WorldWideScience

Sample records for humans initial experience

  1. Balloon-augmented Onyx endovascular ligation: initial human experience and comparison with coil ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Toshiya; Bain, Mark D; Toth, Gabor; Hussain, M Shazam; Hui, Ferdinand K

    2015-08-01

    Carotid artery sacrifice remains an important procedure for cerebral vascular disorders despite the development of new endovascular devices. Conventional carotid artery sacrifice with detachable coils alone often requires numerous coils to complete occlusion. To describe the initial human experience with balloon-augmented Onyx and coil vessel sacrifice based on our previous experience with animals. We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent carotid artery sacrifice between 2008 and 2012 in accordance with local investigational review board approval. Two methods were used to occlude carotid arteries-namely, combined Onyx and coil embolization and traditional coil embolization. We compared the two methods for the cost of embolizate, time to occlude the vessels, and the number of coils. Eight consecutive patients (combined group n=3, traditional group n=5) were assessed. The median cost of embolic material was $6321 in the combined Onyx and coil embolization group and $29 996 in the traditional coil embolization group. The median time from first coil placement to achievement of vessel occlusion was 52 min in the Onyx group and 113 min in the coil embolization group. The median number of coils used was 4 in the Onyx group and 35 in the coil embolization group (p<0.05). No symptomatic complications or recurrences were seen in the combined group. Balloon-augmented Onyx endovascular ligation may reduce costs and fluoroscopy times during vessel sacrifice. Further studies in a larger number of patients are needed to confirm these findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Initial Cooling Experiment (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1978-01-01

    In 1977, in a record-time of 9 months, the magnets of the g-2 experiment were modified and used to build a proton/antiproton storage ring: the "Initial Cooling Experiment" (ICE). It served for the verification of the cooling methods to be used for the "Antiproton Project". Stochastic cooling was proven the same year, electron cooling followed later. Also, with ICE the experimental lower limit for the antiproton lifetime was raised by 9 orders of magnitude: from 2 microseconds to 32 hours. For its previous life as g-2 storage ring, see 7405430. More on ICE: 7711282, 7809081, 7908242.

  3. Hyperpolarized 13C Metabolic MRI of the Human Heart: Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Charles H; Lau, Justin Y C; Chen, Albert P; Geraghty, Benjamin J; Perks, William J; Roifman, Idan; Wright, Graham A; Connelly, Kim A

    2016-11-11

    Altered cardiac energetics is known to play an important role in the progression toward heart failure. A noninvasive method for imaging metabolic markers that could be used in longitudinal studies would be useful for understanding therapeutic approaches that target metabolism. To demonstrate the first hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging of the human heart. Four healthy subjects underwent conventional proton cardiac magnetic resonance imaging followed by (13)C imaging and spectroscopic acquisition immediately after intravenous administration of a 0.1 mmol/kg dose of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. All subjects tolerated the procedure well with no adverse effects reported ≤1 month post procedure. The [1-(13)C]pyruvate signal appeared within the chambers but not within the muscle. Imaging of the downstream metabolites showed (13)C-bicarbonate signal mainly confined to the left ventricular myocardium, whereas the [1-(13)C]lactate signal appeared both within the chambers and in the myocardium. The mean (13)C image signal:noise ratio was 115 for [1-(13)C]pyruvate, 56 for (13)C-bicarbonate, and 53 for [1-(13)C]lactate. These results represent the first (13)C images of the human heart. The appearance of (13)C-bicarbonate signal after administration of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate was readily detected in this healthy cohort (n=4). This shows that assessment of pyruvate metabolism in vivo in humans is feasible using current technology. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02648009. © 2016 The Authors.

  4. The Development of Consumer-Driven Human Services Information Technology Initiatives: The Lake County Indiana Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Pavkov

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Family Access Project will deploy innovative community empowerment, education, consensus building, and information system development strategies to strengthen community, ensure the efficient and effective delivery of needed services, and address the unique needs of families requiring public assistance from a host of public and private agencies in Lake County. The goal of the project is to enhance community life through improved care coordination by linking new technologies to the human service delivery process. Upon completion, the project will assist in the enhancement of community-based services through the development of rules of data transaction and data standards and the deploy-ment of a secure messaging/document exchange network. By putting technology in the hands of consumers we also hope to impact the economic development and workforce readiness goals set forth in our community's welfare to work programs. These innovations will require educational innovations in order to facilitate the use of technology by both provider and consumer end-users. Proposed innovations include tutorials related to data standards development, peer train-the-trainer training in the development and use of technology to support service system reforms; and ongoing support through a technical assistance clearinghouse and help desk.

  5. Initial Egyptian ECMO experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Abdelbary

    2016-04-01

    Results: A total of twelve patients received ECMO between January 2014 and June 2015. The mean age was 35.9 years. (range 13–65 years, 8 males, with VV ECMO in 10 patients, and VA ECMO in 2 patients. Out of ten patients of VV ECMO, one had H1N1 pneumonia, one had advanced vasculitic lung, four had bacterial pneumonia, two traumatic lung contusions and one with organophosphorus poisoning, and one undiagnosed etiology leading to severe ARDS. Lung injury score range was 3–3.8, PaO2/FiO2 (20–76 mechanical ventilation duration before ECMO 1–14 days, Femoro-jugular cannulation in 7 patients and femoro-femoral in 2 patients and femoro-subclavian in 1 patient; all patients were initially sedated and paralyzed for (2–4 days and ventilated on pressure controlled ventilation with Pmax of 25 cm H2O and PEEP of 10 cm H2O. In VA ECMO patients were cannulated percutaneously using femoro-femoral approach. One patient showed no neurologic recovery and died after 24 h, the other had CABG on ECMO however the heart didn’t recover and died after 9 days. Heparin intravenous infusion was used initially in all patients and changed to Bivalirudin in 2 patients due to possible HIT. Pump flow ranged from 2.6 to 6.5 L/min. Average support time was 12 days (range 2–24 days. Seven patients (63.3% were successfully separated from ECMO and survived to hospital discharge. Hospital length of stay ranged from 3 to 42 days, tracheostomy was done percutaneously in 5 patients and surgically in 3. Gastrointestinal bleeding occurred in 6 patients, VAP in 7 patients, neurologic complications in 1 patient with complete recovery, cardiac arrhythmias in 3 patients, pneumothorax in 9 patients, and deep venous thrombosis in 2 patients.

  6. INITIAL COOLING EXPERIMENT (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    ICE was built in 1977, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring (see 7405430). Its purpose was to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project. Stochastic cooling proved a resounding success early in 1978 and the antiproton project could go ahead, now entirely based on stochastic cooling. Electron cooling was experimented with in 1979. The 26 kV equipment is housed in the cage to the left of the picture, adjacent to the "e-cooler" located in a straight section of the ring. With some modifications, the cooler was later transplanted into LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) and then, with further modifications, into the AD (Antiproton Decelerator), where it cools antiprotons to this day (2006). See also: 7711282, 7802099, 7809081.

  7. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of the healthy human brain at 9.4 T: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadzynski, Grzegorz L; Pohmann, Rolf; Shajan, Gunamony; Kolb, Rupert; Bisdas, Sotirios; Klose, Uwe; Scheffler, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the feasibility of in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((1)H MRSI) of the healthy human brain at a field strength of 9.4 T, using conventional acquisition techniques, is examined and the initial experience is summarized. MRSI measurements were performed on a 9.4 T MR scanner (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) equipped with head-only gradient insert (AC84, Siemens) and custom-developed, 8-channel transmit/24-channel receive, and 16-channel transmit/31-channel receive coils. Spectra were acquired from the superior part of the human brain with a modified STEAM sequence. Spectral quantification was done with LCModel software. Reasonable quality and signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired spectra allowed reliable quantification of 12 metabolites (Cramer-Rao lower bounds < 20 %), some of which may be difficult to quantify at field strengths below 7 T due to overlapping resonances or low concentrations. While further developments are necessary to minimize chemical shift displacement and homogeneity of the transmit field, it is demonstrated that in vivo (1)H MRSI at a field strength of 9.4 T is possible. However, further studies applying up-to-date techniques to overcome high-field specific problems are needed in order to assess the potential gain in sensitivity that may be offered by MRSI at 9.4 T.

  8. Robonaut Mobile Autonomy: Initial Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Goza, S. M.; Tyree, K. S.; Huber, E. L.

    2006-01-01

    A mobile version of the NASA/DARPA Robonaut humanoid recently completed initial autonomy trials working directly with humans in cluttered environments. This compact robot combines the upper body of the Robonaut system with a Segway Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid ideal for interacting with human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereovision to locate human teammates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form complex behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  9. EXPERIENCES WITH IDEA PROMOTING INITIATIVES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gish, Liv

    2011-01-01

    In new product development a central activity is to provide new ideas. Over the last decades experiences with stimulating employee creativity and establishing idea promoting initiatives have been made in industrial practice. Such initiatives are often labeled Idea Management – a research field...... with a growing interest. In this paper I examine three different idea promoting initiatives carried out in Grundfos, a leading pump manufacturer. In the analysis I address what understandings of idea work are inscribed in the initiatives and what role these initiatives play in the organization with respect...... understandings of idea work are inscribed in the idea promoting initiatives as they to some degree have to fit with the understandings embedded in practice in order to work....

  10. EXPERIENCES WITH IDEA PROMOTING INITIATIVES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gish, Liv

    2011-01-01

    In new product development a central activity is to provide new ideas. Over the last decades experiences with stimulating employee creativity and establishing idea promoting initiatives have been made in industrial practice. Such initiatives are often labeled Idea Management – a research field...... with a growing interest. In this paper I examine three different idea promoting initiatives carried out in Grundfos, a leading pump manufacturer. In the analysis I address what understandings of idea work are inscribed in the initiatives and what role these initiatives play in the organization with respect...... understandings of idea work are inscribed in the idea promoting initiatives as they to some degree have to fit with the understandings embedded in practice in order to work....

  11. From the Experience of Revitalization of Ecological and Local Lore Student Initiatives of Izmail State University for Humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gramatik N.V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of the problem of ecological education of students of local lore is its connection with the decision of the major problems of pedagogy, as the problem of the formation of personality, all its moral side, and including - a responsible attitude to nature. Ecological and local history education in the vocational training system, opens the future specialist the world with all the versatility of the complex nature of the relationship, it promotes the formation of personal qualities and values. In this regard, the main objective of the educational process in higher education is study ways to enhance eco-initiatives of local history students.

  12. Energy efficiency initiatives: Indian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Dipankar [ICFAI Business School, Kolkata, (IBS-K) (India)

    2007-07-01

    India, with a population of over 1.10 billion is one of the fastest growing economies of the world. As domestic sources of different conventional commercial energy are drying up, dependence on foreign energy sources is increasing. There exists a huge potential for saving energy in India. After the first 'oil shock' (1973), the government of India realized the need for conservation of energy and a 'Petroleum Conservation Action Group' was formed in 1976. Since then many initiatives aiming at energy conservation and improving energy efficiency, have been undertaken (the establishment of Petroleum Conservation Research Association in 1978; the notification of Eco labelling scheme in 1991; the formation of Bureau of Energy Efficiency in 2002). But no such initiative was successful. In this paper an attempt has been made to analyze the changing importance of energy conservation/efficiency measures which have been initiated in India between 1970 and 2005.The present study tries to analyze the limitations and the reasons of failure of those initiatives. The probable reasons are: fuel pricing mechanism (including subsidies), political factors, corruption and unethical practices, influence of oil and related industry lobbies - both internal and external, the economic situation and the prolonged protection of domestic industries. Further, as India is opening its economy, the study explores the opportunities that the globally competitive market would offer to improve the overall energy efficiency of the economy. The study suggests that the Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) - the newly formed nodal agency for improving energy efficiency of the economy may be made an autonomous institution where intervention from the politicians would be very low. For proper implementation of different initiatives to improve energy efficiency, BEE should involve more the civil societies (NGO) from the inception to the implementation stage of the programs. The paper also

  13. In vivo (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the human liver at 7 T: an initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelik, Marek; Považan, Michal; Krššák, Martin; Gruber, Stephan; Tkačov, Martin; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bogner, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Phosphorus ((31) P) MRS is a powerful tool for the non-invasive investigation of human liver metabolism. Four in vivo (31) P localization approaches (single voxel image selected in vivo spectroscopy (3D-ISIS), slab selective 1D-ISIS, 2D chemical shift imaging (CSI), and 3D-CSI) with different voxel volumes and acquisition times were demonstrated in nine healthy volunteers. Localization techniques provided comparable signal-to-noise ratios normalized for voxel volume and acquisition time differences, Cramer-Rao lower bounds (8.7 ± 3.3%1D-ISIS , 7.6 ± 2.5%3D-ISIS , 8.6 ± 4.2%2D-CSI , 10.3 ± 2.7%3D-CSI ), and linewidths (50 ± 24 Hz1D-ISIS , 34 ± 10 Hz3D-ISIS , 33 ± 10 Hz2D-CSI , 34 ± 11 Hz3D-CSI ). Longitudinal (T1 ) relaxation times of human liver metabolites at 7 T were assessed by 1D-ISIS inversion recovery in the same volunteers (n = 9). T1 relaxation times of hepatic (31) P metabolites at 7 T were the following: phosphorylethanolamine - 4.41 ± 1.55 s; phosphorylcholine - 3.74 ± 1.31 s; inorganic phosphate - 0.70 ± 0.33 s; glycerol 3-phosphorylethanolamine - 6.19 ± 0.91 s; glycerol 3-phosphorylcholine - 5.94 ± 0.73 s; γ-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) - 0.50 ± 0.08 s; α-ATP - 0.46 ± 0.07 s; β-ATP - 0.56 ± 0.07 s. The improved spectral resolution at 7 T enabled separation of resonances in the phosphomonoester and phosphodiester spectral region as well as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and uridine diphosphoglucose signals. An additional resonance at 2.06 ppm previously assigned to phosphoenolpyruvate or phosphatidylcholine is also detectable. These are the first (31) P metabolite relaxation time measurements at 7 T in human liver, and they will help in the exploration of new, exciting questions in metabolic research with 7 T MR. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Return to Experience and Initial Wage Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kenneth Lykke; Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    This paper estimates the relationship between initial wage and return to experience. We use a Mincer-like wage model to nonparametrically estimate this relationship allowing for an unobservable individual permanent effect in wages and unobservable individual return to experience. The relationship...

  15. Return to experience and initial wage level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.L.; Vejlin, R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper estimates the relationship between initial wage and return to experience. We use a Mincer-like wage model to non-parametrically estimate this relationship allowing for an unobservable individual permanent effect in wages and unobservable individual return to experience. The relationshi...

  16. Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan, Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics, 2455 Hayward Dr., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Bingham, D.; Goh, J. [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6 (Canada); Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic γ, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ∼7 × 10{sup 14} W cm{sup −2} to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code.

  17. Initial state radiation experiment at MAMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihovilovič M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to contribute further insight into the discrepancy between the Lamb shift and elastic scattering determinations of the proton charge radius, a new experiment at MAMI is underway, aimed at measuring proton form-factors at very low momentum transfers by using a new technique based on initial state radiation. This paper reports on the conclusions of the pilot measurement performed in 2010, whose main goal was to check the feasibility of the proposed experiment and to recognize and overcome any obstacles before running the full experiment. The modifications to the experimental apparatus are then explained which significantly improved the quality of data collected in the full scale experiment, which was successfully executed in August 2013. At the end first findings of the new experiment are discussed.

  18. Science and Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Leon N.

    2015-01-01

    Part I. Science and Society: 1. Science and human experience; 2. Does science undermine our values?; 3. Can science serve mankind?; 4. Modern science and contemporary discomfort: metaphor and reality; 5. Faith and science; 6. Art and science; 7. Fraud in science; 8. Why study science? The keys to the cathedral; 9. Is evolution a theory? A modest proposal; 10. The silence of the second; 11. Introduction to Copenhagen; 12. The unpaid debt; Part II. Thought and Consciousness: 13. Source and limits of human intellect; 14. Neural networks; 15. Thought and mental experience: the Turing test; 16. Mind as machine: will we rubbish human experience?; 17. Memory and memories: a physicist's approach to the brain; 18. On the problem of consciousness; Part III. On the Nature and Limits of Science: 19. What is a good theory?; 20. Shall we deconstruct science?; 21. Visible and invisible in physical theory; 22. Experience and order; 23. The language of physics; 24. The structure of space; 25. Superconductivity and other insoluble problems; 26. From gravity to light and consciousness: does science have limits?

  19. The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Werner; Miyoshi, Takanori

    2016-07-01

    The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (OOSA) launched the Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI) in 2010 within the United Nations Programme on Space Applications, based on relevant recommendations of the Third United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNISPACE III). The activities of HSTI are characterized by the following "Three Pillars": International Cooperation, Outreach, and Capacity-building. For International Cooperation, OOSA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) jointly launched a new programme entitled "KiboCUBE". KiboCUBE aims to provide educational or research institutions located in developing countries with opportunities to deploy cube satellites of their own design and manufacture from Japanese Experiment Module "Kibo" on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The Announcement of Opportunity was released on 8 September 2015 and the selected institution is to be announced by 1 August 2016. OOSA is also collaborating with WHO and with the COPUOS Expert Group on Space and Global Health to promote space technologies and ground- and space-based research activities that can contribute to improving global health. For Outreach, OOSA and the government of Costa Rica are jointly organising the United Nations/Costa Rica Workshop on Human Space Technology from 7 to 11 March 2016. Participants will exchange information on achievements in human space programmes and discuss how to promote international cooperation by further facilitating the participation of developing countries in human space exploration-related activities. Also, it will address the role of space industries in human space exploration and its related activities, considering that they have become significant stakeholders in this field. For Capacity-building, OOSA has been carrying out two activities: the Zero-Gravity Instrument Project (ZGIP) and the Drop Tower Experiment Series (DropTES). In ZGIP, OOSA has annually distributed

  20. Balanced Steady State Free Precession for Arterial Spin Labeling MRI: Initial Experience for Blood Flow Mapping in Human Brain, Retina, and Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Hong; Wang, Danny J.J.; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2013-01-01

    We implemented pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with 2D and 3D balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) readout for mapping blood flow in the human brain, retina, and kidney, free of distortion and signal dropout, which are typically observed in the most commonly used echo-planar imaging acquisition. High resolution functional brain imaging in the human visual cortex was feasible with 3D bSSFP pCASL. Blood flow of the human retina could be imaged with pCASL and bSSFP in conjunction with a phase cycling approach to suppress the banding artifacts associated with bSSFP. Furthermore, bSSFP based pCASL enabled us to map renal blood flow within a single breath hold. Control and test-retest experiments suggested that the measured blood flow values in retina and kidney were reliable. Because there is no specific imaging tool for mapping human retina blood flow and the standard contrast agent technique for mapping renal blood flow can cause problems for patients with kidney dysfunction, bSSFP based pCASL may provide a useful tool for the diagnosis of retinal and renal diseases and can complement existing imaging techniques. PMID:23664680

  1. United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI)

    CERN Document Server

    Ochiai, M; Steffens, H; Balogh, W; Haubold, H J; Othman, M; Doi, T

    2015-01-01

    The Human Space Technology Initiative was launched in 2010 within the framework of the United Nations Programme on Space Applications implemented by the Office for Outer Space Affairs of the United Nations. It aims to involve more countries in activities related to human spaceflight and space exploration and to increase the benefits from the outcome of such activities through international cooperation, to make space exploration a truly international effort. The role of the Initiative in these efforts is to provide a platform to exchange information, foster collaboration between partners from spacefaring and non-spacefaring countries, and encourage emerging and developing countries to take part in space research and benefit from space applications. The Initiative organizes expert meetings and workshops annually to raise awareness of the current status of space exploration activities as well as of the benefits of utilizing human space technology and its applications. The Initiative is also carrying out primary ...

  2. Initial Commissioning Experience With the LCLS Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akre, R.; Castro, J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.H.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, A.; Hays, G.; Hering, P.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Rivetta, C.; Saleski, M.; Schmerge, J.F.; Schultz, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; /SLAC /DESY

    2007-11-02

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE xray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently under construction at SLAC [1]. The injector section, from drive-laser and RF photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in fall 2006. Initial system commissioning with an electron beam is taking place during the spring and summer of 2007. The second phase of construction, including second bunch compressor and full linac, will begin later, in the fall of 2007. We report here on experience gained during the first phase of machine commissioning, including RF photocathode gun, linac booster section, S-band and X-band RF systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  3. Barrier experiment: Shock initiation under complex loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The barrier experiments are a variant of the gap test; a detonation wave in a donor HE impacts a barrier and drives a shock wave into an acceptor HE. The question we ask is: What is the trade-off between the barrier material and threshold barrier thickness to prevent the acceptor from detonating. This can be viewed from the perspective of shock initiation of the acceptor subject to a complex pressure drive condition. Here we consider key factors which affect whether or not the acceptor undergoes a shock-to-detonation transition. These include the following: shock impedance matches for the donor detonation wave into the barrier and then the barrier shock into the acceptor, the pressure gradient behind the donor detonation wave, and the curvature of detonation front in the donor. Numerical simulations are used to illustrate how these factors affect the reaction in the acceptor.

  4. The trapped human experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, R; Agapiou, A; Bocos-Bintintan, V; Brown, L J; Burns, C; Creaser, C S; Devenport, N A; Gao-Lau, B; Guallar-Hoyas, C; Hildebrand, L; Malkar, A; Martin, H J; Moll, V H; Patel, P; Ratiu, A; Reynolds, J C; Sielemann, S; Slodzynski, R; Statheropoulos, M; Turner, M A; Vautz, W; Wright, V E; Thomas, C L P

    2011-12-01

    This experiment observed the evolution of metabolite plumes from a human trapped in a simulation of a collapsed building. Ten participants took it in turns over five days to lie in a simulation of a collapsed building and eight of them completed the 6 h protocol while their breath, sweat and skin metabolites were passed through a simulation of a collapsed glass-clad reinforced-concrete building. Safety, welfare and environmental parameters were monitored continuously, and active adsorbent sampling for thermal desorption GC-MS, on-line and embedded CO, CO(2) and O(2) monitoring, aspirating ion mobility spectrometry with integrated semiconductor gas sensors, direct injection GC-ion mobility spectrometry, active sampling thermal desorption GC-differential mobility spectrometry and a prototype remote early detection system for survivor location were used to monitor the evolution of the metabolite plumes that were generated. Oxygen levels within the void simulator were allowed to fall no lower than 19.1% (v). Concurrent levels of carbon dioxide built up to an average level of 1.6% (v) in the breathing zone of the participants. Temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide levels and the physiological measurements were consistent with a reproducible methodology that enabled the metabolite plumes to be sampled and characterized from the different parts of the experiment. Welfare and safety data were satisfactory with pulse rates, blood pressures and oxygenation, all within levels consistent with healthy adults. Up to 12 in-test welfare assessments per participant and a six-week follow-up Stanford Acute Stress Response Questionnaire indicated that the researchers and participants did not experience any adverse effects from their involvement in the study. Preliminary observations confirmed that CO(2), NH(3) and acetone were effective markers for trapped humans, although interactions with water absorbed in building debris needed further study. An unexpected observation from the NH(3

  5. Women's initial experience of abnormal papanicolaou smear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Susan; Hall, Vincent P

    2009-06-01

    To discover the early subjective experience of women affected by abnormal Papanicolaou smear, a qualitative study was undertaken with 8 North Carolina women, 4 to 12 months postnotification of their first abnormal result. Data were analyzed via grounded theory methodology to identify a core theory that could guide interventions to improve follow-up for cancer prevention. This theoretical process is described as a labyrinth journey-an imperative healing process undertaken by all participants, who undertook the following tasks: evaluating peril, seeking refuge, obtaining information, and reframing their self-image. Women who also learned they were infected with the human papillomavirus faced a prolonged sense of threat to their sense of sexual well-being. Their additional tasks related to reevaluating their sexual self-image, and they continued to work on these reframing tasks throughout their 1st year's journey. Progress through the labyrinth depended upon emotional or spiritual support, nonjudgmental acceptance and access to accurate information.

  6. Liver transplantations in Bulgaria--initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladov, N; Mihaylov, V; Takorov, I; Vasilevski, I; Lukanova, T; Odisseeva, E; Katzarov, K; Simonova, M; Tomova, D; Konakchieva, M; Petrov, N; Mladenov, N; Sergeev, S; Mutafchiiski, V

    2014-01-01

    The filed of liver transplantation (LT) continues to evolve and is highly effective therapy for many patients with acute and chronic liver failure resulting from a variety of causes. Improvement of perioperative care, surgical technique and immunosuppression in recent years has led to its transformation into a safe and routine procedure with steadily improving results. The aim of this paper is to present the initial experience of the transplant team at Military Medical Academy - Sofia, Bulgaria. For the period of April 2007 - August 2014 the team performed 38 liver transplants in 37 patients (one retransplantation). Patients were followed up prospectively and retrospectively. In 36 (95%) patients a graft from a cadaveric donor was used and in two cases--a right liver grafts from live donor. The mean MELD score of the transplanted patients was 17 (9-40). The preferred surgical technique was "piggyback" with preservation of inferior vena cava in 33 (86%) of the cases and classical technique in 3 (8%) patients. The overall complication rate was 48%. Early mortality rate was 13% (5 patients). The overall 1- and 5-year survival is 81% and 77% respectivelly. The setting of a new LT program is a complex process which requires the effort and effective colaboration of a wide range of speciacialists (hepatologists, surgeons, anesthesiologists, psychologists, therapists, coordinators, etc.) and institutions. The good results are function of a proper selection of the donors and the recipients. Living donation is an alternative in the shortage of cadaveric donors.

  7. Architecture of human translation initiation factor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol-Audi, Jordi; Sun, Chaomin; Vogan, Jacob M; Smith, M Duane; Gu, Yu; Cate, Jamie H D; Nogales, Eva

    2013-06-04

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) plays a central role in protein synthesis by organizing the formation of the 43S preinitiation complex. Using genetic tag visualization by electron microscopy, we reveal the molecular organization of ten human eIF3 subunits, including an octameric core. The structure of eIF3 bears a close resemblance to that of the proteasome lid, with a conserved spatial organization of eight core subunits containing PCI and MPN domains that coordinate functional interactions in both complexes. We further show that eIF3 subunits a and c interact with initiation factors eIF1 and eIF1A, which control the stringency of start codon selection. Finally, we find that subunit j, which modulates messenger RNA interactions with the small ribosomal subunit, makes multiple independent interactions with the eIF3 octameric core. These results highlight the conserved architecture of eIF3 and how it scaffolds key factors that control translation initiation in higher eukaryotes, including humans.

  8. Experiences of Racism in Initial Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garewal, Gurpreet

    1999-01-01

    Explores trainee teachers' perceptions and projections of racial discrimination while taking the postcompulsory teaching course in England. Experiences of four trainee teachers highlight the need for more support for teacher trainees, more cultural sensitivity among teacher educators, and the inclusion of cultural and racial issues in the course.…

  9. The Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), a collaborative paradigm for institutional and human resources capacity building between high- and low- and middle-income countries: the Mozambique experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgínia Noormahomed, Emília; Carrilho, Carla; Ismail, Mamudo; Noormahomed, Sérgio; Nguenha, Alcido; Benson, Constance A.; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Schooley, Robert T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Collaborations among researchers based in lower and middle income countries (LMICs) and high income countries (HICs) have made major discoveries related to diseases disproportionately affecting LMICs and have been vital to the development of research communities in LMICs. Such collaborations have generally been scientifically and structurally driven by HICs. Objectives: In this report we outline a paradigm shift in collaboration, exemplified by the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), in which the formulation of priorities and administrative infrastructure reside in the LMIC. Methods: This descriptive report outlines the critical features of the MEPI partnership. Results: In the MEPI, LMIC program partners translate broad program goals and define metrics into priorities that are tailored to local conditions. Program funds flow to a LMIC-based leadership group that contracts with peers from HICs to provide technical and scientific advice and consultation in a 'reverse funds flow' model. Emphasis is also placed on strengthening administrative capacity within LMIC institutions. A rigorous monitoring and evaluation process modifies program priorities on the basis of evolving opportunities to maximize program impact. Conclusions: Vesting LMIC partners with the responsibility for program leadership, and building administrative and fiscal capacity in LMIC institutions substantially enhances program relevance, impact and sustainability.

  10. Initial ground experiments of silkworm cultures living on different feedstock for provision of high quality animal protein for human in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunan; Tang, Liman; Tong, Ling; Liu, Yang; Liu, Hong; Li, Xiaomin

    2010-09-01

    Silkworm could be an alternative to provide edible animal protein in Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) for long-term manned space missions. Silkworms can consume non-edible plant residue and convert plant nutrients to high quality edible animal protein for astronauts. The preliminary investigation of silkworm culture was carried out in earth environment. The silkworms were fed with artificial silkworm diet and the leaves of stem lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L. var. angustana Irish) separately and the nutritional structure of silkworm was investigated and compared, The culture experiments showed that: (1) Stem lettuce leaves could be used as food of silkworm. The protein content of silkworm fed with lettuce leaves can reach 70% of dry mass. (2) The protein content of silkworm powder produced by the fifth instar silkworm larvae was 70%, which was similar to the protein content of silkworm pupae. The powder of the fifth instar silkworm larvae can be utilized by astronaut. (3) The biotransformation rate of silkworm larvae between the third instar and the fifth instar could reach above 70%. The biotransformation cycle of silkworm was determined as 24 days. (4) Using the stem lettuce leaves to raise silkworm, the coarse fiber content of silkworm excrements reached about 33%. The requirements of space silkworm culture equipment, feeding approaches and feeding conditions were also preliminarily designed and calculated. It is estimated that 2.2 m 3 of culture space could satisfy daily animal protein demand for seven astronauts.

  11. Initial genomics of the human nucleolus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Németh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report for the first time the genomics of a nuclear compartment of the eukaryotic cell. 454 sequencing and microarray analysis revealed the pattern of nucleolus-associated chromatin domains (NADs in the linear human genome and identified different gene families and certain satellite repeats as the major building blocks of NADs, which constitute about 4% of the genome. Bioinformatic evaluation showed that NAD-localized genes take part in specific biological processes, like the response to other organisms, odor perception, and tissue development. 3D FISH and immunofluorescence experiments illustrated the spatial distribution of NAD-specific chromatin within interphase nuclei and its alteration upon transcriptional changes. Altogether, our findings describe the nature of DNA sequences associated with the human nucleolus and provide insights into the function of the nucleolus in genome organization and establishment of nuclear architecture.

  12. Initial experiments with Multiple Musical Gestures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristoffer; Graugaard, Lars

    2005-01-01

    The classic orchestra has a diminishing role in society, while hard-disc recorded music plays a predominant role today. A simple to use pointer interface in 2D for producing music is presented as a means for playing in a social situation. The sounds of the music are produced by a low......-level synthesizer, and the music is produced by simple gestures that are repeated easily. The gestures include left-to-right and right-to-left motion shapes for spectral envelope and temporal envelope of the sounds, with optional backwards motion for the addition of noise; downward motion for note onset and several...... other manipulation gestures. The initial position controls which parameter is being affected, the notes intensity is controlled by the downward gesture speed, and a sequence is finalized instantly with one upward gesture. The synthesis employs a novel interface structure, the multiple musical gesture...

  13. Coronary MR angiography using citrate-coated very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles as blood-pool contrast agent: initial experience in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Moritz; Wagner, Susanne; Schnorr, Jörg; Schellenberger, Eyk; Kivelitz, Dietmar; Krug, Lasse; Dewey, Marc; Laule, Michael; Hamm, Bernd; Taupitz, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP-C184) as blood-pool contrast agent for coronary MR angiography (CMRA) in humans. Six healthy volunteers and 14 patients with suspected coronary artery disease underwent CMRA after administration of VSOP-C184 at the following doses: 20 μmol Fe/kg (4 patients), 40 μmol Fe/kg (5 patients), 45 μmol Fe/kg (6 healthy volunteers), and 60 μmol Fe/kg (5 patients). In healthy volunteers, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and vessel edge definition (VED) of contrast-enhanced CMRA were compared with non-contrast-enhanced CMRA. In patients, a per-segment intention-to-diagnose evaluation of contrast-enhanced CMRA for detection of significant coronary stenosis (≥50%) was performed. Three healthy volunteers (45 μmol Fe/kg VSOP-C184) and two patients (60 μmol Fe/kg VSOP-C184) had adverse events of mild or moderate intensity. VSOP-C184 significantly increased CNR (15.1 ± 4.6 versus 6.9 ± 1.9; P = 0.010), SNR (21.7 ± 5.3 versus 15.4 ± 1.6; P = 0.048), and VED (2.3 ± 0.6 versus 1.2 ± 0.2; P VSOP-C184 was feasible and yielded moderate diagnostic accuracy for detection of significant coronary stenosis within this proof-of-concept setting. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. SNS Target Systems initial operating experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManamy, T.; Forester, J.

    2009-02-01

    The SNS mercury target started operation with low beam power when commissioned on April 28, 2006. The beam power has been following a planned ramp up since then and has reached 340 kW as of February 2008. The target systems supporting neutron production include the target and mercury loop, the cryogenic and ambient moderator systems, reflector and vessel systems, bulk shielding and shutters systems, utility systems, remote handling systems and the associated instrumentation and controls. Availability for these systems has improved with time and reached 100% for the first 2000 hour neutron production run in fiscal year 2008. An overview of the operating experience and the planning to support continued power increases to 1.4 MW for these systems will be given in this paper.

  15. Initial experience with robot-assisted varicocelectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tung Shu; Shaya Taghechian; Run Wang

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To determine if robot-assisted varicocelectomy can be safely and effectively performed when compared microscopic inguinal varicocelectomy. Methods: Eight patients aged 29.1 ± 12.5 years underwent microscopic subinguinal varicocelectomies: seven patients with left-sided repair, and one patient with bilateral repair. Eight patients aged 22.0 ± 8.0 years underwent robot-assisted varicocelectomies: seven patients with left-sided repair and one patient with bilateral repair. Results: The average operative time for microscopic inguinal varicocelectomy was 73.9 ± 12.2 min, whereas the robot-assisted technique took 71.1 ± 21.1 min. There were no difficulties in identifying and isolating vessels and the vas deferens with robot-assisted subinguinal varicocelectomy. Hand tremor was eliminated using the robotic procedure. Patients who underwent either microscopic or robot-assisted varicocelectomies were able to resume daily activities on the day of surgery and full activities within 2 weeks. There were complications or recurrences of varicocele. Conclusion: From our experience, compared to microscopic surgery,robot-assisted varicocelectomy can be safely and effectively performed, with the added benefit of eliminating hand tremor.

  16. Initial performance of the CUORE-0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artusa, D.R. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Avignone, F.T.; Chott, N.; Creswick, R.J.; Farach, H.A.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, J. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Azzolini, O.; Keppel, G.; Palmieri, V. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Padua (Italy); Balata, M.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Casali, N.; Di Vacri, M.L.; Goett, J.; Gorla, P.; Nisi, S.; Orlandi, D.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S.; Zarra, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Banks, T.I. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bari, G.; Deninno, M.M.; Moggi, N. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Beeman, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bellini, F.; Cardani, L.; Cosmelli, C.; Ferroni, F.; Piperno, G. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Bersani, A. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Capelli, S.; Carrettoni, M.; Chiesa, D.; Clemenza, M.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Fiorini, E.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Gotti, C.; Maiano, C.; Maino, M.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Sala, E.; Sisti, M.; Terranova, F.; Zanotti, L. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Cai, X.Z.; Cao, X.G.; Fang, D.Q.; Li, Y.L.; Ma, Y.G.; Tian, W.D.; Wang, H.W. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (Chinese Academy of Sciences), Shanghai (China); Carbone, L.; Cremonesi, O.; Datskov, V.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E.; Rusconi, C. [INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Dafinei, I.; Morganti, S.; Orio, F.; Pettinacci, V.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Dally, A.; Ejzak, L.; Wielgus, L. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Di Domizio, S.; Fernandes, G.; Pallavicini, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); Freedman, S.J. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; Mei, Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Giuliani, A.; Tenconi, M. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, Orsay Campus (France); Gutierrez, T.D. [California Polytechnic State University, Physics Department, San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Haller, E.E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Heeger, K.M.; Lim, K.E.; Maruyama, R.H. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Ouellet, J.L. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Huang, H.Z.; Liu, X.; Trentalange, S.; Winslow, L.A.; Zhu, B.X. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kadel, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kazkaz, K.; Pedretti, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Scielzo, N.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Kolomensky, Yu.G. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Martinez, M. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Saragossa (Spain); Nones, C. [Service de Physique des Particules, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Norman, E.B.; Wang, B.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); O' Donnell, T. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, A.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, EH and S Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Taffarello, L. [INFN-Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Ventura, G. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica, Florence (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Wise, T. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Zucchelli, S. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    CUORE-0 is a cryogenic detector that uses an array of tellurium dioxide bolometers to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 130}Te. We present the first data analysis with 7.1kg . y of total TeO{sub 2} exposure focusing on background measurements and energy resolution. The background rates in the neutrinoless double-beta decay region of interest (2.47 to 2.57MeV) and in the α backgrounddominated region (2.70 to 3.90 MeV) have been measured to be 0.071 ± 0.011 and 0.019 ± 0.002 counts/(keV . kg . y), respectively. The latter result represents a factor of 6 improvement from a predecessor experiment, Cuoricino. The results verify our understanding of the background sources in CUORE-0, which is the basis of extrapolations to the full CUORE detector. The obtained energy resolution (full width at half maximum) in the region of interest is 5.7 keV. Based on themeasured background rate and energy resolution in the region of interest, CUORE-0 half-life sensitivity is expected to surpass the observed lower bound of Cuoricino with one year of live time. (orig.)

  17. Initial performance of the CUORE-0 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, C P; Avignone, F T; Azzolini, O; Balata, M; Banks, T I; Bari, G; Beeman, J; Bellini, F; Bersani, A; Biassoni, M; Brofferio, C; Bucci, C; Cai, X Z; Canonica, L; Cao, X G; Capelli, S; Carbone, L; Cardani, L; Carrettoni, M; Casali, N; Chiesa, D; Chott, N; Clemenza, M; Cosmelli, C; Cremonesi, O; Creswick, R J; Dafinei, I; Dally, A; Datskov, V; Deninno, M M; Di Domizio, S; di Vacri, M L; Ejzak, L; Fang, D Q; Farach, H A; Faverzani, M; Fernandes, G; Ferri, E; Ferroni, F; Fiorini, E; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; Giachero, A; Gironi, L; Giuliani, A; Goett, J; Gorla, P; Gotti, C; Gutierrez, T D; Haller, E E; Han, K; Heeger, K M; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Huang, H Z; Kadel, R; Kazkaz, K; Keppel, G; Kolomensky, Yu G; Li, Y L; Lim, K E; Liu, X; Ma, Y G; Maiano, C; Maino, M; Martinez, M; Maruyama, R H; Mei, Y; Moggi, N; Morganti, S; Nisi, S; Nones, C; Norman, E B; Nucciotti, A; O'Donnell, T; Orio, F; Orlandi, D; Ouellet, J L; Pallavicini, M; Palmieri, V; Pattavina, L; Pavan, M; Pedretti, M; Pessina, G; Pettinacci, V; Piperno, G; Pirro, S; Previtali, E; Rosenfeld, C; Rusconi, C; Sala, E; Sangiorgio, S; Scielzo, N D; Sisti, M; Smith, A R; Taffarello, L; Tenconi, M; Terranova, F; Tian, W D; Tomei, C; Trentalange, S; Vignati, M; Wang, B S; Wang, H W; Wielgus, L; Wilson, J; Winslow, L A; Wise, T; Zanotti, L; Zarra, C; Zhu, B X; Zucchelli, S

    2014-01-01

    CUORE-0 is a cryogenic detector that uses an array of tellurium dioxide bolometers to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of ^{130}Te. We present the first data analysis with 7.1 kg y of total TeO_2 exposure focusing on background measurements and energy resolution. The background rates in the neutrinoless double-beta decay region of interest (2.47 to 2.57 MeV) and in the {\\alpha} background-dominated region (2.70 to 3.90 MeV) have been measured to be 0.071 \\pm 0.011 and 0.019 \\pm 0.002 counts/keV/kg/y, respectively. The latter result represents a factor of 6 improvement from a predecessor experiment, Cuoricino. The results verify our understanding of the background sources in CUORE-0, which is the basis of extrapolations to the full CUORE detector. The obtained energy resolution (full width at half maximum) in the region of interest is 5.7 keV. Based on the measured background rate and energy resolution in the region of interest, CUORE-0 half-life sensitivity is expected to surpass the observed lower b...

  18. Laparoscopic nephrectomy: initial experience with 120 cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cheema, I A

    2012-02-01

    Laparoscopic nephrectomy for both benign and malignant diseases of kidney is increasingly being performed. We report our experience with the first 120 consecutive laparoscopic nephrectomy performed in our hospital. It is the retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database of 4 years period. The parameters examined included age, gender, indications, operative time, blood loss, intraoperative and post operative complications. Mean age of surgery was 59 years (rang 19-84years). The indications for surgery included solid renal masses (71 patients), non-functioning kidneys (43), and collecting system tumours (6). The mean operating time was 132 minutes (range 75-270), average blood loss was 209 ml (range 0-1090) and average hospital stay was 4.7days (range 2-20). Bleeding, bowel injury and poor progression of laparoscopic procedure were the reasons in 7 (5.8%) cases converted to open surgery. There was 1 (0.8%) perioperative mortality. Eight (6.6%) patients developed post operative complications. Laparoscopic nephrectomy has inherent benefits and may be considered an alternate therapeutic option for kidney diseases with acceptable morbidity

  19. Laparoscopic nephrectomy: initial experience with 120 cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cheema, I A

    2010-02-01

    Laparoscopic nephrectomy for both benign and malignant diseases of kidney is increasingly being performed. We report our experience with the first 120 consecutive laparoscopic nephrectomy performed in our hospital. It is the retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database of 4 years period. The parameters examined included age, gender, indications, operative time, blood loss, intraoperative and post operative complications. Mean age of surgery was 59 years (rang 19-84years). The indications for surgery included solid renal masses (71 patients), non-functioning kidneys (43), and collecting system tumours (6). The mean operating time was 132 minutes (range 75-270), average blood loss was 209 ml (range 0-1090) and average hospital stay was 4.7days (range 2-20). Bleeding, bowel injury and poor progression of laparoscopic procedure were the reasons in 7 (5.8%) cases converted to open surgery. There was 1 (0.8%) perioperative mortality. Eight (6.6%) patients developed post operative complications. Laparoscopic nephrectomy has inherent benefits and may be considered an alternate therapeutic option for kidney diseases with acceptable morbidity

  20. Initial predictions in learning-to-forecast experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Diks; T. Makarewicz

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we estimate the distribution of the initial predictions of the Heemeijer et al. [5] Learning-to-Forecast experiment. By design, these initial predictions were uninformed. We show that in fact they have a non-continuous distribution and that they systematically under-evaluate the fundam

  1. The NIF Shear Experiment: Emergent Coherent Structures and Initial Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippo, K. A.; Doss, F. W.; Merritt, E. C.; di Stefano, C. A.; Devolder, B. G.; Kurien, S.; Kot, L.; Loomis, E. N.; Murphy, T. J.; Perry, T. S.; Kline, J. L.; Huntington, C. M.; Nagel, S. R.; MacLaren, S. A.; Schmidt, D. W.

    2016-10-01

    The NIF Shear experiments are designed to stress turbulence models at high Atwood numbers, high convective Mach number, and in a highly compressible regime. The NIF laser system is used to drive two hohlraums on either end of the experiment, which convert the laser drive into a bath of soft x-rays, 250eV in temperature. The counter-propagating shocks and flow, pressure balance the shear layer, such that it can grow due to the KH instability in the center of the experiment for 20 ns. These experiments are the first High Energy Density (HED) hydro-instability studies to show emergent coherent Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) structures arising from random broadband seeds, and the first to control the phenomenological evolution of the tracer layer by controlling the initial surface roughness conditions. The change in initial conditions forces the system evolution on a different path that does not appear to reach a universal nor self-similar state by the end of the experiment. The experiment was modeled using the multi-physics hydrodynamic code RAGE with the BHR turbulence model. The initial scale-length of the model is modified to match the data. When the model is turned off, the pure hydrodynamics do not capture the behavior of the mixing layer and cannot match the data.

  2. Report on the Human Genome Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinoco, I.; Cahill, G.; Cantor, C.; Caskey, T.; Dulbecco, R.; Engelhardt, D. L.; Hood, L.; Lerman, L. S.; Mendelsohn, M. L.; Sinsheimer, R. L.; Smith, T.; Soll, D.; Stormo, G.; White, R. L.

    1987-04-01

    The report urges DOE and the Nation to commit to a large. multi-year. multidisciplinary. technological undertaking to order and sequence the human genome. This effort will first require significant innovation in general capability to manipulate DNA. major new analytical methods for ordering and sequencing. theoretical developments in computer science and mathematical biology, and great expansions in our ability to store and manipulate the information and to interface it with other large and diverse genetic databases. The actual ordering and sequencing involves the coordinated processing of some 3 billion bases from a reference human genome. Science is poised on the rudimentary edge of being able to read and understand human genes. A concerted. broadly based. scientific effort to provide new methods of sufficient power and scale should transform this activity from an inefficient one-gene-at-a-time. single laboratory effort into a coordinated. worldwide. comprehensive reading of "the book of man". The effort will be extraordinary in scope and magnitude. but so will be the benefit to biological understanding. new technology and the diagnosis and treatment of human disease.

  3. Human error mitigation initiative (HEMI) : summary report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Susan M.; Ramos, M. Victoria; Wenner, Caren A.; Brannon, Nathan Gregory

    2004-11-01

    Despite continuing efforts to apply existing hazard analysis methods and comply with requirements, human errors persist across the nuclear weapons complex. Due to a number of factors, current retroactive and proactive methods to understand and minimize human error are highly subjective, inconsistent in numerous dimensions, and are cumbersome to characterize as thorough. An alternative and proposed method begins with leveraging historical data to understand what the systemic issues are and where resources need to be brought to bear proactively to minimize the risk of future occurrences. An illustrative analysis was performed using existing incident databases specific to Pantex weapons operations indicating systemic issues associated with operating procedures that undergo notably less development rigor relative to other task elements such as tooling and process flow. Future recommended steps to improve the objectivity, consistency, and thoroughness of hazard analysis and mitigation were delineated.

  4. Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, E S; Linton, L M; Birren, B; Nusbaum, C; Zody, M C; Baldwin, J; Devon, K; Dewar, K; Doyle, M; FitzHugh, W; Funke, R; Gage, D; Harris, K; Heaford, A; Howland, J; Kann, L; Lehoczky, J; LeVine, R; McEwan, P; McKernan, K; Meldrim, J; Mesirov, J P; Miranda, C; Morris, W; Naylor, J; Raymond, C; Rosetti, M; Santos, R; Sheridan, A; Sougnez, C; Stange-Thomann, Y; Stojanovic, N; Subramanian, A; Wyman, D; Rogers, J; Sulston, J; Ainscough, R; Beck, S; Bentley, D; Burton, J; Clee, C; Carter, N; Coulson, A; Deadman, R; Deloukas, P; Dunham, A; Dunham, I; Durbin, R; French, L; Grafham, D; Gregory, S; Hubbard, T; Humphray, S; Hunt, A; Jones, M; Lloyd, C; McMurray, A; Matthews, L; Mercer, S; Milne, S; Mullikin, J C; Mungall, A; Plumb, R; Ross, M; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Waterston, R H; Wilson, R K; Hillier, L W; McPherson, J D; Marra, M A; Mardis, E R; Fulton, L A; Chinwalla, A T; Pepin, K H; Gish, W R; Chissoe, S L; Wendl, M C; Delehaunty, K D; Miner, T L; Delehaunty, A; Kramer, J B; Cook, L L; Fulton, R S; Johnson, D L; Minx, P J; Clifton, S W; Hawkins, T; Branscomb, E; Predki, P; Richardson, P; Wenning, S; Slezak, T; Doggett, N; Cheng, J F; Olsen, A; Lucas, S; Elkin, C; Uberbacher, E; Frazier, M; Gibbs, R A; Muzny, D M; Scherer, S E; Bouck, J B; Sodergren, E J; Worley, K C; Rives, C M; Gorrell, J H; Metzker, M L; Naylor, S L; Kucherlapati, R S; Nelson, D L; Weinstock, G M; Sakaki, Y; Fujiyama, A; Hattori, M; Yada, T; Toyoda, A; Itoh, T; Kawagoe, C; Watanabe, H; Totoki, Y; Taylor, T; Weissenbach, J; Heilig, R; Saurin, W; Artiguenave, F; Brottier, P; Bruls, T; Pelletier, E; Robert, C; Wincker, P; Smith, D R; Doucette-Stamm, L; Rubenfield, M; Weinstock, K; Lee, H M; Dubois, J; Rosenthal, A; Platzer, M; Nyakatura, G; Taudien, S; Rump, A; Yang, H; Yu, J; Wang, J; Huang, G; Gu, J; Hood, L; Rowen, L; Madan, A; Qin, S; Davis, R W; Federspiel, N A; Abola, A P; Proctor, M J; Myers, R M; Schmutz, J; Dickson, M; Grimwood, J; Cox, D R; Olson, M V; Kaul, R; Raymond, C; Shimizu, N; Kawasaki, K; Minoshima, S; Evans, G A; Athanasiou, M; Schultz, R; Roe, B A; Chen, F; Pan, H; Ramser, J; Lehrach, H; Reinhardt, R; McCombie, W R; de la Bastide, M; Dedhia, N; Blöcker, H; Hornischer, K; Nordsiek, G; Agarwala, R; Aravind, L; Bailey, J A; Bateman, A; Batzoglou, S; Birney, E; Bork, P; Brown, D G; Burge, C B; Cerutti, L; Chen, H C; Church, D; Clamp, M; Copley, R R; Doerks, T; Eddy, S R; Eichler, E E; Furey, T S; Galagan, J; Gilbert, J G; Harmon, C; Hayashizaki, Y; Haussler, D; Hermjakob, H; Hokamp, K; Jang, W; Johnson, L S; Jones, T A; Kasif, S; Kaspryzk, A; Kennedy, S; Kent, W J; Kitts, P; Koonin, E V; Korf, I; Kulp, D; Lancet, D; Lowe, T M; McLysaght, A; Mikkelsen, T; Moran, J V; Mulder, N; Pollara, V J; Ponting, C P; Schuler, G; Schultz, J; Slater, G; Smit, A F; Stupka, E; Szustakowki, J; Thierry-Mieg, D; Thierry-Mieg, J; Wagner, L; Wallis, J; Wheeler, R; Williams, A; Wolf, Y I; Wolfe, K H; Yang, S P; Yeh, R F; Collins, F; Guyer, M S; Peterson, J; Felsenfeld, A; Wetterstrand, K A; Patrinos, A; Morgan, M J; de Jong, P; Catanese, J J; Osoegawa, K; Shizuya, H; Choi, S; Chen, Y J; Szustakowki, J

    2001-02-15

    The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine and evolution. Here we report the results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence.

  5. Chromatin remodelling initiation during human spermiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke De Vries

    2012-03-01

    During the last phase of spermatogenesis, spermiogenesis, haploid round spermatids metamorphose towards spermatozoa. Extensive cytoplasmic reduction and chromatin remodelling together allow a dramatic decrease of cellular, notably nuclear volume. DNA packing by a nucleosome based chromatin structure is largely replaced by a protamine based one. At the cytoplasmic level among others the acrosome and perinuclear theca (PNT are formed. In this study we describe the onset of chromatin remodelling to occur concomitantly with acrosome and PNT development. In spread human round spermatid nuclei, we show development of a DAPI-intense doughnut-like structure co-localizing with the acrosomal sac and sub acrosomal PNT. At this structure we observe the first gradual decrease of nucleosomes and several histones. Histone post-translational modifications linked to chromatin remodelling such as H4K8ac and H4K16ac also delineate the doughnut, that is furthermore marked by H3K9me2. During the capping phase of acrosome development, the size of the doughnut-like chromatin domain increases, and this area often is marked by uniform nucleosome loss and the first appearance of transition protein 2 and protamine 1. In the acrosome phase at nuclear elongation, chromatin remodelling follows the downward movement of the marginal ring of the acrosome. Our results indicate that acrosome development and chromatin remodelling are interacting processes. In the discussion we relate chromatin remodelling to the available data on the nuclear envelope and the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC complex of spermatids, suggesting a signalling route for triggering chromatin remodelling.

  6. Advertising's new medium: human experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayport, Jeffrey F

    2013-03-01

    We live in a media-saturated world, where consumers are drowning in irrelevant messages delivered from the web, TV, radio, print, outdoor displays, and a proliferating array of mobile devices. Advertising strategies built on persuading through interruption, repetition, and brute ubiquity are increasingly ineffective. To win consumers' attention and trust, marketers must think less about what advertising says to its targets and more about what it does for them. Rayport outlines four domains of human experience: In the public sphere people move from one place or activity to another, both online and off. In the social sphere they interact with and relate to one another. In the tribal sphere they affiliate with groups to define or express their identity. In the psychological sphere they connect language with specific thoughts and feelings. Savvy marketers think about crafting messages that consumers will welcome in these domains. Zappos did that when it placed ads in airport security bins (the public sphere)--reaching people whose minds may be on their shoes. Nintendo identified young mothers who were willing to host Wii parties and provided them with everything they needed for these social-sphere events. Yelp's Elite Squad of reviewers have a heightened sense of tribal affiliation that makes them powerful brand ambassadors. Life is good Inc. is rooted in the psychological sphere: It advertises only through the optimism-promoting logo and slogan on its products.

  7. Initial Homosexual Experiences of MSM in Surat City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Mukesh, Bansal RK

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study among 200 Men having sex with men in Surat City explores their initial MSM experiences. Our findings reveal that MSM are sexually active with slightly more bisexual than homosexual. Over half had their first homosexual attraction and relationships before the age of 14 years commonly while playing with friends, though some were forced or raped into their first MSM experience by cousin, friend or elders and care takers. 94% the second homosexual encounter had occurred within 3 months of the first homosexual encounter. These two initial MSM experiences play an important role in future MSM inclinations and highlight the need to ensure that children do not enter into such early relationships before the age of consent. What merits special attention is that these experiences invariably occur during adolescence and their impression makes a lasting effect on their psyche and sexual inclination lifelong. Receptive anal sex emerges as the most common sexual act (89.5% and as the commonest reason for continuing with MSM relationships (26.5%. Friends are the main source (99.5% of entry into an MSM group.

  8. Dynamic crack initiation toughness : experiments and peridynamic modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, John T.

    2009-10-01

    This is a dissertation on research conducted studying the dynamic crack initiation toughness of a 4340 steel. Researchers have been conducting experimental testing of dynamic crack initiation toughness, K{sub Ic}, for many years, using many experimental techniques with vastly different trends in the results when reporting K{sub Ic} as a function of loading rate. The dissertation describes a novel experimental technique for measuring K{sub Ic} in metals using the Kolsky bar. The method borrows from improvements made in recent years in traditional Kolsky bar testing by using pulse shaping techniques to ensure a constant loading rate applied to the sample before crack initiation. Dynamic crack initiation measurements were reported on a 4340 steel at two different loading rates. The steel was shown to exhibit a rate dependence, with the recorded values of K{sub Ic} being much higher at the higher loading rate. Using the knowledge of this rate dependence as a motivation in attempting to model the fracture events, a viscoplastic constitutive model was implemented into a peridynamic computational mechanics code. Peridynamics is a newly developed theory in solid mechanics that replaces the classical partial differential equations of motion with integral-differential equations which do not require the existence of spatial derivatives in the displacement field. This allows for the straightforward modeling of unguided crack initiation and growth. To date, peridynamic implementations have used severely restricted constitutive models. This research represents the first implementation of a complex material model and its validation. After showing results comparing deformations to experimental Taylor anvil impact for the viscoplastic material model, a novel failure criterion is introduced to model the dynamic crack initiation toughness experiments. The failure model is based on an energy criterion and uses the K{sub Ic} values recorded experimentally as an input. The failure model

  9. Team learning in medical education: initial experiences at ten institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Nancy S; Haidet, Paul; Kelly, P Adam; Schneider, Virginia F; Seidel, Charles L; Richards, Boyd F

    2003-10-01

    In the midst of curricular reforms that frequently call for reducing lectures and increasing small-group teaching, there is a crisis in faculty time for teaching. This paper describes the initial experiences of ten institutions with team learning (TL), a teaching method which fosters small-group learning in a large-class setting. After initial pilot studies at one institution, nine additional institutions implemented TL in one or more courses. Within 18 months, TL has been used in 40 courses (from.5% to 100% of the time) and all ten institutions will increase its use next year. We surmise that this relatively rapid spread of TL into the medical curriculum is due to the sound pedagogy and efficiency of TL as well as the modest financial resources and support we have provided to partner institutions.

  10. Initiating the development of multisensory integration by manipulating sensory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liping; Rowland, Benjamin A; Stein, Barry E

    2010-04-07

    The multisensory integration capabilities of superior colliculus neurons emerge gradually during early postnatal life as a consequence of experience with cross-modal stimuli. Without such experience neurons become responsive to multiple sensory modalities but are unable to integrate their inputs. The present study demonstrates that neurons retain sensitivity to cross-modal experience well past the normal developmental period for acquiring multisensory integration capabilities. Experience surprisingly late in life was found to rapidly initiate the development of multisensory integration, even more rapidly than expected based on its normal developmental time course. Furthermore, the requisite experience was acquired by the anesthetized brain and in the absence of any of the stimulus-response contingencies generally associated with learning. The key experiential factor was repeated exposure to the relevant stimuli, and this required that the multiple receptive fields of a multisensory neuron encompassed the cross-modal exposure site. Simple exposure to the individual components of a cross-modal stimulus was ineffective in this regard. Furthermore, once a neuron acquired multisensory integration capabilities at the exposure site, it generalized this experience to other locations, albeit with lowered effectiveness. These observations suggest that the prolonged period during which multisensory integration normally appears is due to developmental factors in neural circuitry in addition to those required for incorporating the statistics of cross-modal events; that neurons learn a multisensory principle based on the specifics of experience and can then apply it to other stimulus conditions; and that the incorporation of this multisensory information does not depend on an alert brain.

  11. Initial clinical experience with Dideco Kids D100 neonatal oxygenator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace Napoleone, Carlo; Oppido, Guido; Angeli, Emanuela; Shekho, Nazar; De Toni, Erika; Bruzzi, Franco; Gargiulo, Gaetano

    2008-07-01

    We describe our initial clinical experience with the new hollow fibre membrane oxygenator Dideco Kids D100, used in five patients with a mean age of 21 +/- 28 days. The priming volume is 31 ml with a membrane surface area of 0.22 m2. Data were compared with those deriving from five patients treated with Dideco D901 Lilliput 1 oxygenator. Among patients treated by the new Dideco Kids D100 oxygenator, priming volume was significantly reduced and an easier blood gas delivery was evident.

  12. Initial NIF Shock Timing Experiments: Comparison with Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Giraldez, E.; Castro, C.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    Initial experiments are underway to demonstrate the techniques required to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) and DANTE. The results of these measurements will be used to set the precision pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  13. Scaffolding Students’ Initial Self-Access Language Centre Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Croker

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available As the number of self-access language centres (SALCs in Japanese universities continues to grow, so too does the challenge of successfully introducing them to first-year university students, whose initial experiences of self-access language learning may otherwise be confusing and even unsettling. One approach is to carefully scaffold students’ first SALC encounters by connecting them with their classroom learning experiences. This paper discusses one such approach developed at a private university in central Japan, which was based upon a two-stage ‘push-pull’ ‘materials-light, people-focused’ strategy. Teachers initially ‘pushed’ their students to visit the SALC by giving them speaking ‘homework’ to be done there. The SALC then also offered interesting interactive events designed to ‘pull’ learners to continue to come. These push-pull activities could be done with few or no materials, and emphasized interaction with people rather than materials. This two-stage, push-pull strategy served as a bridge between the language classroom and a SALC, helping learners make the first steps in their transition from being a ‘classroom English learner’ to becoming a ‘SALC English user’.

  14. Effect of residents' previous laparoscopic surgery experience on initial robotic suturing experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Gokhan Sami; Walsh, Teresa M; Borahay, Mostafa; Zeybek, Burak; Wen, Michael; Breitkopf, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of gynecology residents' previous laparoscopic experience on the learning curve of robotic suturing techniques and the value of initial structured teaching in dry lab prior to surgery. Methods. Thirteen gynecology residents with no previous robotic surgery experience were divided into Group 1, consisting of residents with 2 or fewer laparoscopic experiences, and Group 2, consisting of residents with 3 or more laparoscopic experiences. Group 1 had a dry-laboratory training in suturing prior to their initial experience in the operating room. Results. For all residents, it took on average 382 ± 159 seconds for laparoscopic suturing and 326 ± 196 seconds for robotic suturing (P = 0.12). Residents in Group 1 had a lower mean suture time than residents in Group 2 for laparoscopic suturing (P = 0.009). The residents in Group 2, however, had a lower mean suture time on the robot compared to Group 1 (P = 0.5). Conclusion. Residents with previous laparoscopic suturing experience may gain more from a robotic surgery experience than those with limited laparoscopic surgery experience. In addition, dry lab training is more efficient than hands-on training in the initial phase of teaching for both laparoscopic and robotic suturing skills.

  15. Action initiation in the human dorsal anterior cingulate cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayan Srinivasan

    Full Text Available The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC has previously been implicated in processes that influence action initiation. In humans however, there has been little direct evidence connecting dACC to the temporal onset of actions. We studied reactive behavior in patients undergoing therapeutic bilateral cingulotomy to determine the immediate effects of dACC ablation on action initiation. In a simple reaction task, three patients were instructed to respond to a specific visual cue with the movement of a joystick. Within minutes of dACC ablation, the frequency of false starts increased, where movements occurred prior to presentation of the visual cue. In a decision making task with three separate patients, the ablation effect on action initiation persisted even when action selection was intact. These findings suggest that human dACC influences action initiation, apart from its role in action selection.

  16. Themes in the human experience of nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollio, Howard R; Heaps, Christopher

    2004-02-01

    To identify themes in the human experience of nature, a three-part study was run. In the first part, 100 undergraduate students were asked to list three situations in which they are or were aware of nature and to describe one of these in detail. In the second part, 26 descriptions were selected from these responses, summarized to a 2- to 5-sentence format, and presented to a different group of 30 subjects who sorted them into groups on the basis of cross-item similarity. These groupings were then analyzed by hierarchical clustering and multidimensional scaling procedures to produce thematic meanings. In the third part, a qualitative analysis of themes was performed over the unabridged initial versions of the same set of descriptions. Results of both qualitative and quantitative procedures led to the identification of four themes--Power and Scale, Danger and Safety, Beauty, and Connection and Alienation --and to a smaller number of themes unique to each mode of analysis. All themes were related to the everyday meanings of nature and to the more abstract definitions of nature employed in scientific or aesthetic analyses of the human response to this domain.

  17. Human Vestibular Function - Skylab Experiment M131

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    This set of photographs details Skylab's Human Vestibular Function experiment (M131). This experiment was a set of medical studies designed to determine the effect of long-duration space missions on astronauts' coordination abilities. This experiment tested the astronauts susceptibility to motion sickness in the Skylab environment, acquired data fundamental to an understanding of the functions of human gravity reception under prolonged absence of gravity, and tested for changes in the sensitivity of the semicircular canals. Data from this experiment was collected before, during, and after flight. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  18. Human Cancer Models Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Human Cancer Models Initiative (HCMI) is an international consortium that is generating novel human tumor-derived culture models, which are annotated with genomic and clinical data. In an effort to advance cancer research and more fully understand how in vitro findings are related to clinical biology, HCMI-developed models and related data will be available as a community resource for cancer research.

  19. PET/MR imaging of atherosclerosis: initial experience and outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G; Beer, Ambros J

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid scanners such as PET/CT have in the past emerged as a valuable modality in clinical routine as well as an important research tool. Recently, the newly developed fully integrated PET/MR scanners were introduced to the market, raising high expectations especially due to the excellent soft tissue contrast and functional imaging capabilities of MRI. In this issue of the American Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, initial experiences using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for carotid artery imaging in a group of patients with increased risk for atherosclerosis are described. This represents a proof-of-principle study, which could stimulate future applications of this powerful modality in atherosclerotic plaque imaging.

  20. Debris-flow initiation experiments using diverse hydrologic triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Mark E.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Iverson, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Controlled debris-flow initiation experiments focused on three hydrologic conditions that can trigger slope failure: localized ground-water inflow; prolonged moderate-intensity rainfall; and high-intensity rainfall. Detailed monitoring of slope hydrology and deformation provided exceptionally complete data on conditions preceding and accompanying slope failure and debris-flow mobilization. Ground-water inflow and high-intensity sprinkling led to abrupt, complete failure whereas moderate-intensity sprinkling led to retrogressive, block-by-block failure. Failure during ground-water inflow and during moderate-intensity sprinkling occurred with a rising water table and positive pore pressures. Failure during high-intensity sprinkling occurred without widespread positive pore pressures. In all three cases, pore pressures in most locations increased dramatically (within 2-3 seconds) during failure. In some places, pressures in unsaturated materials rapidly 'flashed' from zero to elevated positive values. Transiently elevated pore pressures and partially liquefied soil enhanced debris-flow mobilization.

  1. Initiation of a thrust fault revealed by analog experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotare, Tatsuya; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Adam, Juergen; Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2016-08-01

    To reveal in detail the process of initiation of a thrust fault, we conducted analog experiments with dry quartz sand using a high-resolution digital image correlation technique to identify minor shear-strain patterns for every 27 μm of shortening (with an absolute displacement accuracy of 0.5 μm). The experimental results identified a number of "weak shear bands" and minor uplift prior to the initiation of a thrust in cross-section view. The observations suggest that the process is closely linked to the activity of an adjacent existing thrust, and can be divided into three stages. Stage 1 is characterized by a series of abrupt and short-lived weak shear bands at the location where the thrust will subsequently be generated. The area that will eventually be the hanging wall starts to uplift before the fault forms. The shear strain along the existing thrust decreases linearly during this stage. Stage 2 is defined by the generation of the new thrust and active displacements along it, identified by the shear strain along the thrust. The location of the new thrust may be constrained by its back-thrust, generally produced at the foot of the surface slope. The activity of the existing thrust falls to zero once the new thrust is generated, although these two events are not synchronous. Stage 3 of the thrust is characterized by a constant displacement that corresponds to the shortening applied to the model. Similar minor shear bands have been reported in the toe area of the Nankai accretionary prism, SW Japan. By comparing several transects across this subduction margin, we can classify the lateral variations in the structural geometry into the same stages of deformation identified in our experiments. Our findings may also be applied to the evaluation of fracture distributions in thrust belts during unconventional hydrocarbon exploration and production.

  2. Symetis Acurate Neo transfemoral aortic bioprosthesis - initial Polish experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembala, Michał; Hawranek, Michał; Wacławski, Jacek; Niklewski, Tomasz; Nadziakiewicz, Paweł; Koba, Rafał; Przybylski, Roman; Walas, Ryszard; Głowacki, Jan; Jazwiec, Tomasz; Garbacz, Marcin; Gąsior, Mariusz; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has proven to be a valuable alternative to conventional surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk and surgically inoperable patients who suffer from severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. With the second generation of TAVI devices improvements in both handling and performance are highly demanded. This brief clinical communication reports the first Polish experience with the second generation of transfemoral TAVI device--Symetis Acurate Neo. From November 19th 2014 until February 18th 2015 nine (n = 9) patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis have been operated on using the Symetis Acurate Neo. Patients were subject to seven-day evaluation and 30-day phone follow-up. The procedure was safely and successfully performed in all patients. A SMALL (S) valve (21-23 mm equivalent) was used in two patients, MEDIUM valve (M; 23-25 mm equivalent) in five patients, and a LARGE valve (L; 25-26 mm equivalent) in two patients. In three cases post-release balloon dilatation was required. There were no intraoperative complications and no major adverse events (as per VARC classification) during initial hospitalisation, including conduction or rhythm disturbances. In all cases, the mean gradient on the prosthetic valves was 7.8 mm Hg (10.2 mm Hg on the "S" valves). Rapid improvement in patients' functional class was noted. Perivalvular leak was evaluated as "mild" in three cases, "trace" in one, and "not existing" in five. This initial experience with the Symetis Acurate Neo demonstrates its good safety profile and excellent haemodynamics. Low radial stress of the valve results in minimal incidence of atrioventricular rhythm disturbances, and a sealing crown for nearly non-existent paravalvular leak.

  3. Initial results from the DSPlanar experiments on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, E. S.; Merritt, E. C.; Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W.; Schmidt, D. W.; Cardenas, T.; Wilson, D. C.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    Recently, LANL has begun a project aimed ultimately at fielding a neutron-producing double-shell capsule at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Initial experiments have begun at both the NIF and OMEGA laser facilities over the last year. At OMEGA, halfraum-driven planar targets will be used to study physics issues important to double shell implosions, but outside of a convergent geometry. In particular, side-on radiography through a tube has advantages over imaging through the hohlraum and double-shell capsule at NIF. We plan to study a number physics issues with this platform, including both 1-d and higher dimensional effects. In 1-d, momentum transfer from the ablator to the inner shell, and the effect of pre-heat on the inner shell can be studied. Higher dimensional effects, in the form of hydrodynamic instabilities, can also be studied. Pre-heat expansion of the inner shell can lead to an unstable interface, which can be mitigated by a tamper layer. Manufacturing tolerances can be used to mitigate against feature-driven instability growth, such as from a glue joint or fill tube. Initial results on the amount pre-heat from various ablator materials will be given, along with a discussion of future plans. Supported under the US DOE by the LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-16-25044.

  4. Initially curved microplates under electrostatic actuation: theory and experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Saghir, S.

    2016-07-01

    Microplates are the building blocks of many micro-electro-mechanical systems. It is common for them to experience initial curvature imperfection due to residual stresses caused by the micro fabrication process. Such plates are essentially different from perfectly flat ones and cannot be modeled using flat plate models. In this paper, we adopt a dynamic analog of the von Karman governing equations of imperfect plates. These equations are then used to develop a reduced order model based on the Galerkin procedure, to simulate the static and dynamic behavior of the microplate under electrostatic actuation. To validate the simulation results, an initially curved imperfect microplate made of silicon nitride is fabricated and tested. The static behaviour of the microplate is investigated when applying a DC voltage Vdc. Then, the dynamic behaviour of the microplate is examined under the application of a harmonic AC voltage, Vac, superimposed to Vdc. The simulation results show good agreement with the experimentally measured responses. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. Shock initiation experiments on ratchet grown PBX 9502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Darla G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olinger, Barton W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deluca, Racci [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierce, Timothy H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Nathaniel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This study compares the shock initiation behavior of PBX 9502 pressed to less than nominal density (nominal density is 1.890 {+-} 0.005 g/cm{sup 3}) with PBX 9502 pressed to nominal density and then ''ratchet grown'' to low density. PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic bonded explosive consisting of 95 weight % dry-aminated tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) and 5 weight % Kel-F 800 plastic binder. ''Ratchet growth'' - an irreversible increase in specific volume - occurs when an explosive based on TATB is temperature cycled. The design of our study is as follows: PBX 9502, all from the same lot, received the following four treatments. Samples in the first group were pressed to less than nominal density. These were not ratchet grown and used as a baseline. Samples in the second group were pressed to nominal density and then ratchet grown by temperature cycling 30 times between -54 C and +80 C. Samples in the final group were pressed to nominal density and cut into 100 mm by 25.4 mm diameter cylinders. During thermal cycling the cylinders were axially constrained by a 100 psi load. Samples for shock initiation experiments were cut perpendicular (disks) and parallel (slabs) to the axial load. The four sample groups can be summarized with the terms pressed low, ratchet grown/no load, axial load/disks, and axial load/slabs. All samples were shock initiated with nearly identical inputs in plate impact experiments carried out on a gas gun. Wave profiles were measured after propagation through 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm of explosive. Side by side comparison of wave profiles from different samples is used as a measure of relative sensitivity. All reduced density samples were more shock sensitive than nominal density PBX 9502. Differences in shock sensitivity between ratchet grown and pressed to low density PBX 9502 were small, but the low density pressings are slightly more sensitive than the ratchet grown samples.

  6. Initial Experience Using the Gore Embolic Filter in Carotid Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Marius; Franke, Jennifer; Bertog, Stefan C; Gafoor, Sameer; Grunwald, Iris; Sievert, Horst

    2016-08-01

    This is the first clinical report on experience in the use of the Gore embolic filter in carotid interventions. It was designed as a guidewire and embolic protection system in carotid, peripheral, and coronary interventions. The ability to capture debris is driven by the frame of the filter, which is designed to improve vessel wall apposition and allows a short landing zone. We report the results of the first 20 consecutive patients undergoing carotid artery stenting using the Gore embolic filter in our institution. We analyzed technical success as well as the occurrence of transient ischemic attack (TIA), stroke, or death periprocedurally and through 30 days of follow-up. Mean patient age was 72 years and 12 patients (60%) were male. Seven patients were symptomatic and 4 patients suffered recurrent neurological events. Technical success was achieved in all procedures. In 1 patient, the retrieval catheter was caught between the proximal struts of the stent and required further retrieval maneuvers. Within 30 days of follow-up, 1 patient had a TIA. No stroke, death, or myocardial infarction occurred. This initial experience suggests that the Gore embolic filter device can be used safely for distal embolic protection during carotid stenting procedures with high technical success.

  7. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative.

  8. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative. 34 refs.

  9. A transcript finishing initiative for closing gaps in the human transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogayar, Mari Cleide; Camargo, Anamaria A; Bettoni, Fabiana

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of a transcript finishing initiative, undertaken for the purpose of identifying and characterizing novel human transcripts, in which RT-PCR was used to bridge gaps between paired EST clusters, mapped against the genomic sequence. Each pair of EST clusters selected for experi...

  10. [Initial experience in robot-assisted colorectal surgery in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Sáenz, Eduardo; Ramírez-Ramírez, Moisés Marino; Zubieta-O'Farrill, Gregorio; García-Hernández, Luis

    Colorectal surgery has advanced notably since the introduction of the mechanical suture and the minimally invasive approach. Robotic surgery began in order to satisfy the needs of the patient-doctor relationship, and migrated to the area of colorectal surgery. An initial report is presented on the experience of managing colorectal disease using robot-assisted surgery, as well as an analysis of the current role of this platform. A retrospective study was conducted in order to review five patients with colorectal disease operated using a robot-assisted technique over one year in the initial phase of the learning curve. Gender, age, diagnosis and surgical indication, surgery performed, surgical time, conversion, bleeding, post-operative complications, and hospital stay, were analysed and described. A literature review was performed on the role of robotic assisted surgery in colorectal disease and cancer. The study included 5 patients, 3 men and 2 women, with a mean age of 62.2 years. Two of them were low anterior resections with colorectal primary anastomoses, one of them extended with a loop protection ileostomy, a Frykman-Goldberg procedure, and two left hemicolectomies with primary anastomoses. The mean operating time was 6hours and robot-assisted 4hours 20minutes. There were no conversions and the mean hospital stay was 5 days. This technology is currently being used worldwide in different surgical centres because of its advantages that have been clinically demonstrated by various studies. We report the first colorectal surgical cases in Mexico, with promising results. There is enough evidence to support and recommend the use of this technology as a viable and safe option. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Left atrial appendage occlusion: initial experience with the Amplatzer™ Amulet™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixa, Xavier; Abualsaud, Ali; Chan, Jason; Nosair, Mohamed; Tzikas, Apostolos; Garceau, Patrick; Basmadjian, Arsène; Ibrahim, Réda

    2014-07-01

    The Amplatzer™ Amulet™ (Amulet) is the evolution of the Amplatzer™ Cardiac Plug, a dedicated device for percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion. The new device has been designed to facilitate the implantation process, improve the sealing performance and further reduce the risk of complications. The objective of the study was to describe the initial experience with the Amplatzer Amulet for percutaneous LAA occlusion. This was a prospective single-center study of patients undergoing percutaneous LAA occlusion. The indication for LAA closure was a formal contraindication for oral anticoagulation or previous history of stroke due to INR lability. All procedures were done under general anesthesia and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) guidance. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed 24h after the procedure in order to rule out procedural complications before discharge. Further follow-up was done with a clinical visit and TEE at 1-3 months. Between July-2012 and June-2013, 25 patients with a mean CHA2DS2-VASC of 4.3 ± 1.7 underwent LAA occlusion with the Amplatzer Amulet. The device was successfully implanted in 24 patients (96%) without any procedural stroke, pericardial effusion or device embolization. None of the patients presented any clinical event at follow-up. Follow-up TEE showed complete LAA sealing in all patients with no residual leaks >3mm and no device embolization. One patient (4.1%) presented a device thrombosis at follow-up without clinical expression. In this initial series of patients, the Amulet showed a remarkable acute and short-term performance in terms of feasibility and safety as depicted by the high successful implantation rate and the low incidence of complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer: initial experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrospi, Francisco; Celis, Juan; Ruíz, Eloy; Payet, Eduardo; Chávez, Iván; Young, Frank

    2008-01-01

    To report the initial experience with the laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) with D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. Between May 2006 and May 2007, 29 consecutive GC patients with gastric cancer underwent LADG with D2 lymphadenectomy. The operation consisted in a laparoscopic time to perform lymphadenectomy and mobilization of the distal stomach, followed by a minilaparotomy for exteriorization of the specimen and construction of a hand sewn anastomosis. Twenty-nine patients underwent LADG with D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. Mean age was 58.2 years. Mean operative time was 287.4 min. Mean number of lymph nodes resected was 42.6. Twelve patients were early gastric cancer, and seventeen were advanced gastric cancer. Mean proximal and distal resection margin were 5.8 cm and 3.5 cm, respectively. Resection margins were negative in all cases. Mean number of lymph nodes resected was 42.6. Thirty-day morbidity rate was 10.3 %. There were no postoperative deaths.CONCLUSION. The short-term results of our LADG with D2 lymphadenectomy for the treatment of gastric cancer shows that a radical surgery, in terms of resection margins and lymphadenectomy, can be done with low morbidity.

  13. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation of prostate cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi, Afshin; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Abdelli, Omar; Buy, Xavier [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Interventional Radiology, Strasbourg (France); Mathelin, Michel de [University of Strasbourg, Lsiit, Strasbourg (France); Jacqmin, Didier; Lang, Herve [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Urology, Strasbourg (France)

    2012-08-15

    We report our initial experience and the technical feasibility of transperineal prostate cryoablation under MR guidance. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation was performed in 11 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma contraindicated for surgery (mean age: 72 years, mean Gleason score: 6.45, mean prostate-specific antigen (PSA): 6.21 ng/ml, T1-2c/N0/M0, mean: prostate volume 36.44 ml). Free-hand probe positioning was performed under real-time MR imaging. Four to seven cryoprobes were inserted into the prostate, depending on gland volume. The ice ball was monitored using real-time and high-resolution BLADE multi-planar imaging. Patients were followed at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the procedure with serum PSA level and post-ablation MRI. Prostate cryoablation was technically feasible in 10/11 patients. The ice ball was clearly and sharply visualised in all cases as a signal-void area. Mean ice-ball volume was 53.3 ml. Mean follow-up was 15 months (range: 1-25). Mean PSA nadir was 0.33 ng/ml (range: 0.02-0.94 ng/ml). Mean hospitalisation was 5 days (range: 3-13). Complications included a urethro-rectal fistula, urinary infection, transient dysuria and scrotal pain. MR-guided prostate cryoablation is feasible and promising, with excellent monitoring of the ice ball. Future perspectives could include the use of MR guidance for focal prostate cancer cryotherapy. (orig.)

  14. [The transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus. The initial experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Antona, C A; Rijlaarsdam, M; Gaspar, J; Gil Moreno, M; Buendía Hernández, A; Martínez Ríos, M A; Attie, F

    1993-01-01

    Percutaneous closure of the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) has been recently reported to be an effective alternative in the treatment of patients with ductal shunting. We report the initial experience and results during follow-up of percutaneous ductal occlusion with the Rashkind occluder (USCI) in six patients with isolated PDA. Ages ranged from 3 to 23 years. Diagnosis was corroborated with two dimensional and Doppler echocardiography in all patients. During cardiac catheterization systolic pulmonary artery pressure oscillated between 22 and 64 mmHg and Qp/Qs ratio between 1.3 and 4.1. In two patients prosthesis of 12 mm were used and in the remaining prosthesis of 17 mm. Only one patient demonstrated total occlusion during immediate control aortography, the other patients presented central residual shunting over the occluder. In the three patients occlusion with balloon-catheter was added to the procedure, resulting in total occlusion in two and significant reduction of the shunt magnitude in one. Two technical problems were resolved satisfactorily. None of the cases presented device embolization. Mean follow-up was 23.8 months with control echocardiograms at 24 hours, 1, 4, 12 and 24 months. In all patients immediate reduction of the left atrial dimension was demonstrated. Three patients presented residual shunts in the first 24 hours. In two of them total occlusion had occurred after one month and the other patient persisted with a small residual shunt until one year after the procedure. In conclusion, in this small study group good results were obtained with percutaneous ductal closure.

  15. Our initial experience with percutaneous nephrolithotomy in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Hanifi Okur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present our initial experience on percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL in children between March 2012 and November 2013. Methods: 13 renal units of 12 patients underwent PCNL. Patients were evaluated in terms of age, preoperatively in terms of urine, blood count, urine culture, serum biochemical, and routine coagulation tests and radiological examinations, stone location, stone burden (according to plain radiograph, preoperative use of nephrostomy and average fluoroscopic manipulation time. To facilitate access, prior mechanical dilatation was performed nephrostomy access tract. After the PCNL procedure, we placed nephrostomy in all patients postoperatively. They were evaluated with regard to residual stone, complications (according to the Clavien classification and outcomes. Results: Average age was 11 years (6-15. There was no abnormality in Laboratory Screening. Location of 11 stones was renal pelvis and 2 stones was pelvis + calyx. The average stone size was 260 mm². Preoperative acces were provided in 3 patients, others were intraoperatively. Average fluoroscopic manipulation time was 4,8 minutes (2-11. At the first postoperative day, 11 (85 % patients achieved a completely stone-free state. Complications were seen in 3 patients; failure of renal access in one patient (Grade 3b, urine leakage was observed after surgery in one (Grade 3a, postoperative blood transfusion required in one patient (Grade 2. The hospital stay duration was 5,5 days (5-7 days. Conclusions: Pediatric PCNL is a minimal invasive procedure which provides high rate of stone free and good cosmetics. İf there is adequate facilities and equipment with experienced persons, this procedure can easily be used in pediatric surgery clinics.

  16. The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI): Science Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Niu, A; Haubold, H J; Doi, T

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI) aims at promoting international cooperation in human spaceflight and space exploration-related activities; creating awareness among countries on the benefits of utilizing human space technology and its applications; and building capacity in microgravity education and research. HSTI has been conducting various scientific activities to promote microgravity education and research. The primary science activity is called 'Zero-gravity Instrument Distribution Project', in which one-axis clinostats will be distributed worldwide. The distribution project will provide unique opportunities for students and researchers to observe the growth of indigenous plants in their countries in a simulated microgravity condition and is expected to create a huge dataset of plant species with their responses to gravity.

  17. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine initiation in minority Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, P; Budhwani, H

    2017-03-01

    Transmission of the human papillomavirus (HPV) is a significant public health concern. HPV is preventable through a series of vaccinations; however, knowledge gaps exist as to which groups are least likely to initiate vaccination. Considering this gap, the aim of this study is to examine HPV vaccine initiation rates in racial minorities, comparing foreign-born individuals to their American-born peers. Population-based data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), a repeated large-scale household interview survey of a statistically representative sample of the United States civilian non-institutionalized population, were applied. Data were derived from two survey modules: the family and summary adult modules. Sampling weights were employed to logistic regression modelling the outcome of HPV vaccine initiation. Foreign-born persons, African Americans, males, those lacking health insurance coverage and those without a medical home (usual place to receive care) held statistically lower rates of HPV vaccine initiation. Being college educated was associated with higher odds of HPV vaccine initiation. Our findings support the persistence of health disparities in racial minorities and foreign-born persons residing in the United States. Addressing these gaps will likely require both individual-level (e.g. targeted health education) and system-level (e.g. HPV vaccine promoting policies) interventions. Since health insurance coverage and having a medical home were significant associates of HPV vaccine initiation, attempts to coverage may improve HPV vaccine initiation rates. Additionally, policies which require HPV vaccination for school entry could boost coverage across all population groups, including boys, foreign-born persons and racial minorities. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 16 CFR 1500.4 - Human experience with hazardous substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human experience with hazardous substances... § 1500.4 Human experience with hazardous substances. (a) Reliable data on human experience with any..., the human experience takes precedence. (b) Experience may show that an article is more or less toxic...

  19. Informal Science: Family Education, Experiences, and Initial Interest in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.; Scott, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research and public policy have indicated the need for increasing the physical science workforce through development of interest and engagement with informal and formal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics experiences. This study examines the association of family education and physical scientists' informal experiences in…

  20. Professional Experience as a Wicked Problem in Initial Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southgate, Erica; Reynolds, Ruth; Howley, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Professional experience in teacher education is explored through the conceptual lens of the wicked problem. Wicked problems are socially constructed and complex. This paper outlines what is at stake in the framing of the problem of professional experience and how constructions of the problem make it difficult to find enduring solutions. The…

  1. Informal Science: Family Education, Experiences, and Initial Interest in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.; Scott, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research and public policy have indicated the need for increasing the physical science workforce through development of interest and engagement with informal and formal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics experiences. This study examines the association of family education and physical scientists' informal experiences in…

  2. Initial Experiences with Retrieving Similar Objects in Simulation Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, S-C S; Kamath, C

    2003-02-21

    Comparing the output of a physics simulation with an experiment, referred to as 'code validation,' is often done by visually comparing the two outputs. In order to determine which simulation is a closer match to the experiment, more quantitative measures are needed. In this paper, we describe our early experiences with this problem by considering the slightly simpler problem of finding objects in a image that are similar to a given query object. Focusing on a dataset from a fluid mixing problem, we report on our experiments with different features that are used to represent the objects of interest in the data. These early results indicate that the features must be chosen carefully to correctly represent the query object and the goal of the similarity search.

  3. Context-specific adaptation of pursuit initiation in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, M.; Abe, H.; Hasegawa, S.; Usui, T.; Hasebe, H.; Miki, A.; Zee, D. S.; Shelhauser, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if multiple states for the initiation of pursuit, as assessed by acceleration in the "open-loop" period, can be learned and gated by context. METHODS: Four normal subjects were studied. A modified step-ramp paradigm for horizontal pursuit was used to induce adaptation. In an increasing paradigm, target velocity doubled 230 msec after onset; in a decreasing paradigm, it was halved. In the first experiment, vertical eye position (+/-5 degrees ) was used as the context cue, and the training paradigm (increasing or decreasing) changed with vertical eye position. In the second experiment, with vertical position constant, when the target was red, training was decreasing, and when green, increasing. The average eye acceleration in the first 100 msec of tracking was the index of open-loop pursuit performance. RESULTS: With vertical position as the cue, pursuit adaptation differed between up and down gaze. In some cases, the direction of adaptation was in exact accord with the training stimuli. In others, acceleration increased or decreased for both up and down gaze but always in correct relative proportion to the training stimuli. In contrast, multiple adaptive states were not induced with color as the cue. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple values for the relationship between the average eye acceleration during the initiation of pursuit and target velocity could be learned and gated by context. Vertical position was an effective contextual cue but not target color, implying that useful contextual cues must be similar to those occurring naturally, for example, orbital position with eye muscle weakness.

  4. 16 CFR 1702.8 - Human experience data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human experience data. 1702.8 Section 1702.8... REQUIREMENTS § 1702.8 Human experience data. Human experience data constitutes the primary criterion used by... literature, and (d) For drugs, where the human experience data submitted is based on data required by FDA to...

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging of periventricular leukomalacia – Initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M. Abdelsalam

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: DTI proved to be a promising noninvasive method for assessing the severity of white matter tract injury in patients with PVL. This is owing to the capability of fiber-tracking techniques to provide more information for understanding the pathophysiologic features of sensorimotor and cognitive disability associated with PVL. This will allow for the early intervention and initiation of rehabilitation programs aiming for minimizing the associated neurological deficit.

  6. The Planeterrella experiment: from individual initiative to networking

    CERN Document Server

    Lilensten, Jean; Grimald, Sandrine; Brekke, Asgeir; Fluckiger, Erwin; Vanlommel, Petra; Wedlund, Cyril Simon; Barthélémy, Mathieu; Garnier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Space weather is a relatively new discipline which is generally unknown to the wider public, despite its increasing importance to all of our daily lives. Outreach activities can help in promoting the concept of space weather. In particular the visual beauty and excitement of the aurora make these lights a wonderful inspirational hook. A century ago Norwegian experimental physicist Kristian Birkeland, one of the founding fathers of modern space science, demonstrated with his Terrella experiment the formation of the aurora. Recently a modernised version of the Terrella has been designed. This Planeterrella experiment is very flexible, allowing the visualization of many phenomena occurring in our space environment. Although the Planeterrella was originally designed to be small to be demonstrated locally by a scientist, the Planeterrella has proved to be a very successful public outreach experiment. We believe that its success is due to two main factors (i) the Planeterrella is not patented and the plans are give...

  7. 英国高校人力资源管理经验初探%The Initial Exploration on the Experience of Human Resources Management in the Colleges and Universities of the UK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁庆林; 林新奇

    2012-01-01

    自20世纪70年代以来,英国高校在人力资源管理理念更新、组织结构变迁、职能领域扩张、战略地位提升、专业化和信息化发展等方面,取得了令人瞩目的成绩。同时,在工作分析与评价、招聘管理、员工培训与发展、绩效与薪酬管理等实践领域,英国高校也总结了许多行之有效的做法。%Since the 1970s,the British universities and colleges have made great achievements on such aspects as concept updating of human resources management, changing in organizational structure, expansion of functional areas, enhancement of strategic position, and development of specialization and informationization. At the same time, the universities and colleges in the UK have also explored many effective methods in the practical field of human resource management on such issues as job analysis and evaluation, recruitment management, staff training and development, performance and compensation management and so on.

  8. Structure of initial crystals formed during human amelogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisinier, F. J. G.; Voegel, J. C.; Yacaman, J.; Frank, R. M.

    1992-02-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis revealed only the existence of carbonated hydroxyapatite (c.HA) during amelogenesis, whereas conventional transmission electron microscopy investigations showed that developing enamel crystals have a ribbon-like habit. The described compositional changes could be an indication for the presence of minerals different from c.HA. However, the absence of identification of such a mineral shows the need of studies by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) of initial formed human enamel crystals. We demonstrate the existence of two crystal families involved in the early stages of biomineralization: (a) nanometer-size particles which appeared as a precursor phase; (b) ribbon-like crystals, with a structure closely related to c.HA, which by a progressive thickening process tend to attain the mature enamel crystal habit.

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation for Iatrogenic Thyroid Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ye Kyeong; Jung, So Lyung; Byun, Ho Kyun; Baek, Jung Hwan; Sung, Jin Yong; Sim, Jung Suk

    2016-10-01

    Eight iatrogenic thyroid pseudoaneurysms (ITPAs) after thyroid biopsy are reported. The mean ITPA diameter was 7.2 mm (range 4 to 12 mm). Ultrasound (US)-guided compression was initially performed at the neck of the ITPA in all cases. Among them, 4 ITPAs persisted (50%) in which radiofrequency (RF) ablation was performed. Mean RF ablation time and power were 13.5 seconds (range 5 to 24 seconds) and 20 W (range 10 to 50 W), respectively. All 4 cases were treated with RF ablation without any complications.

  10. Ozone initiated reactions and human comfort in indoor environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamas, Gyöngyi

    2006-01-01

    their precursors. The present thesis investigates the effects of ozone-initiated reactions with limonene and with various interior surfaces, including those associated with people, on short-term sensory responses. The evaluations were conducted using a perceived air quality (PAQ) method introduced by Fanger (1988...... that are typical for ozone-limonene chemistry have been concomitantly identified with real time measurement using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), at concentrations high enough to be responsible for the sensory effects reported. The stabilized reaction products of ozone-limonene chemistry...... to be proportional to the magnitude of the sensory responses. However, the particles themselves did not appear to be the primary causative agent, but instead are co-varying surrogates for sensory offending gas-phase species. The experiments involving heterogeneous reactions of ozone with various indoor materials...

  11. Initial operation with sodium in the Madison Dynamo Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, R.; Spence, Ej; Forest, C. B.; O'Connell, R.; Nornberg, Md; Canary, Hw; Wright, A.; Robinson, K.

    1999-11-01

    A new liquid metal MHD experiment has been constructed at the University of Wisconsin to test several key predictions of dynamo theory: magnetic instabilities driven by sheared flow, the effects of turbulence on current generation, and the back-reaction of the self-generated magnetic field on the fluid motion which brings saturation. This presentation describes the engineering design of the experiment, which is a 0.5 m radius spherical vessel, filled with liquid sodium at 150 ^circC. The experiment is designed to achieve a magnetic Reynolds number in excess of 100, which requires approximately 80 Hp of mechanical drive, producing flow velocities in sodium of 15 m/s through impellers. Handling liquid sodium offers a number of technical challenges, but routine techniques have been developed over the past several decades for safely handling large quantities for the fast breeder reactor. The handling strategy is discussed, technical details concerning seals and pressurization are presented, and safety elements are highlighted.

  12. Initial experience with ocriplasmin in the treatment of vitreomacular traction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maurício Botto de Barros Garcia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to report the clinical and structural outcomes of intravitreal ocriplasmin in the treatment of vitreomacular interface disorders in two tertiary centers in Brazil. A retrospective study was performed by reviewing medical records and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings of seven patients who were treated with a single ocriplasmin injection. A total of 57.14% of patients achieved resolution of vitreomacular traction as evidenced by SD-OCT. Regarding our functional results, 87.71% maintained or improved visual acuity after follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting initial results of ocriplasmin therapy in Brazil.

  13. Coherent fluctuations in the initial TFTR D-T experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, E.; Chang, Z.Y.; Budny, R.V.

    1995-03-01

    The initial operation of TFTR with approximately equal power in the tritium and deuterium neutral beam injectors has resulted in the production of fusion power in excess of 9MW and central {beta}{sub {alpha}} > 0.25%. This {beta}{sub {alpha}} is within a factor of 2--3 of the {beta}{sub {alpha}} in projections of ITER performance. Effects of this {alpha} population on TAE modes, sawteeth and fishbone activity are being searched for. The D-T plasmas are also being studied for evidence of changes in MHD activity which might be attributed to the fast {alpha} population. This paper reports on the activity in the Alfven range of frequencies in the D-T plasmas and on detailed measurements of the MHD activity preceding major disruptions in D-D and D-T.

  14. Cardiac biplane strain imaging: initial in vivo experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopata, R G P; Nillesen, M M; Thijssen, J M; De Korte, C L [Clinical Physics Laboratory, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Verrijp, C N; Lammens, M M Y; Van der Laak, J A W M [Department of Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Singh, S K; Van Wetten, H B [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kapusta, L [Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: R.Lopata@cukz.umcn.nl

    2010-02-21

    In this study, first we propose a biplane strain imaging method using a commercial ultrasound system, yielding estimation of the strain in three orthogonal directions. Secondly, an animal model of a child's heart was introduced that is suitable to simulate congenital heart disease and was used to test the method in vivo. The proposed approach can serve as a framework to monitor the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. A 2D strain estimation technique using radio frequency (RF) ultrasound data was applied. Biplane image acquisition was performed at a relatively low frame rate (<100 Hz) using a commercial platform with an RF interface. For testing the method in vivo, biplane image sequences of the heart were recorded during the cardiac cycle in four dogs with an aortic stenosis. Initial results reveal the feasibility of measuring large radial, circumferential and longitudinal cumulative strain (up to 70%) at a frame rate of 100 Hz. Mean radial strain curves of a manually segmented region-of-interest in the infero-lateral wall show excellent correlation between the measured strain curves acquired in two perpendicular planes. Furthermore, the results show the feasibility and reproducibility of assessing radial, circumferential and longitudinal strains simultaneously. In this preliminary study, three beagles developed an elevated pressure gradient over the aortic valve ({delta}p: 100-200 mmHg) and myocardial hypertrophy. One dog did not develop any sign of hypertrophy ({delta}p = 20 mmHg). Initial strain (rate) results showed that the maximum strain (rate) decreased with increasing valvular stenosis (-50%), which is in accordance with previous studies. Histological findings corroborated these results and showed an increase in fibrotic tissue for the hearts with larger pressure gradients (100, 200 mmHg), as well as lower strain and strain rate values.

  15. Cardiac biplane strain imaging: initial in vivo experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopata, R. G. P.; Nillesen, M. M.; Verrijp, C. N.; Singh, S. K.; Lammens, M. M. Y.; van der Laak, J. A. W. M.; van Wetten, H. B.; Thijssen, J. M.; Kapusta, L.; de Korte, C. L.

    2010-02-01

    In this study, first we propose a biplane strain imaging method using a commercial ultrasound system, yielding estimation of the strain in three orthogonal directions. Secondly, an animal model of a child's heart was introduced that is suitable to simulate congenital heart disease and was used to test the method in vivo. The proposed approach can serve as a framework to monitor the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. A 2D strain estimation technique using radio frequency (RF) ultrasound data was applied. Biplane image acquisition was performed at a relatively low frame rate (cardiac cycle in four dogs with an aortic stenosis. Initial results reveal the feasibility of measuring large radial, circumferential and longitudinal cumulative strain (up to 70%) at a frame rate of 100 Hz. Mean radial strain curves of a manually segmented region-of-interest in the infero-lateral wall show excellent correlation between the measured strain curves acquired in two perpendicular planes. Furthermore, the results show the feasibility and reproducibility of assessing radial, circumferential and longitudinal strains simultaneously. In this preliminary study, three beagles developed an elevated pressure gradient over the aortic valve (Δp: 100-200 mmHg) and myocardial hypertrophy. One dog did not develop any sign of hypertrophy (Δp = 20 mmHg). Initial strain (rate) results showed that the maximum strain (rate) decreased with increasing valvular stenosis (-50%), which is in accordance with previous studies. Histological findings corroborated these results and showed an increase in fibrotic tissue for the hearts with larger pressure gradients (100, 200 mmHg), as well as lower strain and strain rate values.

  16. Management support to e-business initiatives: The Croatian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Spremić

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available After defining e-business and explaining why an evolutionary aspect of moving to e-business is required, the dimensions of e-business is defined with respect to differences between traditional business, partial, or pure e-business. Also, a model for moving to e-business is illustrated. The e-business evolving model is divided into six stages and represents an evolutionary aspect of migrating to e-business. Finally, the results of the research study on current practices in evolving e-business in the most successful Croatian companies are given. In this research, some aspects of business process innovation and e-business usage have been investigated (general e-business issues with levels of e-business usage, key objectives of participating in e-business, alignment of business strategy with e-business initiatives, initiation of e-business projects and e-business planning issues, especially e-business funding. The questionnaire was sent to 400 CEOs or CIOs in Croatian companies selected from the Register of the ‘400 Biggest’ Croatian companies which were ranked according to their 2001 annual revenue and which were most likely to represent the structure of the Croatian economy. Although they represent less than 1% of the total number of registered companies in Croatia, the sampled companies hold 73% of the equity capital of the whole Croatian economy, they contribute with 65% in the total Croatian economy’s export balance and they employ 37% of the total number of people employed in Croatia.

  17. The Planeterrella experiment: from individual initiative to networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garnier Pierre

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Space weather is a relatively new discipline, which is still largely unknown amongst the wider public despite its increasing importance in all of our daily lives. Outreach activities can promote awareness of space weather. In particular the visual beauty and excitement of the aurora make these lights a wonderful inspirational hook to enhance understanding of space weather in a general audience. A century ago, the Norwegian experimental physicist Kristian Birkeland, one of the founding fathers of modern space science, demonstrated with his Terrella experiment the formation of the aurora. Recently, a modernized version of the Terrella has been designed. This “Planeterrella” experiment allows the visualization of many phenomena that occur in our space environment. Although the Planeterrella was originally a local project, it has developed to become a very successful international public outreach experiment. We believe that its success is due to mainly two factors (i the Planeterrella is not patented and the plans are free to any public institute and (ii the project is widely advertised using national and European scientific networks such as COST ES 0803, as well as press releases, books and web sites. Today, seven Planeterrellas are in operation, four more are under construction in four different countries and several more are being planned. During the last five years, about 50 000 people in Europe have attended live Planeterrella demonstration on the formation of auroral light, the space environment and space weather. Many more have seen the Planeterrella being demonstrated on TV. The Planeterrella received the first international prize for outreach activities from the Europlanet Framework 7 program in 2010 and the French Ministry of Science outreach prize “Le goût des sciences” in November 2012. This paper describes the process that led to the construction of the first Planeterrella and discusses how the Planeterrella project developed

  18. The Planeterrella experiment: from individual initiative to networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilensten, J.; Provan, G.; Barthelemy, M.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Gronoff, G.; Vanlommel, P.; Brekke, A.; Garnier, P.; Grimald Rochel, S.

    2013-12-01

    Space weather is a relatively new discipline, which is still largely unknown amongst the wider public despite its increasing importance in all of our daily lives. Outreach activities can promote awareness of space weather. In particular the visual beauty and excitement of the aurora make these lights a wonderful inspirational hook to enhance understanding of space weather in a general audience. A century ago, the Norwegian experimental physicist Kristian Birkeland, one of the founding fathers of modern space science, demonstrated with his Terrella experiment the formation of the aurora. Recently, a modernized version of the Terrella has been designed in France. This ';';Planeterrella'' experiment allows the visualization of many phenomena that occur in our space environment. Although the Planeterrella was originally a local project, it has developed to become a very successful international public outreach experiment. We believe that its success is due to mainly two factors (i) the Planeterrella is not patented and the plans are free to any public institute and (ii) the project is widely advertised using national and scientific networks, as well as press releases, books and web sites. Today, nine Planeterrellas are in operation, six more are under construction in five different countries including in the US and several more are being planned. During the last five years, about 55 000 people in Europe have attended live Planeterrella demonstration on the formation of auroral light, the space environment and space weather. Many more have seen the Planeterrella being demonstrated on TV. It is now used for education, outreach, scientific, and artistic purposes. We will describes this process and discuss how the Planeterrella project developed to become an international public outreach phenomenon. We also examine some of the lessons learnt along the way such as patented or not, big or small, automatized or hand-operated, and the cost of the overall project. A star (close

  19. Operational experience during initial beam commissioning of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchsberger, K; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Bailey, R; Bruning, O; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Lamont, M; MacPherson, A; Meddahi, M; Papotti, G; Pojer, M; Ponce, L; Redaelli, S; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Wenninger, J

    2010-01-01

    After the incident on the 19th September 2008 and more than one year without beam the commissioning of the LHC started again on November 20, 2009. Progress was rapid and collisions under stable beam conditions were established at 1.2 TeV within 3 weeks. In 2010 after qualification of the new quench protection system the way to 3.5 TeV was open and collision were delivered at this energy after a month of additional commissioning. This paper describes the experiences and issues encountered during these first periods of commissioning with beam.

  20. Using mixed-initiative human-robot interaction to bound performance in a search task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis W. Nielsen; Douglas A. Few; Devin S. Athey

    2008-12-01

    Mobile robots are increasingly used in dangerous domains, because they can keep humans out of harm’s way. Despite their advantages in hazardous environments, their general acceptance in other less dangerous domains has not been apparent and, even in dangerous environments, robots are often viewed as a “last-possible choice.” In order to increase the utility and acceptance of robots in hazardous domains researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory have both developed and tested novel mixed-initiative solutions that support the human-robot interactions. In a recent “dirty-bomb” experiment, participants exhibited different search strategies making it difficult to determine any performance benefits. This paper presents a method for categorizing the search patterns and shows that the mixed-initiative solution decreased the time to complete the task and decreased the performance spread between participants independent of prior training and of individual strategies used to accomplish the task.

  1. Robotic-assisted partial Nephrectomy: initial experience in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo C. Lemos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To report the initial outcomes of robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy in a tertiary center in South America. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 11/2008 to 12/2009, a total of 16 transperitoneal robotic-assisted partial nephrectomies were performed in 15 patients to treat 18 kidney tumors. One patient with bilateral tumor had two procedures, while two patients with two synchronous unilateral tumors had a single operation to remove them. Eleven (73% patients were male and the right kidney was affected in 7 (46% patients. The median patient age and tumor size were 57 years old and 30 mm, respectively. Five (28% tumors were hilar and/or centrally located. RESULTS: The median operative time, warm ischemia time and estimated blood loss was 140 min, 27 min and 120 mL, respectively. Blood transfusion was required in one patient with bilateral tumor, and one additional pyelolithotomy was performed due to a 15mm stone located in the renal pelvis. The histopathology analysis showed 15 (83% malignant tumors, which 10 (67% were clear cell carcinoma. The median hospital stay was 72 hrs and no major complication was observed. CONCLUSION: Robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy is safe and represents a valuable option to perform minimally invasive nephron-sparing surgery.

  2. Initial experience with tadalafil in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsuki, Shinichi; Calderbank, Michelle; Ivy, David Dunbar

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the safety, tolerability, and effects of tadalafil on children with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) after transition from sildenafil or after tadalafil received as initial therapy. A total of 33 pediatric patients with PAH were retrospectively evaluated. Of the 33 patients, 29 were switched from sildenafil to tadalafil. The main reason for the change from sildenafil was once-daily dosing. The average dose of sildenafil was 3.4 ± 1.1 mg/kg/day, and that of tadalafil was 1.0 ± 0.4 mg/kg/day. For 14 of the 29 patients undergoing repeat catheterization, statistically significant improvements were observed after transition from sildenafil to tadalafil in terms of mean pulmonary arterial pressure (53.2 ± 18.3 vs. 47.4 ± 13.7 mmHg; p sildenafil to tadalafil including headache, nausea, myalgia, nasal congestion, flushing, and allergic reaction. Two patients discontinued tadalafil due to migraine or allergic reaction. One patient receiving sildenafil had no breakthrough syncope after transition to tadalafil. Tadalafil can be safely used for pediatric patients with PAH and may prevent disease progression.

  3. Initial Active MHD Spectroscopy Experiments on Alcator C-MOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittdiel, D. A.; Snipes, J. A.; Granetz, R. S.; Parker, R. R.; Wolfe, S. M.; Fasoli, A.

    2002-11-01

    The Active MHD Spectroscopy system is a new diagnostic on C-MOD that will be used to study low frequency MHD modes and TAE's present at high B_tor, n_e, and Te ˜= T_i. The present system consists of two antennas, power amplifiers, and an impedance matching network. Each antenna is 15 × 25 cm with five turns, an inductance of ˜10 μH, and is covered by boron nitride tiles. The two antennas are placed at the same toroidal location, symmetrically above and below the midplane. Each antenna is driven by a ˜1 kW power amplifier in the range of 1 kHz - 1 MHz with an expected antenna current ˜10 A, which will produce a vacuum field of ˜0.5 G at the q = 1.5 surface. This diagnostic is designed to excite high n ( ˜20) stable TAE's and initial results regarding their frequency, mode structure, and damping rate will be presented. Evolution of these modes could also provide information on the q profile to compare with MSE measurements, which will be important for planned lower hybrid current drive operation in 2003.

  4. Initial Diagnostics for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.L. Roquemore; B. McCormack; D. Johnson; H. Kugel; R. Kaita; and the NSTX Team

    1999-06-01

    The spherical torus (ST) approach to magnetic confinement has many attractive features as both a fusion reactor concept and a volume neutron source. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is under construction at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), and it is designed to achieve plasma parameters needed for a proof-of-principle test of the ST concept. Discharges with magnetic fields of 2.3 kG on axis and plasma currents of 1 MA will be heated with 6 MW of radio frequency (RF) power and 5 MW of neutral beams, and pulse lengths up to 5 seconds are planned. Central electron temperatures of about 4 keV are expected with RF heating, and theoretical studies show that high values of b and b{sub n} can be achieved.

  5. PET/MRI in head and neck cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzek, Ivan; Laniado, Michael [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Matthias [Dresden University Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Gudziol, Volker [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Dresden (Germany); Langner, Jens; Schramm, Georg; Hoff, Joerg van den [Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg [Dresden University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG ({sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for initial staging of head and neck cancer. The study group comprised 20 patients (16 men, 4 women) aged between 52 and 81 years (median 64 years) with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. The patients underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MRI examination on a whole-body hybrid system. FDG was administered intravenously prior to the conventional PET scan (267-395 MBq FDG, 348 MBq on average). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumour and of both cerebellar hemispheres were determined for both PET datasets. The numbers of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake were compared between the two PET datasets. No MRI-induced artefacts where observed in the PET images. The tumour was detected by PET/MRI in 17 of the 20 patients, by PET in 16 and by MRI in 14. The PET/MRI examination yielded significantly higher SUV{sub max} than the conventional PET scanner for both the tumour (p < 0.0001) and the cerebellum (p = 0.0009). The number of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake detected using the PET dataset from the PET/MRI system was significantly higher the number detected by the stand-alone PET system (64 vs. 39, p = 0.001). The current study demonstrated that PET/MRI of the whole head and neck region is feasible with a whole-body PET/MRI system without impairment of PET or MR image quality. (orig.)

  6. Application of robotics in general surgery: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ninh T; Hinojosa, Marcelo W; Finley, David; Stevens, Melinda; Paya, Mahbod

    2004-10-01

    Robotic surgery was recently approved for clinical use in general abdominal surgery. The aim of this study was to review our experience with the da Vinci surgical system during laparoscopic general surgical procedures. Eighteen patients underwent robotically assisted laparoscopic abdominal surgery between June 2002 and March 2003. Main outcome measures were operative time, room setup time, robotic arm-positioning and surgical time, blood loss, conversion to laparoscopy, length of stay, and morbidity. The types of robotically assisted laparoscopic procedures were excision of gastric leiomyoma (n = 1), Heller myotomy (n = 1), cholecystectomy (n = 2), gastric banding (n = 2), Nissen fundoplication (n = 4), and gastric bypass (n = 8). The mean room setup time was 63 +/- 14 minutes, and the mean robotic arm-positioning time was 16 +/- 7 minutes. Conversion to laparoscopy occurred in two (11%) of 18 cases because of equipment difficulty (n = 1) and technical difficulty (n = 1). Estimated blood loss was 91 +/- 71 mL. The mean operative time was 156 +/- 42 minutes, and the robotic operative time was 27% of the total operative time. The mean length of hospital stay was 2.2 +/- 1.5 days. There was one postoperative wound infection and one anastomotic stricture. Robotically assisted laparoscopic abdominal surgery is feasible and safe; however, the theoretical advantages of the da Vinci surgical system were not clinically apparent.

  7. The role of psychological support in cardiac surgery: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Sansone

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The scientific literature has pointed out several predictors of negative outcome after surgery such as pain and depression, negatively affecting the postoperative outcome in cardiac surgery. From January 2009 until June 2010, 15 patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were enrolled. The patients were assessed by psychological evaluation either in the hospital stay either in the rehabilitation period with the aim of identifying their emotional condition (sentiments about the onset of the disease, support received from family and friends even by means of preformed tests for anxiety and depression (tests of Stay and Back. Thus, in our preliminary experience, the psychological evaluation failed to detect the occurrence of postoperative complications. Conversely, the psychological evaluation is very effective in detecting a poor emotional state and the psychological support decreases the degree of anxiety and depression with positive effects on postoperative outcome. In conclusion, a standardize test for anxiety and depression should be used for patients at hospital admission to detect who may benefits by psychological support.

  8. Initial experience with a nuclear medicine viewing workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Robert M.; Burt, Robert W.

    1992-07-01

    Graphical User Interfaced (GUI) workstations are now available from commercial vendors. We recently installed a GUI workstation in our nuclear medicine reading room for exclusive use of staff and resident physicians. The system is built upon a Macintosh platform and has been available as a DELTAmanager from MedImage and more recently as an ICON V from Siemens Medical Systems. The workstation provides only display functions and connects to our existing nuclear medicine imaging system via ethernet. The system has some processing capabilities to create oblique, sagittal and coronal views from transverse tomographic views. Hard copy output is via a screen save device and a thermal color printer. The DELTAmanager replaced a MicroDELTA workstation which had both process and view functions. The mouse activated GUI has made remarkable changes to physicians'' use of the nuclear medicine viewing system. Training time to view and review studies has been reduced from hours to about 30-minutes. Generation of oblique views and display of brain and heart tomographic studies has been reduced from about 30-minutes of technician''s time to about 5-minutes of physician''s time. Overall operator functionality has been increased so that resident physicians with little prior computer experience can access all images on the image server and display pertinent patient images when consulting with other staff.

  9. Initial experience with a newly developed cementless hip endoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hach, V; Delfs, G

    2009-01-01

    The HELICA-Endoprosthesis is a newly developed cementless hip prosthesis for dogs. It was implanted in 39 dogs that had severe hip osteoarthritis and a history of hip pain, as well as in one dog that had chronic hip luxation. One dog had a bilateral arthroplasty. The body weight of the patients ranged between 22 and 54 kg and their ages between nine months and 10 years. Both the femoral stem and acetabular component of the prosthesis were screwed into position following bony preparation. Additional fixation was not necessary as the components remain fixed in position until osteointegration is complete. There are currently five sizes of prosthesis available, and the various components such as the stem, cup and head are readily interchangeable. Although it appeared that good osseous anchorage of the prostheses in the bone on the surgery table had been obtained, three patients experienced both stem and cup loosening (one week, three weeks and six months after surgery). In one animal, stem loosening was observed six weeks after surgery, and another dog experienced a cup loosening two weeks postoperatively. Most of the complications were due to technical errors that occurred during the learning phase. Surgical revisions were successful in three out of five animals. In two animals we had to perform a femoral head and neck excision. Two other animals experienced radiographic bone resorption underneath the segmented collar of the femoral prosthesis but did not show any significant clinical signs of lameness. Another dog that showed signs of ischial neuropraxy after surgery, recovered completely within six weeks after surgery. All of the dogs were capable of weight bearing on the operated leg one day after surgery. The main advantage of the HELICA-Endoprosthesis is the relatively easy surgical technique and short surgery time. The initial clinical results in these 40 cases have been very encouraging. The aim of this study was to assess the early clinical results in these 39

  10. Laparoscopic colorectal surgery: what to expect from an initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Ramos Teixeira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is less traumatic when compared to traditional surgery techniques, with well-established advantages. The objective of this study was to report the experience in laparoscopic surgical treatment of colorectal diseases. METHOD: Catalog all patients submitted to laparoscopic colorectal surgery performed by one surgeon and perform a descriptive analysis of key data from these records. RESULTS: The study analyzed data from 43 patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Most were females (n=30; 69.77% in relation to males (n=13; 30.23%, mean age of 57.21 years old. Among the indications for surgery, diverticular disease was the most frequent (n=20; 46.51%, followed by malignancy (n=13; 30.23%. Most patients underwent rectosigmoidectomy (n=28; 65.12%, followed by right hemicolectomy (n=6; 13.95%, with conversions in five cases (11.63%. The study observed a tendency towards increased number of surgeries, reduced average operative time as well as decreased conversions to laparotomy along the studied period. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is a safe procedure, and with the technical development of the team, the results have been increasingly good.A videolaparoscopia colorretal apresenta-se como uma tática operatória menos traumática com vantagens bem-estabelecidas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi apresentar a experiência no tratamento cirúrgico videolaparoscópico das afecções colorretais. MÉTODO: Catalogar todos os pacientes submetidos à cirurgia colorretal videolaparoscópica realizadas por um único cirurgião e realizar uma análise descritiva dos principais dados a partir dos prontuários destes. RESULTADOS: O estudo analisou dados de 43 pacientes que foram submetidos à cirurgia colorretal por videolaparoscopia. A maioria era do gênero feminino (n=30; 69,77% em relação ao masculino (n=13; 30,23% com média de idade de 57,21 anos. Dentre as indicações cirúrgicas, doença diverticular

  11. CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY WITH DUAL SOURCE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: INITIAL EXPERIENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu-hua Zhang; Wen-min Zhao; Wen-bin Mou; Li-ren Zhang; Wen-ling Zhu; Qi Miao; Qi Fang; Zheng-yu Jin; Shu-yang Zhang; Song-bai Lin; Dong-jing Li; Ling-yan Kong; Yi-ning Wang; Lan Song; Yun Wang

    2007-01-01

    To explore the scan technique and image quality of coronary angiography with dual source computed tomography (CT) without oral metoprolol preparation.Methods Plain and enhanced dual source CT coronary angiography without oral metoprolol preparation was prospectively performed in 600 patients. Calcium scoring with plain scan images as well as multi-planar reconstruction( MPR ), maximum intensity projection (MIP), and volume rendering technique (VRT) reconstruction with enhanced scan images were performed in all cases. The scan technique and post-reconstruction experience was summarized. The image quality was classified as 1 to 4 points, and coronary segments classified according to the American Heart Association standards were evaluated.Results The average calcium score of the 600 cases was 213.6 ± 298.7 (0-3 216. 5). The average heart rate of the enhanced scan was 82.1 ± 16.2 (47-139) bpm. The post-reconstruction methods with which coronary segments could be shown as best as possible consisted of single phase reconstruction method, two or more phases supplemented method, and electrocardiogram editing method. Altogether 8 457 coronary segments were evaluated, among which 97.2% were evaluated as point 1, 1.7% point 2, 0.5% point 3, and0.6% point 4. The coronary segments in 261 cases were completely normal, while 360 segments were diagnosed with < 50% stenosis and 625 segments with ≥50%stenosis.Conclusions Excellent coronary artery image can be obtained with dual source CT in patients with any heart rate without oral metoprolol preparation. Heart rate is not a major source of the artifact, coronary segments can be well shown with single or multiple-phase reconstruction method.

  12. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): initial experience in a clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaane, Per; Gullien, Randi; Eben, Ellen B.; Haakenaasen, Unni; Naess Jebsen, Ingvild; Krager, Mona [Dept of Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital Ullevaal, Univ. of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)], e-mail: PERSKA@ous-hf.no; Bjoerndal, Hilde [Dept of Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Ekseth, Ulrika [Curato Roentgen Institute, Oslo (Norway); Jahr, Gunnar [Dept. of Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-06-15

    false-positive findings. The side-by-side feature analysis showed higher conspicuity scores for tomosynthesis compared to conventional 2D for cancers presenting as spiculated masses and distortions. Conclusion: Tomosynthesis is a promising new technique. Our preliminary clinical experience shows that there is a potential for increasing the sensitivity using this new technique, especially for cancers manifesting as spiculated masses and distortions.

  13. The human experience with intravenous levodopa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan H Siddiqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compile a comprehensive summary of published human experience with levodopa given intravenously, with a focus on information required by regulatory agencies.Background: While safe intravenous (IV use of levodopa has been documented for over 50 years, regulatory supervision for pharmaceuticals given by a route other than that approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA has become increasingly cautious. If delivering a drug by an alternate route raises the risk of adverse events, an investigational new drug (IND application is required, including a comprehensive review of toxicity data.Methods: Over 200 articles referring to IV levodopa were examined for details of administration, pharmacokinetics, benefit and side effects.Results: We identified 142 original reports describing IVLD use in humans, beginning with psychiatric research in 1959-1960 before the development of peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors. Over 2750 subjects have received IV levodopa, and reported outcomes include parkinsonian signs, sleep variables, hormone levels, hemodynamics, CSF amino acid composition, regional cerebral blood flow, cognition, perception and complex behavior. Mean pharmacokinetic variables were summarized for 49 healthy subjects and 190 with Parkinson’s disease. Side effects were those expected from clinical experience with oral levodopa and dopamine agonists. No articles reported deaths or induction of psychosis.Conclusion: Over 2750 patients have received IV levodopa with a safety profile comparable to that seen with oral administration.

  14. The Human Experience with Intravenous Levodopa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Shan H; Abraham, Natalia K; Geiger, Christopher L; Karimi, Morvarid; Perlmutter, Joel S; Black, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    To compile a comprehensive summary of published human experience with levodopa given intravenously, with a focus on information required by regulatory agencies. While safe intravenous (IV) use of levodopa has been documented for over 50 years, regulatory supervision for pharmaceuticals given by a route other than that approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has become increasingly cautious. If delivering a drug by an alternate route raises the risk of adverse events, an investigational new drug (IND) application is required, including a comprehensive review of toxicity data. Over 200 articles referring to IV levodopa were examined for details of administration, pharmacokinetics, benefit, and side effects. We identified 142 original reports describing IVLD use in humans, beginning with psychiatric research in 1959-1960 before the development of peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors. At least 2760 subjects have received IV levodopa, and reported outcomes include parkinsonian signs, sleep variables, hormone levels, hemodynamics, CSF amino acid composition, regional cerebral blood flow, cognition, perception and complex behavior. Mean pharmacokinetic variables were summarized for 49 healthy subjects and 190 with Parkinson's disease. Side effects were those expected from clinical experience with oral levodopa and dopamine agonists. No articles reported deaths or induction of psychosis. At least 2760 patients have received IV levodopa with a safety profile comparable to that seen with oral administration.

  15. Musical experience sharpens human cochlear tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Nelms, Caitlin; Bhagat, Shaum P

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian cochlea functions as a filter bank that performs a spectral, Fourier-like decomposition on the acoustic signal. While tuning can be compromised (e.g., broadened with hearing impairment), whether or not human cochlear frequency resolution can be sharpened through experiential factors (e.g., training or learning) has not yet been established. Previous studies have demonstrated sharper psychophysical tuning curves in trained musicians compared to nonmusicians, implying superior peripheral tuning. However, these findings are based on perceptual masking paradigms, and reflect engagement of the entire auditory system rather than cochlear tuning, per se. Here, by directly mapping physiological tuning curves from stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs)-cochlear emitted sounds-we show that estimates of human cochlear tuning in a high-frequency cochlear region (4 kHz) is further sharpened (by a factor of 1.5×) in musicians and improves with the number of years of their auditory training. These findings were corroborated by measurements of psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) derived via simultaneous masking, which similarly showed sharper tuning in musicians. Comparisons between SFOAE and PTCs revealed closer correspondence between physiological and behavioral curves in musicians, indicating that tuning is also more consistent between different levels of auditory processing in trained ears. Our findings demonstrate an experience-dependent enhancement in the resolving power of the cochlear sensory epithelium and the spectral resolution of human hearing and provide a peripheral account for the auditory perceptual benefits observed in musicians. Both local and feedback (e.g., medial olivocochlear efferent) mechanisms are discussed as potential mechanisms for experience-dependent tuning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Systems biology of coagulation initiation: kinetics of thrombin generation in resting and activated human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manash S Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Blood function defines bleeding and clotting risks and dictates approaches for clinical intervention. Independent of adding exogenous tissue factor (TF, human blood treated in vitro with corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI, to block Factor XIIa will generate thrombin after an initiation time (T(i of 1 to 2 hours (depending on donor, while activation of platelets with the GPVI-activator convulxin reduces T(i to ∼20 minutes. Since current kinetic models fail to generate thrombin in the absence of added TF, we implemented a Platelet-Plasma ODE model accounting for: the Hockin-Mann protease reaction network, thrombin-dependent display of platelet phosphatidylserine, VIIa function on activated platelets, XIIa and XIa generation and function, competitive thrombin substrates (fluorogenic detector and fibrinogen, and thrombin consumption during fibrin polymerization. The kinetic model consisting of 76 ordinary differential equations (76 species, 57 reactions, 105 kinetic parameters predicted the clotting of resting and convulxin-activated human blood as well as predicted T(i of human blood under 50 different initial conditions that titrated increasing levels of TF, Xa, Va, XIa, IXa, and VIIa. Experiments with combined anti-XI and anti-XII antibodies prevented thrombin production, demonstrating that a leak of XIIa past saturating amounts of CTI (and not "blood-borne TF" alone was responsible for in vitro initiation without added TF. Clotting was not blocked by antibodies used individually against TF, VII/VIIa, P-selectin, GPIb, protein disulfide isomerase, cathepsin G, nor blocked by the ribosome inhibitor puromycin, the Clk1 kinase inhibitor Tg003, or inhibited VIIa (VIIai. This is the first model to predict the observed behavior of CTI-treated human blood, either resting or stimulated with platelet activators. CTI-treated human blood will clot in vitro due to the combined activity of XIIa and XIa, a process enhanced by platelet activators and which proceeds

  17. Integrated modeling of natural and human systems - problems and initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, H.; Giles, J.; Gunnink, J.; Hughes, A.; Moore, R. V.; Peach, D.

    2009-12-01

    Governments and their executive agencies across the world are facing increasing pressure to make decisions about the management of resources in light of population growth and environmental change. In the UK and the Netherlands, for example, groundwater is becoming a scarce resource for large parts of its most densely populated areas. At the same time river and groundwater flooding resulting from high rainfall events are increasing in scale and frequency and sea level rise is threatening the defences of coastal cities. There is also a need for affordable housing, improved transport infrastructure and waste disposal as well as sources of renewable energy and sustainable food production. These challenges can only be resolved if solutions are based on sound scientific evidence. Although we have knowledge and understanding of many individual processes in the natural sciences it is clear that a single science discipline is unable to answer the questions and their inter-relationships. Modern science increasingly employs computer models to simulate the natural, economic and human system. Management and planning requires scenario modelling, forecasts and “predictions”. Although the outputs are often impressive in terms of apparent accuracy and visualisation, they are inherently not suited to simulate the response to feedbacks from other models of the earth system, such as the impact of human actions. Geological Survey Organisations (GSO) are increasingly employing advances in Information Technology to visualise and improve their understanding of geological systems. Instead of 2 dimensional paper maps and reports many GSOs now produce 3 dimensional geological framework models and groundwater flow models as their standard output. Additionally the British Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of the Netherlands have developed standard routines to link geological data to groundwater models, but these models are only aimed at solving one specific part of the earth

  18. The visible human and digital anatomy learning initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Parvati; Senger, Steven

    2005-01-01

    A collaborative initiative is starting within the Internet2 Health Science community to explore the development of a framework for providing access to digital anatomical teaching resources over Internet2. This is a cross-cutting initiative with broad applicability and will require the involvement of a diverse collection of communities. It will seize an opportunity created by a convergence of needs and technical capabilities to identify the technologies and standards needed to support a sophisticated collection of tools for teaching anatomy.

  19. The Virtual Physiological Human - a European initiative for in silico human modelling -.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viceconti, Marco; Clapworthy, Gordon; Van Sint Jan, Serge

    2008-12-01

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) is an initiative, strongly supported by the European Commission (EC), that seeks to develop an integrated model of human physiology at multiple scales from the whole body through the organ, tissue, cell and molecular levels to the genomic level. VPH had its beginnings in 2005 with informal discussions amongst like-minded scientists which led to the STEP project, a Coordination Action funded by the EC that began in early 2006. The STEP project greatly accelerated the progress of the VPH and proved to be a catalyst for wide-ranging discussions within Europe and for outreach activities designed to develop a broad international approach to the huge scientific and technological challenges involved in this area. This paper provides an overview of the VPH and the developments it has engendered in the rapidly expanding worldwide activities associated with the physiome. It then uses one particular project, the Living Human Project, to illustrate the type of advances that are taking place to further the aims of the VPH and similar initiatives worldwide.

  20. The WIND-HAARP Experiment: Initial Results of High Power Radiowave Interactions with Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-10

    Results from the first science experiment with the new HF Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) facility in Alaska are reported. The initial...experiments involved transmission of high frequency waves from HAARP to the NASA/WIND satellite. The objective was to investigate the effects of space

  1. Naval Special Warfare Injury Prevention and Human Performance Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-30

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 JUL 10-30 JUN 12 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Naval Special Warfare Group 4 Injury Prevention and Human Performance...from suboptimal biomechanical, musculoskeletal, and physiological characteristics and is further compounded with poor or inadequate nutrition . The...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Naval Special Warfare Injury Prevention and Human Performance

  2. X chromosome inactivation is initiated in human preimplantation embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Ilse M; Laven, Joop S E; Stevens, Mary; Jonkers, Iris; Galjaard, Robert-Jan; Gribnau, Joost; van Doorninck, J Hikke

    2009-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is the mammalian mechanism that compensates for the difference in gene dosage between XX females and XY males. Genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms induce transcriptional silencing of one X chromosome in female cells. In mouse embryos, XCI is initiated at the

  3. Serial sections and human embryology: a new research initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, A

    1996-01-01

    The author provides an historical and current view of the work of the Human Developmental Anatomy Center of the National Museum of Health and Medicine of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC. A project to create and disseminate electronic images from the extensive holdings, as presented at a 1994 National Institutes of Health conference, is described.

  4. Entrepreneurial Choices of Initial Human Capital Endowments and New Venture Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Van Praag, Mirjam; B. Folta, Timothy;

    The founder (team)'s human capital is a vital determinant of future firm performance. This is a stylized fact. Less is known about the effect of the human capital of the initial workforce hired by the founder(s). We study the performance consequences of a founder's choice of the initial workforce......'s human capital (quantity and quality), besides the human capital of the founder(s). The analysis is based on matched employer-employee data and covers about 5,300 startups in manufacturing industries founded by individuals coming from employment between 1992 and 2007. We acknowledge that initial hiring...... decisions are endogenous and correlated with the human capital of the founders and the ownership structure of startups (single founder versus team of founders). Given the stickiness of initial choices, human capital decisions at entry turn out to be a close to irreversible matter with significant...

  5. Entrepreneurial Choices of Initial Human Capital Endowments and New Venture Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Van Praag, Mirjam; B. Folta, Timothy

    The founder (team)'s human capital is a vital determinant of future firm performance. This is a stylized fact. Less is known about the effect of the human capital of the initial workforce hired by the founder(s). We study the performance consequences of a founder's choice of the initial workforce......'s human capital (quantity and quality), besides the human capital of the founder(s). The analysis is based on matched employer-employee data and covers about 5,300 startups in manufacturing industries founded by individuals coming from employment between 1992 and 2007. We acknowledge that initial hiring...... decisions are endogenous and correlated with the human capital of the founders and the ownership structure of startups (single founder versus team of founders). Given the stickiness of initial choices, human capital decisions at entry turn out to be a close to irreversible matter with significant...

  6. National Human Trafficking Initiatives: Dimensions of Policy Diffusion1

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Eun-hye; Boyle, Elizabeth Heger

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of criminal law involves formal law enforcement, education and public outreach aimed at preventing criminal activity, and providing services for victims. Historically, quantitative research on global trends has tended to focus on a single policy dimension, potentially masking the unique factors that affect the diffusion of each policy dimension independently. Using an ordered-probit model to analyze new human trafficking policy data on national prosecution, p...

  7. Mixed-Initiative Human-Robot Interaction: Definition, Taxonomy, and Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    principles (e.g., opportunistic intervention) of mixed- initiative interaction. Thus, what mixed-initiative interaction means for human-robot teamwork ...ensure successful shift of initiative, and to prevent breakdown in teamwork and initiative to be lost in transition. The „how‟ question is...accurate shared understanding of each others‟ needs, responsibilities, and expected actions (i.e., a shared mental model), and a common mental image of

  8. Comparing overflow and wave-overtopping induced breach initiation mechanisms in an embankment breach experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Damme Myron

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the SAFElevee project Delft University of Technology collabored with Flanders Hydraulics Research, and Infram B.V. in the preperation and execution of a full scale embankment breach experiment in November 2015. This breach experiment was performed on an 3.5m high embankment with a sand core and clay outer layer situated along the tidal river Scheldt in Belgium near Schellebelle. During the experiment a wave overtopping simulator and overflow simulator were used to initiate a breach. Both simulators were placed near the top of the waterside slope. The use of the simulators facilitated comparison between the effects of continueous overflow and the effects of intermittent wave overtopping. This paper presents the data collected during the experiment, describe the development of hypotheses on the failure processes using the latest insights, and comment on the failure initiation process of a grass covered flood embankment with a clay outer layer and a sandy core.

  9. Commissioning and initial experimental program of the BGO-OD experiment at ELSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alef S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BGO-OD is a new meson photoproduction experiment at the ELSA facility of Bonn University. It aims at the investigation of non strange and strange baryon excitations, and is especially designed to be able to detect weekly bound meson-baryon type structures. The setup for the BGO-OD experiment is presented, the characteristics of the photon beam and the detector performances are shown and the initial experimental program is discussed.

  10. Under the (legal radar screen: global health initiatives and international human rights obligations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammonds Rachel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given that many low income countries are heavily reliant on external assistance to fund their health sectors the acceptance of obligations of international assistance and cooperation with regard to the right to health (global health obligations is insufficiently understood and studied by international health and human rights scholars. Over the past decade Global Health Initiatives, like the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund have adopted novel approaches to engaging with stakeholders in high and low income countries. This article explores how this experience impacted on acceptance of the international obligation to (help fulfil the right to health beyond borders. Methods The authors conducted an extensive review of international human rights law literature, transnational legal process literature, global public health literature and grey literature pertaining to Global Health Initiatives. To complement this desk work and deepen their understanding of how and why different legal norms evolve the authors conducted 19 in-depth key informant interviews with actors engaged with three stakeholders; the European Union, the United States and Belgium. The authors then analysed the interviews through a transnational legal process lens. Results Through according value to the process of examining how and why different legal norms evolve transnational legal process offers us a tool for engaging with the dynamism of developments in global health suggesting that operationalising global health obligations could advance the right to health for all. Conclusions In many low-income countries the health sector is heavily dependent on external assistance to fulfil the right to health of people thus it is vital that policies and tools for delivering reliable, long-term assistance are developed so that the right to health for all becomes more than a dream. Our research suggests that the Global Fund experience offers

  11. Initiating Transdisciplinarity in Academic Case Study Teaching: Experiences from a Regional Development Project in Salzburg, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhar, Andreas; Vilsmaier, Ulli; Glanzer, Michaela; Freyer, Bernhard

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe experiences with the initiation of transdisciplinarity in academic case study teaching with special reference to regional planning, based on the case study "Leben 2014 (Life 2014)--perspectives for regional development in the national park region Ober-pinz-gau, Salzburg".…

  12. "Elite" Career-Changers and Their Experience of Initial Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the motivation of "high-status" professionals to change career and enter teaching, and their experience of undertaking initial teacher education (ITE) programmes in England. The study builds on previous research which found that career-changers are disproportionately more likely to fail to complete their ITE studies,…

  13. Initial Experience with the Extracorporeal HIFU Knife with 49 Patients: Japanese Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaha, F.; Okuno, T.; Lee, C. O.; Shimizu, T.; Osako, K.; Oka, S.; Lee, K. H.; Chen, W. Z.; Zhu, H.; Park, S. H.; Qi, Z.; Shi, D.; Song, H. S.

    2005-03-01

    Forty nine patients with 63 tumours were treated with the Chongqing Haifu knife, as an adjunct to intra-arterial chemoinfusion. Treatment targets included breast (20 lesions), liver (16), bone (8), lymph-node (6), soft tissue (4), lung and pleura (4), pancreas (2), kidney (2) and adrenal gland (1). Follow-up contrast MRI was performed at 3 weeks to assess the effects of HIFU ablation. All cases completed the planned treatment. Of 25 lesions treated with the intention of complete tumour ablation, complete necrosis was obtained in 19 lesions (76%) including 4 secondary success cases. Among 32 lesions having partial and palliative treatment, tumour size was decreased in 6 lesions (21%), and good pain control was obtained in 6 out of 7 patients (86%). Skin injury was the most common complication after HIFU (16%), and was mostly a superficial dermal burn that did not necessitate any treatment. However, there was one patient with deep skin injury at an operation scar which resulted in skin perforation. Other adverse events included soft tissue swelling, prolonged fever, anorexia, persistent pain, shortness of the breath, sacroiliac joint fracture and prolonged diarrhoea. In our limited experience, superficial lesions (e.g. breast cancer, bone, soft tissue, lymph-node and pleural metastasis) appear to be good candidates for HIFU treatment. There appears to be a role for the HIFU knife in pain control for patients with bone metastasis and pancreatic cancer.

  14. National Human Trafficking Initiatives: Dimensions of Policy Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Eun-Hye; Boyle, Elizabeth Heger

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of criminal law involves formal law enforcement, education and public outreach aimed at preventing criminal activity, and providing services for victims. Historically, quantitative research on global trends has tended to focus on a single policy dimension, potentially masking the unique factors that affect the diffusion of each policy dimension independently. Using an ordered-probit model to analyze new human trafficking policy data on national prosecution, prevention, and victim-protection efforts, we find that global ties and domestic interest groups matter more in areas where international law is less defined. While prosecution, officially mandated by the Trafficking Protocol, was relatively impervious to global ties and domestic interest groups, both trafficking prevention and victim protection were associated with these factors. Our findings also suggest that fear of repercussions is not a major driver of state actions to combat trafficking-neither ratification of the Trafficking Protocol nor levels of United States aid were associated with greater implementation of anti-trafficking measures.

  15. National Human Trafficking Initiatives: Dimensions of Policy Diffusion1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Eun-hye; Boyle, Elizabeth Heger

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of criminal law involves formal law enforcement, education and public outreach aimed at preventing criminal activity, and providing services for victims. Historically, quantitative research on global trends has tended to focus on a single policy dimension, potentially masking the unique factors that affect the diffusion of each policy dimension independently. Using an ordered-probit model to analyze new human trafficking policy data on national prosecution, prevention, and victim-protection efforts, we find that global ties and domestic interest groups matter more in areas where international law is less defined. While prosecution, officially mandated by the Trafficking Protocol, was relatively impervious to global ties and domestic interest groups, both trafficking prevention and victim protection were associated with these factors. Our findings also suggest that fear of repercussions is not a major driver of state actions to combat trafficking—neither ratification of the Trafficking Protocol nor levels of United States aid were associated with greater implementation of anti-trafficking measures. PMID:26538806

  16. Human productivity experience and undersea habitat design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, T. C.; Spencer, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Lessons learned from the Alaskan North Slope construction camps and the Western Regional Undersea Laboratory are analyzed with respect to possible improvements for space station interior space utilization and living areas. The human factors engineering aspects have a direct bearing on the condition of crew and occupants.

  17. Simple electrical model and initial experiments for intra-body communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y M; Pun, S H; Du, M; Mak, P U; Vai, M I

    2009-01-01

    Intra-Body Communication(IBC) is a short range "wireless" communication technique appeared in recent years. This technique relies on the conductive property of human tissue to transmit the electric signal among human body. This is beneficial for devices networking and sensors among human body, and especially suitable for wearable sensors, telemedicine system and home health care system as in general the data rates of physiologic parameters are low. In this article, galvanic coupling type IBC application on human limb was investigated in both its mathematical model and related experiments. The experimental results showed that the proposed mathematical model was capable in describing the galvanic coupling type IBC under low frequency. Additionally, the calculated result and experimental result also indicated that the electric signal induced by the transmitters of IBC can penetrate deep into human muscle and thus, provide an evident that IBC is capable of acting as networking technique for implantable devices.

  18. Influence of the initial soil water content on Beerkan water infiltration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassabatere, L.; Loizeau, S.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Winiarski, T.; Rossier, Y.; Delolme, C.; Gaudet, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding and modeling of water flow in the vadose zone are important with regards water management and infiltration devices design. Water infiltration process clearly depends on initial soil water content, in particular for sandy soils with high organic matter content. This study investigates the influence of initial water content on water infiltration in a hydrophobic sandy soil and on the related derivation of hydraulic parameters using the BEST algorithm (Lassabatere et al., 2006). The studied sandy soil has a high total organic content decreasing from 3.5% (w/w) at the surface to 0.5% (w/w) below 1cm depth. The highest TOC at surface was due to the presence of a dense biofilm and resulted in a high surface hydrophobicity under dry conditions (low initial water contents). The water infiltration experiments consisted in infiltrating known volumes of water through a simple ring at null pressure head (Beerkan method). The infiltrations were performed during three successive days after a dry period with a storm event between the first and the second day (5 mm) and another between the second and the third day (35 mm). These events resulted in an increase in initial water contents, from less than 5% for the first day to around 10% for the last day. Experiments were performed for appropriate conditions for Beerkan experiments: initial water contents below 1/4 of the saturated water content and uniform water profile resulting from water redistribution after each rainfall event. The analysis of the infiltration data clearly highlights the strong effect of hydrophobicity. For the driest initial conditions (first day), infiltration rates increased with time, whereas they decreased with time for wetter conditions. Such a decrease agreed with the principles of water infiltration without hydrophobicity. In addition, total cumulative infiltrations were far higher for the wettest conditions. Regarding hydraulic characterization, only the data obtained during the last

  19. Researching Human Experience: video intervention/prevention assessment (VIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Patashnick

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Human experience is a critical subject for research. By discussing Video Intervention/Prevention Assessment (VIA, a patient-centered health research method where patients teach their clinicians about living with a chronic condition through the creation of visual illness narratives, this paper examines the value of qualitative inquiry and why human experience rarely is investigated directly. An analysis of a sample VIA data is presented to demonstrate how, by utilizing grounded theory and qualitative analysis, one can derive rich and unique information from human experience.

  20. The human-induced pluripotent stem cell initiative-data resources for cellular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Ian; Harrison, Peter W; Faulconbridge, Adam; Flicek, Paul; Parkinson, Helen; Clarke, Laura

    2017-01-04

    The Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Initiative (HipSci) isf establishing a large catalogue of human iPSC lines, arguably the most well characterized collection to date. The HipSci portal enables researchers to choose the right cell line for their experiment, and makes HipSci's rich catalogue of assay data easy to discover and reuse. Each cell line has genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and cellular phenotyping data. Data are deposited in the appropriate EMBL-EBI archives, including the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA), European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA), ArrayExpress and PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) databases. The project will make 500 cell lines from healthy individuals, and from 150 patients with rare genetic diseases; these will be available through the European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures (ECACC). As of August 2016, 238 cell lines are available for purchase. Project data is presented through the HipSci data portal (http://www.hipsci.org/lines) and is downloadable from the associated FTP site (ftp://ftp.hipsci.ebi.ac.uk/vol1/ftp). The data portal presents a summary matrix of the HipSci cell lines, showing available data types. Each line has its own page containing descriptive metadata, quality information, and links to archived assay data. Analysis results are also available in a Track Hub, allowing visualization in the context of public genomic annotations (http://www.hipsci.org/data/trackhubs). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Experiments and simulations on the incompressible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability with small wavelength initial perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael Scott

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is a buoyancy driven instability that takes place in a stratified fluid system with a constant acceleration directed from the heavy fluid into the light fluid. In this study, both experimental data and numerical simulations are presented. Experiments are performed primarily using a lithium-tungstate aqueous solution as the heavy liquid, but sometimes a calcium nitrate aqueous solution is used for comparison purposes. Experimental data is obtained for both miscible and immiscible fluid combinations. For the miscible experiments the light liquid is either ethanol or isopropanol, and for the immiscible experiments either silicone oil or trans-anethole is used. The resulting Atwood number is either 0.5 when the lithium-tungstate solution is used or 0.2 when the calcium nitrate solution is used. These fluid combinations are either forced or left unforced. The forced experiments have an initial perturbation imposed by vertically oscillating the liquid containing tank to produce Faraday waves at the interface. The unforced experiments rely on random interfacial fluctuations, due to background noise, to seed the instability. The liquid combination is partially enclosed in a test section that is accelerated downward along a vertical rail system causing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Accelerations of approximately 1g (with a weight and pulley system) or 10g (with a linear induction motor system) are experienced by the liquids. The tank is backlit and digitally recorded with high speed video cameras. These experiments are then simulated with the incompressible, Navier-Stokes code Miranda. The main focus of this study is the growth parameter (α) of the mixing region produced by the instability after it has become apparently self-similar and turbulent. The measured growth parameters are compared to determine the effects of miscibility and initial perturbations (of the small wavelength, finite bandwidth type used here). It is found that while

  2. Migration experience and premarital sexual initiation in urban Kenya: an event history analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Nancy; Xu, Hongwei; Mberu, Blessing U; Goldberg, Rachel E

    2012-06-01

    Migration during the formative adolescent years can affect important life-course transitions, including the initiation of sexual activity. In this study, we use life history calendar data to investigate the relationship between changes in residence and timing of premarital sexual debut among young people in urban Kenya. By age 18, 64 percent of respondents had initiated premarital sex, and 45 percent had moved at least once between the ages of 12 and 18. Results of the event history analysis show that girls and boys who move during early adolescence experience the earliest onset of sexual activity. For adolescent girls, however, other dimensions of migration provide protective effects, with greater numbers of residential changes and residential changes in the last one to three months associated with later sexual initiation. To support young people's ability to navigate the social, economic, and sexual environments that accompany residential change, researchers and policymakers should consider how various dimensions of migration affect sexual activity.

  3. Experiments on the emergence of human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steels, Luc

    2006-08-01

    Children learn language from their parents and then use the acquired system throughout the rest of their life with little change. At least that is commonly assumed. But a recent paper by Galantucci adds to the growing evidence that adults (and children) are able to create and negotiate complex communication systems from scratch and relatively quickly, without a prior model. This raises questions of what cognitive mechanisms are implied in this joint construction of communication systems, and what the implications are for the origins of human language.

  4. Causes and outcomes of revisional bariatric surgery: initial experience at a single center

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bariatric surgery has become more prevalent owing to the worldwide obesity epidemic. With the growing number of bariatric procedures performed annually, the requirement for revisional and secondary operations is increasing accordingly. This study aimed to evaluate the initial experience of revisional bariatric surgery at a single specialized center. Methods A retrospective review of the prospectively established database identified all patients who underwent revisional bariatric surge...

  5. Initial experience with a first-to-market member accountability-based insurance product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woll, Douglas R; Nelson, David R

    2010-10-01

    We describe the initial experience with a first-to-market health insurance product design based on principles of both member and purchaser accountability. Two benefit levels were offered, enhanced and standard. Qualification for the enhanced benefit level was obtained through members' commitment to follow their physicians' recommended treatment plan. Employers were offered a discount of 10% in exchange for offering this new product and promoting a healthy work environment. Membership in the product grew beyond expectations, and several health improvements were noted.

  6. The human orbitofrontal cortex: linking reward to hedonic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringelbach, Morten L

    2005-09-01

    Hedonic experience is arguably at the heart of what makes us human. In recent neuroimaging studies of the cortical networks that mediate hedonic experience in the human brain, the orbitofrontal cortex has emerged as the strongest candidate for linking food and other types of reward to hedonic experience. The orbitofrontal cortex is among the least understood regions of the human brain, but has been proposed to be involved in sensory integration, in representing the affective value of reinforcers, and in decision making and expectation. Here, the functional neuroanatomy of the human orbitofrontal cortex is described and a new integrated model of its functions proposed, including a possible role in the mediation of hedonic experience.

  7. Experiment M-131 - Human vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. F., II; Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the M-131 experiment is to measure responses in astronauts throughout orbital flight that reflect vestibular function and compare them with measurements made before and after flight. Three subtasks require measurement of (1) susceptibility to motion sickness, (2) thresholds of response to stimulation of the semicircular canals, and (3) space perception, viz, visual and nonvisual localization, using external spacecraft and internal morphological frames of reference. Four astronauts will be available for all measurements in Skylab 2 and 3 and two additional astronauts for only the 'static' measurements during the flights.

  8. The Human Experience of Death or, What Can We Learn from Near-Death Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Russell Jr.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of serious accidents and illness many persons undergo death-rebirth experiences. The changes in attitudes, personality, and beliefs that sometimes follow these experiences reflect rebirth and reveal a fundamental human strategy for coping with the threat of death. These experiences have great therapeutic potential. (Author)

  9. Thermophysical Property Estimation by Transient Experiments: The Effect of a Biased Initial Temperature Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Scarpa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of thermophysical properties of materials in dynamic experiments can be conveniently performed by the inverse solution of the associated heat conduction problem (IHCP. The inverse technique demands the knowledge of the initial temperature distribution within the material. As only a limited number of temperature sensors (or no sensor at all are arranged inside the test specimen, the knowledge of the initial temperature distribution is affected by some uncertainty. This uncertainty, together with other possible sources of bias in the experimental procedure, will propagate in the estimation process and the accuracy of the reconstructed thermophysical property values could deteriorate. In this work the effect on the estimated thermophysical properties due to errors in the initial temperature distribution is investigated along with a practical method to quantify this effect. Furthermore, a technique for compensating this kind of bias is proposed. The method consists in including the initial temperature distribution among the unknown functions to be estimated. In this way the effect of the initial bias is removed and the accuracy of the identified thermophysical property values is highly improved.

  10. Focal Areas for Measuring the Human Well-Being Impacts of a Conservation Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sanjayan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Within conservation, the need to measure the impacts on people from conservation initiatives such as projects and programs is growing, but understanding and measuring the multidimensional impacts on human well-being from conservation initiatives is complex. To understand the constituent components of human well-being and identify which components of well-being are most common, we analyzed 31 known indices for measuring human well-being. We found 11 focal areas shared by two or more indices for measuring human well-being, and the focal areas of living standards, health, education, social cohesion, security, environment, and governance were in at least 14 of the 31 human well-being indices. We examined each of the common focal areas and assessed its relevance to measuring the human well-being impacts of a conservation initiative. We then looked for existing indices that include the relevant focal areas and recommend the use of Stiglitz et al. (2009—a framework designed to measure economic performance and social progress—as a starting place for understanding and selecting human well-being focal areas suitable for measuring the impacts on people from a conservation initiative.

  11. Human otolith function, experiment M009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, A.; Miller, E. F., II

    1971-01-01

    The experiments that were performed during the Gemini 5 and 7 missions resulted in quantitative information concerning otolithic function and orientation of four subjects exposed to an orbiting spacecraft environment for prolonged periods of time. Preflight counterrolling measurements revealed significant differences between crewmembers with regard to the basic magnitude of otolith response. However, after the flight, each crewmember maintained his respective preflight level of response. This was indicative that no significant change in otolithic sensitivity occurred as a result of the flight, or at least no change persisted long enough to be recorded several hours after recovery. The EVLH data recorded for each subject confirmed the observation that a coordinate space sense exists even in a weightless environment if contact cues are adequate. However, it was noted that the apparent location of the horizontal within the spacecraft may not agree necessarily with its physical correlate in the spacecraft.

  12. Experience shapes our odor perception but depends on the initial perceptual processing of the stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinding, Charlotte; Coureaud, Gérard; Bervialle, Boris; Martin, Christophe; Schaal, Benoist; Thomas-Danguin, Thierry

    2015-07-01

    The questions of whether configural and elemental perceptions are competitive or exclusive perceptual processes and whether they rely on independent or dependent mechanisms are poorly understood. To examine these questions, we modified perceptual experience through preexposure to mixed or single odors and measured the resulting variation in the levels of configural and elemental perception of target odor mixtures. We used target mixtures that were spontaneously processed in a configural or an elemental manner. The AB binary mixture spontaneously involved the configural perception of a pineapple odor, whereas component A smelled like strawberry and component B smelled like caramel. The CD mixture produced the elemental perceptions of banana (C) and smoky (D) odors. Perceptual experience was manipulated through repeated exposure to either a mixture (AB or CD) or the components (A and B or C and D). The odor typicality rating data recorded after exposure revealed different influences of experience on odor mixtures and single-component perception, depending both on the type of exposure (components or mixture) and the mixture's initial perceptual property (configural or elemental). Although preexposure to A and B decreased the pineapple typicality of the configural AB mixture, preexposure to AB did not modify its odor quality. In contrast, preexposure to the CD elemental mixture induced a quality transfer between the components. These results emphasize the relative plasticity of odor mixture perception, which is prone to experience-induced modulations but depends on the stimulus's initial perceptual properties, suggesting that configural and elemental forms of odor mixture perception rely on rather independent processes.

  13. Experiments on the fluid dynamics of the human cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Gary

    2011-11-01

    Human coughing is studied non-intrusively by high-speed schlieren videography, revealing a turbulent jet lasting up to 1 sec with a total expelled air volume of about 2 L. Velocimetry of eddy motion reveals a jet centerline airspeed of at least 8 m/sec. With Re roughly 18,000 the cough jet is inertia-driven and buoyancy is negligible. It shows typical round-turbulent-jet behavior, including a conical spreading angle of 24 deg, despite irregular initial conditions. The cough jet is projected several m into the surrounding air before it mixes out. It is well known that a cough can transmit infectious agents, and we are advised to cover our mouths in an apparent attempt to thwart the jet formation. Present experiments have shown that wearing a surgical mask or respirator designed to prevent the inhalation of infectious agents also interferes with the cough-jet formation, redirecting it into the person's rising thermal plume. (Tang et al., J. Royal. Soc. Interface 6, S727, 2009.)

  14. Analysis of compaction initiation in human embryos by using time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Kyoko; Yumoto, Keitaro; Sugishima, Minako; Mizoguchi, Chizuru; Kai, Yoshiteru; Iba, Yumiko; Mio, Yasuyuki

    2014-04-01

    To analyze the initiation of compaction in human embryos in vitro by using time-lapse cinematography (TLC), with the goal of determining the precise timing of compaction and clarifying the morphological changes underlying the compaction process. One hundred and fifteen embryos donated by couples with no further need for embryo-transfer were used in this study. Donated embryos were thawed and processed, and then their morphological behavior during the initiation of compaction was dynamically observed via time-lapse cinematography (TLC) for 5 days. Although the initiation of compaction occurred throughout the period from the 4-cell to 16-cell stage, 99 (86.1 %) embryos initiated compaction at the 8-cell stage or later, with initiation at the 8-cell stage being most frequent (22.6 %). Of these 99 embryos, 49.5 % developed into good-quality blastocysts. In contrast, of the 16 (13.9 %) embryos that initiated compaction prior to the 8-cell stage, only 18.8 % developed into good-quality blastocysts. Embryos that initiated compaction before the 8-cell stage showed significantly higher numbers of multinucleated blastomeres, due to asynchronism in nuclear division at the third mitotic division resulting from cytokinetic failure. The initiation of compaction primarily occurs at the third mitotic division or later in human embryos. Embryos that initiate compaction before the 8-cell stage are usually associated with aberrant embryonic development (i.e., cytokinetic failure accompanied by karyokinesis).

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of solid-deuterium-initiated Z-pinch experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehey, Peter Trogdon [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Solid-deuterium-initiated Z-pinch experiments are numerically simulated using a two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic model, which includes many important experimental details, such as ``cold-start`` initial conditions, thermal conduction, radiative energy loss, actual discharge current vs. time, and grids of sufficient size and resolution to allow realistic development of the plasma. The alternating-direction-implicit numerical technique used meets the substantial demands presented by such a computational task. Simulations of fiber-initiated experiments show that when the fiber becomes fully ionized rapidly developing m=0 instabilities, which originated in the coronal plasma generated from the ablating fiber, drive intense non-uniform heating and rapid expansion of the plasma column. The possibility that inclusion of additional physical effects would improve stability is explored. Finite-Larmor-radius-ordered Hall and diamagnetic pressure terms in the magnetic field evolution equation, corresponding energy equation terms, and separate ion and electron energy equations are included; these do not change the basic results. Model diagnostics, such as shadowgrams and interferograms, generated from simulation results, are in good agreement with experiment. Two alternative experimental approaches are explored: high-current magnetic implosion of hollow cylindrical deuterium shells, and ``plasma-on-wire`` (POW) implosion of low-density plasma onto a central deuterium fiber. By minimizing instability problems, these techniques may allow attainment of higher temperatures and densities than possible with bare fiber-initiated Z-pinches. Conditions for significant D-D or D-T fusion neutron production may be realizable with these implosion-based approaches.

  16. Astronauts Conrad and Kerwin practice Human Vestibular Function experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the first manned Skylab mission, checks out the Human Vestibular Function, Experiment M131, during Skylab training at JSC. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, science pilot of the mission, goes over a checklist. The two men are in the work and experiments compartment of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer at JSC.

  17. Initial Scaling Studies and Conceptual Thermal Fluids Experiments for the Prismatic NGNP Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this report is to document the initial high temperature gas reactor scaling studies and conceptual experiment design for gas flow and heat transfer. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/ATHENA/RELAP5-3D calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses are being applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant forced convection with slight transverse property variation. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple buoyant jets into a confined density-stratified crossflow -- with obstructions. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary. The second experiment will treat heated jets entering a model plenum. Unheated MIR (Matched-Index-of-Refraction) experiments are first steps when the geometry is complicated. One does not want to use a computational technique which will not even handle constant properties properly. The MIR experiment will simulate flow features of the paths of jets

  18. Effects of Initial Conditions on Compressible Mixing in Supernova-Relevant Laboratory Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M; Greenough, J

    2004-04-30

    In core-collapse supernovae, strong blast waves drive interfaces susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. In addition, perturbation growth can result from material expansion in large-scale velocity gradients behind the shock front. Laser-driven experiments are designed to produce a strongly shocked interface whose evolution is a scaled version of the unstable hydrogen-helium interface in core-collapse supernovae such as SN 1987A. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities and the resulting transition to turbulence on supernovae observables that remain as yet unexplained. In this paper, we summarize recent results from our computational study of unstable systems driven by high Mach number shock and blast waves. For planar multimode systems, compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions (IC's) by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. With higher-dimensional blast waves, divergence restores the properties necessary for establishment of the self-similar state, but achieving it requires very high initial characteristic mode number and high Mach number for the incident blast wave. Initial conditions predicted by some recent stellar calculations are incompatible with self-similarity.

  19. Genome-wide uniformity of human ‘open’ pre-initiation complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, William K.M.; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2017-01-01

    Transcription of protein-coding and noncoding DNA occurs pervasively throughout the mammalian genome. Their sites of initiation are generally inferred from transcript 5′ ends and are thought to be either locally dispersed or focused. How these two modes of initiation relate is unclear. Here, we apply permanganate treatment and chromatin immunoprecipitation (PIP-seq) of initiation factors to identify the precise location of melted DNA separately associated with the preinitiation complex (PIC) and the adjacent paused complex (PC). This approach revealed the two known modes of transcription initiation. However, in contrast to prevailing views, they co-occurred within the same promoter region: initiation originating from a focused PIC, and broad nucleosome-linked initiation. PIP-seq allowed transcriptional orientation of Pol II to be determined, which may be useful near promoters where sufficient sense/anti-sense transcript mapping information is lacking. PIP-seq detected divergently oriented Pol II at both coding and noncoding promoters, as well as at enhancers. Their occupancy levels were not necessarily coupled in the two orientations. DNA sequence and shape analysis of initiation complex sites suggest that both sequence and shape contribute to specificity, but in a context-restricted manner. That is, initiation sites have the locally “best” initiator (INR) sequence and/or shape. These findings reveal a common core to pervasive Pol II initiation throughout the human genome. PMID:27927716

  20. Antimicrobial Resistance Control Strategies: A Coordinated Research Initiative Experience in the Asia Pacific Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Lisette; Asenjo, Gabriela; Vergara, Constanza; Cornejo, Javiera

    2017-05-01

    The objective was to gather information on the status of antimicrobial surveillance in the Asia Pacific region and suggest control strategies. Twenty-one economies of the Asia Pacific region participated in this initiative. A survey was conducted on antimicrobial use and surveillance throughout the region. A workshop was carried out to create awareness about the issue and discuss the implementation of control strategies. Based on the survey results and workshop conclusions, it can be established that there is better understanding of the implications of antimicrobial resistance in the human medicine area. Only few economies take actions to control antimicrobial resistance on a veterinary/agricultural level. To confront antimicrobial resistance, it is critical to raise awareness; cooperation between all countries is needed to apply international standards, to be able to have harmonized public policies. Countries must align and improve their systems for surveillance and monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in human, animals, and the environment.

  1. Initial utility experience with cluster of three Mod-2 wind turbine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, D. B.; Warchol, E. J.; Butler, N. G.; Ciranny, S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the initial utility experiences of operating three MOD-2s during the Engineering Acceptance Testing. Electrical quantities of bus voltage, phase currents and power are initially being recorded to evaluate impacts to customers on the 69-kV subtransmission line during synchronization and operation of one or more WTSs. To date, effects on the system have been essentially undetectable. Measurements of television signal strengths were taken at an existing television remote pickup and relay station at the WTS site. Potential TV signal interference problems from the WTSs have been avoided by replacing the remote pickups with microwave repeater links for the four TV channels received from Portland, Oregon. Preliminary measurements of audible and sub-audible noise levels indicate that the upwind rotor, tubular tower design of the MOD-2 does not have the pulsing high intensity infrasound problems experienced by the MOD-1 machine at Boone, North Carolina.

  2. Mixed-Initiative Cyber Security: Putting humans in the right loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haack, Jereme N.; Fink, Glenn A.; Maiden, Wendy M.; McKinnon, Archibald D.; Fulp, Errin W.

    2009-05-11

    In recent years, organizations and their computer infrastructures have grown intertwined in complex relationships through mergers, acquisitions, reorganizations, and cooperative service delivery. Defensive actions and policy changes by one organization may have far-reaching negative consequences on its partner organizations. Human-only or machine-only approaches are insufficient. The former are slow but highly adaptable, while the latter are fast but highly specialized. In either case, humans retain the ultimate responsibility for the actions of their automated systems. Deploying automated defenses does not absolve humans of their inherent responsibility. We believe the solution lies in mixed-initiative defense unifying the complementary qualities of both human- and machine-based approaches. We describe the Cooperative Infrastructure Defense (CID), a new cyber-defense paradigm employing complex-adaptive swarm intelligence, logical rational agents, and human insight to enable collaborative cyber defense among cooperating organizations in an infrastructure setting. CID takes a mixed-initiative approach to infrastructure defense where teams of humans and software agents defend cooperating organizations in tandem, sharing insights and solutions without violating proprietary boundaries. CID will help create security policy via dialogue between humans and agents, foster a collaborative problem-solving environment, and increase human situational awareness and influence through visualization and shared control. CID will provide a foundation for building trust between humans and agents within and between organizations.

  3. Experience of initiating collaboration of traditional healers in managing HIV and AIDS in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshi Mainen J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Collaboration between traditional healers and biomedical practitioners is now being accepted by many African countries south of the Sahara because of the increasing problem of HIV/AIDS. The key problem, however, is how to initiate collaboration between two health systems which differ in theory of disease causation and management. This paper presents findings on experience learned by initiation of collaboration between traditional healers and the Institute of Traditional Medicine in Arusha and Dar-es-Salaam Municipalities, Tanzania where 132 and 60 traditional healers respectively were interviewed. Of these 110 traditional healers claimed to be treating HIV/AIDS. The objective of the study was to initiate sustainable collaboration with traditional healers in managing HIV/AIDS. Consultative meetings with leaders of traditional healers' associations and government officials were held, followed by surveys at respective traditional healers' "vilinge" (traditional clinics. The findings were analysed using both qualitative and quantitative methods. The findings showed that influential people and leaders of traditional healers' association appeared to be gatekeepers to access potential good healers in the two study areas. After consultative meetings these leaders showed to be willing to collaborate; and opened doors to other traditional healers, who too were willing to collaborate with the Institute of Traditional Medicine in managing HIV/AIDS patients. Seventy five percent of traditional healers who claimed to be treating HIV/AIDS knew some HIV/AIDS symptoms; and some traditional healers attempted to manage these symptoms. Even though, they were willing to collaborate with the Institute of Traditional Medicine there were nevertheless some reservations based on questions surrounding sharing from collaboration. The reality of past experiences of mistreatment of traditional healers in the colonial period informed these reservations. General

  4. Human Vestibular Function, Rotating Litter Chair - Skylab Experiment M131

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    This 1970 photograph shows the Rotating Litter Chair, a major component of Skylab's Human Vestibular Function experiment (M131). The experiment was a set of medical studies designed to determine the effect of long-duration space missions on astronauts' coordination abilities. The M131 experiment tested the astronauts susceptibility to motion sickness in the Skylab environment, acquired data fundamental to an understanding of the functions of human gravity reception under prolonged absence of gravity, and tested for changes in the sensitivity of the semicircular canals. Data from this experiment was collected before, during, and after flight. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  5. Maximizing the Workshop Experience: An Example from the PTRA Rural Initiatives Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Teresa

    2003-11-01

    Since the summer of 2001, the Rural Initiative of the Physics Teaching Resource Agents have led summer workshops for high school and middle school physics teachers at several universities nationwide. From the site at Coastal Carolina University where teachers learned about radioactivity and nuclear physics, assistant professor Teresa Burns describes how high school teacher Lucas Mullen was able to build a curriculum tied to South Carolina State Science Standards around the content he learned at the workshop. This is one example of how a workshop experience can lead to better teaching practices through exposure to content material and current accepted practices in physics education research.

  6. Reactivity Initiated Accident Test Series RIA Scoping Test Experiment Operating Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1978-06-01

    This document describes the experiment operating specifications for the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Scoping Test to be conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The primary objectives of the RIA research are to determine fuel failure thresholds, modes, and consequences as functions of (a) enthalpy insertion, (b) irradiation history, and (c) fuel design. Coolant conditions of pressure, temperature, and flow rate that are typical of hot-startup conditions in commercial boiling water reactors (BWRs) will be used in the first six RIA tests, termed Series I.

  7. Initial experience with the Codman Certas adjustable valve in the management of patients with hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watt, Sara; Agerlin, Niels; Romner, Bertil

    2012-01-01

    A new adjustable valve, the Codman CertasTM valve for treatment of hydrocephalus was introduced into clinical practice in January 2011. It has 8 different settings with an opening pressure varying from 36 to over 400 mm H2O at a flow rate of 20 mL/h. The 8th setting is designed to provide...... a "virtual off" function. The objective of this report is to describe the initial clinical experience with the CertasTM valve and evaluate clinical usage with the main focus on the portable adjustment device - Therapeutic Management System (TMS), the "virtual off" setting and compatibility with magnetic...

  8. Sex reassignment surgery for male to female transsexuals: initial experience in Okayama university hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai,Atsushi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The first case of sex reassignment surgery (SRS in our hospital was performed in January 2001; as of February, 2005, 4 cases of MTF-SRS had been performed. In the 2 most recent cases, we used penile and scrotal skin flaps to avoid complications. The depth and width of the new vagina was made to be adequate for sexual intercourse. Future attention should be focused on devising a surgical technique that will help prevent the complications of partial necrosis of the epidermal skin and wound dehiscence. Although ours is only an initial experience, we describe our surgical technique herein.

  9. Interim report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-21

    The Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was created by President Clinton to advise the Human Radiation Interagency Working Group on the ethical and scientific criteria applicable to human radiation experiments carried out or sponsored by the U.S. Government. The Committee seeks to answer several fundamental question: What ethics criteria should be used to evaluate human radiation experiments? What was the Federal Government`s role in human radiation experiments? What are the criteria for determining appropriate Federal responses where wrongs or harms have occurred? What lessons learned from studying past and present research standards and practices should be applied to the future? The Committee has been gathering vast amounts of information and working to render it orderly and accessible. In the next six months, the Committee will continue with the tasks of data gathering and organizing. The focus of the work, however, will be developing criteria for judging historical and contemporary experiments, policies, and procedures, as well as criteria for remedies that may be appropriate where harms or wrongs have ocurred. Based on findings, the Committee will make specific recommendations regarding policies for the future.

  10. Can Computers Foster Human Users’ Creativity? Theory and Praxis of Mixed-Initiative Co-Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios Liapis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the impact of artificially intelligent computers to the process of design, play and educational activities. A computational process which has the necessary intelligence and creativity to take a proactive role in such activities can not only support human creativity but also foster it and prompt lateral thinking. The argument is made both from the perspective of human creativity, where the computational input is treated as an external stimulus which triggers re-framing of humans’ routines and mental associations, but also from the perspective of computational creativity where human input and initiative constrains the search space of the algorithm, enabling it to focus on specific possible solutions to a problem rather than globally search for the optimal. The article reviews four mixed-initiative tools (for design and educational play based on how they contribute to human-machine co-creativity. These paradigms serve different purposes, afford different human interaction methods and incorporate different computationally creative processes. Assessing how co-creativity is facilitated on a per-paradigm basis strengthens the theoretical argument and provides an initial seed for future work in the burgeoning domain of mixed-initiative interaction.

  11. Initial experience with stereoscopic visualization of three-dimensional ultrasound data in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronningsaeter, A; Lie, T; Kleven, A; Mørland, T; Langø, T; Unsgård, G; Myhre, H O; Mårvik, R

    2000-11-01

    Initial in vivo and in vitro experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of stereoscopically displaying three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound data from neurosurgery, laparoscopic surgery, and vascular surgery. Stereoscopic visualization was illustrated by four video sequences, which can be downloaded from http://www.us.unimed. sintef.no/. These sequences show a brain tumor, hepatic arteries in relation to the gallbladder, a model that mimics a neuroendoscope in a cyst, and a "flight" into model of an artery with an intima flap. The experiments indicate that stereoscopic display of ultrasound data is feasible when there is sufficient contrast between the objects of interest and the surrounding tissue. True 3D vision improves perception, thus enhancing the ability to understand complex anatomic structures such as irregular lesions and tortuous vessels.

  12. Comparison between initial Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments and integrated simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefkow, A. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Geissel, M.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Harding, E. C.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Koning, J. M.; Marinak, M. M.

    2014-10-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) approach to ICF has obtained thermonuclear fusion yields using the Z facility. Integrated magnetohydrodynamic simulations provided the design for the first neutron-producing experiments using capabilities that presently exist, and the initial experiments measured stagnation radii rstag < 75 μm, temperatures around 3 keV, and isotropic neutron yields up to YnDD = 2 ×1012 from imploded liners reaching peak velocities around 70 km/s over an implosion time of about 60 ns. We present comparisons between the experimental observables and post-shot degraded integrated simulations. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Identification of evolutionarily conserved non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in human coding sequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P

    2011-05-01

    In eukaryotes, it is generally assumed that translation initiation occurs at the AUG codon closest to the messenger RNA 5\\' cap. However, in certain cases, initiation can occur at codons differing from AUG by a single nucleotide, especially the codons CUG, UUG, GUG, ACG, AUA and AUU. While non-AUG initiation has been experimentally verified for a handful of human genes, the full extent to which this phenomenon is utilized--both for increased coding capacity and potentially also for novel regulatory mechanisms--remains unclear. To address this issue, and hence to improve the quality of existing coding sequence annotations, we developed a methodology based on phylogenetic analysis of predicted 5\\' untranslated regions from orthologous genes. We use evolutionary signatures of protein-coding sequences as an indicator of translation initiation upstream of annotated coding sequences. Our search identified novel conserved potential non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in 42 human genes including VANGL2, FGFR1, KCNN4, TRPV6, HDGF, CITED2, EIF4G3 and NTF3, and also affirmed the conservation of known non-AUG-initiated extensions in 17 other genes. In several instances, we have been able to obtain independent experimental evidence of the expression of non-AUG-initiated products from the previously published literature and ribosome profiling data.

  14. Human Capital Planning in Higher Education Institutions: A Strategic Human Resource Development Initiative in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasawneh, Samer

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study is to determine the status of human capital planning in higher education institutions in Jordan. Design/methodology/approach: A random sample of 120 faculty members (in administrative positions) responded to a human capital planning (HCP) survey. The survey consisted of a pool of 38 items distributed over…

  15. Development of human protein reference database as an initial platform for approaching systems biology in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J Daniel; Amanchy, Ramars

    2003-01-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) is an object database that integrates a wealth of information relevant to the function of human proteins in health and disease. Data pertaining to thousands of protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, enzyme/substrate relationships, di...

  16. Transplante cardíaco humano: experiência inicial Human cardiac transplant: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noedir A. G Stolf

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available No Instituto do Coração, de março de 1985 a fevereiro de 1986,11 pacientes foram submetidos a transplante cardíaco ortotópico. Eram todos do sexo masculino, com idade variando de 39 a 54 anos; 6 com cardiopatia isquémica, 4 com cardiomiopatia dilatada e um com cardiomiopatia chagásica. Foi realizado estudo hemodinâmico através de catéter de Swan-Ganz, no pré-operatório, no pós-operatório, após estabilização na unidade de recuperação, e trinta ou mais dias após o transplante. Os dados mostram melhora progressiva em relação ao índice cardíaco, pressão em artéria pulmonar, pressão de capilar pulmonar, resistência vascular pulmonar e resistência vascular sistêmica. Três dos 11 pacientes apresentaram disfunção renal transitória no pós-operatório imediato e que regrediram até o 15º dia, enquanto que 2 pacientes apresentaram aumento moderado da creatinina plasmática. Apenas 3 pacientes não apresentaram qualquer episódio de rejeição; nos demais, esses episódios foram um diagnóstico histológico sem repercussões clínicas. Complicações infecciosas ocorreram em 9 pacientes e foram de fácil controle clínico. No pós-operatório tardio, a hipertensão esteve presente em 8 pacientes, sendo mais acentuada em 2 deles. Não houve óbitos, nesta série de pacientes; todos estão assintomáticos e os 6 primeiros estão trabalhando.At the Instituto do Cora��ão, University of São Paulo Medical School, 11 patients were submitted to heart transplantation from march 1985 up to february 1986. All were male, with ages of 39-59 years, 6 with coronary heart disease, 4 with dilated cardiomyopathy and 1 with Chagas cardiomyopathy. The patients were studied hemodynamically with a Swan-Ganz catheter pre-operatively, at the arrival in the intensive care unit, in the first postoperative day and 30 or more days after the transplant. The data showed that there was a progressive increase of cardiac index and decreases of pulmonary artery pressure, capilary pulmonary wedge pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance and systemic vascular resistance. Three of the 11 patients had immediate renal dysfunction that returned to normal by the 15th day. Late postoperatively 2 patients had increase of creatinine levels. Only 3 patients had no rejection episodes; among the others these episodes were represented by hystological alterations with no clinical manifestations. Infections complications occurred in 9 patients and were easily clinically treated. Late postoperatively, hypertension was present in 8 patients; in 2 of them it was moderate. There was no death in these 11 patients; all are symptom free and the first 6 are working.

  17. Initial Off-Axis Neutral Beam Checkout and Physics Experiments on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zeeland, M. A.; Ferron, J. R.; Hyatt, A. W.; Murphy, C. J.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Scoville, J. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Muscatello, C. M.; Park, J. M.; Murakami, M.; Pace, D. C.; Holcomb, C. T.; Grierson, B. A.; Tobias, B. J.; Solomon, W. M.; Moyer, R. A.

    2011-10-01

    Two of the eight neutral beam sources on DIII-D have been modified to allow vertical steering, with the injection angle varying from horizontal to downward at an angle of 16.5 degrees for off-axis deposition. Initial experiments to assess the basic beam functionality, geometry, and confinement were carried out. Dα images of beam into gas and plasma yield beam neutral profiles and are key in assessing beam shape and clipping. Neutron and fast-ion Dα (FIDA) diagnostics verify classical behavior of the off-axis beam ions in MHD-quiescent conditions. An initial physics experiment takes advantage of the downward steered beams to vary the fast-ion gradient ∇βf from centrally peaked to hollow. Systematic scans determine the stability and impact of reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes and toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes as a function of ∇βf . Supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, SC-G903402, DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-AC05-06OR23100, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC02-09CH11466, & DE-FG02-07ER54917.

  18. Initial Experience with a Cone-beam Breast Computed Tomography-guided Biopsy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Posy J; Morgan, Renee C; Conover, David L; Arieno, Andrea L

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate our initial experience with a cone-beam breast computed tomography (BCT)-guided breast biopsy system for lesion retrieval in phantom studies for use with a cone-beam BCT imaging system. Materials and Methods: Under the Institutional Review Board approval, a phantom biopsy study was performed using a dedicated BCT-guided biopsy system. Fifteen biopsies were performed on each of the small, medium, and large anthropomorphic breast phantoms with both BCT and stereotactic guidance for comparison. Each set of the 45 phantoms contained masses and calcification clusters of varying sizes. Data included mass/calcium retrieval rate and dose and length of procedure time for phantom studies. Results: Phantom mass and calcium retrieval rate were 100% for BCT and stereotactic biopsy. BCT dose for small and medium breast phantoms was found to be equivalent to or less than the corresponding stereotactic approach. Stereotactic-guided biopsy dose was 34.2 and 62.5 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. BCT-guided biopsy dose was 15.4 and 30.0 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. Both computed tomography biopsy and stereotactic biopsy study time ranged from 10 to 20 min. Conclusion: Initial experience with a BCT-guided biopsy system has shown to be comparable to stereotactic biopsy in phantom studies with equivalent or decreased dose. PMID:28217404

  19. Intraoperative 3-tesla MRI in the management of paediatric cranial tumours - initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avula, Shivaram; Garlick, Deborah; Abernethy, Laurence J. [Alder Hey Children' s NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mallucci, Connor L. [Alder Hey Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Pizer, Barry [Alder Hey Children' s Hospital, Department of Oncology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Crooks, Daniel [Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Department of Pathology, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) has been gaining recognition because of its value in the neurosurgical management of cranial tumours. There is limited documentation of its value in children. To review the initial experience of a paediatric 3-Tesla ioMRI unit in the management of cranial tumours. Thirty-eight children underwent ioMRI during 40 cranial tumour resections using a 3-Tesla MR scanner co-located with the neurosurgical operating theatre. IoMRI was performed to assess the extent of tumour resection and/or to update neuronavigation. The intraoperative and follow-up scans, and the clinical records were reviewed. In 27/40 operations, complete resection was intended. IoMRI confirmed complete resection in 15/27 (56%). As a consequence, surgical resection was extended in 5/27 (19%). In 6/27 (22%), ioMRI was equivocal for residual tumour. In 13/40 (33%) operations, the surgical aim was to partially resect the tumour. In 7 of the 13 (54%), surgical resection was extended following ioMRI. In our initial experience, ioMRI has increased the rate of complete resection, with intraoperative surgical strategy being modified in 30% of procedures. Collaborative analysis of ioMRI by the radiologist and neurosurgeon is vital to avoid errors in interpretation. (orig.)

  20. The Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX): Its structure, connection to other international initiatives and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagener, T; Hogue, T; Schaake, J; Duan, Q; Gupta, H; Andreassian, V; Hall, A; Leavesley, G

    2006-05-08

    The Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) is an international project aimed at developing enhanced techniques for the a priori estimation of parameters in hydrologic models and in land surface parameterization schemes connected to atmospheric models. The MOPEX science strategy involves: database creation, a priori parameter estimation methodology development, parameter refinement or calibration, and the demonstration of parameter transferability. A comprehensive MOPEX database has been developed that contains historical hydrometeorological data and land surface characteristics data for many hydrologic basins in the United States (US) and in other countries. This database is being continuously expanded to include basins from various hydroclimatic regimes throughout the world. MOPEX research has largely been driven by a series of international workshops that have brought interested hydrologists and land surface modelers together to exchange knowledge and experience in developing and applying parameter estimation techniques. With its focus on parameter estimation, MOPEX plays an important role in the international context of other initiatives such as GEWEX, PUB and PILPS. This paper outlines the MOPEX initiative, discusses its role in the scientific community and briefly states future directions.

  1. Initial Experiences of Simultaneous Laparoscopic Resection of Colorectal Cancer and Liver Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Hoekstra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Simultaneous resection of primary colorectal carcinoma (CRC and synchronous liver metastases (SLMs is subject of debate with respect to morbidity in comparison to staged resection. The aim of this study was to evaluate our initial experience with this approach. Methods. Five patients with primary CRC and a clinical diagnosis of SLM underwent combined laparoscopic colorectal and liver surgery. Patient and tumor characteristics, operative variables, and postoperative outcomes were evaluated retrospectively. Results. The primary tumor was located in the colon in two patients and in the rectum in three patients. The SLM was solitary in four patients and multiple in the remaining patient. Surgical approach was total laparoscopic (2 patients or hand-assisted laparoscopic (3 patients. The midline umbilical or transverse suprapubic incision created for the hand port and/or extraction of the specimen varied between 5 and 10 cm. Median operation time was 303 (range 151–384 minutes with a total blood loss of 700 (range 200–850 mL. Postoperative hospital stay was 5, 5, 9, 14, and 30 days. An R0 resection was achieved in all patients. Conclusions. From this initial single-center experience, simultaneous laparoscopic colorectal and liver resection appears to be feasible in selected patients with CRC and SLM, with satisfying short-term results.

  2. New perspectives on sea use management: initial findings from European experience with marine spatial planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douvere, Fanny; Ehler, Charles N

    2009-01-01

    Increased development pressures on the marine environment and the potential for multiple use conflicts, arising as a result of the current expansion of offshore wind energy, fishing and aquaculture, dredging, mineral extraction, shipping, and the need to meet international and national commitments to biodiversity conservation, have led to increased interest in sea use planning with particular emphasis on marine spatial planning. Several European countries, on their own initiative or driven by the European Union's Marine Strategy and Maritime Policy, the Bergen Declaration of the North Sea Conference, and the EU Recommendation on Integrated Coastal Zone Management, have taken global leadership in implementing marine spatial planning. Belgium, The Netherlands, and Germany in the North Sea, and the United Kingdom in the Irish Sea, have already completed preliminary sea use plans and zoning proposals for marine areas within their national jurisdictions. This paper discusses the nature and context of marine spatial planning, the international legal and policy framework, and the increasing need for marine spatial planning in Europe. In addition, the authors review briefly three marine spatial planning initiatives in the North Sea and conclude with some initial lessons learned from these experiences.

  3. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karyono, E-mail: karyonosu@gmail.com [Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG), Jakarta (Indonesia); OSLO University (Norway); Padjadjaran University (UNPAD), Bandung (Indonesia); Mazzini, Adriano; Sugiharto, Anton [OSLO University (Norway); Lupi, Matteo [ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Syafri, Ildrem [Padjadjaran University (UNPAD), Bandung (Indonesia); Masturyono,; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli,; Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat [Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG), Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green’s functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  4. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyono, Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono, Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli, Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat; Sugiharto, Anton

    2015-04-01

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green's functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  5. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Chiu, Vi K

    2016-01-19

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer initiation by performing gene set enrichment analysis on gene expression from human colon tissues. We find that KRASmut imposes the embryonic stem cell-like program during human colon cancer initiation from colon adenoma to stage I carcinoma. Expression of miR145, an embryonic SC program inhibitor, promotes cell lineage differentiation marker expression in KRASmut colon cancer cells and significantly suppresses their tumorigenicity. Our data support an in vivo plasticity model of human colon cancer initiation that merges the intrinsic stem cell properties of aberrant colon stem cells with the embryonic stem cell-like program induced by KRASmut to optimize malignant transformation. Inhibition of the embryonic SC-like program in KRASmut colon cancer cells reveals a novel therapeutic strategy to programmatically inhibit KRASmut tumors and prevent colon cancer.

  6. The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI): Activity Status in 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Ochiai, M; Haubold, H J; Doi, T

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI) was launched by the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) within the United Nations Programme on Space Applications. The Initiative aims at promoting international cooperation in human spaceflight and space exploration-related activities, creating awareness among countries on the benefits of utilizing human space technology and its applications, and building capacity in microgravity education and research. HSTI has conducted a series of outreach activities and expert meetings bringing together participants from around the world. HSTI will also be implementing science and educational activities in relevant areas to raise the capacities, particularly in developing countries, in pursuit of the development goals of the United Nations, thus contributing to promoting the peaceful uses of outer space.

  7. Development of human protein reference database as an initial platform for approaching systems biology in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J Daniel; Amanchy, Ramars; Kristiansen, Troels Z; Jonnalagadda, Chandra Kiran; Surendranath, Vineeth; Niranjan, Vidya; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Gandhi, T K B; Gronborg, Mads; Ibarrola, Nieves; Deshpande, Nandan; Shanker, K; Shivashankar, H N; Rashmi, B P; Ramya, M A; Zhao, Zhixing; Chandrika, K N; Padma, N; Harsha, H C; Yatish, A J; Kavitha, M P; Menezes, Minal; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Suresh, Shubha; Ghosh, Neelanjana; Saravana, R; Chandran, Sreenath; Krishna, Subhalakshmi; Joy, Mary; Anand, Sanjeev K; Madavan, V; Joseph, Ansamma; Wong, Guang W; Schiemann, William P; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Huang, Lily; Khosravi-Far, Roya; Steen, Hanno; Tewari, Muneesh; Ghaffari, Saghi; Blobe, Gerard C; Dang, Chi V; Garcia, Joe G N; Pevsner, Jonathan; Jensen, Ole N; Roepstorff, Peter; Deshpande, Krishna S; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Hamosh, Ada; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2003-10-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) is an object database that integrates a wealth of information relevant to the function of human proteins in health and disease. Data pertaining to thousands of protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, enzyme/substrate relationships, disease associations, tissue expression, and subcellular localization were extracted from the literature for a nonredundant set of 2750 human proteins. Almost all the information was obtained manually by biologists who read and interpreted >300,000 published articles during the annotation process. This database, which has an intuitive query interface allowing easy access to all the features of proteins, was built by using open source technologies and will be freely available at http://www.hprd.org to the academic community. This unified bioinformatics platform will be useful in cataloging and mining the large number of proteomic interactions and alterations that will be discovered in the postgenomic era.

  8. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  9. Human Ecology and Health Advancement: The Newcastle Experience and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jenny; Honari, Morteza

    1992-01-01

    Argues for the necessity of adopting a human ecological framework for the advancement of health. Focusing on the Australian experience, highlights the difficulties in moving beyond the narrow mold of Western Medical Science to a more holistic, quality of life orientation, and suggests that the role of education at all levels of the community is…

  10. Animation, embodiment, and digital media human experience of technological liveliness

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, K

    2013-01-01

    Animation, Embodiment and Digital Media articulates the human experience of technology-mediated animated phenomena in terms of sensory perception, bodily action and imaginative interpretation, suggesting a new theoretical framework with analyses of exemplary user interfaces, video games and interactive artworks.

  11. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    When the Advisory Committee began work in April 1994 we were charged with determining whether the radiation experiments design and administration adequately met the ethical and scientific standards, including standards of informed consent, that prevailed at the time of the experiments and that exist today and also to determine the ethical and scientific standards and criteria by which it shall evaluate human radiation experiments. Although this charge seems straightforward, it is in fact difficult to determine what the appropriate standards should be for evaluating the conduct and policies of thirty or fifty years ago. First, we needed to determine the extent to which the standards of that time are similar to the standards of today. To the extent that there were differences we needed to determine the relative roles of each in making moral evaluations. In Chapter 1 we report what we have been able to reconstruct about government rules and policies in the 1940s and 1950s regarding human experiments. We focus primarily on the Atomic Energy Commission and the Department of Defense. In Chapter 2 we turn from a consideration of government standards to an exploration of the norms and practices of physicians and medical scientists who conducted research with human subjects during this period. Using the results of our Ethics Oral History Project, and other sources, we also examine how scientists of the time viewed their moral responsibilities to human subjects as well as how this translated into the manner in which they conducted their research.

  12. Experiments in human multi-issue negotiation: analysis and support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, T.; Jonker, C.M.; Schut, M.C.; Treur, J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on experiments in (human) multi-issue negotiation and their analysis, and to present a generic software environment supporting such an analysis. First, the paper presents a System for Analysis of Multi-Issue Negotiation (SAMIN). SAMIN is designed to analyse neg

  13. Neuroscience and the Soul: Competing Explanations for the Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jesse Lee; Ritter, Ryan S.; Hepler, Justin

    2013-01-01

    The development of fMRI techniques has generated a boom of neuroscience research across the psychological sciences, and revealed neural correlates for many psychological phenomena seen as central to the human experience (e.g., morality, agency). Meanwhile, the rise of neuroscience has reignited old debates over mind-body dualism and the soul.…

  14. Capturing Moment-To-Moment Changes in Multivariate Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ruiter, Naomi M. P.; Van Der Steen, Steffie; Den Hartigh, Ruud J. R.; Van Geert, Paul L. C.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we aim to shed light on a technique to study intra-individual variability that spans the time frame of seconds and minutes, i.e., micro-level development. This form of variability is omnipresent in behavioural development and processes of human experience, yet is often ignored in empirical studies, given a lack of proper analysis…

  15. Neuroscience and the Soul: Competing Explanations for the Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jesse Lee; Ritter, Ryan S.; Hepler, Justin

    2013-01-01

    The development of fMRI techniques has generated a boom of neuroscience research across the psychological sciences, and revealed neural correlates for many psychological phenomena seen as central to the human experience (e.g., morality, agency). Meanwhile, the rise of neuroscience has reignited old debates over mind-body dualism and the soul.…

  16. Human strategic reasoning in dynamic games: Experiments, logics, cognitive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Sujata; Halder, Tamoghna; Sharma, Khyati; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2015-01-01

    © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015.This article provides a three-way interaction between experiments, logic and cognitive modelling so as to bring out a shared perspective among these diverse areas, aiming towards better understanding and better modelling of human strategic reasoning in

  17. Human Ecology and Health Advancement: The Newcastle Experience and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jenny; Honari, Morteza

    1992-01-01

    Argues for the necessity of adopting a human ecological framework for the advancement of health. Focusing on the Australian experience, highlights the difficulties in moving beyond the narrow mold of Western Medical Science to a more holistic, quality of life orientation, and suggests that the role of education at all levels of the community is…

  18. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  19. Human strategic reasoning in dynamic games: Experiments, logics, cognitive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Sujata; Halder, Tamoghna; Sharma, Khyati; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2015-01-01

    © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015.This article provides a three-way interaction between experiments, logic and cognitive modelling so as to bring out a shared perspective among these diverse areas, aiming towards better understanding and better modelling of human strategic reasoning in dynami

  20. The human amygdala and the induction and experience of fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Justin S; Adolphs, Ralph; Damasio, Antonio; Tranel, Daniel

    2011-01-11

    Although clinical observations suggest that humans with amygdala damage have abnormal fear reactions and a reduced experience of fear, these impressions have not been systematically investigated. To address this gap, we conducted a new study in a rare human patient, SM, who has focal bilateral amygdala lesions. To provoke fear in SM, we exposed her to live snakes and spiders, took her on a tour of a haunted house, and showed her emotionally evocative films. On no occasion did SM exhibit fear, and she never endorsed feeling more than minimal levels of fear. Likewise, across a large battery of self-report questionnaires, 3 months of real-life experience sampling, and a life history replete with traumatic events, SM repeatedly demonstrated an absence of overt fear manifestations and an overall impoverished experience of fear. Despite her lack of fear, SM is able to exhibit other basic emotions and experience the respective feelings. The findings support the conclusion that the human amygdala plays a pivotal role in triggering a state of fear and that the absence of such a state precludes the experience of fear itself. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The human amygdala and the induction and experience of fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Justin S.; Adolphs, Ralph; Damasio, Antonio R.; Tranel, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Summary Although clinical observations suggest that humans with amygdala damage have abnormal fear reactions and a reduced experience of fear [1–3], these impressions have not been systematically investigated. To address this gap, we conducted a new study in a rare human patient, SM, who has focal bilateral amygdala lesions [4]. To provoke fear in SM, we exposed her to live snakes and spiders, took her on a tour of a haunted house, and showed her emotionally evocative films. On no occasion did SM exhibit fear and she never endorsed feeling more than minimal levels of fear. Likewise, across a large battery of self-report questionnaires, three months of real-life experience sampling, and a life history replete with traumatic events, SM repeatedly demonstrated an absence of overt fear manifestations and an overall impoverished experience of fear. Despite her lack of fear, SM is able to exhibit other basic emotions and experience the respective feelings. The findings support the conclusion that the human amygdala plays a pivotal role in triggering a state of fear, and that the absence of such a state precludes the experience of fear itself. PMID:21167712

  2. Post-game analysis: An initial experiment for heuristic-based resource management in concurrent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jerry C.

    1987-01-01

    In concurrent systems, a major responsibility of the resource management system is to decide how the application program is to be mapped onto the multi-processor. Instead of using abstract program and machine models, a generate-and-test framework known as 'post-game analysis' that is based on data gathered during program execution is proposed. Each iteration consists of (1) (a simulation of) an execution of the program; (2) analysis of the data gathered; and (3) the proposal of a new mapping that would have a smaller execution time. These heuristics are applied to predict execution time changes in response to small perturbations applied to the current mapping. An initial experiment was carried out using simple strategies on 'pipeline-like' applications. The results obtained from four simple strategies demonstrated that for this kind of application, even simple strategies can produce acceptable speed-up with a small number of iterations.

  3. Use of indocyanine green angiography in microsurgical subinguinal varicocelectomy - lessons learned from our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chak-Lam; Ho, Kwan-Lun; Chan, Wayne Kwun-Wai; Chu, Ringo Wing-Hong; Law, In-Chak

    2017-07-20

    Microsurgical subinguinal varicocelectomy (MSV) is generally considered the gold standard nowadays in view of the lower risk of complications and recurrence. To achieve complete ligation of veins while preserving testicular artery (TA) during the procedure remains challenging despite the application of high power optical magnification and micro-Doppler ultrasonography. The use of intraoperative indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) with infrared fluorescence operative micro-scope in MSV potentially lowers the incidence of TA injury and shortens the learning curve of nov-ice surgeons. We present our initial experience in the application of the technique in nine patients and explore the potential of the new adjunct. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  4. The Case For Reporting Pro-Active Environmental Initiatives: A Malaysian Experiment On Stakeholder Influence Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangeline Elijido-Ten

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to gain insights on the preferred strategies chosen by various stakeholder representatives to influence management to either provide/not provide environmental disclosures in an experimental setting. A typology of resource relationships and influence strategies is adapted as a framework to make sense of the views presented by various stakeholder representative groups. To facilitate a Malaysian experiment, qualitative interviews with the aid of a hypothetical vignette are conducted to understand how different stakeholder groups go about seeking what they want from the management. The findings in this exploratory study indicate that although the model is useful to understand the influence strategies taken by each stakeholder group, its effectiveness is tempered by the level of significance placed by these groups on the environmental initiative and their perception of how the event will affect their stake on the firm.

  5. Highlight report local initiatives. Experiences with electric transport; Highlight report lokale initiatieven. Ervaringen met elektrisch vervoer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-15

    In March 2013 Linkingreen and XTNT started a survey on local electric transportation initiatives. The aim is to learn from the experiences, problems and obstacles of business users of electric vehicles: cars, vans or trucks, scooters, boats and special vehicles (e.g. garbage trucks) that are all-electric or plug-in (with plug). In this brief report, the main results are presented [Dutch] In maart 2013 is door Linkingreen en XTNT in opdracht van Agentschap NL een enquete uitgezet naar lokale initiatieven elektrisch vervoer. Doel is te leren wat de ervaringen, knelpunten en belemmeringen zijn van zakelijke gebruikers van elektrisch vervoer: personenauto's, bestel- of vrachtauto's, scooters, vaartuigen en bijzondere voertuigen (vuilniswagens etc.) die volledig elektrische of plug in (met stekker) zijn. In dit korte verslag zijn de belangrijkste resultaten opgenomen.

  6. LOW AMPLITUDE SINGLE AND MULTIPLE SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING OF LX-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Chidester, S; Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W

    2006-06-27

    Shock initiation experiments were performed on the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton binder) using single and multiple low amplitude shocks to obtain pressure history data for use in Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling parameterization. A 100 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the LX-04 explosive charges containing manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between explosive discs. In the single shock experiments, the run distances to detonation at three shock pressures showed agreement with previously published data above 3 GPa. Even longer run distances to detonation were measured using 80 mm long by 145 mm diameter LX-04 charges impacted by low velocity projectiles from a 155 mm diameter gun. The minimum shock pressure required to cause low levels of exothermic reaction were determined for these large LX-04 charge dimensions. Multiple shocks were generated as double shocks by using a flyer plate with two materials and as reflected shocks by placing a high impedance material at the rear of the explosive charge. In both cases, the first shock pressure was not high enough to cause detonation of LX-04, and the second shock pressure, which would have been sufficient to cause detonation if generated by a single shock, failed to cause detonation. Thus LX-04 exhibited shock desensitization over a range of 0.6 to 1.4 GPa. The higher shock pressure LX-04 model was extended to accurately simulate these lower pressure and multiple shock gauge records. The shock desensitization effects observed with multiple shock compressions were partially accounted for in the model by using a critical compression corresponding to a shock pressure of 1.2 GPa. This shock desensitization effect occurs at higher pressures than those of other HMX-based PBX's containing higher HMX percentages.

  7. Initial experience of using the filter protection device during carotid artery stenting in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Katsutoshi; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Satoru; Taoka, Toshiaki; Miyasaka, Toshiteru; Myouchin, Kaoru; Wada, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Masahiko; Fukusumi, Akio; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Kurokawa, Shinichiro; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2008-07-01

    No filter protection devices for carotid artery stenting (CAS) have been formally approved for use in Japan; however, as of April 2008, the Angioguard XP (AGXP) was approved. This article describes our initial results using the AGXP during CAS for the treatment of carotid artery stenosis. A group of 15 patients (14 men) with a mean age of 72.3 years (range 53-81 years) were treated by CAS using the AGXP. Among them, 10 were symptomatic with >50% stenosis of the common or internal carotid artery (ICA), and 5 were asymptomatic with >70% stenosis. The rates of technical success, periprocedural stroke, ICA flow impairment, filter movement, and development of new ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) were assessed. CAS using the AGXP was successful in all cases. There was one minor stroke, and flow impairment occurred in six patients. Filter movement averaged 1.9 vertebral bodies. DWI showed new ipsilateral ischemic lesions in eight of the patients. Initial clinical experience using the AGXP for CAS has been generally sufficient. However, attention must be paid to three problems when using the AGXP: the filter may move after placement; the filter may disturb blood flow in the ICA; and debris may pass around the filter.

  8. Endobronchial Ultrasound-directed Transbronchial Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Mediastinal Lesions: Initial Egyptian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safwat, Tarek; Khattab, Adel; Haddad, Salwa El; Mostafa, Yasser; Korraa, Emad; Madkour, Ashraf; Fattah, Wael Abd El

    2009-01-01

    Mediastinal lesions represent a diagnostic challenge and often require invasive approaches. We evaluated the role of radial probe endobronchial ultrasound-directed transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) in the evaluation of mediastinal lesions. Between March 2005 to February 2006, 30 consecutive patients with enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes from unknown etiologies or suspicious for metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma and mediastinal masses underwent EBUS-TBNA and were clinically followed up. EBUS-TBNA was applied under topical anesthesia, midazolam sedation with a mean dose of 4.6+1.7 mg and prolonged the examination by 14.7 minutes on average. EBUS-directed TBNA was performed in 17 lymph nodes and 13 mediastinal masses, achieving specific diagnosis in 82.3% (14/17) and 84.6% (11/13) of examined lesions, respectively, with an overall yield of 83%. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of EBUS-TBNA in distinguishing benign from malignant mediastinal lesions were 89.4%, 100%, and 93.3%, respectively. EBUS was well tolerated by most of the patients with no TBNA-related complications. In conclusion, EBUS-TBNA of mediastinal lesions is a minimally invasive safe diagnostic technique with high yield, even in the hands of those with initial experience. This initial study is convincing and stimulating for widespread application of EBUS-TBNA in Egyptian bronchoscopy practice.

  9. Academics and Learners’ Perceptions on Blended Learning as a Strategic Initiative to Improve Student Learning Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Adeline Ng Ling

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasingly tighter shift of socio-economic constraints on higher education sectors in the recent years has called for greater flexibilities in student learning experience both locally and abroad. To this end, we have recently implemented a Blended Learning Initiative in an attempt to provide better learning support and greater flexibility to our students. This initiative is also in line with the University’s aim of having 50% of our learning and teaching delivered on-line by 2020. In this report, we present our findings on academics and learners’ perceptions on the approach which were obtained through surveys. Results showed that blended learning approach was new to the academics and the factors for successful blended learning implementation were identified. Results also showed that learners appreciated the approach as it made learning more accessible and flexible. Furthermore, they also enjoyed the interesting online activities incorporated into their units. In addition, learners were also able to review and pace their own learning. They also perceived that they have the access to the resources and technical ability to cope with online learning materials and activities. Nonetheless, the survey also revealed that learners still prefer to have academics delivering information to them directly rather than a flipped classroom model. In conclusion, findings from this study provide insights that blended learning could be effective to supplement courses offered by the faculty.

  10. Implementation of electronic checklists in an oncology medical record: initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Kevin V; Miller, Alexis A; Roeske, John C

    2011-07-01

    The quality of any medical treatment depends on the accurate processing of multiple complex components of information, with proper delivery to the patient. This is true for radiation oncology, in which treatment delivery is as complex as a surgical procedure but more dependent on hardware and software technology. Uncorrected errors, even if small or infrequent, can result in catastrophic consequences for the patient. We developed electronic checklists (ECLs) within the oncology electronic medical record (EMR) and evaluated their use and report on our initial clinical experience. Using the Mosaiq EMR, we developed checklists within the clinical assessment section. These checklists are based on the process flow of information from one group to another within the clinic and enable the processing, confirmation, and documentation of relevant patient information before the delivery of radiation therapy. The clinical use of the ECL was documented by means of a customized report. Use of ECL has reduced the number of times that physicians were called to the treatment unit. In particular, the ECL has ensured that therapists have a better understanding of the treatment plan before the initiation of treatment. An evaluation of ECL compliance showed that, with additional staff training, > 94% of the records were completed. The ECL can be used to ensure standardization of procedures and documentation that the pretreatment checks have been performed before patient treatment. We believe that the implementation of ECLs will improve patient safety and reduce the likelihood of treatment errors.

  11. Posture-Dependent Human 3He Lung Imaging in an Open Access MRI System: Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, L L; Li, C -H; Rosen, M S; Patz, S; Walsworth, R L

    2007-01-01

    The human lung and its functions are extremely sensitive to orientation and posture, and debate continues as to the role of gravity and the surrounding anatomy in determining lung function and heterogeneity of perfusion and ventilation. However, study of these effects is difficult. The conventional high-field magnets used for most hyperpolarized 3He MRI of the human lung, and most other common radiological imaging modalities including PET and CT, restrict subjects to lying horizontally, minimizing most gravitational effects. In this paper, we briefly review the motivation for posture-dependent studies of human lung function, and present initial imaging results of human lungs in the supine and vertical body orientations using inhaled hyperpolarized 3He gas and an open-access MRI instrument. The open geometry of this MRI system features a "walk-in" capability that permits subjects to be imaged in vertical and horizontal positions, and potentially allows for complete rotation of the orientation of the imaging su...

  12. Microcosm experiments to study the interaction of solid and solute phases during initial soil development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, C.; Chabbi, S.; Schaaf, W.

    2009-04-01

    During the initial phase of soil formation mineral weathering, interactions between the solid and liquid phases as well as accumulation of organic matter play an important role for the development of soil properties and for the establishment of vegetation and the colonization of soil biota. Our study is part of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre (SFB/TRR 38) ‘Patterns and processes of initial ecosystem development in an artificial catchment' funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG). The catchment ´Chicken Creeḱ close to Cottbus (Germany) has a size of 6 ha and is composed of a 3-4 m layer of Quaternary loamy to sandy sediments overlying a 1-2 m clay layer. To connect interactions between the soil solid phase and soil solution at the micro-scale with observed processes at the catchment scale we perform microcosm experiments with soil samples from the catchment under controlled laboratory conditions. The microcosm experiments are carried out in a climate chamber at constant 10 °C corresponding to the mean annual temperature of the region. In total 48 soil columns with a diameter of 14.4 cm and height of 30 cm were filled with substrates of two textural compositions reflecting the gradients observed at the catchment and a bulk density of 1.4-1.5 g*cm3. Within the microcosms it is possible to control the gaseous phase and the water fluxes by artificial irrigation. The irrigation runs automated and quasi-continuously four times a day with 6.6 ml each (in total 600 mm*yr-1). Irrigation amount and chemical composition of the artificial rainwater are based on the annual mean at the field site. Litter of two different plant species occurring at the catchment site (Lotus corniculatus, Calamagrostis epigejos) labelled with stable isotopes (δ13C; δ15N) is used for the experiments. All treatments including a control run with four replicates. The gaseous phase in the headspace of the microcosms is analysed continuously for CO2 and N2O contents

  13. UNIX trademark in high energy physics: What we can learn from the initial experiences at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.N.

    1991-03-01

    The reasons why Fermilab decided to support the UNIX operating system are reviewed and placed in the content of an overall model for high energy physics data analysis. The strengths and deficiencies of the UNIX environment for high energy physics are discussed. Fermilab's early experience in dealing with a an open'' multivendor environment, both for computers and for peripherals, is described. The human resources required to fully exploit the opportunities are clearly growing. The possibility of keeping the development and support efforts within reasonable bounds may depend on our ability to collaborate or at least to share information even more effectively than we have in the past. 7 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K; ZENG, ZHAOSHI; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B.; Chiu, Vi K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut ) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer i...

  15. Apoptotic and necrotic influence of dental resin polymerization initiators in human gingival fibroblast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuki, Kouhei; Nomura, Yuji; Bhawal, Ujjal Kumar; Sawajiri, Masahiko; Hirata, Isao; Nahara, Yukinori; Okazaki, Masayuki

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the apoptotic and necrotic influence of four dental resin polymerization initiators--namely benzoyl peroxide (BPO), camphorquinone (CQ), dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and dimethyl-para-toluidine (DMPT)--on human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells. To this end, the growth inhibition of HGF cells with 1 mM BPO, CQ, and DMAEMA, and 500 microM DMPT was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8. Then, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry was used to assess propidium iodide-stained cells (distribution of cells in G0/G1, S, G2/M phases). All four dental resin polymerization initiators induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. As for the patterns of cell death (necrosis and/or apoptosis), they were analyzed using Annexin V-FITC/PI staining with flow cytometry. All four dental resin polymerization initiators most likely induced necrosis.

  16. Mechanism of initiation site selection promoted by the human rhinovirus 2 internal ribosome entry site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Ann; Pöyry, Tuija A A; Skene, Peter J; Jackson, Richard J

    2010-07-01

    Translation initiation site usage on the human rhinovirus 2 internal ribosome entry site (IRES) has been examined in a mixed reticulocyte lysate/HeLa cell extract system. There are two relevant AUG triplets, both in a base-paired hairpin structure (domain VI), with one on the 5' side at nucleotide (nt) 576, base paired with the other at nt 611, which is the initiation site for polyprotein synthesis. A single residue was inserted in the apical loop to put AUG-576 in frame with AUG-611, and in addition another in-frame AUG was introduced at nt 593. When most of the IRES was deleted to generate a monocistronic mRNA, the use of these AUGs conformed to the scanning ribosome model: improving the AUG-576 context increased initiation at this site and decreased initiation at downstream sites, whereas the converse was seen when AUG-576 was mutated to GUA; and AUG-593, when present, took complete precedence over AUG-611. Under IRES-dependent conditions, by contrast, much less initiation occurred at AUG-576 than in a monocistronic mRNA with the same AUG-576 context, mutation of AUG-576 decreased initiation at downstream sites by approximately 70%, and introduction of AUG-593 did not completely abrogate initiation at AUG-611, unless the apical base pairing in domain VI was destroyed by point mutations. These results indicate that ribosomes first bind at the AUG-576 site, but instead of initiating there, most of them are transferred to AUG-611, the majority by strictly linear scanning and a substantial minority by direct transfer, which is possibly facilitated by the occasional persistence of base pairing in the apical part of the domain VI stem.

  17. A novel intermediate in transcription initiation by human mitochondrial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Yaroslav I; Agaronyan, Karen; Cheung, Alan C M; Anikin, Michael; Cramer, Patrick; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2014-04-01

    The mitochondrial genome is transcribed by a single-subunit T7 phage-like RNA polymerase (mtRNAP), structurally unrelated to cellular RNAPs. In higher eukaryotes, mtRNAP requires two transcription factors for efficient initiation-TFAM, a major nucleoid protein, and TFB2M, a transient component of mtRNAP catalytic site. The mechanisms behind assembly of the mitochondrial transcription machinery and its regulation are poorly understood. We isolated and identified a previously unknown human mitochondrial transcription intermediate-a pre-initiation complex that includes mtRNAP, TFAM and promoter DNA. Using protein-protein cross-linking, we demonstrate that human TFAM binds to the N-terminal domain of mtRNAP, which results in bending of the promoter DNA around mtRNAP. The subsequent recruitment of TFB2M induces promoter melting and formation of an open initiation complex. Our data indicate that the pre-initiation complex is likely to be an important target for transcription regulation and provide basis for further structural, biochemical and biophysical studies of mitochondrial transcription.

  18. Astronaut Charles Conrad checks out Human Vestibular Function experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the first manned Skylab mission, checks out the Human Vestibular Function, Experiment M131, during Skylab training at JSC. Conrad is in the work and experiments compartment of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer at JSC. The reference sphere with a magnetic rod is used by the astronaut to indicate body orientation non-visually. The litter chair in which he is seated can be rotated by a motor at its base or, when not being rotated, can tilt forward, backward or to either side.

  19. Effect of Microgravity on Sinorhizobium meliloti: Initial Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael S.; Stutte, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIe) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species of the legume family, was innoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFUs). Two sets of experiments were conducted in orbit and in 24-hour delayed ground controls. Experiment one was designed to determine if S. meliloti infect M. truncatula and initiate physiological changes associated with nodule formation. Roots of five-day-old M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 (Enodll::gus) were innoculated 24 hr before launch with either S. meliloti strain 1021 or strain ABS7 and integrated into BRIC-PDFU hardware placed in a 4 C Cold Bag for launch on Atlantis. Innoculated plants and uninoculated controls were maintained in the dark at ambient temperature in the middeck of STS-135 for 11 days before fixation in RNA/ate/M by crew activation of the PDFU. Experiment two was designed to determine if microgravity altered the process of bacterial infection and host plant nodule formation. Seeds of two M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 lines, the Enodll::gus used in experiment 1, and SUNN, a super-nodulating mutant of A17, were germinated on orbit for 11 days in the middeck cabin and returned to Earth alive inside of BRIC-PDFU's at 4 C S. meliloti strains 1021 and ABS7 were cultivated separately in broth culture on orbit and also returned to Earth alive. After landing, flight- and ground-grown plants and bacteria were transferred from BRIC-PDFU's into Nunc(TradeMark) 4-well plates for reciprocity crosses. Rates of plant growth and nodule development on Buffered Nodulation Medium (lacking nitrogen) were measured for 14 days. Bacteria cultivated in microgravity in the

  20. Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT): Initial clinical experience in the first 80 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E. (Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)), E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Ellerbrock, Malte; Haberer, Thomas (Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)) (and others)

    2010-10-15

    The Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT) started clinical operation in November 2009. In this report we present the first 80 patients treated with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and describe patient selection, treatment planning and daily treatment for different indications. Patients and methods. Between November 15, 2009 and April 15, 2010, 80 patients were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT) with carbon ion and proton radiotherapy. Main treated indications consisted of skull base chordoma (n = 9) and chondrosarcoma (n = 18), malignant salivary gland tumors (n=29), chordomas of the sacrum (n = 5), low grade glioma (n=3), primary and recurrent malignant astrocytoma and glioblastoma (n=7) and well as osteosarcoma (n = 3). Of these patients, four pediatric patients aged under 18 years were treated. Results. All patients were treated using the intensity-modulated rasterscanning technique. Seventy-six patients were treated with carbon ions (95%), and four patients were treated with protons. In all patients x-ray imaging was performed prior to each fraction. Treatment concepts were based on the initial experiences with carbon ion therapy at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) including carbon-only treatments and carbon-boost treatments with photon-IMRT. The average time per fraction in the treatment room per patient was 29 minutes; for irradiation only, the mean time including all patients was 16 minutes. Position verification was performed prior to every treatment fraction with orthogonal x-ray imaging. Conclusion. Particle therapy could be included successfully into the clinical routine at the Dept. of Radiation Oncology in Heidelberg. Numerous clinical trials will subsequently be initiated to precisely define the role of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy in radiation oncology.

  1. [Initial experiences with propofol (Disoprivan) for anesthesia induction in pediatric anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motsch, J; Must, W; Hutschenreuter, K

    1988-09-01

    Propofol is a new intravenous anesthetic agent that provides smooth and rapid induction of anesthesia. A short elimination half-life guarantees rapid recovery. Since it has been reformulated as an emulsion in soya bean oil, anaphylactoid reactions are unlikely to occur. As compared to adults, there is very little experience with propofol in pediatric anesthesia. The aim of this study was to evaluate propofol as an induction agent in children with respect to cardiovascular and respiratory effects and to investigate the incidence of other side-effects. METHOD. In 25 ASA I children aged 3-12 years (6.4 +/- 2.7 SD) anesthesia was induced with a single dose of propofol, after standard premedication with atropine 0.01 mg/kg and Thalamonal 0.04 ml/kg. Anesthesia was maintained with halothane, nitrous oxide, and oxygen. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) were measured before and each minute for 6 min after propofol administration. The incidence of side-effects during induction of anesthesia as well as during recovery and the postoperative period were recorded. RESULTS. Propofol 2.5 mg/kg produced rapid and smooth induction of anesthesia. Mean arterial pressure decreased after 1 min by 14.3% with a maximum of 16.8% after 3 min. HR was influenced differently by propofol; children with initially high HR had a decrease in HR, whereas in children with a low initial rate, HR increased transiently. After 1 min, no further changes occurred. Although no apnea was observed, respiration was shallow and depressed, as indicated by a decrease in SaO2. Two children complained of pain and 4 of discomfort at the site of the injection; 1 of these developed transient phlebitis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. When less equal is less human: Intragroup (dis)respect and the experience of being human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renger, Daniela; Mommert, Alex; Renger, Sophus; Simon, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Past research has demonstrated that equality-based respect is an important antecedent of positive social interaction and group-serving behavior. In the present research we tested whether intragroup equality-based respect affects perceptions of being treated as a human as well as self-dehumanization. In Experiment 1, we found that high respect received from fellow work group members heightens group members' sense of being treated as a human being, while low respect diminishes it. In Experiment 2, we secured evidence that (dis)respect also affected recipients' self-views in terms of self-dehumanization. More specifically, if respect was withheld by other ingroup members, fewer human nature and human uniqueness traits, as well as secondary positive emotions, were attributed to the self. This increase in self-infrahumanization was further related to higher endorsement of unethical behavior. We discuss the importance of equality-based respect for (de-)humanization processes in social groups.

  3. The Workplace Experiences of Beginning Teachers in Three Countries: A Message for Initial Teacher Education from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Anna Elizabeth; Sunde, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Previous research indicates that beginning teachers are not fully prepared for what awaits them in the workforce. This study highlights the value of partnerships among higher education providers, schools and employers and links the experiences of beginning teachers to initial teacher education (ITE). Real-life experiences from the field provide…

  4. NUMERICAL EXPERIMENTS AND ANALYSIS OF DIGITAL FILTER INITIALIZATION FOR WRF MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-chang; HUANG Si-xun; ZHANG Wei-min; ZHU Xiao-qian; CAO Xiao-qun; LI Yi

    2008-01-01

    Initialization and initial imbalance problem were discussed in the context of a three-dimensional variational data assimilation system of the new generation "Weather Research and Forecasting Model". Severaloptions of digital filter initialization have been tested with a rain storm case. It is shown that digital filter initialization, especially diabatic digital filter initialization and twice digital filter initialization, have effectively removed spurious high frequency noise from initial data for numerical weather prediction and produced balanced initial conditions. For six consecutive intermittent data assimilation cycles covering a 3-day period, mean initialization increments and impact on forecast variables are studied. DFI has been demonstrated to provide better adjustment of the hydrometeors and vertical velocity, reduced spin-up time, and improved forecast variables quantity.

  5. Initial Results from the STEM Student Experiences Aboard Ships (STEMSEAS) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. C.; Cooper, S. K.; Thomson, K.; Rabin, B.; Alberts, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Science Technology Engineering and Math Student Experiences Aboard Ships (STEMSEAS) program was created as a response to NSF's call (through GEOPATHS) for improving undergraduate STEM education and enhancing diversity in the geosciences. It takes advantage of unused berths on UNOLS ships during transits between expeditions. During its 2016 pilot year - which consisted of three transits on three different research vessels in different parts of the country, each with a slightly different focus - the program has gained significant insights into how best to create and structure these opportunities and create impact on individual students. A call for applications resulted in nearly 900 applicants for 30 available spots. Of these applicants, 32% are from minority groups underrepresented in the geosciences (Black, Hispanic, or American Indian) and 20% attend community colleges. The program was able to sail socioeconomically diverse cohorts and include women, veterans, and students with disabilities and from two- and four-year colleges. Twenty-three are underrepresented minorities, 6 attend community colleges, 5 attend an HBCU or tribal college, and many are at HSIs or other MSIs. While longer term impact assessment will have to wait, initial results and 6-month tracking for the first cohort indicate that these kinds of relatively short but intense experiences can indeed achieve significant impacts on students' perception of the geosciences, in their understanding of STEM career opportunities, their desire to work in a geoscience lab setting, and to incorporate geosciences into non-STEM careers. Insights were also gained into the successful makeup of mentor/leader groups, factors to consider in student selection, necessary pre- and post-cruise logistics management, follow-up activities, structure of activities during daily life at sea, increasing student networks and access to mentorships, and leveraging of pre-existing resources and ship-based opportunities

  6. The Ways of Advanced Human Capital: Discussions from Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayén Amanda Rovira Rubio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present research aimed to know the significance of academic training experienced by postgraduate students who are pursuing their studies abroad under the context of a Training Program for Advanced Human Capital promoted by the Government of Chile. A feminist epistemology of situated knowledge was used as methodological framework, and narrative productions were used as technique of data collection. With this approach, the experiences of seven graduate students in Spanish universities, mostly of them beneficiaries of scholarships from Chile, were analyzed. The main findings were: the positive assessment of the experience of studying abroad, the divergent testimonies about these experiences, which based on previous educational trajectories and the socioeconomic level of the professional. These aspects influenced the identifications with the concept of Advanced Human Capital for Chile. Also, for some participants, the Advanced Human Capital is seen as an imposed concept which does not coincide with the real opportunities for the professional practice in the country. Therefore, the participants are sceptical about the possibilities of adequate job insertion in the return to Chile.

  7. Humans adjust control to initial squat depth in vertical squat jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Casius, L J Richard; Sijpkens, Igor W T; Jaspers, Richard T

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the control strategy that humans use in jumping. Eight male gymnasts performed vertical squat jumps from five initial postures that differed in squat depth (P1-P5) while kinematic data, ground reaction forces, and electromyograms (EMGs) of leg muscles were collected; the latter were rectified and smoothed to obtain SREMGs. P3 was the preferred initial posture; in P1, P2, P4, and P5 height of the mass center was +13, +7, -7 and -14 cm, respectively, relative to that in P3. Furthermore, maximum-height jumps from the initial postures observed in the subjects were simulated with a model comprising four body segments and six Hill-type muscles. The only input was the onset of stimulation of each of the muscles (Stim). The subjects were able to perform well-coordinated squat jumps from all postures. Peak SREMG levels did not vary among P1-P5, but SREMG onset of plantarflexors occurred before that of gluteus maximus in P1 and > 90 ms after that in P5 (P < 0.05). In the simulation study, similar systematic shifts occurred in Stim onsets across the optimal control solutions for jumps from P1-P5. Because the adjustments in SREMG onsets to initial posture observed in the subjects were very similar to the adjustments in optimal Stim onsets of the model, it was concluded that the SREMG adjustments were functional, in the sense that they contributed to achieving the greatest jump height possible from each initial posture. For the model, we were able to develop a mapping from initial posture to Stim onsets that generated successful jumps from P1-P5. It appears that to explain how subjects adjust their control to initial posture there is no need to assume that the brain contains an internal dynamics model of the musculoskeletal system.

  8. Pancreas Preservation With Viaspan, Celsior, and Custodiol Solutions: An Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Casado, M C; Pérez-Daga, J A; Blanco-Elena, J A; Aranda-Narváez, J M; Sánchez-Pérez, B; Cabello-Díaz, M; Ruiz-Esteban, P; León-Díaz, F J; Gutiérrez-de la Fuente, C; Santoyo-Santoyo, J

    2016-11-01

    There is still controversy about which preservation solution in pancreas transplantation could be the best. The aim of this study was to analyze our initial experience with Custodiol solution (CuS) compared with Viaspan solution (VS) and Celsior solution (CS) in pancreas transplantation. A retrospective study included 94 consecutive pancreatic transplants, from 2007 until 2015. We compared 3 groups, depending on preservation solution: Viaspan (n = 41), Celsior (n = 40), or Custodiol (n = 13). The primary end point was patient and pancreas survival at 1 year after pancreas transplantation. The recipient and donor characteristics were similar except in cold ischemia time; it was higher with Celsior. No differences were found in postoperative complications and pancreas graft function at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year (glucose, HbA1c, C-peptide, creatinine). The pancreas and patient survival at 1 year was comparable (pancreas survival: VS, 80%; CS, 90%; CuS, 92%; log-rank, 0.875; and patient survival: VS, 92%; CS, 97%; CuS, 100%; log-rank, 0.9). In our institution, the Custodiol solution in pancreas transplantation presented similar outcomes in terms of postoperative complications, pancreas graft function, and 1-year survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementing a robotics curriculum at an academic general surgery training program: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Sasaki, Jennifer; Rogers, Ann M; Pauli, Eric M; Haluck, Randy S; Estes, Stephanie J; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2016-09-01

    The robotic surgical platform is being utilized by a growing number of hospitals across the country, including academic medical centers. Training programs are tasked with teaching their residents how to utilize this technology. To this end, we have developed and implemented a robotic surgical curriculum, and share our initial experience here. Our curriculum was implemented for all General Surgical residents for the academic year 2014-2015. The curriculum consisted of online training, readings, bedside training, console simulation, participating in ten cases as bedside first assistant, and operating at the console. 20 surgical residents were included. Residents were provided the curriculum and notified the department upon completion. Bedside assistance and operative console training were completed in the operating room through a mix of biliary, foregut, and colorectal cases. During the fiscal years of 2014 and 2015, there were 164 and 263 robot-assisted surgeries performed within the General Surgery Department, respectively. All 20 residents completed the online and bedside instruction portions of the curriculum. Of the 20 residents trained, 13/20 (65 %) sat at the Surgeon console during at least one case. Utilizing this curriculum, we have trained and incorporated residents into robot-assisted cases in an efficient manner. A successful curriculum must be based on didactic learning, reading, bedside training, simulation, and training in the operating room. Each program must examine their caseload and resident class to ensure proper exposure to this platform.

  10. CT-guided spinal injection: initial experience with Sprotte tip needles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, Uei [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this paper is to describe our initial experience and to illustrate the potential benefits of using small caliber (25 and 27 G), noncutting pencil point needles (Sprotte) with single puncture coaxial technique in CT-guided spinal intervention (CTSI). From January 2009 to June 2009, Sprotte needles with single puncture coaxial technique were used in a total of ten patients for selective nerve root block (SNRB), facet joint block, and pars block under CT fluoroscopy (total of 16 target structures). All procedures were performed without conscious sedation, and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were recorded to determine pain related to needle placement. Total CT fluoroscopy time and out-of-plane needle deviation were obtained. Final needle position was documented by contrast injection for SNRBs and image capture for joint space cannulation. Sixteen out of the 16 structures were successfully targeted. No increase in VAS scores associated with needle placement was recorded, after infiltration of local anesthesia. Optimal peri-neurograms were obtained in all cases of SNRB, despite the side-hole opening in the Sprotte needles. Mean CT fluoroscopy time was 2 s (range 2-8 s per structure), and there was no case of out-of-plane needle deviation that required adjustment of the CT gantry. The use of small caliber Sprotte needles in CTSI is technically feasible and represents a potential refinement to current techniques in the management of chronic spinal pain. (orig.)

  11. A nonsurgical endodontics relational research database: the initial six years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Mian K; Shukovsky, Deborah Gortler; Wong, Steven; Vohra, Gayatri

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to report results of the initial six years of experience utilizing a nonsurgical root canal treatment (NSRCT) database; to compare patient characteristics, operative procedures, and patient outcomes observed in the database to those observed in other studies; and to discuss the potential benefits of a clinical endodontic database. A total of 7,372 NSRCT cases performed by endodontic residents at the University of Pennsylvania from 2000 to 2006 were evaluated. The odds ratio (OR) for caries and trauma being causative agents for NSRCT in

  12. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in ovarian tumors – diagnostic parameters: method presentation and initial experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAXIM, ANITA-ROXANA; BADEA, RADU; TAMAS, ATILLA; TRAILA, ALEXANDRU

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss and illustrate the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in evaluating ovarian tumors compared to conventional ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound and the histopathological analysis and suggest how this technique may best be used to distinguish benign from malignant ovarian masses. We present the method and initial experience of our center by analyzing the parameters used in contrast-enhanced ultrasound in 6 patients with ovarian tumors of uncertain etiology. For examination we used a Siemens ultrasound machine with dedicated contrast software and the contrast agent SonoVue, Bracco. The patients underwent conventional ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound and i.v. administration of the contrast agent. The parameters studied were: inflow of contrast (rise time), time to peak enhancement, mean transit time. The series of patients is part of an extensive prospective PhD study aimed at elaborating a differential diagnosis protocol for benign versus malignant ovarian tumors, by validating specific parameters for contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Although the method is currently used with great success in gastroenterology, urology and senology, its validation in gynecology is still in the early phases. Taking into consideration that the method is minimally invasive and much less costly that CT/MRI imaging, demonstrating its utility in oncologic gynecology would be a big step in preoperative evaluation of these cases. PMID:26527912

  13. Robotic liver resection: initial experience with three-arm robotic and single-port robotic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Emad; Noureldine, Salem I; Saggi, Bob; Buell, Joseph F

    2013-01-01

    Robotic-assisted surgery offers a solution to fundamental limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery, and its use is gaining wide popularity. However, the application of this technology has yet to be established in hepatic surgery. A retrospective analysis of our prospectively collected liver surgery database was performed. Over a 6-month period, all consecutive patients who underwent robotic-assisted hepatic resection for a liver neoplasm were included. Demographics, operative time, and morbidity encountered were evaluated. A total of 7 robotic-assisted liver resections were performed, including 2 robotic-assisted single-port access liver resections with the da Vinci-Si Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Sunnyvalle, Calif.) USA. The mean age was 44.6 years (range, 21-68 years); there were 5 male and 2 female patients. The mean operative time (± SD) was 61.4 ± 26.7 minutes; the mean operative console time (± SD) was 38.2 ± 23 minutes. No conversions were required. The mean blood loss was 100.7 mL (range, 10-200 mL). The mean hospital stay (± SD) was 2 ± 0.4 days. No postoperative morbidity related to the procedure or death was encountered. Our initial experience with robotic liver resection confirms that this technique is both feasible and safe. Robotic-assisted technology appears to improve the precision and ergonomics of single-access surgery while preserving the known benefits of laparoscopic surgery, including cosmesis, minimal morbidity, and faster recovery.

  14. Preparing beginning reading teachers: An experimental comparison of initial early literacy field experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Lake, Vickie E; Greulich, Luana; Folsom, Jessica S; Guidry, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This randomized-control trial examined the learning of preservice teachers taking an initial Early Literacy course in an early childhood education program and of the kindergarten or first grade students they tutored in their field experience. Preservice teachers were randomly assigned to one of two tutoring programs: Book Buddies and Tutor Assisted Intensive Learning Strategies (TAILS), which provided identical meaning-focused instruction (shared book reading), but differed in the presentation of code-focused skills. TAILS used explicit, scripted lessons, and the Book Buddies required that code-focused instruction take place during shared book reading. Our research goal was to understand which tutoring program would be most effective in improving knowledge about reading, lead to broad and deep language and preparedness of the novice preservice teachers, and yield the most successful student reading outcomes. Findings indicate that all pre-service teachers demonstrated similar gains in knowledge, but preservice teachers in the TAILS program demonstrated broader and deeper application of knowledge and higher self-ratings of preparedness to teach reading. Students in both conditions made similar comprehension gains, but students tutored with TAILS showed significantly stronger decoding gains.

  15. Single-port laparoscopic approach of the left liver: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps Lasa, Judith; Cugat Andorrà, Esteban; Herrero Fonollosa, Eric; García Domingo, María Isabel; Sánchez Martínez, Raquel; Vargas Pierola, Harold; Rodríguez Campos, Aurora

    2014-11-01

    New technological advances have enabled the development of single-port laparoscopic surgery. This approach began with cholecystectomy and subsequently with other abdominal surgeries. However, few publications on laparoscopic liver surgery have described the use of complete single-port access. We present our initial experience of a single-port laparoscopic hepatectomy. Between May 2012 and December 2013, 5 single-port laparoscopic hepatectomies were performed: one for benign disease and four for colorectal liver metastases. The lesions were approached through a 3-5 cm right supraumbilical incision using a single-port access device. All the lesions were located in hepatic segments II or III. Four left lateral sectorectomies and one left hepatectomy were performed. Median operative time was 135 min. No cases were converted to conventional laparoscopic or open surgery. The oral intake began at 18 h. There were no postoperative complications and no patients required blood transfusion. The median hospital stay was 3 days. The degree of satisfaction was very good in 4 cases and good in one. Patients resumed their normal daily activities at 8 days. Single-port laparoscopic hepatectomy is safe and feasible in selected cases and may reduce surgical aggression and offer better cosmetic results. Comparative studies are needed to determine the real advantages of this approach. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. An initial experience with a digital drainage system during the postoperative period of pediatric thoracic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Altair da Silva; Bachichi, Thiago; Holanda, Caio; Rizzo, Luiz Augusto Lucas Martins De

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To report an initial experience with a digital drainage system during the postoperative period of pediatric thoracic surgery. Methods: This was a prospective observational study involving consecutive patients, ≤ 14 years of age, treated at a pediatric thoracic surgery outpatient clinic, for whom pulmonary resection (lobectomy or segmentectomy via muscle-sparing thoracotomy) was indicated. The parameters evaluated were air leak (as quantified with the digital system), biosafety, duration of drainage, length of hospital stay, and complications. The digital system was used in 11 children (mean age, 5.9 ± 3.3 years). The mean length of hospital stay was 4.9 ± 2.6 days, the mean duration of drainage was 2.5 ± 0.7 days, and the mean drainage volume was 270.4 ± 166.7 mL. The mean maximum air leak flow was 92.78 ± 95.83 mL/min (range, 18-338 mL/min). Two patients developed postoperative complications (atelectasis and pneumonia, respectively). The use of this digital system facilitated the decision-making process during the postoperative period, reducing the risk of errors in the interpretation and management of air leaks. PMID:28117476

  17. Initial clinical experience using the Echo Navigator~-system during structural heart disease interventions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Balzer; Tobias; Zeus; Katharina; Hellhammer; Verena; Veulemans; Silke; Eschenhagen; Eva; Kehmeier; Christian; Meyer; Tienush; Rassaf; Malte; Kelm

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To present our initial clinical experience using this innovative software solution for guidance of percutaneous structural heart disease interventions.METHODS: Left atrial appendage, atrial septal defect and paravalvular leak closure, transaortic valve repair and Mitra Clip procedures were performed in the catheter laboratory under fluoroscopic and echocardiographic guidance. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional images generated by the transesophageal echocardiography probe were interfaced with the fluoroscopic images in real-time using the Echo Navigator-system.RESULTS:The application of the novel image fusion technology was safe and led to a better appreciation of multimodality imaging guidance due to improved visualization of the complex relationship between catheter devices and anatomical structures.CONCLUSION:The Echo Navigator-system is a feasible and safe tool for guidance of interventional procedures in structural heart disease.This innovative technology may improve confidence of interventional cardiologists in targeting and positioning interventional devices in order to increase safety,accuracy,and efficacy of percutaneous interventions in the catheter laboratory.

  18. Initial experience with personal digital assistant-based reflectance photoplethysmograph for free tissue transfer monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Brendan C; Futran, Neal D; Zang, Billy; Scharf, John E

    2003-08-01

    Improved microsurgical technique has resulted in a high percentage of successful free tissue transfers. When a tissue transfer fails in the head and neck, however, the results are orocutaneous fistulas, carotid artery exposure, and deformity that adds morbidity, expense, and may delay adjuvant therapy. Postoperative monitoring of tissue perfusion can detect early problems in free tissue transfer that may allow for early intervention and salvage. The authors have demonstrated that reflectance photoplethysmography can detect perfusion changes in free tissue transfer within 5 minutes of a pedicle "insult" intraoperatively. Normative data for viable flaps from various donor sites have been established. The authors now report their initial experience with a newly developed reflectance photoplethysmograph based on a hand-held computer for routine clinical use. Their results are compared with a conventional surveillance protocol that included observation, bleeding to pin prick, and bedside duplex scanning of the vascular pedicle. In a series of 30 free tissue transfers (29 patients), there was one ischemic event (skin paddle loss only), which was detected by the monitor. The monitor was able to predict correctly (one flap) survival of a free tissue transfer even when duplex ultrasonic data were indicative of an absence of perfusion. Personal digital assistant-based photoplethysmography appears to be a promising device for bedside diagnosis of free tissue transfer viability or ischemia.

  19. Integrating an Interprofessional Education Experience Into a Human Physiology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Scott; Molina, Patricia E; McDonough, Kathleen H; Mercante, Donald E; Gunaldo, Tina P

    2017-09-01

    To obtain physician assistant (PA) student perceptions about an interprofessional education (IPE) training experience embedded in a multidisciplinary science course. An IPE training experience was integrated into a graduate human physiology course offered to PA, physical therapy, and graduate studies students. The focus of the activity related to the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competency domains of (1) roles and responsibilities and (2) teams and teamwork. Effectiveness was assessed in pretraining and posttraining surveys, which included questions addressing student self-perceptions of IPEC competency domains, student assessment of the learning activity, and student reflection. We observed a statistically significant positive change in PA student perceptions of IPEC competency domains. Students also provided a positive evaluation of the IPE activity and communicated personal improvements in IPE perspectives. Incorporating planned IPE experiences into multidisciplinary health science courses represents an appropriate venue for PA students to learn and apply interprofessional competencies, which may benefit future interprofessional practice.

  20. Flight initiation distances of nesting Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus in response to human disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel G. Jorgensen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Birds frequently interact with people when they occur in coupled human-ecological or anthropogenic environments, which makes the protection of legally protected species a challenge. Flight initiation distances (FIDs are often used to inform development of appropriate buffer distances required for human exclusion zones used to protect birds nesting in anthropogenic landscapes. Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus are protected by the Endangered Species Act in the United States and often nest in areas used by humans. Studies evaluating Piping Plover FIDs are limited and implementation of exclusion zones has been inconsistent across the species' range. We measured Piping Plover response and FIDs to naturally occurring stimuli on public beaches at Lake McConaughy, Nebraska, USA. Piping Plover FIDs differed most by stimulus class (vehicle, human, dog, human with dog, Julian day, and hour of day. Piping Plover FIDs were greatest for dog and human with dog compared to humans and vehicles. For all types of stimuli, Piping Plover FIDs decreased over time during the nesting season and increased slightly during each day. In the majority of instances in which Piping Plovers left their nests, return times to the nest were relatively short (less than three minutes. These results suggest Piping Plovers become habituated to the presence of human-related stimuli over the course of a nesting season, but other explanations such as parental investment and risk allocation cannot be excluded. Additional research and improved guidance regarding the implementation of exclusion zones is needed so managers can implement effective protection programs in anthropogenic landscapes.

  1. Rising from failure and learning from success: The role of past experience in radical initiative taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Deichmann (Dirk); J.C.M. van den Ende (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ We investigate how the successes and failures of people who initiate radical ideas influence (a) the inclination to take new personal initiatives and (b) the outcome of those initiatives. Using the data of 1,792 radical ideas suggested by 908 employees in a multinationa

  2. Human Empathy, Personality and Experience Affect the Emotion Ratings of Dog and Human Facial Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V; Somppi, Sanni; Jokela, Markus; Vainio, Outi; Parkkonen, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Facial expressions are important for humans in communicating emotions to the conspecifics and enhancing interpersonal understanding. Many muscles producing facial expressions in humans are also found in domestic dogs, but little is known about how humans perceive dog facial expressions, and which psychological factors influence people's perceptions. Here, we asked 34 observers to rate the valence, arousal, and the six basic emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear, and anger/aggressiveness) from images of human and dog faces with Pleasant, Neutral and Threatening expressions. We investigated how the subjects' personality (the Big Five Inventory), empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index) and experience of dog behavior affect the ratings of dog and human faces. Ratings of both species followed similar general patterns: human subjects classified dog facial expressions from pleasant to threatening very similarly to human facial expressions. Subjects with higher emotional empathy evaluated Threatening faces of both species as more negative in valence and higher in anger/aggressiveness. More empathetic subjects also rated the happiness of Pleasant humans but not dogs higher, and they were quicker in their valence judgments of Pleasant human, Threatening human and Threatening dog faces. Experience with dogs correlated positively with ratings of Pleasant and Neutral dog faces. Personality also had a minor effect on the ratings of Pleasant and Neutral faces in both species. The results imply that humans perceive human and dog facial expression in a similar manner, and the perception of both species is influenced by psychological factors of the evaluators. Especially empathy affects both the speed and intensity of rating dogs' emotional facial expressions.

  3. 78 FR 73518 - Notice Inviting Suggestions for New Experiments for the Experimental Sites Initiative; Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... based experiments designed to test alternative ways of administering the student financial assistance... the suggestions submitted in response to this notice the Secretary will design experiments and... the Congress. ] We are particularly interested in experiments that are designed to improve...

  4. Avoiding Human Error in Mission Operations: Cassini Flight Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Operating spacecraft is a never-ending challenge and the risk of human error is ever- present. Many missions have been significantly affected by human error on the part of ground controllers. The Cassini mission at Saturn has not been immune to human error, but Cassini operations engineers use tools and follow processes that find and correct most human errors before they reach the spacecraft. What is needed are skilled engineers with good technical knowledge, good interpersonal communications, quality ground software, regular peer reviews, up-to-date procedures, as well as careful attention to detail and the discipline to test and verify all commands that will be sent to the spacecraft. Two areas of special concern are changes to flight software and response to in-flight anomalies. The Cassini team has a lot of practical experience in all these areas and they have found that well-trained engineers with good tools who follow clear procedures can catch most errors before they get into command sequences to be sent to the spacecraft. Finally, having a robust and fault-tolerant spacecraft that allows ground controllers excellent visibility of its condition is the most important way to ensure human error does not compromise the mission.

  5. Model and experiences of initiating collaboration with traditional healers in validation of ethnomedicines for HIV/AIDS in Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinsembu Kazhila C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many people with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS in Namibia have access to antiretroviral drugs but some still use traditional medicines to treat opportunistic infections and offset side-effects from antiretroviral medication. Namibia has a rich biodiversity of indigenous plants that could contain novel anti-HIV agents. However, such medicinal plants have not been identified and properly documented. Various ethnomedicines used to treat HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections have not been scientifically validated for safety and efficacy. These limitations are mostly attributable to the lack of collaboration between biomedical scientists and traditional healers. This paper presents a five-step contextual model for initiating collaboration with Namibian traditional healers in order that candidate plants that may contain novel anti-HIV agents are identified, and traditional medicines used to treat HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections are subjected to scientific validation. The model includes key structures and processes used to initiate collaboration with traditional healers in Namibia; namely, the National Biosciences Forum, a steering committee with the University of Namibia (UNAM as the focal point, a study tour to Zambia and South Africa where other collaborative frameworks were examined, commemorations of the African Traditional Medicine Day (ATMD, and consultations with stakeholders in north-eastern Namibia. Experiences from these structures and processes are discussed. All traditional healers in north-eastern Namibia were willing to collaborate with UNAM in order that their traditional medicines could be subjected to scientific validation. The current study provides a framework for future collaboration with traditional healers and the selection of candidate anti-HIV medicinal plants and ethnomedicines for scientific testing in Namibia.

  6. Model and experiences of initiating collaboration with traditional healers in validation of ethnomedicines for HIV/AIDS in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C

    2009-10-23

    Many people with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in Namibia have access to antiretroviral drugs but some still use traditional medicines to treat opportunistic infections and offset side-effects from antiretroviral medication. Namibia has a rich biodiversity of indigenous plants that could contain novel anti-HIV agents. However, such medicinal plants have not been identified and properly documented. Various ethnomedicines used to treat HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections have not been scientifically validated for safety and efficacy. These limitations are mostly attributable to the lack of collaboration between biomedical scientists and traditional healers. This paper presents a five-step contextual model for initiating collaboration with Namibian traditional healers in order that candidate plants that may contain novel anti-HIV agents are identified, and traditional medicines used to treat HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections are subjected to scientific validation. The model includes key structures and processes used to initiate collaboration with traditional healers in Namibia; namely, the National Biosciences Forum, a steering committee with the University of Namibia (UNAM) as the focal point, a study tour to Zambia and South Africa where other collaborative frameworks were examined, commemorations of the African Traditional Medicine Day (ATMD), and consultations with stakeholders in north-eastern Namibia. Experiences from these structures and processes are discussed. All traditional healers in north-eastern Namibia were willing to collaborate with UNAM in order that their traditional medicines could be subjected to scientific validation. The current study provides a framework for future collaboration with traditional healers and the selection of candidate anti-HIV medicinal plants and ethnomedicines for scientific testing in Namibia.

  7. Neurotoxicity of 1-bromopropane: Evidence from animal experiments and human studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaku Ichihara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 1-Bromopropane was introduced as an alternative to ozone layer-depleting solvents such as chlorofluorocarbons and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. However, a dozen human cases have been reported with symptoms and signs of toxicity to 1-bromopropane including numbness, diminished vibration sense in the lower extremities as well as ataxic gait. An epidemiological study also demonstrated dose-dependent prolongation of distal latency and decrease in vibration sense in the lower extremities. The initial animal experiments helped to identify and analyze the initial human case of 1-bromopropane toxicity. However, animal data that can explain the central nervous system disorders in humans are limited. Nonetheless, animal data should be carefully interpreted especially in a high-order function of the central nervous system or neurological signs such as ataxia that is influenced by fundamental anatomical/physiological differences between humans and animals. Enzymatic activity in the liver may explain partly the difference in the susceptibility between humans and animals, but further studies are needed to clarify the biological factors that can explain the difference and commonality among the species.

  8. Factors implicated in the initiation of human parturition in term and preterm labor: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanos, Konstantinos; Dagklis, Themistoklis; Petousis, Stamatios; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Prapas, Yannis; Prapas, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    After accommodating the pregnancy for an average of 40 weeks, the uterus expels the fetus, the placenta and the membranes through the birth canal in a process named parturition. The absolute sequence of events that trigger and sustain human parturition are not yet fully clarified. Evidence suggests that spontaneous preterm and term labor seem to share a common inflammatory pathway. However, there are several other factors being involved in the initiation of human parturition. Placental corticotropin releasing hormone production seems to serve as a placental clock that might be set to ring earlier or later determining the duration of pregnancy and timing of labor. Estrogens do not cause contractions but their properties seem to capacitate uterus to coordinate and enhance contractions. Cytokines, prostaglandins, nitric oxide and steroids seem also to induce ripening by mediating remodeling of the extracellular matrix and collagen. Infection and microbe invasion resulting in chorioamnionitis also represents a common cause of early preterm labour. This review provides an overview of all these factors considered to be implicated in the initiation of human parturition.

  9. Monitoring the initial pulmonary absorption of two different beclomethasone dipropionate aerosols employing a human lung reperfusion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritz Peter

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pulmonary residence time of inhaled glucocorticoids as well as their rate and extend of absorption into systemic circulation are important facets of their efficacy-safety profile. We evaluated a novel approach to elucidate the pulmonary absorption of an inhaled glucocorticoid. Our objective was to monitor and compare the combined process of drug particle dissolution, pro-drug activation and time course of initial distribution from human lung tissue into plasma for two different glucocorticoid formulations. Methods We chose beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP delivered by two different commercially available HFA-propelled metered dose inhalers (Sanasthmax®/Becloforte™ and Ventolair®/Qvar™. Initially we developed a simple dialysis model to assess the transfer of BDP and its active metabolite from human lung homogenate into human plasma. In a novel experimental setting we then administered the aerosols into the bronchus of an extracorporally ventilated and reperfused human lung lobe and monitored the concentrations of BDP and its metabolites in the reperfusion fluid. Results Unexpectedly, we observed differences between the two aerosol formulations Sanasthmax®/Becloforte™ and Ventolair®/Qvar™ in both the dialysis as well as in the human reperfusion model. The HFA-BDP formulated as Ventolair®/Qvar™ displayed a more rapid release from lung tissue compared to Sanasthmax®/Becloforte™. We succeeded to explain and illustrate the observed differences between the two aerosols with their unique particle topology and divergent dissolution behaviour in human bronchial fluid. Conclusion We conclude that though the ultrafine particles of Ventolair®/Qvar™ are beneficial for high lung deposition, they also yield a less desired more rapid systemic drug delivery. While the differences between Sanasthmax®/Becloforte™ and Ventolair®/Qvar™ were obvious in both the dialysis and lung perfusion experiments, the latter

  10. Reflections between CSR and international human rights in EU initiatives for a competitive inclusive society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    : The paper aims to contribute to our understanding of whether a shift is taking place in societal attitudes towards a perception that corporations have duties based on international law. This is assessed on the basis of EU initiatives on inclusiveness and responsible competitiveness, particularly...... the EU Multistakeholder Forum and the Lisbon Strategy, with a particular focus on goals or views related to the human rights of non-discrimination and rights to work, education and vocational training, and network governance in (soft) law creation. It is found that despite obvious links, international...... law does not serve as a clear source of inclusiveness or responsible competitiveness. It is also found that the initiatives assessed do not indicate a shift at EU institutional level towards a perception that business holds duties under international law. International law seems at the most to be seen...

  11. Reflections between CSR and international human rights in EU initiatives for a competitive inclusive society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    : The paper aims to contribute to our understanding of whether a shift is taking place in societal attitudes towards a perception that corporations have duties based on international law. This is assessed on the basis of EU initiatives on inclusiveness and responsible competitiveness, particularly...... the EU Multistakeholder Forum and the Lisbon Strategy, with a particular focus on goals or views related to the human rights of non-discrimination and rights to work, education and vocational training, and network governance in (soft) law creation. It is found that despite obvious links, international...... law does not serve as a clear source of inclusiveness or responsible competitiveness. It is also found that the initiatives assessed do not indicate a shift at EU institutional level towards a perception that business holds duties under international law. International law seems at the most to be seen...

  12. Challenges conducting comparative effectiveness research: the Clinical and Health Outcomes Initiative in Comparative Effectiveness (CHOICE experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedly JL

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Janna L Friedly,1,4 Zoya Bauer,2,4 Bryan A Comstock,3,4 Emily DiMango,5 Assiamira Ferrara,6 Susan S Huang,7 Elliot Israel,8 Jeffrey G Jarvik,2,4 Andrew A Nierenberg,9 Michael K Ong,10 David F Penson,11 Rebecca Smith-Bindman,12 Arthur E Stillman,13 William M Vollmer,6 Stephen M Warren,14 Chunliu Zhan,15 David Chu-Wen Hsia,15 Anne Trontell15 1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Biostatistics, 4Comparative Effectiveness, Cost and Outcomes Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 5Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, 6Kaiser Foundation Research Institute, Oakland, 7Division of Infectious Diseases and Health Policy Research Institute, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, 8Harvard Medical School, Pulmonary and Critical Care, Allergy and Immunology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 9Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, 10Division of General Internal Medicine & Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 11Vanderbilt University and Tennessee Valley VAHCC, Nashville, TN, 12Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Health Policy, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, SF, 13Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 14Department of Plastic Surgery, Division of Clinical and Translational Research, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, 15Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD, USA Abstract: The Clinical and Health Outcomes Initiative in Comparative Effectiveness (CHOICE program, which includes 12 ongoing comparative effectiveness research (CER trials funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, has had firsthand experience in dealing with the unique challenges of conducting CER since the trials started in the fall of 2010. This paper will explore the collective experience

  13. Initial experience of occluding special type patent ductus arterioses using the Amplatzer vascular plug

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Po; ZHU Xian-yang; WANG Qi-guang; ZHANG Duan-zhen; HAN Xiu-min

    2013-01-01

    Background Occluders licensed for clinical use are not fit for some special Krichenko E patent ductus arterioses.The Amplatzer vascular plug I (AVP1) has not been licensed for use for closure of patent ductus arteriose.We report our initial experience to occluding special type patent ductus arterioses with the AVP1-a single lobe device of single layer Nitinol mesh for short vessel landing zones.Methods Patients referred with small and long Krichenko E patent ductus arterioses 1 mm to 3 mm in diameter underwent occlusion using AVP1.All cases underwent pre-,intra-and post-procedural echocardiography and chest X-ray at the completion of the procedure,the next day and at a 30-day,3-month and 6-month follow-up visits.Device sizing for device waist diameter and length was based on aortography.Results From April 2008 to June 2012,26 patients with a mean age of (7.6±8.0) years (range 6 months-32 years)and a mean weight of (23.8±14.8) kg (range 7-67 kg) underwent successful patent ductus arteriose closure.The mean ductus diameter was (2.1±0.7) mm (range 1-3 mm).Transpulmonary (22/26) and transaortic approaches (4/26) were used.No persistent patency was observed after 24 hours and after one month.No device displacement,residual flow and iatrogenic coarctation of the aorta were observed after three months and six months.Conclusions The AVP1 makes it easy to close some Krichenko E patent ductus arterioses.Smaller delivery catheter profile and symmetric cylindrical device shape allow for use for small and long Krichenko E patent ductus arterioses 1 mm to 3 mm in diameter and small patients through transaortic approaches.Broader experience is required to further delineate device and patient selection as well as to document its long-term efficacy and safety.

  14. Impact of human presence on secondary organic aerosols derived from ozone-initiated chemistry in a simulated office environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeyi, Moshood O; Weschler, Charles J; Tham, Kwok W; Wu, Wei Y; Sultan, Zuraimi M

    2013-04-16

    Several studies have documented reductions in indoor ozone levels that occur as a consequence of its reactions with the exposed skin, hair and clothing of human occupants. One would anticipate that consumption of ozone via such reactions would impact co-occurring products derived from ozone's reactions with various indoor pollutants. The present study examines this possibility for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) derived from ozone-initiated chemistry with limonene, a commonly occurring indoor terpene. The experiments were conducted at realistic ozone and limonene concentrations in a 240 m(3) chamber configured to simulate a typical open office environment. During an experiment the chamber was either unoccupied or occupied with 18-20 workers. Ozone and particle levels were continuously monitored using a UV photometric ozone analyzer and a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS), respectively. Under otherwise identical conditions, when workers were present in the simulated office the ozone concentrations were approximately two-thirds and the SOA mass concentrations were approximately one-half of those measured when the office was unoccupied. This was observed whether new or used filters were present in the air handling system. These results illustrate the importance of accounting for occupancy when estimating human exposure to pollutants in various indoor settings.

  15. Effects of a "silent mentor" initiation ceremony and dissection on medical students' humanity and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Ruei-Jen; Tsai, Po-Fang; Han, Der-Yan

    2017-09-16

    Many medical schools in Taiwan have adopted a dignified "silent mentor" initiation ceremony to strengthen student's medical humanity and increase their learning attitudes. This ceremony consists of introductions of the body donor's conduct and deeds, wreath-laying, and a tea party. However, few empirical studies have examined the influences of the ceremony and dissection on medical humanity. This study explored if the initiation ceremony and the course can help students care more about others, develop more positive attitudes toward death, improve learning effectiveness in the course, and decrease negative emotions the first time they see a cadaver. The Attitudes Towards Death and Love and Care subscales of the life attitude inventory, Learning Effectiveness of Gross Anatomy Laboratory Scale (LEGALS), and Emotional Reactions Towards Cadavers Scale were adopted to examine differences before (T1) and after (T2) medical students attended an initiation ceremony at a university in northern Taiwan. Whether these effects lasted to the end of the semester (T3) was also tested. After the ceremony, students' attitudes towards death increased, negative emotions towards cadavers decreased, but love and care and the LEGALS did not significantly change. Data from T3 showed a similar pattern, but high-level emotions (e.g., being respected, cherished, and grateful) and the LEGALS were significantly higher than those at T1. The initiation ceremony, which showed a body donor's deeds and attitudes toward life and death when they were alive, could help medical students gain more mature attitudes towards death and decreased negative emotions. Learning between T2 and T3 might have caused significant changes in high-level emotions and the LEGALS at T3. Arranging reflective writing with guided discussion by a teacher before and after the ceremony is highly recommended.

  16. Social and Psychological Predictors of Initial Cigarette Smoking Experience: A Survey in Male College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menati, Walieh; Nazarzadeh, Milad; Bidel, Zeinab; Würtz, Morten; Menati, Rostam; Hemati, Rohollah; Yaghoubi, Maryam; Zareimanesh, Elham; Mohammadi, Mohammad Sabour; Akhlaghi Ardekani, Farzad; Tazval, Jafar; Delpisheh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about social and psychological risk factors for initial cigarette smoking experience (ICSE) is sparse. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of ICSE and to examine the psychological and social factors related to ICSE. In a cross-sectional survey, 1,511 male college students were recruited using multistage sampling techniques from four universities located within the city of Ilam, Iran. Self-administered multiple-choice questionnaires were distributed to students from March to June 2013. Risk factors for ICSE were evaluated using logistic regression models. Participants were 22.3 ± 2.4 years of age. ICSE prevalence was 30.6%. In multivariable adjusted analysis, risk taking behavior (odds ratio [OR] = 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-2.33), perceived peer smoking prevalence (OR = 2.48; 95% CI = 1.03-5.97), positive thoughts about smoking (OR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.02-1.10), high self-efficacy (OR = 0.95, 95% CI [0.93, 0.98]), presence in smokers' gathering (OR = 4.45; 95% CI = 2.88-6.81), comity of smokers (OR = 2.56; 95% CI = 1.66, 3.92), very hard access to cigarettes (OR = 2.20; 95% CI = 1.16-4.16), close friends' medium reaction toward smoking (OR = 1.38; 95% CI = 1.02-1.88), and sporting activity (OR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.56-0.98) were significantly associated with ICSE. This study identified that a combination of psychological and social variables account for up to 78% of the probability of ICSE. The most important protective factor against ICSE was physical activity, whereas the most important risk factor for ICSE was frequent gathering in the presence of smokers.

  17. SU-E-J-181: Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Workflow: Initial Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, O; Kashani, R; Santanam, L; Wooten, H; Li, H; Rodriguez, V; Hu, Y; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hand, T; Victoria, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States); Steele, C [Barnes Jewish Hospital, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aims of this work are to describe the workflow and initial clinical experience treating patients with an MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRIGRT) system. Methods: Patient treatments with a novel MR-IGRT system started at our institution in mid-January. The system consists of an on-board 0.35-T MRI, with IMRT-capable delivery via doubly-focused MLCs on three {sup 60} Co heads. In addition to volumetric MR-imaging, real-time planar imaging is performed during treatment. So far, eleven patients started treatment (six finished), ranging from bladder to lung SBRT. While the system is capable of online adaptive radiotherapy and gating, a conventional workflow was used to start, consisting of volumetric imaging for patient setup using visible tumor, evaluation of tumor motion outside of PTV on cine images, and real-time imaging. Workflow times were collected and evaluated to increase efficiency and evaluate feasibility of adding the adaptive and gating features while maintaining a reasonable patient throughput. Results: For the first month, physicians attended every fraction to provide guidance on identifying the tumor and an acceptable level of positioning and anatomical deviation. Average total treatment times (including setup) were reduced from 55 to 45 min after physician presence was no longer required and the therapists had learned to align patients based on soft-tissue imaging. Presently, the source strengths were at half maximum (7.7K Ci each), therefore beam-on times will be reduced after source replacement. Current patient load is 10 per day, with increase to 25 anticipated in the near future. Conclusion: On-board, real-time MRI-guided RT has been incorporated into clinical use. Treatment times were kept to reasonable lengths while including volumetric imaging, previews of tumor movement, and physician evaluation. Workflow and timing is being continuously evaluated to increase efficiency. In near future, adaptive and gating capabilities of the system will

  18. MRI-guided percutaneous laser ablation of small renal cell carcinoma: Initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kariniemi, Juho; Ojala, Risto; Hellstroem, Pekka; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco (Dept. of Radiology, Dept. of Surgery, Oulu Univ. Hospital, Oulu (Finland)), e-mail: juho.kariniemi@oulu.fi

    2010-05-15

    Background: The number of detected small renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) has been rising, largely due to advances in imaging. Open surgical resection is the standard management of small RCCs; however, imaging-guided percutaneous ablative therapies have emerged as a minimally invasive treatment alternative, especially for patients who are poor candidates for surgery. Purpose: To evaluate the initial clinical experience of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided percutaneous laser ablation of small RCCs. Material and Methods: Eight patients with 10 tumors were treated with percutaneous MRI-guided laser ablation. All tumors (diameter range 1.5-3.8 cm, mean 2.7 cm) were biopsy-proven RCCs. By using a 0.23 T open MRI system and general anesthesia in patients, one to four (mean 2.6) laser fibers were placed and the tumors were ablated under near real-time MRI control by observing the signal void caused by the temperature change in the heated tissue. The treatment was considered successful if the tumor showed no contrast enhancement at follow-up imaging. Results: All except one tumor were successfully ablated in one session. The first patient treated showed enhancing residual tumor in post-procedural MRI; she has thus far declined retreatment. One complication, a myocardial infarction, occurred; all other patients tolerated the procedure well. No local recurrence was discovered during the follow-up (range 12-30 months, mean 20 months). Conclusion: In this small group of patients with relatively short follow-up period, MRI-guided percutaneous laser ablation proved to be a promising treatment option for small RCCs

  19. Initial experience of percutaneous treatment of mitral regurgitation with MitraClip® therapy in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Chinchilla, Fernando; Arzamendi, Dabit; Romero, Miguel; Gimeno de Carlos, Federico; Alonso-Briales, Juan Horacio; Li, Chi-Hion; Mesa, Maria Dolores; Arnold, Roman; Serrador Frutos, Ana María; Pan, Manuel; Roig, Eulalia; Rodríguez-Bailón, Isabel; de la Fuente Galán, Luis; Hernández, José María; Serra, Antonio; Suárez de Lezo, José

    2014-12-01

    Symptomatic mitral regurgitation has an unfavorable prognosis unless treated by surgery. However, the European registry of valvular heart disease reports that 49% of patients with this condition do not undergo surgery. Percutaneous treatment of mitral regurgitation with MitraClip® has been proved a safe, efficient adjunct to medical treatment in patients with this profile. The objective of the present study is to describe initial experience of MitraClip® therapy in Spain. Retrospective observational study including all patients treated between November 2011 and July 2013 at the 4 Spanish hospitals recording the highest numbers of implantations. A total of 62 patients (77.4% men) were treated, mainly for restrictive functional mitral regurgitation (85.4%) of grade III (37%) or grade IV (63%), mean (standard deviation) ejection fraction 36% (14%), and New York Heart Association functional class III (37%) or IV (63%). Device implantation was successful in 98% of the patients. At 1 year, 81.2% had mitral regurgitation ≤ 2 and 90.9% were in New York Heart Association functional class ≤ II. One periprocedural death occurred (sepsis at 20 days post-implantation) and another 3 patients died during follow-up (mean, 9.1 months). Two patients needed a second implantation due to partial dehiscence of the first device and 2 others underwent heart transplantation. In Spain, MitraClip® therapy has principally been aimed at patients with functional mitral regurgitation, significant systolic ventricular dysfunction, and high surgical risk. It is considered a safe alternative treatment, which can reduce mitral regurgitation and improve functional capacity. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Transperineal prostate biopsy with ECHO-MRI fusion. Biopsee system. Initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Selas, E; Cuadros, V; Montáns, J; Sánchez, E; López-Alcorocho, J M; Gómez-Sancha, F

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to present our initial experience with the stereotactic echo-MRI fusion system for diagnosing prostate cancer. Between September 2014 and January 2015, we performed 50 prostate biopsies using the stereotactic echo-MRI fusion system. The 3-Tesla multiparameter MR images were superimposed using this image fusion system on 3D echo images obtained with the Biopsee system for the exact locating of areas suspected of prostate cancer. The lesions were classified using the Prostate Imaging Report and Date System. We assessed a total of 50 patients, with a mean age of 63 years (range, 45-79), a mean prostate-specific antigen level of 8 ng/mL (range, 1.9-20) and a mean prostate volume of 52mL (range, 12-118). Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 69% of the patients and intraepithelial neoplasia in 6%. The results of the biopsy were negative for 24% of the patients. The results of the biopsy and MRI were in agreement for 62% of the patients; however, 46% also had a tumour outside of the suspicious lesion. We diagnosed 46% anterior tumours and 33% apical tumours. One patient had a haematuria, another had a haematoma and a third had acute urine retention. Multiparametric prostatic MRI helps identify prostate lesions suggestive of cancer. The Biopsee echo-MRI fusion system provides for guided biopsy and increases the diagnostic performance, reducing the false negatives of classical biopsies and increasing the diagnosis of anterior tumours. Transperineal access minimises the risk of prostatic infection and sepsis. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Initial Australian experience with high dose indium-111 pentreotide therapy in progressive, symptomatic neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, R.J.; Keady, M.A.; Johnson, V. [The Peter McCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET

    1998-06-01

    Full text: Neuroendocrine tumours variably express somatostatin receptors enabling imaging using somatostatin analogues, including In-111 pentreotide. Due to the emission of Auger electrons in the decay of In-1 11, there is the potential to use this agent for therapy. Based on favourable experience with high dose In-111 pentreotide therapy a the University of Rotterdam, a prospective trial of this treatment was performed in 6 patients with progressive, symptomatic neuroendocrine tumours (carcinoid in 4 patients and glucagonoma in 2 patients). Patients were selected based on the presence of uptake at multiple sites on In-1 11 pentreotide scanning with intensity equal to or greater than splenic activity. Follow-up of haematology, endocrine and renal function was performed and serial imaging correlation of index lesions was performed. Three treatments of approximately 6.5 GBq of In-111 pentreotide were administered to each patient over 3-5 months. One pt with bone metastases from carcinoid had an initial flare in symptoms 1 week following treatment but subsequent palliation which lasted 6 months before requiring local radiotherapy. The three remaining carcinoid patients had symptomatic improvement and reduced 5-HIAA levels when abnormal at baseline. Both patients with glucagonoma had symptomatic improvement and reduction in glucagon levels. No patients had evidence of disease progression up to 6 months post-treatment in index lesions with high In-1 11 pentreotide uptake. One lesion with low uptake progressed despite regression in other lesions with high uptake in the same patient Minor transient lymphopaenia was seen following treatment but no clinically significant toxicity was noted. These preliminary results complement European data suggesting good palliation from high dose In-111 pentreotide therapy in patients with high somatostatin receptor expression

  2. Initial experience in Brazil with the Helex septal occluder for percutaneous occlusion of atrial septal defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedra Carlos A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the initial clinical experience with the Helex septal occluder for percutaneous closure of atrial septal defects. METHODS: Ten patients underwent the procedure, 7 patients with ostium secundum atrial septal defects (ASD with hemodynamic repercussions and 3 patients with pervious foramen ovale (PFO and a history of stroke. Mean age was 33.8 years and mean weight was 55.4 kg. Mean diameter by transesophageal echocardiography and mean stretched ASD diameter were 11.33 ± 3.3mm, and 15.2 ± 3.8mm, respectively. The Qp/Qs ratio was 1.9 ± 0.3 in patients with ASD. RESULTS: Eleven occluders were placed because a patient with 2 holes needed 2 devices. It was necessary to retrieve and replace 4 devices in 3 patients. We observed immediate residual shunt (< 2mm in 4 patients with ASD, and in those with patent foramen ovale total occlusion of the defect occurred. No complications were noted, and all patients were discharged on the following day. After 1 month, 2 patients with ASD experienced trivial residual shunts (1mm. In 1 patient, we observed mild prolapse in the proximal disk in the right atrium, without consequences. CONCLUSION: The Helex septal occluder was safe and effective for occluding small to moderate atrial septal defects. Because the implantation technique is demanding, it requires specific training of the operator. Even so, small technical failures may occur in the beginning of the learning curve, but they do not involve patient safety.

  3. Initial experience with the Codman Certas adjustable valve in the management of patients with hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watt Sara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new adjustable valve, the Codman CertasTM valve for treatment of hydrocephalus was introduced into clinical practice in January 2011. It has 8 different settings with an opening pressure varying from 36 to over 400 mm H2O at a flow rate of 20 mL/h. The 8th setting is designed to provide a "virtual off" function. The objective of this report is to describe the initial clinical experience with the CertasTM valve and evaluate clinical usage with the main focus on the portable adjustment device - Therapeutic Management System (TMS, the “virtual off” setting and compatibility with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Findings Forty-two patients with hydrocephalus from different etiologies were treated with the CertasTM adjustable shunt system. Data regarding implantation procedures, the use of the TMS system, x-ray imaging, and MRI procedures were recorded prospectively. All patients had clinical follow-up at four weeks after implantation and every three months until a stable clinical condition was obtained. The mean time for follow-up was 8.6 months (1–16.6. Seventy-one adjustments were performed with the TMS, 12 were problematic. Twenty-nine MRI procedures were performed and did not cause accidental resetting. Five patients were treated with the "virtual off" function for a period. Conclusions We found the CertasTM valve valuable in the treatment of hydrocephalus, usability of the TMS was high because it is small and portable, but in some cases we experienced adjustment problems with the first procedures performed by a surgeon, indicating that there is a learning curve. The "virtual off" function provided a possibility of treating over-drainage without the need for shunt ligation or other invasive procedures.

  4. Augmented Reality Guidance for the Resection of Missing Colorectal Liver Metastases: An Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntourakis, Dimitrios; Memeo, Ricardo; Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques; Mutter, Didier; Pessaux, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Modern chemotherapy achieves the shrinking of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) to such extent that they may disappear from radiological imaging. Disappearing CRLM rarely represents a complete pathological remission and have an important risk of recurrence. Augmented reality (AR) consists in the fusion of real-time patient images with a computer-generated 3D virtual patient model created from pre-operative medical imaging. The aim of this prospective pilot study is to investigate the potential of AR navigation as a tool to help locate and surgically resect missing CRLM. A 3D virtual anatomical model was created from thoracoabdominal CT-scans using customary software (VR RENDER(®), IRCAD). The virtual model was superimposed to the operative field using an Exoscope (VITOM(®), Karl Storz, Tüttlingen, Germany). Virtual and real images were manually registered in real-time using a video mixer, based on external anatomical landmarks with an estimated accuracy of 5 mm. This modality was tested in three patients, with four missing CRLM that had sizes from 12 to 24 mm, undergoing laparotomy after receiving pre-operative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. AR display and fine registration was performed within 6 min. AR helped detect all four missing CRLM, and guided their resection. In all cases the planned security margin of 1 cm was clear and resections were confirmed to be R0 by pathology. There was no postoperative major morbidity or mortality. No local recurrence occurred in the follow-up period of 6-22 months. This initial experience suggests that AR may be a helpful navigation tool for the resection of missing CRLM.

  5. Single-incision laparoscopic colectomy without using special articulating instruments: an initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trakarnsanga Atthaphorn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-incision laparoscopic colectomy (SILC was introduced as a novel minimally invasive technique. The benefits of this technique include reducing number of the incision and cosmetic improvement. Unlike the conventional laparoscopic colectomy, majority of previously reported SILC need to be performed using special curved or articulated instruments. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate our initial experience of SILC, which could be performed using the standard laparoscopic instruments. Material and methods Retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent SILC at Siriraj Hospital from May to December 2010, patient's demographic data, perioperative outcomes, early postoperative complications and pathological data were collected and analyzed. Results The mean age of all patients was 60 years. The most common operation with SILC was sigmoidectomy (n = 9, followed by right hemicolectomy (n = 2, left hemicolectomy (n = 1, anterior resection (n = 1, and total colectomy (n = 1. The trocar insertion techniques were multi-fascial incision using regular port (n = 11 and GelPOINT® (n = 3. The mean operative time was 155 minutes (range 90-280 and the mean estimate blood loss was 32.1 mL (range 10-100. All patients were successfully operated without conversion. The mean length of hospital stay was 9 days (range 5-20. There was no mortality. The pathological results revealed colorectal cancer (n = 12, neoplastic polyp (n = 1 and Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP (n = 1. The mean number of lymph nodes retrieval was 16.6 (range 3-34. Conclusion SILC can successfully and safely be performed with standard laparoscopic instruments. This technique might be an alternative procedure to conventional laparoscopic colectomy with better cosmetic result.

  6. Initial experience with extreme angle cervical screw for treatment of trauma and cervical spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ankit I; Babu, Ranjith; Bagley, Carlos A; Grossi, Peter M; Gottfried, Oren N

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we have described our initial experience and surgical technique of extreme angle screw placement in the cervical and upper thoracic spine of a cohort of patients undergoing posterior fusion. This extreme angle screw facilitates rod placement without need for any coronal contouring of the rod or offset connectors despite the varied entry site locations for posterior instrumentation and the different trajectories and pathways of these screws. From ruary 2011 to July 2011, extreme angle screws were placed in twenty consecutive adult patients who underwent posterior cervical, occipital-cervical or cervical-thoracic fusions. The primary diagnosis was cervical spondylotic myelopathy (13), trauma (4), and pseudoarthrosis with stenosis (3). Eight patients had gross instability. A total of 196 screws were placed; half of the cases involved instrumentation at or within the C3-7 segments (10) and the others included constructs extending to occipital bone, C2, T1, or T2 (10). Of all twenty cases, there were no perioperative hardware complications. At long-term follow-up, two patients required reoperation, one for hardware failure and the other for single level symptomatic pseudoarthrosis. We conclude that extreme angle screw use in the posterior cervical spine provides an evolution in posterior instrumentation that maximizes the biomechanical strength of a construct, allows for easy rod placement, and may improve the restoration of sagittal alignment. Overall, extreme angle screws facilitate rod placement even for screws offset from the natural plane of the rod, thereby avoiding the need for coronal contouring or placement of offset connectors.

  7. Pneumatic reduction of intussusception in children at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital: An initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw Boateng Mensah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intussusception is a common abdominal emergency in children which necessitates prompt diagnosis and management. Nonsurgical methods of managing this condition are rapidly gaining popularity with fluoroscopic-guided pneumatic reduction being one of such methods that has been used with great success in many countries. We present our initial experience with fluoroscopic-guided pneumatic reduction of intussusception at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital which is also the first time the technique has been used in Ghana. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 children were enrolled in the study between August 2007 and February 2008 at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. Patients were given air enema under fluoroscopic-guidance using locally assembled equipment. The intraluminal pressure was monitored with a pressure gauge and was not permitted to go above 120 mmHg. A total of three attempts of 3 min each were allowed. Results: There were 12 males and 6 females. The average age of the patients was 8.3 months (SD= 3 months. Twelve (67% of the cases were reduced successfully while 6 (33% failed to reduce. A majority of those that did not reduced had symptoms for at least 2 days. Bowel perforation occurred in three (16.7% cases. Conclusion: Pneumatic reduction of intussusception is a cost-effective and rapid method of management of intussusception. It however has limitations like high reported rate of bowel perforation and limited ability to identify lead points. The benefits however seem to outweigh these challenges, such as fluoroscopic-guided pneumatic reduction has a very high success rate. Fluoroscopic guided pneumatic reduction should be considered as one of the primary modes of reduction in Ghana and other neighbouring countries that are yet to practice it.

  8. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy: initial experience in Brazil and a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Camargo Passerotti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND PURPOSE: Partial nephrectomy has become the standard of care for renal tumors less than 4 cm in diameter. Controversy still exists, however, regarding the best surgical approach, especially when minimally invasive techniques are taken into account. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (RALPN has emerged as a promising technique that helps surgeons achieve the standards of open partial nephrectomy care while offering a minimally invasive approach. The objective of the present study was to describe our initial experience with robotic-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and extensively review the pertinent literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between August 2009 and February 2010, eight consecutive selected patients with contrast enhancing renal masses observed by CT were submitted to RALPN in a private institution. In addition, we collected information on the patients' demographics, preoperative tumor characteristics and detailed operative, postoperative and pathological data. In addition, a PubMed search was performed to provide an extensive review of the robotic-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy literature. RESULTS: Seven patients had RALPN on the left or right sides with no intraoperative complications. One patient was electively converted to a robotic-assisted radical nephrectomy. The operative time ranged from 120 to 300 min, estimated blood loss (EBL ranged from 75 to 400 mL and, in five cases, the warm ischemia time (WIT ranged from 18 to 32 min. Two patients did not require any clamping. Overall, no transfusions were necessary, and there were no intraoperative complications or adverse postoperative clinical events. All margins were negative, and all patients were disease-free at the 6-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Robotic-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is a feasible and safe approach to small renal cortical masses.Further prospective studies are needed to compare open partial nephrectomy with

  9. Genetic and archaeological perspectives on the initial modern human colonization of southern Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Mellars, Paul; Gori, Kevin C.; Carr, Martin; Soares, Pedro A.; Richards, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    It has been argued recently that the initial dispersal of anatomically modern humans from Africa to southern Asia occurred before the volcanic “supereruption” of the Mount Toba volcano (Sumatra) at ∼74,000 y before present (B.P.)—possibly as early as 120,000 y B.P. We show here that this “pre-Toba” dispersal model is in serious conflict with both the most recent genetic evidence from both Africa and Asia and the archaeological evidence from South Asian sites. We present an alternative model b...

  10. Quantifying human subjective experience and social interaction using the eXperience Induction Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardet, Ulysses; Väljamäe, Aleksander; Inderbitzin, Martin; Wierenga, Sytse; Mura, Anna; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2011-06-30

    With the advance of novel brain imaging technology more correlations between complex human properties and the neuronal substrate can be assessed. However, thus far, not many well-validated paradigms exist that would allow for a systematic and quantitative exploration of these phenomena. For instance, despite the rapid technological advances in the domain of mixed and virtual reality systems, a fundamental issue remains how we can define and quantify "presence". A standard approach has been to use questionnaires and self-report measures. However, it has been well established that humans' capabilities to access and externalize their internal states are limited. Hence, we have investigated the question whether other less subjective measures can be devised that can corroborate subjective self-reports on presence. In particular, we have developed a quantitative recollection task that assesses the ability of human subjects (N=40) to recollect the factual structure and organization of a structured and fully controlled experience in a human accessible mixed reality space, the eXperience Induction Machine (XIM). In this structured experience - referred to as the "Autodemo"--a virtual guide explains the key elements and properties of XIM while the user is able to freely move around in the space. To evaluate the users' experience and the amount of factual information retained about the Autodemo, we used the ITC-SOPI questionnaire and a recall test specifically designed for the Autodemo. We found significant correlations between spatial presence and engagement factors of ITC-SOPI and recall performance. Moreover we observed an interaction with the participants' gender. Our results show that we can assess correlates of "presence" by focusing on other dependent measures such as those related to memory and performance. Additionally, our work exemplifies how virtual and mixed reality systems provide new ways to address fundamental questions in psychology and cognitive neuroscience

  11. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory: Developing Our Human Capital FY2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Rebecca S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hawkins Erpenbeck, Heather [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-13

    This report documents the accomplishments of the Safeguards HCD Fiscal Year 2015 (FY15) Project Work Plan, highlighting LANL’s work as well as the accomplishments of our NGSI-sponsored students, graduate and postdoctoral fellows, and mid-career professionals during this past year. While fiscal year 2015 has been a year of transition in the Human Capital Development area for LANL, we are working to revitalize our efforts to promote and develop Human Capital in Safeguards and Non-proliferation and are looking forward to implementing new initiatives in the coming fiscal year and continuing to transition the knowledge of staff who have been on assignment at IAEA and Headquarters to improve our support to HCD.

  12. The Arctic Human Health Initiative: a legacy of the International Polar Year 2007–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J. Parkinson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . The International Polar Year (IPY 2007–2008 represented a unique opportunity to further stimulate cooperation and coordination on Arctic health research and increase the awareness and visibility of Arctic regions. The Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI was a US-led Arctic Council IPY coordinating project that aimed to build and expand on existing International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH and Arctic Council human health interests. The project aimed to link researchers with potential international collaborators and to serve as a focal point for human health research, education, outreach and communication activities during the IPY. The progress of projects conducted as part of this initiative up until the end of the Arctic Council Swedish chairmanship in May 2013 is summarized in this report. Design . The overall goals of the AHHI was to increase awareness and visibility of human health concerns of Arctic peoples, foster human health research, and promote health strategies that will improve health and well-being of all Arctic residents. Proposed activities to be recognized through the initiative included: expanding research networks that will enhance surveillance and monitoring of health issues of concern to Arctic peoples, and increase collaboration and coordination of human health research; fostering research that will examine the health impact of anthropogenic pollution, rapid modernization and economic development, climate variability, infectious and chronic diseases, intentional and unintentional injuries, promoting education, outreach and communication that will focus public and political attention on Arctic health issues, using a variety of publications, printed and electronic reports from scientific conferences, symposia and workshops targeting researchers, students, communities and policy makers; promoting the translation of research into health policy and community action including implementation of prevention

  13. Automated work packages architecture: An initial set of human factors and instrumentation and controls requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Oxstrand, Johanna H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Le Blanc, Katya L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The work management process in current fleets of national nuclear power plants is so highly dependent on large technical staffs and quality of work instruction, i.e., paper-based, that this puts nuclear energy at somewhat of a long-term economic disadvantage and increase the possibility of human errors. Technologies like mobile portable devices and computer-based procedures can play a key role in improving the plant work management process, thereby increasing productivity and decreasing cost. Automated work packages are a fundamentally an enabling technology for improving worker productivity and human performance in nuclear power plants work activities because virtually every plant work activity is accomplished using some form of a work package. As part of this year’s research effort, automated work packages architecture is identified and an initial set of requirements identified, that are essential and necessary for implementation of automated work packages in nuclear power plants.

  14. Wood smoke in a controlled exposure experiment with human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddervold, I S; Bønløkke, J H; Mølhave, L; Massling, A; Jensen, B; Grønborg, T K; Bossi, R; Forchhammer, L; Kjærgaard, S K; Sigsgaard, T

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to wood smoke in the general population is increasing and concurrently, also our awareness. This article describes a wood-smoke generating system for studying human exposure to wood smoke and symptoms related to this exposure. Twenty nonsmoking atopic human participants with normal lung function and normal bronchial reactivity were randomly exposed for 3 h at three different exposure conditions; clean filtered air (control exposure) and wood smoke with a characteristic particulate matter (PM) concentration of 200 µg/m³ (low) and 400 µg/m³ (high) under controlled environmental conditions. The range for PM₂.₅ load observed for single experiments was 165-303 µg/m³ for the low exposure and 205-662 µg/m³ for the high exposure, whereas particle loads during clean air exposure most often were below the detection limit (humans. The knowledge gained in this study on subjective-rated symptoms may be important for understanding human response to wood-smoke exposure.

  15. Brain and Social Networks: Fundamental Building Blocks of Human Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Emily B; Bassett, Danielle S

    2017-09-01

    How do brains shape social networks, and how do social ties shape the brain? Social networks are complex webs by which ideas spread among people. Brains comprise webs by which information is processed and transmitted among neural units. While brain activity and structure offer biological mechanisms for human behaviors, social networks offer external inducers or modulators of those behaviors. Together, these two axes represent fundamental contributors to human experience. Integrating foundational knowledge from social and developmental psychology and sociology on how individuals function within dyads, groups, and societies with recent advances in network neuroscience can offer new insights into both domains. Here, we use the example of how ideas and behaviors spread to illustrate the potential of multilayer network models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Percutaneous transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects: initial single-centre experience and follow-up results. Initial experience with three-dimensional echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ridder, Serge; Suttorp, Maarten-Jan; Ernst, Sjef M P G; Six, Jacob A; Mannaerts, Herman F J; Kamp, Otto; Plokker, Thijs H W M; Jaarsma, Wybren

    2005-04-01

    Registry to report our single-centre experience in closing defects of the atrial septum. Between 1996 and 2001, transcatheter device closure of significant atrial septal defects was performed in 32 adults (mean age 45.1 years, range from 15 to 76 years), using different device types. Six patients had a patent foramen ovale (PFO) and 26 patients had a secundum atrial septal defect (ASD II). Defects were selected by means of two-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (2D TOE). For 12 defects additional three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3D TOE) was performed. Mean balloon-stretched diameter was 19.3 mm (range from 11 to 24 mm). A device was successfully placed in all PFO patients (100%) without complications at follow-up. Successful immediate device placement occurred in 24 out of 26 ASD patients. Two immediate placement failures, 1 device embolisation and 1 device non-fixation, occurred and required urgent surgery. There was 1 patient with pericardial effusion after the intervention, requiring pericardiocentesis. Three late placement failures occurred: 2 device embolisations and 1 device dislocation. Clinical success after 3 to 6 months follow-up, defined as the absence of shunt or small shunt, was achieved in all 6 PFO patients and in 21 out of 23 ASD patients (1 device embolisation, requiring surgery, occurred before follow-up was completed). Two patients with significant shunt, 1 late device dislocation and 1 late device embolisation, underwent elective surgery. For patient selection, 3D TOE proved useful in the evaluation of large and/or complex defects. Transcatheter device closure of carefully selected atrial septal defects is an alternative to surgery. Although the results are promising, surgical back-up is often needed.

  17. Complex events initiated by individual spikes in the human cerebral cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Molnár

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic interactions between neurons of the human cerebral cortex were not directly studied to date. We recorded the first dataset, to our knowledge, on the synaptic effect of identified human pyramidal cells on various types of postsynaptic neurons and reveal complex events triggered by individual action potentials in the human neocortical network. Brain slices were prepared from nonpathological samples of cortex that had to be removed for the surgical treatment of brain areas beneath association cortices of 58 patients aged 18 to 73 y. Simultaneous triple and quadruple whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed testing mono- and polysynaptic potentials in target neurons following a single action potential fired by layer 2/3 pyramidal cells, and the temporal structure of events and underlying mechanisms were analyzed. In addition to monosynaptic postsynaptic potentials, individual action potentials in presynaptic pyramidal cells initiated long-lasting (37 +/- 17 ms sequences of events in the network lasting an order of magnitude longer than detected previously in other species. These event series were composed of specifically alternating glutamatergic and GABAergic postsynaptic potentials and required selective spike-to-spike coupling from pyramidal cells to GABAergic interneurons producing concomitant inhibitory as well as excitatory feed-forward action of GABA. Single action potentials of human neurons are sufficient to recruit Hebbian-like neuronal assemblies that are proposed to participate in cognitive processes.

  18. Greening of a Campus through Waste Management Initiatives: Experience from a Higher Education Institution in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangwanichagapong, Siwaporn; Nitivattananon, Vilas; Mohanty, Brahmanand; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the effects of 3R (reduce, reuse and recycle) waste management initiatives on a campus community. It ascertains the environmental attitudes and opinions of the residents and investigates their behavioral responses to waste management initiatives. Practical implications for enhancing sustainable waste management…

  19. Project Description Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative AFC-2A and AFC-2B Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AFCI AFC-2A and AFC-2B Experiments Project Executi

    2007-03-01

    The proposed AFC-2A and AFC-2B irradiation experiments are a continuation of the AFC-1 fuel test series currently in progress in the ATR. This document discusses the experiments and the planned activities that will take place.

  20. Reporting on Strategic Considerations About the Role of Science in Initial Human Missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, David; Bass, Deborah; Thronson, Harley; Hays, Lindsay; Carberry, Chris; Cassady, Joe; Craig, Mark; Duggan, Matt; Drake, Bret; Stern, Jennifer; Zucker, Rick

    2016-07-01

    mission prior to a Mars surface mission should be initiated. 3. A well-planned set of science objectives for a future human-landed mission to Mars is essential in order to sustain coordination among the science and human spaceflight communities. In particular, while it is clear how humans on the surface of Mars would significantly accelerate the pace of the search for past life, it is unclear how humans would play a role in (and not serve as a hindrance to) the search for extant life. Further study should be supported. 4. Sustained formal collaboration among Mars scientists, engineers, technologists, and teams developing scenarios for Mars exploration should be supported. The human and robotic sides of the Mars exploration community need to become further engaged with each other, particularly as we enter a potential period of dual-purpose (science + human precursor) missions. Central to this era is generating mutual support for a Mars sample return architecture as a goal that has crucial value to both the human preparatory program and planetary science.

  1. Treatment outcomes after early initiation of antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus-associated tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C K; Wong, K H; Leung, C C; Tam, C M; Chan, K C W; Pang, K W; Chan, W K; Mak, I K Y

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the optimal timing for initiating antiretroviral therapy in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated tuberculosis in Hong Kong. Historical cohort. SETTING. Tuberculosis and Chest Service and Special Preventive Programme, Public Health Service Branch, Centre for Health Protection, Department of Health, Hong Kong. Consecutive patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis in a territory-wide TB-HIV registry encountered from 1996 to 2009. Of the 260 antiretroviral therapy-naïve patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis, 32 (12%) had antiretroviral therapy initiated within 2 months after starting anti-tuberculosis treatment (early antiretroviral therapy). Early antiretroviral therapy was associated with a more favourable outcome (cure or treatment completion without relapse) at 24 months (91% vs 67%; P=0.007) than those with antiretroviral therapy started later or not initiated, and remained an independent predictor of a favourable outcome after adjustment for potential confounders. Adverse effects from anti-tuberculosis drugs tended to occur more frequently in patients with early antiretroviral therapy (13/32 or 41%) compared with the remainder (59/228 or 26%; P=0.08). A significantly higher proportion of patients in the former group experienced immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome than in the latter group (7/32 or 22% vs 9/228 or 4%; Ptuberculosis treatment outcomes in patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis with a low CD4 count (tuberculosis treatment outcomes to a significant extent.

  2. Initial Experience of Transurethral Resection with Pediatric Resectoscope for Incomplete Anterior Urethral Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Seok Jang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Endoscopic urethrotomy is an alternative method in treatment of urethral stricture. However, it have high recurrence rate because of the remained fibrotic tissue. Removal of the fibrotic tissue can maintain the patency of the urethral lumen after the procedure. We report the therapeutic efficacy of our initial experience using pediatric resectoscope for treating anterior urethral stricture in 16 cases. Materials and Methods From January 2009 to April 2011, transurethral resection with pediatric resectoscope was primarily performed on 16 patients with anterior urethral stricture. Retrograde urethrography, uroflowmetry, postvoid residual volume, IPSS score and QoL score were performed preoperatively. We used 11.5Fr pediatric resectoscope (Wolf and monopolar electrosurgical generator. The stricture was incised under vision at the 12 o'clock location or the site of maximum scar tissue or narrowing in asymmetric strictures for working space. After incision, transurethral resection with pediatric resectoscope was performed to all scar tissues. Monopolar cutting current was set on 45 watt and coagulation current was set on 30 watt, fulgurate mode. Postoperatively, drainage of the bladder was performed for 7 days using an 18F latex catheter. Patients were followed up by IPSS score, QoL score, uroflowmetry and postvoid residual volume. Results Successful results without recurrence were achieved in 11 of 16patients. Postoperative urethral dilation had been performed average 2.4 times (0∼6 times. When we classified the results by etiology, the number of successful results in strictures with a trauma, iatrogenic, or unknown cause was 5 (7/11, 3 (3/4 and 1 (1/1, respectively. In 5 patients who failed treatment, we repeated transurethral resection with pediatric resectoscope in 1 patient, and periodic urethral dilation in 4 patients. No operative complications occurred in any patients. Conclusions Transurethral resection with pediatric resectoscope

  3. Supporting ITM Missions by Observing System Simulation Experiments: Initial Design, Challenges and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudin, V. A.; England, S.; Matsuo, T.; Wang, H.; Immel, T. J.; Eastes, R.; Akmaev, R. A.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Liu, H.; Solomon, S. C.; Wu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    We review and discuss the capability of novel configurations of global community (WACCM-X and TIME-GCM) and planned-operational (WAM) models to support current and forthcoming space-borne missions to monitor the dynamics and composition of the Ionosphere-Thermosphere-Mesosphere (ITM) system. In the specified meteorology model configuration of WACCM-X, the lower atmosphere is constrained by operational analyses and/or short-term forecasts provided by the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) of GMAO/NASA/GSFC. With the terrestrial weather of GEOS-5 and updated model physics, WACCM-X simulations are capable to reproduce the observed signatures of the perturbed wave dynamics and ion-neutral coupling during recent (2006-2013) stratospheric warming events, short-term, annual and year-to-year variability of prevailing flows, planetary waves, tides, and composition. With assimilation of the NWP data in the troposphere and stratosphere the planned-operational configuration of WAM can also recreate the observed features of the ITM day-to-day variability. These "terrestrial-weather" driven whole atmosphere simulations, with day-to-day variable solar and geomagnetic inputs, can provide specification of the background state (first guess) and errors for the inverse algorithms of forthcoming NASA ITM missions, such as ICON and GOLD. With two different viewing geometries (sun-synchronous, for ICON and geostationary for GOLD) these missions promise to perform complimentary global observations of temperature, winds and constituents to constrain the first-principle space weather forecast models. The paper will discuss initial designs of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) in the coupled simulations of TIME-GCM/WACCM-X/GEOS5 and WAM/GIP. As recognized, OSSE represent an excellent learning tool for designing and evaluating observing capabilities of novel sensors. The choice of assimilation schemes, forecast and observational errors will be discussed along with challenges

  4. Myocardial stress perfusion magnetic resonance: initial experience in a pediatric and young adult population using regadenoson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, Cory V. [Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Moffett, Brady [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Pharmacology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Dipyridamole and adenosine are traditional pharmacological stressors for myocardial perfusion. Regadenoson, a selective adenosine A2A agonist, has a lower side effect profile with lower incidence of bronchospasm and bradycardia. There is a growing need for myocardial perfusion assessment within pediatrics. There is no report on the utility of regadenoson as a stress agent in children. To observe the safety and feasibility of regadenoson as a pharmacologic stressor for perfusion cardiac MR in a pilot cohort of pediatric patients weighing more than 40 kg who have congenital heart disease and pediatric acquired heart disease. We reviewed our initial experience with regadenoson stress cardiac MR in 31 pediatric patients 15.8 ± 1.7 years (range 12-22 years) with congenital heart disease and acquired heart disease. Mean patient weight was 60 ± 15 kg (range of 40-93 kg). All patients underwent cardiac MR because of concern for ischemia. The cohort included a heterogeneous group of patients at a pediatric institution with potential risk for ischemia. Subjects' heart rate and blood pressure were monitored and pharmacologic stress was induced by injection of 400 mcg of regadenoson. We evaluated their hemodynamic response and adverse effects using changes in vital signs and onset of symptoms. A pediatric cardiologist and radiologist qualitatively assessed myocardial perfusion and viability images. One child was unable to complete the stress perfusion portion of the examination, but did complete the remaining portion of the CMR. Resting heart rate was 72 ± 14 beats per minute (bpm) and rose to peak of 124 ± 17 bpm (95 ± 50% increase, P < 0.005) with regadenoson. Image quality was considered good or diagnostic in all cases. Three patients had irreversible perfusion defects. Four patients had reversible perfusion defects. Nine of the patients underwent cardiac catheterization with angiography and the findings showed excellent agreement. Regadenoson might be a safe and

  5. Initial experiences of implementation of functional integration (FI) in LEPRA India projects in Orissa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V Prabhakara; Bhuskade, R A; Raju, M Sathi; Rao, P V Ranganadha; Desikan, K V

    2002-06-01

    In 2000, the Government of the State of Orissa (population 37 million) in India decided to introduce functional integration for the control of leprosy, in place of the long-established vertical programme, using the general health services and the primary health care system. This paper describes the initial (9 months) experience of implementing this strategy in two projects run by LEPRA India. One of these, in the district of Koraput, was established in 1991 and covers a population of 1.5 million people. The other, in Kalahandi district, started in 1997 and covers a population of 600,000. Both projects operate under difficult conditions with regard to terrain, the use of numerous tribal languages, illiteracy, water shortage, poor roads and communications. The preparatory phase included intensive health education of the public on leprosy, using a wide range of educational media and techniques. At the same time, LEPRA India supported the Government in the training and orientation of trainers, medical officers, primary health care staff and female health workers at village level. In all, over 2000 were trained. This paper describes all aspects of the implementation of functional integration in these two areas. In the 9-month period, 4207 suspect cases were referred to medical officers by health workers, but only 256 (6%) were confirmed as having leprosy. There were 169 confirmed self-reporting cases. Despite the clearly understood intention to involve primary health staff in case detection, 67% of all cases were in fact detected by LEPRA India, possibly due to overlapping attendance at clinics by vertical and general staff. There is obviously a need for further training of the general staff since only 6% of cases referred by them were confirmed as having leprosy. Steps must also be taken to ensure that the emphasis on case detection, confirmation and treatment shifts from the vertical to the general health staff. The supply of anti-leprosy drugs and steroids to primary

  6. Identification of Human-induced Initiating Event in the Low and Shutdown operation by using CESA method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Chan; Kim, Jong Hyun [KEPCO International nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    This paper suggests a procedure to identify human-induced initiating events during low and shutdown state in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Human-induced initiating events, also called Category B actions in human reliability analysis (HRA), are operator actions that may lead directly to initiating events either by themselves or in combination with equipment failures. Most of conventional probabilistic safety analyses (PSAs) typically assume that the frequency of initiating events also includes the probability of human-induced initiating events. However, some regulatory documents require Category B actions to be specifically analyzed and quantified in the PSA. In addition, a NUREG report also addresses that an explicit modeling of Category B actions could potentially lead to important insights for human performance on safety. However, there is no standard procedure to identify Category B actions which are either recommended by regulations or widely used in the PSA. This paper develops a systematic procedure to identify the Category B actions for the shutdown and low power. The procedure includes several steps to derive operator actions that may lead to initiating events in the low and shutdown stage. Those steps are the selection of initiating events to be analyzed, the selection of systems or components, the screening of unlikely operating actions, and quantification of initiating events. The procedure also suggests the detailed activity of each step such as the information required, screening rules, and output of steps. Finally, the applicability of the suggested approach is also investigated to show its feasibility.

  7. [Christian responsibility and experimental medicine. Experiments with and on humans, experiments on animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Heinrich W

    2002-01-01

    The Jewish-Christian convictions that man was created as the image of God founded the "ethics of unavailability" which contrast with the utilitarian "ethics of interests." As man s nature is imperfect according to biblical understanding, those responsible in the field of experimental medicine should counteract all tendencies in society which promote an utopian definition of health and an eugenic mentality (idea of the "perfection of mankind"). Consequently, scientists must reflect their own image of man and the effects of their actions on this image. The goals of experimental medicine must also be examined under the aspect of fairness: do they only benefit a minority in the rich industrial nations? As in research on humans, the ethical evaluation of animal experiments must consider the question of the underlying image of humanity and the responsibility of mankind connected to it. Because of changes in society's values, the validity of traditional anthropocentrism is increasingly questioned. However, this does not affect the view of the special position of man as the bearer of responsibility. Even though there are different biblical statements on the relationship between man and animal, the Christian maxim to minimise violence towards animals can be derived from them. In the case of animal experiments this means: experiments which cause the animals severe suffering must be avoided by waiving the potential gain of knowledge from them. In general: in an ethical discussion on medical experiments using humans or animals, the public must be informed completely and involved effectively. A moratorium must be possible before plans become facts. Thinking about ethical problems in the area of experimental medicine should not be separated from the far-reaching questions about changes in our lifestyle and consumer behaviour.

  8. E-learning course: Basis of Harvest and Preservation of Tissues – design and initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Měřička

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The design and initial experience with the e-learning course “Basis of Harvest and Preservation of Tissues” used as a support of an elective subject is presented. The aim of the e-learning course was to enable the students to learn the theoretical principles of the subject individually and to present the gained knowledge at the final seminar. Methods: All functions of the course were operated in Moodle, local application of the Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Králové. The course was divided into 3 main topics corresponding with topics of lectures: 1. Principles of tissue and organ donation, 2. Low temperature preservation of cells, tissues and organs, 3. Quality and safety assurance in practice of tissue and procurement establishments. A test consisting of 5 questions selected randomly from the bank of questions followed each topic. If the student answers correctly at least 3 questions he is allowed to pass to the next topic. The fourth topic “Basic processes in the tissue establishment and principles of their validation” was added into the electronic version as a tool for repeating and improving of knowledge. The fifth topic was represented by a database for uploading theses presented by students at the final seminar. The final test consisted of 15 questions (5 ones from each basic topic. It was necessary to answer correctly at least 10 questions to receive a certificate of completing the course. Results: The course was put into operation during the summer term of the academic year 2012/2013. To the date 15 of September the total of 23 students enrolled (17, i.e. all students of the elective subject in the Czech version, 2 students of this subject in the English version, 2 postgraduate students and 2 medical doctors. All enrolled students used the course for on-line learning, downloading, or printing course study materials. All undergraduate students were obliged to use it for preparation

  9. An initial experience with a digital drainage system during the postoperative period of pediatric thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Altair da Silva; Bachichi, Thiago; Holanda, Caio; Rizzo, Luiz Augusto Lucas Martins De

    2016-01-01

    To report an initial experience with a digital drainage system during the postoperative period of pediatric thoracic surgery. This was a prospective observational study involving consecutive patients, ≤ 14 years of age, treated at a pediatric thoracic surgery outpatient clinic, for whom pulmonary resection (lobectomy or segmentectomy via muscle-sparing thoracotomy) was indicated. The parameters evaluated were air leak (as quantified with the digital system), biosafety, duration of drainage, length of hospital stay, and complications. The digital system was used in 11 children (mean age, 5.9 ± 3.3 years). The mean length of hospital stay was 4.9 ± 2.6 days, the mean duration of drainage was 2.5 ± 0.7 days, and the mean drainage volume was 270.4 ± 166.7 mL. The mean maximum air leak flow was 92.78 ± 95.83 mL/min (range, 18-338 mL/min). Two patients developed postoperative complications (atelectasis and pneumonia, respectively). The use of this digital system facilitated the decision-making process during the postoperative period, reducing the risk of errors in the interpretation and management of air leaks. Relatar a experiência inicial com um sistema de drenagem digital no pós-operatório de cirurgia torácica pediátrica. Estudo observacional e prospectivo envolvendo pacientes consecutivos do ambulatório de cirurgia torácica pediátrica da instituição, com idade até 14 anos, e com indicação de ressecção pulmonar (lobectomia e/ou segmentectomia através de toracotomia poupadora muscular). Os parâmetros avaliados foram perda aérea (quantificada com o sistema digital), biossegurança, tempo de drenagem, tempo de internação e complicações. O sistema digital foi utilizado em 11 crianças, com média de idade de 5,9 ± 3,3 anos. A média do tempo de internação foi de 4,9 ± 2,6 dias, a de tempo de drenagem foi de 2,5 ± 0,7 dias, e a de volume de drenagem foi de 270,4 ± 166,7 ml. A média da perda aérea máxima foi de 92,78 ± 95,83 ml

  10. Characterizing Design Cognition of High School Students: Initial Analyses Comparing Those with and without Pre-Engineering Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, John; Lammi, Matthew; Gero, John; Grubbs, Michael E.; Paretti, Marie; Williams, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Reported in this article are initial results from of a longitudinal study to characterize the design cognition and cognitive design styles of high school students with and without pre-engineering course experience over a 2-year period, and to compare them with undergraduate engineering students. The research followed a verbal protocol analysis…

  11. The initial noncovalent binding of glucose to human hemoglobin in nonenzymatic glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Shelley L D; Santin, Angela E; Bryant, Priscilla A; Holman, Rw; Rodnick, Kenneth J

    2013-11-01

    Mechanisms for nonenzymatic protein glycation have been extensively studied albeit with an emphasis at the later stages that gives rise to advanced glycation end products. No detailed investigation of the initial, noncovalent binding of d-glucose to human hemoglobin A (HbA) exists in the literature. Although anionic molecules 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and HCO3(-) have been implicated in the latter stages of glycation, their involvement at the initial binding of glucose to HbA has not yet been assessed. Results from this computational study involving crystal structures of HbA predict that the transient, ring-opened glucose isomer, assumed to be critical in the later stages of glycation, is not directly involved in initial binding to the β-chain of HbA. All the five structures of glucose generated upon mutorotation will undergo reversible, competitive and slow binding at multiple amino acid residues. The ring-opened structure is most likely generated from previously bound pyranoses that undergo mutarotation while bound. BPG, Pi and HCO3(-) also reversibly bind to HbA with similar energies as glucose isomers (~3-5 kcal/mol) and share common binding sites with glucose isomers. However, there was modest amino acid residue selectivity for binding of certain anionic molecules (1-3 regions) but limited selectivity for glucose structures (≥ 7 regions). The clinical difference between average blood glucose and predicted HbA1c, and the presence of unstable HbA-glucose complexes may be more fully explained by initial noncovalent binding interactions and different concentrations of BPG, Pi and HCO3(-) in serum vs. erythrocytes.

  12. The Relationship of a Pilot's Educational Background, Aeronautical Experience and Recency of Experience to Performance In Initial Training at a Regional Airline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Nancy R.

    The purpose of this study was to determine how a pilot's educational background, aeronautical experience and recency of experience relate to their performance during initial training at a regional airline. Results show that variables in pilots' educational background, aeronautical experience and recency of experience do predict performance in training. The most significant predictors include years since graduation from college, multi-engine time, total time and whether or not a pilot had military flying experience. Due to the pilot shortage, the pilots entering regional airline training classes since August 2013 have varied backgrounds, aeronautical experience and recency of experience. As explained by Edward Thorndike's law of exercise and the law of recency, pilots who are actively using their aeronautical knowledge and exercising their flying skills should exhibit strong performance in those areas and pilots who have not been actively using their aeronautical knowledge and exercising their flying skills should exhibit degraded performance in those areas. Through correlation, chi-square and multiple regression analysis, this study tests this theory as it relates to performance in initial training at a regional airline.

  13. Genetic and archaeological perspectives on the initial modern human colonization of southern Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellars, Paul; Gori, Kevin C; Carr, Martin; Soares, Pedro A; Richards, Martin B

    2013-06-25

    It has been argued recently that the initial dispersal of anatomically modern humans from Africa to southern Asia occurred before the volcanic "supereruption" of the Mount Toba volcano (Sumatra) at ∼74,000 y before present (B.P.)-possibly as early as 120,000 y B.P. We show here that this "pre-Toba" dispersal model is in serious conflict with both the most recent genetic evidence from both Africa and Asia and the archaeological evidence from South Asian sites. We present an alternative model based on a combination of genetic analyses and recent archaeological evidence from South Asia and Africa. These data support a coastally oriented dispersal of modern humans from eastern Africa to southern Asia ∼60-50 thousand years ago (ka). This was associated with distinctively African microlithic and "backed-segment" technologies analogous to the African "Howiesons Poort" and related technologies, together with a range of distinctively "modern" cultural and symbolic features (highly shaped bone tools, personal ornaments, abstract artistic motifs, microblade technology, etc.), similar to those that accompanied the replacement of "archaic" Neanderthal by anatomically modern human populations in other regions of western Eurasia at a broadly similar date.

  14. Prokineticin 1 induces inflammatory response in human myometrium: a potential role in initiating term and preterm parturition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gorowiec, Marta R; Catalano, Rob D; Norman, Jane E; Denison, Fiona C; Jabbour, Henry N

    2011-01-01

    The infiltration of human myometrium and cervix with leukocytes and the formation of a pro-inflammatory environment within the uterus have been associated with the initiation of both term and preterm parturition...

  15. Initial experiments on the effectiveness of telephone access to government services

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cloete, Jacob PL

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available - and post-experiment interviews and an observed experiment. The experiments were performed at the Department of Labour in Pretoria, South Africa, in November 2003. Unscreened participants were solicited from the queue of UIF applicants. 14 callers used..., a number of conclusions were reached. Although transaction- completion rates were comparable for the speech-input and DTMF systems, users were much more comfortable with the speech-based system as reflected in somewhat higher user-satisfaction...

  16. MicroRNA miR-34 inhibits human pancreatic cancer tumor-initiating cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Ji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in cancer initiation and progression via their ability to affect expression of genes and proteins that regulate cell proliferation and/or cell death. Transcription of the three miRNA miR-34 family members was recently found to be directly regulated by p53. Among the target proteins regulated by miR-34 are Notch pathway proteins and Bcl-2, suggesting the possibility of a role for miR-34 in the maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the roles of miR-34 in p53-mutant human pancreatic cancer cell lines MiaPaCa2 and BxPC3, and the potential link to pancreatic cancer stem cells. Restoration of miR-34 expression in the pancreatic cancer cells by either transfection of miR-34 mimics or infection with lentiviral miR-34-MIF downregulated Bcl-2 and Notch1/2. miR-34 restoration significantly inhibited clonogenic cell growth and invasion, induced apoptosis and G1 and G2/M arrest in cell cycle, and sensitized the cells to chemotherapy and radiation. We identified that CD44+/CD133+ MiaPaCa2 cells are enriched with tumorsphere-forming and tumor-initiating cells or cancer stem/progenitor cells with high levels of Notch/Bcl-2 and loss of miR-34. More significantly, miR-34 restoration led to an 87% reduction of the tumor-initiating cell population, accompanied by significant inhibition of tumorsphere growth in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that miR-34 may restore, at least in part, the tumor suppressing function of the p53 in p53-deficient human pancreatic cancer cells. Our data support the view that miR-34 may be involved in pancreatic cancer stem cell self-renewal, potentially via the direct modulation of downstream targets Bcl-2 and Notch, implying that miR-34 may play an important role in pancreatic cancer stem cell self-renewal and/or cell fate determination. Restoration of miR-34 may hold significant

  17. Sensitivity Experiments of an Eastward-Moving Southwest Vortex to Initial Perturbations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王智; 高坤

    2003-01-01

    Whether the initial conditions contain pronounced mesoscale signals is important to the simulation of the southwest vortex. An eastward-moving southwest vortex is simulated using the PSU/NCAR MM5. A modest degree of success is achieved, but the most serious failure is that the formation and displacement of the simulated vortex in its early phase are about fourteen hours later than the observed vortex. Considering the relatively sparse data on the mesoscale vortex and in an attempt to understand the cause of the forecast failure, an adjoint model is used to examine the sensitivity of the southwest vortex to perturbations of initial conditions. The adjoint sensitivity indicates how small perturbations of model variables at the initial time in the model domain can influence the vortex. A large sensitivity for zonal wind is located under 400 hPa, a large sensitivity for meridional wind is located under 500 hPa, a large sensitivity for temperature is located between 500 and 900 hPa, and almost all of the large sensitivity areas are located in the southwestern area. Based on the adjoint sensitivity results, perturbations are added to initial conditions to improve the simulation of the southwest vortex. The results show that the initial conditions with perturbations can successfully simulate the formation and displacement of the vortex; the wind perturbations added to the initial conditions appear to be a cyclone circulation under the middle level of the atmosphere in the southwestern area with an anticyclone circulation to its southwest; a water vapor perturbation added to initial conditions can strengthen the vortex and the speed of its displacement.

  18. Reproducibility of scratch assays is affected by the initial degree of confluence: Experiments, modelling and model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wang; Shah, Esha T; Penington, Catherine J; McCue, Scott W; Chopin, Lisa K; Simpson, Matthew J

    2016-02-01

    Scratch assays are difficult to reproduce. Here we identify a previously overlooked source of variability which could partially explain this difficulty. We analyse a suite of scratch assays in which we vary the initial degree of confluence (initial cell density). Our results indicate that the rate of re-colonisation is very sensitive to the initial density. To quantify the relative roles of cell migration and proliferation, we calibrate the solution of the Fisher-Kolmogorov model to cell density profiles to provide estimates of the cell diffusivity, D, and the cell proliferation rate, λ. This procedure indicates that the estimates of D and λ are very sensitive to the initial density. This dependence suggests that the Fisher-Kolmogorov model does not accurately represent the details of the collective cell spreading process, since this model assumes that D and λ are constants that ought to be independent of the initial density. Since higher initial cell density leads to enhanced spreading, we also calibrate the solution of the Porous-Fisher model to the data as this model assumes that the cell flux is an increasing function of the cell density. Estimates of D and λ associated with the Porous-Fisher model are less sensitive to the initial density, suggesting that the Porous-Fisher model provides a better description of the experiments.

  19. Symptomatic dermographism (factitious urticaria)--passive transfer experiments from human to monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, G M; Zollman, P E; Greaves, M W; Winkelmann, R K

    1987-06-01

    Passive transfer experiments were carried out on three species of monkey, Macaca mulatta, Macaca nemestrina and Macaca fascicularis, using human serum from patients affected with severe symptomatic dermographism (factitious urticaria), cholinergic urticaria, chronic idiopathic urticaria and normal subjects. The monkeys were tested for dermographism by means of a calibrated dermographometer 24 h after intradermal injection of the serum, using Evans blue as a marker. Positive responses were seen initially in the M. nemestrina. Four sites injected with serum from patients with severe symptomatic dermographism gave positive responses, one site injected with serum from a normal subject produced a faint response. One of the four responses was reproduced one month later in M. fascicularis. These results indicate that passive transfer of dermographism is possible from human to monkey.

  20. Seventh Fleet field training exercise : Fleet Battle Experiment Kilo : fires initiatives final report

    OpenAIRE

    Schacher, G. E.; Pilnick, Steve; Irvine, Nelson; Gallup, Shelley

    2003-01-01

    Fleet Battle Experiment Kilo was conducted during Seventh Fleet exercise Tandem Thrust 03. During the Field Training Exercise phase, testing of Time Sensitive Targets processes using the Joint Fires Network was carried out. This report contains results obtained on contributions made by the Joint Fires Network to Navy Time Sensitive Targeting and experiment lessons learned. NA

  1. Eating at worksites in Nordic countries: national experiences and policy initiatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Arsky, Gunn Helene; Brandhøj, Mia

    2010-01-01

    with healthier worksite eating schemes based on employee participation can change the worksite eating substantially, also at blue-collar worksites. However, the dissemination to other worksites not participating in experiments seems limited. There is need for more research in the embedding of experiments...

  2. Initial Results on Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX-IA) for High Intensity Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Prabir K; Baca, David; Bieniosek, Frank; Coleman, Joshua E; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Eylon, Shmuel; Gilson, Erik P; Grant Logan, B; Greenway, Wayne; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Leitner, Matthaeus; Rose, David; Sefkow, Adam; Sharp, William M; Shuman, Derek; Thoma, Carsten H; Vanecek, David; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam neutralization and compression experiments are designed to determine the feasibility of using compressed high intensity ion beams for high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and for inertial fusion power. To quantitatively ascertain the various mechanisms and methods for beam compression, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) facility is being constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). In the first compression experiment, a 260 KeV, 25 mA, K+ ion beam of centimeters size is radially compressed to a mm size spot by neutralization in a meter-long plasma column and beam peak current is longitudinally compressed by an induction velocity tilt core. Instrumentation, preliminary results of the experiments, and practical limits of compression are presented. These include parameters such as emittance, degree of neutralization, velocity tilt time profile, and accuracy of measurements (fast and spatially high resolution diagnostic) are discussed.

  3. The i5K Initiative: advancing arthropod genomics for knowledge, human health, agriculture, and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Insects and their arthropod relatives including mites, spiders, and crustaceans play major roles in the world's terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Arthropods compete with humans for food and transmit devastating diseases. They also comprise the most diverse and successful branch of metazoan evolution, with millions of extant species. Here, we describe an international effort to guide arthropod genomic efforts, from species prioritization to methodology and informatics. The 5000 arthropod genomes initiative (i5K) community met formally in 2012 to discuss a roadmap for sequencing and analyzing 5000 high-priority arthropods and is continuing this effort via pilot projects, the development of standard operating procedures, and training of students and career scientists. With university, governmental, and industry support, the i5K Consortium aspires to deliver sequences and analytical tools for each of the arthropod branches and each of the species having beneficial and negative effects on humankind.

  4. Human behavior in Prisoner's Dilemma experiments suppresses network reciprocity

    CERN Document Server

    Gracia-Lazaro, Carlos; Sanchez, Angel; Moreno, Yamir

    2012-01-01

    During the last few years, much research has been devoted to strategic interactions on complex networks. In this context, the Prisoner's Dilemma has become a paradigmatic model, and it has been established that imitative evolutionary dynamics lead to very different outcomes depending on the details of the network. We here report that when one takes into account the real behavior of people observed in the experiments, both at the mean-field level and on utterly different networks the observed level of cooperation is the same. We thus show that when human subjects interact in an heterogeneous mix including cooperators, defectors and moody conditional cooperators, the structure of the population does not promote or inhibit cooperation with respect to a well mixed population.

  5. Human behavior in Prisoner's Dilemma experiments suppresses network reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Cuesta, José A; Sánchez, Angel; Moreno, Yamir

    2012-01-01

    During the last few years, much research has been devoted to strategic interactions on complex networks. In this context, the Prisoner's Dilemma has become a paradigmatic model, and it has been established that imitative evolutionary dynamics lead to very different outcomes depending on the details of the network. We here report that when one takes into account the real behavior of people observed in the experiments, both at the mean-field level and on utterly different networks, the observed level of cooperation is the same. We thus show that when human subjects interact in a heterogeneous mix including cooperators, defectors and moody conditional cooperators, the structure of the population does not promote or inhibit cooperation with respect to a well mixed population.

  6. SLAM family predicting the initiation potential of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia in NOD/SCID mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Na; ZHOU Jian-feng; HUANG Liang; XIAO Fei; LIU Jin-ping; WANG Di; GENG Zhe; WANG Jin; MA Shu-yan; SHU Li-li; CHEN Tai-ping

    2011-01-01

    Background The SLAM family recently has been reported to show an important biological role in lymphocyte development and immunological function, and it is efficient to highly purify hematopoietic stem cells using a simple combination of SLAM family members. To elucidate the presence of this family on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL),as well as its relationship with the leukemia-initiating potential, we analyzed the expression pattern of this family members on human ALL progenitor cells, combined with serial xenotransplantation assay.Methods Expression analysis was carried out by flow cytometry. We combined the expression pattern of human CD150,CD244 and CD48 with serial xenotransplantation of B-ALL progenitor cells to indicate their relationship.Results CD48 and CD244 were expressed on most B-ALL progenitor cells, the percentage being (93.08±6.46)% and (63.37±29.31)%, respectively. Interestingly, the proportion of CD150+ cells declined obviously in engrafted cases ((24.94±7.32)%) compared with non-engrafted cases ((77.54±5.93)%, P <0.01), which indicated that only blast cells with low percentage of CD150+ population were able to reconstitute leukemia into primary, secondary and tertiary NOD/SCID mice.Conclusions SLAM family members are present on B-ALL progenitor cells and the leukemia-initiating potential of leukemic blasts is correlated negatively with the proportion of CD150+ cells, the percentage of which can serve as a useful predictor for engraftment success of B-ALL to immune deficient mice.

  7. Experiences in the application of human factors engineering to human-system interface modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba Alonso, Pedro; Fernandez Illobre, Luis; Ortega Pascual, Fernando [Tecnatom S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes (Spain). Simulation and Control Rooms Div.

    2015-07-15

    Almost all the existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) include plans to modernize their existing Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems and associated Human System Interfaces (HSIs), due to obsolescence problems. Tecnatom, S.A. has been participating in modernization programs in NPPs to help them to plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and associated I and C and HSIs. The application of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in modernization programs is nowadays unavoidable. This is because is becoming a regulatory requirement, and also because it is needed to ensure that any plant modification, involving the modernization of I and C and HSI, is well designed to improve overall plant operations, reliability, and safety. This paper shows some experiences obtained during the application of HFE to the modernization of these HSIs. The experience applying HFE in modernizations and design modifications show a positive effect, improving the associated HSIs, with the acceptability of the final user.

  8. Development and initial feedback about a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine comic book for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Mira L; Oldach, Benjamin R; Goodwin, Jennifer; Reiter, Paul L; Ruffin, Mack T; Paskett, Electra D

    2014-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates do not meet the Healthy People 2020 objective of 80% coverage among adolescent females. We describe the development and initial feedback about an HPV vaccine comic book for young adolescents. The comic book is one component of a multilevel intervention to improve HPV vaccination rates among adolescents. Parents suggested and provided input into the development of a HPV vaccine comic book. Following the development of the comic book, we conducted a pilot study to obtain initial feedback about the comic book among parents (n = 20) and their adolescents ages 9 to 14 (n = 17) recruited from a community-based organization. Parents completed a pre-post test including items addressing HPV knowledge, HPV vaccine attitudes, and about the content of the comic book. Adolescents completed a brief interview after reading the comic book. After reading the comic book, HPV knowledge improved (2.7 to 4.6 correct answers on a 0-5 scale; p comic book's content was acceptable and adolescents liked the story, found it easy to read, and thought the comic book was a good way to learn about being healthy. Parents provided valuable information in the development of a theoretically-based comic book and the comic book appears to be an acceptable format for providing HPV vaccine information to adolescents. Future research will include the comic book in an intervention study to improve HPV vaccination rates.

  9. INL Human Resource Development and the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouveia, Fernando; Metcalf, Richard Royce Madison

    2010-07-01

    It is the stated goal of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to promote the development of a strengthened nuclear safeguards base, one with the potential to advance the secure and peaceful implementation of nuclear energy world-wide. To meet this goal, the initiative, among other things, has sought to develop a revitalized effort to ensure the continued availability of next generation safeguards professionals. Accordingly, this paper serves to outline the human capital building strategies taken by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in line with the NGSI. Various components are presented in detail, including INL’s efforts directed at university outreach, in particular the laboratory’s summer internship program, along with the development of various innovative training programs and long-term oriented strategies for student professional development. Special highlights include a video training series, developed by INL in cooperation with LLNL and other laboratories, which sought to expose students and entry-level professionals to the concept and practice of international nuclear safeguards.

  10. Conformational characterization of human eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha: a single tryptophan protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, R K; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Varshney, Nishant K; Berwal, Sunil K; Suresh, C G; Gaikwad, Sushama M; Pal, Jayanta K

    2009-12-11

    The alpha-subunit of the human eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (heIF2alpha), a GTP binding protein, plays a major role in the initiation of protein synthesis. During various cytoplasmic stresses, eIF2alpha gets phosphorylated by eIF2alpha-specific kinases resulting in inhibition of protein synthesis. The cloned and over expressed heIF2alpha, a protein with a single tryptophan (trp) residue was examined for its conformational characteristics using steady-state and time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and hydrophobic dye binding. The steady-state fluorescence spectrum, fluorescence lifetimes (tau(1)=1.13ns and tau(2)=4.74ns) and solute quenching studies revealed the presence of trp conformers in hydrophobic and differential polar environment at any given time. Estimation of the alpha-helix and beta-sheet content showed: (i) more compact structure at pH 2.0, (ii) distorted alpha-helix and rearranged beta-sheet in presence of 4M guanidine hydrochloride and (iii) retention of more than 50% ordered structure at 95 degrees C. Hydrophobic dye binding to the protein with loosened tertiary structure was observed at pH 2.0 indicating the existence of a molten globule-like structure. These observations indicate the inherent structural stability of the protein under various denaturing conditions.

  11. BUILDING HUMAN CAPITAL: THE IMPACT OF PARENTS´ INITIAL EDUCATIONAL LEVEL AND LIFELONG LEARNING ON THEIR CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FISCHER, Jakub

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of parents´ educational level on lifelong learning of children and relationship between parents´ and student´ lifelong learning including language skills and computer literacy. This intergenerational transmission, if proven, could influence the investments into the human capital in the long run. We used data from Adult Education Survey 2011 (AES to test the hypothesis that the parental attained level of education has a significant impact on the initial educational level of their children as well as on their lifelong learning participation. Furthermore, using data from AES, we tested the association between parental educational level and children´s language skills and reading activity and between parental non-formal as well as informal education and students´ lifelong learning. We have found that the parental effect on lifelong learning participation is slightly weaker than the effect of initial adult´s education. Nevertheless, the intergenerational transmission mechanism obviously works. The relationship between parental and students computer literacy is statistically significant, nevertheless weak. As for the nominal and ordinal character of the data, we used mainly the standard statistical methods including nonparametric tests, logit model and correspondence analysis.

  12. Notch signalling inhibits CD4 expression during initiation and differentiation of human T cell lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Carlin

    Full Text Available The Delta/Notch signal transduction pathway is central to T cell differentiation from haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Although T cell development is well characterized using expression of cell surface markers, the detailed mechanisms driving differentiation have not been established. This issue becomes central with observations that adult HSCs exhibit poor differentiation towards the T cell lineage relative to neonatal or embryonic precursors. This study investigates the contribution of Notch signalling and stromal support cells to differentiation of adult and Cord Blood (CB human HSCs, using the Notch signalling OP9Delta co-culture system. Co-cultured cells were assayed at weekly intervals during development for phenotype markers using flow cytometry. Cells were also assayed for mRNA expression at critical developmental stages. Expression of the central thymocyte marker CD4 was initiated independently of Notch signalling, while cells grown with Notch signalling had reduced expression of CD4 mRNA and protein. Interruption of Notch signalling in partially differentiated cells increased CD4 mRNA and protein expression, and promoted differentiation to CD4(+ CD8(+ T cells. We identified a set of genes related to T cell development that were initiated by Notch signalling, and also a set of genes subsequently altered by Notch signal interruption. These results demonstrate that while Notch signalling is essential for establishment of the T cell lineage, at later stages of differentiation, its removal late in differentiation promotes more efficient DP cell generation. Notch signalling adds to signals provided by stromal cells to allow HSCs to differentiate to T cells via initiation of transcription factors such as HES1, GATA3 and TCF7. We also identify gene expression profile differences that may account for low generation of T cells from adult HSCs.

  13. Timing of Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)–Associated Tuberculous Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, M. Estee; Yen, Nguyen Thi Bich; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Mai, Pham Phuong; Dung, Nguyen Thi; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Bang, Nguyen Duc; Tien, Nguyen Anh; Minh, N. H.; Hien, Nguyen Quang; Thai, Phan Vuong Khac; Dong, Doan The; Anh, Do Thi Tuong; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Cam; Hai, Nguyen Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Quy, Hoang Thi; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Hien, Tran Tinh; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Simmons, Cameron Paul; de Jong, Menno; Wolbers, Marcel; Farrar, Jeremy James

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal time to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–associated tuberculous meningitis is unknown. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of immediate versus deferred ART in patients with HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis to determine whether immediate ART reduced the risk of death. Antiretroviral drugs (zidovudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz) were started either at study entry or 2 months after randomization. All patients were treated with standard antituberculosis treatment, adjunctive dexamethasone, and prophylactic co-trimoxazole and were followed up for 12 months. We conducted intention-to-treat, per-protocol, and prespecified subgroup analyses. Results A total of 253 patients were randomized, 127 in the immediate ART group and 126 in the deferred ART group; 76 and 70 patients died within 9 months in the immediate and deferred ART groups, respectively. Immediate ART was not significantly associated with 9-month mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], .81–1.55; P = .50) or the time to new AIDS events or death (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, .87–1.55; P = .31). The percentage of patients with severe (grade 3 or 4) adverse events was high in both arms (90% in the immediate ART group and 89% in the deferred ART group; P = .84), but there were significantly more grade 4 adverse events in the immediate ART arm (102 in the immediate ART group vs 87 in the deferred ART group; P = .04). Conclusions Immediate ART initiation does not improve outcome in patients presenting with HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis. There were significantly more grade 4 adverse events in the immediate ART arm, supporting delayed initiation of ART in HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis. Clinical Trials Registration ISRCTN63659091. PMID:21596680

  14. Information on a Major New Initiative: Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome (1986 DOE Memorandum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisi, Charles (Associate Director, Health and Environmental Research, DOE Office of Energy Research)

    1986-05-06

    In the history of the Human Genome Program, Dr. Charles DeLisi and Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece of the Department of Energy (DOE) were instrumental in moving the seeds of the program forward. This May 1986 memo from DeLisi to Trivelpiece, Director of DOE's Office of Energy Research, documents this fact. Following the March 1986 Santa Fe workshop on the subject of mapping and sequencing the human genome, DeLisi's memo outlines workshop conclusions, explains the relevance of this project to DOE and the importance of the Department's laboratories and capabilities, notes the critical experience of DOE in managing projects of this scale and potential magnitude, and recognizes the fact that the project will impact biomedical science in ways which could not be fully anticipated at the time. Subsequently, program guidance was further sought from the DOE Health Effects Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) and the April 1987 HERAC report recommended that DOE and the nation commit to a large, multidisciplinary, scientific and technological undertaking to map and sequence the human genome.

  15. Human acellular dermal wound matrix: evidence and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsner, Robert S; Bohn, Greg; Driver, Vickie R; Mills, Joseph L; Nanney, Lillian B; Williams, Marie L; Wu, Stephanie C

    2015-12-01

    A chronic wound fails to complete an orderly and timely reparative process and places patients at increased risk for wound complications that negatively impact quality of life and require greater health care expenditure. The role of extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in normal and chronic wound repair. Not only is ECM the largest component of the dermal skin layer, but also ECM proteins provide structure and cell signalling that are necessary for successful tissue repair. Chronic wounds are characterised by their inflammatory and proteolytic environment, which degrades the ECM. Human acellular dermal matrices, which provide an ECM scaffold, therefore, are being used to treat chronic wounds. The ideal human acellular dermal wound matrix (HADWM) would support regenerative healing, providing a structure that could be repopulated by the body's cells. Experienced wound care investigators and clinicians discussed the function of ECM, the evidence related to a specific HADWM (Graftjacket(®) regenerative tissue matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., licensed by KCI USA, Inc., San Antonio, TX), and their clinical experience with this scaffold. This article distills these discussions into an evidence-based and practical overview for treating chronic lower extremity wounds with this HADWM. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Assessment of pain experience in adults and children after bracket bonding and initial archwire insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio José da Silva Campos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ninety five percent of orthodontic patients routinely report pain, due to alterations in the periodontal ligament and surrounding soft tissues, with intensity and prevalence varying according to age. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess toothache and buccal mucosal pain in adults and children during two initial phases of the orthodontic treatment. METHODS: The intensity of toothache and buccal mucosal pain reported by 20 patients, 10 children (11-13 years and 10 adults (18-37 years was recorded with the aid of a Visual Analog Scale (VAS, during 14 days - 7 days with bonded brackets only and 7 days with the initial archwire inserted. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in pain intensity among adults and children. After bracket bonding, 50% of the children and 70% of the adults reported pain. 70% of both groups reported pain after initial archwire insertion. While adults reported constant, low intensity, buccal mucosal pain, the children showed great variation of pain intensity, but with a trend towards decreasing pain during the assessment period. After initial archwire insertion the peaks of toothache intensity and prevalence occurred 24 hours in children and 48 hours in adults. CONCLUSIONS: In general, children reported pain less frequently than adults did, though with greater intensity.

  17. English as an Additional Language and Initial Teacher Education: Views and Experiences from Northern Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses training for teaching English as an Additional Language (EAL) at initial teacher education (ITE) level in Northern Ireland. This small-scale qualitative study describes 15 primary and post-primary teachers' perspectives on their preparation for teaching EAL in Northern Ireland. It explores reflections on EAL content in ITE…

  18. Robotics in hepatobiliary surgery-initial experience, first reported case series from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Goja

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This initial series adds to existing data on the feasibility of robotic hepatobiliary cases with inherent advantages of minimal invasive surgery, however with limitation of availability and use of devices like cavitron ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA and higher operative cost.

  19. Experiments with Metadata-Derived Initial Values and Linesearch Bundle Adjustment in Architectural Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börlin, N.; Grussenmeyer, P.

    2013-07-01

    According to the Waldhäusl and Ogleby (1994) "3 x 3 rules", a well-designed close-range architectural photogrammetric project should include a sketch of the project site with the approximate position and viewing direction of each image. This orientation metadata is important to determine which part of the object each image covers. In principle, the metadata could be used as initial values for the camera external orientation (EO) parameters. However, this has rarely been used, partly due to convergence problem for the bundle adjustment procedure. In this paper we present a photogrammetric reconstruction pipeline based on classical methods and investigate if and how the linesearch bundle algorithm of Börlin et al. (2004) and/or metadata can be used to aid the reconstruction process in architectural photogrammetry when the classical methods fail. The primary initial values for the bundle are calculated by the five-point algorithm by Nistér (Stewénius et al., 2006). Should the bundle fail, initial values derived from metadata are calculated and used for a second bundle attempt. The pipeline was evaluated on an image set of the INSA building in Strasbourg. The data set includes mixed convex and non-convex subnetworks and a combination of manual and automatic measurements. The results show that, in general, the classical bundle algorithm with five-point initial values worked well. However, in cases where it did fail, linesearch bundle and/or metadata initial values did help. The presented approach is interesting for solving EO problems when the automatic orientation processes fail as well as to simplify keeping a link between the metadata containing the plan of how the project should have become and the actual reconstructed network as it turned out to be.

  20. Acquisition of business intelligence from human experience in route planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello Orgaz, Gema; Barrero, David F.; R-Moreno, María D.; Camacho, David

    2015-04-01

    The logistic sector raises a number of highly challenging problems. Probably one of the most important ones is the shipping planning, i.e. plan the routes that the shippers have to follow to deliver the goods. In this article, we present an artificial intelligence-based solution that has been designed to help a logistic company to improve its routes planning process. In order to achieve this goal, the solution uses the knowledge acquired by the company drivers to propose optimised routes. Hence, the proposed solution gathers the experience of the drivers, processes it and optimises the delivery process. The solution uses data mining to extract knowledge from the company information systems and prepares it for analysis with a case-based reasoning (CBR) algorithm. The CBR obtains critical business intelligence knowledge from the drivers experience that is needed by the planner. The design of the routes is done by a genetic algorithm that, given the processed information, optimises the routes following several objectives, such as minimise the distance or time. Experimentation shows that the proposed approach is able to find routes that improve, on average, the routes made by the human experts.

  1. Sexual experience promotes adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus despite an initial elevation in stress hormones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Leuner

    Full Text Available Aversive stressful experiences are typically associated with increased anxiety and a predisposition to develop mood disorders. Negative stress also suppresses adult neurogenesis and restricts dendritic architecture in the hippocampus, a brain region associated with anxiety regulation. The effects of aversive stress on hippocampal structure and function have been linked to stress-induced elevations in glucocorticoids. Normalizing corticosterone levels prevents some of the deleterious consequences of stress, including increased anxiety and suppressed structural plasticity in the hippocampus. Here we examined whether a rewarding stressor, namely sexual experience, also adversely affects hippocampal structure and function in adult rats. Adult male rats were exposed to a sexually-receptive female once (acute or once daily for 14 consecutive days (chronic and levels of circulating glucocorticoids were measured. Separate cohorts of sexually experienced rats were injected with the thymidine analog bromodeoxyuridine in order to measure cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. In addition, brains were processed using Golgi impregnation to assess the effects of sexual experience on dendritic spines and dendritic complexity in the hippocampus. Finally, to evaluate whether sexual experience alters hippocampal function, rats were tested on two tests of anxiety-like behavior: novelty suppressed feeding and the elevated plus maze. We found that acute sexual experience increased circulating corticosterone levels and the number of new neurons in the hippocampus. Chronic sexual experience no longer produced an increase in corticosterone levels but continued to promote adult neurogenesis and stimulate the growth of dendritic spines and dendritic architecture. Chronic sexual experience also reduced anxiety-like behavior. These findings suggest that a rewarding experience not only buffers against the deleterious actions of early elevated

  2. SSEA-1 is an enrichment marker for tumor-initiating cells in human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myung Jin; Woolard, Kevin; Nam, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jeongwu; Fine, Howard A

    2009-05-08

    CD133+ populations of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells are reportedly enriched for tumor stem cells (TSCs) or tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Approximately 40% of freshly isolated GBM specimens, however, do not contain CD133+ tumor cells, raising the possibility that CD133 may not be a universal enrichment marker for GBM TSCs/TICs. Here we demonstrate that stage-specific embryonic antigen 1(SSEA-1/LeX)+ GBM cells fulfill the functional criteria for TSC/TIC, since (1) SSEA-1+ cells are highly tumorigenic in vivo, unlike SSEA-1- cells; (2) SSEA-1+ cells can give rise to both SSEA-1+ and SSEA-1- cells, thereby establishing a cellular hierarchy; and (3) SSEA-1+ cells have self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials. A distinct subpopulation of SSEA-1+ cells was present in all but one of the primary GBMs examined (n = 24), and most CD133+ tumor cells were also SSEA-1+, suggesting that SSEA-1 may be a general TSC/TIC enrichment marker in human GBMs.

  3. Cellular prion protein controls stem cell-like properties of human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Bajetto, Adriana; Thellung, Stefano; Begani, Giulia; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Solari, Agnese; Gatti, Monica; Pagano, Aldo; Würth, Roberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-01-01

    Prion protein (PrPC) is a cell surface glycoprotein whose misfolding is responsible for prion diseases. Although its physiological role is not completely defined, several lines of evidence propose that PrPC is involved in self-renewal, pluripotency gene expression, proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Moreover, PrPC regulates different biological functions in human tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed the role of PrPC in GBM cell pathogenicity focusing on tumor-initiating cells (TICs, or cancer stem cells, CSCs), the subpopulation responsible for development, progression and recurrence of most malignancies. Analyzing four GBM CSC-enriched cultures, we show that PrPC expression is directly correlated with the proliferation rate of the cells. To better define its role in CSC biology, we knocked-down PrPC expression in two of these GBM-derived CSC cultures by specific lentiviral-delivered shRNAs. We provide evidence that CSC proliferation rate, spherogenesis and in vivo tumorigenicity are significantly inhibited in PrPC down-regulated cells. Moreover, PrPC down-regulation caused loss of expression of the stemness and self-renewal markers (NANOG, Sox2) and the activation of differentiation pathways (i.e. increased GFAP expression). Our results suggest that PrPC controls the stemness properties of human GBM CSCs and that its down-regulation induces the acquisition of a more differentiated and less oncogenic phenotype. PMID:27229535

  4. Transient Oral Human Cytomegalovirus Infections Indicate Inefficient Viral Spread from Very Few Initially Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Bryan T; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Swan, David; Ferrenberg, James; Simmons, Karen; Selke, Stacy; Huang, Meei-Li; Casper, Corey; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Schiffer, Joshua T; Gantt, Soren

    2017-06-15

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is acquired by the oral route in children, and primary infection is associated with abundant mucosal replication, as well as the establishment of latency in myeloid cells that results in lifelong infection. The efficiency of primary CMV infection in humans following oral exposure, however, is unknown. We consistently detected self-limited, low-level oral CMV shedding events, which we termed transient CMV infections, in a prospective birth cohort of 30 highly exposed CMV-uninfected infants. We estimated the likelihood of transient oral CMV infections by comparing their observed frequency to that of established primary infections, characterized by persistent high-level shedding, viremia, and seroconversion. We developed mathematical models of viral dynamics upon initial oral CMV infection and validated them using clinical shedding data. Transient infections comprised 76 to 88% of oral CMV shedding events. For this high percentage of transient infections to occur, we identified two mathematical prerequisites: a very small number of initially infected oral cells (1 to 4) and low viral infectivity (<1.5 new cells infected/cell). These observations indicate that oral CMV infection in infants typically begins with a single virus that spreads inefficiently to neighboring cells. Thus, although the incidence of CMV infection is high during infancy, our data provide a mechanistic framework to explain why multiple CMV exposures are typically required before infection is successfully established. These findings imply that a sufficiently primed immune response could prevent CMV from establishing latent infection in humans and support the achievability of a prophylactic CMV vaccine.IMPORTANCE CMV infects the majority of the world's population and is a major cause of birth defects. Developing a vaccine to prevent CMV infection would be extremely valuable but would be facilitated by a better understanding of how natural human CMV infection is acquired. We

  5. Advanced Air Traffic Management Research (Human Factors and Automation): NASA Research Initiatives in Human-Centered Automation Design in Airspace Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corker, Kevin M.; Condon, Gregory W. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    NASA has initiated a significant thrust of research and development focused on providing the flight crew and air traffic managers automation aids to increase capacity in en route and terminal area operations through the use of flexible, more fuel-efficient routing, while improving the level of safety in commercial carrier operations. In that system development, definition of cognitive requirements for integrated multi-operator dynamic aiding systems is fundamental. The core processes of control and the distribution of decision making in that control are undergoing extensive analysis. From our perspective, the human operators and the procedures by which they interact are the fundamental determinants of the safe, efficient, and flexible operation of the system. In that perspective, we have begun to explore what our experience has taught will be the most challenging aspects of designing and integrating human-centered automation in the advanced system. We have performed a full mission simulation looking at the role shift to self-separation on board the aircraft with the rules of the air guiding behavior and the provision of a cockpit display of traffic information and an on-board traffic alert system that seamlessly integrates into the TCAS operations. We have performed and initial investigation of the operational impact of "Dynamic Density" metrics on controller relinquishing and reestablishing full separation authority. (We follow the assumption that responsibility at all times resides with the controller.) This presentation will describe those efforts as well as describe the process by which we will guide the development of error tolerant systems that are sensitive to shifts in operator work load levels and dynamic shifts in the operating point of air traffic management.

  6. Next generation experiments and models for shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarver, C M

    1999-06-01

    Current phenomenological hydrodynamic reactive flow models, such as Ignition and Growth and Johnson- Tang-Forest, when normalized to embedded gauge and laser velocimetry data, have been very successful in predicting shock initiation and detonation properties of solid explosives in most scenarios. However, since these models use reaction rates based on the compression and pressure of the reacting mixture, they can not easily model situations in which the local temperature, which controls the local reaction rate, changes differently from the local pressure. With the advent of larger, faster, parallel computers, microscopic modeling of the hot spot formation processes and Arrhenius chemical kinetic reaction rates that dominate shock initiation and detonation can now be attempted. Such a modeling effort can not be successful without nanosecond or better time resolved experimental data on these processes. The experimental and modeling approaches required to build the next generation of physically realistic reactive flow models are discussed.

  7. Initial results of NEXT-DEMO, a large-scale prototype of the NEXT-100 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Álvarez, V; Cárcel, S; Castel, J; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Díaz, J; Egorov, M; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Gil, A; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jinete, M A; Labarga, L; Laing, A; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martín-Albo, J; Martínez, A; Miller, T; Moiseenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Palma, R; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Segui, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Tomás, A; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Vázquez, D; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2012-01-01

    NEXT-DEMO is a large scale prototype and demonstrator of the NEXT-100 High Pressure Xenon Gas TPC, which will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of Xe-136 using 100-150 kg of enriched xenon gas. The apparatus was built to prove the expected performance of NEXT-100, namely, energy resolution better than 1% FWHM at 2.5 MeV and event topological reconstruction. In this paper we describe the operation and initial results of the detector.

  8. Seeding Entrepreneurship Across Campus Early Implementation Experiences of the Kauffman Campuses Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Lara Hulsey; Linda Rosenberg; Benita Kim

    2006-01-01

    Entrepreneurship has long been a fundamental aspect of American society, serving as an important contributor to economic growth. However, only recently has entrepreneurship begun to develop as an academic field in U.S. colleges and universities. The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation launched the Kauffman Campuses Initiative in eight U.S. universities to encourage campuswide expansion of entrepreneurship programs and activities. This report provides a cross-site analysis of implementation exper...

  9. Initiating an Action Research Programme for University EFL Teachers: Early Experiences and Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Burns

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Accounts of how teacher educators begin to plan, develop, and support action research programmes for language teachers are rare, as are descriptions of the responses of the teachers who participate. This article documents and analyses the initial processes of introducing and supporting a new programme of action research for language teachers at the Universidad Chileno-Británica de Cultura (UCBC in Santiago, Chile. To evaluate the setting up of the programme and how the teachers have perceived it in its early stages, the authors, who are the programme facilitators, have conducted a meta- study. Data include workshop and meeting recordings, workshop observation notes, a reflective account, and a teacher questionnaire. The findings indicate that the teachers value the input and collaboration provided by an initial workshop, and subsequent meetings and discussions, very highly, but that issues of time, student involvement, and academic literature are areas for further debate and development. The article ends by drawing out the broader implications for UCBC and for others wishing to initiate similar action research programmes.

  10. Injecting learning experience into geoethics for human and natural sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookall, David

    2016-04-01

    Our early life experience has a strong influence on our actions in later life. Humans today are just starting to re-learn, collectively, how to treat Earth with the respect that it deserves and that is needed for our offspring to inherit a decent home. However, we still have a long way to go to instill in people at large the ethics, knowledge and skills necessary to ensure a healthy journey for humanity on spaceship. The experience of early upbringing, of schooling and of everyday life is probably the only path strong enough to develop in people a strong desire for ethical behaviour towards their environment. The problem is that the measures taken today to ensure the development of ethical behaviours in the population at large are woefully inadequate. At best, western school programmes contain a few lessons devoted to the environment, and even then they usually just pay lip service to the basics of the environment; they rarely aim to instill skills and knowledge in order to understand and care deeply for the environment. My presentation will suggest some practical ways to help communities build ethical frameworks and strategies to guide and generate tools, methods and activities that guide young people (pupils, students, scholars, researchers) to toward more ethical behaviours regarding their environment and their communities. Examples might include: - Developing geoethical dimensions of internships, in all areas; - Designing, testing and running simulation/games+debriefing providing a rich affective-cognitive context for grappling with geoethical problems- eg, FISH BANKS, KEEP COOL. - Pressuring governments to make geoethics, environmental care and climate change understanding central components of (almost) all educational programmes (in, eg, history, language, business, law, medicine, etc). - Subsidizing environmental-care summer schools for families and teachers at all levels. - Etc. One of my actions is founding a academic journal in the area, maybe with the

  11. 77 FR 25533 - Agency Requests for Approval of a New Information Collection(s): Human Subjects Experiments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ...(s): Human Subjects Experiments Related to Keyless Ignition Controls, Gear Selection Controls, and....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OMB Control Number: 2127-New. Title: Human Subjects Experiments... available at www.regulations.gov . Human factors observational experiments are proposed to examine...

  12. Initial Experience of Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Radical Prostatectomy Requiring Well-Equipped Appliances and a Skilled Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Yong Lee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an initial experience in laparoendoscopic single-site radical prostatectomy (LESSRP using a homemade single-port device for prostate cancer. A 63-year-old man was diagnosed with prostate cancer. The patient underwent LESSRP using an Alexis® wound retractor, which was inserted through an umbilical incision. A homemade single-port device was made by fixing a 61/2 surgical glove to the retractor’s outer ring and securing the glove finger to the end of 4 trocars with a tie. Using the flexible laparoscopic and rigid instruments, LESSRP was performed using a procedure similar to conventional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP. In the current case, we could not perform complete LESSRP, so we report our initial experience and consider the reason why laparoendoscopic single-site surgery was converted to conventional LRP.

  13. Initiation of Addiction Treatment and Access to Services: Young Adults' Accounts of Their Help-Seeking Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Vincent; Bertrand, Karine; Flores-Aranda, Jorge; Acier, Didier; Brunelle, Natacha; Landry, Michel; Brochu, Serge

    2016-12-04

    Substance addiction in young adults is particularly problematic. Yet, much remain at stake in understanding the specifics of this population's access to services. The objective of this study is to explore young adults' initiation of substance misuse treatment. Our study sample was composed of 35 individuals aged 18 to 30 with problematic psychoactive substance use who have been identified in criminal courts, hospital emergency departments, and Health and Social Services Centers in Québec (Canada). A thematic analysis was performed on the 62 semi-structured interviews conducted with participants. Three components emerged. First, personal elements-expectations, individual motivations, perceptions of use, and capacity to control it-influence initiation of substance misuse treatment. Second, family and peers have noticeable influences. Finally, system characteristics and prior care experiences also shape the process. Consideration should be given to tailor interventions that can reach young adults and encourage them to initiate appropriate care.

  14. Outcome of MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy – initial experience at Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Zebic-Sinkovec, Marta; Hertl, Kristijana; Kadivec, Maksimiljan; Cavlek, Mihael; Podobnik, Gasper; Snoj, Marko

    2012-01-01

    Background. Like all breast imaging modalities MRI has limited specificity and the positive predictive value for lesions detected by MRI alone ranges between 15 and 50%. MRI guided procedures (needle biopsy, presurgical localisation) are mandatory for suspicious findings visible only at MRI, with potential influence on therapeutic decision. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate our initial clinical experience with MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy as an alternative to sur...

  15. An Experience-Based Learning Framework: Activities for the Initial Development of Sustainability Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniglia, Guido; John, Beatrice; Kohler, Martin; Bellina, Leonie; Wiek, Arnim; Rojas, Christopher; Laubichler, Manfred D.; Lang, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present an experience-based learning framework that provides a bottom-up, student-centered entrance point for the development of systems thinking, normative and collaborative competencies in sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: The framework combines mental mapping with exploratory walking. It interweaves…

  16. Initial Clinical Experience With Surgical Technique of Robot-assisted Transperitoneal Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Kuang Yang

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion: Robot-assisted LPN is feasible and may be a viable alternative to open or LPN in selected patients with small exophytic renal tumors. Compared with standard LPN, the robotic assisted LPN approach with precise renal reconstruction under a safe warm ischemia time is feasible and can be easily adopted by those with experience in robot-assisted surgery.

  17. Initial tensile test results from J316 stainless steel irradiated in the HFIR spectrally tailored experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel alloys. In this experiment, the spectrum has been tailored to reduce the thermal neutron flux and achieve a He/dpa level near that expected in a fusion reactor.

  18. Experiences of Student Speech-Language Pathology Clinicians in the Initial Clinical Practicum: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    Speech-language pathology literature is limited in describing the clinical practicum process from the student perspective. Much of the supervision literature in this field focuses on quantitative research and/or the point of view of the supervisor. Understanding the student experience serves to enhance the quality of clinical supervision. Of…

  19. Initial experience with transperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy in an Irish hospital setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, J C

    2009-08-01

    Laparoscopic nephrectomy has gained widespread acceptance as a treatment for both benign and malignant conditions and is becoming increasingly popular in Irish hospitals. We report a single surgeon, single centre experience with 20 consecutive laparoscopic nephrectomies comparing them to 20 open cases performed prior to the establishment of a laparoscopic service.

  20. Initiation of subduction at Atlantic-type margins: Insights from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccenna, Claudio; Giardini, Domenico; Davy, Philippe; Argentieri, Alessio

    1999-02-01

    We have performed scaled lithospheric experiments to simulate the behavior of a ocean-continent plate system subjected to compressional strain over a geological timescale. Experiments have been constructed using sand and silicone putty, representing the brittle upper crust and the ductile lower crust/upper mantle, respectively; the layers floated on glucose syrup simulating the asthenosphere. Compressional stress is achieved by displacing a piston at constant velocity perpendicular to the plate margin. We investigate the influence of four parameters: (1) the negative buoyancy of oceanic lithosphere, (2) the horizontal body forces between continent and ocean, and (3) the brittle and (4) the ductile strength of the passive margin. Two numbers express the importance of these parameters: the Argand number (Ar), representing the ratio between the body force of continent and its integrated strength, and the buoyancy number (F), representing the ratio between the buoyancy force of ocean and its ductile resistance. We obtain three scenarios. In experiments with Ar 3 and F 1 the continent collapses toward the ocean, producing back-arc extension and subduction, simulating the post-Alpine Neogene evolution of the Mediterranean area. In experiments with Ar 3 and F > 1 the passive margin slowly evolves toward trench nucleation with the formation of a viscous mantle instability. We conclude that the latter model can be applied to the evolution of Atlantic-type margins, where there is evidence of this ongoing process.

  1. Investigating the Impact of Mediated Learning Experiences on Cooperative Peer Communication during Group Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robert; Dinos, Sokratis

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates how structured Mediated Learning Experiences may improve peer-cooperative communication within problem-solving task exercises. Two groups (n = 22) of Year 8 students (mean age 13 +/- 5 months) were randomly selected to participate in this study. The study began with two one-hour sessions of activity-based problem-solving…

  2. An Experience-Based Learning Framework: Activities for the Initial Development of Sustainability Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniglia, Guido; John, Beatrice; Kohler, Martin; Bellina, Leonie; Wiek, Arnim; Rojas, Christopher; Laubichler, Manfred D.; Lang, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present an experience-based learning framework that provides a bottom-up, student-centered entrance point for the development of systems thinking, normative and collaborative competencies in sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: The framework combines mental mapping with exploratory walking. It interweaves…

  3. Teachers' Experiences of a Single-Sex Initiative in a Co-Education School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Colette; Wilson, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    Argued to "raise boys' grades" and "boost boys' academic achievement", single-sex classes in coeducation schools is one strategy among a plethora aimed at raising standards. This paper explores the experiences of teachers in one coeducation post-primary school that sought to raise academic performance, particularly among boys, and to improve…

  4. Multibiological life support system experiments with humans partially involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Li, Ming; Hu, Dawei; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Hu, Enzhu

    To establish bioregenerative life support system in lunar or mars bases in the future, manned stimulation experiments including several kinds of creatures are needed to be conducted first. Gas exchange relation, element transfer and transformation principles, etc. between human beings and the multibiological system composed of plants, animals, Chlorella vulgaris and so on must be investigated in order to place different organisms with appropriate numbers and proportions. This research cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) in the Closed Integrative Cultivating System (CICS) of the Integrative Experimental Sys-tem (IES) with Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in the Plate Photo Bioreactor (PPB) of the IES. Gas exchange between testers and the IES were conducted periodically. The automotive control system of the PPB changed the illumination intensity of the photo bioreactor according to the CO2 concentration in the IES to make CO2 /O2 in the system maintain at stable levels by regu-lating the photosynthesis of alga. The conveyor-type cultivation method which was harvesting the biggest batch of lettuce and silkworms through the mass exchange chamber of IES every four days and transferring the smallest batch of lettuce and silkworms into the system; carrying certain amount of alga liquid out of the bioreactor every day with nutrient liquid replenished into the system was implemented in the experiments. In terms of gas circulation, CO2 /O2 concentration changes in the system with trace gas contaminants (CH4 , NH3 and C2 H4 ) were measured. As to the mass transfer and transformation, element (C, H, O, N) contents, height, crown width and biomasses of lettuce in different developing stages, silkworms' bioconversion rates, alga's biomass changes, the amount and community change trends of the microorganism in different positions of the system, the quality of condensates gained under different running conditions and so on were studied. Results showed

  5. What experimental experience affects dogs' comprehension of human communicative actions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Marc D; Comins, Jordan A; Pytka, Lisa M; Cahill, Donal P; Velez-Calderon, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Studies of dogs report that individuals reliably respond to the goal-directed communicative actions (e.g., pointing) of human experimenters. All of these studies use some version of a multi-trial approach, thereby allowing for the possibility of rapid learning within an experimental session. The experiments reported here ask whether dogs can respond correctly to a communicative action based on only a single presentation, thereby eliminating the possibility of learning within the experimental context. We tested 173 dogs. For each dog reaching our test criteria, we used a single presentation of six different goal-directed actions within a session, asking whether they correctly follow to a target goal (container with concealed food) a (1) distal hand point, (2) step toward one container, (3) hand point to one container followed by step toward the other, (4) step toward one container and point to the other, (5) distal foot point with the experimenter's hands free, and (6) distal foot point with the experimenter's hands occupied. Given only a single presentation, dogs selected the correct container when the experimenter hand pointed, foot pointed with hands occupied, or stepped closer to the target container, but failed on the other actions, despite using the same method. The fact that dogs correctly followed foot pointing with hands occupied, but not hands free, suggests that they are sensitive to environmental constraints, and use this information to infer rational, goal-directed action. We discuss these results in light of the role of experience in recognizing communicative gestures, as well as the significance of coding criteria for studies of canine competence.

  6. Desfibrilador cardioversor automático implantável: experiência inicial Implantable cardioverter defibrillator: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor BAUER JÚNIOR

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem por objetivo demonstrar o protocolo de implante, técnica utilizada, avaliação dos parâmetros iniciais do implante de desfibrilador cardioversor automático implantável (DCAI e seguimento precoce dos 15 pacientes operados em nosso Serviço. O implante transvenoso nessa série de pacientes obteve sucesso em 14 casos. O limiar de desfibrilação teve média de 8,05 ± 4,60 Joules, onda R 16,00 ± 4,32 mV, "slew rate" 1,25 ± 0,29 V/s, limiar de comando de 0,65 ± 0,80 Volts e resistência de 620,00 ± 102,77 Ohms. O tempo médio de implante foi de 164,17 ± 71,15 minutos. Não ocorreu morte operatória, nem episódios de rejeição ou infecção. A média de seguimento foi de 18,79 ± 13,81 meses sendo que 9 pacientes receberam choques apropriados com reversão das arritmias. Choques inapropriados ocorreram em uma paciente devido à perda do limiar de sensibilidade do cardioversor. Observamos a facilidade técnica do implante utilizando o modelo Phylax 06 na região infraclavicular esquerda com eletrodo único, sendo o DCAI capaz de reconhecer e realizar a terapia de cardioversão ou desfibrilação com sucesso, sugerindo ser um método importante e eficaz para o tratamento dos pacientes que desenvolvem arritmias com alto risco de mortalidade em ambulatório.The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD is gaining increasing significance in therapy of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Mirowski started to develop experimental automatic implantable defibrillators in the seventies. In 1980, the first human implant of an automatic implantable defibrillator was done by the team of Mirowski in Baltimore, USA. The purpose of this report is to examine 15 implantation at our Institution. Adequate defibrillation thresholds with were obrtained mean 8.0 Joules, slew rate 1.25 V/s and impedance of 620 Ohms. All implants were performed with non-thoracotomy lead, two abdominal implantations and three left pectoral implantations

  7. Graduate Medical Education as a Lever for Collaborative Change: One Institution's Experience with a Campuswide Patient Safety Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vath, Richard J; Musso, Mandi W; Rabalais, Lauren S; Dunbar, Alston; Hosea, Stephen; Johnson, Angela C; Bolton, Michael; Rhynes, Vernon K; Caffery, Terrell S; Tynes, L Lee; Mantzor, Savarra; Miller, Bahnsen; Calongne, Laurinda L

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 closure of a public hospital in Baton Rouge, LA transformed graduate medical education (GME) at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center (OLOL). Administrators were tasked with incorporating residents into patient safety and quality improvement initiatives to fulfill regulatory obligations. This report outlines our experiences as we built these patient safety and quality improvement initiatives in a rapidly expanding independent academic medical center. We joined the Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers (AIAMC) to meet and learn from national peers. To fulfill the scholarly activity requirement of the AIAMC's National Initiative IV, we formed a multidisciplinary team to develop a patient safety education project. Prioritized monthly team meetings allowed for project successes to be celebrated and circulated within the organization. The public-private partnership that more than quadrupled the historic size of GME at OLOL has, in the past 2 years, led to the development of an interdisciplinary team. This team has expanded to accommodate residency program leadership from across the campus. Our National Initiative IV project won a national award and inspired several follow-up initiatives. In addition, this work led to the formation of a Patient Safety and Clinical Quality Improvement fellowship that matched its first fellow in 2015. Through the commitment and support of hospital and medical education leaders, as well as a focus on promoting cultural change through scholarly activity, we were able to greatly expand patient safety and quality improvement efforts in our institution.

  8. Fostering of Less Commonly Taught Language Initiatives — The Minnesota Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Anthony Polakiewicz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available First, let me express my sincere gratitude to NCOLCTL for awarding me this prestigious recognition bearing the name of a man who was responsible for many important initiatives and contributions relating to the promotion of the interests of LCTLs. Although for the past 36 years I have been teaching Russian and Polish, in my discussion today I will focus mainly on Polish, the less common of my less commonly taught languages. We can view the future of LCTLs in two ways: paraphrasing Anton Chekhov—one is the view that everything passes and nothing matters; the other view is that nothing passes and everything matters. If we are guided by the first outlook in assessing the present and future status of LCTLs we will conclude that despite all of our initiatives to promote and safeguard the interests of LCTLs, in the final analysis developments beyond our control will threaten the survival of LCTLs as part of institutionalized curriculum at many institutions. Thus, all of our efforts will prove to be in vain.

  9. Initial 10-year Experience of Sperm Cryopreservation Services for Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Chiang Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Offering sperm cryopreservation to preserve the fertility of male cancer patients is a relatively recent service in Asia. This study analyzed the types of cancer, timing of collection, sperm quality, and utilization for reproductive services by patients during a 10-year period at a medical center in Taiwan. A total of 75 oncology patients elected to freeze sperm for fertility preservation at our medical center during the initial 10 years of the availability of this service. The mean age of the patients was 25.7 years. Storage was discontinued in 13 (17% patients and their survival duration was 13.1 ±11.1 months. The utilization rate of sperm cryo-preservation was 2.8% (75/2642. The types of cancer varied, with leukemia (35%, lymphoma (25%, and testicular cancer (13% comprising the largest groups. A significantly lower sperm count was found in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia, suggesting the need for earlier sperm collection after initiation of cancer treatment. Only three (4% patients utilized their specimens for reproductive purposes. There was no clinical pregnancy during the study period, although one biochemical pregnancy was achieved. The low rates of sperm cryostorage for fertility preservation in cancer patients in this study suggest that there is a need for greater emphasis of this option for male oncology patients whose fertility is likely to be affected by chemotherapeutic treatment.

  10. The Accelerating Access Initiative: experience with a multinational workplace programme in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Borght, S; Janssens, V; Schim van der Loeff, M F; Kajemba, A; Rijckborst, H; Lange, J M A; Rinke de Wit, T F

    2009-10-01

    A multinational company with operations in several African countries was committed to offer antiretroviral treatment to its employees and their dependants. The Accelerating Access Initiative (AAI), an initiative of six pharmaceutical companies and five United Nations' agencies, offered the possibility of obtaining brand antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) at 10% of the commercial price. PharmAccess, a foundation aimed at removing barriers to AIDS treatment in Africa, helped to establish an HIV policy and treatment guidelines, and a workplace programme was rolled out from September 2001. Private sector employers in Africa are keen to take more responsibility in HIV prevention and AIDS care. An important hurdle for African employers remains the price and availability of ARVs. The programme encountered various hurdles, among them the need for multiple contracts with multiple companies, complex importation procedures, taxes levied on ARVs, lack of support from pharmaceutical companies in importation and transportation, slow delivery of the drugs, lack of institutional memory in pharmaceutical companies and government policies excluding the company from access to ARVs under the AAI. The launch of the AAI enabled this multinational company to offer access to ARVs to its employees and dependants. The private sector should have access to these discounted drugs under the AAI. A network of local AAI offices should be created to assist in logistics of drugs ordering, purchase and clearance. No taxes should be levied on ARVs.

  11. Radiopurity control in the NEXT-100 double beta decay experiment: procedures and initial measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, V; Bettini, A; Borges, F I G M; Carcel, S; Castel, J; Catala, J M; Cebrian, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Diaz, J; Egorov, M; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Gil, A; Giomataris, I; Goldschmidt, A; Gomez, H; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gonzalez, K; Gonzalez-Diaz, D; Gutierrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Herrero, V; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Kalinnikov, V; Labarga, L; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzon, G; Mari, A; Martin-Albo, J; Martinez, A; Miller, T; Moiseenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Monzo, J M; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Munoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; de Solorzano, A Ortiz; Palma, R; Perez, J; Aparicio, J L Perez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodriguez, A; Rodriguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Segui, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simon, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Tomas, A; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Vazquez, D; Velicheva, E; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R C; Weber, T; White, J; Yahlali, N

    2012-01-01

    The Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC (NEXT) is intended to investigate the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe, which requires a severe suppression of potential backgrounds. An extensive screening and material selection process is underway for NEXT since the control of the radiopurity levels of the materials to be used in the experimental set-up is a must for rare event searches. First measurements based on Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry and gamma-ray spectroscopy using ultra-low background germanium detectors at the Laboratorio Subterr\\'aneo de Canfranc (Spain) are described here. Activity results for natural radioactive chains and other common radionuclides are summarized, being the values obtained for some materials like copper and stainless steel very competitive. The implications of these results for the NEXT experiment are also discussed.

  12. Role of laser myringotomy in a pediatric otolaryngology practice: initial experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Udayan K.

    2001-05-01

    A new technology (OtoLAM) to fenestrate the tympanic membrane with the carbon dioxide laser (CO2), in the office or the operating room, has been introduced over the last three years. While not new conceptually, this product offers the ability to easily create a precise window into the middle ear using a portable system. Controversy regarding the indications and benefits of this technique, amplified by the costs of the system and the marketing of the technology prior to extensive clinical testing, has plagued the clinical application of this technology. We report our experience over the past year with this system in a busy pediatric otolaryngology practice. Laser fenestration of the tympanic membrane has been useful for the insertion of tympanostomy tubes, and for the minimally invasive evaluation of the middle ear. Our small experience to date reveals that there is a limited role for laser tympanic membrane fenestration in a busy pediatric otolaryngology practice.

  13. Initial evaluation of 11C-DPA-713, a novel TSPO PET ligand, in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Christopher J; Pomper, Martin G; James, Michelle; Uzuner, Ovsev; Hammoud, Dima A; Watkins, Crystal C; Reynolds, Aaron; Hilton, John; Dannals, Robert F; Kassiou, Michael

    2009-08-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is upregulated in activated microglia and thus can serve as a marker of neuroinflammation. Recently, a novel radioligand, (11)C-N,N-diethyl-2-[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5,7-dimethyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]-acetamide ((11)C-DPA-713), has been described that binds to TSPO with high affinity. Here, we report the first examination of (11)C-DPA-713 in human subjects using PET. Five healthy controls were studied with PET for 90 min after a bolus injection of high-specific-activity (11)C-DPA-713. For comparison, 2 additional healthy controls were studied with (11)C-R-PK11195. Arterial blood sampling and metabolite analysis were performed to allow the accurate quantification of tracer kinetics. Tracer uptake was evaluated for several brain regions. Tissue time-activity curves were fitted using 1- and 2-tissue-compartment models, with goodness-of-fit tests showing a preference for the 2-tissue model. In the healthy brain, the average plasma-to-tissue clearance and the total volume of distribution were an order of magnitude larger than measured for (11)C-R-PK11195. Accordingly, dose-normalized time-activity curves showed that (11)C-DPA-713 gives a larger brain signal. Studies in patient populations will help determine whether (11)C-DPA-713 provides better sensitivity for evaluating increased TSPO expression. This initial study in humans shows that (11)C-DPA-713 is a promising ligand for evaluating TSPO binding with PET.

  14. Shock initiation behavior of PBXN-9 determined by gas gun experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Nathaniel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The shock to detonation transition was evaluated in the HMX based explosive PBXN-9 by a series of light-gas gun experiments. PBXN-9 consists of 92 wt% HMX, 2wt% Hycar 4054 & 6 wt% dioctyl adipate with a density of 1.75 g/cm{sup 3} and 0.8% voids. The experiments were designed to understand the specifics of wave evolution and the run distance to detonation as a function of input shock pressure. These experiments were conducted on gas guns in order to vary the input shock pressure accurately. The primary diagnostics were embedded magnetic gauges, which are based on Faraday's law of induction, and Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The run distance to detonation vs. shock pressure, or 'Pop plot,' was redefined as log(X*) = 2.14-1.82 log(P), which is substantially different than previous data. The Hugoniot was refined as U{sub s} = 2.32 + 2.21 U{sub p}. This data will be useful for the development of predictive models for the safety and performance of PBXN-9 along with providing increased understanding of HMX based explosives in varying formulations.

  15. NASA Experience with Pogo in Human Spaceflight Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Curtis E.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of more than 45 years of NASA human spaceflight experience is presented with respect to the thrust axis vibration response of liquid fueled rockets known as pogo. A coupled structure and propulsion system instability, pogo can result in the impairment of the astronaut crew, an unplanned engine shutdown, loss of mission, or structural failure. The NASA history begins with the Gemini Program and adaptation of the USAF Titan II ballistic missile as a spacecraft launch vehicle. It continues with the pogo experienced on several Apollo-Saturn flights in both the first and second stages of flight. The defining moment for NASA s subsequent treatment of pogo occurred with the near failure of the second stage on the ascent of the Apollo 13 mission. Since that time NASA has had a strict "no pogo" philosophy that was applied to the development of the Space Shuttle. The "no pogo" philosophy lead to the first vehicle designed to be pogo-free from the beginning and the first development of an engine with an integral pogo suppression system. Now, more than 30 years later, NASA is developing two new launch vehicles, the Ares I crew launch vehicle propelling the Orion crew excursion vehicle, and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle. A new generation of engineers must again exercise NASA s system engineering method for pogo mitigation during design, development and verification.

  16. Initial experience with optical-CT scanning of RadBall Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldham, M; Clift, C; Thomas, A; Farfan, E; Foley, T; Jannik, T; Adamovics, J; Holmes, C; Stanley, S, E-mail: Mark.Oldham@Duke.ed

    2010-11-01

    The RadBall dosimeter is a novel device for providing 3-D information on the magnitude and distribution of contaminant sources of unknown radiation in a given hot cell, glovebox, or contaminated room. The device is presently under evaluation by the National Nuclear Lab (NNL, UK) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL, US), for application as a diagnostic device for such unknown contaminants in the nuclear industry. A critical component of the technique is imaging the dose distribution recorded in the RadBall using optical-CT scanning. Here we present our initial investigations using the Duke Mid-sized Optical-CT Scanner (DMOS) to image dose distributions deposited in RadBalls exposed to a variety of radiation treatments.

  17. Robotic pulmonary lobectomy for lung cancer treatment: program implementation and initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mingarini Terra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the implementation of a robotic thoracic surgery program at a public tertiary teaching hospital and to analyze its initial results. Methods: This was a planned interim analysis of a randomized clinical trial aimed at comparing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and robotic surgery in terms of the results obtained after pulmonary lobectomy. The robotic surgery program developed at the Instituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo, in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, is a multidisciplinary initiative involving various surgical specialties, as well as anesthesiology, nursing, and clinical engineering teams. In this analysis, we evaluated the patients included in the robotic lobectomy arm of the trial during its first three months (from April to June of 2015. Results: Ten patients were included in this analysis. There were eight women and two men. The mean age was 65.1 years. All of the patients presented with peripheral tumors. We performed right upper lobectomy in four patients, right lower lobectomy in four, and left upper lobectomy in two. Surgical time varied considerably (range, 135-435 min. Conversion to open surgery or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was not necessary in any of the cases. Intraoperative complications were not found. Only the first patient required postoperative transfer to the ICU. There were no deaths or readmissions within the first 30 days after discharge. The only postoperative complication was chest pain (grade 3, in two patients. Pathological examination revealed complete tumor resection in all cases. Conclusions: When there is integration and proper training of all of the teams involved, the implementation of a robotic thoracic surgery program is feasible and can reduce morbidity and mortality.

  18. Initial Thomson Scattering Survey of Local Helicity Injection and Ohmic Plasmas at the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Winz, G. R.

    2014-10-01

    A multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic has recently been installed on the Pegasus ST. The system utilizes a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (λ0 ~ 532 nm), spectrometers with volume phase holographic gratings, and a gated, intensified CCD camera. It provides measurements of Te and ne at 8 spatial locations for each spectrometer once per discharge. A new multiple aperture and beam dump system has been implemented to mitigate interference from stray light. This system has provided initial measurements in the core region of plasmas initiated by local helicity injection (LHI), as well as conventional Ohmic L- and H-mode discharges. Multi-shot averages of low-density (ne ~ 3 ×1018 m-3) , Ip ~ 0 . 1 MA LHI discharges show central Te ~ 75 eV at the end of the helicity injection phase. Ip ~ 0 . 13 MA Ohmic plasmas at moderate densities (ne ~ 2 ×1019 m-3) have core Te ~ 150 eV in L-mode. Generally, these plasmas do not reach transport equilibrium in the short 25 ms pulse length available. After an L-H transition, strong spectral broadening indicates increasing Te, to values above the range of the present spectrometer system with a high-dispersion VPH grating. Near-term system upgrades will focus on deploying a second spectrometer, with a lower-dispersion grating capable of measuring the 0.1-1.0 keV range. The second spectrometer system will also increase the available number of spatial channels, enabling study of H-mode pedestal structure. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  19. Multi-frequency harmonic arrays: initial experience with a novel transducer concept for nonlinear contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Flemming; Shi, William T; Jadidian, Bahram; Winder, Alan A

    2004-12-01

    Nonlinear contrast imaging modes such as second harmonic imaging (HI) and subharmonic imaging (SHI) are increasingly important for clinical applications. However, the performance of currently available transducers for HI and SHI is significantly constrained by their limited bandwidth. To bypass this constraint, a novel transducer concept termed multi-frequency harmonic transducer arrays (MFHA's) has been designed and a preliminary evaluation has been conducted. The MFHA may ultimately be used for broadband contrast enhanced HI and SHI with high dynamic range and consists of three multi-element piezo-composite sub-arrays (A-C) constructed so the center frequencies are 4f(A) = 2f(B) = f(C) (specifically 2.5/5.0/10.0 MHz and 1.75/3.5/7.0 MHz). In principle this enables SHI by transmitting on sub-array C receiving on B and, similarly, from B to A as well as HI by transmitting on A receiving on B and, likewise, from B to C. Initially transmit and receive pressure levels of the arrays were measured with the elements of each sub-array wired in parallel. Following contrast administration, preliminary in vitro HI and SHI signal-to-noise ratios of up to 40 dB were obtained. In conclusion, initial design and in vitro characterization of two MFHA's have been performed. They have an overall broad frequency bandwidth of at least two octaves. Due to the special design of the array assembly, the SNR for HI and SHI was comparable to that of regular B-mode and better than commercially available HI systems. However, further research on multi-element MFHA's is required before their potential for in vivo nonlinear contrast imaging can be assessed.

  20. The initiation and growth of gullies in Madagascar: are humans to blame?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Neil A.; Andriamihaja, Benjamin

    1993-09-01

    Lavaka (Madagascar's unusual gullies) require thick lateritic regolith on smoothly convex hills, and they are initiated locally by a variety of cultural and natural proximate causes, such as paths, roads, defensive trenches around hillforts, steep fields, unchanneled to slightly concentrated storm run-off, springs, mass movements, etc. Growth continues by rain attack, incision by run-off, earthfalls caused by wetting and drying cycles, and especially basal sapping by diffuse groundwater flow above bedrock, somewhat in that order. Lavaka are less directly permitted and promoted by (1) hardening of exposed laterite surfaces, which creates a hard-soft-hard profile from bedrock to laterite, which favors incision relative to lateral erosion, (2) the superimposition of concave run-off profiles onto convex hills, and, locally, (3) re-equilibration of watersheds after stream piracy and faulting. Run-off and hardening are interrelated with devegetation, because hardening results from exposure following devegetation, because both hardening and devegetation increase run-off relative to infiltration, and because hardening, rain attack, and run-off impede vegetation. Devegetation is certainly worsened by harmful human activities (such as range burning, forest cutting, and/or overgrazing), but tectonism and natural climatic aridification are probably ultimately more important, given that many lavaka are simply a natural part of the landscape's evolution and that some lavaka clearly predate primary (uncut) rain forest.

  1. Laser immunotherapy: initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hode, Tomas; Guerra, Maria C.; Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Lunn, John A.; Adelsteinsson, Orn; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    Laser Immunotherapy is an experimental treatment modality for late-stage, metastatic tumors, which targets solid primary and/or secondary tumors and utilizes an autologous vaccine-like approach to stimulate immune responses. Specifically, laser immunotherapy combines laser-induced in situ tumor devitalization with an immunoadjuvant for local immunostimulation. Here we report the initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial with laser immunotherapy. Six stage III and IV cancer patients were treated, all of which were considered to be out of all other options, and preliminary data at the three-month examination are presented. The immediate goal of the trial was to determine the patient tolerance and the toxicity of the therapy, the optimal dose for the alteration of the course of the disease, and the reduction of the tumor burden. Each patient was individually evaluated for toxicity tolerance through physical exams and by appropriate supplemental and routine laboratory tests. Observable tumors in patients were followed with physical examination and radiological evaluations. Treatment efficacy was judged by the size and number of local and distant metastases before and after treatment.

  2. Effects of 3D microwell culture on initial fate specification in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Cheston; Tomai, Matthew; Glynn, Jeremy; Palecek, Sean P

    2014-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that 3D culture systems influence human embryonic stem cell (hESC) phenotypes and fate choices. However, the effect that these microenvironmental changes have on signaling pathways governing hESC behaviors is not well understood. Here, we have used a 3D microwell array to investigate differences in activation of developmental pathways between 2D and 3D cultures of both undifferentiated hESCs and hESCs undergoing initial differentiation in embryoid bodies (EBs). We observed increased induction into mesoderm and endoderm and differences in expression of genes from multiple signaling pathways that regulate development, including Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β superfamily, Notch and FGF during EB-mediated differentiation, in 3D microwells as compared with the 2D substrates. In undifferentiated hESCs, we also observed differences in epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotypes and the TGFβ/BMP pathway between cultures in 3D and 2D. These results illustrate that 3D culture influences multiple pathways that may regulate the differentiation trajectories of hESCs.

  3. Phase transformations in a human tooth tissue at the initial stage of caries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Seredin

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to study phase transformations in solid tissues of the human teeth during the development of fissure caries by Raman and fluorescence microspectroscopy. The study of the areas with fissure caries confirmed the assumption of the formation of a weak interaction between phosphate apatite enamel and organic acids (products of microorganisms. The experimental results obtained with by Raman microspectroscopy showed the formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate - CaHPO4-2H2O in the area of mural demineralization of carious fissure. A comparative analysis of structural and spectroscopic data for the intact and carious enamel shows that emergence of a more soluble phase - carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite - is typical for the initial stage of caries. It is shown that microareas of dental hard tissues in the carious fissure due to an emerging misorientation of apatite crystals have a higher fluorescence yield than the area of the intact enamel. These areas can be easily detected even prior to a deep demineralization (white spot stage for the case of irreversibly changed organomineral complex and intensive removal of the mineral component.

  4. Conceptual design of initial opacity experiments on the national ignition facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeter, R. F.; Bailey, J. E.; Craxton, R. S.; Devolder, B. G.; Dodd, E. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Huffman, E. J.; Iglesias, C. A.; King, J. A.; Kline, J. L.; Liedahl, D. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Opachich, Y. P.; Rochau, G. A.; Ross, P. W.; Schneider, M. B.; Sherrill, M. E.; Wilson, B. G.; Zhang, R.; Perry, T. S.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate models of X-ray absorption and re-emission in partly stripped ions are necessary to calculate the structure of stars, the performance of hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion and many other systems in high-energy-density plasma physics. Despite theoretical progress, a persistent discrepancy exists with recent experiments at the Sandia Z facility studying iron in conditions characteristic of the solar radiative-convective transition region. The increased iron opacity measured at Z could help resolve a longstanding issue with the standard solar model, but requires a radical departure for opacity theory. To replicate the Z measurements, an opacity experiment has been designed for the National Facility (NIF). The design uses established techniques scaled to NIF. A laser-heated hohlraum will produce X-ray-heated uniform iron plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at temperatures eV and electron densities 21~\\text{cm}-3$ . The iron will be probed using continuum X-rays emitted in a ps, diameter source from a 2 mm diameter polystyrene (CH) capsule implosion. In this design, of the NIF beams deliver 500 kJ to the mm diameter hohlraum, and the remaining directly drive the CH capsule with 200 kJ. Calculations indicate this capsule backlighter should outshine the iron sample, delivering a point-projection transmission opacity measurement to a time-integrated X-ray spectrometer viewing down the hohlraum axis. Preliminary experiments to develop the backlighter and hohlraum are underway, informing simulated measurements to guide the final design.

  5. SU-E-E-05: Initial Experience On Physics Rotation of Radiological Residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Williams, D; DiSantis, D; Hardy, P; Oates, M [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The new ABR core exam integrates physics into clinical teaching, with an emphasis on understanding image quality, image artifacts, radiation dose and patient safety for each modality and/or sub-specialty. Accordingly, physics training of radiological residents faces a challenge. A traditional teaching of physics through didactic lectures may not fully fulfill this goal. It is also difficult to incorporate physics teaching in clinical practice due to time constraints. A dedicated physics rotation may be a solution. This study is to evaluate a full week physics workshop developed for the first year radiological residents. Methods: The physics rotation took a full week. It included three major parts, introduction lectures, hand-on experiences and observation of technologist operation. An introduction of basic concepts was given to each modality at the beginning. Hand-on experiments were emphasized and took most of time. During hand-on experiments, residents performed radiation measurements, studied the relationship between patient dose and practice (i.e., fluoroscopy), investigated influence of acquisition parameters (i.g., kV, mAs) on image quality, and evaluated image quality using phantoms A physics test before and after the workshop was also given but not for comparison purpose. Results: The evaluation shows that the physics rotation during the first week of residency in radiology is preferred by all residents. The length of a full week of physics workshop is appropriate. All residents think that the intensive workshop can significantly benefit their coming clinical rotations. Residents become more comfortable regarding the use of radiation and counseling relevant questions such as a pregnant patient risk from a CE PE examination. Conclusion: A dedicated physics rotation, assisting with didactic lectures, may fulfill the requirements of physics of the new ABR core exam. It helps radiologists deeply understand the physics concepts and more efficiently use

  6. Initial experience in setting up a medical student first responder scheme in South Central England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, William H; Ganatra, Sameer; England, David; Black, John J M

    2016-02-01

    Prehospital emergency medicine (PHEM) is a recently recognised subspecialty of emergency medicine, and anaesthetics, intensive care and acute medicine, in the UK, and yet it receives little to no mention in many undergraduate medical curricula. However, there is growing interest in PHEM among medical students and junior doctors. Several programmes are in existence across the UK that serve to provide teaching and exposure of prehospital care to medical students and junior doctors. However, relatively few students are able to gain significant first-hand experience of treating patients in the prehospital phase. In this short report, we discuss our experience of launching the student first responder (SFR) scheme across three counties in the Thames Valley. Medical students are trained by the regional ambulance service and respond to life-threatening medical emergencies in an ambulance response vehicle. The scheme is likely to benefit the ambulance service by providing a wider pool of trained volunteer first responders able to attend to emergency calls, to benefit patients by providing a quick response at their time of need, and to benefit medical students by providing first-hand experience of medical emergencies in the community. In its first 15 months of operation, SFRs were dispatched to 343 incidents. This scheme can serve as a training model for other ambulance services and medical schools across the UK. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Initial Results from the Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) Balloon Flight Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) high-altitude balloon mission was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico USA on 25 September, 2015. Over 15 hours of science data were obtained from four dosimeters at altitudes above about 25 km. The four dosimeters flown on the RaD-X science payload are a Hawk version 3.0 Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) manufactured by Far West Technologies, a Liulin dosimeter-spectrometer produced by the Solar Research and Technology Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, a total ionizing dose detector manufactured by Teledyne Microelectronic Technologies, and the RaySure detector provided by the University of Surrey.

  8. [Initial experiences with the new environmental medicine course in graduate education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemitz, B

    1995-08-01

    The "master of environmental medicine" is a new medical subspeciality in Germany. Specialised physicians can qualify for it, if they have spent at least an additional period of 1.5 years at a recognized institution in the field. Furthermore the attendance of a 200 hours comprehensive specialist's training course is required. Preliminary experience with this comprehensive course, as offered by our institution (Academy of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Berlin, Germany) is lined out. Additionally, details of the curriculum, which was specifically designed for this purpose by our institution, are given. The results of an evaluation-procedure (questionnaire) among those participants, who completed the first parts of the course, are discussed.

  9. Strain localization and evolving kinematic efficiency of initiating strike-slip faults within wet kaolin experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, Alexandra E.; Cooke, Michele L.; Toeneboehn, Kevin

    2017-08-01

    Using wet kaolin experiments, we document the evolution of strain localization during strike-slip fault maturation under variable boundary conditions (pre-existing fault, depth of and distribution of basal shear). While the nature of the basal shear influences strain localization observed at the clay surface, similarities between experiments reveal a general conceptual model of strain accommodation. First, shear strain is accommodated as distributed shear (Stage 0), then by development of echelon faults (Stage I), then by interaction, lengthening and propagation of those echelon faults (Stage II) and, finally, by slip along through-going fault (Stage III). Stage II serves as a transitory period when the system reorganizes after sufficient strain localization. Here, active fault system complexity is maximized as faults link producing apparent rotation of active fault surfaces without material rotation. As the shear zone narrows, off-fault deformation decreases while fault slip and kinematic efficiency increases. We quantify kinematic efficiency as the ratio of fault slip to applied displacement. All fault systems reach a steady-state efficiency in excess of 80%. Despite reducing off-fault deformation, the through-going fault maintains <1.5 cm structural irregularities (i.e., stepovers), which suggests that small (<3 km) stepovers may persist along mature, efficient faults in the crust.

  10. Multi-initialized States Referred Work Parameter Calibration for Gaze Tracking Human-Robot Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijie Zhao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to adaptively calibrate the work parameters in the infrared‐TV based eye gaze tracking Human‐Robot Interaction (HRI system, a kind of gaze direction sensing model has been provided for detecting the eye gaze identified parameters. We paid more attention to situations where the user’s head was in a different position to the interaction interface. Furthermore, the algorithm for automatically correcting work parameters of the system has also been put up by defining certain initial reference system states and analysing the historical information of the interaction between a user and the system. Moreover, considering some application cases and factors, and relying on minimum error rate Bayesian decision‐making theory, a mechanism for identifying system state and adaptively calibrating parameters has been proposed. Finally, some experiments have been done with the established system and the results suggest that the proposed mechanism and algorithm can identify the system work state in multi‐ situations, and can automatically correct the work parameters to meet the demands of a gaze tracking HRI system.

  11. Application of Radar Reflectivity Factor in Initializing Cloud-Resolving Mesoscale Model. Part Ⅱ: Numerical Simulation Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hongya; XU Haiming; XUE Jishan; HU Zhijin; SHEN Tongli

    2008-01-01

    Microphysics elements and vertical velocity retrieved were incorporated using the nudging method into the initial data assimilation of GRAPES (Global/Regional Assimilation and Prediction System) model.Simulation experiments indicated that nudging technique was effective in forcing the model forecast gradually consistent to the observations, yielding the thermodynamically and dynamically balanced analysis field. As viewed from the simulation results, water vapor is vital to precipitation, and it is a governing factor for the amount and duration of precipitation. The initial cloud water, rain water, and vertical velocity determine the strength distribution of convection and precipitation at the beginning time of forecast; the horizontal wind field steers the motion of the mesoscale weather system embedded in and impacts the position of precipitation zone to a large extent. The simulation experiments show that the influence of the initial retrieval data on prediction weakens with the increase of forecast time, and within the first hour of forecast, the retrieval data have an important impact on the evolution of the weather system, but its influence becomes trivial after the first three hours. Changing the nudging coefficient and the integral time-spacing of numerical model will bring some influences to the results. Herein only one radar reflectivity was used, the radar observations did not cover the whole model domain, and some empirical parameters were used in the retrieval method, therefore some differences still lie between simulation and observation to a certain extent, and further studies on several aspects are expected.

  12. Combined laparoscopic and thoracoscopic Ivor Lewis esophagectomy for esophageal cancer: initial experience from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; HU Bin; YOU Bin; MIAO Jin-bai; FU Yi-li; CHEN Qi-rui

    2012-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive lvor Lewis esophagectomy was usually performed with either hand-sewn or circular stapler anastomosis through a small thoracotomy or using a side-to-side stapler anastomotic technique.This study aimed to present our initial results of lvor Lewis esophagectomy using a circular-stapled anastomosis with transoral anvil technique.Methods Six patients with esophageal cancer underwent minimally invasive lvor Lewis esophagectomy with an intrathoracic circular-stapled end-to-end anastomosis.The abdominal portion was operated on laparoscopically,and the thoracic portion was done using thoracoscopic techniques.A 25 mm anvil connected to a 90 cm long delivery tube was introduced transorally to the esophageal stump in a tilted position,the anvil head was then connected to circular stapler.The anastomosis was completed under direct thoracoscopic view.Results A total of six patients in this report successfully underwent total laparoscopic and thoracoscopic lvor Lewis esophagectomy with a circular-stapled anastomosis using a transoral anvil.They were five male and one female patients,and had a mean age of 55 years (range,38-69 years).The thoracic and abdominal operations were successfully performed without any intraoperative complications or conversion to laparotomy or thoracotomy.The passage of the anvil head was technically easy and successful in all six cases.The mean overall operative time was (260±42) minutes (range,220-300 minutes),and the mean estimated blood loss was (520±160) ml (range,130-800 ml).Patients resumed a liquid oral diet on postoperative day seven.The median length of hospital stay was 17 days (range,9-25 days).The postoperative pathological diagnosis was esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in five patients and esophageal small cell carcinoma in one patient.Tumors were staged as T2N0M0 in three cases,T2N1M0 in one case,and T3N0M0 in two cases.During the mean follow-up of 2.5 months (range,2-4months),there were no intraoperative

  13. Fundamentals of human resource management : emerging experiences from Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itika, J.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamentals of human resource management are extensively described in European and American literature. This book summarises the general human resource management philosophies, theories, strategies and techniques and links them to the specific African context. The usefulness of these general

  14. Human Capital Development and Economic Growth: The Nigeria Experience

    OpenAIRE

    God’stime Osekhebhen Eigbiremolen; Uchechi Shirley Anaduaka

    2014-01-01

    This study employs the augmented Solow human-capital-growth model to investigate the impact of human capital development on national output, a proxy for economic growth, using quarterly time-series data from 1999-2012. Empirical results show that human capita development, in line with theory, exhibits significant positive impact on output level. This implies that human capital development is indispensable in the achievement of sustainable economic growth in Nigeria, as there is an increase in...

  15. Intent at day case laparoscopic cholecystectomy in Owerri, Nigeria: Initial experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Nonso Ekwunife

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has been the default operation for cholelithiasis at Federal Medical Centre, Owerri for the past 2 years and the outcomes have been good. The duration of post operative stay has been decreasing. We therefore initiated a preliminary 2-year prospective study in May 2010 to determine the feasibility of carrying out day case laparoscopic cholecystectomy in our hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in the study if they satisfied the following criteria: Age < 65 years, body mass index < 35 kg/m 2 , American Society of Anaesthesiology physical status class I and II, patient residence within 20 km radius of the hospital, patient acceptance of the procedure and absence of previous complicated upper abdominal surgery. Results: Twelve patients (10 females, 2 males were worked up with the intent of achieving same-day discharge of the patients. Five of the patients (41.7% were discharged on the day of operation. The reasons for overnight stay included inadequate pain control, insertion of drain and patient wishes. There was no conversion to open surgery, no major complications and no case of readmission to the hospital. Conclusions: Day case laparoscopic cholecystectomy in our environment could be safely promoted but will depend on improved facilities and patient enlightenment.

  16. Local Control of Perivascular Malignant Liver Lesions Using Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation: Initial Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eller, Achim, E-mail: Achim.Eller@uk-erlangen.de; Schmid, Axel, E-mail: axel.schmid@uk-erlangen.de [University Hospital Erlangen, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Schmidt, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.schmidt@kfa.imed.uni-erlangen.de [University Hospital Erlangen, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Anesthesiology (Germany); May, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.may@uk-erlangen.de; Brand, Michael, E-mail: michael.brand@uk-erlangen.de; Saake, Marc, E-mail: marc.saake@uk-erlangen.de; Uder, Michael, E-mail: michael.uder@uk-erlangen.de; Lell, Michael, E-mail: michael.lell@uk-erlangen.de [University Hospital Erlangen, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess efficacy and safety in the treatment of perivascular malignant liver lesions using percutaneous, computed tomography (CT)-guided irreversible electroporation (IRE).MethodsFourteen patients (mean age 58 ± 11 years) with 18 malignant liver lesions were consecutively enrolled in this study. IRE was performed in patients not eligible for surgery and lesions abutting large vessels or bile ducts. Follow-up exams were performed using multislice-CT (MS-CT) or MRI.ResultsMedium lesion diameter was 20 ± 5 mm. Ten of 14 (71 %) were successfully treated with no local recurrence to date (mean follow-up 388 ± 160 days). One case left initial tumor control unclear and additional RFA was performed 4 weeks after IRE. Complications occurred in 4 of 14 (29 %) cases. In one case, intervention was terminated and abdominal bleeding required laparotomy. In two cases, a postinterventional hematothorax required intervention. In another case, abdominal bleeding could be managed conservatively. No complications related to the bile ducts occurred.ConclusionsPercutaneous IRE seems to be effective in perivascular lesions but is associated with a higher complication rate compared with thermoablative techniques.

  17. [Telecommunication--a medium for improving prenatal diagnosis and gynecologic ultrasound diagnosis? Initial experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, C; Beldermann, F; Wallwiener, D; Lepold, H; Bastert, G

    1997-01-01

    To establish the requirements for real-time transfer of an ultrasound examination via telecommunication network the following tests were performed: The ultrasound data were transferred from the video out of an ultrasound system to a basis terminal of the German Telekom. Simultaneously, an external video camera filmed the positioning and movements of the ultrasound transducer, and the verbal comments were recorded. These informations were transmitted to Karlsruhe and London, where they were rerouted to the examination room in Heidelberg. Here the informations were received on a Telecom reception unit/terminal and compared directly with the initial signal. The quality was sufficient if the moving ultrasound images and the camera image of the transducer as well as the oral comment were transmitted over 2 parallel ISDN lines. The delay to a real-time transmission of the examination process is only in the range of milliseconds. If only one ISDN line is used, the image quality is unsatisfactory, three parallel lines do not bring significant improvement of image quality. Telemedicine seems a new possibility to bring the knowledge of specialized centers to the practicing gynaecologists thus avoiding unnecessary referrals. Still unanswered, however, are the problem of liability, data protection and costs.

  18. Initial operating experience of the 12-MW La Ola photovoltaic system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Abraham; Lenox, Carl (SunPower Corporation, Richmond, CA); Johnson, Jay; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

    2011-10-01

    The 1.2-MW La Ola photovoltaic (PV) power plant in Lanai, Hawaii, has been in operation since December 2009. The host system is a small island microgrid with peak load of 5 MW. Simulations conducted as part of the interconnection study concluded that unmitigated PV output ramps had the potential to negatively affect system frequency. Based on that study, the PV system was initially allowed to operate with output power limited to 50% of nameplate to reduce the potential for frequency instability due to PV variability. Based on the analysis of historical voltage, frequency, and power output data at 50% output level, the PV system has not significantly affected grid performance. However, it should be noted that the impact of PV variability on active and reactive power output of the nearby diesel generators was not evaluated. In summer 2011, an energy storage system was installed to counteract high ramp rates and allow the PV system to operate at rated output. The energy storage system was not fully operational at the time this report was written; therefore, analysis results do not address system performance with the battery system in place.

  19. Can we reduce the burden of depression? The Australian experience with beyondblue: the national depression initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickie, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Throughout the Asia Pacific region, there is an urgent need to reduce the burden of depression by increasing depression awareness, reducing stigma and dismantling those social barriers that prevent full participation by people with depression. This paper describes the development and early achievements of the Australian depression initiative, beyondblue. A review of the key priorities of beyondblue and their impacts during the first three years of operation (2001-03). Key achievements include: the degree of national recognition of beyondblue; size and scope of media impact; growth in website utilisation; increased reporting of the community's recognition of people with depression; genuine reforms in life insurance and income protection; development of a new national consumer and carer organisation; establishment of major population-based preventative and early intervention programs; system-wide reform of primary care-based mental health services; national educational program uptake by general practitioners; and, development of key awareness and intervention programs for use in schools and the workplace. In its first three years of operation, beyondblue has had a major impact on depression awareness in Australia and demonstrable gains have been made in reducing stigma and major social barriers. A pre-existing national mental health policy and implementation plan, a substantial funding base and participation by key political, media and community leaders have been essential elements of its short-term success. Its longer-term impact will now depend on more sustainable community and business partnerships as well as the growth of a more influential consumer and carer voice.

  20. Intraoperative perfusion contrast echocardiography. Initial experience during coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabas, J S; Kisslo, J; Flick, C L; Johnson, S H; Craig, D M; Stanley, T E; Smith, P K

    1990-03-01

    Intraoperative evaluation of the effectiveness of myocardial revascularization has been limited by an inability to assess regional myocardial perfusion. Microbubbles of sonicated diatrizoate sodium and diatrizoate meglumine (Renografin) have been an effective echocardiographic contrast agent and have been employed clinically during cardiac catheterization. This recent development in contrast-enhanced two-dimensional echocardiography permits real-time imaging of transmural myocardial blood flow but has not been evaluated in the operating room. This study represents the initial surgical application of this directed technique and was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intraoperative perfusion contrast echocardiography in assessing the results of coronary artery bypass grafting. Twenty men with significant coronary artery disease ranging in age from 49 to 73 years were studied. Direct contrast agent injection into completed saphenous vein bypass grafts caused the myocardium supplied by each graft to be well delineated and provided a tomographic view of contrast distribution. The enhanced region was well correlated with the size and distribution of the native vessel. Rapid contrast washout (less than 20 seconds) indicated satisfactory regional perfusion. Contrast echocardiography prolonged the operation less than 10 minutes and did not result in any perioperative complications.

  1. Participation in ICZM initiatives: critical aspects and lessons learnt from the Mediterranean and Black Sea experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriani, Stefano; Buono, Fabrizia; Tonino, Marco; Camuffo, Monica

    2015-03-15

    Public participation is recognized as a necessary tool to ensure a successful implementation of Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) strategies and plans. This paper, based on the experiences carried out in the Mediterranean and in the Black Sea within the EU FP7 project PEGASO, presents some critical aspects and lessons learnt regarding participation in ICZM projects. The research shows that data availability, the complexity of data interpretation, an inadequate legal and cultural framework and the difficulties in promoting integration of all the components of coastal management within short term projects are all elements that if not properly considered since the beginning of the participatory process may hinder public participation effectiveness. Moreover the definition of the spatial scale of coastal phenomenon as well as the discrepancy between the local scale of coastal governance and the complex multi-scale nature of coastal systems remain highly critical aspects to be addressed.

  2. EXPERIENCES INITIATING SOFTWARE PRODUCT LINE ENGINEERING IN SMALL TEAMS WITH PULSE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mærsk-Møller, Hans Martin; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2010-01-01

    papers and collective results on Software Product Line Engineering (SPLE) in the context of small teams. This paper remedies this situation by providing experiences from a successful approach of applying software product line engineering in a small team. We conduct a transition from single......-system production to Software Product Line (SPL) in the domain of greenhouse climate control systems. The domain contains inherent variabilities and extensive commonalities between the products in scope, which makes it a prime candidate for SPLE - besides having good business prospects. The transitioning to SPLE...... an existing methodology, PuLSETM, drew advantages of NetBeans Rich Client Platform, and based the product line on the existing application....

  3. Significance of assessment experiences during initial teacher training in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner dos Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study investigates how students in the final semester of their teacher training program (licensure at the Center of Physical Education and Sports (CEFD, Espírito Santo Federal University, Brazil, (reinterpret their assessment experiences, an integral component of their teacher training. It employs the narrative as a theoretical and methodological perspective, and it utilizes student portfolios, as well as focus groups and semi-structured individual interviews as inputs for data generation. Ten students in their eighth, or final, semester participated in this study. These were the total respondents to a "call for volunteers" among the 2014 graduating class. The results suggest that the students believe the assessment processes of their teaching practices in physical education are disjointed. They feel that the disciplines that allow them to review their own performance during teacher training are more efficient and play a stronger role in their education.

  4. Intracoronary brachytherapy in the treatment of in-stent restenosis. Initial experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Sândoli de Brito Jr

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracoronary brachytherapy using beta or gamma radiation is currently the most efficient type of therapy for preventing the recurrence of coronary in-stent restenosis. Its implementation depends on the interaction among interventionists, radiotherapists, and physicists to assure the safety and quality of the method. The authors report the pioneering experience in Brazil of the treatment of 2 patients with coronary in-stent restenosis, in whom beta radiation was used as part of the international multicenter randomized PREVENT study (Proliferation REduction with Vascular ENergy Trial. The procedures were performed rapidly and did not require significant modifications in the traditional techniques used for conventional angioplasty. Alteration in the radiological protection devices of the hemodynamic laboratory were also not required, showing that intracoronary brachytherapy using beta radiation can be incorporated into the interventional tools of cardiology in our environment.

  5. Experimental warming delays autumn senescence in a boreal spruce bog: Initial results from the SPRUCE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrew; Furze, Morgan; Aubrecht, Donald; Milliman, Thomas; Nettles, Robert; Krassovski, Misha; Hanson, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phenology is considered one of the most robust indicators of the biological impacts of global change. In temperate and boreal regions, long-term data show that rising temperatures are advancing spring onset (e.g. budburst and flowering) and delaying autumn senescence (e.g. leaf coloration and leaf fall) in a wide range of ecosystems. While warm and cold temperatures, day length and insolation, precipitation and water availability, and other factors, have all been shown to influence plant phenology, the future response of phenology to rising temperatures and elevated CO2 still remains highly uncertain because of the challenges associated with conducting realistic manipulative experiments to simulate future environmental conditions. At the SPRUCE (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change) experiment in the north-central United States, experimental temperature (0 to +9° C above ambient) and CO2 (ambient and elevated) treatments are being applied to mature, and intact, Picea mariana-Sphagnum spp. bog communities in their native habitat through the use of ten large (approximately 12 m wide, 10 m high) open-topped enclosures. We are tracking vegetation green-up and senescence in these chambers, at both the individual and whole-community level, using repeat digital photography. Within each chamber, digital camera images are recorded every 30 minutes and uploaded to the PhenoCam (http://phenocam.sr.unh.edu) project web page, where they are displayed in near-real-time. Image processing is conducted nightly to extract quantitative measures of canopy color, which we characterize using Gcc, the green chromatic coordinate. Data from a camera mounted outside the chambers (since November 2014) indicate strong seasonal variation in Gcc for both evergreen shrubs and trees. Shrub Gcc rises steeply in May and June, and declines steeply in September and October. By comparison, tree Gcc rises gradually from March through June, and declines gradually from

  6. Hepatobilio-pancreatic robotic surgery: initial experience from a single center institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Yolanda; Vicente, Emilio; Ielpo, Benedetto; Duran, Hipolito; Diaz, Eduardo; Fabra, Isabel; Malave, Luis; Ferri, Valentina; Plaza, Carlos; Lindemann, Jan Lammel; D'Andrea, Vito; Caruso, Riccardo

    2016-12-30

    The use of robotic surgery in the hepatobilio-pancreatic (HBP) field is still limited. Our aim is to present our early experience of robotic liver resection. A retrospective review of robotic pancreatic and liver resection was performed at Sanchinarro University hospital from October 2010 to April 2016. Since the beginning of the robotic program in our center, 22 hepatic procedures and 45 pancreatic robotic procedures have been performed. Of the 21 patients subjected to liver resection, 13 (65%) were for malignancy. There were two left hepatectomies, one right hepatectomy, one associated liver partition and portal vein ligation staged procedure (both steps by robotic approach), three bisegmentectomies and three segmentectomies, eight wedge resections, and three pericystectomies. The mean operating time was 282 min. The overall conversion rate and postoperative complication rate were 4.7 and 19%, respectively. The mean length of hospital stay was 13.4 days (range 4-64 days). Of the 45 patients subjected to pancreatic resection, 22 were male and 23 female. The average age of all patients was 62 years (range 31-82 years). The mean operating room (OR) time was 370 min (120-780 min). Among the procedures performed were 15 pancreatico-duodenectomies, 19 distal pancreatectomies, and 11 enucleations. All procedures in the HBP area were R0. Our early experience shows that robotic surgery is a safe and feasible procedure in the HBP area. The complication and mortality rates are comparable to those of open surgery, but with the advantages of minimally invasive surgery.

  7. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  8. Endoscopic endonasal skull base approach for parasellar lesions: Initial experiences, results, efficacy, and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigetoshi Yano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endoscopic surgery is suitable for the transsphenoidal approach; it is minimally invasive and provides a well-lit operative field. The endoscopic skull base approach through the large opening of the sphenoid sinus through both nostrils has extended the surgical indication for various skull base lesions. In this study, we describe the efficacy and complications associated with the endoscopic skull base approach for extra- or intradural parasellar lesions based on our experiences. Methods: Seventy-four cases were treated by an endoscopic skull base approach. The indications for these procedures included 55 anterior extended approaches, 10 clival approaches, and 9 cavernous approaches. The operations were performed through both the nostrils using a rigid endoscope. After tumor removal, the skull base was reconstructed by a multilayered method using a polyglactin acid (PGA sheet. Results: Gross total resection was achieved in 82% of pituitary adenomas, 68.8% of meningiomas, and 60% of craniopharyngiomas in anterior extended approach and in 83.3% of chordomas in clival approach, but only in 50% of the tumors in cavernous approach. Tumor consistency, adhesion, and/or extension were significant limitations. Visual function improvements were achieved in 37 of 41 (90.2% cases. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage (9.5%, infections (5.4%, neural injuries (4.1%, and vascular injuries (2.7% were the major complications. Conclusions: Our experiences show that the endoscopic skull base approach is a safe and effective procedure for various parasellar lesions. Selection of patients who are unlikely to develop complications seems to be an important factor for procedure efficacy and good outcome.

  9. Initial experience at a university teaching hospital from using telemedicine to promote education through video conferencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Monteiro Tavares Pereira

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Telehealth and telemedicine services are advancing rapidly, with an increasing spectrum of information and communication technologies that can be applied broadly to the population's health, and to medical education. The aim here was to report our institution's experience from 100 videoconferencing meetings between five different countries in the Americas over a one-year period. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective study at Universidade Estadual de Campinas. METHODS: Through a Microsoft Excel database, all conferences in all specialties held at our institution from September 2009 to August 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: A total of 647 students, physicians and professors participated in telemedicine meetings. A monthly mean of 8.3 (± 4.3 teleconferences were held over the analysis period. Excluding holidays and the month of inaugurating the telemedicine theatre, our teleconference rate reached a mean of 10.3 (± 2.7, or two teleconferences a week, on average. Trauma surgery and meetings on patient safety were by far the most common subjects discussed in our teleconference meetings, accounting for 22% and 21% of the total calls. CONCLUSION: Our experience with telemedicine meetings has increased students' interest; helped our institution to follow and discuss protocols that are already accepted worldwide; and stimulated professors to promote telemedicine-related research in their own specialties and keep up-to-date. These high-technology meetings have shortened distances in our vast country, and to other reference centers abroad. This virtual proximity has enabled discussion of international training with students and residents, to increase their overall knowledge and improve their education within this institution.

  10. Initial experience at a university teaching hospital from using telemedicine to promote education through video conferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Bruno Monteiro Tavares; Calderan, Thiago Rodrigues Araújo; Silva, Marcos Tadeu Nolasco da; Silva, Antonio Carlos da; Marttos, Antonio Carlos; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Telehealth and telemedicine services are advancing rapidly, with an increasing spectrum of information and communication technologies that can be applied broadly to the population's health, and to medical education. The aim here was to report our institution's experience from 100 videoconferencing meetings between five different countries in the Americas over a one-year period. Retrospective study at Universidade Estadual de Campinas. Through a Microsoft Excel database, all conferences in all specialties held at our institution from September 2009 to August 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 647 students, physicians and professors participated in telemedicine meetings. A monthly mean of 8.3 (± 4.3) teleconferences were held over the analysis period. Excluding holidays and the month of inaugurating the telemedicine theatre, our teleconference rate reached a mean of 10.3 (± 2.7), or two teleconferences a week, on average. Trauma surgery and meetings on patient safety were by far the most common subjects discussed in our teleconference meetings, accounting for 22% and 21% of the total calls. Our experience with telemedicine meetings has increased students' interest; helped our institution to follow and discuss protocols that are already accepted worldwide; and stimulated professors to promote telemedicine-related research in their own specialties and keep up-to-date. These high-technology meetings have shortened distances in our vast country, and to other reference centers abroad. This virtual proximity has enabled discussion of international training with students and residents, to increase their overall knowledge and improve their education within this institution.

  11. Human body composition models and methodology: theory and experiment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Z.M.

    1997-01-01

    The study of human body composition is a branch of human biology which focuses on the in vivo quantification of body components, the quantitative relationships between components, and the quantitative changes in these components related to various influencing factors. Accordingly, the study of human

  12. The Role of Model and Initial Condition Error in Numerical Weather Forecasting Investigated with an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prive, Nikki C.; Errico, Ronald M.

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments that explore the roles of model and initial condition error in numerical weather prediction are performed using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) framework developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (NASA/GMAO). The use of an OSSE allows the analysis and forecast errors to be explicitly calculated, and different hypothetical observing networks can be tested with ease. In these experiments, both a full global OSSE framework and an 'identical twin' OSSE setup are utilized to compare the behavior of the data assimilation system and evolution of forecast skill with and without model error. The initial condition error is manipulated by varying the distribution and quality of the observing network and the magnitude of observation errors. The results show that model error has a strong impact on both the quality of the analysis field and the evolution of forecast skill, including both systematic and unsystematic model error components. With a realistic observing network, the analysis state retains a significant quantity of error due to systematic model error. If errors of the analysis state are minimized, model error acts to rapidly degrade forecast skill during the first 24-48 hours of forward integration. In the presence of model error, the impact of observation errors on forecast skill is small, but in the absence of model error, observation errors cause a substantial degradation of the skill of medium range forecasts.

  13. Tumour-initiating stem-like cells in human prostate cancer exhibit increased NF-κB signalling

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Androgen depletion is a key strategy for treating human prostate cancer, but the presence of hormone-independent cells escaping treatment remains a major therapeutic challenge. Here, we identify a minor subset of stem-like human prostate tumour-initiating cells (TICs) that do not express prostate cancer markers, such as androgen receptor or prostate specific antigen. These TICs possess stem cell characteristics and multipotency as demonstrated by in vitro sphere-formation and in vivo tumour-i...

  14. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Colatusso, Daniele de Fátima Fornazari; da Costa, Ana Claudia Brenner Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Cavicchioli, Vinicius Nesi; Lopes, Sergio Augusto Veiga; Ferreira, Andrea Dumsch de Aragon; Collatusso, Claudinei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95%) at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97%) and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97%) at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results. PMID:27556321

  15. Reflectance confocal microscopy-guided laser ablation of basal cell carcinomas: initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Heidy; Yélamos, Oriol; Cordova, Miguel; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2017-08-01

    Laser ablation offers a procedure for precise, fast, and minimally invasive removal of superficial and early nodular basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). However, the lack of histopathological confirmation has been a limitation toward widespread use in the clinic. A reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging-guided approach offers cellular-level histopathology-like feedback directly on the patient, which may then guide and help improve the efficacy of the ablation procedure. Following an ex vivo benchtop study (reported in our earlier papers), we performed an initial study on 44 BCCs on 21 patients in vivo, using a pulsed erbium:ytterbium aluminum garnet laser and a contrast agent (aluminum chloride). In 10 lesions on six patients, the RCM imaging-guided detection of either presence of residual tumor or complete clearance was immediately confirmed with histopathology. Additionally, 34 BCCs on 15 patients were treated with RCM imaging-guided laser ablation, with immediate confirmation for clearance of tumor (no histopathology), followed by longer-term monitoring, currently in progress, with follow-up imaging (again, no histopathology) at 3, 6, and 18 months. Thus far, the imaging resolution appears to be sufficient and consistent for monitoring efficacy of ablation in the wound, both immediately postablation and subsequently during recovery. The efficacy results appear to be promising, with observed clearance in 19 cases of 22 cases with follow-ups ranging from 6 to 21 months. An additional 12 cases with 1 to 3 months of follow-ups has shown clearance of tumor but a longer follow-up time is required to establish conclusive results. Further instrumentation development will be necessary to cover larger areas with a more automatically controlled instrument for more uniform, faster, and deeper imaging of margins. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  16. Initial clinical experience with scanned proton beams at the Italian National Center for Hadrontherapy (CNAO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, J; Vischioni, B; Fossati, P; Srivastava, A; Vitolo, V; Iannalfi, A; Fiore, M R; Krengli, M; Mizoe, J E; Orecchia, R

    2013-07-01

    We report the initial toxicity data with scanned proton beams at the Italian National Center for Hadrontherapy (CNAO). In September 2011, CNAO commenced patient treatment with scanned proton beams within two prospective Phase II protocols approved by the Italian Health Ministry. Patients with chondrosarcoma or chordoma of the skull base or spine were eligible. By October 2012, 21 patients had completed treatment. Immobilization was performed using rigid non-perforated thermoplastic-masks and customized headrests or body-pillows as indicated. Non-contrast CT scans with immobilization devices in place and MRI scans in supine position were performed for treatment-planning. For chordoma, the prescribed doses were 74 cobalt grey equivalent (CGE) and 54 CGE to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and PTV2, respectively. For chondrosarcoma, the prescribed doses were 70 CGE and 54 CGE to PTV1 and PTV2, respectively. Treatment was delivered five days a week in 35-37 fractions. Prior to treatment, the patients' positions were verified using an optical tracking system and orthogonal X-ray images. Proton beams were delivered using fixed-horizontal portals on a robotic couch. Weekly MRI incorporating diffusion-weighted-imaging was performed during the course of proton therapy. Patients were reviewed once weekly and acute toxicities were graded with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Median age of patients = 50 years (range, 21-74). All 21 patients completed the proton therapy without major toxicities and without treatment interruption. Median dose delivered was 74 CGE (range, 70-74). The maximum toxicity recorded was CTCAE Grade 2 in four patients. Our preliminary data demonstrates the clinical feasibility of scanned proton beams in Italy.

  17. Conversion to sirolimus immunosuppression in liver transplantation recipients with hepatocellular carcinoma: Report of an initial experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhou; Yi-Feng He; Yu-Qi Wang; Zhao-You Tang; Jia Fan; Zheng Wang; Zhi-Quan Wu; Shuang-Jian Qiu; Xiao-Wu Huang; Yao Yu; Jian Sun; Yong-Sheng Xiao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To report a retrospective analysis of preliminary results of 36 patients who received sirolimus (SRL, Rapamune(R), rapamycin) in a consecutive cohort of 248 liver allograft recipients.METHODS: Thirty-six liver transplant patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who were switched to SRL-based immunosuppression therapy from tacrolimus were enrolled in this study. The patients who were diagnosed as advanced HCC before orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) were divided into group A (n = 11), those who were found to have HCC recurrence and/or metastasis after OLT were assigned to group B (n = 18), and those who developed renal insufficiency caused by calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) were assigned to group C (n = 7) after OLT.RESULTS: The patients were followed up for a median of 10.4 mo (range, 3.8-19.1 mo) after conversion to SRL therapy and 12.3 mo (range, 5.1-34.4 mo) after OLT.Three patients developed mild acute cellular rejection 2 wk after initiating SRL therapy, which was fully reversed after prednisolone pulse therapy. In group A, only 1 patient was found to have HCC recurrence and metastasis 12 mo after OLT. In group B, 66.7% (12/18) patients (2 with progressive tumor, 7 with stable tumor and 3 without tumor) were still alive due to conversing to SRL and/or resection for HCC recurrence at the end of a median follow-up of 6.8 mo post conversion and 10.7 mo posttransplant. In group C, no HCC recurrence was demonstrated in 7 patients, and renal function became normal after SRL therapy. Thrombocytopenia (n = 2), anemia (n = 8), and oral aphthous ulcers (n = 7) found in our cohort were easily manageable.CONCLUSION: The conversion to SRL-based immunosuppression may inhibit the recurrence and metastasis of HCC and improve CNI-induced renal insufficiency in OLT patients with HCC.

  18. Conceptual design of initial opacity experiments on the national ignition facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R.  F.; Bailey, J.  E.; Craxton, R.  S.; DeVolder, B.  G.; Dodd, E.  S.; Garcia, E.  M.; Huffman, E.  J.; Iglesias, C.  A.; King, J.  A.; Kline, J.  L.; Liedahl, D.  A.; McKenty, P.  W.; Opachich, Y.  P.; Rochau, G.  A.; Ross, P.  W.; Schneider, M.  B.; Sherrill, M.  E.; Wilson, B.  G.; Zhang, R.; Perry, T.  S.

    2017-01-09

    Accurate models of X-ray absorption and re-emission in partly stripped ions are necessary to calculate the structure of stars, the performance of hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion and many other systems in high-energy-density plasma physics. Despite theoretical progress, a persistent discrepancy exists with recent experiments at the Sandia Z facility studying iron in conditions characteristic of the solar radiative–convective transition region. The increased iron opacity measured at Z could help resolve a longstanding issue with the standard solar model, but requires a radical departure for opacity theory. To replicate the Z measurements, an opacity experiment has been designed for the National Facility (NIF). The design uses established techniques scaled to NIF. A laser-heated hohlraum will produce X-ray-heated uniform iron plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at temperatures${\\geqslant}150$ eV and electron densities${\\geqslant}7\\times 10^{21}~\\text{cm}^{-3}$. The iron will be probed using continuum X-rays emitted in a${\\sim}200$ ps,${\\sim}200~\\unicode[STIX]{x03BC}\\text{m}$diameter source from a 2 mm diameter polystyrene (CH) capsule implosion. In this design

  19. Personal experience and reputation interact in human decisions to help reciprocally

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, Lucas; van den Broek, Eva; Egas, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    There is ample evidence that human cooperative behaviour towards other individuals is often conditioned on information about previous interactions. This information derives both from personal experience (direct reciprocity) and from experience of others (i.e. reputation; indirect reciprocity).

  20. Personal experience and reputation interact in human decisions to help reciprocally.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, L.; van den Broek, E.; Egas, M.

    2013-01-01

    There is ample evidence that human cooperative behaviour towards other individuals is often conditioned on information about previous interactions. This information derives both from personal experience (direct reciprocity) and from experience of others (i.e. reputation; indirect reciprocity).

  1. Initial experience in 115 patients with the retrievable Cook Celect vena cava filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, O; Given, M F; Kavnoudias, H; Street, M; Thomson, K R; Lyon, S M

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate our experience with the retrievable Cook Celect inferior vena cava (IVC) filter (William Cook, Europe) with regard to insertion, efficiency, ease of retrieval, and any associated complications. A retrospective review was performed of 115 patients (41 female, 74 male, mean age 47.97 years) who underwent Cook Celect IVC filter insertion between December 2005 and October 2007. Filter insertion was successful in all patients. Of the 115 filters inserted, 57 have been successfully retrieved (49.6%) to date. The successful retrieval rate from attempted retrieval was 93.4%. The mean dwell time of successfully retrieved filters was 114.9 days (range 14-267 days). Failed retrievals were due to a thrombosed vena cava (n = 1) and endothelialisation of the filter (n = 3). In the failed retrieval group the mean implantation time was 142 days (range 78-211 days). While this is the first retrospective clinical study on the Cook Celect filter, results to date are promising. We demonstrated an efficacious filter with a high successful retrieval rate of 93.4% and a low complication rate. The filter was assessed with extended dwell times (range 14-267 days). Failed retrieval secondary to hook endothelialisation continues to be an issue with this filter. We recognize that a limitation of our study was the lack of systematic follow-up for clinically silent complications. Further studies to evaluate longer term outcomes and effectiveness of this filter are warranted.

  2. [A new balloon-expandable plastic endoprosthesis. Initial report of experience with the malleable thermostent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, A

    1990-07-01

    A new system of balloon-expandable stents for different purposes is presented. A special plastic material that can be shaped by a hot balloon technique or other internal or external heating modalities has been developed. The plastic material - a distant derivative of polyurethane - is caprolactone, which is soft from 52 degrees C to 70 degrees C. Using balloon techniques, the "thermo-stent" can be modeled to suit the form of the vessels, the bile ducts or the bronchial tree, as required. The balloon can be heated simply by means of a warm NaCl solution, electric matter in the balloon itself or microwaves. The plastic material can even be heated directly, which is especially beneficial if the stent needs to be thicker, e.g. in the bronchial tree, by an electric network within the plastic material, which heats the material to the necessary temperature by electric current. When the balloon is cooled after the dilatation the new form, the plastic has been modeled to is maintained exactly. The advantages of this thermo-stent will be the perfect adaptation to every individual situation in the intraluminal vessels, the bile ducts, and even the bronchi. The problems encountered hitherto with conventional metallic stents, e.g. high thrombogenicity, risk of metal intoxication or metallic rupture of filaments, have not be seen so far in animal experiments.

  3. Initial SAM Calibration Gas Experiments on Mars: Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Heather B.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Malespin, Charles A.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Becker, Richard H,; Benna, Mehdi; Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Freissinet, Caroline; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is equipped to analyze both martian atmospheric gases and volatiles released by pyrolysis of solid surface materials, with target measurements including chemical and isotopic composition (Mahaffy et al., 2012). To facilitate assessment of instrument performance and validation of results obtained on Mars, SAM houses a calibration cell containing CO2, Ar, N2, Xe, and several fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds (Franz et al., 2014; Mahaffy et al., 2012). This report describes the first two experiments utilizing this calibration cell on Mars and gives results from analysis of data acquired with the SAM Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). These data support the accuracy of isotope ratios obtained with the QMS (Conrad et al., 2016; Mahaffy et al., 2013) and provide ground-truth for reassessment of analytical constants required for atmospheric measurements, which were reported in previous contributions (Franz et al., 2015, 2014). The most significant implication of the QMS data involves reinterpretation of pre-launch contamination previously believed to affect only CO abundance measurements (Franz et al., 2015) to affect N2 abundances, as well. The corresponding adjustment to the N2 calibration constant presented here brings the atmospheric volume mixing ratios for Ar and N2 retrieved by SAM into closer agreement with those reported by the Viking mission (Owen et al., 1977; Oyama and Berdahl, 1977).

  4. Use of natural user interfaces for image navigation during laparoscopic surgery: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M; Sánchez-Margallo, Juan A; Moyano-Cuevas, José L; Pérez, Eva María; Maestre, Juan

    2017-03-28

    Surgical environments require special aseptic conditions for direct interaction with the preoperative images. We aim to test the feasibility of using a set of gesture control sensors combined with voice control to interact in a sterile manner with preoperative information and an integrated operating room (OR) during laparoscopic surgery. Two hepatectomies and two partial nephrectomies were performed by three experienced surgeons in a porcine model. The Kinect, Leap Motion, and MYO armband in combination with voice control were used as natural user interfaces (NUIs). After surgery, surgeons completed a questionnaire about their experience. Surgeons required <10 min training with each NUI. They stated that NUIs improved the access to preoperative patient information and kept them more focused on the surgical site. The Kinect system was reported as the most physically demanding NUI and the MYO armband in combination with voice commands as the most intuitive and accurate. The need to release one of the laparoscopic instruments in order to use the NUIs was identified as the main limitation. The presented NUIs are feasible to directly interact in a more intuitive and sterile manner with the preoperative images and the integrated OR functionalities during laparoscopic surgery.

  5. Initial SAM calibration gas experiments on Mars: Quadrupole mass spectrometer results and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Heather B.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Malespin, Charles A.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Becker, Richard H.; Benna, Mehdi; Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Freissinet, Caroline; Manning, Heidi L. K.; Prats, Benito D.; Raaen, Eric; Wong, Michael H.

    2017-04-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is equipped to analyze both martian atmospheric gases and volatiles released by pyrolysis of solid surface materials, with target measurements including chemical and isotopic composition (Mahaffy et al., 2012). To facilitate assessment of instrument performance and validation of results obtained on Mars, SAM houses a calibration cell containing CO2, Ar, N2, Xe, and several fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds (Franz et al., 2014; Mahaffy et al., 2012). This report describes the first two experiments utilizing this calibration cell on Mars and gives results from analysis of data acquired with the SAM Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). These data support the accuracy of isotope ratios obtained with the QMS (Conrad et al., 2016; Mahaffy et al., 2013) and provide ground-truth for reassessment of analytical constants required for atmospheric measurements, which were reported in previous contributions (Franz et al., 2015, 2014). The most significant implication of the QMS data involves reinterpretation of pre-launch contamination previously believed to affect only CO abundance measurements (Franz et al., 2015) to affect N2 abundances, as well. The corresponding adjustment to the N2 calibration constant presented here brings the atmospheric volume mixing ratios for Ar and N2 retrieved by SAM into closer agreement with those reported by the Viking mission (Owen et al., 1977; Oyama and Berdahl, 1977).

  6. Initial experience with a group presentation of study results to research participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bent Stephen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite ethical imperatives, informing research participants about the results of the studies in which they take part is not often performed. This is due, in part, to the costs and burdens of communicating with each participant after publication of the results. Methods Following the closeout and publication of a randomized clinical trial of saw palmetto for treatment of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, patients were invited back to the research center to participate in a group presentation of the study results. Results Approximately 10% of participants attended one of two presentation sessions. Reaction to the experience of the group presentation was very positive among the attendees. Conclusion A group presentation to research participants is an efficient method of communicating study results to those who desire to be informed and was highly valued by those who attended. Prospectively planning for such presentations and greater scheduling flexibility may result in higher attendance rates. Trial Registration Number Clinicaltrials.gov #NCT00037154

  7. Somatic and Reinforcement-Based Plasticity in the Initial Stages of Human Motor Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidarta, Ananda; Vahdat, Shahabeddin; Bernardi, Nicolò F; Ostry, David J

    2016-11-16

    As one learns to dance or play tennis, the desired somatosensory state is typically unknown. Trial and error is important as motor behavior is shaped by successful and unsuccessful movements. As an experimental model, we designed a task in which human participants make reaching movements to a hidden target and receive positive reinforcement when successful. We identified somatic and reinforcement-based sources of plasticity on the basis of changes in functional connectivity using resting-state fMRI before and after learning. The neuroimaging data revealed reinforcement-related changes in both motor and somatosensory brain areas in which a strengthening of connectivity was related to the amount of positive reinforcement during learning. Areas of prefrontal cortex were similarly altered in relation to reinforcement, with connectivity between sensorimotor areas of putamen and the reward-related ventromedial prefrontal cortex strengthened in relation to the amount of successful feedback received. In other analyses, we assessed connectivity related to changes in movement direction between trials, a type of variability that presumably reflects exploratory strategies during learning. We found that connectivity in a network linking motor and somatosensory cortices increased with trial-to-trial changes in direction. Connectivity varied as well with the change in movement direction following incorrect movements. Here the changes were observed in a somatic memory and decision making network involving ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and second somatosensory cortex. Our results point to the idea that the initial stages of motor learning are not wholly motor but rather involve plasticity in somatic and prefrontal networks related both to reward and exploration.

  8. Human papillomavirus infection on initiating synchronous esophageal neoplasia in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Lun; Wang, Yu-Chi; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lo, Jo-Lin; Kuo, Yao-Hung; Hwang, Tzer-Zen; Wang, Chih-Chun; Mo, Lein-Ray; Lin, Jaw-Town; Lee, Ching-Tai

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a risk factor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) as well as esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We aimed to investigate whether HPV infection underlies the field cancerization phenomenon over upper aerodigestive tract to develop synchronous multiple cancers. A case control study. The presence and subtype of HPV-DNA sequence in cancers were examined by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing in a prospective cohort with 100 HNSCCs, 50 of which had synchronous ESCCs. The clinicopathologic characteristics were further analyzed according to the presence of HPV. Twelve patients were HPV-positive, of which 11 were positive for HPV-16. The prevalence of HPV infection were not different between the synchronous and HNSCC alone groups (P = 0.357). Testing for HPV in paired HNSCC and ESCC tissues from the same patient revealed that none were concomitantly HPV-positive. Multivariate logistic regression showed drinking alcohol (odds ratio [OR], 18.75; P = 0.030), alcohol flushing (OR, 2.53; P = 0.041), and body mass index (OR, 0.77; P = 0.001) but not HPV infection were independent risk factors for synchronous phenotype. The patients with synchronous ESCCs had significantly poorer survival than those with HNSCC alone (5-year overall survival: 30% vs. 70%; log-rank P infection plays little role in field cancerization phenomenon to initiate synchronous SCC. The synchronous HNSCC and ESCC from the same patients had no clonal relationship. Routine endoscopic examination of the esophagus should be recommended for patients with risk factors identified. NA. Laryngoscope, 126:1097-1102, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Human rhinovirus 2 2Apro recognition of eukaryotic initiation factor 4GI. Involvement of an exosite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foeger, Nicole; Schmid, Eva M; Skern, Tim

    2003-08-29

    The 2A proteinase (2Apro) of human rhinovirus 2 is a cysteine proteinase with a unique chymotrypsin-like fold. During viral replication, 2Apro performs self-processing by cleaving between its own N terminus and the C terminus of the preceding protein, VP1. Subsequently, 2Apro cleaves the two isoforms of the cellular protein, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4G. We have previously shown that HRV2 2Apro can directly bind to eIF4G isoforms. Here we demonstrate using deletion mutants of eIF4GI that HRV2 2Apro requires eIF4GI amino acids 600-674 for binding; however, the amino acids at the cleavage site, Arg681 downward arrow Gly, are not required. The HRV2 2Apro binding domain for eIF4GI was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Specifically, mutations Leu17 --> Arg and Asp35 --> Glu severely impaired HRV2 2Apro binding and thus processing of eIF4GI in rabbit reticulocyte lysates; self-processing, however, was not affected. Alanine scanning analysis further identified the loop containing residues Tyr32, Ser33, and Ser34 as important for eIF4GI binding. Although Asp35 is part of the catalytic triad, most of the eIF4GI binding domain lies in a unique exosite structure absent from other chymotrypsin-like enzymes and is distinct from the substrate binding cleft. The exosite represents a novel virulence determinant that may allow the development of specific inhibitors for HRV2 2Apro.

  10. Safety of autologous bone marrow aspiration concentrate transplantation: initial experiences in 101 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hendrich

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The clinical application of cellular based therapies with ex vivo cultivation for the treatment of diseases of the musculoskeletal system has until now been limited. In particular, the advanced laboratory and technical effort necessary, regulatory issues as well as high costs are major obstacles. On the other hand, newly developed cell therapy systems permit intra-operative enrichment and application of mesenchymal and progenitor stem cells from bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC in one single operative session. The objective of the present clinical surveillance study was to evaluate new bone formation after the application of BMAC as well as to record any possible therapy-specific complications For this purpose, the clinical-radiological progress of a total of 101 patients with various bone healing disturbances was documented (surveillance study. The study included 37 necrosis of the head of the femur, 32 avascular necroses/bone marrow edema of other localization, 12 non-unions, 20 other defects. The application of BMAC was performed in the presence of osteonecrosis via a local injection as part of a core decompression (n=72 or by the local adsorption of intra-operative cellular bone substitution material (scaffold incubated with BMAC during osteosynthesis (n=17 or in further surgery (n=12. After an average of 14 months (2-24 months, the patients were re-examined clinically and radiologically and interviewed. Further surgery was necessary in 2 patients within the follow-up period. These were due to a progression of a collapsed head of the femur with initial necrosis in ARCO Stage III, as well as inadequate new bone formation with secondary loss of correction after periprosthetic femoral fracture. The latter healed after repeated osteosynthesis plus BMAC application without any consequences. Other than these 2 patients, no further complications were observed. In particular, no infections, no excessive new bone formation, no induction of

  11. Establishing a health demographic surveillance site in Bhaktapur district, Nepal: initial experiences and findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryal Umesh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A health demographic surveillance system (HDSS provides longitudinal data regarding health and demography in countries with coverage error and poor quality data on vital registration systems due to lack of public awareness, inadequate legal basis and limited use of data in health planning. The health system in Nepal, a low-income country, does not focus primarily on health registration, and does not conduct regular health data collection. This study aimed to initiate and establish the first HDSS in Nepal. Results We conducted a baseline survey in Jhaukhel and Duwakot, two villages in Bhaktapur district. The study surveyed 2,712 households comprising a total population of 13,669. The sex ratio in the study area was 101 males per 100 females and the average household size was 5. The crude birth and death rates were 9.7 and 3.9/1,000 population/year, respectively. About 11% of births occurred at home, and we found no mortality in infants and children less than 5 years of age. Various health problems were found commonly and some of them include respiratory problems (41.9%; headache, vertigo and dizziness (16.7%; bone and joint pain (14.4%; gastrointestinal problems (13.9%; heart disease, including hypertension (8.8%; accidents and injuries (2.9%; and diabetes mellitus (2.6%. The prevalence of non-communicable disease (NCD was 4.3% (95% CI: 3.83; 4.86 among individuals older than 30 years. Age-adjusted odds ratios showed that risk factors, such as sex, ethnic group, occupation and education, associated with NCD. Conclusion Our baseline survey demonstrated that it is possible to collect accurate and reliable data in a village setting in Nepal, and this study successfully established an HDSS site. We determined that both maternal and child health are better in the surveillance site compared to the entire country. Risk factors associated with NCDs dominated morbidity and mortality patterns.

  12. Extracorporeal Shock-wave Lithotripsy Success Rate and Complications: Initial Experience at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S. Al-Marhoon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with Modularis Vario Siemens in the management of patients with renal and ureteral stones.Methods: Between 2007 and 2009, 225 outpatients were treated with Siemens Modularis Vario lithotripter at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Stone size, location, total number of shockwaves, stone-free rate, complications and adjunctive interventions were investigated. Chi-Square and Logistic Regression analyses were used, with p<0.05 set as the level of significance.Results: Of the 225 initial consecutive patients who underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, 192 (85% had renal stones and 33 (15% had ureteric stones. The mean±SD stone size was 11.3 ± 4.5 mm, while the mean age of the patients was 39.9 ± 12.8 years with 68.5% males. The mean renal stone size was 11.6 ± 4.7 mm; a mean of 1.3 sessions was required. The mean ureteric stone size was 9.9 ± 3 mm; and a mean of 1.3 sessions was required. Treatment success (defined as complete clearance of ureteric stones, stone-free or clinically insignificant residual fragments of <4 mm for renal stones was 74% for renal stones and 88% for ureteric stones. Additional extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and ureteroscopy were the most adjunctive procedures used for stone clearance. Complications occurred in 74 patients (38.5% with renal stones and 13 patients (39.4% with uretetric stones. The most common complication was loin pain (experienced by 16.7% with renal stones and 21% with ureteric stones. Severe renal colic mandating admission occurred in 2% of patients with renal stones and 6% of patients with ureteric stones. In patients with renal stone, steinstrasse occurred in 3.6% and infection post extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in 0.5%. Using Multivariate Logistic Regression analysis, factors found to have significant effect on complete stone clearance were serum creatinine (p=0.004 and the number of

  13. Documentation of polio eradication initiative best practices: Experience from WHO African Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeibunor, Joseph; Nshimirimana, Deo; Nsubuga, Peter; Mutabaruka, Evariste; Tapsoba, Leonard; Ghali, Emmanuel; Kabir, Shaikh Humayun; Gassasira, Alex; Mihigo, Richard; Mkanda, Pascal

    2016-10-10

    The African Region is set to achieving polio eradication. During the years of operations, the Polio Eradication Initiative [PEI] in the Region mobilized and trained tremendous amount of manpower with specializations in surveillance, social mobilization, supplementary immunization activities [SIAs], data management and laboratory staff. Systems were put in place to accelerate the eradication of polio in the Region. Standardized, real-time surveillance and response capacity were established. Many innovations were developed and applied to reaching people in difficult and security challenged terrains. All of these resulted in accumulation of lessons and best practices, which can be used in other priority public health intervention if documented. The World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa [WHO/AFRO] developed a process for the documentation of these best practices, which was pretested in Uganda. The process entailed assessment of three critical elements [effectiveness, efficiency and relevance] five aspects [ethical soundness, sustainability, involvement of partners, community involvement, and political commitment] of best practices. A scored card which graded the elements and aspects on a scale of 0-10 was developed and a true best practice should score >50 points. Independent public health experts documented polio best practices in eight countries in the Region, using this process. The documentation adopted the cross-sectional design in the generation of data, which combined three analytical designs, namely surveys, qualitative inquiry and case studies. For the selection of countries, country responses to earlier questionnaire on best practices were screened for potential best practices. Another criterion used was the level of PEI investment in the countries. A total of 82 best practices grouped into ten thematic areas were documented. There was a correlation between the health system performances with DPT3 as proxy, level of PEI investment in countries

  14. Past Experience Influences the Processing of Stimulus Compounds in Human Pavlovian Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchers, Klaus G.; Lachnit, Harold; Shanks, David R.

    2004-01-01

    In two human skin conductance conditioning experiments we investigated whether processing of stimulus compounds can be influenced by past experience. Participants were either pre-trained with a discrimination problem that could be solved elementally (A+, B-, AB+, C- in Experiment 1 and A+, AB+, C-, CB- in Experiment 2) or one that required a…

  15. Kidney Transplantation From Brain-Dead Donors: Initial Experience in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Li, J; Fu, Q; Chen, L; Fei, J; Deng, S; Qiu, J; Chen, G; Huang, G; Wang, C

    2016-10-01

    Experience with kidney transplantation from brain-dead donors remains limited in China. Our objective was to evaluate the outcomes of kidney transplantation from brain-dead donors (group 1), compared with those from living ones of the same age (group 2). Clinical data of kidney transplantation from brain-dead donors and living donors in the same age range (18-45 years) performed between May 2007 and December 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. Recipients were analyzed for posttransplantation serum creatinine, creatinine clearance (calculated by the Cockcroft-Gault formula), the number of acute rejection episodes and delayed graft function, and patient/graft survival. Mean donor age was comparable between the 2 groups (31.9 ± 6.5 vs 32.8 ± 7.0 years; P = .268). The terminal serum creatinine level of donors was 125.5 ± 63.5 μmol/L in group 1 (n = 30) and 65.1 ± 13.7 μmol/L in group 2 (n = 110; P = .000). Recipient creatinine clearance was comparable between the 2 groups 1 month posttransplantation and thereafter. Acute rejection episodes were seen in 7 cases in recipients of group 1 (15.9%) and in 15 cases in recipients of group 2 (13.6%; P = .716). The incidence of delayed graft function was higher in recipients of group 1 (18.2%) than that of group 2 (3.6%; P = .002). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year patient/graft survival rate was comparable between the 2 groups. Our study demonstrated kidney transplantation from brain-dead donors achieved acceptable graft function and patient/graft survival in the 5-year follow-up, encouraging the use of this approach. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Initial Clinical Experience: Symmetric-Tip Dialysis Catheter with Helical Flow Characteristics Improves Patient Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Timothy W I; Redmond, Jonas W; Mantell, Mark P; Nadolski, Gregory J; Mondschein, Jeffrey I; Dowd, Michael F; Dagli, Mandeep S; Sudheendra, Deepak; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D; Cohen, Raphael D

    2015-10-01

    To report preliminary clinical experience with a new symmetric-tip dialysis catheter compared with a conventional split-tip catheter. Over a 5-month period, patients requiring a tunneled catheter for hemodialysis or undergoing exchange of a dysfunctional dialysis catheter at a tertiary academic medical center were retrospectively analyzed. Patients underwent placement of a VectorFlow or Ash Split Cath catheter at the discretion of the inserting interventional radiologist. Patient demographics, catheter patency, mean blood flow rate, and arterial and venous pressures were compared according to catheter type. Catheter failure was analyzed based on clinical and anatomic variables by using a multivariate Cox proportional-hazards model. A total of 33 VectorFlow and 46 Ash Split Cath catheters were placed. Patients in the VectorFlow group had significantly higher body mass index (P = .013) and Charlson Comorbidity Index (P = .049), as well as more non-internal jugular vein placements. At 120 days, 89% of VectorFlow catheters remained functional, compared with 45% of Ash Split Cath catheters (P = .046). The VectorFlow catheter was associated with 16% lower arterial pressures during dialysis (P = .009); mean blood flow rate was equivalent. On multivariate analysis, the risk of catheter failure was 13.3 times higher in the Ash Split Cath group compared with the VectorFlow group (P = .004). Left-sided catheters were also predictive of catheter failure (relative risk = 5.5; P = .02). The VectorFlow catheter was associated with a significant increase in intervention-free catheter patency compared with the Ash Split Cath catheter, with equivalent flow at lower arterial pressures during dialysis. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Digital storytelling and teacher education: an experience in initial teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lazzari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A group of pre-service teachers experienced the digital storytelling as part of their e-learning duties. We describe the structure of the project-work carried out by the students and discuss the results of a questionnaire they filled out after the end of the course, aiming to gather their opinions. The students claim to have enjoyed the proposal and most of them are likely to repeat it in their school, either by developing digital stories themselves or by involving their future students as designers and developers. By questionnaire and interviews with the participants, it is clear that the development experience has changed their attitude towards educational technology, enhanced their digital skills, and increased their self-esteem.Digital storytelling nella formazione iniziale degli insegnanti: un’esperienza nel Tirocinio Formativo AttivoUn gruppo di aspiranti insegnanti iscritti al Tirocinio Formativo Attivo ha affrontato un’esperienza di digital storytelling come parte dei compiti di didattica a distanza. Viene qui descritta la struttura del lavoro svolto dai corsisti e si riflette sui risultati di un questionario sottoposto al termine del corso per rilevarne le opinioni. I corsisti dichiarano di aver gradito la proposta e buona parte di loro ritiene probabile ripeterla a scuola, anche coinvolgendo gli studenti nel progetto e nella realizzazione di narrazioni digitali multimediali. Da questionario e colloqui con i corsisti si deduce che l’esperienza di sviluppo ha mutato il loro atteggiamento verso le tecnologie didattiche, aumentato la loro efficacia come comunicatori digitali e accresciuto la loro autostima.

  18. Robotic-assisted modified retroauricular cervical approach: initial experience in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulam, Thiago Celestino; Lira, Renan Bezerra; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate the thickness of the gastric wall at the time of intra gastric balloon (IGB) placement, at the time of its withdrawal and one month after withdrawal. fifteen morbidly obese patients underwent the introduction of IGB under general anesthesia. In all patients, there was infusion of 500ml of distilled water in the balloon for the test. Measurements of the thickness of the gastric wall were made in the antrum, body and proximal body, using a radial echoendoscope with a frequency of 12MHz and maximum zoom, and its own balloon inflated with 5ml of distilled water. the presence of IGB led to increased wall thickness of the gastric body by expanding the muscle layer. These changes were apparently transient, since 30 days after the balloon withdrawal there was a tendency to return of the wall thickness values ​​observed before the balloon insertion. the use of intragastric balloon for the treatment of obesity determines transient increase in the wall thickness of the gastric body caused by expanded muscle layer. A preocupação com a melhoria dos resultados estéticos e funcionais sem comprometimento dos resultados oncológicos na cirurgia de cabeça e pescoço tem aumentado significativamente. Os procedimentos minimamente invasivos e principalmente aqueles que utilizam a tecnologia robótica permitiram o desenvolvimento de novas abordagens, incluindo o acesso retroauricular, que agora é usado rotineiramente, especialmente na Coréia do Sul. A presente nota irá ilustrar a técnica e a experiência inicial na América Latina, demonstrando que esta abordagem é viável, segura e eficaz oncologicamente, podendo ser utilizada em casos selecionados com um benefício estético evidente.

  19. Initial experience of treating anal fistula with the Surgisis anal fistula plug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S; McCullough, J; Schizas, A; Vasas, P; Engledow, A; Windsor, A; Williams, A; Cohen, C R

    2012-06-01

    Complex anal fistulas remain a challenge for the colorectal surgeon. The anal fistula plug has been developed as a simple treatment for fistula-in-ano. We present and evaluate our experience with the Surgisis anal fistula plug from two centres. Data were prospectively collected and analysed from consecutive patients undergoing insertion of a fistula plug between January 2007 and October 2009. Fistula plugs were inserted according to a standard protocol. Data collected included patient demographics, fistula characteristics and postoperative outcome. Forty-four patients underwent insertion of 62 plugs (27 males, mean age 45.6 years), 25 of whom had prior fistula surgery. Mean follow-up was 10.5 months Twenty-two patients (50%) had successful healing following the insertion of plug with an overall success rate of 23 out of 62 plugs inserted (35%). Nineteen out of 29 patients healed following first-time plug placement, whereas repeated plug placement was successful in 3 out of 15 patients (20%; p = 0.0097). There was a statistically significant difference in the healing rate between patients who had one or less operations prior to plug insertion (i.e. simple fistulas) compared with patients who needed multiple operations (18 out of 24 patients vs. 4 out of 20 patients; p = 0.0007). Success of treatment with the Surgisis anal fistula plug relies on the eradication of sepsis prior to plug placement. Plugs inserted into simple tracts have a higher success rate, and recurrent insertion of plugs following previous plug failure is less likely to be successful. We suggest the fistula plug should remain a first-line treatment for primary surgery and simple tracts.

  20. Simpatectomia cervicotoracica por videotoracoscopia: experiência inicial Thoracoscopic cervicodorsal sympathectomy: initial results

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    Paulo Kauffman

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho é avaliar os resultados iniciais obtidos com a simpatectomia cervicotorácica videotoracoscópica. De outubro de 1995 a outubro de 1997 foram realizados 24 procedimentos em 14 pacientes: dez homens e quatro mulheres, com idades que variaram de 16 a 56 anos, média de 30 anos. Indicações para a operação foram: hiperidrose palmar em dez pacientes, isquemia de mão em três e causalgia em um. Nos casos de hiperidrose, a ressecção da cadeia simpática incluiu T2 e T3. Nos portadores de isquemia e causalgia também o gânglio estrelado foi ressecado. Vinte e três das 24 extremidades mostraram excelente resposta imediata à simpatectomia. Somente uma extremidade de paciente com hiperidrose permaneceu inalterada devido a procedimento incompleto, tendo sido desnervada pela mesma técnica em reoperação posterior, com bom resultado. Pneumotórax residual pós-operatório ocorreu em uma paciente com resolução espontânea. Treze pacientes tiveram seguimento que variou de dois a 18 meses, com média de 11 meses. Não houve mortalidade nessa série, e a principal complicação tardia observada nos pacientes operados por hiperidrose foi a hiperidrose compensatória, que ocorreu, em grau variado, nos nove pacientes com seguimento, sendo que em 30% deles esta manifestação foi significativa. Concluímos tratar-se de procedimento simples, seguro, eficiente e de melhor aceitação por parte dos pacientes do que a operação convencional.This report analyzes the initial results of thoracoscopic cervicodorsal sympathectomy. From October 1995 to October 1997, 24 procedures were accomplished in 14 patients. Ten were males and four were females ranging in age from 16 to 56 (mean 30. Surgical indications were: palmar hyperhidrosis in ten, ischemia of the hand in three and causalgia in one. Resection of the sympathetic chain in hyperhidrosis included T2 and T3. In those with ischemia and causalgia the stellate ganglion was

  1. Human Effector / Initiator Gene Sets That Regulate Myometrial Contractility During Term and Preterm Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    WEINER, Carl P.; MASON, Clifford W.; DONG, Yafeng; BUHIMSCHI, Irina A.; SWAAN, Peter W.; BUHIMSCHI, Catalin S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Distinct processes govern transition from quiescence to activation during term (TL) and preterm labor (PTL). We sought gene sets responsible for TL and PTL, along with the effector genes necessary for labor independent of gestation and underlying trigger. Methods Expression was analyzed in term and preterm +/− labor (n =6 subjects/group). Gene sets were generated using logic operations. Results 34 genes were similarly expressed in PTL/TL but absent from nonlabor samples (Effector Set). 49 genes were specific to PTL (Preterm Initiator Set) and 174 to TL (Term Initiator Set). The gene ontogeny processes comprising Term Initiator and Effector Sets were diverse, though inflammation was represented in 4 of the top 10; inflammation dominated the Preterm Initiator Set. Comments TL and PTL differ dramatically in initiator profiles. Though inflammation is part of the Term Initiator and the Effector Sets, it is an overwhelming part of PTL associated with intraamniotic inflammation. PMID:20452493

  2. Motion-Corrected Real-Time Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart: Initial Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahsepar, Amir Ali; Saybasili, Haris; Ghasemiesfe, Ahmadreza; Dolan, Ryan S; Shehata, Monda L; Botelho, Marcos P; Markl, Michael; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Collins, Jeremy D; Carr, James C

    2017-08-29

    Free-breathing real-time (RT) imaging can be used in patients with difficulty in breath-holding; however, RT cine imaging typically experiences poor image quality compared with segmented cine imaging because of low resolution. Here, we validate a novel unsupervised motion-corrected (MOCO) reconstruction technique for free-breathing RT cardiac images, called MOCO-RT. Motion-corrected RT uses elastic image registration to generate a single heartbeat of high-quality data from a free-breathing RT acquisition. Segmented balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine images and free-breathing RT images (Cartesian, TGRAPPA factor 4) were acquired with the same spatial/temporal resolution in 40 patients using clinical 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanners. The respiratory cycle was estimated using the reconstructed RT images, and nonrigid unsupervised motion correction was applied to eliminate breathing motion. Conventional segmented RT and MOCO-RT single-heartbeat cine images were analyzed to evaluate left ventricular (LV) function and volume measurements. Two radiologists scored images for overall image quality, artifact, noise, and wall motion abnormalities. Intraclass correlation coefficient was used to assess the reliability of MOCO-RT measurement. Intraclass correlation coefficient showed excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 0.95) of MOCO-RT with segmented cine in measuring LV function, mass, and volume. Comparison of the qualitative ratings indicated comparable image quality for MOCO-RT (4.80 ± 0.35) with segmented cine (4.45 ± 0.88, P = 0.215) and significantly higher than conventional RT techniques (3.51 ± 0.41, P cine (1.51 ± 0.90, P = 0.088 and 1.23 ± 0.45, P = 0.182) were not different. Wall motion abnormality ratings were comparable among different techniques (P = 0.96). The MOCO-RT technique can be used to process conventional free-breathing RT cine images and provides comparable quantitative assessment of LV function and volume

  3. [Initial clinical experience with deep sclerectomy in ambulatory surgery in glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitrová, S; Pesková, H; Lesták, J

    1999-01-01

    Deep sclerectomy is a non-perforating filtering operation used in surgical treatment of open angle glaucomas. The advantage of the operation is the creation of gradual filtration due to the thin trabecular Descement membrane which reduces markedly the risk of development of postoperative complications typical for perforating antiglaucomatous operations. The authors operated at the out-patient department 10 eyes of 8 patients (age 46-81 years). Indications for deep sclerectomy was seven times primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), once capsular glaucoma and twice normotensive glaucoma (NTG). In all eyes deep sclerectomy was indicated because of decompensation of the intraocular pressure with maximum tolerated therapy before surgery. None of the eyes were operated previously. The mean value of intraocular pressure before surgery was 25.1 +/- 6.5 mm Hg. From the results ensues that in nine operated eyes the intraocular pressure at the end of the 6-month follow-up period was compensated without supplementary therapy, only in one eye beta-blockers were prescribed one month after surgery. The cause of failure of filtration was the development of superficial adherence at the site of microperforatiion of the trabecular Descemet membrane which developed during operation. The mean intraocular pressure values at the end of the investigation period were 14.3 +/- 2.8 mm Hg. In two eyes haemorrhage into the anterior chamber was observed on the first day after surgery, the blood was absorbed within 24 hours. Hypotonia in two eyes was only transient and was not associated with a change in the depth of the anterior chamber or other complications. In none of the patients a decline of visual acuity was observed. In three operated eyes a change of refraction was necessary due to discontinuation of miotics after surgery. Deep sclerectomy is a delicate microsurgical technique which calls for experience and skill of the surgeon. The most complicated task is to prevent perforation of the

  4. Single-port video-assisted thoracic surgery for early lung cancer: initial experience in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Shingo; Usuda, Jitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Single-port video-assisted thoracic surgery (SPVATS) emerged several years ago as a new, minimally invasive surgery for diseases in the field of respiratory surgery, and is increasingly becoming a subject of interest for some thoracic surgeons in Europe and Asia. However, the adoption rate of this procedure in the United States and Japan remains low. We herein reviewed our experience of SPVATS for early lung cancer in our center, and evaluated the safety and minimal invasiveness of this technique. Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients who had undergone SPVATS for pathological stage I lung cancer in Nippon Medical School Chiba Hokusoh Hospital between September 2012 and October 2015. In SPVATS, an approximately 4-cm incision was made at the 4th or 5th intercostal space between the anterior and posterior axillary lines. A rib spreader was not used at the incision site, and surgical manipulation was performed very carefully in order to avoid contact between surgical instruments and the intercostal nerves. The same surgeon performed surgery on all patients, and analyzed laboratory data before and after surgery. Results Eighty-four patients underwent anatomical lung resection for postoperative pathological stage I lung cancer. The mean wound length was 4.2 cm. Eighty-four patients underwent lobectomy and segmentectomy, respectively. The mean preoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%) was 1.85%±0.36%. Our patients consisted of 49 men (58.3%) and 35 women (41.7%), with 64, 18, 1, and 1 having adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, adenosquamous carcinoma, and small-cell lung cancer, respectively. The mean operative time was 175±21 min, operative blood loss 92±18 mL, and duration of drain placement 1.9±0.6 days. The duration of the postoperative hospital stay was 7.1±1.7 days, numeric rating scale (NRS) 1 week after surgery 2.8±0.6, and occurrence rate of allodynia 1 month after surgery 10.7%. No patient developed serious

  5. Initial clinical experience with a radiation oncology dedicated open 1.0T MR-simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K; Wen, Ning; Hearshen, David; Kim, Joshua; Pantelic, Milan; Zhao, Bo; Mancell, Tina; Levin, Kenneth; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J; Siddiqui, M Salim

    2015-03-08

    The purpose of this study was to describe our experience with 1.0T MR-SIM including characterization, quality assurance (QA) program, and features necessary for treatment planning. Staffing, safety, and patient screening procedures were developed. Utilization of an external laser positioning system (ELPS) and MR-compatible couchtop were illustrated. Spatial and volumetric analyses were conducted between CT-SIM and MR-SIM using a stereotactic QA phantom with known landmarks and volumes. Magnetic field inhomogeneity was determined using phase difference analysis. System-related, in-plane distortion was evaluated and temporal changes were assessed. 3D distortion was characterized for regions of interest (ROIs) 5-20 cm away from isocenter. American College of Radiology (ACR) recommended tests and impact of ELPS on image quality were analyzed. Combined ultrashort echotime Dixon (UTE/Dixon) sequence was evaluated. Amplitude-triggered 4D MRI was implemented using a motion phantom (2-10 phases, ~ 2 cm excursion, 3-5 s periods) and a liver cancer patient. Duty cycle, acquisition time, and excursion were evaluated between maximum intensity projection (MIP) datasets. Less than 2% difference from expected was obtained between CT-SIM and MR-SIM volumes, with a mean distance of 3D geometric distortion was 0.59 ± 0.32 mm (maximum = 1.65 mm) and increased 10-15 cm from isocenter (mean = 1.57 ± 1.06 mm, maximum = 6.26 mm). ELPS interference was within the operating frequency of the scanner and was characterized by line patterns and a reduction in signal-to-noise ratio (4.6-12.6% for TE = 50-150 ms). Image quality checks were within ACR recommendations. UTE/Dixon sequences yielded detectability between bone and air. For 4D MRI, faster breathing periods had higher duty cycles than slow (50.4% (3 s) and 39.4% (5 s), p < 0.001) and ~fourfold acquisition time increase was measured for ten-phase versus two-phase. Superior-inferior object extent was underestimated 8% (6 mm) for two

  6. Human Security: China’s Discourses and Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Ren

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses three research questions by elaborating on how the idea of human security is understood or defined by the government and social actors in China; how the distinction between the “protection” aspect and “empowerment” aspect of human security is understood and accepted; and what particular downside risks are perceived as pressing human security issues in China. Amongst these the major ones include air pollution, food security, and cyber security. The study reveals that, whilst as a term “human security” is not frequently used, there have been significant discussions leading to the consideration and implementation of various human security practices in China. The idea of human security has been firmly established and threats to human security detected. For both the government and academic community in China, human security and state security are not necessarily confrontational but can rather be combined, often complimenting each other. Recent developments in China are pointing to a positive direction in terms of human security in the country.

  7. Nonlinearly combined impacts of initial perturbation from human activities and parameter perturbation from climate change on the grassland ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Human activities and climate change are important factors that affect grassland ecosystems. A new optimization approach, the approach of conditional nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP related to initial and parameter perturbations, is employed to explore the nonlinearly combined impacts of human activities and climate change on a grassland ecosystem using a theoretical grassland model. In our study, it is assumed that the initial perturbations and parameter perturbations are regarded as human activities and climate change, respectively. Numerical results indicate that the climate changes causing the maximum effect in the grassland ecosystem are different under disparate intensities of human activities. This implies the pattern of climate change is very critical to the maintenance or degradation of grassland ecosystem in light of high intensity of human activities and that the grassland ecosystem should be rationally managed when the moisture index decreases. The grassland ecosystem influenced by the nonlinear combination of human activities and climate change undergoes abrupt change, while the grassland ecosystem affected by other types of human activities and climate change fails to show the abrupt change under a certain range of perturbations with the theoretical model. The further numerical analyses also indicate that the growth of living biomass and the evaporation from soil surface shaded by the wilted biomass may be crucial factors contributing to the abrupt change of the grassland equilibrium state within the theoretical model.

  8. RM de cuerpo entero, experiencia inicial Whole body MRI, initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Rombolá

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Exponer y compartir nuestra experiencia en resonancia magnética de cuerpo entero (RMCE. Material y métodos: Se realizó estudio prospectivo entre octubre de 2005 y mayo de 2007 sobre 165 RMCE. Edad de los pacientes: 21 y 85 años, media de 51,64. Se utilizó equipo de 1,5 Tesla de campo magnético y tabla deslizable. El protocolo de estudio estuvo integrado por cortes coronales multicontraste (T1, T2 y STIR, axiales y sagitales en T2. Resultados: Se obtuvieron 140 (84,84 % estudios con hallazgos relevantes y 25 (15,15 % sin alteraciones. Se halló predominancia de enfermedades degenerativas articulares del esqueleto axial en 94 pacientes (56,96% sin diferencias significativas entre sexos. Trece pacientes realizaron controles oncológicos demostrándose diseminación a distancia en 6 estudios. En 1 examen se registró la distribución de polimiositis. Conclusiones: La RMCE no representa solamente una innovadora herramienta diagnóstica, sino también ostenta el potencial de competir con metodologías preexistentes en aplicaciones oncológicas y no oncológicas. La sensibilidad y especificidad del método están probadas, pero su aplicación se encuentra limitada por el alto costo y la falta de inclusión en protocolos diagnósticos de estadificación tumoral.Objective: To expose and share our experience in whole-body MRI. Material and methods: A prospective study of 165 whole-body MRI was made from october 2005 to may 2007. The age range was between 21 to 85 years old, with a mean age of 51, 64. A 1.5 Tesla MRI scan was utilized with a table-top movement. Multicontrast coronal scans (T1, T2 and STIR, sagittal and axial T2 compose the study protocol. Results: 140 (84,84 % scans with relevant results and 25 (15,15 % without abnormalities were found. The axial skeletal articular degenerative disease prevalence on 94 (56,96 % cases, without significant difference. Six MRI scans showed secondary dissemination of the oncology disease in a

  9. Elephant-Initiated Interactions with Humans: Individual Differences and Specific Preferences in Captive African Elephants (Loxodonta africana

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    Zoë T. Rossman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has seen a recent increase in the number of African elephants (Loxodonta africana maintained in reserves and parks and managed in free contact, where they may spend a significant amount of time in close proximity to humans. This study investigates how individual elephants choose to initiate interactions with humans by examining whether interaction types and frequencies vary both between elephants and with regards to the category of human involved in the interaction. Observations were made on a herd of seven captive African elephants frequently exposed to elephant handlers (guides, volunteers (who carry out general observations for the park’s research unit, and tourists. The elephants differed in the frequencies with which they initiated interactions with each category of human and in the types of behaviors they used to initiate interactions. However, all of the elephants interacted most frequently with guides. Certain individual elephants showed preferences in interacting with specific guides, indicating particular elephant-guide bonds. This study provides evidence for elephant-handler bonds as well as information on the extent of interactions between humans and African elephants managed in free contact.

  10. Ultrasound-guided Breast Biopsy in the Resource-limited Setting: An Initial Experience in Rural Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Stark

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the methodology and initial experience behind creation of an ultrasoundguided percutaneous breast core biopsy program in rural Uganda. Methods and Materials: Imaging the World Africa (ITWA is the registered non-governmental organization division of Imaging the World (ITW, a not-for-profit organization whose primary aim is the integration of affordable high-quality ultrasound into rural health centers. In 2013, ITWA began the pilot phase of an IRB-approved breast care protocol at a rural health center in Uganda. As part of the protocol’s diagnostic arm, an ultrasound-guided percutaneous breast core biopsy training curriculum was implemented in tandem with creation of regionally supplied biopsy kits. Results: A surgeon at a rural regional referral hospital was successfully trained and certified to perform ultrasound-guided percutaneous breast core biopsies. Affordable and safe biopsy kits were created using locally available medical supplies with the cost of each kit totaling $10.62 USD. Conclusion: Successful implementation of an ultrasound-guided percutaneous breast core biopsy program in the resource-limited setting is possible and can be made sustainable through incorporation of local health care personnel and regionally supplied biopsy materials. Our hope is that ITWA’s initial experience in rural Uganda can serve as a model for similar programs in the future.

  11. Cognition, Emotion, and Other Inescapable Dimensions of Human Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascara, Jorge

    1999-01-01

    Looks at human information processing as a complex system, concentrating on certain insights about field interactions that will reposition the understanding of mental processes, moving it from an analysis of logical steps to the exploration of the influence that contexts have on human cognitive performance. (CR)

  12. Human body composition models and methodology : theory and experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Z.M.

    1997-01-01


    The study of human body composition is a branch of human biology which focuses on the in vivo quantification of body components, the quantitative relationships between components, and the quantitative changes in these components related to various influencing factors.

  13. Fundamentals of human resource management : emerging experiences from Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itika, J.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamentals of human resource management are extensively described in European and American literature. This book summarises the general human resource management philosophies, theories, strategies and techniques and links them to the specific African context. The usefulness of these general in

  14. Destination Deimos: A Design Reference Architecture for Initial Human Exploration of the Mars System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, James S.; Adamo, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    The two biggest challenges to successful human operations in interplanetary space are flight dynamics, constrained by the cold hard physics of the rocket equation, and bioastronautics, the psychophysiological realities of human adaptation, or lack thereof, to the deep space environment. Without substantial innovation in project/mission architecture and vehicle design, human exploration of the Mars system could be problematic for decades. Although a human landing on Mars is inevitable, humans-in-the-loop telerobotic exploration from the outer Martian moon Deimos is the best way to begin. Precursor robotic missions for reconnaissance and local site preparation will be required.

  15. Image guided respiratory gated hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (H-SBRT) for liver and lung tumors: Initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurm, R.E.; Gum, F.; Erbel, S. [Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2006-09-15

    To evaluate our initial experience with image guided respiratory gated H-SBRT for liver and lung tumors. The system combines a stereoscopic x-ray imaging system (ExacTrac{sup R} X-Ray 6D) with a dedicated conformal stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy linear accelerator (Novalis) and ExacTrac{sup R} Adaptive Gating for dynamic adaptive treatment. Moving targets are located and tracked by x-ray imaging of implanted fiducial markers defined in the treatment planning computed tomography (CT). The marker position is compared with the position in verification stereoscopic x-ray images, using fully automated marker detection software. The required shift for a correct, gated set-up is calculated and automatically applied. We present our acceptance testing and initial experience in patients with liver and lung tumors. For treatment planning CT and Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) taken at free breathing and expiration breath hold with internal and external fiducials present were used. Patients were treated with 8-11 consecutive fractions to a dose of 74.8-79.2 Gy. Phantom tests demonstrated targeting accuracy with a moving target to within {+-}1 mm. Inter- and intrafractional patient set-up displacements, as corrected by the gated set-up and not detectable by a conventional set-up, were up to 30 mm. Verification imaging to determine target location during treatment showed an average marker position deviation from the expected position of up to 4 mm on real patients. This initial evaluation shows the accuracy of the system and feasibility of image guided real-time respiratory gated H-SBRT for liver and lung tumors.

  16. Human Resource Executives' Perceptions and Measurement of the Strategic Impact of Work/Life Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Michael Lane; Heames, Joyce Thompson; McMillan, Heather S.

    2011-01-01

    Given the stresses associated with today's demanding workplaces, work/life (w/l) initiatives continue to grow in importance as an organizational development (OD) intervention. In a period of increasing accountability, it is important for scholars and practitioners to demonstrate how OD interventions, like w/l initiatives, can be used as a…

  17. Malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients in India: Initial experience in the HAART era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra K Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Malignancies in HIV-infected adult patients were infrequent in patients attending the clinic. Majority of the patients presented with advanced immunosuppression and the ADCs, NHL in particular, were the commonest malignancies.

  18. Wilderness as a place: human dimensions of the wilderness experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chad P. Dawson

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the experiences sought by visitors to wilderness areas and how satisfied they are with their experiences is an important type of information for wilderness managers. Understanding how these dimensions are measures of the concept of "place" can help wilderness managers develop better visitor education and management programs. This paper briefly...

  19. The human secretome atlas initiative: implications in health and disease conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kristy J; Seol, Haeri; Pillai, Dinesh K; Sankoorikal, Binu-John; Formolo, Catherine A; Mac, Jenny; Edwards, Nathan J; Rose, Mary C; Hathout, Yetrib

    2013-11-01

    Proteomic analysis of human body fluids is highly challenging, therefore many researchers are redirecting efforts toward secretome profiling. The goal is to define potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in the secretome that can be traced back in accessible human body fluids. However, currently there is a lack of secretome profiles of normal human primary cells making it difficult to assess the biological meaning of current findings. In this study we sought to establish secretome profiles of human primary cells obtained from healthy donors with the goal of building a human secretome atlas. Such an atlas can be used as a reference for discovery of potential disease associated biomarkers and eventually novel therapeutic targets. As a preliminary study, secretome profiles were established for six different types of human primary cell cultures and checked for overlaps with the three major human body fluids including plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and urine. About 67% of the 1054 identified proteins in the secretome of these primary cells occurred in at least one body fluid. Furthermore, comparison of the secretome profiles of two human glioblastoma cell lines to this new human secretome atlas enabled unambiguous identification of potential brain tumor biomarkers. These biomarkers can be easily monitored in different body fluids using stable isotope labeled standard proteins. The long term goal of this study is to establish a comprehensive online human secretome atlas for future use as a reference for any disease related secretome study. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: An Updated Secretome.

  20. Los Alamos Science: Number 23, 1995. Radiation protection and the human radiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, N.G. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    There are a variety of myths and misconceptions about the ionizing radiation that surrounds and penetrates us all. Dispel a few of these by taking a leisurely tour of radiation and its properties, of the natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation, and of the way doses are calculated. By damaging DNA and inducing genetic mutations, ionizing radiation can potentially initiate a cell on the road to cancer. The authors review what is currently known about regulation of cellular reproduction, DNA damage and repair, cellular defense mechanisms, and the specific cancer-causing genes that are susceptible to ionizing radiation. A rapid survey of the data on radiation effects in humans shows that high radiation doses increase the risk of cancer, whereas the effects of low doses are very difficult to detect. The hypothetical risks at low doses, which are estimated from the atomic-bomb survivors, are compared to the low-dose data so that the reader can assess the present level of uncertainty. As part of the openness initiative, ten individuals who have worked with plutonium during various periods in the Laboratory`s history were asked to share their experiences including their accidental intakes. The history and prognosis of people who have had plutonium exposures is discussed by the Laboratory`s leading epidemiologist.

  1. Qualitative analysis of cancer patients' experiences using donated human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rough, Susanne M; Sakamoto, Pauline; Fee, Caroline H; Hollenbeck, Clarie B

    2009-05-01

    This represents the first published account from the patient's perspective of the use of human milk as cancer therapy. Purposive sampling was used to select a sample of 10 participants. Five were patients and 5 were family proxies. Individual interviews were conducted using confirmatory interviewing technique to obtain individual perspectives on the motivation for cancer patients to take donated human milk. Human milk therapy improved the quality of life (QOL) measures in the physical, psychological, and spiritual domains for most patients interviewed. The patients continued their use of human milk despite cost, taste, and discouragement from the conventional medical community. The study results support the theory that QOL may be more important to cancer patients than cancer outcomes and may improve patient medical care overall. These interviews offer information to cancer patients, their practitioners, and donor milk banks on outcomes and symptom relief from this therapy.

  2. CORRELATION OF CRISES, CRISIS EXPERIENCES AND ORIENTATION OF TIME PERSPECTIVE AT THE INITIAL STAGE OF TRAINING IN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A. Kurus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of article is identification of an actual problem of psychological science: correlation of crises and a crisis experiences with and orientation of time perspective at the initial stage of training in institution of higher education.Methods. During the research the following psychodiagnostic methods are applied: the questionnaire of crisis experiences for student by V. R. Manukyan; a questionnaire of time perspective by F. Zimbardo in adaptation of A. Syrtsova, E. T. Sokolova, O. V. Mitina (ZTPI.Results and scientific novelty. Data on interrelation of crises and crisis experiences with an orientation of temporary prospect are obtained and analysed on the basis of representative selection of students in Novosibirsk State Medical University. Gender distinctions of crises behaviour of students are shown. It is established that temporary prospects «The negative past» and «The fatalistic present» correlate with all the crisis experiences of students at the initial stage of training in higher education institution. The temporary prospect «Future» has the return correlation with crisis experience «absence of the appreciably attractive purposes in the future», and the interrelation with crises is absent. In this regard the author proposes the correction procedure of psychological escort of first-year students.Practical significance. The research findings can be used by educational psychologists for psychological diagnostics of pupils, to search the reasons of their poor progress, during the developing and correction of programs of psychology and pedagogical escort of first-year students, in particular when writing the program of adaptive training in the centers of psychosocial maintenance of the trainees. Guidelines for a choice of the techniques and methods promoting overcoming of the problems connected with crisis of identity and biographic crises are given.

  3. Structural determinant of human La protein critical for internal initiation of translation of hepatitis C virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Tanmoy; Ray, Upasana; Manna, Asit Kumar; Gupta, Romi; Roy, Siddhartha; Das, Saumitra

    2008-12-01

    Human La protein has been implicated in facilitating internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated translation of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Earlier, we demonstrated that the RNA recognition motif (RRM) encompassing residues 112 to 184 of La protein [La (112-184)] interacts with the HCV IRES near the initiator AUG codon. A synthetic peptide, LaR2C (24-mer), derived from La RRM (112-184), retains RNA binding ability, competes with La protein binding to the HCV IRES, and inhibits translation. The peptide interferes with the assembly of 48S complexes, resulting in the accumulation of preinitiation complexes that are incompetent for the 60S ribosomal subunit joining. Here, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the HCV IRES-bound peptide complex revealed putative contact points, mutations that showed reduced RNA binding and translation inhibitory activity. The residues responsible for RNA recognition were found to form a turn in the RRM (112-184) structure. A 7-mer peptide comprising this turn showed significant translation inhibitory activity. The bound structure of the peptide inferred from transferred nuclear Overhauser effect experiments suggests that it is a beta turn. This conformation is significantly different from that observed in the free RRM (112-184) NMR structure, suggesting paths toward a better-stabilized mimetic peptide. Interestingly, addition of hexa-arginine tag enabled the peptide to enter Huh7 cells and showed inhibition of HCV IRES function. More importantly, the peptide significantly inhibited replication of the HCV monocistronic replicon. Elucidation of the structural determinant of the peptide provides a basis for developing small peptidomimetic structures as potent anti-HCV therapeutics.

  4. Emotions, fear, and empathy: a design approach to human experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Polinedrio, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Fear is an intrinsic human emotion, which produces with variable intensity a bodily reaction as a response to a stimuli. It is considered one of the basic human emotions, and it is universal of all animal species. Despite its subjective quality, fear has gained a rather negativistic stereotype that this research intends to debate and readdress, proposing that “negative fear” is part of an evolutionary transition cultivated by social and cultural constructs. This thesis will analyze the contex...

  5. The human secretome atlas initiative: Implications in health and disease conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kristy J; Seol, Haeri; Pillai, Dinesh K.; Sankoorikal, Binu-John; Formolo, Catherine A; Mac, Jenny; Edwards, Nathan J.; Mary C Rose; Hathout, Yetrib

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of human body fluids is highly challenging, therefore many researchers are redirecting efforts towards secretome profiling. The goal is to define potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in the secretome that can be traced back in accessible human body fluids. However, currently there is a lack of secretome profiles of normal human primary cells making it difficult to assess the biological meaning of current findings. In this study we sought to establish secretome profi...

  6. Initial measurements of the angular velocity of walking humans using an active millimeter-wave correlation interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilevu, Kojo S.; Kammerman, Kelly L.; Nanzer, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    The design of a 29.5 GHz experimental active interferometer for the measurement of the angular velocity of moving humans is presented in this paper, as well as initial measurements of walking humans. Measurement of the angular motion of moving objects is a desirable function in remote security sensing applications. Doppler radar sensors are able to measure the signature of moving humans based on micro-Doppler analysis; however, a person moving with little to no radial velocity produces negligible Doppler returns. Measurement of the angular movement of humans can be done with traditional radar techniques however the process involves either continuous tracking with narrow beamwidth or angle-of arrival estimation algorithms. Recently, the authors presented a new method of measuring the angular velocity of moving objects using interferometry. The method measures the angular velocity of an object without tracking or complex processing. The frequency shift imparted on the signal response is proportional to the angular velocity of the object as it passes through the interferometer beam pattern. The experimental system consists of a transmitter and two separate receivers with two widely spaced antennas. The received signals in each of the two channels are downconverted and digitized, and post-processed offline. Initial results of a walking person passing through the interferometer beam pattern are presented, which verify the expected operation of the receiver derived from the initial theory.

  7. Experience in system design for human-robot teaming in urban search & rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, G.J.M.; Janíček, M.; Keshavdas, S.; Larochelle, B.; Zender, H.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Diggelen, J. van; Colas, F.; Liu, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Svoboda, T.; Petriček, T.; Pirri, F.; Giannni, M.; Papadakis, P.; Sinha, A.; Balmer, P.; Tomatis, N.; WOrst, R.; Linder, T.; Surmann, H.; Tretyakov, V.; Corrao, S.; Pratzler-Wanczura, S.; Sulk, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes experience with applying a user-centric design methodology in developing systems for human-robot teaming in Urban Search & Rescue. A human-robot team consists of several robots (rovers/UGVs, microcopter/UAVs), several humans at an off-site command post (mission commander, UGV ope

  8. Experience in system design for human-robot teaming in urban search & rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, G.J.M.; Janíček, M.; Keshavdas, S.; Larochelle, B.; Zender, H.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Diggelen, J. van; Colas, F.; Liu, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Svoboda, T.; Petriček, T.; Pirri, F.; Giannni, M.; Papadakis, P.; Sinha, A.; Balmer, P.; Tomatis, N.; WOrst, R.; Linder, T.; Surmann, H.; Tretyakov, V.; Corrao, S.; Pratzler-Wanczura, S.; Sulk, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes experience with applying a user-centric design methodology in developing systems for human-robot teaming in Urban Search & Rescue. A human-robot team consists of several robots (rovers/UGVs, microcopter/UAVs), several humans at an off-site command post (mission commander, UGV ope

  9. Experience in system design for human-robot teaming in urban search & rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, G.J.M.; Janíček, M.; Keshavdas, S.; Larochelle, B.; Zender, H.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Diggelen, J. van; Colas, F.; Liu, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Svoboda, T.; Petriček, T.; Pirri, F.; Giannni, M.; Papadakis, P.; Sinha, A.; Balmer, P.; Tomatis, N.; WOrst, R.; Linder, T.; Surmann, H.; Tretyakov, V.; Corrao, S.; Pratzler-Wanczura, S.; Sulk, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes experience with applying a user-centric design methodology in developing systems for human-robot teaming in Urban Search & Rescue. A human-robot team consists of several robots (rovers/UGVs, microcopter/UAVs), several humans at an off-site command post (mission commander, UGV

  10. The internationalization of Law through human rights: Initial thoughts for the future of constitutionalism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gustavo Oliveira Vieira; Jose Luis Bolzan de Morais

    2012-01-01

      The present article aims to present initial thoughts about the implications of globalization to the constitutionalism, questioning about the State and Constitution direction in this "post-national" scenario...

  11. Reactor physics studies for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Reactor-Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovskiy, Evgeny Yuryevich

    In the recently completed RACE Project of the AFCI, accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADS) experiments were conducted to develop technology of coupling accelerators to nuclear reactors. In these experiments electron accelerators induced photon-neutron reactions in heavy-metal targets to initiate fission reactions in ADS. Although the Idaho State University (ISU) RACE ADS was constructed only to develop measurement techniques for advanced experiments, many reactor kinetics experiments were conducted there. In the research reported in this dissertation, a method was developed to calculate kinetics parameters for measurement and calculation of the reactivity of ADS, a safety parameter that is necessary for control and monitoring of power production. Reactivity is measured in units of fraction of delayed versus prompt neutron from fission, a quantity that cannot be directly measured in far-subcritical reactors such as the ISU RACE configuration. A new technique is reported herein to calculate it accurately and to predict kinetic behavior of a far-subcritical ADS. Experiments conducted at ISU are first described and experimental data are presented before development of the kinetic theory used in the new computational method. Because of the complexity of the ISU ADS, the Monte-Carlo method as applied in the MCNP code is most suitable for modeling reactor kinetics. However, the standard method of calculating the delayed neutron fraction produces inaccurate values. A new method was developed and used herein to evaluate actual experiments. An advantage of this method is that its efficiency is independent of the fission yield of delayed neutrons, which makes it suitable for fuel with a minor actinide component (e.g. transmutation fuels). The implementation of this method is based on a correlated sampling technique which allows the accurate evaluation of delayed and prompt neutrons. The validity of the obtained results is indicated by good agreement between experimental

  12. INITIAL COOLING EXPERIMENT (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    ICE was built in 1977, in a record time of 9 months, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring. Its purpose was to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project, to be launched in 1978. Already early in 1978, stochastic cooling proved a resounding success, such that the antiproton (p-pbar)project was entirely based on it. Tests of electron cooling followed later: protons of 46 MeV kinetic energy were cooled with an electron beam of 26 kV and 1.3 A. The cage seen prominently in the foreground houses the HV equipment, adjacent to the "cooler" installed in a straight section of the ring. With some modifications, the cooler was later transplanted into LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) and then, with further modifications, into the AD (Antiproton Decelerator), where it cools antiprotons to this day (2006). See also: 7711282, 7802099, 7908242.

  13. Using narratives to understand the motivational factors and experience of being a self-initiated academic expatriate in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinashe T. Harry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A growing movement of foreign nationals is settling in South Africa. Given this, there is a need to understand not only those factors influencing foreign nationals to settle in South Africa but also their lived experiences as a basis for individual career development.Research purpose: To investigate the expatriation motivational factors and experiences of selfinitiated academic expatriates in South Africa.Motivation for the study: Calls have been made within the careers literature for more empirical focus on understanding career development using some of the neglected sample groups.Research approach, design and method: The interpretive paradigm was adopted to understand the main purpose of the study. Guided by study objectives, unstructured interviews were conducted using a sample of foreign academics working in South Africa (n = 25.Main findings: Individual stories and narratives highlighted that academics relocated for the following reasons: (1 individual preference, (2 economic meltdown and (3 political conditions. Furthermore, the lived experiences of the expatriates reflected discrimination within the workplace and the community of residences in South Africa.Practical and managerial implications: Research findings indicate that the human resources (HR function can come up with interventions that positively influence the lived experience and career development of foreign academics working in South Africa.Contribution: The expatriate experience framed in this study provides a picture of the career development processes of neglected sample groups in the extant literature. Such an understanding is key in advancing literature and proposing interventions. All this is important given the global trend on labour and skills movement added to the role South Africa plays in the international arena. 

  14. Human reliability analysis in low power and shut-down probabilistic safety assessment: Outcomes of an international initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Giustino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the nuclear power generation, human performance has been a very important factor in all phases of the plant lifecycle: design, commissioning, operation, maintenance, surveillance, modification, and decommissioning. This aspect has been confirmed by the operating experience. A workshop was organized by the IAEA and the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, on Harmonization of low power and shutdown probabilistic safety assessment for WWER nuclear power plants. One of the major objectives of the Workshop was to provide a comparison of the approaches and results of human reliability analyses for WWER 440 and WWER 1000, and gain insights for future application of human reliability analyses in Low Power and Shutdown scenarios. This paper provides the insights and conclusions of the workshops concerning human reliability analyses and human factors.

  15. 48 CFR 1352.235-73 - Research involving human subjects-after initial contract award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... women, prisoners, or children, the contractor is also required to follow the guidelines set forth at 45... documentation may include: (1) Copies of the human subjects research protocol, advertisements, recruitment... human subjects research protocol, advertisements, recruitment material, and informed consent forms...

  16. My 20 years of experience in the human factors field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnino, A. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

    1992-01-01

    My first encounter with human factors happened in early 1973: I was performing a reliability assessment of the safety injection system of the Fessenheim reactor, and I found that the operators had to switch to the recirculation phase manually and had only 6 min between the low and low-low level alarm indicating that the water tank was empty. It of course led us to replace this manual action by an automatic positioning for the recirculation phase. In July of the same year, I attended a North Atlantic Treaty Organization workshop in Liverpool on reliability assessment, and I met Alan Swain from the United States and Jens Rasmussen from Denmark. During the long rainy evenings of the seminar, we had time to discuss human errors and human factors, and that was the beginning of a very fruitful collaboration between us. I realized then the complexity of the problem. Quantification needs were obvious for reliability and risk assessment studies, but, at the same time, there were needs for better understanding of human behavior and the mechanisms that could lead to human errors. Knowledge of the man-machine interface also seemed very poor, although some basic ergonomic rules were available and could be applied. But a major problem was the lack of data.

  17. The International Space Station human life sciences experiment implementation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L J; Haven, C P; McCollum, S G; Lee, A M; Kamman, M R; Baumann, D K; Anderson, M E; Buderer, M C

    2001-01-01

    The selection, definition, and development phases of a Life Sciences flight research experiment has been consistent throughout the past decade. The implementation process, however, has changed significantly within the past two years. This change is driven primarily by the shift from highly integrated, dedicated research missions on platforms with well defined processes to self contained experiments with stand alone operations on platforms which are being concurrently designed. For experiments manifested on the International Space Station (ISS) and/or on short duration missions, the more modular, streamlined, and independent the individual experiment is, the more likely it is to be successfully implemented before the ISS assembly is completed. During the assembly phase of the ISS, science operations are lower in priority than the construction of the station. After the station has been completed, it is expected that more resources will be available to perform research. The complexity of implementing investigations increases with the logistics needed to perform the experiment. Examples of logistics issues include- hardware unique to the experiment; large up and down mass and volume needs; access to crew and hardware during the ascent or descent phases; maintenance of hardware and supplies with a limited shelf life,- baseline data collection schedules with lengthy sessions or sessions close to the launch or landing; onboard stowage availability, particularly cold stowage; and extensive training where highly proficient skills must be maintained. As the ISS processes become better defined, experiment implementation will meet new challenges due to distributed management, on-orbit resource sharing, and adjustments to crew availability pre- and post-increment.

  18. The International Space Station human life sciences experiment implementation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. J.; Haven, C. P.; McCollum, S. G.; Lee, A. M.; Kamman, M. R.; Baumann, D. K.; Anderson, M. E.; Buderer, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    The selection, definition, and development phases of a Life Sciences flight research experiment has been consistent throughout the past decade. The implementation process, however, has changed significantly within the past two years. This change is driven primarily by the shift from highly integrated, dedicated research missions on platforms with well defined processes to self contained experiments with stand alone operations on platforms which are being concurrently designed. For experiments manifested on the International Space Station (ISS) and/or on short duration missions, the more modular, streamlined, and independent the individual experiment is, the more likely it is to be successfully implemented before the ISS assembly is completed. During the assembly phase of the ISS, science operations are lower in priority than the construction of the station. After the station has been completed, it is expected that more resources will be available to perform research. The complexity of implementing investigations increases with the logistics needed to perform the experiment. Examples of logistics issues include- hardware unique to the experiment; large up and down mass and volume needs; access to crew and hardware during the ascent or descent phases; maintenance of hardware and supplies with a limited shelf life,- baseline data collection schedules with lengthy sessions or sessions close to the launch or landing; onboard stowage availability, particularly cold stowage; and extensive training where highly proficient skills must be maintained. As the ISS processes become better defined, experiment implementation will meet new challenges due to distributed management, on-orbit resource sharing, and adjustments to crew availability pre- and post-increment. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The international space station human life sciences experiment implementation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, LadonnaJ.; Haven, CynthiaP.; McCollum, SuzanneG.; Lee, AngeleneM.; Kamman, MichelleR.; Baumann, DavidK.; Anderson, MarkE.; Buderer, MelvinC.

    2001-08-01

    The selection, definition, and development phases of a Life Sciences flight research experiment has been consistent throughout the past decade. The implementation process, however, has changed significantly within the past two years. This change is driven primarily by the shift from highly integrated, dedicated research missions on platforms with well defined processes to self contained experiments with stand alone operations on platforms which are being concurrently designed. For experiments manifested on the International Space Station (ISS) and / or on short duration missions, the more modular, streamlined, and independent the individual experiment is, the more likely it is to be successfully implemented before the ISS assembly is completed. During the assembly phase of the ISS, science operations are lower in priority than the construction of the station. After the station has been completed, it is expected that more resources will be available to perform research. The complexity of implementing investigations increases with the logistics needed to perform the experiment. Examples of logistics issues include: hardware unique to the experiment; large up and down mass and volume needs; access to crew and hardware during the ascent or descent phases; maintenance of hardware and supplies with a limited shelf life; baseline data collection schedules with lengthy sessions or sessions close to the launch or landing; onboard stowage availability, particularly cold stowage; and extensive training where highly proficient skills must be maintained. As the ISS processes become better defined, experiment implementation will meet new challenges due to distributed management, on-orbit resource sharing, and adjustments to crew availability pre- and post-increment.

  20. Initial experience of dual-energy lung perfusion CT using a dual-source CT system in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-09-15

    Initial experience of dual-source dual-energy (DE) lung perfusion CT in children is described. In addition to traditional identification of pulmonary emboli, the assessment of lung perfusion is technically feasible with dual-source DE CT in children with acceptable radiation dose. This article describes how to perform dual-source DE lung perfusion CT in children, including the optimization of intravenous injection method and CT dose parameters. How to produce weighted-average CT images for the assessment of pulmonary emboli and colour-coded perfusion maps for the assessment of regional lung perfusion is also detailed. Lung perfusion status can then be evaluated on perfusion maps by means of either qualitative or quantitative analysis. Potential advantages and disadvantages of this emerging CT technique compared to lung perfusion scintigraphy and cardiac MRI are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Initial results of a model rotor higher harmonic control (HHC) wind tunnel experiment on BVI impulsive noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Lehmann, G.; van der Wall, B.

    1989-09-01

    Initial acoustic results are presented from a higher harmonic control (HHC) wind tunnel pilot experiment on helicopter rotor blade-vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise reduction, making use of the DFVLR 40-percent-scaled BO-105 research rotor in the DNW 6m by 8m closed test section. Considerable noise reduction (of several decibels) has been measured for particular HHC control settings, however, at the cost of increased vibration levels and vice versa. The apparently adverse results for noise and vibration reduction by HHC are explained. At optimum pitch control settings for BVI noise reduction, rotor simulation results demonstrate that blade loading at the outer tip region is decreased, vortex strength and blade vortex miss-distance are increased, resulting altogether in reduced BVI noise generation. At optimum pitch control settings for vibration reduction adverse effects on blade loading, vortex strength and blade vortex miss-distance are found.

  2. Multimedia materials for education, training, and advocacy in international health: experiences with the Schistosomiasis Control Initiative CD-ROM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TJ Beanland

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe an innovative use of multimedia materials to support training and advocacy within a schistosomiasis control programme. The Schistosomiasis Control Initiative (SCI at Imperial College London works with selected sub-Saharan African countries to develop schistosomiasis control programmes. Two elements of the SCI programme were supported by multimedia materials developed at the Wellcome Trust in collaboration with the SCI: (1 training of programme managers, district health officers, and those delivering practical elements of the programme; and (2 advocacy targeted at decision-makers and donors. Evaluation of the materials revealed high reported ratings for both user satisfaction and impact from use of the product. From this experience we draw out several general messages about development of multimedia materials and how these will play a growing future role in promoting training within international health.

  3. Multimedia materials for education, training, and advocacy in international health: experiences with the Schistosomiasis Control Initiative CD-ROM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beanland, T J; Lacey, S D; Melkman, D D; Palmer, S; Stothard, J R; Fleming, F; Fenwick, A

    2006-09-01

    We describe an innovative use of multimedia materials to support training and advocacy within a schistosomiasis control programme. The Schistosomiasis Control Initiative (SCI) at Imperial College London works with selected sub-Saharan African countries to develop schistosomiasis control programmes. Two elements of the SCI programme were supported by multimedia materials developed at the Wellcome Trust in collaboration with the SCI: (1) training of programme managers, district health officers, and those delivering practical elements of the programme; and (2) advocacy targeted at decision-makers and donors. Evaluation of the materials revealed high reported ratings for both user satisfaction and impact from use of the product. From this experience we draw out several general messages about development of multimedia materials and how these will play a growing future role in promoting training within international health.

  4. Humans make near-optimal adjustments of control to initial body configuration in vertical squat jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Richard Casius, L J; Kistemaker, Dinant A

    2013-05-01

    We investigated adjustments of control to initial posture in squat jumping. Eleven male subjects jumped from three initial postures: preferred initial posture (PP), a posture in which the trunk was rotated 18° more backward (BP) and a posture in which it was rotated 15° more forward (FP) than in PP. Kinematics, ground reaction forces and electromyograms (EMG) were collected. EMG was rectified and smoothed to obtain smoothed rectified EMG (srEMG). Subjects showed adjustments in srEMG histories, most conspicuously a shift in srEMG-onset of rectus femoris (REC): from early in BP to late in FP. Jumps from the subjects' initial postures were simulated with a musculoskeletal model comprising four segments and six Hill-type muscles, which had muscle stimulation (STIM) over time as input. STIM of each muscle changed from initial to maximal at STIM-onset, and STIM-onsets were optimized using jump height as criterion. Optimal simulated jumps from BP, PP and FP were similar to jumps of the subjects. Optimal solutions primarily differed in STIM-onset of REC: from early in BP to late in FP. Because the subjects' adjustments in srEMG-onsets were similar to adjustments of the model's optimal STIM-onsets, it was concluded that the former were near-optimal. With the model we also showed that near-maximum jumps from BP, PP and FP could be achieved when STIM-onset of REC depended on initial hip joint angle and STIM-onsets of the other muscles were posture-independent. A control theory that relies on a mapping from initial posture to STIM-onsets seems a parsimonious alternative to theories relying on internal optimal control models. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Human eye-head gaze shifts in a distractor task. II. Reduced threshold for initiation of early head movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneil, B D; Munoz, D P

    1999-09-01

    This study was motivated by the observation of early head movements (EHMs) occasionally generated before gaze shifts. Human subjects were presented with a visual or auditory target, along with an accompanying stimulus of the other modality, that either appeared at the same location as the target (enhancer condition) or at the diametrically opposite location (distractor condition). Gaze shifts generated to the target in the distractor condition sometimes were preceded by EHMs directed either to the side of the target (correct EHMs) or the side of the distractor (incorrect EHMs). During EHMs, the eyes performed compensatory eye movements to keep gaze stable. Incorrect EHMs were usually between 1 and 5 degrees in amplitude and reached peak velocities generally EHMs initially followed a trajectory typical of much larger head movements. These results suggest that incorrect EHMs are head movements that initially were planned to orient to the peripheral distractor. Furthermore gaze shifts preceded by incorrect EHMs had longer reaction latencies than gaze shifts not preceded by incorrect EHMs, suggesting that the processes leading to incorrect EHMs also serve to delay gaze-shift initiation. These results demonstrate a form of distraction analogous to the incorrect gaze shifts (IGSs) described in the previous paper and suggest that a motor program encoding a gaze shift to a distractor is capable of initiating either an IGS or an incorrect EHM. A neural program not strong enough to initiate an IGS nevertheless can initiate an incorrect EHM.

  6. Prevalence of the initiator over the TATA box in human and yeast genes and identification of DNA motifs enriched in human TATA-less core promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuhu; Bolotin, Eugene; Jiang, Tao; Sladek, Frances M; Martinez, Ernest

    2007-03-01

    The core promoter of eukaryotic genes is the minimal DNA region that recruits the basal transcription machinery to direct efficient and accurate transcription initiation. The fraction of human and yeast genes that contain specific core promoter elements such as the TATA box and the initiator (INR) remains unclear and core promoter motifs specific for TATA-less genes remain to be identified. Here, we present genome-scale computational analyses indicating that approximately 76% of human core promoters lack TATA-like elements, have a high GC content, and are enriched in Sp1-binding sites. We further identify two motifs - M3 (SCGGAAGY) and M22 (TGCGCANK) - that occur preferentially in human TATA-less core promoters. About 24% of human genes have a TATA-like element and their promoters are generally AT-rich; however, only approximately 10% of these TATA-containing promoters have the canonical TATA box (TATAWAWR). In contrast, approximately 46% of human core promoters contain the consensus INR (YYANWYY) and approximately 30% are INR-containing TATA-less genes. Significantly, approximately 46% of human promoters lack both TATA-like and consensus INR elements. Surprisingly, mammalian-type INR sequences are present - and tend to cluster - in the transcription start site (TSS) region of approximately 40% of yeast core promoters and the frequency of specific core promoter types appears to be conserved in yeast and human genomes. Gene Ontology analyses reveal that TATA-less genes in humans, as in yeast, are frequently involved in basic "housekeeping" processes, while TATA-containing genes are more often highly regulated, such as by biotic or stress stimuli. These results reveal unexpected similarities in the occurrence of specific core promoter types and in their associated biological processes in yeast and humans and point to novel vertebrate-specific DNA motifs that might play a selective role in TATA-independent transcription.

  7. The mediating effect of depressive symptoms on the relationship between traumatic childhood experiences and drug use initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Diana; Novak, Scott P; Krebs, Christopher; Warner, Tara; Hammond, Jane

    2011-05-01

    Stressful experiences such as childhood trauma and depressive symptoms have both been implicated in the initiation of drug use; however, longitudinal designs have not yet been used to elucidate their respective roles to better understand the causal sequence. In the present study, a sensitivity analysis was conducted using two mediation strategies to examine how this sequence may differ by various levels of statistical control, including (1) the standard mediational model in which the effect of lifetime traumatic stressors (Year 1) on the onset of drug use (Years 3 and 4) is mediated by levels of depressive symptoms (Year 2); and (2) a stronger test of causality such that the effect of lifetime traumatic stressors (Year 1) on the onset of drug use (Years 3 and 4) was mediated by changes in depressive symptoms (Year 1 to 2), measured by a residualized change score that controlled for levels in Year 1. Two types of trauma were studied in a community-based study of 489 Hispanic preadolescents (aged 10-12): (a) the number of lifetime traumatic stressors and (b) seven specific lifetime stressors. We also controlled for new onset traumatic stressors occurring between Years 1 and 2. Primary findings indicate that drug use initiation during early adolescence (e.g., ages 14-16) may not be tied to immediate proximal perturbations in risk factors, such as traumatic experiences and depressive symptoms. Rather, the effects of trauma on depression in this sample appear to be established earlier in childhood (ages 10-14 or younger) and persist in a relatively stable manner into middle adolescence when the risk for drug use may be heightened. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic mapping of high caries experience on human chromosome 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, Erika C; Deeley, Kathleen; Ho, Bao; Linkowski, Samantha; Meyer, Chelsea; Noel, Jacqueline; Kouzbari, M Zahir; Bezamat, Mariana; Granjeiro, José M; Antunes, Leonardo S; Antunes, Livia Azeredo; de Abreu, Fernanda Volpe; Costa, Marcelo C; Tannure, Patricia N; Seymen, Figen; Koruyucu, Mine; Patir, Asli; Mereb, Juan C; Poletta, Fernando A; Castilla, Eduardo E; Orioli, Ieda M; Marazita, Mary L; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2013-11-05

    Our previous genome-wide linkage scan mapped five loci for caries experience. The purpose of this study was to fine map one of these loci, the locus 13q31.1, in order to identify genetic contributors to caries. Seventy-two pedigrees from the Philippines were studied. Caries experience was recorded and DNA was extracted from blood samples obtained from all subjects. Sixty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 13q31.1 were genotyped. Association between caries experience and alleles was tested. We also studied 1,481 DNA samples obtained from saliva of subjects from the USA, 918 children from Brazil, and 275 children from Turkey, in order to follow up the results found in the Filipino families. We used the AliBaba2.1 software to determine if the nucleotide changes of the associated SNPs changed the prediction of the presence of transcription-binding site sequences and we also analyzed the gene expression of the genes selected based on binding predictions. Mutation analysis was also performed in 33 Filipino individuals of a segment of 13q31.1 that is highly conserved in mammals. Statistically significant association with high caries experience was found for 11 markers in 13q31.1 in the Filipino families. Haplotype analysis also confirmed these results. In the populations used for follow-up purposes, associations were found between high caries experience and a subset of these markers. Regarding the prediction of the transcription-binding site, the base change of the SNP rs17074565 was found to change the predicted-binding of genes that could be involved in the pathogenesis of caries. When the sequence has the allele C of rs17074565, the potential transcription factors binding the sequence are GR and GATA1. When the subject carries the G allele of rs17074565, the potential transcription factor predicted to bind to the sequence is GATA3. The expression of GR in whole saliva was higher in individuals with low caries experience when compared to individuals with high

  9. Experiences in using DISCUS for visualizing human communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groehn, Matti; Nieminen, Marko; Haho, Paeivi; Smeds, Riitta

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, we present further improvement to the DISCUS software that can be used to record and analyze the flow and constants of business process simulation session discussion. The tool was initially introduced in 'visual data exploration and analysis IV' conference. The initial features of the tool enabled the visualization of discussion flow in business process simulation sessions and the creation of SOM analyses. The improvements of the tool consists of additional visualization possibilities that enable quick on-line analyses and improved graphical statistics. We have also created the very first interface to audio data and implemented two ways to visualize it. We also outline additional possibilities to use the tool in other application areas: these include usability testing and the possibility to use the tool for capturing design rationale in a product development process. The data gathered with DISCUS may be used in other applications, and further work may be done with data ming techniques.

  10. The initial magnetic susceptibility of polydisperse ferrofluids: A comparison between experiment and theory over a wide range of concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyova, Anna Y.; Goldina, Olga A.; Ivanov, Alexey O.; Lebedev, Aleksandr V.; Elfimova, Ekaterina A.

    2016-08-01

    Temperature dependencies of the static initial magnetic susceptibility for ferrofluids at various concentrations are studied using experiment and statistical-mechanical theories. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are carried out for twelve samples of magnetite-based fluids stabilized with oleic acid over a wide range of temperatures (210 K ≲T ≲ 390 K); all samples have the same granulometric composition but different volume ferroparticle concentrations (0.2 ≲ φ ≲ 0.5). Experimental results are analyzed using three theories: the second-order modified mean-field theory (MMF2) [A. O. Ivanov and O. B. Kuznetsova, Phys. Rev. E 64, 41405 (2001)]; its correction for polydisperse ferrofluids arising from Mayer-type cluster expansion and taking into account the first terms of the polydisperse second virial coefficient [A. O. Ivanov and E. A. Elfimova, J. Magn. Magn. Mater 374, 327 (2015)]; and a new theory based on MMF2 combined with the first terms of the polydisperse second and third virial contributions to susceptibility. It turns out that the applicability of each theory depends on the experimental sample density. If twelve ferrofluid samples are split into three groups of strong, moderate, and low concentrated fluids, the temperature dependences of the initial magnetic susceptibility in each group are very precisely described by one of the three theories mentioned above. The determination of a universal formula predicting a ferrofluid susceptibility over a broad range of concentrations and temperatures remains as a challenge.

  11. The Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM) Initiative: Developing methods and best practices for global agricultural monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, C.; Jarvis, I.; Defourny, P.; Davidson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Agricultural systems differ significantly throughout the world, making a 'one size fits all' approach to remote sensing and monitoring of agricultural landscapes problematic. The Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM) was established in 2009 to bring together the global scientific community to work towards a set of best practices and recommendations for using earth observation data to map, monitor and report on agricultural productivity globally across an array of diverse agricultural systems. These methods form the research and development component of the Group on Earth Observation Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) initiative to harmonize global monitoring efforts and increase market transparency. The JECAM initiative brings together researchers from a large number of globally distributed, well monitored agricultural test sites that cover a range of crop types, cropping systems and climate regimes. Each test site works independently as well as together across multiple sites to test methods, sensors and field data collection techniques to derive key agricultural parameters, including crop type, crop condition, crop yield and soil moisture. The outcome of this project will be a set of best practices that cover the range of remote sensing monitoring and reporting needs, including satellite data acquisition, pre-processing techniques, information retrieval and ground data validation. These outcomes provide the research and development foundation for GEOGLAM and will help to inform the development of the GEOGLAM "system of systems" for global agricultural monitoring. The outcomes of the 2014 JECAM science meeting will be discussed as well as examples of methods being developed by JECAM scientists.

  12. Initial Experience with Percutaneous Needle Aspiration of Paraspinal Lesions Using XperGuide Cone-Beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Lip; Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Chung, Eun Chul; Paark, Hae Won; Kook, Shin Ho; Rho, Myung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study is to report our initial experience using XperGuide cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for percutaneous needle aspiration of the paraspinal lesions. Between September 2011 and September 2012, 12 patients who underwent percutaneous needle aspiration of the paraspinal lesions for suspected pyogenic spondylitis, tuberculous spondylitis, or metastasis were included. The procedure was performed on the XperGuide CBCT. Based on the initial CBCT, target points and entrance were determined, using dedicated guidance software (XperGuide), and the needle pathway was visualized in various reconstructed images. Needle aspiration was performed using Westcott needle and correct needle positioning was confirmed with the second CBCT. The technical success was defined as the needle tip reached within 5 mm of the target point. Culture, smear, and polymerase chain reaction of obtained samples were performed. In all twelve patients, target areas could be determined based on XperCT data and achieved 100% technical success. Diagnosis could be made in 91.7% of cases and the median interventional procedure time was 27.8 minutes. There was no major complication in all patients. Percutaneous needle aspiration of paraspinal lesions using XperGuide CBCT is easy, accurate, safe, and useful in determining the treatment of direction.

  13. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis: initial experience in Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Matus, Rolando; Hernández-Hernández, Carlos Alberto; Leyva-García, Omar; Vásquez-Ciriaco, Sergio; Flores-Ayala, Guillermo; Navarro-Hernández, Quetzalli; Pérez-Bustamante, Gerardo; Valencia-Mijares, Norma Miriam; Esquivel, Jesus

    2012-09-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) has been traditionally considered a terminal disease with median survivals reported in the literature of 6 to 12 months. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) are playing an ever increasing role in the treatment of these patients. Excellent results have been achieved in well-selected patients but there is a very steep learning curve when starting a new program. A program for peritoneal surface malignancies in which patients with PC of gastrointestinal or gynecological origin were treated using multimodality therapy with combinations of systemic therapy, cytoreductive surgery (CRS), and HIPEC was initiated in December 2007 at "Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidad de Oaxaca," Mexico. We present the results of our initial experience. From December 2007 to February 2011, 26 patients were treated with CRS and HIPEC. There were 21 female patients. Most common indication (46%) was recurrent ovarian cancer. Mean duration of surgery was 260 minutes. Mean Peritoneal Cancer Index was 9. Twenty-three (88.5%) patients had a complete cytoreduction. Major morbidity and mortality rates were 19.5 and 3.8 per cent, respectively. Mean hospital stay was 8 days. At a mean follow-up of 20 months, median survival has not been reached. Rigorous preoperative workup, strict selection criteria, and mentoring from an experienced cytoreductive surgeon are mandatory and extremely important when starting a center for PC.

  14. Human nonsense-mediated RNA decay initiates widely by endonucleolysis and targets snoRNA host genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Chen, Yun; Ardal, Britt;

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNAs with premature termination codons (PTCs) are eliminated by nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). While human nonsense RNA degradation can be initiated either by an endonucleolytic cleavage event near the PTC or through decapping, the individual contribution of these activities on endogen......Eukaryotic RNAs with premature termination codons (PTCs) are eliminated by nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). While human nonsense RNA degradation can be initiated either by an endonucleolytic cleavage event near the PTC or through decapping, the individual contribution of these activities...... yield alternative transcript isoforms that allow for differential expression of individual coencoded snoRNAs. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that snoRNA host genes need to be highly transcribed to accommodate high levels of snoRNA production and that the expression of individual sno...

  15. Tenure, Experience, Human Capital and Wages: A Tractable Equilibrium Search Model of Wage Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bagger, Jesper; Fontaine, François; Postel-Vinay, Fabien; Robin, Jean-Marc

    2011-01-01

    We develop and estimate an equilibrium job search model of worker careers, allowing for human capital accumulation, employer heterogeneity and individual-level shocks. Career wage growth is decomposed into the contributions of human capital and job search, within and between jobs. Human capital accumulation is largest for highly educated workers, and both human capital accumulation and job search contribute to the observed concavity of wage-experience profiles. The contribution from job searc...

  16. Immanuel Kant's Account of Cognitive Experience and Human Rights Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Gregory Lewis

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Gregory Bynum seeks to show that Immanuel Kant's thought, which was conceived in an eighteenth-century context of new, and newly widespread, pressures for nationally institutionalized human rights-based regimes (the American and French revolutions being the most prominent examples), can help us think in new and appreciative ways…

  17. Quaking aspen and the human experience: Dimensions, issues, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. McCool

    2001-01-01

    Humans assign four types of meanings to aspen landscapes: (1) instrumental meanings dealing with the attainment of a goal - such as production of pulp or provision of recreation opportunities; (2) aesthetic meanings; (3) cultural/symbolic meanings dealing with spiritual and social attachments to landscapes; and (4) individual/expressive meanings derived out of...

  18. Immanuel Kant's Account of Cognitive Experience and Human Rights Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Gregory Lewis

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Gregory Bynum seeks to show that Immanuel Kant's thought, which was conceived in an eighteenth-century context of new, and newly widespread, pressures for nationally institutionalized human rights-based regimes (the American and French revolutions being the most prominent examples), can help us think in new and appreciative ways…

  19. Comparison of trunk activity during gait initiation and walking in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Charles Ceccato

    Full Text Available To understand the role of trunk muscles in maintenance of dynamic postural equilibrium we investigate trunk movements during gait initiation and walking, performing trunk kinematics analysis, Erector spinae muscle (ES recordings and dynamic analysis. ES muscle expressed a metachronal descending pattern of activity during walking and gait initiation. In the frontal and horizontal planes, lateroflexion and rotation occur before in the upper trunk and after in the lower trunk. Comparison of ES muscle EMGs and trunk kinematics showed that trunk muscle activity precedes corresponding kinematics activity, indicating that the ES drive trunk movement during locomotion and thereby allowing a better pelvis mobilization. EMG data showed that ES activity anticipates propulsive phases in walking with a repetitive pattern, suggesting a programmed control by a central pattern generator. Our findings also suggest that the programs for gait initiation and walking overlap with the latter beginning before the first has ended.

  20. Comparison of Trunk Activity during Gait Initiation and Walking in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Christine; Cazalets, Jean-René

    2009-01-01

    To understand the role of trunk muscles in maintenance of dynamic postural equilibrium we investigate trunk movements during gait initiation and walking, performing trunk kinematics analysis, Erector spinae muscle (ES) recordings and dynamic analysis. ES muscle expressed a metachronal descending pattern of activity during walking and gait initiation. In the frontal and horizontal planes, lateroflexion and rotation occur before in the upper trunk and after in the lower trunk. Comparison of ES muscle EMGs and trunk kinematics showed that trunk muscle activity precedes corresponding kinematics activity, indicating that the ES drive trunk movement during locomotion and thereby allowing a better pelvis mobilization. EMG data showed that ES activity anticipates propulsive phases in walking with a repetitive pattern, suggesting a programmed control by a central pattern generator. Our findings also suggest that the programs for gait initiation and walking overlap with the latter beginning before the first has ended. PMID:19997606

  1. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms: DRESS following Initiation of Oxcarbazepine with Elevated Human Herpesvirus-6 Titer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Seth L; DiBlasi, Daniel; Arora, Navin S

    2014-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a rare and potentially fatal severe cutaneous reaction, which has a delayed onset after the initiation of an inciting medication. After recognition and withdrawal of the causative agent, along with aggressive management, a majority of patients will have complete recovery over several months. We present a rare case of DRESS secondary to oxcarbazepine with an elevated human herpesvirus-6 titer.

  2. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms: DRESS following Initiation of Oxcarbazepine with Elevated Human Herpesvirus-6 Titer

    OpenAIRE

    Cornell, Seth L.; Daniel DiBlasi; Arora, Navin S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a rare and potentially fatal severe cutaneous reaction, which has a delayed onset after the initiation of an inciting medication. After recognition and withdrawal of the causative agent, along with aggressive management, a majority of patients will have complete recovery over several months. We present a rare case of DRESS secondary to oxcarbazepine with an elevated human herpesvirus-6 titer.

  3. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms: DRESS following Initiation of Oxcarbazepine with Elevated Human Herpesvirus-6 Titer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth L. Cornell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS is a rare and potentially fatal severe cutaneous reaction, which has a delayed onset after the initiation of an inciting medication. After recognition and withdrawal of the causative agent, along with aggressive management, a majority of patients will have complete recovery over several months. We present a rare case of DRESS secondary to oxcarbazepine with an elevated human herpesvirus-6 titer.

  4. Initiation of DNA synthesis by human thrombin: relationships between receptor binding, enzymic activity, and stimulation of 86Rb+ influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiernberg, J; Carney, D H; Fenton, J W; LaBelle, E F

    1984-09-01

    Stimulation of amiloride-sensitive sodium (Na+) influx and the subsequent activation of NA+, K+-ATPase by serum or growth factors have been implicated as early events leading to initiation of cell proliferation. We recently demonstrated that amiloride inhibits thrombin-initiated DNA synthesis not by inhibiting an early event occurring during the first 8 hr, but rather by inhibiting some later event 8 to 12 hr after thrombin addition. To further probe the relationship between stimulation of ion influx and initiation of cell proliferation, human alpha-thrombin was converted to gamma-thrombin, nitro-alpha-thrombin, and diisopropylphospho (DIP)-alpha-thrombin. These derivatives retain either the capacity to bind cell surface alpha-thrombin receptors or thrombin esterase activity, but they do not initiate DNA synthesis. At low concentrations of alpha-thrombin or the various thrombin derivatives, only alpha-thrombin stimulates 86Rb+ influx, suggesting a correlation between stimulation of influx and the ability of these derivatives to initiate DNA synthesis. Concentrations of a DIP-alpha-thrombin that saturate the alpha-thrombin receptors (up to 2 micrograms/ml) do not stimulate either the early or late influx of 86Rb+, indicating that DIP-alpha-thrombin binding alone is not sufficient to stimulate ion fluxes. High concentrations of either gamma-thrombin or nitro-alpha-thrombin, however, stimulate both early and late 86RB+ uptake but do not initiate DNA synthesis. These results demonstrate that events leading to both the early and late stimulation of 86Rb+ influx by themselves are not sufficient to initiate cell proliferation. Thus, initiation may require a combination of events that can be independently regulated by different transmembrane signals.

  5. Sexual orientation identity disparities in human papillomavirus vaccination initiation and completion among young adult US women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Peitzmeier, Sarah M; Gordon, Allegra R; Charlton, Brittany M; Haneuse, Sebastien; Potter, Jennifer; Austin, S Bryn

    2016-10-01

    To examine the association between sexual orientation identity and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination initiation and completion among both women and men. Using data from the 2013 and 2014 National Health Interview Survey, we estimated logistic regression models for the association between sexual orientation identity and HPV vaccination initiation (≥1 dose) and completion (≥3 doses) among US women and men in relation to sociodemographic and healthcare factors. Analyses were restricted to individuals for whom the HPV vaccine was recommended at some point in their lives, namely women aged 18-34 years (n = 9,734) and men aged 18-31 years (n = 6,812). Among all women, bisexual women had higher adjusted odds of HPV vaccination initiation [(odds ratio) 1.71; (95 % confidence interval) 1.20-2.45] and completion (1.59; 1.05-2.42) than heterosexual women. No difference was observed in the odds of HPV vaccination initiation or completion between lesbian and heterosexual women. Among women who had initiated HPV vaccination, lesbians had lower adjusted odds of completion than heterosexual women (0.41; 0.19-0.90). Among all men, gay men had higher adjusted odds of initiating (2.07; 1.17-3.52) and completing (3.90; 1.68-9.06) HPV vaccination than heterosexual men. No difference was observed in the odds of HPV vaccination initiation or completion between bisexual and heterosexual men. Among men who had initiated HPV vaccination, gay (4.36; 1.28-14.83) and bisexual (20.92; 2.34-186.73) men had higher adjusted odds of completion than heterosexual men, although these results are unreliable and should be interpreted with caution. Interventions are needed to promote HPV vaccination among all US women and men, regardless of sexual orientation identity.

  6. An experimental investigation of the dynamics of submarine leveed channel initiation as sediment-laden density currents experience sudden unconfinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowland, Joel C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hilley, George E [STANFORD UNIV; Fildani, Andrea [CHEVRON ETC

    2009-01-01

    Leveed submarine channels play a critical role in the transfer of sediment from the upper continental slopes to interslope basins and ultimately deepwater settings. Despite a reasonable understanding of how these channels grow once established, how such channels initiate on previously unchannelized portions of the seafloor remains poorly understood. We conducted a series of experiments that elucidate the influence of excess density relative to flow velocity on the dynamics of, and depositional morphologies arising from, density currents undergoing sudden unconfinement across a sloped bed. Experimental currents transported only suspended sediment across a non-erodible substrate. Under flow conditions ranging from supercritical to subcritical (bulk Richardson numbers of 0.02 to 1.2) our experiments failed to produce deposits resembling or exhibiting the potential to evolve into self-formed leveed channels. In the absence of excess density, a submerged sediment-laden flow produced sharp crested lateral deposits bounding the margins of the flow for approximately a distance of two outlet widths down basin. These lateral deposits terminated in a centerline deposit that greatly exceeded marginal deposits in thickness. As excess density increased relative to the outlet velocity, the rate of lateral spreading of the flow increased relative to the downstream propagation of the density current, transitioning from a narrow flow aligned with the channel outlet to a broad radially expanding flow. Coincident with these changes in flow dynamics, the bounding lateral deposits extended for shorter distances, had lower, more poorly defined crests that were increasingly wider in separation than the initial outlet, and progressively became more oblong rather than linear. Based on our results, we conclude that leveed channels cannot initiate from sediment-laden density currents under strictly depositional conditions. Partial confinement of these currents appears to be necessary to

  7. New Strategy for Exploration Technology Development: The Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Exploration/Commercialization Technology Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankins, John C.

    2000-01-01

    In FY 2001, NASA will undertake a new research and technology program supporting the goals of human exploration: the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Exploration/Commercialization Technology Initiative (HTCI). The HTCI represents a new strategic approach to exploration technology, in which an emphasis will be placed on identifying and developing technologies for systems and infrastructures that may be common among exploration and commercial development of space objectives. A family of preliminary strategic research and technology (R&T) road maps have been formulated that address "technology for human exploration and development of space (THREADS). These road maps frame and bound the likely content of the HTCL Notional technology themes for the initiative include: (1) space resources development, (2) space utilities and power, (3) habitation and bioastronautics, (4) space assembly, inspection and maintenance, (5) exploration and expeditions, and (6) space transportation. This paper will summarize the results of the THREADS road mapping process and describe the current status and content of the HTCI within that framework. The paper will highlight the space resources development theme within the Initiative and will summarize plans for the coming year.

  8. New Strategy for Exploration Technology Development: The Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Exploration/Commercialization Technology Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankins, John C.

    2000-01-01

    In FY 2001, NASA will undertake a new research and technology program supporting the goals of human exploration: the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Exploration/Commercialization Technology Initiative (HTCI). The HTCI represents a new strategic approach to exploration technology, in which an emphasis will be placed on identifying and developing technologies for systems and infrastructures that may be common among exploration and commercial development of space objectives. A family of preliminary strategic research and technology (R&T) road maps have been formulated that address "technology for human exploration and development of space (THREADS). These road maps frame and bound the likely content of the HTCL Notional technology themes for the initiative include: (1) space resources development, (2) space utilities and power, (3) habitation and bioastronautics, (4) space assembly, inspection and maintenance, (5) exploration and expeditions, and (6) space transportation. This paper will summarize the results of the THRE