WorldWideScience

Sample records for hungarian managed care

  1. Comparison of Cardiovascular Risk Screening Methods and Mortality Data among Hungarian Primary Care Population: Preliminary Results of the First Government-Financed Managed Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Móczár, Csaba; Rurik, Imre

    2015-09-01

    Besides participation in the primary prevention, screening as secondary prevention is an important requirement for primary care services. The effect of this work is influenced by the characteristics of individual primary care practices and doctors' screening habits, as well as by the regulation of screening processes and available financial resources. Between 1999 and 2009, a managed care program was introduced and carried out in Hungary, financed by the government. This financial support and motivation gave the opportunity to increase the number of screenings. 4,462 patients of 40 primary care practices were screened on the basis of SCORE risk assessment. The results of the screening were compared on the basis of two groups of patients, namely: those who had been pre-screened (pre-screening method) for known risk factors in their medical history (smoking, BMI, age, family cardiovascular history), and those randomly screened. The authors also compared the mortality data of participating primary care practices with the regional and national data. The average score was significantly higher in the pre-screened group of patients, regardless of whether the risk factors were considered one by one or in combination. Mortality was significantly lower in the participating primary practices than had been expected on the basis of the national mortality data. This government-financed program was a big step forward to establish a proper screening method within Hungarian primary care. Performing cardiovascular screening of a selected target group is presumably more appropriate than screening within a randomly selected population. Both methods resulted in a visible improvement in regional mortality data, though it is very likely that with pre-screening a more cost-effective selection for screening may be obtained.

  2. STRATEGY IMPLEMENTATION STYLES OF MALAYSIAN, THAI AND HUNGARIAN MIDDLE MANAGERS

    OpenAIRE

    Maheshkumar P. Joshi; Hugh D. Sherman; John R. Schermerhorn, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    There is a need for more comparative empirical research that examines middle manager roles in strategic change. This paper reports a study of middle managers in two dynamic settings: the Asia/Pacific region – Malaysia and Thailand; and Central/Eastern Europe – Hungary. Results of 213 respondents across three countries indicate that middle managers from all three tend toward use of authoritarian management styles even in proactive strategic change situations. However, Hungarians are less likel...

  3. WEAKNESSES OF THE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM OF TRADITIONAL HUNGARIAN UNIVERSITIES

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    Gabriella KECZER

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Transformation of the management of traditional higher education institutionsemerged in Hungary following the change of the political system in 1990,however, an appropriate answer has not been found to date. The first step inthe management of reform is identification of the issues that need to beresolved through the implementation of changes.The present research has been aimed at identifying the present weaknessesof the inner management system of traditional Hungarian universities, thusfind a solid starting point for reforming it. I conducted in-depth interviews inthe course of research, with 10 top university managers who represent 9institutions, thus the majority of traditional Hungarian universities. Such aresearch has not been made at least for the last decade.In my paper first I present the current legal framework of the system ofuniversity management. Then I give an assessment of it on the basis of theinterviews, analysing the deficiencies, the external and internal obstacles toefficient management I conclude that the present leaders of theuniversities can exactly identify those deficiencies of the system and therelated external and internal circumstances that lead to disturbed operationand low efficiency. The results obtained through the interviews suggest that areform of the internal management should rearrange intra-university powerrelations and harmonize scopes of responsibility and competence. A shifttoward a stronger central, rectoral and a more limited faculty- and bodyrelatedmanagement appears necessary.

  4. Implementation of the Hungarian RW management project: Results and lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigassy, J.; Czoch, I.; Ormai, P.

    1995-01-01

    In 1993, a National RW Management Project was launched to solve handling and disposal of LLW/ILW of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant and to elaborate a complex strategy for the management of radwastes from the NPP, including HLW, spent fuel and wastes from the decommissioning. It was intended to implement the project so as to have selected the possible site (or sites) for the LLW/ILW waste repository by 1996. This paper describes the first results of the nation-wide screening for suitable areas and the problems related to the comparative evaluation process to select potential sites for a surface or geological LLW/ILW disposal facility. International tenders were issued to find the most appropriate technology to reduce the quantity of liquid and solid radwaste in the Nuclear Power Plant. Their results will provide a better basis for planning the characteristics and quantity of radwaste. The applications revealed that supercompacting can be ordered as a service when the need arises, and thus it was possible to re-allocate the funding originally foreseen for the equipment to treat solid wastes. Great importance is attached in the Project to public acceptance and PR activity. An expert organization was selected in a two-phase bidding process, and it was decided that detailed exploration of a potential site will take place only if public acceptance is assured. The original program of the Hungarian RW Management Project was extended in 1994 to perform on-site underground investigations (with Canadian support) in a silt-stone formation. The first results confirm that this is a potential site for deep geological disposal of HLW. The financial and legal framework of the RW management is also to be solved. The new law on nuclear energy -- now in preparation -- will deal with that problem in one of its most important chapters, defining the responsibilities for RW management and the sources of funding

  5. STRATEGY IMPLEMENTATION STYLES OF MALAYSIAN, THAI AND HUNGARIAN MIDDLE MANAGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshkumar P. Joshi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for more comparative empirical research that examines middle manager roles in strategic change. This paper reports a study of middle managers in two dynamic settings: the Asia/Pacific region – Malaysia and Thailand; and Central/Eastern Europe – Hungary. Results of 213 respondents across three countries indicate that middle managers from all three tend toward use of authoritarian management styles even in proactive strategic change situations. However, Hungarians are less likely to use these styles than Thai and Malaysian middle managers. For all three countries, managers with less work experience were found to have lower tendencies to use an authoritarian style of implementation. When top managers exhibit an aggressive strategic posture, middle-managers from all three countries are also less likely to use an authoritarian style.Firms that want to stay competitive in the global market place must continuously evolve by successfully accomplishing strategic change (Struckman & Yammarino 2003. Although senior managers are critical in leading the strategic change process, even the best-planned strategic changes will not achieve their full potential unless they are well implemented. Part of the strategic leadership responsibility, therefore, includes establishing a climate in which the organization's rank and file will experience both a positive attitude about change and the confidence to actively seek change opportunities (Kanter 2003. Research attention is bringing more insight into the important roles of middle-managers in this process of implementing strategic change (Balogun & Jenkins 2003; Floyd & Wooldridge, 1992, 1994; Wooldridge & Floyd 1990. Although there is little doubt that active support by middle managers is critical for the strategies to be well implemented (Guth & MacMillan 1986, there remain many important questions with regard to how middle managers participate in this process (Balogun 2003.The need for research

  6. Quality management and patient safety: survey results from 102 Hungarian hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makai, P.; Klazinga, N.; Wagner, C.; Boncz, I.; Gulácsi, L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to describe the development of quality management systems in Hungarian hospitals. It also aims to answer the policy question, whether a separate patient safety policy should be created additional to quality policies, on national as well as hospital level. METHOD:

  7. [Types of conflicts and conflict management among Hungarian healthcare workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csupor, Éva; Kuna, Ágnes; Pintér, Judit Nóra; Kaló, Zsuzsa; Csabai, Márta

    2017-04-01

    Efficient communication, conflict management and cooperation are the key factors of a successful patient care. This study is part of an international comparative research. The aim of this study is to unfold conflicts among healthcare workers. 73 healthcare workers were interviewed using a standardized interview protocol. The in-person interviews used the critical incident method. 30 interviews (15 doctors, 15 nurses) were analysed with the Atlas.ti 7 content analysis software. The sources, types, effects of conflicts and conflict management strategies were investigated. The content analysis unfolded the specificities of conflicts in healthcare based on personal experiences. Organizational hierarchy was a substantial source of conflict, especially among physicians, which originates from implicit rules. As a result of the avoiding conflict management the conflicts remain partly unresolved which has negative individual and group effect. Our conceptual framework helps to develop a proper intervention specific to healthcare. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(16), 625-632.

  8. Health status among elderly Hungarians and Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, T F; Beres, C; Hofstetter, C R; Pomidor, A

    1994-07-01

    Selected health status data for elderly populations from similar industrial cities-Youngstown, Ohio, USA, and Debrecen, Hungary-were compared. Because of their impoverished health care system, unregulated heavily industrialized society, and unhealthful life-styles Hungarians were hypothesized to have poorer health status than Americans, even after taking into account demographic mediating factors. The study provides a health status baseline for elderly Hungarians shortly after communism's fall in 1989-1990 and shows how great a gap exists between Hungarian health status and that in the West. Hungarians were in much poorer health as measured by functional status, symptomatology, medical condition, depression, and subjective health status. Distinctions persisted when controlling for gender, age, and education. Poverty-level (and income) did not explain health status differences. The paper concludes that Hungary should pay more attention to health promotion, prevention, and primary care, as well as to reforming patient management in hospitals, nursing homes, and home care programs.

  9. [Work schedules in the Hungarian health care system and the sleep quality of nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusz, Katalin; Pakai, Annamária; Kívés, Zsuzsanna; Szunomár, Szilvia; Regős, Annamária; Oláh, András

    2016-03-06

    One way of ensuring the continuity of health care is the shift work, which is burdensome and it can lead to sleep disturbances. The aim of the study was to measure the typical Hungarian nursing shift systems in hospitals, to analyse the causes of irregular work schedules, and to compare the sleep quality of nurses in different work schedules. 236 head nurses filled out the national online survey, and 217 nurses in clinics of the University of Pécs filled the Hungarian version of Bergen Shift Work Sleep Questionnaire. The head nurses provided data of 8697 nurses's schedules. 51.89% of nurses work in flexible shift system. 1944 employees work in regular shift system, most of them in the following order: 12-hour day shift and 12-hour night shift, followed by a one- or two-day rest. Where there is no system of shifts, the most frequent causes are the needs of nurses and the nurse shortage. Nurses who are working in irregular shift system had worse sleep quality than nurses who are working in flexible and regular shift system (p = 0.044). It would be helpful if the least burdensome shift system could be established.

  10. Management under Limited Information – The Measurement of Off-Balance Sheet Assets at Hungarian firms

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    Peter Juhasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Relying on three questionnaire-based surveys from 2004, 2009 and 2013, each covering around 300 top financial managers of different Hungarian manufacturing and service companies, this article analyzes how the perception and measurement of intellectual capital (IC elements has changed. Instead of focusing on stock exchange prices or case studies of individual firms, this research is unique for using a database on the opinion of top managers over a decade. After the managers, IC has slightly gained importance giving 48-51 percent of the firm value during the years analyzed, still, most companies give little attention to measuring these items correctly. This is dangerous, as by just focusing on traditional accounting measures or relying on outdated methods, top managers are less likely to take shareholder value maximizing decisions. Encouragingly, those who measure do it better: book value has lost popularity while more appropriate market value based estimates have gained importance.

  11. [Autoimmune pancreatitis. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Hegyi, Péter; Hritz, István; Kelemen, Dezső; Lásztity, Natália; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Párniczky, Andrea; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Szücs, Ákos; Czakó, László

    2015-02-22

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare disease which can even mimic pancreatic tumor, however, unlike the latter, it requires not surgical but conservative management. Correct diagnosis and differential diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and treatment of these patients requires up-to-date and evidence based management guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available international guidelines and evidences. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented and/or modified the international guidelines if it was necessary. 29 relevant clinical questions in 4 topics were defined (Basics; Diagnosis; Differential diagnostics; Therapy). Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate(®) grading system. The draft of the guidelines was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. All clinial questions were accepted with almost total (more than 95%) agreement. The present guideline is the first evidence based autoimmune pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The guideline may provide very important and helpful data for tuition of autoimmune pancreatitis, for everyday practice and for establishing proper finance. Therefore, the authors believe that these guidelines will widely become a basic reference in Hungary.

  12. Managing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandifer, Q D

    1997-09-01

    The terms 'managed care' and 'disease management' are gaining common usage in the health service but their meaning is not widely understood. Managed care is a generic term describing any health care system that integrates the financing and delivery of medical care. Its growth in the United States has been driven by pressure to control costs, and there is circumstantial evidence that costs are slowing as a result of better management of resources. However, it is not clear how much of this is due to managed care, the selection of more favourable enrollees to health plans or other factors. Research evidence is limited, and that available is constrained by the rapidly changing nature of managed care. In the United States a bewildering variety of managed care arrangements have emerged, although several common characteristics can be identified: limited choice of physician providers; controlled access to secondary care; selective contracting; financial incentives; quality management; and utilization management. All are present in the National Health Service (NHS), which exemplifies a nationalized managed care system. Disease management is an extension of managed care that takes a global approach to patient care by attempting to co-ordinate resources across the entire health care delivery system throughout the life cycle of the disease. This is poorly developed in the NHS, so that the attention of commercial organizations has been attracted. However, concern has been expressed about the implications of commercial involvement: the fragmentation of general medical services; effect of for-profit status; and use of patient-based data. Recent policy developments could allow disease management to develop within the NHS.

  13. Using Learning Management Systems in Business and Economics Studies in Hungarian Higher Education

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    Nagy, Judit T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores all uses of LMS in teaching Business Mathematics in Hungarian undergraduate training from the point of view of the instructors. Since no similar survey had been carried out in Hungary earlier, the aim was to fill in this gap and to investigate which LMS systems are being used by the instructors, to what specific purposes and…

  14. Use of hand hygiene agents as a surrogate marker of compliance in Hungarian long-term care facilities: first nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Rita; Morvai, Júlia; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Pittet, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Hand hygiene practice is an important measure for preventing infections in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). However, low compliance with hand hygiene has been reported in a number of studies. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the first reference data collected on alcohol-based handrub (ABHR) and antiseptic soap consumption, as surrogate markers for hand hygiene compliance by healthcare workers (HCWs) in Hungarian LTCFs. The objective was to inform stakeholders on the need of hand hygiene improvement in these settings. Between 5 May and 30 September 2014, we conducted a nationwide, cross-sectional survey using a standardized self-administered questionnaire; all Hungarian LTCFs were eligible. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0 was used for data analysis. The questionnaire was completed by 354 LTCFs, representing 24 % of all Hungarian LTCFs. In total, the median consumption of ABHR and antimicrobial soap was 15.5 L (IQR, 0-800 L) and 60 L (IQR, 0-1,680 L) per LTCFs, and 2.2 mL (IQR, 0.4-9.1 mL) and 12.1 mL (IQR, 0.7-32.8 mL) per HCWs in 2013, respectively. The estimated number of hand hygiene actions was 0.6 hygienic handrub/HCW per day (IQR, 0-12.8/HCWs) and 2.4 hygienic handwashing/HCW per day (IQR, 0-21.9/HCWs; P = .001), respectively. This study suggests that non-compliance with hand hygiene is a significant problem in Hungarian LTCFs. Based on our results, there is an urgent need for a nationwide multimodal hand hygiene promotion strategy including education and performance monitoring and feedback in all LTCFs. Furthermore, monitoring of ABHR consumption constitute an additional component of the existing National Nosocomial Surveillance system.

  15. Examination of Performance Management Targets in Case of an International Corporation’s Eastern Hungarian Operating Unit

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    Nemeth Zoltan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, due to the social and economic changes, the human is already the main resource which determines the successfulness of corporations. The expertise in managing the human resources is a key factor of competitiveness therefore it has become a strategic question. Primary aim of the treatise is to outline the most important principles, targets and peculiarities of performance management system, which is a central element of human resource management, as well as its interconnectedness with the individual performance evaluation and human resource development through the mirror of one of today’s biggest Hungarian economic corporations. We aimed to explore, by means of document analysis as well as methods of case study and interview, how the targets of performance management are used for increasing the economic productivity, preserving the competitiveness, retaining and enhancing the satisfaction of workers. It can be stated that the PM system was continuously improved in case of the organization examined because the corporate goals and the expected performances were adjusted to the changing market demands over time but, at the same time the goal of differentiation has remained unchanged. Each worker evaluates his/her performance individually, the base of which is the extent of contribution to the corporate results. Based on the results, it can overall be stated that such a well-functioning performance management system is applied in the operating unit of the corporation examined which is strongly supported by the organizational culture and which contributes to the joint fulfilment of personal as well as organizational goals.

  16. Fewer can be More: Nuclear Safety and Security Culture Self-Assessment in the Hungarian Public Ltd. for Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horváth, K.; Solymosi, M.; Vass, G.

    2016-01-01

    The Hungarian regulator and operators show strong commitment towards robust nuclear safety and security culture. The paper discusses the evolution and the basis of the regulation of Hungarian safety and security culture. Because of security considerations nuclear safety incidents have always received and for sure will receive more publicity than malicious acts. That is probably the main reason behind that mostly nuclear safety incidents influence the common beliefs. This kind of primacy is noticeable as well in regulations and also in practice. Although there is a strong connection nuclear safety and security culture, their relationship has not been researched for a long time. The paper also presents an already achieved, combined nuclear safety and security culture survey type assessment. Survey is a well known type of organizational culture self assessment. The applied methods, relationship between these two cultures and of course some difficulties of the process are summarized. The presented method is appropriate to combine different guidance and characteristics to measure different attitude in a single survey. The method in practice is shown through the nuclear safety and security culture assessment conducted at Hungarian Public Ltd. Of Radioactive Waste Management. (author)

  17. Health care operations management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, M.W.; Hans, Elias W.; Kolisch, R.

    2012-01-01

    Health care operations management has become a major topic for health care service providers and society. Operations research already has and further will make considerable contributions for the effective and efficient delivery of health care services. This special issue collects seven carefully

  18. Palliative care - managing pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Palliative care is a holistic approach to care that focuses on treating pain ... stressful for you and your family. But with treatment, pain can be managed. How Pain is Measured ...

  19. Evaluation of participatory planning: Lessons from Hungarian Natura 2000 management planning processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Eszter; Kelemen, Eszter; Kiss, Gabriella; Kalóczkai, Ágnes; Fabók, Veronika; Mihók, Barbara; Megyesi, Boldizsár; Pataki, György; Bodorkós, Barbara; Balázs, Bálint; Bela, Györgyi; Margóczi, Katalin; Roboz, Ágnes; Molnár, Dániel

    2017-12-15

    Stakeholder participation in nature conservation policies and especially in the management of protected areas has gained importance in the last decades. These changes are underlined by democratic principles and the perceived contribution of stakeholder involvement to the effectiveness of conservation management. Evaluating participatory processes is essential to learn about the past and thus increase the quality of future processes. The evaluation can be useful for the organisations responsible for planning and management, stakeholders and policy makers as well. The present paper shows the results of a systematic evaluation of 25 participatory processes related to the development of management plans for Natura 2000 sites in Hungary between 2007 and 2015. A conceptual framework was developed to evaluate the process and outcome of participatory management planning processes. Criteria were based on the scientific literature on public participation and tailored to conservation-related management planning and stakeholder involvement. Evaluated processes were grouped in three cases based on their time range and financial sources. Overall, the analysed processes scored at a medium level, showing better performance in the process criteria than in the outcome criteria. The best case scored significantly higher in four criteria compared to the other cases: representativeness, resource availability for facilitation, new, creative ideas and impact on the plan. The main factors behind the success were (1) embeddedness of the planning process in a larger project, where the plan was a tool for conservation, (2) carrying out only one process at a time, (3) previous experience of facilitators and planners with participatory planning and (4) the opportunity and capacity to propose a payment scheme as an incentive. But even this case received low scores in some criteria: conflict resolution, early involvement and well defined goals. Based on the results we suggest that more data is

  20. Health care engineering management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzembski, W B

    1980-01-01

    Today, health care engineering management is merely a concept of dreamers, with most engineering decisions in health care being made by nonengineers. It is the purpose of this paper to present a rationale for an integrated hospital engineering group, and to acquaint the clinical engineer with some of the salient features of management concepts. Included are general management concepts, organization, personnel management, and hospital engineering systems.

  1. Receptiveness to Flexible Employment at Hungarian SMEs

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    Ákos Essősy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, only companies that are adaptable and flexible in their structure and processes can survive. The basis for a motivated company aiming for peak performance is organisational innovation. Hungary is one of the less innovative countries in Europe. Only organisations that can integrate new solutions smoothly into their everyday operations will remain truly competitive. The Government of Hungary, in its Partnership Agreement with the European Union, set out the goals for improving and supporting the adaptability of enterprises, the promotion of flexible and family-friendly workplace practices and services, and the employment of women with young children. The aim of this study is to demonstrate, through a Hungarian example, the receptiveness of Hungarian small and medium-sized enterprises to flexible forms of employment. The effect of flexible employment on economic adaptability and competitiveness through workforce efficiency and retention is examined. Its aim is the raise the awareness of options to increase employment among Hungarian SME managers.

  2. Towards an integrated flood management approach to address trade-offs between ecosystem services: Insights from the Dutch and German Rhine, Hungarian Tisza, and Chinese Yangtze basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbe, Johannes; Knüppe, Kathrin; Knieper, Christian; Pahl-Wostl, Claudia

    2018-04-01

    The utilization of ecosystem services in flood management is challenged by the complexity of human-nature interactions and practical implementation barriers towards more ecosystem-based solutions, such as riverine urban areas or technical infrastructure. This paper analyses how flood management has dealt with trade-offs between ecosystem services and practical constrains towards more ecosystem-based solutions. To this end, we study the evolution of flood management in four case studies in the Dutch and German Rhine, the Hungarian Tisza, and the Chinese Yangtze basins during the last decades, focusing on the development and implementation of institutions and their link to ecosystem services. The complexity of human-nature interactions is addressed by exploring the impacts on ecosystem services through the lens of three management paradigms: (1) the control paradigm, (2) the ecosystem-based paradigm, and (3) the stakeholder involvement paradigm. Case study data from expert interviews and a literature search were structured using a database approach prior to qualitative interpretation. Results show the growing importance of the ecosystem-based and stakeholder involvement paradigms which has led to the consideration of a range of regulating and cultural ecosystem services that had previously been neglected. We detected a trend in flood management practice towards the combination of the different paradigms under the umbrella of integrated flood management, which aims at finding the most suitable solution depending on the respective regional conditions.

  3. Computerization of Hungarian reforestation manual with machine learning methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czimber, Kornél; Gálos, Borbála; Mátyás, Csaba; Bidló, András; Gribovszki, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Hungarian forests are highly sensitive to the changing climate, especially to the available precipitation amount. Over the past two decades several drought damages were observed for tree species which are in the lower xeric limit of their distribution. From year to year these affected forest stands become more difficult to reforest with the same native species because these are not able to adapt to the increasing probability of droughts. The climate related parameter set of the Hungarian forest stand database needs updates. Air humidity that was formerly used to define the forest climate zones is not measured anymore and its value based on climate model outputs is highly uncertain. The aim was to develop a novel computerized and objective method to describe the species-specific climate conditions that is essential for survival, growth and optimal production of the forest ecosystems. The method is expected to project the species spatial distribution until 2100 on the basis of regional climate model simulations. Until now, Hungarian forest managers have been using a carefully edited spreadsheet for reforestation purposes. Applying binding regulations this spreadsheet prescribes the stand-forming and admixed tree species and their expected growth rate for each forest site types. We are going to present a new machine learning based method to replace the former spreadsheet. We took into great consideration of various methods, such as maximum likelihood, Bayesian networks, Fuzzy logic. The method calculates distributions, setups classification, which can be validated and modified by experts if necessary. Projected climate change conditions makes necessary to include into this system an additional climate zone that does not exist in our region now, as well as new options for potential tree species. In addition to or instead of the existing ones, the influence of further limiting parameters (climatic extremes, soil water retention) are also investigated. Results will be

  4. Emotional Intelligence of Hungarian Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baracsi, Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    The research focused on the personal and social competencies of Hungarian teachers as unexplored areas. The participants in the survey were 707 Hungarian teachers from elementary and secondary schools. In view of the expectations of the European Union related to new teacher roles, the following research question was formulated to guide the study:…

  5. Dative experiencer predicates in Hungarian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rákosi, G.

    2006-01-01

    Dative experiencer predicates in Hungarian investigates the argument structure and the syntax of appeal to- and important-type predicates in Hungarian. Couched in terms of Reinhart’s (2000, 2002) Theta System, the thesis presents arguments for the need to resort to the lexicon in setting up

  6. The deficit mechanism of the Hungarian municipalities

    OpenAIRE

    Vasvári, Tamás

    2012-01-01

    The management of the Hungarian municipal sector has received special attention since the crisis in 2008 and interest in the sector increased further due to the changes in legislation in 2011. A great number of economy experts and speakers on behalf of the government or the municipalities provided further details on prevailing issues in the municipal sector, however, their assessment of the severity of these issues varied greatly. By describing the logical framework of the deficit mechanism t...

  7. Educating Hungarian medical librarians in special literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantsits, G

    1974-01-01

    In Hungary the completion of a thirty-month course is required of those who wish to qualify as medium-level librarians. Medical librarians are given a special course which differs from the general course in that it covers the subjects of medical terminology and information in special literature. The latter subject is accorded the highest number of teaching hours, since the subject matter is vast and since, in addition to theory, much time must be spent on exercises and the presentation of reference books. The students become familiar with the main Hungarian and foreign information systems in the medical and related fields and with special bibliographies, encyclopedias, handbooks, and dictionaries. We take special care to familiarize students with the abstracting journals and indices. For several semesters they have homework and lesson exercises in the use of the Hungarian Medical Bibliography and Index Medicus.

  8. Operations management in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, M D

    1995-01-01

    Health care operations encompass the totality of those health care functions that allow those who practice health care delivery to do so. As the health care industry undergoes dramatic reform, so will the jobs of those who manage health care delivery systems. Although health care operations managers play one of the most vital and substantial roles in the new delivery system, the criteria for their success (or failure) are being defined now. Yet, the new and vital role of the operations manager has been stunted in its development, which is primarily because of old and outdated antipathy between hospital administrators and physicians. This article defines the skills and characteristics of today's health care operations managers.

  9. Professional management for eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AK Sivakumar

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe global initiative VISION 2020: The Right to Sight, estimates that only 25 per cent of existing infrastructure is used for eye care, while the target utilisation is set at 90 per cent. This requires a complete reorganisation. Many providers have the potential to significantly enhance their service by adopting professional management practice and new technologies in clinical services. This article addresses this opportunity from a professional management perspective.The responsibilities of a hospital administrator could be broadly classified as managing patient care, functional areas, support services, and developmental work. Eye care providers need to focus on four key areas. Strategic management to enhance the efficiency of their organisations requires: human resources management; quality management; marketing; and financial sustainability.

  10. Moral challenges in managed care

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    Leandri Hattingh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Managed health care in South Africa is faced with complex moral challenges, where different stakeholders appeal to different ethics principles to guide decision making. The traditional bio-medical ethics principles of beneficence, non-maleficence and respect for autonomy are typically emphasised in clinical practice, while third party funders appeal to the principle of justice to guide the allocation of limited, pooled resources. Health care professionals working in managed care are particularly exposed to these conflicts, vis-à-vis incongruence between the ethics guidelines from their professional bodies and the legislation pertaining to managed care. Common understanding of the claims and responsibilities of each of the stakeholders may promote a more coherent, sustainable health care system. 

  11. Medicaid Managed Care Enrollment Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This report is composed annually and profiles enrollment statistics on Medicaid managed care programs on a plan-specific level. This report also provides...

  12. Managing obesity in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, Christine; Brown, Jenny

    Obesity is a complex problem and often difficult to tackle in primary care. A year-long pilot of a practice nurse-led scheme that used a holistic approach towards self-care in obesity management was set up to reduce the cardiovascular risk of patients who were obese and improve their quality of life. This person-centred approach may offer an important tool in the management of these patients in the GP surgery.

  13. Glossary of Managed Care Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or treatment provided to a plan member. Coverage : decision making process that identifies what services or products are ... themselves and pay a monthly premium for it. Mental health care : medical ... abuse. Mixed model or network HMO : a managed care plan that ...

  14. Respiratory care management information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Richard M

    2004-04-01

    Hospital-wide computerized information systems evolved from the need to capture patient information and perform billing and other financial functions. These systems, however, have fallen short of meeting the needs of respiratory care departments regarding work load assessment, productivity management, and the level of outcome reporting required to support programs such as patient-driven protocols. The respiratory care management information systems (RCMIS) of today offer many advantages over paper-based systems and hospital-wide computer systems. RCMIS are designed to facilitate functions specific to respiratory care, including assessing work demand, assigning and tracking resources, charting, billing, and reporting results. RCMIS incorporate mobile, point-of-care charting and are highly configurable to meet the specific needs of individual respiratory care departments. Important and substantial benefits can be realized with an RCMIS and mobile, wireless charting devices. The initial and ongoing costs of an RCMIS are justified by increased charge capture and reduced costs, by way of improved productivity and efficiency. It is not unusual to recover the total cost of an RCMIS within the first year of its operation. In addition, such systems can facilitate and monitor patient-care protocols and help to efficiently manage the vast amounts of information encountered during the practitioner's workday. Respiratory care departments that invest in RCMIS have an advantage in the provision of quality care and in reducing expenses. A centralized respiratory therapy department with an RCMIS is the most efficient and cost-effective way to monitor work demand and manage the hospital-wide allocation of respiratory care services.

  15. Managed care: mastering the moving parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Dawn; Finman, Larry

    2010-05-01

    A hospital's success with managed care depends on how thoroughly the hospital understands its interrelated aspects, including: Managed care strategy Contract negotiations. Contract language. Key performance indicators. Modeling. Contract termination provisions. Movement from wholesale to retail health care.

  16. Reengineering health care materials management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, L R

    1998-01-01

    Health care executives across the country, faced with intense competition, are being forced to consider drastic cost cutting measures as a matter of survival. The entire health care industry is under siege from boards of directors, management and others who encourage health care systems to take actions ranging from strategic acquisitions and mergers to simple "downsizing" or "rightsizing," to improve their perceived competitive positions in terms of costs, revenues and market share. In some cases, management is poorly prepared to work within this new competitive paradigm and turns to consultants who promise that following their methodologies can result in competitive advantage. One favored methodology is reengineering. Frequently, cost cutting attention is focused on the materials management budget because it is relatively large and is viewed as being comprised mostly of controllable expenses. Also, materials management is seldom considered a core competency for the health care system and the organization performing these activities does not occupy a strongly defensible position. This paper focuses on the application of a reengineering methodology to healthcare materials management.

  17. Hungarian national nuclear material control and accounting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lendvai, O.

    1985-01-01

    The Hungarian system for nuclear materials control and accounting is briefly described. Sections include a historical overview, a description of nuclear activities and an outline of the organizational structure of the materials management system. Subsequent sections discuss accounting, verification and international relations

  18. Strategic Foresight Process - Improvements for the Hungarian Ministry of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    data by modeling and econometric techniques including trend curves and trend extrapolations, among others; the kind of extrapolation of past data that...strategic management, Hungary, Hungarian Ministry of Defense, migration, Russia 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 79 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY ...CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE Unclassified 19. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF ABSTRACT Unclassified 20

  19. Collaborative care management effectively promotes self-management: patient evaluation of care management for depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJesus, Ramona S; Howell, Lisa; Williams, Mark; Hathaway, Julie; Vickers, Kristin S

    2014-03-01

    Chronic disease management in the primary care setting increasingly involves self-management support from a nurse care manager. Prior research had shown patient acceptance and willingness to work with care managers. This survey study evaluated patient-perceived satisfaction with care management and patient opinions on the effectiveness of care management in promoting self-management. Qualitative and quantitative survey responses were collected from 125 patients (79% female; average age 46; 94% Caucasian) enrolled in care management for depression. Qualitative responses were coded with methods of content analysis by 2 independent analysts. Patients were satisfied with depression care management. Patients felt that care management improved their treatment above and beyond other aspects of their depression treatment (mean score, 6.7 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), increased their understanding of depression self-management (mean score, 7.2 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), and increased the frequency of self-management goal setting (mean score, 6.9 [SD, 3]; 10 = Very much). Predominant qualitative themes emphasized that patients value emotional, motivational, and relational aspects of the care manager relationship. Patients viewed care managers as caring and supportive, helpful in creating accountability for patients and knowledgeable in the area of depression care. Care managers empower patients to take on an active role in depression self-management. Some logistical challenges associated with a telephonic intervention are described. Care manager training should include communication and motivation strategies, specifically self-management education, as these strategies are valued by patients. Barriers to care management, such as scheduling telephone calls, should be addressed in future care management implementation and study.

  20. Disease Management, Case Management, Care Management, and Care Coordination: A Framework and a Brief Manual for Care Programs and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osman I

    2016-01-01

    With the changing landscape of health care delivery in the United States since the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2010, health care organizations have struggled to keep pace with the evolving paradigm, particularly as it pertains to population health management. New nomenclature emerged to describe components of the new environment, and familiar words were put to use in an entirely different context. This article proposes a working framework for activities performed in case management, disease management, care management, and care coordination. The author offers standard working definitions for some of the most frequently used words in the health care industry with the goal of increasing consistency for their use, especially in the backdrop of the Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services offering a "chronic case management fee" to primary care providers for managing the sickest, high-cost Medicare patients. Health care organizations performing case management, care management, disease management, and care coordination. Road map for consistency among users, in reporting, comparison, and for success of care management/coordination programs. This article offers a working framework for disease managers, case and care managers, and care coordinators. It suggests standard definitions to use for disease management, case management, care management, and care coordination. Moreover, the use of clear terminology will facilitate comparing, contrasting, and evaluating all care programs and increase consistency. The article can improve understanding of care program components and success factors, estimate program value and effectiveness, heighten awareness of consumer engagement tools, recognize current state and challenges for care programs, understand the role of health information technology solutions in care programs, and use information and knowledge gained to assess and improve care programs to design the "next generation" of programs.

  1. Radiology education in Hungarian schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, G.

    1999-01-01

    Basic concepts of nuclear physics are not more abstract and more difficult than those of electricity. For the orientation of the citizens of the 21st century, the Hungarian school curriculum has made them compulsory for all teenagers. According to the teachers' experience, the students find nuclear issues more relevant and more interesting than the topics inherited from the schoolbooks of earlier centuries. (author)

  2. Optimizing diabetes management: managed care strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeel, E Albert

    2013-06-01

    Both the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and its associated costs have been rising over time and are projected to continue to escalate. Therefore, type 2 DM (T2DM) management costs represent a potentially untenable strain on the healthcare system unless substantial, systemic changes are made. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are uniquely positioned to attempt to make the changes necessary to reduce the burdens associated with T2DM by developing policies that align with evidence-based DM management guidelines and other resources. For example, MCOs can encourage members to implement healthy lifestyle choices, which have been shown to reduce DM-associated mortality and delay comorbidities. In addition, MCOs are exploring the strengths and weaknesses of several different benefit plan designs. Value-based insurance designs, sometimes referred to as value-based benefit designs, use both direct and indirect data to invest in incentives that change behaviors through health information technologies, communications, and services to improve health, productivity, quality, and financial trends. Provider incentive programs, sometimes referred to as "pay for performance," represent a payment/delivery paradigm that places emphasis on rewarding value instead of volume to align financial incentives and quality of care. Accountable care organizations emphasize an alignment between reimbursement and implementation of best practices through the use of disease management and/ or clinical pathways and health information technologies. Consumer-directed health plans, or high-deductible health plans, combine lower premiums with high annual deductibles to encourage members to seek better value for health expenditures. Studies conducted to date on these different designs have produced mixed results.

  3. The impact of managed care in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouse, H R

    1999-01-01

    Managed care plans attempt to control health care expenditures aggressively. These plans directly influence access to medical care and the type, level, and frequency of care rendered. As a result, hospital stays are reduced, focus shifts from inpatient to outpatient care, and patients are responsible for a larger share of health care costs. Dentistry is not immune from the impact of managed care. The attractiveness of the dental market has drawn many managed care organizations, insurers, and entrepreneurs to encourage dentists to participate in a wide variety of managed care programs. However, the delivery of dental care differs markedly in many respects from that of medical care. Therefore, many of the cost saving aspects of managed care that have been so successful in medicine may not result in similar cost savings in dentistry.

  4. Managed consumerism in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C

    2005-01-01

    The future of market-oriented health policy and practice lies in "managed consumerism," a blend of the patient-centric focus of consumer-driven health care and the provider-centric focus of managed competition. The optimal locus of incentives will vary among health services according to the nature of the illness, the clinical technology, and the extent of discretion in utilization. A competitive market will manifest a variety of comprehensive and limited benefit designs, broad and narrow contractual networks, and single-and multispecialty provider organizations.

  5. How will computerization revolutionize managed care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabin, T

    1994-01-01

    Computerization of behavioral health care information systems is revolutionizing how payors, managed care companies, and providers exchange information. In this article, an imaginary scenario is depicted of how patient data will be accessed and communicated to facilitate care management of behavioral health care services in the near future.

  6. Managed care innovation and new product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C S; Schuster, T B

    1994-01-01

    This article explores recent innovative activity by managed care payor plans nationwide with particular emphasis on emerging, new relationships between the plans and their purchasers, enrollees, provider panels, and competitors. Because they already practice what advocates of health care reform are now preaching, many managed care plans are leading the charge to transform our health care delivery and financing systems.

  7. The Steins and the Hungarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barki, Gergely

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The traveling exhibition entitled "The Steins Collect" (2011-12 again drew attention – and on this occasion in a manner perhaps more vivid than any exhibition to date – to the importance of the systematically canon-shaping work that took place in two tiny Parisian ateliers (one in the Rue de Fleurus, the other in the Rue de Madame in terms of the new painterly movements that emerged at the beginning of the 20th century. Leo, Gertrude, and Michael, three siblings from the Stein family, a family of Jewish origin from San Francisco, along with Michael's wife Sarah, not only built within the space of a few years the most important contemporary art collection in Paris, but through their lively salons came to be the most influential shapers and propagators of universal modernism, making their influence felt to this day on assessments of avant-garde art. In the course of preparations for the exhibition and the publication of the accompanying catalogue, both of which provide a comprehensive survey of the Steins' activity, light was cast on the family's Hungarian connections as well. Consequently, one painting by the Hungarian Vilmos Pelrott-Csaba was included at the American venues (San Francisco and New York of the exhibition, and a presentation on the family's ties to Hungary was held at the scholarly conference organized in connection with the exhibition. Despite the fact that several essays have been published on this subject, the written sources have not been collected – neither those dealing with the large number of Hungarians present at the Steins' Saturday evening gatherings, nor those covering the Hungarian pupils at the Académie Matisse, which was closely aligned with the Steins. This essay is a revised version of the presentation held at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, supplemented with additional source-material.

  8. Radiology education in Hungarian schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, Boetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary)

    1999-09-01

    Basic concepts of nuclear physics are not more abstract and more difficult than those of electricity. For the orientation of the citizens of the 21st century, the Hungarian school curriculum has made them compulsory for all teenagers. According to the teachers' experience, the students find nuclear issues more relevant and more interesting than the topics inherited from the schoolbooks of earlier centuries. (author)

  9. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Conclusion. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  10. Care management in nursing within emergency care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tono de Oliveira, Roberta Juliane; Vieira Hermida, Patrícia Madalena; da Silva Copelli, Fernanda Hannah; Guedes Dos Santos, José Luís; Lorenzini Erdmann, Alacoque; Regina de Andrade, Selma

    2015-12-01

    Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  11. Managed care and ethical conflicts: anything new?

    OpenAIRE

    Meyers, C

    1999-01-01

    Does managed care represent the death knell for the ethical provision of medical care? Much of the current literature suggests as much. In this essay I argue that the types of ethical conflicts brought on by managed care are, in fact, similar to those long faced by physicians and by other professionals. Managed care presents new, but not fundamentally different, factors to be considered in medical decision making. I also suggest ways of better understanding and resolving these conflicts, in p...

  12. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira; Patrícia Madalena Vieira Hermida; Fernanda Hannah da Silva Copelli; José Luís Guedes dos Santos; Alacoque Lorenzini Erdmann; Selma Regina de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency se...

  13. An overview of Medicaid managed care litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, S; Teitelbaum, J; Kirby, C; Priebe, L; Klement, T

    1998-11-01

    Since the enactment of Medicaid in 1965, states have had the option of offering beneficiaries enrollment in managed care arrangements. With the advent of mandatory managed care reaching millions of beneficiaries (including a growing proportion of disabled recipients), the amount and scope of litigation involving Medicaid managed care plans can be expected to grow. A review of the current litigation regarding Medicaid managed care reveals two basic types of lawsuits: (1) those that challenge the practices of managed care companies under various federal and state laws that safeguard consumer rights, protect health care quality, and prohibit discrimination; and (2) suits that assert claims arising directly under the Medicaid statute and implementing regulations, as well as claims related to Constitutional safeguards that undergird the program. Lawsuits asserting claims arising under Medicaid tend to raise two basic questions: (1) the extent to which enrollment in a Medicaid managed care plan alters existing Medicaid beneficiary rights and state agency duties under federal or state Medicaid law; and (2) the extent to which managed care companies, as agents of the state, act under "color of law" (i.e., undertaking to perform official duties or acting with the imprimatur of state authority). Additionally, states might see an increase in litigation brought by prospective and current contractors who assert that they have been wrongfully denied contracts or improperly penalized for poor performance. These assertions may involve claims that are grounded in federal and state law, the Medicaid statute, and the Constitution. Moreover, in light of the consumer protection elements of the managed care reforms contained in the Balanced Budget Act, future managed care litigation may focus on the manner in which companies carry out states' obligations toward managed care enrollees. Resolution of Medicaid managed care cases involves the application of general principles of

  14. Survey of ketolactia, determining the main predisposing management factors and consequences in Hungarian dairy herds by using a cow-side milk test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechner, Gerhard; Csorba, Csaba; Könyves, László

    2018-01-01

    The aims of the survey were to determine the prevalence of ketosis in dairy herds by measuring the concentration of beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) in milk by Keto-Test (Sanwa Kagaku Kenkyusho, Nagoya, Japan); risk factors and the relationship with postpartum diseases were investigated. 1667 early lactating (days in milk 0–75) cows were tested in 52 dairy herds in 2013 and 2014 years. In total, 29.3 per cent of samples were positive (BHBAMILK ≥100 µmol/l), including 3.7 per cent high positives (BHBAMILK ≥500 µmol/l). The prevalence was similar in herds with less than or more than 9000 kg milk yield (0.34 and 0.38, respectively, P=0.4); however, it was higher in the herds with more than 1000 cows than in smaller herds (ketosis (P<0.001). The results confirm the high prevalence of ketolactia in Hungarian dairy herds and its links to herd-related and cow-related risk factors and diseases occurring commonly in fresh cows. PMID:29868171

  15. Information Needs of Nurse Care Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, David A.; Tran, Hanh; Gorman, Paul; Wilcox, Adam B.

    2006-01-01

    Unmet information needs of physicians and patients are common, but those of nurse care managers – defined as collaborative care planners for with chronic conditions – are less well understood. We taped and transcribed daily activities and conducted semi-structured interviews of 7 care managers, and analyzed questions elicited through this work through a variety of frameworks. PMID:17238532

  16. 4. Congress of the Hungarian Radiotherapy Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Clinical experiences with radiotherapeutic treatment of patients with malignant tumors at several Hungarian hospitals and technical aspects of irradiation devices and irradiation procedures has been reported in the 50 lectures given at the congress. Abstracts of the lectures are published in Hungarian or English or German. (N.T.)

  17. Ethnic Attitudes of Hungarian Students in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Bob; Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Oikonomidoy, Eleni

    2012-01-01

    Participants in this study were ethnic Hungarian secondary students attending high schools in Romania in which Hungarian was the primary language of instruction. Attitudes of participants toward ethnic and cultural groups were measured using a variation of the Bogardus (1933) Scale of Social Distance. Results were consistent with predictions based…

  18. Genetic Research and Hungarian "Deep Ancestry"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nándor Dreisziger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The past few decades saw the birth of the new science of genetics that can be used not only for medical purposes but also for the study of the past. Geneticists were quick to begin applying this science to the examination of Hungarian history, especially the subject of Hungarian origins. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the reader with some of these studies. One study this paper will examine is itself a review of the scientific literature of early genetic studies on Hungarian origins. Other studies evaluated in this paper will be the English-language scientific publications of a team of Hungarian geneticists who over the last several years have studied the genetic inter-relatedness of 10th century and present-day Hungarian populations in the Middle Danube Valley of Central Europe. The paper comes to the conclusion that while very early genetic inquiries into Hungarian origins were often fault-ridden and are of little use now, more recent studies suggest that the currently held explanations of Hungarian ethnogenesis — especially the story of the so-called Hungarian conquest of the late 9th century — might very well be subjected to a fundamental re-assessment.

  19. Managing Cancer Care - Finding Health Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my condition? Has it been rated by state, consumer, or other groups for its quality of care? ... be both rewarding and demanding. It can change relationships and require families to cope with all aspects ...

  20. Tailoring Self-Management in Chronic Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touwen, ID

    2016-01-01

    Self-management is nowadays seen as an important element in chronic care and therefore, self-management is increasingly embedded in chronic care guidelines; however, implementation in clinical practice is a slow and difficult process. Evidence, from research on self-management interventions, shows

  1. Characteristics of effective health care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sherryl W

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of traditional and contemporary management theories. Concerns, characteristics, and skills of effective managers are also presented. Further, a self-assessment (survey) of 7 highly effective health care managers in a South Georgia community was conducted to determine their ratings on 6 management indices. The assessment or Scale of Transformational Leadership uses a Likert-type scale to allow for the evaluation of managers. The scale contains 6 management elements for assessment: attention, meaning, trust, self, vision, and feeling. Individual ratings and group summary skills rating are presented. Findings revealed the order of managerial importance of the elements as follows (from highest to lowest): Management of Trust, Management of Attention, Management of Self, Management of Feeling, Management of Meaning, and Management of Risk. As a second tier, the final ratings are corroborated by health care management interns.

  2. Strategic management of health care information systems: nurse managers' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula; Saranto, Kaija; Kinnunen, Juha

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the strategic management of information systems in health care. Lack of strategic thinking is a typical feature in health care and this may also concern information systems. The data for this study was collected by eight focus group interviews including altogether 48 nurse managers from primary and specialised health care. Five main categories described the strategic management of information systems in health care; IT as an emphasis of strategy; lack of strategic management of information systems; the importance of management; problems in privacy protection; and costs of IT. Although IT was emphasised in the strategies of many health care organisations, a typical feature was a lack of strategic management of information systems. This was seen both as an underutilisation of IT opportunities in health care organisations and as increased workload from nurse managers' perspective. Furthermore, the nurse managers reported that implementation of IT strengthened their managerial roles but also required stronger management. In conclusion, strategic management of information systems needs to be strengthened in health care and nurse managers should be more involved in this process.

  3. Producing Just Papers or Creating Added Value? Snap-Shot about Quality Systems at Hungarian SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil NYERKI

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a short historical review and the research results are presented, which are focused on the quality management systems used by the Hungarian SME’s. The research was based on an original empirical survey, conducted using a random sample of fifty managers from small and medium sized Hungarian enterprises. All of them use certified quality management systems. The paper presents their current state in the light of their responses, under several aspects. In conclusion, suggestions are given for the problems, such as measurement, development, and education on the research topic.

  4. [Quality management in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to extern quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system.

  5. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Kovács

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried out in the morning and afternoon in order to decrease the effect of the distant temporal correction. To further increase the accuracy, on-site dIdD variometer has also been installed near the Aggtelek station, in the Baradla cave, during the survey of the easternmost sites. The paper presents the technical details and the results of our last campaign. The improvement of the accuracy of the temporal reduction by the use of the local variometer is also reported.

  6. Hungarian climate change action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, S.; Takacs, T. [Systemexpert Consulting Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Arpasi, M. [MOL, Budapest (Hungary); Farago, T.; Palvoelgyi, T. [Ministry for Environment and Regional Policy, Budapest (Hungary); Harnos, Z. [Univ. of Horticulture, Budapest (Hungary); Lontay, Z. [EGI-Contracting Engineering Co. Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Somogyi, Z. [Forest Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary); Tajthy, T. [Univ. of Technology, Budapest (Hungary)

    1998-12-31

    In 1994--1996, within the framework of the US Country Studies Program, the Hungarian Country Study Team developed the national greenhouse gas emission inventory, and elaborated the mitigation options for the different sectors of the economy. In 1997, the development of a National Action Plan was begun as the continuation of this work. Results of the inventory study showed that greenhouse gas emissions decreased from the selected base level (i.e., from the yearly average emissions of 1985--1987) until 1994 by cca. 25%. However, this decrease was primarily caused by the deep economic recession. Therefore the policy makers have to face the problem of economic recovery without a relevant increase of greenhouse gas emissions in the near future. This is the main focus of the mitigation analysis and the National Action Plan.

  7. Physician-patient communication in managed care.

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, G H; Baker, L; Levinson, W

    1995-01-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication affects important health care outcomes. Managed care presents a number of challenges to physician-patient communication, including shorter visits, decreased continuity, and lower levels of trust. Good communication skills can help physicians create and maintain healthy relationships with patients in the face of these challenges. We describe 5 communication dilemmas that are common in managed care and review possible solutions suggested by recent ...

  8. Intensive Care Nursing And Time Management

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZCANLI, Derya; İLGÜN, Seda

    2008-01-01

    Time is not like other resources, because it can not be bought, sold, stolen, borrowed, stored, saved, multiplied or changed. All it can be done is spent. Time management means the effective use of resources, including time, in such a way that indi- viduals are effective in achieving important personal goals. With the increasing emphasis on efficiency in health care, how a nurse manages her time is an important consideration. Since intensive care nurs- ing is focused on the care and tr...

  9. Brief retrospection on Hungarian school atlases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinghammer, István; Jesús Reyes Nuñez, José

    2018-05-01

    The first part of this article is dedicated to the history of Hungarian school atlases to the end of the 1st World War. Although the first maps included in a Hungarian textbook were probably made in 1751, the publication of atlases for schools is dated almost 50 years later, when professor Ézsáiás Budai created his "New School Atlas for elementary pupils" in 1800. This was followed by a long period of 90 years, when the school atlases were mostly translations and adaptations of foreign atlases, the majority of which were made in German-speaking countries. In those years, a school atlas made by a Hungarian astronomer, Antal Vállas, should be highlighted as a prominent independent piece of work. In 1890, a talented cartographer, Manó Kogutowicz founded the Hungarian Geographical Institute, which was the institution responsible for producing school atlases for the different types of schools in Hungary. The professional quality of the school atlases published by his institute was also recognized beyond the Hungarian borders by prizes won in international exhibitions. Kogutowicz laid the foundations of the current Hungarian school cartography: this statement is confirmed in the second part of this article, when three of his school atlases are presented in more detail to give examples of how the pupils were introduced to the basic cartographic and astronomic concepts as well as how different innovative solutions were used on the maps.

  10. Intensive Care Management of Patients with Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jody C

    2018-06-01

    Cirrhosis is a major worldwide health problem which results in a high level of morbidity and mortality. Patients with cirrhosis who require intensive care support have high mortality rates of near 50%. The goal of this review is to address the management of common complications of cirrhosis in the ICU. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an increase in hospitalizations due to advanced liver disease with an associated increase in intensive care utilization. Given an increasing burden on the healthcare system, it is imperative that we strive to improve our management cirrhotic patients in the intensive care unit. Large studies evaluating the management of patients in the intensive care setting are lacking. To date, most recommendations are based on extrapolation of data from studies in cirrhosis outside of the ICU or by applying general critical care principles which may or may not be appropriate for the critically ill cirrhotic patient. Future research is required to answer important management questions.

  11. [Managed care. Its impact on health care in the USA, especially on anesthesia and intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M; Bach, A

    1998-06-01

    Managed care, i.e., the integration of health insurance and delivery of care under the direction of one organization, is gaining importance in the USA health market. The initial effects consisted of a decrease in insurance premiums, a very attractive feature for employers. Managed care promises to contain expenditures for health care. Given the shrinking public resources in Germany, managed care seems attractive for the German health system, too. In this review the development of managed care, the principal elements, forms of organisation and practical tools are outlined. The regulation of the delivery of care by means of controlling and financial incentives threatens the autonomy of physicians: the physician must act as a "double agent", caring for the interest for the individual patient and being restricted by the contract with the managed care organisation. Cost containment by managed care was achieved by reducing the fees for physicians and hospitals (and partly by restricting care for patients). Only a fraction of this cost reduction was handed over to the enrollee or employer, and most of the money was returned with profit to the shareholders of the managed care organisations. The preeminent role of primary care physicians as gatekeepers of the health network led to a reduced demand for specialist services in general and for university hospitals and anesthesiologists in particular. The paradigm of managed care, i.e., to guide the patient and the care giver through the health care system in order to achieve cost-effective and high quality care, seems very attractive. The stress on cost minimization by any means in the daily practice of managed care makes it doubtful if managed care should be an option for the German health system, in particular because there are a number of restrictions on it in German law.

  12. Evaluating managed care's special telecommunications needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, P; Schenk, D

    1993-11-01

    Right now, managed care is a vast cosmic soup. But whether its ultimate form is the result of a bureaucratic big bang or a series of small industry explosions, one thing seems clear: telecommunications is the framework upon which managed care will be built. Managed care's primary players--purchasers, providers and payors--have already discovered the unifying power of telecommunications within their respective worlds. However, as the three worlds collide, an entirely new set of special telecommunications needs arises. And most of these needs can be distilled into three basic requirements: bigger networks, faster networks and smarter networks.

  13. Managed care aspects of managing multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Gary M

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system usually diagnosed in the second or third decade of life; MS is more common among women than men by a ratio of 3 to 1. With its relatively early age of onset and symptoms that impair patients' quality of life, MS requires lifelong, dynamic treatment, and places a substantial economic burden on individuals, healthcare systems, and society. The costs associated with providing benefits for MS therapy are growing rapidly and the increasing complexity of the MS market is impacting disease management for payers. Employers are also increasingly aware of the costs associated with MS and are asking health plans to advise on the most appropriate and cost-effective ways to manage both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies for MS. Health plans, by necessity, must therefore balance appropriate access to treatments for MS with the need to manage rising treatment costs. To meet this goal, payers require population-based solutions, guidelines, and treatment algorithms for the management of MS that can be used in clinical and formulary management decision making in the context of an evolving therapeutic landscape. Further, comparative studies are necessary for payers to determine which agents may work best on a population basis. Due to the current lack of appropriate clinical guidance and insufficient head-to-head data on disease-modifying drugs, strategies for health plans and clinical management have been designed using the best available evidence. Undoubtedly, management of this class will continue to evolve with the launch of newer agents.

  14. THE SZEKLERS AND HUNGARIANS FROM ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GR. P. POP

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Szeklers and Hungarians from Romania. This study regards, as its main topic, the possibility of establishing at present, a geodemographical entity on Romania’s territory, since certain representatives of the Hungarian ethnical minority in our country, and with a particular insistence of those in the vicinity of the western border, always remember to bring into view the problem of establishing an autonomy, common to a Székely Land, located in the central area of our country, which would include Mureş, Harghita and Covasna counties. Without carrying out a detailed account of this situation, it needs to be mentioned, just as it will emerge of the following presentation, that such an approach has neither the most reduced geodemographical support, since the Szeklers, after being assimilated by the Hungarian ethnic group, are no longer present at the census of 20 October 2011. By taking into account the above mentioned aspects, in order to be able to respond to the insistent requests for autonomy in Transylvania, we proceeded to highlight, through a fairly detailed approach of the Hungarian ethnical minority, obviously in point of the number of inhabitants and of their distribution on Romania’s territory, resulting of this the fact that the number of Hungarians is of 1,227,623 people, value which related to those 20,121,641 inhabitants of Romania, means 6.10%. The total number of mentioned Hungarians is characterized by a pronounced concentration on Romania’s territory, standing out by creating a corridor with a diagonal aspect, on the northwestsoutheast direction, consisting of seven counties, the first four (Satu Mare, Bihor, Sălaj and Cluj being registered with 2.01% (404,561 inhabitants of those 6.10% Hungarians, the following three (Mureş, Harghita and Covasna accounting for 3.03% (609,033 inhabitants, and hence in the corridor are present 5.04% (1,013,594 Hungarians of 6.10% at the level of the entire country. The above mentioned

  15. [The role of management in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güntert, Bernhard J

    2007-01-01

    The situation in the health care sector is affected by a shortage of public funds on the one hand and, on the other hand, by rapid developments in medicine and nursing with an enormous expansion of both diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities. This and the aging population are generating a steadily increasing demand for health care services. The result is an increased cost consciousness in society calling for more professional management in health care organizations. However, the traditional administration of health care organizations, which is closely aligned with health professionals and production processes, was not able to cope with these dynamics or did so only unsatisfactorily. An improved management would surely lead to an optimization of health care delivery processes and a more effective use of resources. The question, however, is whether the effectiveness of the total system can be improved and whether patients' and society's needs can actually be met by classical management approaches.

  16. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Medicare Managed Care plan Performance, A Comparison...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The study evaluates the performance of Medicare managed care, Medicare Advantage, Plans in comparison to Medicare fee-for-service Plans in three states with...

  18. Participatory management in today's health care setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    As the health care revolution progresses, so must the management styles of today's leaders. The authors must ask ourselves if we are managing tomorrow's work force or the work force of the past. Participatory management may better meet the needs of today's work force. This paper identifies the reasons participatory management is a more effective management style, the methods used to implement a participatory management program, its benefits (such as higher productivity and more efficient, effective implementation and acceptance of change), and the difficulties experienced

  19. Participative management in health care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muller

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available The need and demand for the highest-quality management of all health care delivery activities requires a participative management approach. The purpose with this article is to explore the process of participative management, to generate and describe a model for such management, focusing mainly on the process of participative management, and to formulate guidelines for operationalisation of the procedure. An exploratory, descriptive and theory-generating research design is pursued. After a brief literature review, inductive reasoning is mainly employed to identify and define central concepts, followed by the formulation of a few applicable statements and guidelines. Participative management is viewed as a process of that constitutes the elements of dynamic interactive decision-making and problem-solving, shared governance, empowerment, organisational transformation, and dynamic communication within the health care organisation. The scientific method of assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation is utilised throughout the process of participative management.

  20. Primary care quality management in Slovenia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Bulc, M.

    2008-01-01

    Of all GPs in Slovenia 86% are not interested in activities to systematically improve care. A clear national quality policy, further education for care managers and financial incentives for GPs could change the picture, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation

  1. Attachment Theory and Neuroscience for Care Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Thomas J; Dziadosz, Gregory M

    2016-09-01

    This article describes a model for care managers that is based on attachment theory supplemented by knowledge from neuroscience. Together, attachment theory and basic knowledge from neuroscience provide for both an organizing conceptual framework and a scientific, measureable approach to assessment and planning interventions in a care plan.

  2. Achieving a competitive advantage in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, D A

    1998-02-01

    When building a competitive advantage to thrive in the managed care arena, subacute care providers are urged to be revolutionary rather than reactionary, proactive rather than passive, optimistic rather than pessimistic and growth-oriented rather than cost-reduction oriented. Weaknesses must be addressed aggressively. To achieve a competitive edge, assess the facility's strengths, understand the marketplace and comprehend key payment methods.

  3. Landscape ethnoecological knowledge base and management of ecosystem services in a Sz?kely-Hungarian pre-capitalistic village system (Transylvania, Romania)

    OpenAIRE

    Moln?r, Zsolt; Gell?ny, Krisztina; Marg?czi, Katalin; Bir?, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed an in-depth ecological understanding by traditional people of managing natural resources. We studied the landscape ethnoecological knowledge (LEEK) of Sz?kelys on the basis of 16-19th century village laws. We analyzed the habitat types, ecosystem services and sustainable management types on which village laws had focused. Methods Sz?kelys had self-governed communities formed mostly of ?noble peasants?. Land-use was dominated by commons and regulated by villa...

  4. Fibromyalgia: management strategies for primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L M; Gebke, K B; Choy, E H S

    2016-02-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic disorder defined by widespread pain, often accompanied by fatigue and sleep disturbance, affects up to one in 20 patients in primary care. Although most patients with FM are managed in primary care, diagnosis and treatment continue to present a challenge, and patients are often referred to specialists. Furthermore, the lack of a clear patient pathway often results in patients being passed from specialist to specialist, exhaustive investigations, prescription of multiple drugs to treat different symptoms, delays in diagnosis, increased disability and increased healthcare resource utilisation. We will discuss the current and evolving understanding of FM, and recommend improvements in the management and treatment of FM, highlighting the role of the primary care physician, and the place of the medical home in FM management. We reviewed the epidemiology, pathophysiology and management of FM by searching PubMed and references from relevant articles, and selected articles on the basis of quality, relevance to the illness and importance in illustrating current management pathways and the potential for future improvements. The implementation of a framework for chronic pain management in primary care would limit unnecessary, time-consuming, and costly tests, reduce diagnostic delay and improve patient outcomes. The patient-centred medical home (PCMH), a management framework that has been successfully implemented in other chronic diseases, might improve the care of patients with FM in primary care, by bringing together a team of professionals with a range of skills and training. Although there remain several barriers to overcome, implementation of a PCMH would allow patients with FM, like those with other chronic conditions, to be successfully managed in the primary care setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Managing diversity in the health care workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Newman Giger, J

    1999-03-01

    Cultural diversity is increasing in the United States as increasing numbers of minorities enter the United States from abroad, and cultural diversity is especially prevalent in the health care workplace. In fact, the health care professions are particularly interested in the presence of minorities among caregivers because this often enhances the cultural competence of care delivery. Nevertheless, subtle discrimination can still be found, and managers must be alert that such behavior is not tolerated. Use of the Giger-Davidhizar Cultural Assessment Model can provide managers with information needed to respond to diversity among staff appropriately.

  6. Simulation modeling for the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the use of simulation software to solve administrative problems faced by health care managers. Spreadsheet add-ins, process simulation software, and discrete event simulation software are available at a range of costs and complexity. All use the Monte Carlo method to realistically integrate probability distributions into models of the health care environment. Problems typically addressed by health care simulation modeling are facility planning, resource allocation, staffing, patient flow and wait time, routing and transportation, supply chain management, and process improvement.

  7. Child and Youth Care Approaches to Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharabaghi, Kiaras

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the themes and issues related to child and youth care approaches to management. The profession is significantly underrepresented at the management level. To some extent, this reflects the challenges of being recognized in the broader human services sector as a profession, but perhaps more so, it reflects an underdevelopment…

  8. Critical care management of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplin, William M

    2012-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) can have profound and devastating effects on the CNS and several other organs. Approximately 15% to 20% of patients with AIS are admitted to an intensive care unit and cared for by a multidisciplinary team. This article discusses the critical care management of patients with AIS. Patients with AIS require attention to airway, pulmonary status, blood pressure, glucose, temperature, cardiac function, and, sometimes, life-threatening cerebral edema. The lack of disease-specific data has led to numerous management approaches and limited guidance on choosing among them. Existing guidelines emphasize risk factors, prevention, natural history, and prevention of bleeding but provide little discussion of the complex critical care issues involved in caring for patients with AIS.

  9. Quality management in Irish health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, K; Harrington, D

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings from a quantitative research study of quality management in the Irish health-care sector. The study findings suggest that quality management is what hospitals require to become more cost-effective and efficient. The research also shows that the culture of health-care institutions must change to one where employees experience pride in their work and where all are involved and committed to continuous quality improvement. It is recommended that a shift is required from the traditional management structures to a more participative approach. Furthermore, all managers whether from a clinical or an administration background must understand one another's role in the organisation. Finally, for quality to succeed in the health-care sector, strong committed leadership is required to overcome tensions in quality implementation.

  10. Do competition and managed care improve quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Nazmi

    2002-10-01

    In recent years, the US health care industry has experienced a rapid growth of managed care, formation of networks, and an integration of hospitals. This paper provides new insights about the quality consequences of this dynamic in US hospital markets. I empirically investigate the impact of managed care and hospital competition on quality using in-hospital complications as quality measures. I use random and fixed effects, and instrumental variable fixed effect models using hospital panel data from up to 16 states in the 1992-1997 period. The paper has two important findings: First, higher managed care penetration increases the quality, when inappropriate utilization, wound infections and adverse/iatrogenic complications are used as quality indicators. For other complication categories, coefficient estimates are statistically insignificant. These findings do not support the straightforward view that increases in managed care penetration are associated with decreases in quality. Second, both higher hospital market share and market concentration are associated with lower quality of care. Hospital mergers have undesirable quality consequences. Appropriate antitrust policies towards mergers should consider not only price and cost but also quality impacts. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Linguistic layers of Old Hungarian hydronyms

    OpenAIRE

    Győrffy, Erzsébet

    2014-01-01

    When analysing the etymological layers of Hungarian river names, it becomes soon clear that loan names make up a much larger group than in the group of settlement names, for instance. This fact can be due to the phenomenon that in the case of hydronyms, name-giving and name-usage is driven mainly by communicative needs, while other (e. g. socio-cultural or political) factors only rarely influence name-giving. In my paper, it was my aim to provide an etymological typology of Hungarian hydronym...

  12. POPULISM AS A DISCOURSE OF HUNGARIAN ELITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bozóki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the end of the 19th century populist movements emerged as significant actors of the Hungarian politics. The attempts to assess populism appeared to be as ambiguous, as the attempts by politicians and pundits to describe it. The study of its development demonstrates that it is not linked to the traditional division between left and right, but represents dissatisfaction with the established elites in the society. The article considers changing nature of Hungarian populism on different stages of national history. Specific attention is devoted to the content and value of populist policies in the current Hungary.

  13. Management or care: different outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohain, Judy Slome

    2007-01-01

    Recently a popular magazine published a birth story of a long, medically managed, first labor of a low-risk woman, which ended in a cesarean. (1) The doctor/writer was convinced that the labor could not be safely managed other than how he described it and that no safe alternative existed to a cesarean delivery. This is another example of the media trend of promoting medical birth stories and not midwifery-supported birth stories. The article below provides two versions of the same woman's labor to show how a woman's choice of birth attendant and labor support can influence the course of labor and the likelihood of cesarean surgery. judyslome@hotmail.com.

  14. Participative management in health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, M

    1995-03-01

    The need and demand for the highest-quality management of all health care delivery activities requires a participative management approach. The purpose with this article is to explore the process of participative management, to generate and describe a model for such management, focusing mainly on the process of participative management, and to formulate guidelines for operationalization of the procedure. An exploratory, descriptive and theory-generating research design is pursued. After a brief literature review, inductive reasoning is mainly employed to identify and define central concepts, followed by the formulation of a few applicable statements and guidelines. Participative management is viewed as a process of that constitutes the elements of dynamic interactive decision-making and problem-solving, shared governance, empowerment, organisational transformation, and dynamic communication within the health care organisation. The scientific method of assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation is utilised throughout the process of participative management. A continuum of interactive decision-making and problem-solving is described, the different role-players involved, as well as the levels of interactive decision-making and problem-solving. The most appropriate decision-making strategy should be employed in pro-active and reactive decision-making. Applicable principles and assumptions in each element of participative management is described. It is recommended that this proposed model for participative management be refined by means of a literature control, interactive dialogue with experts and a model case description or participative management, to ensure the trustworthiness of this research.

  15. Reliability and validity study on the Hungarian versions of the oswestry disability index and the Quebec back pain disability scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valasek, Tamás; Varga, Peter Paul; Szövérfi, Zsolt; Kümin, Michelle; Fairbank, Jeremy; Lazary, Aron

    2013-05-01

    Patient-reported outcome measurements (PROMs) are widely used in spine care. The development of reliable and valid National versions of spine-related disability questionnaires is strongly recommended from both the clinical and scientific points-of-view. The aims of this study were to adapt and validate the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the Quebec back pain disability scale (QDS) for use with the Hungarian language. After translating and culturally adapting the ODI and QDS, 133 patients with lumbar degenerative spinal disorder filled in the questionnaire booklet twice within 2 weeks. Subjects completed the Hungarian versions of the two PROMs as well as the WHOQoL-BREF validated as a general life quality questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scale of pain. Internal consistency, reliability and construct validity of the questionnaires were determined, as were the standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change (MDC) scores. The Hungarian ODI consisted of one factor that showed good internal consistency (Cronbach-α 0.890). The QDS showed a four-factor structure with Cronbach-α values between 0.788 and 0.917. No significant floor or ceiling effects were observed. The test-retest analysis showed excellent reliability of the Hungarian ODI and QDS. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were 0.927 and 0.923, respectively. SEM values of 4.8 and 5.2 resulted in a MDC of 13 and 14 points in the Hungarian ODI and QDS, respectively. The correlation coefficient (r) between pain and ODI was 0.680 (p 0.4, p disability measured by the Hungarian ODI and QDS was significantly higher in the surgical subgroup than in non-surgically treated patients (p < 0.001). Translation and cultural adaptation of the ODI and QDS were successful. Hungarian versions of the ODI and QDS proved to be reliable, valid PROMs confirming that they can be used in future clinical and scientific work with Hungarian-speaking spine patients.

  16. Physician fees and managed care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, Jack

    2002-01-01

    One of the objectives of managed care organizations (MCOs) has been to reduce the rate of growth of health care expenditures, including that of physician fees. Yet, due to a lack of data, no one has been able to determine whether MCOs have been successful in encouraging the growth of price competition in the market for physician services in order to slow the growth in physician fees. This study uses a unique, national-level data set to determine what factors influenced the physician fees that MCOs negotiated during the 1990-92 period. The most influential characteristics were physician supply and managed care penetration, which suggest that the introduction of competition into the health care market was an effective force in reducing physician fees.

  17. Multiple sclerosis care: an integrated disease-management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, J

    1998-04-01

    A disease-management model must be integrated, comprehensive, individual patient focused and outcome driven. In addition to high quality care, the successful model must reduce variations in care and costs. MS specialists need to be intimately involved in the long-term care of MS patients, while not neglecting primary care issues. A nurse care manager is the "glue" between the managed care company, health care providers and the patient/family. Disease management focuses on education and prevention, and can be cost effective as well as patient specific. To implement a successful program, managed care companies and health care providers must work together.

  18. Landscape ethnoecological knowledge base and management of ecosystem services in a Székely-Hungarian pre-capitalistic village system (Transylvania, Romania).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Zsolt; Gellény, Krisztina; Margóczi, Katalin; Biró, Marianna

    2015-01-07

    Previous studies showed an in-depth ecological understanding by traditional people of managing natural resources. We studied the landscape ethnoecological knowledge (LEEK) of Székelys on the basis of 16-19(th) century village laws. We analyzed the habitat types, ecosystem services and sustainable management types on which village laws had focused. Székelys had self-governed communities formed mostly of "noble peasants". Land-use was dominated by commons and regulated by village laws framed by the whole community. Seventy-two archival laws from 52 villages, resulting in 898 regulations, were analyzed using the DPSIR framework. Explicit and implicit information about the contemporary ecological knowledge of Székelys was extracted. We distinguished between responses that limited use and supported regeneration and those that protected produced/available ecosystem services and ensured their fair distribution. Most regulations referred to forests (674), arable lands (562), meadows (448) and pastures (134). Székelys regulated the proportion of arable land, pasture and forest areas consciously in order to maximize long-term exploitation of ecosystem services. The inner territory was protected against overuse by relocating certain uses to the outer territory. Competition for ecosystem services was demonstrated by conflicts of pressure-related (mostly personal) and response-related (mostly communal) driving forces. Felling of trees (oaks), grazing of forests, meadows and fallows, masting, use of wild apple/pear trees and fishing were strictly regulated. Cutting of leaf-fodder, grazing of green crops, burning of forest litter and the polluting of streams were prohibited. Marketing by villagers and inviting outsiders to use the ecosystem services were strictly regulated, and mostly prohibited. Székelys recognized at least 71 folk habitat types, understood ecological regeneration and degradation processes, the history of their landscape and the management possibilities of

  19. Managing complaints in health and social care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Bonney, Kathy

    2010-04-01

    An important aspect of allowing patients to take control of their health care is the introduction of new procedures for dealing with complaints. This article examines the concepts that underpin the new Department of Health regulations on complaints management and what they will mean for health and social care professionals. It also explains why these regulations focus on restorative justice rather than blame when adverse events occur.

  20. Understanding performance management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Lisa; Boaden, Ruth

    2017-02-13

    Purpose Principal-agent theory (PAT) has been used to understand relationships among different professional groups and explain performance management between organisations, but is rarely used for research within primary care. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether PAT can be used to attain a better understanding of performance management in primary care. Design/methodology/approach Purposive sampling was used to identify a range of general practices in the North-west of England. Interviews were carried out with directors, managers and clinicians in commissioning and regional performance management organisations and within general practices, and the data analysed using matrix analysis techniques to produce a case study of performance management. Findings There are various elements of the principal-agent framework that can be applied in primary care. Goal alignment is relevant, but can only be achieved through clear, strategic direction and consistent interpretation of objectives at all levels. There is confusion between performance measurement and performance management and a tendency to focus on things that are easy to measure whilst omitting aspects of care that are more difficult to capture. Appropriate use of incentives, good communication, clinical engagement, ownership and trust affect the degree to which information asymmetry is overcome and goal alignment achieved. Achieving the right balance between accountability and clinical autonomy is important to ensure governance and financial balance without stifling innovation. Originality/value The principal-agent theoretical framework can be used to attain a better understanding of performance management in primary care; although it is likely that only partial goal alignment will be achieved, dependent on the extent and level of alignment of a range of factors.

  1. The Hungarian car insurance cartel saga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cseres, K.J.; Szilágyi, P.; Rodger, B.

    2013-01-01

    his chapter discusses the landmark Hungarian case relating to the car insurance and repair markets, which involved both vertical and horizontal agreements. The case concerned the horizontal relationship between Hungary’s two largest insurance companies and their vertical relationships with car

  2. Hungarian Competition Law & Policy: The Watermelon Omen

    OpenAIRE

    Pal Szilagyi

    2012-01-01

    If we look at recent developments from a wider perspective, we can see some radical changes in the attitudes of the Hungarian legislature and the society. Pál Szilágyi (Péter Pázmány Catholic University )

  3. VHA Support Service Center Primary Care Management Module (PCMM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Primary Care Management Module (PCMM) was developed to assist VA facilities in implementing Primary Care. PCMM supports both Primary Care and non-Primary Care...

  4. Benchmarking and performance management in health care

    OpenAIRE

    Buttigieg, Sandra; ; EHMA Annual Conference : Public Health Care : Who Pays, Who Provides?

    2012-01-01

    Current economic conditions challenge health care providers globally. Healthcare organizations need to deliver optimal financial, operational, and clinical performance to sustain quality of service delivery. Benchmarking is one of the most potent and under-utilized management tools available and an analytic tool to understand organizational performance. Additionally, it is required for financial survival and organizational excellence.

  5. Implementing comprehensive health care management for sickle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-28

    May 28, 2015 ... adopted as the strategy for the management of SCD and this has resulted in the ... Therefore, there is a need to adapt this form of care for the low-resource settings in ..... Omilola B. Patterns and trends of child and maternal ...

  6. Health care management modelling: a process perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.M.H.

    1998-01-01

    Modelling-based health care management ought to become just as popular as evidence based medicine. Making managerial decisions based on evidence by modelling efforts is certainly a step forward. Examples can be given of many successful applications in different areas of decision making: disease

  7. Knowledge management: organizing nursing care knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jane A; Willson, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Almost everything we do in nursing is based on our knowledge. In 1984, Benner (From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice. Menlo Park, CA: Addison-Wesley; 1984) described nursing knowledge as the culmination of practical experience and evidence from research, which over time becomes the "know-how" of clinical experience. This "know-how" knowledge asset is dynamic and initially develops in the novice critical care nurse, expands within competent and proficient nurses, and is actualized in the expert intensive care nurse. Collectively, practical "know-how" and investigational (evidence-based) knowledge culminate into the "knowledge of caring" that defines the profession of nursing. The purpose of this article is to examine the concept of knowledge management as a framework for identifying, organizing, analyzing, and translating nursing knowledge into daily practice. Knowledge management is described in a model case and implemented in a nursing research project.

  8. Designing the role of the embedded care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Patricia; Mercury, Marge

    2013-01-01

    : The role of the professional case manager is changing rapidly. Health reform has called upon the industry to ensure that care is delivered in an efficient, effective, and high-quality and low cost manner. As a means to achieve this objective, health plans and health systems are moving the care manager out of a centralized location within their organizations to "embedding" them into physician offices. This move enables the care manager to work alongside the primary care physicians and their high-risk patients. This article discusses the framework for designing and implementing an embedded care manager role into a physician practice. Key elements of the program are discussed. IMPLICATIONS FOR CARE MANAGEMENT:: Historically care management has played a foundational role in improving the quality of care for individuals and populations via the efficient and effective use of resources. Now with the goals of health care reform, a successful transition from a volume-based to value-based reimbursement system requires primary care physicians to welcome care managers into their practices to improve patient care, quality, and costs through care coordination across health care settings and populations. : As patient-centered medical homes and integrated delivery systems formulate their plans for population health management, their efforts have included embedding a care manager in the primary practice setting. Having care managers embedded at the physician offices increases their ability to collaborate with the physician and their staff in the implementation and monitoring care plans for their patients. : Implementing an embedded care manager into an existing physician's practice requires the following:Although the embedded care manager is a highly evolving role, physician groups are beginning to realize the benefits from their care management collaborations. Examples cited include improved outreach and coordination, patient adherence to care plans, and improved quality of life.

  9. Better team management--better team care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, P; Powney, B

    1994-01-01

    Team building should not be a 'bolt-on' extra, it should be a well planned, integrated part of developing teams and assisting their leaders. When asked to facilitate team building by a group of NHS managers we developed a framework which enabled individual members of staff to become more effective in the way they communicated with each other, their teams and in turn within the organization. Facing the challenge posed by complex organizational changes, staff were able to use 3 training days to increase and develop their awareness of the principles of teamwork, better team management, and how a process of leadership and team building could help yield better patient care.

  10. Transitional care management in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldonado, Analiza; Hawk, Ofelia; Ormiston, Thomas; Nelson, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Patients who are high risk high cost (HRHC), those with severe or multiple medical issues, and the chronically ill elderly are major drivers of rising health care costs.1 The HRHC patients with complex health conditions and functional limitations may likely go to emergency rooms and hospitals, need more supportive services, and use long-term care facilities.2 As a result, these patient populations are vulnerable to fragmented care and "falling through the cracks".2 A large county health and hospital system in California, USA introduced evidence-based interventions in accordance with the Triple AIM3 focused on patient-centered health care, prevention, health maintenance, and safe transitions across the care continuum. The pilot program embedded a Transitional Care Manager (TCM) within an outpatient Family Medicine clinic to proactively assist HRHC patients with outreach assistance, problem-solving and facilitating smooth transitions of care. This initiative is supported by a collaborative team that included physicians, nurses, specialists, health educator, and pharmacist. The initial 50 patients showed a decrease in Emergency Department (ED) encounters (pre-vs post intervention: 33 vs 17) and hospital admissions (pre-vs post intervention: 32 vs 11), improved patient outcomes, and cost saving. As an example, one patient had 1 ED visit and 5 hospital admission with total charges of $217,355.75 in the 6 months' pre-intervention with no recurrence of ED or hospital admissions in the 6 months of TCM enrollment. The preliminary findings showed improvement of patient-centered outcomes, quality of care, and resource utilization however more data is required.

  11. New Spirit and New Hero: How Hungarian Startups Redefine the Ideas of Local Capitalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabó Natasa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates how the Bridge Budapest, a CSR organization founded by leading Hungarian IT startups, attempts to shape the values of Hungarian society towards capitalism in general, and towards entrepreneurship in particular. In my paper I argue that the central aim of the organization is to facilitate Hungary’s catching up with the core capitalist countries through the transformation of the attitudes and the ideologies surrounding capitalism in the Hungarian context, i.e. the local spirit of capitalism. This consists, on the one hand, of restoring the legitimation of some of the core institutions of capitalism, such as the enterprise and the entrepreneur, and of confronting the risk-taking, innovative and ethical figure of the entrepreneur hero with the provincial figure of the ‘postcommunist cheater’. On the other hand, it also consists of propagating a new management of work that aims to produce self-controlling and self-motivating employees. In the narrative of Bridge Budapest IT companies appear as the perfect moral and economic subjects – the bearers of the new spirit of capitalism – that have the expertise to offer solutions to the problems of Hungarian society, and around which the local capitalism should be built.

  12. The next 20 years operation of the 36 years old Hungarian training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aszodi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Hungary prepares for extending the design lifetime of the four VVER-440/213 type units; in that case they will finish operation between 2032 and 2037. Discussion on possible new nuclear units in Hungary was recently commenced. The paper describes actions in human resource management and knowledge management, and also the new safety analysis methods which were applied during the recent Periodic Safety Review of the Hungarian Training Reactor

  13. DEPRESSION IN PRIMARY CARE. PART 2: MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XV Pereira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of depression in the primary care setting should ideally take a biological, psychological, and sociologicalapproach. Antidepressants are the most commonly used biological agents in the treatment of depression. Psychologicaltherapies and psychosocial interventions improve the outcome of treatment when combined with pharmacotherapy.Clinical depression is treatable and thus efforts should be made to alleviate the suffering of patients with depression.

  14. Hungarian participation in the intercosmos program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferencz, Cs.

    1981-01-01

    Hungarian specialists have been interested in all fields of space research from the beginning. They also participate in the program in accordance with the scientific and technical state-of-the-art and financial possibilities of Hungary. The author summarizes the most important results of more than twenty years achieved in the field of cosmic physics, cosmic meteorology, space telecommunication, medical biology and the research of energy resources. (author)

  15. Using Social Network Analysis to Examine the Effect of Care Management Structure on Chronic Disease Management Communication Within Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Ruland, Sandra; Diaz, Stephanie; Morrato, Elaine H; Jones, Eric

    2018-05-01

    Care management and care managers are becoming increasingly prevalent in primary care medical practice as a means of improving population health and reducing unnecessary care. Care managers are often involved in chronic disease management and associated transitional care. In this study, we examined the communication regarding chronic disease care within 24 primary care practices in Michigan and Colorado. We sought to answer the following questions: Do care managers play a key role in chronic disease management in the practice? Does the prominence of the care manager's connectivity within the practice's communication network vary by the type of care management structure implemented? Individual written surveys were given to all practice members in the participating practices. Survey questions assessed demographics as well as practice culture, quality improvement, care management activities, and communication regarding chronic disease care. Using social network analysis and other statistical methods, we analyzed the communication dynamics related to chronic disease care for each practice. The structure of chronic disease communication varies greatly from practice to practice. Care managers who were embedded in the practice or co-located were more likely to be in the core of the communication network than were off-site care managers. These care managers also had higher in-degree centrality, indicating that they acted as a hub for communication with team members in many other roles. Social network analysis provided a useful means of examining chronic disease communication in practice, and highlighted the central role of care managers in this communication when their role structure supported such communication. Structuring care managers as embedded team members within the practice has important implications for their role in chronic disease communication within primary care.

  16. Research on Relative Age in Hungarian Swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Nikoletta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2017, the 19th World Swimming Championship will be organized in Hungary. Up to now, many people have already been working with swimmers to achieve good results. However, in the next period they must work even harder to ensure that the national swimmers of a country as small as Hungary can achieve the outstanding results of their predecessors. Since high-level competitions in swimming have become more intense, innovations including scientific studies are needed during preparation for the event. The purpose of this paper is to present the major results of an independent study carried out by the authors about the relative age of the best Hungarian swimmers with the aim of contributing to their preparation. The research population consisted of selected age groups of swimmers registered by the Hungarian Swimming Association (N=400. The method for data collection was an analysis of documents. To evaluate the data, the Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used. The results are presented according to the period of the competitor’s date of birth, gender, and age group. The results confirm only partly the hypothesis that people born in the first quarters of the year play a dominant role in Hungarian national swimming teams. In the conclusion, the authors recommend further research on relative age in swimming and in other sports.

  17. The Hungarian youth's knowledge and attitude in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petoefi, G.; Legradi, G.

    2000-01-01

    The Hungarian Youth for Nuclear (FINE) was established in 1999 as the Hungarian branch of the Young Generation Network. Our purpose is to remove the misconceptions and fears that have arisen around the nuclear techniques, mainly nuclear energetics, and to reply to the questions brought up by the Hungarian youth on this topic. This year, our main activity was to take part in the Student Island with a Nuclear-tent. In this paper we delineate our experience that we have gained with the help of our programmes about the attitude and knowledge of the Hungarian youth. (authors)

  18. Management of dizziness in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, P D; Dallara, J; Roach, C; Bailey, K E; Mitchell, M; McNutt, R

    1994-01-01

    We sought to determine the types of dizziness problems that are commonly seen in primary care practices, and to bring to light clinical and demographic factors that predict management decisions. We undertook a prospective cohort study with a 6-month follow-up using data gathered in nine primary care practices in two North Carolina counties. Subjects were 144 dizziness patients examined by primary care physicians. Data collected included demographic characteristics, a standardized dizziness history, physician estimation of symptom severity and diagnostic certainty, and physician "worry" about arrhythmia, transient ischemic attack, and brain tumor. Physicians reported their management decisions and diagnosis (or differential diagnosis) by responding to a questionnaire after completing the patient encounter. A 6-month follow-up chart review and physician interview were completed on 140 patients (97.2 percent); information obtained included changes in diagnosis and patient mortality. The most common diagnoses were labyrinthitis, otitis media, benign positional vertigo, unspecified presyncope, sinusitis, and transient ischemic attack. The initial diagnosis changed during the 6-month follow-up period in 34 (24.3 percent) of patients. The overall course of these patients was benign, however, with only one death occurring during the 6-month follow-up period. Patients' dizziness tended to be managed using a combination of strategies, including office laboratory testing (33.6 percent), advanced testing (11.4 percent), referral to a specialist (9.3 percent), medication (61.3 percent), observation (71.8 percent), reassurance (41.6 percent), and behavioral recommendations (15.0 percent). Office laboratory testing was associated with younger patient age, a suspected metabolic or endocrine disorder, and physician worry about a cardiac arrhythmia; advanced laboratory testing was associated with suspected cardiovascular or neurologic disorders. Medication tended to be prescribed

  19. Association between the application of ISO 9001:2008 alone or in combination with health-specific standards and quality-related activities in Hungarian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrádi, Viktor; Csenteri, Orsolya Karola; Sándor, János; Godény, Sándor

    2017-04-01

    To investigate how International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9001 and the Hungarian Health Care Standards (HHCS) certifications are associated with quality management, patient safety, patient rights and human resource management activities. A cross-sectional study was implemented using the 2009 Hungarian hospital survey's database. Hungary. Fifty-three general hospitals were included in the statistical analysis. No intervention was carried out in the study. The outcomes included the percentage of compliance in the dimensions of quality management, patient safety, patient rights, human resource management and the overall score for each hospital, and they were grouped according to the hospitals' certifications. Sixteen hospitals did not have either ISO 9001 or HHCS certifications, 19 had ISO 9001 certification only and 18 had both. Hospitals with ISO 9001 alone or in combination with the HHCS significantly outperformed hospitals with no certifications in terms of quality management and human resource management activities but not in terms of patient safety or patient rights activities. Combined, the two models provided the highest median levels in all cases. Nevertheless, no significant differences were observed when the hospitals with both certifications were compared with hospitals with ISO 9001 only. Although the combination of ISO 9001 and the HHCS showed the best results, the benefits were not decisive. Furthermore, although the HHCS include standards addressing patient safety, no direct association was found with regard to compliance. Thus, further investigation is required to understand this enigma. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Fundamentals of pain management in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulling, Sarah

    Under-treated pain can result in a number of potentially serious sequelae (Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, 2006), including delayed mobilization and recovery, cardiac complications, thromboses, pulmonary complications, delayed healing, psychosocial problems and chronic pain syndromes. This article considers pain management in the context of painful wounds. An international comparative survey on wound pain (European Wound Management Association, 2002) found that practitioners in the wound care community tend to focus on healing processes rather than the patient's total pain experience involving an accurate pain assessment and selection of an appropriate pain management strategy. Procedural pain with dressing removal and cleansing caused the greatest concerns. An overview of simple, evidence-based drug and non-drug techniques is offered as potential strategies to help minimize the experience of pain.

  1. Assessing the effect of increased managed care on hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowll, C A

    1998-01-01

    This study uses a new relative risk methodology developed by the author to assess and compare certain performance indicators to determine a hospital's relative degree of financial vulnerability, based on its location, to the effects of increased managed care market penetration. The study also compares nine financial measures to determine whether hospital in states with a high degree of managed-care market penetration experience lower levels of profitability, liquidity, debt service, and overall viability than hospitals in low managed care states. A Managed Care Relative Financial Risk Assessment methodology composed of nine measures of hospital financial and utilization performance is used to develop a high managed care state Composite Index and to determine the Relative Financial Risk and the Overall Risk Ratio for hospitals in a particular state. Additionally, financial performance of hospitals in the five highest managed care states is compared to hospitals in the five lowest states. While data from Colorado and Massachusetts indicates that hospital profitability diminishes as the level of managed care market penetration increases, the overall study results indicate that hospitals in high managed care states demonstrate a better cash position and higher profitability than hospitals in low managed care states. Hospitals in high managed care states are, however, more heavily indebted in relation to equity and have a weaker debt service coverage capacity. Moreover, the overall financial health and viability of hospitals in high managed care states is superior to that of hospitals in low managed care states.

  2. The evolving role and care management approaches of safety-net Medicaid managed care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmano, Michael K; Sparer, Michael S; Brown, Lawrence D; Rowe, Catherine; Gray, Bradford

    2002-12-01

    This article provides new empirical data about the viability and the care management activities of Medicaid managed-care plans sponsored by provider organizations that serve Medicaid and other low-income populations. Using survey and case study methods, we studied these "safety-net" health plans in 1998 and 2000. Although the number of safety-net plans declined over this period, the surviving plans were larger and enjoying greater financial success than the plans we surveyed in 1998. We also found that, based on a partnership with providers, safety-net plans are moving toward more sophisticated efforts to manage the care of their enrollees. Our study suggests that, with supportive state policies, safety-net plans are capable of remaining viable. Contracting with safety-net plans may not be an efficient mechanism for enabling Medicaid recipients to "enter the mainstream of American health care," but it may provide states with an effective way to manage and coordinate the care of Medicaid recipients, while helping to maintain the health care safety-net for the uninsured.

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension in Pregnancy: Critical Care Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel M. Bassily-Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30–56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Imaging workup may have undesirable radiation exposure. Pulmonary artery catheter remains the gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary hypertension, although its use in the intensive care unit for other conditions has slowly fallen out of favor. Goal-directed bedside echocardiogram and lung ultrasonography provide attractive alternatives. Basic principles of managing pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular failure are maintaining right ventricular function and reducing pulmonary vascular resistance. Fluid resuscitation and various vasopressors are used with caution. Pulmonary-hypertension-targeted therapies have been utilized in pregnant women with understanding of their safety profile. Mainstay therapy for pulmonary embolism is anticoagulation, and the treatment for amniotic fluid embolism remains supportive care. Multidisciplinary team approach is crucial to achieving successful outcomes in these difficult cases.

  4. Management of postmenopausal osteoporosis for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, P; Lukert, B; Broy, S; Civitelli, R; Fleischmann, R; Gagel, R; Khosla, S; Lucas, M; Maricic, M; Pacifici, R; Recker, R; Sarran, H S; Short, B; Short, M J

    1998-01-01

    The shift in health care delivery from a subspecialty to primary care system has transferred the responsibility of preventing osteoporotic fractures from specialists in metabolic bone disease to the web of physicians--family practitioners, general internists, pediatricians, and gynecologists--who provide the bulk of primary care. The challenge for this group of physicians is to decrease the rising prevalence of osteoporotic hip and vertebral fractures while operating within the cost parameters. It is the goal of this brief summary to provide primary practitioners with focused guidelines for the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis based on new and exciting developments. Prevention and treatment will change rapidly over the next decade and these advances will require changes in these recommendations. We identified patients at risk for osteoporosis and provided indications for bone mass measurement, criteria for diagnosis of osteoporosis, therapeutic interventions, and biochemical markers of the disease. Prevention and treatment are discussed, including hormone replacement therapy and use of calcitonin, sodium fluoride, bisphosphonates, and serum estrogen receptor modulators. Postmenopausal osteoporosis should no longer be an accepted process of aging. It is both preventable and treatable. Primary care physicians must proactively prevent and treat osteoporosis in their daily practice, and combination therapies are suggested.

  5. Managing change in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulies, N

    1977-08-01

    The forces for change seem more potent today than ever before; increased technological advancement and rapid "societal upheavals" create a more critical need for change and a more significant need for skills to manage and channel change toward meaningful ends. The area of health care delivery is probably one of the fields most impinged upon and most affected by these turbulent times. Organizational development is presented herein as an approach to assist people in health care organizations with the problems of adaptation and change. A specific change strategy, action research, is discussed and a concrete case example is presented to illustrate the ways in which the action research model can be applied. Advantages and pitfalls are discussed in the concluding section.

  6. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  7. The evolving role and care management approaches of safety-net medicaid managed care plans

    OpenAIRE

    Gusmano, Michael K.; Sparer, Michael S.; Brown, Lawrence D.; Rowe, Catherine; Gray, Bradford

    2002-01-01

    This article provides new empirical data about the viability and the care management activities of Medicaid managed-care plans sponsored by provider organizations that serve Medicaid and other low-income populations. Using survey and case study methods we studied these “safety-net” health plans in 1998 and 2000. Although the number of safety-net plans declined over this period, the surviving plans were larger and enjoying greater financial success than the plans we surveyed in 1998. We also f...

  8. The importance of management information systems in a managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, M R; Brill, K R

    1995-06-01

    Keys to successful information systems for home care providers are planning and control. With managed care's emphasis on data, agencies need to have information systems that can handle the demands managed care puts on agencies today--planning before hurrying to install a system will ensure control as the managed care contracts add up.

  9. Management of neonatal jaundice in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Wan Seng Lian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Clinical Practice Guidelines on Management of Neonatal Jaundice 2003 was updated by a multidisciplinary development group and approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia in 2014. A systematic review of 13 clinical questions was conducted using evidence retrieved mainly from Medline and Cochrane databases. Critical appraisal was done using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklist. Recommendations were formulated based on the accepted 103 evidences and tailored to local setting as stated below. Neonatal jaundice (NNJ is a common condition seen in primary care. Multiple risk factors contribute to severe NNJ, which if untreated can lead to adverse neurological outcomes. Visual assessment, transcutaneous bilirubinometer (TcB and total serum bilirubin (TSB are the methods used for the detection of NNJ. Phototherapy remains the mainstay of the treatment. Babies with severe NNJ should be followed-up to detect and manage sequelae. Strategies to prevent severe NNJ include health education, identification of risk factors, proper assessment and early referral.

  10. Managed Care for Children: Effect on Access to Care and Utilization of Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Peter G.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews what is known about the effect of managed care on access to health services, as well as utilization of hospital care, emergency department visits, primary care services, and specialty pediatric services. The effect of managed care appears dependent on several factors and, thus, is likely to vary according to the population served. (SLD)

  11. Hungarian University Students' Misunderstandings in Thermodynamics and Chemical Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turanyi, Tamas; Toth, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    The misunderstandings related to thermodynamics (including chemical equilibrium) and chemical kinetics of first and second year Hungarian students of chemistry, environmental science, biology and pharmacy were investigated. We demonstrated that Hungarian university students have similar misunderstandings in physical chemistry to those reported in…

  12. Quantitative Investigations in Hungarian Phonotactics and Syllable Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation investigates statistical properties of segment collocation and syllable geometry of the Hungarian language. A corpus and dictionary based approach to studying language phonologies is outlined. In order to conduct research on Hungarian, a phonological lexicon was created by compiling existing dictionaries and corpora and using a…

  13. TAXONOMY AND STRUCTURE OF HUNGARIAN PERSONALITY-TRAITS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SZIRMAK, Z; DERAAD, B

    This study reports on the application of the principles of the lexical approach to a non-Indo-European language, namely Hungarian. This language is a Uralic island surrounded on all sides by Indo-European languages. In addition, the Hungarians are, in terms of cultural features, Europeans. These

  14. Check list of the Hungarian Salticidae with biogeographical notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szüts, Tamás

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available An updated check list of the Hungarian jumping spider fauna is presented. 70 species are recorded from Hungary so far. Four species are new to the Hungarian fauna: Hasarius adansoni, Neon valentulus, Sitticus caricis, Synageles subcingulatus. With 12 original drawings.

  15. The role of managed care organizations in obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaecher, Kenneth L

    2016-06-01

    In the United States, obesity is characterized as this century's greatest healthcare threat. The American Medical Association and several other large organizations now classify obesity as a disease. Several federal initiatives are in the planning stages, have been approved, or are being implemented to address the disease. Obesity poses challenges for all healthcare stakeholders. Diet and exercise often are insufficient to create the magnitude of change patients and their attending healthcare providers need. Managed care organizations (MCOs) have 3 tools that can help their members: health and wellness programs focusing on lifestyle changes, prescription weight-loss drugs, and bariatric surgical interventions. MCOs are addressing changes with national requirements and are responding to the availability of new weight-loss drugs to help their members achieve better health. A number of factors either deter or stimulate the progress of weight loss therapy. Understanding how MCOs are key to managing obesity at the local level is important for healthcare providers. It can help MCOs and individual healthcare providers develop and coordinate strategies to educate stakeholders and better manage overall care.

  16. Behind the Exporters’ Success: Analysis of Successful Hungarian Exporter Companies From a Strategic Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Annamaria Kazai Onodi; Krisztina Pecze

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to provide an overview of export success from a strategic management perspective. The paper empirically tested the relationships between the firm’s export performance, strategic thinking, adaptation to the changing environment and companies’ capabilities. The research is based on the Hungarian Competitiveness Research database of 2013 that consists of 300 firms. Cluster analysis differentiated successful export-oriented and stagnant companies. Both of them had high...

  17. Food irradiation and Hungarian experiences with it

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, Jozsef; Kiss, Istvan

    1988-01-01

    Among the different types of food irradiation techniques using ionizing radiations the methods serving - in a direct or indirect way - the purposes of health protection are reviewed. Based on foreign and Hungarian examples radurization of vegetables (potatoes, onions, garlics) by low irradiation doses, radiosterilization of corn, tropic and subtropic fruits, radicidation of dry additivies (spice, medicinal herb) and foodstuffs of animal origin (meat, poultry, egg, fish, shrimp, etc.) are discussed. The general situation of food irradiation in Hungary inlcuding licensing procedures is evaluated. (V.N.) 32 refs.; 3 figs.

  18. Thermoluminescence dating of some Hungarian medieval churches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasa, I.; Bajnoczy, G.

    1984-01-01

    Thermoluminescence dating of three Hungarian historic churches was performed using the quarz inclusion technique and sup(60)Co gamma irradiation. Quarz grains obtained from the bricks were irradiated and the radiation doses were measured by CaSOsub(4):Dy TL dosemeters. Glow curves of irradiated and non-irradiated samples were also measured. From the results it was concluded that the ages of two churches were 10 and 30 percent less, respectively, than the ages estimated earlier. The age of the third church proved to be correct. (R.P.)

  19. THE HUNGARIAN CRISIS: AN AUSTRIAN SCHOOL EXPLANATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Toth

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Hungarian model was heralded as one of the most successful post-socialist way of integration into the globalised world economy and European economic area in the nineties. Currently, Hungary is suffering from a full-blown crisis 1996 onwards. Increasingly large number of Hungarians is losing their faith in political parties, institutions, democracy and in market economy. The government, elected in 2010 by supermajority and still enjoying a broad support despite the deepening recession, condemns the development path taken after 1989 and openly rejects the wrong model of the last 20 years. The government intends to build a new economic model following a model, which one can call a model of economic nationalism as the only way out of the crisis. The paper intends to portray, through the case of Hungary, how economy and politics is interconnected, and why political elites are choosing a credit fuelled development path. The paper intends to portray how a credit fuelled growth was induced by politics and ended up in tears. Moreover, the paper describes the consequences of pro-etatist shift in the public sentiment due to the alleged “market-failure”, which was in reality a crisis, at first place, created for political purposes by political means. This article, based on the Austrian business cycle theory, argues that the tragedy of Hungary was that it went through a government inspired spending binge in the first half of the 2000s. The deficit spending of the government was accompanied by the expansion of credit by the commercial banks, mostly denominated in Swiss francs. The combined effect of deficit spending and credit expansion was the build-up of debt and loss of cost competitiveness. The 2008 crisis ended the credit fuelled development path and has started the long and painful period of deleveraging crisis. On the other hand, the Hungarian crisis is a post-Keynesian crisis. It had broken out when the state was already heavily indebted and

  20. Hungarian medical physics MSc education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrady, D.; Czifrus, Z.; Zarand, P.; Aszodi, A.; Pesznyak, C.; Major, T.

    2012-01-01

    The medical physics specialisation aims at providing high level interdisciplinary theoretical and practical knowledge and readily applicable skills, which can put into action in both the clinical and the R and D field. The first competence based gradual medical physics course in the B.Sc./M.Sc. system in Hungary was launched two years ago at the Faculty of Natural Sciences of Budapest University of Technology and Economics managed by the Institute of Nuclear Techniques. The MSc programme was compiled on the base of EFOMP, IPEM, AAPM and IAEA recommendations. The course curriculum comprises fundamental physical subjects (atomic and molecular physics, nuclear physics and particle physics) as well as fundamental medical knowledge (anatomy, physiology and radiobiology) required for subjects of diagnostic and therapy. Students of this MSc branch may chose further subjects from a 'compulsory optional' set of subjects, which contains medical imaging, X-ray diagnostics, radiation therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, radiation protection, Monte Carlo calculation and its clinical applications, ultrasound diagnostics and nuclear medicine. (authors)

  1. CHALLENGES OF HUNGARIAN HIGHER EDUCATION IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktória Ferenc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hungarians in Ukraine have a well organized educational system that covers institutions from the kindergarten to the university. At first glance it may look like that the maintenance of the Transcarpathian Hungarians in Ukraine is guaranteed, however,we have to see that minority education (which is one of the key-issue of the maintenance of the community is threatened by several factors. In the given paper I will take under investigation only two of these factors. On the one hand the Ukrainian state language policy would like to strengthen the position of the state language even at the expense of other languages and education is used as a means of achieving these aims. On the other hand, while education is one of the effective and powerful means of achieving social goals of the minority and choosing the language of instruction is a crucial part of language education policy, minority universities neglect serious language planning activity. It is high time for every institute to work out an individual university language policy taking into account their own aims and personal conditions.

  2. Ottoman-Hungarian Conflict through Venetian Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zeynep YELÇE

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The new phase in Ottoman-Hungarian relations starting with the ascension of Süleyman I and the following period of conflict have been thoroughly examined by scholars; causes and effects have been analyzed; and the process has been evaluated in a wide array of perspectives ranging from evaluations as a process of glorious conquest to a process of tragic enslavement. This paper moves away from such grand narratives to explore the way the process was perceived by contemporaries as they lived through the conflict. As such, this paper focuses on the letters of Lorenzo Orio, the Venetian ambassador in Buda between 1519-1523. From his arrival in Buda on June 5, 1519, to his presentation of his report to the Pregadi on December 22, 1523; Orio has been a close witness of the relations and conflicts between the Ottomans, Habsburgs, and the Hungarians. The information offered by Orio in these tumultuous times, as he tried to present a neutral stance for Venice, has not only added to the soft power of Venice but presents us the experience and perception of an era. In other words, it opens a window to the rumors, gossip, fears, and hopes in the daily lives of the contemporaries.

  3. Evaluation of home care management of umbilical cord stumps by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Umbilical cord care is an integral part of neonatal care in all communities and cultures and appropriate cord care reduces the risk of infection in the newborn infant. Objective: The present study assessed the home care management of the umbilical stump by the mothers at Ilesa, Southwestern Nigeria. Subjects ...

  4. Managing chronic conditions in a South African primary care context ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managing chronic conditions in a South African primary care context: ... is an approach to motivating behaviour change in general health care settings. ... They had mixed experiences with skills for agenda setting and reducing resistance.

  5. Implications of the development of managed health care in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    care or the public heatth care sector, and that it may potentially promote ... The MHC approach controls costs through measures such as .... (managers, computer systems, accountants). If it does not, .... Health EconomICS 1994: 3: 351-357.

  6. Conflicts between managed care organizations and emergency departments in California.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, L A; Derlet, R W

    1996-01-01

    To control costs, managed care organizations have begun to restrict the use of hospital emergency departments by their enrollees. They are doing this by educating enrollees, providing better access to 24-hour urgent care, denying preauthorizations for care for some patients who do present to emergency departments, and retrospectively denying payment for certain patients who use emergency services. Changing traditional use of emergency departments has resulted in conflicts between managed care...

  7. 20 strategies for marketing your managed care plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firshein, J

    1996-01-01

    In today's fiercely competitive managed care marketplace, healthcare executives must find a way to set their plans apart from the competition and build a sufficient customer base. At the same time, they must confront a growing anti-managed care backlash among a wary and confused public. Healthcare executive magazine talked with managed care experts to gather their views on key strategies to help executives meet both of these challenges. Here's what they suggest.

  8. Health information technology: transforming chronic disease management and care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shaline; Brammer, Craig; McKethan, Aaron; Buntin, Melinda B

    2012-06-01

    Adoption of health information technology (HIT) is a key effort in improving care delivery, reducing costs of health care, and improving the quality of health care. Evidence from electronic health record (EHR) use suggests that HIT will play a significant role in transforming primary care practices and chronic disease management. This article shows that EHRs and HIT can be used effectively to manage chronic diseases, that HIT can facilitate communication and reduce efforts related to transitions in care, and that HIT can improve patient safety by increasing the information available to providers and patients, improving disease management and safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment, authorization and access to medicaid managed mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masland, Mary C; Snowden, Lonnie R; Wallace, Neal T

    2007-11-01

    Examined were effects on access of managed care assessment and authorization processes in California's 57 county mental health plans. Primary data on managed care implementation were collected from surveys of county plan administrators; secondary data were from Medicaid claims and enrollment files. Using multivariate fixed effects regression, we found that following implementation of managed care, greater access occurred in county plans where assessments and treatment were performed by the same clinician, and where service authorizations were made more rapidly. Lower access occurred in county plans where treating clinicians authorized services themselves. Results confirm the significant effects of managed care processes on outcomes and highlight the importance of system capacity.

  10. The match between institutional elderly care management research and management challenges - a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, Kaija; Rissanen, Sari; Hujala, Anneli

    2012-11-08

    Elderly care practice and its management together with policy and research play a crucial role in responding to increasing challenges in institutional care for elderly people. Successful dialogue between these is necessary. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to compare how institutional elderly care management research meets the care challenges currently emphasized in international long-term care policy documents. This paper was based on a systematic literature review. After screening 1971 abstracts using inclusion/exclusion criteria, 58 refereed articles published between 2000 and 2010 remained for analysis. The articles were analyzed using theory-based content analysis by comparing the results to the framework based on analysis of international long-term care management policy documents. The current challenges of long-term care management identified from policy documents were Integrated Care Management, Productivity Management, Quality Management, Workforce Management and ICT Management. The research on institutional elderly care management responded somewhat to the challenges mentioned in policy documents. However, some of the challenges were studied broadly and some were paid only minor attention. Further, only few studies focused on the core items of challenges addressed in policy documents. Institutional care management research needs to focus more on challenges in integrated care, productivity, ICT and division of labor. Managers, researchers and policy-makers should assume more active collaborative roles in processes of research, policymaking and policy implementation. In addition managers' and policymakers' scientific literacy needs to be enhanced.

  11. Management challenges faced by managers of New Zealand long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madas, E; North, N

    2000-01-01

    This article reports on a postal survey of 78 long-term care managers in one region of New Zealand, of whom 45 (58%) responded. Most long-term care managers (73.2%) were middle-aged females holding nursing but not management qualifications. Most long-term care facilities (69%) tended to be stand-alone facilities providing a single type of care (rest home or continuing care hospital). The most prominent issues facing managers were considered to be inadequate funding to match the growing costs of providing long-term care and occupancy levels. Managers believed that political/regulatory, economic and social factors influenced these issues. Despite a turbulent health care environment and the challenges facing managers, long-term care managers reported they were coping well and valued networking.

  12. Managed care: employers' influence on the health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, K T; Phoon, J; Barter, M

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform is a complex issue involving many key sectors including providers, consumers, insurers, employers, and the government. System changes must involve all sectors for reform to be effective. Each sector has a responsibility to understand not only its own role in the health care system, but the roles of others as well. The role of business employers is often not apparent to health care providers, especially nurses. Understanding the influence employers have on the health care system is vital if providers want to be proactive change agents ensuring quality care.

  13. Health Care Autonomy in Children with Chronic Conditions: Implications for Self Care and Family Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacham, Barbara L.; Deatrick, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Health care autonomy typically occurs during late adolescence but health care providers and families often expect children with chronic health conditions to master self-care earlier. Few studies have examined the development of health care autonomy as it pertains to self-care and family management. This review will link the three concepts and discuss implications for families and health care providers. Case studies are provided as exemplars to highlight areas where intervention and research is needed. PMID:23659815

  14. Hungarian system for nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsi, Laszlo; Szabo, Laszlo; Ronaky, Jozsef

    2000-01-01

    The Hungarian Government had established in 1989 on the basis of national and international experience the National System for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness (NSNEP). Its guidance is ad-ministered by the Governmental Commission for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness (GCNEP). The work of the Governmental Commission is designated to be assisted by the Secretariat, the Operational Staff and by the Technical Scientific Council. The leading and guiding duties of the relevant ministries and national agencies are performed by the Sectional Organisations for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness (SONEP), together with those of the Metropolitan Agencies and of the county agencies by the Metropolitan Local Committee (MLCNEP) and by County Local Committees. The chairman of the Governmental Commission is the Minister of the Interior whose authority covers the guidance of the NSNEP's activities. The Secretariat of the Governmental Commission (SGC) co-ordinates the activities of the bodies of the Governmental Commission, the sectional organisations, the local committees for nuclear emergency preparedness and those of the other bodies responsible for implementing action. The Emergency Information Centre (EIC) of GCNEP as the central body of the National Radiation Monitoring, Warning and Surveillance System provides the information needed for preparing decisions at Governmental Commission level. The technical-scientific establishment of the governmental decisions in preparation for nuclear emergency situations and the elimination of their consequences are tasks of the Technical-Scientific Council. The Centre for Emergency Response, Training and Analysis (CERTA) of the Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) may be treated as a body of the Governmental Commission as well. The National Radiation Monitoring, Warning and Surveillance System (NRMWSS) is integral part of the NSNEP. The NRMWSS consists of the elements operated by the ministries and the operation of nation-wide measuring network in

  15. Internet map of the Hungarian nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besenyei, Elisabeth

    2001-01-01

    The increasing role of Internet in the dissemination of information cannot be questioned. The organisations dealing with public information have to face with this challenge. New methods and ways are needed in order to effectively use this opportunity. An effective communication requires certain knowledge on the characteristics of the target group. The present situation on the Internet use in Hungary has been studied by a number of public opinion polls. In Europe Hungary is the eleventh in the row concerning the population percentage of Internet users. At the same time it is hard to define the exact number as it is continuously increasing. From the public opinion polls it can be seen that about 49 % of active Internet users, about 37 percent seek for information on the Internet. The organisations playing role in nuclear field includes nuclear facilities, research institutes, regulatory bodies as well as civil associations. Almost all of them realised the importance of the appearance on the Internet and have their web site. Among the web-sites of the Hungarian nuclear facilities the new home page of the Paks NPP (www.npp.hu) is especially well designed and worth to visit. The Atomic Energy Research Institute operates the 10 MW Budapest Research Reactor. The main features of the reactor can be found on the web site of the institute (www.kfki.hu/~aekihp/). Information about the research possibilities of the training reactor of the Institute of Nuclear Techniques of the Technical University of Budapest is provided on the web site (www.reak.bme.hu). The web site of the Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (www.haea.gov.hu) has been renewed recently. Certainly, the list of the web sites of the Hungarian organisations active in nuclear field cannot be complete as it is a continuously evolving area. Nevertheless one can see that the players realised the importance of the challenge given by the Internet. While considerable effort is needed to maintain and refresh the web site

  16. NETWORKS OF HEALTH CARE: A CHALLENGE TO SUS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Dubow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a critical reflection, based on national law, scholarly, scientific, on the current development of Networks of Health Care, as a strategy for strengthening the Single Health System (SUS. Are weighted inefficiency of traditional ways of organizing care and management, the challenge of Network Health Care for comprehensive care and management mechanisms used in this process. The work provides subsidies for the care practices and health management are reflected, pointing strategies that result in disruptions of paradigms through a refocusing of attention in existing models. For networks of health care can be consolidated, is fundamental to political sensitivity of health managers with a commitment to build a new model of care, through the struggle to consolidate the SUS and the realization of the principles of universality, comprehensiveness and equity.

  17. Care management actions in the Family Health Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Costa Fernandes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify, from nurses’ speeches, the actions that enable care management in the Family Health Strategy.Methods: descriptive study with a qualitative approach conducted with 32 nurses of primary care. It was used a semistructuredinterview as the data collection technique. The methodological process of the collective subject discourse wasused to organize the data Results: from the nurses’ speeches one identified the categories: complementary relationshipbetween care and management; meeting with community health agents, a care management strategy in nurses’ work;health education activities such as a care management action and a health information system as an essential tool forcare Conclusion: it was possible to observe that nurses understood the importance of coordination and complementaritybetween the activities of the working process of care and management.

  18. The match between institutional elderly care management research and management challenges - a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Elderly care practice and its management together with policy and research play a crucial role in responding to increasing challenges in institutional care for elderly people. Successful dialogue between these is necessary. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to compare how institutional elderly care management research meets the care challenges currently emphasized in international long-term care policy documents. Methods This paper was based on a systematic literature review. After screening 1971 abstracts using inclusion/exclusion criteria, 58 refereed articles published between 2000 and 2010 remained for analysis. The articles were analyzed using theory-based content analysis by comparing the results to the framework based on analysis of international long-term care management policy documents. Results The current challenges of long-term care management identified from policy documents were Integrated Care Management, Productivity Management, Quality Management, Workforce Management and ICT Management. The research on institutional elderly care management responded somewhat to the challenges mentioned in policy documents. However, some of the challenges were studied broadly and some were paid only minor attention. Further, only few studies focused on the core items of challenges addressed in policy documents. Conclusions Institutional care management research needs to focus more on challenges in integrated care, productivity, ICT and division of labor. Managers, researchers and policy-makers should assume more active collaborative roles in processes of research, policymaking and policy implementation. In addition managers’ and policymakers’ scientific literacy needs to be enhanced. PMID:23137416

  19. The match between institutional elderly care management research and management challenges - a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokkonen Kaija

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elderly care practice and its management together with policy and research play a crucial role in responding to increasing challenges in institutional care for elderly people. Successful dialogue between these is necessary. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to compare how institutional elderly care management research meets the care challenges currently emphasized in international long-term care policy documents. Methods This paper was based on a systematic literature review. After screening 1971 abstracts using inclusion/exclusion criteria, 58 refereed articles published between 2000 and 2010 remained for analysis. The articles were analyzed using theory-based content analysis by comparing the results to the framework based on analysis of international long-term care management policy documents. Results The current challenges of long-term care management identified from policy documents were Integrated Care Management, Productivity Management, Quality Management, Workforce Management and ICT Management. The research on institutional elderly care management responded somewhat to the challenges mentioned in policy documents. However, some of the challenges were studied broadly and some were paid only minor attention. Further, only few studies focused on the core items of challenges addressed in policy documents. Conclusions Institutional care management research needs to focus more on challenges in integrated care, productivity, ICT and division of labor. Managers, researchers and policy-makers should assume more active collaborative roles in processes of research, policymaking and policy implementation. In addition managers’ and policymakers’ scientific literacy needs to be enhanced.

  20. Using patient acuity data to manage patient care outcomes and patient care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Slyck, A; Johnson, K R

    2001-01-01

    This article describes actual reported uses for patient acuity data that go beyond historical uses in determining staffing allocations. These expanded uses include managing patient care outcomes and health care costs. The article offers the patient care executive examples of how objective, valid, and reliable data are used to drive approaches to effectively influence decision making in an increasingly competitive health care environment.

  1. Quality management in home care: models for today's practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhey, M P

    1996-01-01

    In less than a decade, home care providers have been a part of two major transitions in health care delivery. First, because of the advent of managed care and a shift from inpatient to community-based services, home care service delivery systems have experienced tremendous growth. Second, the principles and practices of total quality management and continuous quality improvement have permeated the organization, administration, and practice of home health care. Based on the work of Deming, Juran, and Crosby, the basic tenets of the new quality management philosophy involve a focus on the following five key areas: (1) systems and processes rather than individual performance; (2) involvement, collaboration, and empowerment; (3) internal and external "customers"; (4) data and measurement; and (5) standards, guidelines, and outcomes of care. Home care providers are among those in the forefront who are developing and implementing programs that integrate these foci into the delivery of quality home care services. This article provides a summary of current home care programs that address these five key areas of quality management philosophy and provide models for innovative quality management practice in home care. For further information about each program, readers are referred to the original reports in the home care and quality management journal literature, as cited herein.

  2. Care for children with special health care needs in a managed care system: a patient satisfaction survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, J M; Bravo, C J; Reyes, O

    2001-09-01

    In 1994 the government of Puerto Rico adopted a capitated managed health care system for the medically indigent. The new law has been implemented in most municipalities. A survey of children with special health care needs treated at a tertiary pediatric center under the capitated managed care system and the prior non-capitated system was analyzed using the Consumer Assessments of Health Plan Survey (CHAPS) instrument. One third of the patients who were under the new capitated managed care system were not satisfied with the medial care they were receiving. The parents of children with multidisciplinary conditions found it much more difficult to access care at the tertiary center. It took parents two years to learn to navigate within the capitated managed care system. Studies to measure outcome and health quality of children with special health care needs in capitated managed health care programs must be developed to learn how the potential benefits of managed care can be maximized and the potential harms minimized. The purpose of this study was to analyze the accessibility and satisfaction of caretakers of children with special health care needs under a capitated managed health care system.

  3. The costs of caring: medical costs of Alzheimer's disease and the managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murman, D L

    2001-01-01

    This review summarizes the medical costs associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias, as well as the payers responsible for these medical costs in the US health care system. It is clear from this review that AD and related dementias are associated with substantial medical costs. The payers responsible for a majority of these costs are families of patients with AD and the US government through the Medicare and Medicaid programs. In an attempt to control expenditures, Medicare and Medicaid have turned to managed care principles and managed care organizations. The increase in "managed" dementia care gives rise to several potential problems for patients with AD, along with many opportunities for systematic improvement in the quality of dementia care. Evidence-based disease management programs provide the greatest opportunities for improving managed dementia care but will require the development of dementia-specific quality of care measures to evaluate and continually improve them.

  4. A Survey of Managed Care Education at Optometry Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Mort; Reis, Lesley

    2003-01-01

    Studied the courses and topics offered at schools of optometry and the total hours devoted to managed care. Responses from the 17 schools of optometry reveal significant variations in curricular coverage of managed care, although a core set of materials was found to exist that could be the basis for more standard curriculum. (SLD)

  5. Use of Care Paths to Improve Patient Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this special issue of Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics is to present an evidence-based system to guide the physical therapy management of patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Two systematic guides to patient management will be presented. The first is a care path intended primarily for use by physical…

  6. Primary care referral management: a marketing strategy for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, A D; Geoghegan, S S; Lundquist, S H; Cantone, J M; Krasnick, C J

    1990-06-01

    With increasing competition among hospitals, primary care referral development and management programs offer an opportunity for hospitals to increase their admissions. Such programs require careful development, the commitment of the hospital staff to the strategy, an integration of hospital activities, and an understanding of medical practice management.

  7. Preparing Students for Practice in a Managed Care Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claiborne, Nancy; Fortune, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Managed care has profound effects on health and mental health service delivery in the United States. This article describes the knowledge that students need for effective social work practice within a managed care environment and evaluates a course to deliver the content. (Contains 3 tables.)

  8. Estimating wage equations for Hungarian higher-education graduates

    OpenAIRE

    Galasi, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The paper investigates the wage determination of Hungarian highereducation graduates with using two samples of Hungarian careerbeginners, applying IV techniques and the multiple indicator solution so as to diminish potential estimation biases due to endogeneity of independent variables (especially the education variable) and the simultaneity of wages and working time. The results show that university education yields considerable wage premium as compared to college education, and that the ret...

  9. Innovation and Internationalization of Hungarian SMEs in the IT Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csonka László

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to look at the extent and type of internationalization among Hungarian information technology (IT small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs and the possible relationship between the degree of innovativeness and the internationalization of these companies. Information technologies play an important role in the Hungarian economy: this sector is one of the most R&D intensive industries in which many SMEs are active.

  10. Twenty years of isotope applications in the Hungarian aluminium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujdoso, E.

    1982-01-01

    After a short review of the isotope techniques applied in the Hungarian aluminium industry some special applications and their results are briefly outlined. Industrial and laboratory scale trace constituent determinations, isotope and activation analytical methods and the application of sealed radiation sources are discussed. It has been shown that the related R+D activity followed closely the development trends of the aluminium industry. The references given is a comprehensive bibliography of Hungarian publications in this field. (author)

  11. The New Etymological Dictionary of Hungarian Idioms and Proverbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárdosi Vilmos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After briefly surveying the research carried out in Hungary on the origin of sayings, proverbs and adages, this paper introduces and exemplifies the way the new Hungarian phraseological etymological dictionary has been compiled. It subsequently presents excerpts from the dictionary that will expound on the origin of 1800 set phrases and statistically analyses the linguistic, cultural-historical, historical, literary, ethnographic and intercultural background of the Hungarian set phrases included in the dictionary.

  12. Marketing quality and value to the managed care market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmirski, G

    1998-11-01

    Quantifying quality and marketing care delivery have been long-term challenges in the health care market. Insurers, employers, other purchasers of care, and providers face a constant challenge in positioning their organizations in a proactive, competitive niche. Tools that measure patient's self-reported perception of health care needs and expectations have increased the ability to quantify quality of care delivery. When integrated with case management and disease management strategies, outcomes reporting and variance analysis tracking can be packaged to position a provider in a competitive niche.

  13. COPD self-management supportive care: chaos and complexity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornforth, Amber

    This paper uses the emergent theories of chaos and complexity to explore the self-management supportive care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients within the evolving primary care setting. It discusses the concept of self-management support, the complexity of the primary care context and consultations, smoking cessation, and the impact of acute exacerbations and action planning. The author hopes that this paper will enable the acquisition of new insight and better understanding in this clinical area, as well as support meaningful learning and facilitate more thoughtful, effective and high quality patient-centred care within the context of primary care.

  14. Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Palliative Care Electronic Health Records When Your Child's in the Pediatric Intensive Care ... Us Contact Us Partners Editorial Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit ...

  15. Academic medicine meets managed care: a high-impact collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, R M; Engelhard, C L

    1996-08-01

    The managed care revolution is sweeping the country as a result of intense marketing on the part of managed care organizations and the widespread belief that price-sensitive managed care systems will control health costs. Although few believe that managed care alone can adequately stem the growth of nation health care spending, competition based on price has emerged as a powerful force in the health care sector. Academic health center (AHCs) stand to suffer with this new managed care regime because their special missions of teaching, research, and highly specialized clinical care make them more expensive than nonacademic hospitals and place them at a noncompetitive disadvantage. The traditional focus of the acute care hospital with individual departmentally designed programs will be narrow. Major changes will be required on the part of AHCs if they are to survive and preserve patient volume, maintain the integrity of medical education, advance scientific research, and provide highly specialized care. AHCs will have to make unprecedented adjustments in virtually every phase of their operations, particularly in the areas of clinical decision making and speedy patient-related information flow. A premium will be placed on multidisciplinary, inclusive medical services that can assume total health care risks for large populations. New ways of educating students in ambulatory settings with an emphasis on outcomes and population-based health will be needed along with the traditional responsibility of pursuing new approaches to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. The extent to which managed care will ultimately alter the traditional role of AHCs in the American health care system is unclear, but successful adaptation in the short term will require them to respond broadly, flexibly, and in a timely fashion to the anticipated health care scene.

  16. Health care managers' views on and approaches to implementing models for improving care processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasson, Jörgen; Eriksson, Andrea; Dellve, Lotta

    2016-03-01

    To develop a deeper understanding of health-care managers' views on and approaches to the implementation of models for improving care processes. In health care, there are difficulties in implementing models for improving care processes that have been decided on by upper management. Leadership approaches to this implementation can affect the outcome. In-depth interviews with first- and second-line managers in Swedish hospitals were conducted and analysed using grounded theory. 'Coaching for participation' emerged as a central theme for managers in handling top-down initiated process development. The vertical approach in this coaching addresses how managers attempt to sustain unit integrity through adapting and translating orders from top management. The horizontal approach in the coaching refers to managers' strategies for motivating and engaging their employees in implementation work. Implementation models for improving care processes require a coaching leadership built on close manager-employee interaction, mindfulness regarding the pace of change at the unit level, managers with the competence to share responsibility with their teams and engaged employees with the competence to share responsibility for improving the care processes, and organisational structures that support process-oriented work. Implications for nursing management are the importance of giving nurse managers knowledge of change management. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Multidisciplinary approach of hip fractures based on Hungarian data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Krisztina; Turchányi, Béla; Mintál, Tibor; Somogyi, Péter

    2016-09-01

    Hip fractures are described by increased mortality, loss of quality of life, functional decline and burden of diseases. They show a growing number worldwide. The aim of the present study is to summarise the existing data on the incidence, mortality, complications and rehabilitation of hip fractures, which relevance is reported only by few studies. To reduce mortality and complications of hip fractures the authors emphasize the importance of primary treatment within 12 hours, appropriate selection of surgical methods corresponding to the fracture type after the assessment of femoral head viability, vitamin D supplementation, same conditions for primary treatment during everyday of the week, and an adequate acute treatment and rehabilitation for patient's general health status. In the future integrated processing of multidisciplinary results of hip fractures based on Hungarian data can support the development of efficient treatment and prevention strategies, which can be advantageous for the patient, families, health care system, and the society, too, by the reduction of costly complications of hip fracture healing and mortality. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(37), 1469-1475.

  18. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis L Kodner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each. It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a “whole systems” approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program

  19. Assessing Hungary’s Stance on Migration and Asylum in Light of the European and Hungarian Migration Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhász Krisztina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The European Union and its member states are facing one of their biggest challenges in recent years due to the surge in migration. This crisis saw more than a million migrants and refugees cross into Europe in 2015. Solutions and policies have been advanced at both the European and national levels, keeping in mind that migration policy is an area of shared competence under Article 4 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU. On 13 May 2015, the EU adopted the European Agenda on Migration, which set out immediate and medium-term actions designed to tackle the crisis more effectively. Earlier, in October 2013, the Hungarian government adopted its own migration strategy. The first part of this study provides some insight into the aims and measures contained in the European and Hungarian migration strategies. In the second part, I focus on the steps taken by the Hungarian government regarding asylum policy and crisis management. I conclude that the actions and communications of the Hungarian government are contrary to both these strategic documents.

  20. Data Management for Evaluating Complications of Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Streed, Stephen A.; Massanari, R. Michael

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the design and operating characteristics of a microcomputer-based data management system for assessing complications associated with the delivery of health care. The system was developed in response to the need to promote “risk management” as an essential component of the Quality Assurance effort within the health care delivery environment. The system herein described allows the epidemiological evaluation of complications of health care in a tertiary care referral center....

  1. Managed care and its impact on American urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgrewe, H L

    1998-05-01

    America's health care is undergoing a revolution. A previous private, fee-for-service, delivery system chiefly centered around hospital specialty care is rapidly being replaced by a commercialized system of managed care, controlled by businessmen whose prime motive is profit. Increasing emphasis of these managed care organizations is upon primary physicians who function as gatekeepers. While this new commercialized method of health care has been attended with reductions in the previous omnipresent health care inflation our country has experienced for the past several decades, its impact on quality of care and patient choice of physician remain a great concern. Especially vulnerable in this new system are our nation's academic centers, which, burdened with responsibility for education and research, are at a disadvantage in the competitive cost-based bidding for managed care contracts. Urology work force issues and the number of urologists in our nation remain another concern for urologists as they compete for access to patients in this new highly competitive environment. In a 1995 survey of a cohort of urologists in seven states, the respondents reported 35.8% of gross income came from managed care contracts, 86% reported the need for preservice approval for many diagnostic and therapeutic undertakings, 87% reported an inability to refer complex cases outside the Managed Care Organization (MCO) network, and 23% reported they were required to retain patients for treatment who they would have otherwise referred to a more qualified urologist. The majority of American urologists are reporting dropping gross revenues and increasing overhead in their dealings with managed care contracts. The advent of managed care is being attended with dropping gross revenues, increasing overhead costs and interference with the practice patterns of American urologists.

  2. Telephone Care Management of Fall Risk:: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Elizabeth A; Pence, Maureen; Williams, Barbara; MacCornack, Frederick A

    2017-03-01

    Care management has been found to be more effective than usual care for some chronic conditions, but few studies have tested care management for prevention of elder falls. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of telephone care management of older adults presenting for medical attention due to a fall. The setting was an independent practice association in western Washington serving 1,300 Medicare Advantage-insured patients. Patients aged ≥65 years treated for a fall in an emergency department or their primary care provider's office were contacted via telephone by a care manager within 48 hours of their fall-related visit and invited to participate in a telephone-administered interview to identify modifiable fall risk factors and receive recommendations and follow-up to address identified risk factors. Data from care manager records, patient medical records, and healthcare claims for the first 6 months (November 2009-April 2010) of program implementation were analyzed in 2011. The feasibility of screening and management of fall risk factors over the telephone and the effect on medically attended falls were assessed. Twenty-two patients eligible for fall care management were reached and administered the protocol. Administration took 15-20 minutes and integrated easily with the care manager's other responsibilities. Follow-through on recommendations varied, from 45% for those for whom exercise participation was recommended to 100% for other recommendations. No medically attended falls occurred over 6 months of follow-up. Telephone care management of fall risk appears feasible and may reduce falls requiring medical attention. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The mapping competences of the nurse Case/Care Manager in the context of Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, Emanuela; Ferrini, Anna Chiara; Gianfrancesco, Francesca; Lise, Gianluca; Messana, Giovanni; Tirelli, Lorenzo; Lorenzo, Ana; Sarli, Leopoldo

    2017-03-15

    Since the recent introduction of the Case/Care Manager's professional figure, it is quite difficult to identify properly his/her own particular features, which could be mainly be found revising mainly in American studies. Therefore, the present study intended to identify the Case/Care Manager's skills and professional profile in an Intensive Care Unit experience, taking into consideration the staff's activities, perception and expectations towards the Case/Care Manager. In particular, it has been compared the experience of an Intensive Care Units where the Case/Care Manager's profile is operational to a different Unit where a Case/Care Manager is not yet in force. a Levati's model was used to map the Case/Care Manager's skills, involving each unit whole working staff, executives and caregivers through semi-structured interviews. It has been taken into consideration the Anaesthesia Unit and Emergency Unit of Cesena's healthcare organisation (AUSL of Romagna) and a Cardiology Intensive Care Unit of Piacenza's healthcare organisation, where the Case/Care Manager's profile has not been experimented yet. Firstly, it a data collection in each healthcare organization has been organised. Subsequently, semi-structured interviews to doctors, unit nurses, caregivers, nurses' coordinators and medical staff have been used to compare each healthcare system. The interviewees' described their expectations in relation to the Case/Care Manager working in a critical area. Then, every data collected during interviews has been organised to map a Case/Care Manager's essential professional profile to work in a critical area together with medical staff. Piacenza's O.U. critical area experience reported a major demand for patients' and patient's families' assistance. On the other hand, the very same aspects seem to have been better achieved in Cesena's O.U., where a Case/Care Manager's recent introduction has actually helped to overcome the void in organising systems. a Case/Care Manager

  4. Care managers' views on death and caring for older cancer patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Miho; Kanai, Emi; Kitagawa, Akiko; Hattori, Keiko

    2013-12-01

    Care managers (CMs) have an important role in coordinating care for cancer patients who are in the end-of-life stage; however, little is known about their views of death and their experiences while caring for older cancer patients. This study was conducted to examine CMs' views of death and caring for older cancer patients in a home care setting in Japan. Convenience sampling was undertaken, and 35 offices from 43 approached services agreed to participate. The final valid sample included responses from 136 CMs (90.7%). Most CMs, including nurses, care workers, home helpers, and social workers in home care settings, experienced difficulty in managing the care of cancer patients in the end-of-life stage. Respondents reported a wide array of experiences with end-of-life care, care management, and seminar attendance, and their ages and Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scores were associated factors. Moreover, multiple regression analysis indicated that better attitudes toward caring for the dying were positively associated with seminar attendance. These results suggest that CMs need education about palliative and end-of-life care in order to promote good home care for cancer patients.

  5. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with

  6. Customer service: the key to remaining competitive in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J E

    2000-01-01

    The health care industry is undergoing a rapid transformation to meet the ever-increasing needs and demands of its patient population. Employers and managed care organizations are demanding better service and higher quality care, while providers are trying to tackle reimbursement cutbacks, streamlining of services, and serving a diverse population. Providers have begun to realize that to overcome these obstacles and meet the needs of their health plans and consumers, they must focus on the demands of their customers. Health care organizations have found they can meet the demands of both the consumer and the managed care industry through initiating and maintaining a customer service program. This essay explains the importance of customer service and its link to success in the managed care environment.

  7. Embedding care management in the medical home: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaleman, Timothy P; Hay, Sherry; Prentice, Amy; Gwynne, Mark D

    2014-04-01

    Care managers are playing increasingly significant roles in the redesign of primary care and in the evolution of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), yet their adoption within day-to-day practice remains uneven and approaches for implementation have been minimally reported. We introduce a strategy for incorporating care management into the operations of a PCMH and assess the preliminary effectiveness of this approach. A case study of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Family Medicine Center used an organizational model of innovation implementation to guide the parameters of implementation and evaluation. Two sources were used to determine the effectiveness of the implementation strategy: data elements from the care management informatics system in the health record and electronic survey data from the Family Medicine Center providers and care staff. A majority of physicians (75%) and support staff (82%) reported interactions with the care manager, primarily via face-to-face, telephone, or electronic means, primarily for facilitating referrals for behavioral health services and assistance with financial and social and community-based resources. Trend line suggests an absolute decrease of 8 emergency department visits per month for recipients of care management services and an absolute decrease of 7.5 inpatient admissions per month during the initial 2-year implementation period. An organizational model of innovation implementation is a potentially effective approach to guide the process of incorporating care management services into the structure and workflows of PCMHs.

  8. Managed Care Approaches to Children's Services within Public Systems of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumariega, Andres; Fallon, Theodore, Jr.

    This report presents two discussions of conceptual and infrastructure issues that state mental health systems serving children with emotional disturbances must consider to make an effective transition towards a managed care organization of services under Medicaid. The first discussion, "Clinical Experiences in Managed Care Implementation for…

  9. Corporate social responsibility and the future health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K

    2010-01-01

    The decisions and actions of health care managers are oftentimes heavily scrutinized by the public. Given the current economic climate, managers may feel intense pressure to produce higher results with fewer resources. This could inadvertently test their moral fortitude and their social consciousness. A study was conducted to determine what corporate social responsibility orientation and viewpoint future health care managers may hold. The results of the study indicate that future health care managers may hold patient care in high regard as opposed to profit maximization. However, the results of the study also show that future managers within the industry may continue to need rules, laws, regulations, and legal sanctions to guide their actions and behavior.

  10. Managed care, consumerism, preventive medicine: does a causal connection exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, John A; Xie, Yang

    2006-07-01

    Managed care plans, and HMOs in particular, have long touted that their emphasis is on preventive care, to avoid expensive illness later in life. However, few articles in the contemporary literature adequately address this claim. The available evidence seems to support that HMOs do, in fact, provide greater access to preventive services, but the limitations of this research are substantial. This article discusses the scientific evidence on the relationships between managed care arrangements and the implications for preventive care in the current era, emphasizing consumer choices and less-restrictive plan structures.

  11. Toward population management in an integrated care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Franklin W; McMurray, Stephen; Nissenson, Allen R

    2013-01-01

    Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, accountable care organizations (ACOs) will be the primary mechanism for achieving the dual goals of high-quality patient care at managed per capita costs. To achieve these goals in the newly emerging health care environment, the nephrology community must plan for and direct integrated delivery and coordination of renal care, focusing on population management. Even though the ESRD patient population is a complex group with comorbid conditions that may confound integration of care, the nephrology community has unique experience providing integrated care through ACO-like programs. Specifically, the recent ESRD Management Demonstration Project sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the current ESRD Prospective Payment System with it Quality Incentive Program have demonstrated that integrated delivery of renal care can be accomplished in a manner that provides improved clinical outcomes with some financial margin of savings. Moving forward, integrated renal care will probably be linked to provider performance and quality outcomes measures, and clinical integration initiatives will share several common elements, namely performance-based payment models, coordination of communication via health care information technology, and development of best practices for care coordination and resource utilization. Integration initiatives must be designed to be measured and evaluated, and, consistent with principles of continuous quality improvement, each initiative will provide for iterative improvements of the initiative. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Design and application of a theory-based case/care management model for home care: advanced practice for nurses as care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Nancy A

    2002-01-01

    Case management has developed in a variety of health care, social service, and insurance industries. Its historical pattern of development has resulted in practices that are generally administrative and technical in nature as well as being relatively generic and often undifferentiated between being a role and process. Research over the last decade has resulted in the opportunity to move case management practice for home care into a structured theory-based model and practice. Design and implementation of a specialized advanced practice care management model reflective of care management research and theory design by British researchers is beginning to show clinical and systemic results that should be replicable in other regions.

  13. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2......, and monitoring delivered by medical assistants with usual care. Measurements: All-cause hospitalizations at 12 months (primary outcome) and quality of life scores (Short Form 12 Health Questionnaire [SF-12] and the Euroqol instrument [EQ-5D]). Results: Included patients had, on average, four co-occurring chronic...

  14. An attempt to categorize Hungarian community currencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Szemerédi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the emergence of complementary currencies in the 1980s there have been numerous attempts to classify them, despite that the terms local currency, community currency and many others describing place-based monetary tools are not considered similarly by scholars. The local currencies take many forms, and local governments play different roles in their emergence and development. In Hungary there has been an increasing attention and discussion around the idea of implementing these alternative monetary tools. There is a growing number of working complementary currencies in Hungary, but academic research focuses mostly on whether these can contribute to the local development and what kind of effects they have. The aim of this paper is to present a possible categorization of Hungarian complementary currencies based on the role local governments played in their implementation. I evaluate whether these community currencies are effective at first, and attempt to categorize them based on their purpose, association form and their relationships with local governments, with the purpose of increasing awareness for these initiatives in the process of policy-making.

  15. Nurse care manager contribution to quality of care in a dual-eligible special needs plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Carol P; Ganz, David A; Nickles, Lorraine; Martin, David; Beckman, Robin; Wenger, Neil S

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the quality of care provided to older patients with complex needs in a dual-eligible, community-based Medicare Special Needs Plan that used a nurse care manager model. Care provided by physicians was substantially supplemented by nurse care managers, as measured by Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders quality indicators. We describe selected nurse care manager activities for six geriatric conditions (falls, dementia, depression, nutrition, urinary incontinence, and end-of-life care) during provision of patient care coordination and management for patients in the highest decile of clinical complexity. We identify areas of high nurse performance (i.e., falls screening, functional assessment, behavioral interventions for dementia problems, advance care planning) and areas of potential missed opportunities (i.e., follow up for new memory problems, targeted dementia counseling, nutrition, and behavioral approaches to urinary incontinence). Increasing the collaborative interaction between nurses providing care in this model and physicians has the potential to enhance nurses' contributions to primary care for vulnerable older adults.

  16. Organizing and managing care in a changing health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, L T

    2000-04-01

    To examine ways in which the management and organization of medical care is changing in response to the shifting incentives created by managed care. Site visits conducted in 12 randomly selected communities in 1996/ 1997. Approximately 35-60 interviews were conducted per site with key informants in healthcare and community organizations; about half were with providers. A standardized interview protocol was implemented across all sites, enabling cross-site comparisons. Multiple respondents were interviewed on each issue. A great deal of experimentation and apparent duplication exist in efforts to develop programs to influence physician practice patterns. Responsibility for managing care is being contested by health plans, medical groups and hospitals, as each seeks to accrue the savings that can result from the more efficient delivery of care. To manage the financial and clinical risk, providers are aggressively consolidating and reorganizing. Most significant was the rapid formation of intermediary organizations, such as independent practice arrangements (IPAs), physician-hospital organizations (PHOs), or management services organizations (MSOs), for contracting with managed care organizations. Managed care appears to have only a modest effect on how healthcare organizations deliver medical care, despite the profound effect that managed care has on how providers are organized. Rather than improving the efficiency of healthcare organizations, provider efforts to build large systems and become indispensable to health plans are exacerbating problems of excess capacity. It is not clear if new organizational arrangements will help providers manage the changing incentives they face, or if their intent is to blunt the effects of the incentives by forming larger organizations to improve their bargaining power and resist change.

  17. Risk Management for Point-of-Care Testing

    OpenAIRE

    James, H. Nichols

    2014-01-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is growing in popularity, and with this growth comes an increased chance of errors. Risk management is a way to reduce errors. Originally developed for the manufacturing industry, risk management principles have application for improving the quality of test results in the clinical laboratory. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), EP23-A Laboratory Quality Control based on Risk Management guideline, introduces risk management to the clinical labor...

  18. Health care autonomy in children with chronic conditions: implications for self-care and family management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacham, Barbara L; Deatrick, Janet A

    2013-06-01

    Health care autonomy typically occurs during late adolescence but health care providers and families often expect children with chronic health conditions to master self-care earlier. Few studies have examined the development of health care autonomy as it pertains to self-care and family management. This review links the 3 concepts and discusses the implications for families and health care providers. Case studies are provided as exemplars to highlight areas where intervention and research is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Becoming nursing manager in the nested and complex border of caring and management dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Marcellino de Melo Lanzoni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to understand the experience of managing medical-surgical inpatient units in a general hospital, highlighting the meaning of being a nursing manager, with the intention to qualify and instrument nurses for caring management practice in this scenario. This is a Grounded Theory research, conducted from August 2010 to August 2012, through interviews with 19 participants from the nursing team, distributed in 3 sampling groups. From the analysis emerged the phenomenon “Becoming a nursing manager in the nested and complex border of caring and management dimension”. To exercise caring management, nurses use management instruments as essential tools, they become capable theoretically and enhances, based on his experience, professional skills and personal characteristics.  We conclude that competency mobilization beyond the clinical aspect is needed; allowing the use of management instruments to make caring viable and to improve relational and interactive processes.

  20. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David

    2014-01-01

    . The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility...... study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide...... countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe....

  1. Service Line Management: A New Paradigm in Health Care System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat Rezapour Nasrabad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Health care organizations are required to implement modern management practices and approaches due to the importance of improving quality and increasing efficiency of health care services. Service line management of healthcare services is one of the new approaches that managers of health sectors are interested in. The “service line” approach will organize the management of inpatient and outpatient in clinical services focusing on patient diagnostic clusters. Services specific in each patient diagnostic cluster will be offered by a multidisciplinary team including nurses, physicians, and so no. Accordingly, the present study aims to evaluate the features, process and benefits of service line management approach in the provision of health services. In this descriptive study, internal and external scientific database have been reviewed and the necessary data have been extracted from the latest research projects and related scientific documents. The results showed that the new management approach is based on a paradigm shift from traditional health care system management to healthcare service line management with a focus on managers’ competencies. Four specific manager’s competencies in this new management model are: conceptual, collaborative, interpersonal, and leadership competencies. Theses competencies should be developed in health system managers so as to lead to organizational excellency and improvement of health service quality. The health sector managers should strengthen these four key competencies and act on them. Then they will become effective leaders and managers in the health system.

  2. Business ethics: implications for managed care contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, D A

    1997-01-01

    Business ethics is a specialized study that emphasizes how moral standards apply to organizations, policies, procedures and behavior. Moral standards must be considered to understand the implications of business ethics in subacute care.

  3. Brahms J. Hungarian Dances. London Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järvi / Jonathan Swain

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Swain, Jonathan

    1991-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Brahms J. Hungarian Dances. London Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järvi. Chandos MC ABTD 1496; CD CHAN 8885 (57 minutes). Brahms J. Hungarian Dances. Staatskapelle Berlin. Otmar Suitner." Denon CD CO- 74597 (53 minutes)

  4. Intensive care management of severe tetanus at the university of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intensive care management of severe tetanus at the university of Benin teaching ... Journal Home > Vol 14, No 1 (2015) > ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... protocol in the centre, in line with evidence-based medical principles.

  5. Pain management in primary care – current perspectives | Meyer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to a 1998 World Health Organization Survey of 26 000 primary care ... in pain medicine and continue to follow the biomedical approach, which ... The modern paradigm of pain management has moved from this biomedical to the ...

  6. The evolution of physician-directed managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unland, J J

    1995-01-01

    The health care industry is evolving. In the near term, POs will become the state of the art in physician-directed managed care. Eventually, POs will merge into fully integrated group practices. From there, regional POs and group practices will develop their own insurance products. But because these organizations will be dominated by physicians who wish to practice medicine, rather than sell insurance, money will be made by appropriately managing risk and providing high-quality care. In time, physicians will take control and "manage" managed care, as they are the only ones--not administrators, executives, or other business people--who are in a position to fundamentally revise the way medicine is practiced.

  7. Medicaid Managed Care Penetration Rates and Expansion Enr...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicaid managed care penetration rates and expansion enrollment by state charts are composed annually by the Data and System Group (DSG) of the Centers for...

  8. Responding to financial pressures. The effect of managed care on hospitals' provision of charity care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Núria

    2013-06-01

    Healthcare financing and insurance is changing everywhere. We want to understand the impact that financial pressures can have for the uninsured in advanced economies. To do so we focus on analyzing the effect of the introduction in the US of managed care and the big rise in financial pressures that it implied. Traditionally, in the US safety net hospitals have financed their provision of unfunded care through a complex system of cross-subsidies. Our hypothesis is that financial pressures undermine the ability of a hospital to cross-subsidize and challenges their survival. We focus on the impact of price pressures and cost-controlling mechanisms imposed by managed care. We find that financial pressures imposed by managed care disproportionately affect the closure of safety net hospitals. Moreover, amongst those hospitals that remain open, in areas where managed care penetration increases the most, they react by closing the health services most commonly used by the uninsured.

  9. Disabling health care? Medicaid managed care and people with disabilities in America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    Medicaid, America's largest government-funded health insurance program, plays a pivotal role in providing health services to eight million adults with disabilities. Since the mid-1990s, many Medicaid programs have aggressively introduced managed care, which reconfigures service delivery using...... business principles. Most states have insufficient experience in developing managed care plans for Medicaid beneficiaries with disabilities. Middle-aged adults with physical disabilities present their own constellation of health care issues that is not readily appreciated in health and social services....... The purpose of the study was to understand their experiences in accessing physical health care services and to ascertain the effects of managed care on their health and well-being. This study found beneficiaries encounter numerous barriers in accessing preventative, treatment, and acute care services. Overall...

  10. Rama in the royal title of the Hungarian kings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Tibor D.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The region (župa of Rama was enlisted in the official title of the Hungarian kings around 1138, as it is known from an official document. The exact answer to the question under which circumstances it happened has never been reached. It is most probable that Rama was not just other name for Bosnia as it was proposed in historiography, neither was a part of Bosnia conquered by military action of the Hungarian king around 1135. Having in mind that Rama was a part of the principality of Raška during the Early Middle Ages, it is quite possible that Rama became part of the official title of the Hungarian kings through some direct connections between ruling families of Hungary and Raška. The most probable answer could be reached through the examination of these relations. Namely, a daughter of Raška's župan, Uroš I, Helena, was married to the Hungarian crown prince Bela in 1129, when Rama was, most probably, part of Helena's dowry. When the crown prince became king of Hungary in 1131, Rama was included in his royal title. Later on during the Middle Ages Rama became part of Bosnia giving ground to the Hungarian kings to claim whole Bosnia as their heritage. .

  11. Indonesian heath care and the economic crisis: is managed care the needed reform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkiss, D R; Jacobalis, S

    1999-03-01

    The ramifications of the current economic crisis are being felt throughout Asia, but problems are particularly acute in Indonesia; in the midst of high inflation and unemployment the government is considering expanding managed care reform. In this paper, we discuss the impact of the recent economic crisis on the health sector in Indonesia, and analyze the potential for implementing effective reform following the managed care model. The health sector is discussed, highlighting pre-existing problems in the health care supply environment. The determinants of the economic crisis are summarized, and the broad impacts of the crisis to date on the health sector are assessed. Next the prospects for success of current managed-care reform proposals are examined in some detail: viability of expanded managed care reform measures are assessed in light of the continuing crisis and its likely impacts on the consumers and suppliers of health care. Analysis of the potential impact of the continuing crisis focuses on key participants in health care reform: households, the government, and private health care providers. In conclusion the potential viability of managed care appears poor, given the current economic, political, and institutional conditions and likely future impacts, and suggest some alternative reform measures.

  12. Human resource management in patient-centered pharmaceutical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S J

    1994-04-01

    Patient-centered care may have the pharmacists and technicians reporting either directly or in a matrix to other than pharmacy administration. The pharmacy administrative people will need to be both effective leaders and managers utilizing excellent human resource management skills. Significant creativity and innovation will be needed for transition from departmental-based services to patient care team services. Changes in the traditional methods of recruiting, interviewing, hiring, training, developing, inspiring, evaluating, and disciplining are required in this new environment.

  13. A survey of managed care strategies for pregnant smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, D.; Robinson, L.; Rosenthal, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to measure the content and comprehensiveness of pregnancy specific smoking cessation strategies within managed care organisations (MCOs) responding affirmatively to the national 1997-98 Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care (ATMC) survey.
DESIGN—This cross sectional follow up study consisted of a fax survey sent to medical directors and a 37 question telephone survey of program overseers about the smoking cessation strategy.
SUBJECTS—147 MCOs identifying a...

  14. Managed Care, Distance Traveled, and Hospital Market Definition

    OpenAIRE

    Frech, Ted E

    1998-01-01

    Most scholars and antitrust cases have defined hospital service markets as primarily local. But, two recent decisions have greatly expanded geographic markets, incorporating hospitals as far as 100 miles apart. Managed care plans, now important in most markets, were believed to shift patients to distant hospitals to capture lower prices. We examine distance traveled and its connection to managed care penetration. In contrast to earlier literature, we examine both direct and indirect effects. ...

  15. Nurse management skills required at an emergency care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Montezeli, Juliana Helena; Peres, Aida Maris; Bernardino, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify the management skills needed for this professional at an emergency care unit. Method: An exploratory descriptive qualitative study conducted with eight nurses in which semi-structured interviews with nonparticipating systematic observation were conducted; the data was processed by content analysis. Results: The categories which emerged from the content analysis served as a list of management skills necessary to their work at the emergency care unit: leadership, decision...

  16. Diabetic and Obese Patient Clinical Outcomes Improve During a Care Management Implementation in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Luo, Zhehui; Piatt, Gretchen; Green, Lee A; Chen, Qiaoling; Piette, John

    2017-10-01

    To address the increasing burden of chronic disease, many primary care practices are turning to care management and the hiring of care managers to help patients coordinate their care and self-manage their conditions. Care management is often, but not always, proving effective at improving patient outcomes, but more evidence is needed. In this pair-matched cluster randomized trial, 5 practices implemented care management and were compared with 5 comparison practices within the same practice organization. Targeted patients included diabetic patients with a hemoglobin A1c >9% and nondiabetic obese patients. Clinical values tracked were A1c, blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein, microalbumin, and weight. Clinically important improvements were demonstrated in the intervention versus comparison practices, with diabetic patients improving A1c control and obese patients experiencing weight loss. There was a 12% relative increase in the proportion of patients meeting the clinical target of A1c management practices lost 5% or more of their body weight as compared with 10% of comparison patients (adjusted relative improvement, 15%; CI, 2%-28%). These findings add to the growing evidence-base for the effectiveness of care management as an effective clinical practice with regard to improving diabetes- and obesity-related outcomes.

  17. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  18. Kangaroo Mother Care Management of a 750 Ggrammes Baby: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the successful management of 750 grammes low birth weight baby using kangaroo mother care in the hospital and at home. The baby had suffered a variety of morbidities associated with prematurity in the early neonatal period. Key words: Kangaroo mother care, low birth weight babies ...

  19. Medicine management in municipal home care : delegating, administrating and receiving

    OpenAIRE

    Gransjön Craftman, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to investigate how delegation of medication is handled in municipal home care. Specific aims were to 1) explore the prevalence of medication use in older adults over time; 2) describe district nurses’ experiences of the delegation of medication management to municipal home care personnel; 3) explore and describe how home care assistants experience receiving the actual delegation of the responsibility of medication administration; and 4) to describe how older...

  20. Manager traits and quality-of-care performance in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aij, Kjeld Harald; Aernoudts, René L M C; Joosten, Gepke

    2015-07-06

    This paper aims to assess the impact of the leadership traits of chief executive officers (CEOs) on hospital performance in the USA. The effectiveness and efficiency of the CEO is of critical importance to the performance of any organization, including hospitals. Management systems and manager behaviours (traits) are of crucial importance to any organization because of their connection with organizational performance. To identify key factors associated with the quality of care delivered by hospitals, the authors gathered perceptions of manager traits from chief executive officers (CEOs) and followers in three groups of US hospitals delivering different levels of quality of care performance. Three high- and three low-performing hospitals were selected from the top and bottom 20th percentiles, respectively, using a national hospital ranking system based on standard quality of care performance measures. Three lean hospitals delivering intermediate performance were also selected. A survey was used to gather perceptions of manager traits (providing a modern or lean management system inclination) from CEOs and their followers in the three groups, which were compared. Four traits were found to be significantly different (alpha management inclination. No differences were found between lean (intermediate-) and high-performing hospitals, or between high- and low-performing hospitals. These findings support a need for hospital managers to acquire appropriate traits to achieve lean transformation, support a benefit of measuring manager traits to assess progress towards lean transformation and lend weight to improved quality of care that can be delivered by hospitals adopting a lean system of management.

  1. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-08-08

    analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. analisar a concordância entre prescrições de enfermagem, registradas nos prontuários, e as necessidades de cuidados dos pacientes; investigar a correlação entre o perfil profissional dos enfermeiros e a concordância das prescrições. estudo descritivo com abordagem quantitativa e documental, realizado em unidades de clínica médica, cirúrgica e especializada de um hospital de ensino, no interior do Estado de São Paulo. Foi aplicada a nova versão validada do Instrumento de Classificação de Pacientes e, posteriormente, investigadas 380 prescrições de enfermagem no momento da admissão e alta hospitalar. foi identificado que 75% dos itens das prescrições de enfermagem estavam compatíveis com as necessidades cuidativas dos pacientes. Encontrou-se baixa correlação entre a concordância da prescrição de enfermagem e o perfil profissional. as prescrições de enfermagem não estão sendo realizadas, em sua totalidade, em consonância com as necessidades dos pacientes. Para

  2. Health care waste management practice in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, R; Pradhan, B

    2010-10-01

    Health-care waste is a by-product of health care. Its poor management exposes health-care workers, waste handlers and the community to infections, toxic effects and injuries including damage of the environment. It also creates opportunities for the collection of disposable medical equipment, its re-sale and potential re-use without sterilization, which causes an important burden of disease worldwide. The purpose of this study was to find out health care waste management practice in hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Narayani Sub-Regional Hospital, Birgunj from May to October 2006 using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Study population was four different departments of the hospital (Medical/Paediatric, Surgical/Ortho, Gynae/Obstetric and Emergency), Medical Superintendent, In-charges of four different departments and all sweepers. Data was collected using interview, group discussion, observation and measurement by weight and volume. Total health-care waste generated was 128.4 kg per day while 0.8 kg per patient per day. The composition of health care waste was found to be 96.8 kg (75.4%) general waste, 24.1 kg (8.8%) hazardous waste and 7.5 kg (5.8%) sharps per day by weight. Health staffs and sweepers were not practicing the waste segregation. Occupational health and safety was not given due attention. Majority of the sweepers were unaware of waste management and need of safety measures to protect their own health. Health care waste management practice in the hospital was unsatisfactory because of the lack of waste management plan and carelessness of patients, visitors and staffs. Therefore the hospital should develop the waste management plan and strictly follow the National Health Care Waste Management Guideline.

  3. DEVELOPMENT POSSIBILITIES OF THE HUNGARIAN-UKRAINIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasztor Szabolcs

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the all pervasive globalisation trends previous state borders have become more permeable and subject to change. As borders disappear previously separated borderlands can unite and form a spatial unit where more increased economic interactions could integrate both sides to the global economy.The European continent is such a case which previously had been puctuated by strong state borders. Today the continent sees the physical and intellectual disappearance of borders. Regional integrations – like the European Union – spur this process and helps the integration of borderland inside and outside of the common market. The creation of a common market was a huge success and still a great deal of benefits are anticipated from the fulfillment. We are not taken by surprise when we see a massive increase in the number of border related studies and researchers. This field is very popular today. However the difference between Western and Eastern Europe is huge because eastern state borders are still strong or they link peripheral regions. There - under the communist times- border crossings were restricted and trade links were quite poor. No wonder that the tendencies of the past are still determining. This paper focuses on of one the most peripheral external borderland of the Schengen zone: the Hungarian-Ukrainian borderland. Expectations are running high and the disappearance of the border is a long-awaited hope. First I take into consideration the relevant economic theory in connection with more intense borderland dynamics. In the literature the trade theory, new economic geography and the traditional location theory approach this question. The approaches do not give coherent and clear-cut answers so I have to turn my attention to different empirical approaches. These show huge heterogeneity depending on the nature and character of the borderlands. In the mentioned case, settlement-level data are not fully available so I conduct a

  4. Development of a Patient Charting System to Teach Family Practice Residents Disease Management and Preventive Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dickerman, Joel

    1997-01-01

    .... Designing notes which 'prompt' residents to gather patient information vital to optimal care can teach residents the concepts of longitudinal care, particularly chronic disease management and preventive care...

  5. Managing social awkwardness when caring for morbidly obese patients in intensive care: A focused ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Caz; de Vries, Kay; Coombs, Maureen

    2016-06-01

    Critically ill morbidly obese patients pose considerable healthcare delivery and resource utilisation challenges in the intensive care setting. These are resultant from specific physiological responses to critical illness in this population and the nature of the interventional therapies used in the intensive care environment. An additional challenge arises for this population when considering the social stigma that is attached to being obese. Intensive care staff therefore not only attend to the physical and care needs of the critically ill morbidly obese patient but also navigate, both personally and professionally, the social terrain of stigma when providing care. To explore the culture and influences on doctors and nurses within the intensive care setting when caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients. A focused ethnographic approach was adopted to elicit the 'situated' experiences of caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients from the perspectives of intensive care staff. Participant observation of care practices and interviews with intensive care staff were undertaken over a four month period. Analysis was conducted using constant comparison technique to compare incidents applicable to each theme. An 18 bedded tertiary intensive care unit in New Zealand. Sixty-seven intensive care nurses and 13 intensive care doctors involved with the care and management of seven critically ill patients with a body mass index ≥40kg/m(2). Interactions between intensive care staff and morbidly obese patients were challenging due to the social stigma surrounding obesity. Social awkwardness and managing socially awkward moments were evident when caring for morbidly obese patients. Intensive care staff used strategies of face-work and mutual pretence to alleviate feelings of discomfort when engaged in aspects of care and caring. This was a strategy used to prevent embarrassment and distress for both the patients and staff. This study has brought new understandings

  6. Hollywood on the Danube: Hungarian Filmmakers in a Transnational Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Portuges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exile, emigration and displacement have marked the trajectories of Hungarian filmmakers over the past century. Michael Curtiz, the Korda brothers—Alexander, Vincent and Zoltán—André de Toth, Emeric Pressburger, Vilmos Zsigmond, Miklós Rózsa, Peter Lorre, Géza von Radvány and other talented artists have crossed borders, cultures and languages, creating such classics as Casablanca, Somewhere in Europe, The Red Shoes and The Lost One. The legendary sign posted in Hollywood studios read: "It is not enough to be Hungarian, you have to have talent, too!" Accompanied by film extracts, rare footage, personal interviews, archive photographs, and documentary materials, my presentation explores the transnational odysseys of these Hungarian directors, producers, cinematographers, composers, actors and screenwriters whose artistic contributions became an indispensable part of international cinema, suggesting that the challenges of emigration may also offer opportunities for critique, self-examination and artistic creativity.

  7. [Motivations for foreign employment and carrier change among Hungarian physiotherapists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pónusz, Róbert; Kovács, Dalma; Raposa, László Bence; Hock, Márta; Decsi, Tamás; Kránicz, János; Endrei, Dóra

    2016-02-28

    An increasing motivation can be experienced among professional workers within the Hungarian healthcare system towards foreign employment or career change. The aim of the authors was to assess Hungarian physiotherapists' migration and career changing behaviour and to understand the underlying factors. A national survey in Hungary from April to August, 2014 was performed. Only physiotherapists who practice in Hungary were included (n = 215). The results suggest that age (pappreciation experienced in the workplace (pappreciated, are 55 times more likely to search for employment outside the country's borders [OR = 55.28 CI (95%) = 18.85 to 161.12]. The most common causes for that are unfavourable financial (pappreciation of the profession within the Hungarian healthcare system.

  8. Development of the security system of the new Hungarian banknotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterfi, Sandor

    2000-04-01

    The more than 75 year old Hungarian Banknote Printing Corporation is an enterprise with a rich history. It is located in the very center of the capital, only some blocks away form the Parliament. Most people on this side of the Atlantic may not even have heard about the Hungarian currency, the Forint. Some may remember that after the WWII it was Hungary, where the severest hyperinflation in the world took place. As we come from a manufacturing company , we can give you information about deliberation and experiences of application of optically variable features on banknotes and some observations made in the past two years since the new Hungarian bank note series is ins circulation.

  9. A New Adaptive Hungarian Mating Scheme in Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanju Jung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In genetic algorithms, selection or mating scheme is one of the important operations. In this paper, we suggest an adaptive mating scheme using previously suggested Hungarian mating schemes. Hungarian mating schemes consist of maximizing the sum of mating distances, minimizing the sum, and random matching. We propose an algorithm to elect one of these Hungarian mating schemes. Every mated pair of solutions has to vote for the next generation mating scheme. The distance between parents and the distance between parent and offspring are considered when they vote. Well-known combinatorial optimization problems, the traveling salesperson problem, and the graph bisection problem are used for the test bed of our method. Our adaptive strategy showed better results than not only pure and previous hybrid schemes but also existing distance-based mating schemes.

  10. Emotion management in children′s palliative care nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eryl Zac Maunder

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the emotional labor involved for nurses providing palliative care for children/young people living with life-limiting illnesses/conditions, and their families. It highlights the challenges nurses face in managing their emotion when caring for children/young people and their families, and explores strategies to enable nurses to cope with this aspect of their role without compromising their personal wellbeing. It suggests that emotional labor within nursing goes largely unrecorded, and remains undervalued by managers and health care services.

  11. Care for the case manager: balancing your wheel of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, D M

    1998-01-01

    The case manager's role in our complex health care system is demanding and draining without some self-reflective attention. The Wheel of Life is a key tool for individuals to assess how well they are leading a fully balanced life. The eight aspects of a balanced life--values, self-care, work, relationships, leisure, relaxation, exercise, and centering--are explained and discussed. A self-reflective activity is presented that encourages readers to assess their current life balance. This focused clarification of personal and professional life will facilitate a more fully balanced life with rewards for case managers as individuals, and for their family, clients, and the health care organization.

  12. Pediatric wound care and management in the emergency department [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jennifer E; Pade, Kathryn H

    2017-10-23

    Traumatic wounds and lacerations are common pediatric presenting complaints to emergency departments. Although there is a large body of literature on wound care, many emergency clinicians base management of wounds on theories and techniques that have been passed down over time. Therefore, controversial, conflicting, and unfounded recommendations are prevalent. This issue reviews evidence-based recommendations for wound care and management, including wound cleansing and irrigation, anxiolysis/sedation techniques, closure methods, and post-repair wound care. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  13. Intensive Care Management of Myasthenia Gravis After Thymectomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim:To evaluate the management of post thymectomy myasthenia gravis (MG) patient in our centre; to highlight those aspects of patient care that could improve outcome and to serve as a bench mark for developing a standardized protocol for management. Method: A retrospective study of 5 cases of post thymectomy MG ...

  14. Audit Trail Management System in Community Health Care Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Nakayama, Masaharu; Nakaya, Jun; Tominaga, Teiji; Suganuma, Takuo; Shiratori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake we constructed a community health care information network system. Focusing on the authentication server and portal server capable of SAML&ID-WSF, we proposed an audit trail management system to look over audit events in a comprehensive manner. Through implementation and experimentation, we verified the effectiveness of our proposed audit trail management system.

  15. Primary care management of food allergy and food intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzon, Dawn Lee; Kempker, Tara; Piel, Pamela

    2011-12-16

    The incidence of food allergies is steadily increasing. Due to potentially life-threatening complications, it is important that primary care providers recognize and appropriately manage these disorders. This article includes a discussion of the current evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis, screening, and management of food allergies.

  16. Consumer Protection in Managed Care: A Third-Generation Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, John

    1996-01-01

    Discusses three generations of consumer protection issues related to managed care: (1) individual treatment decisions--individuals wanting treatment their plan does not cover or deems unnecessary; (2) insurance practices and risk selection--impact of health management organizations on the rest of the health insurance system; and (3) health plan…

  17. Managing the overflow of intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, M.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Houdenhoven, M.; Litvak, Nelli

    2005-01-01

    Many hospitals in the Netherlands are confronted with capacity problems at their Intensive Care Units (ICUs) resulting in cancelling operations, overloading the staff with extra patients, or rejecting emergency patients. In practice, the last option is a common choice because juridically, as well as

  18. Nurses improve migraine management in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Petra; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; de Jong, Gosse; Baarveld, Frans; van den Berg, J. S. Peter

    Introduction Migraine is a common disorder with a high burden. Adequate treatment results in improvement of quality of life. Migraine patients are mainly treated by general practitioners (GPs), but there is still room for improvement. This study investigated whether primary care nurses could improve

  19. Managing stress in a palliative care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vineeta; Woodman, Clare

    2010-12-01

    This article describes a strategy to reduce the high levels of stress experienced by community nurses in a children's palliative care team. The development, use and effectiveness of a problem-solving team intervention are illustrated by direct quotations from the nurses themselves.

  20. Investigation of health care waste management in Binzhou District, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruoyan, Gai; Xu Lingzhong; Li Huijuan; Zhou Chengchao; He Jiangjiang; Yoshihisa, Shirayama; Tang Wei; Chushi, Kuroiwa

    2010-01-01

    In China, national regulations and standards for health care waste management were implemented in 2003. To investigate the current status of health care waste management at different levels of health care facilities (HCF) after the implementation of these regulations, one tertiary hospital, one secondary hospital, and four primary health care centers from Binzhou District were visited and 145 medical staff members and 24 cleaning personnel were interviewed. Generated medical waste totaled 1.22, 0.77, and 1.17 kg/bed/day in tertiary, secondary, and primary HCF, respectively. The amount of medical waste generated in primary health care centers was much higher than that in secondary hospitals, which may be attributed to general waste being mixed with medical waste. This study found that the level of the HCF, responsibility for medical waste management in departments and wards, educational background and training experience can be factors that determine medical staff members' knowledge of health care waste management policy. Regular training programs and sufficient provision of protective measures are urgently needed to improve occupational safety for cleaning personnel. Financing and administrative monitoring by local authorities is needed to improve handling practices and the implementation of off-site centralized disposal in primary health care centers.

  1. Optimizing cardiothoracic surgery information for a managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, T A; Matloff, J M

    1995-11-01

    The rapid change occurring in American healthcare is a direct response to rising costs. Managed care is the fastest growing model that attempts to control escalating costs through limitations in patient choice, the active use of guidelines, and placing providers at risk. Managed care is an information intensive system, and those providers who use information effectively will be at an advantage in the competitive healthcare marketplace. There are five classes of information that providers must collect to be competitive in a managed care environment: patient satisfaction, medical outcomes, continuous quality improvement, quality of the decision, and financial data. Each of these should be actively used in marketing, assuring the quality of patient care, and maintaining financial stability. Although changes in our healthcare system are occurring rapidly, we need to respond to the marketplace to maintain our viability, but as physicians, we have the singular obligation to maintain the supremacy of the individual patient and the physician-patient relationship.

  2. Guidelines for Management Information Systems in Canadian Health Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Larry E.

    1987-01-01

    The MIS Guidelines are a comprehensive set of standards for health care facilities for the recording of staffing, financial, workload, patient care and other management information. The Guidelines enable health care facilities to develop management information systems which identify resources, costs and products to more effectively forecast and control costs and utilize resources to their maximum potential as well as provide improved comparability of operations. The MIS Guidelines were produced by the Management Information Systems (MIS) Project, a cooperative effort of the federal and provincial governments, provincial hospital/health associations, under the authority of the Canadian Federal/Provincial Advisory Committee on Institutional and Medical Services. The Guidelines are currently being implemented on a “test” basis in ten health care facilities across Canada and portions integrated in government reporting as finalized.

  3. [Access to prenatal care and quality of care in the Family Health Strategy: infrastructure, care, and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Wilderi Sidney Gonçalves; Parente, Rosana Cristina Pereira; Guimarães, Thayanne Louzada Ferreira; Garnelo, Luiza

    2018-05-10

    This study focuses on access to prenatal care and quality of care in the Family Health Strategy in Brazil as a whole and in the North region, through evaluation of infrastructure characteristics in the health units, management, and supply of care provided by the teams, from the perspective of regional and state inequalities. A cross-sectional evaluative and normative study was performed, drawing on the external evaluation component of the second round of the Program for Improvement of Access and Quality of Primary Care, in 2013-2014. The results revealed the inadequacy of the primary healthcare network's infrastructure for prenatal care, low adequacy of clinical actions for quality of care, and the teams' low management capacity to guarantee access and quality of care. In the distribution according to geopolitical regions, the findings pertaining to the units' infrastructure indicate a direct relationship between the infrastructure's adequacy and social contexts with higher municipal human development indices and income. For the clinical actions in patient care, the teams in all the regions scored low on adequacy, with slightly better results in the North and South regions of the country. There were important differences between the states of the North, and the states with higher mean income and human development scored higher on adequacy. The results indicate important organizational difficulties in both access and quality of care provided by the health teams, in addition to visible insufficiency in management activities aimed to improve access and quality of prenatal care.

  4. The Expanding Role of Managed Care in the Medicaid Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Kyle J.; Long, Sharon K.

    2015-01-01

    States increasingly use managed care for Medicaid enrollees, yet evidence of its impact on health care outcomes is mixed. This research studies county-level Medicaid managed care (MMC) penetration and health care outcomes among nonelderly disabled and nondisabled enrollees. Results for nondisabled adults show that increased penetration is associated with increased probability of an emergency department visit, difficulty seeing a specialist, and unmet need for prescription drugs, and is not associated with reduced expenditures. We find no association between penetration and health care outcomes for disabled adults. This suggests that the primary gains from MMC may be administrative simplicity and budget predictability for states rather than reduced expenditures or improved access for individuals. PMID:25882616

  5. Named Entity Recognition in a Hungarian NL Based QA System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkl, Domonkos; Szidarovszky, P. Ferenc; Kardkovacs, Zsolt T.; Magyar, Gábor

    In WoW project our purpose is to create a complex search interface with the following features: search in the deep web content of contracted partners' databases, processing Hungarian natural language (NL) questions and transforming them to SQL queries for database access, image search supported by a visual thesaurus that describes in a structural form the visual content of images (also in Hungarian). This paper primarily focuses on a particular problem of question processing task: the entity recognition. Before going into details we give a short overview of the project's aims.

  6. Hungarian activity in cosmic physics in the last 20 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, Ferenc.

    1987-01-01

    The Hungarian activity in cosmic physics is reviewed. Hungary is participant of the Interkosmos collaboration and participates in research programs to study the Earth's magnetosphere, interplanetary space, solar activity, planets of the Solar system, comets (e.g. Vega project to study Halley's comet). Cosmic geodesy is also cultivated in Hungary. A broadening field of the Hungarian cosmic physical activity is the design and construction of measuring intstruments used on board of probes and those of other space probe components, e.g. power supplies, telemetric and telecommunication systems. A brief summary of recent and future projects is also presented. (D.Gy.)

  7. The Hungarian youth's knowledge and attitude in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petofi, G.; Legradi, G.

    2001-01-01

    The Young People for the Nuclear Energetics (FINE) was established in 1999 as the Hungarian branch of the Young Generation Network. Our purpose is to remove the misbelieves and fears arisen around the nuclear techniques and mainly the nuclear energetics and to reply the questions brought up by the Hungarian youth in this topic. In this year our main activity was to take part in the Student Island festival with a Nuclear-tent. In this paper our experience is delineated what we drawn with the help of our programmes about the attitude and the knowledge of the youth. (authors)

  8. Government Health Care Contract Incentives: Making Managed Health Care Work in Federal Government Procurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teskey, Mark S

    1999-01-01

    Contracting for managed health care systems is a complex undertaking. The current TRICARE contracts captured all the important parts of the system and ensured detailed compliance with the many system requirements...

  9. Nutrition services in managed care: new paradigms for dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laramee, S H

    1996-04-01

    Managed care systems are transforming the health care system in the United States. Dietitians will need to review practice opportunities in new and different settings, and develop additional skills to make a successful transition to the transformed health care environment. The shift in health care financing from a fee-for-service model to a capitated system will have the most dramatic impact on the profession. Not all the answers are available, but the focus for the future is clear--customer satisfaction, outcomes research, and cost-effective nutrition services.

  10. A guide to wound managment in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Wayne A

    2005-11-01

    Wound management in palliative patients is often a very challenging area of care. There are many unique issues that can combine to produce complicated wound management scenarios, including the types of wounds and wound symptoms most commonly affecting palliative care patients, as well as the presence of concurrent disease and associated treatment. Problems exist with the availability of suitable dressings and balancing life expectancy with the goals of wound care. A significant, and possibly under-recognized, issue is the emotional and social distress experienced by these patients, which can be directly attributed to their wound. These problems must all be recognized and addressed in order to manage wounds effectively in this patient population. This article aims to explore these issues and offer advice on the management of wound-related symptoms, with the ultimate goal of improving patients' quality of life.

  11. Using matrix organization to manage health care delivery organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allcorn, S

    1990-01-01

    Matrix organization can provide health care organization managers enhanced information processing, faster response times, and more flexibility to cope with greater organization complexity and rapidly changing operating environments. A review of the literature informed by work experience reveals that the use of matrix organization creates hard-to-manage ambiguity and balances of power in addition to providing positive benefits for health care organization managers. Solutions to matrix operating problems generally rely on the use of superior information and decision support systems and extensive staff training to develop attitudes and behavior consistent with the more collegial matrix organization culture. Further improvement in understanding the suitability of matrix organization for managing health care delivery organizations will involve appreciating the impact of partial implementation of matrix organization, temporary versus permanent uses of matrix organization, and the impact of the ambiguity created by dual lines of authority upon the exercise of power and authority.

  12. Referral determinants in Swiss primary care with a special focus on managed care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Tandjung

    Full Text Available Studies have shown large variation of referral probabilities in different countries, and many influencing factors have been described. This variation is most likely explained by different healthcare systems, particularly to which extent primary care physicians (PCPs act as gatekeepers. In Switzerland no mandatory gatekeeping system exists, however insurance companies offer voluntary managed care plans with reduced insurance premiums. We aimed at investigating the role of managed care plans as a potential referral determinant in a non-gatekeeping healthcare system. We conducted a cross-sectional study with 90 PCPs collecting data on consultations and referrals in 2012/2013. During each consultation up to six reasons for encounters (RFE were documented. For each RFE PCPs indicated whether a referral was initiated. Determinants for referrals were analyzed by hierarchical logistic regression, taking the potential cluster effect of the PCP into account. To further investigate the independent association of the managed care plan with the referral probability, a hierarchical multivariate logistic regression model was applied, taking into account all available data potentially affecting the referring decision. PCPs collected data on 24'774 patients with 42'890 RFE, of which 2427 led to a referral. 37.5% of patients were insured in managed health care plans. Univariate analysis showed significant higher referral rates of patients with managed care plans (10.7% vs. 8.5%. The difference in referral probability remained significant after controlling for other confounders in the hierarchical multivariate regression model (OR 1.355. Patients in managed care plans were more likely to be referred than patients without such a model. These data contradict the argument that patients in managed care plans have limited healthcare access, but underline the central role of PCPs as coordinator of care.

  13. Will your academic department survive managed care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, L; Temmerman, J

    1996-12-01

    The current form of academic department is likely to vanish from many institutions. Changes occurring in health care are part of the evolution other industries have experienced, following the product life cycle. Physicians are becoming "deprofessionalized" and as such are beginning to resemble technical workers seen in other industries. The rearrangements in health care are bringing together organizations with different missions, priorities, culture and even language. An academic department may not be considered as an asset to the larger organization or network, representing but one option for product differentiation in the market place. There are strategies for maintaining the viability of the academic component of an organization that necessitate congruence with the overall strategy for the greater organization.

  14. Health care units and human resources management trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Adriana Maria; Ciampone, Maria Helena Trench; Santelle, Odete

    2013-02-01

    To identify factors producing new trends in basic health care unit management and changes in management models. This was a prospective study with ten health care unit managers and ten specialists in the field of Health in São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010. The Delphi methodology was adopted. There were four stages of data collection, three quantitative and the fourth qualitative. The first three rounds dealt with changing trends in management models, manager profiles and required competencies, and the Mann-Whitney test was used in the analysis. The fourth round took the form of a panel of those involved, using thematic analysis. The main factors which are driving change in basic health care units were identified, as were changes in management models. There was consensus that this process is influenced by the difficulties in managing teams and by politics. The managers were found to be up-to-date with trends in the wider context, with the arrival of social health organizations, but they are not yet anticipating these within the institutions. Not only the content, but the professional development aspect of training courses in this area should be reviewed. Selection and recruitment, training and assessment of these professionals should be guided by these competencies aligned to the health service mission, vision, values and management models.

  15. An Application of Business Process Management to Health Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohsen M D

    The purpose of this article is to help health care facility managers and personnel identify significant elements of their facilities to address, and steps and actions to follow, when applying business process management to them. The ABPMP (Association of Business Process Management Professionals) life-cycle model of business process management is adopted, and steps from Lean, business process reengineering, and Six Sigma, and actions from operations management are presented to implement it. Managers of health care facilities can find in business process management a more comprehensive approach to improving their facilities than Lean, Six Sigma, business process reengineering, and ad hoc approaches that does not conflict with them because many of their elements can be included under its umbrella. Furthermore, the suggested application of business process management can guide and relieve them from selecting among these approaches, as well as provide them with specific steps and actions that they can follow. This article fills a gap in the literature by presenting a much needed comprehensive application of business process management to health care facilities that has specific steps and actions for implementation.

  16. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting.

  17. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth.

  18. Nonprice competition and quality of care in managed care: the New York SCHIP market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hangsheng; Phelps, Charles E

    2008-06-01

    To examine the effect of nonprice competition among managed care plans on the quality of care in the New York SCHIP market. U.S. Census 2000; 2002 New York State Managed Care Plan Performance Report; and 2001 New York State Managed Care Annual Enrollment Report. Each market is defined as a county, and competition is measured as the number of plans in a market. Quality of care is measured in percentages using three Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey and three Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set scores. Two-stage least squares is applied to address the endogeneity between competition and the quality of care, using population as an instrument. We find a negative association between competition and quality of care. An additional managed care plan is significantly associated with a decrease of 0.40-2.31 percentage points in four out of six quality measures. After adjusting for production cost, a positive correlation is observed between price and quality measures across different pricing regions. It seems likely that pricing policy is a constraint on quality production, although it may not be interpreted as a causal relationship and further study is needed.

  19. On the history of codification of Hungarian civil law and the new Hungarian civil code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Jožef

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The first part of the paper examines the basic tendencies in the development of the codification of Hungarian civil law in the period of representative and civil society. The second part deals with the new Hungarian Civil Code (2013/14 its content, methods of regulation and its relation to other civil legislation, temporal validity with the adherence to the idea of validity pro futuro, as well as its tendency to harmonize its norms with the guidelines of the European civil law. In accordance with the idea of completeness, the lawmakers incorporated all of the areas of civil law according to the pandecta system - personal law, corporate law with civil association law, family law, obligations and inheritance. The Code is based on the principle of equality of parties in civil relations, the principle of good faith, fraus legis prohibition. Family law is based on specific principles of protection of marriage, family and children. Contract law is based on the freedom of contract, limited by good customs and morality. Tort law is guided by the principle of prohibiting the harm to others, full compensation of material and imaterial damages. Contractual responsibility is regulated separately, so that the tort rules apply if the specific rules of contractual responsibility donot say otherwise. Other grounds for obligations are also regulated, as well as unjustified enrichment, doing business without order or authority, unilateral expression of intention and securities. The grounds for inheritance are contractual, statutory or based on the will. Freedom of disposition by will is limited by statutory rules regulating the forced share. The system of transfer of property ex lege after the death is adopted. The state is a successor if there are no testamentary, statutory or contractual inheritors.

  20. Strategies to address management challenges in larger intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlakala, M C; Bezuidenhout, M C; Botha, A D H

    2015-10-01

    To illustrate the need for and suggest strategies that will enhance sustainable management of a large intensive care unit (ICU). The challenges faced by intensive care nursing in South Africa are well documented. However, there appear to be no strategies available to assist nurses to manage large ICUs or for ICU managers to deal with problems as they arise. Data sources to illustrate the need for strategies were challenges described by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. A purposive sample of managers was included in individual interviews during compilation of evidence regarding the challenges experienced in the management of large ICUs. The challenges were presented at the Critical Care Society of Southern Africa Congress held on 28 August to 2 September 2012 in Sun City North-West province, South Africa. Five strategies are suggested for the challenges identified: divide the units into sections; develop a highly skilled and effective nursing workforce to ensure delivery of quality nursing care; create a culture to retain an effective ICU nursing team; manage assets; and determine the needs of ICU nurses. ICUs need measures to drive the desired strategies into actions to continuously improve the management of the unit. Future research should be aimed at investigating the effectiveness of the strategies identified. This research highlights issues relating to large ICUs and the strategies will assist ICU managers to deal with problems related to large unit sizes, shortage of trained ICU nurses, use of agency nurses, shortage of equipment and supplies and stressors in the ICU. The article will make a contribution to the body of nursing literature on management of ICUs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Care management at Ikata Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Koji

    1982-01-01

    For operating nuclear power stations safely and economically, it is necessary to control nuclear fuel itself and reactor cores. Nuclear fuel must be controlled consistently in view of quantitative balance and operational method over the whole nuclear fuel cycle of uranium ore, fabrication, burning in reactors and reprocessing, based on the plan of using fuel in electric power companies. The control of the burning in reactors is called core management, and it is important because the users of fuel execute it. For dealing with such core management works, Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc., has developed the computer code system for grasping the state of fuel exchange and the burning condition in reactors and used it since 1972. The outline of the core management in Ikata Power Station is reported in this paper centering around computing works. The core management works are divided into those at the time of regular inspection and those in operation. In the regular inspection, fuel inspection, fuel exchange and reactor physics test are performed. In operation, the burning condition of fuel is grasped. The technical computations corresponding to these works are explained, and the examples of computations are shown. (Kako, I.)

  2. Association Between Health Plan Exit From Medicaid Managed Care and Quality of Care, 2006-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndumele, Chima D; Schpero, William L; Schlesinger, Mark J; Trivedi, Amal N

    2017-06-27

    State Medicaid programs have increasingly contracted with insurers to provide medical care services for enrollees (Medicaid managed care plans). Insurers that provide these plans can exit Medicaid programs each year, with unclear effects on quality of care and health care experiences. To determine the frequency and interstate variation of health plan exit from Medicaid managed care and evaluate the relationship between health plan exit and market-level quality. Retrospective cohort of all comprehensive Medicaid managed care plans (N = 390) during the interval 2006-2014. Plan exit, defined as the withdrawal of a managed care plan from a state's Medicaid program. Eight measures from the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set were used to construct 3 composite indicators of quality (preventive care, chronic disease care management, and maternity care). Four measures from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems were combined into a composite indicator of patient experience, reflecting the proportion of beneficiaries rating experiences as 8 or above on a 0-to-10-point scale. Outcome data were available for 248 plans (68% of plans operating prior to 2014, representing 78% of beneficiaries). Of the 366 comprehensive Medicaid managed care plans operating prior to 2014, 106 exited Medicaid. These exiting plans enrolled 4 848 310 Medicaid beneficiaries, with a mean of 606 039 beneficiaries affected by plan exits annually. Six states had a mean of greater than 10% of Medicaid managed care recipients enrolled in plans that exited, whereas 10 states experienced no plan exits. Plans that exited from a state's Medicaid market performed significantly worse prior to exiting than those that remained in terms of preventive care (57.5% vs 60.4%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, 0.3% to 5.5%]), maternity care (69.7% vs 73.6%; difference, 3.8% [95% CI, 1.7% to 6.0%]), and patient experience (73.5% vs 74.8%; difference, 1.3% [95% CI, 0.6% to 1

  3. Medicare managed care. How physicians can make it better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggin, G M

    1997-12-01

    The federal government is attempting to control anticipated, increased Medicare health care costs by providing the senior population with incentives to encourage their movement into managed care programs. For-profit corporate HMOs that currently dominate the managed care arena are coming under increased competitive pressure at a time when their perception of profiteering is undergoing increased public scrutiny. If physicians are to take advantage of this window of opportunity and successfully enter the Medicare managed care marketplace, they must identify the major deficiencies existing in the current model, and fashion a new product that divests itself of the profit orientation of current corporate HMOs. A nonprofit version of a highly integrated, multispecialty provider service organization (PSO) provides an appropriate model to effectively compete with the corporate HMO. The ideal physician-controlled managed care model must: develop a responsive policy board structure; create practice guidelines that decrease variation in physician practice; achieve an appropriate balance between primary and specialty medical care; and adopt a quality-assurance program that effectively addresses both process and outcome data.

  4. Medication Therapy Management and Preconception Care: Opportunities for Pharmacist Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie A. DiPietro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As medication therapy management (MTM continues to grow in the profession of pharmacy, careful consideration as to areas for positive patient impact is warranted. Given the current gaps in preconception care in the United States, and the accessibility and expertise of the pharmacist, MTM interventions related to preconception care may be valuable. This paper describes potential for pharmacist intervention in several different areas of preconception care. Notably, targeted medication reviews may be appropriate for interventions such as folic acid recommendations, teratogenic/category X medication management, immunizations, and disease state management. Comprehensive medication reviews may be warranted for selected disease states due to complexity of interventions, such the management of diabetes. Comprehensive medication reviews may also be warranted if several targeted interventions are necessary, or if there are a several medications or disease states requiring intervention. Pharmacists also have important roles in screening, support, and referrals needed for preconception care in the context of MTM. Patients may benefit substantially from pharmacist-directed MTM services related to preconception care. In addition, depending on clinical pharmacy service contracts and billing opportunities, pharmacists may be reimbursed for providing these services, generating sustainable revenue while fulfilling an important public health need.   Type: Idea Paper

  5. Using management information systems to enhance health care quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, L H; Kleiner, B H

    1995-01-01

    Examines how computers and quality assurance are being used to improve the quality of health care delivery. Traditional quality assurance methods have been limited in their ability to effectively manage the high volume of data generated by the health care process. Computers on the other hand are able to handle large volumes of data as well as monitor patient care activities in both the acute care and ambulatory care settings. Discusses the use of computers to collect and analyse patient data so that changes and problems can be identified. In addition, computer models for reminding physicians to order appropriate preventive health measures for their patients are presented. Concludes that the use of computers to augment quality improvement is essential if the quality of patient care and health promotion are to be improved.

  6. Bayesian inference of genetic parameters on litter size and gestation length in Hungarian Landrace and Hungarian Large White pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Csörnyei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic parameters of number of piglets born alive (NBA and gestation length (GL were analyzed for 39798 Hungarian Landrace (HLA, 141397 records and 70356 Hungarian Large White (HLW, 246961 records sows. Bivariate repeatability animal models were used, applying a Bayesian statistics. Estimated and heritabilitie repeatabilities (within brackets, were low for NBA, 0.07 (0.14 for HLA and 0.08 (0.17 for HLW, but somewhat higher for GL, 0.18 (0.27 for HLA and 0.26 (0.35 for HLW. Estimated genetic correlations between NBA and GL were low, -0.08 for HLA and -0.05 for HLW.

  7. Impact of managed care on cancer trial enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, C P; Krumholz, H M

    2005-06-01

    To determine the relationship between managed care market activity and cancer trial enrollment. Trial participant data were obtained from the National Cancer Institute. Participants in cooperative group trials of breast, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer during the years 1996 through 2001 were assigned to counties based on their zip code of residence. Linear regression was used to determine the relationship between county enrollment rate and two measures of county managed care activity (penetration and index of competition [IOC]), adjusting for other county characteristics. In bivariate analysis, there was a strong inverse correlation between trial enrollment rate and IOC (r = -0.23; P penetration, proportion uninsured, and other county characteristics. Counties in the lowest quartile of managed care penetration tended to have lower enrollment rates than the remaining counties (r = -0.05; P = .048), while counties in the second, third, and fourth quartiles of penetration all had similar enrollment rates to one another. Cancer trial enrollment rates were suboptimal across all counties, and counties with higher levels of managed care competition had significantly lower enrollment rates. The relationship between managed care penetration and trial enrollment was less consistent. Future efforts to enhance trial participation should address the potential negative influence of market factors.

  8. Price elasticity and pharmaceutical selection: the influence of managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Marisa Elena; Salkever, David S

    2003-07-01

    State Medicaid programs are turning increasingly to managed care to control expenditures, although the types of managed care programs in use have changed dramatically. Little is known about the influence of the shifting Medicaid managed care arena on treatment decisions. This paper investigates factors affecting the selection of treatments for depression by providers participating in either of two Medicaid managed care programs. Of particular interest is the influence of medication price on the choice of treatment, since one vehicle through which managed care organizations can reduce total expenditures is by increasing the price sensitivity of participating providers. We take a new approach by phrasing the problem as a discrete choice, using a nested multinomial logit model for the analyses. Contrary to earlier literature, we find some evidence that physicians in both programs do take price into consideration when selecting among treatment options. HMO providers in particular demonstrate increased price sensitivity in the two most commonly prescribed categories of antidepressants. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Spiritual beliefs and barriers among managed care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Jeanne; Jenckes, Mollie W; Tarpley, Margaret J; Koenig, Harold G; Yanek, Lisa R; Becker, Diane M

    2005-01-01

    Ninety percent of American adults believe in God and 82% pray weekly. A majority wants their physicians to address spirituality during their health care visit. However, clinicians incorporate spiritual discussion in less than 20% of visits. Our objectives were to measure clinician beliefs and identify perceived barriers to integrating spirituality into patient care in a statewide, primary care, managed care group. Practitioners completed a 30-item survey including demographics and religious involvement (DUREL), spirituality in patient care (SPC), and barriers (BAR). We analyzed data using frequencies, means, standard deviations, and ANOVA. Clinicians had a range of religious denominations (67% Christian, 14% Jewish, 11% Muslim, Hindu or Buddhist, 8% agnostic), were 57% female and 24% had training in spirituality. Sixty-six percent reported experiencing the divine. Ninety-five percent felt that a patient's spiritual outlook was important to handling health difficulties and 68% percent agreed that addressing spirituality was part of the physician's role. Ninety-five percent of our managed care group noted 'lack of time' as an important barrier, 'lack of training' was indicated by 69%, and 21% cited 'fear of response from administration'. Managed care practitioners in a time constrained setting were spiritual themselves and believed this to be important to patients. Respondents indicated barriers of time and training to implementing these beliefs. Comparing responses from our group to those in other published surveys on clinician spirituality, we find similar concerns. Clinician education may overcome these barriers and improve ability to more fully meet their patients' expressed needs regarding spirituality and beliefs.

  10. Managing mechanistic and organic structure in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olden, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Managers at all levels in a health care organization must organize work to achieve the organization's mission and goals. This requires managers to decide the organization structure, which involves dividing the work among jobs and departments and then coordinating them all toward the common purpose. Organization structure, which is reflected in an organization chart, may range on a continuum from very mechanistic to very organic. Managers must decide how mechanistic versus how organic to make the entire organization and each of its departments. To do this, managers should carefully consider 5 factors for the organization and for each individual department: external environment, goals, work production, size, and culture. Some factors may push toward more mechanistic structure, whereas others may push in the opposite direction toward more organic structure. Practical advice can help managers at all levels design appropriate structure for their departments and organization.

  11. Time based management in health care system: The chosen aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kobza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Time-based management (TBM is the key element of the whole management process. For many years in health care systems of highly developed countries modern and effective methods of time-based management have been implemented in both primary health care and hospitals (emergency departments and operating rooms. Over the past two decades a systematic review of Polish literature (since 1990 and peer reviewed articles published in international journals based on PubMed/Medline (2001–2011 have been carried out. The collected results indicate that the demographic and health changes in the populations are one of the main challenges facing general practitioners in the nearest future. Time-based management needs new and effective tools and skills, i.e., identification of priorities, well designed planning, delegation of the tasks, proper coordination, and creation of primary care teams that include additional members and human resources management. Proper reimbursement of health services, development of IT in health care system, better collection, storage, processing, analysis and exchange of information and research findings will also be needed. The use of innovative technologies, like telemedicine consultations, provides the possibility of reducing waiting time for diagnosis and treatment and in some cases could be applied in terms of secondary care. To improve the efficiency of operating rooms it is necessary to introduce different solutions, such as operating room coordinator involvement, application of automation to guide decision-making or use of robotic tools to assist surgical procedures. Overcrowded emergency departments have a major detrimental effect on the quality of hospital functions, therefore, efforts should be made to reduce them. Time-based management training among physicians and health care management in Poland, as well as the implementation of practice-based solutions still applied in highly developed countries seem to be necessary

  12. [Time based management in health care system: the chosen aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobza, Joanna; Syrkiewicz-Świtała, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Time-based management (TBM) is the key element of the whole management process. For many years in health care systems of highly developed countries modern and effective methods of time-based management have been implemented in both primary health care and hospitals (emergency departments and operating rooms). Over the past two decades a systematic review of Polish literature (since 1990) and peer reviewed articles published in international journals based on PubMed/Medline (2001-2011) have been carried out. The collected results indicate that the demographic and health changes in the populations are one of the main challenges facing general practitioners in the nearest future. Time-based management needs new and effective tools and skills, i.e., identification of priorities, well designed planning, delegation of the tasks, proper coordination, and creation of primary care teams that include additional members and human resources management. Proper reimbursement of health services, development of IT in health care system, better collection, storage, processing, analysis and exchange of information and research findings will also be needed. The use of innovative technologies, like telemedicine consultations, provides the possibility of reducing waiting time for diagnosis and treatment and in some cases could be applied in terms of secondary care. To improve the efficiency of operating rooms it is necessary to introduce different solutions, such as operating room coordinator involvement, application of automation to guide decision-making or use of robotic tools to assist surgical procedures. Overcrowded emergency departments have a major detrimental effect on the quality of hospital functions, therefore, efforts should be made to reduce them. Time-based management training among physicians and health care management in Poland, as well as the implementation of practice-based solutions still applied in highly developed countries seem to be necessary.

  13. Documentation of pain care processes does not accurately reflect pain management delivered in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Erin E; Bair, Matthew J; Carey, Timothy S; Weinberger, Morris

    2010-03-01

    Researchers and quality improvement advocates sometimes use review of chart-documented pain care processes to assess the quality of pain management. Studies have found that primary care providers frequently fail to document pain assessment and management. To assess documentation of pain care processes in an academic primary care clinic and evaluate the validity of this documentation as a measure of pain care delivered. Prospective observational study. 237 adult patients at a university-affiliated internal medicine clinic who reported any pain in the last week. Immediately after a visit, we asked patients to report the pain treatment they received. Patients completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) to assess pain severity at baseline and 1 month later. We extracted documentation of pain care processes from the medical record and used kappa statistics to assess agreement between documentation and patient report of pain treatment. Using multivariable linear regression, we modeled whether documented or patient-reported pain care predicted change in pain at 1 month. Participants' mean age was 53.7 years, 66% were female, and 74% had chronic pain. Physicians documented pain assessment for 83% of visits. Patients reported receiving pain treatment more often (67%) than was documented by physicians (54%). Agreement between documentation and patient report was moderate for receiving a new pain medication (k = 0.50) and slight for receiving pain management advice (k = 0.13). In multivariable models, documentation of new pain treatment was not associated with change in pain (p = 0.134). In contrast, patient-reported receipt of new pain treatment predicted pain improvement (p = 0.005). Chart documentation underestimated pain care delivered, compared with patient report. Documented pain care processes had no relationship with pain outcomes at 1 month, but patient report of receiving care predicted clinically significant improvement. Chart review measures may not accurately

  14. Health care managers learning by listening to subordinates' dialogue training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, C; Ahlborg, G; Wikström, E

    2014-01-01

    Middle managers in health care today are expected to continuously and efficiently decide and act in administration, finance, care quality, and work environment, and strategic communication has become paramount. Since dialogical communication is considered to promote a healthy work environment, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the ways in which health care managers experienced observing subordinates' dialogue training. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and documents from eight middle managers in a dialogue programme intervention conducted by dialogue trainers. Focus was on fostering and assisting workplace dialogue. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used. Managers' experiences were both enriching and demanding, and consisted of becoming aware of communication, meaning perceiving interaction between subordinates as well as own silent interaction with subordinates and trainer; Discovering communicative actions for leadership, by gaining self-knowledge and recognizing relational leadership models from trainers--such as acting democratically and pedagogically--and converting theory into practice, signifying practising dialogue-promoting conversation behaviour with subordinates, peers, and superiors. Only eight managers participated in the intervention, but data afforded a basis for further research. Findings stressed the importance of listening, and of support from superiors, for well-functioning leadership communication at work. Studies focusing on health care managers' communication and dialogue are few. This study contributes to knowledge about these activities in managerial leadership.

  15. Functioning of primary health care in opinion of managers of primary health care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojar, I; Wdowiak, L; Kwiatosz-Muc, M

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the research is to get to know opinions of primary health care managers concerning working of primary health care and concerning quality of medical services offered by family doctors out-patient clinics. The research among managers of primary health care units took place in all out-patient clinics in Lublin province. Research instrument was survey questionnaire of authors own construction. Results were statistically analyzed. From 460 surveys sent, 108 questionnaires were accepted to analysis. Majority of managers of out-patient clinics of primary health care is satisfied with the way and the quality of work of employed staff. In opinion of 71.3% of managers access to family doctor services is very good. Availability of primary health care services is better estimated by managers of not public units. The occupied local provide comfortable work for the staff in opinion of 78.5% of surveyed managers of out-patient clinics. Managers estimate the level of their services as very good (37.96%) and good (37.96%) comparing to other such a subjects present in the market. Internal program of improving quality is run in 22% of out-patient clinics, which were investigated. Managers of primary health care units assess the quality of their services as good and very good. They estimate positively the comfort and politeness in serving patients as well as technical status of equipment and the lodging. They assess availability of their services as very good. Large group of managers of family doctors practices recognizes neighborhood practices as a competitors.

  16. The impact of managed care and current governmental policies on an urban academic health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J L; Peterson, D J; Muehlstedt, S G; Zera, R T; West, M A; Bubrick, M P

    2001-10-01

    Managed care and governmental policies have restructured hospital reimbursement. We examined reimbursement trends in trauma care to assess the impact of this market driven change on an urban academic health center. Patients injured between January 1997 and December 1999 were analyzed for Injury Severity Score (ISS), length of hospital stay, hospital cost, payer, and reimbursement. Between 1997 and 1999, the volume of patients with an ISS less than 9 increased and length of stay decreased. In addition, overall cost, payment, and profit margin increased. Commercially insured patients accounted for this margin increase, because the margins of managed care and government insured patients experienced double-digit decreases. Patients with ISS of 9 or greater also experienced a volume increase and a reduction in length of stay; however, costs within this group increased greater than payments, thereby reducing profit margin. Whereas commercially insured patients maintained their margin, managed care and government insured patients did not (double- and triple-digit decreases). Managed care and current governmental policies have a negative impact on urban academic health center reimbursement. Commercial insurers subsidize not only the uninsured but also the government insured and managed care patients as well. National awareness of this issue and policy action are paramount to urban academic health centers and may also benefit commercial insurers.

  17. Managing health care organizations in an age of rapid change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, S; al-Alaiwat, S

    1998-03-01

    Health care managers find their work increasingly difficult, due in part to rapid environmental change that plagues organizational life. Management practices and attitudes that may have been appropriate in previous eras are ineffective today. A study was conducted among managers in the Ministry of Health, State of Bahrain, seeking information about current trends in the macro or external environment that affect the Ministry of Health, as well as internal environmental pressures that may be similar or different. This article provides a clear picture of the context in which managers perform their work and offers recommendations for coping with change in dynamic, complex organizations.

  18. Primary care clinicians' recognition and management of depression: a model of depression care in real-world primary care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Seong-Yi; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Gonzales, Junius J

    2013-11-01

    Depression is prevalent in primary care (PC) practices and poses a considerable public health burden in the United States. Despite nearly four decades of efforts to improve depression care quality in PC practices, a gap remains between desired treatment outcomes and the reality of how depression care is delivered. This article presents a real-world PC practice model of depression care, elucidating the processes and their influencing conditions. Grounded theory methodology was used for the data collection and analysis to develop a depression care model. Data were collected from 70 individual interviews (60 to 70 min each), three focus group interviews (n = 24, 2 h each), two surveys per clinician, and investigators' field notes on practice environments. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed for analysis. Surveys and field notes complemented interview data. Seventy primary care clinicians from 52 PC offices in the Midwest: 28 general internists, 28 family physicians, and 14 nurse practitioners. A depression care model was developed that illustrates how real-world conditions infuse complexity into each step of the depression care process. Depression care in PC settings is mediated through clinicians' interactions with patients, practice, and the local community. A clinician's interactional familiarity ("familiarity capital") was a powerful facilitator for depression care. For the recognition of depression, three previously reported processes and three conditions were confirmed. For the management of depression, 13 processes and 11 conditions were identified. Empowering the patient was a parallel process to the management of depression. The clinician's ability to develop and utilize interactional relationships and resources needed to recognize and treat a person with depression is key to depression care in primary care settings. The interactional context of depression care makes empowering the patient central to depression care delivery.

  19. Physician directed networks: the new generation of managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, T; O'Sullivan, D

    1996-07-01

    The external pressure to reduce cost while maintaining quality and services is moving the whole industry into a rapid mode of integration. Hospitals, vendors, MCOs, and now, physicians, are faced with the difficult decisions concerning how their operations will be integrated into the larger health care delivery system. These pressures have forced physicians to consolidate, build leverage, and create efficiencies to become more productive; thereby better positioning themselves to respond to the challenges and the opportunities that lie before them. This initial phase of consolidation has given many physicians the momentum to begin to wrestle back the control of health care and the courage to design the next generation of managed care: Physician Directed Managed Care. What will be the next phase? Perhaps, the next step will be fully-integrated specialty and multi-specialty groups leading to alternate delivery sites. "Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself." - Leo Tolstoy

  20. Improving Obesity Prevention and Management in Primary Care in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Sharma, Arya Mitra

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic diseases with significant morbidity, mortality and health care cost. There is concern due to the dramatic increase in overweight and obesity in Canada in the last 20 years. The causes of obesity are multifactorial, with underestimation by patients and healthcare providers of the long-term nature of the condition, and its complexity. Solutions related to prevention and management will require multifaceted strategies involving education, health policy, public health and health systems across the care continuum. We believe that to support such strategies we need to have a strong primary care workforce equipped with appropriate knowledge, skills and attitudes to support persons at risk for, or with, obesity. To achieve this end, significant skills building is required to improve primary care obesity prevention and management efforts. This review will first examine the current state, and then will outline how we can improve.

  1. Depression Care Management: Can Employers Purchase Improved Outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Rost

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen vendors are currently selling depression care management products to US employers after randomized trials demonstrate improved work outcomes. The research team interviewed 10 (71.4% of these vendors to compare their products to four key components of interventions demonstrated to improve work outcomes. Five of 10 depression products incorporate all four key components, three of which are sold by health maintenance organizations (HMOs; however, HMOs did not deliver these components at the recommended intensity and/or duration. Only one product delivered by a disease management company delivered all four components of care at the recommended intensity and duration. This “voltage drop,” which we anticipate will increase with product implementation, suggests that every delivery system should carefully evaluate the design of its depression product before implementation for its capacity to deliver evidence-based care, repeating these evaluations as new evidence emerges.

  2. Development of a chronic care ostomy self-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Hornbrook, Mark C; Wendel, Christopher S; Krouse, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Each year a percentage of the 1.2 million men and women in the United States with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer join the 700,000 people who have an ostomy. Education targeting the long-term, chronic care of this population is lacking. This report describes the development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program, which was informed by (1) evidence on published quality-of-life changes for cancer patients with ostomies, (2) educational suggestions from patients with ostomies, and (3) examination of the usual care of new ostomates to illustrate areas for continued educational emphases and areas for needed education and support. Using these materials, the Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program was developed by a team of multi-disciplinary researchers accompanied by experienced ostomy nurses. Testing of the program is in process. Pilot study participants reported high satisfaction with the program syllabus, ostomy nurse leaders, and ostomate peer buddies.

  3. Development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Krouse, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Each year a percentage of the 1.2 million men and women in the United States with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer join the 700,000 people who have an ostomy. Education targeting the long term, chronic care of this population is lacking. This report describes the development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program, which was informed by (1) evidence on published quality of life changes for cancer patients with ostomies, (2) educational suggestions from patients with ostomies, and (3) examination of the usual care of new ostomates to illustrate areas for continued educational emphases and areas for needed education and support. Using these materials, the Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program was developed by a team of multi-disciplinary researchers accompanied by experienced ostomy nurses. Testing of the program is in process. Pilot study participants reported high satisfaction with the program syllabus, ostomy nurse leaders, and ostomate peer buddies. PMID:23104143

  4. The stigmatization of obesity among Gypsy and Hungarian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Ildikó; Túry, Ferenc

    2013-06-01

    Prejudice against obese people has been widely confirmed in scientific papers. Therefore, recent studies have increasingly focused on investigating the individual and cultural factors related to attitudes towards obesity. Since there have been no comparative studies involving Gypsy people, our present research aimed at exploring the possible discrepancies in children's attitudes towards obese children between Gypsy and Hungarian cultures. Our survey included 247 children aged 9-16 (108 boys and 139 girls), of which 136 considered themselves Hungarian (55.1 %), while 111 children (44.9 %) claimed themselves as Gypsy. The subjects were asked to rank six male and six female figure drawings according to their preference. Each sequence of figure drawings included a healthy child, an obese child, and four drawings depicted children with disabilities. According to our results, the drawings portraying the healthy child figure were rated most preferable and those portraying the obese child figure the least preferable amongst the subjects regardless of gender and origin. However, the obese girl figures and boy figures were rated significantly more positively by Gypsy children than Hungarian children. Our results suggest that there is a difference in attitude towards obesity among Gypsy and Hungarian children. Therefore, it is worthwhile to further explore this phenomenon.

  5. Media Literacy and Cigarette Smoking in Hungarian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Randy M.; Piko, Bettina F.; Balazs, Mate A.; Struk, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess smoking media literacy in a sample of Hungarian youth and to determine its association with current smoking and susceptibility to future smoking. Design: Quantitative cross-sectional survey. Setting: Four elementary and four high schools in Mako, Hungary. Method: A survey form was administered in regularly-scheduled classes to…

  6. Chemical composition and utilization of Hungarian spent sulfite liquor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, B

    1968-01-01

    A review on the composition of Hungarian spent sulfite liquor and on its possible utilization, e.g., for the manufacturing of vanillin, yeast protein, or ethanol, as well as its direct utilization as a plasticizer for cement, additive for insecticides, or in adhesives.

  7. Behaviour Profile of Hungarian Adolescent Outpatients with a Dual Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinya, Elek; Csorba, Janos; Suli, Agota; Grosz, Zsofia

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour dimensions of 244 Hungarian adolescent psychiatric outpatients with a dual diagnosis (intellectual disability and psychiatric diagnosis) were examined by means of the adapted version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI, Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001). Four IQ subgroups were created: borderline, mild, moderate…

  8. Problems of a Declining Hungarian Birth Rate: A Historical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildikó Szántó

    2015-01-01

    about 0.15 – 0.20 percent per year, and currently fertility in Hungary is one of the lowest in Europe. The Hungarian age structure will become increasingly problematic as the fertile age group of the population continues to shrink.

  9. Medical Liability in the Light of New Hungarian Civil Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The number of medical malpractice lawsuits filed each year in Hungary has considerably increased since the change of regime. The judicial decisions and practices on determining and awarding wrongful damages recoverable for medical malpractices in the Hungarian civil law have been developing for decades.

  10. Long memory in the Croatian and Hungarian stock market returns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvo Dajčman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to analyze and compare the fractal structure of the Croatian and Hungarian stock market returns. The presence of long memory components in asset returns provides evidence against the weak-form of stock market efficiency. The starting working hypothesis that there is no long memory in the Croatian and Hungarian stock market returns is tested by applying the Kwiatkowski-Phillips-Schmidt-Shin (KPSS (1992 test, Lo’s (1991 modified rescaled range (R/S test, and the wavelet ordinary least squares (WOLS estimator of Jensen (1999. The research showed that the WOLS estimator may lead to different conclusions regarding long memory presence in the stock returns from the KPSS and unit root tests or Lo’s R/S test. Furthermore, it proved that the fractal structure of individual stock returns may be masked in aggregated stock market returns (i.e. in returns of stock index. The main finding of the paper is that both the Croatian stock index Crobex and individual stocks in this index exhibit long memory. Long memory is identified for some stocks in the Hungarian stock market as well, but not for the stock market index BUX. Based on the results of the long memory tests, it can be concluded that while the Hungarian stock market is weakform efficient, the Croatian stock market is not.

  11. Translating Shakespeare for the Hungarian Stage: Contemporary Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint Szele

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents trends in today’s Shakespeare translation in Hungary based on interviews with Hungarian translators and scholars. Instead of a collection of names and dates of translators and translations, it focuses on the organic development of Hungarian Shakespeare translation, which has been going on for more than two hundred years, and tries to fit new developments into the tradition of translating Shakespeare in a theoretical framework. “Hungarian Shakespeare,” now seen as a broad collection of Hungarian translations and adaptations, lives on, is kept alive in theaters, but it is undergoing a process of simplification. It was very hard work to do away with the forced prudishness and mannerism of the nineteenth century Shakespeare translations. After World War II, during the dominance of Communist culture, it was not allowed for several translations of Shakespeare to co-exist, so a politically appointed committee was set up to decide which one fit into the official canon. Only the selected texts could be printed and used in performances. After the political changes in Hungary in 1989, there was an upsurge of interest in Shakespeare, and since the 1990s there has been an unprecedented plurality of Shakespeare translations. I aim to examine the processes that led to the development of today’s easy-to-understand and naturalistic translations, and to the abandonment of century-old classical ones.

  12. US-Hungarian Relations Ten Years After 1956

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Glant

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available 1966, the tenth anniversary of the 1956 Revolution, was a key year in US–Hungarian relations. Diplomatic relations were raised from the lowest to the highest level, but suspicion and tension remained. Neither side knew what to expect from the other on account of the anniversary, the Vietnam War, economic and cultural negotiations, and the fate of Cardinal Mindszenty. A traditional diplomatic historical approach is supplemented here with cultural materials to present the full scale of contacts ranging from high political issues to the visit of Hollywood movie star Kirk Douglas in Budapest. First Secretary of the Legation for Press and Cultural Affairs Edward Alexander receives special attention, because he played a crucial role in the events of 1966. As press secretary, he helped calm Hungarian fears over what American journalists might report about the anniversary, while as cultural affairs officer he worked on documenting and expanding American cultural presence in Hungary. In the latter capacity, he opened the USIA Library at the Legation, fraternized with blacklisted painters of the Zuglói Kör [‘Zugló Circle’], monitored the Hungarian stage production of My Fair Lady, and reported on the publication of American literature in Hungarian.

  13. Anaesthetic and Intensive Care Management of Traumatic Cervical Spine Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Umamaheswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to the cervical spine may have devastating consequences. Timely interventions are essential to prevent avoidable neurological deterioration. In the initial stabilization of patients with acute cervical spine injuries, physiological disturbances, especially those involving cardiac and respiratory function require careful attention. Early surgery, which facilitates rapid mobi-lization of the patient, is fraught with important management considerations in the intraopoerative period and the subsequent critical care. Airway management poses a crucial challenge at this stage. Those patients who survive the injury with quadriplegia or quadriparesis may present themselves for incidental surgical procedures. Chronic systemic manifestations in these patients require attention in providing anaesthesia and postoperative care at this stage. The current review provides an insight into the physiological disturbances and the management issues in both acute and chronic phases of traumatic cervical spine injury.

  14. Specialty pharmaceuticals care management in an integrated health care delivery system with electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, C Douglas; Chin, Karen Y

    2013-05-01

    The specialty pharmaceuticals market is expanding more rapidly than the traditional pharmaceuticals market. Specialty pharmacy operations have evolved to deliver selected medications and associated clinical services. The growing role of specialty drugs requires new approaches to managing the use of these drugs. The focus, expectations, and emphasis in specialty drug management in an integrated health care delivery system such as Kaiser Permanente (KP) can vary as compared with more conventional health care systems. The KP Specialty Pharmacy (KP-SP) serves KP members across the United States. This descriptive account addresses the impetus for specialty drug management within KP, the use of tools such as an electronic health record (EHR) system and process management software, the KP-SP approach for specialty pharmacy services, and the emphasis on quality measurement of services provided. Kaiser Permanente's integrated system enables KP-SP pharmacists to coordinate the provision of specialty drugs while monitoring laboratory values, physician visits, and most other relevant elements of the patient's therapy. Process management software facilitates the counseling of patients, promotion of adherence, and interventions to resolve clinical, logistic, or pharmacy benefit issues. The integrated EHR affords KP-SP pharmacists advantages for care management that should become available to more health care systems with broadened adoption of EHRs. The KP-SP experience may help to establish models for clinical pharmacy services as health care systems and information systems become more integrated.

  15. [The hospital perspective: disease management and integrated health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrappe, Matthias

    2003-06-01

    Disease Management is a transsectoral, population-based form of health care, which addresses groups of patients with particular clinical entities and risk factors. It refers both to an evidence-based knowledge base and corresponding guidelines, evaluates outcome as a continuous quality improvement process and usually includes active participation of patients. In Germany, the implementation of disease management is associated with financial transactions for risk adjustment between health care assurances [para. 137 f, Book V of Social Code (SGB V)] and represents the second kind of transsectoral care, besides a program designed as integrated health care according to para. 140 a ff f of Book V of Social Code. While in the USA and other countries disease management programs are made available by several institutions involved in health care, in Germany these programs are offered by health care insurers. Assessment of disease management from the hospital perspective will have to consider three questions: How large is the risk to compensate inadequate quality in outpatient care? Are there synergies in internal organisational development? Can the risk of inadequate funding of the global "integrated" budget be tolerated? Transsectoral quality assurance by valid performance indicators and implementation of a quality improvement process are essential. Internal organisational changes can be supported, particularly in the case of DRG introduction. The economic risk and financial output depends on the kind of disease being focussed by the disease management program. In assessing the underlying scientific evidence of their cost effectiveness, societal costs will have to be precisely differentiated from hospital-associated costs.

  16. Parity for mental health and substance abuse care under managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Richard G.; McGuire, Thomas G.

    1998-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Parity in insurance coverage for mental health and substance abuse has been a key goal of mental health and substance abuse care advocates in the United States during most of the past 20 years. The push for parity began during the era of indemnity insurance and fee for service payment when benefit design was the main rationing device in health care. The central economic argument for enacting legislation aimed at regulating the insurance benefit was to address market failure stemming from adverse selection. The case against parity was based on inefficiency related to moral hazard. Empirical analyses provided evidence that ambulatory mental health services were considerably more responsive to the terms of insurance than were ambulatory medical services. AIMS: Our goal in this research is to reexamine the economics of parity in the light of recent changes in the delivery of health care in the United States. Specifically managed care has fundamentally altered the way in which health services are rationed. Benefit design is now only one mechanism among many that are used to allocate health care resources and control costs. We examine the implication of these changes for policies aimed at achieving parity in insurance coverage. METHOD: We develop a theoretical approach to characterizing rationing under managed care. We then analyze the traditional efficiency concerns in insurance, adverse selection and moral hazard in the context of policy aimed at regulating health and mental health benefits under private insurance. RESULTS: We show that since managed care controls costs and utilization in new ways parity in benefit design no longer implies equal access to and quality of mental health and substance abuse care. Because costs are controlled by management under managed care and not primarily by out of pocket prices paid by consumers, demand response recedes as an efficiency argument against parity. At the same time parity in benefit design may accomplish less

  17. Myasthenic crisis patients who require intensive care unit management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hideya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Hirano, Teruyuki; Nakajima, Makoto; Kimura, En; Maeda, Yasushi; Uchino, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this report was to investigate predictive factors that necessitate intensive care in myasthenic crisis (MC). We retrospectively reviewed MC patients at our institution and compared ICU and ward management groups. Higher MG-ADL scale scores, non-ocular initial symptoms, infection-triggered findings, and higher MGFA classification were observed more frequently in the ICU group. In patients with these prognostic factors, better outcomes may be obtained with early institution of intensive care. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Marketing a managed care plan: achieving product differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, N C

    1996-01-01

    The health care marketplace is changing dramatically, even without federal reform measures. This is a volatile, yet promising, time to market a managed care plan. Before marketing the product, it is critical that the competition is thoroughly evaluated and consumer and employer needs are researched. The final product should be distinguishable from the competition and address market needs. Promotion can then begin, utilizing a proactive public relations and advertising campaign in addition to traditional methods of marketing.

  19. Managing organizational change: strategies for the female health care supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G

    1990-07-01

    In responding to resistance to change in the current health care organization, the new female supervisor can learn to support her staff in encountering and accepting these changes. The strategies and skills discussed above are characteristic of a supervisory style that may naturally occur for women, but also can be incorporated into the leadership style of men in health care management today. Health care leaders of tomorrow must work from an androgynous framework in which the behavior patterns and responses of each gender are learned and used appropriately by both men and women. Sargent suggests that the best managers are androgynous and that this is the inevitable wave of the future. Whether man or woman, a supervisor should learn, accept, and use methods that are characteristic of both sexes to be successful in managing people. Women and men must learn from each other's strengths and share these diverse skills. Given that women now outnumber men in health care management positions and organizations are changing to a more nurturing environment, the androgynous supervisor will be the successful leader of the future. Finally, women in health care supervisory positions have the potential to bring change where it is badly needed. Women in these roles often have a system wide view of health care policy issues that recognizes less federal commitment to social programs. Many women in health care positions believe that the issues of children, women, the elderly, the poor, and the homeless need focused attention. The growing number of women in health care supervisory and leadership roles is an important factor in changing national health policy for the benefit of these groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Antidepressant Medication Management among Older Patients Receiving Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Shao, Huibo; Bruce, Martha L.; Press, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Antidepressant management for older patients receiving home health care (HHC) may occur through two pathways: nurse-physician collaboration (without patient visits to the physician) and physician management through office visits. This study examines the relative contribution of the two pathways and how they interplay. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted using Medicare claims of 7,389 depressed patients 65 or older who received HHC in 2006–7 and who possessed antidepressants at the start of HHC. A change in antidepressant therapy (vs. discontinuation or refill) was the main study outcome and could take the form of a change in dose, switch to a different antidepressant, or augmentation (addition of a new antidepressant). Logistic regressions were estimated to examine how use of home health nursing care, patient visits to physicians, and their interactions predict a change in antidepressant therapy. Results About 30% of patients experienced a change in antidepressants versus 51% who refilled and 18% who discontinued. Receipt of mental health specialty care was associated with a statistically significant, 10–20 percentage-point increase in the probability of antidepressant change; receipt of primary care was associated with a small and statistically significant increase in the probability of antidepressant change among patients with no mental health specialty care and above-average utilization of nursing care. Increased home health nursing care in absence of physician visits was not associated with increased antidepressant change. Conclusions Active antidepressant management resulting in a change in medication occurred on a limited scale among older patients receiving HHC. Addressing knowledge and practice gaps in antidepressant management by primary care providers and home health nurses and improving nurse-physician collaboration will be promising areas for future interventions. PMID:25158915

  1. A dementia care management intervention: which components improve quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodosh, Joshua; Pearson, Marjorie L; Connor, Karen I; Vassar, Stefanie D; Kaisey, Marwa; Lee, Martin L; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2012-02-01

    To analyze whether types of providers and frequency of encounters are associated with higher quality of care within a coordinated dementia care management (CM) program for patients and caregivers. Secondary analysis of intervention-arm data from a dementia CM cluster-randomized trial, where intervention participants interacted with healthcare organization care managers (HOCMs), community agency care managers (CACMs), and/ or healthcare organization primary care providers (HOPCPs) over 18 months. Encounters of 238 patient/caregivers (dyads) with HOCMs, CACMs, and HOPCPs were abstracted from care management electronic records. The quality domains of assessment, treatment, education/support, and safety were measured from medical record abstractions and caregiver surveys. Mean percentages of met quality indicators associated with exposures to each provider type and frequency were analyzed using multivariable regression, adjusting for participant characteristics and baseline quality. As anticipated, for all 4 domains, the mean percentage of met dementia quality indicators was 15.5 to 47.2 percentage points higher for dyads with HOCM--only exposure than for dyads with none (all P < .008); not anticipated were higher mean percentages with increasing combinations of provider-type exposure-up to 73.7 percentage points higher for safety (95% confidence interval 65.2%-82.1%) with exposure to all 3 provider types compared with no exposure. While greater frequency of HOCM-dyad encounters was associated with higher quality (P < .04), this was not so for other provider types. HOCMs' interactions with dyads was essential for dementia care quality improvement. Additional coordinated interactions with primary care and community agency staff yielded even higher quality.

  2. A quality improvement management model for renal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlchek, D L; Day, L M

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the potential for applying the theory and tools of quality improvement (total quality management) in the renal care setting. We believe that the coupling of the statistical techniques used in the Deming method of quality improvement, with modern approaches to outcome and process analysis, will provide the renal care community with powerful tools, not only for improved quality (i.e., reduced morbidity and mortality), but also for technology evaluation and resource allocation.

  3. [Organization of health services and tuberculosis care management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrêto, Anne Jaquelyne Roque; de Sá, Lenilde Duarte; Nogueira, Jordana de Almeida; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Pinheiro, Patrícia Geórgia de Oliveira Diniz; de Farias, Nilma Maria Porto; Rodrigues, Débora Cezar de Souza; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2012-07-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the discourse of managers regarding the relationship between the organization of the health services and tuberculosis care management in a city in the metropolitan region of João Pessoa, State of Pernambuco. Using qualitative research in the analytical field of the French line of Discourse Analysis, 16 health workers who worked as members of the management teams took part in the study. The transcribed testimonials were organized using Atlas.ti version 6.0 software. After detailed reading of the empirical material, an attempt was made to identify the paraphrasic, polyssemic and metaphoric processes in the discourses, which enabled identification of the following discourse formation: Organization of the health services and the relation with TB care management: theory and practice. In the discourse of the managers the fragmentation of the actions of control of tuberculosis, the lack of articulation between the services and sectors, the compliance of the specific activities for TB, as well as the lack of strategic planning for management of care of the disease are clearly revealed. In this respect, for the organization of the health services to be effective, it is necessary that tuberculosis be considered a priority and acknowledged as a social problem in the management agenda.

  4. The work and challenges of care managers in the implementation of collaborative care: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeck, G; Kousgaard, M B; Davidsen, A S

    2018-04-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: In collaborative care models between psychiatry and general practice, mental health nurses are used as care managers who carry out the treatment of patients with anxiety or depression in general practice and establish a collaborating relationship with the general practitioner. Although the care manager is the key person in the collaborative care model, there is little knowledge about this role and the challenges involved in it. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Our study shows that before the CMs could start treating patients in a routine collaborative relationship with GPs, they needed to carry out an extensive amount of implementation work. This included solving practical problems of location and logistics, engaging GPs in the intervention, and tailoring collaboration to meet the GP's particular preferences. Implementing the role requires high commitment and an enterprising approach on the part of the care managers. The very experienced mental health nurses of this study had these skills. However, the same expertise cannot be presumed in a disseminated model. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: When introducing new collaborative care interventions, the care manager role should be well defined and be well prepared, especially as regards the arrival of the care manager in general practice, and supported during implementation by a coordinated leadership established in collaboration between hospital psychiatry and representatives from general practice. Introduction In collaborative care models for anxiety and depression, the care manager (CM), often a mental health nurse, has a key role. However, the work and challenges related to this role remain poorly investigated. Aim To explore CMs' experiences of their work and the challenges they face when implementing their role in a collaborative care intervention in the Capital Region of Denmark. Methods Interviews with eight CMs, a group interview with five CMs and a recording

  5. Economic and clinical impact of multiple myeloma to managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Richard

    2008-09-01

    Because of the development of novel agents such as immunomodulators, proteasome inhibitors, and bisphosphonates, the standards of care for the multiple myeloma (MM) patient have changed. The costs associated with current and emerging therapies, as well as supportive care, are significant and pose a tremendous financial burden to both patients and managed care. To review the economic impact of MM and to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of current treatments in bringing value for prolonged life versus the cost of treatment. This chapter will also discuss the need for thorough data review and pharmacoeconomic analyses to determine the most cost-effective therapies. Although MM accounts for only a small percentage of all cancer types, the costs associated with treating and managing it are among the highest. Recent developments in diagnosing, treating, and managing myeloma have led to novel treatment strategies. Immunomodulators, proteasome inhibitors, and bisphosphonates are improving response rates and preserving quality of life. However, these agents are not replacing older treatment modalities, but being used in addition to them. Intensive chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation, and supportive care are all important components in achieving treatment goals. Costs associated with stem cell transplants and complications of the disease add to the economic burden of myeloma. Additional costs for routine diagnostics to measure the progression of the disease or response to treatment need to be considered. Complications (e.g., lytic bone disease, infection, anemia, and renal failure) also add to morbidity and mortality, thus increasing the burden to the patient and the health care system as a whole. Financial and time constraints of caregivers must also be considered, as well as the added administrative burdens to health care providers. New standards of care in the treatment and management of myeloma are likely to lead to significant increases in costs. Although

  6. How the United States exports managed care to developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzkin, H; Iriart, C

    2001-01-01

    As their expansion slows in the United States, managed care organizations will continue to enter new markets abroad. Investors view the opening of managed care in Latin America as a lucrative business opportunity. As public-sector services and social security funds are cut back, privatized, and reorganized under managed care, with the support of international lending agencies such as the World Bank, the effects of these reforms on access to preventive and curative services will hold great importance throughout the developing world. Many groups in Latin America are working on alternative projects that defend health as a public good, and similar movements have begun in Africa and Asia. Increasingly, this organizing is being recognized not only as part of a class struggle but also as part of a struggle against economic imperialism--which has now taken on the new appearance of rescuing less developed countries from rising health care costs and inefficient bureaucracies through the imposition of neoliberal managed-care solutions exported from the United States.

  7. Managed care, vertical integration strategies and hospital performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B B; Wan, T T; Clement, J; Begun, J

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association of managed care with hospital vertical integration strategies, as well as to observe the relationships of different types of vertical integration with hospital efficiency and financial performance. The sample consists of 363 California short-term acute care hospitals in 1994. Linear structure equation modeling is used to test six hypotheses derived from the strategic adaptation model. Several organizational and market factors are controlled statistically. Results suggest that managed care is a driving force for hospital vertical integration. In terms of performance, hospitals that are integrated with physician groups and provide outpatient services (backward integration) have better operating margins, returns on assets, and net cash flows (p < 0.01). These hospitals are not, however, likely to show greater productivity. Forward integration with a long-term-care facility, on the other hand, is positively and significantly related to hospital productivity (p < 0.001). Forward integration is negatively related to financial performance (p < 0.05), however, opposite to the direction hypothesized. Health executives should be responsive to the growth of managed care in their local market and should probably consider providing more backward integrated services rather than forward integrated services in order to improve the hospital's financial performance in today's competitive health care market.

  8. Using systems science for population health management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Kong, Nan; Lawley, Mark A; Pagán, José A

    2014-10-01

    Population health management is becoming increasingly important to organizations managing and providing primary care services given ongoing changes in health care delivery and payment systems. The objective of this study is to show how systems science methodologies could be incorporated into population health management to compare different interventions and improve health outcomes. The New York Academy of Medicine Cardiovascular Health Simulation model (an agent-based model) and data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to evaluate a lifestyle program that could be implemented in primary care practice settings. The program targeted Medicare-age adults and focused on improving diet and exercise and reducing weight. The simulation results suggest that there would be significant reductions projected in the proportion of the Medicare-age population with diabetes after the implementation of the proposed lifestyle program for a relatively long term (3 and 5 years). Similar results were found for the subpopulations with high cholesterol, but the proposed intervention would not have a significant effect in the proportion of the population with hypertension over a time period of Systems science methodologies can be useful to compare the health outcomes of different interventions. These tools can become an important component of population health management because they can help managers and other decision makers evaluate alternative programs in primary care settings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Colorectal cancer: complexities and challenges in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkoff, Neil B

    2007-08-01

    Managed care weighs advances and associated costs to determine whether the combination of longer life at sometimes significantly increased cost represents value. The price of treatment is only 1 factor. To review treatment decision processes for oncologic agents in managed care environments. Price can be exceptionally high for individuals. But if the population size is low, the per-member-per-month (PMPM) impact can be almost negligible, unlike treatments that have moderate costs but are used ubiquitously. Cancer therapies have, for the most part, escaped managed care's notice. For 2007, the national Cancer Institute projects that antineoplastic agents will consume almost a quarter of the overall drug spend. The Medicare population is a unique concern with regard to cancer. Traditionally, Medicare reimbursement of chemotherapeutic agents was based on average wholesale price (AWP) discounting, not the oncologist's purchasing cost. This allowed oncologists to use reimbursement for infusions to support their medical practices. The proposed plan of the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to use average sales price (ASP) plus 6% to reimburse for drugs used in the office setting leads to significant problems. Pharmacy and therapeutics committees will also face challenges: fewer data are available for some agents because they have become available through the U.S. Food and drug administration's Fast Track, Priority review, or accelerated approval processes. Oncology disease management programs must reach out to patients and not necessarily deal with oncology issues directly, but address tangential issues that impact care, especially depression and pain management.

  10. Guideline for primary care management of headache in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Werner J.; Findlay, Ted; Moga, Carmen; Scott, N. Ann; Harstall, Christa; Taenzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To increase the use of evidence-informed approaches to diagnosis, investigation, and treatment of headache for patients in primary care. Quality of evidence A comprehensive search was conducted for relevant guidelines and systematic reviews published between January 2000 and May 2011. The guidelines were critically appraised using the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) tool, and the 6 highest-quality guidelines were used as seed guidelines for the guideline adaptation process. Main message A multidisciplinary guideline development group of primary care providers and other specialists crafted 91 specific recommendations using a consensus process. The recommendations cover diagnosis, investigation, and management of migraine, tension-type, medication-overuse, and cluster headache. Conclusion A clinical practice guideline for the Canadian health care context was created using a guideline adaptation process to assist multidisciplinary primary care practitioners in providing evidence-informed care for patients with headache. PMID:26273080

  11. The new caring: financial asset management and older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilse, Cheryl; Wilson, Jill; Setterlund, Deborah; Rosenman, Linda

    2007-10-01

    Increasing longevity and the growing proportion of the aged in the population in most countries have served to focus on the question of how governments and older people can finance living, health, and care options in retirement. Prudent management of income and assets is an increasingly complex and important aspect of aging as assets and expectations of self-financing increase. Although many informal caregivers act as asset managers and/or substitute decision-makers for older people, little attention has been paid to this increasingly important aspect of care. This paper summaries key findings of a broad research program exploring family involvement in the management of older people's assets and the practices that constitute good practice as well as financial mismanagement and abuse. It identifies multi-level and multi-strategy responses needed to address the issues raised by the research and outlines an innovative community demonstration project aimed at improving financial management practices in relation to older people's assets.

  12. Managing actinic keratosis in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Nicola; Tidman, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Actinic, or solar, keratosis is caused by chronic ultraviolet-induced damage to the epidermis. In the UK, 15-23% of individuals have actinic keratosis lesions. Risk factors include: advanced age; male gender; cumulative sun exposure or phototherapy; Fitzpatrick skin phototypes I-II; long-term immuno-suppression and genetic syndromes e.g. xeroderma pigmentosum and albinism. Actinic keratoses are regarded by some authorities as premalignant lesions that may transform into invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and by others as in situ SCC that may progress to an invasive stage. The risk of malignant change appears low; up to 0.5% per lesion per year. Up to 20-30% of lesions may spontaneously regress but in the absence of any reliable prognostic clinical indicators regarding malignant potential active treatment is considered appropriate. Actinic keratosis lesions may present as discrete hyperkeratotic papules, cutaneous horns, or more subtle flat lesions on sun-exposed areas of skin. The single most helpful diagnostic sign is an irregularly roughened surface texture: a sandpaper-like feel almost always indicates actinic damage. Dermatoscopy can be helpful in excluding signs of basal cell carcinoma when actinic keratosis is non-keratotic. It is always important to consider the possibility of SCC. The principal indication for referral to secondary care is the possibility of cutaneous malignancy. However, widespread and severe actinic damage in patients who are immunosuppressed is also a reason for referral.

  13. Transcultural nursing and a care management partnership project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazure, G; Vissandjée, B; Pepin, J; Kérouac, S

    1997-09-01

    This paper aims to illustrate how Leininger's Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality has influenced the research process of a study that emerged from a care management partnership between Canadian nursing teachers and Tunisian nurses. The purpose of the study was to investigate the meanings of care as viewed by university hospital-based Tunisian nurses. The qualitative analysis of data gathered through observation-participation and interviews highlights recurrent patterns and reveals three major professional care themes. For Tunisian nurses care means to secure the patient's cooperation towards the medical regimen within established rules in the hospital; to contribute to curing the patient by using current technology as well as by maintaining their technical skills and improving their medical knowledge; to take charge of the patient to assist the physician in treating disease. This study showed that Tunisian nurses emphasize curing rather than widely shared community values such as interdependence, intercommunication, understanding, presence and responsibility for others. Discussion of the study's findings draws upon the perspective provided by Freire's Oppressed Group Theory. In order to promote cultural congruence within the Care Management Partnership Project in Tunisia, the three predicted modes of care within Leininger's theory guide the decisions and actions for future nursing research and partnership activities.

  14. Assessment and management of suicide risk in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Pooja; While, David; Chantler, Khatidja; Windfuhr, Kirsten; Kapur, Navneet

    2014-01-01

    Risk assessment and management of suicidal patients is emphasized as a key component of care in specialist mental health services, but these issues are relatively unexplored in primary care services. To examine risk assessment and management in primary and secondary care in a clinical sample of individuals who were in contact with mental health services and died by suicide. Data collection from clinical proformas, case records, and semistructured face-to-face interviews with general practitioners. Primary and secondary care data were available for 198 of the 336 cases (59%). The overall agreement in the rating of risk between services was poor (overall κ = .127, p = .10). Depression, care setting (after discharge), suicidal ideation at last contact, and a history of self-harm were associated with a rating of higher risk. Suicide prevention policies were available in 25% of primary care practices, and 33% of staff received training in suicide risk assessments. Risk is difficult to predict, but the variation in risk assessment between professional groups may reflect poor communication. Further research is required to understand this. There appears to be a relative lack of suicide risk assessment training in primary care.

  15. Active Social Media Management: The Case of Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Amalia R.; Tucker, Catherine Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Given the demand for authentic personal interactions over social media, it is unclear how much firms should actively manage their social media presence. We study this question empirically in a health care setting. We show that active social media management drives more user-generated content. However, we find that this is due to an incremental increase in user postings from an organization's employees rather than from its clients. This result holds when we explore exogenous variation in socia...

  16. Petroleum and Health Care: Evaluating and Managing Health Care's Vulnerability to Petroleum Supply Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Daniel; Bae, Jaeyong; Pierce, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Petroleum is used widely in health care—primarily as a transport fuel and feedstock for pharmaceuticals, plastics, and medical supplies—and few substitutes for it are available. This dependence theoretically makes health care vulnerable to petroleum supply shifts, but this vulnerability has not been empirically assessed. We quantify key aspects of petroleum use in health care and explore historical associations between petroleum supply shocks and health care prices. These analyses confirm that petroleum products are intrinsic to modern health care and that petroleum supply shifts can affect health care prices. In anticipation of future supply contractions lasting longer than previous shifts and potentially disrupting health care delivery, we propose an adaptive management approach and outline its application to the example of emergency medical services. PMID:21778473

  17. Improving quality in Medicaid: the use of care management processes for chronic illness and preventive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Diane R; Robinson, James C

    2006-01-01

    Care management processes (CMPs), tools to improve the efficiency and quality of primary care delivery, are particularly important for low-income patients facing substantial barriers to care. To measure the adoption of CMPs by medical groups, Independent Practice Associations, community clinics, and hospital-based clinics in California's Medicaid program and the factors associated with CMP adoption. Telephone survey of every provider organization with at least 6 primary care physicians and at least 1 Medi-Cal HMO contract, Spring 2003. One hundred twenty-three organizations participated, accounting for 64% of provider organizations serving Medicaid managed care in California. We surveyed 30 measures of CMP use for asthma and diabetes, and for child and adolescent preventive services. The mean number of CMPs used by each organization was 4.5 for asthma and 4.9 for diabetes (of a possible 8). The mean number of CMPs for preventive services was 4.0 for children and 3.5 for adolescents (of a possible 7). Organizations with more extensive involvement in Medi-Cal managed care used more CMPs for chronic illness and preventive service. Community clinics and hospital-based clinics used more CMPs for asthma and diabetes than did Independent Practice Associations (IPAs), and profitable organizations used more CMPs for child and adolescent preventive services than did entities facing severe financial constraints. The use of CMPs by Medicaid HMOs and the presence of external (financial and nonfinancial) incentives for clinical performance were strongly associated with use of care management by provider organizations. Physician and provider organizations heavily involved in California's Medicaid program are extensively engaged in preventive and chronic care management programs.

  18. Improving performance management for delivering appropriate care for patients no longer needing acute hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Christine; Henry, Effie

    2008-01-01

    The public, providers and policy-makers are interested in a service continuum where care is provided in the appropriate place. Alternate level of care is used to define patients who no longer need acute care but remain in an acute care bed. Our aims were to determine how subacute care and convalescent care should be defined in British Columbia (BC); how these care levels should be aligned with existing legislation to provide more consistent service standards to patients and what reporting requirements were needed for system planning and performance management. A literature review was conducted to understand the international trends in performance management, care delivery models and change management. A Canada-wide survey was carried out to determine the directions of other provinces on the defined issues and a BC survey provided a current state analysis of programming within the five regional health authorities (HAs). A provincial policy framework for subacute and convalescent care has been developed to begin to address the concerns raised and provide a base for performance measurement. The policy has been approved and disseminated to BC HAs for implementation. An implementation plan has been developed and implementation activities have been integrated into the work of existing provincial committees. Evaluation will occur through performance measurement. The benefits anticipated include: clear policy guidance for programme development; improved comparability of performance information for system monitoring, planning and integrity of the national acute care Discharge Abstracting Database; improved efficiency in acute care bed use; and improved equity of access, insurability and quality for patients requiring subacute and convalescent care. While a national reporting system exists for acute care in Canada, this project raises questions about the implications for this system, given the shifting definition of acute care as other care levels emerge. Questions are also

  19. Documentation of Contraception and Pregnancy Intention In Medicaid Managed Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Thiel de Bocanegra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Clinical guidelines recommend the documentation of pregnancy intention and family planning needs during primary care visits. Prior to the 2014 Medicaid expansion and release of these guidelines, the documentation practices of Medicaid managed care providers are unknown. Methods: We performed a chart review of 1054 Medicaid managed care visits of women aged 13 to 49 to explore client, provider, and visit characteristics associated with documentation of immediate or future plans for having children and contraceptive method use. Five managed care plans used Current Procedural Terminology and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes to identify providers with at least 15 women who had received family planning or well-woman care in 2013. We conducted multilevel logistic regression analyses with documentation of contraceptive method and pregnancy intention as outcome variables and clinic site as the level 2 random effect. Results: Only 12% of charts had documentation of pregnancy intention and 59% documented contraceptive use. Compared to women with a family planning visit reason, women with an annual, reproductive health, or primary care reason for their visit were significantly less likely to have contraception documented (odds ratio [OR] = 11.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.8-17.7. Age was also a significant predictor with women aged 30 to 49 (OR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.4-0.9, and women aged 13 to 19 (OR = 0.2; 95% CI = 0.1-0.6 being less likely to have a note about pregnancy intention in their chart. Pregnancy intention was more likely to be documented in multispecialty clinics (OR = 15.5; 95% CI = 2.7-89.2. Conclusions: Interventions to improve routine medical record documentation of contraception and pregnancy intention regardless of patient age and visit characteristics are needed to facilitate the provision of family planning in managed care visits and, ultimately, achieving better maternal infant health outcomes

  20. Ethics in practice: managed care and the changing health care environment: medicine as a profession managed care ethics working group statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povar, Gail J; Blumen, Helen; Daniel, John; Daub, Suzanne; Evans, Lois; Holm, Richard P; Levkovich, Natalie; McCarter, Alice O; Sabin, James; Snyder, Lois; Sulmasy, Daniel; Vaughan, Peter; Wellikson, Laurence D; Campbell, Amy

    2004-07-20

    Cost pressures and changes in the health care environment pose ethical challenges and hard choices for patients, physicians, policymakers, and society. In 2000 and 2001, the American College of Physicians, with the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Ethics Program, convened a working group of stakeholders--patients, physicians, and managed care representatives, along with medical ethicists--to develop a statement of ethics for managed care. The group explored the impact of a changing health care environment on patient-physician relationships and how to best apply the principles of professionalism in this environment. The statement that emerged offers guidance on preserving the patient-clinician relationship, patient rights and responsibilities, confidentiality and privacy, resource allocation and stewardship, the obligation of health plans to foster an ethical environment for the delivery of care, and the clinician's responsibility to individual patients, the community, and the public health, among other issues.

  1. Safe management of waste from health-care activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, A.; Giroult, E.; Rushbrook, P.

    1999-01-01

    The waste produced in the course of health-care activities, from contaminated needles to radioactive isotopes, carries a greater potential for causing infection and injury than any other type of waste, and inadequate or inappropriate management is likely to have serious public health consequences and deleterious effects on the environment. This handbook - the result of extensive international consultation and collaboration - provides comprehensive guidance on safe, efficient, and environmentally sound methods for the handling and disposal of health-care wastes. The various categories of waste are clearly defined and the particular hazards that each poses are described. Considerable prominence is given to the careful planning that is essential for the success of waste management; workable means of minimizing waste production are outlined and the role of reuse and recycling of waste is discussed. Most of the text, however, is devoted to the collection, segregation, storage, transport, and disposal of wastes. Details of containers for each category of waste, labelling of waste packages, and storage conditions are provided, and the various technologies for treatment of waste and disposal of final residues are discussed at length. Advice is given on occupational safety for all personnel involved with waste handling, and a separate chapter is devoted to the closely related topic of hospital hygiene and infection control. The handbook pays particular attention to basic processes and technologies that are not only safe but also affordable, sustainable, and culturally appropriate. For health-care settings in which resources are severely limited there is a separate chapter on minimal programmes; this summarizes all the simplest and least costly techniques that can be employed for the safe management of health-care wastes. The guide is aimed at public health managers and policy-makers, hospital managers, environmental health professionals, and all administrators with an

  2. RN Diabetes Virtual Case Management: A New Model for Providing Chronic Care Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nancy N; Carrara, Barbara E; Watts, Sharon A; Lucatorto, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. chronic disease health care system has substantial gaps in delivery of services. New models of care change traditional delivery of care and explore new settings for care. This article describes a new model of diabetes chronic care delivery: nurse-delivered care that includes protocol-based insulin titration and patient education delivered solely in a virtual environment. In phase 1, the clinical outcome of time to achievement of glycated hemoglobin (A(1C)) goals (P managed insulin titration protocol with individualized A(1C) goals had a significant (P Safety was demonstrated by the absence of hypoglycemia related to RN protocol adjustment. There were no admissions or emergency room (ER) visits for hypoglycemia. This study demonstrates safety and efficacy of RN virtual chronic disease management for an older population of patients with long-standing diabetes.

  3. Managed care and clinical decision-making in child and adolescent behavioral health: provider perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanos, Philip T; Garcia, Christine I; Hansell, Stephen; Rosato, Mark G; Minsky, Shula

    2003-03-01

    This study investigated how managed care affects clinical decision-making in a behavioral health care system. Providers serving children and adolescents under both managed and unmanaged care (n = 28) were interviewed about their awareness of differences between the benefit arrangements, how benefits affect clinical decision-making, outcomes and quality of care; and satisfaction with care. Quantitative and qualitative findings indicated that providers saw both advantages and disadvantages to managed care. Although most providers recognized the advantages of managed care in increasing efficiency, many were concerned that administrative pressures associated with managed care compromise service quality.

  4. Improving Health Care Management in Primary Care for Homeless People: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abcaya, Julien; Ștefan, Diana-Elena; Calvet-Montredon, Céline; Gentile, Stéphanie

    2018-01-01

    Background: Homeless people have poorer health status than the general population. They need complex care management, because of associated medical troubles (somatic and psychiatric) and social difficulties. We aimed to describe the main characteristics of the primary care programs that take care of homeless people, and to identify which could be most relevant. Methods: We performed a literature review that included articles which described and evaluated primary care programs for homeless people. Results: Most of the programs presented a team-based approach, multidisciplinary and/or integrated care. They often proposed co-located services between somatic health services, mental health services and social support services. They also tried to answer to the specific needs of homeless people. Some characteristics of these programs were associated with significant positive outcomes: tailored primary care organizations, clinic orientation, multidisciplinary team-based models which included primary care physicians and clinic nurses, integration of social support, and engagement in the community’s health. Conclusions: Primary health care programs that aimed at taking care of the homeless people should emphasize a multidisciplinary approach and should consider an integrated (mental, somatic and social) care model. PMID:29439403

  5. ["Hannibal ante portas" -- technical development and health care reorganization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fülesdi, Béla; Velkey, György

    2011-11-20

    Authors intend to analyze the impact of medical technical development on the Hungarian health care system and try to draw attention to potentially necessary measures for professional and structural health care reorganization.

  6. Empowerment, patient centred care and self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvirenti, Mariastella; McMillan, John; Lawn, Sharon

    2014-06-01

    Patient or person centred care is widely accepted as the philosophy and practice that underpins quality care. An examination of the Australian National Chronic Disease Strategy and literature in the field highlights assumptions about the self-manager as patient and a focus on clinical settings. This paper considers patient or person centred care in the light of empowerment as it is understood in the health promotion charters first established in Alma Ata in 1977. We argue that patient or person centred care can be reconfigured within a social justice and rights framework and that doing so supports the creation of conditions for well-being in the broader context, one that impacts strongly on individuals. These arguments have broader implications for the practice of patient centred care as it occurs between patient and health professional and for creating shared responsibility for management of the self. It also has implications for those who manage their health outside of the health sector. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The transfer of a health insurance/managed care business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, John N; Goodman, George; Goroff, David B

    2007-01-01

    The owners of a health insurance/managed care business may want to sell that business for a variety of reasons. Health care provider systems may want to exit that business due to operating losses, difficulty in complying with regulations, the inherent conflict in operating that business as part of a provider system, or the desire to focus on being a health care provider. Health insurers/HMOs may want to sell all or a portion of their business due to operating losses, difficulty in servicing a particular market, or a desire to focus on other markets. No matter what reason prompts a seller to undertake a sale, a sale of health insurance/managed care business can be a complicated transaction involving a multitude of issues. This article will focus first on the ways in which such a sale may be structured. The article will then discuss some transactional issues that may arise in the negotiations for the sale of a health insurance/managed care business. The article will then focus on some particular legal issues that arise in each sale-e.g., antitrust, HIPAA, regulatory approvals, and charitable issues. Finally, this article will provide an overview of tax structuring considerations.

  8. The regulatory role of the Hungarian Geological Survey in the closure of Mecsek uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamor, T.; Gombor, L.

    2001-01-01

    Under Mining Act XLIII established in 1993, the Hungarian Geological Survey was given a wide range of authority related to the environment, mining, nuclear and general constructions. In implementing these task the Survey will be supported by the well established Geological Institute of Hungary and the Eoetvoes Lorand Geophysical Institute. The Survey's role in the nuclear field includes the licensing of plans and reports on geologically related research to any nuclear facilities. The Hungarian Geological Survey is also co-authority on matters related to the establishment, construction, modification and closure, environmental protection of nuclear facilities in general and all matter related to uranium mining. The Survey's regulatory activity in radioactive waste management follows the Decree of the Minister of Industry and Tourism 62/1997 which is based on the Atomic Energy Act CXVI of 1966. These regulations were prepared in harmony with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency conventions, standards and guides and those of other countries. Case histories on the applications of these regulations to the closure of Mecsek uranium mine and the operation of the research laboratory tunnel for long-lived, high level radioactive waste are presented here. (author)

  9. Assessing and Promoting the Level of Safeguards Culture in Hungarian Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanka, Z.; Vincze, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Hungarian SSAC has introduced a comprehensive domestic safeguards verification system consisting of regular comprehensive SSAC verifications in the whole lifetime of the facilities. The main goals of the comprehensive verification system are: (i) to assess the facility's safeguards system compliance with the relevant national legislation and recommendations, (ii) to assess the activities of the facility aimed at maintaining and further developing its safeguards system, and, (iii) to revise validity of data and information previously provided by the facility subject to safeguards licencing procedures. The maintenance level of the system as well as the available knowledge on the possible needs for change reflect the top management's awareness of this issue and is a good indicator of the present and future effectiveness of the facility level safeguards system and the level of safeguards culture. The structure, preparation, conduction, documentation and initial experiences of the comprehensive safeguards verification system is introduced in the paper. Additionally, HAEA has just introduced a safeguards indexing method for evaluation the safeguards culture at Hungarian nuclear facilities. The main goal of indexing method and the evaluated parameters are also shown in the paper. (author)

  10. The role of managed care in work-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, M J; Miller, J C

    1996-10-01

    Many opportunities exist today for orthopedic surgeons in the treatment and management of work-related injuries. Physicians wishing to enter or participate in this market must realize that the role of the physician in the treatment of the injured worker has expanded from one of being solely the care giver to being a patient manager, a problem solver, and a communicator. A number of years ago, many orthopedic surgeons missed out on managed care contracting for health maintenance organizations because they thought they could survive without it. They soon learned the challenges of sitting on the sidelines. Whether we like it or not, managed care for work-related injuries is here and its likelihood for going away is about zero. If your state has not yet adopted utilization management standards or managed care for workers' compensation-enabling legislation, when you wake up tomorrow they may have done so. Because of its relative embryonic development, there are exceptional opportunities for practitioners to take active roles in shaping the models that will serve employees and employers in the year 2000. Physicians who are interested in the treatment of injured workers have a unique opportunity right now to develop relationships in the managed workers' compensation arena. Payment and patient referrals for workers' compensation may turn out to be more attractive financially than many of the contracts currently in place with health maintenance organizations and other general health plans. Physicians willing to partner with employers and other players in the workers' compensation arena currently face some challenging, rewarding, and exciting opportunities. In the immortal words of Hippocrates, "Healing is a matter of time, but it is sometimes a matter of opportunity."3 It is unclear whether Hippocrates ever imagined our current level of science, practice, and organization, but it is clear the opportunities to be an active participant in the changes occurring in workers

  11. Management of Tracheostomy: A Survey of Dutch Intensive Care Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veelo, Denise P.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Phoa, Kai Y. N.; Dongelmans, Dave A.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine tracheostomy-management practices in Dutch intensive care units (ICUs) and post-ICU step-down facilities. METHODS: We surveyed the physician medical directors of all Dutch nonpediatric ICUs that have : 5 beds suitable for mechanical ventilation. The survey asked for

  12. The knowledge and practice of self-care management among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Self-care management in diabetic patients is crucial to control and ... Rwanda Journal Series F: Medicine and Health Sciences Vol. 2 No. 1, 2015 .... the shoes, and 63% (n=51) checked their feet every day as a matter of principle.

  13. Telephone versus usual care in management of acute whiplash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whiplash associated disorder (WAD) is a common and costly condition, and recommended management includes advice to “act as usual” and exercise. Providing this treatment through a telephonic intervention may help to improve access to care, and reduce costs. This pilot study assessed: (1) the effectiveness of a ...

  14. Care-managers' professional choices: ethical dilemmas and conflicting expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnessen, Siri; Ursin, Gøril; Brinchmann, Berit Støre

    2017-09-07

    Care-managers are responsible for the public administration of individual healthcare decisions and decide on the volume and content of community healthcare services given to a population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the conflicting expectations and ethical dilemmas these professionals encounter in their daily work with patients and to discuss the clinical implications of this. The study had a qualitative design. The data consisted of verbatim transcripts from 12 ethical reflection group meetings held in 2012 at a purchaser unit in a Norwegian city. The participants consist of healthcare professionals such as nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and social workers. The analyses and interpretation were conducted according to a hermeneutic methodology. This study is part of a larger research project. Two main themes emerged through the analyses: 1. Professional autonomy and loyalty, and related subthemes: loyalty to whom/what, overruling of decisions, trust and obligation to report. 2. Boundaries of involvement and subthemes: private or professional, care-manager or provider and accessibility. Underlying values and a model illustrating the dimensions of professional responsibility in the care-manager role are suggested. The study implies that when allocating services, healthcare professionals need to find a balance between responsibility and accountability in their role as care-managers.

  15. Federated management of information for TeleCARE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afsarmanesh, H.; Guevara-Masis, V.; Hertzberger, L.O.; Camarinha-Matos, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Distributed information management plays a fundamental role within the base infrastructure supporting the elderly care domain. Specificities of this domain include the autonomy and independence of its involved actors, the critical data that is handled about individuals, and the variety of

  16. Clothing for Elderly Persons: Management and Caring Strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the clothing requirements of the elderly across the globe and the management and caring strategies in supporting them. There is however, no specific requirement for the elderly in terms of what they wear or how they dress over and above the requirements of early adult life in many nations of the world.

  17. Hospital marketing orientation and managed care processes: are they coordinated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K R; Thompson, J M; Patel, U B

    2001-01-01

    The hospital marketing function has been widely adopted as a way to learn about markets, attract sufficient resources, develop appropriate services, and communicate the availability of such goods to those who may be able to purchase such services. The structure, tasks, and effectiveness of the marketing function have been the subject of increased inquiry by researchers and practitioners alike. A specific understanding of hospital marketing in a growing managed care environment and the relationship between marketing and managed care processes in hospitals is a growing concern. Using Kotler and Clarke's framework for assessing marketing orientation, we examined the marketing orientation of hospitals in a single state at two points in time--1993 and 1999. Study findings show that the overall marketing orientation score decreased from 1993 to 1999 for the respondent hospitals. The five elements of the Kotler and Clarke definition of marketing orientation remained relatively stable, with slightly lower scores related to customer philosophy. In addition, we evaluated the degree to which selected managed care activities are carried out as part of its marketing function. A significant (p marketing function was evident from 1993 to 1999. With increasing numbers of managed care plan enrollees, hospitals are likely focusing on organizational buyers as important customers. In order to appeal to organizational buyers, hospital executives may be focusing more on clinical quality and cost efficiency in the production of services, which will improve a hospital's position with organizational buyers.

  18. Primary health care management challenges for childhood atopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kaarina Frieda Meintjes

    primary health care (PHC) management of their children's atopic eczema in a Gauteng district. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive, contextual embedded single case study design ... direct observation until saturation occurred; analysed according to Tesch's ..... needed, it was provided by the researcher as part of the pro-.

  19. TQ What?: Applying Total Quality Management to Child Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewes, Dorothy

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM), developed by W. Edward Deming and Joseph Juran in 1940s, and its applications for child care centers. Discusses how TQM focuses on customer satisfaction, measuring performance, benchmarking, employee empowerment, and continuous training. Includes a list of suggested readings on TQM. (MDM)

  20. A retrospective review of intensive care management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Organophosphate (OP) compounds are used as insecticides. Given the widespread availability and use of these chemicals, OP poisoning is quite common following either accidental or intentional exposures. Immediate intensive care management can save lives in these patients. We aimed to investigate ...

  1. The Exnovation of Chronic Care Management Processes by Physician Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Hector P; Henke, Rachel Mosher; Bibi, Salma; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-09-01

    Policy Points The rate of adoption of chronic care management processes (CMPs) by physician organizations has been fairly slow in spite of demonstrated effectiveness of CMPs in improving outcomes of chronic care. Exnovation (ie, removal of innovations) by physician organizations largely explains the slow population-level increases in practice use of CMPs over time. Expanded health information technology functions may aid practices in retaining CMPs. Low provider reimbursement by Medicaid programs, however, may contribute to disinvestment in CMPs by physician organizations. Exnovation is the process of removal of innovations that are not effective in improving organizational performance, are too disruptive to routine operations, or do not fit well with the existing organizational strategy, incentives, structure, and/or culture. Exnovation may contribute to the low overall adoption of care management processes (CMPs) by US physician organizations over time. Three national surveys of US physician organizations, which included common questions about organizational characteristics, use of CMPs, and health information technology (HIT) capabilities for practices of all sizes, and Truven Health Insurance Coverage Estimates were integrated to assess organizational and market influences on the exnovation of CMPs in a longitudinal cohort of 1,048 physician organizations. CMPs included 5 strategies for each of 4 chronic conditions (diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure, and depression): registry use, nurse care management, patient reminders for preventive and care management services to prevent exacerbations of chronic illness, use of nonphysician clinicians to provide patient education, and quality of care feedback to physicians. Over one-third (34.1%) of physician organizations exnovated CMPs on net. Quality of care data feedback to physicians and patient reminders for recommended preventive and chronic care were discontinued by over one-third of exnovators, while nurse

  2. The Exnovation of Chronic Care Management Processes by Physician Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    HENKE, RACHEL MOSHER; BIBI, SALMA; RAMSAY, PATRICIA P.; SHORTELL, STEPHEN M.

    2016-01-01

    Policy Points The rate of adoption of chronic care management processes (CMPs) by physician organizations has been fairly slow in spite of demonstrated effectiveness of CMPs in improving outcomes of chronic care.Exnovation (ie, removal of innovations) by physician organizations largely explains the slow population‐level increases in practice use of CMPs over time.Expanded health information technology functions may aid practices in retaining CMPs. Low provider reimbursement by Medicaid programs, however, may contribute to disinvestment in CMPs by physician organizations. Context Exnovation is the process of removal of innovations that are not effective in improving organizational performance, are too disruptive to routine operations, or do not fit well with the existing organizational strategy, incentives, structure, and/or culture. Exnovation may contribute to the low overall adoption of care management processes (CMPs) by US physician organizations over time. Methods Three national surveys of US physician organizations, which included common questions about organizational characteristics, use of CMPs, and health information technology (HIT) capabilities for practices of all sizes, and Truven Health Insurance Coverage Estimates were integrated to assess organizational and market influences on the exnovation of CMPs in a longitudinal cohort of 1,048 physician organizations. CMPs included 5 strategies for each of 4 chronic conditions (diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure, and depression): registry use, nurse care management, patient reminders for preventive and care management services to prevent exacerbations of chronic illness, use of nonphysician clinicians to provide patient education, and quality of care feedback to physicians. Findings Over one‐third (34.1%) of physician organizations exnovated CMPs on net. Quality of care data feedback to physicians and patient reminders for recommended preventive and chronic care were discontinued by over one

  3. [Interest of psychiatric guidelines in managing agitation in intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazignac, Coralie; Ricou, Bara; Dan, Liviu; Virgillito, Salvatore; Adam, Eric; Seyedi, Majid; Cicotti, Andrei; Azi, Amine; Damsa, Cristian

    2007-02-14

    This paper discusses the importance of psychiatric guidelines and the position of the psychiatrist in the management of agitation in the intensive care unit. The use of psychiatric validated scales to assess agitation seems to ameliorate the quality of care in psychiatry, but also in intensive care. Psychiatric experts' recommendations for managing agitation are given, which is useful to create an open discussion with the intensivists. The use of sedative medication to protect the patient, staff and to prevent an escalation of violence remains a personal choice for each practitioner, depending on individual patient needs and context. In the treatment of agitated patients, an equilibrium needs to be found between the subjective dimension and the available data from evidence based medicine.

  4. Managing information technology human resources in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, Sathiadev; Crow, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    The health care sector has seen a major increase in the use of information technology (IT). The increasing permeation of IT into the enterprise has resulted in many non-IT employees acquiring IT-related skills and becoming an essential part of the IT-enabled enterprise. Health care IT employees work in a continually changing environment dealing with new specializations that are often unfamiliar to other personnel. The widespread use of outsourcing and offshoring in IT has introduced a third layer of complexity in the traditional hierarchy and its approach to managing human resources. This article studies 3 major issues in managing these human resources in an IT-enabled health care enterprise and recommends solutions to the problem.

  5. Fifteen minute consultation: Practical pain management in paediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Emily Jane; Brombley, Karen; Boyce, Katherine

    2017-10-01

    Pain and distress in the paediatric palliative care population can be very difficult to manage. Clinical scenarios range from the acute management of cancer-related pain at the end of life to the ongoing long-term support of children with complex multimodal pain related to progressive neurological conditions. Understanding the child's underlying condition, possible causes of pain and their preferred mode of communication are important to the delivery of holistic care. Modification of environmental factors, basic care consideration and non-pharmacological measures have a large role to play, alongside conventional analgesics. Medication may also need to be delivered by novel routes such as transdermal patches, continuous subcutaneous infusion of multiple drugs or transmucosal breakthrough analgesic doses. Two cases are used to illustrate approaches to these clinical problems. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Effective managed care marketing strategies for evolving markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, M K

    1997-11-01

    In a world of increased competition and changing consumer expectations, one of the keys to a fiscally sound health plan is having a dynamic marketing strategy that takes into account the shifting attitudes of consumers as managed care markets mature. The primary goal of any health plan marketing strategy should be the acquisition and retention of members. Providing cost-efficient and convenient service for enrollees, offering low or no deductibles, having convenient office locations, and minimizing paper-work are important elements of such a marketing strategy. Factors such as brand awareness and the perceived image of a health plan also are important considerations in acquiring and retaining market share. The relative importance of these consumer satisfaction criteria change as a managed care market evolves and matures. Financial and marketing managers, thus, should ascertain their market's stage of development and respond with appropriate marketing strategies.

  7. Intensive Care Unit Nurses' Beliefs About Delirium Assessment and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhouse, Kimberly J; Vincent, Catherine; Foreman, Marquis D; Gruss, Valerie A; Corte, Colleen; Berger, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Delirium, the most frequent complication of hospitalized older adults, particularly in intensive care units (ICUs), can result in increased mortality rates and length of stay. Nurses are neither consistently identifying nor managing delirium in these patients. The purpose of this study was to explore ICU nurses' identification of delirium, actions they would take for patients with signs or symptoms of delirium, and beliefs about delirium assessment and management. In this cross-sectional study using qualitative descriptive methods guided by the theory of planned behavior, 30 ICU nurses' responses to patient vignettes depicting different delirium subtypes were explored. Descriptive and content analyses revealed that nurses did not consistently identify delirium; their actions varied in different vignettes. Nurses believed that they needed adequate staffing, balanced workload, interprofessional collaboration, and established policy and protocols to identify and manage delirium successfully. Research is needed to determine if implementing these changes increases recognition and decreases consequences of delirium. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. [Local planning: the speech of basic health care center manager].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubas, Márcia Regina

    2005-01-01

    As planning is understood as a management tool, this article offers an argument through the speech framework of Basic Health Care Center Managers in the city of Curitiba-PR, by means of the Collective Subject Speech Methodology on local planning aspects. Its purpose is to bring local managers to a reflection concerning their styles, practices and experiences, as well as to collaborate with central level leading teams towards building their planning processes in an upward, participatory, communicative and strategic way. Considerations of the speeches built from central ideas are presented: planning methodology; inter-sectoriality; territorial basis; team and community participation; training, autonomy and particular profile of local managers; the manager's agenda; and institutional culture.

  9. [Relationship of the effectiveness of care management services and burdens of primary family caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Ling; Liu, Li-Fan; Chen, Shuh-Sin; Lin, Hsiu-Chun

    2014-02-01

    In Taiwan, long-term care management centers hold primary responsibility for administering long-term care services, assisting with long-term care placements, and sharing the care burden with family caregivers in need. Research into the effectiveness of current care management services and the effectiveness of these services in reducing care burdens remains limited. This study investigates the relationship among care management center service effectiveness, care management personnel, and burdens in relation to the provision of care services from the prospective of caregivers. A purposive sampling method and structured questionnaire survey were used to conduct telephone interviews with 154 home caregivers who had been transferred from care management centers to homecare service centers. Participants expressed overall satisfaction with care management centers and with the services provided by these centers. Satisfaction toward the care managers' professional competence was associated with lower physical burden for caregivers. Participants' psychological and social burdens were associated with overall satisfaction with the care management centers and their satisfaction with the services provided by care managers. The implementation of care management services has improved satisfaction. However, center services remain inadequate to reduce the psychological and social burdens of caregivers. Greater focus on these two aspects will be critical to the successful implementation of the proposed intensive care management model and multiple services intervention in order to meet the complex care needs of home service recipients and their primary caregivers.

  10. Exposure management systems in emergencies as comprehensive medical care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Teruhiko

    2000-01-01

    The emergency management of nuclear hazards relies on a comprehensive medical care system that includes accident prevention administration, environmental monitoring, a health physics organization, and a medical institution. In this paper, the care organization involved in the criticality accident at Tokai-mura is described, and the problems that need to be examined are pointed out. In that incident, even the expert was initially utterly confused and was unable to take appropriate measures. The author concluded that the members of the care organization were all untrained for dealing with nuclear hazards and radiation accidents. The education and training of personnel at the job site are important, and they are even more so for the leaders. Revisions of the regional disaster prevention plans and care manual are needed. (K.H.)

  11. Control in chronic condition self-care management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawn, Sharon; Delany, Toni; Sweet, Linda

    2014-01-01

    of their communication style and the power of their role must improve for client chronic condition self-care management to be achieved. Training on the impacts of control in worker communication and systems where they work must be provided if unbeneficial forms of client dependency are to be overcome and true self......Aim: To examine health worker-client interactions during care planning to understand processes that foster client empowerment and disempowerment. Background: It is unclear how health worker-client exchanges and information sharing through chronic condition care planning currently operate in primary...... health care. Moreover, it is unclear how control in these exchanges either enhances collaborative decision-making, partnership and client empowerment, or works to create client disempowerment and dependency on workers and health services. Design: Critical discourse analysis of qualitative data from...

  12. Income statement management in a turbulent health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covaleski, M A

    2001-03-01

    This article considers the role of accounting information embedded in the income statement of health care providers in their increasingly difficult economic environment. This turbulent economic environment has resulted from the dramatic shift in power from the seller to the buyer of health care services, with a consequential shift of risks that will mandate that health care providers obtain access to better cost and utilization information. This article looks at the 2 critical components of the income statement--the revenue function and the cost structure-in terms of their importance in the management of enhanced economic performance in both the fee-for-service and the prepaid provision of health care services. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  13. Influence of novel oral anticoagulants on anticoagulation care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzic, Andrej; Kos, Mitja

    2017-09-01

    Anticoagulation treatment was recently improved by the introduction of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, this study explores the effects of the introduction of NOACs on anticoagulation care in Slovenia. Face-to-face interviews with key stakeholders revealed evolvement and challenges of anticoagulation care from different perspectives. Obtained information was further explored through the analysis of nationwide data of drug prescriptions and realization of health care services. Simplified management of anticoagulation treatment with NOACs and their high penetration expanded the capacity of anticoagulation clinics, and consequentially the treated population increased by more than 50 % in the last 5 years. The main challenge concerned the expenditures for medicines, which increased approximately 10 times in just a few years. At the same time, the anticoagulation clinics and their core organisation were not affected, which is not expected to change, since they are vital in delivering high-quality care.

  14. Managing Organized Insecurity: The Consequences for Care Workers of Deregulated Working Conditions in Elderly Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Ede

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Part-time work is more than twice as common among women than men in Sweden. New ways of organizing working hours to allow for more full-time jobs have been introduced for care workers in elderly care, which means unscheduled working hours based on the needs of the workplace. The aim of the study is to analyze how the organization of the unscheduled working hours affect employees’ daily lives and their possibility to provide care. The Classic Grounded Theory method was used in a secondary analysis of interviews with employees and managers in Swedish municipal elderly care. The implementation of unscheduled working hours plunged employees into a situation of managing organized insecurity. This main concern for the care workers involved a cyclic process of first having to be available for work because of economic and social obligations to the employer and the co-workers, despite sacrifices in the private sphere. Then, they had to be adaptable in relation to unknown clients and co-workers and to the employer, which means reduced possibilities to provide good care. Full-time jobs were thus created through requiring permanent staff to be flexible, which in effect meant eroded working conditions with high demands on employee adaptability. Solving the part-time problem in elderly care by introducing unscheduled working hours may in effect be counter-productive.

  15. A comprehensive approach to quality management of intensive care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Seetharaman; Dey, Prasanta Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive framework for improving intensive care unit performance. The study introduces a quality management framework by combining cause and effect diagram and logical framework. An intensive care unit was identified for the study on the basis of its performance. The reasons for not achieving the desired performance were identified using a cause and effect diagram with the stakeholder involvement. A logical framework was developed using information from the cause and effect diagram and a detailed project plan was developed. The improvement projects were implemented and evaluated. Stakeholders identified various intensive care unit issues. Managerial performance, organizational processes and insufficient staff were considered major issues. A logical framework was developed to plan an improvement project to resolve issues raised by clinicians and patients. Improved infrastructure, state-of-the-art equipment, well maintained facilities, IT-based communication, motivated doctors, nurses and support staff, improved patient care and improved drug availability were considered the main project outputs for improving performance. The proposed framework is currently being used as a continuous quality improvement tool, providing a planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating framework for the quality improvement measures on a sustainable basis. The combined cause and effect diagram and logical framework analysis is a novel and effective approach to improving intensive care performance. Similar approaches could be adopted in any intensive care unit. The paper focuses on a uniform model that can be applied to most intensive care units.

  16. Development of an allergy management support system in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flokstra - de Blok BMJ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bertine MJ Flokstra - de Blok,1,2 Thys van der Molen,1,2 Wianda A Christoffers,3 Janwillem WH Kocks,1,2 Richard L Oei,4 Joanne NG Oude Elberink,2,4 Emmy M Roerdink,5 Marie Louise Schuttelaar,3 Jantina L van der Velde,1,2 Thecla M Brakel,1,6 Anthony EJ Dubois2,5 1Department of General Practice, 2GRIAC Research Institute, 3Department of Dermatology, 4Department of Allergology, 5Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Pediatric Allergy, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, 6Teaching Unit, Department of Social Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands Background: Management of allergic patients in the population is becoming more difficult because of increases in both complexity and prevalence. Although general practitioners (GPs are expected to play an important role in the care of allergic patients, they often feel ill-equipped for this task. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an allergy management support system (AMSS for primary care. Methods: Through literature review, interviewing and testing in secondary and primary care patients, an allergy history questionnaire was constructed by allergists, dermatologists, GPs and researchers based on primary care and specialists’ allergy guidelines and their clinical knowledge. Patterns of AMSS questionnaire responses and specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE-test outcomes were used to identify diagnostic categories and develop corresponding management recommendations. Validity of the AMSS was investigated by comparing specialist (gold standard and AMSS diagnostic categories. Results: The two-page patient-completed AMSS questionnaire consists of 12 (mainly multiple choice questions on symptoms, triggers, severity and medication. Based on the AMSS questionnaires and sIgE-test outcome of 118 patients, approximately 150 diagnostic categories of allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, anaphylaxis, food allergy, hymenoptera allergy and other

  17. Contingency Management of Health Care Organizations: It Depends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olden, Peter C

    Managers in health care organizations (HCOs) must perform many processes and activities, such as planning goals, designing organization structure, leading people, motivating employees, making decisions, and resolving conflict. How they do all this strongly affects the performance and outcomes of their organizations and themselves. Some managers develop a usual way of performing their jobs and achieve some success with a preferred method of leading or a favorite approach to motivating. However, their success will be limited if they always rely on a standard "1-size-fits-all" approach. This is because contingency factors influence the effectiveness of a given approach to managing. The "best" approach depends on contingency factors, including the situation and the people involved. Managers should choose an approach to fit with the changing contingency factors. This article explains why and how managers should develop a contingency approach to managing HCOs. The development of contingency theory is briefly described. Practical application of contingency management is explained for leading, motivating, decision making, and resolving conflict. By using a contingency approach, managers can be more effective when managing their HCOs.

  18. The role of primary care in adult weight management: qualitative interviews with key stakeholders in weight management services

    OpenAIRE

    Blane, David N.; Macdonald, Sara; Morrison, David; O’Donnell, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Primary care has a key role to play in the prevention and management of obesity, but there remain barriers to engagement in weight management by primary care practitioners. The aim of this study was to explore the views of key stakeholders in adult weight management services on the role of primary care in adult weight management. Methods Qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews with nine senior dietitians involved in NHS weight management from seven Scottish health bo...

  19. Reforming health care in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Császi, L; Kullberg, P

    1985-01-01

    Over the past two decades Hungary has initiated a series of social and economic reforms which have emphasized decentralization of control and the reintroduction of market mechanisms into the socialized economy. These reforms both reflect and reinforce a changing social structure, in particular the growing influence of upper class special interest groups. Market reforms are an expression of concurrent ideological shifts in Hungarian society. We examined the political significance of three recent proposals to reform health services against the backdrop of broader social and economic changes taking place. The first proposes a bureaucratic reorganization, the second, patient co-payments, and the third, a voucher system. The problems each proposal identifies, as well as the constituency each represents, reveal a trend toward consolidation of class structure in Hungary. Only one of these proposals has any potential to democratize the control and management of the heath care system. Moreover, despite a governmental push toward decentralization, two of these proposals would actually increase centralized bureaucratic control. Two of the reforms incorporate market logic into their arguments, an indication that the philosophical premises of capitalism are re-emerging as an important component of the Hungarian world-view. In Hungary, as well as in other countries, social analysis of proposed health care reforms can effectively illuminate the social and political dynamics of the larger society.

  20. Formative evaluation of practice changes for managing depression within a Shared Care model in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulac, Julie; Edwards, Jeanette; Steele, Angus

    2017-01-01

    Aim To investigate the implementation and initial impact of the Physician Integrated Network (PIN) mental health indicators, which are specific to screening and managing follow-up for depression, in three primary care practices with Shared Mental Health Care in Manitoba. Manitoba Health undertook a primary care renewal initiative in 2006 called the PIN, which included the development of mental health indicators specific to screening and managing follow-up for depression. These indicators were implemented in three PIN group practice sites in Manitoba, which are also part of Shared Mental Health Care. The design was a non-experimental longitudinal design. A formative evaluation investigated the implementation and initial impact of the mental health indicators using mixed methods (document review, survey, and interview). Quantitative data was explored using descriptive and comparative statistics and a content and theme analysis of the qualitative interviews was conducted. Survey responses were received from 32 out of 36 physicians from the three sites. Interviews were conducted with 15 providers. Findings This evaluation illustrated providers' perceived attitudes, knowledge, skills, and behaviours related to recognizing and treating depression and expanded our understanding of primary care processes related to managing depression related to the implementation of a new initiative. Depression is viewed as an important problem in primary care practice that is time consuming to diagnose, manage and treat and requires further investigation. Implementation of the PIN mental health indicators was variable across sites and providers. There was an increase in use of the indicators across time and a general sentiment that benefits of screening outweigh the costs; however, the benefit of screening for depression remains unclear. Consistent with current guidelines, a question the findings of this evaluation suggests is whether there are more effective ways of having an impact on

  1. Innovation in health service management: Adoption of project management offices to support major health care transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Aubry, Monique; Cyr, Guylaine; Richer, Marie-Claire; Fortin-Verreault, Jean-François; Fortin, Claude; Marchionni, Caroline

    2017-11-01

    To explore the characteristics that influence project management offices acceptance and adoption in healthcare sector. The creation of project management offices has been suggested as a promising avenue to promote successful organisational change and facilitate evidence-based practice. However, little is known about the characteristics that promote their initial adoption and acceptance in health care sector. This knowledge is important in the context where many organisations are considering implementing project management offices with nurse managers as leaders. A descriptive multiple case study design was used. The unit of analysis was the project management offices. The study was conducted in three university-affiliated teaching hospitals in 2013-14 (Canada). Individual interviews (n = 34) were conducted with senior managers. Results reveal that project management offices dedicated to project and change management constitute an innovation and an added value that addresses tangible needs in the field. Project management offices are an innovation highly compatible with health care managers and their approach has parallels to the process of clinical problem solving and reasoning well-known to adopters. This knowledge is important in a context where many nurses hold various roles in project management offices, such as Director, project manager, clinical expert and knowledge broker. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Knowledge Management System in Health & Social Care: Review on 20 Practiced Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saiful Ridhwan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of managing medical information has become very critical in the healthcare delivery system. Medical information nowadays are optimized towards serving different areas such as; diagnosing of diseases, planning and administration, treatment and monitoring of patient outcomes, services and costs. This article provides a review into various Health and Social Care systems which encompasses the Knowledge Management value. For analysis, more than 30 systems that are related to Health and Social Care were gathered via Internet research, only 20 of these systems were finally selected based on recent system development and popularity of the system.Keywords: Health Care, Knowledge, Knowledge Management, Social Care, systemdoi:10.12695/ajtm.2013.6.2.4 How to cite this article:Ridhwan, M.S., and Oyefolahan, I.O. (2013. Knowledge Management System in Health & Social Care: Review on 20 Practiced Knowledge Management. The Asian Journal of Technology Management 6 (2: 92-101. Print ISSN: 1978-6956; Online ISSN: 2089-791X. doi:10.12695/ajtm.2013.6.2.4

  3. A SUSTAINABLE HEALTH CARE SYSTEM REQUIRES MANAGEMENT TRANSFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos Dimitros

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to be the health care system sustainable , management transformations must be based on very precise diagnostic analysis that includes complete and current information. It is necessary to implement an information system that collects information in real time, that watches the parameters that significantly influence the sustainability of the system. Such an information system should point out a radiography(a scan of the system at some time under following aspects:: 1. An overview of system; 2 An overview of the economic situation; 3 A technical presentation ;4. A legal overview; 5. A social overview ; 6. A management overview .Based on these Xrays of the health system, it outlines a series of conclusions and recommendations together with a SWOT analysis that highlights the potential internal (strengths and weaknesses and external potential (opportunities and threats. Based on this analysis and recommendations, the management is going to redesign the system in order to be adapted to the changing environmental requirements. Management transformation is recommended to be by following steps. :1. The development of a new management system that would make a positive change in the health care system 2. Implementation of the new management system 3. Assessment of the changes

  4. ESRD in the geriatric population: the crisis of managed care and the opportunity of disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Theodore I

    2002-01-01

    The geriatric population with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is placed at risk with regards to the quality and extent of medical coverage because of the rapidly changing financial environment. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are generally for-profit companies that must focus on the bottom line. While the verbal commitment to quality care is voiced, the financial pressures on MCOs have led to a decrease in coverage of many services and outright denial for some necessary treatments. While denying services, the MCOs have also reduced payments to providers for services rendered. The coverage crisis is compounded by health maintenance organizations (HMOs) quitting Medicare because the reimbursement from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is less than their costs. Because of the above issues which can potentially impact on the quality of care delivered to the ESRD geriatric population, a new approach to disease management has created the opportunity to improve total patient care to a level not yet achieved in the United States. Disease management encompasses integrated care across all disciplines. Every component of care can be tracked by a dedicated information system. Improvement in outcomes has far exceeded the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) benchmark performance measurements with a disease management model approach. The key to success is the health service coordinator (HSC), a senior nurse with many years of ESRD experience. This individual coordinates care across all disciplines and expedites necessary referrals. With rapid attention to patient needs there has been a significant reduction in hospital admissions, hospital length of stay, and emergency room visits. Patient care will steadily improve as the disease management system matures as a consequence of understanding the patients total physical and psychosocial needs.

  5. Using project management methodology to plan and track inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Darren S

    2005-08-01

    Effective care of each patient throughout a hospital admission involves executing a specific set of tasks to produce a favorable outcome within an appropriate time frame. The ProjectRounds methodology, which can be implemented using widely available software, incorporates the principles of project management in planning and control hospital inpatient care. It consists of four stages--clinical assessment, planning, scheduling, and tracking. OVERVIEW OF PROJECTROUNDS AND EXAMPLE: As an example, a 68-year-old-man is admitted with pneumonia. In clinical assessment, the admitting physician uses an assessment tool that prompts her to list all the patient's clinical issues, define the conditions that need to be met to discharge the patient, highlight special problems, and list any consultations, diagnostic tests, and procedures that are planned. In planning, the work breakdown structure--a tabulation of all the tasks in the "project" (the admission)--is created. In scheduling, a project schedule is generated, and in tracking, the clinical team evaluates and monitors the project's course. During interdisciplinary clinical rounds, the progress of the patient's hospital care can be tracked and quantified by employing the percent complete method. Tracking can be used as a "dashboard," providing a concise summary of the care that needs to be and has been rendered to the patient. Applying the tenets of project management can optimize the process of providing health care to hospital inpatients.

  6. Diabetes management in an Australian primary care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krass, I; Hebing, R; Mitchell, B; Hughes, J; Peterson, G; Song, Y J C; Stewart, K; Armour, C L

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide studies have shown that significant proportions of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) do not meet targets for glycaemic control, blood pressure (BP) and lipids, putting them at higher risk of developing complications. However, little is known about medicines management in Australian primary care populations with T2DM. The aim of this study was to (i) describe the management of a large group of patients in primary care, (ii) identify areas for improvement in management and (iii) determine any relationship between adherence and glycaemic, BP and lipid control. This was a retrospective, epidemiological study of primary care patients with T2DM diabetes, with HbA(1c) of >7%, recruited in 90 Australian community pharmacies. Data collected included demographic details, diabetes history, current medication regimen, height, weight, BP, physical activity and smoking status. Of the 430 patients, 98% used antidiabetics, 80% antihypertensives, 73% lipid lowering drugs and 38% aspirin. BP and all lipid targets were met by only 21% and 14% of the treated patients and 21% and 12% of the untreated patients respectively. Medication adherence was related to better glycaemic control (P = 0.04). An evidence-base prescribing practice gap was seen in this Australian primary care population of T2DM patients. Patients were undertreated with antihypertensive and lipid lowering medication, and several subgroups with co-morbidities were not receiving the recommended pharmacotherapy. Interventions are required to redress the current evidence-base prescribing practice gap in disease management in primary care. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Chronic disease management: improving care for people with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline A; Ackerman, Ilana N; Tropea, Joanne

    2014-02-01

    Chronic disease management (CDM) service models are being developed for many conditions; however, there is limited evidence to support their effectiveness in osteoarthritis (OA). A systematic review was undertaken to examine effectiveness, cost effectiveness and barriers to the use of osteoarthritis-chronic disease management (OA-CDM) service models. Thirteen eligible studies (eight randomised controlled trial (RCTs)) were identified. The majority focussed on delivery system design (n = 9) and/or providing self-management support (SMS) (n = 8). Overall, reported model effectiveness varied, and where positive impacts on process or health outcomes were observed, they were of small to moderate effect. There was no information about cost effectiveness. There is some evidence to support the use of collaborative care/multidisciplinary case management models in primary and community care and evidence-based pathways/standardisation of care in hospital settings. Multiple barriers were identified. Future research should focus on identifying the effective components of multi-faceted interventions and evaluating cost-effectiveness to support clinical and policy decision-making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Leveraging Interactive Patient Care Technology to Improve Pain Management Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao-Gupta, Suma; Kruger, David; Leak, Lonna D; Tieman, Lisa A; Manworren, Renee C B

    2017-12-15

    Most children experience pain in hospitals; and their parents report dissatisfaction with how well pain was managed. Engaging patients and families in the development and evaluation of pain treatment plans may improve perceptions of pain management and hospital experiences. The aim of this performance improvement project was to engage patients and families to address hospitalized pediatric patients' pain using interactive patient care technology. The goal was to stimulate conversations about pain management expectations and perceptions of treatment plan effectiveness among patients, parents, and health care teams. Plan-Do-Study-Act was used to design, develop, test, and pilot new workflows to integrate the interactive patient care technology system with the automated medication dispensing system and document actions from both systems into the electronic health record. The pediatric surgical unit and hematology/oncology unit of a free-standing, university-affiliated, urban children's hospital were selected to pilot this performance improvement project because of the high prevalence of pain from surgeries and hematologic and oncologic diseases, treatments, and invasive procedures. Documentation of pain assessments, nonpharmacologic interventions, and evaluation of treatment effectiveness increased. The proportion of positive family satisfaction responses for pain management significantly increased from fiscal year 2014 to fiscal year 2016 (p = .006). By leveraging interactive patient care technologies, patients and families were engaged to take an active role in pain treatment plans and evaluation of treatment outcomes. Improved active communication and partnership with patients and families can effectively change organizational culture to be more sensitive to patients' pain and patients' and families' hospital experiences. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adapting to managed care by becoming a learning organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, M J

    1999-03-01

    In the tumultuous and chaotic environment of managed health care, hospital-based mental health providers need to change in fundamental ways. The traditional view of mental health organizations is a professional-bureaucratic one where actions and outcomes of planning are thought to be highly predictable. The author proposes an alternative paradigm for viewing mental health provider organizations, one based on learning theory, which accepts that the future is unknowable because of its complexity and the probabilistic nature of the world. Within this perspective, mental health care providers need to become "learning organizations" to successfully adapt to the new and evolving conditions.

  10. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: Prevention, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy has substantial prognostic implications in an intensive care unit, given its increased mortality risk and association with life-threatening complications. This report seeks to discuss diagnostic modalities that can be useful in accurately differentiating Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy from Acute Coronary Syndrome, and also briefly discuss prevention and management of this cardiomyopathy in an intensive care unit. For critically ill Takotsubo patients, intensive clinicians can consider establishment of diagnosis by specific electrocardiograph changes, distinctive marked release of cardiac enzymes, characteristic echocardiograph findings, as well as invasive coronary angiography or noninvasive cardiac magnetic imaging.

  11. Hungarian experience in using the IAEA planning methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacsko, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Hungarian Power Companies Ltd. has been using the IAEA planning methodologies since 1985 when it acquired the WASP model. Since then this model has been applied on a regular basis to determine the least cost expansion plan of the power generating system of the country. This report describes this experience as well as the application of the WASP model for other types of studies. (author)

  12. Delineating the genetic heterogeneity of OCA in Hungarian patients

    OpenAIRE

    F?bos, Be?ta; Farkas, Katalin; T?th, Lola; Sul?k, Adrienn; Tripolszki, Korn?lia; Tihanyi, Mariann; N?meth, R?ka; Vas, Krisztina; Csoma, Zsanett; Kem?ny, Lajos; Sz?ll, M?rta; Nagy, Nikoletta

    2017-01-01

    Background Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a clinically and genetically heterogenic group of pigmentation abnormalities characterized by variable hair, skin, and ocular hypopigmentation. Six known genes and a locus on human chromosome 4q24 have been implicated in the etiology of isolated OCA forms (OCA 1?7). Methods The most frequent OCA types among Caucasians are OCA1, OCA2, and OCA4. We aimed to investigate genes responsible for the development of these OCA forms in Hungarian OCA patients ...

  13. Hungarian experience in using the IAEA planning methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacsko, M [Hungarian Power Companis Ltd, Budapest (Hungary)

    1997-09-01

    The Hungarian Power Companies Ltd. has been using the IAEA planning methodologies since 1985 when it acquired the WASP model. Since then this model has been applied on a regular basis to determine the least cost expansion plan of the power generating system of the country. This report describes this experience as well as the application of the WASP model for other types of studies. (author).

  14. Hungarian-Vietnamese Nuclear Energy Train the Trainers Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aszódi, Attila; Boros, Ildikó; Czifrus, Szabolcs; Kiss, István

    2014-01-01

    HUVINETT 2012-2013: Hungarian-Vietnamese Nuclear Energy „Train the Trainers” Course: HUVINETT Courses at Paks NPP - • 3 weeks of practice oriented training; • Practical application of nuclear theory and knowledge; • Plant technology; • Importance of nuclear safety; • Behavioral standards and required attitude in a nuclear power plant; • Practice in real working environment: – Maintenance Performance Improvement Center; – Simulator; – Labs and workshops of the plant

  15. Between the Word of the Law and Practice: a Case of the Hungarian Speakers in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić Marija

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper initially presents the Serbian legislative framework relevant to the use of minority languages. The ethnolinguistic vitality of the Hungarian-speaking population in Serbia is then analysed, particularly in the Serbian province of Vojvodina. The paper then focuses upon the sociolinguistic survey of Hungarian language use in Belgrade. The emphasis is placed upon the survey responses related to the awareness of language rights among the Hungarian speakers.

  16. Youth Psychotherapy Change Trajectories and Outcomes in Usual Care: Community Mental Health versus Managed Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jared S.; Nelson, Philip L.; Mondragon, Sasha A.; Baldwin, Scott A.; Burlingame, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared symptom change trajectories and treatment outcome categories in children and adolescents receiving routine outpatient mental health services in a public community mental health system and a private managed care organization. Method: Archival longitudinal outcome data from parents completing the Youth Outcome…

  17. The development of an acute care case manager orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelecki, S; Brobst, R

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe the development of an inpatient acute care case manager orientation in a community hospital. Benner's application of the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition provides the basis for the orientation program. The candidates for the case manager position were expert clinicians. Because of the role change it was projected that they would function as advanced beginners. It was also predicted that, as the case managers progressed within the role, the educational process would need to be adapted to facilitate progression of skills to the proficient level. Feedback from participants reinforced that the model supported the case manager in the role transition. In addition, the model provided a predictive framework for ongoing educational activities.

  18. What do the Hungarian young people think about the nuclear?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazmandi, T.; Aszodi, A.; Boros, I.; Hanti, A.; Legradi, G.; Petofi, G. [Budapest University of Technology and Economys, Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest (Hungary)

    2001-07-01

    During the last few years new challenges and opportunities appeared on the nuclear agenda, like the improvement of the economic competitiveness, enhancing radiation and waste safety, strengthening of the role of the public acceptance. It seems that the future of the nuclear industry depends on several things. On the one hand the scientific and technical development in the last decades worked up sufficient nuclear safety and radiation protection, and nuclear methods are widely used in the industry, agriculture and medical systems, as well. On the other hand there are some other interesting questions, like Human Relations and the public acceptance of the nuclear energy still lying ahead of us. The Hungarian Youth for Nuclear (FINE) was established in 1998 as the Hungarian branch of the Young Generation Network. Our purpose is to remove the misbelieves and fears arisen around the nuclear techniques and mainly the nuclear energetics and to answer the questions brought up by the Hungarian youth in this topic. In this paper our experience what we have drawn with the help of our programmes about the attitude and the knowledge of the youth is summarised. (author)

  19. What do the Hungarian young people think about the nuclear?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazmandi, T.; Aszodi, A.; Boros, I.; Hanti, A.; Legradi, G.; Petofi, G.

    2001-01-01

    During the last few years new challenges and opportunities appeared on the nuclear agenda, like the improvement of the economic competitiveness, enhancing radiation and waste safety, strengthening of the role of the public acceptance. It seems that the future of the nuclear industry depends on several things. On the one hand the scientific and technical development in the last decades worked up sufficient nuclear safety and radiation protection, and nuclear methods are widely used in the industry, agriculture and medical systems, as well. On the other hand there are some other interesting questions, like Human Relations and the public acceptance of the nuclear energy still lying ahead of us. The Hungarian Youth for Nuclear (FINE) was established in 1998 as the Hungarian branch of the Young Generation Network. Our purpose is to remove the misbelieves and fears arisen around the nuclear techniques and mainly the nuclear energetics and to answer the questions brought up by the Hungarian youth in this topic. In this paper our experience what we have drawn with the help of our programmes about the attitude and the knowledge of the youth is summarised. (author)

  20. The Notion of the Foreign in Hungarian and Bulgarian Phraseologisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesnichkova Lilyana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The confrontation between the native and the foreign is a problem that focuses research efforts on a number of humanities, e.g. cultural studies, anthropology, linguistics, ethnography, etc. The following report analyses the notion of the foreign, the other, the different, reflected in the phraseological wealth of the Hungarian and Bulgarian languages. The reviewed phrasemes concentrate the shock upon collision with the different or evaluation of the experience gained in the continuous communication with the other. The foreign is usually individualized by outlining and exaggerating some of its characteristics using parallels, oppositions, and metaphors. The negative attitudes and judgments prevail over the others: the fear of the collective “I” losing its own identity creates a negative attitude towards the foreign, distorted, or wrong notion of the other and the different. Many of the idioms reflect interethnic relations from times long gone, and so they are no longer a significant part of the active vocabulary of Hungarians and Bulgarians. Their analysis, however, is of great interest as they preserve the collective memory of the Hungarian and Bulgarian cultural communities and reveal their traditional notions and knowledge.

  1. [Validation of Hungarian Smartphone Deprivation Inventory (HSDI) with school children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csibi, Sándor; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Szabo, Attila

    2017-01-01

    The widespread use of smartphones generates new habits and behaviors among the users, including schoolchildren. Advance technology-based applications, capturing interest and attention, influence cognitive focus and time spent with the device. Examination of these factors points toward the risk of addiction, as well as the deprivations sensations associated with the latter, that call for scholastic attention. The aim of this study was to validate a Hungarian Smartphone Deprivation Inventory (HSDI), to gauge the deprivation feelings and their severity in schoolchildren when they cannot access their device. A 9-item, 7-point, agree-disagree inventory was developed on the basis of an earlier exercise deprivation scale (Robbins and Joseph, 1985). The inventory was completed by 258 Hungarian schoolchildren (mean age=12.4 ± SD = 1.71 years). The participants also completed the Hungarian version of the Brief Addiction to Smartphone Scale (BASS). An exploratory factor analysis of the HSDI yielded a single factor that accounted for 55.84 % of the variance. The internal consistency of the inventory was excellent (Cronbach's α = 0.90). Content validity of the HSDI was checked by comparing the scores of those scoring above and below the median on the BASS that yielded statistically significant differences (p smartphone access in schoolchildren.

  2. The Greek charter of the Hungarian King Stephen I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojkovski Boris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Hungarian Christian ruler, King Stephen I (997-1038 issued several charters that have survived to this day. One of them is the charter issued on behalf of the nuns from the Monastery of the Holy Theotokos in Veszprémvölgy. The charter was written in the Greek language, and has been the subject of many studies. The original has not been preserved; what remains is a copy from the time of King Coloman, dated to 1109. The charter has not been published in a critical edition in any language other than Hungarian and even though it has been examined by numerous Hungarian scholars, many questions remain open. The aim of the author is to provide a critical edition and an English translation of the charter, but also to clarify some remaining doubts about the charter and its contents. Furthermore, some comparisons will be made with the Byzantine charters issued at the beginning of the 11th and during the 12th century.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of Hungarian goose parvovirus isolates and vaccine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatár-Kis, Tímea; Mató, Tamás; Markos, Béla; Palya, Vilmos

    2004-08-01

    Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing were used to analyse goose parvovirus field isolates and vaccine strains. Two fragments of the genome were amplified. Fragment "A" represents a region of VP3 gene, while fragment "B" represents a region upstream of the VP3 gene, encompassing part of the VP1 gene. In the region of fragment "A" the deduced amino acid sequence of the strains was identical, therefore differentiation among strains could be done only at the nucleotide level, which resulted in the formation of three groups: Hungarian, West-European and Asian strains. In the region of fragment "B", separation of groups could be done by both nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence level. The nucleotide sequences resulted in the same groups as for fragment "A" but with a different clustering pattern among the Hungarian strains. Within the "Hungarian" group most of the recent field isolates fell into one cluster, very closely related or identical to each other, indicating a very slow evolutionary change. The attenuated strains and field isolates from 1979/80 formed a separate cluster. When vaccine strains and field isolates were compared, two specific amino acid differences were found that can be considered as possible markers for vaccinal strains. Sequence analysis of fragment "B" seems to be a suitable method for differentiation of attenuated vaccine strains from virulent strains. Copyright 2004 Houghton Trust Ltd

  4. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlakala, Mokgadi C; Bezuidenhout, Martie C; Botha, Annali D H

    2014-04-04

    Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs) are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives. The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding. Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU. Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  5. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgadi C. Matlakala

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives. Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. Method: A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding. Results: Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU. Conclusion: Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  6. Sociolinguistic and Contact-induced Variation in Hungarian Language Use in Subcarpathia, Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Csernicskó

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to showing regional and social variation, the language use of the minority Hungarians of Subcarpathia, Ukraine, also presents a reflection of the region’s complex linguistic history and its effects from contact with Russian and Ukrainian. On the basis of quantitative empirical findings, this study shows Subcarpathian Hungarians to be a sociolinguistically stratified group of speakers whose Hungarian language use varies in a systematic manner according to sex, age, level of education, and place of residence. The paper also outlines some of the main differences in the language use of Hungarians in Subcarpathia and Hungary which are manifested in statistically significant ways.

  7. Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaenglein, Andrea L; Pathy, Arun L; Schlosser, Bethanee J; Alikhan, Ali; Baldwin, Hilary E; Berson, Diane S; Bowe, Whitney P; Graber, Emmy M; Harper, Julie C; Kang, Sewon; Keri, Jonette E; Leyden, James J; Reynolds, Rachel V; Silverberg, Nanette B; Stein Gold, Linda F; Tollefson, Megha M; Weiss, Jonathan S; Dolan, Nancy C; Sagan, Andrew A; Stern, Mackenzie; Boyer, Kevin M; Bhushan, Reva

    2016-05-01

    Acne is one of the most common disorders treated by dermatologists and other health care providers. While it most often affects adolescents, it is not uncommon in adults and can also be seen in children. This evidence-based guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in its management. Issues from grading of acne to the topical and systemic management of the disease are reviewed. Suggestions on use are provided based on available evidence. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Health Care Leadership: Managing Knowledge Bases as Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotarius, Timothy

    Communities are composed of many organizations. These organizations naturally form clusters based on common patterns of knowledge, skills, and abilities of the individual organizations. Each of these spontaneous clusters represents a distinct knowledge base. The health care knowledge base is shown to be the natural leader of any community. Using the Central Florida region's 5 knowledge bases as an example, each knowledge base is categorized as a distinct type of stakeholder, and then a specific stakeholder management strategy is discussed to facilitate managing both the cooperative potential and the threatening potential of each "knowledge base" stakeholder.

  9. [Training of health-care employees in crisis resource management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanager, Lene; Østergaard, Doris; Lippert, Anne; Nielsen, Kurt; Dieckmann, Peter

    2013-03-25

    Studies show that human errors contribute to up to 70% of mistakes and mishaps in health care. Crisis resource management, CRM, is a conceptual framework for analysing and training individual and team skills in order to prevent and manage errors. Different CRM training methods, e.g. simulation, are in use and the literature emphasises the need of training the full team or organisation for maximal effect. CRM training has an effect on skill improvement, but few studies have shown an effect on patient outcome. However, these studies show great variability of quality.

  10. [Hungarian Diet and Nutritional Status Survey - OTÁP2014. II. Energy and macronutrient intake of the Hungarian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi Nagy, Eszter; Bakacs, Márta; Illés, Éva; Nagy, Barbara; Varga, Anita; Kis, Orsolya; Schreiberné Molnár, Erzsébet; Martos, Éva

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess and monitor the dietary habits and nutrient intake of Hungarian adults. Three-day dietary records were used for dietary assessment, the sample was representative for the Hungarian population aged ≥18ys by gender and age. The mean proportion of energy from fat was higher (men: 38 energy%, women: 37 energy%), that from carbohydrates was lower (men: 45 energy%, women: 47 energy%) than recommended, the protein intake is adequate. Unfavorable change compared to the previous survey in 2009 was the increase of fat and saturated fatty acid energy percent in women, the decrease in fruit and vegetable consumption, which explains the decreased fiber intake. An increasing trend in added sugar energy percent in each age groups of both genders was observed compared to 2009. Interventions focusing on the promotion of fruit and vegetable consumption and decreasing of saturated fat and added sugar intake are needed. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(15), 587-597.

  11. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians ...... supportive literature. The purpose of this review is to investigate what non-specialist tools, action plans or guidelines for IBD are published in readily searchable medical literature and compare these to those which exist for other chronic conditions....... are helpful but they are not designed for the primary care setting. Few non-expert IBD management tools or guidelines exist compared with those used for other chronic diseases such as asthma and scant data have been published regarding the usefulness of such tools including IBD action plans and associated...

  12. [Rare diseases and their patient organization: the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogány, Gábor

    2014-03-02

    The aim of the author is to discuss special issues of rare diseases, with emphasis on circumstances present in Hungary, including those leading to the foundation of the non-governmental organization, the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases. The author briefly reviews the most important findings of current international surveys which have been performed with or without the involvement of member associations of the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases. At the level of medical and social services in Hungary, it is still "incidental" to get to the appropriate expert or centre providing the diagnosis or treatment. It is difficult to find the still very few existing services due to the lack of suitable "pathways" and referrals. There are long delays in obtaining the first appointment, resulting in vulnerability and inequality along the regions. The overall consequence is the insufficiency or lack of access to medical and social services. There are also difficulties related to the supply of orphan medication and the long duration of hospitalization. At the level of patient organizations financial scarcity and uncertainty are typical, combined with inappropriate infrastructural background and human resources. The poor quality of organization of patient bodies along with insufficient cooperation among them are characteristic as well. The author concludes that a National Plan or Strategy is needed to improve the current fragmentation of services which would enable patients and health, social and educational professionals to provide and use the best care in the practice. This would ensure all patients with rare diseases to be diagnosed within a possible shortest time allowing access to the care and support needed in time resulting in a decrease in burden of families and society.

  13. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Khatib, Issam A.; Sato, Chikashi

    2009-01-01

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m 3 (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

  14. The application of heptadecanoic acid (HDA) labelled with Hungarian-made 123I with a Hungarian method in human diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, Mihaly; Pszota, Agnes; Koernyei, Jozsef; Lakatos, Mihaly; Mahunka, Imre; Mikecz, Pal

    1988-01-01

    In 15 examinations made in ergometric load and 2 in quiet state the regional distributions of the uptake of 123 I-HDA and that of 201 Tl coincided. HDA kinetics was also analyzed by computerized circumferential profile programme and it was demonstrated that the results of the examinations made previously with foreign-made preparate are comparable with those of the Hungarian one. (author) 13 refs.; 7 figs

  15. In Connecticut: improving patient medication management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marie; Giuliano, Margherita R; Starkowski, Michael P

    2011-04-01

    Medications are a cornerstone of the management of most chronic conditions. However, medication discrepancies and medication-related problems-some of which can cause serious harm-are common. Pharmacists have the expertise to identify, resolve, monitor, and prevent these problems. We present findings from a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services demonstration project in Connecticut, in which nine pharmacists worked closely with eighty-eight Medicaid patients from July 2009 through May 2010. The pharmacists identified 917 drug therapy problems and resolved nearly 80 [corrected] percent of them after four encounters. The result was an estimated annual saving of $1,123 per patient on medication claims and $472 per patient on medical, hospital, and emergency department expenses-more than enough to pay for the contracted pharmacist services. We recommend that the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation support the evaluation of pharmacist-provided medication management services in primary care medical homes, accountable care organizations, and community health and care transition teams, as well as research to explore how to enhance team-based care.

  16. Pharmaceutical management in ProCare Health Limited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, L; Barry, M; MacLean, I

    2001-06-22

    To review pharmaceutical budget holding and management in ProCare Health Limited by; describing budget holding strategies implemented in 1995/6, identifying prescribing savings achieved, analysing variation in prescribing behaviour and comparing the findings with experience elsewhere. With 340 members, ProCare is one of the largest and most progressive of New Zealand's independent practitioner associations (IPAs). Data were obtained for the three years 1994 to 1996 to determine pharmaceutical expenditure against budget and against national trends, by member and general medical services (GMS) consultations. ProCare has established a classical, quality focussed pharmaceutical management strategy. Savings against the agreed budget was 9.5% comparing 1996 with 1995 but 5.7% compared, with national trends. Wide variation in per capita and per consultation costs was not reduced and was entirely explained by prescribing volumes not drug prices. The most important finding is that general practitioners (GPs), working collaboratively, can establish a strategy of clinical and corporate governance which may be exerting a wide ranging influence over clinical behaviour. Although there may be doubts about the actual levels of saving these appeared to be well in excess of the financial investment in the strategy. Greater savings appear possible with a focus on addressing the large and apparently inappropriate per capita prescribing volume variation between practices. Understanding and successfully addressing this variation will be one of the key issues facing the implementation of the government's primary health care strategy.

  17. Enhancing systems to improve the management of acute, unscheduled care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Sabina A; Pines, Jesse M; Asplin, Brent R; Epstein, Stephen K

    2011-06-01

    For acutely ill patients, health care services are available in many different settings, including hospital-based emergency departments (EDs), retail clinics, federally qualified health centers, and outpatient clinics. Certain conditions are the sole domain of particular settings: stabilization of critically ill patients can typically only be provided in EDs. By contrast, many conditions that do not require hospital resources, such as advanced radiography, admission, and same-day consultation can often be managed in clinic settings. Because clinics are generally not open nights, and often not on weekends or holidays, the ED remains the only option for face-to-face medical care during these times. For patients who can be managed in either setting, there are many open research questions about which is the best setting, because these venues differ in terms of access, costs of care, and potentially, quality. Consideration of these patients must be risk-adjusted, as patients may self-select a venue for care based upon perceived acuity. We present a research agenda for acute, unscheduled care in the United States developed in conjunction with an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality-funded conference hosted by the American College of Emergency Physicians in October 2009, titled "Improving the Quality and Efficiency of Emergency Care Across the Continuum: A Systems Approach." Given the possible increase in ED utilization over the next several years as more people become insured, understanding differences in cost, quality, and access for conditions that may be treated in EDs or clinic settings will be vital in guiding national health policy. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  18. A Training Intervention to Improve Information Management in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifferdecker, Karen E.; Reed, Virginia A.; Homa, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Training programs designed to improve information management have been implemented but not adequately tested. Three critical components for information management were tested in a randomized control study: (1) knowledge of valid, synthesized summary information, (2) skills to use Web-based resources that provide access to these summaries, and (3) use of Web-based resources in clinical practice. Methods Twenty-four primary care practices were provided with computers and high-speed Internet access and then matched, with half randomly assigned to receive training and half to receive training at a later date. Training was designed to address knowledge, skills, and use of Web-based information. Outcomes were assessed by comparing baseline and follow-up questionnaires that focused on five conceptual domains related to Web-based resource use for patient care decisions and patient education. Results Compared to the delayed training group, the initial training group increased their knowledge and skill of Web-based resources and use for patient care decisions. Some measures of communication with patients about using Web-based resources and of incorporating use of Web-based resources into daily practice increased from baseline to follow-up for all participants. Conclusions Our findings suggest that training and providing computers and Internet connections have measurable effects on information management behaviors. PMID:18773781

  19. THE BIOGRAPHY OF JÁNOS NAGYVÁTHY - THE FIRST HUNGARIAN AGRICULTURAL WRITER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor LUKÁCS

    2002-03-01

    experience and the regularities regarding animals and plants discovered by the developing sciences. His main source is ’Elementa rei rusticae’ by Mitterpacher but he also mentioned 51 different books as sources, (34 of them in the section about plant cultivation. Plant cultivation had the same importance and number of pages as in the work of Mitterpacher but animal husbandry had twice as many pages. He wrote about the breeding of all farm animals but it was not the chapters on animal husbandry that pointed ahead but his remarks to help the rationalization of farming and the fact that he wrote about plant cultivation and animal husbandry as a whole. The book made him well-known in the country. He was offered the post of a land steward by Széchenyi Ferenc and Festetics György. Accepting the latter he moved to Keszthely and he took over the management of the domain of 162ooo acres. The earl left the army at that time and started to restore his neglected domain. Nagyváthy’s main task was to improve farm management. He introduced strict accountancy and applied double-entry book-keeping for the first time and Hungary and his main principle was to put down all farming activities in writing. The farm managers were not suitable for this task so he convinced Festetics to found a school for them and an other secondary grammar school in the other centre of the domain in Csurgó. By 1797 the condition of the domain improved significantly and the Earl founded ’Georgikon’ the first agricultural college in Europe though without the land steward who favoured the idea of enlightment (the court in Vienna would not approve it. After the expiration of his contract he retired and moved to Csurgó, where he inspected the secondary grammar school as a secular inspector. He spent the last 22 years of his life here ’hard working in respectable poverty’. He died on 13th February 1819 (according to other sources on 24th. His posthumous books are as follows: ’Hungarian housewife on the farm

  20. The effect of normative social forces on managed care organizations: implications for strategic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, E G; Sebastian, J G

    1998-01-01

    Drawing on institutional theory, this study examines how adherence to a number of "institutional" and "technical" environmental forces can influence the business success of managed care organizations (MCOs). The standards studied include: (1) institutional forces: socially accepted procedures for delivering care (access to quality care, availability of information, and delivery of care in a personal manner); and (2) technical forces: industry standards for cost control and efficient use of financial and medical resources. The most significant finding is that successful MCOs must conform to both institutional and technical forces to be successful. MCOs that conform to either one or the other type of standard were no more successful than those that conformed to neither. These findings have several important implications for MCO strategy. First, to be successful, MCO executives must understand the external environment in which they operate. They must anticipate and respond to shifts in that environment. Second, this understanding of the external environment must place equal emphasis on societal demands (e.g., for accessible care and information) and on technical demands (e.g., for cost-efficient care). These findings may well reflect that once managed care penetration reaches relatively high levels, marketshare can no longer be gained through cost-efficiency alone; rather, enrollee satisfaction based on societal demands becomes a key factor in maintaining and gaining marketshare. Institutional theory provides' some strategies for accomplishing these goals. Cost-containment strategies include implementing policies for cutting costs in areas that do not affect the quality of care, such as using generic drugs and reducing administrative excesses and redundancies. At the same time, MCOs must implement strategies aimed at improving conformity to prevailing societal perceptions of appropriate care, including providing patients more freedom to choose their physicians and

  1. The impact of care management information technology model on quality of care after Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: "Bridging the Divides".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, William S; Elliott, Daniel; Fanari, Zaher; Ostertag-Stretch, Jennifer; Muther, Ann; Lynahan, Margaret; Kerzner, Roger; Salam, Tabassum; Scherrer, Herbert; Anderson, Sharon; Russo, Carla A; Kolm, Paul; Steinberg, Terri H

    Reducing readmissions and improving metrics of care are a national priority. Supplementing traditional care with care management may improve outcomes. The Bridges program was an initial evaluation of a care management platform (CareLinkHub), supported by information technology (IT) developed to improve the quality and transition of care from hospital to home after Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery (CABG) and reduce readmissions. CareLink is comprised of care managers, patient navigators, pharmacists and physicians. Information to guide care management is guided by a middleware layer to gather information, PLR (ColdLight Solutions, LLC) and presented to CareLink staff on a care management platform, Aerial™ (Medecision). In addition there is an analytic engine to help evaluate and guide care, Neuron™ (Coldlight Solutions, LLC). The "Bridges" program enrolled a total of 716 CABG patients with 850 admissions from April 2013 through March 2015. The data of the program was compared with those of 1111 CABG patients with 1203 admissions in the 3years prior to the program. No impact was seen with respect to readmissions, Blood Pressure or LDL control. There was no significant improvement in patients' reported outcomes using either the CTM-3 or any of the SAQ-7 scores. Patient follow-up with physicians within 1week of discharge improved during the Bridges years. The CareLink hub platform was successfully implemented. Little or no impact on outcome metrics was seen in the short follow-up time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Managing the physics of the economics of integrated health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zismer, Daniel K; Werner, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    The physics metaphor, as applied to the economics (and financial performance) of the integrated health system, seems appropriate when considered together with the nine principles of management framework provided. The nature of the integrated design enhances leaders' management potential as they consider organizational operations and strategy in the markets ahead. One question begged by this argument for the integrated design is the durability, efficiency and ultimate long-term survivability of the more "traditional" community health care delivery models, which, by design, are fragmented, internally competitive and less capital efficient. They also cannot exploit the leverage of teams, optimal access management or the pursuit of revenues made available in many forms. For those who wish to move from the traditional to the more integrated community health system designs (especially those who have not yet started the journey), the path requires: * Sufficient balance sheet capacity to fund the integration process-especially as the model requires physician practice acquisitions and electronic health record implementations * A well-prepared board13, 14 * A functional, durable and sustainable physician services enterprise design * A redesigned organizational and governance structure * Favorable internal financial incentives alignment design * Effective accountable physician leadership * Awareness that the system is not solely a funding strategy for acquired physicians, rather a fully -.. committed clinical and business model, one in which patient-centered integrated care is the core service (and not acute care hospital-based services) A willingness to create and exploit the implied and inherent potential of an integrated design and unified brand Last, it's important to remember that an integrated health system is a tool that creates a "new potential" (a physics metaphor reference, one last time). The design doesn't operate itself. Application of the management principles

  3. Managed care and the quality of substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Donald S; Daley, Marilyn; Ritter, Grant A; Hodgkin, Dominic; Beinecke, Richard H

    2002-12-01

    In the US, the spiraling costs of substance abuse and mental health treatment caused many state Medicaid agencies to adopt managed behavioral health care (MBHC) plans during the 1990s. Although research suggests that these plans have successfully reduced public sector spending, their impact on the quality of substance abuse treatment has not been established. The Massachusetts Medicaid program started a risk-sharing contract with MHMA, a private, for-profit specialty managed behavioral health care (MBHC) carve-out vendor on July 1, 1992. This paper evaluates the carve-out s impact on spending per inpatient episode and three proxy measures of quality: (i) access to inpatient treatment (ii) 30-day re-admissions and (iii) continuity of care. Medicaid claims for inpatient treatment were collapsed into episodes. Clients were tracked across the five-year period and an interrupted time series design was used to compare the three quality outcomes and spending in the year prior to (FY1992) and the four years during MHMA (FY1993-FY1996). Logistic and linear regression models were used to control for race, disability status, age, gender and primary diagnosis. Despite a 99% reduction in the use of hospital-based settings, access to 24-hour services overall increased by 38%, largely due to an expansion in the use of freestanding detoxification and acute residential services. Continuity improved by 73%. Nevertheless, rates of 7-day (58%) and 30-day (24%) readmission increased significantly, even after controlling for increases in disability status. Per episode spending decreased by 76% ($2,773), characterized by a dramatic spending reduction in FY1993 that was maintained but not augmented in subsequent years. The carve-out had mixed effects on the quality of substance abuse treatment. While one of the three measures (readmission rates) deteriorated, two improved (access and continuity). Rapid re-admissions were strongly associated with shorter lengths of stay, suggesting that

  4. Bowel management systems in critical care: a service evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzema, Jennifer

    2017-01-25

    Aim Many patients who are critically ill develop faecal incontinence associated with diarrhoea, and require a bowel management system (BMS) to prevent skin excoriation. Following guidelines produced by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, early rehabilitation has resulted in a reduction in the number of days that patients receive mechanical ventilation. However, patients with a BMS are potentially mechanically ventilated for longer because they are cared for in bed. The aim of this evaluation was to investigate whether patients with a BMS are mechanically ventilated for longer than those without a BMS. Method This was a retrospective service evaluation, in which a database search was conducted to identify patients admitted to the critical care department in one healthcare organisation during 2013. The search was narrowed to identify patients admitted to the critical care department who had received advanced respiratory support (mechanical ventilation), to compare the mean number of mechanically ventilated days between patients with and without a BMS (n = 122). Data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results There was a significant difference in the number of mechanically ventilated days (Pcritically ill patients with a BMS are placed in a sitting position for short periods of time. Further research should explore alternative bowel care options for patients who are critically ill.

  5. Managing managed care: habitus, hysteresis and the end(s) of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, S R; Lachicotte, W S

    2001-12-01

    In this paper we examine how clinicians at a community mental health center are responding to the beginnings of changes in the health care delivery system, changes that are designated under the rubric of "managed care." We describe how clinicians' attitudes about good mental health care are embodied in what sociologist Pierre Bourdieu calls their habitus, i.e., their professional habits and sense of good practice. Viewed in this light, their moral outrage and sense of threat, as well as their strategic attempts to resist or subvert the dictates of managed care agencies, become a function of what Bourdieu terms the hysteresis effect. The paper is based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted by a team of researchers at the mental health and substance abuse service of a hospital-affiliated, storefront clinic which serves residents of several neighborhoods in a large northeastern city. Data consist primarily of observations of meetings and interviews with staff members. We describe four aspects of the clinicians' professional habitus: a focus on cases as narratives of character and relationship, an imperative of authenticity, a distinctive orientation towards time, and an ethic of ambiguity. We then chronicle practices that have emerged in response to the limits on care imposed by managed care protocols, which are experienced by clinicians as violating the integrity of their work. These are discussed in relation to the concept of hysteresis.

  6. Anaesthetic and critical care management of thoracic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, J A; Mellor, A J

    2010-09-01

    Thoracic wounding has been a relatively common presentation of military wounds throughout modern conflict. When civilian casualties are included the incidence has remained constant at around 10%, although the frequency and severity of wounds to combatants has been altered by modern body armour. Whilst thoracic injury has a high initial mortality on the battlefield, those surviving to reach hospital frequently have injuries that only require simple management. In addition to penetrating ballistic injury, blunt chest trauma frequently occurs on operations as a result of road traffic collisions or tertiary blast injury. The physiological impact of thoracic wounds, however, is often great and survivors often require intensive care management and, where available, complex strategies to ensure oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal. This review examines the incidence and patterns of thoracic trauma and looks at therapeutic options for managing these complex cases.

  7. Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Glenn T; Brashear, Andrea D; Green, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves.

  8. Effect of Medicaid Managed Care on racial disparities in health care access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin Lê

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of Medicaid Managed Care (MMC) on racial disparities in access to care consistent with the Institute of Medicine (IOM) definition of racial disparity, which excludes differences stemming from health status but includes socioeconomic status (SES)-mediated differences. Secondary data from the Adult Samples of the 1997-2001 National Health Interview Survey, metropolitan statistical area (MSA)-level Medicaid Health Maintenance Organization (MHMO) market share from the 1997 to 2001 InterStudy MSA Trend Dataset, and MSA characteristics from the 1997 to 2001 Area Resource File. I estimate multivariate regression models to compare racial disparities in doctor visits, emergency room (ER) use, and having a usual source of care between enrollees in MMC and Medicaid Fee-for-Service (FFS) plans. To contend with potential selection bias, I use a difference-in-difference analytical strategy and assess the impact of greater MHMO market share at the MSA level on Medicaid enrollees' access measures. To implement the IOM definition of racial disparity, I adjust for health status but not SES factors using a novel method to transform the distribution of health status for minority populations to approximate the white health status distribution. MMC enrollment is associated with lowered disparities in having any doctor visit in the last year for blacks, and in having any usual source of care for both blacks and Hispanics. Increasing Medicaid HMO market share lowered disparities in having any doctor visits in the last year for both blacks and Hispanics. Although disparities in most other measures were not much affected, black-white ER use disparities exist among MMC enrollees and in areas of high MHMO market share. MMC programs' reduction of some disparities suggests that recent shifts in Medicaid policy toward managed care plans have benefited minority enrollees. Future research should investigate whether black-white disparities in ER use within MMC groups

  9. Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delon, Sandra; Mackinnon, Blair

    2009-01-01

    Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.

  10. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AMONG INTENSIVE CARE NURSES: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Abbas; Najar, Ali Vafaee; Bakhshi, Mahmoud

    2015-12-01

    Nurses are the main users of supplies and equipment applied in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) which are high-priced and costly. Therefore, understanding ICU nurses' experiences about resource management contributes to the better control of the costs. This study aimed to investigate the culture of nurses' working environment regarding the resource management in the ICUs in Iran. In this study, a focused ethnographic method was used. Twenty-eight informants among ICU nurses and other professional individuals were purposively selected and interviewed. As well, 400 hours of ethnographic observations as a participant observer was used for data gathering. Data analysis was performed using the methods described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Two main themes describing the culture of ICU nurses regarding resource management included (a) consumption monitoring and auditing, and (b) prudent use. The results revealed that the efforts for resource management are conducted in the conditions of scarcity and uncertainty in supply. ICU nurses had a sense of futurism in the supply and use of resources in the unit and do the planning through taking the rules and guidelines as well as the available resources and their values into account. Improper storage of some supplies and equipment was a reaction to this uncertain condition among nurses. To manage the resources effectively, improvement of supply chain management in hospital seems essential. It is also necessary to hold educational classes in order to enhance the nurses' awareness on effective supply chain and storage of the items in the unit stock.

  11. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early…

  12. 76 FR 34541 - Child and Adult Care Food Program Improving Management and Program Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... 7 CFR Parts 210, 215, 220 et al. Child and Adult Care Food Program Improving Management and Program..., 220, 225, and 226 RIN 0584-AC24 Child and Adult Care Food Program Improving Management and Program... management and integrity in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), at 67 FR 43447 (June 27, 2002) and...

  13. A survey of managed care strategies for pregnant smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, D C; Robinson, L A; Rosenthal, A C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the content and comprehensiveness of pregnancy specific smoking cessation strategies within managed care organisations (MCOs) responding affirmatively to the national 1997-98 Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care (ATMC) survey. This cross sectional follow up study consisted of a fax survey sent to medical directors and a 37 question telephone survey of program overseers about the smoking cessation strategy. 147 MCOs identifying a pregnancy specific smoking cessation strategy on the 1997-98 ATMC survey served as the initial sample; 88 MCOs of 128 eligible plans completed both components, with a response rate of 69%. Pregnancy specific smoking cessation strategies varied. 40% of respondents used the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines for clinical smoking cessation to design their strategy. Strategies included self help materials, quit classes, telephone support and brief counselling by providers, linkages to quality improvement efforts, and use of patient databases for outreach. Only 42% offered a postpartum relapse prevention element. Lack of patient interest, competing clinic priorities, and the lack of a smoker identification system were the most problematic barriers to implementing strategies, common to at least a quarter of respondents. A majority ranked best practice manuals and web site linkages as the most useful form of technical assistance, followed by peer-to-peer counselling, regional workshops, newsletters, on-site assistance, and national conferences. The survey provides the first profile of prenatal tobacco treatment strategies in managed care. While design limitations prevent generalisation of these results to all MCOs, such information can help guide technical assistance to plans interested in reducing smoking among pregnant women.

  14. Care for a Patient With Cancer As a Project: Management of Complex Task Interdependence in Cancer Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosman, Julia R; Carlos, Ruth C; Simon, Melissa A; Madden, Debra L; Gradishar, William J; Benson, Al B; Rapkin, Bruce D; Weiss, Elisa S; Gareen, Ilana F; Wagner, Lynne I; Khan, Seema A; Bunce, Mikele M; Small, Art; Weldon, Christine B

    2016-11-01

    Cancer care is highly complex and suffers from fragmentation and lack of coordination across provider specialties and clinical domains. As a result, patients often find that they must coordinate care on their own. Coordinated delivery teams may address these challenges and improve quality of cancer care. Task interdependence is a core principle of rigorous teamwork and is essential to addressing the complexity of cancer care, which is highly interdependent across specialties and modalities. We examined challenges faced by a patient with early-stage breast cancer that resulted from difficulties in understanding and managing task interdependence across clinical domains involved in this patient's care. We used team science supported by the project management discipline to discuss how various task interdependence aspects can be recognized, deliberately designed, and systematically managed to prevent care breakdowns. This case highlights how effective task interdependence management facilitated by project management methods could markedly improve the course of a patient's care. This work informs efforts of cancer centers and practices to redesign cancer care delivery through innovative, practical, and patient-centered approaches to management of task interdependence in cancer care. Future patient-reported outcomes research will help to determine optimal ways to engage patients, including those who are medically underserved, in managing task interdependence in their own care.

  15. Banking union through Hungarian eyes–assessment of a possible close cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anikó Szombati

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Legislation laying down the first two pillars of the institutional system of the Banking Union was finalised in April 2014. In accordance with the regulations, non-euro area Member States, including Hungary, may notify the ECB at any time if they wish to participate in the common system even before the euro is adopted. The paper aims at summarising the possible pros and cons vis-à-vis the Banking Union from a Hungarian perspective. It highlights the reasons for not opting in at the inception of the new supervisory system and also gives indications about those major milestones that could give rise to the reconsideration of the present position. In its existing form, the single supervisory and crisis management mechanism has not achieved the initial target, i.e. the separation of the stability of national banking systems and the fiscal capacity of Member States and the elimination of interdependencies. In addition, close cooperation implies weaker powers than those provided by actual membership, and the separation of central bank and supervisory functions carries risks in non-euro area countries. By contrast, the attraction of Banking Union membership lies in the opportunity to join a uniform European system, a wider analyst base and ultimately, the “ammunition” of the EUR 98 billion available for crisis management in comparison to the Hungarian banking system. In October 2013, a uniform supervisory system integrated into the central bank was set up in Hungary, and the domestic resolution institutional system was complete by the end of 2014. Therefore, until the finalisation of the Banking Union through the creation of the common deposit insurance fund and a common fiscal backstop, it is reasonable to put the decision to join on hold; indeed, such a decision should be made in light of several factors presented in this study.

  16. Physicians in health care management: 2. Managing performance: who, what, how and when?

    OpenAIRE

    Lemieux-Charles, L

    1994-01-01

    Physicians are becoming more involved in performance management as hospitals restructure to increase effectiveness. Although physicians are not hospital employees, they are subject to performance appraisals because the hospitals are accountable to patients and the community for the quality of hospital services. The performance of a health care professional may be appraised by the appropriate departmental manager, by other professionals in a team or program or by peers, based on prior agreemen...

  17. The challenge of managing laboratory information in a managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B A

    1996-04-01

    This article considers some of the major changes that are occurring in pathology and pathology informatics in response to the shift to managed care in the United States. To better understand the relationship between information management in clinical laboratories and managed care, a typology of integrated delivery systems is presented. Following this is a discussion of the evolutionary trajectory for the computer networks that serve these large consolidated healthcare delivery organizations. The most complex of these computer networks is a community health information network. Participation in the planning and deployment of community health information networks will be important for pathologists because information management within pathology will be inexorably integrated into the larger effort by integrated delivery systems to share clinical, financial, and administrative data on a regional basis. Finally, four laboratory information management challenges under managed care are discussed, accompanied by possible approaches to each of them. The challenges presented are (1) organizational integration of departmental information systems such as the laboratory information system; (2) weakening of the best-of-breed approach to laboratory information system selection; (3) the shift away from the centralized laboratory paradigm; and (4) the development of rule-based systems to monitor and control laboratory utilization.

  18. Emergency planning and management in health care: priority research topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Alan; Chambers, Naomi; French, Simon; Shaw, Duncan; King, Russell; Whitehead, Alison

    2014-06-01

    Many major incidents have significant impacts on people's health, placing additional demands on health-care organisations. The main aim of this paper is to suggest a prioritised agenda for organisational and management research on emergency planning and management relevant to U.K. health care, based on a scoping study. A secondary aim is to enhance knowledge and understanding of health-care emergency planning among the wider research community, by highlighting key issues and perspectives on the subject and presenting a conceptual model. The study findings have much in common with those of previous U.S.-focused scoping reviews, and with a recent U.K.-based review, confirming the relative paucity of U.K.-based research. No individual research topic scored highly on all of the key measures identified, with communities and organisations appearing to differ about which topics are the most important. Four broad research priorities are suggested: the affected public; inter- and intra-organisational collaboration; preparing responders and their organisations; and prioritisation and decision making.

  19. Forging community partnerships to improve health care: the experience of four Medicaid managed care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silow-Carroll, Sharon; Rodin, Diana

    2013-04-01

    Some managed care organizations (MCOs) serving Medicaid beneficiaries are actively engaging in community partnerships to meet the needs of vulnerable members and nonmembers. We found that the history, leadership, and other internal factors of four such MCOs primarily drive that focus. However, external factors such as state Medicaid policies and competition or collaboration among MCOs also play a role. The specific strat­egies of these MCOs vary but share common goals: (1) improve care coordination, access, and delivery; (2) strengthen the community and safety-net infrastructure; and (3) prevent illness and reduce disparities. The MCOs use data to identify gaps in care, seek community input in designing interventions, and commit resources to engage community organiza­tions. State Medicaid programs can promote such work by establishing goals, priorities, and guidelines; providing data analysis and technical assistance to evaluate local needs and community engagement efforts; and convening stakeholders to collaborate and share best practices.

  20. Factors associated with advance care planning discussions by area agency on aging care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelett, Susan; Baughman, Kristin R; Palmisano, Barbara R; Sanders, Margaret; Ludwick, Ruth E

    2013-12-01

    Initiating advance care planning (ACP) discussions in the home may prevent avoidable hospitalizations by elucidating goals of care. Area agencies on aging care managers (AAACMs) work in the home with high-risk consumers. To determine which AAACM characteristics contribute to an increased frequency of ACP discussions. Cross-sectional investigator-generated surveys administered to AAACMs at 3 AAAs in Ohio. Of 289 AAACMs, 182 (63%) responded. The more experience and comfort AAACMs felt with ACP discussions, the more likely they were to initiate ACP discussions. It may be necessary to build interactive educational experiences where, for example, AAACMs are asked to fill out their own advance directives and/or facilitate others in ACP discussions to improve experience and comfort with ACP discussions.

  1. MANAGEMENT OF INNOVATION IN HEALTH CARE AT THE REGIONAL LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. G. Totskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews topical issues of organization and management of innovative activity in the regional health care system.Objective. Development and scientific substantiation of a conceptual model of managing innovation in the regional health care system, introduction of institutional mechanisms for its implementation, and evaluation of their efficacy in using diagnosis and treatment technologies. Objectives of the study included reviewing the organization status and problems hampering the development, identification of prospects, and justification for appropriate changes in innovation in healthcare system and medical science at the regional level.Material and methods. To conduct a comprehensive assessment of the status and meet challenges of innovation promotion, a methodology for social-hygienic research was worked out including bibliographic and analytical methods, situational analysis, sociological and economic methods, expert assessment, methods for quality management system audit in accordance with ISO 19011:2002, IDEFO function modeling (RD IDEF0-2000, and organizational modeling. The study was based on the analysis of foreign and domestic literature, statistics, methods for managerial modeling, as well as management experience (including innovative methodological approaches gained by Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics named after Ya.L. Tsivyan which meets the requirements for a platform for research and innovative product reproduction, including research, clinical, organizational, and managerial aspects. Other facilities were considered in conjunction with the leading innovative platform.Results. The paper presents a scientifically based model of innovative medical environment with its elements as subjects, each with a set of functions. Conceptual model for management includes structuring (resource, processes, and quality management; application of international standards and strategic management mechanisms

  2. Looking at CER from the managed care organization perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, H Eric

    2012-05-01

    The amount of available comparative effectiveness research (CER) is increasing, giving managed care organizations (MCOs) more information to use in decision making. However, MCOs may not be prepared to integrate this new and voluminous data into their current practices and policies. To describe ways that health care reform will affect MCO populations in the future, to examine examples of how MCOs have utilized CER data in the past, and to identify questions that MCOs will have to address as they integrate CER into future decision making. Unquestionably, health care reform will change the U.S. market. Millions more insured individuals will be making purchasing decisions. In addition, health care reform will mean more CER data will be available, affecting the decisions MCOs must make. In the past, MCOs may not have used CER as effectively as they could in making formulary and other policy decisions. However, there are examples that show how CER can be integrated effectively, such as Intermountain Healthcare's use of CER to create treatment guidelines, which have been shown to lower costs and improve delivery of care. In the future, MCOs will need to assess their own abilities to utilize CER, including their infrastructure of expertise, hardware, software, and protocols and processes. MCOs will also need to understand how pertinent CER is to their own needs, how it may affect benefit design, and how it will affect their customers' needs. Health care reform, and the resultant growth of CER, will have significant impact on MCOs, who will need to invest in better infrastructure and new understandings of a transforming market, changing customer bases, and evolving data.

  3. ProvenCare-Psoriasis: A disease management model to optimize care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gionfriddo, Michael R; Pulk, Rebecca A; Sahni, Dev R; Vijayanagar, Sonal G; Chronowski, Joseph J; Jones, Laney K; Evans, Michael A; Feldman, Steven R; Pride, Howard

    2018-03-15

    There are a variety of evidence-based treatments available for psoriasis. The transition of this evidence into practice is challenging. In this article, we describe the design of our disease management approach for Psoriasis (ProvenCare®) and present preliminary evidence of the effect of its implementation. In designing our approach, we identified three barriers to optimal care: 1) lack of a standardized and discrete disease activity measure within the electronic health record, 2) lack of a system-wide, standardized approach to care, and 3) non-uniform financial access to appropriate non-pharmacologic treatments. We implemented several solutions, which collectively form our approach. We standardized the documentation of clinical data such as body surface area (BSA), created a disease management algorithm for psoriasis, and aligned incentives to facilitate the implementation of the algorithm. This approach provides more coordinated, cost effective care for psoriasis, while being acceptable to key stakeholders. Future work will examine the effect of the implementation of our approach on important clinical and patient outcomes.

  4. Management of pharmaceutical services in the Brazilian primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlack, Letícia Farias; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Areda, Camila Alves; Galato, Dayani; Oliveira, Aline Gomes de; Álvares, Juliana; Leite, Silvana Nair; Costa, Ediná Alves; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2017-11-13

    To identify limiting factors in the management of pharmaceutical services in the primary health care provided by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS). This study was based on the data from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos no Brasil (PNAUM - National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines), and it was conducted by interviews with professionals responsible for pharmaceutical services in Brazilian cities, in 2015. To identify the management limiting factors, we considered the organizational, operational, and sustainability indicators of the management. For the analyses, we included the weights and structure of analysis plan for complex samples. The results were expressed by frequencies and measures of central tendency with 95% confidence interval, considering the Brazilian geographic regions. We identified the following limiting factors: lack of pharmaceutical services in the Municipal Health Secretariat organization chart (24%) and in the health plan (18%); lack of participation of managers in the Health Board and the absence of reference to this topic in the agenda of meetings (58.4%); lack of financial autonomy (61.5%) and lack of knowledge on the available values (81.7%); lack of adoption of operational procedures (about 50%) for selection, scheduling, and acquisition; and the fact that most professionals evaluate the organization of pharmaceutical services as good and great (58.8%), despite the worrisome indicators. Pharmaceutical services management is currently supported by a legal and political framework that should guide and contribute to improve the pharmaceutical services in the Brazilian Unified Health System primary health care. However, there is a mismatch between the goals established by these guidelines and what is actually happening.

  5. Experience of Hungarian model project: 'Strengthening training for operational safety at Paks NPP'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, I.

    1998-01-01

    Training of Operational Safety at Paks NPP is described including all the features of the project including namely: description of Paks NPP, its properties and performances; reasons for establishing Hungarian Model Project, its main goals, mentioning Hungarian and IAEA experts involved in the Project, its organization, operation, budget, current status together with its short term and long term impact

  6. Aggressive Neighborhood Watch or Unconventional Threat? The Hungarian Extreme Right-Wing Self-Defense Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    paramilitary force, for instance the Hungarian Guard.33 The Guard was formed in 2007 through an ‘oath of allegiance’ taken by men and women wearing black...gyorgy-gyulat.html. 35 9. 10/07/2012 Disruption of the Hungarian National Front.90 Gyula Thurmer, leader of the (Communist) Labour Party and the

  7. Early Morphological Productivity in Hungarian: Evidence from Sentence Repetition and Elicited Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Balint; Lukacs, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates early productivity of morpheme use in Hungarian children aged between 2 ; 1 and 5 ; 3. Hungarian has a rich morphology which is the core marker of grammatical functions. A new method is introduced using the novel word paradigm in a sentence repetition task with masked inflections (i.e. a disguised elicited production task).…

  8. The new system of the talent development program in Hungarian soccer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csáki István

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: due to a series of failures and the drastic reduction in the quality of Hungarian soccer, greater emphasis should be put on coaches’ professional development and talent development programs. The aim of this study was to present the newly established Hungarian Soccer Development Program that focuses on the development of youth talent.

  9. Care Management Processes Used Less Often For Depression Than For Other Chronic Conditions In US Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Tara F; Ramsay, Patricia P; Casalino, Lawrence P; Bao, Yuhua; Pincus, Harold A; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-03-01

    Primary care physicians play an important role in the diagnosis and management of depression. Yet little is known about their use of care management processes for depression. Using national survey data for the period 2006-13, we assessed the use of five care management processes for depression and other chronic illnesses among primary care practices in the United States. We found significantly less use for depression than for asthma, congestive heart failure, or diabetes in 2012-13. On average, practices used fewer than one care management process for depression, and this level of use has not changed since 2006-07, regardless of practice size. In contrast, use of diabetes care management processes has increased significantly among larger practices. These findings may indicate that US primary care practices are not well equipped to manage depression as a chronic illness, despite the high proportion of depression care they provide. Policies that incentivize depression care management, including additional quality metrics, should be considered. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  10. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, I R; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, C M; Purcarea, V L

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer's perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician's perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician's perspective.

  11. Assessment, care and management of patients with red eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, Susan; Seewoodhary, Ramesh

    2017-12-06

    Red eye is a common ocular presentation in primary care, and there are several challenges that healthcare practitioners may encounter when caring for such patients. The main ocular conditions that can give rise to red eye are: primary acute angle closure glaucoma, acute iritis, dry eye, blepharitis and conjunctivitis. Red eye can be classified as sight-threatening or non-sight-threatening. Many patients presenting with painless red eye and normal vision usually recover well. However, when red eye is associated with pain, photophobia, watering and blurred vision, it is potentially sight-threatening and must be addressed urgently. Therefore, it is vital for healthcare practitioners to be able to undertake a careful assessment of the patient and make an accurate diagnosis early. This article provides an overview of the common causes of red eye encountered in general practice or an eye clinic. It discusses the nurse's role in the care and management of patients with red eye, with reference to patient assessment, the skills required to make an accurate diagnosis, treatment and health promotion. ©2017 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  12. Management of health-care waste in Izmir, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Soysal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate health-care waste in the 18 districts of metropolitan municipality of the third biggest city in Turkey. This cross-sectional study was carried out with 825 health institutions established in the 18 districts of Izmir metropolitan municipality, in 2007. The total amount of health-care waste collected was 4841 tons and 621 kilograms per patient's bed in 2007. Most of the medical wastes were collected from Konak, Karsiyaka and Bornova districts and were 2308, 272 and 1020 tons, respectively. Regarding to overpopulation, the number of health institutions in these districts are more than the number of health institutions in the other administrative districts. There was a statistically significant, positive correlation between the amount of health-care waste collected and population of the 18 districts (r = 0.79, p < 0.001, and number of beds/patients (r = 0.83, p < 0.001. To provide a safe health-care waste management metropolitan municipality must provide hazardous waste separation in health institutions, establish sterilization units for infectious waste, and provide the last storage of medical waste in completely different, safe and special areas apart from the municipal waste storage areas.

  13. Managed care. What is its impact on nursing education and practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, C

    1997-08-01

    Market forces present the nursing profession with an urgency to prepare gerontological nurses to assume significant roles in the managed care industry. An understanding of the current managed care environment underscores the need for training. Nurses require a "managed care" skill-set encompassing a firm grasp of the organization, financing, delivery, and policy implications of managed care as well as advanced practice clinical skills and a sound business orientation. The importance of the consumer as a significant player in managed care is highlighted.

  14. [Quality assurance and quality management in intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notz, K; Dubb, R; Kaltwasser, A; Hermes, C; Pfeffer, S

    2015-11-01

    Treatment success in hospitals, particularly in intensive care units, is directly tied to quality of structure, process, and outcomes. Technological and medical advancements lead to ever more complex treatment situations with highly specialized tasks in intensive care nursing. Quality criteria that can be used to describe and correctly measure those highly complex multiprofessional situations have only been recently developed and put into practice.In this article, it will be shown how quality in multiprofessional teams can be definded and assessed in daily clinical practice. Core aspects are the choice of a nursing theory, quality assurance measures, and quality management. One possible option of quality assurance is the use of standard operating procedures (SOPs). Quality can ultimately only be achieved if professional groups think beyond their boundaries, minimize errors, and establish and live out instructions and SOPs.

  15. Delineating the genetic heterogeneity of OCA in Hungarian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábos, Beáta; Farkas, Katalin; Tóth, Lola; Sulák, Adrienn; Tripolszki, Kornélia; Tihanyi, Mariann; Németh, Réka; Vas, Krisztina; Csoma, Zsanett; Kemény, Lajos; Széll, Márta; Nagy, Nikoletta

    2017-06-19

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a clinically and genetically heterogenic group of pigmentation abnormalities characterized by variable hair, skin, and ocular hypopigmentation. Six known genes and a locus on human chromosome 4q24 have been implicated in the etiology of isolated OCA forms (OCA 1-7). The most frequent OCA types among Caucasians are OCA1, OCA2, and OCA4. We aimed to investigate genes responsible for the development of these OCA forms in Hungarian OCA patients (n = 13). Mutation screening and polymorphism analysis were performed by direct sequencing on TYR, OCA2, SLC45A2 genes. Although the clinical features of the investigated Hungarian OCA patients were identical, the molecular genetic data suggested OCA1 subtype in eight cases and OCA4 subtype in two cases. The molecular diagnosis was not clearly identifiable in three cases. In four patients, two different heterozygous known pathogenic or predicted to be pathogenic mutations were present. Seven patients had only one pathogenic mutation, which was associated with non-pathogenic variants in six cases. In two patients no pathogenic mutation was identified. Our results suggest that the concomitant screening of the non-pathogenic variants-which alone do not cause the development of OCA, but might have clinical significance in association with a pathogenic variant-is important. Our results also show significant variation in the disease spectrum compared to other populations. These data also confirm that the concomitant analysis of OCA genes is critical, providing new insights to the phenotypic diversity of OCA and expanding the mutation spectrum of OCA genes in Hungarian patients.

  16. FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS AND BANKRUPTCY PREDICTION IN HUNGARIAN DAIRY SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozsa Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The preliminary sample for the analysis is framed on the basis of three criteria: amount of the subscribed capital, sales revenues and product structure. Those companies are regarded as competitors that have subscribed capitals in excess of HUF 250 million, consistently high levels of sales revenues and diversified product structures. The preliminary sample consists of 7 companies. In 2012, their total sales revenues were as high as about 50% of the overall amount of sales revenues in the sector. Three of the 7 companies are possessed by foreign owners in full or part, whereas 4 of them belong to Hungarian owners. In 2012, Hungarian-owned companies covered more than one-third of the combined sales revenues of the 7 leading companies. Hence, the competitive positions of these 4 companies based on their financial positions are examined. These calculations have relied on the annual reports for the period of 2008–2012 (balance sheets, income statements, cash flow statements. The research has implemented a comprehensive and comparative financial analysis. The main question is what the key financial characteristics of the Hungarian-owned companies are. Financial indicators are calculated and their time-series analysis is accomplished to describe the sample companies’ capital structures, liquidity and profitability. Using comparative analysis of the applied financial ratios the study determines (1 which company has the most advantageous financial conditions for the successful operation; (2 which companies have disadvantageous financial situation; and (3 which companies are in potential financial distress situation. Potential bankruptcy positions are examined by the applications of Altman and Springate models.

  17. Energy conservation and energy prices: the Hungarian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, L.

    1997-01-01

    The main sources of emissions into the outdoor air are from the energy sector (e.g. power plants), industry, the transport sector and the residential sector (buildings). The danger from most of these emissions is the fact that heat plants and boilers of residential buildings in particular, are usually in the areas where people live and work and therefore their emissions may have a direct effect on health. The best way to improve this situation - to diminish emissions and to improve air quality - is to increase the efficiency of both energy production and use. This also has important consequences for the economic use of the national energy carrier stock and diminishes the need to import energy which increases the competitiveness of goods produced. The Hungarian government has set out an Energy Saving Programme to address, among other things the fact that the Hungarian average energy consumption per capita is less than the EU average but the energy intensity (the necessary energy to produce 1 USD GDP) is 3.5-4.0 times higher than the EU average. It has been shown that the best way to save energy is to invest in energy-conscious behaviour and training. Recent studies in public and residential buildings have shown that there is a potential for high energy saving in Hungarian buildings which is independent from the building technology used. Also, the pay-back times of investment in the building envelope are significantly higher than the pay-back times of investment in heating-ventilating or control systems, while the energy saved was of the same magnitude. (author) 5 figs., 5 tabs., 6 refs

  18. The fate of Hungarian Jewish dermatologists during the Holocaust: Part 2: Under Nazi rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Julia; Burgdorf, Walter H C; Hoenig, Leonard J; Parish, Lawrence Charles

    At least 564,500 Hungarian Jews perished during the Holocaust, including many physicians. Exactly how many Jewish dermatologists were killed is not known. We have identified 62 Hungarian Jewish dermatologists from this period: 19 of these dermatologists died in concentration camps or were shot in Hungary, 3 committed suicide, and 1 died shortly after the Holocaust, exhausted by the War. Fortunately, many Hungarian Jewish dermatologists survived the Holocaust. Some had fled Europe before the Nazi takeover, as was described in Part 1 of this contribution. Two Holocaust survivors, Ferenc Földvári and Ödön Rajka, became presidents of the Hungarian Dermatologic Society and helped rebuild the profession of dermatology in Hungary after the War. This contribution provides one of the first accounts of the fate of Hungarian Jewish dermatologists during the Holocaust and serves as a remembrance of their suffering and ordeal. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. [Pre-travel advice and patient education of Hungarian travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Ingrid; Felkai, Péter

    2018-03-01

    According to international surveys, over half of the travellers face some kind of health issue when travelling. The overwhelming majority of travel-related illnesses can be prevented with pre-travel medical consultations, but the syllabus and content of the consultation have to match the travel habits and culture of the given society. This publication explores the specificities and travel habits of Hungarian travellers. One hundred participants of a travel exhibition completed a survey about their international travel. As the survey was not representative, the data could only be processed through simple statistical methods. However, since the exhibition was presumably attended by those wishing to travel, the conclusions drawn from the results are worth publishing, since no similar survey in Hungary has been published before. Based on the suitable classification of age groups in travel medicine, 11% of the participants were adolescents / young adults (aged 15-24), 81% adults (25-59) and 8% elderly (60-74). Twenty-eight percent of the participants travel multiple times a year, 40% yearly and 32% of them less frequently; 16% of the adults, 8% of the adolescents and 4% of the elderly age group travel multiple times a year. The travel destinations of Hungarian travellers have remained practically unchanged since a study was conducted 13 years ago: the vast majority (95%) travelled within Europe, 2% to the United States, and 11% of them elsewhere. Since Hungarians do not travel to endemic areas, only 5% consulted their general practitioners (GPs) prior to travelling, and 29% did when they had to be vaccinated. Forty-two percent of those wishing to travel never consult their GPs, even though 29% of them are aware of some chronic illness. Instead, 51% gather their health information from the internet and only 6% from their doctors. By the contradiction between the poor health status of the majority of Hungarian travellers and the negligence of seeking pre-travel advice

  20. New species in the Hungarian avifauna in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadarics Tibor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two new species appeared in the Hungarian avifauna in 2014: the Spanish Sparrow and the Blyth’s Reed Warbler. One pair of Spanish Sparrow was breeding in Bácsborsód between June 13th and July 31st in the side of a stork nest. The Blyth’s Reed Warbler was trapped and ringed near Tömörd on August 15th. With the observations of these species the number of bird species that have ever been proven to occur in Hungary has risen to 411.

  1. Nucleotide sequence of Hungarian grapevine chrome mosaic nepovirus RNA1.

    OpenAIRE

    Le Gall, O; Candresse, T; Brault, V; Dunez, J

    1989-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the RNA1 of hungarian grapevine chrome mosaic virus, a nepovirus very closely related to tomato black ring virus, has been determined from cDNA clones. It is 7212 nucleotides in length excluding the 3' terminal poly(A) tail and contains a large open reading frame extending from nucleotides 216 to 6971. The presumably encoded polyprotein is 2252 amino acids in length with a molecular weight of 250 kDa. The primary structure of the polyprotein was compared with that o...

  2. Hungarian situation of the technologically enhanced naturally occuring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhasz, L.; Szerbin, P.; Czoch, I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In Hungary, the main goal is that the Hungarian regulations should meet with the EU Directive No. 96/29. For this aim, a surveying project has been launched in order to collect all relevant information about the Hungarian TENORM situation. This surveying programme covers a lot of data collection (work activities, disposal places, residue quantities) and radiological measurements on the TENORM site. The Hungarian situation of TENORM definitely differs from other countries in the aspect of occurrence forms of natural sources (or in the imported raw materials), in the quantities of exploitation, in the level of the radioactivity and in the applied technological processes. Firstly, those work activities have been choosen where the huge amount of residues have been produced. The other criteria is that the activity concentration in a great portion of the given residues is much higher than the average activity concentration of the typical Hungarian soil. After filtering and ranking, the following main activities enhanced the radioactivity level are left: uranium mining and milling, coal mining, coal firing in power plants, bauxite mining and aluminous earth production. At the uranium mining and milling area the uranium content of residues ranges from 20 to 70 g t -1 , and above those the dose rate is 0.4-10 μSv h -1 . The waste rock piles and heaps for leaching were restored and the remediation of tailings ponds is still under way. In the mountain Mecsek and on the territory from the highland Balaton to the mountain Vertes, the radioactivity level of the coals is 10-50 times higher than the worldwide average. The coal fired plants have piled up in the order of magnitude of 10 million tons of fly ash, bottom ash and slag in ponds around the plants. The radioactivity of U-238 series of ash and slag is in the range from 200 to 2000 Bq·kg -1 . The radionuclide concentrations of bauxite ores range from 200 to 300 Bq·kg -1 . At the refining factories, a lot of red

  3. [Munchausen syndrome: need for centralized administrative health-care management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmark, D; Sigal, M; Gelkopf, M

    1991-03-01

    The clinical picture of Munchausen syndrome is that of feigned or self-induced illness with the aim of being hospitalized and/or receiving unnecessary medical interventions, peregrination from 1 hospital to another, and disruptive behavior when hospitalized. These patients are a danger to themselves and heavily burden inpatient facilities that care for them. We present a case that illustrates the problems of diagnosing and managing such patients. We stress the need for adequate centralization and distribution of the relevant information concerning these patients.

  4. GUIDELINES OF CARE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F.; Tom, Wynnis L.; Chamlin, Sarah L.; Feldman, Steven R.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Simpson, Eric L.; Berger, Timothy G.; Bergman, James N.; Cohen, David E.; Cooper, Kevin D.; Cordoro, Kelly M.; Davis, Dawn M.; Krol, Alfons; Margolis, David J.; Paller, Amy S.; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Robert A.; Williams, Hywel C.; Elmets, Craig A.; Block, Julie; Harrod, Christopher G.; Begolka, Wendy Smith; Sidbury, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, pruritic inflammatory dermatosis that affects up to 25% of children and 2–3% of adults. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in AD management and care, providing updated and expanded recommendations based on the available evidence. In this first of four sections, methods for diagnosis and monitoring of disease, outcomes measures for assessment and common clinical associations that affect patients with AD are discussed. Known risk factors for the development of disease are also reviewed. PMID:24290431

  5. A computer science approach to managing security in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asirelli, P; Braccini, G; Caramella, D; Coco, A; Fabbrini, F

    2002-09-01

    The security of electronic medical information is very important for health care organisations, which have to ensure confidentiality, integrity and availability of the information provided. This paper will briefly outline the legal measures adopted by the European Community, Italy and the United States to regulate the use and disclosure of medical records. It will then go on to highlight how information technology can help to address these issues with special reference to the management of organisation policies. To this end, we will present a modelling example for the security policy of a radiological department.

  6. Managed care and the delivery of primary care to the elderly and the chronically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wholey, D R; Burns, L R; Lavizzo-Mourey, R

    1998-06-01

    To analyze primary care staffing in HMOs and to review the literature on primary care organization and performance in managed care organizations, with an emphasis on the delivery of primary care to the elderly and chronically ill. Analysis of primary care staffing: InterStudy HMO census data on primary care (n = 1,956) and specialist (n = 1,777) physician staffing levels from 1991 through 1995. Primary care organization and performance for the chronically ill and elderly were analyzed using a review of published research. For the staffing-level models, the number of primary care and specialist physicians per 100,000 enrollees was regressed on HMO characteristics (HMO type [group, staff, network, mixed], HMO enrollment, federal qualification, profit status, national affiliation) and community characteristics (per capita income, population density, service area size, HMO competition). For the review of organization and performance, literature published was summarized in a tabular format. The analysis of physician staffing shows that group and staff HMOs have fewer primary care and specialist physicians per 100,000 enrollees than do network and mixed HMOs, which have fewer than IPAs. Larger HMOs use fewer physicians per 100,000 enrollees than smaller HMOs. Federally qualified HMOs have fewer primary care and specialist physicians per 100,000 enrollees. For-profit, nationally affiliated, and Blue Cross HMOs have more primary care and specialist physicians than do local HMOs. HMOs in areas with high per capita income have more PCPs per 100,000 and a greater proportion of PCPs in the panel. HMO penetration decreases the use of specialists, but the number of HMOs increases the use of primary care and specialist physicians in highly competitive markets. Under very competitive conditions, HMOs appear to compete by increasing access to both PCPs and specialists, with a greater emphasis on access to specialists. The review of research on HMO performance suggests that access

  7. Review article: Critical Care Airway Management eLearning modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Deepak; McCarthy, Sally; Mowatt, Elizabeth; Cahill, Angela; Peirce, Bronwyn; Hawking, Geoff; Osborne, Ruth; Hibble, Belinda; Ebbs, Katharine

    2017-11-16

    The Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM) has recently launched the Critical Care Airway Management eLearning modules to support emergency medicine trainees in developing their airway management skills in the ED. A team of emergency physicians and trainees worked collaboratively to develop the eLearning resources ensuring extensive stakeholder consultation. A comprehensive resource manual was written to provide learners with knowledge that underpins the modules. ACEM provided project coordination as well as administrative and technical team support to the production. Although specifically developed with early ACEM trainees in mind, it is envisaged the resources will be useful for all emergency clinicians. The project was funded by the Australian Commonwealth Department of Health. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. The impact of care management information technology model on quality of care after percutaneous coronary intervention: "Bridging the Divides".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, William S; Fanari, Zaher; Elliott, Daniel; Ostertag-Stretch, Jennifer; Muther, Ann; Lynahan, Margaret; Kerzner, Roger; Salam, Tabassum; Scherrer, Herbert; Anderson, Sharon; Russo, Carla A; Kolm, Paul; Steinberg, Terri H

    2017-07-03

    Reducing readmissions and improving metrics of care are a national priority. Supplementing traditional care with care management may improve outcomes. The Bridges program was an initial evaluation of a care management platform (CareLinkHub), supported by information technology (IT) developed to improve the quality and transition of care from hospital to home after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and reduce readmissions. CareLink is comprised of care managers, patient navigators, pharmacists and physicians. Information to guide care management is guided by a middleware layer to gather information, PLR (ColdLight Solutions, LLC) and presented to CareLink staff on a care management platform, Aerial™ (Medecision). An additional analytic engine [Neuron™ (ColdLight Solutions, LLC)] helps, evaluates and guide care. The "Bridges" program enrolled a total of 2054 PCI patients with 2835 admission from April, 1st 2013 through March 1st, 2015. The data of the program was compared with those of 3691 PCI patients with 4414 admissions in the 3years prior to the program. No impact was seen with respect to inpatient and observation readmission, or emergency department visits. Similarly no change was noticed in LDL control. There was minimal improvement in BP control and only in the CTM-3 and SAQ-7 physical limitation scores in the patients' reported outcomes. Patient follow-up with physicians within 1week of discharge improved during the Bridges years. The CareLink hub platform was successfully implemented. Little or no impact on outcome metrics was seen in the short follow-up time. The Bridges program suggests that population health management must be a long-term goal, improving preventive care in the community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Social Determinants of Health in Managed Care Payment Formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Arlene S; Mick, Eric O; Ellis, Randall P; Kiefe, Catarina I; Allison, Jeroan J; Clark, Melissa A

    2017-10-01

    Managed care payment formulas commonly allocate more money for medically complex populations, but ignore most social determinants of health (SDH). To add SDH variables to a diagnosis-based payment formula that allocates funds to managed care plans and accountable care organizations. Using data from MassHealth, the Massachusetts Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program, we estimated regression models predicting Medicaid spending using a diagnosis-based and SDH-expanded model, and compared the accuracy of their cost predictions overall and for vulnerable populations. MassHealth members enrolled for at least 6 months in 2013 in fee-for-service (FFS) programs (n = 357 660) or managed care organizations (MCOs) (n = 524 607). We built cost prediction models from a fee-for-service program. Predictors in the diagnosis-based model are age, sex, and diagnoses from claims. The SDH model adds predictors describing housing instability, behavioral health issues, disability, and neighborhood-level stressors. Overall model explanatory power and overpayments and underpayments for subgroups of interest for all Medicaid-reimbursable expenditures excepting long-term support services (mean annual cost = $5590 per member). We studied 357 660 people who were FFS participants and 524 607 enrolled in MCOs with a combined 806 889 person-years of experience. The FFS program experience included more men (49.6% vs 43.6%), older patients (mean age of 26.1 years vs 21.6 years), and sicker patients (mean morbidity score of 1.16 vs 0.89) than MCOs. Overall, the SDH model performed well, but only slightly better than the diagnosis-based model, explaining most of the spending variation in the managed care population (validated R2 = 62.4) and reducing underpayments for several vulnerable populations. For example, raw costs for the quintile of people living in the most stressed neighborhoods were 9.6% ($537 per member per year) higher than average. Since greater

  10. [Community health in primary health care teams: a management objective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot Adell, Carme; Pasarin Rua, Maribel; Canela Soler, Jaume; Sala Alvarez, Clara; Escosa Farga, Alex

    2016-12-01

    To describe the process of development of community health in a territory where the Primary Health Care board decided to include it in its roadmap as a strategic line. Evaluative research using qualitative techniques, including SWOT analysis on community health. Two-steps study. Primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalan Health Institute in Barcelona city. The 24 PCT belonging to the Muntanya-Dreta Primary Care Service in Barcelona city, with 904 professionals serving 557,430 inhabitants. Application of qualitative methodology using SWOT analysis in two steps (two-step study). Step 1: Setting up a core group consisting of local PCT professionals; collecting the community projects across the territory; SWOT analysis. Step 2: From the needs identified in the previous phase, a plan was developed, including a set of training activities in community health: basic, advanced, and a workshop to exchange experiences from the PCTs. A total of 80 team professionals received specific training in the 4 workshops held, one of them an advanced level. Two workshops were held to exchange experiences with 165 representatives from the local teams, and 22 PCTs presenting their practices. In 2013, 6 out of 24 PCTs have had a community diagnosis performed. Community health has achieved a good level of development in some areas, but this is not the general situation in the health care system. Its progression depends on the management support they have, the local community dynamics, and the scope of the Primary Health Care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of care management program structure on implementation: a normalization process theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Potworowski, Georges; Fitzpatrick, Laurie; Kowalk, Amy; Green, Lee A

    2016-08-15

    Care management in primary care can be effective in helping patients with chronic disease improve their health status, however, primary care practices are often challenged with implementation. Further, there are different ways to structure care management that may make implementation more or less successful. Normalization process theory (NPT) provides a means of understanding how a new complex intervention can become routine (normalized) in practice. In this study, we used NPT to understand how care management structure affected how well care management became routine in practice. Data collection involved semi-structured interviews and observations conducted at 25 practices in five physician organizations in Michigan, USA. Practices were selected to reflect variation in physician organizations, type of care management program, and degree of normalization. Data were transcribed, qualitatively coded and analyzed, initially using an editing approach and then a template approach with NPT as a guiding framework. Seventy interviews and 25 observations were completed. Two key structures for care management organization emerged: practice-based care management where the care managers were embedded in the practice as part of the practice team; and centralized care management where the care managers worked independently of the practice work flow and was located outside the practice. There were differences in normalization of care management across practices. Practice-based care management was generally better normalized as compared to centralized care management. Differences in normalization were well explained by the NPT, and in particular the collective action construct. When care managers had multiple and flexible opportunities for communication (interactional workability), had the requisite knowledge, skills, and personal characteristics (skill set workability), and the organizational support and resources (contextual integration), a trusting professional relationship

  12. Home-based Self-care: Understanding and Designing Pervasive Technology to Support Care Management Work at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    the self-care management work at home. People need to know which care activities to perform, when to perform them, how to proceed and why these are important. While at home, an active lifestyle and comorbidity not only challenge self-care activities but also the use of self-care technologies in non...... that fit into people’s everyday life. Through a design research approach applying user-centered design methods and prototyping, the main focus of this dissertation is on exploring and providing a holistic understanding of the self-care work practices in non-clinical settings. Several home-based care...... practices are investigated to (a) further understand the self-care management work in nonclinical settings, and (b) inform future design of pervasive healthcare technology that accounts for people’s perspectives on self-care and everyday life. First, we explore two selfcare practices of medication...

  13. Modern Management and Diagnosis of Hypertension in the United Kingdom: Home Care and Self-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, James P; Schwartz, Claire L; Tucker, Katherine L; McManus, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The effective diagnosis and management of hypertension is one of the most important parts of cardiovascular prevention internationally and this is no different in the United Kingdom. Approximately 14% of the UK population currently receive treatment for hypertension. Recent UK guidelines from the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence have placed greater emphasis on the utilization of out-of-office measurement of blood pressure to more accurately diagnose hypertension. The aim of the present study was to provide a state-of-the-art review of the evidence for screening, diagnosing, and managing hypertension, as implemented in the United Kingdom, with an emphasis on the role of self-monitored and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in routine clinical care. Consideration was given to the use of ambulatory and home monitoring to confirm a diagnosis of hypertension and the use of self-monitoring and self-management to monitor and guide treatment. The evidence for the use of self-monitoring in patients with hypertension was examined, both in isolation, and in combination with lifestyle and treatment interventions. There is a place for self-monitored blood pressure in specific underresearched populations such as the elderly, specialist conditions, ethnic groups, and during pregnancy and this is discussed here. The evidence supporting the use of out-of-office monitoring in all aspects of routine clinical care has increased substantially in recent years and is reflected in increased utilization by patients and clinicians alike. Several areas require further research but it is clear that out-of-office monitoring is here to stay and is fast becoming an important part of hypertension management in the United Kingdom. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Physician anger: Leggo dem managed care blues--leadership beyond the era of managed cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirz, H L

    1999-01-01

    While managed care has caused great disruption, it has also provided physician executives with a natural leadership raison d'être. Managed care, with all its pros and cons, is largely a response to certain unrelenting trends. The core functions of leaders comprise the stewardship of organizations and colleagues in response to these trends. Four trends are explored: (1) The demise of open-ended funding of American health care; (2) continued competition for health care resources; (3) thriving pluralism; and (4) patients continually adjusting to assure themselves of appropriate health care access, quality, and service. In the 21st century, the industry will need a new brand of leader, one capable of balancing the needs of the professionals with the business and accountability requirements of a permanently competitive and resource-constrained service industry. The keys to successful leadership in the future include: (1) Clear service differentiation and a compelling vision to match it; (2) recruiting and retaining top clinical talent, including the required return to physician self-direction and governance; (3) successful partnerships with others outside your organization; and (4) a steady focus on performance in all its dimensions.

  15. [Economic impact of AFId management with modern management system in Intensive Care patients: comparison between ICUs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuoco, Giovanni; Di Giulio, Paola

    2016-01-01

    . Economic impact of AFId management with modern management systems in Intensive Care patients: comparison between ICUs. Acute fecal incontinence associated with diarrhea (AFId) affects up to 40% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients and may be responsible for pressure ulcers (PU). The FMS (Fecal Management System) though improving the management of these patients is not often provided due to its cost. To measure the costs of the use of FMS compared to routine care in three intensive care units (ICU) of Piedmont (Italy). All patients admitted from January to June 2016, > 18 years with at least three AFId episodes in the previous 24 hours were included. The costs for hygiene, medications and nursing time spent were calculated on 10 patients without FMS, accounting for the mean number of diarrhea attacks (3.04 per day), and mean days of FMS use. The FMS generated savings compared to routine care in nursing time, equipments for hygiene and pressure sores medications in patients with sacral sores. Savings depended on length of use (LoU) of the device: ICU with 10 patients (7 with PUs), mean LoU FMS 11.9 days, savings 1.210 euros; ICU with 10 patients (2 with PUs), mean LoU FMS 17.3 days, savings 5.317 euros; ICU with 45 patients (11 with PUs) mean LoU FMS 9.3 days, cost increase 1.057 euros. The cost of FMS is quickly amortised in patients with PUs. No FMS patients developed a new PUs. The FMS gives rise to savings when used in patients with PUs or for more than 10 days. The savings related to the prevention of PUs should be also added.

  16. Fathers and Asthma Care: Paternal Involvement, Beliefs, and Management Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Deborah; Masek, Bruce; Barreto, Esteban; Baer, Lee; Lapey, Allen; Budge, Eduardo; McQuaid, Elizabeth L

    2015-09-01

    To compare asthma care roles of maternal and paternal caregivers, and examine associations between caregiver involvement and the outcomes of adherence, morbidity, and parental quality of life (QoL). Mothers and fathers in 63 families of children, ages 5-9 years, with persistent asthma completed semistructured interviews and questionnaires. Adherence was measured via electronic monitoring. Paired t tests compared parental asthma care roles, and analysis of covariance, controlling for socioeconomic status, evaluated associations of asthma outcomes with caregiver involvement scores. Mothers had higher scores on measures of involvement, beliefs in medication necessity, and on four subscales of the Family Asthma Management System Scale interview (Asthma Knowledge, Relationship with Provider, Symptom Assessment, and Response to Symptoms). Maternal QoL was lowest when both maternal and paternal involvement was high. Paternal involvement was associated with increased morbidity. There is room for enhancement of fathers' asthma care roles. Higher levels of paternal involvement may be driven by family need. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Staff Experience of Pain Management: An Improvement in Palliative Care

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    Anna Unné

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care involves helping patients to achieve best possible quality of life by alleviating symptoms and suffering. The aim of the study was to describe and analyze staff member’s experience of working with evidence-based guidelines for pain management in palliative care. The study comprised a total of eight group interviews and 93 narratives from 22 staff members, all of who worked in palliative care. Data was analyzed using manifest qualitative content analysis and deductive perspectives according to SOC (sense of coherence. Three categories, “Awareness of Pain Management”, “Participation in Pain Management”, and “Safety at Pain Management”, were identified. The result showed an increased awareness of the value of a deeper understanding of policy documents and local guidelines. A key factor in improvement work was that team members were given the opportunity to repeat and continuously reflect on their performed work together within the team in dialog form. Teamwork may contribute to a better knowledge and understanding of how to develop high quality in healthcare by learning from each other in everyday work and by using evidence-based practices. Consistency in the working group could improve healthcare by using the espoused theory and theory-in-use for develop procedures and guidelines at work.

  18. Managing chronic myeloid leukemia: a coordinated team care perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Stacie; Lord, Katharine; Bethelmie-Bryan, Beverly; Shepard, Marian W; Neely, Jessica; McLemore, Morgan; Reddy, Satyanarayan K; Montero, Aldemar; Jonas, William S; Gladney, Sara Pierson; Khanwani, Shyam L; Reddy, Silpa C; Lahiry, Anup K; Heffner, Leonard T; Winton, Elliott; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has seen dramatic progress in recent years with the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). To take maximum advantage of therapy with TKIs, compliance and good understanding of monitoring response to therapy are essential. We established a team that included a hematologist, a physician assistant (PA), and a nurse who work closely with a social worker, a pharmacist, and a research coordinator to assist patients throughout their journey with CML. The patient and the referring community oncologist were incorporated into this team. This coordinated team care approach takes advantage of each member's specific skills to provide patients with education about CML, encourage patients' strong involvement in tracking/monitoring results/response to therapy, and support patients with issues that arise throughout the long course of the disease. A low rate of noncompliance with clinic visits (3%) was an indirect measure of the impact of this approach. The inclusion of the referring oncologist in the team extended the tracking of monitoring results to the community practice. We conclude that a coordinated team care approach is feasible in the management of patients with CML. This approach provided patients with education and a good understanding of response to therapy and improved relations with the health care team. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Medicare managed care plan performance: a comparison across hospitalization types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Jayasree; Mobley, Lee Rivers

    2012-01-01

    The study evaluates the performance of Medicare managed care (Medicare Advantage [MA]) Plans in comparison to Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) Plans in three states with historically high Medicare managed care penetration (New York, California, Florida), in terms of lowering the risks of preventable or ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC) hospital admissions and providing increased referrals for admissions for specialty procedures. Using 2004 hospital discharge files from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP-SID) of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ACSC admissions are compared with 'marker' admissions and 'referral-sensitive' admissions, using a multinomial logistic regression approach. The year 2004 represents a strategic time to test the impact of MA on preventable hospitalizations, because the HMOs dominated the market composition in that time period. MA enrollees in California experienced 22% lower relative risk (RRR= 0.78, p<0.01), those in Florida experienced 16% lower relative risk (RRR= 0.84, p<0.01), while those in New York experienced 9% lower relative risk (RRR=0.91, p<0.01) of preventable (versus marker) admissions compared to their FFS counterparts. MA enrollees in New York experienced 37% higher relative risk (RRR=1.37, p<0.01) and those in Florida had 41% higher relative risk (RRR=1.41, p<0.01)-while MA enrollees in California had 13% lower relative risk (RRR=0.87, p<0.01)-of referral-sensitive (versus marker) admissions compared to their FFS counterparts. While MA plans were associated with reductions in preventable hospitalizations in all three states, the effects on referral-sensitive admissions varied, with California experiencing lower relative risk of referral-sensitive admissions for MA plan enrollees. The lower relative risk of preventable admissions for MA plan enrollees in New York and Florida became more pronounced after accounting for selection bias.

  20. Managing the primary care practice on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Grevenhof P; Rahman; Cabanela; Naessens; Lassig

    2000-01-01

    Physicians and administrators have little hope of responding appropriately to the challenges of the health care market without data to support decision making. Desired Mayo Clinic s Primary Care Practice was to have the ability to access and integrate data from many platforms in many formats from the Enterprise and bring this information to the desktop in a robust interactive display. The solution was delivery of the data to the Web through an interface using Java with access to Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) tools for summarization, graphical display and reporting. Communicating major trends, assisting in planning and management, visually displaying alerts in summary data and individual patients that are all possible through an easy-to-use Web application. To really understand what the summarized data represents, the physicians must be able to drill down, download and explore their own detail data. A pilot project was developed to test the capabilities of the development environment, the acceptance Web tools, the ability to deliver timely information and the methodology of using a multi-dimensional database to define the data. The Family Medicine practice at four separate locations was chosen for the demonstration project. Two practices in Rochester, MN and practices in two smaller towns, totaling 50 physicians and administrative personnel, were the first clients using the system. A cross-functional team examined a variety of development issues such as data sources, data definitions, levels of security, data analysis types, and style of display. Demonstrations of the prototype met with an overwhelming positive response from administrators and department leaders. The Physician Patient Management solution collects, analyzes, and communicates the information needed to meet today s health care challenges.

  1. Role of Orvosi Hetilap in the development of Hungarian gastroenterology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the contribution of Orvosi Hetilap (Hungarian Medical Journal) to the field of gastroenterology. METHODS: All issues of the journal between 1857 and 2008 and identified original articles and reviews dealing with gastroenterology were reviewed. The rate of publications, the thematic distribution and foreign sources of knowledge were assessed. The dates that major achievements in gastroenterology were introduced in Hungary were compared to those dates in Western medicine. RESULTS: A total of 4799 original/research articles on gastroenterology were published, which represents 11.1% of the total publications. Thematic rankings showed that liver and biliary diseases represented 20.36% of the total, followed by gastric diseases (9.35%) and surgery (8.77%). A total of 268 foreign journals were reviewed: 50.9% were German, 30.4% English, 12.1% French and only 6.6% were in other languages. The major achievements of gastroenterology were introduced with varying delays compared to Western countries. CONCLUSION: Orvosi Hetilap has made a large contribution to the development of Hungarian gastroenterology. The high proportion of gastroenterology studies underlines the importance of digestive diseases in public health. PMID:20458774

  2. Hungarian Accounting Regulations: Exposed to the Cross-Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Ambrus

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to highlight two factors influencing Hungarian accounting regulations: the legislation of accounting in the last 25 years and the most important features of the taxation system. Both of them can influence the main requirement of the Hungarian Act on Accounting, the true and fair view. The research methods are based on a synthesis of the national and international literature. The authors examine the regulation system embedded in the legal and economic environment. The paper shows the accounting legislation in Hungary after the changing of the regime, its asymmetry, the attitude of the legislators and the current situation. The analysis of the tax system is connected to the provisions of accounting, highlighting the problems of the tax administration, the relation between corporate tax and the resultsof accounting and the intention to simplify it. The main conclusion is to make the system more flexible, in line with the legal and fiscal institutions, to fulfil its important requirements.

  3. [What worries Hungarian men? Characteristics of masculine gender role stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susánszky, Anna; Susánszky, Eva; Kopp, Mária

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the characteristics of stress associated with male gender role and its relationship to health and to risk behaviours among Hungarian men. The present analysis is based on data of the Hungarostudy 2006 survey. Forty-one percent of the participants were men. Eighty nine percent of the male respondents completed the Eisler-Skidmore Masculine Gender Role Stress Scale; data of 1764 persons were analyzed. Anxiety about sexual performance, breadwinner role, and appearance (i.e. tradition factor) causes a much greater burden of stress than anxiety about changing gender relationships (i.e. modernization factor). With the increase of age, stress caused by traditional role expectations significantly decreases; tensions caused by women's dominance and by situations which demand emotional response and empathy are the highest among middle aged men. Traditional gender role stress is more prevalent among pensioners than among economically active men; stress caused by the modernization of masculine gender role particularly afflicts unemployed men. Married men are to the least extent troubled by female dominance and difficulties in expressing emotions. Of the two dimensions analyzed here (tradition and modernization) only the values on the tradition factor were related to health status, psychological wellbeing, and frequency of smoking. Modernization of gender roles represents only a small--if any--stressor in the life of Hungarian men; on the other hand, unsuccessful adaptation to traditional role expectations highly increases the burden of stress and is closely related to smoking.

  4. Typically Female Features in Hungarian Shopping Tourism

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    Gábor Michalkó

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Although shopping has been long acknowledged as a major tourist activity, the extent and characteristics of shopping tourism have only recently become the subject of academic research and discussion. As a contribution to this field of knowledge, the paper presents the characteristics of shopping tourism in Hungary, and discusses the typically female features of outbound Hungarian shopping tourism. The research is based on a survey of 2473 Hungarian tourists carried out in 2005. As the findings of the study indicate, while female respondents were altogether more likely to be involved in tourist shopping than male travellers, no significant difference was experienced between the genders concerning the share of shopping expenses compared to their total travel budget. In their shopping behaviour, women were typically affected by price levels, and they proved to be both more selfish and more altruistic than men by purchasing more products for themselves and for their family members. The most significant differences between men and women were found in their product preferences as female tourists were more likely to purchase typically feminine goods such as clothes, shoes, bags and accessories, in the timing of shopping activities while abroad, and in the information sources used by tourists, since interpersonal influences such as friends’, guides’ and fellow travellers’ recommendations played a higher role in female travellers’ decisions.

  5. Assessment of quality of care in acute postoperative pain management

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    Milutinović Dragana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Managing of acute postoperative pain should be of great interest for all hospital institutions, as one of the key components of patients satisfaction, which indicates quality, as well as the outcome of treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of nursing care in managing acute postoperative pain and to establish factors which influence patients assessment of the same. Method. The investigation was conducted on the sample of 135 patients hospitalized in surgical clinics of the Clinical Centre of Vojvodina in Novi Sad in the form of cross-sectional study, by interviewing patients during the second postoperative day and collecting sociodemographic variables, type of surgical procedure and applied analgesic therapy which were taken from their medical documentation. The modified questionnaire of the Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management (SCQIPP was used as the instrument of the investigation. The data were processed with suitable mathematical statistics methods such as multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA, discriminative and other parametric procedures and methods. Roy's test, Pearson's coefficient contingency (χ, multiple correlation coefficient (R were conducted amongst other invariant procedures. Results. The mean score for the individual items of SCQIPP questionnaire was between 2.0 and 4.7 (scale range 1-5 and the percentage of patients answers 'strongly agree' ranged from 4.4 to 77%. The smallest number of positive answers were given by the patients for the item 'In order to assess pain intensity, some of the staff asked me at least once in the morning, in the afternoon and in the evening to show the number from 0-10'. Most of the patients (57% evaluated severe pain during the previous 24 hours, as moderate pain, which represents significantly greater number of patients which complain of severe pain and mild pain (p < 0.001. The analysis of patients evaluation (MANOVA p

  6. Management training of physician executives, their leadership style, and care management performance: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Samuels, Michael E; Curtin, Thomas F

    2006-02-01

    To examine associations between management training of physician executives and their leadership styles, as well as effectiveness in achieving disease management goals. Cross-sectional national survey. Executive directors of community health centers (269 respondents; response rate = 40.9%) were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the medical director's leadership, and for quantitative information on the center's achievement of clinical (mostly disease management) goals. The dependent variables were the medical director's scores (as perceived by the executive director) on transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership, effectiveness, satisfaction with the leader, and subordinate extra effort, using an adapted Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (43 items; 5-point Likert scale). The independent variable was the medical director's management training status. Compared with medical directors with or =30 days of in-service training, had 0.32, 0.35, 0.30, 0.36, and 0.37 higher scores on transformational leadership, transactional leadership, rated effectiveness, satisfaction, and subordinate extra effort, respectively, and 0.31 lower score on laissez-faire leadership (all P management degrees but with > or =30 days of in-service training had 0.34, 0.36, 0.50, and 0.47 higher scores on transformational leadership, transactional leadership, rated effectiveness, and satisfaction with the leader (all P management goals. Training may enable physician executives to develop leadership styles that are effective in influencing clinical providers' adoption of disease management guidelines under managed care.

  7. Managing Bias in Palliative Care: Professional Hazards in Goals of Care Discussions at the End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Katharine A; Fanning, Joseph B

    2018-02-01

    In the setting of end-of-life care, biases can interfere with patient articulation of goals and hinder provision of patient-centered care. No studies have addressed clinician bias or bias management specific to goals of care discussions at the end of life. To identify and determine the prevalence of palliative care clinician biases and bias management strategies in end-of-life goals of care discussions. A semistructured interview guide with relevant domains was developed to facilitate data collection. Participants were asked directly to identify biases and bias management strategies applicable to this setting. Two researchers developed a codebook to identify themes using a 25% transcript sample through an iterative process based on grounded theory. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated using Cohen κ. It was 0.83, indicating near perfect agreement between coders. The data approach saturation. A purposive sampling of 20 palliative care clinicians in Middle Tennessee participated in interviews. The 20 clinicians interviewed identified 16 biases and 11 bias management strategies. The most frequently mentioned bias was a bias against aggressive treatment (n = 9), described as a clinician's assumption that most interventions at the end of life are not beneficial. The most frequently mentioned bias management strategy was self-recognition of bias (n = 17), described as acknowledging that bias is present. This is the first study identifying palliative care clinicians' biases and bias management strategies in end-of-life goals of care discussions.

  8. Caring behaviour perceptions from nurses of their first-line nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiao; Liu, Yilan; Zeng, Qingsong

    2015-12-01

    Nursing is acknowledged as being the art and science of caring. According to the theory of nursing as caring, all persons are caring but not every behaviour of a person is caring. Caring behaviours in the relationship between first-line nurse managers and Registered Nurses have been studied to a lesser extent than those that exist between patients and nurses. Caring behaviour of first-line nurse managers from the perspective of Registered Nurses is as of yet unknown. Identifying caring behaviours may be useful as a reference for first-line nurse managers caring for nurses in a way that nurses prefer. To explore first-line nurse managers' caring behaviours from the perspective of Registered Nurses in mainland China. Qualitative study, using descriptive phenomenological approach. Fifteen Registered Nurses recruited by purposive sampling method took part in in-depth interviews. Data were analysed according to Colaizzi's technique. Three themes of first-line nurse managers' caring behaviours emerged: promoting professional growth, exhibiting democratic leadership and supporting work-life balance. A better understanding of the first-line nurse managers' caring behaviours is recognised. The three kinds of behaviours have significant meaning to nurse managers. Future research is needed to describe what first-line nurse managers can do to promote nurses' professional growth, increase the influence of democratic leadership, as well as support their work-life balance. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J E; Lemmens, Lidwien C.; Baan, Caroline A.; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2016-01-01

    Background: More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined

  10. Making it local: Beacon Communities use health information technology to optimize care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Amy; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Heider, Arvela; Kanger, Chatrian R; Lobach, David F; McWilliams, Lee; Polello, Jennifer M; Rein, Alison L; Schachter, Abigail A; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Tulikangas, Megan C; Turske, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    Care management aims to provide cost-effective, coordinated, non-duplicative care to improve care quality, population health, and reduce costs. The 17 communities receiving funding from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology through the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program are leaders in building and strengthening their health information technology (health IT) infrastructure to provide more effective and efficient care management. This article profiles 6 Beacon Communities' health IT-enabled care management programs, highlighting the influence of local context on program strategy and design, and describing challenges, lessons learned, and policy implications for care delivery and payment reform. The unique needs (eg, disease burden, demographics), community partnerships, and existing resources and infrastructure all exerted significant influence on the overall priorities and design of each community's care management program. Though each Beacon Community needed to engage in a similar set of care management tasks--including patient identification, stratification, and prioritization; intervention; patient engagement; and evaluation--the contextual factors helped shape the specific strategies and tools used to carry out these tasks and achieve their objectives. Although providers across the country are striving to deliver standardized, high-quality care, the diverse contexts in which this care is delivered significantly influence the priorities, strategies, and design of community-based care management interventions. Gaps and challenges in implementing effective community-based care management programs include: optimizing allocation of care management services; lack of available technology tailored to care management needs; lack of standards and interoperability; integrating care management into care settings; evaluating impact; and funding and sustainability.

  11. Impact of chronic kidney disease management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meran, S; Don, K; Shah, N; Donovan, K; Riley, S; Phillips, A O

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of eGFR reporting and publication of national CKD guidelines has led to major challenges in primary and secondary care, leading to an increase in the number of referrals to nephrology clinics. We have shown that introduction of a renal patient care pathway reduces nephrology referrals and enables managed discharges of CKD patients to primary care. The aim of this article is to examine the outcome of patients discharged to primary care to find out if there is an associated risk with increased discharge supported by the patient pathway. The study was carried out within a single NHS Trust covering a population of 560,000. All patients discharged from the trust's renal outpatient clinic between June 2007 and July 2008 were identified. Patient notes and the local laboratory database systems were used to determine the source and timing of tests. A total of 31 new referrals and 57 regular follow-ups were discharged during this period. The median age of discharge was 67.5 years. Most subjects (60%) had CKD stage 3 at the time of discharge. A total of 23% of discharges were categorized as CKD stages 1, 2 or normal and 17% of patients had CKD stage 4. Overall, 93% had stable eGFRs prior to discharge, 77.5% of patients had blood pressure within threshold (140/90 according to UK CKD guidelines) and 97.7% of patients had haemoglobins >10 g/dl. Post-discharge 83% of patients had eGFRs recorded by their general practitioner and 92.6% of these were measured within appropriate time frames as per CKD guidelines. The majority of patients (82%) had either improved or stable eGFR post-discharge and only three patients had a significant decline in their eGFR. These data indicate that selected CKD patients can be appropriately discharged from secondary care and adequately monitored in primary care. Furthermore, we have shown that this was a safe practice for patients.

  12. Informal care givers’ experiences with support in primary palliative care when a case manager is involved: a descriptive study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, A.G.M. van der; Francke, A.L.; Deliens, L.; Jansen, W.J.J.; Vissers, K.C.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Case managers have been introduced in primary palliative care in the Netherlands; these are nurses with expertise in palliative care who offer support to patients and informal care givers. The case manager provides support in addition to the care provided by the home care nurse and

  13. Evaluation and management of overactive bladder: strategies for optimizing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis-Gray MG

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Marcella G Willis-Gray, Alexis A Dieter, Elizabeth J Geller Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: Overactive bladder (OAB is a common condition affecting millions of men and women worldwide. It is an embarrassing condition with far-reaching consequences. Although many treatment options exist, no single treatment has been proven to be most effective. Often a combination of therapy is required to successfully manage OAB symptoms. In this review, we provide an overview of OAB, including risk factors for development of OAB; keys to diagnosis; therapeutic options including conservative and medical management, as well as treatments for refractory OAB; when to consider referral to a specialist; and resources for clinicians and patients. The aim of this review is to inform clinicians regarding OAB management in order to improve patient counseling and care. Keywords: overactive bladder, urge incontinence, urinary incontinence, bladder training, lifestyle modifications

  14. Crises in clinical care: an approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runciman, W B; Merry, A F

    2005-06-01

    A "crisis" in health care is "the point in the course of a disease at which a decisive change occurs, leading either to recovery or to death". The daunting challenges faced by clinicians when confronted with a crisis are illustrated by a tragic case in which a teenage boy died after a minor surgical procedure. Crises are challenging for reasons which include: presentation with non-specific signs or symptoms, interaction of complex factors, progressive evolution, new situations, "revenge effects", inadequate assistance, and time constraints. In crises, clinicians often experience anxiety- and overload-induced performance degradation, tend to use "frequency gambling", run out of "rules" and have to work from first principles, and are prone to "confirmation bias". The effective management of crises requires formal training, usually simulator-based, and ideally in the inter-professional groups who will need to function as a team. "COVER ABCD-A SWIFT CHECK" is a pre-compiled algorithm which can be applied quickly and effectively to facilitate a systematic and effective response to the wide range of potentially lethal problems which may occur suddenly in anaesthesia. A set of 25 articles describing additional pre-compiled responses collated into a manual for the management of any crisis under anaesthesia has been published electronically as companion papers to this article. This approach to crisis management should be applied to other areas of clinical medicine as well as anaesthesia.

  15. [Outsourcing in long-term care: a risk management approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Cristina Machado; Carvalho, José Crespo de

    2012-05-01

    This article seeks to investigate outsourcing decisions in supply chain management of healthcare organizations, namely the motives and constraints behind the decision, the selection criteria for activities to be outsourced to third parties, the type of possible agreements, and the impact of this decision on the organization per se. A case study of the start-up phase of a Long-term Care unit with an innovative approach and high levels of customization was conducted to understand the outsourcing process in a start-up context (not in the standard context of organizational change) and a risk evaluation matrix was created for outsourcing activities in order to define and implement a performance monitoring process. This study seeks to understand how to evaluate and assess the risks of an outsourcing strategy and proposes a monitoring model using risk management tools. It was shown that the risk management approach can be a solution for monitoring outsourcing in the organizational start-up phase. Conclusions concerning dissatisfaction with the results of outsourcing strategies adopted are also presented.

  16. Advancements in the critical care management of status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerschmidt, Andrew; Martin, Andrew; Claassen, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Status epilepticus has a high morbidity and mortality. There are little definitive data to guide management; however, new recent data continue to improve understanding of management options of status epilepticus. This review examines recent advancements regarding the critical care management of status epilepticus. Recent studies support the initial treatment of status epilepticus with early and aggressive benzodiazepine dosing. There remains a lack of prospective randomized controlled trials comparing different treatment regimens. Recent data support further study of intravenous lacosamide as an urgent-control therapy, and ketamine and clobazam for refractory status epilepticus. Recent data support the use of continuous EEG to help guide treatment for all patients with refractory status epilepticus and to better understand epileptic activity that falls on the ictal-interictal continuum. Recent data also improve our understanding of the relationship between periodic epileptic activity and brain injury. Many treatments are available for status epilepticus and there are much new data guiding the use of specific agents. However, there continues to be a lack of prospective data supporting specific regimens, particularly in cases of refractory status epilepticus.

  17. Lexical Borrowing in the Speech of First-Generation Hungarian Immigrants in Australia

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    Anikó Hatoss

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports findings of a sociolinguistic project which investigated language contact phenomena in the speech of first-generation Hungarian Australians living in Sydney. The research aimed to identify and analyze English lexical items borrowed into the spoken Hungarian of first-generation Hungarian–English bilinguals. This research had a mixed methods approach including a quantitative element (count of lexical manifestations by categories such as part of speech and a qualitative element in which the various lexical manifestations have been subjected to a linguistic analysis. The Hungarian National Corpus was used as a reference guide to determine the status of these phenomena in the lexicon of Standard Hungarian. The data were collected through semi-structured sociolinguistic interviews with 22 Hungarian Australians living in Sydney. The findings demonstrate that (a first-generation Hungarians are highly creative language users and integrate a large number of English lexical items into their speech. Most lexical borrowings belong to the derivational blends with the highest proportion of the nominal group. Lexical borrowings from English are morphologically integrated with Hungarian-derivational suffixes and inflectional case markings. This research provides original empirical data to better understand the various inter-language lexical manifestations in Hungarian–English bilingual contexts. The study adds to the relatively small body of research on Hungarian–English bilingualism in diasporic context and contributes to understanding lexical borrowing from a contact linguistic perspective.

  18. Translating Welsh Drama Into Hungarian Through English: A Contextual Introduction to Sêra Moore Williams’ Crash in Hungarian Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márta Minier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article offers a predominantly contextual introduction to my translation of a contemporary Welsh play by Sêra Moore Williams, Crash (2004, into Hungarian. Williams' three-person drama for young people was written originally in the author's native language, Welsh, and translated into English by the playwright herself. In my translation process of the play from English to Hungarian the intermediary role played by English raises ethical concerns from a postcolonial perspective, while in a pragmatic sense it is almost a necessity to rely on it when communicating Welsh-language cultural production to the broader international public, including to other minor languages. The article will place the drama in its generic context, introducing the play as a Theater in Education piece, as Williams' work has been inspirational in the development of tantermi színház [classroom theater] in Hungary since the early 2000s. As a specific case study within the case study, the additional discussion of the translation of Williams' polysemic title will provide an insight into the role such a significant paratext plays in uprooting a dramatic text from one culture to another.

  19. Diabetes management patterns in a palliative care unit in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ayed Alshammary

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Diabetes management varied among PCU patients. There is a real need for evidence-based guidelines for diabetes management among patients at the end of life. These guidelines should be tailored to patients' individual preferences in goals of care. Advance care planning should include discussion about patient preferences for management of diabetes at the end of life.

  20. Talent management best practices: how exemplary health care organizations create value in a down economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Kevin S

    2011-01-01

    : Difficult economic conditions and powerful workforce trends pose significant challenges to managing talent in health care organizations. Although robust research evidence supports the many benefits of maintaining a strong commitment to talent management practices despite these challenges, many organizations compound the problem by resorting to workforce reductions and limiting or eliminating investments in talent management. : This study examines how nationwide health care systems address these challenges through best practice talent management systems. Addressing important gaps in talent management theory and practice, this study develops a best practice model of talent management that is grounded in the contextual challenges facing health care practitioners. : Utilizing a qualitative case study that examined 15 nationwide health care systems, data were collected through semistructured interviews with 30 executives and document analysis of talent management program materials submitted by each organization. : Exemplary health care organizations employ a multiphased talent management system composed of six sequential phases and associated success factors that drive effective implementation. Based on these findings, a model of talent management best practices in health care organizations is presented. : Health care practitioners may utilize the best practice model to assess and enhance their respective talent management systems by establishing the business case for talent management, defining, identifying, and developing high-potential leaders, carefully communicating high-potential designations, and evaluating talent management outcomes.

  1. Medicare Chronic Care Management Payments and Financial Returns to Primary Care Practices: A Modeling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Phillips, Russell S; Bitton, Asaf; Song, Zirui; Landon, Bruce E

    2015-10-20

    Physicians have traditionally been reimbursed for face-to-face visits. A new non-visit-based payment for chronic care management (CCM) of Medicare patients took effect in January 2015. To estimate financial implications of CCM payment for primary care practices. Microsimulation model incorporating national data on primary care use, staffing, expenditures, and reimbursements. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and other published sources. Medicare patients. 10 years. Practice-level. Comparison of CCM delivery approaches by staff and physicians. Net revenue per full-time equivalent (FTE) physician; time spent delivering CCM services. If nonphysician staff were to deliver CCM services, net revenue to practices would increase despite opportunity and staffing costs. Practices could expect approximately $332 per enrolled patient per year (95% CI, $234 to $429) if CCM services were delivered by registered nurses (RNs), approximately $372 (CI, $276 to $468) if services were delivered by licensed practical nurses, and approximately $385 (CI, $286 to $485) if services were delivered by medical assistants. For a typical practice, this equates to more than $75 ,00 of net annual revenue per FTE physician and 12 hours of nursing service time per week if 50% of eligible patients enroll. At a minimum, 131 Medicare patients (CI, 115 to 140 patients) must enroll for practices to recoup the salary and overhead costs of hiring a full-time RN to provide CCM services. If physicians were to deliver all CCM services, approximately 25% of practices nationwide could expect net revenue losses due to opportunity costs of face-to-face visit time. The CCM program may alter long-term primary care use, which is difficult to predict. Practices that rely on nonphysician team members to deliver CCM services will probably experience substantial net revenue gains but must enroll a sufficient number of eligible patients to recoup costs. None.

  2. Hard To Find and Difficult To Manage: The Effects of Child Care on the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emlen, Arthur C.; Koren, Paul E.

    This study, which focused on effects of child care on the workplace, addressed several questions: (1) What kinds of child care arrangements do employed parents make, and why do they make them? (2) Are these parents having difficulty finding child care? (3) Does their ability to manage child care affect their absenteeism and stress? (4) What roles…

  3. Posttreatment follow-up of radiation oncology patients in a managed care environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, Michael L.; Rose, Christopher M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Health care delivery in the United States is in the midst of a structural revolution called managed care. Demands for cost control within the managed care environment force radiation oncologists to defend the need and obligation to follow their patients. Methods and Materials: We have analyzed this follow-up requirement from six potential justifications: patient care, medical-legal, quality assurance, outcome measurement, cost, and improvement of care. Results: Practical recommendations for discussing the need for follow-up with the medical directors and primary care physicians of managed care entities are given. Follow-up without valid documentation of benefit is hard to justify in this era of managed care. Conclusions: Collaborative follow-up between the referring physician, the treating radiation oncologist, and the other oncologic specialists will allow for outcome measurement and improvement in practice without driving up cost or exposing the patient to undue risk.

  4. Care and management of a stoma: maintaining peristomal skin health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, Anna; Hunt, Sharon

    2016-09-22

    It is estimated that around one in 500 people in the UK are living with a stoma, with approximately 21 000 operations that result in stoma formation being performed each year ( Colostomy Association, 2016 ). These people face a unique set of challenges in maintaining the integrity of their peristomal skin. This article explores the normal structure and function of skin and how the care and management of a stoma presents challenges for maintaining peristomal skin health. Particular focus is paid to the incidence of skin problems for those living with a stoma, whether it is temporary or permanent, and the factors that contribute to skin breakdown in this population. Wider factors such as the central role of the clinical nurse specialist and the impact of product usage on positive outcomes and health economics are also considered.

  5. Resistant hypertension: an approach to management in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian P Yaxley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is widely encountered in family medicine. Despite its prevalence, many patients have uncontrolled or difficult-to-control blood pressure. Resistant hypertension is defined as hypertension that is poorly responsive to treatment and requires the use of multiple medications to achieve acceptable blood pressure ranges. It may be a consequence of secondary hypertension or have no identifiable cause. Resistant hypertension is important to recognise because it places patients at risk of end-organ damage. Primary care physicians should be aware of the therapeutic approach for hypertension when traditional therapy fails. This article aims to familiarise readers with the evaluation and management of resistant hypertension by outlining the most recent evidence-based treatment options.

  6. New Public Management, Care and Struggles about Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene

    2009-01-01

    - of these two logics in two different Danish municipalities that are strategically chosen to illustrate differences along the continuum of NPM translations. It asks which logic the home helpers feel is most dominant and relates the results to feelings of recognition and misrecognition as well as to strategies......New Public Management (NPM) is usually perceived as a homogeneous discourse. However, when we examine it by looking at micro-politics in municipalities and understand its consequences drawing on the voices of home helpers, the picture is more complex and ambiguous. NPM is seen as disciplining paid...... of resistance. The analysis applies feminist theories of recognition and care, and its findings are based on focus group interviews and feminist discourse analysis...

  7. [Management of the esophageal candidiasis by the primary care physician].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Garance; Bocherens, Astrid; Senn, Nicolas

    2014-05-14

    Esophageal candidiasis is one of the most common opportunistic infections in patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This pathology is also found in patients without overt immunodeficiency. Other risk factors are known to be associated with this disease like inhaled or systemic corticosteroid treatment or proton-pump inhibitors and H2 receptor antagonists. In the absence of identified risk factors, a primary immune deficiency should be sought. Prevention of esophageal candidiasis is based primarily on the identification of risk factors, and a better control of them. This article presents a review of the physiopathology, clinical presentation and management of esophageal candidiasis by primary care physicians. We will also discuss ways of preventing esophageal candidiasis when necessary.

  8. Options analysis of managed care contracting and regulation: theory and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, R A; Magiera, F T

    2000-08-01

    Managed care contracts can be represented as bundles of options. In particular, the managed care provider is short a call option. To hedge the risk involved in such contracts, managed care contractors can construct several types of virtual put options, among them the ownership of facilities. Agency theory and options theory suggest that for-profit managed care plans, in the presence of debt, will engage in less hedging activity than will other managed care plans. Here, the authors test that hypothesis, using data for Florida HMOs in 1995, and they reject the null hypothesis. That managed care organizations act as if they are short a call option raises interesting regulatory issues, including the possibility of using a hedge-based regulatory scheme in place of a net-worth-based scheme.

  9. Aspects of family-managed care at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik

    More and more care, for example of older adults, is performed at home. Municipality home-care workers and novel technologies support this translocation of care. At home, an important care provider is also the immediate family. A recent trend is to formalize this volunteer-, and family-based care...... caring for another family member, such as an older parent. Hence it is both in the society and the individual’s interests that future supportive care technologies consider already at design time how to support care while not impede the everyday lives and possibilities for the caring family....

  10. Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, Michael

    2013-12-13

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization's maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization's safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their

  11. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum

  12. [Management of adult secondary insomnia in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadas, Luís Filipe; Ribeiro, Lúcia

    2011-01-01

    Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder in adults, with secondary insomnia being the most prevalent. This sleep disorder is associated with important medical and social consequences. The General Practitioner (GP) plays a key role in the diagnosis of insomnia, which may affect about 69% of their patients in the PHC (Primary Health Care). Recognize the differential diagnosis of secondary insomnia in adults, evaluate and manage these patients in the PHC, appropriately use the treatments available and meet the criteria for referral. Bibliographic search in MEDLINE databases, and evidence based review databases, using the MeSH terms: Primary Health Care, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, for articles published since January 2000 until July 2009, in English, Portuguese, French and Spanish. Index de Revistas Médicas Portuguesas and scientific societies dedicated to sleep disorders were searched. Mood and anxiety disorders are the main co-morbidities associated with secondary insomnia, being present in 30% to 50% of patients with insomnia. The medical pathology and substance abuse are present respectively in 10% of patients. It is essential a proper clinical history, with a history of sleep, sleep diary and the partner information. There is evidence that the combination of specific pharmacological treatments (benzodiazepines and the benzodiazepine receptor agonists) with the nonpharmacological (cognitive-behavioral therapy) may be useful in secondary insomnia, as co-adjuvant treatment of the underlying disease. There are several treatment options with their indications and adverse effects. The criteria for referral should be defined according to the availability of human resources. Due to the high prevalence and the serious consequences of secondary insomnia in adults, it must be systematically managed by the GP. It is important to know and to use non-pharmacological therapy in GP consultation, because this therapy was shown to be important in treating this type of insomnia

  13. What is case management in palliative care? An expert panel study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Plas Annicka G M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Case management is a heterogeneous concept of care that consists of assessment, planning, implementing, coordinating, monitoring, and evaluating the options and services required to meet the client's health and service needs. This paper describes the result of an expert panel procedure to gain insight into the aims and characteristics of case management in palliative care in the Netherlands. Methods A modified version of the RAND®/University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA appropriateness method was used to formulate and rate a list of aims and characteristics of case management in palliative care. A total of 76 health care professionals, researchers and policy makers were invited to join the expert panel, of which 61% participated in at least one round. Results Nine out of ten aims of case management were met with agreement. The most important areas of disagreement with regard to characteristics of case management were hands-on nursing care by the case manager, target group of case management, performance of other tasks besides case management and accessibility of the case manager. Conclusions Although aims are agreed upon, case management in palliative care shows a high level of variability in implementation choices. Case management should aim at maintaining continuity of care to ensure that patients and those close to them experience care as personalised, coherent and consistent.

  14. [Relations between research and clinical care in co-management studies with mental health care users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombini, Analice de Lima; Onocko-Campos, Rosana Teresa; Silveira, Marília; Gonçalves, Laura Lamas Martins; Zanchet, Lívia; Xavier, Maria Angélica Zamora; de Castro e Marques, Cecília

    2013-10-01

    This paper is derived from the experience of conducting research with mental health users (not about them, nor for them), analyzing aspects of a study in which different ways of structuring the relationship between clinical practice and research were put into play, thereby questioning the boundaries and ethical issues involved. The clinical practice and research fields that are dealt with are studied with the input of authors who, on the basis of institutional analysis, propose the idea of interventional research, and in the context of public health, revert to the concept of broadened clinical care. The relationship between these two terms - interventional research and broadened clinical care - is based on the notion of subjectivity that operates within the scope of public health and which culminates in the concept of autonomy. Lastly, co-management is proposed as a strategy based on which the different actors involved in conducting research and exercising clinical care can collectively build working principles that are both therapeutic and ethical.

  15. Gold standards for primary care of burn management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Zor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, about 2.5 million people are affected from burns in the world. In our country there is no reliable database related to this subject. There are ongoing studies about the epidemiology of burns in Turkey. After burn injury had represent many various complications, such as myocardial infarction, cardiac deficiency, acute hypertension, endocarditis, thromboembolism, pulmonary edema, pneumonia, respiratuar failure, renal failure, gastric ulcus, ileus, sepsis, coagulopathy and anemia. Such complications can preventable or treatable. In this respect, preventive management in the first step burn treatment had very importantly in burn cases. Skin is a barrier which protects evaporative heat loss. In cases of acute burn, hypothermia occurs related to skin loss. For these cases, care must be taken to keep the patient warm. In addition fluid resuscitation is very important in these cases. Furthermore, the damaged tissues are highly susceptible to infection in burned patients. Burn care and rehabilitation includes challenging and complex procedures. Briefly, treatments of burn cases require a multidisciplinary and meticulous approach.

  16. Managing health care decisions and improvement through simulation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Helena Hvitfeldt; Aronsson, Håkan; Keller, Christina; Lindblad, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    Simulation modeling is a way to test changes in a computerized environment to give ideas for improvements before implementation. This article reviews research literature on simulation modeling as support for health care decision making. The aim is to investigate the experience and potential value of such decision support and quality of articles retrieved. A literature search was conducted, and the selection criteria yielded 59 articles derived from diverse applications and methods. Most met the stated research-quality criteria. This review identified how simulation can facilitate decision making and that it may induce learning. Furthermore, simulation offers immediate feedback about proposed changes, allows analysis of scenarios, and promotes communication on building a shared system view and understanding of how a complex system works. However, only 14 of the 59 articles reported on implementation experiences, including how decision making was supported. On the basis of these articles, we proposed steps essential for the success of simulation projects, not just in the computer, but also in clinical reality. We also presented a novel concept combining simulation modeling with the established plan-do-study-act cycle for improvement. Future scientific inquiries concerning implementation, impact, and the value for health care management are needed to realize the full potential of simulation modeling.

  17. Disease management programs in type 2 diabetes: quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, Heiner K; Bestehorn, Kurt P; Jannowitz, Christina; Krone, Wilhelm; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna

    2011-06-01

    To determine whether disease management programs (DMPs) for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can improve some processes of care and intermediate outcomes. Two cross-sectional registries of patients with T2DM were used for data extraction before (previous cohort) and after (recent cohort) introduction of DMPs in Germany (N = 78,110). In the recent cohort, 15,293 patients were treated within the DMPs and 9791 were not. Processes of care, medications, and intermediate outcomes (achievement of treatment targets for low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol, blood pressure, and glycosylated hemoglobin [A1C]) were analyzed using multi- variable, multilevel logistic regression, adjusting for patient case-mix and physician-level clustering to derive odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Availability of structured diabetes education and of lipid, blood pressure, and A1C measurements increased over time. In DMP patients, availability was significantly higher for blood pressure and A1C but not for lipid measurements. Prescription of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, oral antidiabetic drugs, and insulin increased over time and was more common in DMP patients. Statin prescription increased over time but was not influenced by DMP status. Intermediate outcomes improved over time, but DMPs had no influence on intermediate outcomes except for reaching LDL cholesterol targets (odds ratio 1.12 [95% CI 1.06, 1.19] in favor of DMPs). While there may be some unmeasured confounding, our data suggest that improvement in processes of care by DMPs, as implemented in Germany, only partially translates into improvement of intermediate outcomes.

  18. Enhancing the Safe and Effective Management of Chronic Pain in Accountable Care Organization Primary Care Practices in Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubu, Selam; Hall, Laura Lee; Straub, Paula; Bair, Matthew J; Marsteller, Jill A; Hsu, Yea-Jen; Schneider, Doron; Hood, Gregory A

    Chronic pain is a prevalent chronic condition with significant burden and economic impact in the United States. Chronic pain is particularly abundant in primary care, with an estimated 52% of chronic pain patients obtaining care from primary care physicians (PCPs). However, PCPs often lack adequate training and have limited time and resources to effectively manage chronic pain. Chronic pain management is complex in nature because of high co-occurrence of psychiatric disorders and other medical comorbidities in patients. This article describes a quality improvement initiative conducted by the American College of Physicians (ACP), in collaboration with the Kentucky ACP Chapter, and the Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, to enhance chronic pain management in 8 primary care practices participating in Accountable Care Organizations in Kentucky, with a goal of enhancing the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with chronic pain.

  19. Successful Implementation of a Clinical Care Pathway for Management of Epistaxis at a Tertiary Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosler, Peter S; Kass, Jason I; Wang, Eric W; Snyderman, Carl H

    2016-11-01

    We compare the management of patients with severe epistaxis before and after the implementation a clinical care pathway (CCP) to standardize care, minimize hospital stay, and decrease cost. Single prospective analysis with historical control. Tertiary academic hospital. Patients treated for epistaxis between October 2012 to December 2013 were compared with a prospective analysis of patients treated for severe epistaxis after implementation of a CCP from June 2014 to February 2015. Severe epistaxis was defined as nasal bleeding not able to be controlled with local pressure, topical vasoconstrictors, or simple anterior packing. Severe epistaxis was similar in the pre- and post-CCP cohorts: 24.7% (n = 42) vs 18.9% (n = 22), respectively. Implementation of early sphenopalatine artery ligation resulted in decreased number of days packed (3.2 ± 1.6 to 1.4 ± 1.6; P = .001), decreased hospital stay (5.2 ± 3.9 to 2.1 ± 1.3 days; P vs 54.5%; P = .035), admission to an appropriate hospital location with access to key resources (41.7% vs 83.3%; P = .007), and decreased overall cost of hospitalization by 66% ($9435 saved). No patients received embolization after the CCP was implemented. Implementation of a CCP decreased hospital stay and days of packing, facilitated definitive care in patients with severe epistaxis, improved patient safety, and decreased cost. The results of this study can serve as a model for the management of severe epistaxis and for future quality improvement measures. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  20. Disease Management Plus Recommended Care versus Recommended Care Alone for Ambulatory COPD Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra; Benderly, Michal; Freedman, Laurence S; Kaufman, Galit; Molcho Falkenberg Luft, Tchiya; Murad, Havi; Olmer, Liraz; Gluch, Meri; Segev, David; Gilad, Avi; Elkrinawi, Said; Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali; Chen, Baruch; Jacobson, Orit; Key, Calanit; Shani, Mordechai; Fink, Gershon

    2018-03-01

    The efficacy of disease management programs in the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains uncertain. To study the effect of disease management (DM) added to recommended care (RC) in ambulatory COPD patients. In this trial, 1,202 COPD patients (age >40 years), with moderate to very severe airflow limitation were randomly assigned either to DM plus RC (study intervention) or to RC alone (control intervention). RC included follow-up by pulmonologists; inhaled long-acting bronchodilators and corticosteroids; smoking cessation intervention; nutritional advice and psychosocial support when indicated, and supervised physical activity sessions. DM, delivered by trained nurses during patients' visits to the designated COPD centers and remote contacts with the patients between these visits, included patient self-care education; monitoring patients' symptoms and adherence to treatment; provision of advice in case of acute disease exacerbation, and coordination of care vis-à-vis other healthcare providers. The primary composite endpoint was first hospital admission for respiratory symptoms or death from any cause. During 3,537 patient-years, 284 (47.2%) patients in the control group and 264 (44.0%) in the study intervention group had a primary endpoint event. The median (range) time elapsed until a primary endpoint event was 1.0 (0-4.0) years among patients assigned to the study intervention and 1.1 (0-4.1) years among patients assigned to the control intervention; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.92 (95%CI: 0.77 to 1.08). DM added to RC was not superior to RC alone in delaying first hospital admission or death among ambulatory COPD patients. Clinical trial registration available at www.clinicaltrials.gov, ID NCT00982384.