactor features a scalable hollow cathode type plasma source. Data obtained through characterisation is subjected to theoretical treatment which explains much not previously understood behaviour of the GaN films. Many challenges in III-Nitride film growth have been overcome during this research project. A method of developing structures consisting of InN and GaN within the same system has been proven.

  2. Lattice dynamics and ferroelectric properties of the nitride perovskite LaWN3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yue-Wen; Fisher, Craig A. J.; Kuwabara, Akihide; Shen, Xin-Wei; Ogawa, Takafumi; Moriwake, Hiroki; Huang, Rong; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2017-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations we examine the crystal structures and phase transitions of nitride perovskite LaWN3. Lattice dynamics calculations indicate that the ground-state structure belongs to space group R 3 c . Two competitive phase transition pathways are identified which are characterized by symmetry-adapted distortion modes. The results suggest that R 3 c LaWN3 should be an excellent ferroelectric semiconductor, as its large spontaneous polarization of around 61 μ C /cm2 is comparable to that of PbTiO3, and its band gap is about 1.72 eV. Ferroelectricity is found to result from the B -site instability driven by hybridization between W -5 d and N -2 p orbitals. These properties make LaWN3 an attractive candidate material for use in ferroelectric memory devices and photovoltaic cells.

  3. Microstructure and Hardness of High Temperature Gas Nitrided AISI 420 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Nor Nurulhuda Md.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the microstructure and hardness of as-received and nitrided AISI 420 martensitic stainless steels. High temperature gas nitriding was employed to treat the steels at 1200°C for one hour and four hours using nitrogen gas, followed by furnace cooled. Chromium nitride and iron nitride were formed and concentrated at the outmost surface area of the steels since this region contained the highest concentration of nitrogen. The grain size enlarged at the interior region of the nitrided steels due to nitriding at temperature above the recrystallization temperature of the steel and followed by slow cooling. The nitrided steels produced higher surface hardness compared to as-received steel due to the presence of nitrogen and the precipitation of nitrides. Harder steel was produced when nitriding at four hours compared to one hour since more nitrogen permeated into the steel.

  4. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, S., E-mail: hamann@inp-greifswald.de; Röpcke, J. [INP-Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Materials Engineering, Gustav-Zeuner-Str. 5, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Strämke, M.; Strämke, S. [ELTRO GmbH, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Ring 3, 52499 Baesweiler (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  5. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Throughout the history of group-III-nitride materials and devices, scientific breakthroughs and technological advances have gone hand-in-hand. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the discovery of the nucleation of smooth (0001) GaN films on c-plane sapphire and the activation of p-dopants in GaN led very quickly to the realization of high-brightness blue and green LEDs, followed by the first demonstration of GaN-based violet laser diodes in the mid 1990s. Today, blue InGaN LEDs boast record external quantum efficiencies exceeding 80% and the emission wavelength of the InGaN-based laser diode has been pushed into the green spectral range. Although these tremenduous advances have already spurred multi-billion dollar industries, there are still a number of scientific questions and technological issues that are unanswered. One key challenge is related to the polar nature of the III-nitride wurtzite crystal. Until a decade ago all research activities had almost exclusively concentrated on (0001)-oriented polar GaN layers and heterostructures. Although the device characteristics seem excellent, the strong polarization fields at GaN heterointerfaces can lead to a significant deterioration of the device performance. Triggered by the first demonstration non-polar GaN quantum wells grown on LiAlO2 by Waltereit and colleagues in 2000, impressive advances in the area of non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors and devices have been achieved. Today, a large variety of heterostructures free of polarization fields and exhibiting exceptional electronic and optical properties have been demonstrated, and the fundamental understanding of polar, semipolar and non-polar nitrides has made significant leaps forward. The contributions in this Semiconductor Science and Technology special issue on non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors provide an impressive and up-to-date cross-section of all areas of research and device physics in this field. The articles cover a wide range of

  6. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  7. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S; Börner, K; Burlacov, I; Spies, H-J; Strämke, M; Strämke, S; Röpcke, J

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  8. Hybrid intermediaries

    OpenAIRE

    Cetorelli, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    I introduce the concept of hybrid intermediaries: financial conglomerates that control a multiplicity of entity types active in the "assembly line" process of modern financial intermediation, a system that has become known as shadow banking. The complex bank holding companies of today are the best example of hybrid intermediaries, but I argue that financial firms from the "nonbank" space can just as easily evolve into conglomerates with similar organizational structure, thus acquiring the cap...

  9. Hybrid composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacob John, Maya

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available effect was observed for the elongation at break of the hybrid composites. The impact strength of the hybrid composites increased with the addition of glass fibres. The tensile and impact properties of thermoplastic natural rubber reinforced short... panels made from conventional structural materials. Figure 3 illustrates the performance of cellular biocomposite panels against conventional systems used for building and residential construction, namely a pre- cast pre-stressed hollow core concrete...

  10. Encapsulated Vanadium-Based Hybrids in Amorphous N-Doped Carbon Matrix as Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Bei; Balogun, Muhammad-Sadeeq; Luo, Lei; Luo, Yang; Qiu, Weitao; Song, Shuqin; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Yexiang

    2017-09-12

    Recently, researchers have made significant advancement in employing transition metal compound hybrids as anode material for lithium-ion batteries and developing simple preparation of these hybrids. To this end, this study reports a facile and scalable method for fabricating a vanadium oxide-nitride composite encapsulated in amorphous carbon matrix by simply mixing ammonium metavanadate and melamine as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. By tuning the annealing temperature of the mixture, different hybrids of vanadium oxide-nitride compounds are synthesized. The electrode material prepared at 700 °C, i.e., VM-700, exhibits excellent cyclic stability retaining 92% of its reversible capacity after 200 cycles at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1) and attractive rate performance (220 mAh g(-1) ) under the current density of up to 2 A g(-1) . The outstanding electrochemical properties can be attributed to the synergistic effect from heterojunction form by the vanadium compound hybrids, the improved ability of the excellent conductive carbon for electron transfer, and restraining the expansion and aggregation of vanadium oxide-nitride in cycling. These interesting findings will provide a reference for the preparation of transition metal oxide and nitride composites as well. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Heuristic Analysis Model of Nitrided Layers' Formation Consisting of the Image Processing and Analysis and Elements of Artificial Intelligence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomasz Wójcicki; Michal Nowicki

    2016-01-01

    .... The objectives of the analyses of the materials for gas nitriding technology are described. The methods of the preparation of nitrided layers, the steps of the process and the construction and operation of devices for gas nitriding are given...

  12. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  13. Microcavity effects in the photoluminescence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpenguzel, Ali; Aydinli, Atilla; Bek, Alpan

    1998-07-01

    Fabry-Perot microcavities are used for the alteration of photoluminescence in hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride grown with and without ammonia. The photoluminescence is red-near-infrared for the samples grown without ammonia, and blue-green for the samples grown with ammonia. In the Fabry- Perot microcavities, the amplitude of the photoluminescence is enhanced, while its linewidth is reduced with respect to the bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride. The microcavity was realized by a metallic back mirror and a hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride--air or a metallic front mirror. The transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance spectra were also measured and calculated. The calculated spectra agree well with the experimental spectra. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride microcavity has potential for becoming a versatile silicon based optoelectronic device such as a color flat panel display, a resonant cavity enhanced light emitting diode, or a laser.

  14. Thermal Effect of Ceramic Nanofiller Aluminium Nitride on Polyethylene Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Bin Sohail

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene polymerization was done to form polyethylene nano-composite with nanoaluminum nitride using zirconocene catalysts. Results show that the catalytic activity is maximum at a filler loading of 15 mg nanoaluminum nitride. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and X-ray diffraction (XRD results show that percentage crystallinity was also marginally higher at this amount of filler. Thermal behavior of polyethylene nanocomposites (0, 15, 30, and 45 mg was studied by DSC and thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA. Morphology of the component with 15 mg aluminium nitride is more fibrous as compared to 0 mg aluminium nitride and higher filler loading as shown by SEM images. In order to understand combustibility behavior, tests were performed on microcalorimeter. Its results showed decrease in combustibility in polyethylene nanocomposites as the filler loading increases.

  15. Defect complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defect complexes on the stability, structural and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes is investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method implemented...

  16. Pair distribution functions of silicon/silicon nitride interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Deng; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2006-03-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate different mechanical and structural properties of the silicon/silicon nitride interface. One way to characterize the structure as tensile strain is applied parallel to the interface is to calculate pair distribution functions for specific atom types. The pair distribution function gives the probability of finding a pair of atoms a distance r apart, relative to the probability expected for a completely random distribution at the same density. The pair distribution functions for bulk silicon nitride reflect the fracture of the silicon nitride film at about 8 % and the fact that the centerpiece of the silicon nitride film returns to its original structure after fracture. The pair distribution functions for interface silicon atoms reveal the formation of bonds for originally unbound atom pairs, which is indicative of the interstitial-vacancy defect that causes failure in silicon.

  17. Bond Angles in the Crystalline Silicon/Silicon Nitride Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Robert H.; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2006-03-01

    Silicon nitride deposited on a silicon substrate has major applications in both dielectric layers in microelectronics and as antireflection and passivation coatings in photovoltaic applications. Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to investigate the influence of temperature and rate of externally applied strain on the structural and mechanical properties of the silicon/silicon nitride interface. Bond-angles between various atom types in the system are used to find and understand more about the mechanisms leading to the failure of the crystal. Ideally in crystalline silicon nitride, bond angles of 109.5 occur when a silicon atom is at the vertex and 120 angles occur when a nitrogen atom is at the vertex. The comparison of the calculated angles to the ideal values give information on the mechanisms of failure in silicon/silicon nitride system.

  18. Physics of wurtzite nitrides and oxides passport to devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gil, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a survey of the current state of the art of a special class of nitrides semiconductors, Wurtzite Nitride and Oxide Semiconductors. It includes properties, growth and applications. Research in the area of nitrides semiconductors is still booming although some basic materials sciences issues were solved already about 20 years ago. With the advent of modern technologies and the successful growth of nitride substrates, these materials currently experience a second birth. Advanced new applications like light-emitters, including UV operating LEDs, normally on and normally off high frequency operating transistors are expected. With progress in clean room technology, advanced photonic and quantum optic applications are envisioned in a close future. This area of research is fascinating for researchers and students in materials science, electrical engineering, chemistry, electronics, physics and biophysics. This book aims to be the ad-hoc instrument to this active field of research.

  19. Ellipsometric study of silicon nitride on gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Bu-Abbud, G. H.; Woollam, J. A.; Liu, D.; Chung, Y.; Langer, D.

    1982-01-01

    A method for optimizing the sensitivity of ellipsometric measurements for thin dielectric films on semiconductors is described in simple physical terms. The technique is demonstrated for the case of sputtered silicon nitride films on gallium arsenide.

  20. Plasma-nitriding of tantalum at relatively low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Deyuan; LIN Qin; ZHAO Haomin; FEI Qinyong; GENG Man

    2004-01-01

    The combined quadratic orthogonal regression method of experiment design was employed to explore the effects of process parameters of plasma nitriding of tantalum such as total pressure, temperature and original hydrogen molar fraction on the hardness, roughness and structure of nitriding surfaces. The regression equations of hardness, roughness and structure were given according to the results of regression and statistic analysis. And the diffusion activation energy of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions was calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The diffusion activation energy calculated belongs to (155.49 + 10.51)kJ/mol (783-983 K).

  1. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, R. B. Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N.; Varma, Rajender S.

    2016-12-01

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  2. Osteoblastlike cell adhesion on titanium surfaces modified by plasma nitriding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jose Sandro Pereira; Amico, Sandro Campos; Rodrigues, Almir Olegario Neves; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvao; Alves, Clodomiro; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of various titanium surfaces modified by cold plasma nitriding in terms of adhesion and proliferation of rat osteoblastlike cells. Samples of grade 2 titanium were subjected to three different surface modification processes: polishing, nitriding by plasma direct current, and nitriding by cathodic cage discharge. To evaluate the effect of the surface treatment on the cellular response, the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblastlike cells (MC3T3) were quantified and the results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman statistical tests. Cellular morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. There was more MC3T3 cell attachment on the rougher surfaces produced by cathodic cage discharge compared with polished samples (P Plasma nitriding improves titanium surface roughness and wettability, leading to osteoblastlike cell adhesion.

  3. Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse

    candidate because of its many similarities with diamond: bonding pattern in the extended network structure, hardness, and the quality of the crystallites.3 However, some degree ionic interaction is a part of the bonding in boron nitride, which is not present in diamond. By investigating the core density...... beyond multipolar modeling of the valence density. As was recently shown in a benchmark study of diamond by Bindzus et al.1 The next step is to investigate more complicated chemical bonding motives, to determine the effect of bonding on the core density. Cubic boron nitride2 lends itself as a perfect...... in boron nitride we may obtain a deeper understanding of the effect of bonding on the total density. We report here a thorough investigation of the charge density of cubic boron nitride with a detailed modelling of the inner atom charge density. By combining high resolution powder X-ray diffraction data...

  4. Platinum group metal nitrides and carbides: synthesis, properties and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanovskii, Alexander L [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Urals Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-30

    Experimental and theoretical data on new compounds, nitrides and carbides of the platinum group 4d and 5d metals (ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium, platinum), published over the past five years are summarized. The extreme mechanical properties of platinoid nitrides and carbides, i.e., their high strength and low compressibility, are noted. The prospects of further studies and the scope of application of these compounds are discussed.

  5. Apparatus for the production of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

    2014-06-17

    An apparatus for the large scale production of boron nitride nanotubes comprising; a pressure chamber containing; a continuously fed boron containing target; a source of thermal energy preferably a focused laser beam; a cooled condenser; a source of pressurized nitrogen gas; and a mechanism for extracting boron nitride nanotubes that are condensed on or in the area of the cooled condenser from the pressure chamber.

  6. Oxidation Protection of Uranium Nitride Fuel using Liquid Phase Sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Paul A. Lessing

    2012-03-01

    Two methods are proposed to increase the oxidation resistance of uranium nitride (UN) nuclear fuel. These paths are: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U3Si2) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with various compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering or Liquid Phase Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance. The advantages (high thermal conductivity, very high melting point, and high density) of nitride fuel have long been recognized. The sodium cooled BR-10 reactor in Russia operated for 18 years on uranium nitride fuel (UN was used as the driver fuel for two core loads). However, the potential advantages (large power up-grade, increased cycle lengths, possible high burn-ups) as a Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel are offset by uranium nitride's extremely low oxidation resistance (UN powders oxidize in air and UN pellets decompose in hot water). Innovative research is proposed to solve this problem and thereby provide an accident tolerant LWR fuel that would resist water leaks and high temperature steam oxidation/spalling during an accident. It is proposed that we investigate two methods to increase the oxidation resistance of UN: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance.

  7. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  8. Infrared Dielectric Properties of Low-stress Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Beall, James A.; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; McAndrew, Brendan; Niemack, Michael D.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nitride thin films play an important role in the realization of sensors, filters, and high-performance circuits. Estimates of the dielectric function in the far- and mid-IR regime are derived from the observed transmittance spectra for a commonly employed low-stress silicon nitride formulation. The experimental, modeling, and numerical methods used to extract the dielectric parameters with an accuracy of approximately 4% are presented.

  9. Progress in periodically oriented III-nitride materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hite, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    The ability to grow III-nitride structures with alternating c-plane orientation has garnered interest in using these materials for new application spaces, such as frequency conversion. An overview of recent progress in growing periodically oriented (PO) III-nitrides is discussed, including AlN, AlGaN, and GaN. Successes in fabricating thick PO GaN structures (>500 mm) for uses in frequency conversion are highlighted.

  10. Optical studies of cubic III-nitride structures

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Ross E L

    2014-01-01

    The properties of cubic nitrides grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs (001) have been studied using optical and electrical techniques. The aim of these studies was the improvement of the growth techniques in order to improve the quality of grown nitrides intended for bulk substrate and optoelectronic device applications. We have also characterised hexagonal nanocolumn structures incorporating indium. Firstly, bulk films of cubic AlxGa1-xN with aluminium fractions (x) spanning the ...

  11. Four-Wave Mixing in Silicon-Rich Nitride Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrovic, Miranda; Guan, Xiaowei; Ji, Hua

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate four-wave mixing wavelength conversion in silicon-rich nitride waveguides which are a promising alternative to silicon for nonlinear applications. The obtained conversion efficiency reaches -13.6 dB while showing no significant nonlinear loss.......We demonstrate four-wave mixing wavelength conversion in silicon-rich nitride waveguides which are a promising alternative to silicon for nonlinear applications. The obtained conversion efficiency reaches -13.6 dB while showing no significant nonlinear loss....

  12. Defect reduction in seeded aluminum nitride crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondokov, Robert T.; Morgan, Kenneth E.; Schowalter, Leo J.; Slack, Glen A.

    2017-06-06

    Bulk single crystal of aluminum nitride (AlN) having an areal planar defect density .ltoreq.100 cm.sup.-2. Methods for growing single crystal aluminum nitride include melting an aluminum foil to uniformly wet a foundation with a layer of aluminum, the foundation forming a portion of an AlN seed holder, for an AlN seed to be used for the AlN growth. The holder may consist essentially of a substantially impervious backing plate.

  13. Corrosion behavior of tantalum and its nitride in alkali solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Deyuan; LIN Qin; FEI Qinyong; ZHAO Haomin; KANG Guangyu; GENG Man

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of tantalum and its nitrides in stirring NaOH solutions was researched by potenfiostatic method, cyclic voltammetry and XPS. The results showed that the corrosion products were composed of Ta2O5 and NaTaO3.The corrosion reaction formula of tantalum and its nitrides was written according to cyclic volt-ampere curves. The electric charge transfer coefficient and the electric charge transfer number were calculated.

  14. CRITICAL ASSESSMENT: Gallium nitride based visible light emitting diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, Rachel A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. It is currently under an indefinite embargo pending publication by Maney Publishing. Solid state lighting based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is a technology with the potential to drastically reduce energy usage, made possible by the development of gallium nitride and its alloys. However, the nitride materials family exhibits high defect densities and, in the equilibrium wurtzite crystal phase, large piezo-electric and polarisation fields arising a...

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Hexagonal Boron Nitride (h- BN) Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-09

    Synthesis 1. Diborane- ammonia (B2H6-NH3- gases): Early results with these precursors were published in 2012. 5 Briefly, LPCVD growth of h-BN in a hot-wall...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Synthesis and Characterization of Hexagonal Boron Nitride (h- BN) Films. The views, opinions and...1 ABSTRACT Number of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Synthesis and Characterization of Hexagonal Boron Nitride (h-BN) Films. Report Title

  16. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir M

    2014-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm exhibit plasmon resonance in the biological transparency window. With dimensions optimized for efficient cellular uptake, the nanoparticles demonstrate a high photothermal conversion efficiency. A self-passivating native oxide at the surface of the nanoparticles provides an additional degree of freedom for surface functionalization.

  17. Study on Titanium Nitride Film Modified for Intraocular Lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To study the characteristics of the intraocular lens using ion beam sputtering depositing titanium nitride thin film on the intraocular lens(IOLs).Methods:To deposite titanium nitride thin film on the top of intraocular lens by ion beam sputtering depositing.We analyzed the surface morphology of intraocular lens through SEM and AFM.We detected intraocular lens resolution through the measurement of intraocular lens.Biocompatibility of intraocular lens is preliminary evaluated in this test.Results:T...

  18. Defect reduction in seeded aluminum nitride crystal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondokov, Robert T.; Morgan, Kenneth E.; Schowalter, Leo J.; Stack, Glen A.

    2017-04-18

    Bulk single crystal of aluminum nitride (AlN) having an areal planar defect density.ltoreq.100 cm.sup.-2. Methods for growing single crystal aluminum nitride include melting an aluminum foil to uniformly wet a foundation with a layer of aluminum, the foundation forming a portion of an AlN seed holder, for an AlN seed to be used for the AlN growth. The holder may consist essentially of a substantially impervious backing plate.

  19. Performance of chromium nitride based coatings under plastic processing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, l.; Andritschky, M.; Pischow, K.; Wang, Z.(Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China); Zarychta, A.; Miranda, A. S.; A.M. Cunha

    2000-01-01

    Chromium nitride based coatings were produced in the form of monolithic and multilayer coatings, by DC and RF reactive magnetron sputtering. These coatings were deposited onto stainless steel and tool steel substrates. Chromium nitride coatings have;proved to be wear and corrosion resistant. The combination of these characteristics was necessary to protect surfaces during plastic processing. In order to select the best coatings, some mechanical and tribological tests were performed. Har...

  20. Synthesis of reduced carbon nitride at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharlamov, Alexey [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science of NASU, Krzhyzhanovsky St. 3, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Bondarenko, Marina, E-mail: mebondarenko@ukr.net [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science of NASU, Krzhyzhanovsky St. 3, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Kharlamova, Ganna [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, Volodymyrs' ka St. 64, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Fomenko, Veniamin [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science of NASU, Krzhyzhanovsky St. 3, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2016-09-15

    For the first time at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})O reduced carbon nitride (or reduced multi-layer azagraphene) is obtained. It is differed from usually synthesized carbon nitride by a significantly large (on 0.09 nm) interplanar distance is. At the same time, the chemical bonds between atoms in a heteroatomic plane of reduced carbon nitride correspond to the bonds in a synthesized g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The samples of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide were synthesized under the special reactionary conditions of a pyrolysis of melamine and urea. We believe that reduced carbon nitride consists of weakly connected carbon-nitrogen monosheets (azagraphene sheets) as well as reduced (from graphene oxide) graphene contains weakly connected graphene sheets. - Graphical abstract: XRD pattern and schematic atomic model of one layer of reduced carbon nitride, carbon nitride oxide and synthesized carbon nitride. For the first time at the reduction by hydroquinone of the water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})O is obtained the reduced carbon nitride (or reduced multi-layer azagraphene). Display Omitted - Highlights: • First the reduced carbon nitride (RCN) at the reduction of the carbon nitride oxide was obtained. • Water-soluble carbon nitride oxide was reduced by hydroquinone. • The chemical bonds in a heteroatomic plane of RCN correspond to the bonds in a synthesized g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • Reduced carbon nitride consists of poorly connected heteroatomic azagraphene layers.

  1. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J.; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing.

  2. Aluminum nitride for heatspreading in RF IC's

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Spina, L.; Iborra, E.; Schellevis, H.; Clement, M.; Olivares, J.; Nanver, L. K.

    2008-09-01

    To reduce the electrothermal instabilities in silicon-on-glass high-frequency bipolar devices, the integration of thin-film aluminum nitride as a heatspreader is studied. The AlN is deposited by reactive sputtering and this material is shown to fulfill all the requirements for actively draining heat from RF IC's, i.e., it has good process compatibility, sufficiently high thermal conductivity and good electrical isolation also at high frequencies. The residual stress and the piezoelectric character of the material, both of which can be detrimental for the present application, are minimized by a suitable choice of deposition conditions including variable biasing of the substrate in a multistep deposition cycle. Films of AlN as thick as 4 μm are successfully integrated in RF silicon-on-glass bipolar junction transistors that display a reduction of more than 70% in the value of the thermal resistance.

  3. Thermal tuners on a Silicon Nitride platform

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, Daniel; Baños, Rocío; Doménech, José David; Sánchez, Ana M; Cirera, Josep M; Mas, Roser; Sánchez, Javier; Durán, Sara; Pardo, Emilio; Domínguez, Carlos; Pastor, Daniel; Capmany, José; Muñoz, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the design trade-offs for the implementation of small footprint thermal tuners on silicon nitride are presented, and explored through measurements and supporting simulations of a photonic chip based on Mach-Zehnder Interferometers. Firstly, the electrical properties of the tuners are assessed, showing a compromise between compactness and deterioration. Secondly, the different variables involved in the thermal efficiency, switching power and heater dimensions, are analysed. Finally, with focus on exploring the limits of this compact tuners with regards to on chip component density, the thermal-cross talk is also investigated. Tuners with footprint of 270x5 {\\mu}m 2 and switching power of 350 mW are reported, with thermal-cross talk, in terms of induced phase change in adjacent devices of less than one order of magnitude at distances over 20 {\\mu}m. Paths for the improvement of thermal efficiency, power consumption and resilience of the devices are also outlined

  4. Boron Nitride Nanotube: Synthesis and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Park, Cheol; Lee, Joseph W.; Luong, Hoa H.; Gibbons, Luke J.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Applin, Samantha I.; Gnoffo, Peter; Lowther, Sharon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Kang, Jin Ho; Sauti, Godfrey; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Yamakov, Vesselin; Wise, Kristopher E.; Su, Ji; Fay, Catharine C.

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have predicted that carbon's immediate neighbors on the periodic chart, boron and nitrogen, may also form perfect nanotubes, since the advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in 1991. First proposed then synthesized by researchers at UC Berkeley in the mid 1990's, the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has proven very difficult to make until now. Herein we provide an update on a catalyst-free method for synthesizing highly crystalline, small diameter BNNTs with a high aspect ratio using a high power laser under a high pressure and high temperature environment first discovered jointly by NASA/NIA JSA. Progress in purification methods, dispersion studies, BNNT mat and composite formation, and modeling and diagnostics will also be presented. The white BNNTs offer extraordinary properties including neutron radiation shielding, piezoelectricity, thermal oxidative stability (> 800 C in air), mechanical strength, and toughness. The characteristics of the novel BNNTs and BNNT polymer composites and their potential applications are discussed.

  5. Oxygen radical functionalization of boron nitride nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Toby; Satti, Amro; May, Peter; Wang, Zhiming; McGovern, Ignatius; Gun'ko, Yurii K; Coleman, Jonathan

    2012-11-14

    The covalent chemical functionalization of exfoliated hexagonal boron-nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) is achieved by the solution-phase oxygen radical functionalization of boron atoms in the h-BN lattice. This involves a two-step procedure to initially covalently graft alkoxy groups to boron atoms and the subsequent hydrolytic defunctionalization of the groups to yield hydroxyl-functionalized BNNSs (OH-BNNSs). Characterization of the functionalized-BNNSs using HR-TEM, Raman, UV-vis, FTIR, NMR, and TGA was performed to investigate both the structure of the BNNSs and the covalent functionalization methodology. OH-BNNSs were used to prepare polymer nanocomposites and their mechanical properties analyzed. The influence of the functional groups grafted to the surface of the BNNSs is investigated by demonstrating the impact on mechanical properties of both noncovalent and covalent bonding at the interface between the nanofiller and polymer matrixes.

  6. Mechanical Hysteresis of Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Aiguo; LI Haoran

    2011-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an important structural material with layered microstructure.Because of the plastic anisotropy,this material shows obvious mechanical hysteresis (nonlinear elastic deformation).There are hysteretic loops at the cyclical load-unload stress-strain curves of h-BN.Consequently,two hot-pressed h-BN cylinders with different textures were studied.The mechanical hysteresis is heavily texture-dependent.The area of hysteretic loop is linearly related with the square of loading stresslevel.Two minor loops attached on the hysteretic loops with the same extreme stresses have congruent shapes.It can be concluded that the mechanical hysteresis of h-BN can he explained by a Kink Nonlinear Elastic model developed from the study of a ternary carbide Ti3SiC2.

  7. Pure and doped boron nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Terrones

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available More than ten years ago, it was suggested theoretically that boron nitride (BN nanotubes could be produced. Soon after, various reports on their synthesis appeared and a new area of nanotube science was born. This review aims to cover the latest advances related to the synthesis of BN nanotubes. We show that these tubes can now be produced in larger amounts and, in particular, that the chemistry of BN tubes appears to be very important to the production of reinforced composites with insulating characteristics. From the theoretical standpoint, we also show that (BN-C heteronanotubes could have important implications for nanoelectronics. We believe that BN nanotubes (pure and doped could be used in the fabrication of novel devices in which pure carbon nanotubes do not perform very efficiently.

  8. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D., E-mail: d.fischer@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwinghammer, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany); Sondermann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Lau, V.W.; Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lotsch, B.V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C{sub 2}N{sub 4}H{sub 4}), melamine (C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}), and melem (C{sub 6}N{sub 10}H{sub 6}), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials.

  9. Carbon nitride frameworks and dense crystalline polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Chris J.; Salamat, Ashkan; Bojdys, Michael J.; Needs, Richard J.; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-09-01

    We used ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) to investigate polymorphism in C3N4 carbon nitride as a function of pressure. Our calculations reveal new framework structures, including a particularly stable chiral polymorph of space group P 43212 containing mixed s p2 and s p3 bonding, that we have produced experimentally and recovered to ambient conditions. As pressure is increased a sequence of structures with fully s p3 -bonded C atoms and three-fold-coordinated N atoms is predicted, culminating in a dense P n m a phase above 250 GPa. Beyond 650 GPa we find that C3N4 becomes unstable to decomposition into diamond and pyrite-structured CN2.

  10. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Chang; Li, Guan-Hua; Lin, Yuan-Ting; Chang, Ching-Wen; Wadekar, Paritosh; Chen, Quark Yung-Sung; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Tchernycheva, Maria; Julien, François Henri; Tu, Li-Wei

    2011-12-14

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio.

  11. Thickness dependent thermal conductivity of gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziade, Elbara; Yang, Jia; Brummer, Gordie; Nothern, Denis; Moustakas, Theodore; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2017-01-01

    As the size of gallium nitride (GaN) transistors is reduced in order to reach higher operating frequencies, heat dissipation becomes the critical bottleneck in device performance and longevity. Despite the importance of characterizing the physics governing the thermal transport in thin GaN films, the literature is far from conclusive. In this letter, we report measurements of thermal conductivity in a GaN film with thickness ranging from 15-1000 nm grown on 4H-SiC without a transition layer. Additionally, we measure the thermal conductivity in the GaN film when it is 1 μm-thick in the temperature range of 300 < T < 600 K and use a phonon transport model to explain the thermal conductivity in this film.

  12. Nonlinear electronic transport behavior in Indium Nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Cloves G., E-mail: cloves@pucgoias.edu.br [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Goias, CP 86, 74605-010 Goiania, Goias (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    A theoretical study on the nonlinear transport of electrons and of the nonequilibrium temperature in n-doped Indium Nitride under influence of moderate to high electric fields (in this nonlinear domain) is presented. It is based on a nonlinear quantum kinetic theory which provides a description of the dissipative phenomena developing in the system. The electric current and the mobility in the steady state are obtained, and their dependence on the electric field strength and on the concentration (that is, a mobility dependent nonlinearly on field and concentration) is obtained and analyzed. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have reported on the topic of nonlinear transport (electron mobility) in n-doped InN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results evidence the presence of two distinctive regimes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dependence of the mobility on the electric field is manifested through of the relaxation times.

  13. Multifractal characteristics of titanium nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ţălu Ştefan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study presents a multi-scale microstructural characterization of three-dimensional (3-D micro-textured surface of titanium nitride (TiN thin films prepared by reactive DC magnetron sputtering in correlation with substrate temperature variation. Topographical characterization of the surfaces, obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM analysis, was realized by an innovative multifractal method which may be applied for AFM data. The surface micromorphology demonstrates that the multifractal geometry of TiN thin films can be characterized at nanometer scale by the generalized dimensions Dq and the singularity spectrum f(α. Furthermore, to improve the 3-D surface characterization according with ISO 25178-2:2012, the most relevant 3-D surface roughness parameters were calculated. To quantify the 3-D nanostructure surface of TiN thin films a multifractal approach was developed and validated, which can be used for the characterization of topographical changes due to the substrate temperature variation.

  14. CEMS of nitride coatings in agressive environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzel, D. [University of Ljubljana, J. Stefan Institute (Slovenia); Agudelo, A.C.; Gancedo, J.R. [Instituto de Quimica-Fisica ' Rocasolano' , CSIC (Spain); Lakatos-Varsanyi, M. [Eoetvoes University, Department of Physical Chemistry (Hungary); Marco, J.F. [Instituto de Quimica-Fisica ' Rocasolano' , CSIC (Spain)

    1998-12-15

    The corrosion properties of single layered TiN and CrN films have been compared to bi-layered and multi-layered Ti/TiN films. XPS has showed that in humid SO{sub 2} atmosphere the best corrosion properties have been achieved by a multi-layered Ti/TiN coating. Cyclic voltammetry in acetate buffer has been applied to measure the porousity and corrosion resistance of coatings. The best results have been achieved by multi-layered Ti/TiN and CrN films. Conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to study the changes in the interface Fe/TiN during thermal treatment in UHV. It has been shown that the amount of iron nitrides in the interface increases with increasing temperature.

  15. Optical processes in dilute nitrides Semiconductors; Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Potter, R J

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the narrow bandgap semiconductor alloys known as dilute nitrides. The initial part of this project was concerned with characterisation of chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) grown samples so that growth techniques could be refined. Early samples show evidence of structural/compositional disorder resulting from the large miscibility gap induced by nitrogen. Non-equilibrium growth was employed to overcome this, eventually resulting in improved material. In the second part of this project, steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence, along with photomodulated reflectance were employed to investigate the optical properties of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown GalnNAs, GaNAs and InGaAs quantum wells (QWs). Low temperature results show evidence of carrier localization, which was interpreted in terms of structural/compositional fluctuations induced by the nitrogen incorporation. Poor photoluminescence efficiency and rapid decay of emission kinetics indicate the presence of strong non-radi...

  16. Gallium Nitride Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Min, E-mail: mlu2006@sinano.ac.c [Su zhou Institute of Nano-technology and Nano-bionics, CAS, Su zhou 215125 (China); Zhang Guoguang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Fu Kai; Yu Guohao [Su zhou Institute of Nano-technology and Nano-bionics, CAS, Su zhou 215125 (China); Su Dan; Hu Jifeng [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Gallium Nitride nuclear batteries with Ni-63 are demonstrated for the first time. {yields} Open circuit voltage of 0.1 V and conversion efficiency of 0.32% have been obtained. {yields} The limited performance is due to thin effective energy deposition layer. {yields} The output power is expected to greatly increase with growing thick GaN films. -- Abstract: Gallium Nitride (GaN) Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries (GNBB) are demonstrated in our work for the first time. GaN films are grown on sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and then GaN Schottky diodes are fabricated by normal micro-fabrication process. Nickel with mass number of 63 ({sup 63}Ni), which emits {beta} particles, is loaded on the GaN Schottky diodes to achieve GNBB. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) are carried out to investigate the crystal quality for the GaN films as grown. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics shows that the GaN Schottky diodes are not jet broken down at -200 V due to consummate fabrication processes, and the open circuit voltage of the GNBB is 0.1 V and the short circuit current density is 1.2 nA cm{sup -2}. The limited performance of the GNBB is due to thin effective energy deposition layer, which is only 206 nm to absorb very small partial energy of the {beta} particles because of the relatively high dislocation density and carrier concentration. However, the conversion efficiency of 0.32% and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 29% for the GNBB have been obtained. Therefore, the output power of the GNBB are expected to greatly increase with growing high quality thick GaN films.

  17. Facile synthesis of efficient photocatalytic tantalum nitride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zheng; Wang, Jiangting; Hou, Jungang; Huang, Kai; Jiao, Shuqiang [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhu, Hongmin, E-mail: hzhu@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Tantalum nitride nanoparticles as a visible-light-driven photocatalyst prepared by a novel homogeneously chemical reduction of tantalum pentachloride using sodium in liquid ammonia and the morphologies, visible-light photocatalytic properties and stability of tantalum nitride nanoparticles were investigated. Highlights: ► Tantalum nitride nanoparticles have been prepared by a homogeneously chemical reduction. ► The crystal structure of tantalum nitride was determined by Rietveld refinement and XRD patterns. ► The Tantalum nitride nanoparticle size was in the range of 20–50 nm. ► Much high photocatalytic activities of Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} nanoparticles were obtained under visible-light irradiation. -- Abstract: Tantalum nitride nanoparticles, as visible-light photocatalysts were synthesized by a two-step homogeneously chemical reduction without any polymers and templates. The well-crystallized Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} nanoparticles with a range of 20–50 nm in size have been characterized by a number of techniques, such as XRD, XPS, SEM, TEM, BET and UV–Vis spectrum. Most importantly, the Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} nanoparticles with good stability exhibited higher photooxidation activities in the water splitting and degradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation than bulk Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} particles and commercial P25 TiO{sub 2}, demonstrating that Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} nanoparticle is a promising candidate as a visible-light photocatalyst.

  18. Nanotribological response of a plasma nitrided bio-steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Aniruddha; Chakraborty, Himel; Bhattacharya, Manjima; Ghosh, Jiten; Sreemany, Monjoy; Bysakh, Sandip; Rane, Ramkrishna; Joseph, Alphonsa; Jhala, Ghanshyam; Mukherjee, Subroto; Das, Mitun; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop K

    2017-01-01

    AISI 316L is a well known biocompatible, austenitic stainless steel (SS). It is thus a bio-steel. Considering its importance as a bio-prosthesis material here we report the plasma nitriding of AISI 316L (SS) followed by its microstructural and nanotribological characterization. Plasma nitriding of the SS samples was carried out in a plasma reactor with a hot wall vacuum chamber. For ease of comparison these plasma nitrided samples were termed as SSPN. The experimental results confirmed the formations of an embedded nitrided metal layer zone (ENMLZ) and an interface zone (IZ) between the ENMLZ and the unnitrided bulk metallic layer zone (BMLZ) in the SSPN sample. These ENMLZ and IZ in the SSPN sample were richer in iron nitride (FeN) chromium nitride (CrN) along with the austenite phase. The results from nanoindentation, microscratch, nanoscratch and sliding wear studies confirmed that the static contact deformation resistance, the microwear, nanowear and sliding wear resistance of the SSPN samples were much better than those of the SS samples. These results were explained in terms of structure-property correlations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarifah, Ratna Dewi; Suud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better.

  20. Anisotropic Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanomaterials - Synthesis and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han,W.Q.

    2008-08-01

    Boron nitride (BN) is a synthetic binary compound located between III and V group elements in the Periodic Table. However, its properties, in terms of polymorphism and mechanical characteristics, are rather close to those of carbon compared with other III-V compounds, such as gallium nitride. BN crystallizes into a layered or a tetrahedrally linked structure, like those of graphite and diamond, respectively, depending on the conditions of its preparation, especially the pressure applied. Such correspondence between BN and carbon readily can be understood from their isoelectronic structures [1, 2]. On the other hand, in contrast to graphite, layered BN is transparent and is an insulator. This material has attracted great interest because, similar to carbon, it exists in various polymorphic forms exhibiting very different properties; however, these forms do not correspond strictly to those of carbon. Crystallographically, BN is classified into four polymorphic forms: Hexagonal BN (h-BN) (Figure 1(b)); rhombohedral BN (r-BN); cubic BN (c-BN); and wurtzite BN (w-BN). BN does not occur in nature. In 1842, Balmain [3] obtained BN as a reaction product between molten boric oxide and potassium cyanide under atmospheric pressure. Thereafter, many methods for its synthesis were reported. h-BN and r-BN are formed under ambient pressure. c-BN is synthesized from h-BN under high pressure at high temperature while w-BN is prepared from h-BN under high pressure at room temperature [1]. Each BN layer consists of stacks of hexagonal plate-like units of boron and nitrogen atoms linked by SP{sup 2} hybridized orbits and held together mainly by Van der Waals force (Fig 1(b)). The hexagonal polymorph has two-layered repeating units: AA'AA'... that differ from those in graphite: ABAB... (Figure 1(a)). Within the layers of h-BN there is coincidence between the same phases of the hexagons, although the boron atoms and nitrogen atoms are alternatively located along the c

  1. Critical flaw size in silicon nitride ball bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, George Arthur

    Aircraft engine and bearing manufacturers have been aggressively pursuing advanced materials technology systems solutions to meet main shaft-bearing needs of advanced military aircraft engines. Ceramic silicon nitride hybrid bearings are being developed for such high performance applications. Though silicon nitride exhibits many favorable properties such as high compressive strength, high hardness, a third of the density of steel, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and high corrosion and temperature resistance, they also have low fracture toughness and are susceptible to failure from fatigue spalls emanating from pre-existing surface flaws that can grow under rolling contact fatigue (RCF). Rolling elements and raceways are among the most demanding components in aircraft engines due to a combination of high cyclic contact stresses, long expected component lifetimes, corrosive environment, and the high consequence of fatigue failure. The cost of these rolling elements increases exponentially with the decrease in allowable flaw size for service applications. Hence the range of 3D non-planar surface flaw geometries subject to RCF is simulated to determine the critical flaw size (CFS) or the largest allowable flaw that does not grow under service conditions. This dissertation is a numerical and experimental investigation of surface flaws in ceramic balls subjected to RCF and has resulted in the following analyses: Crack Shape Determination: the nucleation of surface flaws from ball impact that occurs during the manufacturing process is simulated. By examining the subsurface Hertzian stresses between contacting spheres, their applicability to predicting and characterizing crack size and shape is established. It is demonstrated that a wide range of cone and partial cone cracks, observed in practice, can be generated using the proposed approaches. RCF Simulation: the procedure and concerns in modeling nonplanar 3D cracks subject to RCF using FEA for stress intensity

  2. Generation and Characteristics of IV-VI transition Metal Nitride and Carbide Nanoparticles using a Reactive Mesoporous Carbon Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-02-22

    Interstitial nitrides and carbides of early transition metals in groups IV–VI exhibit platinum-like electronic structures, which make them promising candidates to replace noble metals in various catalytic reactions. Herein, we present the preparation and characterization of nano-sized transition metal nitries and carbides of groups IV–VI (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W) using mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4), which not only provides confined spaces for restricting primary particle size but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. We studied the reactivity of the metals with the template under N2 flow at 1023 K while keeping the weight ratio of metal to template constant at unity. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr form nitride phases with face centered cubic structure, whereas Mo and W forme carbides with hexagonal structures. The tendency to form nitride or carbide obeys the free formation energy of the transition metal nitrides and carbides. This method offers the potential to prepare the desired size, shape and phase of transition metal nitrides and carbides that are suitable for a specific reaction, which is the chief objective of materials chemistry.

  3. Graphene-like Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniwal, Sumit; Hooper, James; Miller, Daniel P; Costa, Paulo S; Chen, Gang; Liu, Shih-Yuan; Dowben, Peter A; Sykes, E Charles H; Zurek, Eva; Enders, Axel

    2017-03-28

    A strategy to synthesize a 2D graphenic but ternary monolayer containing atoms of carbon, nitrogen, and boron, h-BCN, is presented. The synthesis utilizes bis-BN cyclohexane, B2N2C2H12, as a precursor molecule and relies on thermally induced dehydrogenation of the precursor molecules and the formation of an epitaxial monolayer on Ir(111) through covalent bond formation. The lattice mismatch between the film and substrate causes a strain-driven periodic buckling of the film. The structure of the film and its corrugated morphology is discussed based on comprehensive data from molecular-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy imaging, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory. First-principles calculations further predict a direct electronic band gap that is intermediate between gapless graphene and insulating h-BN.

  4. Integrated experimental and theoretical approach for corrosion and wear evaluation of laser surface nitrided, Ti-6Al-4V biomaterial in physiological solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Hitesh D; Shanker Rajamure, Ravi; Dahotre, Sanket N; Ho, Yee-Hsien; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Dahotre, Narendra B

    2014-09-01

    A laser based surface nitriding process was adopted to further enhance the osseo-integration, corrosion resistance, and tribological properties of the commonly used bioimplant alloy, Ti-6Al-4V. Earlier preliminary osteoblast, electrochemical, and corrosive wear studies of laser nitrided titanium in simulated body fluid clearly revealed improvement of cell adhesion as well as enhancement in corrosion and wear resistance but mostly lacked the in-depth fundamental understanding behind these improvements. Therefore, a novel integrated experimental and theoretical approach were implemented to understand the physical phenomena behind the improvements and establish the property-structure-processing correlation of nitrided surface. The first principle and thermodynamic calculations were employed to understand the thermodynamic, electronic, and elastic properties of TiN for enthalpy of formation, Gibbs free energy, density of states, and elastic properties of TiN were investigated. Additionally, open circuit potential and cyclic potentio-dynamic polarization tests were carried out in simulated body fluid to evaluate the corrosion resistance that in turn linked with the experimentally measured and computationally predicted surface energies of TiN. From these results, it is concluded that the enhancement in the corrosion resistance after laser nitriding is mainly attributed to the presence of covalent bonding via hybridization among Ti (p) and N (d) orbitals. Furthermore, mechanical properties, such as, Poisson׳s ratio, stiffness, Pugh׳s ductility criteria, and Vicker׳s hardness, predicted from first principle calculations were also correlated to the increase in wear resistance of TiN. All the above factors together seem to have contributed to significant improvement in both wear and corrosion performance of nitride surface compared to the bare Ti-6Al-4V in physiological environment indicating its suitability for bioimplant applications.

  5. Nitride coating enhances endothelialization on biomedical NiTi shape memory alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ion, Raluca [University of Bucharest, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 91-95 Spl. Independentei, 050095 Bucharest (Romania); Luculescu, Catalin [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Cimpean, Anisoara, E-mail: anisoara.cimpean@bio.unibuc.ro [University of Bucharest, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 91-95 Spl. Independentei, 050095 Bucharest (Romania); Marx, Philippe [AMF Company, Route de Quincy, 18120 Lury-sur-Arnon (France); Gordin, Doina-Margareta; Gloriant, Thierry [INSA Rennes, UMR CNRS 6226 ISCR, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France)

    2016-05-01

    Surface nitriding was demonstrated to be an effective process for improving the biocompatibility of implantable devices. In this study, we investigated the benefits of nitriding the NiTi shape memory alloy for vascular stent applications. Results from cell experiments indicated that, compared to untreated NiTi, a superficial gas nitriding treatment enhanced the adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), cell spreading and proliferation. This investigation provides data to demonstrate the possibility of improving the rate of endothelialization on NiTi by means of nitride coating. - Highlights: • Gas nitriding process of NiTi is competent to promote cell spreading. • Surface nitriding of NiTi is able to stimulate focal adhesion formation and cell proliferation. • Similar expression pattern of vWf and eNOS was exhibited by bare and nitrided NiTi. • Gas nitriding treatment of NiTi shows promise for better in vivo endothelialization.

  6. Imitators of plutonium and americium in a mixed uranium- plutonium nitride fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, S. N.; Shornikov, D. P.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.; Burlakova, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Uranium nitride and mix uranium nitride (U-Pu)N is most popular nuclear fuel for Russian Fast Breeder Reactor. The works in hot cells associated with the radiation exposure of personnel and methodological difficulties. To know the main physical-chemical properties of uranium-plutonium nitride it necessary research to hot cells. In this paper, based on an assessment of physicochemical and thermodynamic properties of selected simulators Pu and Am. Analogues of Pu is are Ce and Y, and analogues Am - Dy. The technique of obtaining a model nitride fuel based on lanthanides nitrides and UN. Hydrogenation-dehydrogenation- nitration method of derived powders nitrides uranium, cerium, yttrium and dysprosium, held their mixing, pressing and sintering, the samples obtained model nitride fuel with plutonium and americium imitation. According to the results of structural studies have shown that all the samples are solid solution nitrides rare earth (REE) elements in UN.

  7. First principles calculations of interstitial and lamellar rhenium nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, G., E-mail: gerardo@cnyn.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada Baja California (Mexico); Tiznado, H.; Reyes, A.; Cruz, W. de la [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada Baja California (Mexico)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The possible structures of rhenium nitride as a function of composition are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloying energy is favorable for rhenium nitride in lamellar arrangements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures produced by magnetron sputtering are metastable variations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures produced by high-pressure high-temperature are stable configurations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lamellar structures are a new category of interstitial dissolutions. - Abstract: We report here a systematic first principles study of two classes of variable-composition rhenium nitride: i, interstitial rhenium nitride as a solid solution and ii, rhenium nitride in lamellar structures. The compounds in class i are cubic and hexagonal close-packed rhenium phases, with nitrogen in the octahedral and tetrahedral interstices of the metal, and they are formed without changes to the structure, except for slight distortions of the unit cells. In the compounds in class ii, by contrast, the nitrogen inclusion provokes stacking faults in the parent metal structure. These faults create trigonal-prismatic sites where the nitrogen residence is energetically favored. This second class of compounds produces lamellar structures, where the nitrogen lamellas are inserted among multiple rhenium layers. The Re{sub 3}N and Re{sub 2}N phases produced recently by high-temperature and high-pressure synthesis belong to this class. The ratio of the nitrogen layers to the rhenium layers is given by the composition. While the first principle calculations point to higher stability for the lamellar structures as opposed to the interstitial phases, the experimental evidence presented here demonstrates that the interstitial classes are synthesizable by plasma methods. We conclude that rhenium nitrides possess polymorphism and that the two-dimensional lamellar structures might represent an emerging class of materials

  8. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Norizzawati Mohd; Yasui, Kanji; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2014-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm(2) using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si.

  9. Effect of variation of silicon nitride passivation layer on electron irradiated aluminum gallium nitride/gallium nitride HEMT structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Helen C.

    Silicon nitride passivation on AlGaNGaN heterojunction devices can improve performance by reducing electron traps at the surface. This research studies the effect of displacement damage caused by 1 MeV electron irradiation as a function of the variation of passivation layer thickness and heterostructure layer variation on AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. The effects of passivation layer thickness are investigated at thicknesses of 0, 20, 50 and 120 nanometers on AlGaNGaN test structures with either an AlN nucleation layer or a GaN cap structures which are then measured before and immediately after 1.0 MeV electron irradiation at fluences of 1016 cm-2. Hall system measurements are used to observe changes in mobility, carrier concentration and conductivity as a function of Si3N4 thickness. Models are developed that relate the device structure and passivation layer under 1 MeV radiation to the observed changes to the measured photoluminescence and deep level transient spectroscopy. A software model is developed to determine the production rate of defects from primary 1 MeV electrons that can be used for other energies and materials. The presence of either a 50 or 120 nm Si 3N4 passivation layer preserves the channel current for both and appears to be optimal for radiation hardness.

  10. Crystal structure and electronic properties of the new structure dinitride-nitride N{sub 2}MN (M: Cu, Ag)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, Yuriy [Physical Faculty, Department of General Physics, Kemerovo State University, Red st. 6, 650043 Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Lisitsyn, Viktor; Morozova, Yelena [Department of Lasers and Lighting Engineering, Institute of High Technology Physics, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av. 30, 634030 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-15

    Copper and nitrogen compounds and silver and nitrogen compounds have been researched with the first-principle linear combination of the atomic orbitals in full-screen basis with the local gradient and hybrid potential of the density functional theory (DFT) realized in the CRYSTAL09 program code. We have found the structural N{sub 2}MN (M: Cu, Ag) dinitride-nitride phase having an orthorhombic structure, the spatial group of the Ibam symmetry and four formula units in the primitive cell that have not been reported before. The structure was found to be layered, the metal atoms are linearly circled by the nitride N atoms, whereas, the other two atoms make a molecule with a small negative charge of {proportional_to}0.02 e. The volume elastic modules in N{sub 2}CuN, N{sub 2}AgN crystals are equal to 4.3 and 6.6 GPa, respectively, and their pressure derivatives are equal to 6.7 and 5.3, respectively. The electron energy spectrum makes a superposition of weakly interacting molecular states of N{sub 2} and metal states of MN. The bandgap width equals {proportional_to}0.05 eV. The estimations of the enthalpy energies show that N{sub 2}MN possess large energy content and in its decomposition into metal and gaseous nitride the energy release can reach 8 eV cell{sup -1}, which appears to be higher than that in the known metal azides. Thus, the new structure of the dinitride-nitride N{sub 2}MN combines the properties of molecular and semiconductor crystals: high compressibility, strong mechanical anisotropy, localized vacant states in the zone spectrum, and small bandgap. The unique physical properties can ensure their application as energy materials, the source of chemically pure nitride, and in semiconductor and optical material science. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. DFT Studies on Electronic Structures of Boro-Nitride-Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ming; HUANG Chun-Hui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the configurations of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes with BNC2 composition were optimized by ROHF method. According to the density functional theory, the electronic structures of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes were calculated by DFT/ROB3LYP method. By analyzing the energy gap, density of electronic state and bonding maps of atoms, the conductive properties of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes were obtained, and compared with those of carbon nanotubes and other Boro-Nitride nanotubes.

  12. Evanescent field phase shifting in a silicon nitride waveguide using a coupled silicon slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Asger Sellerup; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Green, William M. J.

    2015-01-01

    An approach for electrical modulation of low-loss silicon nitride waveguides is proposed, using a silicon nitride waveguide evanescently loaded with a thin silicon slab. The thermooptic phase-shift characteristics are investigated in a racetrack resonator configuration.......An approach for electrical modulation of low-loss silicon nitride waveguides is proposed, using a silicon nitride waveguide evanescently loaded with a thin silicon slab. The thermooptic phase-shift characteristics are investigated in a racetrack resonator configuration....

  13. Electroless plating of thin gold films directly onto silicon nitride thin films and into micropores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Julie C; Karawdeniya, Buddini Iroshika; Bandara, Y M Nuwan D Y; Velleco, Brian D; Masterson, Caitlin M; Dwyer, Jason R

    2014-07-23

    A method to directly electrolessly plate silicon-rich silicon nitride with thin gold films was developed and characterized. Films with thicknesses plating free-standing ultrathin silicon nitride membranes, and we successfully plated the interior walls of micropore arrays in 200 nm thick silicon nitride membranes. The method is thus amenable to coating planar, curved, and line-of-sight-obscured silicon nitride surfaces.

  14. Technical assistance for development of thermally conductive nitride filler for epoxy molding compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Song, Kee Chan; Jung, In Ha

    2005-07-15

    Technical assistance was carried out to develop nitride filler for thermally conductive epoxy molding compounds. Carbothermal reduction method was used to fabricate silicon nitride powder from mixtures of silica and graphite powders. Microstructure and crystal structure were observed by using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction technique. Thermal properties of epoxy molding compounds containing silicon nitride were measured by using laser flash method. Fabrication process of silicon nitride nanowire was developed and was applied to a patent.

  15. Performance analysis of nitride alternative plasmonic materials for localized surface plasmon applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, U.; Naik, G. V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    . Titanium nitride and zirconium nitride, which were recently suggested as alternative plasmonic materials in the visible and near-infrared ranges, are compared to the performance of gold. In contrast to the results from quasistatic methods, both nitride materials are very good alternatives to the usual...

  16. UN{sub 2−x} layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Zhong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Hu, Yin [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Chen, Lin [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Luo, Lizhu [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Liu, Kezhao, E-mail: liukz@hotmail.com [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Lai, Xinchun, E-mail: lai319@yahoo.com [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • We used a very simple method to prepare nitride layer on uranium metal surface. • This modified layer is nitrogen-rich nitride, which should be written as UN{sub 2−x}. • TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains. • XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence in the nitride. - Abstract: Glow plasma nitriding is a simple and economical surface treatment method, and this technology was used to prepare nitride layer on the surface of uranium metal with thickness of several microns. The composition and structure of the nitride layer were analyzed by AES and XRD, indicating that this modified layer is nitrogen-rich uranium nitride, which should be written as UN{sub 2−x}. TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains, with compact structure. And XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence existing in the nitride. After the treated uranium storage in air for a long time, oxygen just entered the surface several nanometers, showing the nitride layer has excellent oxidation resistance. The mechanism of nitride layer formation and low valence uranium appearance is discussed.

  17. Corrosion behaviour of the 42CrMo4 Steel Nitrided by Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okba Belahssen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents corrosion behaviour of alloy 42CrMo4 steel nitrided by plasma. Different samples were tested: untreated and plasma nitrided samples. The corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical techniques (potentiodynamic curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The corrosion tests were carried out in acid chloride solution 1M. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples nitrided.

  18. Turbostratic boron nitride coated on high-surface area metal oxide templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Egeblad, Kresten; Brorson, M.

    2007-01-01

    Boron nitride coatings on high-surface area MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by X-ray powder diffraction. The metal oxide templates were coated with boron nitride using a simple nitridation in a flow of ammonia starting from ammonium...

  19. Imaging Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistors to Identify Point Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE IMAGING GALLIUM NITRIDE HIGH ELECTRON MOBILITY TRANSISTORS TO IDENTIFY...Identification of these trends will assist in the improvement of gallium nitride HEMT fabrication processes leading to the development of more...reliable devices. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Electron microscopy, Gallium Nitride (GaN), high electron mobility transistor (HEMT

  20. Corrosion behaviour of the 42CrMo4 Steel Nitrided by Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Okba Belahssen; Abdelouahed Chala; Said Benramache

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents corrosion behaviour of alloy 42CrMo4 steel nitrided by plasma. Different samples were tested: untreated and plasma nitrided samples. The corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical techniques (potentiodynamic curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy). The corrosion tests were carried out in acid chloride solution 1M. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples nitrided.

  1. Effective Duration of Gas Nitriding Process on AISI 316L for the Formation of a Desired Thickness of Surface Nitrided Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Hassan R. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High temperature gas nitriding performed on AISI 316L at the temperature of 1200°C. The microstructure of treated AISI 316L samples were observed to identify the formation of the microstructure of nitrided surface layer. The grain size of austenite tends to be enlarged when the nitriding time increases, but the austenite single phase structure is maintained even after the long-time solution nitriding. Using microhardness testing, the hardness values drop to the center of the samples. The increase in surface hardness is due to the high nitrogen concentration at or near the surface. At 245HV, the graph of the effective duration of nitriding process was plotted to achieve the maximum depth of nitrogen diffuse under the surface. Using Sigma Plot software best fit lines of the experimental result found and plotted to find out effective duration of nitriding equation as Y=1.9491(1-0.7947x, where Y is the thickness of nitrided layer below the surface and X is duration of nitriding process. Based on this equation, the duration of gas nitriding process can be estimated to produce desired thickness of nitrided layer.

  2. Fabrication of nitride fuels for transmutation of minor actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Kazuo; Akabori, Mitsuo; Takano, Masahide; Arai, Yasuo; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Itoh, Akinori; Ogawa, Toru

    2003-07-01

    At the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the concept of the transmutation of minor actinides (MA: Np, Am and Cm) with accelerator-driven systems is being studied. The MA nitride fuel has been chosen as a candidate because of the possible mutual solubility among the actinide mononitrides and excellent thermal properties besides supporting hard neutron spectrum. MA nitrides of NpN, (Np, Pu)N, (Np, U)N, AmN, (Am, Y)N, (Am, Zr)N and (Cm, Pu)N were prepared from the oxides by the carbothermic reduction method. The prepared MA nitrides were examined by X-ray diffraction and the contents of impurities of oxygen and carbon were measured. The fabrication conditions for MA nitrides were improved so as to reduce the impurity contents. For an irradiation test of U-free nitride fuels, pellets of (Pu, Zr)N and PuN + TiN were prepared and a He-bonded fuel pin was fabricated. The irradiation test started in May 2002 and will go on for two years in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor.

  3. Functional carbon nitride materials — design strategies for electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Fabian K.; Zheng, Yun; Schwarz, Dana; Merschjann, Christoph; Schnick, Wolfgang; Wang, Xinchen; Bojdys, Michael J.

    2017-06-01

    In the past decade, research in the field of artificial photosynthesis has shifted from simple, inorganic semiconductors to more abundant, polymeric materials. For example, polymeric carbon nitrides have emerged as promising materials for metal-free semiconductors and metal-free photocatalysts. Polymeric carbon nitride (melon) and related carbon nitride materials are desirable alternatives to industrially used catalysts because they are easily synthesized from abundant and inexpensive starting materials. Furthermore, these materials are chemically benign because they do not contain heavy metal ions, thereby facilitating handling and disposal. In this Review, we discuss the building blocks of carbon nitride materials and examine how strategies in synthesis, templating and post-processing translate from the molecular level to macroscopic properties, such as optical and electronic bandgap. Applications of carbon nitride materials in bulk heterojunctions, laser-patterned memory devices and energy storage devices indicate that photocatalytic overall water splitting on an industrial scale may be realized in the near future and reveal a new avenue of 'post-silicon electronics'.

  4. Two-dimensional gallium nitride realized via graphene encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, Zakaria Y.; Wang, Ke; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Vilá, Rafael A.; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Qin, Xiaoye; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Desario, Paul A.; Stone, Greg; Subramanian, Shruti; Paul, Dennis F.; Wallace, Robert M.; Datta, Suman; Redwing, Joan M.; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2016-11-01

    The spectrum of two-dimensional (2D) and layered materials `beyond graphene’ offers a remarkable platform to study new phenomena in condensed matter physics. Among these materials, layered hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), with its wide bandgap energy (~5.0-6.0 eV), has clearly established that 2D nitrides are key to advancing 2D devices. A gap, however, remains between the theoretical prediction of 2D nitrides `beyond hBN’ and experimental realization of such structures. Here we demonstrate the synthesis of 2D gallium nitride (GaN) via a migration-enhanced encapsulated growth (MEEG) technique utilizing epitaxial graphene. We theoretically predict and experimentally validate that the atomic structure of 2D GaN grown via MEEG is notably different from reported theory. Moreover, we establish that graphene plays a critical role in stabilizing the direct-bandgap (nearly 5.0 eV), 2D buckled structure. Our results provide a foundation for discovery and stabilization of 2D nitrides that are difficult to prepare via traditional synthesis.

  5. Surface properties of nitrided layer on AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel produced by high temperature plasma nitriding in short time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang, E-mail: metalytu@163.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yantai University, Qingquan Road 32, Yantai 264005 (China); Wang, Zhuo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yantai University, Qingquan Road 32, Yantai 264005 (China); Wang, Liang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian Maritime University, Linghai Road 1, Dalian 116026 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The 8 μm nitrided layer was produced on the surface of AISI 316L stainless steel by plasma nitrided at high temperatures (540 °C) within 1 h. • The nitrided layer consisted of nitrogen expanded austenite and possibly a small amount of free-CrN and iron nitrides. • It could critically reduce processing time compared with low temperature nitriding. • High temperature plasma nitriding could improve pitting corrosion resistance of the substrate in 3.5% NaCl solution. - Abstract: It has generally been believed that the formation of the S phase or expanded austenite γ{sub N} with enough thickness depends on the temperature (lower than 480 °C) and duration of the process. In this work, we attempt to produce nitrogen expanded austenite layer at high temperature in short time. Nitriding of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was carried out at high temperatures (>520 °C) for times ranging from 5 to 120 min. The microstructures, chemical composition, the thickness and the morphology of the nitrided layer, as well as its surface hardness, were investigated using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness tester. The corrosion properties of the untreated and nitrided samples were evaluated using anodic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. The results confirmed that nitrided layer was shown to consist of γ{sub N} and a small amount of free-CrN and iron nitrides. High temperature plasma nitriding not only increased the surface hardness but also improved the corrosion resistance of the austenitic stainless steel, and it can critically reduce processing time compared with low temperature nitriding.

  6. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  7. Porous Boron Nitride with Tunable Pore Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-01-16

    On the basis of a global structural search and first-principles calculations, we predict two types of porous boron-nitride (BN) networks that can be built up with zigzag BN nanoribbons (BNNRs). The BNNRs are either directly connected with puckered B (N) atoms at the edge (type I) or connected with sp(3)-bonded BN chains (type II). Besides mechanical stability, these materials are predicted to be thermally stable at 1000 K. The porous BN materials entail large surface areas, ranging from 2800 to 4800 m(2)/g. In particular, type-II BN material with relatively large pores is highly favorable for hydrogen storage because the computed hydrogen adsorption energy (-0.18 eV) is very close to the optimal adsorption energy (-0.15 eV) suggested for reversible hydrogen storage at room temperature. Moreover, the type-II materials are semiconductors with width-dependent direct bandgaps, rendering the type-II BN materials promising not only for hydrogen storage but also for optoelectronic and photonic applications.

  8. Ceramic processing of boron nitride insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, C. S.; McCulloch, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel pin simulators (FPS) are the prime elements of several test facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These experimental facilities are used to conduct out-of-reactor thermal-hydraulic and mechanical interaction safety tests for both light-water and breeder reactor programs. The FPS units simulate the geometry, heat flux profiles, and operational capabilities of a reactor core element under steady-state and transient conditions. They are subjected to temperatures as high as 1600/sup 0/C (2900/sup 0/F) and power levels as high as 57.5 kW/m (17.5 kW/ft) as well as severe thermal stresses during transient tests. The insulating material in the narrow annulus between the heating coil and the FPS sheath is subjected to very rigorous conditions. Accuracy of the reactor safety test information and validity of the test data depend on the heat flux uniformity under all test conditions and on the reliable operation of all fuel pin simulators and their internal thermocouples. Boron nitride (BN), because of its high degree of chemical inertness combined with its relatively unique properties of high thermal conductivity and low electrical conductivity, is the most suitable insulating material for FPS. The important BN properties, thermal conductivity and electrical resistance, are strongly influenced by crystallite orientation and by impurities. The article describes new BN powder processing techniques, which optimize these properties.

  9. Nonlinear Refractory Plasmonics with Titanium Nitride Nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Lili; Bagheri, Shahin; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Hentschel, Mario; Zgrabik, Christine M; Metzger, Bernd; Linnenbank, Heiko; Hu, Evelyn L; Giessen, Harald

    2016-09-14

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a novel refractory plasmonic material which can sustain high temperatures and exhibits large optical nonlinearities, potentially opening the door for high-power nonlinear plasmonic applications. We fabricate TiN nanoantenna arrays with plasmonic resonances tunable in the range of about 950-1050 nm by changing the antenna length. We present second-harmonic (SH) spectroscopy of TiN nanoantenna arrays, which is analyzed using a nonlinear oscillator model with a wavelength-dependent second-order response from the material itself. Furthermore, characterization of the robustness upon strong laser illumination confirms that the TiN antennas are able to endure laser irradiation with high peak intensity up to 15 GW/cm(2) without changing their optical properties and their physical appearance. They outperform gold antennas by one order of magnitude regarding laser power sustainability. Thus, TiN nanoantennas could serve as promising candidates for high-power/high-temperature applications such as coherent nonlinear converters and local heat sources on the nanoscale.

  10. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Justin A., E-mail: jabriggs@stanford.edu [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Naik, Gururaj V.; Baum, Brian K.; Dionne, Jennifer A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Petach, Trevor A.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  11. Alumimun nitride piezoelectric NEMS resonators and switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, G.

    2010-04-01

    A major challenge associated with the demonstration of high frequency and fast NanoElectroMechanical Systems (NEMS) components is the ability to efficiently transduce the nanomechanical device. This work presents noteworthy opportunities associated with the scaling of piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) films from the micro to the nano realm and their application to the making of efficient NEMS resonators and switches that can be directly interfaced with conventional electronics. Experimental data showing NEMS AlN resonators (250 nm thick with lateral features as small as 300 nm) vibrating at record-high frequencies approaching 10 GHz with Qs close to 500 are presented. These NEMS resonators could be employed as sensors to tag analyte concentrations that reach the part per trillion levels or for frequency synthesis and filtering in ultra-compact microwave transceivers. 100 nm thick AlN films have been used to fabricate NEMS actuators for mechanical computing applications. Experimental data confirming that bimorph nanopiezo- actuators have the same piezoelectric properties of microscale counterparts and can be adopted for the implementation of mechanical logic elements are presented.

  12. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Justin A.; Naik, Gururaj V.; Petach, Trevor A.; Baum, Brian K.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  13. Hyperbolic phonon polaritons in hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Siyuan

    2015-03-01

    Uniaxial materials whose axial and tangential permittivities have opposite signs are referred to as indefinite or hyperbolic media. While hyperbolic responses are normally achieved with metamaterials, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) naturally possesses this property due to the anisotropic phonons in the mid-infrared. Using scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy, we studied polaritonic phenomena in hBN. We performed infrared nano-imaging of highly confined and low-loss hyperbolic phonon polaritons in hBN. The polariton wavelength was shown to be governed by the hBN thickness according to a linear law persisting down to few atomic layers [Science, 343, 1125-1129 (2014)]. Additionally, we carried out the modification of hyperbolic response in heterostructures comprised of a mononlayer graphene deposited on hBN. Electrostatic gating of the top graphene layer allows for the modification of wavelength and intensity of hyperbolic phonon polaritons in bulk hBN. The physics of the modification originates from the plasmon-phonon coupling in the hyperbolic medium. Furthermore, we demonstrated the ``hyperlens'' for subdiffractional imaging and focusing using a slab of hBN.

  14. Preparation of graphitic carbon nitride by electrodeposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao; CAO Chuanbao; ZHU Hesun

    2003-01-01

    The CNx thin film was deposited on Si(100) substrate from a saturated acetone solution of cyanuric trichloride and melamine (cyanuric trichloride/melamine=1︰1.5) at room temperature. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the diffraction peaks in the pattern coincided well with those of graphite-like carbon nitride calculated in the literature. The lattice constants (a=4.79 A, c=6.90 A) for g-C3N4 matched with those of ab initio calculations (a=4.74 A, c=6.72 A) quite well. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements indicated that the elements in the deposited films were mostly of C and N (N/C=0.75), and N (400.00 eV) bonded with C (287.72 eV) in the form of six-member C3N3 ring. The peaks at 800 cm-1, 1310 cm-1 and 1610 cm-1 in the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum indicated that triazine ring existed in the product. These results demonstrated that crystalline g-C3N4 was obtained in the CNx film.

  15. Polymeric photocatalysts based on graphitic carbon nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shaowen; Low, Jingxiang; Yu, Jiaguo; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor-based photocatalysis is considered to be an attractive way for solving the worldwide energy shortage and environmental pollution issues. Since the pioneering work in 2009 on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) for visible-light photocatalytic water splitting, g-C3N4 -based photocatalysis has become a very hot research topic. This review summarizes the recent progress regarding the design and preparation of g-C3N4 -based photocatalysts, including the fabrication and nanostructure design of pristine g-C3N4 , bandgap engineering through atomic-level doping and molecular-level modification, and the preparation of g-C3N4 -based semiconductor composites. Also, the photo-catalytic applications of g-C3N4 -based photocatalysts in the fields of water splitting, CO2 reduction, pollutant degradation, organic syntheses, and bacterial disinfection are reviewed, with emphasis on photocatalysis promoted by carbon materials, non-noble-metal cocatalysts, and Z-scheme heterojunctions. Finally, the concluding remarks are presented and some perspectives regarding the future development of g-C3N4 -based photocatalysts are highlighted.

  16. Boron Nitride Nanostructures: Fabrication, Functionalization and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Li, Jidong; Hang, Yang; Yu, Jin; Tai, Guoan; Li, Xuemei; Zhang, Zhuhua; Guo, Wanlin

    2016-06-01

    Boron nitride (BN) structures are featured by their excellent thermal and chemical stability and unique electronic and optical properties. However, the lack of controlled synthesis of quality samples and the electrically insulating property largely prevent realizing the full potential of BN nanostructures. A comprehensive overview of the current status of the synthesis of two-dimensional hexagonal BN sheets, three dimensional porous hexagonal BN materials and BN-involved heterostructures is provided, highlighting the advantages of different synthetic methods. In addition, structural characterization, functionalizations and prospective applications of hexagonal BN sheets are intensively discussed. One-dimensional BN nanoribbons and nanotubes are then discussed in terms of structure, fabrication and functionality. In particular, the existing routes in pursuit of tunable electronic and magnetic properties in various BN structures are surveyed, calling upon synergetic experimental and theoretical efforts to address the challenges for pioneering the applications of BN into functional devices. Finally, the progress in BN superstructures and novel B/N nanostructures is also briefly introduced.

  17. Nanoscale optical properties of indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride nanodisk-in-rod heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Lu, Ming-Yen; Lu, Yu-Jung; Jones, Eric J; Gwo, Shangjr; Gradečak, Silvija

    2015-03-24

    III-nitride based nanorods and nanowires offer great potential for optoelectronic applications such as light emitting diodes or nanolasers. We report nanoscale optical studies of InGaN/GaN nanodisk-in-rod heterostructures to quantify uniformity of light emission on the ensemble level, as well as the emission characteristics from individual InGaN nanodisks. Despite the high overall luminescence efficiency, spectral and intensity inhomogeneities were observed and directly correlated to the compositional variations among nanodisks and to the presence of structural defect, respectively. Observed light quenching is correlated to type I1 stacking faults in InGaN nanodisks, and the mechanisms for stacking fault induced nonradiative recombinations are discussed in the context of band structure around stacking faults and Fermi level pinning at nanorod surfaces. Our results highlight the importance of controlling III-nitride nanostructure growths to further reduce defect formation and ensure compositional homogeneity for optoelectronic devices with high efficiencies and desirable spectrum response.

  18. Polymeric Graphitic Carbon Nitride Doped with CuO Dispersed on Dealuminated Clinoptilolite (CuO/HCP: Synthesis and Characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheed Olalekan Sanni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CuO dispersed on dealuminated clinoptilolite (CuO/HCP and further doped with polymeric graphitic carbon nitride (CuO/HCP-g-C3N4 was synthesized through 2 facile routes: precipitation method for CuO/HCP and impregnation through ultrasonication method for the hybrid composite material. The hybrid composite material crystalline phase, surface morphology, and structural and thermal properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and thermal analysis. The formation of the hybrid composite material was confirmed by XRD showing crystalline phase of CuO and g-C3N4 present on the surface of dealuminated clinoptilolite (HCP. SEM images analysis depicts no aggregation of the mixed metal oxide semiconductor nanoparticles at the center of HCP. The hybrid composite material, CuO/HCP-g-C3N4, with a good homogeneously dispersed metal oxide conductor having excellent catalytic activities has been synthesized.

  19. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Borowski, Tomasz [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Sowińska, Agnieszka [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Lelątko, Józef [Silesia University, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Wierzchoń, Tadeusz, E-mail: twierz@inmat.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Low temperature plasma nitriding process of NiTi shape memory alloy is presented. • The possibility of treatment details of sophisticated shape. • TiN surface layer has diffusive character. • TiN surface layer increases corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. • Produced TiN layer modify the biological properties of NiTi alloy. - Abstract: NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications.

  20. Elastic properties of indium nitrides grown on sapphire substrates determined by nano-indentation: In comparison with other nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Yonenaga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The hardness of wurtzite indium nitride (α-InN films of 0.5 to 4 μm in thickness was measured by the nano-indentation method at room temperature. After investigation of crystalline quality by x-ray diffraction, the hardness and Young’s modulus were determined to be 8.8 ± 0.4 and 184 ± 5 GPa, respectively, for the In (0001- and N ( 000 1 ̄ -growth faces of InN films. The bulk and shear moduli were then derived to be 99 ± 3 and 77 ± 2 GPa, respectively. The Poisson’s ratio was evaluated to be 0.17 ± 0.03. The results were examined comprehensively in comparison with previously reported data of InN as well as those of other nitrides of aluminum nitride and gallium nitride. The underlying physical process determining the moduli and hardness was examined in terms of atomic bonding and dislocation energy of the nitrides and wurtzite zinc oxide.

  1. Fabrication of hybrid nanostructures by liquid plasma for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponraj, Sri Balaji; Dai, Xiujuan Jane; Li, Luhua; Chen, Zhiqiang; Surya Narayanan, Jayanth; Kanwar, Jagat; Du Plessis, Johan

    2013-09-01

    Liquid plasma, generated by a nanosecond pulsed generator at atmospheric pressure, was used to treat bamboo-like boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). It was observed that the length of the BNNTs was reduced and found more cup like structures called boron nitride nanocups (BNNCs). Interestingly, a new peak appeared at 406.86 eV in the N1s X-ray photoelectron spectrum, which seems to be attributable to the oxidation of nitrogen (N-O) in BNNTs. The C1s spectrum showed that oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the BNNT/BNNC surface. The liquid plasma was also used to assemble gold nanoparticles onto the treated BNNTs/BNNCs. This hybrid nanostructure was fabricated efficiently, compared with normal equilibrium conditions. The pH values and conductivity of all samples were measured. After plasma treatment, the pH values were greatly reduced and conductivity was significantly increased. We propose that the plasma acid, hydrogen peroxide, OH-, H ions and radicals formed in liquid plasma as well as the pulsed electric field contribute to the oxidation of nitrogen, reduced length of the BNNTs(forming BNNCs), surface functionalization, and to the fabrication of hybrid nanostructure. The cytotoxic tests for these hybrid nanostructures is underway. The authors acknowledge Rosey van Driel and Prabhukumar Sellamuthu for assisting with TEM and SEM, and the access of the XPS facility at RMIT University.

  2. Low-Temperature Nitriding by Means of SMAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.P. Tong; H.W. Zhang; N.R. Tao; Z.B. Wang; J. Lu; K. Lu

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure in the surface layer of iron and steel samples can be refined at the nanometer scale by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) that generates repetitive severe plastic deformation to the surface layer.The subsequent nitriding kinetics of the as-treated samples with the nanostructured surface layer is greatly enhanced so that the nitriding temperatures can be reduce to 300 ~ 400 ℃ regions. This enhanced processing method demonstrates both the technological significance of nanomaterials in advancing the traditional processing techniques, and provides a new approach for selective surface reactions in solids. This article reviews the present state of the art in this field. The microstructure and properties of SMAT samples nitrided will be summarized. Further considerations of the development and applications of this new technique will also be presented.

  3. Nanoparticle plasmonics: going practical with transition metal nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urcan Guler

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Promising designs and experimental realizations of devices with unusual properties in the field of plasmonics have attracted a great deal of attention over the past few decades. However, the high expectations for realized technology products have not been met so far. The main complication is the absence of robust, high performance, low cost plasmonic materials that can be easily integrated into already established technologies such as microelectronics. This review provides a brief discussion on alternative plasmonic materials for localized surface plasmon applications and focuses on transition metal nitrides, in particular, titanium nitride, which has recently been shown to be a high performance refractory plasmonic material that could replace and even outperform gold in various plasmonic devices. As a material compatible with biological environments and the semiconductor industry, titanium nitride possesses superior properties compared to noble metals such as high temperature durability, chemical stability, corrosion resistance, low cost and mechanical hardness.

  4. Nitridation in Photon-Assisted Process Using Argon Excimer Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshikawa, Kiyohiko; Amari, Kouichi; Ishimura, Sou; Katto, Masahito; Yokotani, Atsushi; Kurosawa, Kou

    2006-05-01

    We attempted silicon nitridation that continuously deposits silicon with monosilane (SiH4) and nitrides the silicon with ammonia (NH3) at a low temperature using a vacuum ultraviolet excimer lamp. We used an argon excimer lamp (λ=126 nm, h ν=9.8 eV) so that SiH4 and NH3 can absorb photons and dissociate. Nitrogen exists only near the film surface at a low temperature, and its concentration increases at a high temperature. This photon-assisted process is very feasible for the nitridation of semiconductor devices and flat panel displays in the near future, because it is a low-temperature and low-damage process.

  5. Electronic Biosensors Based on III-Nitride Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirste, Ronny; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-07-01

    We review recent advances of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT)-based electronic biosensors. We discuss properties and fabrication of III-nitride-based biosensors. Because of their superior biocompatibility and aqueous stability, GaN-based devices are ready to be implemented as next-generation biosensors. We review surface properties, cleaning, and passivation as well as different pathways toward functionalization, and critically analyze III-nitride-based biosensors demonstrated in the literature, including those detecting DNA, bacteria, cancer antibodies, and toxins. We also discuss the high potential of these biosensors for monitoring living cardiac, fibroblast, and nerve cells. Finally, we report on current developments of covalent chemical functionalization of III-nitride devices. Our review concludes with a short outlook on future challenges and projected implementation directions of GaN-based HEMT biosensors.

  6. Transition Metal Nitrides for Electrocatalytic Energy Conversion: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Junfeng; Xie, Yi

    2016-03-07

    Electrocatalytic energy conversion has been considered as one of the most efficient and promising pathways for realizing energy storage and energy utilization in modern society. To improve electrocatalytic reactions, specific catalysts are needed to lower the overpotential. In the search for efficient alternatives to noble metal catalysts, transition metal nitrides have attracted considerable interest due to their high catalytic activity and unique electronic structure. Over the past few decades, numerous nitride-based catalysts have been explored with respect to their ability to drive various electrocatalytic reactions, such as the hydrogen evolution reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction to achieve water splitting and the oxygen reduction reaction coupled with the methanol oxidation reaction to construct fuel cells or rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. This Minireview provides a brief overview of recent progress on electrocatalysts based on transition metal nitrides, and outlines the current challenges and future opportunities.

  7. Thermally grown thin nitride films as a gate dielectric

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, H C; Hwang, T K; Lee, K R

    1998-01-01

    High-quality very thin films ( <=6 nm) of silicon nitride were thermally grown in ammonia atmosphere with an IR (Infrared) gold image furnace. As-grown nitride film was analyzed using AES(Auger Emission Spectroscopy). Using MIS (Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor) devices, the growth rate was calculated using CV (Capacitance-Voltage) measurements and various electrical characteristics were obtained using CV, IV (Current-Voltage), trapping, time-dependent breakdown, high-field stress, constant current injection stress and dielectric breakdown techniques. These characteristics showed that very thin thermal silicon nitride films can be used as gate dielectrics for future highly scaled-down ULSI (Ultra Large Scale Integrated) devices, especially for EEPROM (Electrically Erasable and Programmable ROM)'s.

  8. Electronic Biosensors Based on III-Nitride Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirste, Ronny; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-01-01

    We review recent advances of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT)-based electronic biosensors. We discuss properties and fabrication of III-nitride-based biosensors. Because of their superior biocompatibility and aqueous stability, GaN-based devices are ready to be implemented as next-generation biosensors. We review surface properties, cleaning, and passivation as well as different pathways toward functionalization, and critically analyze III-nitride-based biosensors demonstrated in the literature, including those detecting DNA, bacteria, cancer antibodies, and toxins. We also discuss the high potential of these biosensors for monitoring living cardiac, fibroblast, and nerve cells. Finally, we report on current developments of covalent chemical functionalization of III-nitride devices. Our review concludes with a short outlook on future challenges and projected implementation directions of GaN-based HEMT biosensors.

  9. Effect of oxygen plasma on nanomechanical silicon nitride resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Niklas; Jachimowicz, Artur; Schalko, Johannes; Sadeghi, Pedram; Sauer, Markus; Foelske-Schmitz, Annette; Schmid, Silvan

    2017-08-01

    Precise control of tensile stress and intrinsic damping is crucial for the optimal design of nanomechanical systems for sensor applications and quantum optomechanics in particular. In this letter, we study the influence of oxygen plasma on the tensile stress and intrinsic damping of nanomechanical silicon nitride resonators. Oxygen plasma treatments are common steps in micro and nanofabrication. We show that oxygen plasma for only a few minutes oxidizes the silicon nitride surface, creating several nanometer thick silicon dioxide layers with a compressive stress of 1.30(16) GPa. Such oxide layers can cause a reduction in the effective tensile stress of a 50 nm thick stoichiometric silicon nitride membrane by almost 50%. Additionally, intrinsic damping linearly increases with the silicon dioxide film thickness. An oxide layer of 1.5 nm grown in just 10 s in a 50 W oxygen plasma almost doubled the intrinsic damping. The oxide surface layer can be efficiently removed in buffered hydrofluoric acid.

  10. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  11. Dissolution performance of plutonium nitride based fuel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aneheim, E.; Hedberg, M. [Nuclear Chemistry, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 4, Gothenburg, SE41296 (Sweden)

    2016-07-01

    Nitride fuels have been regarded as one viable fuel option for Generation IV reactors due to their positive features compared to oxides. To be able to close the fuel cycle and follow the Generation IV concept, nitrides must, however, demonstrate their ability to be reprocessed. This means that the dissolution performance of actinide based nitrides has to be thoroughly investigated and assessed. As the zirconium stabilized nitrides show even better potential as fuel material than does the pure actinide containing nitrides, investigations on the dissolution behavior of both PuN and (Pu,Zr)N has been undertaken. If possible it is desirable to perform the fuel dissolutions using nitric acid. This, as most reprocessing strategies using solvent-solvent extraction are based on a nitride containing aqueous matrix. (Pu,Zr)N/C microspheres were produced using internal gelation. The spheres dissolution performance was investigated using nitric acid with and without additions of HF and Ag(II). In addition PuN fuel pellets were produced from powder and their dissolution performance were also assessed in a nitric acid based setting. It appears that both PuN and (Pu,Zr)N/C fuel material can be completely dissolved in nitric acid of high concentration with the use of catalytic amounts of HF. The amount of HF added strongly affects dissolution kinetics of (Pu, Zr)N and the presence of HF affects the 2 solutes differently, possibly due to inhomogeneity o the initial material. Large additions of Ag(II) can also be used to facilitate the dissolution of (Pu,Zr)N in nitric acid. PuN can be dissolved by pure nitric acid of high concentration at room temperature while (Pu, Zr)N is unaffected under similar conditions. At elevated temperature (reflux), (Pu,Zr)N can, however, also be dissolved by concentrated pure nitric acid.

  12. Synthesis of reduced carbon nitride at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C3N4)O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamov, Alexey; Bondarenko, Marina; Kharlamova, Ganna; Fomenko, Veniamin

    2016-09-01

    For the first time at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C3N4)O reduced carbon nitride (or reduced multi-layer azagraphene) is obtained. It is differed from usually synthesized carbon nitride by a significantly large (on 0.09 nm) interplanar distance is. At the same time, the chemical bonds between atoms in a heteroatomic plane of reduced carbon nitride correspond to the bonds in a synthesized g-C3N4. The samples of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide were synthesized under the special reactionary conditions of a pyrolysis of melamine and urea. We believe that reduced carbon nitride consists of weakly connected carbon-nitrogen monosheets (azagraphene sheets) as well as reduced (from graphene oxide) graphene contains weakly connected graphene sheets.

  13. Hardness evaluation, stoichiometry and grain size of titanium nitride films obtained with plasma nitriding on Ti-6Al-4V samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcellos, Marcos Antonio Zen; Lima, Saulo Cordeiro; Hinrichs, Ruth [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Titanium nitride films were formed on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V discs by plasma nitriding (glow discharge) in different N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} atmospheres at several substrate temperatures. In this study the influence of the process parameters on dynamic micro-hardness were investigated. Grain sizes of the nitride films, determined with X Ray Diffraction, were related to the nitriding parameters. TiNx stoichiometry was determined with Nuclear Reaction Analysis and showed a correlation to substrate temperature during the nitriding process. Micro-hardness measurements were taken on the nitrided surfaces. Grain sizes increased for a particular gas composition of 60%N{sub 2}+40%H{sub 2} where hardness was lowest. (author)

  14. Compressive creep of silicon nitride with additives; Fluencia por compressao de nitreto de silicio aditivado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, Newton Hissao; Cavalcanti, Celso Berilo Cidade; Piorino Neto, Francisco; Silva, Vitor Alexandre da; Silva, Cosme Roberto Moreira da [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Aeronautica e Espaco

    1995-12-31

    Manufacturing of engine and turbine components made of silicon nitride based ceramics requires knowledge of thermochemical properties such as resistance to compressive creep. In order to characterize this property a compressive creep apparatus was assembled at AMR/IAE/CTA, able to work at 1450 deg C in a continuous mode. Test pieces were prepared from mixtures of silicon nitride with rare earth carbonate and aluminium nitride. These test pieces were pressureless sintered at 1750 deg C for 30 minutes under nitrogen atmosphere. Experiments showed that rare earth carbonate and aluminium nitride are suitable additives for silicon nitride. (author) 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Effect of Plasma Nitriding Parameters on the Wear Resistance of Alloy Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovací, Halim; Ghahramanzadeh ASL, Hojjat; Albayrak, Çigdem; Alsaran, Akgün; Çelik, Ayhan

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the temperature and duration of plasma nitriding on the microstructure and friction and wear parameters of Inconel 718 nickel alloy is investigated. The process of plasma nitriding is conducted in a nitrogen-hydrogen gaseous mixture at a temperature of 400, 500 and 600°C for 1 and 4 h. The modulus of elasticity of the nitrided layer, the micro- and nanohardness, the surface roughness, the friction factor and the wear resistance of the alloy are determined prior to and after the nitriding. The optimum nitriding regime providing the best tribological characteristics is determined.

  16. Hybrid microelectronic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P.

    Various areas of hybrid microelectronic technology are discussed. The topics addressed include: basic thick film processing, thick film pastes and substrates, add-on components and attachment methods, thin film processing, and design of thick film hybrid circuits. Also considered are: packaging hybrid circuits, automating the production of hybrid circuits, application of hybrid techniques, customer's view of hybrid technology, and quality control and assurance in hybrid circuit production.

  17. A Simple Method for Forming Hybrid Core-Shell Nanoparticles Suspended in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Daigle

    2008-01-01

    addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization as dispersant. Then, the resulting dispersion is engaged in a radical emulsion polymerization process whereby a hydrophobic organic monomer (styrene and butyl acrylate is polymerized to form the shell of the hybrid nanoparticle. This method is extremely versatile, allowing the preparation of a variety of nanocomposites with metal oxides (alumina, rutile, anatase, barium titanate, zirconia, copper oxide, metals (Mo, Zn, and even inorganic nitrides (Si3N4.

  18. Neutron detection using boron gallium nitride semiconductor material

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuhiro Atsumi; Yoku Inoue; Hidenori Mimura; Toru Aoki; Takayuki Nakano

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we developed a new neutron-detection device using a boron gallium nitride (BGaN) semiconductor in which the B atom acts as a neutron converter. BGaN and gallium nitride (GaN) samples were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, and their radiation detection properties were evaluated. GaN exhibited good sensitivity to α-rays but poor sensitivity to γ-rays. Moreover, we confirmed that electrons were generated in the depletion layer under neutron irradiation. This resulted in ...

  19. Lateral electrochemical etching of III-nitride materials for microfabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jung

    2017-02-28

    Conductivity-selective lateral etching of III-nitride materials is described. Methods and structures for making vertical cavity surface emitting lasers with distributed Bragg reflectors via electrochemical etching are described. Layer-selective, lateral electrochemical etching of multi-layer stacks is employed to form semiconductor/air DBR structures adjacent active multiple quantum well regions of the lasers. The electrochemical etching techniques are suitable for high-volume production of lasers and other III-nitride devices, such as lasers, HEMT transistors, power transistors, MEMs structures, and LEDs.

  20. Synthesis and Optimization of the Sintering Kinetics of Actinide Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drryl P. Butt; Brian Jaques

    2009-03-31

    Research conducted for this NERI project has advanced the understanding and feasibility of nitride nuclear fuel processing. In order to perform this research, necessary laboratory infrastructure was developed; including basic facilities and experimental equipment. Notable accomplishments from this project include: the synthesis of uranium, dysprosium, and cerium nitrides using a novel, low-cost mechanical method at room temperature; the synthesis of phase pure UN, DyN, and CeN using thermal methods; and the sintering of UN and (Ux, Dy1-x)N (0.7 ≤ X ≤ 1) pellets from phase pure powder that was synthesized in the Advanced Materials Laboratory at Boise State University.

  1. New amorphous interface for precipitate nitrides in steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    to be enveloped in an amorphous shell a few nm thick, thus leaving them without any coherency with the matrix. The amorphous nature of the shells could be ascertained with high resolution microscopy and dark field techniques. When extracted from the ferrite matrix the amorphous shells were observed to crystallize...... during electron beam exposure. The amorphous shells were observed around Ta- and Nb-based nitrides, which are considered to have a high interfacial energy with the ferrite matrix. They were not observed around V-based nitrides which have a Baker–Nutting relationship with low-misfit to the matrix....

  2. Inter-layer potential for hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leven, Itai; Hod, Oded, E-mail: odedhod@tau.ac.il [Department of Chemical Physics, School of Chemistry, The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Azuri, Ido; Kronik, Leeor [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth 76100 (Israel)

    2014-03-14

    A new interlayer force-field for layered hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) based structures is presented. The force-field contains three terms representing the interlayer attraction due to dispersive interactions, repulsion due to anisotropic overlaps of electron clouds, and monopolar electrostatic interactions. With appropriate parameterization, the potential is able to simultaneously capture well the binding and lateral sliding energies of planar h-BN based dimer systems as well as the interlayer telescoping and rotation of double walled boron-nitride nanotubes of different crystallographic orientations. The new potential thus allows for the accurate and efficient modeling and simulation of large-scale h-BN based layered structures.

  3. Structure, Mechanics and Synthesis of Nanoscale Carbon and Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Steven G.

    This thesis is divided into two parts. In Part I, we examine the properties of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride. We begin with an introduction to the theory of elastic sheets, where the stretching and bending modes are considered in detail. The coupling between stretching and bending modes is thought to play a crucial role in the thermodynamic stability of atomically-thin 2D sheets such as graphene. In Chapter 2, we begin by looking at the fabrication of suspended, atomically thin sheets of graphene. We then study their mechanical resonances which are read via an optical transduction technique. The frequency of the resonators was found to depend on their temperature, as was their quality factor. We conclude by offering some interpretations of the data in terms of the stretching and bending modes of graphene. In Chapter 3, we look briefly at the fabrication of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. We examine the structure of the sheets using transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively). We then show a technique by which one can make sheets suspended over a trench with adjustable supports. Finally, DC measurements of the resistivity of the sheets in the temperature range 600 -- 1400 C are presented. In Chapter 4, we study the folding of few-layer graphene oxide, graphene and boron nitride into 3D aerogel monoliths. The properties of graphene oxide are first considered, after which the structure of graphene and boron nitride aerogels is examined using TEM and SEM. Some models for their structure are proposed. In Part II, we look at synthesis techniques for boron nitride (BN). In Chapter 5, we study the conversion of carbon structures of boron nitride via the application of carbothermal reduction of boron oxide followed by nitridation. We apply the conversion to a wide variety of morphologies, including aerogels, carbon fibers and nanotubes, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In the latter chapters, we look at the

  4. Size effects in band gap bowing in nitride semiconducting alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2011-01-01

    Chemical and size contributions to the band gap bowing of nitride semiconducting alloys (InxGa1-xN, InxAl1-xN, and AlxGa1-xN) are analyzed. It is shown that the band gap deformation potentials of the binary constituents determine the gap bowing in the ternary alloys. The particularly large gap bo...... bowing in In-containing nitride alloys can be explained by specific properties of InN, which do not follow trends observed in several other binaries....

  5. Wear monitoring of protective nitride coatings using image processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Inge Lise; Guibert, M.; Belin, M.

    2010-01-01

    A double-layer model system, consisting of a thin layer of tribological titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on 17 top of titanium nitride (TiN), was deposited on polished 100Cr6 steel substrates. The TiAlN top-coatings 18 were exposed to abrasive wear by a reciprocating wear process in a linear tribo...... processing by color detection is a potential technique for early 25 warning or determination of residual thickness of tribological tool coatings prior to complete wear....

  6. Communication: Water on hexagonal boron nitride from diffusion Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hamdani, Yasmine S.; Ma, Ming; Michaelides, Angelos, E-mail: angelos.michaelides@ucl.ac.uk [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Alfè, Dario [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Sciences, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von [Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratories, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Despite a recent flurry of experimental and simulation studies, an accurate estimate of the interaction strength of water molecules with hexagonal boron nitride is lacking. Here, we report quantum Monte Carlo results for the adsorption of a water monomer on a periodic hexagonal boron nitride sheet, which yield a water monomer interaction energy of −84 ± 5 meV. We use the results to evaluate the performance of several widely used density functional theory (DFT) exchange correlation functionals and find that they all deviate substantially. Differences in interaction energies between different adsorption sites are however better reproduced by DFT.

  7. NOVEL SALTS OF GRAPHITE AND A BORON NITRIDE SALT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, Neil; Biagioni, R.N.; McQuillan, B.W.; Robertson, A.S.; Thompson, A.C

    1977-12-01

    Graphite is oxidized by O{sub 2}{sup +} AsF{sub 6}{sup -} and by OsF{sub 6} to give first-stage graphite salts C{sub 8}{sup +} MF{sub 6}{sup -} and S{sub 2}O{sub 6}F{sub 2} oxidizes both graphite and boron nitride to yield the salts C{sub 12}{sup +} SO{sub 3}F{sup -} and (BN){sub 4}{sup +} SO{sub 3}F{sup -}, the latter being the first example of a first-stage boron nitride salt.

  8. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Urcan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm, which was found to be the optimum size for cellular uptake with gold nanoparticles [1], exhibit plasmon resonance in the biological transparency window and demonstrate a high absorption efficiency. A self-passivating native oxide at the surface of the nanoparticles provides an additional degree of freedom for surface functionalization. The titanium oxide shell surrounding the plasmonic core can create new opportunities for photocatalytic applications.

  9. Designing of TJ VCSEL based on nitride materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzała, R. P.; Pijanowski, K.; Gebski, M.; Marciniak, M.; Nakwaski, W.

    2016-12-01

    Different structures of nitride Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) have been developed in recent years. However there is still many problems with such constructions, especially with electrical and optical confinement, current injection and construction and fabrication of mirrors. In this paper we present novel approach to nitride VCSEL designing. We investigated structure with tunnel junction (TJ) and top and bottom dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). Using our three-dimensional self-consistent model we investigated thermal and electrical properties of such laser. We also proposed replacing bottom DBR by monolithic high contrast grating mirror (MHCG) and presented optical properties of VCSEL with such mirrors.

  10. Inter-layer potential for hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leven, Itai; Azuri, Ido; Kronik, Leeor; Hod, Oded

    2014-03-01

    A new interlayer force-field for layered hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) based structures is presented. The force-field contains three terms representing the interlayer attraction due to dispersive interactions, repulsion due to anisotropic overlaps of electron clouds, and monopolar electrostatic interactions. With appropriate parameterization, the potential is able to simultaneously capture well the binding and lateral sliding energies of planar h-BN based dimer systems as well as the interlayer telescoping and rotation of double walled boron-nitride nanotubes of different crystallographic orientations. The new potential thus allows for the accurate and efficient modeling and simulation of large-scale h-BN based layered structures.

  11. Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing; Current Status and Future Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.

    in a compound layer consisting of iron (carbo-)nitrides and a diffusion zone, consisting of a dispersion of alloying element nitrides in ferrite. The compound layer provides beneficial tribological and corrosion performance, while the diffusion zone is responsible for improved fatigue performance. Furthermore......, aspects of low temperature surface hardening of stainless steels in a gaseous environment will be addressed. Here, the developed case consists of expanded austenite and/or expanded martensite, which essentially is a super saturated solid solution of nitrogen/carbon in austenite/martensite. The current...

  12. The Role of Carbides in Formation of Surface Layer on Steel X153CrMoV12 Due to Low-Pressure Nitriding (Vacuum Nitriding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszewicz, B.; Wołowiec, E.; Kula, P.

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of formation of surface layer on steel X153CrMoV12 in the process of vacuum nitriding (low-pressure nitriding) in a universal vacuum furnace in an atmosphere of dissociated ammonia at a pressure of 30 × 102 Pa (30 mbar) is studied by the methods of light microscopy and measurement of microhardness. The chemical composition of the nitrided layers is determined.

  13. Graphene-on-dielectric micromembrane for optoelectromechanical hybrid devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil;

    2013-01-01

    Due to their exceptional mechanical and optical properties, dielectric silicon nitride (SiN) micromembranes have become the centerpiece of many optomechanical experiments. Efficient capacitive coupling of the membrane to an electrical system would facilitate exciting hybrid optoelectromechanical ...... devices. However, capacitive coupling of such SiN membranes is rather weak. Here we add a single layer of graphene on SiN micromembranes (SiN-G) and compare the electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare SiN membranes and to membranes coated with an aluminium layer (Si...

  14. ZeroFlow - new, environmentally friendly method of controlled gas nitriding used for selected car parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, J.; Małdziński, L.

    2016-09-01

    This article presents new method of controlled gas nitriding called ZeroFlow, which is used for nitriding of selected car parts, such as crankshafts, camshafts, piston rings, poppet valve springs and discs, piston pins or nozzles for unit injectors. This article will discuss the essence of controlled gas nitriding process, with an emphasis on the influence of process parameters on results of nitriding process. This information are the basis to understand the issue of the kinetics of nitrided layer growth, and as it follows - for its practical application in designing, regulation and control of nitriding processes using simulation models (simulator of the kinetics of nitrided layer growth). This article will also present the simulator of the kinetics of nitrided layer growth, which supports nitriding using ZeroFlow method - through the use of simulator layers are obtained in the shortest possible time, which is connected with the lowest energy consumption; therefore, nitriding process using ZeroFlow method and simulator of the kinetics of nitrided layer growth is both economical and environmentally friendly.

  15. Plasmonic Antennas Hybridized with Dielectric Waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Arango, Felipe Bernal; Koenderink, A Femius

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of using plasmonics in an integrated scheme where single emitters can be probed efficiently, we experimentally and theoretically study the scattering properties of single nano-rod gold antennas as well as antenna arrays placed on one-dimensional dielectric silicon nitride waveguides. Using real space and Fourier microscopy correlated with waveguide transmission measurements, we quantify the spectral properties, absolute strength and directivity of scattering. The scattering processes can be well understood in the framework of the physics of dipolar objects placed on a planar layered environment with a waveguiding layer. We use the single plasmonic structures on top of the waveguide as dipolar building blocks for new types of antennas where the waveguide enhances the coupling between antenna elements. We report on waveguide hybridized Yagi-Uda antennas which show directionality in out-coupling of guided modes as well as directionality for in-coupling into the waveguide of localized excitations ...

  16. Elastic Properties of Several Silicon Nitride Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.; Metcalf, T. H.; Wang, Q.; Photiadis, D. M.

    2007-01-01

    We have measured the internal friction (Q{sup -1}) of amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN{sub x}) films prepared by a variety of methods, including low-pressure chemical-vapor deposition (LPCVD), plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD), and hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition (HWCVD) from 0.5 K to room temperature. The measurements are made by depositing the films onto extremely high-Q silicon double paddle oscillator substrates with a resonant frequency of {approx}5500 Hz. We find the elastic properties of these a-SiN{sub x} films resemble those of amorphous silicon (a-Si) films, demonstrating considerable variation which depends on the film growth methods and post deposition annealing. The internal friction for most of the films shows a broad temperature-independent plateau below 30 K, characteristic of amorphous solids. The values of Q{sup -1}, however, vary from film to film in this plateau region by more than one order of magnitude. This has been observed in tetrehedrally covalent-bonded amorphous thin films, like a-Si, a-Ge, and a-C. The PECVD films have the highest Q{sup -1} just like a normal amorphous solid, while LPCVD films have an internal friction more than one order of magnitude lower. All the films show a reduction of Q{sup -1} after annealing at 800 C, even for the LPCVD films which were prepared at 850 C. This can be viewed as a reduction of structural disorder.

  17. Graphitic carbon nitride based nanocomposites: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zaiwang; Sun, Yanjuan; Dong, Fan

    2015-01-07

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C(3)N(4)), as an intriguing earth-abundant visible light photocatalyst, possesses a unique two-dimensional structure, excellent chemical stability and tunable electronic structure. Pure g-C(3)N(4) suffers from rapid recombination of photo-generated electron-hole pairs resulting in low photocatalytic activity. Because of the unique electronic structure, the g-C(3)N(4) could act as an eminent candidate for coupling with various functional materials to enhance the performance. According to the discrepancies in the photocatalytic mechanism and process, six primary systems of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites can be classified and summarized: namely, the g-C(3)N(4) based metal-free heterojunction, the g-C(3)N(4)/single metal oxide (metal sulfide) heterojunction, g-C(3)N(4)/composite oxide, the g-C(3)N(4)/halide heterojunction, g-C(3)N(4)/noble metal heterostructures, and the g-C(3)N(4) based complex system. Apart from the depiction of the fabrication methods, heterojunction structure and multifunctional application of the g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites, we emphasize and elaborate on the underlying mechanisms in the photocatalytic activity enhancement of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites. The unique functions of the p-n junction (semiconductor/semiconductor heterostructures), the Schottky junction (metal/semiconductor heterostructures), the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect, photosensitization, superconductivity, etc. are utilized in the photocatalytic processes. Furthermore, the enhanced performance of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites has been widely employed in environmental and energetic applications such as photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, photocatalytic hydrogen generation, carbon dioxide reduction, disinfection, and supercapacitors. This critical review ends with a summary and some perspectives on the challenges and new directions in exploring g-C(3)N(4)-based advanced nanomaterials.

  18. Hybrid Photonic Integration on a Polymer Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyang Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To fulfill the functionality demands from the fast developing optical networks, a hybrid integration approach allows for combining the advantages of various material platforms. We have established a polymer-based hybrid integration platform (polyboard, which provides flexible optical input/ouptut interfaces (I/Os that allow robust coupling of indium phosphide (InP-based active components, passive insertion of thin-film-based optical elements, and on-chip attachment of optical fibers. This work reviews the recent progress of our polyboard platform. On the fundamental level, multi-core waveguides and polymer/silicon nitride heterogeneous waveguides have been fabricated, broadening device design possibilities and enabling 3D photonic integration. Furthermore, 40-channel optical line terminals and compact, bi-directional optical network units have been developed as highly functional, low-cost devices for the wavelength division multiplexed passive optical network. On a larger scale, thermo-optic elements, thin-film elements and an InP gain chip have been integrated on the polyboard to realize a colorless, dual-polarization optical 90° hybrid as the frontend of a coherent receiver. For high-end applications, a wavelength tunable 100Gbaud transmitter module has been demonstrated, manifesting the joint contribution from the polyboard technology, high speed polymer electro-optic modulator, InP driver electronics and ceramic electronic interconnects.

  19. Theoretical study on stability of hybrid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thiago S.; de Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio; Azevedo, Sèrgio

    2015-04-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental realization of the hybrid nanostructure of graphene and boron nitride (h-BN) sheet, and studies of gap modulation by strain, we use first principles calculations based on density functional theory to investigate the effects of strain in hybrid bilayers composed of two monolayers of graphene with a nanodomain of {{B}3}{{N}3}. The calculations were made with two different approximations for the functional exchange-correlation, GGA and VDW-DF. We investigate the modification in the electronic structure and structural properties of various configurations of the hybrid bilayers. Among the configurations, those with Bernal stacking are found to be more stable when compared to the others. Studies of the compressive strain influence were made only in the structure that has been shown to be the most stable. We have found that the two approximations used in the calculations exhibit the same results for the electronic properties of all structures. The opening of the energy gap due to strain was possible in the calculations by using the GGA approximation, but the same does not happen in the calculations using the VDW-DF approximation. Our analysis shows that the VDW-DF approximation is better suited for studies involving surfaces.

  20. Hybrid Gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F. (Inventor); Roberts, Gary D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid gear consisting of metallic outer rim with gear teeth and metallic hub in combination with a composite lay up between the shaft interface (hub) and gear tooth rim is described. The composite lay-up lightens the gear member while having similar torque carrying capability and it attenuates the impact loading driven noise/vibration that is typical in gear systems. The gear has the same operational capability with respect to shaft speed, torque, and temperature as an all-metallic gear as used in aerospace gear design.

  1. Hybrid Qualifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    has turned out as a major focus of European education and training policies and certainly is a crucial principle underlying the European Qualifications Framework (EQF). In this context, «hybrid qualifications» (HQ) may be seen as an interesting approach to tackle these challenges as they serve «two...... masters», i.e. by producing skills for the labour market and enabling individuals to progress more or less directly to higher education. The specific focus of this book is placed on conditions, structures and processes which help to combine VET with qualifications leading into higher education...

  2. Improved tensile and buckling behavior of defected carbon nanotubes utilizing boron nitride coating – A molecular dynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badjian, H.; Setoodeh, A.R., E-mail: setoodeh@sutech.ac.ir

    2017-02-15

    Synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have led to immense studies due to their many interesting functional features such as piezoelectricity, high temperature resistance to oxygen, electrical insulation, high thermal conductivity and very long lengths as physical features. In order to utilize the superior properties of pristine and defected carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a hybrid nanotube is proposed in this study by forming BNNTs surface coating on the CNTs. The benefits of such coating on the tensile and buckling behavior of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are illustrated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the resulted nanostructures during the deformation. The AIREBO and Tersoff-Brenner potentials are employed to model the interatomic forces between the carbon and boron nitride atoms, respectively. The effects of chiral indices, aspect ratio, presence of mono-vacancy defects and coating dimension on coated/non-coated CNTs are examined. It is demonstrated that the coated defective CNTs exhibit remarkably enhanced ultimate strength, buckling load capacity and Young's modulus. The proposed coating not only enhances the mechanical properties of the resulted nanostructure, but also conceals it from few external factors impacting the behavior of the CNT such as humidity and high temperature.

  3. Improved tensile and buckling behavior of defected carbon nanotubes utilizing boron nitride coating - A molecular dynamic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badjian, H.; Setoodeh, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    Synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have led to immense studies due to their many interesting functional features such as piezoelectricity, high temperature resistance to oxygen, electrical insulation, high thermal conductivity and very long lengths as physical features. In order to utilize the superior properties of pristine and defected carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a hybrid nanotube is proposed in this study by forming BNNTs surface coating on the CNTs. The benefits of such coating on the tensile and buckling behavior of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are illustrated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the resulted nanostructures during the deformation. The AIREBO and Tersoff-Brenner potentials are employed to model the interatomic forces between the carbon and boron nitride atoms, respectively. The effects of chiral indices, aspect ratio, presence of mono-vacancy defects and coating dimension on coated/non-coated CNTs are examined. It is demonstrated that the coated defective CNTs exhibit remarkably enhanced ultimate strength, buckling load capacity and Young's modulus. The proposed coating not only enhances the mechanical properties of the resulted nanostructure, but also conceals it from few external factors impacting the behavior of the CNT such as humidity and high temperature.

  4. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Prado FERRAZ

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces.

  5. Bond length variation in hydronitride molecules and nitride crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buterakos, L. A.; Gibbs, G. V.; Boisen, M. B.

    1992-08-01

    Bond lengths calculated for the coordination polyhedra in hydronitride molecules match average values observed for XN bonds involving main group X-cations in nitride crystals to within ˜0.04 Å. As suggested for oxide and sulfide molecules and crystals, the forces that determine the average bond lengths recorded for coordinated polyhedra in hydronitride molecules and nitride crystals appear to be governed in large part by the atoms that comprise the polyhedra and those that induce local charge balance. The forces exerted on the coordinated polyhedra by other parts of the structure seem to play a small if not an insignificant role in governing bond length variations. Bonded radii for the nitride ion obtained from theoretical electron density maps calculated for the molecules increase linearly with bond length as observed for nitride crystals with the rock salt structure. Promolecule radii calculated for the molecules correlate with bonded and ionic radii, indicating that the electron density distributions in hydronitride molecules possess a significant atomic component, despite bond type.

  6. Compositional analysis of silicon oxide/silicon nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meziani Samir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen, amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx:H abbreviated SiNx films were grown on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD in parallel configuration using NH3/SiH4 gas mixtures. The mc-Si wafers were taken from the same column of Si cast ingot. After the deposition process, the layers were oxidized (thermal oxidation in dry oxygen ambient environment at 950 °C to get oxide/nitride (ON structure. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX were employed for analyzing quantitatively the chemical composition and stoichiometry in the oxide-nitride stacked films. The effect of annealing temperature on the chemical composition of ON structure has been investigated. Some species, O, N, Si were redistributed in this structure during the thermal oxidation of SiNx. Indeed, oxygen diffused to the nitride layer into Si2O2N during dry oxidation.

  7. Thermionic field emission in gold nitride Schottky nanodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, N.; Sarantopoulou, E.; Kollia, Z.; Samardžija, Z.; Kobe, S.; Cefalas, A. C.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the thermionic field emission and charge transport properties of gold nitride nanodomains grown by pulsed laser deposition with a molecular fluorine laser at 157 nm. The nanodomains are sandwiched between the metallic tip of a conductive atomic force microscope and a thin gold layer forming thus a metal-semiconductor-metal junction. Although the limited existing data in the literature indicate that gold nitride was synthesized previously with low efficiency, poor stability, and metallic character; in this work, it is shown that gold nitride nanodomains exhibit semiconducting behavior and the metal-semiconductor-metal contact can be modeled with the back-to-back Schottky barrier model. From the experimental I-V curves, the main charge carrier transport process is found to be thermionic field emission via electron tunneling. The rectifying, near symmetric and asymmetric current response of nanocontacts is related to the effective contact area of the gold nitride nanodomains with the metals. A lower limit for the majority charge carriers concentration at the boundaries of nanodomains is also established using the full depletion approximation, as nanodomains with thickness as low as 6 nm were found to be conductive. Current rectification and charge memory effects are also observed in "quite small" conductive nanodomains (6-10 nm) due to stored charges. Indeed, charges near the surface are identified as inversion domains in the phase shift mapping performed with electrostatic force microscopy and are attributed to charge trapping at the boundaries of the nanodomains.

  8. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  9. Spatial Inhomogeneity of Luminescence in III-Nitride Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintautas TAMULAITIS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The band gap of III-nitride semiconductors cover a wide range from 0.77 eV (band gap of InN to 6.2 eV (AlN. Thus, light-emitting diodes emitting from infrared to deep into ultraviolet can be fabricated using ternary III-nitrides InGaN, AlGaN, and AlInN with appropriate composition. However, growing the compounds with any desirable composition often encounters substantial difficulties due to phase separation, structural quality of the epilayers, impurities and extended defects, etc. The spatial inhomogeneity of emission properties in III-nitride epilayers and quantum well structures provides an informative insight into carrier migration, localization, and recombination and is important for development of light-emitting devices. In this paper, we introduce the techniques for luminescence study with spatial resolution (microphotoluminescence, confocal microscopy, scanning near field optical microscopy and cathodoluminescence, discuss material properties leading to emission inhomogeneity and review results on spatial distribution of photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence in InGaN and AlGaN, which are the most important ternary III-nitride compounds for application in light-emitting devices.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.4.768

  10. BORON NITRIDE CAPACITORS FOR ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONIC DEVICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Badi; D. Starikov; C. Boney; A. Bensaoula; D. Johnstone

    2010-11-01

    This project fabricates long-life boron nitride/boron oxynitride thin film -based capacitors for advanced SiC power electronics with a broad operating temperature range using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. The use of vapor deposition provides for precise control and quality material formation.

  11. Synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride graphene-like few layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S.; Toury, B.; Journet, C.; Brioude, A.

    2014-06-01

    Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction.Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01017e

  12. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  13. Preparation of Crystallized Carbon Nitride Based on Microwave Plasma CVD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masatoshi INOUE; Yukihiro SAKAMOTO; Matsufumi TAKAYA

    2010-01-01

    ... on. To obtain this material, generally CH4 is used as a carbon source. Therefore, to make clear the effects of the reaction gas on the preparation of carbon nitride, we tried to use C2H4 as a carbon source instead of CH4...

  14. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...

  15. Vacancy complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of divacancies on the stability, structural and electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes is studied using the ab initio density functional method. VBBN is more stable in the boron-rich and less stable in the nitrogen...

  16. Hexagonal Boron Nitride Self-Launches Hyperbolic Phonon Polaritons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilburd, Leonid; Kim, Kris S.; Ho, Kevin; Trajanoski, Daniel; Maiti, Aniket; Halverson, Duncan; de Beer, Sissi; Walker, Gilbert C.

    2017-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a 2D material that supports traveling waves composed of material vibrations and light, and is attractive for nanoscale optical devices that function in the infrared. However, the only current method of launching these traveling waves requires the use of a metal

  17. Stress in and texture of PVD deposited metal nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machunze, R.

    2010-01-01

    Thin metal nitride films deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) are used amongst many other applications as wear protective coatings in tool industry or as diffusion barriers in integrated circuit technology. Typically these films exhibit a residual in-plane stress when deposited onto rigid su

  18. Advances and directions of ion nitriding/carburizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1989-01-01

    Ion nitriding and carburizing are plasma activated thermodynamic processes for the production of case hardened surface layers not only for ferrous materials, but also for an increasing number of nonferrous metals. When the treatment variables are properly controlled, the use of nitrogenous or carbonaceous glow discharge medium offers great flexibility in tailoring surface/near-surface properties independently of the bulk properties. The ion nitriding process has reached a high level of maturity and has gained wide industrial acceptance, while the more recently introduced ion carburizing process is rapidly gaining industrial acceptance. The current status of plasma mass transfer mechanisms into the surface regarding the formation of compound and diffusion layers in ion nitriding and carbon build-up ion carburizing is reviewed. In addition, the recent developments in design and construction of advanced equipment for obtaining optimized and controlled case/core properties is summarized. Also, new developments and trends such as duplex plasma treatments and alternatives to dc diode nitriding are highlighted.

  19. Atomistic models of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride from first principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarolimek, K.; Groot, R.A. de; Wijs, G.A. de; Zeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H), with equal concentrations of Si and N atoms (x=1), for two considerably different densities (2.0 and 3.0 g/cm3). Densities and hydrogen concentration were chosen according to experimental data. Using

  20. Heterostructures for Increased Quantum Efficiency in Nitride LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert F. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2010-09-30

    Task 1. Development of an advanced LED simulator useful for the design of efficient nitride-based devices. Simulator will contain graphical interface software that can be used to specify the device structure, the material parameters, the operating conditions and the desired output results. Task 2. Theoretical and experimental investigations regarding the influence on the microstructure, defect concentration, mechanical stress and strain and IQE of controlled changes in the chemistry and process route of deposition of the buffer layer underlying the active region of nitride-based blue- and greenemitting LEDs. Task 3. Theoretical and experimental investigations regarding the influence on the physical properties including polarization and IQE of controlled changes in the geometry, chemistry, defect density, and microstructure of components in the active region of nitride-based blue- and green-emitting LEDs. Task 4. Theoretical and experimental investigations regarding the influence on IQE of novel heterostructure designs to funnel carriers into the active region for enhanced recombination efficiency and elimination of diffusion beyond this region. Task 5. Theoretical and experimental investigations regarding the influence of enhanced p-type doping on the chemical, electrical, and microstructural characteristics of the acceptor-doped layers, the hole injection levels at Ohmic contacts, the specific contact resistivity and the IQE of nitride-based blue- and green-emitting LEDs. Development and optical and electrical characterization of reflective Ohmic contacts to n- and p-type GaN films.

  1. III-nitride grown on freestanding GaN nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yongjin; Zhu, Hongbo [Institute of Communication Technology, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, Jiang-Su 210003 (China); Hu, Fangren; Hane, Kazuhiro [Department of Nanomechanics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    We report here the epitaxial growth of III-nitride on the freestanding GaN nanostructures by molecular beam epitaxy growth. Various GaN nanostructures are defined by electron beam lithography and realized on GaN-on-silicon substrate by fast atom beam etching. Silicon substrate beneath GaN nanostructures is removed from the backside to form the freestanding GaN slab, and the epitaxial growth of III-nitride by MBE is performed on the prepared GaN template. The selective growth takes place with the assistance of GaN nanostructures and generates hexagonal III-nitride pyramids. Thin epitaxial structures, depending on the shape and the size of GaN nanostructure, can produce the promising optical performance. This work opens the way to combine silicon micromachining with the epitaxial growth of III-nitride by MBE on GaN-on-silicon substrate for further integrated optics (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Proportional control valves integrated in silicon nitride surface channel technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Maarten S.; Groenesteijn, Jarno; Meutstege, Esken; Brookhuis, Robert A.; Brouwer, Dannis M.; Lötters, Joost C.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed and realized two types of proportional microcontrol valves in a silicon nitride surface channel technology process. This enables on-die integration of flow controllers with other surface channel devices, such as pressure sensors or thermal or Coriolis-based (mass) flow sensors, to o

  3. Low temperature silicon nitride waveguides for multilayer platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Bucio, T.; Tarazona, A.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Mashanovich, G. Z.; Gardes, F. Y.

    2016-05-01

    Several 3D multilayer silicon photonics platforms have been proposed to provide densely integrated structures for complex integrated circuits. Amongst these platforms, great interest has been given to the inclusion of silicon nitride layers to achieve low propagation losses due to their capacity of providing tight optical confinement with low scattering losses in a wide spectral range. However, none of the proposed platforms have demonstrated the integration of active devices. The problem is that typically low loss silicon nitride layers have been fabricated with LPCVD which involves high processing temperatures (<1000 ºC) that affect metallisation and doping processes that are sensitive to temperatures above 400ºC. As a result, we have investigated ammonia-free PECVD and HWCVD processes to obtain high quality silicon nitride films with reduced hydrogen content at low temperatures. Several deposition recipes were defined through a design of experiments methodology in which different combinations of deposition parameters were tested to optimise the quality and the losses of the deposited layers. The physical, chemical and optical properties of the deposited materials were characterised using different techniques including ellipsometry, SEM, FTIR, AFM and the waveguide loss cut-back method. Silicon nitride layers with hydrogen content between 10-20%, losses below 10dB/cm and high material quality were obtained with the ammonia-free recipe. Similarly, it was demonstrated that HWCVD has the potential to fabricate waveguides with low losses due to its capacity of yielding hydrogen contents <10% and roughness <1.5nm.

  4. Gallium Nitride MMICs for mm-Wave Power Operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quay, R.; Maroldt, S.; Haupt, C.; Heijningen, M. van; Tessmann, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a Gallium Nitride MMIC technology for high-power amplifiers between 27 GHz and 101 GHz based on 150 nm- and 100 nm-gate technologies is presented. The GaN HEMT MMICs are designed using coplanar waveguide transmission-line-technology on 3-inch semi-insulating SiC substrates. The measure

  5. Tailor-made functionalization of silicon nitride surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arafat, A.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Smet, de L.C.P.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2004-01-01

    This communication presents the first functionalization of a hydrogen-terminated silicon-rich silicon nitride (Si3Nx) surface with a well-defined, covalently attached organic monolayer. Properties of the resulting monolayers are monitored by measurement of the static water contact angle, X-ray photo

  6. Development of high-thermal-conductivity silicon nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride (Si3N4 with high thermal conductivity has emerged as one of the most promising substrate materials for the next-generation power devices. This paper gives an overview on recent developments in preparing high-thermal-conductivity Si3N4 by a sintering of reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN method. Due to the reduction of lattice oxygen content, the SRBSN ceramics could attain substantially higher thermal conductivities than the Si3N4 ceramics prepared by the conventional gas-pressure sintering of silicon nitride (SSN method. Thermal conductivity could further be improved through increasing the β/α phase ratio during nitridation and enhancing grain growth during post-sintering. Studies on fracture resistance behaviors of the SRBSN ceramics revealed that they possessed high fracture toughness and exhibited obvious R-curve behaviors. Using the SRBSN method, a Si3N4 with a record-high thermal conductivity of 177 Wm−1K−1 and a fracture toughness of 11.2 MPa m1/2 was developed. Studies on the influences of two typical metallic impurity elements, Fe and Al, on thermal conductivities of the SRBSN ceramics revealed that the tolerable content limits for the two impurities were different. While 1 wt% of impurity Fe hardly degraded thermal conductivity, only 0.01 wt% of Al caused large decrease in thermal conductivity.

  7. Dispersion engineering silicon nitride waveguides for broadband nonlinear frequency conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epping, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigated nonlinear frequency conversion of optical wavelengths using integrated silicon nitride (Si3N4) waveguides. Two nonlinear conversion schemes were considered: seeded four-wave mixing and supercontinuum generation. The first—seeded four-wave mixing—is investigated by a n

  8. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program: Gaseous Nitridation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Suplinskas G. DiBona; W. Grant

    2001-10-29

    Textron has developed a mature process for the fabrication of continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) tubes for application in the aluminum processing and casting industry. The major milestones in this project are System Composition; Matrix Formulation; Preform Fabrication; Nitridation; Material Characterization; Component Evaluation

  9. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Emanuela Prado; Sverzut, Alexander Tadeu; Freitas, Gileade Pereira; Sá, Juliana Carvalho; Alves, Clodomiro; Beloti, Marcio Mateus; Rosa, Adalberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti) surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces.

  10. Nitride RCLEDs grown by MBE for POF applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calle, F.; Naranjo, F.B.; Fernandez, S.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Calleja, E.; Munoz, E. [ISOM and Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-08-16

    Data links by means of plastic optical fibres (POF) demand efficient light emitting diodes (LEDs) at 510 nm, the most promising candidate being nitride-based resonant-cavity LEDs (RCLEDs). These devices include InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structures, and GaN/AlGaN distributed Bragg reflectors. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) offers some advantages for the fabrication of nitride RCLEDs, like high In incorporation in the active region, and control of the interface quality in the mirror. The main steps in the development of nitride-based RCLEDs using radio-frequency plasma-assisted MBE are addressed, with emphasis in a) p-type doping of GaN by MBE; b) the optimisation of growth, the design and characterisation of AlGaN/GaN stacks for a reflector in the micro-cavity; and c) the growth of InGaN layers, InGaN/GaN MQWs, and conventional InGaN LEDs, which are studied by structural, electrical and optical techniques. The design and fabrication of nitride RCLEDs, which satisfy spectral and thermal specifications for POF applications, are finally described. (Abstract Copyright[2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. MEMS Aluminum Nitride Technology for Inertial Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigevani, Gabriele

    2011-12-01

    The design and fabrication of MEMS Inertial Sensors (both accelerometers and gyroscopes) made of Aluminum Nitride (AlN) is described in this dissertation. The goal of this work is to design and fabricate inertial sensors based on c-axis oriented AlN polycrystalline thin films. AlN is a post-CMOS compatible piezoelectric material widely used for acoustic resonators, such Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) and Lamb Wave Resonators (LWR). In this work we develop the design techniques necessary to obtain inertial sensors with AlN thin film technology. Being able to use AlN as structural material for both acoustic wave resonator and sensing elements is key to achieve the three level integration of RF-MEMS components, sensing elements and CMOS in the same chip. Using AlN as integration platform is particularly suitable for large consumer emerging markets where production costs are the major factor that determine a product success. In order to achieve a platform integration, the first part of this work focuses on the fabrication process: starting from the fabrication technology used for LWR devices, this work shows that by slightly modifying some of the fabrication steps it is possible to obtain MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes with the same structural layers used for LWR. In the second part of this work, an extensive analysis, performed with analytical and Finite Element Models (FEM), is developed for beam and ring based structures. These models are of great importance as they provide tools to understand the physics of lateral piezoelectric beam actuation and the major limitations of this technology. Based on the models developed for beam based resonators, we propose two designs for Double Ended Tuning Fork (DETF) based accelerometers. In the last part of the dissertation, we show the experimental results and the measurements performed on actual devices. As this work shows analytically and experimentally, there are some fundamental constraints that limit the ultimate sensitivity

  12. Intuitionistic hybrid logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braüner, Torben

    2011-01-01

    Intuitionistic hybrid logic is hybrid modal logic over an intuitionistic logic basis instead of a classical logical basis. In this short paper we introduce intuitionistic hybrid logic and we give a survey of work in the area.......Intuitionistic hybrid logic is hybrid modal logic over an intuitionistic logic basis instead of a classical logical basis. In this short paper we introduce intuitionistic hybrid logic and we give a survey of work in the area....

  13. Continuity Controlled Hybrid Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Bergstra, J. A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the connections between the process algebra for hybrid systems of Bergstra and Middelburg and the formalism of hybrid automata of Henzinger et al. We give interpretations of hybrid automata in the process algebra for hybrid systems and compare them with the standard interpretation of hybrid automata as timed transition systems. We also relate the synchronized product operator on hybrid automata to the parallel composition operator of the process algebra. It turns out that the f...

  14. Nitridation of Nb surface by nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Ozkendir, Osman Murat [Tarsus Technology Faculty, Mersin University, Tarsus 33480 (Turkey); Koroglu, Ulas; Ufuktepe, Yüksel [Department of Physics, Cukurova University, Adana 01330 (Turkey); Elsayed-Ali, Hani E., E-mail: helsayed@odu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • Laser nitridation of niobium is performed with nanosecond and femtosecond pulses. • Formation of NbN{sub x} with mixed α, β and δ phases was observed. • For femtosecond laser processed samples, laser induced ripple patterns oriented parallel to the beam polarization were formed. • X-ray absorption near edge structure show formation of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} on the surface of the samples. - Abstract: Niobium nitride samples were prepared by laser nitridation in a reactive nitrogen gas environment at room temperature using a Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond laser and a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser. The effects of laser fluence on the formed phase, surface morphology, and electronic properties of the NbN{sub x} were investigated. The samples were prepared at different nanosecond laser fluences up to 5.0 ± 0.8 J/cm{sup 2} at fixed nitrogen pressure of ∼2.7 × 10{sup 4} Pa formed NbN{sub x} with mainly the cubic δ-NbN phase. Femtosecond laser nitrided samples were prepared using laser fluences up to 1.3 ± 0.3 mJ/cm{sup 2} at ∼4.0 × 10{sup 4} Pa nitrogen pressure. Laser induced ripple patterns oriented parallel to the beam polarization were formed with spacing that increases with the laser fluence. To achieve a laser-nitrided surface with desired crystal orientation the laser fulence is an important parameter that needs to be properly adjusted.

  15. RF-sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides - Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  16. RF-sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides - Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  17. Wear and isothermal oxidation kinetics of nitrided TiAl based alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵斌; 吴建生; 孙坚

    2002-01-01

    Gas nitridation of TiAl based alloys in an ammonia atmosphere was c arried out. The evaluation of the surface wear resistance was performed to compare with those of the non-nitrided alloys. It is concluded that high temperature nitridation raised wear resistance of TiAl based alloys markedly. The tribol ogical behaviors of the nitrided alloys were also discussed. The oxidation kinetics of the nitrided TiAl based alloys were investigated at 800~1000 ℃ in hot air. It is concluded that nitridation is detrimental to the oxidation resistance of TiAl based alloys under the present conditions. The nitrided alloys exhibit increased oxidizing rate with the prolongation of nitridation time at 800 ℃. However, alloys nitrided at 940 ℃ for 50 hdisplay a sign of better oxidat ion resistance than the other nitrided alloys at more severe oxidizing conditions. The parabolic rate law is considered as the basis of the data processing and interpretation of the mass gainvs time data. As a comparison with it, attempts were made to fit the data with the power law. The oxidation kinetic parameter kn, kp and n were measured and the trends were discussed.

  18. Synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride by reaction of melamine and uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dante, Roberto C., E-mail: rcdante@yahoo.com [Laboratorio de Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Martin-Ramos, Pablo, E-mail: pablomartinramos@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Correa-Guimaraes, Adriana, E-mail: acg@iaf.uva.es [Laboratorio de Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Martin-Gil, Jesus, E-mail: jesusmartingil@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: {yields} Graphitic carbon nitrides by CVD of melamine and uric acid on alumina. {yields} The building blocks of carbon nitrides are heptazine nuclei. {yields} Composite particles with alumina core and carbon nitride coating. - Abstract: Graphitic carbon nitrides were synthesized starting from melamine and uric acid. Uric acid was chosen because it thermally decomposes, and reacts with melamine by condensation at temperatures in the range of 400-600 deg. C. The reagents were mixed with alumina and subsequently the samples were treated in an oven under nitrogen flux. Alumina favored the deposition of the graphitic carbon nitrides layers on the exposed surface. This method can be assimilated to an in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Infrared (IR) spectra, as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, are in accordance with the formation of a graphitic carbon nitride with a structure based on heptazine blocks. These carbon nitrides exhibit poor crystallinity and a nanometric texture, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The thermal degradation of the graphitic carbon nitride occurs through cyano group formation, and involves the bridging tertiary nitrogen and the bonded carbon, which belongs to the heptazine ring, causing the ring opening and the consequent network destruction as inferred by connecting the IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. This seems to be an easy and promising route to synthesize graphitic carbon nitrides. Our final material is a composite made of an alumina core covered by carbon nitride layers.

  19. Plasma nitriding of a precipitation hardening stainless steel to improve erosion and corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabo, Amado, E-mail: cabo@ionar.com.ar [IONAR S.A., Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bruhl, Sonia P.; Vaca, Laura S.; Charadia, Raul Charadia, E-mail: sonia@frcu.utn.erdu.ar, E-mail: vacal@frcu.utn.edu.ar, E-mail: charadia@frcu.urn.edu.ar, E-mail: dalibone@frcu.utn.edu.ar [Surface Engineering Group (GIS), Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Facultad Regional Concepcion del Uruguay (Argentina)

    2010-07-01

    Precipitation hardening stainless steels are used as structural materials in the aircraft and the chemical industry because of their good combination of mechanical and corrosion properties. The aim of this work is to analyze the structural changes produced by plasma nitriding in the near surface of Thyroplast PH X Supra®, a PH stainless steel from ThyssenKrupp, and to study the effect of nitriding parameters in wear and corrosion resistance. Samples were first aged and then nitriding was carried out in an industrial facility at two temperatures, with two different nitrogen partial pressures in the gas mixture. After nitriding, samples were cut, polished, mounted in resin and etched with Vilella reagent to reveal the nitrided case. Nitrided structure was also analyzed with XRD. Erosion/Corrosion was tested against sea water and sand flux, and corrosion in a salt spray fog (ASTM B117). All nitrided samples presented high hardness. Samples nitrided at 390 deg C with different nitrogen partial pressure showed similar erosion resistance against water and sand flux. The erosion resistance of the nitrided samples at 500 deg C was the highest and XRD revealed nitrides. Corrosion resistance, on the contrary, was diminished; the samples suffered of general corrosion during the salt spray fog test. (author)

  20. Ab-initio study on the stability, electronic and mechanical properties of transition metal nitrides under external pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin; Li, Xuan; Wang, Yangyang; Liu, Xuejie; Yu, Changyong; Ren, Yuan

    2017-04-01

    Structures of transition metal nitrides (TMNs) were optimized using the plane-wave pseudopotential method based on density functional theory. Energy as a function of volume curves were calculated to predict the phase transition pressures. Density of states (DOS), charge density difference, and charge transfers were calculated. The elastic constant (C11) and modulus (G) as a function of pressure were computed. Results showed that TMNs in the WC structure was most stable at normal pressure. All TMNs exhibited metallic, covalent and ionic property. Metallic character increased and covalent property reduced with increasing atomic number of TM atom. The elastic constant (C11) and modulus (G) increased linearly with increasing pressure due to stronger hybridization, bonding and covalent property. Thus, mechanical property enhanced under external pressure.

  1. Quasi-freestanding monolayer heterostructure of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride on Ir(111) with a chiral boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Mengxi; Chen, Pengcheng; Sun, Jingyu; Ma, Donglin; Gao, Teng; Gao, Yabo; Li, Qiucheng; Cheng, Zhihai; Qiu, Xiaohui; Fang, Ying; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2014-01-01

    Monolayer lateral heterostructure of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BNC) has attracted a growing attention mainly due to its tunable band-gap character and unique physical properties at interface. Hereby, we reported the first-time synthesis of a nearly freestanding h-BNC hybrid on a weakly coupled substrate of Ir (111), where graphene and h-BN possessing different surface heights and corrugations formed a perfect monolayer hybrid. With the aid of scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS), we demonstrated that h-BN can patch alongside the boundary of pre-deposited graphene domains and vice versa to form a seamless monolayer hybrid, with the realization of predominant zigzag type chiral boundaries at the interface. Density-functional theory calculations and STM/STS measurements aided us to reveal that this interface between graphene and h-BN were atomically sharp in aspects of the chemical bonding as well as the local electronic property from both theoretical and experimental points of view...

  2. Numerical analysis on current and optical confinement of III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Yu; Huang, Shen-Che; Ho, Tsung-Lin; Lu, Tien-Chang; Wang, Shing-Chung

    2014-04-21

    We report on the numerical analysis of the electrical and optical properties of current-injected III-nitride based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with three types of current confinement schemes: the conventional planar-indium tin oxide (ITO) type, the AlN-buried type without ITO, and the hybrid type. The proposed hybrid structure, which combines an ITO layer and an intracavity AlN aperture, exhibits not only uniform current distribution but also enhanced lateral optical confinement. Thus, the hybrid type design shows remarkably better performance including lower threshold current and series resistance compared with the planar-ITO type and the AlN-buried type. Furthermore, the multi-transverse mode lasing behavior induced by strong index guiding of the AlN aperture is suppressed to single transverse mode operation by reducing the aperture size. Such design provides a powerful solution for the high performance III-N based VCSELs and is also viable by using current state of the art processing techniques.

  3. Performance analysis of boron nitride embedded armchair graphene nanoribbon metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor with Stone Wales defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanana, Anuja; Sengupta, Amretashis; Mahapatra, Santanu

    2014-01-01

    We study the performance of a hybrid Graphene-Boron Nitride armchair nanoribbon (a-GNR-BN) n-MOSFET at its ballistic transport limit. We consider three geometric configurations 3p, 3p + 1, and 3p + 2 of a-GNR-BN with BN atoms embedded on either side (2, 4, and 6 BN) on the GNR. Material properties like band gap, effective mass, and density of states of these H-passivated structures are evaluated using the Density Functional Theory. Using these material parameters, self-consistent Poisson-Schrodinger simulations are carried out under the Non Equilibrium Green's Function formalism to calculate the ballistic n-MOSFET device characteristics. For a hybrid nanoribbon of width ˜5 nm, the simulated ON current is found to be in the range of 265 μA-280 μA with an ON/OFF ratio 7.1 × 106-7.4 × 106 for a VDD = 0.68 V corresponding to 10 nm technology node. We further study the impact of randomly distributed Stone Wales (SW) defects in these hybrid structures and only 2.5% degradation of ON current is observed for SW defect density of 3.18%.

  4. Performance analysis of boron nitride embedded armchair graphene nanoribbon metal–oxide–semiconductor field effect transistor with Stone Wales defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanana, Anuja; Sengupta, Amretashis; Mahapatra, Santanu [Nano Scale Device Research Laboratory, Department of Electronic Systems Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2014-01-21

    We study the performance of a hybrid Graphene-Boron Nitride armchair nanoribbon (a-GNR-BN) n-MOSFET at its ballistic transport limit. We consider three geometric configurations 3p, 3p + 1, and 3p + 2 of a-GNR-BN with BN atoms embedded on either side (2, 4, and 6 BN) on the GNR. Material properties like band gap, effective mass, and density of states of these H-passivated structures are evaluated using the Density Functional Theory. Using these material parameters, self-consistent Poisson-Schrodinger simulations are carried out under the Non Equilibrium Green's Function formalism to calculate the ballistic n-MOSFET device characteristics. For a hybrid nanoribbon of width ∼5 nm, the simulated ON current is found to be in the range of 265 μA–280 μA with an ON/OFF ratio 7.1 × 10{sup 6}–7.4 × 10{sup 6} for a V{sub DD} = 0.68 V corresponding to 10 nm technology node. We further study the impact of randomly distributed Stone Wales (SW) defects in these hybrid structures and only 2.5% degradation of ON current is observed for SW defect density of 3.18%.

  5. Constituted oxides/nitrides on nitriding 304, 430 and 17-4 PH stainless steel in salt baths over the temperature range 723 to 923 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Teng-Shih; Huang, Yung-Sen; Chen, Chi-Fan

    2011-10-01

    The progressively developed oxides and nitrides that form on nitriding 304, 430 and 17-4 PH stainless steel are analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) in this study. The experimental results show that the Cr contents and matrix structures (ferrite, austenite and martensite) play an important role in forming FeCr 2O 4, Cr 2O 3 and Fe 2O 3 oxides as well as nitrides. After a short immersion time, oxides of Cr 2O 3 and FeCr 2O 4 form in nitride films on 304 stainless steel samples. Fe 2O 3 oxide will subsequently form following an increasing immersion time. For the 430 stainless steel, Cr 2O 3 predominately forms after a short dipping time which hinders the growth of the nitride layer. As a result, this sample had the thinnest nitride film of the three for a given immersion time. After the formation of oxides, both CrN and Cr 2N were detected near the surface of the nitride films of three samples while Cr 2N phases formed in the deeper zone. The greatest amount of Fe 2O 3 oxide among the three samples was obtained on the nitriding 17-4 PH stainless steel which also had a high intensity count of N 1s.

  6. Microstructural characterization of an AISI-SAE 4140 steel without nitridation and nitrided; Caracterizacion microestructural de un acero AISI-SAE 4140 sin nitrurar y nitrurado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina F, A.; Naquid G, C. [Gerencia de Ciencia de Materiales, Depto. de Sintesis y Caracterizacion de Materiales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    It was micro structurally characterized an AISI-SAE 4140 steel before and after of nitridation through the nitridation process by plasma post-unloading microwaves through Optical microscopy (OM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) by means of secondary electrons and retrodispersed, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersion spectra (EDS) and mapping of elements. (Author)

  7. Hybridized tetraquarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Esposito

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new interpretation of the neutral and charged X,Z exotic hadron resonances. Hybridized-tetraquarks are neither purely compact tetraquark states nor bound or loosely bound molecules but rather a manifestation of the interplay between the two. While meson molecules need a negative or zero binding energy, its counterpart for h-tetraquarks is required to be positive. The formation mechanism of this new class of hadrons is inspired by that of Feshbach metastable states in atomic physics. The recent claim of an exotic resonance in the Bs0π± channel by the D0 Collaboration and the negative result presented subsequently by the LHCb Collaboration are understood in this scheme, together with a considerable portion of available data on X,Z particles. Considerations on a state with the same quantum numbers as the X(5568 are also made.

  8. Hybridized Tetraquarks

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, A.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new interpretation of the neutral and charged X, Z exotic hadron resonances. Hybridized-tetraquarks are neither purely compact tetraquark states nor bound or loosely bound molecules. The latter would require a negative or zero binding energy whose counterpart in h-tetraquarks is a positive quantity. The formation mechanism of this new class of hadrons is inspired by that of Feshbach metastable states in atomic physics. The recent claim of an exotic resonance in the Bs pi+- channel by the D0 collaboration and the negative result presented subsequently by the LHCb collaboration are understood in this scheme, together with a considerable portion of available data on X, Z particles. Considerations on a state with the same quantum numbers as the X(5568) are also made.

  9. Microscopic investigation of pitting corrosion in plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel; Mikroskopische Untersuchung von Lochkorrosion an plasmanitriertem austenitischem rostfreiem Stahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escalada, Lisandro; Simison, Silvia N. [Univ. of Mar del Plata (Argentina). Faculty of Engineering; Bruehl, Sonia P. [National Univ. of Technology, Concepcion del Uruguay (Argentina). Surface Engineering Group

    2014-10-01

    UNS 31603 austenitic stainless steel was nitrided using different techniques, and pitting corrosion resistance was analysed in a chloride solution. All nitriding techniques, LEII, PI. and convectional DC nitriding produced a nitrided layer called S phase which is corrosion resistant. Pits morphology and layer structure was investigated using optical and electronic microscopy, SEM-FIB, EDS, and a 3D reconstruction of a pit was assessed using FIB tomography. It was concluded that pits are initiated in MnS inclusions and a channel was generated passing through the nitrided layer, connecting the steel with the electrolyte. Base alloy dissolution was observed beneath the nitrided layer.

  10. Preparation and characterization of boron nitride/carbon fiber composite with high specific surface area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yan; Fan, Mingwen [Wuhan Univ. (China). Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering; Yuan, Songdong; Xiong, Kun; Hu, Kunpeng; Luo, Yi [Hubei Univ. of Technology, Wuhan (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Li, Dong [Hubei Univ. of Technology, Wuhan (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Chemistry Research Lab.

    2014-06-15

    Boron nitride can be used as a good catalyst carrier because of its high thermal conductivity and chemical stability. However, a high specific surface area of boron nitride is still desirable. In this work, a carbon fiber composite coated with boron nitride villous nano-film was prepared, and was also characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis. The results indicated that the carbon fibers were covered by uniform villous boron nitride films whose thickness was about 150 - 200 nm. The specific surface area of the boron nitride/carbon fiber composite material was 96 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, which was markedly improved compared with conventional boron nitride materials. (orig.)

  11. Effect of Nitridation on Morphology, Structural Properties and Stress of A1N Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Wei-Guo; JIAO Chun-Mei; WEI Hong-Yuan; ZHANG Pan-Feng; KANG Wing-Ting; ZHANG Ri-Qing; LIU Xiang-Lin

    2008-01-01

    @@ We investigate effects of nitridation on A1N morphology, structural properties and stress.It is found that 3 min nitridation can prominently improve A1N crystal structure, and slightly smooth the surface morphology.However, 10min nitridation degrades out-of-plane crystal structure and surface morphology instead.Additionally, 3-min nitridation introduces more tensile stress (1.5 GPa) in A1N films, which can be attributed to the weaker islands 2D coalescent.Nitridation for 10 rain can introduce more defects, or even forms polycrystallinity interlayer, which relaxes the stress.Thus, the stress in A1N with 10 min nitridation decreases to -0.2 GPa compressive stress.

  12. Validity of "sputtering and re-condensation" model in active screen cage plasma nitriding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, A.; Khan, A. W.; Jan, F.; Abrar, M.; Khalid, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2013-05-01

    The validity of "sputtering and re-condensation" model in active screen plasma nitriding for nitrogen mass transfer mechanism is investigated. The dominant species including NH, Fe-I, N2+, N-I and N2 along with Hα and Hβ lines are observed in the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) analysis. Active screen cage and dc plasma nitriding of AISI 316 stainless steel as function of treatment time is also investigated. The structure and phases composition of the nitrided layer is studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Surface morphology is studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hardness profile is obtained by Vicker's microhardness tester. Increasing trend in microhardness is observed in both cases but the increase in active screen plasma nitriding is about 3 times greater than that achieved by dc plasma nitriding. On the basis of metallurgical and OES observations the use of "sputtering and re-condensation" model in active screen plasma nitriding is tested.

  13. Continuity Controlled Hybrid Automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the connections between the process algebra for hybrid systems of Bergstra and Middelburg and the formalism of hybrid automata of Henzinger et al. We give interpretations of hybrid automata in the process algebra for hybrid systems and compare them with the standard interpretation of

  14. Continuity controlled Hybrid Automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the connections between the process algebra for hybrid systems of Bergstra and Middelburg and the formalism of hybrid automata of Henzinger et al. We give interpretations of hybrid automata in the process algebra for hybrid systems and compare them with the standard interpretation of

  15. NITROGEN POTENTIAL DURING ION NITRIDING PROCESS IN GLOW-DISCHARGE PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kozlov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems on regulation of phase composition of a nitrided layer during gas and ion nitriding process in a glow-discharge. It has been established that  available models for control of nitrided layer structure with the help of nitriding index (nitrogen potential can not be applied for nitriding process in the glow-discharge. Principal difference of the ion nitriding from the gas one is in the fact that chemically active nitrogen is formed in the discharge zone (cathode layer and its mass-transfer is carried out in the form of an active particle flow (ions, atoms, molecules which directed to the metal surface.Interrelation of chemical discharge activity with such characteristics of nitriding steel as nitrogen solubility in  α-solid solution and  coefficient diffusion during ion nitriding in low-discharge plasma. It has been shown that regulation of the nitride layer structure during ion nitriding is reached due to changes in nitrogen flow density in plasma. While supporting the flow at the level of nitrogen solubility in  one phase or another (α, γ′  it is possible to obtain the nitrided layer consisting only of α-solid solution or γ′-nitride layer and diffusion sub-layer. Moreover a specific range of nitrogen flow density values exists for every steel grade where it is possible to ensure a limiting nitrogen concentration in α-solid solution and the γ′-layer characterized by low diffusion  mobility is not formed on the surface.

  16. Cathodic cage nitriding of AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel with the addition of CH4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Ribeiro Magalhães de Sousa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel samples were nitrided using the cathodic cage plasma nitriding technique (CCPN, with the addition of methane to reduce chromium precipitation, increase hardness and wear resistance and reduce the presence of nitrides when compared to plasma carbonitriding. Microhardness profiles and X-Ray analysis confirm the formation of a very hard layer containing mainly ε-Fe3N and expanded ferrite phases.

  17. Fabrication and Optical Recombination in III-Nitride Microstructures and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Fabrication and optical investigations of III-nitride microstructures Our group has pioneered the fabrication of micro - and nano -size photonic... pumped individual III-nitride micro -size LEDs and micro -LED arrays and observed enhanced quantum efficiencies. The micro -size LEDs were fabricated...quality III-nitride QWs, heterostructures, microstructures, and micro -devices and to study their optical and optoeletronic properties. By optimizing

  18. Effect of nitride chemical passivation of the surface of GaAs photodiodes on their characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontrosh, E. V.; Lebedeva, N. M.; Kalinovskiy, V. S.; Soldatenkov, F. Yu; Ulin, V. P.

    2016-11-01

    Characteristics of GaAs photodiodes have been studied before and after the chemical nitridation of their surface in hydrazine sulfide solutions, which leads to substitution of surface As atoms with N atoms to give a GaN monolayer. The resulting nitride coatings hinder the oxidation of GaAs in air and provide a decrease in the density of surface states involved in recombination processes. The device characteristics improved by nitridation are preserved during a long time.

  19. High K Oxide Insulated Gate Group III Nitride-Based FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-21

    the physical and electrical properties of high-k dielectric oxides on gallium nitride were explored. The efficacies of several cleaning procedures...surface roughening. Parameters examined included the oxide composition (AI203, Ti02, and Ga203), the gallium nitride crystallographic orientation (c...and m-plane), and its crystal polarity (Ga- anc N-polar). 15. SUBJECT TERMS Gallium nitride , oxides, atomic layer deposition, capitance-voltage

  20. Research on Abrasives in the Chemical Mechanical Polishing Process for Silicon Nitride Balls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si 3N 4) has been the main material for balls in ceramic ball bearings, for its lower density, high strength, high hardness, fine thermal stability and anticorrosive, and is widely used in various fields, such as high speed and high temperature areojet engines, precision machine tools and chemical engineer machines. Silicon nitride ceramics is a kind of brittle and hard material that is difficult to machining. In the traditional finishing process of silicon nitride balls, balls are lapped...