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Sample records for hybrid solar-wind power

  1. ANALYSING SOLAR-WIND HYBRID POWER GENERATING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa ENGİN

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a solar-wind hybrid power generating, system that will be used for security lighting was designed. Hybrid system was installed and solar cells, wind turbine, battery bank, charge regulators and inverter performance values were measured through the whole year. Using measured values of overall system efficiency, reliability, demanded energy cost per kWh were calculated, and percentage of generated energy according to resources were defined. We also include in the paper a discussion of new strategies to improve hybrid power generating system performance and demanded energy cost per kWh.

  2. Simulation and optimum design of hybrid solar-wind and solar-wind-diesel power generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei

    Solar and wind energy systems are considered as promising power generating sources due to its availability and topological advantages in local power generations. However, a drawback, common to solar and wind options, is their unpredictable nature and dependence on weather changes, both of these energy systems would have to be oversized to make them completely reliable. Fortunately, the problems caused by variable nature of these resources can be partially overcome by integrating these two resources in a proper combination to form a hybrid system. However, with the increased complexity in comparison with single energy systems, optimum design of hybrid system becomes more complicated. In order to efficiently and economically utilize the renewable energy resources, one optimal sizing method is necessary. This thesis developed an optimal sizing method to find the global optimum configuration of stand-alone hybrid (both solar-wind and solar-wind-diesel) power generation systems. By using Genetic Algorithm (GA), the optimal sizing method was developed to calculate the system optimum configuration which offers to guarantee the lowest investment with full use of the PV array, wind turbine and battery bank. For the hybrid solar-wind system, the optimal sizing method is developed based on the Loss of Power Supply Probability (LPSP) and the Annualized Cost of System (ACS) concepts. The optimization procedure aims to find the configuration that yields the best compromise between the two considered objectives: LPSP and ACS. The decision variables, which need to be optimized in the optimization process, are the PV module capacity, wind turbine capacity, battery capacity, PV module slope angle and wind turbine installation height. For the hybrid solar-wind-diesel system, minimization of the system cost is achieved not only by selecting an appropriate system configuration, but also by finding a suitable control strategy (starting and stopping point) of the diesel generator. The

  3. A simple mathematical description of an off-grid hybrid solar-wind power generating system

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    Blasone, M.; Dell'Anno, F.; De Luca, R.; Torre, G.

    2013-05-01

    We give a detailed description of the energy balance equation for a stand-alone hybrid solar-wind power generating system. The dimensions of the power generator and the energy capacity of a buffer battery (used as an energy storage system) are chosen to suit a known consumer's profile. Future applications of the mathematical model developed and analogies with a similar hydrodynamic problem are discussed.

  4. Investigation on characteristics and application of hybrid solar-wind power generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin

    This thesis develops an overall methodology for investigating the characteristics and application of hybrid solar-wind power generation systems using both technical methodology and field experiment. The field experiment investigates the operating performances and characteristics of a hybrid solar-wind system and helps to validate the field application feasibility of the models developed in this thesis. By applying and integrating new technologies and new concepts, the Hybrid Solar-Wind System Optimization (HSWSO) methodology is developed according to the Loss of Power Supply Probability (LPSP) technique and the new concept of Levelised Cost of Energy (LCE). The HSWSO model is utilized to carry out system evaluations and to achieve optimal system configurations with two case studies. By applying the HSWSO model, the hybrid system can be sized technically and economically according to the system reliability requirements. The weighting relationships among three sizing parameters (the capacity of photovoltaic (PV) system, the rated power of wind system, and the capacity of battery bank) are investigated accordingly. The orientations of PV modules (gamma, beta) and the hub heights of wind tower are also studied as two factors influencing the sizing simulation results. A Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) for renewable energy applications is proposed. By applying the new methodologies developed in this thesis, a local TMY is derived for solar-wind applications (utilized as the weather data input in the HSWSO model) by processing local long-term weather data. As one part of the integrated HSWSO model, the simulation model for hybrid solar-wind system is developed. System simulation mainly employs modeling of PV modules, modeling of wind turbine, and modeling of battery bank. Modeling PV modules includes two parts: modeling the maximum power output of PV modules, which is developed from the model describing the I--V characteristics of PV modules and validated by

  5. Developing a Hybrid Solar/Wind Powered Drip Irrigation System for Dragon Fruit Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiastuti, I.; Wijayanto, D. S.

    2017-03-01

    Irrigation operations take a large amount of water and energy which impact to total costs of crop production. Development of an efficient irrigation supplying precise amount of water and conserving the use of energy can have benefits not only by reducing the operating costs but also by enhancing the farmland productivity. This article presents an irrigation method that promotes sustainable use of water and energy appropriate for a developing tropical country. It proposes a drip irrigation system supported by a combined solar-wind electric power generation system for efficient use of water in dragon fruit cultivation. The electric power generated is used to drive a water pump filling a storage tank for irrigating a 3000 m2 dragon fruit yield in Nguntoronadi, Wonogiri, Indonesia. In designing the irrigation system, the plant’s water requirement was identified based on the value of reference evapotranspiration of the area. A cost/benefit analysis was performed to evaluate the economic feasibility of the proposed scheme. The installation of this solar and wind drip irrigation helps provide sufficient quantity of water to each plant using renewable energy sources which reduce dependence on fossil fuel.

  6. Developing a hybrid solar/wind powered irrigation system for crops in the Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some small scale irrigation systems (powered by wind or solar do not require subsidies, but this paper discusses ways to achieve an economical renewable energy powered center pivot irrigation system for crops in the Great Plains. By adding a solar-photovoltaic (PV) array together with a wind...

  7. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  8. Global kinetic hybrid simulation for radially expanding solar wind

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    Dyadechkin, S.; Semenov, V. S.; Kallio, E.; Erkaev, N. V.; Alho, M.; Lammer, H.

    2017-08-01

    We present the results of a 1-D global kinetic simulation of the solar wind in spherical coordinates without a magnetic field in the region from the Sun to the Earth's orbit. Protons are considered as particles while electrons are considered as a massless fluid, with a constant temperature, in order to study the relation between the hybrid and hydrodynamic solutions. It is shown that the strong electric field in the hybrid model accelerates the protons. Since the electric field in the model is related to electron pressure, each proton in the initial Maxwellian velocity distribution function moves under the same forces as in the classical Parker Solar wind model. The study shows that the hybrid model results in very similar velocity and number density distributions along the radial distance as in the Parker model. In the hybrid simulations, the proton temperature is decreased with distance in 1 order of magnitude. The effective polytropic index of the proton population slightly exceeds 1 at larger distances with the maximum value ˜1.15 in the region near the Sun. A highly non-Maxwellian type of distribution function is initially formed. Further from the Sun, a narrow beam of the escaping protons is created which does not change much in later expansion. The results of our study indicates that already a nonmagnetized global hybrid model is capable of reproducing some fundamental features of the expanding solar wind shown in the Parker model and additional kinetic effects in the solar wind.

  9. Small Footprint Solar/Wind-powered CASTNET System Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In this Research Effort “Small Footprint Solar/Wind-Powered CASTNET System” there are two data sets. One data set contains atmospheric concentration measurements, at...

  10. Analysis of powerful local acceleration of solar wind particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molotkov, I. A.; Ryabova, N. A.

    2017-07-01

    Collisionless plasma of the solar wind is considered. A number of physical processes in this plasma lead to the formation of magnetic islands that are potential traps for charged particles. The merging and contractions of magnetic islands cause a powerful acceleration of these particles to energies over 1 MeV. This work continues the study in recent years on modeling of the acceleration of charged particles of the solar wind. Our analytical solution of the transport equations allowed us to find the exact number of particles with energies exceeding given level.

  11. Modelling and Optimising the Value of a Hybrid Solar-Wind System

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    Nair, Arjun; Murali, Kartik; Anbuudayasankar, S. P.; Arjunan, C. V.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a net present value (NPV) approach for a solar hybrid system has been presented. The system, in question aims at supporting an investor by assessing an investment in solar-wind hybrid system in a given area. The approach follow a combined process of modelling the system, with optimization of major investment-related variables to maximize the financial yield of the investment. The consideration of solar wind hybrid supply presents significant potential for cost reduction. The investment variables concern the location of solar wind plant, and its sizing. The system demand driven, meaning that its primary aim is to fully satisfy the energy demand of the customers. Therefore, the model is a practical tool in the hands of investor to assess and optimize in financial terms an investment aiming at covering real energy demand. Optimization is performed by taking various technical, logical constraints. The relation between the maximum power obtained between individual system and the hybrid system as a whole in par with the net present value of the system has been highlighted.

  12. Contribution of strong discontinuities to the power spectrum of the solar wind.

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    Borovsky, Joseph E

    2010-09-10

    Eight and a half years of magnetic field measurements (2(22) samples) from the ACE spacecraft in the solar wind at 1 A.U. are analyzed. Strong (large-rotation-angle) discontinuities in the solar wind are collected and measured. An artificial time series is created that preserves the timing and amplitudes of the discontinuities. The power spectral density of the discontinuity series is calculated and compared with the power spectral density of the solar-wind magnetic field. The strong discontinuities produce a power-law spectrum in the "inertial subrange" with a spectral index near the Kolmogorov -5/3 index. The discontinuity spectrum contains about half of the power of the full solar-wind magnetic field over this "inertial subrange." Warnings are issued about the significant contribution of discontinuities to the spectrum of the solar wind, complicating interpretation of spectral power and spectral indices.

  13. The influence of solar wind variability on magnetospheric ULF wave power

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    D. Pokhotelov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF oscillations in the Pc 4–5 frequency range play an important role in the dynamics of Earth's radiation belts, both by enhancing the radial diffusion through incoherent interactions and through the coherent drift-resonant interactions with trapped radiation belt electrons. The statistical distributions of magnetospheric ULF wave power are known to be strongly dependent on solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF orientation. Statistical characterisation of ULF wave power in the magnetosphere traditionally relies on average solar wind–IMF conditions over a specific time period. In this brief report, we perform an alternative characterisation of the solar wind influence on magnetospheric ULF wave activity through the characterisation of the solar wind driver by its variability using the standard deviation of solar wind parameters rather than a simple time average. We present a statistical study of nearly one solar cycle (1996–2004 of geosynchronous observations of magnetic ULF wave power and find that there is significant variation in ULF wave powers as a function of the dynamic properties of the solar wind. In particular, we find that the variability in IMF vector, rather than variabilities in other parameters (solar wind density, bulk velocity and ion temperature, plays the strongest role in controlling geosynchronous ULF power. We conclude that, although time-averaged bulk properties of the solar wind are a key factor in driving ULF powers in the magnetosphere, the solar wind variability can be an important contributor as well. This highlights the potential importance of including solar wind variability especially in studies of ULF wave dynamics in order to assess the efficiency of solar wind–magnetosphere coupling.

  14. Renewable Energy Systems: Development and Perspectives of a Hybrid Solar-Wind System

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    C. Shashidhar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering the intermittent natural energy resources and the seasonal un-balance, a phtovoltaic-wind hybrid electrical power supply system was developed to accommodate remote locations where a conventional grid connection is inconvenient or expensive. However, the hybrid system can also be applied with grid connection and owners are allowed to sell excessive power back to the electric utility. The proposed set-up consists of a photo-voltaic solar-cell array, a mast mounted wind generator, lead-acid storage batteries, an inverter unit to convert DC to AC, electrical lighting loads, electrical heating loads, several fuse and junction boxes and associated wiring, and test instruments for measuring voltages, currents, power factors, and harmonic contamination data throughout the system. The proposed hybrid solar-wind power generating system can be extensively used to illustrate electrical concepts in hands-on laboratories and also for demonstrations in the Industrial Technology curriculum. This paper describes an analysis of local PV-wind hybrid systems for supplying electricity to a private house, farmhouse or small company with electrical power depending on the site needs. The major system components, work principle and specific working condition are presented.

  15. Optimal design of a hybrid solar-wind-battery system using the minimization of the annualized cost system and the minimization of the loss of power supply probability (LPSP)

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    Ould Bilal, B.; Sambou, V.; Ndiaye, P.A.; Kebe, C.M.F. [Centre International de Formation et de Recherche en Energie Solaire (C.I.F.R.E.S), ESP BP: 5085 Dakar Fann (Senegal); Ndongo, M. [Centre de Recherche Appliquee aux Energies Renouvelables de l' Eau et du Froid (CRAER)/FST/Universite de Nouakchott (Mauritania)

    2010-10-15

    Potou is an isolated site, located in the northern coast of Senegal. The populations living in this area have no easy access to electricity supply. The use of renewable energies can contribute to the improvement of the living conditions of these populations. The methodology used in this paper consists in Sizing a hybrid solar-wind-battery system optimized through multi-objective genetic algorithm for this site and the influence of the load profiles on the optimal configuration. The two principal aims are: the minimization of the annualized cost system and the minimization of the loss of power supply probability (LPSP). To study the load profile influence, three load profiles with the same energy (94 kW h/day) have been used. The achieved results show that the cost of the optimal configuration strongly depends on the load profile. For example, the cost of the optimal configuration decreases by 7% and 5% going from profile 1 to 2 and for those ones going from 1 to 3. (author)

  16. The energy coupling function and the power generated by the solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo

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    Kan, J. R.; Lee, L. C.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1980-01-01

    A solar wind parameter epsilon, known as the energy coupling function, has been shown to correlate with the power consumption in the magnetosphere. It is shown in the present paper that the parameter epsilon can be identified semi-quantitatively as the dynamo power delivered from the solar wind to an open magnetosphere. This identification not only provides a theoretical basis for the energy coupling function, but also constitutes an observational verification of the solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo along the magnetotail. Moreover, one can now conclude that a substorm results when the dynamo power exceeds 10 to the 18th erg/s.

  17. The Technical and Economic Study of Solar-Wind Hybrid Energy System in Coastal Area of Chittagong, Bangladesh

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    Shuvankar Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The size optimization and economic evaluation of the solar-wind hybrid renewable energy system (RES to meet the electricity demand of 276 kWh/day with 40 kW peak load have been determined in this study. The load data has been collected from the motels situated in the coastal areas of Patenga, Chittagong. RES in standalone as well as grid connected mode have been considered. The optimal system configurations have been determined based on systems net present cost (NPC and cost of per unit energy (COE. A standalone solar-wind-battery hybrid system is feasible and economically comparable to the present cost of diesel based power plant if 8% annual capacity shortage is allowed. Grid tied solar-wind hybrid system, where more than 70% electricity contribution is from RES, is economically comparable to present grid electricity price. Moreover, grid tied RES results in more than 60% reduction in greenhouse gases emission compared to the conventional grid. Sensitivity analysis has been performed in this study to determine the effect of capital cost variation or renewable resources variation on the system economy. Simulation result of sensitivity analysis has showed that 20% reduction of installation cost results in nearly 9%–12% reductions in cost of per unit energy.

  18. Modelling the solar wind interaction with Mercury by a quasi-neutral hybrid model

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    E. Kallio

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Quasi-neutral hybrid model is a self-consistent modelling approach that includes positively charged particles and an electron fluid. The approach has received an increasing interest in space plasma physics research because it makes it possible to study several plasma physical processes that are difficult or impossible to model by self-consistent fluid models, such as the effects associated with the ions’ finite gyroradius, the velocity difference between different ion species, or the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. By now quasi-neutral hybrid models have been used to study the solar wind interaction with the non-magnetised Solar System bodies of Mars, Venus, Titan and comets. Localized, two-dimensional hybrid model runs have also been made to study terrestrial dayside magnetosheath. However, the Hermean plasma environment has not yet been analysed by a global quasi-neutral hybrid model. In this paper we present a new quasi-neutral hybrid model developed to study various processes associated with the Mercury-solar wind interaction. Emphasis is placed on addressing advantages and disadvantages of the approach to study different plasma physical processes near the planet. The basic assumptions of the approach and the algorithms used in the new model are thoroughly presented. Finally, some of the first three-dimensional hybrid model runs made for Mercury are presented. The resulting macroscopic plasma parameters and the morphology of the magnetic field demonstrate the applicability of the new approach to study the Mercury-solar wind interaction globally. In addition, the real advantage of the kinetic hybrid model approach is to study the property of individual ions, and the study clearly demonstrates the large potential of the approach to address these more detailed issues by a quasi-neutral hybrid model in the future.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (planetary magnetospheres; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions – Space plasma

  19. Three-Dimensional Hybrid-Kinetic Simulations of Alfvénic Turbulence in the Solar Wind

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    Arzamasskiy, Lev; Kunz, Matthew; Chandran, Ben; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    It is well established that the solar wind is turbulent, exhibiting a power spectrum extending over several decades in scale and with most of the energy at large scales is in form of Alfvénic fluctuations. The solar wind is also weakly collisional, with a wide variety of non-Maxwellian features observed in the particle distribution functions. In this talk, we present the first hybrid-kinetic three-dimensional simulations of driven Alfvénic turbulence in the solar wind. We confirm power-law indices obtained in previous analytical and numerical (e.g., gyrokinetic) studies, and carefully explore the location of and physics occurring at the ion Larmor scale. In the low-beta regime, we find evidence of stochastic heating, which arises when ions interact with strong fluctuations at wavelengths comparable to the ion Larmor scale. Finally, we discuss the interpretation of spacecraft measurements of the turbulence by testing the Taylor hypothesis with synthetic spacecraft measurements of our simulation data. This work was supported by Grant NNX16AK09G from NASA's Heliophysics Theory Program.

  20. Hybrid Simulations of the Interaction Between Solar Wind Flow and the Hermean Magnetosphere

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    Travnicek, P.; Hellinger, P.; Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    2003-12-01

    We examine the magnetosphere of Mercury using global three dimensional hybrid plasma simulations. Hybrid simulations treat ions as particles and electrons as a fluid. Having ions as particles allows ion kinetic behavior and waves to be included in the physical treatment of the plasma as compared to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling that treats the plasma as a single magnetized fluid and does not include such kinetic effects. Kinetic effects are essential for understanding magnetospheric physics. Hybrid simulations scale to the ion inertial length and thus on a global scale are somewhat limited in spatial extent compared to an MHD simulation. We note effects caused by the scalling of the numerical model of the magnetized obstacle interacting with the solar wind flow with the full scale simulation. Hermean magnetosphere is estimated to be only a few times the planetary radius, it can fit within a hybrid simulation system. The overal structure of the interaction between a magnetized obstacle in the solar wind flow is determined by few basic parameters (namely the solar wind density, background magnetic field, and the speed of solar wind, and also the strength of the magnetic dipole of the obstacle and its radius). The structure of the interaction of the solar wind flow with Mercury is to a large extend unique when compared to other planets. For example, the magnetic moment of the Mercury is over 1000 times smaller than that of the Earth and also the solar wind is stronger nearby Mercury than at Earth's vicinity. The typical magnetosperic scales are comparable to the ion gyroradii and hence kinetic effects are important for the overall structure of the interaction between the Hermean magnetospere and the solar wind. In this paper we shall focus on the study of the overal structure of the bow shock and magnetosheath of Mercury. We shall examine the formation of the magnetospheric tail. We shall study particle distribution functions in different locations of the

  1. Feasibility study for a standalone solar-wind-based hybrid energy system for application in Ethiopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekele, Getachew; Palm, Bjoern [Department of Energy Technology, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the possibility of supplying electricity from a solar-wind hybrid system to a remotely located model community detached from the main electricity grid in Ethiopia. The wind energy potential of four typical locations has been assessed in a previous article. The solar potential has also been investigated and the results are presented in detail in an accompanying article awaiting publication. For one of the sites, Addis Ababa, the results of the investigation are given here in detail. For the other sites, the results are given as sensitivity diagrams only. Based on the findings of the studies into energy potential, a feasibility study has been carried out on how to supply electricity to a model community of 200 families, which comprises 1000 people in total. The community is equipped with a community school and a health post. The electric load consists of both primary and deferrable types and comprises lighting, water pumps, radio receivers, and some clinical equipment. A software tool, Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewables (HOMER) is used for the analysis. The result of the analysis is a list of feasible power supply systems, sorted according to their net present cost. Furthermore, sensitivity diagrams, showing the influence of wind speeds, PV costs, and diesel prices on the optimum solutions are also provided. (author)

  2. Real-time 3-D hybrid simulation of Titan's plasma interaction during a solar wind excursion

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    S. Simon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasma environment of Saturn's largest satellite Titan is known to be highly variable. Since Titan's orbit is located within the outer magnetosphere of Saturn, the moon can leave the region dominated by the magnetic field of its parent body in times of high solar wind dynamic pressure and interact with the thermalized magnetosheath plasma or even with the unshocked solar wind. By applying a three-dimensional hybrid simulation code (kinetic description of ions, fluid electrons, we study in real-time the transition that Titan's plasma environment undergoes when the moon leaves Saturn's magnetosphere and enters the supermagnetosonic solar wind. In the simulation, the transition between both plasma regimes is mimicked by a reversal of the magnetic field direction as well as a change in the composition and temperature of the impinging plasma flow. When the satellite enters the solar wind, the magnetic draping pattern in its vicinity is reconfigured due to reconnection, with the characteristic time scale of this process being determined by the convection of the field lines in the undisturbed plasma flow at the flanks of the interaction region. The build-up of a bow shock ahead of Titan takes place on a typical time scale of a few minutes as well. We also analyze the erosion of the newly formed shock front upstream of Titan that commences when the moon re-enters the submagnetosonic plasma regime of Saturn's magnetosphere. Although the model presented here is far from governing the full complexity of Titan's plasma interaction during a solar wind excursion, the simulation provides important insights into general plasma-physical processes associated with such a disruptive change of the upstream flow conditions.

  3. Modelling the solar wind interaction with Mercury by a quasi-neutral hybrid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kallio

    Full Text Available Quasi-neutral hybrid model is a self-consistent modelling approach that includes positively charged particles and an electron fluid. The approach has received an increasing interest in space plasma physics research because it makes it possible to study several plasma physical processes that are difficult or impossible to model by self-consistent fluid models, such as the effects associated with the ions’ finite gyroradius, the velocity difference between different ion species, or the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. By now quasi-neutral hybrid models have been used to study the solar wind interaction with the non-magnetised Solar System bodies of Mars, Venus, Titan and comets. Localized, two-dimensional hybrid model runs have also been made to study terrestrial dayside magnetosheath. However, the Hermean plasma environment has not yet been analysed by a global quasi-neutral hybrid model.

    In this paper we present a new quasi-neutral hybrid model developed to study various processes associated with the Mercury-solar wind interaction. Emphasis is placed on addressing advantages and disadvantages of the approach to study different plasma physical processes near the planet. The basic assumptions of the approach and the algorithms used in the new model are thoroughly presented. Finally, some of the first three-dimensional hybrid model runs made for Mercury are presented.

    The resulting macroscopic plasma parameters and the morphology of the magnetic field demonstrate the applicability of the new approach to study the Mercury-solar wind interaction globally. In addition, the real advantage of the kinetic hybrid model approach is to study the property of individual ions, and the study clearly demonstrates the large potential of the approach to address these more detailed issues by a quasi-neutral hybrid model in the future.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics

  4. An hybrid neuro-wavelet approach for long-term prediction of solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Christian; Bonanno, Francesco; Capizzi, Giacomo

    2011-06-01

    Nowadays the interest for space weather and solar wind forecasting is increasing to become a main relevance problem especially for telecommunication industry, military, and for scientific research. At present the goal for weather forecasting reach the ultimate high ground of the cosmos where the environment can affect the technological instrumentation. Some interests then rise about the correct prediction of space events, like ionized turbulence in the ionosphere or impacts from the energetic particles in the Van Allen belts, then of the intensity and features of the solar wind and magnetospheric response. The problem of data prediction can be faced using hybrid computation methods so as wavelet decomposition and recurrent neural networks (RNNs). Wavelet analysis was used in order to reduce the data redundancies so obtaining representation which can express their intrinsic structure. The main advantage of the wavelet use is the ability to pack the energy of a signal, and in turn the relevant carried informations, in few significant uncoupled coefficients. Neural networks (NNs) are a promising technique to exploit the complexity of non-linear data correlation. To obtain a correct prediction of solar wind an RNN was designed starting on the data series. As reported in literature, because of the temporal memory of the data an Adaptative Amplitude Real Time Recurrent Learning algorithm was used for a full connected RNN with temporal delays. The inputs for the RNN were given by the set of coefficients coming from the biorthogonal wavelet decomposition of the solar wind velocity time series. The experimental data were collected during the NASA mission WIND. It is a spin stabilized spacecraft launched in 1994 in a halo orbit around the L1 point. The data are provided by the SWE, a subsystem of the main craft designed to measure the flux of thermal protons and positive ions.

  5. Investigating the ion-scale spectral properties of solar wind turbulence with high-resolution hybrid simulations

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    Franci, L.; Landi, S.; Matteini, L.; Verdini, A.; Hellinger, P.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the properties of the solar wind turbulence from MHD to sub-ion scales by means of two-dimensional, large-scale, high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. These constitute the most accurate hybrid simulations of ion-scale turbulence ever presented so far, and let us explore a very wide range of scales, i.e., three decades in wave vectors simultaneously. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we add a spectrum of in-plane large-scale magnetic and kinetic fluctuations, with energy equipartition and vanishing correlation. We perform a set of simulations with many different values of two fundamental parameters, i.e., the plasma beta, β, and the amplitude of the initial fluctuations, Brms, in order to investigate their relevance in determining the spectral properties of the turbulent cascade around ion scales. Once turbulence is fully developed, we observe the power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations following a power law with a spectral index of -5/3 in the inertial range, with a spectral break around ion scales and a steeper power law in the sub-ion range. The scale at which the steepening of the spectrum occurs changes when exploring the (β,Brms) parameter space. Such a movement of the spectral break is clearer when looking at the spectra of the parallel magnetic fluctuations and of the density fluctuations. Moreover, these share the same power law behavior at sub-ion scales, exhibiting a spectral index of -2.8, which seems to be independent on the values of the two varying parameters. We compare our results with solar wind observations, and we suggest possible explanations for such behavior.

  6. Performance Analysis of Solar-Wind-Diesel-Battery Hybrid Energy System for KLIA Sepang Station of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shezan, S. K. A.; Saidur, R.; Hossain, A.; Chong, W. T.; Kibria, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    A large number of populations of the world live in rural or remote areas those are geographically isolated. Power supply and uninterrupted fuel transportation to produce electrical power for these remote areas poses a great challenge. Using renewable energy in hybrid energy system might be a pathway to solve this problem. Malaysia is a large hilly land with the gift of renewable energy resources. There is a good chance to utilize these renewable resources to produce electrical power and to limit the dependency on the fossil fuel as well as reduce the carbon emissions. In this perspective, a research is carried out to analyze the performance of a solar-wind-diesel-battery hybrid energy system for a remote area named “KLIA Sepang station” in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. In this study, a 56 kW hybrid energy system has been proposed that is capable to support more than 50 households and 6 shops in that area. Real time field data of solar radiation and wind speed is used for the simulation and optimization of operations using “Homer” renewable energy software. The proposed system can reduce CO2 emission by about 16 tons per year compared to diesel generator only. In the same time the Cost of energy (COE) of the optimized system is USD 5.126/kWh.The proposed hybrid energy system might be applicable for other parts of the world where the climate conditions are similar.

  7. Aspects of solar wind interaction with Mars: comparison of fluid and hybrid simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Erkaev

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Mars has no global intrinsic magnetic field, and consequently the solar wind plasma interacts directly with the planetary ionosphere. The main factors of this interaction are: thermalization of plasma after the bow shock, ion pick-up process, and the magnetic barrier effect, which results in the magnetic field enhancement in the vicinity of the obstacle. Results of ideal magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulations are compared in the subsolar magnetosheath region. Good agreement between the models is obtained for the magnetic field and plasma parameters just after the shock front, and also for the magnetic field profiles in the magnetosheath. Both models predict similar positions of the proton stoppage boundary, which is known as the ion composition boundary. This comparison allows one to estimate applicability of magnetohydrodynamics for Mars, and also to check the consistency of the hybrid model with Rankine-Hugoniot conditions at the bow shock. An additional effect existing only in the hybrid model is a diffusive penetration of the magnetic field inside the ionosphere. Collisions between ions and neutrals are analyzed as a possible physical reason for the magnetic diffusion seen in the hybrid simulations.

  8. Variability of the Magnetic Field Power Spectrum in the Solar Wind at Electron Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Owen Wyn; Alexandrova, O.; Kajdič, P.; Turc, L.; Perrone, D.; Escoubet, C. P.; Walsh, A.

    2017-12-01

    At electron scales, the power spectrum of solar-wind magnetic fluctuations can be highly variable and the dissipation mechanisms of the magnetic energy into the various particle species is under debate. In this paper, we investigate data from the Cluster mission’s STAFF Search Coil magnetometer when the level of turbulence is sufficiently high that the morphology of the power spectrum at electron scales can be investigated. The Cluster spacecraft sample a disturbed interval of plasma where two streams of solar wind interact. Meanwhile, several discontinuities (coherent structures) are seen in the large-scale magnetic field, while at small scales several intermittent bursts of wave activity (whistler waves) are present. Several different morphologies of the power spectrum can be identified: (1) two power laws separated by a break, (2) an exponential cutoff near the Taylor shifted electron scales, and (3) strong spectral knees at the Taylor shifted electron scales. These different morphologies are investigated by using wavelet coherence, showing that, in this interval, a clear break and strong spectral knees are features that are associated with sporadic quasi parallel propagating whistler waves, even for short times. On the other hand, when no signatures of whistler waves at ∼ 0.1{--}0.2{f}{ce} are present, a clear break is difficult to find and the spectrum is often more characteristic of a power law with an exponential cutoff.

  9. A global hybrid model for Mercury's interaction with the solar wind: Case study of the dipole representation

    OpenAIRE

    Richer, E.; Modolo, Ronan; Chanteur, G. M.; Hess, Sebastien; Leblanc, François

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the magnetic field of Mercury is investigated by means of a three dimensional parallelized multispecies hybrid model. A comparison between two mathematical representations of Mercury's intrinsic magnetic field is studied. The first model is an Offset Dipole (OD) having the offset and dipolar moment reported by Anderson et al. (2011). The second model is a combination of a Dipole and a Quadrupole (DQ), the total field is fitte...

  10. Real-time 3-D hybrid simulation of Titan's plasma interaction during a solar wind excursion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Simon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasma environment of Saturn's largest satellite Titan is known to be highly variable. Since Titan's orbit is located within the outer magnetosphere of Saturn, the moon can leave the region dominated by the magnetic field of its parent body in times of high solar wind dynamic pressure and interact with the thermalized magnetosheath plasma or even with the unshocked solar wind. By applying a three-dimensional hybrid simulation code (kinetic description of ions, fluid electrons, we study in real-time the transition that Titan's plasma environment undergoes when the moon leaves Saturn's magnetosphere and enters the supermagnetosonic solar wind. In the simulation, the transition between both plasma regimes is mimicked by a reversal of the magnetic field direction as well as a change in the composition and temperature of the impinging plasma flow. When the satellite enters the solar wind, the magnetic draping pattern in its vicinity is reconfigured due to reconnection, with the characteristic time scale of this process being determined by the convection of the field lines in the undisturbed plasma flow at the flanks of the interaction region. The build-up of a bow shock ahead of Titan takes place on a typical time scale of a few minutes as well. We also analyze the erosion of the newly formed shock front upstream of Titan that commences when the moon re-enters the submagnetosonic plasma regime of Saturn's magnetosphere. Although the model presented here is far from governing the full complexity of Titan's plasma interaction during a solar wind excursion, the simulation provides important insights into general plasma-physical processes associated with such a disruptive change of the upstream flow conditions.

  11. Experimental İnvestigation on a Prototype Solar-Wind Hybrid System with a Pico Hydro Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anilkumar, T. T.; P, Srinivasa Rao Nayak; Simon, Sishaj P.

    2017-09-01

    Rural electrification is often considered to be the backbone of the rural economy. In spite of launching of ambitious schemes to achieve 100% rural electrification, millions of people, particularly in rural areas are away from grid electricity and its benefits. Renewable energy sources (RES) coupled with pumped storage provides a technically viable solution for continuous power supply in remote areas. Therefore, this paper presents a solar-wind hybrid system with pumped storage generation unit to meet the basic load demands of domestic consumers, using Pico hydro turbine (PHT). A prototype of this system is developed in the laboratory and investigates its operational aspects. This scheme utilizes a PHT (300 W), usually employed in run-off river schemes, in domestic level application. The developed model is evaluated on sunny and cloudy day. It operates on a daily basis, storing the surplus energy from renewable sources by pumping water to an upper reservoir, and retrieve this energy through its PHT. Therefore, this system satisfies the basic load demands of domestic consumers who are away from access to the grid. The control and energy management of the proposed system is carried out using labVIEW.

  12. On the causes of spectral enhancements in solar wind power spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unti, T.; Russell, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    Enhancements in power spectra of the solar-wind ion flux in the frequency neighborhood of 0.5 Hz had been noted by Unti et al. (1973). It was speculated that these were due to convected small-scale density irregularities. In this paper, 54 flux spectra calculated from OGO 5 data are examined. It is seen that the few prominent spectral peaks which occur were not generated by density irregularities, but were due to several different causes, including convected discontinuities and propagating transverse waves. A superposition of many spectra, however, reveals a moderate enhancement at a frequency corresponding to convected features with a correlation length of a proton gyroradius, consistent with the results of Neugebauer (1975).

  13. Magnetic Pumping as a Source of Particle Heating and Power-law Distributions in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichko, E.; Egedal, J.; Daughton, W.; Kasper, J.

    2017-12-01

    Based on the rate of expansion of the solar wind, the plasma should cool rapidly as a function of distance to the Sun. Observations show this is not the case. In this work, a magnetic pumping model is developed as a possible explanation for the heating and the generation of power-law distribution functions observed in the solar wind plasma. Most previous studies in this area focus on the role that the dissipation of turbulent energy on microscopic kinetic scales plays in the overall heating of the plasma. However, with magnetic pumping, particles are energized by the largest-scale turbulent fluctuations, thus bypassing the energy cascade. In contrast to other models, we include the pressure anisotropy term, providing a channel for the large-scale fluctuations to heat the plasma directly. A complete set of coupled differential equations describing the evolution, and energization, of the distribution function are derived, as well as an approximate closed-form solution. Numerical simulations using the VPIC kinetic code are applied to verify the model’s analytical predictions. The results of the model for realistic solar wind scenario are computed, where thermal streaming of particles are important for generating a phase shift between the magnetic perturbations and the pressure anisotropy. In turn, averaged over a pump cycle, the phase shift permits mechanical work to be converted directly to heat in the plasma. The results of this scenario show that magnetic pumping may account for a significant portion of the solar wind energization.

  14. Kinetic Cascade in Solar-wind Turbulence: 3D3V Hybrid-kinetic Simulations with Electron Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Silvio Sergio; Servidio, Sergio; Califano, Francesco

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the nature of the turbulent fluctuations below the ion gyroradius in solar-wind (SW) turbulence is a great challenge. Recent studies have been mostly in favor of kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW)-type fluctuations, but other kinds of fluctuations with characteristics typical of magnetosonic, whistler, and ion-Bernstein modes could also play a role depending on the plasma parameters. Here, we investigate the properties of the subproton-scale cascade with high-resolution hybrid-kinetic simulations of freely decaying turbulence in 3D3V phase space, including electron inertia effects. Two proton plasma beta are explored: the “intermediate” β p = 1 and “low” β p = 0.2 regimes, both typically observed in the SW and corona. The magnetic energy spectum exhibits {k}\\perp -8/3 and {k}\\parallel -7/2 power laws at β p = 1, while they are slightly steeper at β p = 0.2. Nevertheless, both regimes develop a spectral anisotropy consistent with {k}\\parallel ˜ {k}\\perp 2/3 at {k}\\perp {ρ }p> 1 and pronounced small-scale intermittency. In this context, we find that the kinetic-scale cascade is dominated by KAW-like fluctuations at β p = 1, whereas the low-β case presents a more complex scenario suggesting the simultaneous presence of different types of fluctuations. In both regimes, however, a possible role of the ion-Bernstein-type fluctuations at the smallest scales cannot be excluded.

  15. Hybrid Solar-Wind-Diesel Systems for Rural Application in North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diesel hybrid power systems for supplying electricity to off-grid rural communities in the Tigray region of northern Ethiopia. Using wind resource assessment and solar potential-based data from the National Meteorological Agency of Ethiopia, a case ...

  16. Optimized solar-wind-powered drip irrigation for farming in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Carolina M.

    The two billion people produce 80% of all food consumed in the developing world and 1.3 billion lack access to electricity. Agricultural production will have to increase by about 70% worldwide by 2050 and to achieve this about 50% more primary energy has to be made available by 2035. Energy-smart agri-food systems can improve productivity in the food sector, reduce energy poverty in rural areas and contribute to achieving food security and sustainable development. Agriculture can help reduce poverty for 75% of the world's poor, who live in rural areas and work mainly in farming. The costs associated with irrigation pumping are directly affected by energy prices and have a strong impact on farmer income. Solar-wind (SW) drip irrigation (DI) is a sustainable method to meet these challenges. This dissertation shows with onsite data the low cost of SW pumping technologies correlating the water consumption (evapotranspiration) and the water production (SW pumping). The author designed, installed, and collected operating data from the six SWDI systems in Peru and in the Tohono O'odham Nation in AZ. The author developed, tested, and a simplified model for solar engineers to size SWDI systems. The author developed a business concept to scale up the SWDI technology. The outcome was a simplified design approach for a DI system powered by low cost SW pumping systems optimized based on the logged on site data. The optimization showed that the SWDI system is an income generating technology and that by increasing the crop production per unit area, it allowed small farmers to pay for the system. The efficient system resulted in increased yields, sometimes three to four fold. The system is a model for smallholder agriculture in developing countries and can increase nutrition and greater incomes for the world's poor.

  17. Fuzzy logic controller versus classical logic controller for residential hybrid solar-wind-storage energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrouazin, A., E-mail: derrsid@gmail.com [University Hassiba BenBouali of Chlef, LGEER,Chlef (Algeria); Université de Lorraine, LMOPS, EA 4423, 57070 Metz (France); CentraleSupélec, LMOPS, 57070 Metz (France); Aillerie, M., E-mail: aillerie@metz.supelec.fr; Charles, J. P. [Université de Lorraine, LMOPS, EA 4423, 57070 Metz (France); CentraleSupélec, LMOPS, 57070 Metz (France); Mekkakia-Maaza, N. [Université des sciences et de la Technologie d’Oran, Mohamed Boudiaf-USTO MB,LMSE, Oran Algérie (Algeria)

    2016-07-25

    Several researches for management of diverse hybrid energy systems and many techniques have been proposed for robustness, savings and environmental purpose. In this work we aim to make a comparative study between two supervision and control techniques: fuzzy and classic logics to manage the hybrid energy system applied for typical housing fed by solar and wind power, with rack of batteries for storage. The system is assisted by the electric grid during energy drop moments. A hydrogen production device is integrated into the system to retrieve surplus energy production from renewable sources for the household purposes, intending the maximum exploitation of these sources over years. The models have been achieved and generated signals for electronic switches command of proposed both techniques are presented and discussed in this paper.

  18. Fuzzy logic controller versus classical logic controller for residential hybrid solar-wind-storage energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrouazin, A.; Aillerie, M.; Mekkakia-Maaza, N.; Charles, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    Several researches for management of diverse hybrid energy systems and many techniques have been proposed for robustness, savings and environmental purpose. In this work we aim to make a comparative study between two supervision and control techniques: fuzzy and classic logics to manage the hybrid energy system applied for typical housing fed by solar and wind power, with rack of batteries for storage. The system is assisted by the electric grid during energy drop moments. A hydrogen production device is integrated into the system to retrieve surplus energy production from renewable sources for the household purposes, intending the maximum exploitation of these sources over years. The models have been achieved and generated signals for electronic switches command of proposed both techniques are presented and discussed in this paper.

  19. On the Role of Solar Wind Discontinuities in the ULF Power Spectral Density at the Earth's Outer Radiation Belt: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, A.; Alves, L. R.; Braga, C. R.; Mendonca, R. R. S.; Jauer, P. R.; Medeiros, C.; Souza, V. M. C. E. S.; Mendes, O., Jr.; Marchezi, J.; da Silva, L.; Vieira, L.; Rockenbach, M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.

    2016-12-01

    The solar wind incident upon the Earth's magnetosphere can produce either enhancement, depletion or no change in the flux of relativistic electrons at the outer radiation belt. During geomagnetic storms progress, solar wind parameters may change significantly, and occasionally relativistic electron fluxes at the outer radiation belt show dropouts in a range of energy and L-shells. Wave-particle interactions observed within the Van Allen belts have been claimed to play a significant role in energetic particle flux changes. The relation between changes on the solar wind parameters and the radiation belt is still a hot topic nowadays, particularly the role played by the solar wind on sudden electron flux decreases. The twin satellite Van Allen Probes measured a relativistic electron flux dropout concurrent to broad band Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves, i.e. from 1 mHz to 10 Hz, on October 2, 2013. Magnetic field and plasma data from both ACE and WIND satellites allowed the characterization of this event as being an interplanetary coronal mass ejection in conjunction with shock. The interaction of this event with the Earth's magnetosphere was modeled using a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation and the magnetic field perturbation deep in magnetosphere could be analyzed from the model outputs. Results show the contribution of time-varying solar wind parameters to the generation of ULF waves. The power spectral densities, as a function of L-shell, were evaluated considering changes in the input parameters, e.g. magnitude and duration of dynamic pressure and magnetic field. The modeled power spectral densities are compared with Van Allen Probes data. The results provide us a clue on the solar wind characteristics that might be able to drive ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere, and also which wave modes are expected to be excited under a specific solar wind driving.

  20. Plasma beta dependence of the ion-scale spectral break of solar wind turbulence: high-resolution 2D hybrid simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Franci, Luca; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Hellinger, Petr

    2016-01-01

    We investigate properties of the ion-scale spectral break of solar wind turbulence by means of two-dimensional high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box and add a spectrum of in-plane, large-scale, magnetic and kinetic fluctuations. We perform a set of simulations with different values of the plasma beta, distributed over three orders of magnitude, from 0.01 to 10. In all the cases, once turbulence is fully developed, we observe a power-law spectrum of the fluctuating magnetic field on large scales (in the inertial range) with a spectral index close to -5/3, while in the sub-ion range we observe another power-law spectrum with a spectral index systematically varying with $\\beta$ (from around -3.6 for small values to around -2.9 for large ones). The two ranges are separated by a spectral break around ion scales. The length scale at which this transition occurs is found to be proportional to the ion inertial length, $d_i$...

  1. A MODEL FOR THE NON-UNIVERSAL POWER LAW OF THE SOLAR WIND SUB-ION-SCALE MAGNETIC SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L., E-mail: passot@oca.eu, E-mail: sulem@oca.eu [Laboratoire Lagrange, Université Côte d’Azur, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur, CS 34229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

    2015-10-20

    A phenomenological turbulence model for kinetic Alfvén waves in a magnetized collisionless plasma that is able to reproduce the non-universal power-law spectra observed at the sub-ion scales in the solar wind and the terrestrial magnetosphere is presented. The process of temperature homogenization along distorted magnetic field lines, induced by Landau damping, affects the turbulence transfer time and results in a steepening of the sub-ion power-law spectrum of critically balanced turbulence, whose exponent is sensitive to the ratio between the Alfvén wave period and the nonlinear timescale. Transition from large-scale weak turbulence to smaller scale strong turbulence is captured and nonlocal interactions, relevant in the case of steep spectra, are accounted for.

  2. PV-solar / wind hybrid energy system for GSM/CDMA type mobile telephony base station

    OpenAIRE

    Pragya Nema, R.K. Nema, Saroj Rangnekar

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives the design idea of optimized PV-Solar and Wind Hybrid Energy System for GSM/CDMA type mobile base station over conventional diesel generator for a particular site in central India (Bhopal) . For this hybrid system ,the meteorological data of Solar Insolation, hourly wind speed, are taken for Bhopal-Central India (Longitude 77o.23'and Latitude 23o.21' ) and the pattern of load consumption of mobile base station are studied and suitably modeled for optimization of the hybrid en...

  3. PV-solar / Wind Hybrid Energy System for GSM/CDMA Type Mobile Telephony Base

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Station Md. Ibrahim; Mohammad Tayyab

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design of optimized PV-Solar and Wind Hybrid Energy System for GSM/CDMA type mobile base station over conventional diesel generator for a particular site in south India (Chennai...

  4. Economic and financial analysis of hybrid solar-wind power generation system installed in a isolated community in Jalapao-Tocantins, Brazil; Analise economica-financeira do sistema de geracao de energia eletrica hibrido solar-eolico instalado em uma comunidade isolada no Jalapao-TO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, W.F.; Zukowski Junior, J.C.; Nobrega, S.L. de; Marcon, R.O. [Universidade Luterana do Brasil (CEULP/ULBRA), Palmas, TO (Brazil). Centro Universitario Luterano de Palmas. Curso de Engenharia Agricola], Emails: zukowski@uft.edu.br, olavo@ulbra-to.br, silvestre@ulbra-to.br

    2009-07-01

    With the increasing of energetic demand in several production sectors, the search for renewable energy sources which do not cause negative environmental impacts has become more and more relevant. Amongst all the important factors to decide for installing isolated generation systems as renewable sources or diesel and taking the distribution network to isolated communities, it should be considered the economic viability of those benefits. This study aimed to analyse the hybrid solar wind system installed in an isolated community, in Jalapao - TO. Three scenarios were analyzed: first of them, getting the capital back with MRI = 6% per year; second one, getting the capital back with MRI = 0; and third, without getting the investment back. In all the three cases, O and M costs were considered. The proceeds were calculated from the production at the communities workshop, in which the electricity was available. The results indicated that this technology is economically viable if the generated energy is used for production process. It also demonstrated that the third scenario is more interesting for the community, since the contribution per family is only 8% of its incomes. (author)

  5. PV-solar / wind hybrid energy system for GSM/CDMA type mobile telephony base station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nema, Pragya; Rangnekar, Saroj [Energy Engineering Department, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology , Bhopal-462007 M.P. (India); Nema, R.K. [Electrical Engineering Department, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal-462007 M.P. (India)

    2010-07-01

    This paper gives the design idea of optimized PV-Solar and Wind Hybrid Energy System for GSM/CDMA type mobile base station over conventional diesel generator for a particular site in central India (Bhopal). For this hybrid system ,the meteorological data of Solar Insolation, hourly wind speed, are taken for Bhopal-Central India (Longitude 77 deg.23'and Latitude 23 deg.21' ) and the pattern of load consumption of mobile base station are studied and suitably modeled for optimization of the hybrid energy system using HOMER software. The simulation and optimization result gives the best optimized sizing of wind turbine and solar array with diesel generator for particular GSM/CDMA type mobile telephony base station. This system is more cost effective and environmental friendly over the conventional diesel generator. It should reduced approximate 70%-80% fuel cost over conventional diesel generator and also reduced the emission of CO2 and other harmful gasses in environments. It is expected that the newly developed and installed system will provide very good opportunities for telecom sector in near future.

  6. A design scheme of energy management,control,optimisation system for hybrid solar-wind and battery energy storages system

    OpenAIRE

    Sarban Singh, Ranjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University London. Hybrid renewable energy system was introduced to improve the individual renewable energy power system’s productivity and operation-ability. This circumstance has led towards an extensive technological study and analysis on the hybrid renewable energy system. The extensive technological study is conducted using many different approaches, but in this research the linear programming, arti...

  7. The effects of inhomogeneous proton-α drifts on the heating of the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Viñas, A. F.; Roberts, D. A.

    2017-06-01

    Previous modeling studies have demonstrated that waves and super-Alfvénic drift can lead to perpendicular preferential heating of the α particles with respect to protons. Using 2.5-D hybrid model of the solar wind α-proton plasma, we study the effects of inhomogeneous (across the magnetic field) background streaming focusing on the fast solar wind. We explore the effects of an initial relative, inhomogeneous ion drift on the perpendicular ion heating and cooling and consider the effects of solar wind expansion. We study the spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations in the inhomogeneous background solar wind and demonstrate the generation of oblique waves and their effects on enhanced resonant anisotropic ion heating. The model reproduces the typical ion temperature anisotropy values seen in observations. Using our model, we find that inhomogeneous super-Alfvénic ion drift in the plasma generates significant power of oblique waves in the solar wind plasma, in addition to enhanced heating compared to the nondrifting populations. We demonstrate the effects of various inhomogeneity profiles and regions of the drift on the ion anisotropic heating in super-Alfvénic and near-Alfvénic drifts. We find that the cooling effect due to the solar wind expansion is not significant when super-Alfvénic drifts are considered.

  8. Measurement and Analysis of Power in Hybrid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vartika Keshri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Application with renewable energy  sources  such   as solar cell array, wind turbines, or fuel cells have increased significantly during the past decade. To obtain the clean energy, we are using the hybrid solar-wind power generation. Consumers prefer quality power from suppliers. The quality of power can be measured by using parameters such as voltage sag, harmonic and power factor.   To   obtain   quality   power   we   have different topologies. In our paper we present a new possible topology which improves power quality. This paper presents modeling analysis and design of a pulse width modulation voltage source inverter (PWM-VSI to be connected between sources, which supplies energy from a hybrid solar wind energy system to the ac grid. The objective of this paper is to show that, with an adequate control, the converter not only can transfer the dc from hybrid solar wind energy system, but also can improve the power factor and quality power of electrical system. Whenever a disturbance occurs on load side, this disturbance can be minimized using open loop and closed loop control systems.

  9. Alfvénic waves with sufficient energy to power the quiet solar corona and fast solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Scott W; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo; Boerner, Paul; Goossens, Marcel

    2011-07-27

    Energy is required to heat the outer solar atmosphere to millions of degrees (refs 1, 2) and to accelerate the solar wind to hundreds of kilometres per second (refs 2-6). Alfvén waves (travelling oscillations of ions and magnetic field) have been invoked as a possible mechanism to transport magneto-convective energy upwards along the Sun's magnetic field lines into the corona. Previous observations of Alfvénic waves in the corona revealed amplitudes far too small (0.5 km s(-1)) to supply the energy flux (100-200 W m(-2)) required to drive the fast solar wind or balance the radiative losses of the quiet corona. Here we report observations of the transition region (between the chromosphere and the corona) and of the corona that reveal how Alfvénic motions permeate the dynamic and finely structured outer solar atmosphere. The ubiquitous outward-propagating Alfvénic motions observed have amplitudes of the order of 20 km s(-1) and periods of the order of 100-500 s throughout the quiescent atmosphere (compatible with recent investigations), and are energetic enough to accelerate the fast solar wind and heat the quiet corona.

  10. Assessing temporal complementarity of solar, wind and hydrokinetic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurasz Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy sources (RES exhibit various characteristics when it comes to their availability in time and space domain. Some are characterised by significant variability and limited predictability. This makes their integration to the power grid a complicated task. Temporal and spatial complementarity of RES is perceived as one of the possible ways to facilitate the process of integration. This paper investigates the concept of temporal complementarity of solar wind and hydrokinetic energy in case of two sites in Poland. Obtained results indicate existence of some beneficial complementarity on inter-annual and annual time scale. Combination of those three RES in one hybrid system makes power source more reliable.

  11. 3-D Hybrid Kinetic Modeling of the Interaction Between the Solar Wind and Lunar-like Exospheric Pickup Ions in Case of Oblique/ Quasi-Parallel/Parallel Upstream Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Farrell, W. M.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between the solar wind and Moon-sized objects are determined by a set of the solar wind parameters and plasma environment of the space objects. The orientation of upstream magnetic field is one of the key factors which determines the formation and structure of bow shock wave/Mach cone or Alfven wing near the obstacle. The study of effects of the direction of the upstream magnetic field on lunar-like plasma environment is the main subject of our investigation in this paper. Photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our hybrid model. The computational model includes the self-consistent dynamics of the light (hydrogen (+), helium (+)) and heavy (sodium (+)) pickup ions. The lunar interior is considered as a weakly conducting body. Our previous 2013 lunar work, as reported in this journal, found formation of a triple structure of the Mach cone near the Moon in the case of perpendicular upstream magnetic field. Further advances in modeling now reveal the presence of strong wave activity in the upstream solar wind and plasma wake in the cases of quasiparallel and parallel upstream magnetic fields. However, little wave activity is found for the opposite case with a perpendicular upstream magnetic field. The modeling does not show a formation of the Mach cone in the case of theta(Sub B,U) approximately equal to 0 degrees.

  12. THOR Cold Solar Wind (CSW) instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavraud, Benoit

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission concept dedicated to the study of plasma turbulence. We present the Cold Solar Wind (CSW) instrument that is being designed for THOR. CSW will measure the full three dimensional distribution function of solar wind protons and alphas with unprecedented accuracies. It will measure solar wind proton distributions down to at least 50 ms with energy resolution of 7% and angular resolution of 1.5°. CSW is based on a top-hat electrostatic analyzer (with very large geometric factor) design with deflectors at the entrance. The particle detection system uses Channel Electron Multipliers (CEM) associated with an analog front end Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). CSW electronics comprises a fast sweeping high voltage board, as well as an FPGA and low voltage power supply boards to perform its operations. CSW is designed to address many of the key science objectives of THOR, in particular regarding ion-scale kinetic aspects of solar wind turbulence.

  13. Cometary ion instabilities in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, L.; Schwartz, S. J.; Hellinger, P.

    2015-12-01

    We review some of the processes that characterize the interaction of the solar wind with newborn cometary ions. Instabilities generated by the typical ring-beam velocity-space configuration of the pick-up ions in the solar wind frame are studied by means of one- and two-dimensional hybrid numerical simulations. In agreement with previous studies, we find that instabilities generated by the cometary ions play an important role in shaping the properties of the plasma. The resulting ion distributions are in good agreement with observations, showing the presence of energy shells in velocity space. Bi-spherical shells for the heavy oxygen ions are also observed in the late phase of the simulations. Moreover, we also investigate some new aspects of the dynamics, such as the generation of turbulent cascade from the initial spectra of unstable waves, and the related heating and back reaction of the solar wind plasma. We also consider the case of initial non-gyrotropic pick-up ion distributions, and we focus on the polarization of the associated waves, suggesting that linear polarization can be a signature of this configuration, possibly observed by the Rosetta spacecraft in orbit around comet 67P/CG.

  14. Role of Parallel and Oblique Ion-Cyclotron Waves in Heating Ions in an Inhomogeneous Expanding Solar Wind Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Ozak, N. O.; Vinas, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    In-situ observations of fast solar wind streams at distances of 0.29 AU and beyond by Helios and recently by MESSENGER, and at ~1 AU by STEREO, ACE, and Wind spacecraft provide direct evidence for the presence of turbulent Alfvén wave spectrum and of left-hand polarized ion-cyclotron waves as well as He++ - proton drift in the solar wind plasma. The waves and the super-Alfvénic drift can produce temperature anisotropies by resonant absorption and perpendicular heating of the ions. Measurements indicate that proton velocity distributions are generally non-Maxwellian with evidence for beams, while remote sensing observations of coronal holes have shown that heavy ions are hotter than protons with a temperature anisotropy greater than one (Ti,perp> Ti,||). In addition to the anisotropy, it is expected that the solar wind will be inhomogeneous on decreasing scales approaching the Sun. Here we use a 2.5 D hybrid code and extend previous work to study the heating of solar wind ions (H+, He+) in an inhomogeneous plasma background. We explore the effects of an initial ion drift and of a turbulent wave spectrum on the perpendicular ion heating and cooling and on the spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations in the inhomogeneous background solar wind. Using the 2D hybrid model we find that inhomogeneities in the plasma generate significant power of oblique waves in the solar wind plasma, in addition to enhanced heating compared to the homogenous solar wind case. We find that the cooling effect due to the solar wind expansion is only significant when sub-Alfvénic drifts are explored. On the other hand, the cooling is not significant in the presence of a super-Alfvénic drift, and it is even less significant when we include an inhomogeneous background density. We are able to reproduce the ion temperature anisotropy seen in observations and previous models and find that small-scale inhomogeneities in the inner heliosphere can have a significant impact on resonant wave ion

  15. A New Control Method to Mitigate Power Fluctuations for Grid Integrated PV/Wind Hybrid Power System Using Ultracapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayalakshmi, N. S.; Gaonkar, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    The output power obtained from solar-wind hybrid system fluctuates with changes in weather conditions. These power fluctuations cause adverse effects on the voltage, frequency and transient stability of the utility grid. In this paper, a control method is presented for power smoothing of grid integrated PV/wind hybrid system using ultracapacitors in a DC coupled structure. The power fluctuations of hybrid system are mitigated and smoothed power is supplied to the utility grid. In this work both photovoltaic (PV) panels and the wind generator are controlled to operate at their maximum power point. The grid side inverter control strategy presented in this paper maintains DC link voltage constant while injecting power to the grid at unity power factor considering different operating conditions. Actual solar irradiation and wind speed data are used in this study to evaluate the performance of the developed system using MATLAB/Simulink software. The simulation results show that output power fluctuations of solar-wind hybrid system can be significantly mitigated using the ultracapacitor based storage system.

  16. Dayside magnetic ULF power at high latitudes: A possible long-term proxy for the solar wind velocity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    1999-01-01

    from the solar cycle variation of regular geomagnetic activity, measured by indices such as aa and Dst. The spectral band power is generally at minimum just prior to solar maximum and has a strong maximum in the late declining phase associated with high-speed streams from coronal holes. We have......We examine the occurrence of dayside high-latitude magnetic variations with periods between 2 and 10 min statistically using data from around 20 magnetic stations in Greenland, Scandinavia, and Canada, many of which have been in operation for a full solar cycle. We derive time series of the power...... spectral density (psd) in two different frequency bands: 2-4 min period and 5-10 min period. The average psd in these bands maximizes in the early morning sector between auroral and cusp latitudes. The solar cycle variation of the average psd in the two bands during the morning hours is markedly different...

  17. Solar wind tans young asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    A new study published in Nature this week reveals that asteroid surfaces age and redden much faster than previously thought -- in less than a million years, the blink of an eye for an asteroid. This study has finally confirmed that the solar wind is the most likely cause of very rapid space weathering in asteroids. This fundamental result will help astronomers relate the appearance of an asteroid to its actual history and identify any after effects of a catastrophic impact with another asteroid. ESO PR Photo 16a/09 Young Asteroids Look Old "Asteroids seem to get a ‘sun tan' very quickly," says lead author Pierre Vernazza. "But not, as for people, from an overdose of the Sun's ultraviolet radiation, but from the effects of its powerful wind." It has long been known that asteroid surfaces alter in appearance with time -- the observed asteroids are much redder than the interior of meteorites found on Earth [1] -- but the actual processes of this "space weathering" and the timescales involved were controversial. Thanks to observations of different families of asteroids [2] using ESO's New Technology Telescope at La Silla and the Very Large Telescope at Paranal, as well as telescopes in Spain and Hawaii, Vernazza's team have now solved the puzzle. When two asteroids collide, they create a family of fragments with "fresh" surfaces. The astronomers found that these newly exposed surfaces are quickly altered and change colour in less than a million years -- a very short time compared to the age of the Solar System. "The charged, fast moving particles in the solar wind damage the asteroid's surface at an amazing rate [3]", says Vernazza. Unlike human skin, which is damaged and aged by repeated overexposure to sunlight, it is, perhaps rather surprisingly, the first moments of exposure (on the timescale considered) -- the first million years -- that causes most of the aging in asteroids. By studying different families of asteroids, the team has also shown that an asteroid

  18. Modeling the heating and the acceleration of the fast solar wind ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The solar wind is the major component of solar activity and is the variable background state for the propagating solar disturbances that affect the heliosphere and interact with planetary magnetospheres. However, the physical mechanisms of solar wind acceleration and heating are not fully understood. During periods of solar maxima streamers dominate the solar corona and the slow solar wind streams are ubiquitous in the heliosphere. The ion composition and the charge states of the solar wind streams measured in situ and are used to determine their coronal origin. The physical properties of the multi-ion solar wind plasma and turbulent wave spectra are modeled with multifluid models, while the kinetic processes that lead to solar wind ion heating by resonant waves and instabilities are modeled with 2.5 hybrid models that include the kinetic ion wave-particle interactions and ion-cyclotron wave heating processes. We will show recent results of multi-fluid and hybrid models constrained by remote sensing and in situ observations of the solar wind and discuss how this modeling approach improves understanding of the heating and acceleration processes of the solar wind.

  19. Velocity shear generation of solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.; Ghosh, Sanjoy

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional incompressible MHD spectral code is used to show that shear-driven turbulence is a possible means for producing many observed properties of the evolution of the magnetic and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind and, in particular, the evolution of the cross helicity ('Alfvenicity') at small scales. It is shown that large-scale shear can nonlinearly produce a cascade to smaller scale fluctuations even when the linear Kelvin-Helmholtz mode is stable, and that a roughly power law inertial range is established by this process. The evolution found is similar to that seen in some other simulations of MHD turbulence.

  20. Dominant 2D magnetic turbulence in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieber, John W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Matthaeus, William H.

    1995-01-01

    There have been recent suggestions that solar wind magnetic turbulence may be a composite of slab geometry (wavevector aligned with the mean magnetic field) and 2D geometry (wavevectors perpendicular to the mean field). We report results of two new tests of this hypothesis using Helios measurements of inertial ranged magnetic spectra in the solar wind. The first test is based upon a characteristic difference between perpendicular and parallel reduced power spectra which is expected for the 2D component but not for the slab component. The second test examines the dependence of power spectrum density upon the magnetic field angle (i.e., the angle between the mean magnetic field and the radial direction), a relationship which is expected to be in opposite directions for the slab and 2D components. Both tests support the presence of a dominant (approximately 85 percent by energy) 2D component in solar wind magnetic turbulence.

  1. Turbulence in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of solar wind turbulence from both the theoretical and observational perspective. It argues that the interplanetary medium offers the best opportunity to directly study turbulent fluctuations in collisionless plasmas. In fact, during expansion, the solar wind evolves towards a state characterized by large-amplitude fluctuations in all observed parameters, which resembles, at least at large scales, the well-known hydrodynamic turbulence. This text starts with historical references to past observations and experiments on turbulent flows. It then introduces the Navier-Stokes equations for a magnetized plasma whose low-frequency turbulence evolution is described within the framework of the MHD approximation. It also considers the scaling of plasma and magnetic field fluctuations and the study of nonlinear energy cascades within the same framework. It reports observations of turbulence in the ecliptic and at high latitude, treating Alfvénic and compressive fluctuations separately in...

  2. The Power of Hybridization

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Programming languages always seem to do some things well but not others: Python punts when it comes to user interfaces, Java’s artificial complexity prevents rapid development and produces tangles, and it will be awhile before we see benefits from C++ concurrency work. The cognitive load of languages and their blind spots increases the cost of experimentation, impeding your ability to fail fast and iterate. If you use a single language to solve your problem, you are binding yourself to the worldview limitations and the mistakes made by the creator of that language. Consider increasing your wiggle room by crossing language boundaries, complementing a language that is powerful in one area with a different language powerful in another. Language hybridization can speed development to quickly discover your real problems, giving you more time to fix them. After making a case for hybridizing your thinking in general, I will present a number of simple examples; first showing the benefits of using other languages...

  3. The solar wind as a turbulence laboratory- some new quantitative points of contact between theory, simulation and solar wind observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S. C.; Gogoberidze, G.; Hnat, B.; Mueller, W.-C.; Turner, A. J.

    2012-04-01

    The solar wind flow has a Reynolds number of order 105. Single point observations suitable for the study of turbulence are on timescales from below ion kinetic scales up to days. Central to the concept of using the solar wind as a test laboratory for plasma turbulence are methods that allow direct quantitative comparison between the predictions of theory and simulation, and the observations. Critically, theoretical predictions, and data analysis methods, must come together in a manner in which uncertainties can be well understood, and thus different theoretical scenarios be distinguished unambiguously. Scaling is a key prediction of theories of infinite range turbulence. Its full characterization requires the scaling exponents of all the moments of the probability density of fluctuations as a function of scale. In practice, only the first few moments are accessible. Most comparisons with theory focus on the second moment scaling, that is, the exponent of the power spectral density (PSD). Solar wind plasma turbulence is anisotropic due to the presence of a background field, so that in general the power spectral density (or correlation) tensor is needed to characterise the turbulence. We focus on the ratios of the PSD tensor terms which are sensitive to the scaling exponent, providing a method for direct observational tests of theories. The reduced PSD tensor accessed by single spacecraft measurements yields ratios of perpendicular terms which we show are robust to uncertainties. These can clearly distinguish turbulence theories as we show for the Goldreich-Sridhar model of MHD turbulence, and the 'slab-2D' solar wind model, which we compare with ULYSSES observations. The comparison between solar wind observations, and 'fly throughs' of DNS of MHD turbulence, is also an informative tool to understand the reduced PSD tensor. We will use this alongside Cluster observations to propose an origin of the observed non-axisymmetry of solar wind turbulence. Properties of the

  4. How measurement uncertainties impact upon the observed scaling properties of MHD turbulence in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Gogoberidze, G.; Chapman, S. C.; Dunlop, M.

    2012-12-01

    Quantifying the scaling exponents of fluctuations in the solar wind is central to testing predictions of turbulence theories. We study spectral features of Alfvenic turbulence in fast solar wind. We propose a general, instrument independent method (Gogoberidze et al, MNRAS, 2012) to estimate the uncertainty in velocity fluctuations obtained by in-situ satellite observations in the solar wind. We show that when the measurement uncertainties of the velocity fluctuations are taken into account the less energetic Elsasser spectrum obeys a unique power law scaling throughout the inertial range as prevailing theories of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence predict. Moreover, in the solar wind interval analyzed, the two Elsasser spectra are observed to have the same scaling exponent ~1:54 throughout the inertial range. This highlights the importance of understanding uncertainty estimates and how they affect observed scaling in the PSD when using the solar wind as a laboratory to test predictions of theories of turbulence.

  5. Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project (SWEEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-28

    highly charged ions of the solar wind. The main challenge in predicting the resultant photon flux in the X-ray energy bands is due to the...Newton, an X-ray astronomical observatory. We use OMNI solar wind conditions, heavy ion composition data from ACE, the Hodges neutral hydrogen model...of SWEEP was to compare theoretical models of X-ray emission in the terrestrial magnetosphere caused by the Solar Wind Charge Exchange

  6. Nonaxisymmetric Anisotropy of Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A. J.; Gogoberidze, G.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.; Müller, W.-C.

    2011-08-01

    A key prediction of turbulence theories is frame-invariance, and in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, axisymmetry of fluctuations with respect to the background magnetic field. Paradoxically the power in fluctuations in the turbulent solar wind are observed to be ordered with respect to the bulk macroscopic flow as well as the background magnetic field. Here, nonaxisymmetry across the inertial and dissipation ranges is quantified using in situ observations from Cluster. The observed inertial range nonaxisymmetry is reproduced by a “fly through” sampling of a direct numerical simulation of MHD turbulence. Furthermore, fly through sampling of a linear superposition of transverse waves with axisymmetric fluctuations generates the trend in nonaxisymmetry with power spectral exponent. The observed nonaxisymmetric anisotropy may thus simply arise as a sampling effect related to Taylor’s hypothesis and is not related to the plasma dynamics itself.

  7. Simulations of Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Usmanov, A. V.; Roberts, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    Recently we have restructured our approach to simulating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind. Previously, we had defined a 'virtual' heliosphere that contained, for example, a tilted rotating current sheet, microstreams, quasi-two-dimensional fluctuations as well as Alfven waves. In this new version of the code, we use the global, time-stationary, WKB Alfven wave-driven solar wind model developed by Usmanov and described in Usmanov and Goldstein [2003] to define the initial state of the system. Consequently, current sheets, and fast and slow streams are computed self-consistently from an inner, photospheric, boundary. To this steady-state configuration, we add fluctuations close to, but above, the surface where the flow become super-Alfvenic. The time-dependent MHD equations are then solved using a semi-discrete third-order Central Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (CWENO) numerical scheme. The computational domain now includes the entire sphere; the geometrical singularity at the poles is removed using the multiple grid approach described in Usmanov [1996]. Wave packets are introduced at the inner boundary such as to satisfy Faraday's Law [Yeh and Dryer, 1985] and their nonlinear evolution are followed in time.

  8. On Lunar Exospheric Column Densities and Solar Wind Access Beyond the Terminator from ROSAT Soft X-ray Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, M. R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T.; Farrell, W. M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. K.; Hodges, R. R.; Holmstrom, M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. S.; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, T. J.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the count rate in three wedges, two wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 degrees off (19 degrees wide) the terminator towards the dark side and one wedge 38 degrees wide centered on the antisolar point. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show substantial limb brightening that is absent in the 38 degree wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also monitor how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which solar wind charge exchange has been observed.

  9. Hybrid power source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harmohan N.

    2012-06-05

    A hybrid power system is comprised of a high energy density element such as a fuel-cell and high power density elements such as a supercapacitor banks. A DC/DC converter electrically connected to the fuel cell and converting the energy level of the energy supplied by the fuel cell. A first switch is electrically connected to the DC/DC converter. First and second supercapacitors are electrically connected to the first switch and a second switch. A controller is connected to the first switch and the second switch, monitoring charge levels of the supercapacitors and controls the switching in response to the charge levels. A load is electrically connected to the second switch. The first switch connects the DC/DC converter to the first supercapacitor when the second switch connects the second supercapacitor to the load. The first switch connects the DC/DC converter to the second supercapacitor when the second switch connects the first supercapacitor to the load.

  10. Compressibility in Solar Wind Plasma Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.; Rowlands, G.

    2005-12-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamics is often assumed to describe solar wind turbulence. We use extended self-similarity to reveal scaling in the structure functions of density fluctuations in the solar wind as seen by the ACE spacecraft. The obtained scaling is then compared with that found in the inertial range of quantities identified previously as passive scalars in other turbulent systems. We find that these are not coincident. This implies that either solar wind turbulence is compressible or that straightforward comparison of structure functions does not adequately capture its inertial range properties.

  11. Wave Modeling of the Solar Wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Ofman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The acceleration and heating of the solar wind have been studied for decades using satellite observations and models. However, the exact mechanism that leads to solar wind heating and acceleration is poorly understood. In order to improve the understanding of the physical mechanisms that are involved in these processes a combination of modeling and observational analysis is required. Recent models constrained by satellite observations show that wave heating in the low-frequency (MHD, and high-frequency (ion-cyclotron range may provide the necessary momentum and heat input to coronal plasma and produce the solar wind. This review is focused on the results of several recent solar modeling studies that include waves explicitly in the MHD and the kinetic regime. The current status of the understanding of the solar wind acceleration and heating by waves is reviewed.

  12. Mirror Instability in the Turbulent Solar Wind

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Landi, S.; Matteini, L.; Verdini, A.; Franci, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 838, č. 2 (2017), 158/1-158/7 ISSN 0004-637X Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : instabilities * solar wind * waves Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016

  13. Radio sounding of the solar wind acceleration region with spacecraft signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Oleg I.; Pisanko, Yuri V.

    2018-01-01

    Data from coronal radio-sounding experiments carried out on various interplanetary spacecraft are used to derive the empirical radial dependence of solar wind velocity and density at heliocentric distances from 3 to 60 solar radii for heliolatitudes below 60° and for low solar activity. The radial dependencies of solar wind power and acceleration are derived from these results. Summaries of the radial behavior of characteristic parameters of the solar wind turbulence (e.g., the spectral index and the inner and outer turbulence scales), as well as the fractional density fluctuation, are also presented. These radio-sounding results provide a benchmark for models of the solar wind in its acceleration region.

  14. On lunar exospheric column densities and solar wind access beyond the terminator from ROSAT soft X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Farrell, W. M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Holmström, M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, T. J.; Travnicek, P.; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the Röntgen satellite (ROSAT) position sensitive proportional counter soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges: two 19° wedges (one north and one south) 13-32° off the terminator toward the dark side and one wedge 38° wide centered on the antisolar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show significant limb brightening that is absent in the 38° wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears to be dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now, along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which SWCX has been observed.

  15. Construction of Solar-Wind-Like Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dana Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations in the solar wind fields tend to not only have velocities and magnetic fields correlated in the sense consistent with Alfven waves traveling from the Sun, but they also have the magnitude of the magnetic field remarkably constant despite their being broadband. This paper provides, for the first time, a method for constructing fields with nearly constant magnetic field, zero divergence, and with any specified power spectrum for the fluctuations of the components of the field. Every wave vector, k, is associated with two polarizations the relative phases of these can be chosen to minimize the variance of the field magnitude while retaining the\\random character of the fields. The method is applied to a case with one spatial coordinate that demonstrates good agreement with observed time series and power spectra of the magnetic field in the solar wind, as well as with the distribution of the angles of rapid changes (discontinuities), thus showing a deep connection between two seemingly unrelated issues. It is suggested that using this construction will lead to more realistic simulations of solar wind turbulence and of the propagation of energetic particles.

  16. Verification of high-speed solar wind stream forecasts using operational solar wind models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2016-01-01

    High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluate...

  17. The Genesis Solar Wind Sample Return Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Roger C.; Burnett, Donald S.; Neugebauer, Marcia; Sasaki, Chester; Sevilla, Donald; Stansbery, Eileen; Clark, Ben; Smith, Nick; Oldham, Lloyd

    1990-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft was launched on August 8 from Cape Canaveral on a journey to become the first spacecraft to return from interplanetary space. The fifth in NASA's line of low-cost Discovery-class missions, its goal is to collect samples of solar wind and return them to Earth for detailed isotopic and elemental analysis. The spacecraft is to collect solar wind for over two years, while circling the L1 point 1.5 million km sunward of the earth, before heading back for a capsule-style re-entry in September, 2004. After parachute deployment, a mid-air helicopter recovery will be used to avoid a hard landing. The mission has been in the planning stages for over ten years. Its cost, including development, mission operations, and sample analysis, is approximately $209M. The Genesis science team, headed by principal investigator Donald Burnett of Caltech, consists of approximately 20 co-investigators from universities and science centers around the country and internationally. The spacecraft consists of a relatively flat spacecraft bus containing most of the subsystem components, situated below a sample return capsule (SRC) which holds the solar-wind collection substrates and an electrostatic solar wind concentrator. Some of the collectors are exposed throughout the collection period, for a sample of bulk solar wind, while others are exposed only to certain solar wind regimes, or types of flow. Ion and electron spectrometers feed raw data to the spacecraft control and data-handling (C&DH) unit, which determines ion moments and electron flux geometries in real time. An algorithm is used to robotically decide between interstream (IS), coronal hole (CH), and coronal mass ejection (CME) regimes, and to control deployment of the proper arrays to sample these wind regimes independently. This is the first time such a solar-wind decision algorithm has been used on board a spacecraft.

  18. Statistical comparison of the ionospheric energy deposition before and after sudden enhancements in solar wind dynamic pressure using AMIE output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudouridis, A.; Kim, H.; Lyons, L. R.; Zesta, E.; Ridley, A. J.; Weygand, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    The solar wind dynamic pressure, both through its steady state value and through its variations, plays an important role in the determination of the state of the terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere, its effects being only secondary to those of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). The solar wind dynamic pressure value is routinely included in various magnetospheric and ionospheric models as input. Recent studies have demonstrated the significant effect solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements have on the aurora, the field-aligned currents, the size of the polar cap, and the ionospheric convection and the transpolar potential. We present statistical studies of the ionospheric energy deposition during steady solar wind pressure conditions, and before and after sudden enhancements in solar wind pressure. We use five years of output from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) technique. The AMIE output consists of 1-min resolution values of the transpolar potential, the Hemispheric Power (a measure of auroral precipitation strength), and the ionospheric Joule heating. We find that the ionospheric energy deposition has the expected dependence on solar wind pressure and the IMF during steady conditions, increasing with increasing pressure and southward magnitude of the IMF. However, after solar wind pressure fronts there is additional enhancement of all AMIE parameters, indicating increased energy deposition on the terrestrial ionosphere. The increased ionospheric input lasts for 1-2 hours and then slowly dissipates, even though the solar wind pressure remains high, suggesting that the increased response of the ionosphere is transient in nature.

  19. Substorm probabilities are best predicted from solar wind speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, P. T.; Liou, K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Sotirelis, T.; Wing, S.; Mitchell, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Most measures of magnetospheric activity - including auroral power (AP), magnetotail stretching, and ring current intensity - are best predicted by solar wind-magnetosphere coupling functions which approximate the frontside magnetopause merging rate. However radiation belt fluxes are best predicted by a simpler function, namely the solar wind speed, v. Since most theories of how these high energy electrons arise are associated with repeated rapid dipolarizations such as associated with substorms, this apparent discrepancy could be reconciled under the hypothesis that the frequency of substorms tracks v rather than the merging rate - despite the necessity of magnetotail flux loading prior to substorms. Here we investigate this conjecture about v and substorm probability. Specifically, a continuous list of substorm onsets compiled from SuperMAG covering January 1, 1997 through December 31, 2007 are studied. The continuity of SuperMAG data and near continuity of solar wind measurements minimize selection bias. In fact v is a much better predictor of onset probability than is the overall merging rate, with substorm odds rising sharply with v. Some loading by merging is necessary, and frontside merging does increase substorm probability, but nearly as strongly as does v taken alone. Likewise, the effects of dynamic pressure, p, are smaller than simply v taken by itself. Changes in the solar wind matter, albeit modestly. For a given level of v (or Bz), a change in v (or Bz) will increase the odds of a substorm for at least 2 h following the change. A decrease in driving elevates substorm probabilities to a greater extent than does an increase, partially supporting external triggering. Yet current v is the best single predictor of subsequently observing a substorm. These results explain why geomagnetically quiet years and active years are better characterized by low or high v (respectively) than by the distribution of merging estimators. It appears that the flow of energy

  20. THE NEW HORIZONS SOLAR WIND AROUND PLUTO (SWAP) OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR WIND FROM 11–33 au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P.; Weidner, S.; Livadiotis, G. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Nicolaou, G., E-mail: helliott@swri.edu [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Box 812, SE-98128, Kiruna (Sweden)

    2016-04-15

    The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on National Aeronautics and Space Administration's New Horizons Pluto mission has collected solar wind observations en route from Earth to Pluto, and these observations continue beyond Pluto. Few missions have explored the solar wind in the outer heliosphere making this dataset a critical addition to the field. We created a forward model of SWAP count rates, which includes a comprehensive instrument response function based on laboratory and flight calibrations. By fitting the count rates with this model, the proton density (n), speed (V), and temperature (T) parameters are determined. Comparisons between SWAP parameters and both propagated 1 au observations and prior Voyager 2 observations indicate consistency in both the range and mean wind values. These comparisons as well as our additional findings confirm that small and midsized solar wind structures are worn down with increasing distance due to dynamic interaction of parcels of wind with different speed. For instance, the T–V relationship steepens, as the range in V is limited more than the range in T with distance. At times the T–V correlation clearly breaks down beyond 20 au, which may indicate wind currently expanding and cooling may have an elevated T reflecting prior heating and compression in the inner heliosphere. The power of wind parameters at shorter periodicities decreases with distance as the longer periodicities strengthen. The solar rotation periodicity is present in temperature beyond 20 au indicating the observed parcel temperature may reflect not only current heating or cooling, but also heating occurring closer to the Sun.

  1. The solar wind at solar maximum: comparisons of EISCAT IPS and in situ observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Breen

    Full Text Available The solar maximum solar wind is highly structured in latitude, longitude and in time. Coronal measurements show a very high degree of variability, with large variations that are less apparent within in situ spacecraft measurements. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS observations from EISCAT, covering distances from 20 to 100 solar radii (RS, are an ideal source of information on the inner solar wind and can be used, therefore, to cast light on its evolution with distance from the Sun. Earlier comparisons of in situ and IPS measurements under solar minimum conditions showed good large-scale agreement, particularly in the fast wind. In this study we attempt a quantitative comparison of measurements made over solar maximum by EISCAT (20–100 RS and the Wind and Ulysses spacecraft (at 215 RS and 300–1000 RS, respectively. The intervals studied were August–September 1999, May 2000, September 2000 and May 2001, the last-named being the period of the second Ulysses fast latitude scan. Both ballistic and – when possible – MHD/ballistic hybrid models were used to relate the data sets, and we compare the results obtained from these two mapping methods. The results of this study suggest that solar wind velocities measured in situ were less variable than those estimated from IPS measurements closer to the Sun, with the greatest divergence between IPS velocities and in situ measurements occurring in regions where steep longitudinal velocity gradients were seen in situ. We suggest that the interaction between streams of solar wind with different velocities leads to "smoothing" of solar wind velocities between 30–60 RS and 1 AU, and that this process continues at greater distances from the Sun.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (solar wind plasma; sources of the solar wind; instruments and techniques

  2. Energy Dissipation Processes in Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Wei, F. S.; Feng, X. S.; Xu, X. J.; Zhang, J.; Sun, T. R.; Zuo, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation ultimately cannot be achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection (MR) are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind MR region. We find that the MR region shows unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a MR site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy dissipation process.

  3. Shock heating of the solar wind plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Y. C.; Liu, Shaoliang; Burlaga, L. F.

    1990-01-01

    The role played by shocks in heating solar-wind plasma is investigated using data on 413 shocks which were identified from the plasma and magnetic-field data collected between 1973 and 1982 by Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft. It is found that the average shock strength increased with the heliocentric distance outside 1 AU, reaching a maximum near 5 AU, after which the shock strength decreased with the distance; the entropy of the solar wind protons also reached a maximum at 5 AU. An MHD simulation model in which shock heating is the only heating mechanism available was used to calculate the entropy changes for the November 1977 event. The calculated entropy agreed well with the value calculated from observational data, suggesting that shocks are chiefly responsible for heating solar wind plasma between 1 and 15 AU.

  4. ENERGY DISSIPATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Wei, F. S.; Feng, X. S.; Sun, T. R.; Zuo, P. B. [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, X. J. [Space Science Institute, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macao (China); Zhang, J., E-mail: yw@spaceweather.ac.cn [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 3F3, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation ultimately cannot be achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection (MR) are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind MR region. We find that the MR region shows unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a MR site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy dissipation process.

  5. Hybrid Magnetics and Power Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mo, Wai Keung; Paasch, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid magnetic approach, merging two different magnetic core properites such as ferrite and iron powder cores, is an effective solution for power converter applications. It can offer similar magnetic properties to that of magnetic powder cores but showing less copper loss than powder cores. In...... operation and energy saving. Index Terms—magnetic devices, passive components, boost inductor....... In order to prevent ferrite core saturation, placing an effective air gap within the ferrite core is a key method to obtain optimum hybrid magnetic performance. Furthermore, a relatively large inductance at low loading current is an excellent way to minimze power loss in order to achieve high efficiency...

  6. Acceleration and heating of the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, A.

    1978-01-01

    Some of the competing theories of solar wind acceleration and heating are reviewed, and the observations that are required to distinguish among them are discussed. In most cases what is required is measurement of plasma velocity and temperature and magnetic field, as near the sun as possible and certainly inside 20 solar radii; another critical aspect of this question is determining whether a turbulent envelope exists in this inner region, and if so, defining its properties. Plasma and magnetic observations from the proposed Solar Probe mission would thus yield a quantum jump in our understanding of the dynamics of the solar wind.

  7. Solar wind controls on Mercury's magnetospheric cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Maosheng; Vogt, Joachim; Heyner, Daniel; Zhong, Jun

    2017-06-01

    This study assesses the response of the cusp to solar wind changes comprehensively, using 2848 orbits of MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) observation. The assessment entails four steps: (1) propose and validate an approach to estimate the solar wind magnetic field (interplanetary magnetic field (IMF)) for MESSENGER's cusp transit; (2) define an index σ measuring the intensity of the magnetic disturbance which significantly peaks within the cusp and serves as an indicator of the cusp activity level; (3) construct an empirical model of σ as a function of IMF and Mercury's heliocentric distance rsun, through linear regression; and (4) use the model to estimate and compare the polar distribution of the disturbance σ under different conditions for a systematic comparison. The comparison illustrates that the disturbance peak over the cusp is strongest and widest extending in local time for negative IMF Bx and negative IMF Bz, and when Mercury is around the perihelion. Azimuthal shifts are associated with both IMF By and rsun: the cusp moves toward dawn when IMF By or rsun decrease. These dependences are explained in terms of the IMF Bx-controlled dayside magnetospheric topology, the component reconnection model applied to IMF By and Bz, and the variability of solar wind ram pressure associated with heliocentric distance rsun. The applicability of the component reconnection model on IMF By indicates that at Mercury reconnection occurs at lower shear angles than at Earth.Plain Language SummaryMercury's magnetosphere was suggested to be particularly sensitive to solar wind conditions. This study investigates the response of the magnetospheric cusp to solar wind conditions systematically. For this purpose, we analyze the statistical predictability of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at Mercury, develop an approach for estimating the solar wind magnetic field (IMF) for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging

  8. The solar wind as a turbulence laboratory- some new quantitative points of contact between theory and solar wind observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, Bogdan; Chapman, Sandra; Gogoberidze, Giga; Kiyani, Khurom; Osman, Kareem; Turner, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Single point observations of the high Reynolds number solar wind flow, suitable for the study of turbulence, are on timescales from below ion kinetic scales up to days, providing extensive datasets for the study of plasma turbulence. Central to the concept of using the solar wind as a test laboratory for plasma turbulence are methods that allow direct quantitative comparison between the predictions of theory and simulation, and the observations. Critically, theoretical predictions, and data analysis methods, must come together in a manner in which uncertainties can be well understood, and thus different theoretical scenarios be distinguished unambiguously. Scaling is a key prediction of theories of infinite range turbulence. Its full characterization requires the scaling exponents of all the moments of the probability density of fluctuations as a function of scale. In practice, only the first few moments are accessible. Comparisons with theory often focus on the second moment scaling, that is, the exponent of the power spectral density (PSD). We focus on what can be learned from two key properties of turbulent fluctuations: components of the tensor power spectral density, and the functional form and scaling of the non- Gaussian pdf of fluctuations. Solar wind plasma turbulence is anisotropic due to the presence of a background field, so that in general the power spectral density (or correlation) tensor is needed to characterise the turbulence. We focus on the ratios of the PSD tensor terms which are sensitive to the scaling exponent, providing a method for direct observational tests of theories. The reduced PSD tensor accessed by single spacecraft measurements yields ratios of perpendicular terms which we show are robust to uncertainties. In the MHD inertial range of turbulence in the solar wind, these can clearly distinguish turbulence theories as we discuss[1]. They also offer insights into the physics below the ion kinetic scales where a further scaling range

  9. Differential kinetic dynamics and heating of ions in the turbulent solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Valentini, F; Stabile, S; Pezzi, O; Servidio, S; De Marco, R; Marcucci, F; Bruno, R; Lavraud, B; De Keyser, J; Consolini, G; Brienza, D; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Retinò, A; Vaivads, A; Salatti, M; Veltri, P

    2016-01-01

    The solar wind plasma is a fully ionized and turbulent gas ejected by the outer layers of the solar corona at very high speed, mainly composed by protons and electrons, with a small percentage of helium nuclei and a significantly lower abundance of heavier ions. Since particle collisions are practically negligible, the solar wind is typically not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium. Such a complex system must be described through self-consistent and fully nonlinear models, taking into account its multi-species composition and turbulence. We use a kinetic hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical code to reproduce the turbulent energy cascade down to ion kinetic scales, in typical conditions of the uncontaminated solar wind plasma, with the aim of exploring the differential kinetic dynamics of the dominant ion species, namely protons and alpha particles. We show that the response of different species to the fluctuating electromagnetic fields is different. In particular, a significant differential heating of alphas w...

  10. Reassessing Solar Wind Stability using Nyquist's Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kristopher; Kasper, Justin; Alterman, Benjamin; Stevens, Michael; Korreck, Kelly

    2017-10-01

    In nearly-collisionless plasmas, such as the solar wind, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium structures, including temperature anisotropies, beam populations with relative drifts, and agyrotropic features, are frequently observed to persist. These features can act as sources of free energy which may drive instabilities that move the plasma closer to LTE. Analysis techniques applied to solar wind observations for the presence of such instabilities typically consider only a single source of free energy, such the temperature anisotropy of the proton population. We have developed an efficient algorithm for general determination of linear stability considering all sources of free energy using Nyquist's Method. By applying this method to the dispersion relation associated with a particular solar wind observation, we rapidly determine if the plasma is linearly unstable, and if so, how many normal modes are driven. Our technique is verified against well-characterized theoretical and observational cases from the literature, and applied to in situ observations from the Wind spacecraft to determine how additional sources of free energy affect the plasma's stability and may govern the solar wind's evolution.

  11. Classification of Solar Wind With Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, Enrico; Carè, Algo; Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2017-11-01

    We present a four-category classification algorithm for the solar wind, based on Gaussian Process. The four categories are the ones previously adopted in Xu and Borovsky (2015): ejecta, coronal hole origin plasma, streamer belt origin plasma, and sector reversal origin plasma. The algorithm is trained and tested on a labeled portion of the OMNI data set. It uses seven inputs: the solar wind speed Vsw, the temperature standard deviation σT, the sunspot number R, the F10.7 index, the Alfven speed vA, the proton specific entropy Sp, and the proton temperature Tp compared to a velocity-dependent expected temperature. The output of the Gaussian Process classifier is a four-element vector containing the probabilities that an event (one reading from the hourly averaged OMNI database) belongs to each category. The probabilistic nature of the prediction allows for a more informative and flexible interpretation of the results, for instance, being able to classify events as "undecided." The new method has a median accuracy larger than 90% for all categories, even using a small set of data for training. The Receiver Operating Characteristic curve and the reliability diagram also demonstrate the excellent quality of this new method. Finally, we use the algorithm to classify a large portion of the OMNI data set, and we present for the first time transition probabilities between different solar wind categories. Such probabilities represent the "climatological" statistics that determine the solar wind baseline.

  12. The Solar Wind as a Turbulence Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Carbone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review we will focus on a topic of fundamental importance for both astrophysics and plasma physics, namely the occurrence of large-amplitude low-frequency fluctuations of the fields that describe the plasma state. This subject will be treated within the context of the expanding solar wind and the most meaningful advances in this research field will be reported emphasizing the results obtained in the past decade or so. As a matter of fact, Helios inner heliosphere and Ulysses' high latitude observations, recent multi-spacecrafts measurements in the solar wind (Cluster four satellites and new numerical approaches to the problem, based on the dynamics of complex systems, brought new important insights which helped to better understand how turbulent fluctuations behave in the solar wind. In particular, numerical simulations within the realm of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD turbulence theory unraveled what kind of physical mechanisms are at the basis of turbulence generation and energy transfer across the spectral domain of the fluctuations. In other words, the advances reached in these past years in the investigation of solar wind turbulence now offer a rather complete picture of the phenomenological aspect of the problem to be tentatively presented in a rather organic way.

  13. Extended Self Similarity in Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, G.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2005-12-01

    The solar wind provides a natural laboratory for observations of MHD turbulence over extended temporal scales. A hallmark of turbulence is scaling- and scaling in the Probability Density Functions (PDF) of fluctuations in certain solar wind in- situ bulk plasma parameters has been established from WIND and ACE observations on `short' timescales up to a few hours. On longer timescales there is a crossover in scaling to uncorrelated behaviour. The intermittency of the system is expressed in these parameters through the non-Gaussian nature of the fluctuations PDF up to this timescale. Here we apply a generic approach to turbulence- that of Extended Self Similarity (ESS)- to the analysis of solar wind observations. We find that ESS can extend the range of scaling and for some parameters reveals two distinct scaling regions for the `short' and long timescales, whereas for others, a single scaling encompasses the behaviour over the full range of timescales. That certain parameters, and conditions, can be distinguished via ESS may provide physical insight into the turbulent solar wind.

  14. Verification of high-speed solar wind stream forecasts using operational solar wind models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2016-01-01

    High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluat...... score, TS ≈ 0.37). The predicted high-speed streams show typical uncertainties in the arrival time of about 1 day and uncertainties in the speed of about 100 km/s. General advantages and disadvantages of the investigated solar wind models are diagnosed and outlined.......High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluate...... high-speed stream forecasts made by the empirical solar wind forecast (ESWF) and the semiempirical Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model based on the in situ plasma measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft for the years 2011 to 2014. While the ESWF makes use of an empirical relation...

  15. Solar Wind Interaction and Impact on the Venus Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Stenberg Wieser, Gabriella; Barabash, Stas; Luhmann, Janet G.

    2017-11-01

    Venus has intrigued planetary scientists for decades because of its huge contrasts to Earth, in spite of its nickname of "Earth's Twin". Its invisible upper atmosphere and space environment are also part of the larger story of Venus and its evolution. In 60s to 70s, several missions (Venera and Mariner series) explored Venus-solar wind interaction regions. They identified the basic structure of the near-Venus space environment, for example, existence of the bow shock, magnetotail, ionosphere, as well as the lack of the intrinsic magnetic field. A huge leap in knowledge about the solar wind interaction with Venus was made possible by the 14-year long mission, Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO), launched in 1978. More recently, ESA's probe, Venus Express (VEX), was inserted into orbit in 2006, operated for 8 years. Owing to its different orbit from that of PVO, VEX made unique measurements in the polar and terminator regions, and probed the near-Venus tail for the first time. The near-tail hosts dynamic processes that lead to plasma energization. These processes in turn lead to the loss of ionospheric ions to space, slowly eroding the Venusian atmosphere. VEX carried an ion spectrometer with a moderate mass-separation capability and the observed ratio of the escaping hydrogen and oxygen ions in the wake indicates the stoichiometric loss of water from Venus. The structure and dynamics of the induced magnetosphere depends on the prevailing solar wind conditions. VEX studied the response of the magnetospheric system on different time scales. A plethora of waves was identified by the magnetometer on VEX; some of them were not previously observed by PVO. Proton cyclotron waves were seen far upstream of the bow shock, mirror mode waves were observed in magnetosheath and whistler mode waves, possibly generated by lightning discharges were frequently seen. VEX also encouraged renewed numerical modeling efforts, including fluid-type of models and particle-fluid hybrid type of models

  16. Solar Wind Interaction and Impact on the Venus Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Stenberg Wieser, Gabriella; Barabash, Stas; Luhmann, Janet G.

    2017-08-01

    Venus has intrigued planetary scientists for decades because of its huge contrasts to Earth, in spite of its nickname of "Earth's Twin". Its invisible upper atmosphere and space environment are also part of the larger story of Venus and its evolution. In 60s to 70s, several missions (Venera and Mariner series) explored Venus-solar wind interaction regions. They identified the basic structure of the near-Venus space environment, for example, existence of the bow shock, magnetotail, ionosphere, as well as the lack of the intrinsic magnetic field. A huge leap in knowledge about the solar wind interaction with Venus was made possible by the 14-year long mission, Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO), launched in 1978. More recently, ESA's probe, Venus Express (VEX), was inserted into orbit in 2006, operated for 8 years. Owing to its different orbit from that of PVO, VEX made unique measurements in the polar and terminator regions, and probed the near-Venus tail for the first time. The near-tail hosts dynamic processes that lead to plasma energization. These processes in turn lead to the loss of ionospheric ions to space, slowly eroding the Venusian atmosphere. VEX carried an ion spectrometer with a moderate mass-separation capability and the observed ratio of the escaping hydrogen and oxygen ions in the wake indicates the stoichiometric loss of water from Venus. The structure and dynamics of the induced magnetosphere depends on the prevailing solar wind conditions. VEX studied the response of the magnetospheric system on different time scales. A plethora of waves was identified by the magnetometer on VEX; some of them were not previously observed by PVO. Proton cyclotron waves were seen far upstream of the bow shock, mirror mode waves were observed in magnetosheath and whistler mode waves, possibly generated by lightning discharges were frequently seen. VEX also encouraged renewed numerical modeling efforts, including fluid-type of models and particle-fluid hybrid type of models

  17. Escape for the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    Plasma from the Sun known as the slow solar wind has been observed far away from where scientists thought it was produced. Now new simulations may have resolved the puzzle of where the slow solar wind comes from and how it escapes the Sun to travel through our solar system.An Origin PuzzleA full view of a coronal hole (dark portion) from SDO. The edges of the coronal hole mark the boundary between open and closed magnetic field lines. [SDO; adapted from Higginson et al. 2017]The Suns atmosphere, known as the corona, is divided into two types of regions based on the behavior of magnetic field lines. In closed-field regions, the magnetic field is firmly anchored in the photosphere at both ends of field lines, so traveling plasma is confined to coronal loops and must return to the Suns surface. In open-field regions, only one end of each magnetic field line is anchored in the photosphere, so plasma is able to stream from the Suns surface out into the solar system.This second type of region known as a coronal hole is thought to be the origin of fast-moving plasma measured in our solar system and known as the fast solar wind. But we also observe a slow solar wind: plasma that moves at speeds of less than 500 km/s.The slow solar wind presents a conundrum. Its observational properties strongly suggest it originates in the hot, closed corona rather than the cooler, open regions. But if the slow solar wind plasma originates in closed-field regions of the Suns atmosphere, then how does it escape from the Sun?Slow Wind from Closed FieldsA team of scientists led by Aleida Higginson (University of Michigan) has now used high-resolution, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to show how the slow solar wind can be generated from plasma that starts outin closed-field parts of the Sun.A simulated heliospheric arc, composed of open magnetic field lines. [Higginson et al. 2017]Motions on the Suns surface near the boundary between open and closed-field regions the boundary

  18. Kinetic Features Observed in the Solar Wind Electron Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrard, V.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.

    2016-12-01

    More than 120 000 of velocity distributions measured by Helios, Cluster and Ulysses in the ecliptic have been analyzed within an extended range of heliocentric distances from 0.3 to over 4 AU. The velocity distribution of electrons reveal a dual structure with a thermal (Maxwellian) core and a suprathermal (Kappa) halo. A detailed observational analysis of these two components provides estimations of their temperatures and temperature anisotropies, and we decode any potential interdependence that their properties may indicate. The core temperature is found to decrease with the radial distance, while the halo temperature slightly increases, clarifying an apparent contradiction in previous observational analysis and providing valuable clues about the temperature of the Kappa-distributed populations. For low values of the power-index kappa, these two components manifest a clear tendency to deviate from isotropy in the same direction, that seems to confirm the existence of mechanisms with similar effects on both components, e.g., the solar wind expansion, or the particle heating by the fluctuations. However, the existence of plasma states with anti-correlated anisotropies of the core and halo populations and the increase of their number for high values of the power-index kappa suggest a dynamic interplay of these components, mediated most probably by the anisotropy-driven instabilities. Estimating the temperature of the solar wind particles and their anisotropies is particularly important for understanding the origin of these deviations from thermal equilibrium as well as their effects.

  19. ROSAT Observations of Soft X-ray Emission from the Solar Wind Interaction with the Lunar Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael

    We analyze the ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray image of the moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges, two wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 degrees off (19 degrees wide) the terminator towards the dark side and one wedge 38 degrees wide centered on the antisolar point. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show substantial limb brightening that is absent in the 38 degree wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the moon represents another solar system body at which solar wind charge exchange has been observed.

  20. Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Wind Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Whittlesey, P. L.

    2017-01-01

    Historically, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has operated a Solar Wind Facility (SWF) to provide long term particle and photon exposure to material samples. The requirements on the particle beam details were not stringent as the cumulative fluence level is the test goal. Motivated by development of the faraday cup instrument on the NASA Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission, the MSFC SWF has been upgraded to included high fidelity particle beams providing broadbeam ions, broadbeam electrons, and narrow beam protons or ions, which cover a wide dynamic range of solar wind velocity and flux conditions. The large vacuum chamber with integrated cryo-shroud, combined with a 3-axis positioning system, provides an excellent platform for sensor development and qualification. This short paper provides some details of the SWF charged particle beams characteristics in the context of the Solar Probe Plus program requirements. Data will be presented on the flux and energy ranges as well as beam stability.

  1. The technique of linear prediction filters applied to studies of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauer, C. Robert

    1986-01-01

    Linear prediction filtering is a powerful empirical technique suitable for the study of stimulus-response behavior. The technique enables one to determine the most general linear relationship between multiple time-varying quantities, assuming that the physical systems relating the quantities are linear and time invariant. Several researchers have applied linear prediction analysis to investigate solar wind-magnetosphere interactions. This short review describes the method of linear prediction analysis, its application to solar wind-magnetosphere coupling studies both in terms of physical processes, and the results of investigations which have used this technique.

  2. Quantifying the intermittency independent scaling exponents in the anisotropic solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2006-12-01

    Solar wind turbulence is dominated by Alfvenic fluctuations with power spectral exponents that somewhat surprisingly evolve toward the Kolmogorov value of -5/3, that of hydrodynamic turbulence. We analyse a 3 year interval of ACE data that is dominated by slow solar wind and show that at 1AU the turbulence decomposes linearly into two coexistent components perpendicular and parallel to the local average magnetic field and determine the distinct intermittency independent scaling exponents. The first of these is consistent with recent predictions for anisotropic MHD and the second shows Kolmogorov-like scaling which we also find in the number and magnetic energy density, and Poynting flux.

  3. Mirror Instability in the Turbulent Solar Wind

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Landi, S.; Matteini, L.; Verdini, A.; Franci, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 838, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 158. ISSN 0004-637X Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : instabilities * solar wind * turbulence * waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/aa67e0

  4. Origin of the Ubiquitous Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, S. R.; Woo, R.; Fineschi, S.; O'Neal, R.; Kohl, J.; Noci, G.

    1997-01-01

    The solar wind is a direct manifestation of the coronal heating processes which continue to elude us. For over three decades, observations in interplanetary space have identified two types of wind: a slow component with highly variable physical properties also characterized by speeds typically beow 500 kn/s, and a much less variable fast wind flowing on average at 750 km/s1.

  5. A consistent thermodynamics of the MHD wave-heated two-fluid solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We start our considerations from two more recent findings in heliospheric physics: One is the fact that the primary solar wind protons do not cool off adiabatically with distance, but appear to be heated. The other one is that secondary protons, embedded in the solar wind as pick-up ions, behave quasi-isothermal at their motion to the outer heliosphere. These two phenomena must be physically closely connected with each other. To demonstrate this we solve a coupled set of enthalpy flow conservation equations for the two-fluid solar wind system consisting of primary and secondary protons. The coupling of these equations comes by the heat sources that are relevant, namely the dissipation of MHD turbulence power to the respective protons at the relevant dissipation scales. Hereby we consider both the dissipation of convected turbulences and the dissipation of turbulences locally driven by the injection of new pick-up ions into an unstable mode of the ion distribution function. Conversion of free kinetic energy of freshly injected secondary ions into turbulence power is finally followed by partial reabsorption of this energy both by primary and secondary ions. We show solutions of simultaneous integrations of the coupled set of differential thermodynamic two-fluid equations and can draw interesting conclusions from the solutions obtained. We can show that the secondary proton temperature with increasing radial distance asymptotically attains a constant value with a magnitude essentially determined by the actual solar wind velocity. Furthermore, we study the primary proton temperature within this two-fluid context and find a polytropic behaviour with radially and latitudinally variable polytropic indices determined by the local heat sources due to dissipated turbulent wave energy. Considering latitudinally variable solar wind conditions, as published by McComas et al. (2000, we also predict latitudinal variations of primary proton temperatures at

  6. A consistent thermodynamics of the MHD wave-heated two-fluid solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    Full Text Available We start our considerations from two more recent findings in heliospheric physics: One is the fact that the primary solar wind protons do not cool off adiabatically with distance, but appear to be heated. The other one is that secondary protons, embedded in the solar wind as pick-up ions, behave quasi-isothermal at their motion to the outer heliosphere. These two phenomena must be physically closely connected with each other. To demonstrate this we solve a coupled set of enthalpy flow conservation equations for the two-fluid solar wind system consisting of primary and secondary protons. The coupling of these equations comes by the heat sources that are relevant, namely the dissipation of MHD turbulence power to the respective protons at the relevant dissipation scales. Hereby we consider both the dissipation of convected turbulences and the dissipation of turbulences locally driven by the injection of new pick-up ions into an unstable mode of the ion distribution function. Conversion of free kinetic energy of freshly injected secondary ions into turbulence power is finally followed by partial reabsorption of this energy both by primary and secondary ions. We show solutions of simultaneous integrations of the coupled set of differential thermodynamic two-fluid equations and can draw interesting conclusions from the solutions obtained. We can show that the secondary proton temperature with increasing radial distance asymptotically attains a constant value with a magnitude essentially determined by the actual solar wind velocity. Furthermore, we study the primary proton temperature within this two-fluid context and find a polytropic behaviour with radially and latitudinally variable polytropic indices determined by the local heat sources due to dissipated turbulent wave energy. Considering latitudinally variable solar wind conditions, as published by McComas et al. (2000, we also predict latitudinal variations of primary proton temperatures at

  7. Electric solar wind sail mass budget model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The electric solar wind sail (E-sail is a new type of propellantless propulsion system for Solar System transportation, which uses the natural solar wind to produce spacecraft propulsion. The E-sail consists of thin centrifugally stretched tethers that are kept charged by an onboard electron gun and, as such, experience Coulomb drag through the high-speed solar wind plasma stream. This paper discusses a mass breakdown and a performance model for an E-sail spacecraft that hosts a mission-specific payload of prescribed mass. In particular, the model is able to estimate the total spacecraft mass and its propulsive acceleration as a function of various design parameters such as the number of tethers and their length. A number of subsystem masses are calculated assuming existing or near-term E-sail technology. In light of the obtained performance estimates, an E-sail represents a promising propulsion system for a variety of transportation needs in the Solar System.

  8. The Solar Wind as a Turbulence Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Roberto

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review we will focus on a topic of fundamental importance for both plasma physics and astrophysics, namely the occurrence of large-amplitude low-frequency fluctuations of the fields that describe the plasma state. This subject will be treated within the context of the expanding solar wind and the most meaningful advances in this research field will be reported emphasizing the results obtained in the past decade or so. As a matter of fact, Ulysses’ high latitude observations and new numerical approaches to the problem, based on the dynamics of complex systems, brought new important insights which helped to better understand how turbulent fluctuations behave in the solar wind. In particular, numerical simulations within the realm of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD turbulence theory unraveled what kind of physical mechanisms are at the basis of turbulence generation and energy transfer across the spectral domain of the fluctuations. In other words, the advances reached in these past years in the investigation of solar wind turbulence now offer a rather complete picture of the phenomenological aspect of the problem to be tentatively presented in a rather organic way.

  9. Extended MHD turbulence and its applications to the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Abdelhamid, Hamdi M; Mahajan, Swadesh M

    2016-01-01

    Extended MHD is a one-fluid model that incorporates two-fluid effects such as electron inertia and the Hall drift. This model is used to construct fully nonlinear Alfv\\'enic wave solutions, and thereby derive the kinetic and magnetic spectra by resorting to a Kolmogorov-like hypothesis based on the constant cascading rates of the energy and generalized helicities of this model. The magnetic and kinetic spectra are derived in the ideal $\\left(k 1/\\lambda_e\\right)$ regimes; $k$ is the wavenumber and $\\lambda_s = c/\\omega_{p s}$ is the skin depth of species `$s$'. In the Hall regime, it is shown that the emergent results are fully consistent with previous numerical and analytical studies, especially in the context of the solar wind. The focus is primarily on the electron inertia regime, where magnetic energy spectra with power-law indexes of $-11/3$ and $-13/3$ are always recovered. The latter, in particular, is quite close to recent observational evidence from the solar wind with a potential slope of approxima...

  10. Weakest solar wind of the space age and the current 'MINI' solar maximum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, D. J.; Angold, N.; Elliott, H. A.; Livadiotis, G. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Schwadron, N. A.; Smith, C. W. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Skoug, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    The last solar minimum, which extended into 2009, was especially deep and prolonged. Since then, sunspot activity has gone through a very small peak while the heliospheric current sheet achieved large tilt angles similar to prior solar maxima. The solar wind fluid properties and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) have declined through the prolonged solar minimum and continued to be low through the current mini solar maximum. Compared to values typically observed from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s, the following proton parameters are lower on average from 2009 through day 79 of 2013: solar wind speed and beta (∼11%), temperature (∼40%), thermal pressure (∼55%), mass flux (∼34%), momentum flux or dynamic pressure (∼41%), energy flux (∼48%), IMF magnitude (∼31%), and radial component of the IMF (∼38%). These results have important implications for the solar wind's interaction with planetary magnetospheres and the heliosphere's interaction with the local interstellar medium, with the proton dynamic pressure remaining near the lowest values observed in the space age: ∼1.4 nPa, compared to ∼2.4 nPa typically observed from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. The combination of lower magnetic flux emergence from the Sun (carried out in the solar wind as the IMF) and associated low power in the solar wind points to the causal relationship between them. Our results indicate that the low solar wind output is driven by an internal trend in the Sun that is longer than the ∼11 yr solar cycle, and they suggest that this current weak solar maximum is driven by the same trend.

  11. Variations of Strahl Properties with Fast and Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Gurgiolo, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The interplanetary solar wind electron velocity distribution function generally shows three different populations. Two of the components, the core and halo, have been the most intensively analyzed and modeled populations using different theoretical models. The third component, the strahl, is usually seen at higher energies, is confined in pitch-angle, is highly field-aligned and skew. This population has been more difficult to identify and to model in the solar wind. In this work we make use of the high angular, energy and time resolution and three-dimensional data of the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer to identify and analyze this component in the ambient solar wind during high and slow speed solar wind. The moment density and fluid velocity have been computed by a semi-numerical integration method. The variations of solar wind density and drift velocity with the general build solar wind speed could provide some insight into the source, origin, and evolution of the strahl.

  12. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  13. Effects of solar wind ultralow-frequency fluctuations on plasma sheet electron temperature: Regression analysis with support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Ping; Kim, Hee-Jeong; Yue, Chao; Weygand, James M.; Hsu, Tung-Shin; Chu, Xiangning

    2017-04-01

    To investigate whether ultralow-frequency (ULF) fluctuations from 0.5 to 8.3 mHz in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) can affect the plasma sheet electron temperature (Te) near geosynchronous distances, we use a support vector regression machine technique to decouple the effects from different solar wind parameters and their ULF fluctuation power. Te in this region varies from 0.1 to 10 keV with a median of 1.3 keV. We find that when the solar wind ULF power is weak, Te increases with increasing southward IMF Bz and solar wind speed, while it varies weakly with solar wind density. As the ULF power becomes stronger during weak IMF Bz ( 0) or northward IMF, Te becomes significantly enhanced, by a factor of up to 10. We also find that mesoscale disturbances in a time scale of a few to tens of minutes as indicated by AE during substorm expansion and recovery phases are more enhanced when the ULF power is stronger. The effect of ULF powers may be explained by stronger inward radial diffusion resulting from stronger mesoscale disturbances under higher ULF powers, which can bring high-energy plasma sheet electrons further toward geosynchronous distance. This effect of ULF powers is particularly important during weak southward IMF or northward IMF when convection electric drift is weak.

  14. Spectral Analysis of Geomagnetic Activity Indices and Solar Wind Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hee Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar variability is widely known to affect the interplanetary space and in turn the Earth’s electromagnetical environment on the basis of common periodicities in the solar and geomagnetic activity indices. The goal of this study is twofold. Firstly, we attempt to associate modes by comparing a temporal behavior of the power of geomagnetic activity parameters since it is barely sufficient searching for common peaks with a similar periodicity in order to causally correlate geomagnetic activity parameters. As a result of the wavelet transform analysis we are able to obtain information on the temporal behavior of the power in the velocity of the solar wind, the number density of protons in the solar wind, the AE index, the Dst index, the interplanetary magnetic field, B and its three components of the GSM coordinate system, BX, BY, BZ. Secondly, we also attempt to search for any signatures of influence on the space environment near the Earth by inner planets orbiting around the Sun. Our main findings are as follows: (1 Parameters we have investigated show periodicities of ~ 27 days, ~ 13.5 days, ~ 9 days. (2 The peaks in the power spectrum of BZ appear to be split due to an unknown agent. (3 For some modes powers are not present all the time and intervals showing high powers do not always coincide. (4 Noticeable peaks do not emerge at those frequencies corresponding to the synodic and/or sidereal periods of Mercury and Venus, which leads us to conclude that the Earth’s space environment is not subject to the shadow of the inner planets as suggested earlier.

  15. The role of compressibility in solar wind plasma turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Hnat, Bogdan; Chapman, Sandra C.; Rowlands, George

    2004-01-01

    Incompressible Magnetohydrodynamics is often assumed to describe solar wind turbulence. We use extended self similarity to reveal scaling in structure functions of density fluctuations in the solar wind. Obtained scaling is then compared with that found in the inertial range of quantities identified as passive scalars in other turbulent systems. We find that these are not coincident. This implies that either solar wind turbulence is compressible, or that straightforward comparison of structur...

  16. Solar cycle dependence of scaling in solar wind fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Chapman

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this review we collate recent results for the statistical scaling properties of fluctuations in the solar wind with a view to synthesizing two descriptions: that of evolving MHD turbulence and that of a scaling signature of coronal origin that passively propagates with the solar wind. The scenario that emerges is that of coexistent signatures which map onto the well known "two component" picture of solar wind magnetic fluctuations. This highlights the need to consider quantities which track Alfvénic fluctuations, and energy and momentum flux densities to obtain a complete description of solar wind fluctuations.

  17. Solar cycle dependence of scaling in solar wind fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.; Kiyani, K.

    2008-06-01

    In this review we collate recent results for the statistical scaling properties of fluctuations in the solar wind with a view to synthesizing two descriptions: that of evolving MHD turbulence and that of a scaling signature of coronal origin that passively propagates with the solar wind. The scenario that emerges is that of coexistent signatures which map onto the well known "two component" picture of solar wind magnetic fluctuations. This highlights the need to consider quantities which track Alfvénic fluctuations, and energy and momentum flux densities to obtain a complete description of solar wind fluctuations.

  18. Genesis Solar Wind Science Canister Components Curated as Potential Solar Wind Collectors and Reference Contamination Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind for 27 months at Earth-Sun L1 on both passive and active collectors carried inside of a Science Canister, which was cleaned and assembled in an ISO Class 4 cleanroom prior to launch. The primary passive collectors, 271 individual hexagons and 30 half-hexagons of semiconductor materials, are described in. Since the hard landing reduced the 301 passive collectors to many thousand smaller fragments, characterization and posting in the online catalog remains a work in progress, with about 19% of the total area characterized to date. Other passive collectors, surfaces of opportunity, have been added to the online catalog. For species needing to be concentrated for precise measurement (e.g. oxygen and nitrogen isotopes) an energy-independent parabolic ion mirror focused ions onto a 6.2 cm diameter target. The target materials, as recovered after landing, are described in. The online catalog of these solar wind collectors, a work in progress, can be found at: http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/gencatalog/index.cfm This paper describes the next step, the cataloging of pieces of the Science Canister, which were surfaces exposed to the solar wind or component materials adjacent to solar wind collectors which may have contributed contamination.

  19. Portable Hybrid Powered Water Filtration Device

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maria Lourdes V. Balansay; Mary Rose Q. Añonuevo; Rexzel M. Cuenca; Ricmart V. Garbin

    2015-01-01

    .... The design of the portable hybrid powered water filtration device shows that the project has more advanced features such as portability and the power supply used such as photovoltaic module solar...

  20. Multifractality and intermittency in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Macek

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the complex dynamics of the solar wind's fluctuating plasma parameters, there is a detectable, hidden order described by a chaotic strange attractor which has a multifractal structure. The multifractal spectrum has been investigated using Voyager (magnetic field data in the outer heliosphere and using Helios (plasma data in the inner heliosphere. We have also analyzed the spectrum for the solar wind attractor. The spectrum is found to be consistent with that for the multifractal measure of the self-similar one-scale weighted Cantor set with two parameters describing uniform compression and natural invariant probability measure of the attractor of the system. In order to further quantify the multifractality, we also consider a generalized weighted Cantor set with two different scales describing nonuniform compression. We investigate the resulting multifractal spectrum depending on two scaling parameters and one probability measure parameter, especially for asymmetric scaling. We hope that this generalized model will also be a useful tool for analysis of intermittent turbulence in space plasmas.

  1. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Osman, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters. PMID:25848082

  2. Hybrid2 - The hybrid power system simulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, E.I.; Green, H.J.; Dijk, V.A.P. van [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Manwell, J.F. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    There is a large-scale need and desire for energy in remote communities, especially in the developing world; however the lack of a user friendly, flexible performance prediction model for hybrid power systems incorporating renewables hindered the analysis of hybrids as options to conventional solutions. A user friendly model was needed with the versatility to simulate the many system locations, widely varying hardware configurations, and differing control options for potential hybrid power systems. To meet these ends, researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the University of Massachusetts (UMass) developed the Hybrid2 software. This paper provides an overview of the capabilities, features, and functionality of the Hybrid2 code, discusses its validation and future plans. Model availability and technical support provided to Hybrid2 users are also discussed. 12 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. NEW MODEL OF A SOLAR WIND AIRPLANE FOR GEOMATIC OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Achachi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability for an aircraft to fly during a much extended period of time has become a key issue and a target of research, both in the domain of civilian aviation and unmanned aerial vehicles. This paper describes a new design and evaluating of solar wind aircraft with the objective to assess the impact of a new system design on overall flight crew performance. The required endurance is in the range of some hours in the case of law enforcement, border surveillance, forest fire fighting or power line inspection. However, other applications at high altitudes, such as geomatic operations for delivering geographic information, weather research and forecast, environmental monitoring, would require remaining airborne during days, weeks or even months. The design of GNSS non precision approach procedure for different airports is based on geomatic data.

  4. Energy Cascade Rate in Compressible Fast and Slow Solar Wind Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadid, L. Z.; Sahraoui, F.; Galtier, S., E-mail: lina.hadid@lpp.polytechnique.fr [LPP, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Sud, Observatoire de Paris, Université Paris-Saclay, Sorbonne Universités, PSL Research University, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2017-03-20

    Estimation of the energy cascade rate in the inertial range of solar wind turbulence has been done so far mostly within incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) theory. Here, we go beyond that approximation to include plasma compressibility using a reduced form of a recently derived exact law for compressible, isothermal MHD turbulence. Using in situ data from the THEMIS / ARTEMIS spacecraft in the fast and slow solar wind, we investigate in detail the role of the compressible fluctuations in modifying the energy cascade rate with respect to the prediction of the incompressible MHD model. In particular, we found that the energy cascade rate (1) is amplified particularly in the slow solar wind; (2) exhibits weaker fluctuations in spatial scales, which leads to a broader inertial range than the previous reported ones; (3) has a power-law scaling with the turbulent Mach number; (4) has a lower level of spatial anisotropy. Other features of solar wind turbulence are discussed along with their comparison with previous studies that used incompressible or heuristic (nonexact) compressible MHD models.

  5. Energy Cascade Rate in Compressible Fast and Slow Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, L. Z.; Sahraoui, F.; Galtier, S.

    2017-03-01

    Estimation of the energy cascade rate in the inertial range of solar wind turbulence has been done so far mostly within incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) theory. Here, we go beyond that approximation to include plasma compressibility using a reduced form of a recently derived exact law for compressible, isothermal MHD turbulence. Using in situ data from the THEMIS/ARTEMIS spacecraft in the fast and slow solar wind, we investigate in detail the role of the compressible fluctuations in modifying the energy cascade rate with respect to the prediction of the incompressible MHD model. In particular, we found that the energy cascade rate (1) is amplified particularly in the slow solar wind; (2) exhibits weaker fluctuations in spatial scales, which leads to a broader inertial range than the previous reported ones; (3) has a power-law scaling with the turbulent Mach number; (4) has a lower level of spatial anisotropy. Other features of solar wind turbulence are discussed along with their comparison with previous studies that used incompressible or heuristic (nonexact) compressible MHD models.

  6. Fractional Levy motion as an Alternative Model for Apparent Multiaffinity in Solar Wind Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credgington, D.; Watkins, N. W.; Freeman, M. P.; Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.

    2006-12-01

    One widely used technique in the testing of multifractal theories of turbulence has been the the multiaffinity plot of ζ(q) versus q, where ζ is the exponent of the q^{th} order structure function, provided that has already been found to be a power law. However, it is not obvious that the most economical description of all derived solar wind quantities, for example the Poynting flux or the ɛ function, must also be a multifractal. We have elsewhere argued that it is also instructive to capture the "stylised facts" of the scaling behaviour of auroral indices and solar wind quantities in simpler phenomenological models. To make this idea more concrete we here consider the use of fractional Lévy motion as a model for solar wind time series. fLm has only three parameters, the Lévy exponent μ, the persistence exponent β and the selfsimilarity exponent H which depends additively on the other two. By making the fLm hypothesis we explore how experimentally measured quantities, in particular the growth of variance, the scaling of the first return probability, and the multiaffinity plot depend on the fLm model's parameters. Comparison of these predictions with data is then used to assess the usefulness of fLm as an alternative model for solar wind time series.

  7. Enigmatic Solar Wind Disappearance Events – Do We Understand ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nearly 60 Earth radii, the lunar orbit. The event was so dramatic that it has come to be known as the solar wind disappearance event. Though extensive studies of this event were made by many authors in the past, it has only been recently shown that the unusual solar wind flows char- acterizing this event originated from a ...

  8. Chaos in the solar wind flow near Earth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have done a time series analysis of daily average data of solar wind velocity, density and temperature at 1 AU measured by ACE spacecraft for a period of nine years. We have used the raw data without filtering to give a faithful representation of the nonlinear behaviour of the solar wind flow which is a novel one ...

  9. Magnetosonic Waveguide Model of Solar Wind Flow Tubes A. K. ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We consider solar wind flow tubes as a magnetosonic wave- guide. Assuming a symmetric expansion in edges of slab-modelled wave- guide, we study the propagation characteristics of magnetosonic wave in the solar wind flow tubes. We present the preliminary results and discuss their implications. Key words.

  10. Association Between the Solar Wind Speed, Interplanetary Magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meena Pokharia

    2017-11-27

    Nov 27, 2017 ... Abstract. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the association of the cosmic ray intensity (CRI) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) with high speed solar wind streams (HSSWS) and slow speed solar wind streams (SSSWS) for solar cycle −23 and 24. We have found very interesting and ...

  11. Tomography of the Solar Wind using Interplanetary Scintillation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 21; Issue 3-4. Tomography of the Solar Wind using Interplanetary Scintillation. Divya Oberoi A. Pramesh Rao. Session XI – Solar Wind & Interplanetary Magnetic Fields Volume 21 Issue 3-4 September-December 2000 pp 445-446 ...

  12. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We find a strong association between different parameters of coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also compute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of ...

  13. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole M ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-25

    May 25, 2015 ... coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also com- pute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength. 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and ...

  14. Geo-effectiveness of Solar Wind Extremes Hari Om Vats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    solar wind to the magnetosphere. Rastogi (2001 and references therein) gives a histor- ical background of the geomagnetic activity phenomena and its interesting features. Now it is an established fact that the major mechanism of energy transfer from the solar wind to the Earth's magnetosphere is magnetic reconnection ...

  15. Economics of hybrid photovoltaic power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breyer, Christian

    2012-08-16

    The global power supply stability is faced to several severe and fundamental threats, in particular steadily increasing power demand, diminishing and degrading fossil and nuclear energy resources, very harmful greenhouse gas emissions, significant energy injustice and a structurally misbalanced ecological footprint. Photovoltaic (PV) power systems are analysed in various aspects focusing on economic and technical considerations of supplemental and substitutional power supply to the constraint conventional power system. To infer the most relevant system approach for PV power plants several solar resources available for PV systems are compared. By combining the different solar resources and respective economics, two major PV systems are identified to be very competitive in almost all regions in the world. The experience curve concept is used as a key technique for the development of scenario assumptions on economic projections for the decade of the 2010s. Main drivers for cost reductions in PV systems are learning and production growth rate, thus several relevant aspects are discussed such as research and development investments, technical PV market potential, different PV technologies and the energetic sustainability of PV. Three major market segments for PV systems are identified: off-grid PV solutions, decentralised small scale on-grid PV systems (several kWp) and large scale PV power plants (tens of MWp). Mainly by application of 'grid-parity' and 'fuel-parity' concepts per country, local market and conventional power plant basis, the global economic market potential for all major PV system segments is derived. PV power plant hybridization potential of all relevant power technologies and the global power plant structure are analyzed regarding technical, economical and geographical feasibility. Key success criteria for hybrid PV power plants are discussed and comprehensively analysed for all adequate power plant technologies, i.e. oil, gas and

  16. On ion-cyclotron-resonance heating of the corona and solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marsch

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concisely summarizes and critically reviews recent work by the authors on models of the heating of the solar corona by resonance of ions with high-frequency waves (up to the proton cyclotron frequency. The quasi-linear theory of pitch angle diffusion is presented in connection with relevant solar wind proton observations. Hybrid fluid-kinetic model equations, which include wave-particle interactions and collisions, are derived. Numerical solutions are discussed, representative of the inner corona and near-Sun solar wind. A semi-kinetic model for reduced velocity distributions is presented, yielding kinetic results for heavy ions in the solar corona. It is concluded that a self-consistent treatment of particle distributions and wave spectra is required, in order to adequately describe coronal physics and to obtain agreement with observations.

  17. Spontaneous emission of magnetic field fluctuations in Solar wind-like suprathermal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, R.; Munoz, V.; Araneda, J. A.; Vinas, A. F.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Heavy ions in solar wind have been observed to flow faster than protons, with temperatures exceeding the mass proportionality respect to protons. The identification and explanation of the physical processes responsible for ion heating may provide the key to explain why the temperature of the outer solar atmosphere and expanding corona forming the solar wind is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the photosphere. Possible explanations of the preferential acceleration and heating of ions often involve linear kinetic theory, which allows for a wide number of heavily damped waves (or higher-order modes), which could play a secondary role in the energization of solar wind plasmas. Also, linear theory predicts instability thresholds in the temperature distribution of protons which are consistent with data from the Solar Wind Experiment (SWE). However, it has also been observed that proton velocity distributions appear to be strongly anisotropic, displaying a pronounced non-Maxwellian profile of particles exceeding thermal energies. These velocity distributions are often modeled with a family of specific functional describing both the low-energy Maxwellian core and the high-energy power-law tails, popularly known in the literature as kappa-distributions. Furthermore, short wavelength magnetic fluctuations with small amplitude are present even in the absence of plasma instabilities. These spontaneous fluctuations are intimately linked to the linear response of perturbations via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The various collective modes of fluctuations are constrained by the structure of the higher-order modes determined by the electromagnetic kinetic dispersion relation. In this work, we examine the propagation and excitation of parallel Alfvén-cyclotron waves in a suprathermal proton solar wind-like plasma, as described by a kappa-like distribution function, by taking care of the often ignored higher-order modes which modify the structure of the

  18. Genesis Solar Wind Array Collector Cataloging Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, P.J.; Rodriguez, M.C.; Calaway, M.C.; Allton, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Genesis solar wind array collectors were fractured upon landing hard in Utah in 2004. The fragments were retrieved from the damaged canister, imaged, repackaged and shipped to the Johnson Space Center curatorial facility [1]. As of January 2009, the collection consists of 3460 samples. Of these, 442 are comprised into "multiple" sample groupings, either affixed to adhesive paper (177) or collected in jars (17), culture trays (87), or sets of polystyrene vials (161). A focused characterization task was initiated in May 2008 to document the largest samples in the collection. The task consisted of two goals: to document sapphire based fragments greater than 2 cm in one dimension, and to document silicon based fragments greater than 1 cm in one direction.

  19. Dst Prediction Based on Solar Wind Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Kyung Park

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We reevaluate the Burton equation (Burton et al. 1975 of predicting Dst index using high quality hourly solar wind data supplied by the ACE satellite for the period from 1998 to 2006. Sixty magnetic storms with monotonously decreasing main phase are selected. In order to determine the injection term (Q and the decay time (tau of the equation, we examine the relationships between Dst* and VB_s, Delta Dst* and VB_s, and Delta Dst* and Dst* during the magnetic storms. For this analysis, we take into account one hour of the propagation time from the ACE satellite to the magnetopause, and a half hour of the response time of the magnetosphere/ring current to the solar wind forcing. The injection term is found to be Q({nT}/h=-3.56VB_s for VB_s>0.5mV/m and Q({nT}/h=0 for VB_s leq0.5mV/m. The tau (hour is estimated as 0.060 Dst* + 16.65 for Dst*>-175nT and 6.15 hours for Dst* leq -175nT. Based on these empirical relationships, we predict the 60 magnetic storms and find that the correlation coefficient between the observed and predicted Dst* is 0.88. To evaluate the performance of our prediction scheme, the 60 magnetic storms are predicted again using the models by Burton et al. (1975 and O'Brien & McPherron (2000a. The correlation coefficients thus obtained are 0.85, the same value for both of the two models. In this respect, our model is slightly improved over the other two models as far as the correlation coefficients is concerned. Particularly our model does a better job than the other two models in predicting intense magnetic storms (Dst* lesssim -200nT.

  20. Modeling and Simulation of Renewable Hybrid Power System using Matlab Simulink Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Dragoş Dumitru

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the modeling of a solar-wind-hydroelectric hybrid system in Matlab/Simulink environment. The application is useful for analysis and simulation of a real hybrid solar-wind-hydroelectric system connected to a public grid. Application is built on modular architecture to facilitate easy study of each component module influence. Blocks like wind model, solar model, hydroelectric model, energy conversion and load are implemented and the results of simulation are also presented. As an example, one of the most important studies is the behavior of hybrid system which allows employing renewable and variable in time energy sources while providing a continuous supply. Application represents a useful tool in research activity and also in teaching

  1. Techno-economic analysis of hybrid power system sizing applied to small desalination plants for sustainable operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nagaraj

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Water and energy are two inseparable commodities that govern the lives of humanity and promote civilization. Energy can be used to produce water in case of scarcity in water. Ironically most of the places that are water stressed are also energy stressed. The cost of extending grid power may be prohibitively high in those cases. Rural/remote locations like hills and islands multiply the problem to a larger magnitude. Use of renewable sources like solar, wind, biomass and other locally available energy sources is the only solution. But these renewable sources are of intermittent nature and have poor availability. Hence, it is practically difficult to produce water with a single source of energy. Naturally, combining two or more sources of energy, known as hybrid power system, is the next available option. This paper carries out a techno-economic analysis of various sizing combinations of systems with solar photo voltaic, wind energy and stored energy in batteries for production of drinking water from a brackish water source. The system can operate the RO plant whenever the power is available, produce drinking water and store in a tank. This paper analyses the model of the entire hybrid power system in MATLAB to simulate the performance of the hybrid power system for different combinations of capacities. Results of the analysis under various input conditions are analyzed.

  2. A numerical study of transient, thermally-conductive solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S. M.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient solar wind starting at the solar surface and arriving at 1 AU is performed by an implicit numerical method. The model hydrodynamic equations include thermal conduction terms for both steady and unsteady simulations. Simulation results show significant influence of thermal conduction on both steady and time-dependent solar wind. Higher thermal conduction results in higher solar wind speed, higher temperature, but lower plasma density at 1 AU. Higher base temperature at the solar surface gives lower plasma speed, lower temperature, but higher density at 1 AU. Higher base density, on the other hand, gives lower velocity, lower temperature, but higher density at 1 AU.

  3. Kolmogorov and Irosnikov-Kraichnan scaling in the anisotropic turbulent solar wind

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, S.C.; Hnat, B.

    2006-01-01

    Solar wind turbulence is dominated by Alfv\\'{e}nic fluctuations but the power spectral exponents somewhat surprisingly evolve toward the Kolmogorov value of -5/3, that of hydrodynamic turbulence. We show that at 1AU the turbulence decomposes linearly into two coexistent components perpendicular and parallel to the local average magnetic field. The first of these is consistent with propagating Alfv\\'{e}n wavepackets and shows the scaling expected of Alfv\\'{e}nic turbulence, namely Irosnikov- K...

  4. Quantifying scaling in the velocity field of the anisotropic\\ud turbulent solar wind

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Sandra C.; Hnat, B.

    2007-01-01

    Solar wind turbulence is dominated by Alfvénic fluctuations with power spectral exponents that somewhat surprisingly evolve toward the Kolmogorov value of −5/3, that of hydrodynamic turbulence. We analyze in situ satellite observations at 1AU and show that the turbulence decomposes linearly into two coexistent components perpendicular and parallel to the local average magnetic field and determine their distinct intermittency independent scaling exponents. The first of these is consistent with...

  5. Power surplus in an hybrid desalination plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Eduardo Manfredini [Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados (UFGD), Dourados, MS (Brazil); Balestieri, Jose Antonio Perrela; Zanardi, Mauricio de Araujo [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)], Emails: perrela@feg.unesp.br, mzanardi@feg.unesp.br

    2010-07-01

    Desalination is a process to be considered in the water planning - its use is year by year worldwide and must be considered as an opportunity even for Brazil. Associated to the perspectives of implementing such technology, advances such as integrating energy generation systems to desalination processes in the so-called hybrid systems have been suggested to obtain a more efficient process. The power surplus generated by hybrid technologies is an interesting index to be considered in the context of produced fresh water. In this paper, several gas turbine systems were considered in a hybrid system; the power surplus of these configurations in a Brazilian case is presented and analyzed. (author)

  6. Flight Testing of Hybrid Powered Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, George; Arves, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid Rocket powered vehicles have had a limited number of flights. Most recently in 2004, Scaled Composites had a successful orbital trajectory that put a private vehicle twice to over 62 miles high, the edge of space to win the X-Prize. This endeavor man rates a hybrid system. Hybrids have also been used in a number of one time launch attempts - SET-1, HYSR, HPDP. Hybrids have also been developed for use and flown in target drones. This chapter discusses various flight-test programs that have been conducted, hybrid vehicles that are in development, other hybrid vehicles that have been proposed and some strap-on applications have also been examined.

  7. Nonlinear interaction of proton whistler with kinetic Alfvén wave to study solar wind turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, R.; Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi-110016 (India); Goldstein, M. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Dwivedi, N. K. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute, Schmiedlstrasse 6, 8042 Graz (Austria)

    2013-12-15

    This paper presents the nonlinear interaction between small but finite amplitude kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) and proton whistler wave using two-fluid model in intermediate beta plasma, applicable to solar wind. The nonlinearity is introduced by modification in the background density. This change in density is attributed to the nonlinear ponderomotive force due to KAW. The solutions of the model equations, governing the nonlinear interaction (and its effect on the formation of localized structures), have been obtained using semi-analytical method in solar wind at 1AU. It is concluded that the KAW properties significantly affect the threshold field required for the filament formation and their critical size (for proton whistler). The magnetic and electric field power spectra have been obtained and their relevance with the recent observations of solar wind turbulence by Cluster spacecraft has been pointed out.

  8. The sun, the solar wind, and the heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Miralles, Mari Paz

    2011-01-01

    This volume presents a concise, up-to-date overview of current research on the observations, theoretical interpretations, and empirical and physical descriptions of the Sun, the Solar Wind, and the Heliosphere, from the solar interior outward to the planets.

  9. SAKIGAKE SOLAR WIND EXPERIMENT DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The original dataset was called MST5SOW. It was personally delivered by Dr. Oyama. The sample hardcopy listed the column headings with units for the solar wind...

  10. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Solar Wind Driven Magnetospheric Reconfiguration

    OpenAIRE

    Savov, Eugene

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic disturbances are associated with electric currents as it is well checked at laboratory room scales and described by the Maxwell's equations of electromagnetic field. The analysis of spacecraft observations for more than a quarter of a century failed to provide a self-consistent three-dimensional picture of the solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo generated magnetospheric and ionospheric current systems. The proposed solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) driven reconfi...

  11. Heating of the interstellar medium by the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunc, J. A.; Wu, F. M.; Judge, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The heating of inflowing interstellar gas by the solar wind is calculated. The experimental differential cross sections have been used for calculating electron-H(He) and proton-H(He) elastic scattering rate coefficients. The solar wind is assumed to be a two-component (protons and electrons), steady, spherically symmetric stream moving radially outward, with the inflowing gas following Keplerian trajectories. The spatial distributions of effective temperature increase within interplanetary space have been obtained.

  12. STEREO Observations of Turbulent Solar Wind Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Paul J.; Goetz, Keith; Monson, Steven J.

    2017-04-01

    Studies of solar wind turbulence have heretofore concentrated on Kolmogorov-type studies of the full MHD equations, without regard to the separate modes of the possible solutions. Further understanding of the nonlinear processes of the cascade, and especially transference of wave energy to particles, would seem to depend on more detailed understanding of the waves, their modes and their separate electric and magnetic fields. . A part of the SWAVES experiment on the STEREO spacecraft was designed to study the waves in the dissipation region of the turbulence spectrum. However, compatibility with SECCHI, the optical sensors, required that only monopole antennas could be accommodated, and these respond both to electric fields and to density fluctuations. This seemed to require that one measure four quantities with only three signals. After several years, the response of the antennas to density fluctuations was reduced, due to changes in photoemission coefficients, and measurement of separate electric fields became possible. It is found that sometimes there are short periods when a sinusoidal waveform appears which seems sufficiently pure to represent a single mode. Results of study of the fields of such waves will be presented.

  13. Intermittent structures at ion scales in the turbulent solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Denise; Alexandrova, Olga; Lion, Sonny; Roberts, Owen W.; Maksimovic, Milan; Escoubet, Philippe C.; Zouganelis, Yannis

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the physical mechanisms of dissipation, and the related heating, in turbulent collisionless plasmas (such as the solar wind) represents nowadays one of the key issues of plasma physics. Although the complex behavior of the solar wind has been matter of investigation of many years, some of the primary problems still remain a puzzle for the scientific community. Here, we study coherent structures responsible for solar wind intermittency around ion characteristic scales. We find that, in fast solar wind, intermittency is due to current sheets and Alfvén vortex-like structures. In slow solar wind, we observe as well compressive structures like magnetic solitons, holes and shocks. By using high-time resolution magnetic field data of multi-point measurements of Cluster spacecraft, we characterize the observed coherent structures in terms of topology and propagation speed. We show that all structures, both in fast and slow solar wind, are characterized by a strong wave-vector anisotropy in the perpendicular direction with respect to the local magnetic field and typical scales around ion characteristic scales. Moreover, some of them propagate in the plasma rest frame. Moreover, a further analysis on the ion velocity distribution shows a high variability; in particular, close to coherent structures the proton distribution function appears strongly deformed and far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. We discuss possible interpretation of the observed structures and their role in the heating process of the plasma.

  14. Charge States of Krypton and Xenon in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochsler, Peter; Fludra, Andrzej; Giunta, Alessandra

    2017-09-01

    We calculate charge state distributions of Kr and Xe in a model for two different types of solar wind using the effective ionization and recombination rates provided from the OPEN_ADAS data base. The charge states of heavy elements in the solar wind are essential for estimating the efficiency of Coulomb drag in the inner corona. We find that xenon ions experience particularly low Coulomb drag from protons in the inner corona, comparable to the notoriously weak drag of protons on helium ions. It has been found long ago that helium in the solar wind can be strongly depleted near interplanetary current sheets, whereas coronal mass ejecta are sometimes strongly enriched in helium. We argue that if the extraordinary variability of the helium abundance in the solar wind is due to inefficient Coulomb drag, the xenon abundance must vary strongly. In fact, a secular decrease of the solar wind xenon abundance relative to the other heavier noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) has been postulated based on a comparison of noble gases in recently irradiated and ancient samples of ilmenite in the lunar regolith. We conclude that decreasing solar activity and decreasing frequency of coronal mass ejections over the solar lifetime might be responsible for a secularly decreasing abundance of xenon in the solar wind.

  15. High-Speed Solar Wind and Geomagnetic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olyak, M. R.

    2015-03-01

    The impact of high-speed solar wind disturbances on the occurrence of geomagnetic storms is analyzed. The solar wind velocity values, determined from scintillation observations at the UTR-2 and URAN-2 Ukrainian decameter radio telescopes are analyzed together with the solar wind parameters at the Earth’s orbit and geomagnetic indices Ap. The solar wind velocity increase during observations was chiefly caused by the high-speed streams from coronal holes. At the time of February 2011, the X-class solar flare, accompanied by coronal mass ejections, was also observed. It was found that the geomagnetic disturbances of that period occurred at negative daily values of the interplanetary magnetic field component being perpendicular to the ecliptic plane. It was shown that the increasing solar wind velocity observed with the UTR-2 and URAN-2 within a wide range of helio- latitudes leads to increase in geomagnetic index Ap and to geomagnetic disturbance. Whereas the increase of solar wind velocity in a narrow range of helio-latitudes near to the ecliptic plane was never accompanied by geomagnetic perturbations.

  16. Simulation of hybrid solar power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, Simon; Dersch, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    Hybrid solar power plants have the potential to combine advantages of two different technologies at the cost of increased complexity. The present paper shows the potential of the software greenius for the techno-economic evaluation of hybrid solar power plants and discusses two exemplary scenarios. Depreciated Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants based on trough technology can be retrofitted with solar towers in order to reach higher steam cycle temperatures and hence efficiencies. Compared to a newly built tower plant the hybridization of a depreciated trough plant causes about 30% lower LCOE reaching 104 /MWh. The second hybrid scenario combines cost-efficient photovoltaics with dispatchable CSP technology. This hybrid plant offers very high capacity factors up to 69% based on 100% load from 8am to 11pm. The LCOE of the hybrid plant are only slightly lower (174 vs. 186 /MWh) compared to the pure CSP plant because the capital expenditure for thermal storage and power block remains the same while the electricity output is much lower.

  17. Solar wind turbulence at 0.72 AU and solar minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Teodorescu, Eliza; Munteanu, Costel; Zhang, Tielong; Bruno, Roberto; Kovacs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We investigate Venus Express (VEX) observations of magnetic field fluctuations performed systematically in the solar wind at 0.72 Astronomical Units (AU), between 2007 and 2009, during the deep minimum of the solar cycle 24. The Power Spectral Densities (PSD) of the magnetic field components have been computed for the time intervals that satisfy data integrity criteria and have been grouped according to the type of wind, fast and slow defined for speeds larger and respectively smaller than 450 km/s. The PSDs show higher levels of power for the fast than for the slow wind. The spectral slopes estimated for all PSDs in the frequency range 0.005-0.1 Hz exhibit a normal distribution. The average value of the trace of the spectral matrix is -1.60 for fast solar wind and -1.65 for slow wind. Compared to the corresponding average slopes at 1 AU, the PSDs are shallower at 0.72 AU for slow wind conditions suggesting a steepening of the solar wind spectra between Venus and Earth. No significant time variation trend is ...

  18. Modular supervisory controller for hybrid power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos Pereira, A. de

    2000-06-01

    The power supply of remote places has been commonly provided by thermal power plants, usually diesel generators. Although hybrid power systems may constitute the most economical solution in many applications their widespread application to the electrification schemes of remote areas still depends on improvements in the issues of design and operation control. The main limitations of the present hybrid power systems technology, which are identified in this work, are related to the control and supervision of the power system. Therefore this thesis focuses on the modularity of supervisory controllers in order to design cost-competitive and reliable hybrid power systems. The modular supervisory controller created in this project is considered an important part of a system design approach that aims to overcome the technical difficulties of the current engineering practice and contribute to open the market of hybrid power systems. The term modular refers to a set of design characteristics that allows the use of basically the same supervisory controller in different projects. The modularization and standardisation of the controller include several issues such as interfacing components, communication protocols, modelling, programming and control strategies. The modularity can reduce the highly specialised system engineering related to the integration of components, operation and control. It can also avoid the high costs for installation, service and maintenance. A modular algorithm for supervisory controllers has been developed (a Matlab program called SuperCon) using an object-oriented design and it has been tested through several simulations using different hybrid system configurations and different control strategies. This thesis presents a complete control system design process which can be used as the basis for the development and implementation of intelligent and autonomous supervisory controllers for hybrid power systems with modular characteristics. (au)

  19. Decay of Solar Wind Turbulence behind Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitňa, Alexander; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdeněk; Franci, Luca

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the decay of magnetic and kinetic energies behind IP shocks with motivation to find a relaxation time when downstream turbulence reaches a usual solar wind value. We start with a case study that introduces computation techniques and quantifies a contribution of kinetic fluctuations to the general energy balance. This part of the study is based on high-time (31 ms) resolution plasma data provided by the Spektr-R spacecraft. On the other hand, a statistical part is based on 92 s Wind plasma and magnetic data and its results confirm theoretically established decay laws for kinetic and magnetic energies. We observe the power-law behavior of the energy decay profiles and we estimated the power-law exponents of both kinetic and magnetic energy decay rates as -1.2. We found that the decay of MHD turbulence does not start immediately after the IP shock ramp and we suggest that the proper decay of turbulence begins when a contribution of the kinetic processes becomes negligible. We support this suggestion with a detailed analysis of the decay of turbulence at the kinetic scale.

  20. Chandrayaan-1 results on the solar wind ion - regolith interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, Stas

    Recently several missions (Kaguya, Chandrayaan-1, IBEX) revealed for the first time the complexity of the solar wind ions interaction with the lunar regolith. In this review we focus on the observations performed by the Chandrayaan-1 mission at the Moon but similar interaction processes take place on all airless bodies covered by regolith. Contrary to early assumptions the solar wind ions are not fully absorbed by the regolith but experience strong (10-20% of the impinging flux) backscattering. Only hydrogen was firmly identified. Helium for the helium enriched solar wind was detected only tentatively. The charge - state of the backscattered particles is mainly neutral. The fraction of H (+) varies strongly with the impinging solar wind velocity and constitutes 0.01 - 10% of the total backscattered flux. No H (-) ions were detected. The spectrum of the backscattered hydrogen is best-fitted by a Maxwellian distribution with a temperature of 40 - 160 eV linearly proportional to the solar wind velocity. The spectrum of the backscattered protons is also Maxwellian although shifted to a velocity some what smaller than the solar wind velocity. The scattering function of the neutrals is close to isotropic at large impinging angles (small solar zenith angles) and becomes backward peaked at shallow impinging angles. The scattering function and energy spectra of the backscatters indicate that the solar wind protons experience multiple collisions with surfaces of individual grain when traveling in the inter-grain space. Why the reflection efficiency is so high in this case is a puzzle. The solar wind also causes sputtering of elements composing the regolith minerals. Only sputtered oxygen was identified although at levels lower than expected. Chandrayaan-1 results on the solar wind ion - regolith interaction still remain to be explained. The orbital measurements should be complemented by measurements from landers revealing the “ground true”. Further studies of the

  1. A low-mass faraday cup experiment for the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, A. J.; Steinberg, J. T.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    Faraday cups have proven to be very reliable and accurate instruments capable of making 3-D velocity distribution measurements on spinning or 3-axis stabilized spacecraft. Faraday cup instrumentation continues to be appropriate for heliospheric missions. As an example, the reductions in mass possible relative to the solar wind detection system about to be flown on the WIND spacecraft were estimated. Through the use of technology developed or used at the MIT Center for Space Research but were not able to utilize for WIND: surface-mount packaging, field-programmable gate arrays, an optically-switched high voltage supply, and an integrated-circuit power converter, it was estimated that the mass of the Faraday Cup system could be reduced from 5 kg to 1.8 kg. Further redesign of the electronics incorporating hybrid integrated circuits as well as a decrease in the sensor size, with a corresponding increase in measurement cycle time, could lead to a significantly lower mass for other mission applications. Reduction in mass of the entire spacecraft-experiment system is critically dependent on early and continual collaborative efforts between the spacecraft engineers and the experimenters. Those efforts concern a range of issues from spacecraft structure to data systems to the spacecraft power voltage levels. Requirements for flight qualification affect use of newer, lighter electronics packaging and its implementation; the issue of quality assurance needs to be specifically addressed. Lower cost and reduced mass can best be achieved through the efforts of a relatively small group dedicated to the success of the mission. Such a group needs a fixed budget and greater control over quality assurance requirements, together with a reasonable oversight mechanism.

  2. A low-mass faraday cup experiment for the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, A. J.; Steinberg, J. T.; Mcnutt, R. L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Faraday cups have proven to be very reliable and accurate instruments capable of making 3-D velocity distribution measurements on spinning or 3-axis stabilized spacecraft. Faraday cup instrumentation continues to be appropriate for heliospheric missions. As an example, the reductions in mass possible relative to the solar wind detection system about to be flown on the WIND spacecraft were estimated. Through the use of technology developed or used at the MIT Center for Space Research but were not able to utilize for WIND: surface-mount packaging, field-programmable gate arrays, an optically-switched high voltage supply, and an integrated-circuit power converter, it was estimated that the mass of the Faraday Cup system could be reduced from 5 kg to 1.8 kg. Further redesign of the electronics incorporating hybrid integrated circuits as well as a decrease in the sensor size, with a corresponding increase in measurement cycle time, could lead to a significantly lower mass for other mission applications. Reduction in mass of the entire spacecraft-experiment system is critically dependent on early and continual collaborative efforts between the spacecraft engineers and the experimenters. Those efforts concern a range of issues from spacecraft structure to data systems to the spacecraft power voltage levels. Requirements for flight qualification affect use of newer, lighter electronics packaging and its implementation; the issue of quality assurance needs to be specifically addressed. Lower cost and reduced mass can best be achieved through the efforts of a relatively small group dedicated to the success of the mission. Such a group needs a fixed budget and greater control over quality assurance requirements, together with a reasonable oversight mechanism.

  3. Fluctuations in the solar wind that show scaling- MHD turbulence and coronal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S. C.; Kiyani, K. H.; Hnat, B.; Nicol, R. M.; Wicks, R.

    2008-12-01

    In- situ spacecraft observations of plasma parameters are at minute (or below) resolution for intervals spanning the solar cycle and provide a large number of samples for statistical studies. These observations reveal that the power spectrum of the components of magnetic field typically has two characteristic features, an inertial range of turbulence over several orders of magnitude with approximately Kolmogorov power law and at lower frequencies, an approximately '1/f' energy containing range believed to be of direct coronal origin. On the other hand, the (much lower energy density) magnetic field magnitude power spectrum typically shows a single scaling range that spans these timescales. This is consistent with the idea that the power seen in the components, but not necessarily the magnitude, of magnetic field is dominated by Alfvenic turbulence in the evolving solar wind. Here, we use quantitative statistical techniques to explore the idea that the solar wind exhibits fluctuations over a broad range of timescales characteristic of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence evolving in the presence of structures of direct coronal origin. We find a strong correlation between the solar cycle variation in the scaling properties of magnetic energy density fluctuations and the magnetic complexity of the coronal magnetic fields. At solar maximum in the ecliptic, the magnetic energy density as seen by WIND and ACE shows a fractal signature, whereas at minimum it is multifractal. This is corroborated by ULLYSES polar observations at solar minimum in quiet, fast solar wind where again, multifractal scaling is found. High magnetic complexity in the corona then corresponds to fractal, rather than multifractal scaling in magnetic energy density seen at 1AU; remarkably, this fractal signature dominates the full dynamic range of observations, extending across timescales typically identified with both the '1/f' and 'inertial range'. Intervals when WIND and ACE simultaneously sample

  4. The magnetosphere under weak solar wind forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Farrugia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere was very strongly disturbed during the passage of the strong shock and the following interacting ejecta on 21–25 October 2001. These disturbances included two intense storms (Dst*≈−250 and −180 nT, respectively. The cessation of this activity at the start of 24 October ushered in a peculiar state of the magnetosphere which lasted for about 28 h and which we discuss in this paper. The interplanetary field was dominated by the sunward component [B=(4.29±0.77, −0.30±0.71, 0.49±0.45 nT]. We analyze global indicators of geomagnetic disturbances, polar cap precipitation, ground magnetometer records, and ionospheric convection as obtained from SuperDARN radars. The state of the magnetosphere is characterized by the following features: (i generally weak and patchy (in time low-latitude dayside reconnection or reconnection poleward of the cusps; (ii absence of substorms; (iii a monotonic recovery from the previous storm activity (Dst corrected for magnetopause currents decreasing from ~−65 to ~−35 nT, giving an unforced decreased of ~1.1 nT/h; (iv the probable absence of viscous-type interaction originating from the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability; (v a cross-polar cap potential of just 20–30 kV; (vi a persistent, polar cap region containing (vii very weak, and sometimes absent, electron precipitation and no systematic inter-hemisphere asymmetry. Whereas we therefore infer the presence of a moderate amount of open flux, the convection is generally weak and patchy, which we ascribe to the lack of solar wind driver. This magnetospheric state approaches that predicted by Cowley and Lockwood (1992 but has never yet been observed.

  5. The magnetosphere under weak solar wind forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Farrugia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere was very strongly disturbed during the passage of the strong shock and the following interacting ejecta on 21–25 October 2001. These disturbances included two intense storms (Dst*≈−250 and −180 nT, respectively. The cessation of this activity at the start of 24 October ushered in a peculiar state of the magnetosphere which lasted for about 28 h and which we discuss in this paper. The interplanetary field was dominated by the sunward component [B=(4.29±0.77, −0.30±0.71, 0.49±0.45 nT]. We analyze global indicators of geomagnetic disturbances, polar cap precipitation, ground magnetometer records, and ionospheric convection as obtained from SuperDARN radars. The state of the magnetosphere is characterized by the following features: (i generally weak and patchy (in time low-latitude dayside reconnection or reconnection poleward of the cusps; (ii absence of substorms; (iii a monotonic recovery from the previous storm activity (Dst corrected for magnetopause currents decreasing from ~−65 to ~−35 nT, giving an unforced decreased of ~1.1 nT/h; (iv the probable absence of viscous-type interaction originating from the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability; (v a cross-polar cap potential of just 20–30 kV; (vi a persistent, polar cap region containing (vii very weak, and sometimes absent, electron precipitation and no systematic inter-hemisphere asymmetry. Whereas we therefore infer the presence of a moderate amount of open flux, the convection is generally weak and patchy, which we ascribe to the lack of solar wind driver. This magnetospheric state approaches that predicted by Cowley and Lockwood (1992 but has never yet been observed.

  6. A Coupling Function Linking Solar Wind /IMF Variations and Geomagnetic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyatsky, W.; Lyatskaya, S.; Tan, A.

    2006-12-01

    From a theoretical consideration we have obtained expressions for the coupling function linking solar wind and IMF parameters to geomagnetic activity. While deriving these expressions, we took into account (1) a scaling factor due to polar cap expansion while increasing a reconnected magnetic flux in the dayside magnetosphere, and (2) a modified Akasofu function for the reconnected flux for combined IMF Bz and By components. The resulting coupling function may be written as Fa = aVsw B^1/2 sina (q/2), where Vsw is the solar wind speed, B^ is the magnitude of the IMF vector in the Y-Z plane, q is the clock angle between the Z axis and IMF vector in the Y-Z plane, a is a coefficient, and the exponent, a, is derived from the experimental data and equals approximately to 2. The Fa function differs primary by the power of B^ from coupling functions proposed earlier. For testing the obtained coupling function, we used solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data for four years for maximum and minimum solar activity. We computed 2-D contour plots for correlation coefficients for the dependence of geomagnetic activity indices on solar wind parameters for different coupling functions. The obtained diagrams showed a good correspondence to the theoretic coupling function Fa for a »2. The maximum correlation coefficient for the dependence of the polar cap PC index on the Fa coupling function is significantly higher than that computed for other coupling functions used researchers, for the same time intervals.

  7. Electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the proton cyclotron frequency in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Lan K.; Boardsen, Scott; Moya, Pablo; Stevens, Michael; Alexander, Robert; Vinas, Adolfo

    2015-04-01

    Strong narrow-band electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency (fpc) have been found sporadically in the solar wind from 0.3 to 0.7 AU during MESSENGER spacecraft’s cruise phase. These waves are transverse and circularly polarized, and they propagate in directions quasi-parallel to the magnetic field. The wave power decreases quadratically with heliocentric distance, faster than the trend if assuming the conservation of Poynting flux for wave packets, suggesting there is energy dissipation from the waves, which could contribute to the heating and acceleration of solar wind plasma. Although the wave frequency is a few times of fpc in the spacecraft frame, it is a fraction of fpc in the solar wind plasma frame after removing the Doppler shift effect. In this frequency range, the waves can be left-hand (LH) polarized ion cyclotron waves or right-hand (RH) polarized magnetosonic waves. Because the waves are LH or RH polarized in the spacecraft frame with otherwise nearly identical characteristics, they could be due to Doppler shift of a same type of waves or a mixture of waves with intrinsically different polarizations. Through the assistance of audification, we have studied the long-lasting wave events in 2005 using high-cadence magnetic field data from the Wind mission. Statistically, in contrast with general solar wind, the protons at these waves are distributed closer to the proton instability thresholds, while the alpha particles at these waves are distributed further away from the alpha instability thresholds. For selected events of extensive waves, the ion distribution is analyzed in detail. A mixture of temperature anisotropies for core protons, beam protons, and alpha particles, as well as proton beam drift are often found in such events. We conduct linear wave dispersion analysis using these ion moments to examine whether these waves can be explained by the local generation of kinetic instabilities such as the LH ion cyclotron, the RH

  8. Solar Wind Sputtering Rates of Small Bodies and Ion Mass Spectrometry Detection of Secondary Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, M. J.; Dukes, C. A.; Hutcherson, A. C.; Lee, P.; Collier, M. R.; Johnson, R. E.

    2017-10-01

    Solar wind interactions with the surfaces of asteroids and small moons eject atoms and molecules from the uppermost several nanometers of regolith grains through a process called sputtering. A small fraction of the sputtered species, called secondary ions, leave the surface in an ionized state, and these are diagnostic of the surface composition. Detection of secondary ions using ion mass spectrometry (IMS) provides a powerful method of analysis due to low backgrounds and high instrument sensitivities. However, the sputtered secondary ion yield and the atomic composition of the surface are not 1-to-1 correlated. Thus, relative yield fractions based on experimental measurements are needed to convert measured spectra to surface composition. Here available experimental results are combined with computationally derived solar wind sputtering yields to estimate secondary ion fluxes from asteroid-sized bodies in the solar system. The Monte Carlo simulation code SDTrimSP is used to estimate the total sputtering yield due to solar wind ion bombardment for a diverse suite of meteorite and lunar soil compositions. Experimentally measured relative secondary ion yields are analyzed to determine the abundance of refractory species (Mg+, Al+, Ca+, and Fe+) relative to Si+, and it is shown that relative abundances indicate whether a body is primitive or has undergone significant geologic reprocessing. Finally, estimates of the sputtered secondary ion fluxes are used to determine the IMS sensitivity required to adequately resolve major element ratios for nominal orbital geometries.

  9. Hybrid Power Management for Office Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingade, Ganesh P.

    Office machines (such as printers, scanners, fax, and copiers) can consume significant amounts of power. Few studies have been devoted to power management of office equipment. Most office machines have sleep modes to save power. Power management of these machines are usually timeout-based: a machine sleeps after being idle long enough. Setting the timeout duration can be difficult: if it is too long, the machine wastes power during idleness. If it is too short, the machine sleeps too soon and too often--the wakeup delay can significantly degrade productivity. Thus, power management is a tradeoff between saving energy and keeping short response time. Many power management policies have been published and one policy may outperform another in some scenarios. There is no definite conclusion which policy is always better. This thesis describes two methods for office equipment power management. The first method adaptively reduces power based on a constraint of the wakeup delay. The second method is a hybrid with multiple candidate policies and it selects the most appropriate power management policy. Using six months of request traces from 18 different offices, we demonstrate that the hybrid policy outperforms individual policies. We also discover that power management based on business hours does not produce consistent energy savings.

  10. Techno-economical Analysis of Hybrid PV-WT-Hydrogen FC System for a Residential Building with Low Power Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badea G.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a techno-economical analysis on performance indicators of hybrid solar-wind-hydrogen power generation system which supply with electricity a low - energy building, located in Cluj-Napoca. The case study had the main objectives, as follows: cost estimation, evaluation of energy and environmental performance for a fuel cell integrated into a small-scale hybrid system power generation and estimation of electrolytic hydrogen production based on renewable energy resources available on the proposed site. The results presented in this paper illustrate a case study for location Cluj-Napoca. The wind and solar resource can play an important role in energy needs for periods with "peak load" or intermittent energy supply. However, hydrogen production is dependent directly proportional to the availability of renewable energy resources, but the hydrogen can be considered as a storage medium for these renewable resources. It can be said that this study is a small-scale model analysis, a starting point for a detailed analysis of Romania's potential electrolytic production of hydrogen from renewable resources and supply electricity using fuel cells integrated into hybrid energy systems.

  11. A survey of solar wind conditions at 5 AU: A tool for interpreting solar wind-magnetosphere interactions at Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wilkes Ebert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examine Ulysses solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF observations at 5 AU for two ~13 month intervals during the rising and declining phases of solar cycle 23 and the predicted response of the Jovian magnetosphere during these times. The declining phase solar wind, composed primarily of corotating interaction regions and high-speed streams, was, on average, faster, hotter, less dense, and more Alfvénic relative to the rising phase solar wind, composed mainly of slow wind and interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Interestingly, none of solar wind and IMF distributions reported here were bimodal, a feature used to explain the bimodal distribution of bow shock and magnetopause standoff distances observed at Jupiter. Instead, many of these distributions had extended, non-Gaussian tails that resulted in large standard deviations and much larger mean over median values. The distribution of predicted Jupiter bow shock and magnetopause standoff distances during these intervals were also not bimodal, the mean/median values being larger during the declining phase by ~1 – 4%. These results provide data-derived solar wind and IMF boundary conditions at 5 AU for models aimed at studying solar wind-magnetosphere interactions at Jupiter and can support the science investigations of upcoming Jupiter system missions. Here, we provide expectations for Juno, which is scheduled to arrive at Jupiter in July 2016. Accounting for the long-term decline in solar wind dynamic pressure reported by McComas et al. (2013, Jupiter’s bow shock and magnetopause is expected to be at least 8 – 12% further from Jupiter, if these trends continue.

  12. Scaling and singularity characteristics of solar wind and magnetospheric fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vörös

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary results are presented which suggest that scaling and singularity characteristics of solar wind and ground-based magnetic fluctuations appear to be a significant component in the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction processes. Of key importance is the intermittence of the "magnetic turbulence" as seen in ground-based and solar wind magnetic data. The methods used in this paper (estimation of flatness and multifractal spectra are commonly used in the studies of fluid or MHD turbulence. The results show that single observatory characteristics of magnetic fluctuations are different from those of the multi-observatory AE-index. In both data sets, however, the influence of the solar wind fluctuations is recognizable. The correlation between the scaling/singularity features of solar wind magnetic fluctuations and the corresponding geomagnetic response is demonstrated in a number of cases. The results are also discussed in terms of patchy reconnection processes in the magnetopause and forced and/or self-organized criticality (F/SOC of internal magnetosphere dynamics.

  13. Simulating and cataloguing the background solar wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rui; Rouillard, Alexis; Odstrcil, Dusan; Mays, Leila

    2017-04-01

    I will present a new series of solar wind simulations used to build a catalogue of the background solar wind from the surface of the Sun to 1 AU. We used a new solar wind model, called MULTI-VP, which takes a coronal magnetic field map as input and calculates the dynamical and thermal properties of the solar wind from the chromosphere up to about 30 Rsun. MULTI-VP supplies the full set of physical inner boundary conditions required to initiate the model ENLIL, which was then used to calculate the properties of the wind flow in the heliosphere (from 21.5 Rsun to 1AU). This combined modelling strategy does not rely on semi-empirical assumptions for the state of the solar wind at the high corona, and provides new estimates of the state of the background wind which are based only on physical principles. MULTI-VP was initiated using Potential Field Source-Surface extrapolations from WSO synoptic maps covering several Carrington rotations both at solar minimum and at solar maximum (CR 2055 - 2079 and CR 2130 - 2149; see https://stormsweb.irap.omp.eu/doku.php?id=windmaptable). Our solutions were calibrated against in-situ measurements of different spacecrafts, white-light J-Maps and coronal/heliospheric imagery in order to provide better predictions than the classical methods. These wind solution will be available as HELCATS catalogues (http://www.helcats-fp7.eu/).

  14. Observing and quantifying the solar wind signature of the magnetically complex corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Kiyani, K. H.; Nicol, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    The solar wind exhibits fluctuations over a broad range of timescales characteristic of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence evolving in the presence of structures of coronal origin. In- situ spacecraft observations of plasma parameters are at minute (or below) resolution for intervals spanning the solar cycle and provide a large number of samples for statistical studies. The magnetic field power spectrum typically has two characteristic components, an inertial range of turbulence over several orders of magnitude with approximately Kolmogorov power law and at lower frequencies, an approximately '1/f' energy containing range believed to be of direct coronal origin. We focus on the behaviour of in- situ observations of fluctuations in the inner heliosphere as a function of solar cycle and solar wind speed; that is, with respect to coronal structure and dynamics. We employ a recently developed technique that sensitively distinguishes between fractal and multifractal scaling in the timeseries. Our working hypothesis is that since the latter can be characteristic of local MHD turbulence, the former maps more directly to features of coronal origin. We find a strong correlation between the scaling properties of magnetic energy density fluctuations and the magnetic complexity of the coronal magnetic fields. At solar maximum in the ecliptic, where the in- situ observations can be dominated by slow solar wind, the magnetic energy density as seen by WIND and ACE shows a fractal signature, whereas at minimum it is multifractal. This is corroborated by ULLYSES polar observations at solar minimum in quiet, fast solar wind where again, multifractal scaling is found. This high magnetic complexity in the corona corresponds to fractal, rather than multifractal scaling in magnetic energy density; remarkably, this fractal signature dominates the full dynamic range of observations, extending across timescales typically identified with both the '1/f' and 'inertial range'. The

  15. A hybrid solar photovoltaic-wind turbine-Rankine cycle for electricity generation in Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Asumadu-Sarkodie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an energy demand model by designing a hybrid solar-wind-thermal power generation system of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, a promising substitute for the expensive battery banks. The study models the future energy demand of Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus based on the IPCC emissions scenario A1B and A2 by designing a new hybrid solar-wind-thermal power system that satisfies the current and future requirements of firm capacity during peak periods. The study suggests an improvement in a hybrid solar-wind-thermal power system performance by predicting reliable outputs that can integrate renewable energy technologies to conventional power generation. The energy consumption prediction model emphasizes the energy requirement that has a growing demand from 300 to 400 GWh in scenario A1B and 150–450 GWh in scenario A2 from 2010 to 2050. The proposed design can meet 400 GWh of electricity demand in TRNC based on IPCC scenario A1B and 450 GWh of electricity demand in TRNC based on IPCC scenario A2. The percentage contribution of solar, wind and thermal energy for 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040 and 2050 are presented along with CO2 emissions and water consumption for each of the years.

  16. Interplanetary shock waves and the structure of solar wind disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhausen, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of interplanetary shock waves are reviewed, with emphasis on the large-scale characteristics of the associated solar wind disturbances and on the relationship of these disturbances to solar activity. The sum of observational knowledge indicates that shock waves propagate through the solar wind along a broad, roughly spherical front, ahead of plasma and magnetic field ejected from solar flares. Typically, the shock front reaches 1 AU about two days after its flare origin, and is of intermediate strength. Not all large flares produce observable interplanetary shock waves; the best indicator of shock production appears to be the generation of both type 2 and type 4 radio bursts by a flare. Theoretical models of shock propagation in the solar wind can account for the typically observed shock strength, transit time, and shape.

  17. The Character of the Solar Wind, Surface Interactions, and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the key characteristics of the proton-rich solar wind and describe how it may interact with the lunar surface. We suggest that solar wind can be both a source and loss of water/OH related volatiles, and review models showing both possibilities. Energy from the Sun in the form of radiation and solar wind plasma are in constant interaction with the lunar surface. As such, there is a solar-lunar energy connection, where solar energy and matter are continually bombarding the lunar surface, acting at the largest scale to erode the surface at 0.2 Angstroms per year via ion sputtering [1]. Figure 1 illustrates this dynamically Sun-Moon system.

  18. Intermittency and local heating in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Rappazzo, A F

    2012-06-29

    Evidence for nonuniform heating in the solar wind plasma near current sheets dynamically generated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is obtained using measurements from the ACE spacecraft. These coherent structures only constitute 19% of the data, but contribute 50% of the total plasma internal energy. Intermittent heating manifests as elevations in proton temperature near current sheets, resulting in regional heating and temperature enhancements extending over several hours. The number density of non-Gaussian structures is found to be proportional to the mean proton temperature and solar wind speed. These results suggest magnetofluid turbulence drives intermittent dissipation through a hierarchy of coherent structures, which collectively could be a significant source of coronal and solar wind heating.

  19. Self-consistent Castaing distribution of solar wind turbulent fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Sorriso-Valvo, L; Lijoi, L; Perri, S; Carbone, V

    2015-01-01

    The intermittent behavior of solar wind turbulent fluctuations has often been investigated through the modeling of their probability distribution functions (PDFs). Among others, the Castaing model (Castaing et al. 1990) has successfully been used in the past. In this paper, the energy dissipation field of solar wind turbulence has been studied for fast, slow and polar wind samples recorded by Helios 2 and Ulysses spacecraft. The statistical description of the dissipation rate has then be used to remove intermittency through conditioning of the PDFs. Based on such observation, a self-consistent, parameter-free Castaing model is presented. The self-consistent model is tested against experimental PDFs, showing good agreement and supporting the picture of a multifractal energy cascade at the origin of solar wind intermittency.

  20. On density and pressure variations in the solar wind plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Jonson, Martin

    2007-01-01

    A study of ACE solar wind data at lAU, for the period from 1998 to early 2005, was conducted. This was done in order to find sudden solar wind pressure enhancements accounting for plasma transfer through the magnetopause. In order to get information about the extent and orientation of the structures found, a correlation of found events to data from the Wind satellite was done. The enhancements considered are those with a relative increase exceeding unity. These are found by applying a 1-hour ...

  1. Scale-free texture of the fast solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Gogoberidze, G.; Wicks, R. T.

    2011-12-01

    The higher-order statistics of magnetic field magnitude fluctuations in the fast quiet solar wind are quantified systematically, scale by scale. We find a single global non-Gaussian scale-free behavior from minutes to over 5 h. This spans the signature of an inertial range of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and a ˜1/f range in magnetic field components. This global scaling in field magnitude fluctuations is an intrinsic component of the underlying texture of the solar wind and puts a strong constraint on any theory of solar corona and the heliosphere. Intriguingly, the magnetic field and velocity components show scale-dependent dynamic alignment outside of the inertial range.

  2. Numerical simulation of a hybrid CSP/Biomass 5 MWel power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, João; Oliveira, Armando

    2017-06-01

    The fundamental benefit of using renewable energy systems is undeniable since they rely on a source that will not run out. Nevertheless, they strongly depend on meteorological conditions (solar, wind, etc.), leading to uncertainty of instantaneous energy supply and consequently to grid connection issues. An interesting concept is renewable hybridisation. This consists in the strategic combination of different renewable sources in the power generation portfolio by taking advantage of each technology. Hybridisation of concentrating solar power with biomass denotes a powerful way of assuring system stability and reliability. The main advantage is dispatchability through the whole extent of the operating range. Regarding concentrating solar power heat transfer fluid, direct steam generation is one of the most interesting concepts. Nevertheless, it presents itself technical challenges that are mostly related to the two-phase fluid flow in horizontal pipes, as well as the design of an energy storage system. Also, the use of reheat within the turbine is usually indirectly addressed, hindering system efficiency. These challenges can be addressed through hybridisation with biomass. In this paper, a hybrid renewable electricity generation system is presented. The system relies on a combination of solar and biomass sources to drive a 5 MWel steam turbine. System performance is analysed through numerical simulation using Ebsilon professional software. The use of direct reheat in the turbine is addressed. Results show that hybridisation results in an enhancement of system dispatchability and generation stability. Furthermore, hybridisation enhanced the annual solar field and power block efficiencies, and thus the system annual efficiency (from 7.6% to 20%). The use of direct reheat eliminates steam wetness in the last turbine stage and also improves system efficiency.

  3. high power facto high power factor high power factor hybrid rectifier

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    compact and efficient new devices, it noted increase in the number of electrical loads that some kind of electronic ... in electric machines and capacitors,. HIGH POWER FACTOR. HIGH POWER FACTOR HYBRID ...... Auxiliary DC-DC Converter for Hybrid Vehicles ”,. IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics vol. 23, no. 6, pp.

  4. Fuel-Cell-Powered Vehicle with Hybrid Power Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2010-01-01

    Figure 1 depicts a hybrid electric utility vehicle that is powered by hydrogenburning proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells operating in conjunction with a metal hydride hydrogen-storage unit. Unlike conventional hybrid electric vehicles, this vehicle utilizes ultracapacitors, rather than batteries, for storing electric energy. This vehicle is a product of continuing efforts to develop the technological discipline known as hybrid power management (HPM), which is oriented toward integration of diverse electric energy-generating, energy-storing, and energy- consuming devices in optimal configurations. Instances of HPM were reported in five prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, though not explicitly labeled as HPM in the first three articles: "Ultracapacitors Store Energy in a Hybrid Electric Vehicle" (LEW-16876), Vol. 24, No. 4 (April 2000), page 63; "Photovoltaic Power Station With Ultracapacitors for Storage" (LEW- 17177), Vol. 27, No. 8 (August 2003), page 38; "Flasher Powered by Photovoltaic Cells and Ultracapacitors" (LEW-17246), Vol. 27, No. 10 (October 2003), page 37; "Hybrid Power Management" (LEW-17520), Vol. 29, No. 12 (December 2005), page 35; and "Ultracapacitor-Powered Cordless Drill" (LEW-18116-1), Vol. 31, No. 8 (August 2007), page 34. To recapitulate from the cited prior articles: The use of ultracapacitors as energy- storage devices lies at the heart of HPM. An ultracapacitor is an electrochemical energy-storage device, but unlike in a conventional rechargeable electrochemical cell or battery, chemical reactions do not take place during operation. Instead, energy is stored electrostatically at an electrode/electrolyte interface. The capacitance per unit volume of an ultracapacitor is much greater than that of a conventional capacitor because its electrodes have much greater surface area per unit volume and the separation between the electrodes is much smaller.

  5. Knowledge of coronal heating and solar-wind acceleration obtained from observations of the solar wind near 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, M.

    1992-01-01

    Clues to the nature of the mechanisms responsible for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind can be obtained by contrasting the properties of the quasi-stationary and transient states of the solar wind. Substantial differences exist in the proton temperatures and anisotropies, the entropy, the field strength, the Alfvenicity of fluctuations in the field, the distribution of MHD discontinuities, and the helium abundance of the two types of flow. Those differences are displayed as a function of the solar wind speed. Several signals of wave acceleration can be found in the data for quasi-stationary flows. The relatively smooth velocity dependences of proton temperature, helium abundance, and frequency of occurrence of rotational discontinuities suggest that the acceleration mechanisms for flow from coronal holes, coronal streamers, and the quasi-stationary low-speed flows between them may be basically the same, differing only in degree.

  6. Periodicities in solar wind-magnetosphere coupling functions and geomagnetic activity during the past solar cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriyas, T.; Andriyas, S.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we study the solar-terrestrial relation through the wavelet analysis. We report periodicities common between multiple solar wind coupling functions and geomagnetic indices during five solar cycles and also and the strength of this correspondence. The Dst (found to be most predictable in Newell et al., J. Geophys. Res. Space Phys. 112(A1):A01206, 2007) and AL (least predictable in Newell et al., J. Geophys. Res. Space Phys. 112(A1):A01206, 2007) indices are used for this purpose. During the years 1966-2016 (which includes five solar cycles 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24), prominent periodicities ≤720 days with power above 95% confidence level were found to occur around 27, 182, 385, and 648 days in the Dst index while those in the AL index were found in bands around 27, 187, and 472 days. Ten solar wind coupling functions were then used to find periodicities common with the indices. All the coupling functions had significant power in bands centered around 27, 280, and 648 days while powers in fluctuations around 182, 385, and 472 days were only found in some coupling functions. All the drivers and their variants had power above the significant level in the 280-288 days band, which was absent in the Dst and AL indices. The normalized scale averaged spectral power around the common periods in the coupling functions and the indices indicated that the coupling functions most correlated with the Dst index were the Newell (27 and 385 days), Wygant (182 days), and Scurry-Russell and Boynton (648 days) functions. An absence of common power between the coupling functions and the Dst index around the annual periodicity was noted during the even solar cycles. A similar analysis for the AL index indicated that Newell (27 days), Rectified (187 days), and Boynton (472 days) were the most correlated functions. It was also found that the correlation numbers were relatively weaker for the AL index, specially for the 187 day periodicity. It is concluded that as the two

  7. Distribution and solar wind control of compressional solar wind-magnetic anomaly interactions observed at the Moon by ARTEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.; Poppe, A. R.; Lue, C.; Farrell, W. M.; McFadden, J. P.

    2017-06-01

    A statistical investigation of 5 years of observations from the two-probe Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) mission reveals that strong compressional interactions occur infrequently at high altitudes near the ecliptic but can form in a wide range of solar wind conditions and can occur up to two lunar radii downstream from the lunar limb. The compressional events, some of which may represent small-scale collisionless shocks ("limb shocks"), occur in both steady and variable interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, with those forming in steady IMF well organized by the location of lunar remanent crustal magnetization. The events observed by ARTEMIS have similarities to ion foreshock phenomena, and those observed in variable IMF conditions may result from either local lunar interactions or distant terrestrial foreshock interactions. Observed velocity deflections associated with compressional events are always outward from the lunar wake, regardless of location and solar wind conditions. However, events for which the observed velocity deflection is parallel to the upstream motional electric field form in distinctly different solar wind conditions and locations than events with antiparallel deflections. Consideration of the momentum transfer between incoming and reflected solar wind populations helps explain the observed characteristics of the different groups of events.Plain Language SummaryWe survey the environment around the Moon to determine when and where strong amplifications in the charged particle density and magnetic field strength occur. These structures may be some of the smallest shock waves in the solar system, and learning about their formation informs us about the interaction of charged particles with small-scale magnetic fields throughout the solar system and beyond. We find that these compressions occur in an extended region downstream from the lunar dawn and dusk regions and

  8. Hybrid power technology for remote military facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, R.N.

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) operates hundreds of test, evaluation, and training facilities across the US and abroad. Due to the nature of their missions, these facilities are often remote and isolated from the utility grid. The preferred choice for power at these facilities has historically been manned diesel generators. The DoD Photovoltaic Review Committee, estimates that on the order of 350 million gallons of diesel fuel is burned each year to generate the 2000 GWh of electricity required to operate these remote military facilities. Other federal agencies, including the National Park Service and the USDA Forest Service use diesel generators for remote power needs as well. The generation of power diesel generators is both expensive and detrimental to the environment. The augmentation of power from diesel generators with power processing and battery energy storage enhances the efficiency and utilization of the generator resulting in lower fuel consumption and lower generator run- time in proportion to the amount of renewables added. The hybrid technology can both reduce the cost of power and reduce environmental degradation at remote DoD facilities. This paper describes the expected performance and economics of photovoltaic/diesel hybrid systems. Capabilities and status of systems now being installed at DoD facilities are presented along with financing mechanisms available within DoD.

  9. Solar Wind Variation with the Cycle I. S. Veselovsky,* A. V. Dmitriev ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Solar wind, energy and mass flux densities during the 20–23 solar cycles. (a) sunspot numbers; (b) solar wind energy flux density St;(c) solar wind mass flux density j. cycles with time scales from days to tens of years. The results of this investigation. (Veselovsky et al. 2000b) show a large manifold of the regular and irregular ...

  10. Analysis of Ion Charge States in Solar Wind and CMEs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We discuss needs in dielectronic recombination data motivated by recent work directed at a quantitative understanding of ion charge states of various elements observed in situ in the solar wind and CMEs. The competing processes of ionization and recombination lead to departures from collision ionization equilibrium.

  11. Astronaut Edwin Aldrin deploying Solar Wind Composition experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, is photographed during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity on the Moon. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with a 70mm lunar surface camera. Aldrin has just deployed the Solar Wind Composition experiment, a component of the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP).

  12. Kinetic instabilities in the solar wind driven by temperature anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2017-12-01

    The present paper comprises a review of kinetic instabilities that may be operative in the solar wind, and how they influence the dynamics thereof. The review is limited to collective plasma instabilities driven by the temperature anisotropies. To limit the scope even further, the discussion is restricted to the temperature anisotropy-driven instabilities within the model of bi-Maxwellian plasma velocity distribution function. The effects of multiple particle species or the influence of field-aligned drift will not be included. The field-aligned drift or beam is particularly prominent for the solar wind electrons, and thus ignoring its effect leaves out a vast portion of important physics. Nevertheless, for the sake of limiting the scope, this effect will not be discussed. The exposition is within the context of linear and quasilinear Vlasov kinetic theories. The discussion does not cover either computer simulations or data analyses of observations, in any systematic manner, although references will be made to published works pertaining to these methods. The scientific rationale for the present analysis is that the anisotropic temperatures associated with charged particles are pervasively detected in the solar wind, and it is one of the key contemporary scientific research topics to correctly characterize how such anisotropies are generated, maintained, and regulated in the solar wind. The present article aims to provide an up-to-date theoretical development on this research topic, largely based on the author's own work.

  13. Remote Sensing of the Heliospheric Solar Wind using Radio ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Astr. (2000) 21, 439–444. Remote Sensing of the Heliospheric Solar Wind using Radio. Astronomy Methods and Numerical Simulations. S. Ananthakrishnan, National Center for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of. Fundamental Research, Pune, India. Abstract. The ground-based radio astronomy method of interplanetary.

  14. Tsallis non-extensive statistics and solar wind plasma complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlos, G. P.; Iliopoulos, A. C.; Zastenker, G. N.; Zelenyi, L. M.; Karakatsanis, L. P.; Riazantseva, M. O.; Xenakis, M. N.; Pavlos, E. G.

    2015-03-01

    This article presents novel results revealing non-equilibrium phase transition processes in the solar wind plasma during a strong shock event, which took place on 26th September 2011. Solar wind plasma is a typical case of stochastic spatiotemporal distribution of physical state variables such as force fields (B → , E →) and matter fields (particle and current densities or bulk plasma distributions). This study shows clearly the non-extensive and non-Gaussian character of the solar wind plasma and the existence of multi-scale strong correlations from the microscopic to the macroscopic level. It also underlines the inefficiency of classical magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) or plasma statistical theories, based on the classical central limit theorem (CLT), to explain the complexity of the solar wind dynamics, since these theories include smooth and differentiable spatial-temporal functions (MHD theory) or Gaussian statistics (Boltzmann-Maxwell statistical mechanics). On the contrary, the results of this study indicate the presence of non-Gaussian non-extensive statistics with heavy tails probability distribution functions, which are related to the q-extension of CLT. Finally, the results of this study can be understood in the framework of modern theoretical concepts such as non-extensive statistical mechanics (Tsallis, 2009), fractal topology (Zelenyi and Milovanov, 2004), turbulence theory (Frisch, 1996), strange dynamics (Zaslavsky, 2002), percolation theory (Milovanov, 1997), anomalous diffusion theory and anomalous transport theory (Milovanov, 2001), fractional dynamics (Tarasov, 2013) and non-equilibrium phase transition theory (Chang, 1992).

  15. Association Between the Solar Wind Speed, Interplanetary Magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 38; Issue 4. Association Between the Solar Wind Speed, Interplanetary Magnetic Field and the Cosmic Ray Intensity for Solar Cycles 23 and 24. Meena Pokharia Lalan Prasad Chandni Mathpal Chandrasekhar Bhoj Hema Kharayat Rajesh Mathpal. Research ...

  16. A large ion beam device for laboratory solar wind studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulibarri, Zach; Han, Jia; Horányi, Mihály; Munsat, Tobin; Wang, Xu; Whittall-Scherfee, Guy; Yeo, Li Hsia

    2017-11-01

    The Colorado Solar Wind Experiment is a new device constructed at the Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres, and Cosmic Dust at the University of Colorado. A large cross-sectional Kaufman ion source is used to create steady state plasma flow to model the solar wind in an experimental vacuum chamber. The plasma beam has a diameter of 12 cm at the source, ion energies of up to 1 keV, and ion flows of up to 0.1 mA/cm2. Chamber pressure can be reduced to 4 × 10-5 Torr under operating conditions to suppress ion-neutral collisions and create a monoenergetic ion beam. The beam profile has been characterized by a Langmuir probe and an ion energy analyzer mounted on a two-dimensional translation stage. The beam profile meets the requirements for planned experiments that will study solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies, the charging and dynamics of dust in the solar wind, plasma wakes and refilling, and the wakes of topographic features such as craters or boulders. This article describes the technical details of the device, initial operation and beam characterization, and the planned experiments.

  17. Global solar wind variations over the last four centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M J; Lockwood, M; Riley, P

    2017-01-31

    The most recent "grand minimum" of solar activity, the Maunder minimum (MM, 1650-1710), is of great interest both for understanding the solar dynamo and providing insight into possible future heliospheric conditions. Here, we use nearly 30 years of output from a data-constrained magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar corona to calibrate heliospheric reconstructions based solely on sunspot observations. Using these empirical relations, we produce the first quantitative estimate of global solar wind variations over the last 400 years. Relative to the modern era, the MM shows a factor 2 reduction in near-Earth heliospheric magnetic field strength and solar wind speed, and up to a factor 4 increase in solar wind Mach number. Thus solar wind energy input into the Earth's magnetosphere was reduced, resulting in a more Jupiter-like system, in agreement with the dearth of auroral reports from the time. The global heliosphere was both smaller and more symmetric under MM conditions, which has implications for the interpretation of cosmogenic radionuclide data and resulting total solar irradiance estimates during grand minima.

  18. Remote Sensing of the Heliospheric Solar Wind using Radio ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The ground-based radio astronomy method of interplanetary scintillations (IPS) and spacecraft observations have shown, in the past 25 years, that while coronal holes give rise to stable, recurring high speed solar wind streams during the minimum of the solar activity cycle, the slow speed wind seen more ...

  19. Importance of energy and angular resolutions in top-hat electrostatic analysers for solar wind proton measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, R.; Marcucci, M. F.; Bruno, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Servidio, S.; Valentini, F.; Lavraud, B.; Louarn, P.; Salatti, M.

    2016-08-01

    We use a numerical code which reproduces the angular/energy response of a typical top-hat electrostatic analyser starting from solar wind proton velocity distribution functions (VDFs) generated by numerical simulations. The simulations are based on the Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical algorithm which integrates the Vlasov equation for the ion distribution function, while the electrons are treated as a fluid. A virtual satellite launched through the simulation box measures the particle VDFs. Such VDFs are moved from the simulation Cartesian grid to energy-angular coordinates to mimic the response of a real sensor in the solar wind. Different energy-angular resolutions of the analyser are investigated in order to understand the influence of the phase-space resolution in existing and upcoming space missions, with regards to determining the key parameters of plasma dynamics.

  20. XMM-Newton Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton spectrum of diffuse X-ray emission from within the solar system. The spectrum is dominated by O VII and O VIII lines at 0.57 keV and 0.65 keV, O VIII (and possibly Fe XVII) lines at approximately 0.8 keV, Ne IX lines at approximately 0.92 keV, and Mg XI lines at approximately 1.35 keV. This spectrum is consistent with what is expected from charge exchange emission between the highly ionized solar wind and either interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere or material from Earth's exosphere. The emission is clearly seen as a low-energy ( E less than 1.5 keV) spectral enhancement in one of a series of observations of the Hubble Deep Field North. The X-ray enhancement is concurrent with an enhancement in the solar wind measured by the ACE satellite. The solar wind enhancement reaches a flux level an order of magnitude more intense than typical fluxes at 1 AU, and has ion ratios with significantly enhanced higher ionization states. Whereas observations of the solar wind plasma made at a single point reflect only local conditions which may only be representative of solar wind properties with spatial scales ranging from less than half of an Earth radii (approximately 10 s) to 100 Earth radii, X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange are remote sensing measurements which may provide observations which are significantly more global in character. Besides being of interest in its own right for studies of the solar system, this emission can have significant consequences for observations of more cosmological objects. It can provide emission lines at zero redshift which are of particular interest (e.g., O VII and O VIII) in studies of diffuse thermal emission, and which can therefore act as contamination in objects which cover the entire detector field of view. We propose the use of solar wind monitoring data, such as from the ACE and Wind spacecraft, as a diagnostic to screen for such possibilities.

  1. Hybrid electric vehicle power management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissontz, Jay E.

    2015-08-25

    Level voltage levels/states of charge are maintained among a plurality of high voltage DC electrical storage devices/traction battery packs that are arrayed in series to support operation of a hybrid electric vehicle drive train. Each high voltage DC electrical storage device supports a high voltage power bus, to which at least one controllable load is connected, and at least a first lower voltage level electrical distribution system. The rate of power transfer from the high voltage DC electrical storage devices to the at least first lower voltage electrical distribution system is controlled by DC-DC converters.

  2. Universality of solar-wind turbulent spectrum from MHD to electron scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrova, O; Saur, J; Lacombe, C; Mangeney, A; Mitchell, J; Schwartz, S J; Robert, P

    2009-10-16

    To investigate the universality of magnetic turbulence in space plasmas, we analyze seven time periods in the free solar wind under different plasma conditions. Three instruments on Cluster spacecraft operating in different frequency ranges give us the possibility to resolve spectra up to 300 Hz. We show that the spectra form a quasiuniversal spectrum following the Kolmogorov's law approximately k(-5/3) at MHD scales, a approximately k(-2.8) power law at ion scales, and an exponential approximately exp[-sqrt[k(rho)e

  3. Phase-synchronization, energy cascade, and intermittency in solar-wind turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, S; Carbone, V; Vecchio, A; Bruno, R; Korth, H; Zurbuchen, T H; Sorriso-Valvo, L

    2012-12-14

    The energy cascade in solar wind magnetic turbulence is investigated using MESSENGER data in the inner heliosphere. The decomposition of magnetic field time series in intrinsic functions, each characterized by a typical time scale, reveals phase reorganization. This allows for the identification of structures of all sizes generated by the nonlinear turbulent cascade, covering both the inertial and the dispersive ranges of the turbulent magnetic power spectrum. We find that the correlation (or anticorrelation) of phases occurs between pairs of neighboring time scales, whenever localized peaks of magnetic energy are present at both scales, consistent with the local character of the energy transfer process.

  4. Quantifying scaling in the velocity field of the anisotropic turbulent solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2007-09-01

    Solar wind turbulence is dominated by Alfvénic fluctuations with power spectral exponents that somewhat surprisingly evolve toward the Kolmogorov value of -5/3, that of hydrodynamic turbulence. We analyze in situ satellite observations at 1AU and show that the turbulence decomposes linearly into two coexistent components perpendicular and parallel to the local average magnetic field and determine their distinct intermittency independent scaling exponents. The first of these is consistent with recent predictions for anisotropic MHD turbulence and the second is closer to Kolmogorov-like scaling.

  5. Decentralized Autonomous Hybrid Renewable Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Power extension of grid to isolated regions is associated with technical and economical issues. It has encouraged exploration and exploitation of decentralized power generation using renewable energy sources (RES. RES based power generation involves uncertain availability of power source round the clock. This problem has been overcome to certain extent by installing appropriate integrated energy storage unit (ESU. This paper presents technical review of hybrid wind and photovoltaic (PV generation in standalone mode. Associated components like converters, storage unit, controllers, and optimization techniques affect overall generation. Wind and PV energy are readily available, omnipresent, and expected to contribute major future energy market. It can serve to overcome global warming problem arising due to emissions in fossil fuel based thermal generation units. This paper includes the study of progressive development of standalone renewable generation units based on wind and PV microgrids.

  6. Heavy noble gases in solar wind delivered by Genesis mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshik, Alex; Hohenberg, Charles; Pravdivtseva, Olga; Burnett, Donald

    2014-02-15

    One of the major goals of the Genesis Mission was to refine our knowledge of the isotopic composition of the heavy noble gases in solar wind and, by inference, the Sun, which represents the initial composition of the solar system. This has now been achieved with permil precision: (36)Ar/(38)Ar = 5.5005 ± 0.0040, (86)Kr/(84)Kr = .3012 ± .0004, (83)Kr/(84)Kr = .2034 ± .0002, (82)Kr/(84)Kr = .2054 ± .0002, (80)Kr/(84)Kr = .0412 ± .0002, (78)Kr/(84)Kr = .00642 ± .00005, (136)Xe/(132)Xe = .3001 ± .0006, (134)Xe/(132)Xe = .3691 ± .0007, (131)Xe/(132)Xe = .8256 ± .0012, (130)Xe/(132)Xe = .1650 ± .0004, (129)Xe/(132)Xe = 1.0405 ± .0010, (128)Xe/(132)Xe = .0842 ± .0003, (126)Xe/(132)Xe = .00416 ± .00009, and (124)Xe/(132)Xe = .00491 ± .00007 (error-weighted averages of all published data). The Kr and Xe ratios measured in the Genesis solar wind collectors generally agree with the less precise values obtained from lunar soils and breccias, which have accumulated solar wind over hundreds of millions of years, suggesting little if any temporal variability of the isotopic composition of solar wind krypton and xenon. The higher precision for the initial composition of the heavy noble gases in the solar system allows (1) to confirm that, exept (136)Xe and (134)Xe, the mathematically derived U-Xe is equivalent to Solar Wind Xe and (2) to provide an opportunity for better understanding the relationship between the starting composition and Xe-Q (and Q-Kr), the dominant current "planetary" component, and its host, the mysterious phase-Q.

  7. Data Assimilation in the Solar Wind: Challenges and First Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Matthew; Browne, Philip; van Leeuwen, Peter Jan; Owens, Mathew

    2017-11-01

    Data assimilation (DA) is used extensively in numerical weather prediction (NWP) to improve forecast skill. Indeed, improvements in forecast skill in NWP models over the past 30 years have directly coincided with improvements in DA schemes. At present, due to data availability and technical challenges, DA is underused in space weather applications, particularly for solar wind prediction. This paper investigates the potential of advanced DA methods currently used in operational NWP centers to improve solar wind prediction. To develop the technical capability, as well as quantify the potential benefit, twin experiments are conducted to assess the performance of the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) in the solar wind model ENLIL. Boundary conditions are provided by the Wang-Sheeley-Arge coronal model and synthetic observations of density, temperature, and momentum generated every 4.5 h at 0.6 AU. While in situ spacecraft observations are unlikely to be routinely available at 0.6 AU, these techniques can be applied to remote sensing of the solar wind, such as with Heliospheric Imagers or interplanetary scintillation. The LETKF can be seen to improve the state at the observation location and advect that improvement toward the Earth, leading to an improvement in forecast skill in near-Earth space for both the observed and unobserved variables. However, sharp gradients caused by the analysis of a single observation in space resulted in artificial wavelike structures being advected toward Earth. This paper is the first attempt to apply DA to solar wind prediction and provides the first in-depth analysis of the challenges and potential solutions.

  8. Hybrid Power Management-Based Vehicle Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid Power Management (HPM) is the integration of diverse, state-of-the-art power devices in an optimal configuration for space and terrestrial applications (s ee figure). The appropriate application and control of the various power devices significantly improves overall system performance and efficiency. The basic vehicle architecture consists of a primary power source, and possibly other power sources, that provides all power to a common energy storage system that is used to power the drive motors and vehicle accessory systems. This architecture also provides power as an emergency power system. Each component is independent, permitting it to be optimized for its intended purpose. The key element of HPM is the energy storage system. All generated power is sent to the energy storage system, and all loads derive their power from that system. This can significantly reduce the power requirement of the primary power source, while increasing the vehicle reliability. Ultracapacitors are ideal for an HPM-based energy storage system due to their exceptionally long cycle life, high reliability, high efficiency, high power density, and excellent low-temperature performance. Multiple power sources and multiple loads are easily incorporated into an HPM-based vehicle. A gas turbine is a good primary power source because of its high efficiency, high power density, long life, high reliability, and ability to operate on a wide range of fuels. An HPM controller maintains optimal control over each vehicle component. This flexible operating system can be applied to all vehicles to considerably improve vehicle efficiency, reliability, safety, security, and performance. The HPM-based vehicle architecture has many advantages over conventional vehicle architectures. Ultracapacitors have a much longer cycle life than batteries, which greatly improves system reliability, reduces life-of-system costs, and reduces environmental impact as ultracapacitors will probably never need to be

  9. No evidence that solar wind turbulence can be described by the critical balance theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Tu, C. Y.; Marsch, E.

    2015-12-01

    The critical balance theory (GS, Goldreich and Sridhar, 1995) in MHD turbulence seems now to be well accepted in the turbulence community. During recent years, quite a few papers claimed to have provided evidence in support of this theory by solar wind turbulence observations. Here we present new data that result in a different conclusion, namely that the previous observations cannot be considered as evidence for the GS theory. It is based on the critical balance assumption that the parallel Alfven wave propagation time equals the perpendicular cascade time, k⊥v⊥=k//VA. Assuming that the cascading energy flux does not change with scale, a spectral index of -2 is obtained for the parallel power spectrum P(k//). To check this theoretical prediction, small sampling angle (θRB) with the mean magnetic field averaged at the local time and the local scale is used for selecting the local power spectral densities (PSDs). We recovered that the so averaged PSDs at different scales have a nearly -2 slope. However, using 30 days of Ulysses data we discovered that the critical balance assumption was invalid in the corresponding data analysis. The values of δB/B0 corresponding to the selected local PSDs are all found to be much smaller than the required value of tan(θRB). Most of the observations with a small sampling angle may be considered to be rather more perpendicular from the theoretical point of view. We also found that the spectral index of the selected PSDs depends on the selection criterion. If one guarantees constantly small sampling angles in a local time period, the slope of the selected PSD changes to -1.7. Thus our conclusion is that no evidence exists that solar wind turbulence can be described by the GS theory. What is the true origin of the spectral anisotropy of the solar wind turbulence remains an important open question.

  10. Non-axisymmetric Anisotropy of the Inertial Range in the Turbulent Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A. J.; Gogoberidze, G.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.; Muller, W.

    2011-12-01

    Anisotropy is a key topic for theoretical, numerical and observational studies of plasma turbulence in the solar wind. However, fluctuations in the solar wind are found to be ordered wrt both the background field and flow directions, for example Belcher and Davis found that the fluctuations on average have 5 : 4 : 1 power anisotropy in an orthogonal coordinate system whose axis are [eBxeR, eBx(eBxeR), eB], where eB is a unit vector in the direction of the average magnetic field and eR is a unit vector in the direction radially away from the sun. The fact that the fluctuations are not axisymmetric wrt the background field is paradoxical in the context of idealized models for MHD turbulence. Here, we show that this observed non-axisymmetric anisotropy may arise as a data sampling effect rather than as a result of the physical properties of the turbulence. We will quantify the observed non-axisymmetry via the Power spectral Density ratio of eBxeR : eBx(eBxeR) for in-situ measurements in fast wind. The observed non-axisymmetric ratio will then be compared with Direct Numerical Simulations that are sampled with a "fly through", emulating in-situ single spacecraft observations using Taylor's hypothesis with a constant velocity. We will see this "fly through" model is sufficient to reproduce the observed non-axisymmetric anisotropy in the inertial range of the solar wind. Thus, the observed non-axisymmetric anisotropy may simply arise as a sampling effect related to the one-dimensional spectrum and Taylor's hypothesis. A simple analytical model for a field composed of a linear superposition of transverse waves confirms this result. Prospects for constructing statistical measures, such as structure functions, in space using super-ensembles of multi-spacecraft observations will be discussed.

  11. Ionospheric Response to Solar Wind Pressure Pulses Under Northward IMF Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Liou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancements of aurora and auroral electrojets in response to sudden compression of the magnetosphere by shocks/pressure pulses are well known and have been attributed by some to compression-enhanced magnetic field reconnection. To examine such a view, we analyze a fortuitous event that is comprised of a series of pressure pulses (< 20 min on November 8, 2000. These pressure pulses were preceded by a large, northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF that lasted more than 15 hours such that effects from reconnection can be minimized. Auroral images acquired by ultraviolet imager on board the Polar satellite clearly show intensifications of the aurora that occurred first near local noon and progressively extended from dayside to nightside. The area-integrated global auroral power reached ~30 gigawatts (GW. It is also found that the global auroral power is well correlated with the solar wind dynamic pressure (correlation coefficient r ~0.90, rather than the change in the solar wind dynamic pressure. In-situ measurements of particle data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite indicate that the magnetospheric source for the pressure-enhanced auroras is most likely the central plasma sheet. Other ionospheric parameters such as the auroral electrojet (AE index, magnetic storm index (Sym-H, and the cross polarcap potential drop also show a one-to-one correspondence to the pressure pulses. In one instance the auroral electrojets AE index reached more than 200 nT, the cross polar-cap potential drop (ÎŚpc inferred from the SuperDARN radar network ionospheric plasma convection increased to ~60 kV. The observed increases in the auroral emissions, AE, and polar cap potential were not associated with substorms. Our result strongly suggests that solar wind pressure pulses are an important source of geomagnetic activity during northward IMF periods.

  12. Response of Mercury's Magnetosphere to Solar Wind Forcing: Results of Global MHD Simulations with Coupled Planetary Interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xianzhe; Slavin, James; Poh, Gangkai; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas

    2016-04-01

    As the innermost planet, Mercury arguably undergoes the most direct space weathering interactions due to its weak intrinsic magnetic field and its close proximity to the Sun. It has long been suggested that two processes, i.e., erosion of the dayside magnetosphere due to intense magnetopause reconnection and the shielding effect of the induction currents generated at the conducting core, compete against each other in governing the large-scale structure of Mercury's magnetosphere. An outstanding question concerning Mercury's space weather is which of the two processes is more important. To address this question, we have developed a global MHD model in which Mercury's interior is electromagnetically coupled to the surrounding space environment. As demonstrated in Jia et al. (2015), the new modeling capability allows for self-consistently characterizing the dynamical response of the Mercury system to time-varying external conditions. To assess the relative importance of induction and magnetopause reconnection in controlling the magnetospheric configuration, especially under strong solar driving conditions, we have carried out multiple global simulations that adopt a wide range of solar wind dynamic pressure and IMF conditions. We find that, while the magnetopause standoff distance decreases with increasing solar wind pressure, just as expected, its dependence on the solar wind pressure follows closely a power-law relationship with an index of ~ -1/6, rather than a steeper power-law falling-off expected for the case with only induction present. This result suggests that for the range of solar wind conditions examined, the two competing processes, namely induction and reconnection, appear to play equally important roles in determining the global configuration of Mercury's magnetosphere, consistent with the finding obtained by Slavin et al. (2014) based on MESSENGER observations. We also find that the magnetic perturbations produced by the magnetospheric current systems

  13. HYBRID FUEL CELL-SOLAR CELL SPACE POWER SUBSYSTEM CAPABILITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report outlines the capabilities and limitations of a hybrid solar cell- fuel cell space power subsystem by comparing the proposed hybrid system...to conventional power subsystem devices. The comparisons are based on projected 1968 capability in the areas of primary and secondary battery, fuel ... cell , solar cell, and chemical dynamic power subsystems. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the relative merits of a hybrid power

  14. The Electron Temperature and Anisotropy in the Solar Wind. Comparison of the Core and Halo Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrard, V.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Štverák, Š.; Maksimovic, M.; Trávníček, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    Estimating the temperature of solar wind particles and their anisotropies is particularly important for understanding the origin of their deviations from thermal equilibrium and the effects this has. In the absence of energetic events, the velocity distribution of electrons reveals a dual structure with a thermal (Maxwellian) core and a suprathermal (kappa) halo. This article presents a detailed observational analysis of these two components, providing estimations of their temperatures and temperature anisotropies, and decoding any potential interdependence that their properties may indicate. The dataset used in this study includes more than 120 000 of the distributions measured by three missions in the ecliptic within an extended range of heliocentric distances from 0.3 to over 4 AU. The core temperature is found to decrease with the radial distance, while the halo temperature slightly increases, clarifying an apparent contradiction in previous observational analyses and providing valuable clues about the temperature of the kappa-distributed populations. For low values of the power-index kappa, these two components manifest a clear tendency to deviate from isotropy in the same direction, which seems to confirm the existence of mechanisms with similar effects on both components, e.g., the solar wind expansion, or the particle heating by the fluctuations. However, the existence of plasma states with anticorrelated anisotropies of the core and halo populations and the increase in their number for high values of the power-index kappa suggest a dynamic interplay of these components, mediated, most probably, by the anisotropy-driven instabilities.

  15. Solar wind stream interaction regions throughout the heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ian G.

    2018-01-01

    This paper focuses on the interactions between the fast solar wind from coronal holes and the intervening slower solar wind, leading to the creation of stream interaction regions that corotate with the Sun and may persist for many solar rotations. Stream interaction regions have been observed near 1 AU, in the inner heliosphere (at ˜ 0.3-1 AU) by the Helios spacecraft, in the outer and distant heliosphere by the Pioneer 10 and 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft, and out of the ecliptic by Ulysses, and these observations are reviewed. Stream interaction regions accelerate energetic particles, modulate the intensity of Galactic cosmic rays and generate enhanced geomagnetic activity. The remote detection of interaction regions using interplanetary scintillation and white-light imaging, and MHD modeling of interaction regions will also be discussed.

  16. MHD effects of the solar wind flow around planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Biernat

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the interaction of the solar wind with magnetized and unmagnetized planets forms a central topic of space research. Focussing on planetary magnetosheaths, we review some major developments in this field. Magnetosheath structures depend crucially on the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field, the solar wind Alfvén Mach number, the shape of the obstacle (axisymmetric/non-axisymmetric, etc., the boundary conditions at the magnetopause (low/high magnetic shear, and the degree of thermal anisotropy of the plasma. We illustrate the cases of Earth, Jupiter and Venus. The terrestrial magnetosphere is axisymmetric and has been probed in-situ by many spacecraft. Jupiter's magnetosphere is highly non-axisymmetric. Furthermore, we study magnetohydrodynamic effects in the Venus magnetosheath.

  17. Magnetic Reconnection and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Osman, K T; Gosling, J T; Greco, A; Servidio, S; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C; Phan, T D

    2014-01-01

    A statistical relationship between magnetic reconnection, current sheets and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind is reported for the first time using in-situ measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We identify intermittency as non-Gaussian fluctuations in increments of the magnetic field vector, $\\mathbf{B}$, that are spatially and temporally non-uniform. The reconnection events and current sheets are found to be concentrated in intervals of intermittent turbulence, identified using the partial variance of increments method: within the most non-Gaussian 1% of fluctuations in $\\mathbf{B}$, we find 87%-92% of reconnection exhausts and $\\sim$9% of current sheets. Also, the likelihood that an identified current sheet will also correspond to a reconnection exhaust increases dramatically as the least intermittent fluctuations are removed from the dataset. Hence, the turbulent solar wind contains a hierarchy of intermittent magnetic field structures that are increasingly linked to current sheets, which ...

  18. Generation of residual energy in the turbulent solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoberidze, G. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Ilia State University, 3/5 Cholokashvili Ave., 0162 Tbilisi (Georgia); Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    In situ observations of the fluctuating solar wind flow show that the energy of magnetic field fluctuations always exceeds that of the kinetic energy, and therefore the difference between the kinetic and magnetic energies, known as the residual energy, is always negative. The same behaviour is found in numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We study the dynamics of the residual energy for strong, anisotropic, critically balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using the eddy damped quasi-normal Markovian approximation. Our analysis shows that for stationary critically balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, negative residual energy will always be generated by nonlinear interacting Alfven waves. This offers a general explanation for the observation of negative residual energy in solar wind turbulence and in the numerical simulations.

  19. Generation of residual energy in the turbulent solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoberidze, G.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2012-10-01

    In situ observations of the fluctuating solar wind flow show that the energy of magnetic field fluctuations always exceeds that of the kinetic energy, and therefore the difference between the kinetic and magnetic energies, known as the residual energy, is always negative. The same behaviour is found in numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We study the dynamics of the residual energy for strong, anisotropic, critically balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using the eddy damped quasi-normal Markovian approximation. Our analysis shows that for stationary critically balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, negative residual energy will always be generated by nonlinear interacting Alfvén waves. This offers a general explanation for the observation of negative residual energy in solar wind turbulence and in the numerical simulations.

  20. The most intense electrical currents in the solar wind: Comparisons between single-spacecraft measurements and plasma turbulence simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, John J.; Roytershteyn, Vadim

    2017-07-01

    Three-dimensional hybrid simulations of solar wind turbulence near the orbit of the Earth are used to investigate the plasma current density over the range of scales from 0.5 proton inertial lengths to hundreds of proton inertial lengths. The data are analyzed along a simulated spacecraft trajectory in order to directly compare the results against single-spacecraft measurements. The most intense current densities are identified using an amplitude threshold technique and the properties of 5σ events identified in the true current density are compared to the properties of 5σ events identified using a proxy for the current density designed for studies of single-spacecraft solar wind measurements. The proxy is proportional to the magnitude of the directional derivative of the magnetic field along the spacecraft trajectory. The results from the simulation show that the average properties of 5σ events observed in the proxy are quantitatively similar to those observed in the true current density, properties such as the spatial size of the events, the nearest neighbor distance, and the peak current density of the events. This provides some justification for the use of the proxy for the statistical analysis of solar wind data even though the simulation indicates that the occurrence times of large-amplitude events in the proxy are not always a reliable indicator of the occurrence times of large-amplitude events in the true current density. The physical properties of 5σ events in simulated spacecraft data show remarkable quantitative agreement with the properties of 5σ events observed in solar wind data.

  1. Modelling supervisory controller for hybrid power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, A.; Bindner, H.; Lundsager, P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Jannerup, O. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Automation, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Supervisory controllers are important to achieve optimal operation of hybrid power systems. The performance and economics of such systems depend mainly on the control strategy for switching on/off components. The modular concept described in this paper is an attempt to design standard supervisory controllers that could be used in different applications, such as village power and telecommunication applications. This paper presents some basic aspects of modelling and design of modular supervisory controllers using the object-oriented modelling technique. The functional abstraction hierarchy technique is used to formulate the control requirements and identify the functions of the control system. The modular algorithm is generic and flexible enough to be used with any system configuration and several goals (different applications). The modularity includes accepting modification of system configuration and goals during operation with minor or no changes in the supervisory controller. (au)

  2. Solar cycle changes in the polar solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.; Rumsey, V. H.; Kaufman, J. J.; Turley, D. G.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Armstrong, J. W.; Harmons, J. K.; Scott, S. L.; Sime, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that although the 11 year solar cycle was first recognized in 1843, it is still only poorly understood. Further, while there are satisfactory models for the magnetic variations, the underlying physics is still obscure. New observations on the changing three-dimensional form of the solar wind are presented which help relate some of the modulations observed in geomagnetic activity, the ionosphere, and the flux of galactic cosmic rays.

  3. On a magnetosphere disturbed by solar wind; observations of macroelectrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Wodnicka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional electromagnetic full kinetic particle code (a version of TRISTAN is used to study the interaction of a weakly-magnetized object with a solar wind of low density. The details of two magnetospheric processes – wave activity and energetic electrons appearing at the flanks of the magnetosphere – are presented. The results of the simulation are compared with known magnetospheric data.

  4. Introducing log-kappa distributions for solar wind analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Martin; Vörös, Zolan Z.; Leubner, Manfred P.

    2010-05-01

    The one-point probability density functions (PDFs) obtained from the Wind spacecraft observations of the magnitude of total magnetic field (B) and the solar wind quasi-invariant (QI) are investigated at 1 AU during the years 1995 and 1998. It is known from previous studies that the distributions follow in a rather good approximation a lognormal distribution. This indicates that the underlying random multiplicative processes are skewed, the PDFs are nonsymmetric. The concept of kappa distributions generating PDF tails closer to the observed values is introduced. The skewness, characteristic for the multiplicative processes in the solar wind, is treated on the basis of log-kappa distributions, introduced here for the first time. Normal and lognormal distributions are related in a similar way to each other as the kappa and log-kappa distributions, although the statistics is based on extensive physics in the former and nonextensive physics in the latter cases. We show hat log-kappa PDFs describe the observed distributions in the solar wind more accurately than the lognormal PDFs. In particular, the tails of PDFs corresponding to extreme values of the considered parameters B and QI are better modeled in terms of the nonextensive approach. It indicates that, for the theoretical explanation of the complexity of multisource fluctuations present in 1 year solar wind magnetic and plasma data, both the extensive and the nonextensive physical escription is needed. The variation of the values of kappa obtained from the log-kappa fits can serve as a quantitative measure describing the changing balance between these two distinct physical processes during the solar cycle.

  5. New stratagies for modelling and forecasting the background solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rui; Rouillard, Alexis; Brun, Sacha

    2017-04-01

    The large-scale solar wind speed distribution varies in time in response to the cyclic variations of the strength and geometry of the magnetic field of the corona. Semi-empirical predictive laws (such as in the widely-used WSA law) parametrise the asymptotic solar wind speed via simple parameters describing the geometry of the coronal magnetic field. In practice, such scaling laws require ad-hoc corrections and empirical fits to in-situ spacecraft data, and a predictive law based solely on physical principles is still missing. I will discuss improvements to this kind of laws based on the analysis of very large samples of wind acceleration profiles in open flux-tubes (both from MHD simulations and potential-field extrapolations), and show that flux-tube expansion effectively control the locations of the slow and fast wind flows (as in WSA), but that the actual asymptotic wind speeds attained - specially those of the slow wind - are also dependent on field-line inclination. I will furthermore present a new solar wind model - MULTI-VP - which takes a coronal magnetic field map as input (past data or forecast), and computes a collection of solar wind profiles (1 to 30 Rsun) spanning a region of interest of the solar atmosphere (up to a full synoptic map) at any instant desired in quasi-real time, while keeping a good description the plasma heating and cooling mechanisms. MULTI-VP provides full sets of inner boundary conditions for heliospheric propagation models (such as ENLIL; see https://stormsweb.irap.omp.eu/doku.php?id=windmaptable), bypassing the need to rely on semi-empirical approaches. I will fully discuss the predictive capabilities of the model (synthetic imagery and in-situ time series) and its suitability to real-time space-weather applications. This is work is supported by the FP7 project #606692 (HELCATS).

  6. Solar wind-magnetosphere coupling; Proceedings of the Chapman Conference, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Feb. 12-15, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamide, Y. (Editor); Slavin, James Arthur (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on the coupling of the solar wind with the earth's magnetosphere are presented. The topics addressed include: geomagnetic indices and statistical methods; solar wind and magnetospheric processes, including solar wind control of the magnetosphere, dayside interaction, and solar wind disturbances and magnetospheric response; the electrodynamics of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, including electric fields and currents and auroras and auroral precipitation; and solar wind control of the nightside magnetosphere.

  7. Origins of the Ambient Solar Wind: Implications for Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Riley, Pete

    2017-10-01

    The Sun's outer atmosphere is heated to temperatures of millions of degrees, and solar plasma flows out into interplanetary space at supersonic speeds. This paper reviews our current understanding of these interrelated problems: coronal heating and the acceleration of the ambient solar wind. We also discuss where the community stands in its ability to forecast how variations in the solar wind (i.e., fast and slow wind streams) impact the Earth. Although the last few decades have seen significant progress in observations and modeling, we still do not have a complete understanding of the relevant physical processes, nor do we have a quantitatively precise census of which coronal structures contribute to specific types of solar wind. Fast streams are known to be connected to the central regions of large coronal holes. Slow streams, however, appear to come from a wide range of sources, including streamers, pseudostreamers, coronal loops, active regions, and coronal hole boundaries. Complicating our understanding even more is the fact that processes such as turbulence, stream-stream interactions, and Coulomb collisions can make it difficult to unambiguously map a parcel measured at 1 AU back down to its coronal source. We also review recent progress—in theoretical modeling, observational data analysis, and forecasting techniques that sit at the interface between data and theory—that gives us hope that the above problems are indeed solvable.

  8. Solar wind heavy ions from energetic coronal events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bame, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Ions heavier than those of He can be resolved in the solar wind with electrostatic E/q analyzers when the local thermal temperatures are low. Ordinarily this condition prevails in the low speed solar wind found between high speed streams, i.e. the interstream, IS, solar wind. Various ions of O, Si and Fe are resolved in IS heavy ion spectra. Relative ion peak intensities indicate that the O ionization state is established in the IS coronal source regions at approx. 2.1 x 10/sup 6/K while the state of Fe is frozen in at approx. 1.5 x 10/sup 6/K farther out. Occasionally, anomalous spectra are observed in which the usually third most prominent ion peak, O/sup 8 +/, is depressed as are the Fe peaks ranging from Fe/sup 12 +/ to Fe/sup 7 +/. A prominent peak in the usual Si/sup 8 +/ position of IS spectra is self-consistently shown to be Fe/sup 16 +/. These features demonstrate that the ionization states were frozen in at higher than usual coronal temperatures. The source regions of these hot heavy ion spectra are identified as energetic coronal events including flares and nonflare coronal mass ejections. 24 references.

  9. Origins of the Ambient Solar Wind: Implications for Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Riley, Pete

    2017-08-01

    The Sun's outer atmosphere is heated to temperatures of millions of degrees, and solar plasma flows out into interplanetary space at supersonic speeds. This paper reviews our current understanding of these interrelated problems: coronal heating and the acceleration of the ambient solar wind. We also discuss where the community stands in its ability to forecast how variations in the solar wind (i.e., fast and slow wind streams) impact the Earth. Although the last few decades have seen significant progress in observations and modeling, we still do not have a complete understanding of the relevant physical processes, nor do we have a quantitatively precise census of which coronal structures contribute to specific types of solar wind. Fast streams are known to be connected to the central regions of large coronal holes. Slow streams, however, appear to come from a wide range of sources, including streamers, pseudostreamers, coronal loops, active regions, and coronal hole boundaries. Complicating our understanding even more is the fact that processes such as turbulence, stream-stream interactions, and Coulomb collisions can make it difficult to unambiguously map a parcel measured at 1 AU back down to its coronal source. We also review recent progress -- in theoretical modeling, observational data analysis, and forecasting techniques that sit at the interface between data and theory -- that gives us hope that the above problems are indeed solvable.

  10. Interaction of the solar wind with comets: a Rosetta perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2017-07-13

    The Rosetta mission provides an unprecedented possibility to study the interaction of comets with the solar wind. As the spacecraft accompanies comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from its very low-activity stage through its perihelion phase, the physics of mass loading is witnessed for various activity levels of the nucleus. While observations at other comets provided snapshots of the interaction region and its various plasma boundaries, Rosetta observations allow a detailed study of the temporal evolution of the innermost cometary magnetosphere. Owing to the short passage time of the solar wind through the interaction region, plasma instabilities such as ring--beam and non-gyrotropic instabilities are of less importance during the early life of the magnetosphere. Large-amplitude ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, the 'singing' of the comet, is probably due to a modified ion Weibel instability. This instability drives a cross-field current of implanted cometary ions unstable. The initial pick-up of these ions causes a major deflection of the solar wind protons. Proton deflection, cross-field current and the instability induce a threefold structure of the innermost interaction region with the characteristic Mach cone and Whistler wings as stationary interaction signatures as well as the ULF waves representing the dynamic aspect of the interaction.This article is part of the themed issue 'Cometary science after Rosetta'. © 2017 The Authors.

  11. Kinetic Physics of the Solar Corona and Solar Wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsch Eckart

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic plasma physics of the solar corona and solar wind are reviewed with emphasis on the theoretical understanding of the in situ measurements of solar wind particles and waves, as well as on the remote-sensing observations of the solar corona made by means of ultraviolet spectroscopy and imaging. In order to explain coronal and interplanetary heating, the microphysics of the dissipation of various forms of mechanical, electric and magnetic energy at small scales (e.g., contained in plasma waves, turbulences or non-uniform flows must be addressed. We therefore scrutinise the basic assumptions underlying the classical transport theory and the related collisional heating rates, and also describe alternatives associated with wave-particle interactions. We elucidate the kinetic aspects of heating the solar corona and interplanetary plasma through Landau- and cyclotron-resonant damping of plasma waves, and analyse in detail wave absorption and micro instabilities. Important aspects (virtues and limitations of fluid models, either single- and multi-species or magnetohydrodynamic and multi-moment models, for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are critically discussed. Also, kinetic model results which were recently obtained by numerically solving the Vlasov–Boltzmann equation in a coronal funnel and hole are presented. Promising areas and perspectives for future research are outlined finally.

  12. Invited article: Electric solar wind sail: toward test missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janhunen, P; Toivanen, P K; Polkko, J; Merikallio, S; Salminen, P; Haeggström, E; Seppänen, H; Kurppa, R; Ukkonen, J; Kiprich, S; Thornell, G; Kratz, H; Richter, L; Krömer, O; Rosta, R; Noorma, M; Envall, J; Lätt, S; Mengali, G; Quarta, A A; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Kauppinen, J; Nuottajärvi, A; Obraztsov, A

    2010-11-01

    The electric solar wind sail (E-sail) is a space propulsion concept that uses the natural solar wind dynamic pressure for producing spacecraft thrust. In its baseline form, the E-sail consists of a number of long, thin, conducting, and centrifugally stretched tethers, which are kept in a high positive potential by an onboard electron gun. The concept gains its efficiency from the fact that the effective sail area, i.e., the potential structure of the tethers, can be millions of times larger than the physical area of the thin tethers wires, which offsets the fact that the dynamic pressure of the solar wind is very weak. Indeed, according to the most recent published estimates, an E-sail of 1 N thrust and 100 kg mass could be built in the rather near future, providing a revolutionary level of propulsive performance (specific acceleration) for travel in the solar system. Here we give a review of the ongoing technical development work of the E-sail, covering tether construction, overall mechanical design alternatives, guidance and navigation strategies, and dynamical and orbital simulations.

  13. Interaction of the solar wind with comets: a Rosetta perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2017-05-01

    The Rosetta mission provides an unprecedented possibility to study the interaction of comets with the solar wind. As the spacecraft accompanies comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from its very low-activity stage through its perihelion phase, the physics of mass loading is witnessed for various activity levels of the nucleus. While observations at other comets provided snapshots of the interaction region and its various plasma boundaries, Rosetta observations allow a detailed study of the temporal evolution of the innermost cometary magnetosphere. Owing to the short passage time of the solar wind through the interaction region, plasma instabilities such as ring-beam and non-gyrotropic instabilities are of less importance during the early life of the magnetosphere. Large-amplitude ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, the `singing' of the comet, is probably due to a modified ion Weibel instability. This instability drives a cross-field current of implanted cometary ions unstable. The initial pick-up of these ions causes a major deflection of the solar wind protons. Proton deflection, cross-field current and the instability induce a threefold structure of the innermost interaction region with the characteristic Mach cone and Whistler wings as stationary interaction signatures as well as the ULF waves representing the dynamic aspect of the interaction. This article is part of the themed issue 'Cometary science after Rosetta'.

  14. Origins of the Ambient Solar Wind: Implications for Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Riley, Pete

    2017-11-01

    The Sun's outer atmosphere is heated to temperatures of millions of degrees, and solar plasma flows out into interplanetary space at supersonic speeds. This paper reviews our current understanding of these interrelated problems: coronal heating and the acceleration of the ambient solar wind. We also discuss where the community stands in its ability to forecast how variations in the solar wind (i.e., fast and slow wind streams) impact the Earth. Although the last few decades have seen significant progress in observations and modeling, we still do not have a complete understanding of the relevant physical processes, nor do we have a quantitatively precise census of which coronal structures contribute to specific types of solar wind. Fast streams are known to be connected to the central regions of large coronal holes. Slow streams, however, appear to come from a wide range of sources, including streamers, pseudostreamers, coronal loops, active regions, and coronal hole boundaries. Complicating our understanding even more is the fact that processes such as turbulence, stream-stream interactions, and Coulomb collisions can make it difficult to unambiguously map a parcel measured at 1 AU back down to its coronal source. We also review recent progress—in theoretical modeling, observational data analysis, and forecasting techniques that sit at the interface between data and theory—that gives us hope that the above problems are indeed solvable.

  15. INERTIAL RANGE TURBULENCE OF FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND AT 0.72 AU AND SOLAR MINIMUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodorescu, Eliza; Echim, Marius; Munteanu, Costel [Institute for Space Sciences, Măgurele (Romania); Zhang, Tielong [Space Research Institute, Graz (Austria); Bruno, Roberto [INAF-IAPS, Istituto di Astrofizica e Planetologia Spaziali, Rome (Italy); Kovacs, Peter, E-mail: eliteo@spacescience.ro [Geological and Geophysical Institute of Hungary, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-05-10

    We investigate Venus Express observations of magnetic field fluctuations performed systematically in the solar wind at 0.72 Astronomical Units (AU), between 2007 and 2009, during the deep minimum of solar cycle 24. The power spectral densities (PSDs) of the magnetic field components have been computed for time intervals that satisfy the data integrity criteria and have been grouped according to the type of wind, fast and slow, defined for speeds larger and smaller, respectively, than 450 km s{sup −1}. The PSDs show higher levels of power for the fast wind than for the slow. The spectral slopes estimated for all PSDs in the frequency range 0.005–0.1 Hz exhibit a normal distribution. The average value of the trace of the spectral matrix is −1.60 for fast solar wind and −1.65 for slow wind. Compared to the corresponding average slopes at 1 AU, the PSDs are shallower at 0.72 AU for slow wind conditions suggesting a steepening of the solar wind spectra between Venus and Earth. No significant time variation trend is observed for the spectral behavior of both the slow and fast wind.

  16. Three-dimensional spatial structures of solar wind turbulence from 10 000-km to 100-km scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Narita

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the four Cluster spacecraft, we have determined the three-dimensional wave-vector spectra of fluctuating magnetic fields in the solar wind. Three different solar wind intervals of Cluster data are investigated for this purpose, representing three different spatial scales: 10 000 km, 1000 km, and 100 km. The spectra are determined using the wave telescope technique (k-filtering technique without assuming the validity of Taylor's frozen-in-flow hypothesis nor are any assumptions made as to the symmetry properties of the fluctuations. We find that the spectra are anisotropic on all the three scales and the power is extended primarily in the directions perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, as might be expected of two-dimensional turbulence, however, the analyzed fluctuations are not axisymmetric. The lack of axisymmetry invalidates some earlier techniques using single spacecraft observations that were used to estimate the percentage of magnetic energy residing in quasi-two-dimensional power. However, the dominance of two-dimensional turbulence is consistent with the relatively long mean free paths of cosmic rays in observed in the heliosphere. On the other hand, the spectra also exhibit secondary extended structures oblique from the mean magnetic field direction. We discuss possible origins of anisotropy and asymmetry of solar wind turbulence spectra.

  17. Quiet solar wind interaction with Mars over the entire solar cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Andrey; Modolo, Ronan; Jarvinen, Riku; Barabash, Stas

    2017-04-01

    This work presents a massive statistical analysis of the ion flows in the Martian induced magnetosphere over the one solar cycle. We performed this analysis using Mars Express ion mass spectrometer data taken during 2008 - 2014 time interval. This data allows to make an enhanced study of the induced magnetosphere variations as a response of the solar activity level. Since Mars Express has no onboard magnetometer, we used the hybrid models of the Martian plasma environment to get a proper frame to make an adequate statistics of the magnetospheric response. We found that the planetary ions escape rate for the quiet solar wind time intervals do not depend on the solar activity. However the induced magnetosphere structure depends very much on the low/high solar cycle season.

  18. Kinetic Distributions of Coronal Hole Protons in the Solar Wind Generation Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, P. A.; Vasquez, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    We solve the inhomogeneous kinetic guiding-center equation for the collisionless proton distribution function in a model polar coronal hole. The protons react to the local forces due to gravity, charge separation electric field, focusing in the decreasing magnetic field, and ponderomotive wave pressure. They are also heated through resonant cyclotron diffusion by a broad spectrum of obliquely-propagating ion cyclotron waves. We model the resonant wave intensities by a power-law extrapolation from the Alfvén wave results of Cranmer and van Ballegooijen (2005), multiplied by an additional scaling factor to represent the inefficient turbulent transport to resonant frequencies. We find that a scaling factor as low as 0.01 gives sufficient proton heating to yield a fast solar wind. The resulting proton distributions have a distinctive shape, compressed in the sunward half of velocity space, and more spread out (that is, hotter) in the anti-sunward half. Observation of similarly-shaped distributions in the fast wind by instruments on Solar Probe would provide evidence for resonant cyclotron heating as the generation mechanism for the solar wind. We will present results for the radial evolution of the model proton distribution, as well as moment quantities such as flow speed, temperatures and heating rates.

  19. Solar winds surfs waves in the Sun's atmosphere!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The fact that this electrified plasma speeds up to almost 3 million kilometres per hour as it leaves the Sun - twice as fast as originally predicted - has been known for years. The interpretation of how it happens is the real and surprising novelty: "The waves in the Sun's atmosphere are produced by vibrating solar magnetic field lines, which give solar wind particles a push just like an ocean wave gives a surfer a ride" said Dr John Kohl, principal investigator for the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) - the instrument among the 12 aboard SOHO which gathered the data - and for the Spartan 201 mission. The outermost solar atmosphere, or corona, is only seen from Earth during a total eclipse of the Sun, when it appears as a shimmering, white veil surrounding the black lunar disc. The corona is an extremely tenuous, electrically charged gas, known as plasma, that flows throughout the solar system as the solar wind. The waves are formed by rapidly vibrating magnetic fields in the coronal plasma. They are called magneto - hydro - dynamic (MHD) waves and are believed to accelerate the solar wind. The solar wind is made up of electrons and ions, electrically charged atoms that have lost electrons. The electric charge of the solar wind particles forces them to travel along invisible lines of magnetic force in the corona. The particles spiral around the magnetic field lines as they rush into space. "The magnetic field acts like a violin string: when it's touched, it vibrates. When the Sun's magnetic field vibrates with a frequency equal to that of the particle spiraling around the magnetic field, it heats it up, producing a force that accelerates the particle upward and away from the Sun," says Dr. Ester Antonucci, an astronomer at the observatory of Turin, Italy, and co-investigator for SOHO's UVCS an instrument developed with considerable financial support by the Italian Space Agency, ASI. In a way this is similar to what happens if two people hold a string at

  20. Interaction of Solar Wind and Magnetic Anomalies - Modelling from Moon to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, Markku; Kallio, Esa; Wedlund, Cyril Simon; Wurz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The crustal magnetic anomalies on both the Moon and Mars strongly affect the local plasma environment. On the Moon, the impinging solar wind is decelerated or deflected when interacting with the magnetic field anomaly, visible in the lunar surface as energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions or as reflected protons, and may play a part in the space weathering of the lunar soil. At Mars, the crustal magnetic fields have been shown to be associated with, e.g., enhanced electron scale heights and modified convection of ionospheric plasma, resulting in the plasma environment being dominated by crustal magnetic fields up to altitudes of 400km. Our previous modelling work suggested that Hall currents are a dominant feature in a Moon-like magnetic anomaly interaction at scales at or below the proton inertial length. In this work we study the solar wind interaction with magnetic anomalies and compare the plasma environments of a Moon-like anomaly with a Mars-like anomaly by introducing an ionosphere and an exosphere to probe the transition from an atmosphere-less anomaly interaction to an ionospheric one. We utilize a 3D hybrid plasma model, in which ions are modelled as particles while electrons form a charge-neutralizing massless fluid. The hybrid model gives a full description of ion kinetics and associated plasma phenomena at the simulation region ranging from instabilities to possible reconnection. The model can thus be used to interpret both in-situ particle and field observations and remotely-sensed ENA emissions. A self-consistent ionosphere package for the model is additionally in development.

  1. Predicting Atmospheric Ionization and Excitation by Precipitating SEP and Solar Wind Protons Measured By MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolitz, Rebecca; Dong, Chuanfei; Lee, Christina; Lillis, Rob; Brain, David; Curry, Shannon; Halekas, Jasper; Bougher, Stephen W.; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    Precipitating energetic particles ionize and excite planetary atmospheres, increasing electron content and producing aurora. At Mars, the solar wind and solar energetic particles (SEPs) can precipitate directly into the atmosphere because solar wind protons can charge exchange to become neutral and pass the magnetosheath, and SEPs are sufficiently energetic to cross the magnetosheath unchanged. We will compare ionization and Lyman alpha emission rates for solar wind and SEP protons during nominal solar activity and a CME shock front impact event on May 16 2016. We will use the Atmospheric Scattering of Protons and Energetic Neutrals (ASPEN) model to compare excitation and ionization rates by SEPs and solar wind protons currently measured by the SWIA (Solar Wind Ion Analyzer) and SEP instruments aboard the MAVEN spacecraft. Results will help quantify how SEP and solar wind protons influence atmospheric energy deposition during solar minimum.

  2. Ensemble downscaling in coupled solar wind-magnetosphere modeling for space weather forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M J; Horbury, T S; Wicks, R T; McGregor, S L; Savani, N P; Xiong, M

    2014-06-01

    Advanced forecasting of space weather requires simulation of the whole Sun-to-Earth system, which necessitates driving magnetospheric models with the outputs from solar wind models. This presents a fundamental difficulty, as the magnetosphere is sensitive to both large-scale solar wind structures, which can be captured by solar wind models, and small-scale solar wind "noise," which is far below typical solar wind model resolution and results primarily from stochastic processes. Following similar approaches in terrestrial climate modeling, we propose statistical "downscaling" of solar wind model results prior to their use as input to a magnetospheric model. As magnetospheric response can be highly nonlinear, this is preferable to downscaling the results of magnetospheric modeling. To demonstrate the benefit of this approach, we first approximate solar wind model output by smoothing solar wind observations with an 8 h filter, then add small-scale structure back in through the addition of random noise with the observed spectral characteristics. Here we use a very simple parameterization of noise based upon the observed probability distribution functions of solar wind parameters, but more sophisticated methods will be developed in the future. An ensemble of results from the simple downscaling scheme are tested using a model-independent method and shown to add value to the magnetospheric forecast, both improving the best estimate and quantifying the uncertainty. We suggest a number of features desirable in an operational solar wind downscaling scheme. Solar wind models must be downscaled in order to drive magnetospheric models Ensemble downscaling is more effective than deterministic downscaling The magnetosphere responds nonlinearly to small-scale solar wind fluctuations.

  3. Characteristics of Solar Wind Density Depletions During Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keunchan Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar wind density depletions are phenomena that solar wind density is rapidly decreased and keep the state. They are generally believed to be caused by the interplanetary (IP shocks. However, there are other cases that are hardly associated with IP shocks. We set up a hypothesis for this phenomenon and analyze this study. We have collected the solar wind parameters such as density, speed and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF data related to the solar wind density depletion events during the period from 1996 to 2013 that are obtained with the advanced composition explorer (ACE and the Wind satellite. We also calculate two pressures (magnetic, dynamic and analyze the relation with density depletion. As a result, we found total 53 events and the most these phenomena’s sources caused by IP shock are interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME. We also found that solar wind density depletions are scarcely related with IP shock’s parameters. The solar wind density is correlated with solar wind dynamic pressure within density depletion. However, the solar wind density has an little anti-correlation with IMF strength during all events of solar wind density depletion, regardless of the presence of IP shocks. Additionally, In 47 events of IP shocks, we find 6 events that show a feature of blast wave. The quantities of IP shocks are weaker than blast wave from the Sun, they are declined in a short time after increasing rapidly. We thus argue that IMF strength or dynamic pressure are an important factor in understanding the nature of solar wind density depletion. Since IMF strength and solar wind speed varies with solar cycle, we will also investigate the characteristics of solar wind density depletion events in different phases of solar cycle as an additional clue to their physical nature.

  4. The Genesis solar wind sample return mission: Past, present, and future

    OpenAIRE

    Burnett, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    The Genesis Discovery mission returned solar matter in the form of the solar wind with the goal of obtaining precise solar isotopic abundances (for the first time) and greatly improved elemental abundances. Measurements of the light noble gases in regime samples demonstrate that isotopes are fractionated in the solar wind relative to the solar photosphere. Theory is required for correction. Measurement of the solar wind O and N isotopes shows that these are very different from any inner solar...

  5. Are Energetic Electrons in the Solar Wind the Source of the Outer Radiation Belt?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xinlin; Baker, D. N.; Temerin, M.; Larson, D.; Lin, R. P.; Reeves, G. D.; Looper, M.; Kanekal, S. G.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Using data from WIND, SAMPEX (Solar Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer), and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sensors onboard geostationary satellites, we investigate the correlation of energetic electrons in the 20–200 keV range in the solar wind and of high speed solar wind streams with relativistic electrons in the magnetosphere to determine whether energetic electrons in the solar wind are the source of the outer relativistic electron radiation belt. Though there is ...

  6. Kinetic scale turbulence and dissipation in the solar wind: key observational results and future outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Wicks, R. T.; Perri, S.; Sahraoui, F.

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in the solar wind. Turbulence causes kinetic and magnetic energy to cascade to small scales where they are eventually dissipated, adding heat to the plasma. The details of how this occurs are not well understood. This article reviews the evidence for turbulent dissipation and examines various diagnostics for identifying solar wind regions where dissipation is occurring. We also discuss how future missions will further enhance our understanding of the importance of turbulence to solar wind dynamics. PMID:25848084

  7. SOHO celebrates its first year in space with new results on the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    In the equatorial regions of the Sun, SOHO's extreme ultraviolet imager EIT reveals frenzied activity in a hot atmosphere. It contrasts with more orderly conditions near the poles, in cooler regions called coronal holes. Another instrument in SOHO, the ultraviolet coronagraph UVCS, makes images of emissions from charged oxygen atoms high above the Sun's visible surface, where the generators of the solar wind are at work. In the equatorial zone, the Sun's magnetic field tries to bottle up the superheated gas. The gas wins the fight and some of it bursts out in funnel-shaped features called helmets. This break-out creates the "slow" solar wind, at 350-400 kilometres per second, which drags the magnetic lines of force with it, far out into the solar system. It seems to be a heat-driven wind, as indicated by UVCS measurements that indicate lower speeds for heavy atoms such as oxygen, compared with the nimbler hydrogen atoms. The wind generator over the coronal holes is completely different. Here the Sun's magnetic field offers no resistance to the outflow of material. Another mechanism accelerates the "fast" solar wind that blows from the coronal holes at 700-800 kilometres per second. It may involve high frequency magnetic waves. John Kohl of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (USA) and Giancarlo Noci of the University of Florence (Italy) believe that their instrument in SOHO will identify the fast wind generator. "UVCS reveals an amazing state of affairs at a height of about 1,700,000 kilometres above the coronal holes," Kohl explains. "There our oxygen atoms are far more agitated than the hydrogen, with 60 times more energy of motion. They rush about as if they were scalded at 200 million degrees C. So we are homing in on the mechanism that accelerates the fast solar wind, with this very strong clue that it favours the heavier elements". At greater distances from the Sun, SOHO's visible-light coronagraph LASCO traces the flow of the slow solar wind far into

  8. Constraining Solar Wind Heating Processes by Kinetic Properties of Heavy Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Patrick J; Kasper, Justin C; Raines, Jim M; Shearer, Paul; Gilbert, Jason A; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2016-06-24

    We analyze the heavy ion components (A>4  amu) in collisionally young solar wind plasma and show that there is a clear, stable dependence of temperature on mass, probably reflecting the conditions in the solar corona. We consider both linear and power law forms for the dependence and find that a simple linear fit of the form T_{i}/T_{p}=(1.35±.02)m_{i}/m_{p} describes the observations twice as well as the equivalent best fit power law of the form T_{i}/T_{p}=(m_{i}/m_{p})^{1.07±.01}. Most importantly we find that current model predictions based on turbulent transport and kinetic dissipation are in agreement with observed nonthermal heating in intermediate collisional age plasma for m/qheating in multispecies plasmas, along with predictions to be tested by the upcoming Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter missions to the near-Sun environment.

  9. Solar wind modulation of the Martian ionosphere observed by Mars Global Surveyor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-S. Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron density profiles in the Martian ionosphere observed by the radio occultation experiment on board Mars Global Surveyor have been analyzed to determine if the densities are influenced by the solar wind. Evidence is presented that the altitude of the maximum ionospheric electron density shows a positive correlation to the energetic proton flux in the solar wind. The solar wind modulation of the Martian ionosphere can be attributed to heating of the neutral atmosphere by the solar wind energetic proton precipitation. The modulation is observed to be most prominent at high solar zenith angles. It is argued that this is consistent with the proposed modulation mechanism.

  10. Venus Ionosphere and Induced Magnetosphere Responses to Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure and IMF Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingjuan; Toth, Gabor; Nagy, Andew; Russell, Chris

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we focus on the responses of the ionosphere and the induced magnetosphere of Venus to two typical changes in the solar wind: solar wind dynamic pressure changes and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction changes. Often regarded as the Earth’s ‘sister planet’, Venus has similar size and mass as Earth. But it is also remarkably different from Earth in many respects. Even though we have some basic knowledge of the solar wind interaction with Venus based on spacecraft observations, little is known about how the interaction and the resulting plasma escape rates vary in response to solar wind variations due to the lack of coordinated observations of both upstream solar wind conditions and simultaneous plasma properties in the Venus ionosphere. Furthermore, recent observations suggest that plasma escape rates are significantly enhanced during stormy space weather in response to solar wind pressure pulses (Edberg et al., 2011). Thus it is important to understand the plasma interaction under varying solar wind conditions. We use a sophisticated multi-species MHD model that has been recently developed for Venus (Ma et al., 2013) to characterize the changes of the ionosphere and the induced magnetosphere for varying solar wind conditions. Based on model results, we discuss the perturbations of the magnetic field in the ionosphere and its variation with altitude; the variation of the total plasma escape-rate; and the time scale of the Venus ionosphere and induced magnetosphere in responding to both types of changes in the solar wind.

  11. Earth's magnetosphere and outer radiation belt under sub-Alfvénic solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles J; Huang, Chia-Lin; Winslow, Reka M; Spence, Harlan E; Schwadron, Nathan A

    2016-10-03

    The interaction between Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind results in the formation of a collisionless bow shock 60,000-100,000 km upstream of our planet, as long as the solar wind fast magnetosonic Mach (hereafter Mach) number exceeds unity. Here, we present one of those extremely rare instances, when the solar wind Mach number reached steady values radiation belt. This study allows us to directly observe the state of the inner magnetosphere, including the radiation belts during a type of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling which is unusual for planets in our solar system but may be common for close-in extrasolar planets.

  12. Dedicated auxiliary power units for Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, S.; Weijer, C.J.T. van de

    1998-01-01

    The use of a dedicated auxiliary power unit is essential to utilize the potential that hybrid vehicles offer for efficient and ultra-clean transportation. An example of a hybrid project at the TNO Road-Vehicles Research Institute shows the development and the results of a dedicated auxiliary power

  13. Portable Hybrid Powered Water Filtration Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lourdes V. Balansay

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The existing water filtration device has features that can be developed to be more useful and functional during emergency situations. The project’s development has been aided by following provisions in PEC, NEC, NEMA and Philippine National Standard for Safe Drinking Water provide standards for the construction of the project. These standards protect both the prototype and the user. These also served as guide for the maintenance of every component. The design of the portable hybrid powered water filtration device shows that the project has more advanced features such as portability and the power supply used such as photovoltaic module solar cells and manually operated generator. This also shows its effectiveness and reliability based on the results of discharging test, water quality test and water production test. Based on analysis of the overall financial aspects, the machine can be profitable and the amount of revenue and operating cost will increase as years pass. Using the proper machine/ tools and methods of fabrication helps in easy assembly of the project. The materials and components used are cost effective and efficient. The best time for charging the battery using solar panel is 9:00 am onwards while the hand crank generator is too slow because the generated current is little. The water filtration device is very efficient regarding the operating hours and water production. The machine may have a great effect to society and economy in generation of clean available water at less cost.

  14. Solar wind control of stratospheric temperatures in Jupiter's auroral regions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, James Andrew; Orton, Glenn; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sato, Takao M.; Tao, Chihiro; Waite, J. Hunter; Cravens, Thomas; Houston, Stephen; Fletcher, Leigh; Irwin, Patrick; Greathouse, Thomas K.

    2017-10-01

    Auroral emissions are the process through which the interaction of a planet’s atmosphere and its external magnetosphere can be studied. Jupiter exhibits auroral emission at a multitude of wavelengths including the X-ray, ultraviolet and near-infrared. Enhanced emission of CH4 and other stratospheric hydrocarbons is also observed coincident with Jupiter’s shorter-wavelength auroral emission (e.g. Caldwell et al., 1980, Icarus 44, 667-675, Kostiuk et al., 1993, JGR 98, 18823). This indicates that auroral processes modify the thermal structure and composition of the auroral stratosphere. The exact mechanism responsible for this auroral-related heating of the stratosphere has however remained elusive (Sinclair et al., 2017a, Icarus 292, 182-207, Sinclair et al., 2017b, GRL, 44, 5345-5354). We will present an analysis of 7.8-μm images of Jupiter measured by COMICS (Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrograph, Kataza et al., 2000, Proc. SPIE(4008), 1144-1152) on the Subaru telescope. These images were acquired on January 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, February 4, 5th and May 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th in 2017, allowing the daily variability of Jupiter’s auroral-related stratospheric heating to be tracked. Preliminary results suggest lower stratospheric temperatures are directly forced by the solar wind dynamical pressure. The southern auroral hotspot exhibited a significant increase in brightness temperature over a 24-hour period. Over the same time period, a solar wind propagation model (Tao et al. 2005, JGR 110, A11208) predicts a strong increase in the solar wind dynamical pressure at Jupiter.

  15. The genesis solar-wind sample return mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The compositions of the Earth's crust and mantle, and those of the Moon and Mars, are relatively well known both isotopically and elementally. The same is true of our knowledge of the asteroid belt composition, based on meteorite analyses. Remote measurements of Venus, the Jovian atmosphere, and the outer planet moons, have provided some estimates of their compositions. The Sun constitutes a large majority, > 99%, of all the matter in the solar system. The elemental composition of the photosphere, the visible 'surface' of the Sun, is constrained by absorption lines produced by particles above the surface. Abundances for many elements are reported to the {+-}10 or 20% accuracy level. However, the abundances of other important elements, such as neon, cannot be determined in this way due to a relative lack of atomic states at low excitation energies. Additionally and most importantly, the isotopic composition of the Sun cannot be determined astronomically except for a few species which form molecules above sunspots, and estimates derived from these sources lack the accuracy desired for comparison with meteoritic and planetary surface samples measured on the Earth. The solar wind spreads a sample of solar particles throughout the heliosphere, though the sample is very rarified: collecting a nanogram of oxygen, the third most abundant element, in a square centimeter cross section at the Earth's distance from the Sun takes five years. Nevertheless, foil collectors exposed to the solar wind for periods of hours on the surface of the Moon during the Apollo missions were used to determine the helium and neon solar-wind compositions sufficiently to show that the Earth's atmospheric neon was significantly evolved relative to the Sun. Spacecraft instruments developed subsequently have provided many insights into the composition of the solar wind, mostly in terms of elemental composition. These instruments have the advantage of observing a number of

  16. Nonlinear development of shocklike structure in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E; Parks, G K; Wilber, M; Lin, N

    2009-07-17

    We report first in situ multispacecraft observations of nonlinear steepening of compressional pulses in the solar wind upstream of Earth's bow shock. The magnetic field of a compressional pulse formed at the upstream edge of density holes is shown to suddenly break and steepen into a shocklike structure. During the early phase of development thermalization of ions is insignificant. Substantial thermalization of ions occurs as gyrating ions are observed at the steepened edge. These observations indicate that the mechanisms causing the dissipation of magnetic fields (currents) and ions are different in the early phase of shock development.

  17. Hybrid simulation: an active power filter case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Garcés

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid simulation concept consisting of a combination of computer simulation and laboratory tests. This approach is a cost effective alternative to physically testing the whole system and allows better understanding of complex coupled systems.This paper describes implementing an active power filter (APF hybrid prototype where the source system and load are implemented as a real-time simulation and the system of static power converter acting as an active power filter is implemented in physical hardware. It also confirmed the hybrid simulation results by implementing the simulation in MATLAB-Simulink regarding the same system implemented during the active power filter analysis and design stage.

  18. Modeling of short scale turbulence in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Krishan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind serves as a laboratory for investigating magnetohydrodynamic turbulence under conditions irreproducible on the terra firma. Here we show that the frame work of Hall magnetohydrodynamics (HMHD, which can support three quadratic invariants and allows nonlinear states to depart fundamentally from the Alfvénic, is capable of reproducing in the inertial range the three branches of the observed solar wind magnetic fluctuation spectrum - the Kolmogorov branch f -5/3 steepening to f -α1 with on the high frequency side and flattening to f -1 on the low frequency side. These fluctuations are found to be associated with the nonlinear Hall-MHD Shear Alfvén waves. The spectrum of the concomitant whistler type fluctuations is very different from the observed one. Perhaps the relatively stronger damping of the whistler fluctuations may cause their unobservability. The issue of equipartition of energy through the so called Alfvén ratio acquires a new status through its dependence, now, on the spatial scale.

  19. Model for vortex turbulence with discontinuities in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Verkhoglyadova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of vortex with embedded discontinuities in plasma flow is developed in the framework of ideal MHD in a low b plasma. Vortex structures are considered as a result of 2-D evolution of nonlinear shear Alfvén waves in the heliosphere. Physical properties of the solutions and vector fields are analyzed and the observational aspects of the model are discussed. The ratio of normal components to the discontinuity Br /Vr can be close to -2. The alignment between velocity and magnetic field vectors takes place. Spacecraft crossing such vortices will typically observe a pair of discontinuities, but with dissimilar properties. Occurrence rate for different discontinuity types is estimated and agrees with observations in high-speed solar wind stream. Discontinuity crossing provides a backward rotation of magnetic field vector and can be observed as part of a backward arc. The Ulysses magnetometer data obtained in the fast solar wind are compared with the results of theoretical modelling.

  20. Solar Wind-Induced Erosion of PLUTÓS Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez De Tejada, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary ionospheres eroded by the solar wind provide mass and momentum to plasma wakes that extend downstream along the solar wind direction. Similar conditions can be applicable to Pluto where an extended atmosphere is expected given its low gravity force. Measurements conducted in the Venus plasma environment have shown that the Venus nightward directed ionospheric flow is deviated on the ecliptic plane as a result of its combined participation with the strong atmospheric rotation. At Pluto that deviation will be on a direction with a component perpendicular to the ecliptic plane given that its rotation axis is oriented ~30° away from that plane+. Measurements in the Venus wake also show the existence of plasma vortex structures located downstream from the planet and it is possible that similar features may be detected far downstream from Pluto along its plasma wake ++. + Pérez-de-Tejada, H., et al., Pluto´s plasma wake orientated away from the ecliptic plane ICARUS, 246, 310-316, 2015. ++Lundin, R. et al., A large-scale flow vortex in the Venus plasma tail and its fluid dynamic interpretation. GRL, 40(7), 1273, 2013; Pérez-de-Tejada, H., et al., Plasma vortices in planetary wakes: Open Questions in Cosmology, INTECH Pub., Dec. 2012 (ISB 978-953-51-0880-1).

  1. Self-Consistent and Time-Dependent Solar Wind Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, K. K.; Musielak, Z. E.; Rosner, R.; Suess, S. T.; Sulkanen, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the first results from a self-consistent study of Alfven waves for the time-dependent, single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solar wind equations, using a modified version of the ZEUS MHD code. The wind models we examine are radially symmetrical and magnetized; the initial outflow is described by the standard Parker wind solution. Our study focuses on the effects of Alfven waves on the outflow and is based on solving the full set of the ideal nonlinear MHD equations. In contrast to previous studies, no assumptions regarding wave linearity, wave damping, and wave-flow interaction are made; thus, the models naturally account for the back-reaction of the wind on the waves, as well as for the nonlinear interaction between different types of MHD waves. Our results clearly demonstrate when momentum deposition by Alfven waves in the solar wind can be sufficient to explain the origin of fast streams in solar coronal holes; we discuss the range of wave amplitudes required to obtained such fast stream solutions.

  2. Formation of Heliospheric Arcs of Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, A. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; Devore, C. R.; Wyper, P. F.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge in solar and heliospheric physics is understanding the origin and nature of the so-called slow solar wind. The Sun's atmosphere is divided into magnetically open regions, known as coronal holes, where the plasma streams out freely and fills the solar system, and closed regions, where the plasma is confined to coronal loops. The boundary between these regions extends outward as the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). Measurements of plasma composition strongly imply that much of the slow wind consists of plasma from the closed corona that escapes onto open field lines, presumably by field-line opening or by interchange reconnection. Both of these processes are expected to release closed-field plasma into the solar wind within and immediately adjacent to the HCS. Mysteriously, however, slow wind with closed-field plasma composition is often observed in situ far from the HCS. We use high-resolution, three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations to calculate the dynamics of a coronal hole with a geometry that includes a narrow corridor flanked by closed field and is driven by supergranule-like flows at the coronal-hole boundary. These dynamics produce giant arcs of closed-field plasma that originate at the open-closed boundary in the corona, but extend far from the HCS and span tens of degrees in latitude and longitude at Earth. We conclude that such structures can account for the long-puzzling slow-wind observations.

  3. Spiky Structures around Reconnection Exhausts in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enžl, Jakub; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdeněk; Přech, Lubomír

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents for the first time observations of unusual reconnection events in the solar wind. In all solar wind types, we identify magnetic reconnection exhausts accompanied by one or two side jets. This complex structure is created around a single current sheet and the jet(s) oriented in the same direction as the main exhaust is (are) spatially separated from it. A statistical analysis of reconnection exhausts in Wind observations (422 events) revealed that about 12% of exhausts is accompanied with one side jet and 3% of exhausts is bounded by two side jets, one on each side. Multispacecraft observations of events allow us to conclude that these structures are not consistent with a folding of the reconnection exhaust boundary. A source of these side jets is probably multiple or patchy reconnection at or close to the heliospheric current sheet. We suggest a scenario based on multiple reconnection that would lead to the presence of two side jets. A single jet is caused by a broken X-line consisting of two or more spatially separated parts.

  4. Solar wind implication on dust ion acoustic rogue waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelghany, A. M., E-mail: asmaaallah20@yahoo.com; Abd El-Razek, H. N., E-mail: hosam.abdelrazek@yahoo.com; El-Labany, S. K., E-mail: skellabany@hotmail.com [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Moslem, W. M., E-mail: wmmoslem@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The relevance of the solar wind with the magnetosphere of Jupiter that contains positively charged dust grains is investigated. The perturbation/excitation caused by streaming ions and electron beams from the solar wind could form different nonlinear structures such as rogue waves, depending on the dominant role of the plasma parameters. Using the reductive perturbation method, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and further modified (KdV) equation. Assuming that the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency, these equations are transformed into nonlinear Schrödinger equations with appropriate coefficients. Rational solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation shows that rogue wave envelopes are supported by the present plasma model. It is found that the existence region of rogue waves depends on the dust-acoustic speed and the streaming temperatures for both the ions and electrons. The dependence of the maximum rogue wave envelope amplitude on the system parameters has been investigated.

  5. Formation of Heliospheric Arcs of Slow Solar Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, A. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H. [Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R. [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wyper, P. F., E-mail: aleida@umich.edu [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    A major challenge in solar and heliospheric physics is understanding the origin and nature of the so-called slow solar wind. The Sun’s atmosphere is divided into magnetically open regions, known as coronal holes, where the plasma streams out freely and fills the solar system, and closed regions, where the plasma is confined to coronal loops. The boundary between these regions extends outward as the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). Measurements of plasma composition strongly imply that much of the slow wind consists of plasma from the closed corona that escapes onto open field lines, presumably by field-line opening or by interchange reconnection. Both of these processes are expected to release closed-field plasma into the solar wind within and immediately adjacent to the HCS. Mysteriously, however, slow wind with closed-field plasma composition is often observed in situ far from the HCS. We use high-resolution, three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations to calculate the dynamics of a coronal hole with a geometry that includes a narrow corridor flanked by closed field and is driven by supergranule-like flows at the coronal-hole boundary. These dynamics produce giant arcs of closed-field plasma that originate at the open-closed boundary in the corona, but extend far from the HCS and span tens of degrees in latitude and longitude at Earth. We conclude that such structures can account for the long-puzzling slow-wind observations.

  6. Lunar precursor effects in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.; Poppe, A. R.; Farrell, W. M.; Delory, G. T.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Plaschke, F.; Roux, A.; Ergun, R. E.

    2012-05-01

    The two ARTEMIS probes observe significant precursor activity upstream from the Moon, when magnetically connected to the dayside lunar surface. The most common signature consists of high levels of whistler wave activity near half of the electron cyclotron frequency. This precursor activity extends to distances of many thousands of km, in both the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosphere. In the magnetosphere, electrons reflect from a combination of magnetic and electrostatic fields above the lunar surface, forming loss cone distributions. In the solar wind they generally form conics, as a result of reflection from an obstacle moving with respect to the plasma frame (just as at a shock). The anisotropy associated with these reflected electrons provides the free energy source for the whistlers, with cyclotron resonance conditions met between the reflected source population and Moonward-propagating waves. These waves can in turn affect incoming plasma, and we observe significant perpendicular electron heating and plasma density depletions in some cases. In the magnetosphere, we also observe broadband electrostatic modes driven by beams of secondary electrons and/or photoelectrons accelerated outward from the surface. We also occasionally see waves near the ion cyclotron frequency in the magnetosphere. These lower frequency waves, which may result from the presence of ions of lunar origin, modulate the whistlers described above, as well as the electrons. Taken together, our observations suggest that the presence of the Moon leads to the formation of an upstream region analogous in many ways to the terrestrial electron foreshock.

  7. The Solar Wind as a Magnetofluid Turbulence Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    The solar wind is the Sun's exosphere. As the solar atmosphere expands into interplanetary space, it is accelerated and heated. Data from spacecraft located throughout the heliosphere have revealed that this exosphere has velocities of several hundred kilometers/sec, densities at Earth orbit of about 5 particles/cu cm, and an entrained magnetic field that at Earth orbit that is about 5 10-5 Gauss. A fascinating feature of the solar wind is that the magnetic field fluctuates in a way that is highly reminiscent of "Alfven waves, i.e., the fluctuating magnetic fields are more-or-less aligned with fluctuations in the velocity of the plasma and, with proper normalization, have approximately equal magnitudes. The imperfect (observed) alignment leads to a variety of complex interactions. In many respects, the flow patterns appear to be an example of fully developed magneto fluid turbulence. Recently, the dissipation range of this turbulence has been studied using search coil magnetometer data from the STAFF instrument on the four Cluster spacecraft. I will attempt to give an overview of selected properties of this large-scale and small-scale turbulence.

  8. Solar Metallicity Derived from In-Situ Solar Wind Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Steiger, R.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2016-12-01

    Solar metallicity — the fraction per unit mass that is composed of elements heavier than He — is a critical and fundamental quantity indicative of the history and future evolution of the Sun. Over the last decade spectroscopic observations of the solar photosphere using inversion techniques of increasing sophistication have led to a downward revision of the abundances of heavy elements, specifically C, N, and O, and thus of the solar metallicity. This in turn has led to a crisis of solar models, which became inconsistent with the results of helioseismology as a consequence of the missing opacity from these elements. We present recently released solar wind compositional data to determine the metallicity of the Sun. We focus on a present-day solar sample available to us, which is the least fractionated solar wind from coronal holes near the poles of the Sun. Using these data, we derive a metallicity of Z = 0.0196 ± 0.0014, which is signicantly larger than recent published values based on photospheric spectroscopy, but consistent with results from helioseismology.

  9. Validation of Model Forecasts of the Ambient Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macneice, P. J.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2009-01-01

    Independent and automated validation is a vital step in the progression of models from the research community into operational forecasting use. In this paper we describe a program in development at the CCMC to provide just such a comprehensive validation for models of the ambient solar wind in the inner heliosphere. We have built upon previous efforts published in the community, sharpened their definitions, and completed a baseline study. We also provide first results from this program of the comparative performance of the MHD models available at the CCMC against that of the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model. An important goal of this effort is to provide a consistent validation to all available models. Clearly exposing the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different models will enable forecasters to craft more reliable ensemble forecasting strategies. Models of the ambient solar wind are developing rapidly as a result of improvements in data supply, numerical techniques, and computing resources. It is anticipated that in the next five to ten years, the MHD based models will supplant semi-empirical potential based models such as the WSA model, as the best available forecast models. We anticipate that this validation effort will track this evolution and so assist policy makers in gauging the value of past and future investment in modeling support.

  10. Magnetic Reconnection and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K. T.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Gosling, J. T.; Greco, A.; Servidio, S.; Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Phan, T. D.

    2014-05-01

    A statistical relationship between magnetic reconnection, current sheets, and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind is reported for the first time using in situ measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We identify intermittency as non-Gaussian fluctuations in increments of the magnetic field vector B that are spatially and temporally nonuniform. The reconnection events and current sheets are found to be concentrated in intervals of intermittent turbulence, identified using the partial variance of increments method: within the most non-Gaussian 1% of fluctuations in B, we find 87%-92% of reconnection exhausts and ˜9% of current sheets. Also, the likelihood that an identified current sheet will also correspond to a reconnection exhaust increases dramatically as the least intermittent fluctuations are removed from the data set. Hence, the turbulent solar wind contains a hierarchy of intermittent magnetic field structures that are increasingly linked to current sheets, which in turn are progressively more likely to correspond to sites of magnetic reconnection. These results could have far reaching implications for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas where turbulence and magnetic reconnection are ubiquitous.

  11. 3D Electric Waveforms of Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Monson, S. J.

    2018-01-01

    Electric fields provide the major coupling between the turbulence of the solar wind and particles. A large part of the turbulent spectrum of fluctuations in the solar wind is thought to be kinetic Alfvén waves; however, whistlers have recently been found to be important. In this article, we attempt to determine the mode identification of individual waveforms using the three-dimensional antenna system of the SWaves experiments on the STEREO spacecraft. Samples are chosen using waveforms with an apparent periodic structure, selected visually. The short antennas of STEREO respond to density fluctuations and to electric fields. Measurement of four quantities using only three antennas presents a problem. Methods to overcome or to ignore this difficulty are presented. We attempt to decide whether the waveforms correspond to the whistler mode or the Alfvén mode by using the direction of rotation of the signal. Most of the waveforms are so oblique—nearly linearly polarized—that the direction cannot be determined. However, about one third of the waveforms can be identified, and whistlers and Alfvén waves are present in roughly equal numbers. The selected waveforms are very intense but intermittent and are orders of magnitude stronger than the average, yet their accumulated signal accounts for a large fraction of the average. The average, however, is supposed to be the result of a turbulent mixture of many waves, not short coherent events. This presents a puzzle for future work.

  12. Charged-Particle Transport in the Data-Driven, Non-Isotropic Turbulent Mangetic Field in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, P.; Jokipii, J. R.; Giacalone, J.

    2016-12-01

    Anisotropies in astrophysical turbulence has been proposed and observed for a long time. And recent observations adopting the multi-scale analysis techniques provided a detailed description of the scale-dependent power spectrum of the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the scale-dependent magnetic field line at different scales in the solar wind. In the previous work, we proposed a multi-scale method to synthesize non-isotropic turbulent magnetic field with pre-determined power spectra of the fluctuating magnetic field as a function of scales. We present the effect of test particle transport in the resulting field with a two-scale algorithm. We find that the scale-dependent turbulence anisotropy has a significant difference in the effect on charged par- ticle transport from what the isotropy or the global anisotropy has. It is important to apply this field synthesis method to the solar wind magnetic field based on spacecraft data. However, this relies on how we extract the power spectra of the turbulent magnetic field across different scales. In this study, we propose here a power spectrum synthesis method based on Fourier analysis to extract the large and small scale power spectrum from a single spacecraft observation with a long enough period and a high sampling frequency. We apply the method to the solar wind measurement by the magnetometer onboard the ACE spacecraft and regenerate the large scale isotropic 2D spectrum and the small scale anisotropic 2D spectrum. We run test particle simulations in the magnetid field generated in this way to estimate the transport coefficients and to compare with the isotropic turbulence model.

  13. Plasma β Scaling of Anisotropic Magnetic Field Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Flux Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Aveek; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Ebrahimi, Fatima

    2014-03-01

    Based on various observations, it has been suggested that at 1 AU, solar wind consists of "spaghetti"-like magnetic field structures that have the magnetic topology of flux tubes. It is also observed that the plasma fluctuation spectra at 1 AU show a plasma β dependence. Reconciling these two sets of observations and using the Invariance Principle, Bhattacharjee et al. suggested that the plasma inside every flux tube may become unstable with respect to pressure-driven instabilities and gives rise to fluctuation spectra that depend on the local plasma β. The present work is the first direct numerical simulation of such a flux tube. We solve the full magnetohydrodynamic equations using the DEBS code and show that if the plasma inside the flux tube is driven unstable by spatial inhomogeneities in the background plasma pressure, the observed nature of the fluctuating power spectra agrees reasonably well with observations, as well as the analytical prediction of Bhattacharjee et al.

  14. Space weather predictions and energetic particle transport in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbardo, G.; Veltri, P.; Pommois, P.

    Solar-terrestrial relationships are a wide range of physical phenomena which include perturbations of the Earth's magnetosphere and of the Earth's environment due to solar activity. These perturbations can heavily influence systems which use advanced technologies. For instance, geomagnetic storms can induce very strong EMF in the power distribution network. Also, increased fluxes of energetic particles in the magnetosphere can seriously damage telecommunication and navigation spacecraft. The research programme known as "Space Weather" aims at making predictions of such perturbations in order to minimize the risk for human life and economic losses. In particular, an understanding of energetic particle transport either from the Sun or from interplanetary shocks to the Earth can help to forecast high risk periods. Numerical results on particle propagation in solar wind magnetic turbulence is discussed.

  15. Empirical Constraints on Proton and Electron Heating in the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Matthaeus, William H.; Breech, Benjamin A.; Kasper, Justin C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents analyses of measured proton and electron temperatures in the high-speed solar wind that are used to calculate the separate rates of heat deposition for protons and electrons. It was found that the protons receive about 60% of the total plasma heating in the inner heliosphere, and that this fraction increases to approximately 80% by the orbit of Jupiter. The empirically derived partitioning of heat between protons and electrons is in rough agreement with theoretical predictions from a model of linear Vlasov wave damping. For a modeled power spectrum consisting only of Alfvenic fluctuations, the best agreement was found for a distribution of wavenumber vectors that evolves toward isotropy as distance increases.

  16. Plasma β scaling of anisotropic magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind flux tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Aveek [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Ebrahimi, Fatima, E-mail: aveek.sarkar@unh.edu, E-mail: amitava@princeton.edu, E-mail: ebrahimi@princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    Based on various observations, it has been suggested that at 1 AU, solar wind consists of 'spaghetti'-like magnetic field structures that have the magnetic topology of flux tubes. It is also observed that the plasma fluctuation spectra at 1 AU show a plasma β dependence. Reconciling these two sets of observations and using the Invariance Principle, Bhattacharjee et al. suggested that the plasma inside every flux tube may become unstable with respect to pressure-driven instabilities and gives rise to fluctuation spectra that depend on the local plasma β. The present work is the first direct numerical simulation of such a flux tube. We solve the full magnetohydrodynamic equations using the DEBS code and show that if the plasma inside the flux tube is driven unstable by spatial inhomogeneities in the background plasma pressure, the observed nature of the fluctuating power spectra agrees reasonably well with observations, as well as the analytical prediction of Bhattacharjee et al.

  17. On the fractal nature of the magnetic field energy density in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Kiyani, K.; Rowlands, G.; Watkins, N. W.

    2007-08-01

    The solar wind exhibits scaling typical of intermittent turbulence in the statistics of in situ fluctuations in both the magnetic and velocity fields. Intriguingly, quantities not directly accessed by theories of ideal, incompressible, MHD turbulence, such as magnetic energy density, B 2, nevertheless show evidence of simple fractal (self-affine) statistical scaling. We apply a novel statistical technique which is a sensitive discriminator of fractality to the B 2 timeseries from WIND and ACE. We show that robust fractal behaviour occurs at solar maximum and determine the scaling exponents. The probability density function (PDF) of fluctuations at solar maximum and minimum are distinct. Power law tails are seen at maximum, and the PDF is reminiscent of a Lévy flight.

  18. Effects of solar wind composition, anisotropy, and streaming on ordinary mode electromagnetic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, B.

    1973-01-01

    The stability of the low-frequency waves propagating transverse to the magnetic field of a plasma composed of electrons, protons, and alpha particles with anisotropic electron and ion temperatures is explored. The threshold for the ordinary mode instability and the growth rates have a very strong dependence on the electron temperature anisotropy but have a comparatively weaker dependence on the ion temperature anisotropy, on the relative abundance of helium to hydrogen, and on the relative streaming of two ion species. The threshold for the instability of these low-frequency waves is (m sub e/m sub p) to the 1/2 power times smaller than the one corresponding to high-frequency waves; however, for a relative abundance of helium to hydrogen up to 20% for the relevant known magnetic fields, particle densities, temperatures, and drifts, the solar wind remains below the threshold for this instability.

  19. The Power Quality Compensation Strategy for Power Distribution System Based on Hybrid Parallel Active Power Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid DEHINI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the main aim is to confront the performance of shunt active power filter (SAPF and the shunt hybrid active power filter (SHAPF to achieve flexibility and reliability of the filter devices. Both of the two devices used the classical proportional-integral controller for pulse generation to trigger the inventers MOSFET’s. In the adopted hybrid active filter there is a passive power filter with high power rating to filter the low order harmonies and one active filter with low power rating to filter the other high order harmonies. In order to investigate the effectiveness of (SHAPF, the studies have been accomplished using simulation with the MATLAB-SIMULINK. The results show That (SHAPF is more effective than (SAPF, and has lower cost.

  20. An extended structure-function model and its application to the analysis of solar wind intermittency properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. Tu

    Full Text Available An extended structure-function model is developed by including the new effect in the p-model of Meneveau and Sreenivasan which shows that the averaged energy cascade rate changes with scale, a situation which has been found to prevail in non-fully-developed turbulence in the inner solar wind. This model is useful for the small-scale fluctuations in the inner heliosphere, where the turbulence is not fully developed and cannot be explained quantitatively by any of the previous intermittency turbulence models. With two model parameters, the intrinsic index of the energy spectrum α, and the fragmentation fraction P1, the model can fit, for the first time, all the observed scaling exponents of the structure functions, which are calculated for time lags ranging from 81 s to 0.7 h from the Helios solar wind data. From the cases we studied we cannot establish for P1 either a clear radial evolution trend, or a solar-wind-speed or stream-structure dependence or a systematic anisotropy for both the flow velocity and magnetic field component fluctuations. Generally, P1 has values between 0.7 and 0.8. However, in some cases in low-speed wind P1 has somewhat higher values for the magnetic components, especially for the radial component. In high-speed wind, the inferred intrinsic spectral indices α of the velocity and magnetic field components are about equal, while the experimental spectral indices derived from the observed power spectra differ. The magnetic index is somewhat larger than the index of the velocity spectrum. For magnetic fluctuations in both high- and low-speed winds, the intrinsic exponent α has values which are near 1.5, while the observed spectral exponent has much higher values. In the solar wind with considerable density fluctuations near the interplanetary current sheet near 1 AU, it is found that P1 has a comparatively high value of 0

  1. Genesis Solar Wind Interstream, Coronal Hole and Coronal Mass Ejection Samples: Update on Availability and Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2017-01-01

    Recent refinement of analysis of ACE/SWICS data (Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer) and of onboard data for Genesis Discovery Mission of 3 regimes of solar wind at Earth-Sun L1 make it an appropriate time to update the availability and condition of Genesis samples specifically collected in these three regimes and currently curated at Johnson Space Center. ACE/SWICS spacecraft data indicate that solar wind flow types emanating from the interstream regions, from coronal holes and from coronal mass ejections are elementally and isotopically fractionated in different ways from the solar photosphere, and that correction of solar wind values to photosphere values is non-trivial. Returned Genesis solar wind samples captured very different kinds of information about these three regimes than spacecraft data. Samples were collected from 11/30/2001 to 4/1/2004 on the declining phase of solar cycle 23. Meshik, et al is an example of precision attainable. Earlier high precision laboratory analyses of noble gases collected in the interstream, coronal hole and coronal mass ejection regimes speak to degree of fractionation in solar wind formation and models that laboratory data support. The current availability and condition of samples captured on collector plates during interstream slow solar wind, coronal hole high speed solar wind and coronal mass ejections are de-scribed here for potential users of these samples.

  2. Cometary X-rays : solar wind charge exchange in cometary atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the planets and the interstellar medium is of key importance for the evolution of our solar system. The interaction with Earth's atmosphere is best known for the northern light. In case of Mars, the interaction with the solar wind might have lead to the erosion

  3. Information theoretical approach to discovering solar wind drivers of the outer radiation belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.P. Wing (Simon); J.R. Johnson (Jay); E. Camporeale (Enrico); G.D. Reeves (Geoffrey)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe solar wind-magnetosphere system is nonlinear. The solar wind drivers of geosynchronous electrons with energy range of 1.8–3.5 MeV are investigated using mutual information, conditional mutual information (CMI), and transfer entropy (TE). These information theoretical tools can

  4. Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Wind Including Pickup Protons and Turbulence Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons.We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 deg - .90 deg and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

  5. Interaction of the solar wind with Venus. [plasma measurements by Mariner space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, H. S.; Lazarus, A. J.; Siscoe, G. L.; Hartle, R. E.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.; Yeates, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    Two topics related to the interaction of the solar wind with Venus are considered. First, a short review of the experimental evidence with particular attention to plasma measurements carried out on Mariner-5 and Mariner-10 is given. Secondly, the results of some recent theoretical work on the interaction of the solar wind with the ionosphere of Venus are summarized.

  6. Preliminary analysis for implementation of a hybrid solar-wind system with storage of electrical energy generated through electrolytic hydrogen and fuel cells; Analise preliminar para implementacao de um sistema hibrido solar-eolico com armazenamento da energia eletrica gerada atraves de hidrogenio eletrolitico e celula a combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Daniel Gabriel; Furlan, Andre Luis; Lopes, Davi Gabriel [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica], e-mail: danielg@fem.unicamp.br; Silva, Ennio Peres; Apolinario, Fernando Resende [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (IFGW/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Gleb Wataghin. Lab. de Hidrogenio; Silva, Maria Eugenia Vieira da; Rocha, Paulo Alexandre Costa [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica e de Producao; Codeceira Neto, Alcides [Companhia Hidro Eletrica do Sao Francisco (CHESF), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Due to relevance of the study and applicability of hybrid electric power generation from solar photovoltaic and wind power in Brazil, the present paper aims to introduce briefly the importance of technical and economic comparison of two electrical energy storage technologies (batteries versus H2 + fuel cell) and also to indicate the previous difficulties related to this possible application. In this context, it was intended a partnership between State University of Campinas - UNICAMP, the Federal University of Ceara - UFC and Hydro Electric Company of the Sao Francisco - CHESF in the meaning of makes viable an implementation. (author)

  7. Agent-based power sharing scheme for active hybrid power sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhenhua

    The active hybridization technique provides an effective approach to combining the best properties of a heterogeneous set of power sources to achieve higher energy density, power density and fuel efficiency. Active hybrid power sources can be used to power hybrid electric vehicles with selected combinations of internal combustion engines, fuel cells, batteries, and/or supercapacitors. They can be deployed in all-electric ships to build a distributed electric power system. They can also be used in a bulk power system to construct an autonomous distributed energy system. An important aspect in designing an active hybrid power source is to find a suitable control strategy that can manage the active power sharing and take advantage of the inherent scalability and robustness benefits of the hybrid system. This paper presents an agent-based power sharing scheme for active hybrid power sources. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed agent-based power sharing scheme, simulation studies are performed for a hybrid power source that can be used in a solar car as the main propulsion power module. Simulation results clearly indicate that the agent-based control framework is effective to coordinate the various energy sources and manage the power/voltage profiles.

  8. The Role of Solar Wind Structures in the Generation of ULF Waves in the Inner Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L. R.; Souza, V. M.; Jauer, P. R.; da Silva, L. A.; Medeiros, C.; Braga, C. R.; Alves, M. V.; Koga, D.; Marchezi, J. P.; de Mendonça, R. R. S.; Dallaqua, R. S.; Barbosa, M. V. G.; Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Mendes, O.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Banik, M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2017-07-01

    The plasma of the solar wind incident upon the Earth's magnetosphere can produce several types of geoeffective events. Among them, an important phenomenon consists of the interrelation of the magnetospheric-ionospheric current systems and the charged-particle population of the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. Ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves resonantly interacting with such particles have been claimed to play a major role in the energetic particle flux changes, particularly at the outer radiation belt, which is mainly composed of electrons at relativistic energies. In this article, we use global magnetohydrodynamic simulations along with in situ and ground-based observations to evaluate the ability of two different solar wind transient (SWT) events to generate ULF (few to tens of mHz) waves in the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere. Magnetic field and plasma data from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite were used to characterize these two SWT events as being a sector boundary crossing (SBC) on 24 September 2013, and an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) in conjunction with a shock on 2 October 2013. Associated with these events, the twin Van Allen Probes measured a depletion of the outer belt relativistic electron flux concurrent with magnetic and electric field power spectra consistent with ULF waves. Two ground-based observatories apart in 90°C longitude also showed evidence of ULF-wave activity for the two SWT events. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation results show that the ULF-like oscillations in the modeled electric and magnetic fields observed during both events are a result from the SWT coupling to the magnetosphere. The analysis of the MHD simulation results together with the observations leads to the conclusion that the two SWT structures analyzed in this article can be geoeffective on different levels, with each one leading to distinct ring current intensities, but both SWTs are related to the same disturbance in the

  9. The distinct character of anisotropy and intermittency in inertial and kinetic range solar wind plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, Khurom; Chapman, Sandra; Osman, Kareem; Sahraoui, Fouad; Hnat, Bogdan

    2014-05-01

    The anisotropic nature of the scaling properties of solar wind magnetic turbulence fluctuations is investigated scale by scale using high cadence in situ magnetic field measurements from the Cluster, ACE and STEREO spacecraft missions in both fast and slow quiet solar wind conditions. The data span five decades in scales from the inertial range to the electron Larmor radius. We find a clear transition in scaling behaviour between the inertial and kinetic range of scales, which provides a direct, quantitative constraint on the physical processes that mediate the cascade of energy through these scales. In the inertial (magnetohydrodynamic) range the statistical nature of turbulent fluctuations are known to be anisotropic, both in the vector components of the magnetic field fluctuations (variance anisotropy) and in the spatial scales of these fluctuations (wavevector or k-anisotropy). We show for the first time that, when measuring parallel to the local magnetic field direction, the full statistical signature of the magnetic and Elsasser field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale-invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multi-exponent statistics observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations suggest the weakness, or absence, of a parallel magnetofluid turbulence energy cascade. In contrast to the inertial range, there is a successive increase toward isotropy between parallel and transverse power at scales below the ion Larmor radius, with isotropy being achieved at the electron Larmor radius. Computing higher-order statistics, we show that the full statistical signature of both parallel, and perpendicular fluctuations at scales below the ion Larmor radius are that of an isotropic globally scale-invariant non-Gaussian process. Lastly, we perform a survey of multiple intervals of quiet solar wind sampled under different plasma conditions (fast, slow wind; plasma beta etc.) and find that the

  10. A new view on the solar wind interaction with the Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Alok, Abhinaw; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Wurz, Peter; Vorburger, Audrey; Holmström, Mats; Lue, Charles; Harada, Yuki; Asamura, Kazushi

    2015-01-01

    Characterised by a surface bound exosphere and localised crustal magnetic fields, the Moon was considered as a passive object when solar wind interacts with it. However, the neutral particle and plasma measurements around the Moon by recent dedicated lunar missions, such as Chandrayaan-1, Kaguya, Chang'E-1, LRO, and ARTEMIS, as well as IBEX have revealed a variety of phenomena around the Moon which results from the interaction with solar wind, such as backscattering of solar wind protons as energetic neutral atoms (ENA) from lunar surface, sputtering of atoms from the lunar surface, formation of a "mini-magnetosphere" around lunar magnetic anomaly regions, as well as several plasma populations around the Moon, including solar wind protons scattered from the lunar surface, from the magnetic anomalies, pick-up ions, protons in lunar wake and more. This paper provides a review of these recent findings and presents the interaction of solar wind with the Moon in a new perspective.

  11. Space and power efficient hybrid counters array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Alan G [Mount Kisco, NY; Salapura, Valentina [Chappaqua, NY

    2009-05-12

    A hybrid counter array device for counting events. The hybrid counter array includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each counter device for receiving signals representing occurrences of events from an event source and providing a first count value corresponding to a lower order bits of the hybrid counter array. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory locations in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory location for storing a second count value representing higher order bits of the hybrid counter array. A control device monitors each of the N counter devices of the first counter portion and initiates updating a value of a corresponding second count value stored at the corresponding addressable memory location in the second counter portion. Thus, a combination of the first and second count values provide an instantaneous measure of number of events received.

  12. Simulating the Reiner Gamma Lunar Swirl: Solar Wind Standoff Works!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Lue, Charles; Ahmadi, Tara; Horányi, Mihály

    2017-04-01

    Discovered by early astronomers during the Renaissance, the Reiner Gamma formation is a prominent lunar surface feature. Observations have shown that the tadpole-shaped albedo marking, or swirl, is co-located with one of the strongest crustal magnetic anomalies on the Moon. The region therefore presents an ideal test case to constrain the kinetic solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies and its possible consequences for lunar swirl formation. All known swirls have been associated with magnetic anomalies, but the opposite does not hold. The evolutionary scenario of the lunar albedo markings has been under debate since the Apollo era. By coupling fully kinetic simulations with a surface vector mapping model based on Kaguya and Lunar Prospector magnetic field measurements, we show that solar wind standoff is the dominant process to have formed the lunar swirls. It is an ion-electron kinetic interaction mechanism that locally prevents weathering by solar wind ions and the subsequent formation of nanophase iron. The correlation between the surface weathering process and the surface reflectance is optimal when evaluating the proton energy flux, rather than the proton density or number flux. This is an important result to characterise the primary process for surface darkening. In addition, the simulated proton reflection rate is for the first time directly compared with in-orbit flux measurements from the SARA:SWIM ion sensor onboard the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft. The agreement is found excellent. Understanding the relation between the lunar surface albedo features and the co-located magnetic anomaly is essential for our interpretation of the Moon's geological history, space weathering, and to evaluate future lunar exploration opportunities. This work was supported in part by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI): Institute for Modeling Plasmas, Atmosphere, and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT). The work by C.L. was supported by NASA grant NNX

  13. The effect of broad-band Alfven-cyclotron waves spectra on the preferential heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Y. G. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, 20064 (United States) and Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States) and Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Vinas, A. F. [Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-06-13

    In anticipation of results from inner heliospheric missions such as the Solar Orbiter and the Solar Probe we present the results from 1.5D hybrid simulations to study the role of magnetic fluctuations for the heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind. We consider the effects of nonlinear Alfven-cyclotron waves at different frequency regimes. Monochromatic nonlinear Alfven-alpha-cyclotron waves are known to preferentially heat and accelerate He{sup ++} ions in collisionless low beta plasma. In this study we demonstrate that these effects are preserved when higherfrequency monochromatic and broad-band spectra of Alfven-proton-cyclotron waves are considered. Comparison between several nonlinear monochromatic waves shows that the ion temperatures, anisotropies and relative drift are quantitatively affected by the shift in frequency. Including a broad-band wave-spectrum results in a significant reduction of both the parallel and the perpendicular temperature components for the He{sup ++} ions, whereas the proton heating is barely influenced, with the parallel proton temperature only slightly enhanced. The differential streaming is strongly affected by the available wave power in the resonant daughter ion-acoustic waves. Therefore for the same initial wave energy, the relative drift is significantly reduced in the case of initial wave-spectra in comparison to the simulations with monochromatic waves.

  14. Low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations in Venus' solar wind interaction region: Venus Express observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guicking

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate wave properties of low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations in Venus' solar wind interaction region based on the measurements made on board the Venus Express spacecraft. The orbit geometry is very suitable to investigate the fluctuations in Venus' low-altitude magnetosheath and mid-magnetotail and provides an opportunity for a comparative study of low-frequency waves at Venus and Mars. The spatial distributions of the wave properties, in particular in the dayside and nightside magnetosheath as well as in the tail and mantle region, are similar to observations at Mars. As both planets do not have a global magnetic field, the interaction process of the solar wind with both planets is similar and leads to similar instabilities and wave structures. We focus on the spatial distribution of the wave intensity of the fluctuating magnetic field and detect an enhancement of the intensity in the dayside magnetosheath and a strong decrease towards the terminator. For a detailed investigation of the intensity distribution we adopt an analytical streamline model to describe the plasma flow around Venus. This allows displaying the evolution of the intensity along different streamlines. It is assumed that the waves are generated in the vicinity of the bow shock and are convected downstream with the turbulent magnetosheath flow. However, neither the different Mach numbers upstream and downstream of the bow shock, nor the variation of the cross sectional area and the flow velocity along the streamlines play probably an important role in order to explain the observed concentration of wave intensity in the dayside magnetosheath and the decay towards the nightside magnetosheath. But, the concept of freely evolving or decaying turbulence is in good qualitative agreement with the observations, as we observe a power law decay of the intensity along the streamlines. The observations support the assumption of wave convection through the magnetosheath, but

  15. EMMI-Electric solar wind sail facilitated Manned Mars Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janhunen, Pekka; Merikallio, Sini; Paton, Mark

    2015-08-01

    The novel propellantless electric solar wind sail concept promises efficient low thrust transportation in the Solar System outside Earth's magnetosphere. Combined with asteroid mining to provide water and synthetic cryogenic rocket fuel in orbits of Earth and Mars, possibilities for affordable continuous manned presence on Mars open up. Orbital fuel and water enable reusable bidirectional Earth-Mars vehicles for continuous manned presence on Mars and allow smaller fuel fraction of spacecraft than what is achievable by traditional means. Water can also be used as radiation shielding of the manned compartment, thus reducing the launch mass further. In addition, the presence of fuel in the orbit of Mars provides the option for an all-propulsive landing, thus potentially eliminating issues of heavy heat shields and augmenting the capability of pinpoint landing. With this E-sail enabled scheme, the recurrent cost of continuous bidirectional traffic between Earth and Mars might ultimately approach the recurrent cost of running the International Space Station, ISS.

  16. Recent progress in astrophysical plasma turbulence from solar wind observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the recent progress that has been made in understanding astrophysical plasma turbulence in the solar wind, from in situ spacecraft observations. At large scales, where the turbulence is predominantly Alfvenic, measurements of critical balance, residual energy, and 3D structure are discussed, along with comparison to recent models of strong Alfvenic turbulence. At these scales, a few percent of the energy is also in compressive fluctuations, and their nature, anisotropy, and relation to the Alfvenic component is described. In the small scale kinetic range, below the ion gyroscale, the turbulence becomes predominantly kinetic Alfven in nature, and measurements of the spectra, anisotropy, and intermittency of this turbulence are discussed with respect to recent cascade models. One of the major remaining questions is how the turbulent energy is dissipated, and some recent work on this question, in addition to future space missions which will help to answer it, are briefly discussed.

  17. Investigation of Backside Textures for Genesis Solar Wind Silicon Collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C. P.; Burkett, P. J.; Rodriguez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Genesis solar wind collectors were comprised of a suite of 15 types of ultrapure materials. The single crystal, pure silicon collectors were fabricated by two methods: float zone (FZ) and Czochralski (CZ). Because of slight differences in bulk purity and surface cleanliness among the fabrication processes and the specific vendor, it is desirable to know which variety of silicon and identity of vendor, so that appropriate reference materials can be used. The Czochralski method results in a bulk composition with slightly higher oxygen, for example. The CZ silicon array wafers that were Genesis-flown were purchased from MEMC Electronics. Most of the Genesis-flown FZ silicon was purchased from Unisil and cleaned by MEMC, although a few FZ wafers were acquired from International Wafer Service (IWS).

  18. Cyclotron instabilities driven by temperature anisotropy in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, N.; Yoon, P. H.; Zaheer, S.

    2017-10-01

    Kinetic plasma instabilities are important for regulating the temperature anisotropies of electrons and ions in solar wind. For the low beta regime, it is known that electromagnetic ion/electron cyclotron instabilities are important, but in the literature these unstable modes are discussed under the assumption of parallel propagation. The present paper extends the analysis to two (or with cylindrical symmetry, three) dimensions. The analysis is further extended to include quasilinear description with the assumption of the bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. Such an analysis lays the foundation for an eventual study in which cyclotron instabilities as well as obliquely propagating unstable modes such as the mirror instability are simultaneously taken into account. The present paper first lays down the basis for such future efforts in which the two- or three dimensional linear and quasilinear theories of cyclotron instabilities in the low beta regime are formulated.

  19. Solar Wind Strahl Broadening by Self-Generated Plasma Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, J.; Vinas, A. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.

    2013-01-01

    This Letter reports on the results of numerical simulations which may provide a possible explanation for the strahl broadening during quiet solar conditions. The relevant processes involved in the broadening are due to kinetic quasi-linear wave-particle interaction. Making use of static analytical electron distribution in an inhomogeneous field, it is found that self-generated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency, i.e., Langmuir waves, are capable of scattering the strahl component, resulting in energy and pitch-angle diffusion that broadens its velocity distribution significantly. The present theoretical results provide an alternative or complementary explanation to the usual whistler diffusion scenario, suggesting that self-induced electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency might play a key role in broadening the solar wind strahl during quiet solar conditions.

  20. Common solar wind drivers behind magnetic storm - magnetospheric substorm dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasis, Georgios; Runge, Jakob; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Donner, Reik E.

    2017-04-01

    The storm-substorm relationship is one of the most controversial aspects of geospace magnetic storm dynamics and one of the unresolved topics of solar-terrestrial coupling. Here we investigate the statistical dependencies between storm and substorm indices in conjunction with multiple relevant solar wind variables with an information-theoretic causal inference approach. We find that the vertical component of the interplanetary magnetic field is the strongest driver of both storms and substorms. Importantly, this common driver explains the transfer entropy between substorms and storms found by a previous bivariate analysis. These results hold during both a year close to solar maximum (2001) and minimum (2008) and suggest that, at least based on the analyzed indices, there is no statistical evidence of a direct or indirect information transfer and, therefore, likely no physical mechanism by which substorms drive storms or vice versa.

  1. SOLAR WIND STRAHL BROADENING BY SELF-GENERATED PLASMA WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R. [UFPEL, Pelotas (Brazil); Vinas, A. F. [NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Yoon, P. H. [IPST, UMD, College Park, MD (United States); Ziebell, L. F., E-mail: joel.pavan@ufpel.edu.br, E-mail: rudi@ufpel.edu.br, E-mail: adolfo.vinas@nasa.gov, E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu, E-mail: luiz.ziebell@ufrgs.br [UFRGS, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2013-06-01

    This Letter reports on the results of numerical simulations which may provide a possible explanation for the strahl broadening during quiet solar conditions. The relevant processes involved in the broadening are due to kinetic quasi-linear wave-particle interaction. Making use of static analytical electron distribution in an inhomogeneous field, it is found that self-generated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency, i.e., Langmuir waves, are capable of scattering the strahl component, resulting in energy and pitch-angle diffusion that broadens its velocity distribution significantly. The present theoretical results provide an alternative or complementary explanation to the usual whistler diffusion scenario, suggesting that self-induced electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency might play a key role in broadening the solar wind strahl during quiet solar conditions.

  2. Kinetic Signatures and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Osman, K T; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-01-01

    A connection between kinetic processes and intermittent turbulence is observed in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. In particular, kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating are concentrated near coherent structures, such as current sheets, which are non-uniformly distributed in space. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. The inhomogeneous heating in these regions, which is present in both the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular temperature components, results in protons at least 3--4 times hotter than under typical stable plasma conditions. These results offer a new understanding of kinetic processes in a turbulent regime, where linear Vlasov theory is not sufficient to explain the inhomogeneous plasma dynamics operating near non-Gaussian structures.

  3. Kinetic Signatures and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K. T.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.

    2012-06-01

    A connection between kinetic processes and intermittent turbulence is observed in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 A.U. In particular, kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating are concentrated near coherent structures, such as current sheets, which are nonuniformly distributed in space. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. The inhomogeneous heating in these regions, which is present in both the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular temperature components, results in protons at least 3-4 times hotter than under typical stable plasma conditions. These results offer a new understanding of kinetic processes in a turbulent regime, where linear Vlasov theory is not sufficient to explain the inhomogeneous plasma dynamics operating near non-Gaussian structures.

  4. Kinetic Processes and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    A connection between intermittent turbulence and kinetic processes in the solar wind is presented using measurements from the Wind spacecraft. Temperature anisotropy is found to be concentrated near coherent structures, such as current sheets, which are non-uniformly distributed in space. Hence, these structures are preferentially found in plasma that is unstable to temperature anisotropy-driven mirror and firehose instabilities. The coherent structures heat the plasma, resulting in protons at least 3-4 times hotter than under typical stable plasma conditions. These results offer a new understanding of kinetic processes in a turbulent regime, where linear Vlasov theory is insufficient to explain the inhomogeneous plasma dynamics operating near non-Gaussian structures.

  5. Statistical Properties of Geomagnetic Activity Indices and Solar Wind Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hee Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As the prediction of geomagnetic storms is becoming an important and practical problem, conditions in the Earth’s magnetosphere have been studied rigorously in terms of those in the interplanetary space. Another approach to space weather forecast is to deal with it as a probabilistic geomagnetic storm forecasting problem. In this study, we carry out detailed statistical analysis of solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices examining the dependence of the distribution on the solar cycle and annual variations. Our main findings are as follows: (1 The distribution of parameters obtained via the superimposed epoch method follows the Gaussian distribution. (2 When solar activity is at its maximum the mean value of the distribution is shifted to the direction indicating the intense environment. Furthermore, the width of the distribution becomes wider at its maximum than at its minimum so that more extreme case can be expected. (3 The distribution of some certain heliospheric parameters is less sensitive to the phase of the solar cycle and annual variations. (4 The distribution of the eastward component of the interplanetary electric field BV and the solar wind driving function BV2, however, appears to be all dependent on the solar maximum/minimum, the descending/ascending phases of the solar cycle and the equinoxes/solstices. (5 The distribution of the AE index and the Dst index shares statistical features closely with BV and BV2 compared with other heliospheric parameters. In this sense, BV and BV2 are more robust proxies of the geomagnetic storm. We conclude by pointing out that our results allow us to step forward in providing the occurrence probability of geomagnetic storms for space weather and physical modeling.

  6. Coronal and heliospheric imagers for solar wind phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Kevin F.; Bourdelle, Anthony; Davies, Jackie A.; Eyles, Chris J.; Griffin, Doug K.; Harrison, Richard A.; Richards, Tony R.; Rogers, J. Kevin; Tappin, S. James; Tosh, Ian A. J.; Waltham, Nick R.

    2015-09-01

    RAL Space is enhancing its program to lead the development of European capabilities in space-based visible-light coronal and heliospheric imaging instrumentation in the light of emerging opportunities such as the European Space Agency's Space Situational Awareness program and recent S2 small-mission call. Visible-light coronal and heliospheric imaging of solar wind phenomena, such as coronal mass ejections and interaction regions, is of critical importance to space weather studies, both operationally and in terms of enabling the underpinning science. This work draws on heritage from scientific instruments such as LASCO (Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph) on the SOHO spacecraft, SMEI (Solar Mass Ejection Imager) on the Coriolis spacecraft and the HI (Heliospheric Imager) instruments on STEREO. Such visible-light observation of solar wind structures relies on the detection of sunlight that has been Thomson-scattered by electrons (the so-called K-corona). The Thomson-scattered signal must be extracted from other signals that can be many orders of magnitude greater (such as that from the F-corona and the solar disc itself) and this places stringent constraints on stray-light rejection, as well as pointing stability and accuracy. We discuss the determination of instrument requirements, key design trade-offs and the evolution of base-line designs for the coronal and heliospheric regimes. We explain how the next generation of instruments will build on this heritage while also, in some cases, meeting the challenges on resources imposed on operational space weather imagers. In particular, we discuss the optical engineering challenges involved in the design of these instruments.

  7. Non-Gaussian probability distributions of solar wind fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marsch

    Full Text Available The probability distributions of field differences ∆x(τ=x(t+τ-x(t, where the variable x(t may denote any solar wind scalar field or vector field component at time t, have been calculated from time series of Helios data obtained in 1976 at heliocentric distances near 0.3 AU. It is found that for comparatively long time lag τ, ranging from a few hours to 1 day, the differences are normally distributed according to a Gaussian. For shorter time lags, of less than ten minutes, significant changes in shape are observed. The distributions are often spikier and narrower than the equivalent Gaussian distribution with the same standard deviation, and they are enhanced for large, reduced for intermediate and enhanced for very small values of ∆x. This result is in accordance with fluid observations and numerical simulations. Hence statistical properties are dominated at small scale τ by large fluctuation amplitudes that are sparsely distributed, which is direct evidence for spatial intermittency of the fluctuations. This is in agreement with results from earlier analyses of the structure functions of ∆x. The non-Gaussian features are differently developed for the various types of fluctuations. The relevance of these observations to the interpretation and understanding of the nature of solar wind magnetohydrodynamic (MHD turbulence is pointed out, and contact is made with existing theoretical concepts of intermittency in fluid turbulence.

  8. HYBRID2: A versatile model of the performance of hybrid power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, H. James; Manwell, James

    1995-04-01

    In 1993, the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) made an assessment of the available tools from the United States and Europe for predicting the long-term performance of hybrid power systems. By hybrid power the authors mean combinations of two or more power sources wind turbines, photovoltaics (PV), diesel gensets, or other generators into integrated systems for electric power generation in remote locations. Their conclusion was that there was no single, user-friendly tool capable of modeling the full range of hybrid power technologies being considered for the 1990s and beyond. The existing tools were, in particular, lacking flexibility in system configuration and in dispatch of components. As a result, NREL developed a specification for a model, called HYBRID2, for making comparisons of competing technology options on a level playing field. This specification was prepared with a range of potential users in mind including not only the US Department of Energy (DOE) renewable energy programs, but also the US wind industry, technical consultants, international development institutions/banks, and rural electrification programs in developing countries. During 1994, NREL and subcontractor, the University of Massachusetts (UMass), began development of HYBRID2 with funding from the DOE Wind Energy Program. It builds on the wind/diesel model, HYBRID1, developed previously by UMass, and expands that model to accommodate the wider array of technologies used in hybrid power systems. This paper will provide an overview of the model's features, functions, and status.

  9. Simulation and Performance Evaluation of Shunt Hybrid Power Filter for Power Quality Improvement Using PQ Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R Balasubramanian; S Palani

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes the design of shunt hybrid filter using instantaneous power theory to improve the power quality and simulation has been carried out for 3 phase distribution system feeding different...

  10. Hybrid Engine Powered City Car: Fuzzy Controlled Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ataur; Mohiuddin, AKM; Hawlader, MNA; Ihsan, Sany

    2017-03-01

    This study describes a fuzzy controlled hybrid engine powered car. The car is powered by the lithium ion battery capacity of 1000 Wh is charged by the 50 cc hybrid engine and power regenerative mode. The engine is operated with lean mixture at 3000 rpm to charge the battery. The regenerative mode that connects with the engine generates electrical power of 500-600 W for the deceleration of car from 90 km/h to 20 km/h. The regenerated electrical power has been used to power the air-conditioning system and to meet the other electrical power. The battery power only used to propel the car. The regenerative power also found charging the battery for longer operation about 40 minutes and more. The design flexibility of this vehicle starts with whole-vehicle integration based on radical light weighting, drag reduction, and accessory efficiency. The energy efficient hybrid engine cut carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen oxides (N2O) emission about 70-80% as the loads on the crankshaft such as cam-follower and its associated rotating components are replaced by electromagnetic systems, and the flywheel, alternator and starter motor are replaced by a motor generator. The vehicle was tested and found that it was able to travel 70 km/litre with the power of hybrid engine.

  11. Stillwater Hybrid Geo-Solar Power Plant Optimization Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Daniel S.; Mines, Gregory L.; Turchi, Craig S.; Zhu, Guangdong; Cohan, Sander; Angelini, Lorenzo; Bizzarri, Fabrizio; Consoli, Daniele; De Marzo, Alessio

    2015-09-02

    The Stillwater Power Plant is the first hybrid plant in the world able to bring together a medium-enthalpy geothermal unit with solar thermal and solar photovoltaic systems. Solar field and power plant models have been developed to predict the performance of the Stillwater geothermal / solar-thermal hybrid power plant. The models have been validated using operational data from the Stillwater plant. A preliminary effort to optimize performance of the Stillwater hybrid plant using optical characterization of the solar field has been completed. The Stillwater solar field optical characterization involved measurement of mirror reflectance, mirror slope error, and receiver position error. The measurements indicate that the solar field may generate 9% less energy than the design value if an appropriate tracking offset is not employed. A perfect tracking offset algorithm may be able to boost the solar field performance by about 15%. The validated Stillwater hybrid plant models were used to evaluate hybrid plant operating strategies including turbine IGV position optimization, ACC fan speed and turbine IGV position optimization, turbine inlet entropy control using optimization of multiple process variables, and mixed working fluid substitution. The hybrid plant models predict that each of these operating strategies could increase net power generation relative to the baseline Stillwater hybrid plant operations.

  12. On the Relation between the In Situ Properties and the Coronal Sources of the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.; Lepri, S. T.; Gilbert, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Raines, J. M.

    2017-09-01

    We categorize the types of solar wind using a new classification scheme based on the location of the wind’s coronal source regions in the solar atmosphere and near-solar heliosphere. We first trace the solar wind measured by ACE/SWEPAM and SWICS from 1998 to 2011 at 1 au back to a 2.5{R}{{s}} solar surface using ballistic mapping at constant proton speed; then we map them back to their magnetic footpoints on the 1{R}{{s}} solar surface via the potential field source surface (PFSS) model. Coronal structures are identified using a classification scheme based on the pixel brightness in the SOHO or STEREO EUV Carrington images. The angular distances between each mapped solar wind footpoint to the different coronal structure pixels are calculated and used as a criterion to identify the type of solar wind source region. Depending on the proximity of the solar wind footpoints to a given coronal or heliospheric structure, we classify the solar wind into six types: active region (AR), AR-boundary, quiet Sun (QS), coronal hole (CH), CH-boundary, and helmet-streamer associated wind. The in situ properties of these six types of solar winds are then examined and compared, and their solar cycle dependences are also discussed.

  13. Cometary X-rays. Solar wind charge exchange in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewits, Dennis

    2007-06-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the planets and the interstellar medium is of key importance for the evolution of our solar system. The interaction with Earth's atmosphere is best known for the northern light. In case of Mars, the interaction with the solar wind might have lead to the erosion of its atmosphere. Solar wind-atmosphere interactions can be studied particularly well in cometary atmospheres, because in that case the solar wind flow is not attenuated by a planetary magnetic field and interacts directly with its atmosphere, the coma. The size of the cometary atmosphere (in the order of 10(4-10^5) km) allows remote tracking of the ions as they penetrate into the comet's atmosphere, offering a unique window on the cometary atmosphere, the solar wind and the interaction of these two plasmas. When solar wind ions fly through an atmosphere they are neutralized via charge exchange reactions with the neutral gaseous species. These reactions depend strongly on target species and collision velocity. The resulting X-ray and Far-UV emission can therefore be regarded as a fingerprint of the underlying reaction, with many diagnostic qualities. My thesis studies have focussed on all aspects relevant for X-ray emission from comets: experimental studies of state-to-state charge exchange cross sections, observations of X-ray emission from comets with Chandra, XMM, and Swift, and theoretical modelling of the interaction of solar wind ions with cometary gasses and the resulting X-ray emission spectrum. Together, this has greatly improved our understanding of the interaction of the solar wind with solar system objects and in more general, of physical processes in wind-environment collisions. The thorough understanding of cometary charge exchange emission has opened the door to the direct observation of more complex solar wind interactions such as those with Mars and Venus.

  14. TURBULENCE IN THE SOLAR WIND MEASURED WITH COMET TAIL TEST PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Matthaeus, W. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, 217 Sharp Laboratory, Newark, DE 19711 (United States); Rice, D. R. [Northwestern University, 633 Clark St., Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    By analyzing the motions of test particles observed remotely in the tail of Comet Encke, we demonstrate that the solar wind undergoes turbulent processing enroute from the Sun to the Earth and that the kinetic energy entrained in the large-scale turbulence is sufficient to explain the well-known anomalous heating of the solar wind. Using the heliospheric imaging (HI-1) camera on board NASA's STEREO-A spacecraft, we have observed an ensemble of compact features in the comet tail as they became entrained in the solar wind near 0.4 AU. We find that the features are useful as test particles, via mean-motion analysis and a forward model of pickup dynamics. Using population analysis of the ensemble's relative motion, we find a regime of random-walk diffusion in the solar wind, followed, on larger scales, by a surprising regime of semiconfinement that we attribute to turbulent eddies in the solar wind. The entrained kinetic energy of the turbulent motions represents a sufficient energy reservoir to heat the solar wind to observed temperatures at 1 AU. We determine the Lagrangian-frame diffusion coefficient in the diffusive regime, derive upper limits for the small scale coherence length of solar wind turbulence, compare our results to existing Eulerian-frame measurements, and compare the turbulent velocity with the size of the observed eddies extrapolated to 1 AU. We conclude that the slow solar wind is fully mixed by turbulence on scales corresponding to a 1–2 hr crossing time at Earth; and that solar wind variability on timescales shorter than 1–2 hr is therefore dominated by turbulent processing rather than by direct solar effects.

  15. Coupled Solar Wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere System by QFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    shoot to Sun from the center of Galaxy. The dynamic balance of forces on the solar surface plasma at once is broken and the plasma will upwards eject as the solar wind with redundant negative charge, at the same time, the solar surface remain a cavity as a sunspot whorl with the positive electric potential relative to around. The whorl caused by that the reaction of plasma eject front and upwards with the different velocity at different latitude of solar rotation, leads to the cavity around in the downwards and backwards helix movement. The solar rotation more slow, when the cavity is filled by around plasma in the reverse turn direction, the Jupiter at front had been produced a new cavity, so that we had observe the sunspot pair with different whorl directions and different magnetic polarity. Jupiter possess half mass of all planets in solar system, its action to stop net nuν _{0} flux is primary, so that Jupiter’s period of 11.8 sidereal years accord basically with the period of sunspot eruptions. The solar wind is essentially the plasma with additional electrons flux ejected from the solar surface: its additional electrons come from the ionosphere again eject into the ionosphere and leads to the direct connect between the solar wind and the ionosphere; its magnetism from its redundant negative charge and leads to the connect between the solar wind and the magnetosphere; it possess the high temperature of the solar surface and ejecting kinetic energy leads to the thermo-exchange connect between the solar wind and the thermosphere. Through the solar wind ejecting into and cross over the outside atmosphere carry out the electromagnetic, particles material and thermal exchanges, the Coupled Solar Wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere System to be came into being. This conclusion is inferred only by QFT.

  16. Modeling and analysis of solar wind generated contributions to the near-Earth magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Moretto, T.; Rastatter, L.

    2006-01-01

    Solar wind generated magnetic disturbances are currently one of the major obstacles for improving the accuracy in the determination of the magnetic field due to sources internal to the Earth. In the present study a global MHD model of solar wind magnetosphere interaction is used to obtain...... of identifying the most important aspects of the solar wind disturbances in an internal field modeling context. The contribution from the distant magnetospheric currents is found to consist of two, mainly opposing, contributions from respectively the dayside magnetopause currents and the cross-tail current...

  17. Comparison of plasma sheet ion composition with the IMF and solar wind plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma sheet energetic ion data (0.1- to 16 keV/e) obtained by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE-1 between 10 and 23 earth radii are compared with concurrent IMF and solar wind plasma data. The densities of H(+) and He(++) ions in the plasma sheet are found to be the highest, and the most nearly proportional to the solar wind density, when the IMF B(z) is not northward. The density of terrestrial O(+) ions increases strongly with increasing magnitude of the IMF, in apparent agreement with the notion that the IMF plays a fundamental role in the electric coupling between the solar wind and the ionosphere.

  18. Evidence for a single stochastic physical process for fast solar wind magnetic field magnitude fluctuations at 1AU across `turbulent' and `1/f' temporal scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Kiyani, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    The power spectral density of magnetic field components in the fast solar wind on magnetohydrodynamic scales typically shows two power law regions, identified with an inertial range of turbulence, and at lower frequencies, a ~1/f range of coronal origin. The power spectral density of field magnitude shows a single power law region across these scales. We present the first scale-by-scale quantitative comparison of the averaged statistical properties of magnetic field magnitude and component fluctuations over timescales of ~2 minutes to 5.6 hours observed in-situ in the fast quiet solar wind at solar minimum at 1AU with the ACE spacecraft. Fluctuations in the field components show an 'inertial range' of scaling up to ~30 minutes and beyond this, uncorrelated Gaussian statistics. In contrast, the magnetic field magnitude fluctuations show a single scaling behaviour up to 5 hours and are non-Gaussian over this entire range of scales. Thus unlike for the components, a single stochastic process could account for the fluctuations in field magnitude over both the inertial range and 1/f range of timescales the fast solar wind.

  19. Ultralight Solar Powered Hybrid Research Drone

    OpenAIRE

    Singer, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    A planetary research drone is proposed, which is capable for vertical takeoff and landing. A hybrid flight concept utilizing static lift enables the exploration over ground. The static lift is achieved with a lighter than CO2 gas like air, He or H2.

  20. Ultralight Solar Powered Hybrid Research Drone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Cs.

    2012-06-01

    A planetary research drone is proposed, which is capable for vertical takeoff and landing. A hybrid flight concept utilizing static lift enables the exploration over ground. The static lift is achieved with a lighter than CO2 gas like air, He or H2.

  1. Hybrid algorithm for rotor angle security assessment in power systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Prasad Wadduwage

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transient rotor angle stability assessment and oscillatory rotor angle stability assessment subsequent to a contingency are integral components of dynamic security assessment (DSA in power systems. This study proposes a hybrid algorithm to determine whether the post-fault power system is secure due to both transient rotor angle stability and oscillatory rotor angle stability subsequent to a set of known contingencies. The hybrid algorithm first uses a new security measure developed based on the concept of Lyapunov exponents (LEs to determine the transient security of the post-fault power system. Later, the transient secure power swing curves are analysed using an improved Prony algorithm which extracts the dominant oscillatory modes and estimates their damping ratios. The damping ratio is a security measure about the oscillatory security of the post-fault power system subsequent to the contingency. The suitability of the proposed hybrid algorithm for DSA in power systems is illustrated using different contingencies of a 16-generator 68-bus test system and a 50-generator 470-bus test system. The accuracy of the stability conclusions and the acceptable computational burden indicate that the proposed hybrid algorithm is suitable for real-time security assessment with respect to both transient rotor angle stability and oscillatory rotor angle stability under multiple contingencies of the power system.

  2. Regulation of Ion Drifts and Anisotropies by Parametrically Unstable Finite-amplitude Alfvén-cyclotron Waves in the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Araneda, J. A.; Marsch, E.

    2014-03-01

    We study the preferential heating and differential acceleration of minor ions by dissipation of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) generated by parametric instabilities of a finite-amplitude monochromatic Alfvén-cyclotron pump wave. We consider the associated kinetic effects of Landau damping and nonlinear pitch-angle scattering of protons and α particles in the tenuous plasma of coronal holes and the fast solar wind. Various data collected by Wind spacecraft show signatures for a local transverse heating of the minor ions, presumably by Alfvén-cyclotron wave dissipation, and an unexpected parallel heating by a so far unknown mechanism. Here, we present the results from a set of 1.5 dimensional hybrid simulations in search for a plausible explanation for the observed field-aligned kinetic features in the fast solar wind minor ions. We investigate the origin and regulation of ion relative drifts and temperature anisotropies in low plasma β, fast solar wind conditions. Depending on their initial drifts, both ion species can heat up not only transversely through cyclotron resonance and non-resonant wave-particle interactions, but also strongly in the parallel direction by Landau damping of the daughter IAWs. We discuss the dependence of the relative ion drifts and temperature anisotropies on the plasma β of the individual species and we describe the effect of the pump wave amplitude on the ion heating and acceleration.

  3. Solar-wind convection in the Uranian magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Gang; Hill, T. W.

    1994-09-01

    We present an analytic, self-consistent model of time-dependent solar-wind-driven convection in the magnetosphere of Uranus. Because of the unusual orientation of the planetary rotation and magnetic dipole axes, magnetic merging on the dayside magnetopause varies as a function of planetary spin, in response to the changing orientation of the planetary magnetic field relative to the upstream interplanetary magnetic field, which is assumed to have a fixed direction for many planetary rotations. Therefore the magnitude of the solar-wind driven convection electric field varies sinusoidally in time with the 17.2-hour planetary spin period, even though the field direction is fixed in the corotating frame in a direction analogous to the dawn-to-dusk direction in the Earth's magnetosphere. We assume that the 'hot' (keV) protons observed by the Voyager 2 plasma science instrument in the inner magnetosphere convect sunward from a source in the near tail and form a ring current shielding layer near L = 5. The shielding process requires a time-dependent model because the convection timescale (approximately 20 days) is much larger than the 17-hour period of variation of the convection field. The time-averaged part of the imposed electric field is strongly attenuated inside the shielding layer, but the sinusoidally varying part of the imposed field penetrates the layer without significant attenuation because the shielding timescale (approximately 30 hours) is longer than the 17-hour oscillation period. A fraction of the hot plasma is thereby 'scattered' onto closed drift orbits to form a trapped ring current population. This trapped ring current population is sufficiently long-lived to undergo charge exchange and inelastic collisions with the widely distributed neutral hydrogen corona, resulting in the energy degradation of the 'hot' component and the simultaneous appearance of the 'intermediate' (approximately 100 eV) and 'warm' (approximately 10 eV) components evident in the

  4. Hybrid anisotropic materials for wind power turbine blades

    CERN Document Server

    Golfman, Yosif

    2012-01-01

    Based on rapid technological developments in wind power, governments and energy corporations are aggressively investing in this natural resource. Illustrating some of the crucial new breakthroughs in structural design and application of wind energy generation machinery, Hybrid Anisotropic Materials for Wind Power Turbine Blades explores new automated, repeatable production techniques that expand the use of robotics and process controls. These practices are intended to ensure cheaper fabrication of less-defective anisotropic material composites used to manufacture power turbine blades. This boo

  5. Concentrated Solar Power Gas Turbine Hybrid with Thermal Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Wallentinsen, Bård Sve

    2016-01-01

    Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technology and shows promise for large-scale renewable electric power generation. CSP is suitable for development in conjunction with other technologies, and this thesis examines the combination of CSP technology with natural gas turbines in order to boost operating temperatures and efficiencies in a resulting solar hybrid gas turbine (SHGT) power plant. Thermal energy storage and a bottoming cycle are included in the design to increase both performance and rene...

  6. Sizing and Simulation of PV-Wind Hybrid Power System

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Engin

    2013-01-01

    A sizing procedure is developed for hybrid system with the aid of mathematical models for photovoltaic cell, wind turbine, and battery that are readily present in the literature. This sizing procedure can simulate the annual performance of different kinds of photovoltaic-wind hybrid power system structures for an identified set of renewable resources, which fulfills technical limitations with the lowest energy cost. The output of the program will display the performance of the system during t...

  7. Hybrid wind-power-distillation plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninić Neven

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports and elaborates on the idea of a solar distiller and an offshore wind power plant operating together. The subject under discussion is a single-stage solar distillation plant with vaporization, using adiabatic expansion in the gravitational field inside a wind power plant supporting column. This scheme divides investment costs for electric power and distillate production. In the region of the Adriatic Sea, all electric power produced could be “converted” to hydrogen using less than 10% of the distillate produced.

  8. Estimated solar wind-implanted helium-3 distribution on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Swindle, T.D.; Lucey, P.G.

    1999-01-01

    Among the solar wind-implanted volatiles present in the lunar regolith, 3 He is possibly the most valuable resource because of its potential as a fusion fuel. The abundance of 3 He in the lunar regolith at a given location depends on surface maturity, the amount of solar wind fluence, and titanium content, because ilmenite (FeTiO3) retains helium much better than other major lunar minerals. Surface maturity and TiO2 maps from Clementine multispectral data sets are combined here with a solar wind fluence model to produce a 3He abundance map of the Moon. Comparison of the predicted 3He values to landing site observations shows good correlation. The highest 3He abundances occur in the farside maria (due to greater solar wind fluence received) and in higher TiO2 nearside mare regions.

  9. Erosion of carbon/carbon by solar wind charged particle radiation during a solar probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; O'Donnell, Tim; Millard, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    The possible erosion of a carbon/carbon thermal shield by solar wind-charged particle radiation is reviewed. The present knowledge of erosion data for carbon and/or graphite is surveyed, and an explanation of erosion mechanisms under different charged particle environments is discussed. The highest erosion is expected at four solar radii. Erosion rates are analytically estimated under several conservative assumptions for a normal quiet and worst case solar wind storm conditions. Mass loss analyses and comparison studies surprisingly indicate that the predicted erosion rate by solar wind could be greater than by nominal free sublimation during solar wind storm conditions at four solar radii. The predicted overall mass loss of a carbon/carbon shield material during the critical four solar radii flyby can still meet the mass loss mission requirement of less than 0.0025 g/sec.

  10. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  11. Solar wind ion trends and signatures: STEREO PLASTIC observations approaching solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Galvin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available STEREO has now completed the first two years of its mission, moving from close proximity to Earth in 2006/2007 to more than 50 degrees longitudinal separation from Earth in 2009. During this time, several large-scale structures have been observed in situ. Given the prevailing solar minimum conditions, these structures have been predominantly coronal hole-associated solar wind, slow solar wind, their interfaces, and the occasional transient event. In this paper, we extend earlier solar wind composition studies into the current solar minimum using high-resolution (1-h sampling times for the charge state analysis. We examine 2-year trends for iron charge states and solar wind proton speeds, and present a case study of Carrington Rotation 2064 (December 2007 which includes minor ion (He, Fe, O kinetic and Fe composition parameters in comparison with proton and magnetic field signatures at large-scale structures observed during this interval.

  12. Estimates of Sputter Yields of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions of Lunar Regolith Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, Abdulmasser F.; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    At energies of approximately 1 keV/amu, solar-wind protons and heavy ions interact with the lunar surface materials via a number of microscopic interactions that include sputtering. Solar-wind induced sputtering is a main mechanism by which the composition of the topmost layers of the lunar surface can change, dynamically and preferentially. This work concentrates on sputtering induced by solar-wind heavy ions. Sputtering associated with slow (speeds the electrons speed in its first Bohr orbit) and highly charged ions are known to include both kinetic and potential sputtering. Potential sputtering enjoys some unique characteristics that makes it of special interest to lunar science and exploration. Unlike the yield from kinetic sputtering where simulation and approximation schemes exist, the yield from potential sputtering is not as easy to estimate. This work will present a preliminary numerical scheme designed to estimate potential sputtering yields from reactions relevant to this aspect of solar-wind lunar-surface coupling.

  13. Magnetic fields in the solar system planets, moons and solar wind interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wicht, Johannes; Gilder, Stuart; Holschneider, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    This book addresses and reviews many of the still little understood questions related to the processes underlying planetary magnetic fields and their interaction with the solar wind. With focus on research carried out within the German Priority Program ”PlanetMag”, it also provides an overview of the most recent research in the field. Magnetic fields play an important role in making a planet habitable by protecting the environment from the solar wind. Without the geomagnetic field, for example, life on Earth as we know it would not be possible. And results from recent space missions to Mars and Venus strongly indicate that planetary magnetic fields play a vital role in preventing atmospheric erosion by the solar wind. However, very little is known about the underlying interaction between the solar wind and a planet’s magnetic field. The book takes a synergistic interdisciplinary approach that combines newly developed tools for data acquisition and analysis, computer simulations of planetary interiors an...

  14. MESSENGER and Venus Express Observations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Barabash, Stas; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Fraenz, Markus; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho,George C.; hide

    2009-01-01

    At 23:08 UTC on 5 June 2007 the MESSENGER spacecraft reached its closest approach altitude of 338 kin during its final flyby of Venus en route to its 2011 orbit insertion at Mercury. The availability of the simultaneous Venus Express solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field measurements provides a rare opportunity to examine the influence of upstream conditions on this planet's solar wind interaction. We present MESSENGER observations of new features of the Venus - solar wind interaction including hot flow anomalies upstream of the bow shock, a flux rope in the near-tail and a two-point determination of the timescale for magnetic flux transport through this induced magnetosphere. Citation: Stavin, J. A., et al. (2009), MESSENGER and Venus Express observations of the solar wind interaction with Venus,

  15. Solar wind heating by an embedded quasi-isothermal pick-up ion fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the solar wind plasma consists of primary ions of solar coronal origin and secondary ions of interstellar origin. Interstellar H-atoms penetrate into the inner heliosphere and when ionized there are converted into secondary ions. These are implanted into the magnetized solar wind flow and are essentially enforced to co-move with this flow. By nonlinear interactions with wind-entrained Alfvén waves the latter are processed in the co-moving velocity space. This pick-up process, however, also causes actions back upon the original solar wind flow, leading to a deceleration, as well as a heating of the solar wind plasma. The resulting deceleration is not only due to the loading effect, but also due to the action of the pressure gradient. To calculate the latter, it is important to take into account the stochastic acceleration that suffers at their convection out of the inner heliosphere by the quasi-linear interactions with MHD turbulences. Only then can the presently reported VOYAGER observations of solar wind decelerations and heatings in the outer heliosphere be understood in terms of the current, most likely values of interstellar gas parameters. In a consistent view of the thermodynamics of the solar wind plasma, which is composed of secondary ions and solar wind protons, we also derive that the latter are globally heated at their motion to larger solar distances. The arising heat transfer is due to the action of suprathermal ions which drive MHD waves that are partially absorbed by solar wind protons and thereby establish their observed quasi-polytropy. We obtain a quantitative expression for the solar wind proton pressure as a function of solar distance. This expression clearly shows the change from an adiabatic to a quasi-polytropic behaviour with a decreasing polytropic index at increasing distances, as has been observed by the VOYAGERS. This also allows one to calculate the average percentage of the intitial energy

  16. Solar wind heating by an embedded quasi-isothermal pick-up ion fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    Full Text Available It is well known that the solar wind plasma consists of primary ions of solar coronal origin and secondary ions of interstellar origin. Interstellar H-atoms penetrate into the inner heliosphere and when ionized there are converted into secondary ions. These are implanted into the magnetized solar wind flow and are essentially enforced to co-move with this flow. By nonlinear interactions with wind-entrained Alfvén waves the latter are processed in the co-moving velocity space. This pick-up process, however, also causes actions back upon the original solar wind flow, leading to a deceleration, as well as a heating of the solar wind plasma. The resulting deceleration is not only due to the loading effect, but also due to the action of the pressure gradient. To calculate the latter, it is important to take into account the stochastic acceleration that suffers at their convection out of the inner heliosphere by the quasi-linear interactions with MHD turbulences. Only then can the presently reported VOYAGER observations of solar wind decelerations and heatings in the outer heliosphere be understood in terms of the current, most likely values of interstellar gas parameters. In a consistent view of the thermodynamics of the solar wind plasma, which is composed of secondary ions and solar wind protons, we also derive that the latter are globally heated at their motion to larger solar distances. The arising heat transfer is due to the action of suprathermal ions which drive MHD waves that are partially absorbed by solar wind protons and thereby establish their observed quasi-polytropy. We obtain a quantitative expression for the solar wind proton pressure as a function of solar distance. This expression clearly shows the change from an adiabatic to a quasi-polytropic behaviour with a decreasing polytropic index at increasing distances, as has been observed by the VOYAGERS. This also allows one to calculate the average percentage of the intitial energy

  17. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, W; Thorne, RM; Bortnik, J; Baker, DN; Reeves, GD; Kanekal, SG; Spence, HE; Green, JC

    2015-01-01

    ©2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations ( > 1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly c...

  18. Response of the Jovian thermosphere to a transient `pulse' in solar wind pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, J. N.; Achilleos, N.; Guio, P.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the Jovian thermosphere with regard to magnetosphere–ionosphere coupling is often neglected in magnetospheric physics. We present the first study to investigate the response of the Jovian thermosphere to transient variations in solar wind dynamic pressure, using an azimuthally symmetric global circulation model coupled to a simple magnetosphere and fixed auroral conductivity model. In our simulations, the Jovian magnetosphere encounters a solar wind shock or rarefaction regi...

  19. Space Weather and Solar Wind Studies with OWFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Subrahmanya, C. R.; Chengalur, J. N.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we review the results of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations made with the legacy system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) and compare them with the possibilities opened by the upgraded ORT, the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA). The stability and the sensitivity of the legacy system of ORT allowed the regular monitoring of IPS on a grid of large number of radio sources and the results of these studies have been useful to understand the physical processes in the heliosphere and space weather events, such as coronal mass ejections, interaction regions and their propagation effects. In the case of OWFA, its wide bandwidth of 38 MHz, the large field-of-view of 27° and increased sensitivity provide a unique capability for the heliospheric science at 326.5 MHz. IPS observations with the OWFA would allow one to monitor more than 5000 sources per day. This, in turn, will lead to much improved studies of space weather events and solar wind plasma, overcoming the limitations faced with the legacy system. We also highlight some of the specific aspects of the OWFA, potentially relevant for the studies of coronal plasma and its turbulence characteristics.

  20. Heating coronal holes and accelerating the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1992-01-01

    The special energy requirements of a coronal hole combined with current knowledge of the limited dissipation of Alfven and fast mode MHD waves in the solar corona suggest a unique source of heat for the coronal hole. The near coronal hole requires approximately 3 - 4 x 10 exp 5 ergs/sq cm s, which can come only from the fluid jets, fast particles, and short period MHD waves from the network activity. The high speed streams of solar wind from coronal holes show that there is substantial heating, of 1 - 2 x 10 exp 5 ergs/sq cm s, beyond the sonic point in the wind, which can come only from the dissipation by thermal conduction of long period (approximately equal or greater than 100 sec) MHD waves from subphotospheric convection. Although the Alfven wave flux from the photosphere is generally taken for granted in the literature, we point out that it is a crucial phenomenon that has yet to be established on either a theoretical or observational scientific basis.

  1. Periodicity for 50 yr of daily solar wind velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K. J.; Zhang, J.; Feng, W.

    2017-11-01

    Daily mean velocity of solar wind that was surveyed near the Earth's orbit at about 1 au from 1963 November 27 to 2015 November 30 and issued by OMNIWeb is used to look into its periodicity through the Lomb-Scargle periodogram method. As the strongest periodical signal, the solar activity cycle of about 10.4 yr is found in high-velocity wind, but in low-velocity wind, the 9.17-yr cycle appears instead. The rotation cycle of about 27 d and its 1/2 and 1/3 harmonic periods are clearly detected in all-, low- and high-velocity wind, and at their periodograms, several individual periodical peaks appear very close to the peaks of these three periods. The annual period of about 1.07 yr is identified for both all- and low-velocity wind, but not for high-velocity wind after 1994. The 1.68-yr period occurs in all- and high-velocity wind, but does not appear in low-velocity wind. The period of about 2.42 yr appears just in the all-velocity wind after 1994, but its twofold period (about 4.83 yr) appears in both all- and high-velocity wind. The period of about 4.1 yr occurs in all-, low- and high-velocity wind. The possible origin of these periods is discussed.

  2. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the −YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002. We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005 and Erkaev et al. (2008. We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008 model gives the best fit to the observations.

  3. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the −YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002. We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005 and Erkaev et al. (2008. We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008 model gives the best fit to the observations.

  4. LANGMUIR WAVE DECAY IN INHOMOGENEOUS SOLAR WIND PLASMAS: SIMULATION RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krafft, C. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Volokitin, A. S. [IZMIRAN, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krasnoselskikh, V. V., E-mail: catherine.krafft@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l’Environnement et de l’Espace, 3A Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-08-20

    Langmuir turbulence excited by electron flows in solar wind plasmas is studied on the basis of numerical simulations. In particular, nonlinear wave decay processes involving ion-sound (IS) waves are considered in order to understand their dependence on external long-wavelength plasma density fluctuations. In the presence of inhomogeneities, it is shown that the decay processes are localized in space and, due to the differences between the group velocities of Langmuir and IS waves, their duration is limited so that a full nonlinear saturation cannot be achieved. The reflection and the scattering of Langmuir wave packets on the ambient and randomly varying density fluctuations lead to crucial effects impacting the development of the IS wave spectrum. Notably, beatings between forward propagating Langmuir waves and reflected ones result in the parametric generation of waves of noticeable amplitudes and in the amplification of IS waves. These processes, repeated at different space locations, form a series of cascades of wave energy transfer, similar to those studied in the frame of weak turbulence theory. The dynamics of such a cascading mechanism and its influence on the acceleration of the most energetic part of the electron beam are studied. Finally, the role of the decay processes in the shaping of the profiles of the Langmuir wave packets is discussed, and the waveforms calculated are compared with those observed recently on board the spacecraft Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory and WIND.

  5. Plasma Beta Dependence of Magnetic Compressibility in Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.; Kiyani, K. H.; Sahraoui, F.

    2014-12-01

    The turbulent signature of MHD scales in the near-Earth solar wind are known to be primarily incompressible which manifests itself in magnetic field fluctuation vector components to be aligned primarily perpendicular to the background magnetic field -- so-called "Variance Anisotropy". This, and other facts, have been seen as evidence for a majority Alfvenic turbulence cascade; with a small component (10%) of compressible fluctuations. When one approaches scales on the order of the ion-inertial length and the Larmor radius, this behaviour changes and it is now becoming increasingly evident that the spectral break at these scales is also accompanied by an increase in magnetic compressibility. This has been attributed to a phase change in the physics at these scales -- from fluid to kinetic -- and in particular to the dominant role of the Hall-effect at sub-ion scales. We will be presenting results from the Cluster mission to show how this increase in the compressibility is dependent on the ion plasma beta and what implications this has for the physics at sub-ion scales in the context of prominent theories and models for kinetic plasma turbulence.

  6. The Hybrid Media System : Politics and Power

    OpenAIRE

    Baviera Puig, Tomás

    2017-01-01

    Reseña: El libro The Hybrid Media System ha sido recientemente galardonado con el 2016 International Journal of Press/Politics Book Award. Entre los motivos que justificaron la decisión del jurado, se señaló lo siguiente: ?Más y más investigadores insisten en que la investigación en comunicación política necesita innovación teórica para comprender adecuadamente un entorno cambiante de medios. Son pocos los que han intentado tales innovaciones. Andrew Chadwick es uno de ellos.? Esta apreciació...

  7. Signatures of Slow Solar Wind Streams from Active Regions in the Inner Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, V.; Harra, L.; Urnov, A.; Kuzin, S.; Goryaev, F.; Berghmans, D.

    2013-08-01

    The identification of solar-wind sources is an important question in solar physics. The existing solar-wind models ( e.g., the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model) provide the approximate locations of the solar wind sources based on magnetic field extrapolations. It has been suggested recently that plasma outflows observed at the edges of active regions may be a source of the slow solar wind. To explore this we analyze an isolated active region (AR) adjacent to small coronal hole (CH) in July/August 2009. On 1 August, Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observations showed two compact outflow regions in the corona. Coronal rays were observed above the active-region coronal hole (ARCH) region on the eastern limb on 31 July by STEREO-A/EUVI and at the western limb on 7 August by CORONAS- Photon/TESIS telescopes. In both cases the coronal rays were co-aligned with open magnetic-field lines given by the potential field source surface model, which expanded into the streamer. The solar-wind parameters measured by STEREO-B, ACE, Wind, and STEREO-A confirmed the identification of the ARCH as a source region of the slow solar wind. The results of the study support the suggestion that coronal rays can represent signatures of outflows from ARs propagating in the inner corona along open field lines into the heliosphere.

  8. Estimating the solar wind pressure at comet 67P from Rosetta magnetic field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Z.; Dósa, M.; Goetz, C.; Madanian, H.; Opitz, A.; Richter, I.; Szego, K.; Timar, A.

    2017-09-01

    The solar wind pressure is an important parameter of planetary space weather, which plays a crucial role in the interaction of the solar wind with the planetary plasma environment. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to measure its value at every locations where it would be useful or needed. Spacecraft observing the internal dynamics of a planetary magnetosphere, for example, would benefit greatly from solar wind pressure data, but as the solar wind does not penetrate to their locations, direct measurements are impossible. It is well known that the maximum of the magnetic field in the pile-up region of a magnetosphere is proportional to the square root of the solar wind pressure. Recent investigation of Rosetta data revealed that the maximum of the magnetic field in the pile-up region can be approximated by magnetic field measurements performed in the inner regions of the cometary magnetosphere close to the boundary of the diamagnetic cavity. This relationship holds for several months spanning from June 2015 to January 2016. Here we investigate the possibility to use this relationship to determine a solar wind pressure proxy for this time interval using magnetic field data measured by the Rosetta Magnetometer. This pressure proxy would be useful not only for other Rosetta related studies, but could also serve as a new independent input database for space weather propagation to other locations in the Solar System.

  9. Observations of Plasma Turbulence and Heating from the Solar Wind and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    The cascade of energy by plasma turbulence has been shown to occur in, and heat, the solar wind. Recent work in the study of solar wind turbulence has focussed, in the most part, on advanced data analysis techniques, such as third moment structure functions, wavelets, conditional data sampling, multi-spacecraft observations and reconstruction of 2D k-spectra with tomography, and statistical studies from long time series of spacecraft observations. These techniques are complex and contain different assumptions about the qualities of the data underpinning the measurements. Here, we will review recent advances and discoveries in the study of plasma turbulence from solar wind data analysis and discuss how benchmarking of techniques against one another could be pursued and how simulations can be used to aid in the understanding of the results of solar wind data analysis, in particular in the framework of the "Turbulence Dissipation Challenge" (Parashar et al., Journal of Plasma Physics, Volume 81, Issue 05, 905810513, 2015). We will pay particular attention to observing two different heating mechanisms: stochastic heating and resonant wave-particle interactions. The magnetic helicity of the solar wind is shown to separate into two distinct components, one originating from pseudo-Alfvenic (k may have a component parallel to the magnetic field) and one from the Alfvenic fluctuations (k is strictly perpendicular). The solar wind results are compared with "pseudo-spacecraft" data from large 3D PIC simulations.

  10. Imaging the Top of the Solar Corona and the Young Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, C. E.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Viall, N. M.; Cranmer, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    We present the first direct visual evidence of the quasi-stationary breakup of solar coronal structure and the rise of turbulence in the young solar wind, directly in the future flight path of Solar Probe. Although the corona and, more recently, the solar wind have both been observed directly with Thomson scattered light, the transition from the corona to the solar wind has remained a mystery. The corona itself is highly structured by the magnetic field and the outflowing solar wind, giving rise to radial "striae" - which comprise the familiar streamers, pseudostreamers, and rays. These striae are not visible in wide-field heliospheric images, nor are they clearly delineated with in-situ measurements of the solar wind. Using careful photometric analysis of the images from STEREO/HI-1, we have, for the first time, directly observed the breakup of radial coronal structure and the rise of nearly-isotropic turbulent structure in the outflowing slow solar wind plasma between 10° (40 Rs) and 20° (80 Rs) from the Sun. These observations are important not only for their direct science value, but for predicting and understanding the conditions expected near SPP as it flies through - and beyond - this final frontier of the heliosphere, the outer limits of the solar corona.

  11. Short-Term Planning of Hybrid Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knežević, Goran; Baus, Zoran; Nikolovski, Srete

    2016-07-01

    In this paper short-term planning algorithm for hybrid power system consist of different types of cascade hydropower plants (run-of-the river, pumped storage, conventional), thermal power plants (coal-fired power plants, combined cycle gas-fired power plants) and wind farms is presented. The optimization process provides a joint bid of the hybrid system, and thus making the operation schedule of hydro and thermal power plants, the operation condition of pumped-storage hydropower plants with the aim of maximizing profits on day ahead market, according to expected hourly electricity prices, the expected local water inflow in certain hydropower plants, and the expected production of electrical energy from the wind farm, taking into account previously contracted bilateral agreement for electricity generation. Optimization process is formulated as hourly-discretized mixed integer linear optimization problem. Optimization model is applied on the case study in order to show general features of the developed model.

  12. Design and control of hybrid active power filters

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Chi-Seng

    2014-01-01

    Design and Control of Hybrid Active Power Filters presents an overview of the current quality problems and their compensators. To get a balance between the system cost and performance, hybrid active power filters (HAPFs) are valuable. The book presents the coverage of resonance phenomena prevention capability, filtering performance and system robustness analysis of HAPF; nonlinear inverter current slope characteristics and their linear operation region requirement analysis of the hysteresis PWM for the HAPF; minimum inverter capacity design procedure of HAPF, adaptive dc-link voltage controller for the HAPF and the real design example of a 220V 10kVA HAPF, in which the system performance analysis method, minimum dc voltage deduction concept and adaptive dc voltage idea can be further extended into the other active compensators, such as APF, static synchronous compensator STATCOM, etc. This book will benefit researchers, graduate students, and electrical power engineers in the field of power-quality compensati...

  13. Photovoltaic and thermal hybrid power generation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Moriaki; Hayashibara, Mitsuo; Chinen, Masanori; Inoue, Kotaro

    1988-10-21

    In the conventional technology, further utilization of the exhaust heat of the solar cell for power generation is not at all considered; power generation efficiency is not especially high although the reduction of the use amount of GaAs solar cell is possible. In addition, the heat dissipation is difficult when light collection yield is enhanced in the case of a trough type parabolic mirror. In this invention, the unit consists of plural number of light collecting mirrors and correspondinng power-generating parts wherein a heat-receiving part of the thermo-element is closely contacted to the non-light-receiving surface of the cell through the intermediary of an electric insulating layer; the power-generating part is located near to the focusing point of the light collector. In this invention, the solar light can be efficiently converted into electricity and most of the formerly unutilized exhaust heat can be efficiently converted into electricity by means of a thermo-element. In addition, enhancement of reliability and the output voltage are possible by increasing the redundancy. 14 figures.

  14. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2004-01-04

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  15. High Power Factor Hybrid Rectifier | Odeh | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the analysis of a new single-phase hybrid rectifier with high power factor (PF) and low harmonic distortion current. The proposed rectifier structure is composed of an ordinary single-phase diode rectifier with parallel connection of a switched converter. It is outlined that the switched converter is capable of ...

  16. Bipolar lead-acid power source (BILAPS) for hybrid vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmal, D.; Saakes, M.

    1998-01-01

    In hybrid electric vehicles (HEV's) the requirements on batteries for energy storage are completely different from those in battery powered electric vehicles (BEV's). In order to come to a succesful development of HEV's, beside fullfilling the technical requirements, the battery has to have a long

  17. Shunt hybrid active power filter for harmonic mitigation: A practical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana; Volume 40; Issue 4. Shunt hybrid active power filter for harmonic mitigation: A practical design approach. Unnikrishnan A K ... This paper presents a control strategy and design criteria for transformer-less shunt HAPF with special attention to the integration of series passive filter. The paper also ...

  18. Honey Lake hybrid geothermal wood residue power project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toland, J.

    1981-05-01

    The Honey Lake Hybrid Geothermal Wood Residue Power Project with a planned output of 50 MW is undergoing feasibility studies funded by GeoProducts Corporation, Department of Water Resources, State of California, US Department of Energy and the Forest Service, USDA. The outlook is optimistic. It is reliably estimated that the required volume of woody biomass can be made available without environmental degradation.

  19. Solar wind plasma interaction with solar probe plus spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guillemant

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available 3-D PIC (Particle In Cell simulations of spacecraft-plasma interactions in the solar wind context of the Solar Probe Plus mission are presented. The SPIS software is used to simulate a simplified probe in the near-Sun environment (at a distance of 0.044 AU or 9.5 RS from the Sun surface. We begin this study with a cross comparison of SPIS with another PIC code, aiming at providing the static potential structure surrounding a spacecraft in a high photoelectron environment. This paper presents then a sensitivity study using generic SPIS capabilities, investigating the role of some physical phenomena and numerical models. It confirms that in the near- sun environment, the Solar Probe Plus spacecraft would rather be negatively charged, despite the high yield of photoemission. This negative potential is explained through the dense sheath of photoelectrons and secondary electrons both emitted with low energies (2–3 eV. Due to this low energy of emission, these particles are not ejected at an infinite distance of the spacecraft and would rather surround it. As involved densities of photoelectrons can reach 106 cm−3 (compared to ambient ions and electrons densities of about 7 × 103 cm−3, those populations affect the surrounding plasma potential generating potential barriers for low energy electrons, leading to high recollection. This charging could interfere with the low energy (up to a few tens of eV plasma sensors and particle detectors, by biasing the particle distribution functions measured by the instruments. Moreover, if the spacecraft charges to large negative potentials, the problem will be more severe as low energy electrons will not be seen at all. The importance of the modelling requirements in terms of precise prediction of spacecraft potential is also discussed.

  20. Perturbations of the solar wind flow by radial and latitudinal pick-up ion pressure gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been found that pick-up ions at their dynamical incorporation into the solar wind modify the original conditions of the asymptotic solar wind plasma flow. In this respect, it has meanwhile been revealed in many papers that these type of solar wind modifications, i.e. deceleration and decrease of effective Mach number, are not only due to the pick-up ion loading effects, but also to the action of pick-up ion pressure gradients. Up to now only the effects of radial pick-up ion pressure gradients were considered, however, analogously but latitudinal pressure gradients also appear to be important. Here we study the effects of radial and latitudinal pick-up ion pressure gradients, occurring especially during solar minimum conditions at mid-latitude regions where slow solar wind streams change to fast solar wind streams. First, we give estimates of the latitudinal wind components connected with these gradients, and then after revealing its importance, present a more quantitative calculation of solar wind velocity and density perturbations resulting from these pressure forces. It is shown that the relative density perturbations near and in the ecliptic increase with radial distance and thus may well explain the measured non-spherically symmetric density decrease with distance. We also show that the solar wind decelerations actually seen with Voyager-1/2 are in conciliation with interstellar hydrogen densities of nH∞≥0.1cm-3, in contrast to earlier claims for nH∞=0.05cm-3.

  1. Perturbations of the solar wind flow by radial and latitudinal pick-up ion pressure gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been found that pick-up ions at their dynamical incorporation into the solar wind modify the original conditions of the asymptotic solar wind plasma flow. In this respect, it has meanwhile been revealed in many papers that these type of solar wind modifications, i.e. deceleration and decrease of effective Mach number, are not only due to the pick-up ion loading effects, but also to the action of pick-up ion pressure gradients. Up to now only the effects of radial pick-up ion pressure gradients were considered, however, analogously but latitudinal pressure gradients also appear to be important. Here we study the effects of radial and latitudinal pick-up ion pressure gradients, occurring especially during solar minimum conditions at mid-latitude regions where slow solar wind streams change to fast solar wind streams. First, we give estimates of the latitudinal wind components connected with these gradients, and then after revealing its importance, present a more quantitative calculation of solar wind velocity and density perturbations resulting from these pressure forces. It is shown that the relative density perturbations near and in the ecliptic increase with radial distance and thus may well explain the measured non-spherically symmetric density decrease with distance. We also show that the solar wind decelerations actually seen with Voyager-1/2 are in conciliation with interstellar hydrogen densities of nH∞≥0.1cm-3, in contrast to earlier claims for nH∞=0.05cm-3.

  2. Two years of solar wind and pickup ion measurements at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Raymond; Burch, J. L.; Mokashi, P.; Mandt, K.; Carr, C.; Eriksson, A.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Henri, P.; Nilsson, H.; Rubin, M.; Tzou, C.-Y.

    2017-07-01

    The Ion and Electron Sensor (IES) as well as other members of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) on board the Rosetta spacecraft (S/C) measured the characteristics of the solar wind almost continuously since its arrival at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG) in 2014 August. An important process at a comet is the so-called pickup process in which a newly ionized atom or molecule begins gyrating about the interplanetary magnetic field, is accelerated in the process and is carried along with the solar wind. Within a month after comet arrival, while Rosetta was ions. We believe that these are newly formed from cometary neutrals near Rosetta and attracted to the negative S/C potential. These ions were in the early phase of pickup and had not yet reached the energy they would after at least one full gyration about the magnetic field. As CG increased its activity, the flux and energy of the measured pickup ions increased intermittently while the solar wind appeared intermittently as well. By about 2015 end of April, the solar wind had become very faint until it eventually disappeared from the IES field of view. We then began to see ions at the highest energy levels of IES, >10 keV for a few days and then intermittently through the remainder of the mission, but lower energy (a few keV) pickup ions were also observed. As of 2016 early February, the solar wind reappeared more consistently. We believe that the disappearance of the solar wind in the IES field of view is the result of interaction with the pickup ions and the eventual formation of a cavity that excluded the solar wind.

  3. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering of Lunar Regolith: The Contribution of the Heavy Highly Charged (Minority) Solar Wind Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. W.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind sputtering of the lunar surface helps determine the composition of the lunar exosphere and contributes to surface weathering. To date, only the effects of the two dominant solar wind constituents, H+ and He+, have been considered. The heavier, less abundant solar wind constituents have much larger sputtering yields because they have greater mass (kinetic sputtering) and they are highly charged (potential sputtering) Their contribution to total sputtering can therefore be orders of magnitude larger than their relative abundances would suggest

  4. The abundances of H-3 and C-14 in the solar wind. [measured by lunar soil analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, E. L.; Defelice, J.; Damico, J.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium is measured as a function of depth in a Surveyor 3 sample. The upper limit for solar-wind-implanted tritium gives a H-3/H-1 limit for the solar wind of 1 part in one hundred billion. The temperature release patterns of C-14 from lunar soils are measured. The C-14 release patterns from surface soils differ from a trench-bottom soil and give evidence for the presence of C-14 in the solar wind with a C-14/H-1 ratio of approximately 4 parts in one hundred billion. The implications of these radionuclide abundances in the solar wind are discussed.

  5. Self-Similar Signature of the Active Solar Corona within the Inertial Range of Solar-Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, K.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.; Nicol, R. M.

    2007-05-01

    We quantify the scaling of magnetic energy density in the inertial range of solar-wind turbulence seen in situ at 1 AU with respect to solar activity. At solar maximum, when the coronal magnetic field is dynamic and topologically complex, we find self-similar scaling in the solar wind, whereas at solar minimum, when the coronal fields are more ordered, we find multifractality. This quantifies the solar-wind signature that is of direct coronal origin and distinguishes it from that of local MHD turbulence, with quantitative implications for coronal heating of the solar wind.

  6. Modeling a PV-FC-Hydrogen Hybrid Power Generation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Javadpoor

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrical grid expansion onto remote areas is often not cost-effective and/or technologically feasible. Thus, isolated electrical systems are preferred in such cases. This paper focuses on a hybrid photovoltaic (PV-hydrogen/fuel cell (FC system which basic components include a PV, a FC, alkaline water electrolysis and a hydrogen gas tank. To increase the response rate, supercapacitors or small batteries are usually employed in such systems. This study focuses on the dynamics of the system. In the suggested structure, the PV is used as the main source of power. The FC is connected to the load in parallel with the PV by a transducer in order to inject the differential power while reducing power generation in relation to power consumption. An electrolyzer is used to convert the surplus power to hydrogen. This study studies a conventional hybrid photovoltaic-hydrogen/fuel cell system to evaluate different loading behaviors. Software modeling is done for the suggested hybrid system using MATLAB/SIMULINK.

  7. Probabilistic Wind Power Forecasting with Hybrid Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Can; Song, Yonghua; Xu, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    The uncertainty of wind power generation imposes significant challenges to optimal operation and control of electricity networks with increasing wind power penetration. To effectively address the uncertainties in wind power forecasts, probabilistic forecasts that can quantify the associated...... via a bootstrap technique. Subsequently, the maximum likelihood estimation method is employed to construct a distinct neural network to estimate the noise variance of forecasting results. The proposed approach has been tested on multi-step forecasting of high-resolution (10-min) wind power using...... actual wind power data from Denmark. The numerical results demonstrate that the proposed hybrid artificial neural network approach is effective and efficient for probabilistic forecasting of wind power and has high potential in practical applications....

  8. Interaction of the interplanetary shock and tangential discontinuity in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, Oleksandr; Koval, Andriy; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Prech, Lubomir; Szabo, Adam; Zastenker, Georgy N.

    2017-04-01

    Collisionless shocks play a significant role in the solar wind interaction with the Earth. Fast forward interplanetary (IP) shocks driven by coronal mass ejections or by interaction of fast and slow solar wind streams can be encountered in the interplanetary space, while the bow shock is a standing fast reverse shock formed by the interaction of the supersonic solar wind with Earth's magnetic field. Both types of shocks are responsible for a transformation of a part of the energy of the directed solar wind motion to plasma heating and to acceleration of reflected particles to high energies. It is well known that the interaction of tangential discontinuities with the bow shock can create hot flow anomalies but interactions between IP shocks and tangential discontinuities in the solar wind are studied to a lesser extent due to lack of observations. A fortunate position of many spacecraft (Wind, ACE, DSCOVR, THEMIS, Spektr-R) on June 22, 2015 allows us detailed observations of an IP shock modification due to this interaction. We present an analysis of the event supported with MHD modeling that reveals basic features of the observed IP shock ramp splitting. However, a good matching of modeling and observations was found for DSCOVR and Spektr-R located above the ecliptic plane, whereas a timing of observations below this plane demonstrates problems of modeling of highly inclined discontinuities.

  9. Solar wind dependence of ion parameters in the Earth's magnetospheric region calculated from CLUSTER observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Denton

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Moments calculated from the ion distributions (~0–40 keV measured by the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS instrument are combined with data from the Cluster Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM instrument and used to characterise the bulk properties of the plasma in the near-Earth magnetosphere over five years (2001–2005. Results are presented in the form of 2-D xy, xz and yz GSM cuts through the magnetosphere using data obtained from the Cluster Science Data System (CSDS and the Cluster Active Archive (CAA. Analysis reveals the distribution of ~0–40 keV ions in the inner magnetosphere is highly ordered and highly responsive to changes in solar wind velocity. Specifically, elevations in temperature are found to occur across the entire nightside plasma sheet region during times of fast solar wind. We demonstrate that the nightside plasma sheet ion temperature at a downtail distance of ~12 to 19 Earth radii increases by a factor of ~2 during periods of fast solar wind (500–1000 km s−1 compared to periods of slow solar wind (100–400 km s−1. The spatial extent of these increases are shown in the xy, xz and yz GSM planes. The results from the study have implications for modelling studies and simulations of solar-wind/magnetosphere coupling, which ultimately rely on in situ observations of the plasma sheet properties for input/boundary conditions.

  10. FIP effect for minor heavy solar wind ions as seen with SOHO/CELIAS/MTOF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich-Meisner, Verena, E-mail: heidrich@physik.uni-kiel.de; Berger, Lars; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F. [Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel (Germany); Wurz, Peter [University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Bochsler, Peter [University of New Hampshire, Durham (United States); Ipavich, Fred M. [University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Paquette, John A. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen (Germany); Klecker, Bernd [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching (Germany)

    2016-03-25

    A recent paper [Shearer et al., 2014] reported that during solar maximum Ne showed a surprisingly low abundance. This leads to the question whether other elements show the same behavior. The good mass resolution of Mass-Time-Of-Flight (MTOF) as part of the Charge ELement and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on the Solar Helioshperic Observatory (SOHO) allows to investigate the composition of heavy minor elements in different types of solar wind. We restrict this study to slow solar wind, where the characterisation of slow solar wind is taken from Xu and Borovsky, 2014. This classification scheme requires magnet field information. Since SOHO does not carry a magnetometer, we use the Magnetometer (MAG) of the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) instead. The Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (ACE/SWICS) also provides composition data for cross-calibration and charge-state distributions as input for the transmission function of MTOF whenever the two spacecraft can be expected to observe the same type of wind. We illustrate the MTOF’s capability to determine the solar wind abundance compared to the photospheric abundance (called the FIP ratio in the following) for rare elements like Ti or Cr on long-time scales as a proof of concept for our analysis. And in this brief study, measurements with both ACE/SWICS indicate that the observed elements exhibit a (weak) dependence on the solar cycle, whereas the MTOF measurements are inconclusive.

  11. Are Dynamical Sources Essential for the Production of the Ambient Solar Wind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Jon; Downs, Cooper; Lionello, Roberto; Titov, Viacheslav; Caplan, Ronald; Riley, Pete; Mikic, Zoran

    2016-10-01

    At a basic level, the large structure of the solar corona and its connection to the solar wind has been known for many years. In the classic (near-solar minimum) picture, the slow solar wind is associated with the streamer belt at low latitudes, while the fast solar wind arises from coronal holes at higher latitudes. At a deeper level, important aspects of this connection still puzzle us. One such controversy is the origin of the slow solar wind. One group of theories assume that the slow wind primarily arises quasi-statically from regions of large expansion factor near the boundaries of coronal holes, while a contrasting set of theories argue that the slow solar wind is primarily dynamic in origin and involves the reconnection and exchange of open and closed fields. In this talk, we describe evidence for both sets of theories, and ongoing and future work that may help to resolve this question. Work supported by NASA, NSF and AFOSR.

  12. Interfacing MHD Single Fluid and Kinetic Exospheric Solar Wind Models and Comparing Their Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, Sofia-Paraskevi; Pierrard, Viviane; Keppens, Rony; Pomoell, Jens

    2017-09-01

    An exospheric kinetic solar wind model is interfaced with an observation-driven single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. Initially, a photospheric magnetogram serves as observational input in the fluid approach to extrapolate the heliospheric magnetic field. Then semi-empirical coronal models are used for estimating the plasma characteristics up to a heliocentric distance of 0.1 AU. From there on, a full MHD model that computes the three-dimensional time-dependent evolution of the solar wind macroscopic variables up to the orbit of Earth is used. After interfacing the density and velocity at the inner MHD boundary, we compare our results with those of a kinetic exospheric solar wind model based on the assumption of Maxwell and Kappa velocity distribution functions for protons and electrons, respectively, as well as with in situ observations at 1 AU. This provides insight into more physically detailed processes, such as coronal heating and solar wind acceleration, which naturally arise from including suprathermal electrons in the model. We are interested in the profile of the solar wind speed and density at 1 AU, in characterizing the slow and fast source regions of the wind, and in comparing MHD with exospheric models in similar conditions. We calculate the energetics of both models from low to high heliocentric distances.

  13. A Hybrid Optimization Method for Reactive Power and Voltage Control Considering Power Loss Minimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chengxi; Qin, Nan; Bak, Claus Leth

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid optimization method to optimally control the voltage and reactive power with minimum power loss in transmission grid. This approach is used for the Danish automatic voltage control (AVC) system which is typically a non-linear non-convex problem mixed with both...

  14. Thermoeconomic Analysis of Hybrid Power Plant Concepts for Geothermal Combined Heat and Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Heberle

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a thermo-economic analysis for a low-temperature Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC in a combined heat and power generation (CHP case. For the hybrid power plant, thermal energy input is provided by a geothermal resource coupled with the exhaust gases of a biogas engine. A comparison to alternative geothermal CHP concepts is performed by considering variable parameters like ORC working fluid, supply temperature of the heating network or geothermal water temperature. Second law efficiency as well as economic parameters show that hybrid power plants are more efficient compared to conventional CHP concepts or separate use of the energy sources.

  15. Modulation of Jupiter's plasma flow, polar currents, and auroral precipitation by solar wind-induced compressions and expansions of the magnetosphere: a simple theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We construct a simple model of the plasma flow, magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents, and auroral precipitation in Jupiter's magnetosphere, and examine how they respond to compressions and expansions of the system induced by changes in solar wind dynamic pressure. The main simplifying assumption is axi-symmetry, the system being modelled principally to reflect dayside conditions. The model thus describes three magnetospheric regions, namely the middle and outer magnetosphere on closed magnetic field lines bounded by the magnetopause, together with a region of open field lines mapping to the tail. The calculations assume that the system is initially in a state of steady diffusive outflow of iogenic plasma with a particular equatorial magnetopause radius, and that the magnetopause then moves rapidly in or out due to a change in the solar wind dynamic pressure. If the change is sufficiently rapid (~2–3 h or less the plasma angular momentum is conserved during the excursion, allowing the modified plasma angular velocity to be calculated from the radial displacement of the field lines, together with the modified magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents and auroral precipitation. The properties of these transient states are compared with those of the steady states to which they revert over intervals of ~1–2 days. Results are shown for rapid compressions of the system from an initially expanded state typical of a solar wind rarefaction region, illustrating the reduction in total precipitating electron power that occurs for modest compressions, followed by partial recovery in the emergent steady state. For major compressions, however, typical of the onset of a solar wind compression region, a brightened transient state occurs in which super-rotation is induced on closed field lines, resulting in a reversal in sense of the usual magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling current system. Current system reversal results in accelerated auroral electron

  16. Modulation of Jupiter's plasma flow, polar currents, and auroral precipitation by solar wind-induced compressions and expansions of the magnetosphere: a simple theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We construct a simple model of the plasma flow, magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents, and auroral precipitation in Jupiter's magnetosphere, and examine how they respond to compressions and expansions of the system induced by changes in solar wind dynamic pressure. The main simplifying assumption is axi-symmetry, the system being modelled principally to reflect dayside conditions. The model thus describes three magnetospheric regions, namely the middle and outer magnetosphere on closed magnetic field lines bounded by the magnetopause, together with a region of open field lines mapping to the tail. The calculations assume that the system is initially in a state of steady diffusive outflow of iogenic plasma with a particular equatorial magnetopause radius, and that the magnetopause then moves rapidly in or out due to a change in the solar wind dynamic pressure. If the change is sufficiently rapid (~2–3 h or less the plasma angular momentum is conserved during the excursion, allowing the modified plasma angular velocity to be calculated from the radial displacement of the field lines, together with the modified magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents and auroral precipitation. The properties of these transient states are compared with those of the steady states to which they revert over intervals of ~1–2 days. Results are shown for rapid compressions of the system from an initially expanded state typical of a solar wind rarefaction region, illustrating the reduction in total precipitating electron power that occurs for modest compressions, followed by partial recovery in the emergent steady state. For major compressions, however, typical of the onset of a solar wind compression region, a brightened transient state occurs in which super-rotation is induced on closed field lines, resulting in a reversal in sense of the usual magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling current system. Current system reversal results in accelerated auroral

  17. Empirically modelled Pc3 activity based on solar wind parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Heilig

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available It is known that under certain solar wind (SW/interplanetary magnetic field (IMF conditions (e.g. high SW speed, low cone angle the occurrence of ground-level Pc3–4 pulsations is more likely. In this paper we demonstrate that in the event of anomalously low SW particle density, Pc3 activity is extremely low regardless of otherwise favourable SW speed and cone angle. We re-investigate the SW control of Pc3 pulsation activity through a statistical analysis and two empirical models with emphasis on the influence of SW density on Pc3 activity. We utilise SW and IMF measurements from the OMNI project and ground-based magnetometer measurements from the MM100 array to relate SW and IMF measurements to the occurrence of Pc3 activity. Multiple linear regression and artificial neural network models are used in iterative processes in order to identify sets of SW-based input parameters, which optimally reproduce a set of Pc3 activity data. The inclusion of SW density in the parameter set significantly improves the models. Not only the density itself, but other density related parameters, such as the dynamic pressure of the SW, or the standoff distance of the magnetopause work equally well in the model. The disappearance of Pc3s during low-density events can have at least four reasons according to the existing upstream wave theory: 1. Pausing the ion-cyclotron resonance that generates the upstream ultra low frequency waves in the absence of protons, 2. Weakening of the bow shock that implies less efficient reflection, 3. The SW becomes sub-Alfvénic and hence it is not able to sweep back the waves propagating upstream with the Alfvén-speed, and 4. The increase of the standoff distance of the magnetopause (and of the bow shock. Although the models cannot account for the lack of Pc3s during intervals when the SW density is extremely low, the resulting sets of optimal model inputs support the generation of mid latitude Pc3 activity predominantly through

  18. Dynamic Modeling and Simulation on a Hybrid Power System for Electric Vehicle Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-Wen He; Rui Xiong; Yu-Hua Chang

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid power systems, formed by combining high-energy-density batteries and high-power-density ultracapacitors in appropriate ways, provide high-performance and high-efficiency power systems for electric vehicle applications. This paper first establishes dynamic models for the ultracapacitor, the battery and a passive hybrid power system, and then based on the dynamic models a comparative simulation between a battery only power system and the proposed hybrid power system was done under the UD...

  19. Robust Power Management Control for Stand-Alone Hybrid Power Generation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Elkhatib; Adouane, Lounis; Aitouche, Abdel; Mohammed, Walaa

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new robust fuzzy control of energy management strategy for the stand-alone hybrid power systems. It consists of two levels named centralized fuzzy supervisory control which generates the power references for each decentralized robust fuzzy control. Hybrid power systems comprises: a photovoltaic panel and wind turbine as renewable sources, a micro turbine generator and a battery storage system. The proposed control strategy is able to satisfy the load requirements based on a fuzzy supervisor controller and manage power flows between the different energy sources and the storage unit by respecting the state of charge and the variation of wind speed and irradiance. Centralized controller is designed based on If-Then fuzzy rules to manage and optimize the hybrid power system production by generating the reference power for photovoltaic panel and wind turbine. Decentralized controller is based on the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model and permits us to stabilize each photovoltaic panel and wind turbine in presence of disturbances and parametric uncertainties and to optimize the tracking reference which is given by the centralized controller level. The sufficient conditions stability are formulated in the format of linear matrix inequalities using the Lyapunov stability theory. The effectiveness of the proposed Strategy is finally demonstrated through a SAHPS (stand-alone hybrid power systems) to illustrate the effectiveness of the overall proposed method.

  20. ROSAT Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange with the Lunar Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the count rate in three wedges, two wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 degrees off (19 degrees wide) the terminator towards the dark side and one wedge 38 degrees wide centered on the anti-solar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show substantial limb brightening that is absent in the 38 degree wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the count rate increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere. Along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which solar wind charge exchange has been observed. This technique can be used to explore the solar wind-lunar interaction.

  1. Azimuthally asymmetric ring current as a function of Dst and solar wind conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Maltsev

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on magnetic data, spatial distribution of the westward ring current flowing at |z|<3 RE has been found under five levels of Dst, five levels of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF z component, and five levels of the solar wind dynamic pressure Psw. The maximum of the current is located near midnight at distances 5 to 7 RE. The magnitude of the nightside and dayside parts of the westward current at distances from 4 to 9 RE can be approximated as Inight=1.75-0.041 Dst, Inoon=0.22-0.013 Dst, where the current is in MA. The relation of the nightside current to the solar wind parameters can be expressed as Inight=1.45-0.20 Bs IMF + 0.32 Psw, where BsIMF is the IMF southward component. The dayside ring current poorly correlates with the solar wind parameters.

  2. The relationship between solar wind entry processes and transpolar arc formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailyan, Bagrat; Shi, Quanqi; Maggiolo, Romain; Zong, Qiugang; Cao, Xin; Zhang, Yongliang; Yao, Zhonghua; Fu, Suiyan; Wei, Yong; Pu, Zuyin

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Cluster observations revealed the presence of solar wind plasma entry regions in the high latitudes of the Earth's magnetosphere, i.e. the lobes tailward of the cusp region, mostly during periods on northward IMF. Such periods of northward IMF are associated with the presence of transpolar arcs. We use observations from the GUVI experiment onboard the TIMED spacecraft to investigate a possible link between solar wind entry in the high latitude magnetosphere and the formation of transpolar arcs. For ~20 solar wind entry events from ~100, transpolar arcs were evidenced by the GUVI imager. The properties of ions and electrons in the entry regions, their connection with transpolar auroras and the correlations with IMF conditions are examined for the most intense events using multiple spacecraft data (Cluster, TIMED, DMSP, IMAGE, POLAR). The time evolution and asymmetries between the two hemispheres for these transpolar arcs are also discussed.

  3. Sensitive test for ion-cyclotron resonant heating in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Justin C; Maruca, Bennett A; Stevens, Michael L; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2013-03-01

    Plasma carrying a spectrum of counterpropagating field-aligned ion-cyclotron waves can strongly and preferentially heat ions through a stochastic Fermi mechanism. Such a process has been proposed to explain the extreme temperatures, temperature anisotropies, and speeds of ions in the solar corona and solar wind. We quantify how differential flow between ion species results in a Doppler shift in the wave spectrum that can prevent this strong heating. Two critical values of differential flow are derived for strong heating of the core and tail of a given ion distribution function. Our comparison of these predictions to observations from the Wind spacecraft reveals excellent agreement. Solar wind helium that meets the condition for strong core heating is nearly 7 times hotter than hydrogen on average. Ion-cyclotron resonance contributes to heating in the solar wind, and there is a close link between heating, differential flow, and temperature anisotropy.

  4. Sheath-limited unipolar induction in the solar wind. [plasma interactions with solar system bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srnka, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    A model of the steady-state interaction between the solar wind and an electrically conducting body having neither an atmosphere nor an intrinsic magnetic field sufficient enough to deflect the plasma flow is presented which considers some effects of a plasma surface sheath on unipolar induction. The Sonett-Colburn (1967, 1968) unipolar dynamo model is reviewed, and it is noted that the unipolar dynamo response of an electrically conducting body in the solar wind's motional field can be controlled by sheath effects in certain cases where the body radius is less than a certain critical value. It is shown that sheath effects do not limit the unipolar response of the moon or Mercury since their body radii are much larger than their critical radii. Sheath effects are also considered for asteroids, the Martian satellites, the irregular Jovian satellites, the outer satellites of Saturn, and meteorite parent bodies in a primordial enhanced solar wind.

  5. Particle Velocity Distributions and Large-Scale Electric Field in Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, J.; Vinas, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Velocity distributions of particles are key elements in the study of solar wind. The physical mechanisms that regulate their many features are a matter of debate. The present work addresses the subject with a fully analytical method in order to establish the shape of particle velocity distributions in solar wind. The method consists in solving the steady-state kinetic equation for particles and the related fluid equations, assigning spatial profiles for density and temperature matching observational data. The model is one-dimensional in configuration-space and two-dimensional in velocity-space, and accounts for large-scale processes, namely, advection, gravity, magnetic mirroring and the large-scale ambipolar electric field, without the aid of wave-particle interactions or collisions. The findings reported add to the general understanding of regulation of particle distributions in solar wind and to the predictions of their shape in regions restricted for in situ measurements.

  6. Solar wind interaction with small bodies. 1: Whistler wing signatures near to Gaspra and Ida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Kivelson, M. G.; Joy, S.; Khurana, K. K.; Polanskey, C.; Southwood, D. J.; Walker, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Data from Galileo's two asteroid flybys reveal magnetic fluctuations that we interpret as perturbations of the solar wind magnetic field caused by an interaction with the nearby asteroid. The scale sizes of the bodies (approximately 14 km for Gaspra and approximately 30 km for Ida) are intermediate between the ion and electron gyroradii, which implies that the asteroid-imposed perturbations propagate in the whistler mode. Special properties of the whistler mode include phase phase velocities that can exceed the solar wind speed and confinement of the disturbance to directions nearly aligned with the magnetic field. These features of the interaction impose a structure on the solar wind disturbance that differs greatly from the forms familiar for either magnetized or unmagnetized bodies of magnetohydrodynamic spatial scales. We examine both data and computer simulations of the interaction with special attention to what can be inferred about the interaction itself from analysis of the data.

  7. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. II - Experimental support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, J. D.; Olbert, S.

    1979-01-01

    Strong observational support from data obtained on three different satellites and reported by three independent experimental groups is presented for all of the theoretically predicted correlations of a previous paper concerning local and global processes that affect solar-wind electrons. Specifically, it is shown that: (1) subthermal electrons behave most nearly as a classical gas; (2) the solar-wind extrathermal fraction of the electron density is anticorrelated within steady-state stream patterns with the local bulk speed; (3) the extrathermal electrons form a spectrally distinguishable subpopulation whose differential 'temperature' is anticorrelated with the local bulk speed; (4) the heat flux carried by electrons is anticorrelated with the bulk speed; and (5) the extrathermal 'temperature' is nearly independent of radius in the inner heliosphere. It is concluded that the previously discussed global and local Coulomb collisional effects are essential aspects of the solar-wind plasma as it is observed.

  8. Comparative Validation of Realtime Solar Wind Forecasting Using the UCSD Heliospheric Tomography Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeice, Peter; Taktakishvili, Alexandra; Jackson, Bernard; Clover, John; Bisi, Mario; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego 3D Heliospheric Tomography Model reconstructs the evolution of heliospheric structures, and can make forecasts of solar wind density and velocity up to 72 hours in the future. The latest model version, installed and running in realtime at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center(CCMC), analyzes scintillations of meter wavelength radio point sources recorded by the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory(STELab) together with realtime measurements of solar wind speed and density recorded by the Advanced Composition Explorer(ACE) Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor(SWEPAM).The solution is reconstructed using tomographic techniques and a simple kinematic wind model. Since installation, the CCMC has been recording the model forecasts and comparing them with ACE measurements, and with forecasts made using other heliospheric models hosted by the CCMC. We report the preliminary results of this validation work and comparison with alternative models.

  9. Scaling properties of intermittent solar wind turbulence and their solar cycle dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Rowlands, G.

    Quantifying the properties of solar wind turbulence is important for our understanding of the fundamentals of MHD turbulence the evolution of the solar wind and for the propagation of energetic particles A hallmark of turbulence is scaling in statistical measures of fluctuations in the flow In data this is quantified by testing for scaling in the Probability Density Functions PDF of fluctuations either directly or via structure function analysis Comparisons can then be made at least in principle with turbulence phenomenologies Having determined the scaling exponents from the data we can also derive a Fokker-Planck model along with the associated Langevin equation- this provides a stochastic dynamical equation for the fluctuations in the time series of in- situ plasma parameters Differences in the scaling exponents found for different plasma parameters constructed to more closely track distinct phenomenologies Alvenic or compressive may reflect both local and nonlocal processes with implications for our understanding of the evolving solar wind

  10. Turbulence and other processes for the scale-free texture of the fast solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Gogoberidze, G.; Wicks, R. T.

    2012-04-01

    The higher-order statistics of magnetic field magnitude fluctuations in the fast quiet solar wind are quantified systematically, scale by scale. We find a single global non-Gaussian scale-free behavior from minutes to over 5 hours. This spans the signature of an inertial range of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and a ˜1/f range in magnetic field components. This global scaling in field magnitude fluctuations is an intrinsic component of the underlying texture of the solar wind which co-exists with the signature of MHD turbulence but extends to lower frequencies. Importantly, scaling and non- Gaussian statistics of fluctuations are not unique to turbulence and can imply other physical mechanisms- our results thus place a strong constraint on theories of the dynamics of the solar corona and solar wind. Intriguingly, the magnetic field and velocity components also show scale-dependent dynamic alignment outside of the inertial range of MHD turbulence.

  11. Scaling properties of the solar wind driver and the Akasofu's ɛ parameter at solar maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Kiyani, K.; Rowlands, G.; Watkins, N. W.

    2007-12-01

    Earth magnetosphere is constantly driven by turbulent and intermittent solar wind. Observations suggest that the multi-scale nature of this coupling is a fundamental aspect of magnetospheric dynamics. We examine the statistical properties of fluctuations in Akasofu's ɛ, which represents the energy input from the solar wind into the magnetosphere, and the magnetic field energy density of the solar wind at solar maximum. Previous studies suggested that, at solar maximum, these fluctuations are approximately self-similar and their probability distributions have similar functional form. We examine scaling properties of these quantities in detail, obtain values of their scaling exponents and examine a fractional Lévy walk as a possible model for their statistics.

  12. Solar wind entry into the high-latitude terrestrial magnetosphere during geomagnetically quiet times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Q Q; Zong, Q-G; Fu, S Y; Dunlop, M W; Pu, Z Y; Parks, G K; Wei, Y; Li, W H; Zhang, H; Nowada, M; Wang, Y B; Sun, W J; Xiao, T; Reme, H; Carr, C; Fazakerley, A N; Lucek, E

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the transport of solar wind plasma into and throughout the terrestrial magnetosphere is crucial to space science and space weather. For non-active periods, there is little agreement on where and how plasma entry into the magnetosphere might occur. Moreover, behaviour in the high-latitude region behind the magnetospheric cusps, for example, the lobes, is poorly understood, partly because of lack of coverage by previous space missions. Here, using Cluster multi-spacecraft data, we report an unexpected discovery of regions of solar wind entry into the Earth's high-latitude magnetosphere tailward of the cusps. From statistical observational facts and simulation analysis we suggest that these regions are most likely produced by magnetic reconnection at the high-latitude magnetopause, although other processes, such as impulsive penetration, may not be ruled out entirely. We find that the degree of entry can be significant for solar wind transport into the magnetosphere during such quiet times.

  13. Particle acceleration at a termination shock. I - Application to the solar wind and the anomalous component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a numerical study of the diffusive acceleration of charged particles at the termination shock of the solar wind are reported. In the model a realistic magnetic field structure is employed which is similar to that observed in the solar wind. In addition to causing spatial variation of the diffusion tensor, a major effect of the magnetic field is to cause guiding-center drifts of the accelerated particles, both in the solar wind and at the shock. It is demonstrated that the inclusion of the drifts has a large effect on the acceleration. It is concluded, furthermore, that acceleration at the termination shock, in conjunction with drifts, can explain several observed features of the anomalous component.

  14. Bipolar lead-acid power source (BILAPS) for hybrid vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmal, D.; Saakes, M. [TNO Institute of Environmental Essences (Netherlands); Mourad, S. [TNO Road-Vehicles Research Institute (Netherlands); Have, P. [Centurion Accumulatoren BV (Netherlands)

    1999-07-01

    In hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) the requirements on batteries for energy storage are completely different from those in battery powered electric vehicles (BEVs). In order to come to a successful of HEVs, beside fulfilling the technical requirements, the battery has to have a long life time and must be cost effective. On the basis of TNO technology (patent pending), the development of a bipolar lead-acid battery has been started, together with a battery manufacturer (Centurion), having as final aim a commercial battery for hybrid vehicles and other high power applications. A prototype of 80 V has been built and tested, mainly for the purpose to identify the route to the final aim. Results of this prototype are discussed. (author)

  15. Intermittency, non-Gaussian statistics and fractal scaling of MHD fluctuations in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marsch

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a review of some recent work on intermittency, non-Gaussian statistics, and fractal scaling of solar wind magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Model calculations and theories are discussed and put in their context with the in-situ observations of the solar wind fluctuations, essentially of the flow velocity and magnetic field. Emphasis is placed more on a comparison of the data with the theory than on a complete derivation of the model results, which are treated in a more tutorial fashion. The introduction reminds of some important observations and key aspects of the solar wind turbulence. Then structure functions are defined and observational results discussed. The probability density functions provide a direct means to analyse the statistical properties of the fluctuations. Evidence for non-Gaussian statistics is provided. Intermittency and simple scaling models are discussed, which yield algebraic expressions for the scaling exponents of the structure functions. The concept of the extended self-similarity is presented and corresponding observational evidence for its existence in the solar wind is provided. Subsequently, and extended structure function model, including the p-model scaling and a scale-dependent cascade, is discussed and compared with selected measurements. The basics of the multifractals are presented and applied to solar wind data. The multifractal scaling of the kinetic energy flux as proxy for the unknown cascading rate is established observationally, and the so-called multifractal spectrum is obtained. Finally, the scaling exponents of the associated correlation functions are derived and analysed. The paper concludes with a discussion of the empirical results and prospects for the future research in this field and in solar wind MHD turbulence in general.

  16. On the electron temperature downstream of the solar wind termination shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the temperatures of electrons convected with the solar wind to large solar distances and finally transported over the solar wind termination shock. Nearly nothing, unless at high energies in the cosmic ray regime, is known about the thermodynamical behaviour of these distant electrons from in~situ plasma observations. Hence it is tacitly assumed these electrons, due to their adiabatic behaviour and vanishing heat conduction or energization processes, have rapidly cooled off to very low temperatures once they eventually arrive at the solar wind termination shock (at about 100 AU. In this paper we show that such electrons, however, at their passage over the termination shock due to the shock–electric field action undergo an over-adiabatic heating and therefore appear on the downstream side as a substantially heated plasma species. Looking quantitatively into this heating process we find that solar wind electrons achieve temperatures of the order of 2–4 × 106 K downstream of the termination shock, depending on the upstream solar wind bulk velocity and the shock compression ratio. Hence these electrons therewith play an important dynamical role in structuring this shock and determining the downstream plasma flow properties. Furthermore, they present an additional ionization source for incoming neutral interstellar hydrogen and excite X-ray emission. They also behave similar to cosmic ray electrons and extend to some limited region upstream of the shock of the order of 0.1 AU by spatial diffusion and thereby also modify the upstream solar wind properties.

  17. A statistical study on the correlations between plasma sheet and solar wind based on DSP explorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Q. Yan

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available By using the data of two spacecraft, TC-1 and ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer, a statistical study on the correlations between plasma sheet and solar wind has been carried out. The results obtained show that the plasma sheet at geocentric distances of about 9~13.4 Re has an apparent driving relationship with the solar wind. It is found that (1 there is a positive correlation between the duskward component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and the duskward component of the geomagnetic field in the plasma sheet, with a proportionality constant of about 1.09. It indicates that the duskward component of the IMF can effectively penetrate into the near-Earth plasma sheet, and can be amplified by sunward convection in the corresponding region at geocentric distances of about 9~13.4 Re; (2 the increase in the density or the dynamic pressure of the solar wind will generally lead to the increase in the density of the plasma sheet; (3 the ion thermal pressure in the near-Earth plasma sheet is significantly controlled by the dynamic pressure of solar wind; (4 under the northward IMF condition, the ion temperature and ion thermal pressure in the plasma sheet decrease as the solar wind speed increases. This feature indicates that plasmas in the near-Earth plasma sheet can come from the magnetosheath through the LLBL. Northward IMF is one important condition for the transport of the cold plasmas of the magnetosheath into the plasma sheet through the LLBL, and fast solar wind will enhance such a transport process.

  18. RECONSTRUCTING THE SOLAR WIND FROM ITS EARLY HISTORY TO CURRENT EPOCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, Vladimir S.; Usmanov, Arcadi V., E-mail: vladimir.airapetian@nasa.gov, E-mail: avusmanov@gmail.com [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Stellar winds from active solar-type stars can play a crucial role in removal of stellar angular momentum and erosion of planetary atmospheres. However, major wind properties except for mass-loss rates cannot be directly derived from observations. We employed a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic Alfvén wave driven solar wind model, ALF3D, to reconstruct the solar wind parameters including the mass-loss rate, terminal velocity, and wind temperature at 0.7, 2, and 4.65 Gyr. Our model treats the wind thermal electrons, protons, and pickup protons as separate fluids and incorporates turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating to properly describe proton and electron temperatures of the solar wind. To study the evolution of the solar wind, we specified three input model parameters, the plasma density, Alfvén wave amplitude, and the strength of the dipole magnetic field at the wind base for each of three solar wind evolution models that are consistent with observational constrains. Our model results show that the velocity of the paleo solar wind was twice as fast, ∼50 times denser and 2 times hotter at 1 AU in the Sun's early history at 0.7 Gyr. The theoretical calculations of mass-loss rate appear to be in agreement with the empirically derived values for stars of various ages. These results can provide realistic constraints for wind dynamic pressures on magnetospheres of (exo)planets around the young Sun and other active stars, which is crucial in realistic assessment of the Joule heating of their ionospheres and corresponding effects of atmospheric erosion.

  19. Electric solar-wind sail for asteroid touring missions and planetary protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janhunen, P.

    2014-07-01

    The electric solar-wind sail (electric sail, E-sail [1,2]) is a relatively new concept for moving around in the solar system without consuming propellant and by using the thrust provided by the natural solar wind to produce propulsion. The E-sail is based on deploying, using the centrifugal force, a set of long, thin metallic tethers and charging them to high positive voltage by actively removing negative charge from the system by an electron gun. To make the tethers resistant towards inevitable wire cuts by micrometeoroids, they must be made by bonding from multiple (typically 4) thin (25--50 μ m) aluminium wires. Production of the tethers was a technical challenge which was recently overcome. According to present numerical estimates, the E-sail could produce up to 1 N of propellantless thrust out of less than 200 kg package which is enough to give characteristic acceleration of 1 mm/s^2 to a spacecraft weighing 1 tonne, thus producing 30 km/s of delta-v per year. The thrust scales as ˜ 1/r where r is the solar distance. There are ways to control and vector the thrust enough to enable inward and outward spiralling missions in the solar system. The E-sail working principle has been indirectly measured in a laboratory, and ESTCube-1 CubeSat experiment is underway in orbit (in late March 2014 it was waiting to be started) to measure the E-sail thrust acting on a short 10-m long tether. A full-scale mission requires ˜ 1000 km of tether altogether (weighing ˜10 kg). The production of a 1-km piece of tether has been demonstrated in laboratory [3]. If the E-sail holds up its present promise, it would be ideally suited for asteroid missions because it enables production of similar level of thrust than ion engines, but needs only a small fraction of the electric power and never runs out of propellant because it does not use any (the ''propellant'' being the natural solar-wind plasma flow). Here we consider especially a mission which would tour the asteroid belt for a

  20. Observational Evidence for Self-generation of Small-scale Magnetic Flux Ropes from Intermittent Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jinlei; Hu, Qiang

    2018-01-01

    We present unique and additional observational evidence for the self-generation of small-scale coherent magnetic flux rope structures in the solar wind. Such structures with durations between 9 and 361 minutes are identified from Wind in situ spacecraft measurements through the Grad–Shafranov (GS) reconstruction approach. The event occurrence counts are on the order of 3500 per year on average and have a clear solar-cycle dependence. We build a database of small-scale magnetic flux ropes from 20 yr worth of Wind spacecraft data. We show a power-law distribution of the wall-to-wall time corresponding well to the inertial range turbulence, which agrees with relevant observations and numerical simulation results. We also provide the axial current density distribution from the GS-based observational analysis, which yields a non-Gaussian probability density function consistent with numerical simulation results.

  1. A Comparative Verification of Forecasts from Two Operational Solar Wind Models (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    Improvements to the HAF solar wind model for space weather predictions, J. Geophys. Res., 106, 20,985–21,001, doi:10.1029/2000JA000220. Fry, C. D., M. Dryer , Z...sheet magnetic model for the solar corona, Cosmic Electrodyn., 2, 232–245. Smith, Z. K., M. Dryer , S. M. P. McKenna‐Lawlor, C. D. Fry, C. S. Deehr, and W...AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TP-2012-0006 TP-2012-0006 A COMPARATIVE VERIFICATION OF FORECASTS FROM TWO OPERATIONAL SOLAR WIND MODELS

  2. IPS observations of the solar wind speed out of the ecliptic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation observations from 1971-1975 show that the average solar wind speed increases away from the solar equator, with a mean gradient of 2.1 km/s per degree. These results are compared with spacecraft observations over the + or - 7 deg attainable in the ecliptic and with those deduced from comet tails. The role of temporal variations, especially those caused by latitude dependent solar wind streams, is emphasized, and this points to the need for extensive ecliptic and ground-based observations during an out-of-the-ecliptic spacecraft mission.

  3. Recent Optical and SEM Characterization of Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator Diamond on Silicon Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, Judith H.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Burkett, P. J.; Ross, D. K.; Gonzalez, C. P.; McNamara, K. M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the 4 Genesis solar wind concentrator collectors was a silicon substrate coated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) in which to capture solar wind. This material was designed for analysis of solar nitrogen and noble gases [1, 2]. This particular collector fractured during landing, but about 80% of the surface was recovered, including a large piece which was subdivided in 2012 [3, 4, 5]. The optical and SEM imaging and analysis described below supports the subdivision and allocation of the diamond-on-silicon (DOS) concentrator collector.

  4. Compressible MHD Turbulence in the Slow Solar Wind: Energy Transfer Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraoui, F.; Andres, N.; Hadid, L.; Galtier, S.; Dmitruk, P.; Mininni, P. D.

    2016-12-01

    The role of compressible fluctuations in the MHD turbulence is investigated using direct numerical simulations and in-situ spacecraft in the solar wind. A focus is put on verifying the exact third-order law derived for compressible isothermal turbulence by Banerjee and Galtier, 2013. The numerical simulations use a 3D compressible MHD code in the isothermal limit ( =1) with low sonic Mach numbers (Ms<1). The main goal is to evaluate the relative importance of the new flux and source terms involved in the derived law. Direct comparison with spacecraft observations from the Themis spacecraft in the fast and slow solar wind will be made.

  5. 3D, multi-fluid, MHD calculations of Mars interaction with the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, D.; Toth, G.; Nagy, A. F.; Curry, S.; Ma, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We use our 3D multi-fluid MHD model to simulate the interaction of the solar wind with non-magnetized planets, Mars in particular. We set the lower boundary to 100 km and consider photo and electron impact ionization as well as charge exchange in our chemistry. We also add more realistic physical processes to our model, and test it against different solar wind conditions. In addition, we are solving for the electron pressure and therefore for the electron fluid. We also calculate the escape fluxes and compare our results to observations.

  6. Scalable and Power Efficient Data Analytics for Hybrid Exascale Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Alok [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Samatova, Nagiza [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wu, Kesheng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liao, Wei-keng [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-03-19

    This project developed a generic and optimized set of core data analytics functions. These functions organically consolidate a broad constellation of high performance analytical pipelines. As the architectures of emerging HPC systems become inherently heterogeneous, there is a need to design algorithms for data analysis kernels accelerated on hybrid multi-node, multi-core HPC architectures comprised of a mix of CPUs, GPUs, and SSDs. Furthermore, the power-aware trend drives the advances in our performance-energy tradeoff analysis framework which enables our data analysis kernels algorithms and software to be parameterized so that users can choose the right power-performance optimizations.

  7. A Hybrid Power Management (HPM) Based Vehicle Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2011-01-01

    Society desires vehicles with reduced fuel consumption and reduced emissions. This presents a challenge and an opportunity for industry and the government. The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed a Hybrid Power Management (HPM) based vehicle architecture for space and terrestrial vehicles. GRC's Electrical and Electromagnetics Branch of the Avionics and Electrical Systems Division initiated the HPM Program for the GRC Technology Transfer and Partnership Office. HPM is the innovative integration of diverse, state-of-the-art power devices in an optimal configuration for space and terrestrial applications. The appropriate application and control of the various power devices significantly improves overall system performance and efficiency. The basic vehicle architecture consists of a primary power source, and possibly other power sources, providing all power to a common energy storage system, which is used to power the drive motors and vehicle accessory systems, as well as provide power as an emergency power system. Each component is independent, permitting it to be optimized for its intended purpose. This flexible vehicle architecture can be applied to all vehicles to considerably improve system efficiency, reliability, safety, security, and performance. This unique vehicle architecture has the potential to alleviate global energy concerns, improve the environment, stimulate the economy, and enable new missions.

  8. Voltage Harmonics Mitigation through Hybrid Active Power Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwer Ali Sahito

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast dynamic response, high efficiency, low cost and small size of power electronic converters have exponentially increased their use in modern power system which resulted in harmonically distorted voltage and currents. Voltage harmonics mainly caused by current harmonics are more dangerous as performance and expected operating life of other power system equipment are affected by harmonically distorted supply voltage. Electronic filter circuits are used to improve system power quality by mitigating adverse effects of harmonics. Hybrid filters having advantages of both passive and active filters are preferred to resolve the problem of harmonics efficiently and avoiding any chance of resonance. In this paper, a three phase three wire network is considered to supply an adjustable speed drive represented by a resistive load connected across a three phase bridge rectifier. Simulation of the considered system shows THD (Total Harmonic Distortion of 18.91 and 7.61% in supply current and voltage respectively. A HAPF (Hybrid Active Power Filter is proposed to reduce these THD values below 5% as recommended by IEEE Standard-519. P-Q theorem is used to calculate required parameters for proposed filter, which is implemented through hysteresis control. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the designed filter as THD for both current and voltage have reduced below allowable limit of 5%.

  9. Application of a High-Power Reversible Converter in a Hybrid Traction Power Supply System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A high-power reversible converter can achieve a variety of functions, such as recovering regenerative braking energy, expanding traction power capacity, and improving an alternating current (AC grid power factor. A new hybrid traction power supply scheme, which consists of a high-power reversible converter and two 12-pulse diode rectifiers, is proposed. A droop control method based on load current feed-forward is adopted to realize the load distribution between the reversible converter and the existing 12-pulse diode rectifiers. The direct current (DC short-circuit characteristics of the reversible converter is studied, then the relationship between the peak fault current and the circuit parameters is obtained from theoretical calculations and validated by computer simulation. The first two sets of 2 MW reversible converters have been successfully applied in Beijing Metro Line 10, the proposed hybrid application scheme and coordinated control strategy are verified, and 11.15% of average energy-savings is reached.

  10. Continual Energy Management System of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Hybrid Power Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current research status in energy management of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cell hybrid power electric vehicles are first described in this paper, and then build the PEMFC/ lithium-ion battery/ ultra-capacitor hybrid system model. The paper analysis the key factors of the continuous power available in PEM fuel cell hybrid power electric vehicle and hybrid power system working status under different driving modes. In the end this paper gives the working flow chart of the hybrid power system and concludes the three items of the system performance analysis.

  11. A study of magnetic fluctuations and their anomalous scaling in the solar wind: the Ulysses fast-latitude scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    c. Pagel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind is a highly turbulent and intermittent medium at frequencies between 10-4 and 10-1 Hz. Power spectra are used to look at fluctuations in the components of the magnetic field at high frequencies over a wide range of latitudes. Results show steady turbulence in the polar regions of the Sun and a more varied environment in the equatorial region. The magnetic field fluctuations exhibit anomalous scaling at high frequencies. Various models have been proposed in an attempt to better understand the scaling nature of such fluctuations in neutral fluid turbulence. We have used the Ulysses fast latitude scan data to perform a wide ranging comparison of three such models on the solar wind magnetic field data: the well-known P model, in both its Kolmogorov and Kraichnan forms, the lognormal cascade model and a model adapted from atmospheric physics, the G infinity model. They were tested by using fits to graphs of the structure function exponents g(q, by making a comparison with a non-linear measure of the deviation of g(q from the non-intermittent straight line, and by using extended self similarity technique, over a large range of helio-latitudes. Tests of all three models indicated a high level of intermittency in the fast solar wind, and showed a varied structure in the slow wind, with regions of apparently little intermittency next to regions of high intermittency, implying that the slow wind has no uniform origin. All but one of the models performed well, with the lognormal and Kolmogorov P model performing the best over all the tests, indicating that inhomogeneous energy transfer in the cascade is a good description. The Kraichnan model performed relatively poorly, and the overall results show that the Kraichnan model of turbulence is not well supported over the frequency and distance ranges of our data set. The G infinity model fitted the results surprisingly well and showed that there may very well be important universal geometrical

  12. Polar summer mesospheric extreme horizontal drift speeds during interplanetary corotating interaction regions (CIRs) and high-speed solar wind streams: Coupling between the solar wind and the mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kirkwood, Sheila; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shepherd, Gordon G.

    2014-05-01

    We report the observation of echo extreme horizontal drift speed (EEHS, ≥ 300 m s-1) during polar mesospheric (80-90 km) summer echoes (PMSEs) by the VHF (52 MHz) radar at Esrange, Sweden, in years of 2006 and 2008. The EEHS occur in PMSEs as correlated with high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs), observed at least once in 12-17% of all hours of observation for the two summers. The EEHS rate peaks occur either during high solar wind speed in the early part of the PMSE season or during the arrival of interplanetary corotating interaction regions (CIRs) followed by peaks in PMSE occurrence rate after 1-4 days, in the latter part of the 2006 summer. The cause of EEHS rate peaks is likely under the competition between the interval of the CIR and HSS passage over the magnetosphere. A candidate process in producing EEHS is suggested to be localized strong electric field, which is caused by solar wind energy transfer from the interaction of CIR and HSS with the magnetosphere in a sequential manner. We suggest that EEHS are created by strong electric field, estimated as > 10-30 V m-1 at 85 km altitude, exceeding the mesospheric breakdown threshold field.

  13. Hybrid intelligent monironing systems for thermal power plant trips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsoum, Nader; Ismail, Firas Basim

    2012-11-01

    Steam boiler is one of the main equipment in thermal power plants. If the steam boiler trips it may lead to entire shutdown of the plant, which is economically burdensome. Early boiler trips monitoring is crucial to maintain normal and safe operational conditions. In the present work two artificial intelligent monitoring systems specialized in boiler trips have been proposed and coded within the MATLAB environment. The training and validation of the two systems has been performed using real operational data captured from the plant control system of selected power plant. An integrated plant data preparation framework for seven boiler trips with related operational variables has been proposed for IMSs data analysis. The first IMS represents the use of pure Artificial Neural Network system for boiler trip detection. All seven boiler trips under consideration have been detected by IMSs before or at the same time of the plant control system. The second IMS represents the use of Genetic Algorithms and Artificial Neural Networks as a hybrid intelligent system. A slightly lower root mean square error was observed in the second system which reveals that the hybrid intelligent system performed better than the pure neural network system. Also, the optimal selection of the most influencing variables performed successfully by the hybrid intelligent system.

  14. Cost-benefit analysis of hybrid wind-solar power generation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOMER power optimization software for evaluation of design and performance of both off-grid and gridconnected power systems has been applied for cost-benefit analysis of a wind-solar hybrid power generation system. Comparison was also made with the cost per kilowatt of grid power supply. The hybrid system had a ...

  15. Trimode optimizes hybrid power plants. Final report: Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Sullivan, G.A.; O`Sullivan, J.A. [Abacus Controls, Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States)

    1998-07-01

    In the Phase 2 project, Abacus Controls Inc. did research and development of hybrid systems that combine the energy sources from photovoltaics, batteries, and diesel-generators and demonstrated that they are economically feasible for small power plants in many parts of the world. The Trimode Power Processor reduces the fuel consumption of the diesel-generator to its minimum by presenting itself as the perfect electrical load to the generator. A 30-kW three-phase unit was tested at Sandia National Laboratories to prove its worthiness in actual field conditions. The use of photovoltaics at remote locations where reliability of supply requires a diesel-generator will lower costs to operate by reducing the run time of the diesel generator. The numerous benefits include longer times between maintenance for the diesel engine and better power quality from the generator. 32 figs.

  16. A Kinetic Model of Solar Wind Generation by Oblique Ion-cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.

    2011-04-01

    The fast solar wind is generated by extended perpendicular ion heating in coronal holes, but the kinetic mechanism responsible for this heating has not been determined. One long-standing possibility is the resonant-cyclotron dissipation of ion-cyclotron waves, replenished from a turbulent cascade of interacting counter-propagating Alfvén waves. We present results of a kinetic model for proton heating by the quasilinear resonant-cyclotron wave-particle interaction in a coronal hole. The resonant wave spectrum is taken as a power law in wavenumber, uniformly distributed in propagation direction between 0° and 60° with respect to the large-scale radial magnetic field. We obtain the steady-state solution of the kinetic guiding-center equation for the proton distribution in an expanding coronal hole, including the effects of large-scale forces of gravity, charge-separation electric field, Alfvén wave ponderomotive force, and mirror force, along with the small-scale scattering from the wave dissipation. We find that plausible wave intensities can yield reasonable flow speeds and temperatures in the heliocentric radial range between 2 and 6 solar radii. We address the claim in earlier work that dissipation of parallel-propagating ion-cyclotron waves cannot provide enough acceleration and show that claim to be incorrect. We find that the combined action of the large-scale forces and the resonant-cyclotron scattering produces proton distribution functions with a characteristic structure: compressed in the sunward half of velocity space with a high-density shell separate from the origin, and relatively expanded in the anti-sunward half of velocity space. We suggest that qualitatively similar proton distributions would result from the kinetic evolution of any sufficiently effective perpendicular heating mechanism operating in an expanding coronal hole.

  17. Magnetic compressibility and Isotropic Scale-Invariant Dissipation of Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, K. H.; Chapman, S. C.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Hnat, B.; Sahraoui, F.

    2010-12-01

    The anisotropic nature of solar wind magnetic fluctuations is investigated scale-by-scale using high cadence in-situ magnetic field ACE, and Cluster FGM and STAFF observations spanning five decades in scales from the inertial to dissipation ranges of plasma turbulence. We find an abrupt transition at ion kinetic scales to a single isotropic stochastic process as characterized by the single functional form of the probability density functions (PDFs) of fluctuations that characterizes the dissipation range on all observable scales. In contrast to the inertial range, this is accompanied by a successive scale-invariant reduction in the ratio between parallel and transverse power. We suggest that this reflects the phase space nature of the cascade which operates in a scale-invariant isotropic manner in the (kinetic) dissipation range - distinct from the anisotropic phenomenology in the (magnetohydrodynamic) inertial range. Alternatively, if we assume that non-linear effects are weak in the dissipation range and use the results of the linear dispersion theory of waves; then our measurements of fluctuation anisotropy provide deep insight into the nature of these waves. In particular, using these measurements to form a measure for the scale-by-scale magnetic compressibility, we can distinguish between the competing hypotheses of oblique kinetic Alfven waves versus Whistler waves dominating the energy transfer in the dissipation range. By looking at the scale-by-scale PDFs of the fluctuations we will also comment on how reasonable the assumption of linear theory is as we cross from the inertial to the dissipation range of plasma turbulence.

  18. An MHD Study of the Interaction Between the Solar Wind and the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The overall objective of this research program is to obtain a better understanding of the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium through the use of numerical solutions of the time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The simulated results have been compared with observations where possible and with the results from previous analytic and numerical studies. The primary accomplishment of this project has been the development of codes for 2-D models in both spherical and cylindrical coordinates and the application of the codes to the solar wind/interstellar medium interaction. Computations have been carried out for both a relatively simple gas-dynamic interaction and a flow-aligned interstellar magnetic field. The results have been shown to compare favorably with models that use more approximations and to modify and extend the previous results as would be expected. The simulations have also been used along with a data analysis study to provide a quantitative estimate of the distance to the termination and bow shocks. Some of the specific topics that have been studied are: (1) gas dynamic models of the solar wind/interstellar medium interaction, (2) termination shock response to large-scale solar wind fluctuations, and (3) distances to the termination shock and heliopause. The main results from each of these studies are summarized. The results were published in three papers which are included as attachments.

  19. Greening the Grid - Advancing Solar, Wind, and Smart Grid Technologies (Spanish Version)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    This is the Spanish version of 'Greening the Grid - Advancing Solar, Wind, and Smart Grid Technologies'. Greening the Grid provides technical assistance to energy system planners, regulators, and grid operators to overcome challenges associated with integrating variable renewable energy into the grid.

  20. Towards Dynamic Realism for Solar Wind Boundary Conditions Used in Global Heliospheric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, L. J.; Mueller, H.; Heiderer, A.

    2009-12-01

    The two Voyager missions have demonstrated the highly time-dependent nature of the outer heliosphere, and the measurements from IBEX will require, for proper interpretation of the data, theoretical models that incorporate this time-dependence. Our research group uses multifluid HD models of the global heliosphere with idealized, simplified solar wind conditions for the inner boundary of the simulations. For this contribution, solar wind data of the past four solar cycles, taken from NASA's OMNI data set, is used to build a realistic inner boundary data set for our simulations. This data set is time-dependent so as to realistically represent changes in solar wind characteristics through the solar cycle and capture the corresponding transient effects in the heliosphere. We have had preliminary success with our data set, extrapolating OMNI data, which is entirely Sun-Earth directed, to fill the entire ecliptic disc. The success of the results confirmed to us that, with some improvements, our central technique would create a solar win data set sufficiently realistic for heliospheric simulations. To refine the data set, independent analyses and categorization of data will be performed. Four solar wind regimes are envisioned, undisturbed fast and slow wind, ICME wind, and 'other' wind, the catchall category. After we have categorized the entire OMNI data set, our extrapolations will represent the behavior of each regime in a more realistic fashion. Preliminary results for global heliospheric simulations will be presented.

  1. Evolution of Intermittency in the Slow and Fast Solar Wind Beyond the Ecliptic Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Wawrzaszek, Anna; Macek, Wiesław M; Bruno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We study intermittency as a departure from self-similarity of the solar wind magnetic turbulence and investigate the evolution with the heliocentric distance and latitude. We use data from the Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997-1998 and 2007-2008) and one solar maximum (1999-2001). In particular, by modeling a multifractal spectrum, we revealed the intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun, in both the slow and fast solar wind, we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) that decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The obtained results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has a solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks, and other nonlinear interactions can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond...

  2. Permutation entropy and statistical complexity analysis of turbulence in laboratory plasmas and the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, P. J.; Schaffner, D. A.; Brown, M. R.; Wicks, R. T.

    2015-02-01

    The Bandt-Pompe permutation entropy and the Jensen-Shannon statistical complexity are used to analyze fluctuating time series of three different turbulent plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the plasma wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX), drift-wave turbulence of ion saturation current fluctuations in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD), and fully developed turbulent magnetic fluctuations of the solar wind taken from the Wind spacecraft. The entropy and complexity values are presented as coordinates on the CH plane for comparison among the different plasma environments and other fluctuation models. The solar wind is found to have the highest permutation entropy and lowest statistical complexity of the three data sets analyzed. Both laboratory data sets have larger values of statistical complexity, suggesting that these systems have fewer degrees of freedom in their fluctuations, with SSX magnetic fluctuations having slightly less complexity than the LAPD edge Isat. The CH plane coordinates are compared to the shape and distribution of a spectral decomposition of the wave forms. These results suggest that fully developed turbulence (solar wind) occupies the lower-right region of the CH plane, and that other plasma systems considered to be turbulent have less permutation entropy and more statistical complexity. This paper presents use of this statistical analysis tool on solar wind plasma, as well as on an MHD turbulent experimental plasma.

  3. Blob formation and acceleration in the solar wind: role of converging flows and viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lapenta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of viscosity and of converging flows on the formation of blobs in the slow solar wind is analysed by means of resistive MHD simulations. The regions above coronal streamers where blobs are formed (Sheeley et al., 1997 are simulated using a model previously proposed by Einaudi et al. (1999. The result of our investigation is two-fold. First, we demonstrate a new mechanism for enhanced momentum transfer between a forming blob and the fast solar wind surrounding it. The effect is caused by the longer range of the electric field caused by the tearing instability forming the blob. The electric field reaches into the fast solar wind and interacts with it, causing a viscous drag that is global in nature rather than local across fluid layers as it is the case in normal uncharged fluids (like water. Second, the presence of a magnetic cusp at the tip of a coronal helmet streamer causes a converging of the flows on the two sides of the streamer and a direct push of the forming island by the fast solar wind, resulting in a more efficient momentum exchange.

  4. Anorthite sputtering by H+ and Arq+ (q = 1-9) at solar wind velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, H.; Bannister, M. E.; Meyer, H. M.; Rouleau, C. M.; Barghouty, A. F.; Rickman, D. L.; Meyer, F. W.

    2014-10-01

    We report sputtering measurements of anorthite-like material, taken to be representative of soils found in the lunar highlands, impacted by singly and multicharged ions representative of the solar wind. The ions investigated include protons, as well as singly and multicharged Ar ions (as proxies for the nonreactive heavy solar wind constituents), in the charge state range +1 to +9, at fixed solar wind-relevant impact velocities of 165 and 310 km/s (0.25 keV/amu and 0.5 keV/amu). A quartz microbalance approach (QCM) for determination of total sputtering yields was used. The goal of the measurements was to determine the sputtering contribution of the heavy, multicharged minority solar wind constituents in comparison to that due to the dominant H+ fraction. The QCM results show a yield increase of a factor of about 80 for Ar+ versus H+ sputtering and an enhancement by a factor of 1.67 between Ar9+ and Ar+, which is a clear indication of a potential sputtering effect.

  5. Mars plasma system response to solar wind disturbances during solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cano, B.; Hall, B. E. S.; Lester, M.; Mays, M. L.; Witasse, O.; Ambrosi, R.; Andrews, D.; Cartacci, M.; Cicchetti, A.; Holmström, M.; Imber, S.; Kajdič, P.; Milan, S. E.; Noschese, R.; Odstrcil, D.; Opgenoorth, H.; Plaut, J.; Ramstad, R.; Reyes-Ayala, K. I.

    2017-06-01

    This paper is a phenomenological description of the ionospheric plasma and induced magnetospheric boundary (IMB) response to two different types of upstream solar wind events impacting Mars in March 2008, at the solar minimum. A total of 16 Mars Express orbits corresponding to five consecutive days is evaluated. Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-B (STEREO-B) at 1 AU and Mars Express and Mars Odyssey at 1.644 AU detected the arrival of a small transient interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME-like) on the 6 and 7 of March, respectively. This is the first time that this kind of small solar structure is reported at Mars's distance. In both cases, it was followed by a large increase in solar wind velocity that lasted for 10 days. This scenario is simulated with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) - ENLIL + Cone solar solar wind model. At Mars, the ICME-like event caused a strong compression of the magnetosheath and ionosphere, and the recovery lasted for 3 orbits ( 20 h). After that, the fast stream affected the upper ionosphere and the IMB, which radial and tangential motions in regions close to the subsolar point are analyzed. Moreover, a compression in the Martian plasma system is also observed, although weaker than after the ICME-like impact, and several magnetosheath plasma blobs in the upper ionosphere are detected by Mars Express. We conclude that, during solar minimum and at aphelion, small solar wind structures can create larger perturbations than previously expected in the Martian system.

  6. Long period slow MHD waves in the solar wind source region

    OpenAIRE

    Dwivedi, B. N.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2006-01-01

    We consider compressive viscosity and thermal conductivity to study the propagation and dissipation of long period slow longitudinal MHD waves in polar coronal holes. We discuss their likely role in the line profile narrowing, and in the energy budget for coronal holes and the solar wind. We compare the contribution of longitudinal MHD waves with high frequency Alfven waves.

  7. Multipoint analysis of compressive fluctuations in the fast and slow solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, O. W.; Narita, Y.; Li, X.; Escoubet, C. P.; Laakso, H.

    2017-07-01

    Compressible turbulence in the solar wind is a topic of much recent debate. To understand the various compressive fluctuations at scales comparable to proton characteristic lengths, we use multipoint magnetic field and density data (derived from spacecraft potential which allows higher time resolution than is typically possible than with particle instruments) from the Cluster spacecraft when they were in undisturbed intervals of slow and fast solar wind. The application of the multipoint signal resonator technique is performed for the first time, to the analysis of scalar time series. Fluctuations in the measurements of electron density and in magnitude of the magnetic field (used as a proxy for compressible magnetic fluctuations) are used as inputs in addition to the traditional vector components of the magnetic field. This analysis is performed on two streams of solar wind, one which can be classed as a slow stream and one which can be classed as a fast stream to investigate the difference in the compressible components in the two types of wind. The recovered plasma frame frequencies for the incompressible component show low propagation speed in the plasma frame consistent with previous applications of the method, while the compressible components are more scattered, some with very high phase speeds. Based on these results, we propose a picture of compressive solar wind turbulence as a mixed state of (1) linear modes such as kinetic Alfvén, kinetic slow, and ion Bernstein modes; (2) coherent structures with very small intrinsic frequencies; and (3) nonlinear or sideband modes.

  8. IMPLICATIONS OF THE RECENT LOW SOLAR MINIMUM FOR THE SOLAR WIND DURING THE MAUNDER MINIMUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, M.; Owens, M. J., E-mail: m.lockwood@reading.ac.uk [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Earley Gate, RG6 6BB (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-20

    The behavior of the Sun and near-Earth space during grand solar minima is not understood; however, the recent long and low minimum of the decadal-scale solar cycle gives some important clues, with implications for understanding the solar dynamo and predicting space weather conditions. The speed of the near-Earth solar wind and the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) embedded within it can be reliably reconstructed for before the advent of spacecraft monitoring using observations of geomagnetic activity that extend back to the mid-19th century. We show that during the solar cycle minima around 1879 and 1901 the average solar wind speed was exceptionally low, implying the Earth remained within the streamer belt of slow solar wind flow for extended periods. This is consistent with a broader streamer belt, which was also a feature of the recent low minimum (2009), and yields a prediction that the low near-Earth IMF during the Maunder minimum (1640-1700), as derived from models and deduced from cosmogenic isotopes, was accompanied by a persistent and relatively constant solar wind of speed roughly half the average for the modern era.

  9. Global scale- free behaviour in compressive fluctuations in the fast solar wind, and pseudo- dynamic alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Gogoberidze, G.; Wicks, R. T.

    2011-12-01

    We present the first scale-by-scale quantitative comparison of the higher order statistics of magnetic field magnitude and component temporal fluctuations in the fast quiet solar wind. The magnetic field magnitude fluctuations show a single global intermittent non-Gaussian scale free behaviour from minutes to over 5 hours. This coexists with the signature in the field components of an inertial range of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence up to ~ 30 minutes and a ~ 1/f range of coronal origin on longer timescales. This is found both in the ecliptic with ACE and in ULLYSES polar passes. This suggests a single stochastic process for magnetic field magnitude fluctuations operating across the full range of MHD timescales supported by the solar wind. Fluctuations in velocity and magnetic field show the strongest 'dynamic' alignment on scales in the ~ 1/f range. We wil discuss how uncertainties in velocity and magnetic field measurements propagate through 'compound' measures of the turbulence properties of the flow in this context. Observational evidence of incompressible MHD turbulence in the solar wind must thus be understood in the context of this global scaling of the compressive 'texture' of the solar wind.

  10. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause and the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz-Dabrowska, J.

    1980-01-01

    The literature dealing with instability caused by inhomogeneous mass flow is briefly reviewed. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is investigated on the basis of MHD and CGL equations, with allowance for the effects of the finite Larmor radius of the ions. Results relating to the problem of magnetopause stability and the possibility of viscous interaction at the solar wind-magnetosphere boundary are presented.

  11. Magnetic Cyclotron Waves near the Proton Cyclotron Frequency in the Solar Wind: Wind and ACE Observations in 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broiles, T. W.; Jian, L.; Stevens, M. L.; Gary, S. P.; Lepri, S. T.; Vinas, A. F.; Moya, P. S.; Alexander, R.

    2016-12-01

    Strong narrow-band electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency (fpc) have been observed extensively in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They are transverse and near-circularly polarized, and propagate in directions quasi-parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field. Their frequency is a few times of fpc in the spacecraft frame and a fraction of fpc in the plasma frame after removing the Doppler shift effect. These waves are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with otherwise similar characteristics except LH ones appear more often and have higher wave power. Intrinsically they can be LH polarized Alfven-cyclotron waves or RH polarized magnetosonic waves. Through the assistance of audification, we have studied the long-lasting wave events near fpc in 2005 using the high-cadence magnetic field data and well-calibrated plasma data from the Wind mission. A mixture of temperature anisotropies for core protons, beam protons, and alpha particles, as well as proton beam drift are often found for selected events of extensive waves. The wave dispersion analysis using these ion moments indicate these waves are likely to be associated with unstable Alfven-cyclotron anisotropy instability or ion beam instability, and suggest there is a mixture of Alfven-cyclotron waves and magnetosonic waves in the solar wind. Using the conjunction of Wind and ACE spacecraft when they were within 50 Earth radii of each other, we study how often the two spacecraft observe the same waves and whether there is noticeable heating for heavy ions associated with these waves.

  12. Linear prediction studies for the solar wind and Saturn kilometric radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Taubenschuss

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The external control of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR by the solar wind has been investigated in the frame of the Linear Prediction Theory (LPT. The LPT establishes a linear filter function on the basis of correlations between input signals, i.e. time profiles for solar wind parameters, and output signals, i.e. time profiles for SKR intensity. Three different experiments onboard the Cassini spacecraft (RPWS, MAG and CAPS yield appropriate data sets for compiling the various input and output signals. The time period investigated ranges from DOY 202 to 326, 2004 and is only limited due to limited availability of CAPS plasma data for the solar wind. During this time Cassini was positioned mainly on the morning side on its orbit around Saturn at low southern latitudes. Four basic solar wind quantities have been found to exert a clear influence on the SKR intensity profile. These quantities are: the solar wind bulk velocity, the solar wind ram pressure, the magnetic field strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and the y-component of the IMF. All four inputs exhibit nearly the same level of efficiency for the linear prediction indicating that all four inputs are possible drivers for triggering SKR. Furthermore, they act at completely different lag times ranging from ~13 h for the ram pressure to ~52 h for the bulk velocity. The lag time for the magnetic field strength is usually beyond ~40 h and the lag time for the y-component of the magnetic field is located around 30 h. Considering that all four solar wind quantities are interrelated in a corotating interaction region, only the influence of the ram pressure seems to be of reasonable relevance. An increase in ram pressure causes a substantial compression of Saturn's magnetosphere leading to tail collapse, injection of hot plasma from the tail into the outer magnetosphere and finally to an intensification of auroral dynamics and SKR emission. So, after the onset of magnetospheric

  13. Ionospheric cusp flows pulsed by solar wind Alfvén waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prikryl

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed ionospheric flows (PIFs in the cusp foot-print have been observed by the SuperDARN radars with periods between a few minutes and several tens of minutes. PIFs are believed to be a consequence of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF reconnection with the magnetospheric magnetic field on the dayside magnetopause, ionospheric signatures of flux transfer events (FTEs. The quasiperiodic PIFs are correlated with Alfvénic fluctuations observed in the upstream solar wind. It is concluded that on these occasions, the FTEs were driven by Alfvén waves coupling to the day-side magnetosphere. Case studies are presented in which the dawn-dusk component of the Alfvén wave electric field modulates the reconnection rate as evidenced by the radar observations of the ionospheric cusp flows. The arrival of the IMF southward turning at the magnetopause is determined from multipoint solar wind magnetic field and/or plasma measurements, assuming plane phase fronts in solar wind. The cross-correlation lag between the solar wind data and ground magnetograms that were obtained near the cusp footprint exceeded the estimated spacecraft-to-magnetopause propagation time by up to several minutes. The difference can account for and/or exceeds the Alfvén propagation time between the magnetopause and ionosphere. For the case of short period ( < 13 min PIFs, the onset times of the flow transients appear to be further delayed by at most a few more minutes after the IMF southward turning arrived at the magnetopause. For the case of long period (30 – 40 min PIFs, the observed additional delays were 10–20 min. We interpret the excess delay in terms of an intrinsic time scale for reconnection (Russell et al., 1997 which can be explained by the surface-wave induced magnetic reconnection mechanism (Uberoi et al., 1999. Here, surface waves with wavelengths larger than the thickness of the neutral layer induce a tearing-mode instability whose rise time explains the

  14. Linear prediction studies for the solar wind and Saturn kilometric radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Taubenschuss

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The external control of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR by the solar wind has been investigated in the frame of the Linear Prediction Theory (LPT. The LPT establishes a linear filter function on the basis of correlations between input signals, i.e. time profiles for solar wind parameters, and output signals, i.e. time profiles for SKR intensity. Three different experiments onboard the Cassini spacecraft (RPWS, MAG and CAPS yield appropriate data sets for compiling the various input and output signals. The time period investigated ranges from DOY 202 to 326, 2004 and is only limited due to limited availability of CAPS plasma data for the solar wind. During this time Cassini was positioned mainly on the morning side on its orbit around Saturn at low southern latitudes. Four basic solar wind quantities have been found to exert a clear influence on the SKR intensity profile. These quantities are: the solar wind bulk velocity, the solar wind ram pressure, the magnetic field strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and the y-component of the IMF. All four inputs exhibit nearly the same level of efficiency for the linear prediction indicating that all four inputs are possible drivers for triggering SKR. Furthermore, they act at completely different lag times ranging from ~13 h for the ram pressure to ~52 h for the bulk velocity. The lag time for the magnetic field strength is usually beyond ~40 h and the lag time for the y-component of the magnetic field is located around 30 h. Considering that all four solar wind quantities are interrelated in a corotating interaction region, only the influence of the ram pressure seems to be of reasonable relevance. An increase in ram pressure causes a substantial compression of Saturn's magnetosphere leading to tail collapse, injection of hot plasma from the tail into the outer magnetosphere and finally to an intensification of auroral dynamics and SKR emission. So, after the onset of magnetospheric

  15. Probabilistic Solar Wind and Geomagnetic Forecasting Using an Analogue Ensemble or "Similar Day" Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M. J.; Riley, P.; Horbury, T. S.

    2017-05-01

    Effective space-weather prediction and mitigation requires accurate forecasting of near-Earth solar-wind conditions. Numerical magnetohydrodynamic models of the solar wind, driven by remote solar observations, are gaining skill at forecasting the large-scale solar-wind features that give rise to near-Earth variations over days and weeks. There remains a need for accurate short-term (hours to days) solar-wind forecasts, however. In this study we investigate the analogue ensemble (AnEn), or "similar day", approach that was developed for atmospheric weather forecasting. The central premise of the AnEn is that past variations that are analogous or similar to current conditions can be used to provide a good estimate of future variations. By considering an ensemble of past analogues, the AnEn forecast is inherently probabilistic and provides a measure of the forecast uncertainty. We show that forecasts of solar-wind speed can be improved by considering both speed and density when determining past analogues, whereas forecasts of the out-of-ecliptic magnetic field [BN] are improved by also considering the in-ecliptic magnetic-field components. In general, the best forecasts are found by considering only the previous 6 - 12 hours of observations. Using these parameters, the AnEn provides a valuable probabilistic forecast for solar-wind speed, density, and in-ecliptic magnetic field over lead times from a few hours to around four days. For BN, which is central to space-weather disturbance, the AnEn only provides a valuable forecast out to around six to seven hours. As the inherent predictability of this parameter is low, this is still likely a marked improvement over other forecast methods. We also investigate the use of the AnEn in forecasting geomagnetic indices Dst and Kp. The AnEn provides a valuable probabilistic forecast of both indices out to around four days. We outline a number of future improvements to AnEn forecasts of near-Earth solar-wind and geomagnetic

  16. Power quality analysis of hybrid renewable energy system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinchin W. Mosobi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An hybrid renewable energy sources consisting of solar photovoltaic, wind energy system, and a microhydro system is proposed in this paper. This system is suitable for supplying electricity to isolated locations or remote villages far from the grid supply. The solar photovoltaic system is modeled with two power converters, the first one being a DC-DC converter along with an maximum power point tracking to achieve a regulated DC output voltage and the second one being a DC-AC converter to obtain AC output. The wind energy system is modeled with a wind-turbine prime mover with varying wind speed and fixed pitch angle to drive an self excited induction generator (SEIG. Owing to inherent drooping characteristics of the SEIG, a closed loop turbine input system is incorporated. The microhydro system is modeled with a constant input power to drive an SEIG. The three different sources are integrated through an AC bus and the proposed hybrid system is supplied to R, R-L, and induction motor loads. A static compensator is proposed to improve the load voltage and current profiles; it also mitigates the harmonic contents of the voltage and current. The static synchronous compensator is realized by means of a three-phase IGBT-based current-controlled voltage source inverter with a self-supporting DC bus. The complete system is modeled and simulated using Matlab/Simulink. The simulation results obtained illustrate the feasibility of the proposed system and are found to be satisfactory.

  17. A GRID-CONNECTED HYBRID WIND-SOLAR POWER SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAAMAR TALEB

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid renewable energy system consisting of a photovoltaic generator and a wind driven DC machine is interconnected with the power utilities grid. The interconnection is done through the use of two separate single phase full wave controlled bridge converters. The bridge converters are operated in the “inverter mode of operation”. That is to guaranty the extraction of the real powers from the wind driven generator as well as from the photovoltaic generator and inject them into the power utilities grid. At any pretended surrounding weather conditions, maximum extraction of powers from both renewable energy sources is targeted. This is done through the realization of self-adjusted firing angle controllers responsible of triggering the semiconductor elements of the controlled converters. An active power filter is shunted with the proposed setup to guaranty the sinusoid quality of the power utilities line current. The overall performance of the proposed system has been simulated in MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. Quite satisfactory and encouraging results have been obtained.

  18. Role of solar wind streams in transport of disturbances from the Sun to the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina; Yermolaev, Michael; Nikolaeva, Nadezhda

    On the basis of OMNI database we identified the following solar wind structures for period 1976-2000: quasi-stationary types (1) heliospheric current sheet (HCS), (2) slow and (3) fast SW streams, and disturbed types: (4) corotating interaction regions (CIR), (5) sheath and (6) magnetic cloud (MC) and (7) ejecta as well as (8) direct and (9) reverse interplanetary shocks (see our «Catalog of large-scale solar wind phenomena during 1976-2000» on site ftp://ftp.iki.rssi.ru/omni/ and paper Yu.I. Yermolaev et al, Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research, 2009, Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 81-94). These data allow us to analyze the relative role of all elements for chain of processes and relations from the Sun to the Earth’s magnetosphere resulting in magnetic storm generation by various types of solar wind streams: occurrence rate of interplanetary drivers; probability of generation of magnetic storm (geoeffectiveness); efficiency of process of this generation (ratio of Dst-index as “output” to integrated electric field as “input”), influence of the interplanetary conditions on development of the magnetic storms, modeling of Dst-index variation. Our analyses show that the reaction of magnetosphere depends on the type of solar wind structure (see details on site http://www.iki.rssi.ru/people/yyermol_inf.html). This work was supported by the RFBR, project 13-02-00158a, and by the Program 22 of Presidium of Russian Academy of Sciences.

  19. The statistical dependence of auroral absorption on geomagnetic and solar wind parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Kavanagh

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Data from the Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies (IRIS at Kilpisjärvi, Finland, have been compiled to form statistics of auroral absorption based on seven years of observations. In a previous study a linear relationship between the logarithm of the absorption and the Kp index provided a link between the observations of precipitation with the level of geomagnetic activity. A better fit to the absorption data is found in the form of a quadratic in Kp for eight magnetic local time sectors. Past statistical investigations of absorption have hinted at the possibility of using the solar wind velocity as a proxy for the auroral absorption, although the lack of available satellite data made such an investigation difficult. Here we employ data from the solar wind monitors, WIND and ACE, and derive a linear relationship between the solar wind velocity and the cosmic noise absorption at IRIS for the same eight magnetic local time sectors. As far as the authors are aware this is the first time that in situ measurements of the solar wind velocity have been used to create a direct link with absorption on a statistical basis. The results are promising although, it is clear that some other factor is necessary in providing reliable absorption predictions. Due to the substorm related nature of auroral absorption, this is likely formed by the recent time history of the geomagnetic activity, or by some other indicator of the energy stored within the magnetotail. For example, a dependence on the southward IMF (interplanetary magnetic field is demonstrated with absorption increasing with successive decreases in Bz; a northward IMF appears to have little effect and neither does the eastward component, By. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions – Ionosphere (modeling and forecasting

  20. The statistical dependence of auroral absorption on geomagnetic and solar wind parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Kavanagh

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Data from the Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies (IRIS at Kilpisjärvi, Finland, have been compiled to form statistics of auroral absorption based on seven years of observations. In a previous study a linear relationship between the logarithm of the absorption and the Kp index provided a link between the observations of precipitation with the level of geomagnetic activity. A better fit to the absorption data is found in the form of a quadratic in Kp for eight magnetic local time sectors. Past statistical investigations of absorption have hinted at the possibility of using the solar wind velocity as a proxy for the auroral absorption, although the lack of available satellite data made such an investigation difficult. Here we employ data from the solar wind monitors, WIND and ACE, and derive a linear relationship between the solar wind velocity and the cosmic noise absorption at IRIS for the same eight magnetic local time sectors. As far as the authors are aware this is the first time that in situ measurements of the solar wind velocity have been used to create a direct link with absorption on a statistical basis. The results are promising although, it is clear that some other factor is necessary in providing reliable absorption predictions. Due to the substorm related nature of auroral absorption, this is likely formed by the recent time history of the geomagnetic activity, or by some other indicator of the energy stored within the magnetotail. For example, a dependence on the southward IMF (interplanetary magnetic field is demonstrated with absorption increasing with successive decreases in Bz; a northward IMF appears to have little effect and neither does the eastward component, By.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions – Ionosphere (modeling and forecasting

  1. High-time resolution measurements of solar wind heavy ions with SOHO/CELIAS/CTOF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janitzek, N. P., E-mail: janitzek@physik.uni-kiel.de; Taut, A.; Berger, L.; Drews, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Kiel (Germany); Bochsler, P. [University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Klecker, B. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching (Germany)

    2016-03-25

    The Charge Time-Of-Flight (CTOF) mass spectrometer as part of the Charge, ELement and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) onboard the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) is designed to measure the kinetic properties and elemental/ionic composition of solar wind ions heavier than protons, which we refer to as heavy ions. This is achieved by the combined measurements of the energy-per-charge, the time-of-flight and the energy of incident ions. The CTOF instrument combines a remarkable time-of-flight resolution with a large effective area and a high measurement cadence. This allows to determine the Velocity Distribution Functions (VDFs) of a wide range of heavy ions with 5-minute time resolution which ensures that the complete VDF is measured under nearly identical solar wind and magnetic field conditions. For the measurement period between Day Of Year (DOY) 150 and 220 in 1996, which covers a large part of the instrument’s short life time, we analyzed VDFs of solar wind iron Fe{sup 8+}, Fe{sup 9+} and Fe{sup 10+} for differential streaming relative to the solar wind proton speed measured simultaneously with the CELIAS Proton Monitor (PM). We find an increasing differential streaming with increasing solar wind proton speed for all investigated ions up to ion-proton velocity differences of 30 - 50 km s{sup −1} at proton velocities of 500 km s{sup −1}, which is contradictory to an earlier CTOF study by [7]. We believe this difference is because in this study we used raw Pulse Height Analysis (PHA) data with a significantly increased mass and mass-per-charge resolution compared to the earlier used onboard preprocessed data.

  2. Simulated solar wind plasma interaction with the Martian exosphere: influence of the solar EUV flux on the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Modolo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind plasma interaction with the Martian exosphere is investigated by means of 3-D multi-species hybrid simulations. The influence of the solar EUV flux on the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up boundary is examined by comparing two simulations describing the two extreme states of the solar cycle. The hybrid formalism allows a kinetic description of each ions species and a fluid description of electrons. The ionization processes (photoionization, electron impact and charge exchange are included self-consistently in the model where the production rate is computed locally, separately for each ionization act and for each neutral species. The results of simulations are in a reasonable agreement with the observations made by Phobos 2 and Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. The position of the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up boundary is weakly dependent of the solar EUV flux. The motional electric field creates strong asymmetries for the two plasma boundaries.

  3. Power Management of Hybrid Power Systems with Li-Fe Batteries and Supercapacitors for Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohui Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an energy management strategy of a Li-Fe battery and supercapacitor hybrid power system to provide both high power density and energy density for mobile robots with fluctuating workloads. A two-phase power-optimization approach is proposed to exploit the high power density of supercapacitors and the high energy density of Li-Fe batteries. With our strategy, large peak power can be provided for a short time period whenever needed, while low power can be provided for very long time. A set of experiments have been conducted. The experimental results show that our strategy can effectively improve the performance of mobile robots and extend the lifetime of batteries.

  4. Sizing and Simulation of PV-Wind Hybrid Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Engin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A sizing procedure is developed for hybrid system with the aid of mathematical models for photovoltaic cell, wind turbine, and battery that are readily present in the literature. This sizing procedure can simulate the annual performance of different kinds of photovoltaic-wind hybrid power system structures for an identified set of renewable resources, which fulfills technical limitations with the lowest energy cost. The output of the program will display the performance of the system during the year, the total cost of the system, and the best size for the PV-generator, wind generator, and battery capacity. Security lightning application is selected, whereas system performance data and environmental operating conditions are measured and stored. This hybrid system, which includes a PV, wind turbine, inverter, and a battery, was installed to supply energy to 24 W lamps, considering that the renewable energy resources of this site where the system was installed were 1700 Wh/m2/day solar radiation and 3.43 m/s yearly average wind speed. Using the measured variables, the inverter and charge regulator efficiencies were calculated as 90% and 98%, respectively, and the overall system’s electrical efficiency is calculated as 72%. Life cycle costs per kWh are found to be $0.89 and LLP = 0.0428.

  5. Hybrid Solar: A Review on Photovoltaic and Thermal Power Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. Chow

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The market of solar thermal and photovoltaic electricity generation is growing rapidly. New ideas on hybrid solar technology evolve for a wide range of applications, such as in buildings, processing plants, and agriculture. In the building sector in particular, the limited building space for the accommodation of solar devices has driven a demand on the use of hybrid solar technology for the multigeneration of active power and/or passive solar devices. The importance is escalating with the worldwide trend on the development of low-carbon/zero-energy buildings. Hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PVT collector systems had been studied theoretically, numerically, and experimentally in depth in the past decades. Together with alternative means, a range of innovative products and systems has been put forward. The final success of the integrative technologies relies on the coexistence of robust product design/construction and reliable system operation/maintenance in the long run to satisfy the user needs. This paper gives a broad review on the published academic works, with an emphasis placed on the research and development activities in the last decade.

  6. Hybrid vehicle powertrain system with power take-off driven vehicle accessory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Kevin D.; Bockelmann, Thomas R.; Zou, Zhanijang; Hope, Mark E.; Kang, Xiaosong; Carpenter, Jeffrey L.

    2006-09-12

    A hybrid vehicle powertrain system includes a first prime mover, a first prime mover driven power transmission mechanism having a power take-off adapted to drive a vehicle accessory, and a second prime mover. The second prime mover is operable to drive the power transmission mechanism alone or in combination with the first prime mover to provide power to the power take-off through the power transmission mechanism. The invention further includes methods for operating a hybrid vehicle powertrain system.

  7. Modeling and simulation of a hybrid ship power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorcik, Christopher J.

    2011-12-01

    Optimizing the performance of naval ship power systems requires integrated design and coordination of the respective subsystems (sources, converters, and loads). A significant challenge in the system-level integration is solving the Power Management Control Problem (PMCP). The PMCP entails deciding on subsystem power usages for achieving a trade-off between the error in tracking a desired position/velocity profile, minimizing fuel consumption, and ensuring stable system operation, while at the same time meeting performance limitations of each subsystem. As such, the PMCP naturally arises at a supervisory level of a ship's operation. In this research, several critical steps toward the solution of the PMCP for surface ships have been undertaken. First, new behavioral models have been developed for gas turbine engines, wound rotor synchronous machines, DC super-capacitors, induction machines, and ship propulsion systems. Conventional models describe system inputs and outputs in terms of physical variables such as voltage, current, torque, and force. In contrast, the behavioral models developed herein express system inputs and outputs in terms of power whenever possible. Additionally, the models have been configured to form a hybrid system-level power model (HSPM) of a proposed ship electrical architecture. Lastly, several simulation studies have been completed to expose the capabilities and limitations of the HSPM.

  8. The Effect of Solar Wind Variations on the Escape of Oxygen Ions From Mars Through Different Channels: MAVEN Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Pätzold, M.; McFadden, J.; Halekas, J. S.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Eparvier, F.; Brain, D.; Jakosky, B. M.; Vaisberg, O.; Zelenyi, L.

    2017-11-01

    We present multi-instrument observations of the effects of solar wind on ion escape fluxes on Mars based on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) data from 1 November 2014 to 15 May 2016. Losses of oxygen ions through different channels (plasma sheet, magnetic lobes, boundary layer, and ion plume) as a function of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field variations were studied. We have utilized the modified Mars Solar Electric (MSE) coordinate system for separation of the different escape routes. Fluxes of the low-energy (≤30 eV) and high-energy (≥30 eV) ions reveal different trends with changes in the solar wind dynamic pressure, the solar wind flux, and the motional electric field. Major oxygen fluxes occur through the tail of the induced magnetosphere. The solar wind motional electric field produces an asymmetry in the ion fluxes and leads to different relations between ion fluxes supplying the tail from the different hemispheres and the solar wind dynamic pressure (or flux) and the motional electric field. The main driver for escape of the high-energy oxygen ions is the solar wind flux (or dynamic pressure). On the other hand, the low-energy ion component shows the opposite trend: ion flux decreases with increasing solar wind flux. As a result, the averaged total oxygen ion fluxes reveal a low variability with the solar wind strength. The large standard deviations from the averages values of the escape fluxes indicate the existence of mechanisms which can enhance or suppress the efficiency of the ion escape. It is shown that the Martian magnetosphere possesses the properties of a combined magnetosphere which contains different classes of field lines. The existence of the closed magnetic field lines in the near-Mars tail might be responsible for suppression of the ion escape fluxes.

  9. Non-axisymmetric Anisotropy of magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind dissipation range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoberidze, G.; Turner, A. J.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.; Muller, W.

    2011-12-01

    Anisotropy is a key topic for theoretical, numerical and observational studies of plasma turbulence in the solar wind. A fundamental assumption of many theoretical descriptions of turbulence, both in the inertial and dissipation range, is that of axisymmetry of the anisotropic fluctuations with respect to the background magnetic field. Intriguingly, there is observational evidence that these fluctuations are ordered both with respect to the background field and flow directions. This level of non-axisymmetry is observed to increases as we move from the inertial range to the dissipation range. This is characterized by minimum variance analysis as well as in observations of the ratio of the Power Spectral Density (PSD) in the perpendicular directions, eBxeR : eBx(eBxeR), where eB is a unit vector in the direction of the average magnetic field and eR is a unit vector in the radial direction away from the sun. Here, we show that this observed non-axisymmetry may arise as a data sampling effect rather than as a result of the physical properties of the turbulent plasma. We first quantify the observed non-axisymmetry through the inertial and dissipation ranges via the PSD ratio in the perpendicular plane for in-situ measurements using the Cluster spacecraft in fast wind where both magnetic field instruments, FGM and STAFF, are operating in burst mode. This allows the small scales of the dissipation range to be investigated. We then show that a spacecraft 'fly through' of a simple analytical model for a field composed of a linear superposition of transverse waves, where Taylor's hypothesis is used and the only variable parameter is the power law index, is sufficient to give the observed non-axisymmetry. In particular, we find that the ratio of power in the perpendicular plane, eBxeR : eBx(eBxeR), depends on the exponent of the PSD. Thus we find that the enhanced non-axisymmetry seen in the dissipation range is a result of the steepening of the PSD slope.

  10. Dynamic Modeling and Simulation on a Hybrid Power System for Electric Vehicle Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Wen He

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid power systems, formed by combining high-energy-density batteries and high-power-density ultracapacitors in appropriate ways, provide high-performance and high-efficiency power systems for electric vehicle applications. This paper first establishes dynamic models for the ultracapacitor, the battery and a passive hybrid power system, and then based on the dynamic models a comparative simulation between a battery only power system and the proposed hybrid power system was done under the UDDS (Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule. The simulation results showed that the hybrid power system could greatly optimize and improve the efficiency of the batteries and their dynamic current was also decreased due to the participation of the ultracapacitors, which would have a good influence on batteries’ cycle life. Finally, the parameter matching for the passive hybrid power system was studied by simulation and comparisons.

  11. A review and design of power electronics converters for fuel cell hybrid system applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe; Pittini, Riccardo; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of most promising power electronics topologies for a fuel cell hybrid power conversion system which can be utilized in many applications such as hybrid electrical vehicles (HEV), distributed generations (DG) and uninterruptible-power-supply (UPS) systems. Then...

  12. Is tropospheric weather influenced by solar wind through atmospheric vertical coupling downward control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prikryl, Paul; Tsukijihara, Takumi; Iwao, Koki; Muldrew, Donald B.; Bruntz, Robert; Rušin, Vojto; Rybanský, Milan; Turňa, Maroš; Šťastný, Pavel; Pastirčák, Vladimír

    2017-04-01

    More than four decades have passed since a link between solar wind magnetic sector boundary structure and mid-latitude upper tropospheric vorticity was discovered (Wilcox et al., Science, 180, 185-186, 1973). The link has been later confirmed and various physical mechanisms proposed but apart from controversy, little attention has been drawn to these results. To further emphasize their importance we investigate the occurrence of mid-latitude severe weather in the context of solar wind coupling to the magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere (MIA) system. It is observed that significant snowstorms, windstorms and heavy rain, particularly if caused by low pressure systems in winter, tend to follow arrivals of high-speed solar wind. Previously published statistical evidence that explosive extratropical cyclones in the northern hemisphere tend to occur after arrivals of high-speed solar wind streams from coronal holes (Prikryl et al., Ann. Geophys., 27, 1-30, 2009; Prikryl et al., J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys., 149, 219-231, 2016) is corroborated for the southern hemisphere. A physical mechanism to explain these observations is proposed. The leading edge of high-speed solar wind streams is a locus of large-amplitude magneto-hydrodynamic waves that modulate Joule heating and/or Lorentz forcing of the high-latitude lower thermosphere generating medium-scale atmospheric gravity waves that propagate upward and downward through the atmosphere. Simulations of gravity wave propagation in a model atmosphere using the Transfer Function Model (Mayr et al., Space Sci. Rev., 54, 297-375, 1990) show that propagating waves originating in the thermosphere can excite a spectrum of gravity waves in the lower atmosphere. In spite of significantly reduced amplitudes but subject to amplification upon reflection in the upper troposphere, these gravity waves can provide a lift of unstable air to release instabilities in the troposphere thus initiating convection to form cloud/precipitation bands

  13. Third-Moment Studies of Cascade Dynamics in Solar Wind Turbulence (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. W.; Stawarz, J. E.; Vasquez, B. J.; Forman, M. A.; MacBride, B. T.

    2010-12-01

    Kolmogorov [1941] and Yaglom [1949] showed that the incompressible hydrodynamic equations governing fluid turbulence could be manipulated to yield a rigorous third-order structure function expression for the energy cascade at inertial range scales. In that derivation the structure function scales linearly with separation distance and the proportionality constant is a factor of the energy cascade rate. For decades it has been argued that the most commonly studied spatial scales for magnetic and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind form an inertial range in an MHD analogy to hydrodynamic turbulence. Politano and Pouquet [1998a,b] and Podesta [2008] derived third-moment expressions for the inertial range cascade in MHD in direct analogy with the earlier hydrodynamic results. We have been exploring the use of these expressions for both isotropic and anisotropic solar wind turbulence [MacBride 2005, 2008; Stawarz 2009, 2010; Smith 2009, 2010; Forman 2010a,b] and find (1) the measured third moments do scale linearly with separation and (2) the resulting estimate for the energy cascade rate accurately account for the energy cascade budget required for turbulence to heat the solar wind. In addition, the anisotropic formalism shows preferential cascade perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. Recent results show the unexpected backward transfer of energy associated with the dominant outward-propagating component when the cross-helicity is large. The latter behavior is thought to exist over only a limited range of heliocentric distances forming a transient turbulent dynamic near 1 AU. We will include some important comments about the need to monitor convergence and error analyses when using solar wind data. Kolmogorov, 1941, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, 32, 16. Forman, et al., 2010a, Physical Review Letters, 104, 189001. Forman, et al., 2010b, Solar Wind 12, 176. MacBride, et al., 2005, Solar Wind 11, 613. MacBride, et al., 2008, The Astrophysical Journal, 679, 1644. Podesta

  14. Impact of solar wind depression on the dayside magnetosphere under northward interplanetary magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baraka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a follow up study of the sensitivity of the Earth's magnetosphere to solar wind activity using a particles-in-cell model (Baraka and Ben Jaffel, 2007, but here during northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF. The formation of the magnetospheric cavity and its elongation around the planet is obtained with the classical structure of a magnetosphere with parallel lobes. An impulsive disturbance is then applied to the system by changing the bulk velocity of the solar wind to simulate a decrease in the solar wind dynamic pressure followed by its recovery. In response to the imposed drop in the solar wind velocity, a gap (abrupt depression in the incoming solar wind plasma appears moving toward the Earth. The gap's size is a ~15 RE and is comparable to the sizes previously obtained for both Bz<0 and Bz=0. During the initial phase of the disturbance along the x-axis, the dayside magnetopause (MP expands slower than the previous cases of IMF orientations as a result of the abrupt depression. The size of the MP expands nonlinearly due to strengthening of its outer boundary by the northward IMF. Also, during the initial 100 Δt, the MP shrank down from 13.3 RE to ~9.2 RE before it started expanding, a phenomenon that was also observed for southern IMF conditions but not during the no IMF case. As soon as they felt the solar wind depression, cusps widened at high altitude while dragged in an upright position. For the field's topology, the reconnection between magnetospheric and magnetosheath fields is clearly observed in both the northward and southward cusps areas. Also, the tail region in the northward IMF condition is more confined, in contrast to the fishtail-shape obtained in the southward IMF case. An X-point is formed in the tail at ~110 RE compared to ~103 RE and ~80 RE for Bz=0 and Bz<0, respectively. Our findings are consistent with existing reports from many space observatories (Cluster, Geotail, Themis, etc. for which predictions

  15. High-speed solar wind streams and polar mesosphere winter echoes at Troll, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kirkwood

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A small, 54 MHz wind-profiler radar, MARA, was operated at Troll, Antarctica (72° S, 2.5° E, continuously from November 2011 to January 2014, covering two complete Antarctic winters. Despite very low power, MARA observed echoes from heights of 55–80 km (polar mesosphere winter echoes, PMWE on 60% of all winter days (from March to October. This contrasts with previous reports from radars at high northern latitudes, where PWME have been reported only by very high power radars or during rare periods of unusually high electron density at PMWE heights, such as during solar proton events. Analysis shows that PWME at Troll were not related to solar proton events but were often closely related to the arrival of high-speed solar wind streams (HSS at the Earth, with PWME appearing at heights as low as 56 km and persisting for up to 15 days following HSS arrival. This demonstrates that HSS effects penetrate directly to below 60 km height in the polar atmosphere. Using local observations of cosmic-noise absorption (CNA, a theoretical ionization/ion-chemistry model and a statistical model of precipitating energetic electrons associated with HSS, the electron density conditions during the HSS events are estimated. We find that PMWE detectability cannot be explained by these variations in electron density and molecular-ion chemistry alone. PWME become detectable at different thresholds depending on solar illumination and height. In darkness, PWME are detected only when the modelled electron density is above a threshold of about 1000 cm−3, and only above 75 km height, where negative ions are few. In daylight, the electron density threshold falls by at least 2 orders of magnitude and PWME are found primarily below 75 km height, even in conditions when a large proportion of negative ions is expected. There is also a strong dawn–dusk asymmetry with PWME detected very rarely during morning twilight but often during evening twilight. This behaviour cannot be

  16. High-speed solar wind streams and polar mesosphere winter echoes at Troll, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkwood, S.; Belova, E. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden). Polar Atmospheric Research; Osepian, A. [Polar Geophysical Institute, Murmansk (Russian Federation); Lee, Y.S. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    A small, 54 MHz wind-profiler radar, MARA, was operated at Troll, Antarctica (72 S, 2.5 E), continuously from November 2011 to January 2014, covering two complete Antarctic winters. Despite very low power, MARA observed echoes from heights of 55-80 km (polar mesosphere winter echoes, PMWE) on 60% of all winter days (from March to October). This contrasts with previous reports from radars at high northern latitudes, where PWME have been reported only by very high power radars or during rare periods of unusually high electron density at PMWE heights, such as during solar proton events. Analysis shows that PWME at Troll were not related to solar proton events but were often closely related to the arrival of high-speed solar wind streams (HSS) at the Earth, with PWME appearing at heights as low as 56 km and persisting for up to 15 days following HSS arrival. This demonstrates that HSS effects penetrate directly to below 60 km height in the polar atmosphere. Using local observations of cosmic-noise absorption (CNA), a theoretical ionization/ion-chemistry model and a statistical model of precipitating energetic electrons associated with HSS, the electron density conditions during the HSS events are estimated. We find that PMWE detectability cannot be explained by these variations in electron density and molecular-ion chemistry alone. PWME become detectable at different thresholds depending on solar illumination and height. In darkness, PWME are detected only when the modelled electron density is above a threshold of about 1000 cm{sup -3}, and only above 75 km height, where negative ions are few. In daylight, the electron density threshold falls by at least 2 orders of magnitude and PWME are found primarily below 75 km height, even in conditions when a large proportion of negative ions is expected. There is also a strong dawn-dusk asymmetry with PWME detected very rarely during morning twilight but often during evening twilight. This behaviour cannot be explained if PMWE

  17. Experiences with a small scale Solar/Wind pilot installation for basic electrification in the chilean altiplano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapiain, Raul; Ovalle, Ricardo; Torres, Ariel; Brockmeyer, Ricarda; Schmidt, Reinhold [Centro de Energias Renovables/Universidad de Tarapaca, Arica, (Chile); Meer, Andreas V. [Solar Institute, Juelich (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Basic rural electrification programmes are already carried out in the rural areas of northern Chile by local communities and local governments using photovoltaic systems. Solar Home Systems, 12 VDC are installed for individual households while systems for schools, public lighting etc. are realized with bigger systems, 220 VAC. Within a cooperation with the Solar Institute of the Fachhochschule Juelich, Germany, the Renewable Energy Center of the University of Tarapaca designed, installed and evaluated the first solar/wind hybrid installation for basic electrification in northern Chile, realized in Colpitas, a typical small village in the chilean altiplano. The following paper presents results and experiences of this first pilot installation. [Espanol] Ya se estan llevando a cabo programas de electrificacion rural basica en las areas rurales del Norte de Chile por las comunidades y los gobiernos locales, usando sistemas fotovoltaicos. Se instalan Sistemas Domesticos Solares de 12VDC para casas-habitacion individuales, mientras que los sistemas para escuelas, alumbrado publico, etc., se ejecutan con sistemas mas grandes de 220VAC. Con la coperacion del Instituto Solar de la Fachhochschule en Julich, Alemania, el Centro de Energia Renovable de la Universidad de Tarapaca, diseno, instalo y evaluo, la primera instalacion hibrida solar/viento para electrificacion basica en el Norte de Chile, realizado en Colpitas, un pueblo tipico pequeno del altiplano chileno. El siguiete articulo presenta los resultados y experiencias de esta primera instalacion piloto.

  18. Intense Geomagnetic Storms Associated with Coronal Holes Under the Weak Solar-Wind Conditions of Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, S.

    2018-02-01

    The activity of Solar Cycle 24 has been extraordinarily low. The yearly averaged solar-wind speed is also lower in Cycle 24 than in Cycles 22 and 23. The yearly averaged speed in the rising phase of Cycle 21 is as low as that of Cycle 24, although the solar activity of Cycle 21 is higher than that of Cycle 24. The relationship between the solar-wind temperature and its speed is preserved under the solar-wind conditions of Cycle 24. Previous studies have shown that only a few percent of intense geomagnetic storms (minimum Dst solar-wind flows from coronal holes. We identify two geomagnetic storms associated with coronal holes within the 19 intense geomagnetic storms that took place in Cycle 24.

  19. Interaction of solar wind with Mercury and its magnetic field. [as observed by Mariner 10 space probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review is presented of magnetic field and solar wind electron observations by Mariner 10 spacecraft. The intrinsic magnetic field of the planet Mercury and the implications of such a field for the planetary interior are also discussed.

  20. Solar wind record in the lunar regolith - Nitrogen and noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Urs; Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1988-01-01

    The measured elemental and isotopic abundances of noble gases and nitrogen have been measured in five different samples of lunar regolith material. It was found noble gases liberated by chemical attack on grain surfaces from two of the samples were solar. The Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio in the two grain surface reservoir is 13.5-13.6, compared to the average value of 13.7 + or - 0.3 measured in the Apollo solar wind collection foils (Gochsler and Geiss, 1977). It is suggested that the noble gases in grain interiors have suffered severe mass fractionation. The surface-sited N/Ar in an ilmenite sample exceeds the predicted solar ratio by more than a factor of 10. It is concluded that the solar system abundances of Cameron (1982) describe the elemental composition of the noble gases in the solar wind very well.

  1. Wave-particle resonance condition test for ion-kinetic waves in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Y. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Austria). Space Research Inst.; Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik; Marsch, E. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik; Perschke, C. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik; Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Glassmeier, K.H. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Goettingen (Germany); Motschmann, U. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Planetenforschung; Comisel, H. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2016-08-01

    Conditions for the Landau and cyclotron resonances are tested for 543 waves (identified as local peaks in the energy spectra) in the magnetic field fluctuations of the solar wind measured by the Cluster spacecraft on a tetrahedral scale of 100 km. The resonance parameters are evaluated using the frequencies in the plasma rest frame, the parallel components of the wavevectors, the ion cyclotron frequency, and the ion thermal speed. The observed waves show a character of the sideband waves associated with the ion Bernstein mode, and are in a weak agreement with the fundamental electron cyclotron resonance in spite of the ionkinetic scales. The electron cyclotron resonance is likely taking place in solar wind turbulence near 1AU (astronomical unit).

  2. Dawn-dusk asymmetries in the coupled solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, A.P. [European Space Agency, ESAC, Madrid (Spain). Science and Robotic Exploration Directorate; Haaland, S. [Max-Planck-Institue for Solar System Research, Goettingen (Germany); Bergen Univ. (Norway). Birkeland Center for Space Science; Forsyth, C. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary (United Kingdom). UCL Dept. of Space and Climate Physics; and others

    2014-10-01

    Dawn-dusk asymmetries are ubiquitous features of the coupled solar-wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system. During the last decades, increasing availability of satellite and ground-based measurements has made it possible to study these phenomena in more detail. Numerous publications have documented the existence of persistent asymmetries in processes, properties and topology of plasma structures in various regions of geospace. In this paper, we present a review of our present knowledge of some of the most pronounced dawn-dusk asymmetries. We focus on four key aspects: (1) the role of external influences such as the solar wind and its interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere; (2) properties of the magnetosphere itself; (3) the role of the ionosphere and (4) feedback and coupling between regions. We have also identified potential inconsistencies and gaps in our understanding of dawn-dusk asymmetries in the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere.

  3. A description of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling based on nonlinear filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Klimas, A. J.; Baker, D. N.; Roberts, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    A nonlinear filtering method is introduced for the study of the solar wind -- magnetosphere coupling and related to earlier linear techniques. The filters are derived from the magnetospheric state, a representation of the magnetospheric conditions in terms of a few global variables, here the auroral electrojet indices. The filters also couple to the input, a representation of the solar wind variables, here the rectified electric field. Filter-based iterative prediction of the indices has been obtained for up to 20 hours. The prediction is stable with respect to perturbations in the initial magnetospheric state; these decrease exponentially at the rate of 30/min. The performance of the method is examined for a wide range of parameters and is superior to that of other linear and nonlinear techniques. In the magnetospheric state representation the coupling is modeled as a small number of nonlinear equations under a time-dependent input.

  4. Identification of Some Low Frequency Wave Modes in the Turbulent Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Monson, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Electric fields provide the major coupling between the turbulence of the solar wind and particles. It has been shown, using statistical methods, that a large part of the turbulent spectrum of fluctuations in the solar wind is due to kinetic Alfven waves (KAW). In this note, an attempt is made to determine the mode identification of individual waveforms using the three dimensional system of SWaves on the STEREO spacecraft. Samples are chosen, using waveforms with an apparent periodic structure, selected visually. The short antennas of STEREO respond to density fluctuations as well as to electric fields. Measurement of four quantities using only three antennas presents a problem. Methods to overcome, or to ignore, this difficulty will be presented. On the other hand, density measurement can sometimes be useful in mode identification. All of these methods will be used, and results presented

  5. The role of turbulence in coronal heating and solar wind expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R; Asgari-Targhi, Mahboubeh; Miralles, Mari Paz; Raymond, John C; Strachan, Leonard; Tian, Hui; Woolsey, Lauren N

    2015-05-13

    Plasma in the Sun's hot corona expands into the heliosphere as a supersonic and highly magnetized solar wind. This paper provides an overview of our current understanding of how the corona is heated and how the solar wind is accelerated. Recent models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence have progressed to the point of successfully predicting many observed properties of this complex, multi-scale system. However, it is not clear whether the heating in open-field regions comes mainly from the dissipation of turbulent fluctuations that are launched from the solar surface, or whether the chaotic 'magnetic carpet' in the low corona energizes the system via magnetic reconnection. To help pin down the physics, we also review some key observational results from ultraviolet spectroscopy of the collisionless outer corona. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Scaling laws of turbulence and heating of fast solar wind: the role of density fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, V; Marino, R; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Noullez, A; Bruno, R

    2009-08-07

    Incompressible and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in plasmas can be described by an exact relation for the energy flux through the scales. This Yaglom-like scaling law has been recently observed in the solar wind above the solar poles observed by the Ulysses spacecraft, where the turbulence is in an Alfvénic state. An analogous phenomenological scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, is observed more frequently in the same data set. Large-scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, thus play a crucial role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The turbulent cascade rate in the compressive case can, moreover, supply the energy dissipation needed to account for the local heating of the nonadiabatic solar wind.

  7. What are the relative roles of heating and cooling in generating solar wind temperature anisotropies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruca, B A; Kasper, J C; Bale, S D

    2011-11-11

    Temperature anisotropy in the solar wind results from a combination of mechanisms of anisotropic heating (e.g., cyclotron-resonant heating and dissipation of kinetic Alfvén waves) and cooling (e.g., Chew-Goldberger-Low double-adiabatic expansion). In contrast, anisotropy-driven instabilities such as the cyclotron, mirror, and firehose instabilities limit the allowable departure of the plasma from isotropy. This study used data from the Faraday cups on the Wind spacecraft to examine scalar temperature and temperature components of protons. Plasma unstable to the mirror or firehose instability was found to be about 3-4 times hotter than stable plasma. Since anisotropy-driven instabilities are not understood to heat the plasma, these results suggest that heating processes are more effective than cooling processes at creating and maintaining proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind.

  8. Overview of Solar Wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Atmosphere Coupling and the Generation of Magnetospheric Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, S. E.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Coxon, J. C.; Carter, J. A.; Walach, M.-T.; Laundal, K.; Østgaard, N.; Tenfjord, P.; Reistad, J.; Snekvik, K.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2017-03-01

    We review the morphology and dynamics of the electrical current systems of the terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere. Observations from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) over the three years 2010 to 2012 are employed to illustrate the variability of the field-aligned currents that couple the magnetosphere and ionosphere, on timescales from minutes to years, in response to the impact of solar wind disturbances on the magnetosphere and changes in the level of solar illumination of the polar ionospheres. The variability is discussed within the context of the occurrence of magnetic reconnection between the solar wind and terrestrial magnetic fields at the magnetopause, the transport of magnetic flux within the magnetosphere, and the onset of magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail. The conditions under which the currents are expected to be weak, and hence minimally contaminate measurements of the internally-produced magnetic field of the Earth, are briefly outlined.

  9. Cluster/Peace Electrons Velocity Distribution Function: Modeling the Strahl in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Gurgiolo, Chris; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of kinetic properties of the strahl electron velocity distribution functions (VDF's) in the solar wind. These are used to investigate the pitch-angle scattering and stability of the population to interactions with electromagnetic (whistler) fluctuations. The study is based on high time resolution data from the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer. Our study focuses on the mechanisms that control and regulate the pitch-angle and stability of strahl electrons in the solar wind; mechanisms that are not yet well understood. Various parameters are investigated such as the electron heat-flux and temperature anisotropy. The goal is to check whether the strahl electrons are constrained by some instability (e.g., the whistler instability), or are maintained by other types of processes. The electron heat-flux and temperature anisotropy are determined by fitting the VDF's to a spectral spherical harmonic model from which the moments are derived directly from the model coefficients.

  10. Plan for Subdividing Genesis Mission Diamond-on-Silicon 60000 Solar Wind Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Patti J.; Allton, J. A.; Clemett, S. J.; Gonzales, C. P.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Rodriquez, M. C.; See, T. H.; Sutter, B.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Genesis solar wind sample return mission experienced an off nominal landing resulting in broken, albeit useful collectors. Sample 60000 from the collector is comprised of diamond-like-carbon film on a float zone (FZ) silicon wafer substrate Diamond-on-Silicon (DOS), and is highly prized for its higher concentration of solar wind (SW) atoms. A team of scientist at the Johnson Space Center was charged with determining the best, nondestructive and noncontaminating method to subdivide the specimen that would result in a 1 sq. cm subsample for allocation and analysis. Previous work included imaging of the SW side of 60000, identifying the crystallographic orientation of adjacent fragments, and devising an initial cutting plan.

  11. Status of Reconstruction of Fragmented Diamond-on-Silicon Collector From Genesis Spacecraft Solar Wind Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, Melissa C.; Calaway, M. C.; McNamara, K. M.; Hittle, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to passive solar wind collector surfaces, the Genesis Discovery Mission science canister had on board an electrostatic concave mirror for concentrating the solar wind ions, known as the concentrator . The 30-mm-radius collector focal point (the target) was comprised of 4 quadrants: two of single crystal SiC, one of polycrystalline 13C diamond and one of diamond-like-carbon (DLC) on a silicon substrate. [DLC-on-silicon is also sometimes referenced as Diamond-on-silicon, DOS.] Three of target quadrants survived the hard landing intact, but the DLC-on-silicon quadrant fractured into numerous pieces (Fig. 1). This abstract reports the status of identifying the DLC target fragments and reconstructing their original orientation.

  12. Using Image Pro Plus Software to Develop Particle Mapping on Genesis Solar Wind Collector Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, Melissa C.; Allton, J. H.; Burkett, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    The continued success of the Genesis mission science team in analyzing solar wind collector array samples is partially based on close collaboration of the JSC curation team with science team members who develop cleaning techniques and those who assess elemental cleanliness at the levels of detection. The goal of this collaboration is to develop a reservoir of solar wind collectors of known cleanliness to be available to investigators. The heart and driving force behind this effort is Genesis mission PI Don Burnett. While JSC contributes characterization, safe clean storage, and benign collector cleaning with ultrapure water (UPW) and UV ozone, Burnett has coordinated more exotic and rigorous cleaning which is contributed by science team members. He also coordinates cleanliness assessment requiring expertise and instruments not available in curation, such as XPS, TRXRF [1,2] and synchrotron TRXRF. JSC participates by optically documenting the particle distributions as cleaning steps progress. Thus, optical document supplements SEM imaging and analysis, and elemental assessment by TRXRF.

  13. Intermittency in the solar wind turbulence through probability distribution functions of fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Carbone, Vincenzo; Veltri, Pierluigi; Consolini, Giuseppe; Bruno, Roberto

    Intermittency in fluid turbulence can be emphasized through the analysis of Probability Distribution Functions (PDF) for velocity fluctuations, which display a strong non-gaussian behavior at small scales. Castaing et al. (1990) have introduced the idea that this behavior can be represented, in the framework of a multiplicative cascade model, by a convolution of gaussians whose variances is distributed according to a log-normal distribution. In this letter we have tried to test this conjecture on the MHD solar wind turbulence by performing a fit of the PDF of the bulk speed and magnetic field intensity fluctuations calculated in the solar wind, with the model. This fit allows us to calculate a parameter λ² depending on the scale, which represents the width of the log-normal distribution of the variances of the gaussians. The physical implications of the obtained values of the parameter as well as of its scaling law are finally discussed.

  14. Low-energy ion outflow modulated by the solar wind energy input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Wei, Yong; Andre, Mats; Eriksson, Anders; Haaland, Stein; Kronberg, Elena; Nilsson, Hans; Maes, Lukas

    2017-04-01

    Due to the spacecraft charging issue, it has been difficult to measure low-energy ions of ionospheric origin in the magnetosphere. A recent study taking advantage of the spacecraft electric potential has found that the previously 'hidden' low-energy ions is dominant in the magnetosphere. This comprehensive dataset of low-energy ions allows us to study the relationship between the ionospheric outflow and energy input from the solar wind (ɛ). In this study, we discuss the ratios of the solar wind energy input to the energy of the ionospheric outflow. We show that the ɛ controls the ionospheric outflow when the ɛ is high, while the ionospheric outflow does not systematically change with the ɛ when the ɛ is low.

  15. Fast and Slow Solar Wind: Energy Transfer Rate in Compressible MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, L.; Sahraoui, F.; Galtier, S.; Banerjee, S.

    2016-12-01

    The role of compressible fluctuations in the energy cascade in the fast and slow solar wind is investigated. A focus is put on comparing the energy cascade rates estimated using the exact laws derived for incompressible MHD turbulence [Politano and Pouquet, 1998] (PP98) and for compressible isothermal turbulence recently derived by Galtier and Banerjee, 2013 (BG13). New features are evidenced using the BG13 model in comparison with the PP98 model: i) broader inertial range (more than two decades of scales); ii) higher energy cascade rate (up to 4 times); iii) less anisotropic cascade rates (along and perpendicular to the local mean field). Furthermore, a term-by-term analysis of the compressible model emphasized the relative importance of the new flux term in the BG13 model, and provided new insight into the role played by the compressible fluctuations in the solar wind.

  16. Fast and Slow solar wind: Energy transferrate in compressible MHD trubulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, Lina; Sahraoui, Fouad; Galtier, Sebastien; Banerjee, Supratik

    2017-04-01

    The role of compressible fluctuations in the energy cascade in the fast and slow solar wind is investigated. A focus is put on comparing the energy cascade rates estimated using the exact laws derived for incompressible MHD turbulence [Politano and Pouquet, 1998] (PP98) and for compressible isothermal turbulence recently derived by Galtier and Banerjee, PRE, 2013 (BG13). New features are evidenced using the BG13 model in comparison with the PP98 model: i) broader inertial range (more than two decades of scales); ii) higher energy cascade rate (up to 4 times); iii) less anisotropic cascade rates (along and perpendicular to the local mean field). Furthermore, a term-by-term analysis of the compressible model emphasized the relative importance of the new flux term in the BG13 model, and provided new insight into the role played by the compressible fluctuations in the solar wind.

  17. Scaling Laws of Turbulence and Heating of Fast SolarWind: The Role of Density Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, V; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Noullez, A; Bruno, R

    2010-01-01

    Incompressible and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in plasms can be described by an exact relation for the energy flux through the scales. This Yaglom-like scaling law has been recently observed in the solar wind above the solar poles observed by the Ulysses spacecraft, where the turbulence is in an Alfv\\'enic state. An analogous phenomenological scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, is observed more frequently in the same dataset. Large scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, play thus a crucial role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The turbulent cascade rate in the compressive case can moreover supply the energy dissipation needed to account for the local heating of the non-adiabatic solar wind.

  18. Inertial-Range Reconnection in Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Lalescu, Cristian C; Eyink, Gregory L; Drivas, Theodore D; Vishniac, Ethan T; Lazarian, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In situ spacecraft data on the solar wind show events identified as magnetic reconnection with outflows and apparent "`$X$-lines" $10^{3-4}$ times ion scales. To understand the role of turbulence at these scales, we make a case study of an inertial-range reconnection event in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation. We observe stochastic wandering of field-lines in space, breakdown of standard magnetic flux-freezing due to Richardson dispersion, and a broadened reconnection zone containing many current sheets. The coarse-grain magnetic geometry is like large-scale reconnection in the solar wind, however, with a hyperbolic flux-tube or "$X$-line" extending over integral length-scales.

  19. Mars atmospheric losses induced by the solar wind: current knowledge and perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Vladimir; Zelenyi, Lev; Vaisberg, Oleg; Sementsov, Egor; Dubinin, Eduard

    2017-04-01

    Solar wind induced atmospheric losses have been studied since earlier 1970th. Several loss channels have been identified including pick-up of exospheric photo-ions and ionospheric ions escape. Measurements performed during several solar cycles showed variation of these losses by about factor of 10, being largest at maximum solar activity. MAVEN spacecraft equipped with comprehensive set of instruments with high temporal and mass resolution operating at Mars since fall 2014 ensures much better investigation of solar wind enforcing Martian environment, Mars atmospheric losses processes and mass loss rate. These issues are very important for understanding of Martian atmospheric evolution including water loss during cosmogonic time. Simultaneous observations by MAVEN and MEX spacecraft open the new perspective in study of Martian environment. In this report we discuss results of past and current missions and preliminary analysis of heavy ions escape using simultaneous measurements of MEX and MAVEN spacecraft.

  20. Solar wind and high energy particle effects in the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastovicka, Jan

    1989-01-01

    The solar wind variability and high energy particle effects in the neutral middle atmosphere are not much known. These factors are important in the high latitude upper mesosphere, lower thermosphere energy budget. They influence temperature, composition (minor constituents of nitric oxide, ozone), circulation (wind system) and airflow. The vertical and latitudinal structures of such effects, mechanisms of downward penetration of energy and questions of energy abundance are largely to be solved. The most important recent finding seems to be the discovery of the role of highly relativistic electrons in the middle atmosphere at L = 3 - 8 (Baker et al., 1987). The solar wind and high energy particle flux variability appear to form a part of the chain of possible Sun-weather (climate) relationships. The importance of such studies in the nineties is emphasized by their role in big international programs STEP and IGBP - Global Change.

  1. Reflection driven wave turbulence in an open field and the structure of solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari-Targhi, M.; van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    We present results from an extensive study of an open magnetic field line positioned at the center of a coronal hole. We test the hypothesis that reflection-driven wave turbulence can provide the energy needed for heating the coronal plasma in the acceleration region of the fast solar wind. We use the reduced magnetohydrodynamic simulations to describe the wave turbulence where the simulated wave dissipation rates are compared with those needed to sustain the background atmosphere. We consider the effects of density fluctuations, which may significantly increase the turbulent heating rate. These density variations simulate the effects of compressive MHD waves on the Alfvén waves. We find that such variations significantly enhance the wave reflection and thereby the turbulent dissipation rates, producing enough heat to maintain the background atmosphere. We conclude that interactions between Alfvén and compressive waves may play an important role in the turbulent heating of the fast solar wind.

  2. Dynamic Power Management for Portable Hybrid Power-Supply Systems Utilizing Approximate Dynamic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooyoung Park

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the optimization of power flows in portable hybrid power-supply systems (HPSSs has become an important issue with the advent of a variety of mobile systems and hybrid energy technologies. In this paper, a control strategy is considered for dynamically managing power flows in portable HPSSs employing batteries and supercapacitors. Our dynamic power management strategy utilizes the concept of approximate dynamic programming (ADP. ADP methods are important tools in the fields of stochastic control and machine learning, and the utilization of these tools for practical engineering problems is now an active and promising research field. We propose an ADP-based procedure based on optimization under constraints including the iterated Bellman inequalities, which can be solved by convex optimization carried out offline, to find the optimal power management rules for portable HPSSs. The effectiveness of the proposed procedure is tested through dynamic simulations for smartphone workload scenarios, and simulation results show that the proposed strategy can successfully cope with uncertain workload demands.

  3. Turbine Powered Simulator Calibration and Testing for Hybrid Wing Body Powered Airframe Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Patrick R.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Long, Kurtis R.; James, Kevin D.; Tompkins, Daniel M.; Beyar, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Propulsion airframe integration testing on a 5.75% scale hybrid wing body model us- ing turbine powered simulators was completed at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-foot test section. Four rear control surface con gurations including a no control surface de ection con guration were tested with the turbine powered simulator units to investigate how the jet exhaust in uenced the control surface performance as re- lated to the resultant forces and moments on the model. Compared to ow-through nacelle testing on the same hybrid wing body model, the control surface e ectiveness was found to increase with the turbine powered simulator units operating. This was true for pitching moment, lift, and drag although pitching moment was the parameter of greatest interest for this project. With the turbine powered simulator units operating, the model pitching moment was seen to increase when compared to the ow-through nacelle con guration indicating that the center elevon and vertical tail control authority increased with the jet exhaust from the turbine powered simulator units.

  4. Wave-vector dependence of magnetic-turbulence spectra in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Y; Glassmeier, K-H; Sahraoui, F; Goldstein, M L

    2010-04-30

    Using four-point measurements of the Cluster spacecraft, the energy distribution was determined for magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind directly in the three-dimensional wave-vector domain in the range |k|wave vector anisotropy is estimated with respect to directions parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, and the result suggests the dominance of quasi-two-dimensional turbulence toward smaller spatial scales.

  5. Effect of coherent structures on energetic particle intensity in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessein, Jeffrey A.

    Solar energetic particles in the solar wind are accelerated in both solar flares and shocks assocated with fast coronal mass ejections. They follow the interplanetary magnetic field and, upon reaching Earth, have implications for space weather. Space weather affects astronaut health and orbiting equipment through radiation hazard and electrical infrastructure on the ground with ground induced currents. Economic im- pacts include disruption of GPS and redirection of commercial polar flights due to a dangerous radiation environment over the poles. By studying how these particles interact with the magnetic fields we can better predict onset times and diffusion of these events. We find, using superposed epoch analysis and conditional statisitics from spacecraft observations that there is a strong association between energetic particles in the solar wind and magnetic discontinuities. This may be related to turbulent dissipa- tion mechanisms in which coherent structures in the solar wind seem to be preferred sites of heating, plasma instabilites and dissipation. In the case of energetic particles, magnetic reconnection and transport in flux tubes are likely to play a role. Though we focus on data away from large shocks, trapping can occur in the downstream region of shocks due to the preponderance of compressive turbulence in these areas. This thesis lays the ground work for the results described above with an intro- duction to solar wind and heliospheric physics in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 is an intro- duction to the acceleration mechanisms that give rise to observed energetic particle events. Chapter 3 describes various data analysis techniques and statistics that are bread and butter when analyzing spacecraft data for turbulence and energetic particle studies. Chapter 4 is a digression that covers preliminary studies that were done on the side; scale dependent kurtosis, ergodic studies and initial conditions for simulations. Chapter 5 contains that central published

  6. An MHD Code for the Study of Magnetic Structures in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, J. C.; MacNeice, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a 2.5D MHD code designed to study how the solar wind influences the evolution of transient events in the solar corona and inner heliosphere. The code includes thermal conduction, coronal heating and radiative cooling. Thermal conduction is assumed to be magnetic field-aligned in the inner corona and transitions to a collisionless formulation in the outer corona. We have developed a stable method to handle field-aligned conduction around magnetic null points. The inner boundary is placed in the upper transition region, and the mass flux across the boundary is determined from 1D field-aligned characteristics and a 'radiative energy balance' condition. The 2.5D nature of this code makes it ideal for parameter studies not yet possible with 3D codes. We have made this code publicly available as a tool for the community. To this end we have developed a graphical interface to aid in the selection of appropriate options and a graphical interface that can process and visualize the data produced by the simulation. As an example, we show a simulation of a dipole field stretched into a helmet streamer by the solar wind. Plasmoids periodically erupt from the streamer, and we perform a parameter study of how the frequency and location of these eruptions changed in response to different levels of coronal heating. As a further example, we show the solar wind stretching a compact multi-polar flux system. This flux system will be used to study breakout coronal mass ejections in the presence of the solar wind.

  7. High-Latitude Thermosphere Neutral Density Response to Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y.; Zesta, E.; Connor, H. K.; Su, Y.-J.; Sutton, E. K.; Huang, C. Y.; Ober, D. M.; Christodoulou, C.; Delay, S.; Oliveira, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the response of the thermosphere to the impact of solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements using observations and global magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) simulations by the OpenGGCM model. Combining neutral density observations from the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites with simultaneous Poynting flux measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16, we find that thermospheric density as well as downward Poynting flux intensified shortly after a sudden enhancement of the solar wind dynamic pressure. The intensification manifested mostly on the dayside high-latitude region with peak intensity in the vicinity of the noon and prenoon cusp. OpenGGCM modeling results show that the ionospheric Joule heating increased abruptly in response to the sudden enhancement of the dynamic pressure in the same region as the observed Poynting flux and neutral density enhancements. The modeling results show that the enhanced Joule heating coincides, both in time and location, with the appearance of a pair of high-latitude localized field-aligned currents (FACs) in the cusp region. The FACs intensified and extended azimuthally. Coincidental with the solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement, the y component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By became strongly positive and, in addition, had some large fluctuations. We explore the separate and combined effects of the dynamic pressure and IMF By perturbations, with specifically designed simulation experiments that isolate the effect of each solar wind parameter. We find that the dynamic pressure enhancement is the primary source for the Joule heating and neutral density enhancements, but the IMF By modulates the level of enhancement.

  8. Multifractal scaling of the kinetic energy flux in solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, E.; Rosenbauer, H.; Tu, C.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    The geometrical and scaling properties of the energy flux of the turbulent kinetic energy in the solar wind have been studied. By present experimental technology in solar wind measurements, we cannot directly measure the real volumetric dissipation rate, epsilon(t), but are constrained to represent it by surrogating the energy flux near the dissipation range at the proton gyro scales. There is evidence for the multifractal nature of the so defined dissipation field epsilon(t), a result derived from the scaling exponents of its statistical q-th order moments. The related generalized dimension D(q) has been determined and reveals that the dissipation field has a multifractal structure. which is not compatible with a scale-invariant cascade. The associated multifractal spectrum f(alpha) has been estimated for the first time for MHD turbulence in the solar wind. Its features resemble those obtained for turbulent fluids and other nonlinear multifractal systems. The generalized dimension D(q) can, for turbulence in high-speed streams, be fitted well by the functional dependence of the p-model with a comparatively large parameter, p = 0.87. indicating a strongly intermittent multifractal energy cascade. The experimental value for D(p)/3, if used in the scaling exponent s(p) of the velocity structure function, gives an exponent that can describe some of the observations. The scaling exponent mu of the auto correlation function of epsilon(t) has also been directly evaluated. It has the value of 0.37. Finally. the mean dissipation rate was determined, which could be used in solar wind heating models.

  9. Solar wind charge exchange emission in the Chandra deep field north

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Wargelin, Bradford J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Koutroumpa, Dimitra [LATMOS/IPSL, CNRS, Université Versailles Saint Quentin, 11 Boulevard d' Alembert, F-78280, Guyancourt (France)

    2013-12-10

    The diffuse soft X-ray background comes from distant galaxies, from hot Galactic gas, and from within the solar system. The latter emission arises from charge exchange between highly charged solar wind ions and neutral gas. This so-called solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission is spatially and temporally variable and interferes with our measurements of more distant cosmic emission while also providing important information on the nature of the solar wind-interstellar medium interaction. We present the results of our analysis of eight Chandra observations of the Chandra Deep Field North (CDFN) with the goal of measuring the cosmic and SWCX contributions to the X-ray background. Our modeling of both geocoronal and heliospheric SWCX emission is the most detailed for any observation to date. After allowing for ∼30% uncertainty in the SWCX emission and subtracting it from the observational data, we estimate that the flux of cosmic background for the CDFN in the O VII Kα, Kβ, and O VIII Lyα lines totals 5.8 ± 1.1 photons s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} sr{sup –1} (or LU). Heliospheric SWCX emission varied for each observation due to differences in solar wind conditions and the line of sight through the solar system, but was typically about half as strong as the cosmic background (i.e., one-third of the total) in those lines. The modeled geocoronal emission was 0.82 LU in one observation but averaged only 0.15 LU in the others. Our measurement of the cosmic background is lower than but marginally consistent with previous estimates based on XMM-Newton data.

  10. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause and the solar wind - magnetosphere interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz-Dabrowska, J. (Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw. Centrum Astronomiczne)

    1980-01-01

    Some basic properties of the instability caused by inhomogeneous mass flow are reviewed, and papers dealing with various aspects of this phenomenon are discussed. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is discussed on the basis of magnetohydrodynamics and CGL equations, and the effects of the finite Larmor radius of ions are taken into account. The results related to the problem of the magnetopause stability are listed and the possibility of viscous interaction at the solar wind-magnetosphere boundary is discussed.

  11. Nitrogen fixation studies, lead detection in living plants, and solar wind analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, W. F.

    1971-01-01

    Progress is reported for research on the following: (1) magnetically shielded test facility studies; (2) electrochemistry of B10C2H12, B9CH10(-), and preparation of tumor specific boron containing materials for use in cancer therapy; (3) histochemical method for determining lead in living plant tissue; (4) diamond cementing; (5) analysis of solar wind using the washings of lunar fines; and (6) environmental engineering.

  12. Shape changing thin films powered by DNA hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Tae Soup; Estephan, Zaki G.; Qian, Zhaoxia; Prosser, Jacob H.; Lee, Su Yeon; Chenoweth, David M.; Lee, Daeyeon; Park, So-Jung; Crocker, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Active materials that respond to physical and chemical stimuli can be used to build dynamic micromachines that lie at the interface between biological systems and engineered devices. In principle, the specific hybridization of DNA can be used to form a library of independent, chemically driven actuators for use in such microrobotic applications and could lead to device capabilities that are not possible with polymer- or metal-layer-based approaches. Here, we report shape changing films that are powered by DNA strand exchange reactions with two different domains that can respond to distinct chemical signals. The films are formed from DNA-grafted gold nanoparticles using a layer-by-layer deposition process. Films consisting of an active and a passive layer show rapid, reversible curling in response to stimulus DNA strands added to solution. Films consisting of two independently addressable active layers display a complex suite of repeatable transformations, involving eight mechanochemical states and incorporating self-righting behaviour.

  13. CORONAL SOURCES, ELEMENTAL FRACTIONATION, AND RELEASE MECHANISMS OF HEAVY ION DROPOUTS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weberg, Micah J. [PhD Candidate in Space Science, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2134A Space Research Building, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, USA. (United States); Lepri, Susan T. [Associate Professor, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2429 Space Research Building, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, USA. (United States); Zurbuchen, Thomas H., E-mail: mjweberg@umich.edu, E-mail: slepri@umich.edu, E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu [Professor, Space Science and Aerospace Engineering, Associate Dean for Entrepreneurship Senior Counselor