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Sample records for human tumour necrosis

  1. Oxygen tension in human tumours measured with polarographic needle electrodes and its relationship to vascular density, necrosis and hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyng, Heidi; Sundfoer, Kolbein; Rofstad, Einar K.

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The use of polarographic needle electrodes for measurement of oxygen tension (pO 2 ) in tumours requires documentation of the validity of the method. In the present work the pO 2 values measured polarographically with the Eppendorf pO 2 histograph in human tumours were compared with the histological appearance of the tumour tissue, i.e. vascular density, fraction of necrosis and fraction of hypoxic tissue, to investigate whether the measurements reflected the expected pO 2 . Materials and methods: The pO 2 was measured in cervix tumours in patients and in human melanoma xenografted tumours in athymic mice. Vascular density was determined in the cervix tumours by histological analysis of biopsies from the pO 2 measurement tracks. Fraction of necrosis and fraction of hypoxic tissue, i.e. tissue binding the hypoxia marker pimonidazole, were determined in the melanomas by analysis of histological sections from the tumour planes in which the pO 2 measurements were performed. Results: The pO 2 distributions showed large intratumour heterogeneity. In cervix tumours, tumour regions with vascular density (vascular length per unit tissue volume) in the range of 47-77 mm/mm 3 showed higher pO 2 than tumour regions with vascular density in the range of 20-47 mm/mm 3 , which in turn showed higher pO 2 than tumour regions with vascular density in the range of 0-20 mm/mm 3 . In melanomas, tumour regions in which necrosis and hypoxia constituted more than 50% of the tissue showed lower pO 2 than other tumour regions. Conclusions: The pO 2 measured in the tumours was consistent with the histological appearance of the tissue in which the measurements were performed, suggesting that reliable pO 2 distributions of tumours can be obtained with polarographic needle electrodes

  2. Induction of human airway hyperresponsiveness by tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticevich, S Z; Hughes, J M; Black, J L; Armour, C L

    1995-09-15

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) is implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma; however, little is known of its direct effect on smooth muscle reactivity. We investigated the effect of TNF alpha on the responsiveness of human bronchial tissue to electrical field stimulation in vitro. Incubation of non-sensitized tissue with 1 nM, 3 nM and 10 nM TNF alpha significantly increased responsiveness to electrical field stimulation (113 +/- 8, 110 +/- 4 and 112 +/- 2% respectively) compared to control (99 +/- 2%) (P 0.05) nor were responses to exogenous acetylcholine (93 +/- 4% versus 73 +/- 7%, n = 3, P = 0.38). These results show that TNF alpha causes an increase in responsiveness of human bronchial tissue and that this occurs prejunctionally on the parasympathetic nerve pathway. This is the first report of a cytokine increasing human airway tissue responsiveness.

  3. Development of a sensitive ELISA for the quantification of human tumour necrosis factor-alpha using 4 polyclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grebenchtchikov, N.J.; Ven-Jongekrijg, J. van der; Pesman, G.J.; Geurts-Moespot, A.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Sweep, C.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the availability of many assays to measure concentrations of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in body fluids, these assays often lack specificity or sensitivity and are often of questionable reliability, resulting in inconsistent results. Therefore, we have developed an ELISA that is

  4. Tumour necrosis factor blockade increases lymphangiogenesis in murine and human arthritic joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polzer, K.; Baeten, D.; Soleiman, A.; Distler, J.; Gerlag, D. M.; Tak, P. P.; Schett, G.; Zwerina, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the presence and regulation of lymphatic vessels in inflamed joints of mice with experimental arthritis as well as patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA). METHODS: Lymphatic vessels and blood vessels were assessed in synovial tissue of human

  5. The effect of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α muteins on human neutrophils in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tchorzewski

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α has been implicated as an important inflammatory mediator. In vitro, TNF-α is reported to activate human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN, inducing responses such as phagocytic activity, degranulation and oxidative metabolism. Biological responses to TNF-α are initiated by its binding to specific cell surface receptors, and various studies have shown that the major TNF receptor species on PMN is the 75 kDa receptor. To verify the suggestion that the receptor binding domain includes the region close to the N-terminus of the TNF-α molecule, four TNF-α derivatives termed muteins were constructed, using a synthetic cDNA fragment substituting the N-terminal 3–7 selected hydrophilic or hydrophobic amino acids in the original TNF-α genomic DNA. Binding of muteins to PMN was assessed using monoclonal antibodies recognizing either the 55 kDa (p55 or the 75 kDa (p75 TNF receptor subtypes. Blocking by muteins of anti-p75 antibody binding to PMN was as expected from their N-terminal amino acid composition and hydrophilic properties. Hydrophilic muteins competed well with anti-TNF receptor antibodies for binding to the p75 receptor. In contrast, hydrophobic muteins were unable to block anti-p75 binding. Similarly, degranulation, chemiluminescence or enhancement of the PMN response to specific stimuli by the muteins correlated with the hydrophilic properties of the muteins. The significance of these observations in relation to the molecular structure of TNF-α is discussed.

  6. Chlorpromazine inhibits tumour necrosis factor synthesis and cytotoxicity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinetti, M; Galli, G; Demitri, M T; Fantuzzi, G; Minto, M; Ghezzi, P; Alzani, R; Cozzi, E; Fratelli, M

    1995-11-01

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ) has been previously shown to protect against endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] lethality and inhibit the release of tumour necrosis factor in vivo. We investigated at the cellular level whether this was due to direct inhibition of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) synthesis, using LPS-stimulated THP-1 human monocytic leukemia cells. We also studied the effect of CPZ on human TNF-alpha action by assessing TNF-alpha cytotoxicity on mouse fibrosarcoma L929 cells. CPZ (1-100 microM) inhibited TNF-alpha production in THP-1 cells in a dose dependent manner by a maximum of 80%. This effect was comparable to that of two well-known inhibitory drugs, dexamethasone and cyclicAMP. Inhibition was also evident at the mRNA level. On the other hand CPZ (10-25 microM) also inhibited TNF-alpha activity: in fact it reduced the cytotoxicity of TNF-alpha on L929 cells (EC50 was increased four times) and could provide protection even as a post-treatment. CPZ inhibited TNF-induced apoptosis in L929 cells, as detected by analysis of nuclear morphology. However, since we showed that apoptosis was very limited, and was not the main mode of cell death in our conditions, this could not explain the overall protection. Since CPZ did not interfere with either the oligomerization state of TNF-alpha or its receptor binding, our data suggest that it reduced cytotoxicity by inhibiting some steps in the TNF-alpha signalling pathways.

  7. Relationship between tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and vascular endothelial growth factor in human multiple myeloma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkun, Lukasz; Lemancewicz, Dorota; Piszcz, Jaroslaw; Moniuszko, Marcin; Bolkun-Skornicka, Urszula; Szkiladz, Malgorzata; Jablonska, Ewa; Kloczko, Janusz; Dzieciol, Janusz

    2015-12-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alfa (TNF-α) is an inflammatory cytokine with a wide spectrum of biological activity, including angiogenesis. Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), which belongs to the TNF family of proteins, plays a role in the regulation of vascular responses, but its effect on the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) is unclear. We analysed TRAIL concentrations in parallel with pro-angiogenic cytokines in serum and their expression in trephine biopsy (TB) in 56 patients with newly diagnosed IgG MM and 24 healthy volunteers. The study showed statistically higher concentrations of TRAIL and TNF-α, as well as of VEGF and its receptor, in MM patients compared to healthy volunteers and patients in advanced stages of the disease. Furthermore, we observed a significant decrease in all studied pro-angiogenic cytokines and significant increase of TRAIL concentration after anti-angiogenic therapy, with meaningful differences between responders (at least partial remission) and patients with progression during the induction treatment. It was also established that TRAIL correlated statistically and negatively with pro-angiogenic cytokines such as VEGF with its receptor and expression of VEGF and syndecan-1 in TB. In summary, our data indicate that in MM patients, both clinical course and treatment responsiveness are associated with dynamic yet corresponding changes of levels of TRAIL parallel pro-angiogenic mediators such as VEGF with its receptor and expression of VEGF and syndecan-1 in TB. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Intestinal necrosis in young patient due to arterial tumour embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahle, Einar; Gögenur, Ismail; Nørgaard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A patient in the thirties, currently undergoing chemotherapy for metastatic osteosarcoma diagnosed 3 years earlier, was admitted with in the emergency department with abdominal pain. Laparoscopic surgery revealed severe inflammation and an abscess. 18 cm of small intestine was removed because...... of intestinal necrosis. Histological examination showed several arterial tumour emboli, morphologically similar to the primary sarcoma. The patient died 1 year after successful surgery. Because of the improved survival of patients with osteosarcoma, acute mesenteric ischaemia should be considered in acute...

  9. In vitro differentiation of human monocytes to macrophages: change of PDE profile and its relationship to suppression of tumour necrosis factor-α release by PDE inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantner, Florian; Kupferschmidt, Rochus; Schudt, Christian; Wendel, Albrecht; Hatzelmann, Armin

    1997-01-01

    During in vitro culture in 10% human AB serum, human peripheral blood monocytes acquire a macrophage-like phenotype. The underlying differentiation was characterized by increased activities of the macrophage marker enzymes unspecific esterase (NaF-insensitive form) and acid phosphatase, as well as by a down-regulation in surface CD14 expression. In parallel, a dramatic change in the phosphodiesterase (PDE) profile became evident within a few days that strongly resembled that previously described for human alveolar macrophages. Whereas PDE1 and PDE3 activities were augmented, PDE4 activity, which represented the major cyclic AMP-hydrolysing activity of peripheral blood monocytes, rapidly declined. Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages responded to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with the release of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). In line with the change in CD14 expression, the EC50 value of LPS for induction of TNF release increased from approximately 0.1 ng ml−1 in peripheral blood monocytes to about 2 ng ml−1 in macrophages. Both populations of cells were equally susceptible towards inhibition of TNF release by cyclic AMP elevating agents such as dibutyryl cyclic AMP, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or forskolin, which all led to a complete abrogation of TNF production in a concentration-dependent manner and which were more efficient than the glucocorticoid dexamethasone. In monocytes, PDE4 selective inhibitors (rolipram, RP73401) suppressed TNF formation by 80%, whereas motapizone, a PDE3 selective compound, exerted a comparatively weak effect (10–15% inhibition). Combined use of PDE3 plus PDE4 inhibitors resulted in an additive effect and fully abrogated LPS-induced TNF release as did the mixed PDE3/4 inhibitor tolafentrine. In monocyte-derived macrophages, neither PDE3- nor PDE4-selective drugs markedly affected TNF generation when used alone (<15% inhibition), whereas in combination, they led to a maximal inhibition of TNF formation by about 40–50

  10. Role of tumour necrosis factor in pathogenesis of radicular cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, W.U.R.; Idris, M.; Khan, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The radicular cyst is very common odontogenic cyst of the jaws, which is usually associated with a tooth with necrotic pulp. The cyst formation requires proliferation of the epithelial rest cells of Malassez present in the periodontal ligament. Proliferation of epithelial rest cells of Malassez is an essential event in the Pathogenesis of radicular cyst. The wall of the cyst contains epithelial cells, macrophages, fibroblasts and other cells. TNF is one of inflammatory mediators, which is produced by macrophages and monocytes. This study was carried out to investigate the role of tumour necrosis factor in the pathogenesis of radicular cyst, which is by far the commonest cystic lesion of the jaws. Methods: Explants from 20 radicular cysts were cultured in vitro to grow the epithelial cells. However, the cultures were rapidly contaminated with fibroblasts and it was impossible to grow the epithelial cells separately. Therefore, the proliferative effect of Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF) was studied on mammalian epithelial cells. Results: TNF at low concentration had a proliferative effect on the epithelial cells, which may play some role in pathogenesis of radicular cyst. Conclusion: TNF stimulated the epithelial cell proliferation in low concentration and inhibit the proliferation in higher concentrations. These two effects may have some implications in the pathogenesis of radicular cyst. (author)

  11. Negative effects of a high tumour necrosis factor-α concentration on human gingival mesenchymal stem cell trophism: the use of natural compounds as modulatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Chiara; Natali, Letizia; Nisi, Marco; De Leo, Marinella; Daniele, Simona; Costa, Barbara; Graziani, Filippo; Gabriele, Mario; Braca, Alessandra; Trincavelli, M Letizia; Martini, Claudia

    2018-05-11

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play a crucial role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and in regenerative processes. Among the different MSC types, the gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) have arisen as a promising tool to promote the repair of damaged tissues secreting trophic mediators that affect different types of cells involved in regenerative processes. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α is one of the key mediators of inflammation that could affect tissue regenerative processes and modify the MSC properties in in-vitro applications. To date, no data have been reported on the effects of TNF-α on GMSC trophic activities and how its modulation with anti-inflammatory agents from natural sources could modulate the GMSC properties. GMSCs were isolated and characterized from healthy subjects. The effects of TNF-α were evaluated on GMSCs and on the well-being of endothelial cells. The secretion of cytokines was measured and related to the modification of GMSC-endothelial cell communication using a conditioned-medium method. The ability to modify the inflammatory response was evaluated in the presence of Ribes nigrum bud extract (RBE). TNF-α differently affected GMSC proliferation and the expression of inflammatory-related proteins (interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2) dependent on its concentration. A high TNF-α concentration decreased the GMSC viability and impaired the positive cross-talk between GMSCs and endothelial cells, probably by enhancing the amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the GMSC secretome. RBE restored the beneficial effects of GMSCs on endothelial viability and motility under inflammatory conditions. A high TNF-α concentration decreased the well-being of GMSCs, modifying their trophic activities and decreasing endothelial cell healing. These data highlight the importance of controlling TNF-α concentrations to maintain the trophic activity of GMSCs. Furthermore, the

  12. Tumour Necrosis Factor-alpha and Nuclear Factor-kappa B Gene Variants in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Leyla; Atalan, Nazan; Karagedik, E Hande; Ergen, Arzu

    2018-01-20

    The humoral system is activated and various cytokines are released due to infections in tissues and traumatic damage. Nuclear factor-kappa B dimers are encoded by nuclear factor-kappa B genes and regulate transcription of several crucial proteins of inflammation such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha. To investigate the possible effect of polymorphisms on tumour necrosis factor-alpha serum levels with clinical and prognostic parameters of sepsis by determining the nuclear factor-kappa B-1-94 ins/del ATTG and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (-308 G/A) gene polymorphisms and tumour necrosis factor-alpha serum levels. Case-control study. Seventy-two patients with sepsis and 104 healthy controls were included in the study. In order to determine the polymorphisms of nuclear factor-kappa B-1-94 ins/del ATTG and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (-308 G/A), polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was performed and serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We observed no significant differences in tumour necrosis factor-alpha serum levels between the study groups. In the patient group, an increase in the tumour necrosis factor-alpha serum levels in patients carrying the tumour necrosis factor-alpha (-308 G/A) A allele compared to those without the A allele was found to be statistically significant. Additionally, an increase in the tumour necrosis factor-alpha serum levels in patients carrying tumour necrosis factor-alpha (-308 G/A) AA genotype compared with patients carrying the AG or GG genotypes was statistically significant. No significant differences were found in these 2 polymorphisms between the patient and control groups (p>0.05). Our results showed the AA genotype and the A allele of the tumour necrosis factor-alpha (-308 G/A) polymorphism may be used as a predictor of elevated tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels in patients with sepsis.

  13. Imaging oxygenation of human tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhani, Anwar R.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Lewis, Jason S.; Alber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia represents a significant challenge to the curability of human tumours leading to treatment resistance and enhanced tumour progression. Tumour hypoxia can be detected by non-invasive and invasive techniques but the inter-relationships between these remains largely undefined. 18 F-MISO and Cu-ATSM-PET, and BOLD-MRI are the lead contenders for human application based on their non-invasive nature, ease of use and robustness, measurement of hypoxia status, validity, ability to demonstrate heterogeneity and general availability, these techniques are the primary focus of this review. We discuss where developments are required for hypoxia imaging to become clinically useful and explore potential new uses for hypoxia imaging techniques including biological conformal radiotherapy. (orig.)

  14. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jian; Chekenya, Martha; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Enger, Per Ø; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Ø; Huszthy, Peter C; Jacobsen, Hege; Brekkå, Narve; Li, Xingang; Zhao, Peng; Mørk, Sverre

    2009-01-01

    Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression

  15. Maturation of human dendritic cells by monocyte-conditioned medium is dependent upon trace amounts of lipopolysaccharide inducing tumour necrosis factor alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nersting, Jacob; Svenson, Morten; Andersen, Vagn

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the ability of monocyte-conditioned medium (MCM), generated by monocytes cultured on plastic-immobilised immunoglobulin, to stimulate maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). Earlier reports suggest that MCM is a strong inducer of irreversible DC maturation......, whereas we find, that adding a small amount of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to the MCM-generating cultures is required for the production of a DC-stimulatory MCM. Moreover, compared with addition of LPS directly to the DC cultures, stimulation via MCM cultures increases by several fold the DC...

  16. Human rheumatoid arthritis tissue production of IL-17A drives matrix and cartilage degradation: synergy with tumour necrosis factor-alpha, Oncostatin M and response to biologic therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Ellen M

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to examine IL-17A in patients, following anti-TNF-alpha therapy and the effect of IL-17A on matrix turnover and cartilage degradation. METHODS: IL-17A expression was examined by ELISA and immunohistology in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints. RA whole synovial tissue explant (RA ST), primary synovial fibroblasts (RASFC), human cartilage and chondrocyte cultures were stimulated with IL-17A +\\/- TNF-alpha and Oncostatin M (OSM). Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and tissue inhibitor (TIMP-1) were assessed by ELISA and zymography. Cartilage proteoglycan release was assessed histologically by Safranin-O staining. Clinical parameters, IL-17A, MMP\\/TIMP were assessed in patients pre\\/post biologic therapy. RESULTS: IL-17A levels were higher in RA vs osteoarthritis (OA)\\/normal joints (P < 0.05). IL-17A up-regulated MMP-1, -2, -9, and -13 in RA ST, RASFC, cartilage and chondrocyte cultures (P < 0.05). In combination with TNF-alpha and OSM, IL-17A shifted the MMP:TIMP-1 ratio in favor of matrix degradation (all P < 0.05). Cartilage proteoglycan depletion in response to IL-17A was mild; however, in combination with TNF-alpha or OSM showed almost complete proteoglycan depletion. Serum IL-17A was detected in 28% of patients commencing biologic therapy. IL-17A negative patients demonstrated reductions post therapy in serum MMP1\\/TIMP4, MMP3\\/TIMP1 and MMP3\\/TIMP4 ratios and an increase in CS846 (all P < 0.05). No significant changes were observed in IL-17A positive patients. CONCLUSIONS: IL-17A is produced locally in the inflamed RA joint. IL-17A promotes matrix turnover and cartilage destruction, especially in the presence of other cytokines, mimicking the joint environment. IL-17A levels are modulated in vivo, following anti-TNF therapy, and may reflect changes in matrix turnover.

  17. Evaluation of tumour necrosis during chemotherapy with diffusion-weighted MR imaging: preliminary results in osteosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, Markus; Saueressig, Ulrich; Bley, Thorsten; Langer, Mathias; Koehler, Gabriele; Kontny, Udo; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Reichardt, Wilfried; Ilyasof, Kamil

    2006-01-01

    During successful chemotherapy of osteosarcomas tumour size does not diminish significantly because the therapy has limited impact on the mineralized matrix of the tumour. Treatment response is considered successful if, histologically, more than 90% of tumour cells show necrosis. To determine if osteosarcomas change their water diffusion during preoperative chemotherapy in relation to the amount of tumour necrosis. Eight patients (age 11-19 years) with histologically proven limb osteosarcoma underwent T1-weighted, fat-suppressed T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo imaging together with diffusion-weighted EPI sequences (b = 700) at 1.5 T before and after five cycles of standard chemotherapy. Tumour volume and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated before and after chemotherapy. The degree of tumour necrosis after chemotherapy was assessed using the histological Salzer-Kuntschik classification (grades 1-6). During chemotherapy, the ADC values of osteosarcomas changed significantly. The ADC of untreated tumour was 2.1 ± 0.4 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s (mean ± SD) (95% CI 1.6-2.0). The ADC of chemotherapy-treated sarcomas was 2.5 ± 0.4 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s (95% CI 1.8-2.2). Necrotic areas, which were confirmed by macroscopic examination, showed ADC values up to 2.7 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. Four patients with little viable tumour tissue within the neoplasm (Salzer-Kuntschik grades 1-2) had an increase in ADC of 0.4 up to 0.7 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. Four patients with larger areas of viable tumour (Salzer-Kuntschik grade 4) showed a lesser increase in ADC of 0.0 up to 0.3 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. The differences in ADC values in tumour tissue before and after chemotherapy were highly significant (P = 0.01). During chemotherapy of osteosarcomas, tumour ADC changes are related to the degree of tumour necrosis. (orig.)

  18. The effect of BW12C on radiosensitivity and necrosis of murine tissues and tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.; Hill, S.A.; Joiner, M.C.; Joiner, B.; Johns, H.; Williams, K.; Denekamp, J.

    1994-01-01

    BW12C is a drug that has the potential to induce normal tissue and tumour hypoxia by binding to haemoglobin, increasing its affinity for oxygen and thereby reducing oxygen availability to tissues. Initial results suggested that BW12C administration caused significant radioprotection of normal tissues and induced tumour necrosis, but variable results have been reported subsequently. This work was carried to extend the range of observations concerning the ability of BW12C to radioprotect normal tissues and tumours and to induce necrosis of tumours of the mouse. BW12C was administered as 70 mg/kg intravenous 15 min before irradiation of jejunum in CBA mice and of foot skin in WHT mice with single doses of 240 kVp X-rays while mice breathed gases of varying oxygen tensions. The radiosensitivities of these tissues were assessed by the crypt survival assay and the acute skin reaction, respectively. The radiosensitivity of CaNT tumours to single fraction irradiation was assessed by the regrowth delay assay following administration of single or multiple does of BW12C at varying times to air-breathing CBA mice. The radiation response was compared to the radiosensitivity of clamped tumours. The effect of BW12C alone on tumours was assessed by regrowth delay and histological examination for necrosis. Single or multiple doses of BW12C did not influence the radiosensitivity of CaNT tumours, although marked radioprotection could be induced by clamping the tumours during irradiation. Multiple doses of BW12C alone led to a slight increase in necrosis of the CaNT tumour but did not alter its growth rate. BW12C alone did not induce necrosis of the murine JT lymphoma. The results shown that BW12C did not have a significant effect as a radioprotective or necrotizing agent in these experimental systems. The reported differences in the radiomodifying effects of BW12C are probably tissue-specific and relate to complex biochemical and physiological interactions. 18 refs., 4 figs

  19. NcoI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) region in primary biliary cirrhosis and in healthy Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1989-01-01

    The restriction fragment length polymorphism of the human tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) region was investigated by means of 20 different restriction enzymes and a human TNF alpha cDNA probe. Only one of the enzymes, NcoI, revealed a polymorphic pattern consisting of fragments of 10.5 and 5.5...

  20. Increased voluntary exercise in mice deficient for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and lymphotoxin-alpha.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netea, M.G.; Kullberg, B.J.; Vonk, A.G.; Verschueren, I.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The endogenous mediators playing a role in the sensing of fatigue and cessation of exercise are yet to be characterized. We hypothesized that proinflammatory cytokines, in particular tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and lymphotoxin-alpha (LT) transmit signals leading to fatigue.

  1. Severe glandular tularemia in a patient treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor for psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Calin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A case of severe glandular tularemia in a patient receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF therapy is reported here. The patient required prolonged treatment with doxycycline–ciprofloxacin due to early relapse after ciprofloxacin was stopped. Tularemia may have a more severe course in patients receiving anti-TNF. This may thus be an indication for more aggressive treatment.

  2. IgE-mediated basophil tumour necrosis factor alpha induces matrix metalloproteinase-9 from monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkencrone, Sidsel; Poulsen, Lars K.; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    IgE-mediated activation of mast cells has been reported to induce the release of tumour necrosis alpha (TNF-α), which may display autocrine effects on these cells by inducing the generation of the tissue remodelling protease matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). While mast cells and basophils have...

  3. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  4. In Entamoeba histolytica, a BspA family protein is required for chemotaxis toward tumour necrosis factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Silvestre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Entamoeba histolytica cell migration is essential for the development of human amoebiasis (an infectious disease characterized by tissue invasion and destruction. The tissue inflammation associated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF secretion by host cells is a well-documented feature of amoebiasis. Tumour necrosis factor is a chemoattractant for E. histolytica, and the parasite may have a TNF receptor at its cell surface. Methods: confocal microscopy, RNA Sequencing, bioinformatics, RNA antisense techniques and histological analysis of human colon explants were used to characterize the interplay between TNF and E. histolytica. Results: an antibody against human TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1 stained the E. histolytica trophozoite surface and (on immunoblots binds to a 150-kDa protein. Proteome screening with the TNFR1 sequence revealed a BspA family protein in E. histolytica that carries a TNFR signature domain and six leucine-rich repeats (named here as "cell surface protein", CSP, in view of its cellular location. Cell surface protein shares structural homologies with Toll-Like receptors, colocalizes with TNF and is internalized in TNF-containing vesicles. Reduction of cellular CSP levels abolished chemotaxis toward TNF and blocked parasite invasion of human colon. Conclusions: there is a clear link between TNF chemotaxis, CSP and pathogenesis.

  5. Severe glandular tularemia in a patient treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor for psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calin, Ruxandra; Caumes, Eric; Reibel, Florence; Ali Mohamed, Anzime; Brossier, Florence; Foltz, Violaine; Boussouar, Samia; Fautrel, Bruno; Maurin, Max; Katlama, Christine; Pourcher, Valérie

    2017-07-01

    A case of severe glandular tularemia in a patient receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is reported here. The patient required prolonged treatment with doxycycline-ciprofloxacin due to early relapse after ciprofloxacin was stopped. Tularemia may have a more severe course in patients receiving anti-TNF. This may thus be an indication for more aggressive treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Thallium brain SPECT and MRI correlation in the evaluation of tumour recurrence versus radiation necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robins, P.D.; Mahoney, D.S.; Mullan, B.P.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: This study compares different methods of determining thallium tumour uptake indices. Correlation with MR was performed to evaluate features that may affect the thallium index (TI) and to improve specificity for differentiation of recurrent tumor from radiation necrosis. 23 patients who had received radiotherapy for a brain neoplasm were included. The TI was determined using three different methods including large and small regions-of-interest (ROI). The concordance between the thallium SPECT and MRI was assessed. The effect of central necrosis on the different thallium indices derived was evaluated. 18 patients were determined to have recurrent tumor and five had inactive disease. The optimal TI cut-off values was statistically delivered and sensitivity and specificity was 78-94% and 80% respectively for cut-off values between 2.0 and 2.6 depending on the method used to calculate the TI. When compared with MRI, the majority of SPECT abnormalities correlated well with location and degree of uptake and enhancement. Seven cases showed central necrosis and the degree of necrosis had less effect on the TI when a small ROI was used in these cases. In conclusion thallium brain SPECT is a sensitive technique for detecting recurrent tumour. When performing semi-quantitative assessment of thallium uptake, a smaller ROI over the most intense area of uptake will reduce the underestimation of the TI in the presence of necrosis and a Tl cut-off value of 2.6 gave optimal accuracy using this method. Correlation with MRI aids in localization, particularly where there is anatomic distortion and enables more accurate analysis of these lesions by avoiding areas of necrosis. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  7. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitor treatment and occurrence of anterior uveitis in ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lie, Elisabeth; Lindström, Ulf; Zverkova-Sandström, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitor (TNFi) treatment has been shown to reduce the rates of anterior uveitis (AU) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Our objective was to compare the effect of adalimumab (ADA), etanercept (ETN) and infliximab (IFX) on AU occurrence in AS, using...... obtained by linkage to the Swedish National Patient Register. For each TNFi, AU rates 2 years before TNFi start and for the first 2 years on TNFi treatment were compared. In the subgroup of patients who were AU-free during the 2 years before TNFi start, we also compared the risk of a first AU event...

  8. Tumour necrosis factor-α polymorphism as one of the complex inherited factors in pemphigus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Dorota Torzecka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to analyse a significance of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α promoter gene polymorphisms in relation to the HLA-DR locus in genetic predisposition to pemphigus. TNF-α gene polymorphisms in position -238 and -308 were identified using a modified polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in 53 patients with pemphigus (38 with pemphigus vulgaris, 15 with pemphigus foliaceus and 87 healthy controls. The HLA-DRB1 locus was typed using the polymerase chain reaction SSO method in all the patients and 152 population controls.

  9. Intracapillary HbO2 saturations in murine tumours and human tumour xenografts measured by cryospectrophotometry: relationship to tumour volume, tumour pH and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofstad, E K; Fenton, B M; Sutherland, R M

    1988-05-01

    Frequency distributions for intracapillary HbO2 saturation were determined for two murine tumour lines (KHT, RIF-1) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenograft lines (MLS, OWI) using a cryospectrophotometric method. The aim was to search for possible relationships between HbO2 saturation status and tumour volume, tumour pH and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. Tumour pH was measured by 31P NMR spectroscopy. Hypoxic fractions were determined from cell survival curves for tumours irradiated in vivo and assayed in vitro. Tumours in the volume range 100-4000 mm3 were studied and the majority of the vessels were found to have HbO2 saturations below 10%. The volume-dependence of the HbO2 frequency distributions differed significantly among the four tumour lines; HbO2 saturation status decreased with increasing tumour volume for the KHT, RIF-1 and MLS lines and was independent of tumour volume for the OWI line. The data indicated that the rate of decrease in HbO2 saturation status during tumour growth was related to the rate of development of necrosis. The volume-dependence of tumour pH was very similar to that of the HbO2 saturation status for all tumour lines. Significant correlations were therefore found between HbO2 saturation status and tumour pH, both within tumour lines and across the four tumour lines, reflecting that the volume-dependence of both parameters probably was a compulsory consequence of reduced oxygen supply conditions during tumour growth. Hypoxic fraction increased during tumour growth for the KHT, RIF-1 and MLS lines and was volume-independent for the OWI line, suggesting a relationship between HbO2 saturation status and hypoxic fraction within tumour lines. However, there was no correlation between these two parameters across the four tumour lines, indicating that the hypoxic fraction of a tumour is not determined only by the oxygen supply conditions; other parameters may also be important, e.g. oxygen diffusivity, rate of oxygen

  10. Role of tumour necrosis factor gene polymorphisms (-308 and -238) in breast cancer susceptibility and severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmy, Iman AF; Balasubramanian, Saba P; Wilson, Anthony G; Stephenson, Timothy J; Cox, Angela; Brown, Nicola J; Reed, Malcolm WR

    2004-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in the promoter region of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) gene can regulate gene expression and have been associated with inflammatory and malignant conditions. We have investigated two polymorphisms in the promoter of the TNF gene (-308 G>A and -238 G>A) for their role in breast cancer susceptibility and severity by means of an allelic association study. Using a case–control study design, breast cancer patients (n = 709) and appropriate age-matched and sex-matched controls obtained from the Breast Screening Unit (n = 498) were genotyped for these TNF polymorphisms, using a high-throughput allelic discrimination method. Allele frequencies for both polymorphisms were similar in both breast cancer cases and controls. However, the -308 polymorphism was found to be associated with vascular invasion in breast tumours (P = 0.024). Comparison with other standard prognostic indices did not show any association for either genotype. We demonstrated no association between the -308G>A polymorphism and the -238G>A polymorphism in the promoter region of TNF and susceptibility to breast cancer, in a large North European population. However, the -308 G>A polymorphism was found to be associated with the presence of vascular invasion in breast tumours

  11. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8) expression associated with cell survival and death in cancer cell lines infected with canine distemper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J A; Ferreira, H L; Vieira, F V; Gameiro, R; Andrade, A L; Eugênio, F R; Flores, E F; Cardoso, T C

    2017-06-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a novel strategy for treatment of cancer in humans and companion animals as well. Canine distemper virus (CDV), a paramyxovirus, has proven to be oncolytic through induction of apoptosis in canine-derived tumour cells, yet the mechanism behind this inhibitory action is poorly understood. In this study, three human mammary tumour cell lines and one canine-derived adenofibrosarcoma cell line were tested regarding to their susceptibility to CDV infection, cell proliferation, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8). CDV replication-induced cytopathic effect, decrease of cell proliferation rates, and >45% of infected cells were considered death and/or under late apoptosis/necrosis. TNFAIP8 and CDVM gene expression were positively correlated in all cell lines. In addition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization was associated with increase in virus titres (p < 0.005). Thus, these results strongly suggest that both human and canine mammary tumour cells are potential candidates for studies concerning CDV-induced cancer therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Delayed radiation necrosis of the central nervous system in patients irradiated for pituitary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grattan-Smith, P.J.; Morris, J.G.; Langlands, A.O.

    1992-01-01

    Four cases of delayed radiation necrosis involving the CNS were found in a group of 46 patients irradiated for pituitary tumours over a six year period. This occurred in three of 11 patients with Cushing's disease representing an incidence of 27% in this group. There were no cases among 11 patients with acromegaly or among seven with prolactinomas. One case (6%) was found in the 17 patients with chromophobe adenomas. Standard doses of radiation were delivered to these patients and the findings support suggestions that the metabolic disturbances of Cushing's disease may reduce tolerance to radiation. Our results and a literature review indicate that if radiotherapy is used to treat Cushing's disease, the total dose should be less than 50 Gy at 2 Gy per day fractionation. (Author)

  13. Delayed radiation necrosis of the central nervous system in patients irradiated for pituitary tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattan-Smith, P.J.; Morris, J.G.; Langlands, A.O. (Westmead Hospital, Sydney (Australia))

    1992-10-01

    Four cases of delayed radiation necrosis involving the CNS were found in a group of 46 patients irradiated for pituitary tumours over a six year period. This occurred in three of 11 patients with Cushing's disease representing an incidence of 27% in this group. There were no cases among 11 patients with acromegaly or among seven with prolactinomas. One case (6%) was found in the 17 patients with chromophobe adenomas. Standard doses of radiation were delivered to these patients and the findings support suggestions that the metabolic disturbances of Cushing's disease may reduce tolerance to radiation. Our results and a literature review indicate that if radiotherapy is used to treat Cushing's disease, the total dose should be less than 50 Gy at 2 Gy per day fractionation. (Author).

  14. Experiences and needs for work participation in employees with rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Marrit; Hoving, Jan L.; Vermeulen, Marjolein I. M.; Herenius, Marieke M. J.; Tak, Paul P.; Sluiter, Judith K.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the experiences and needs with respect to work participation of employees with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. Face-to-face interviews in 14 employees with RA on anti-TNF therapy focused on experiences, offered support and needs with

  15. Expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha and accumulation of fibronectin in coronary artery restenotic lesions retrieved by atherectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausell, N.; de Lima, V. C.; Molossi, S.; Liu, P.; Turley, E.; Gotlieb, A. I.; Adelman, A. G.; Rabinovitch, M.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The formation of coronary artery neointima experimentally induced in piglets after cardiac transplantation is related to an immune-inflammatory reaction associated with increased expression of T cells and inflammatory mediators (tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1 beta) and upregulation of fibronectin. In vivo blockade of tumour necrosis factor alpha in rabbits after cardiac transplantation results in reduced neointimal formation. The objective of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that coronary restenosis after atherectomy or percutaneous balloon angioplasty is associated with a similar inflammatory cascade initiated by mechanical injury. METHODS--Specimens taken at coronary atherectomy were analysed from 16 patients. Nine had had the procedure performed twice, firstly, to remove a primary lesion, and secondly, to remove a restenotic lesion. Seven had percutaneous balloon angioplasty after removal of restenotic tissue. Coronary atherectomy specimens were analysed by immunohistochemistry for the presence of T cells, macrophages, major histocompatibility complex II, interleukin 1 beta, tumour necrosis factor alpha, fibronectin, and the receptor for hyaluronan mediated motility. RESULTS--The groups were clinically and angiographically similar with equivalent lumens before and after atherectomy. Restenotic lesions had increased expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha and fibronectin compared with the primary lesions (P < 0.05 for both). There was also a trend towards a greater number of T cells and increased expression of interleukin 1 beta. CONCLUSIONS--Restenosis is associated with increased expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha and fibronectin, suggesting that an immune-inflammatory reaction probably contributes to neointimal formation and may represent a form of wound healing and repair secondary to mechanical injury. Images PMID:7626352

  16. [Cardiovascular exercise on obese women: effects on adiponectine, leptine, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeros-Olvera, Erick; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Nava-González, Edna J; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther; Lavalle-González, Fernando; Bastarrachea, Raúl A; Salazar González, Bertha Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The relationship of hormones adiponectin, leptin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in adipose tissue on the atherogenic process is one of the most promising models in preventive medicine. The numerous tests performed to identify the effect of exercise on these hormones have not been clear on the type of exercise routine and physical effort calculated to contribute to changing plasma concentrations in obese women. Analyze controlledcardiovascular exercise effect on serum level of adiponectin, leptin, and tumournecrosis factor-alpha in obese young women. A simple blind clinical essay. The intervention covered a 10-week controlled, cardiovascular exercise program by 34 women (cases n=17, controls n=17) with a body mass index>27kg/m(2). Molecular analysis was performed by immune-fluorescence. Following the intervention, cases and controls means were as follows: adiponectin 19.0 vs. 12.2μ/ml (P=.008); leptin 20.0 vs. 28.0μ/L (P=.02); and tumour necrosis factor-alpha 4.7 vs. 5.1pg/ml (P=.05). The established exercise (5 sessions a week of exercise of 40min each for 10 weeks with a heart rate reserve of 40 to 80%) improved plasma concentrations of these hormones in the expected direction. This finding highlights an unpublished amount of exercise, controlled by the reserve cardiac frequency that might contribute the cardiovascular and metabolic protection to obese women. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. What factors determine patients' preference for tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in ankylosing spondylitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajri, Dessy W; Brand, Caroline A; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Martin, Belinda J; Buchanan, Russell R C; Schachna, Lionel

    2009-05-01

    Tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy, either intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SQ), demonstrates similar efficacy in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The objective of this study was to examine factors influencing patient preference of TNFi. Fifty-nine (79.7%) participants were male with mean age 43.9 years and disease duration of 22.0 years. Fifty-nine patients (79.7%) agreed with the statement 'My doctor gave me a choice and I made a decision based on my personal preference'. Patients commenced first on IV TNFi most commonly cited reduced frequency of injections (96.6%), administration by a trained professional (89.7%) and use of infusion time for leisure activities (86.2%). Patients commenced on SQ TNFi cited flexibility with timing of treatment (80%), shortened administration time (73.3%) and the convenience of home therapy (73.3%). Shared clinical decision-making between clinicians and patients may be desirable for AS patients commencing TNFi therapy.

  18. The accuracy of serum interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor as markers for ovarian torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S B; Wattiez, A; Stockheim, D; Seidman, D S; Lidor, A L; Mashiach, S; Goldenberg, M

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a possible role for interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) as pre-operative markers for the diagnosis of ovarian torsion. Twenty consecutive patients admitted to the gynaecological emergency room with suspected clinical diagnosis of ovarian torsion were prospectively assigned to the study. Blood samples were drawn pre-operatively and examined for serum concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-alpha. Surgeons were blinded to laboratory results prior to laparoscopy. The pre-operative diagnosis of ovarian torsion was confirmed during an urgent diagnostic laparoscopy in 8 (40%) patients. The surgical diagnosis among the remaining 12 patients was a large ovarian cyst not in torsion. In six out of eight (75.0%) patients with ovarian torsion serum IL-6 concentrations were elevated. None of the 12 patients without torsion had elevated serum IL-6 concentrations. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the proportion of women with elevated serum TNF-alpha concentrations, two of eight (25.0%) patients with torsion and four of 12 (33.3%) control cases. Elevated serum IL-6 concentrations, but not serum TNF-alpha concentrations, were significantly associated with the occurrence of ovarian torsion. In patients with vague clinical signs of ovarian torsion, serum IL-6 might help to distinguish which patients should undergo diagnostic laparoscopy.

  19. Generation of tumour-necrosis-factor-alpha-specific affibody molecules capable of blocking receptor binding in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Andreas; Wållberg, Helena; Herne, Nina; Ståhl, Stefan; Frejd, Fredrik Y

    2009-08-17

    Affibody molecules specific for human TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) were selected by phage-display technology from a library based on the 58-residue Protein A-derived Z domain. TNF-alpha is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in several inflammatory diseases and, to this day, four TNF-alpha-blocking protein pharmaceuticals have been approved for clinical use. The phage selection generated 18 unique cysteine-free affibody sequences of which 12 were chosen, after sequence cluster analysis, for characterization as proteins. Biosensor binding studies of the 12 Escherichia coli-produced and IMAC (immobilized-metal-ion affinity chromatography)-purified affibody molecules revealed three variants that demonstrated the strongest binding to human TNF-alpha. These three affibody molecules were subjected to kinetic binding analysis and also tested for their binding to mouse, rat and pig TNF-alpha. For ZTNF-alpha:185, subnanomolar affinity (KD=0.1-0.5 nM) for human TNF-alpha was demonstrated, as well as significant binding to TNF-alpha from the other species. Furthermore, the binding site was found to overlap with the binding site for the TNF-alpha receptor, since this interaction could be efficiently blocked by the ZTNF-alpha:185 affibody. When investigating six dimeric affibody constructs with different linker lengths, and one trimeric construct, it was found that the inhibition of the TNF-alpha binding to its receptor could be further improved by using dimers with extended linkers and/or a trimeric affibody construct. The potential implication of the results for the future design of affibody-based reagents for the diagnosis of inflammation is discussed.

  20. Immunoexpression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1α and interleukin-10 on odontogenic cysts and tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, M C; de Matos, F R; Conceição, T S; Leitão, A C G H; Freitas, R A

    2017-05-01

    To analyse the immunoreactivity of IL-1α, TNF-α and IL-10 in odontogenic cysts and tumours and to investigate possible associations with established biological behaviours of these different lesions. Immunohistochemical expression of anti-IL-1α, anti-TNF-α and anti-IL-10 antibodies was assessed on epithelium and mesenchyme of 20 radicular cysts (RCs), 20 residual cysts (RECs), 20 dentigerous cysts (DCs), 18 solid ameloblastomas (SAs), 20 keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs) and 15 dental follicles (DFs). Comparative analysis of data was performed using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Kruskal-Wallis's test. Significantly greater expression of IL-1α in the epithelium was noted in RC, KCOT and SA (P = 0.01), whilst IL-10 and TNF-α was in the epithelium of RC, DC and KCOT (P  IL-10 (P  IL10 ratio (P < 0.01). These results suggest involvement of the proteins in the pathogenesis of odontogenic cysts and tumours, with emphasis on the highest immunoreactivity of osteolysis stimulating factors in tumours with aggressive biological behaviour, such as SA and KCOT. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Tumour necrosis factor-α stimulates HIV-1 replication in single-cycle infection of human term placental villi fragments in a time, viral dose and envelope dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barré-Sinoussi Françoise

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The placenta plays an important role in the control of in utero HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission (MTCT. Proinflammatory cytokines in the placental environment are particularly implicated in this control. We thus investigated the effect of TNF-α on HIV-1 expression in human placental tissues in vitro. Results Human placental chorionic villi fragments were infected with varying doses of luciferase reporter HIV-1 pseudotypes with the R5, X4-Env or the vesicular stomatitis virus protein G (VSV-G. Histocultures were then performed in the presence or absence of recombinant human TNF-α. Luciferase activity was measured at different time points in cell lysates or on whole fragments using ex vivo imaging systems. A significant increase in viral expression was detected in placental fragments infected with 0.2 ng of p24 antigen/fragment (P = 0.002 of VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 in the presence of TNF-α seen after 120 hours of culture. A time independent significant increase of viral expression by TNF-α was observed with higher doses of VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1. When placental fragments were infected with R5-Env pseudotyped HIV-1, a low level of HIV expression at 168 hours of culture was detected for 3 of the 5 placentas tested, with no statistically significant enhancement by TNF-α. Infection with X4-Env pseudotyped HIV-1 did not lead to any detectable luciferase activity at any time point in the absence or in the presence of TNF-α. Conclusion TNF-α in the placental environment increases HIV-1 expression and could facilitate MTCT of HIV-1, particularly in an inflammatory context.

  2. Effectiveness of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α therapy in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Burisch, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF) treatment in a large cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in clinical practice and to establish a cohort...... in clinical trials. Funding: The work was funded by Health Research Fund of Central Denmark Region, Colitis-Crohn Foreningen and the University of Aarhus (PhD grant). Trial registration: Clinicaltrials NCT02322008....

  3. Genetic variants in toll-like receptors are not associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility or anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coenen, Marieke J H; Enevold, Christian; Barrera, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF) medication.......Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF) medication....

  4. Quantitation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in human brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Bock, E; Warecka, K

    1980-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) content of 58 human brain tumours was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using monospecific antibody against GFA. Astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, spongioblastomas, ependymomas and medulloblastomas contained relatively high...

  5. Differential effect of glucocorticoids on tumour necrosis factor production in mice: up-regulation by early pretreatment with dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantuzzi, G; Demitri, M T; Ghezzi, P

    1994-04-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are well known inhibitors of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) production. We investigated the role of endogenous GC in the regulation of TNF production in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using a pretreatment with dexamethasone (DEX) to down-regulate the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). Short-term DEX pretreatment (up to 12 h before LPS) inhibited TNF production, but earlier (24-48 h) pretreatments potentiated it. This up-regulating effect was not observed in adrenalectomized mice or when GC synthesis was inhibited with cyanoketone (CK). This effect could not be explained only by the suppression of LPS-induced corticosterone (CS) levels induced by DEX, since a 48-h pretreatment potentiated TNF production without affecting LPS-induced CS levels. On the other hand, mice chronically pretreated with DEX were still responsive to its inhibitory effect on TNF production, thus ruling out the possibility of a decreased responsiveness to GC.

  6. Predicting death from tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in 80-year-old people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruunsgaard, H; Ladelund, S; Pedersen, A N

    2003-01-01

    Ageing is associated with low-grade inflammation and markers such as IL-6 possess prognostic value. Tumour necrosis-alpha (TNF-alpha) initiates the inflammatory cascade and has been linked to several age-associated disorders. It remains, however, unknown if TNF-alpha is associated with mortality...... in old populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate if serum levels of TNF-alpha were associated with all-cause mortality independently of interleukin (IL)-6 in a prospective study of 333 relatively healthy 80-year-old people. A Cox regression model was used to explore effects of TNF......% of the variability in IL-6 and effects of the two cytokines were independent of each other as well as of other traditional risk factors for death [smoking, blood pressure, physical exercise, total cholesterol, co-morbidity, body mass index (BMI) and intake of anti-inflammatory drugs]. These findings indicate...

  7. Predicting death from tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in 80-year-old people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruunsgaard, H.; Ladelund, S.; Pedersen, Agnes Nadelmann

    2003-01-01

    Ageing is associated with low-grade inflammation and markers such as IL-6 possess prognostic value. Tumour necrosis-alpha (TNF-alpha ) initiates the inflammatory cascade and has been linked to several age-associated disorders. It remains, however, unknown if TNF-alpha is associated with mortality...... in old populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate if serum levels of TNF-alpha were associated with all-cause mortality independently of interleukin (IL)-6 in a prospective study of 333 relatively healthy 80-year-old people. A Cox regression model was used to explore effects of TNF......% of the variability in IL-6 and effects of the two cytokines were independent of each other as well as of other traditional risk factors for death [smoking, blood pressure, physical exercise, total cholesterol, co-morbidity, body mass index (BMI) and intake of anti-inflammatory drugs]. These findings indicate...

  8. Generalised pustular psoriasis induced by cyclosporin a withdrawal responding to the tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitor etanercept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarashev, J; Lor, P; Forster, A; Heinzerling, L; Burg, G; Nestle, F O

    2002-01-01

    We report a 50-year-old male patient with a 15-year history of psoriasis including mutilating psoriatic arthritis, in whom the withdrawal of cyclosporin A induced a generalised pustular exacerbation and a aggravation of the joint condition. Two weekly injections of 25 mg of the tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitor etanercept led to a rapid improvement of his psoriatic arthritis, as well as regression of the pustular eruption, while residual erythema was still present. The clinical response was reflected by an increase in circulating interleukin (IL) 10 and a decrease in IL-6 and IL-8 serum levels during treatment. We conclude that etanercept may be a safe and effective therapy not only in severe psoriatic arthritis, but also in cases of pustular rebound after withdrawal of immunosuppressive agents. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Expression of human soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR NJ TONUKARI

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... bio-technique in bacterial (Lin et al., 2007), yeast (Xu et al., 2003) ... biological activity, such as human somatotropin (hST) .... sion way with chloroplast transit peptide (Wang et al., .... chloroplast protein synthesis capacity by massive expression of a ... necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in vivo.

  10. A study of serum levels of leptin, ghrelin and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in child patients with cyanotic and acyanotic, congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahramian, I.; Noori, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the serum levels of leptin, ghrelin and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in children with cyanotic and acyanotic congenital heart disease. Methods: The prospective cohort study, was conducted at imam Ali Hospital, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, in 2009-10 and comprised 64 subjects, including patients and controls. Using enzyme-linked immunosorpent assay kits, serum levels of ghrelin, leptin and tumour necrosis factor-alpha were measured and compared among patients (both cyanotic and acyanotic) and the controls, SPSS version 20 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 64 subjects, 24 (37.5%) were cyanotic, 21(32.8%) were acynotic and 19(29.68%) were healthy controls. The three groups were homogenous in terms of age and gender characteristics. There was no significant difference among the groups leptin, ghrelin and tumour necrosis factor-alpha serum levels (p>0.05). There were also no significant differences in terms of weight, height and body mass index (P>0.05). Conclusion: Serum levels of ghrelin, leptin and tumour necrosis factor-alpha did not change in acyanotic and cyanotic patients with congenital heart disease, suggesting that other crucial factors may regulate individuals' nutrient intake, growth, weight and energy intake and output. (author)

  11. Preferential decrease in IgG4 anti-citrullinated protein antibodies during treatment with tumour necrosis factor blocking agents in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, W. H.; Bartelds, G. M.; Vis, M.; van der Horst, A. R.; Wolbink, G. J.; van de Stadt, R. J.; van Schaardenburg, D.; Dijkmans, B. A. C.; Lems, W. F.; Nurmohamed, M. T.; Aarden, L.; Hamann, D.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the dynamics of IgG1 and IgG4 anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) subclasses during anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 ACPA levels were determined by ELISA on anti-citrullinated fibrinogen (ACF) and IgG1 :

  12. Preferential decrease in IgG4 anti-citrullinated protein antibodies during treatment with tumour necrosis factor blocking agents in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, W.H.; Bartelds, G.M.; Vis, M.; van der Horst, A.R.; Wolbink, G.J.; van de Stadt, R.J.; van Schaardenburg, D.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Lems, W.F.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Aarden, L.; Hamann, D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the dynamics of IgG1 and IgG4 anti-citrullinated protein antibody ( ACPA) subclasses during anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis ( RA). Methods: IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 ACPA levels were determined by ELISA on anti-citrullinated

  13. Preferential decrease in IgG4 anti-citrullinated protein antibodies during treatment with tumour necrosis factor blocking agents in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, W.H.; Bartelds, G.M.; Vis, M.; Horst, A.; Wolbink, G.; van de Stadt, R.J.; van Schaardenburg, D.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Lems, W.F.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Aarden, L.; Hamann, D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the dynamics of IgG1 and IgG4 anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) subclasses during anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 ACPA levels were determined by ELISA on anti-citrullinated

  14. P55 tumour necrosis factor receptor in bone marrow-derived cells promotes atherosclerosis development in low-density lipoprotein receptor knock-out mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xanthoulea, Sofia; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; van der Made, Ingeborg; Mujcic, Hilda; Thelen, Melanie; Vergouwe, Monique N.; Ambagts, Matheus H. C.; Hofker, Marten H.; de Winther, Menno P. J.

    2008-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a pivotal pro-inflammatory cytokine with a clear pathogenic role in many chronic inflammatory diseases, and p55 TNF receptor (TNFR) mediates the majority of TNF responses. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of p55 TNFR expression in bone

  15. Association between HLA-DR2 and production of tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1 by mononuclear cells activated by lipopolysaccharide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, K; Morling, N; Fomsgaard, A

    1988-01-01

    The production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) by lipopolysaccharide-activated mononuclear cells from 39 healthy donors was studied in vitro by bioassay and ELISA. The donors were typed for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DP antigens. There was no detectable production of TNF be...

  16. The effect of Atorvastatin therapy tumour necrosis factor- and vascular adhesion molecules in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with no prior history of coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Charlton-Menys, V.; Bao, W.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Colhoun, H.M.; Betteridge, D.J.; Durrington, P.; Hitman, G.; Neil, H.A.W.; Livingstone, S.J.; Fuller, J.H.; DeMicco, D.A.; Preston, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the effect of atorvastatin (and placebo) on tumour necrosis factor (TNF)a, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) and soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) in patients with type 2 diabetes without prior cardiovascular disease (CVD) and investigated whether

  17. Adaptation to statins restricts human tumour growth in Nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follet, Julie; Rémy, Lionel; Hesry, Vincent; Simon, Brigitte; Gillet, Danièle; Auvray, Pierrick; Corcos, Laurent; Le Jossic-Corcos, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Statins have long been used as anti-hypercholesterolemia drugs, but numerous lines of evidence suggest that they may also bear anti-tumour potential. We have recently demonstrated that it was possible to isolate cancer cells adapted to growth in the continuous presence of lovastatin. These cells grew more slowly than the statin-sensitive cells of origin. In the present study, we compared the ability of both statin-sensitive and statin-resistant cells to give rise to tumours in Nude mice. HGT-1 human gastric cancer cells and L50 statin-resistant derivatives were injected subcutaneously into Nude mice and tumour growth was recorded. At the end of the experiment, tumours were recovered and marker proteins were analyzed by western blotting, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. L50 tumours grew more slowly, showed a strong decrease in cyclin B1, over-expressed collagen IV, and had reduced laminin 332, VEGF and CD34 levels, which, collectively, may have restricted cell division, cell adhesion and neoangiogenesis. Taken together, these results showed that statin-resistant cells developed into smaller tumours than statin-sensitive cells. This may be reflective of the cancer restricting activity of statins in humans, as suggested from several retrospective studies with subjects undergoing statin therapy for several years

  18. Enhanced casein kinase II activity in human tumour cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowald, K; Fischer, H; Issinger, O G

    1984-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) activity is enhanced as much as 2-3 fold in established and 4-5-fold in transformed human cell lines when compared to that of fibroblasts and primary human tumour cell cultures where CKII activity never exceeded a basic level. The high activity of CKII in transformed cells...

  19. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors versus combination intensive therapy with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in established rheumatoid arthritis: TACIT non-inferiority randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David L; Ibrahim, Fowzia; Farewell, Vern; O'Keeffe, Aidan G; Walker, David; Kelly, Clive; Birrell, Fraser; Chakravarty, Kuntal; Maddison, Peter; Heslin, Margaret; Patel, Anita; Kingsley, Gabrielle H

    2015-03-13

    To determine whether intensive combinations of synthetic disease modifying drugs can achieve similar clinical benefits at lower costs to high cost biologics such as tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis resistant to initial methotrexate and other synthetic disease modifying drugs. Open label pragmatic randomised multicentre two arm non-inferiority trial over 12 months. 24 rheumatology clinics in England. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were eligible for treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors according to current English guidance were randomised to either the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy or the combined disease modifying drug strategy. Biologic strategy: start tumour necrosis factor inhibitor; second biologic in six month for non-responders. Alternative strategy: start combination of disease modifying drugs; start tumour necrosis factor inhibitors after six months in non-responders. reduction in disability at 12 months measured with patient recorded heath assessment questionnaire (range 0.00-3.00) with a 0.22 non-inferiority margin for combination treatment versus the biologic strategy. quality of life, joint damage, disease activity, adverse events, and costs. Intention to treat analysis used multiple imputation methods for missing data. 432 patients were screened: 107 were randomised to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors and 101 started taking; 107 were randomised to the combined drug strategy and 104 started taking the drugs. Initial assessments were similar; 16 patients were lost to follow-up (seven with the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy, nine with the combined drug strategy); 42 discontinued the intervention but were followed-up (19 and 23, respectively). The primary outcome showed mean falls in scores on the health assessment questionnaire of -0.30 with the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy and -0.45 with the alternative combined drug strategy. The difference between

  20. Impact of tumour necrosis factor inhibitor treatment on radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis patients in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ornbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bøyesen, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    radiographic progression rates during the DMARD (prebaseline to baseline x-ray) and TNF-I (baseline to follow-up x-ray) periods were calculated.RESULTS: 517 RA patients (76% women, 80% IgM rheumatoid factor positive, 65% anticyclic citrullinated peptide positive, 40% current smokers, age 54 years (range 21......OBJECTIVES: To compare radiographic progression during treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and subsequent treatment with tumour necrosis factor α inhibitors (TNF-I) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in clinical practice.METHODS: Conventional radiographs (x......-1002) and the median TNF-I period was 562 days (IQR 405-766). The median radiographic progression rate decreased from 0.7 (IQR 0-2.9) total Sharp score units/year (dTSS) in the DMARD period to 0 (0-0.9) units/year in the TNF-I period (p0) in the DMARD period compared with 158 patients in the TNF-I period (p...

  1. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha impairs neuronal differentiation but not proliferation of hippocampal neural precursor cells: Role of Hes1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Aoife; Ryan, Sinead; Maloney, Eimer; Sullivan, Aideen M; Nolan, Yvonne M

    2010-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, which influences neuronal survival and function yet there is limited information available on its effects on hippocampal neural precursor cells (NPCs). We show that TNFalpha treatment during proliferation had no effect on the percentage of proliferating cells prepared from embryonic rat hippocampal neurosphere cultures, nor did it affect cell fate towards either an astrocytic or neuronal lineage when cells were then allowed to differentiate. However, when cells were differentiated in the presence of TNFalpha, significantly reduced percentages of newly born and post-mitotic neurons, significantly increased percentages of astrocytes and increased expression of TNFalpha receptors, TNF-R1 and TNF-R2, as well as expression of the anti-neurogenic Hes1 gene, were observed. These data indicate that exposure of hippocampal NPCs to TNFalpha when they are undergoing differentiation but not proliferation has a detrimental effect on their neuronal lineage fate, which may be mediated through increased expression of Hes1. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The polymorphism -863C/A in tumour necrosis factor-alpha gene contributes an independent association to gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S-J; Tsai, P-C; Chen, C-J; Lai, H-M; Ko, Y-C

    2007-11-01

    To investigate the associations between polymorphisms in the promoter of the tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) gene and gout. The polymorphisms -308G/A and -863C/A in the TNF-alpha gene were determined in 106 gout patients and 159 healthy controls among male Taiwanese using the Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. The biochemical markers, including Glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), Glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT), uric acid, creatinine, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), body mass index (BMI) and hypertension, as well as alcohol consumption were measured. The gout patients had 9.43% (10/106) with genotype AA at polymorphism -863C/A showing a significantly higher fraction than controls (0.63%; 1/159, P gout patients had significantly higher portions of abnormal GOT, GPT, creatinine, TC, TG, alcohol consumption, hypertension and hyperuricaemia than controls (P 0.05). After adjustment by a stepwise logistic regression method, the hyperuricaemia, creatinine, GPT, TG and alcohol consumption as well as genotype AA at polymorphism -863C/A were found to be significantly associated with gout. The genotype AA at polymorphism -863C/A in a recessive model showed a significant association with developing gout independent of hyperuricaemia, abnormal creatinine, higher TG, GPT and alcohol consumption.

  3. Experiences and needs for work participation in employees with rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Meer, Marrit; Hoving, Jan L; Vermeulen, Marjolein I M; Herenius, Marieke M J; Tak, Paul P; Sluiter, Judith K; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the experiences and needs with respect to work participation of employees with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. Face-to-face interviews in 14 employees with RA on anti-TNF therapy focused on experiences, offered support and needs with respect to work participation. Experiences regarding work participation varied and ranged from fatigue at work, having no job control, not being understood by the work environment or difficulty dealing with emotions as a result of interaction within the work environment. Support by health care professionals for work participation was considered important, especially concerning social or psychological issues. Advice in becoming aware of one's changes in abilities was highly appreciated, as was the availability of professional advice in times of an urgent work issue due to RA. Employees mentioned an increase in social support at work and job control as important facilitating factors for work participation. Although patients with RA report improvement in their work functioning after starting anti-TNF therapy, employees continue facing challenges in working life due to RA. For support concerning work participation, it is recommended that health care professionals are more aware of work-related problems in patients with RA treated with anti-TNF therapy.

  4. Radiosensitivity of drug-resistant human tumour xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattern, J.; Bak, M. Jr.; Volm, M.; Hoever, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of three drug-resistant sublines of a human epidermoid lung carcinoma growing as xenografts in nude mice was investigated. Drug resistance to vincristine, actinomycin D and cisplatin was developed in vivo by repeated drug treatment. It was found that all three drug-resistant tumour lines were not cross-resistant to irradiation. (orig.) [de

  5. Nature of the endogenous pyrogen (EP) induced by influenza viruses: lack of correlation between EP levels and content of the known pyrogenic cytokines, interleukin 1, interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakeman, K J; Bird, C R; Thorpe, R; Smith, H; Sweet, C

    1991-03-01

    Fever in influenza results from the release of endogenous pyrogen (EP) following virus-phagocyte interaction and its level correlates with the differing virulence of virus strains. However, the different levels of fever produced in ferrets by intracardial inoculation of EP obtained from the interaction of different virus strains with ferret of human phagocytes did not correlate with the levels of interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-6 or tumour necrosis factor in the same samples as assayed by conventional in vitro methods. Hence, the EP produced by influenza virus appears to be different to these cytokines.

  6. Sperm protein 17 is expressed in human nervous system tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grizzi, Fabio; Baena, Riccardo Rodriguez y; Dioguardi, Nicola; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Gaetani, Paolo; Franceschini, Barbara; Di Ieva, Antonio; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Ceva-Grimaldi, Giorgia; Bollati, Angelo; Frezza, Eldo E; Cobos, E

    2006-01-01

    Human sperm protein 17 (Sp17) is a highly conserved protein that was originally isolated from a rabbit epididymal sperm membrane and testis membrane pellet. It has recently been included in the cancer/testis (CT) antigen family, and shown to be expressed in multiple myeloma and ovarian cancer. We investigated its immunolocalisation in specimens of nervous system (NS) malignancies, in order to establish its usefulness as a target for tumour-vaccine strategies. The expression of Sp17 was assessed by means of a standardised immunohistochemical procedure [(mAb/antigen) MF1/Sp17] in formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded surgical specimens of NS malignancies, including 28 neuroectodermal primary tumours (6 astrocytomas, 16 glioblastoma multiforme, 5 oligodendrogliomas, and 1 ependymoma), 25 meningeal tumours, and five peripheral nerve sheath tumours (4 schwannomas, and 1 neurofibroma),. A number of neuroectodermal (21%) and meningeal tumours (4%) were found heterogeneously immunopositive for Sp17. None of the peripheral nerve sheath tumours was immunopositive for Sp17. The expression pattern was heterogeneous in all of the positive samples, and did not correlate with the degree of malignancy. The frequency of expression and non-uniform cell distribution of Sp17 suggest that it cannot be used as a unique immunotherapeutic target in NS cancer. However, our results do show the immunolocalisation of Sp17 in a proportion of NS tumour cells, but not in their non-pathological counterparts. The emerging complex function of Sp17 makes further studies necessary to clarify the link between it and immunopositive cells

  7. Parapoxvirus orf virus infection induces an increase in interleukin-8, tumour necrosis factor-α, and decorin in goat skin fibroblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lingling

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orf virus (ORFV is a prototype Parapoxvirus species in the Poxviridae family that causes serious zoonotic infectious disease. Goat skin fibroblast (GSF cells are the major host targets of ORFV. Interleukin 8 (IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α are known to play a vital role in immune response during viral infections. However, the manner of variation over time of their level of expression in GSF cells remains unclear.

  8. Optimizing treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis—a proof of principle and exploratory trial: is dose tapering practical in good responders?

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Fowzia; Lorente-Cánovas, Beatriz; Doré, Caroline J; Bosworth, Ailsa; Ma, Margaret H; Galloway, James B; Cope, Andrew P; Pande, Ira; Walker, David; Scott, David L

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: RA patients receiving TNF inhibitors (TNFi) usually maintain their initial doses. The aim of the Optimizing Treatment with Tumour Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis trial was to evaluate whether tapering TNFi doses causes loss of clinical response.Methods: We enrolled RA patients receiving etanercept or adalimumab and a DMARD with DAS28 under 3.2 for over 3 months. Initially (months 0-6) patients were randomized to control (constant TNFi) or two experimental groups...

  9. Extract of corn silk (stigma of Zea mays) inhibits the tumour necrosis factor-alpha- and bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced cell adhesion and ICAM-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtemariam, S

    1998-05-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) or E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the expression of several adhesion molecules and enhances leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell surface. Interfering with this leukocyte adhesion or adhesion molecules upregulation is an important therapeutic target for the treatment of bacterial sepsis and various inflammatory diseases. In the course of screening marketed European anti-inflammatory herbal drugs for TNF antagonistic activity, a crude ethanolic extract of corn silk (stigma of Zea mays) exhibited significant activity. The extract at concentrations of 9-250 micrograms/ml effectively inhibited the TNF- and LPS-induced adhesiveness of EAhy 926 endothelial cells to monocytic U937 cells. Similar concentration ranges of corn silk extract did also block the TNF and LPS but not the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced ICAM-1 expression on EAhy 926 endothelial cell surface. The extract did not alter the production of TNF by LPS-activated macrophages and failed to inhibit the cytotoxic activity of TNF. It is concluded that corn silk possesses important therapeutic potential for TNF- and LPS-mediated leukocyte adhesion and trafficking.

  10. The future role of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) products in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camussi, G; Lupia, E

    1998-05-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) is a pleiotropic cytokine which is overproduced in rheumatoid joints primarily by macrophages. This cytokine has a potential pathogenic role in the establishment of rheumatoid synovitis, in the formation of pannus tissue and in the process of joint destruction, as it increases synoviocyte proliferation and triggers a cascade of secondary mediators involved in the recruitment of inflammatory cells, in neo-angiogenesis and in the process of joint destruction. These findings made TNF alpha a potential target for anticytokine therapy. Experimental studies have shown that TNF alpha blockade by monoclonal antibodies or by soluble TNF receptor reduced the extent and severity of arthritis both in collagen-induced arthritis in mice and in transgenic mice overexpressing TNF alpha, which develop a rheumatoid-like destructive arthritis. Clinical studies based on the use of anti-TNF alpha antibodies or soluble receptors have suggested a potential beneficial effect of TNF alpha-blocking therapy in inducing amelioration of inflammatory parameters in patients with long-standing active disease. In these patients anti-TNF alpha therapy induces a rapid improvement in multiple clinical assessment of disease activity, including morning stiffness, pain score, Ritchie articular index and swollen joint count. The clinical benefits are associated with an improvement in some serological parameters, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid-A, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, blood cytokine levels, haemoglobin, white cells and platelet counts, rheumatoid factor titre and histological features of the synovium. However, it remains to be determined whether anti-TNF alpha therapy may be useful in the long term management of rheumatoid patients and in the achievement of better outcomes of disease. Because TNF alpha production also serves a specific function in host defence against infections and tumours, the adverse effects of long term anti-TNF alpha

  11. Study of single nucleotide polymorphisms of tumour necrosis factors and HSP genes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma in North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhanpal, Meena; Singh, Laishram Chandreshwor; Rahman, Tashnin; Sharma, Jagnnath; Singh, M Madhumangal; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Verma, Saurabh; Pandrangi, Santhi Latha; Singh, Y Mohan; Wajid, Saima; Kapur, Sujala; Saxena, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an epithelial tumour with a distinctive racial and geographical distribution. High incidence of NPC has been reported from China, Southeast Asia, and northeast (NE) region of India. The immune mechanism plays incredibly role in pathogenesis of NPC. Tumour necrosis factors (TNFs) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) constitute significant components of innate as well as adaptive host immunity. Multi-analytical approaches including logistic regression (LR), classification and regression tree (CART) and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) were applied in 120 NPC cases and 100 controls to explore high order interactions among TNF-α (-308 G>A), TNF β (+252 A>G), HSP 70-1 (+190 G>C), HSP 70-hom (+2437 T>C) genes and environmental risk factors. TNF β was identified as the primary etiological factor by all three analytical approaches. Individual analysis of results showed protective effect of TNF β GG genotype (adjusted odds ratio (OR2) = 0.27, 95 % CI = 0.125-0.611, P = 0.001), HSP 70 (+2437) CC genotype (OR2 = 0.17, 95 % CI = 0.0430.69, P = 0.013), while AG genotype of TNF β was found significantly associated with risk of NPC (OR2 = 1.97, 95 % CI = 1.019-3.83, P = 0.04). Analysis of environmental factors demonstrated association of alcohol consumption, living in mud houses and use of firewood for cooking as major risk factors for NPC. Individual haplotype association analysis showed significant risk associated with GTGA haplotype (OR = 68.61, 95 % CI = 2.47-190.37, P = 0.013) while a protective effect with CCAA and GCGA haplotypes (OR = 0.19, 95 % CI = 0.05-0.75, P = 0.019; OR = 0.01 95 % CI = 0.05-0.30, P = 0.007). The multi-analytical approaches applied in this study helped in identification of distinct gene-gene and gene-environment interactions significant in risk assessment of NPC.

  12. T-helper immune phenotype may underlie 'paradoxical' tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy-related psoriasiform dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, A P; Murali, M; Kroshinsky, D; Horn, T D; Nazarian, R M

    2018-01-01

    Therapeutics targeting tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α are effective for psoriasis; however, in patients treated for other disorders, psoriasis may worsen and psoriasiform dermatitis (PsoD) may arise. T helper (Th) cytokines in psoriasis upregulate keratin (K)17, which modulates TNF-α transduction, leading to vascular adhesion molecule upregulation and lymphocytic extravasation. We investigated Th phenotype and expression of K17, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in psoriasis and anti-TNF-α-related PsoD. Skin biopsies from patients with psoriasis unresponsive to TNF-α inhibitor therapy (n = 11), PsoD-related to TNF-α inhibition (n = 9), untreated psoriasis (n = 9) or atopic dermatitis (AD; n = 9) were immunohistochemically analysed for Th1, Th2, Th17 and Th22. Expression of K17, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 was also examined. Anti-TNF-α-unresponsive psoriasis and anti-TNF-α-related PsoD showed decreased Th1 : Th2 raio and increased Th17 : Th1 ratio compared with untreated psoriasis. Anti-TNF-α-unresponsive psoriasis had significantly fewer Th1 (4% vs. 12%) and more Th17 (51% vs. 20%) cells than untreated psoriasis. No difference in Th22 cells was identified. K17 was present in all cases of untreated psoriasis and anti-TNF-α-related PsoD, 91% of anti-TNF-α-unresponsive psoriasis, and only 22% of AD. VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 in anti-TNF-α-related PsoD was akin to untreated psoriasis, but decreased in anti-TNF-α-unresponsive psoriasis. These findings further the current understanding of the anti-TNF-α-related psoriasiform phenotype and support a rationale for therapeutic targeting of interleukin-17 and TNF-α in combination. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. Lactobacillus plantarum L9 but not Lactobacillus acidophilus LA reduces tumour necrosis factor induced bacterial translocation in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Chen, J; Wang, S; Zhao, X; Lu, G; Tang, X

    2017-05-30

    Translocation of bacteria across the intestinal barrier is important in the pathogenesis of systemic sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes. Inflammatory cytokines increase paracellular permeability that allows increased luminal bacteria to translocate across mucosal epithelium and further deteriorate the gut barrier. In order to reduce this risk, the prophylactic use of probiotics has been recently addressed. In this paper, we investigate the protective role toward tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α induced non-pathogenic Escherichia coli translocation across Caco-2 monolayers of Lactobacillus strains. According to our experimental data, Lactobacillus plantarum L9 and Lactobacillus acidophilus LA have good capacities to adhere to Caco-2 cells. Addition of L. plantarum L9 and L. acidophilus LA to the enterocyte monolayer surface result in significant inhibition of E. coli adhesion and cell internalisation. However, L. plantarum L9 and L. acidophilus LA did not inhibit the growth of the non-pathogenic E. coli B5 after 24 h incubation. Exposure to TNF-α for 6 h caused a dramatic increase in E. coli B5 translocation across Caco-2 cells, which was uncoupled from increases in paracellular permeability. Pretreatment with L. plantarum L9 prevent TNF-α induced transcellular bacterial translocation and IL-8 production in Caco-2 cells. L. plantarum L9 also did not affect the integrity of the monolayers, as indicated by lactate dehydrogenase release, horseradish peroxidase permeability, and transepithelial electrical resistance. L. plantarum L9 showed the potential to protect enterocytes from an acute inflammatory response and therefore could be good potential prophylactic agents in counteracting bacterial translocation.

  14. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha infusion produced insulin resistance but no change in the incretin effect in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Louise; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Solomon, Thomas P J; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Lars; Holst, Jens Juul; Møller, Kirsten

    2013-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with peripheral insulin resistance, impaired incretin effect, and increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Although TNF-α infusion at a dose that induces systemic inflammation in healthy volunteers has been demonstrated to induce peripheral insulin resistance, the influence of this cytokine on the incretin effect is unknown. We investigated whether systemic inflammation induced by TNF-α infusion in healthy volunteers alters the incretin hormone response to oral and intravenous glucose loads in a crossover study design with ten healthy male volunteers (mean age 24 years, mean body mass index 23.7 kg/m(2) ). The study consisted of four study days: days 1 and 2, 6-h infusion of saline; days 3 and 4, 6-h infusion of TNF-α; days 1 and 3, 4-h oral glucose tolerance test; and days 2 and 4, 4-h corresponding intravenous isoglycaemic glucose tolerance test. Glucose tolerance tests were initiated after 2 h of saline/TNF-α infusion. Plasma concentrations of TNF-α, interleukin 6, glucose, incretin hormones, and cortisol, and serum concentrations of C-peptide and insulin were measured throughout the study days. Insulin sensitivity was estimated by the Matsuda index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Prehepatic insulin secretion rates were calculated. TNF-α infusion induced symptoms of systemic inflammation; increased plasma levels of cortisol, TNF-α, and interleukin 6; and increased the HOMA-IR. The secretion of incretin hormones as well as the incretin effect remained unchanged. In healthy young male volunteers, acute systemic inflammation induced by infusion of TNF-α is associated with insulin resistance with no change in the incretin effect. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha blockers: potential limitations in the management of advanced endometriosis? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakiba, Khashayar; Falcone, Tommaso

    2006-09-01

    Several studies have shown that tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels are increased in the peritoneal fluid of women with endometriosis, with correlation between TNF-alpha concentrations and the degree of disease. It is also likely that elevation of peritoneal fluids' TNF-alpha levels may play a role in the pathogenesis of infertility associated with endometriosis. Use of drugs such as etanercept, a TNF-alpha receptor immunoglobulin fusion protein which inhibits TNF-alpha activity, showed in an animal study to reduce the severity of the disease, and the size of endometriotic foci. TNF-alpha blockers were recommended as a possible new line of therapy for endometriosis. Our case involved a 35-year-old Para 0, with rheumatic arthritis and stage 4 endometriosis. After 6 years of constant use of etanercept, she showed no improvement of endometriosis as demonstrated at laparoscopy. However, she underwent a successful IVF after the first attempt. TNF-alpha-blocker medications might not be beneficial for patients with advanced endometriosis. However, we cannot exclude the possible effect of these medications on early-stage endometriosis, and further study is required. Some of the immunologic abnormalities in the pelvis of patients with endometriosis could be the consequence of the disease and not the cause, and possibly suppression of immune cells and their products may not have a major effect on endometriotic lesions at an advanced stage. This also could explain why suppression of TNF-alpha showed no effect on infertility. However, use of TNF-alpha-blockers before IVF might increase the success rate in advanced endometriosis.

  16. Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging Predicts Therapeutic Outcomes of Patients With Crohn's Disease Treated With Anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Stefania; Fraquelli, Mirella; Coletta, Marina; Branchi, Federica; Magarotto, Andrea; Conti, Clara Benedetta; Mazza, Stefano; Conte, Dario; Basilisco, Guido; Caprioli, Flavio

    2018-01-05

    Ultrasound elasticity imaging is a non-invasive technique developed to evaluate fibrosis. Measuring tissue strain by ultrasound elasticity imaging can reliably detect severe ileal fibrosis in patients with Crohn's disease [CD]. We have hypothesised that a more severe range of fibrosis might influence the therapeutic response to anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of ultrasound elasticity imaging to predict the therapeutic outcome for CD patients. Consecutive patients with ileal/ileocolonic CD, starting anti-TNF treatment, were enrolled for the study. These patients underwent bowel ultrasound and ultrasound elasticity imaging at baseline and at 14 and 52 weeks after anti-TNF treatment. Bowel wall stiffness was quantified by calculating the strain ratio between the mesenteric tissue and the bowel wall. Strain ratio ≥ 2 was used to identify severe ileal fibrosis. Transmural healing at 14 and 52 weeks was defined as bowel wall thickness ≤ 3 mm. Thirty patients with CD were enrolled. Five patients underwent surgery for bowel obstruction. The frequency of surgeries was significantly greater in patients with a strain ratio ≥ 2 at baseline [p = 0.003]. A significant reduction of the bowel thickness was observed after 14 and 52 weeks of anti-TNF treatment [p < 0.005]. A significant inverse correlation was observed between the strain ratio values at baseline and the thickness variations following anti-TNF therapy [p = 0.007]; 27% of patients achieved transmural healing at 14 weeks. The baseline strain ratio was significantly lower in patients with transmural healing [p < 0.05]. This study shows that ultrasound elasticity imaging predicts therapeutic outcomes for CD patients treated with anti-TNF. Copyright © 2017 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Association of TNF polymorphisms with sarcoidosis, its prognosis and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in Asian Indians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Ghosh, B; Sharma, S K

    2008-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, an important proinflammatory cytokine, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis, a multi-systemic granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Here, we report for the first time the association of TNF haplotypes and genotypes with sarcoidosis and its prognosis in the Indian population. Five potentially functional promoter polymorphisms in the TNFA gene and a LTA_NcoI polymorphism (+252 position) of the LTA gene were genotyped in a clinically well-defined cohort of North-Indian patients with sarcoidosis (n = 96) and their regional controls (n = 155). Serum TNF-α (sTNF-α) and serum angiotensin converting enzyme (SACE) levels were measured and correlated with genotypes and haplotypes. The TNFA_-1031 and TNFA_-863 polymorphisms were identified as markers for disease onset (FET P = 0·006 and 0·042 for TNFA_-1031 and TNFA_-863, respectively). Additionally, the allele A of LTA_NcoI polymorphism was shown to be prevalent in the ‘no treatment’ group (FET P = 0·005), while the G allele was associated with frequent relapses on drug withdrawal (P = 0·057). Furthermore, the TNFA-308G>A and the TNFA-238G>A polymorphisms were found to influence sTNF-α (P = 0·054 and 0·0005, respectively) and SACE levels (P = 0·0017 and 0·056, respectively). The haplotype frequencies were significantly different in the patients and the controls (P = 0·0067). The haplotype GTCCGG was identified as the major risk/susceptibility haplotype (P = 0·003) and was associated with increased SACE levels in the patient population. In conclusion, our study suggests an association of TNF polymorphisms with sarcoidosis. PMID:18062795

  18. Studies on structural features of human tumor necrosis factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Chuanyuan; Guo Donglin; Xi Tao; Xu Xianxiu; Gu Qingchao

    1997-01-01

    The microstructure of human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and its mutant (TNF-b) has been investigated by utilizing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, radioiodination of human TNF and L929 cells assay. The experimental results show that the long lifetime (Τ 2 ) and corresponding intensity (I 2 ) of lower ortho-positronium annihilation in TNF-α are longer and less than those in the TNF-b, respectively. It suggests that the TNF-b is smaller in free volume and higher in density than the TNF-α. The TNF-b may maintain a more favorable conformation for binding to TNF receptors, thus increasing its biological activity. It is then concluded that the increases in the cytotoxicity and in the density for the TNF-b result from the decreases in the free volume in the TNF-b

  19. Evaluation of Cucurbita maxima extract against scopolamine-induced amnesia in rats: implication of tumour necrosis factor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawaid, Talha; Shakya, Ashok K; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Kamal, Mehnaz

    2014-01-01

    Cucurbita maxima (CM) seed oil is commonly used in Indian folk medicine to treat various ailments. We have investigated the effect of CM seed oil on memory impairment induced by scopolamine in rats. Male adult Wistar rats were administered scopolamine 1 mg/kg body weight, i.p. or 1.25 mg/kg body weight, s.c. to induce memory impairment. The nootropic agent piracetam 100 mg/kg body weight, i.p. and CM seed oil 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight, p.o. were administered daily for five consecutive days. The memory function was evaluated in the Morris water maze (MWM) test, the social recognition test (SRT), the elevated plus maze (EPM) test, and the pole climbing test (PCT). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and oxidative stress parameters were estimated in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the brains after completion of the behavioural studies. The effects of scopolamine on the levels of the tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) transcript were also investigated. Scopolamine caused memory impairment in all the behavioural paradigms along with a significant increase in the AChE activity and oxidative stress in the brain. Scopolamine also caused a significant increase in the expression of TNF-α in the hippocampus. CM seed oil exhibited antiamnesic activity as indicated by a significant reduction in the latency time in the MWM test and decreased social interaction during trial 2 in the SRT. Further, treatment with CM seed oil significantly decreased the AChE activity and malondialdehyde levels and increased the glutathione level in brain regions. CM seed oil also significantly decreased the expression of TNF-α in the hippocampus. The effect of CM seed oil on behavioural and biochemical parameters was comparable to that observed in rats treated with piracetam. These results indicate that CM seed oil may exert antiamnesic activity which may be attributed to the inhibition of AChE and inflammation as well as its antioxidant activity in the brain.

  20. Regulation of tumour necrosis factor production by adrenal hormones in vivo: insights into the antiinflammatory activity of rolipram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettipher, E R; Labasi, J M; Salter, E D; Stam, E J; Cheng, J B; Griffiths, R J

    1996-04-01

    1. The role of adrenal hormones in the regulation of the systemic and local production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) was examined in male Balb/c mice. 2. Intraperitoneal injection of 0.3 mg E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0111:B4) led to high levels of circulating TNF alpha without stimulating TNF alpha production in the peritoneal cavity. Systemic production of TNF alpha in response to LPS was increased in adrenalectomized animals and in normal animals treated with the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, propranolol. The glucocorticoid antagonist, RU 486, did not modify systemic TNF alpha production. These results indicate that systemic TNF alpha production is regulated by adrenaline but not by corticosterone. 3. When mice were primed with thioglycollate, TNF alpha was produced in the peritoneal cavity in response to low dose LPS (1 micrograms). The levels of TNF alpha in the peritoneal cavity were not enhanced by adrenalectomy or by treatment with either propranolol or RU 486, indicating local production of TNF alpha in the peritoneal cavity is not regulated by adrenaline or corticosterone. 4. The phosphodiesterase type IV (PDE-IV) inhibitor, rolipram, inhibited both the systemic production of TNF alpha in response to high dose endotoxin (ED50 = 1.3 mg kg-1) and the local production of TNF alpha in the peritoneal cavity in response to low dose endotoxin (ED50 = 9.1 mg kg-1). In adrenalectomized mice there was a slight reduction in the ability of rolipram to inhibit the systemic production of TNF alpha (ED50 = 3.3 mg kg-1) while the ability of rolipram to inhibit the local production of TNF alpha in the peritoneal cavity was virtually abolished (24% inhibition at 30 mg kg-1). The glucocorticoid antagonist, RU 486, also reduced the ability of rolipram to inhibit local TNF alpha production while propranolol was without effect. 5. Systemic treatment with rolipram increased the plasma concentrations of corticosterone in normal mice but not in adrenalectomized mice

  1. Successful tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy suppresses oxidative stress and hypoxia-induced mitochondrial mutagenesis in inflammatory arthritis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2011-07-25

    Abstract Introduction To examine the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy on the levels of early mitochondrial genome alterations and oxidative stress. Methods Eighteen inflammatory arthritis patients underwent synovial tissue oxygen (tpO2) measurements and clinical assessment of disease activity (DAS28-CRP) at baseline (T0) and three months (T3) after starting biologic therapy. Synovial tissue lipid peroxidation (4-HNE), T and B cell specific markers and synovial vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Synovial levels of random mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations were assessed using Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay. Results 4-HNE levels pre\\/post anti TNF-α therapy were inversely correlated with in vivo tpO2 (P < 0.008; r = -0.60). Biologic therapy responders showed a significantly reduced 4-HNE expression (P < 0.05). High 4-HNE expression correlated with high DAS28-CRP (P = 0.02; r = 0.53), tender joint count for 28 joints (TJC-28) (P = 0.03; r = 0.49), swollen joint count for 28 joints (SJC-28) (P = 0.03; r = 0.50) and visual analogue scale (VAS) (P = 0.04; r = 0.48). Strong positive association was found between the number of 4-HNE positive cells and CD4+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.60), CD8+ cells (P = 0.001; r = 0.70), CD20+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.68), CD68+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.47) and synovial VEGF expression (P = 0.01; r = 063). In patients whose in vivo tpO2 levels improved post treatment, significant reduction in mtDNA mutations and DAS28-CRP was observed (P < 0.05). In contrast in those patients whose tpO2 levels remained the same or reduced at T3, no significant changes for mtDNA mutations and DAS28-CRP were found. Conclusions High levels of synovial oxidative stress and mitochondrial mutation burden are strongly associated with low in vivo oxygen tension and synovial inflammation. Furthermore these significant mitochondrial genome alterations are rescued following successful anti TNF

  2. Study on association between genetic polymorphisms of haem oxygenase-1, tumour necrosis factor, cadmium exposure and malaria pathogenicity and severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruangweerayut Ronnatrai

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is the most important public health problems in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Haem oxygenase (HO enzyme and the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF have been proposed as one of the factors that may play significant role in pathogenicity/severity of malaria infection. HO is the enzyme of the microsomal haem degradation pathway that yields biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and iron. In this study, the association between malaria disease pathogenicity/severity and (GTn repeat polymorphism in the promoter region of the inducible HO-1 including the effect of cadmium exposure (potent inducer of HO-1 transcription as well as polymorphism of TNF were investigated. Methods Blood samples were collected from 329 cases non-severe malaria with acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria (UM and 80 cases with Plasmodium vivax malaria (VM, and 77 cases with severe or cerebral malaria (SM for analysis of genetic polymorphisms of HO-1 and TNF and cadmium levels. These patients consisted of 123 (25.3% Thai, 243 (50.0% Burmese and 120 (24.7% Karen who were present at Mae Sot General Hospital, Mae Sot, Tak Province, Thailand. Results The number of (GTn repeats of the HO-1 gene in all patients varied between 16 and 39 and categorized to short (S, medium (M and long (L GTn repeats. The genotype of (GTn repeat of HO-1 was found to be significantly different among the three ethnic groups of patients. Significantly higher frequency of S/L genotype was found in Burmese compared with Thai patients, while significantly lower frequencies of S/S and M/L but higher frequency of M/M genotype was observed in Burmese compared with Karen patients. No significant association between HO-1 and TNF polymorphisms including the inducing effect of cadmium and malaria pathogenicity/severity was observed. Conclusions Difference in the expression of HO-1 genotype in different ethnic groups may contribute to different severity of malaria

  3. Cytotoxic effects of radiation and docetaxel in human tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, A.L.

    2000-12-01

    Data from both single institutions and from randomised multicentre trials have demonstrated that the combination of chemotherapy with radiotherapy can increase the survival of cancer patients. Treatment regimens consisting of taxanes (paclitaxel and docetaxel), a potent class of new chemotherapeutic agents, combined with radiotherapy have recently undergone preclincal investigation. Overall, these studies show that taxanes can enhance the radiation sensitivity of tumour cells. However, data on docetaxel is very limited and the mechanism of radiosensitisation by docetaxel remains largely unknown. The chief purpose of this thesis was to investigate the ability of docetaxel to radiosensitise human tumour cells and investigate potential mechanisms for radiosensitisation. The results reported here for docetaxel indicate that for the cell fines examined this drug does have a synergistic effect and is thus a radiosensitising agent. The degree of radiosensitisation seen seems to be largely dependent on drug concentration. A mechanism involving docetaxel potentiation of radiation-induced apoptosis is also suggested. The second purpose of this thesis is to investigate the potential usefulness of an apoptosis assay and the comet assay as biological indicators for cellular radiosensitivity. Many scientists and clinicans have highlighted the need for development of new rapid, predictive assays of radiation responses. If the radiosensitivity of tumours could be predicted, it may eventually allow the individualisation of patient treatment by radiotherapy. In summary, initial DNA damage measured using the comet assay was successful in predicting the radiosensitivity of colorectal tumour cells. The results suggest that the comet assay appears more suitable than the detection of apoptosis for the prediction of radiosensitivity. We conclude that the results obtained from this thesis will contribute to the current attempts to improve the radiotherapeutic management of cancer. (author)

  4. SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cells bind fibroblasts via ICAM-1 and this is increased by tumour necrosis factor-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Manu S; Kelly, Elizabeth; Cheung, Ivan; Xaymardan, Munira; Moore, Malcolm A S; Zoellner, Hans

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported exchange of membrane and cytoplasmic markers between SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cells and human gingival fibroblasts (h-GF) without comparable exchange of nuclear markers, while similar h-GF exchange was seen for melanoma and ovarian carcinoma cells. This process of "cellular sipping" changes phenotype such that cells sharing markers of both SAOS-2 and h-GF have morphology intermediate to that of either cell population cultured alone, evidencing increased tumour cell diversity without genetic change. TNF-α increases cellular sipping between h-GF and SAOS-2, and we here study binding of SAOS-2 to TNF-α treated h-GF to determine if increased cellular sipping can be accounted for by cytokine stimulated SAOS-2 binding. More SAOS-2 bound h-GF pe-seeded wells than culture plastic alone (pcells migrating across different microenvironments can influence subsequent interactions with fibroblasts. Since cytokine stimulated binding was comparable in magnitude to earlier reported TNF-α stimulated cellular sipping, we conclude that TNF-α stimulated cellular sipping likely reflects increased SAOS-2 binding as opposed to enhanced exchange mechanisms.

  5. Increased risk of post-operative complications in patients with Crohn’s disease treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor α agents - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Hussuna, Alaa; Theede, Klaus; Olaison, Per Olov Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) plays a role in the immune defence, angiogenesis and collagen synthesis. Inhibition of these pathways may increase the risk of infections and impair wound healing in patients after surgery. Biologic treatments including anti-TNF-α agents are increasi......INTRODUCTION: Tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) plays a role in the immune defence, angiogenesis and collagen synthesis. Inhibition of these pathways may increase the risk of infections and impair wound healing in patients after surgery. Biologic treatments including anti-TNF-α agents...... are increasingly used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Taking into consideration the biologics' mechanism of action, fears have been expressed that they might increase the rate of post-operative complications. Results from 18 retrospective studies were conflicting, and meta-analyses based...... an increased risk of overall post-operative complications and an increased rate of infectious or anastomosis-related complications in patients receiving anti-TNF-α. CONCLUSION: The use of anti-TNF-α agents in Crohn's disease patients is associated with an increased risk of post-operative complications after...

  6. Increased risk of post-operative complications in patients with Crohn's disease treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor α agents - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Hussuna, Alaa; Theede, Klaus; Olaison, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) plays a role in the immune defence, angiogenesis and collagen synthesis. Inhibition of these pathways may increase the risk of infections and impair wound healing in patients after surgery. Biologic treatments including anti-TNF-α agents are increasi......INTRODUCTION: Tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) plays a role in the immune defence, angiogenesis and collagen synthesis. Inhibition of these pathways may increase the risk of infections and impair wound healing in patients after surgery. Biologic treatments including anti-TNF-α agents...... are increasingly used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Taking into consideration the biologics' mechanism of action, fears have been expressed that they might increase the rate of post-operative complications. Results from 18 retrospective studies were conflicting, and meta-analyses based...... an increased risk of overall post-operative complications and an increased rate of infectious or anastomosis-related complications in patients receiving anti-TNF-α. CONCLUSION: The use of anti-TNF-α agents in Crohn's disease patients is associated with an increased risk of post-operative complications after...

  7. The beneficial pleiotropic effects of tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) within the vasculature: A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Hannah; Harper, Emma; Davenport, Colin; Rochfort, Keith D; Wallace, Robert; Murphy, Ronan P; Smith, Diarmuid; Cummins, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a type II transmembrane protein that belongs to the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) cytokine superfamily. TRAIL is expressed by numerous cell types including vascular cells, immune cells and adipocytes. Although originally thought to induce apoptosis in malignant or transformed cells only, it is now known that TRAIL can bind up to 5 distinct receptors to activate complex signalling pathways, and is capable of exerting pleiotropic effects in non-transformed cells. In this respect, a number of clinical and animal studies point to the potential vasoprotective influence of TRAIL, with TRAIL deficiency being linked to accelerated atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. Moreover, exogenous TRAIL administration has been shown to exhibit anti-atherosclerotic activity in-vivo. In-vitro studies on TRAIL in this context have yielded conflicting results however, with evidence of both pro-atherogenic and vasoprotective effects ascribed to TRAIL. Notwithstanding these various studies, mechanistic information on the precise nature of TRAIL-mediated injury/protection within the vasculature, as well as the identity of the downstream molecular/cellular targets of TRAIL, is still quite limited. In this review, we will summarize our current knowledge of TRAIL regulation, signalling mechanisms, and its apparent involvement in CVD pathogenesis as a prelude to examining the existing evidence for TRAIL-mediated vasoprotection. To this end, extensive in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies will be reviewed and critical findings highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The mechanism of 67Ga uptake in animal and human tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammersley, P.A.G.; Cronshaw, S.; Taylor, D.M.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H.

    1980-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of 67 Ga has been studied by differential centrifugation in 3 transplantable mouse tumours, 3 transplantable rat tumours, 1 dog tumour, 3 human tumour xenografts and 2 human tumours in situ at various times after injection of the citrate complex. From 24 h post injection the nuclide was located predominantly in lysosomal structures in all the tumours studied. Studies in two murine tumours showed marked differences in the rate of lysosomal accumulation of 67 Ga. In the ADJ/PC6 plasmacytoma lysosomal uptake of 67 Ga had reached a plateau within 15 min while in the S180 tumour lysosomal accumulation of the nuclide occurred over the first 24 h. Normal mouse liver showed a similar pattern to this latter tumour. It is postulated that these variations in the rate of lysosomal accumulation of 67 Ga reflect differences in the permeability of the lysosomal membrane. While large amounts of 67 Ga were found in the crude nuclear fraction of some tumours this was attributed to unbroken cells as studies with purified nuclei from 7 different tumours indicated that between 2 and 14% of the total tumour 67 Ga was associated with the nuclei. (orig.)

  9. Metastatic behaviour of primary human tumours in a zebrafish xenotransplantation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Ines J; Bagowski, Christoph P; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Vlecken, Danielle H; Nitsche, Claudia; Bakkers, Jeroen; Lagendijk, Anne K; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Lerch, Markus M

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of cell migration drives progression of many diseases, including cancer cell invasion and metastasis formation. Analysis of tumour invasion and metastasis in living organisms to date is cumbersome and involves difficult and time consuming investigative techniques. For primary human tumours we establish here a simple, fast, sensitive and cost-effective in vivo model to analyse tumour invasion and metastatic behaviour. We fluorescently labelled small explants from gastrointestinal human tumours and investigated their metastatic behaviour after transplantation into zebrafish embryos and larvae. The transparency of the zebrafish embryos allows to follow invasion, migration and micrometastasis formation in real-time. High resolution imaging was achieved through laser scanning confocal microscopy of live zebrafish. In the transparent zebrafish embryos invasion, circulation of tumour cells in blood vessels, migration and micrometastasis formation can be followed in real-time. Xenografts of primary human tumours showed invasiveness and micrometastasis formation within 24 hours after transplantation, which was absent when non-tumour tissue was implanted. Furthermore, primary human tumour cells, when organotopically implanted in the zebrafish liver, demonstrated invasiveness and metastatic behaviour, whereas primary control cells remained in the liver. Pancreatic tumour cells showed no metastatic behaviour when injected into cloche mutant embryos, which lack a functional vasculature. Our results show that the zebrafish is a useful in vivo animal model for rapid analysis of invasion and metastatic behaviour of primary human tumour specimen

  10. A comparative study between mixed-type tumours from human salivary and canine mammary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genelhu, Marisa CLS; Cardoso, Sérgio V; Gobbi, Helenice; Cassali, Geovanni D

    2007-01-01

    In comparative pathology, canine mammary tumours have special interest because of their similarities with human breast cancer. Mixed tumours are uncommon lesions in the human breast, but they are found most frequently in the mammary gland of the female dogs and in the human salivary glands. The aim of the study was to compare clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical features of human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours, in order to evaluate the latter as an experimental model for salivary gland tumours. Ten examples of each mixed tumour type (human pleomorphic adenoma and carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas and canine mixed tumour and metaplastic carcinoma) were evaluated. First, clinical and morphologic aspects of benign and malignant variants were compared between the species. Then, streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of cytokeratins, vimentin, p63 protein, estrogen receptor, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. After standardization, similar age and site distributions were observed in human and canine tumours. Histological similarities were identified in the comparison of the benign lesions as well. Metaplastic carcinomas also resembled general aspects of carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas in morphological evaluation. Additionally, immunohistochemical staining further presented similar antigenic expression between lesions. There are many similar features between human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours. This observation is of great relevance for those interested in the study and management of salivary gland tumours, since canine lesions may constitute useful comparative models for their investigations

  11. Analysis of clonogenic human brain tumour cells: preliminary results of tumour sensitivity testing with BCNU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblum, M L; Dougherty, D A; Deen, D F; Hoshino, T; Wilson, C B [California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neurology

    1980-04-01

    Biopsies from 6 patients with glioblastoma multiforme were disaggregated and single cells were treated in vitro with various concentrations of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitroso urea (BCNU) and plated for cell survival. One patient's cells were sensitive to BCNU in vitro; after a single dose of BCNU her brain scan reverted to normal and she was clinically well. Five tumours demonstrated resistance in vitro. Three of these tumours progressed during the first course of chemotherapy with a nitrosourea and the patients died at 21/2, 4 and 81/2 months after operation. Two patients who showed dramatic responses to radiation therapy were considered unchanged after the first course of nitrosourea therapy (although one demonstrated tumour enlargement on brain scan). The correlation of in vitro testing of tumour cell sensitivity with actual patient response is encouraging enough to warrant further work to determine whether such tests should weigh in decisions on patient therapy.

  12. Angiogenesis and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, tumour necrosis factor-α and hypoxia inducible factor-1α in canine renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yhee, J Y; Yu, C H; Kim, J H; Im, K S; Kim, N H; Brodersen, B W; Doster, A R; Sur, J-H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution and characteristics of microvessels in various histological types of canine renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The study compared microvessel density (MVD) and distribution of blood vessels according to histological type and evaluated the presence of angiogenesis-related proteins. Nine archival samples of canine RCC were studied. MVD was calculated as the mean number of blood vessels per mm(2). The diameter of blood vessels was calculated by determining either the length of the long axis of blood vessels (diameter(max)) or the mean distance from the centre of each blood vessel to the tunica adventia (diameter(mean)). A significant difference in MVD was evident between RCCs and normal kidneys (46.6 ± 28.0 versus 8.4 ± 2.2 microvessels/mm(2)). Diameter(max) in canine RCCs (34.1 ± 14.7 μm) was also significantly different from normal canine kidney (23.2 ± 3.4 μm). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was expressed by tumour cells and vascular endothelial cells and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression was observed in vascular endothelial cells in both neoplastic and normal kidney. Although VEGF is involved in angiogenesis and correlates with tumour stage of development, no correlation was found between VEGF expression and MVD. Tumour-associated macrophages expressing TNF-α and hypoxia inducible factor 1α were identified in peritumoural tissue and may play an important role in angiogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The measurement of intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity in human tumours and normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    Human tumour and normal cell radiosensitivity are thought to be important factors determining the response of tumour and normal tissues to radiotherapy, respectively. Clonogenic assays are the standard method for measuring radiosensitivity but they are of limited applicability for clinical use with fresh human tumours. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the Adhesive Tumour Cell Culture System (ATCCS), as a method for measuring the radiosensitivity of human tumours. A soft agar clonogenic assay, the modified Courtenay-Mills assay, was used as a standard to compare with the ATCCS. The demonstration that fibroblast contamination could occur with both assay methods led to the investigation of a new technique for removing unwanted fibroblasts from tumour cell suspensions and to the use of a multiwell assay for measuring fibroblast radiosensitivity. (author)

  14. The measurement of intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity in human tumours and normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    Human tumour and normal cell radiosensitivity are thought to be important factors determining the response of tumour and normal tissues to radiotherapy, respectively. Clonogenic assays are the standard method for measuring radiosensitivity but they are of limited applicability for clinical use with fresh human tumours. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the Adhesive Tumour Cell Culture System (ATCCS), as a method for measuring the radiosensitivity of human tumours. A soft agar clonogenic assay, the modified Courtenay-Mills assay, was used as a standard to compare with the ATCCS. The demonstration that fibroblast contamination could occur with both assay methods led to the investigation of a new technique for removing unwanted fibroblasts from tumour cell suspensions and to the use of a multiwell assay for measuring fibroblast radiosensitivity. (author).

  15. SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cells bind fibroblasts via ICAM-1 and this is increased by tumour necrosis factor-α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu S David

    Full Text Available We recently reported exchange of membrane and cytoplasmic markers between SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cells and human gingival fibroblasts (h-GF without comparable exchange of nuclear markers, while similar h-GF exchange was seen for melanoma and ovarian carcinoma cells. This process of "cellular sipping" changes phenotype such that cells sharing markers of both SAOS-2 and h-GF have morphology intermediate to that of either cell population cultured alone, evidencing increased tumour cell diversity without genetic change. TNF-α increases cellular sipping between h-GF and SAOS-2, and we here study binding of SAOS-2 to TNF-α treated h-GF to determine if increased cellular sipping can be accounted for by cytokine stimulated SAOS-2 binding. More SAOS-2 bound h-GF pe-seeded wells than culture plastic alone (p<0.001, and this was increased by h-GF pre-treatment with TNF-α (p<0.001. TNF-α stimulated binding was dose dependent and maximal at 1.16 nM (p<0.05 with no activity below 0.006 nM. SAOS-2 binding to h-GF was independent of serum, while the lipopolysaccharide antagonist Polymyxin B did not affect results, and TNF-α activity was lost on boiling. h-GF binding of SAOS-2 started to increase after 30min TNF-α stimulation and was maximal by 1.5 hr pre-treatment (p<0.001. h-GF retained maximal binding up to 6 hrs after TNF-α stimulation, but this was lost by 18 hrs (p<0.001. FACS analysis demonstrated increased ICAM-1 consistent with the time course of SAOS-2 binding, while antibody against ICAM-1 inhibited SAOS-2 adhesion (p<0.04. Pre-treating SAOS-2 with TNF-α reduced h-GF binding to background levels (p<0.003, and this opposite effect to h-GF cytokine stimulation suggests that the history of cytokine exposure of malignant cells migrating across different microenvironments can influence subsequent interactions with fibroblasts. Since cytokine stimulated binding was comparable in magnitude to earlier reported TNF-α stimulated cellular sipping, we

  16. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of human radio-induced tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, S.

    2002-09-01

    After a brief recall of some fundamentals regarding radiobiology, this research thesis discusses some epidemiological aspects of radio carcinogenesis, based on epidemiological studies performed on people having survived to Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Chernobyl, but also performed on people submitted to domestic or professional exposures to radon, or to medicine-related exposures. The author highlights some predispositions to radio-induced cancers. Then, she discusses the genetic mechanisms of radio-induced carcinogenesis and the genetic alterations observed in human radio-induced tumours. She discusses and comments the genomic instability, its mechanisms and some models observed on mice, and describes the various forms of radio-induced genomic instability. After a discussion of all these aspects, the author draws some perspectives for future research works

  17. Effects of AVX-470, an Oral, Locally Acting Anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor Antibody, on Tissue Biomarkers in Patients with Active Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Deborah S; Tracey, Daniel E; Lemos, Brenda R; Erlich, Emma C; Burton, Randall E; Keane, David M; Patel, Rutvij; Kim, Skaison; Bhol, Kailash C; Harris, M Scott; Fox, Barbara S

    2016-06-01

    AVX-470 is an orally administered, bovine-derived, anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) antibody with local activity in the gastrointestinal tract. In the first-in-human clinical trial of AVX-470 in active ulcerative colitis, we evaluated inflammatory biomarkers in colon tissue as measures of disease activity and early response to treatment. Thirty-six patients received active drug (AVX-470 at 0.2, 1.6 or 3.5g/day) or placebo over 4 weeks. Colon biopsy samples were collected from 5 regions of colon at baseline and week 4. Tissue inflammatory biomarkers were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), epithelial cell apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) and bovine immunoglobulin by immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry. Endoscopic activity (Ulcerative Colitis Endoscopic Index of Severity [UCEIS]) at colonoscopy was assessed in each colonic region by a central reader. Bovine immunoglobulin was observed in mucosal tissue before and after dosing in lamina propria and submucosal layers of biopsy tissue. Baseline levels of TNF, myeloperoxidase (MPO), CD68 and interleukin (IL)-1β and, to a lesser extent, IL-6 mRNA were 2- to 3-fold higher in distal vs proximal colon tissue, corresponding to the 2- to 3-fold differences in baseline severities of endoscopic scores. Reductions of >10-fold in TNF and, to lesser extents, in MPO and epithelial cell apoptosis were observed in proximal and distal colon biopsies after 4 weeks of AVX-470 3.5g/day treatment. Reductions in TNF scores were correlated with changes in MPO and CD3 immunohistochemistry scores. These results are consistent with anti-TNF activity of orally administered AVX-470 in colon mucosal tissue in ulcerative colitis patients and demonstrate the utility of tissue biomarkers in assessing disease and treatment response in early clinical studies. This trial was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov as study NCT

  18. Nutrition, anthropometry, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and circulating levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha receptor I and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in children during stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, B. U.; Pærregaard, Anders; Michaelsen, Kim F.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate anthropometry, nutrition and gastrointestinal dysfunction, and to characterize the relation between these parameters and the inflammatory activity evaluated by plasma levels of soluble tumour necrosis factor alpha receptor I (sTNFRI) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) levels...... during stem cell transplantation (SCT) in children. Clinical assessments and blood sampling were performed on days -3, 0, +7, +15 and +31 in eight children undergoing SCT. Energy intake, anthropometry, gastrointestinal dysfunction (WHO toxicity score) and sTNFRI and IL-1Ra were evaluated. The energy...... intake was below recommended levels. There was a loss of lean body mass (arm muscle area)(median, 2031 mm(2) (day -3) vs 1477 mm(2) (day 31); p = 0.04), and of fat mass (arm fat area) (791 mm(2) (day -3) vs 648 mm(2) (day +31); p = 0.04). sTNFRI was elevated throughout the course of transplantation...

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits differentiation of myogenic cells in human urethral rhabdosphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Mayuka; Sumino, Yasuhiro; Sato, Fuminori; Kiyono, Tohru; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Mimata, Hiromitsu

    2017-06-01

    To examine the inhibitory effects of tumor necrosis factor-α on myogenic differentiation of human urethral rhabdosphincter cells. A rhabdosphincter sample was obtained from a patient who underwent total cystectomy. To expand the lifespan of the primary cultured cells, rhabdosphincter myogenic cells were immortalized with mutated cyclin-dependent kinase 4, cyclin D1 and telomerase. The differential potential of the cells was investigated. The transfected human rhabdosphincter cells were induced for myogenic differentiation with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-α and/or the tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist etanercept at different concentrations, and activation of signaling pathways was monitored. Human rhabdosphincter cells were selectively cultured for at least 40 passages. Molecular analysis confirmed the expression of myosin heavy chain, which is a specific marker of differentiated muscle cells, significantly increased after differentiation induction. Although tumor necrosis factor-α treatment reduced the myosin heavy chain expression in a concentration-dependent manner, etanercept inhibited this suppression. Tumor necrosis factor-α suppressed phosphorylation of protein kinase B and p38, whereas etanercept pretreatment promoted phosphorylation and myosin heavy chain expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibits differentiation of urethral rhabdosphincter cells in part through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathways. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α might be a useful strategy to treat stress urinary incontinence. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  20. Progressive outer retinal necrosis: manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Phey Feng; Lim, Rongxuan; Antonakis, Serafeim N; Almeida, Goncalo C

    2015-05-06

    We present the case of a 54-year-old man who developed progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) as an initial manifestation of HIV infection without any significant risk factors for infection with HIV. PORN is usually found as a manifestation of known AIDS late in the disease. Our patient presented with transient visual loss followed by decrease in visual acuity and facial rash. Subsequent investigation revealed anterior chamber tap positive for varicella zoster virus (VZV), as well as HIV positivity, with an initial CD4 count of 48 cells/µL. Systemic and intravitreal antivirals against VZV, and highly active antiretroviral therapy against HIV were started, which halted further progression of retinal necrosis. This case highlights the importance of suspecting PORN where there is a rapidly progressive retinitis, and also testing the patient for HIV, so appropriate treatment can be started. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. Golimumab in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis who have previous experience with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors: results of a long-term extension of the randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled GO-AFTER study through week 160

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolen, Josef S.; Kay, Jonathan; Landewé, Robert B. M.; Matteson, Eric L.; Gaylis, Norman; Wollenhaupt, Jurgen; Murphy, Frederick T.; Zhou, Yiying; Hsia, Elizabeth C.; Doyle, Mittie K.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess long-term golimumab therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who discontinued previous tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) inhibitor(s) for any reason. Results through week 24 of this multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of

  2. Insights into the efficacy of golimumab plus methotrexate in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis who discontinued prior anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy: post-hoc analyses from the GO-AFTER study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolen, Josef S.; Kay, Jonathan; Matteson, Eric L.; Landewé, Robert; Hsia, Elizabeth C.; Xu, Stephen; Zhou, Yiying; Doyle, Mittie K.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluate golimumab in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and previous tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) inhibitor use. Patients (n=461) previously receiving ≥1 TNF inhibitor were randomised to subcutaneous injections of placebo, golimumab 50 mg or golimumab 100 mg q4 weeks. Primary endpoint

  3. Golimumab in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis after treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (GO-AFTER study): a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolen, Josef S.; Kay, Jonathan; Doyle, Mittie K.; Landewé, Robert; Matteson, Eric L.; Wollenhaupt, Jürgen; Gaylis, Norman; Murphy, Frederick T.; Neal, Jeffrey S.; Zhou, Yiying; Visvanathan, Sudha; Hsia, Elizabeth C.; Rahman, Mahboob U.; Ahern, Michael John; Hall, Stephen; Nash, Peter Thomas; Graninger, Winfried; Ebner, Wolfgang; Machold, Klaus; Zamani, Omid; Atkins, Christopher; Beaulieu, André; Bell, Mary; Fitzcharles, Mary Ann; Keystone, Edward; Khraishi, Majed; McKendry, Robert J. R.; Rahman, Proton; Thomason, Glen T. D.; Thorne, J. Carter; Bookman, Arthur; Faraawi, Rafat; Hannonen, Pekka; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjetta; Järvinen, Pentti; Braun, Jürgen; Burmester, Gerd; Fiehn, Christoph; Gruenke, Mathias; Bäuerle, Michael; Hauer, Rolf-Walter; Kellner, Herbert; Rubbert, Andrea; Schewe, Stefan; Sieper, Joachim; Tony, Hans-Peter; Kekow, Jörn; Ching, Daniel Wai Tho; Jones, Peter Brian Barrie; Singh, Gagrath Pradeep

    2009-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) inhibitors are frequently used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, but whether use of a different TNFalpha inhibitor can improve patient response is unknown. We assess the efficacy and safety of the TNFalpha inhibitor golimumab in patients with active rheumatoid

  4. Somatostatin receptor subtype expression in human thyroid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klagge, A; Krause, K; Schierle, K; Steinert, F; Dralle, H; Fuhrer, D

    2010-04-01

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are expressed in various endocrine tumours. The expression of SSTR at the tumour cell surface confers the possibility for diagnostic imaging and therapy of tumours using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues. The majority of currently available somatostatin analogues show a higher binding affinity for the SSTR2 subtype. To date, the precise expression pattern of the SSTR subtypes 1-5 in thyroid epithelial tumours remains to be determined. We investigated the mRNA expression of SSTR1-5 in benign and malignant epithelial thyroid tumours [20 cold thyroid nodules (CTNs), 20 toxic thyroid nodules (TTNs), 20 papillary, 20 follicular, and 5 anaplastic carcinomas (PTCs, FTCs, ATCs, respectively)] and compared them to normal surrounding thyroid tissues. Four out of five SSTR subtypes were detected in malignant thyroid tumours, benign neoplasia, and normal surrounding tissue with a predominant expression of SSTR2 and SSTR5, and a weak expression of SSTR1 and SSTR3. Weak SSTR4 mRNA expression was detected in some PTCs. Compared to normal thyroid tissue, SSTR2 was significantly upregulated in PTC and ATC. In addition significant upregulation of SSTR3 was found in PTC. SSTR5 mRNA expression was increased in PTC and FTC and significantly decreased in CTN and TTN compared to normal thyroid tissue. SSTR2 is the predominant subtype in thyroid epithelial tumours with a high expression pattern, in particular, in PTC . Perspectively, the expression of distinct SSTR in thyroid epithelial tumours might represent a promising avenue for diagnostics and therapy of advanced thyroid cancer with somatostatin analogues. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  5. Quantifying heterogeneity in human tumours using MRI and PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Marie-Claude; O'Connor, James P B; Boellaard, Ronald; Thacker, Neil A; Jackson, Alan

    2012-03-01

    Most tumours, even those of the same histological type and grade, demonstrate considerable biological heterogeneity. Variations in genomic subtype, growth factor expression and local microenvironmental factors can result in regional variations within individual tumours. For example, localised variations in tumour cell proliferation, cell death, metabolic activity and vascular structure will be accompanied by variations in oxygenation status, pH and drug delivery that may directly affect therapeutic response. Documenting and quantifying regional heterogeneity within the tumour requires histological or imaging techniques. There is increasing evidence that quantitative imaging biomarkers can be used in vivo to provide important, reproducible and repeatable estimates of tumoural heterogeneity. In this article we review the imaging methods available to provide appropriate biomarkers of tumour structure and function. We also discuss the significant technical issues involved in the quantitative estimation of heterogeneity and the range of descriptive metrics that can be derived. Finally, we have reviewed the existing clinical evidence that heterogeneity metrics provide additional useful information in drug discovery and development and in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Response of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF ) in blood and spleen mice that vaccinated with P.berghei radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlina; Tur R; Teja K

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor is a glycoprotein derived from helper T lymphocytes that play an important role in the body's response against malaria infection. However, TNF-α has double play that is on appropriate levels will provide protection and healing, while at excessive levels which may be a response to hyperparasitemia. Thus investigated the expression of TNF alpha secreted blood lymphocytes and spleen cells the mice that's infected with 1 x 10 7 P.berghei infectious or inactivated by radiation. Levels of TNF alpha serum and spleen cell culture medium was monitored on days 2, 7, 14 post infection. Monitoring of parasite growth every two days for 60 days. Determination of TNF alpha levels were measure using ELISA. The results showed parasitaemia mice infected with 175 Gy irradiated parasites have pre patent period of 16 days longer than the control (non-irradiated parasites) with low parasitaemia. TNF alpha concentration that secreted spleen cells of mice vaccinated higher than control mice. Concentration of TNF alpha that secreted blood lymphocyte of mice vaccinated lower than control mice. It was concluded that the secretion of TNF alpha by blood lymphocytes caused more pathogenic factors of the parasite, while the secretion of TNF alpha in spleen due to an immune response against the parasite. (author)

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the normal human eye and its expression pattern in selected eye tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinmei; Wu, Yazhen; Heegaard, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme involved in neoplastic processes. The purpose of the present study is to investigate COX-2 expression in the normal human eye and the expression pattern in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining...... using antibodies against COX-2 was performed on paraffin sections of normal human eyes and selected eye tumours arising from cells expressing COX-2. Results: Cyclooxygenase-2 expression was found in various structures of the normal eye. Abundant expression was seen in the cornea, iris, ciliary body...... and retina. The COX-2 expression was less in tumours deriving from the ciliary epithelium and also in retinoblastoma. Conclusion: Cyclooxygenase-2 is constitutively expressed in normal human eyes. The expression of COX-2 is much lower in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells....

  8. Expression of Selected Markers in Immunohistochemical Diagnosis of Canine and Human Testicular Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaputa Rafał

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemical profiles of the most common canine testicular tumours, including the Leydig cell tumours, seminomas, and Sertoli cell tumours were analysed, and the results were compared with those obtained in the corresponding types of human testicular neoplasms. The expressions of vimentin, von Willebrand factor (FVIII, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and MCM3 were quantified. In the case of Sertoli cell tumours, only canine ones were analysed, since this type of tumour is very rarely diagnosed in men. The expression of the analysed proteins in the testicular tumours was similar. The von Willebrand factor exhibited the strongest expression in Leydig cell tumours in dogs and men, while vimentin was expressed more strongly in dogs (96.7% had an intensity at +++ than in men (62.5% had +++ in the Leydigioma. The immunoexpression of MCM3 in seminomas was high in both men and dogs – 90% +++ and 100% +++ respectively. The lack of chromogranin A and synaptophysin was observed in almost 100% of seminomas in men and dogs. This differed from the results obtained for Leydigioma, where chromogranin A was expressed in 70% of dogs at +++ and in 100% of men at ++++. The results may indicate that the antibodies were selected correctly. Their analysis and interpretation provides valuable information concerning the nature of the studied tumours.

  9. The omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, prevents the damaging effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha during murine skeletal muscle cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearson Stephen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA is a ώ-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid with anti-inflammatory and anti-cachetic properties that may have potential benefits with regards to skeletal muscle atrophy conditions where inflammation is present. It is also reported that pathologic levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α are associated with muscle wasting, exerted through inhibition of myogenic differentiation and enhanced apoptosis. These findings led us to hypothesize that EPA may have a protective effect against skeletal muscle damage induced by the actions of TNF-α. Results The deleterious effects of TNF-α on C2C12 myogenesis were completely inhibited by co-treatment with EPA. Thus, EPA prevented the TNF-mediated loss of MyHC expression and significantly increased myogenic fusion (p p p p p p Conclusion In conclusion, EPA has a protective action against the damaging effects of TNF-α on C2C12 myogenesis. These findings support further investigations of EPA as a potential therapeutic agent during skeletal muscle regeneration following injury.

  10. Interleukin-1β and tumour necrosis factor-α levels in conjunctiva of diabetic patients with symptomatic moderate dry eye: case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Xi, Lei; Zhao, Shaozhen; Wei, Ruihua; Huang, Yue; Yang, Ruibo; Su, Long; Liu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare expression of interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the conjunctiva of diabetic and non-diabetic patients with symptomatic moderate dry eye. Setting and participants Nineteen diabetic patients with dry eye, 15 non-diabetic patients with dry eye and 14 diabetic patients without dry eye were recruited. The relative expression of IL-1β and TNF-α in conjunctival impression cytology (CIC) specimens was evaluated using immunofluorescent staining and in conjunctival biopsy specimens using immunohistochemical staining. Results The diabetic dry eye group showed significantly higher grades of metaplasia than the non-diabetic dry eye and diabetic without dry eye groups (both pdry eye group was significantly increased compared with the non-diabetic dry eye and diabetic without dry eye groups (p=0.002, pdry eye, while levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in apical conjunctival epithelium were similar in the CIC specimens. These findings suggest that the inflammatory response is not limited to the surface of conjunctival epithelial cells, and is more serious in the basal layer of the epithelium, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of dry eye in diabetic patients. PMID:27489152

  11. A study on the association between parvovirus B19 infection, serum tumour necrosis factor and C-reactive protein levels among Nigerian patients with sickle cell anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwalokun, Bamidele Abiodun; Iwalokun, Senapon Olusola; Hodonu, Semande Olufunmilayo; Aina, Olugbenga Ayoola; Omilabu, Sunday

    2012-11-01

    Microbial burden involving parvovirus B19 infection has been recognised as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in sickle cell anaemia (SCA) patients. Given the recent reports of parvovirus B19 infection in Nigeria and the role of inflammation in sickle cell crisis, knowledge of the relationship between the two may be essential for deploying appropriate interventions in infected patients. This study determined the serum levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and C-reactive protein (CRP) as inflammatory markers in Nigerian SCA patients with and without parvovirus B19 infections. A total of 64 SCA patients aged 5-25 years and 41 age-matched apparently healthy volunteers with haemoglobin genotypes AA or AS were enrolled with consent into the study. Parvovirus B19 infection and serum levels of TNF-α and CRP were determined by the ELISA method. The overall prevalence rate of parvovirus B19 infection in the study subjects was 13.3%. This rate further showed gender variation and negative correlation with age. Significant (p Parvovirus B19 infection was found to elicit greater increases in these inflammatory markers than in infected non-SCA controls. We conclude that parvovirus B19 infection is common in this environment, and that serum TNF-α and CRP are predictors of clinical inflammatory episodes in infected SCA patients.

  12. Serial measurement of the circulating levels of tumour necrosis factor and its soluble receptors 1 and 2 for monitoring leprosy patients during multidrug treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Dias Costa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is an infectious and contagious spectral disease accompanied by a series of immunological events triggered by the host response to the aetiologic agent, Mycobacterium leprae . The induction and maintenance of the immune/inflammatory response in leprosy are linked to multiple cell interactions and soluble factors, primarily through the action of cytokines. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the serum levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α and its soluble receptors (sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 in leprosy patients at different stages of multidrug treatment (MDT in comparison with non-infected individuals and to determine their role as putative biomarkers of the severity of leprosy or the treatment response. ELISA was used to measure the levels of these molecules in 30 healthy controls and 37 leprosy patients at the time of diagnosis and during and after MDT. Our results showed increases in the serum levels of TNF-α and sTNF-R2 in infected individuals in comparison with controls. The levels of TNF-α, but not sTNF-R2, decreased with treatment. The current results corroborate previous reports of elevated serum levels of TNF-α in leprosy and suggest a role for sTNF-R2 in the control of this cytokine during MDT.

  13. Alpha-amidated peptides derived from pro-opiomelanocortin in human pituitary tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Johnsen, A H

    1988-01-01

    Human pituitary tumours, obtained at surgery for Cushing's disease and Nelson's syndrome, were extracted and the content and molecular forms of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides determined by radioimmunoassay, gel chromatography, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography....... In conclusion, all the molecular forms of the amidated peptides detected in tumours from patients with Cushing's disease and Nelson's syndrome were similar to the molecular forms found in the normal human pituitary. The main difference between the tumours and the normal pituitary was the greater amount...... (HPLC) and sequence analysis. In the tumours from patients with Cushing's disease the mean concentrations of amidated peptides relative to the total amount of POMC were as follows: alpha-MSH, 1.7%; amidated gamma-MSH (gamma 1-MSH), 8.5% and the peptide linking gamma-MSH and ACTH in the precursor (hinge...

  14. Improvement of Radiation-Mediated Immunosuppression of Human NSCLC Tumour Xenografts in a Nude Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Tokalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model have consistently been used as an essential part of preclinical studies for anticancer drugs activity in human. Commonly, these animals receive whole body irradiation to assure immunosuppression. But whole body dose delivery might be inhomogeneous and the resulting incomplete bone marrow depletion may modify tumour behaviour. To improve irradiation-mediated immunosuppression of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model irradiation (2 + 2 Gy from opposite sides of animals has been performed using a conventional X-ray tube. The described modification of whole body irradiation improves growth properties of human NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model. The design of the whole body irradiation mediated immunosuppression described here for NSCLC xenografts may be useful for research applications involving other types of human tumours.

  15. lmmunohistochemical study of effect of ionizing radiation on human malignant tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adomaitiene, D. I.; Aleknavicius, E.; Valuckas, K. and others

    2000-01-01

    Cell proliferation-associated tumour markers are considered to have a valuable clinical significance. The current study was designed to investigate changes in immunohistochemical (IH) expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen PCNA in human malignant tumour tissue samples obtained before and after preoperative radiotherapy. Tumour tissue samples were obtained from 26 patients with rectal carcinoma, from 22 patients with carcinoma corporis uteri and from 82 patients with breast cancer. Tumour samples were processed for IH examination by using monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) PC10 against PCNA. IH analysis of histological specimens of carcinoma corporis uteri and rectal carcinoma obtained before and after preoperative radiotherapy has revealed heterogeneity of biological response to irradiation. The great majority of tumour specimens after irradiation showed a high PCNA expression level in cell population. Only minority of tumour specimens (15-20%) exhibited reduced immunoreactivity with MoAbs PC10. PCNA positivity rate in breast cancer specimens obtained during surgery from 55 patients after preoperative radiotherapy in comparison to biomarker expression pattern in tumour specimens from 27 unirradiated patients (control group) was found to be tended to decrease. These in vivo findings are discussed in terms of radiation-induced cell death, followed after proliferation, and PCNA role in DNA repair. (author)

  16. Neutron autoradiography imaging of selective boron uptake in human metastatic tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altieri, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Section of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy)], E-mail: saverio.altieri@pv.infn.it; Bortolussi, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Section of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy); Bruschi, P.; Chiari, P.; Fossati, F.; Stella, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy); Prati, U.; Roveda, L. [Unit of cancer surgery, Cancer Center of Excellence, Foundation T. Campanella, Catanzaro (Italy); Zonta, A.; Zonta, C.; Ferrari, C.; Clerici, A. [Department of Surgery, University of Pavia, Piazza Botta, Pavia (Italy); Nano, R. [Department of Animal Biology, University of Pavia, Piazza Botta, Pavia (Italy); Pinelli, T. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Section of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    The ability to selectively hit the tumour cells is an essential characteristic of an anti-tumour therapy. In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) this characteristic is based on the selective uptake of {sup 10}B in the tumour cells with respect to normal tissues. An important step in the BNCT planning is the measurement of the boron concentration in the tissue samples, both tumour and healthy. When the tumour is spread through the healthy tissue, as in the case of metastases, the knowledge of the different kinds of tissues in the sample being analysed is crucial. If the percentage of tumour and normal tissues cannot be evaluated, the obtained concentration is a mean value depending on the composition of the different samples being measured. In this case an imaging method that could give information both on the morphology and on the spatial distribution of boron concentration in the sample would be a fundamental support. In this paper, the results of the boron uptake analysis in the tumour and in the healthy samples taken from human livers after boron phenylalanine (BPA) infusion are shown; boron imaging was performed using neutron autoradiography.

  17. Electrical conductivity measurement of excised human metastatic liver tumours before and after thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemmerich, Dieter; Schutt, David J; Wright, Andrew W; Webster, John G; Mahvi, David M

    2009-05-01

    We measured the ex vivo electrical conductivity of eight human metastatic liver tumours and six normal liver tissue samples from six patients using the four electrode method over the frequency range 10 Hz to 1 MHz. In addition, in a single patient we measured the electrical conductivity before and after the thermal ablation of normal and tumour tissue. The average conductivity of tumour tissue was significantly higher than normal tissue over the entire frequency range (from 4.11 versus 0.75 mS cm(-1) at 10 Hz, to 5.33 versus 2.88 mS cm(-1) at 1 MHz). We found no significant correlation between tumour size and measured electrical conductivity. While before ablation tumour tissue had considerably higher conductivity than normal tissue, the two had similar conductivity throughout the frequency range after ablation. Tumour tissue conductivity changed by +25% and -7% at 10 Hz and 1 MHz after ablation (0.23-0.29 at 10 Hz, and 0.43-0.40 at 1 MHz), while normal tissue conductivity increased by +270% and +10% at 10 Hz and 1 MHz (0.09-0.32 at 10 Hz and 0.37-0.41 at 1 MHz). These data can potentially be used to differentiate tumour from normal tissue diagnostically.

  18. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV-associated tumour vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 52, 1-2 (2006), s. 45-46 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR7807; GA MZd(CZ) NR8004; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/04/0492; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500520605 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HPV * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.387, year: 2006

  19. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I. [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gholami, Parviz [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Li, Feng [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fan, Fang [Department of Pathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hagenbuch, Bruno [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Olyaee, Mojtaba [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  20. Expression of p16(INK4A) gene in human pituitary tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiavelli, Gloria; Cotignola, Javier; Danilowicz, Karina; Carbonara, Carolina; Paes de Lima, Andrea; Basso, Armando; Bruno, Oscar Domingo; Szijan, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise 10-15% of primary intracranial tumours but the mechanisms leading to tumour development are yet to be clearly established. The retinoblastoma pathway, which regulates the progression through the cell cycle, is often deregulated in different types of tumours. We studied the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(INK4A) gene expression at mRNA level in human pituitary adenomas. Forty-six tumour specimens of different subtypes, 21 clinically non-functioning, 12 growth hormone-secreting, 6 prolactin-secreting, 6 adrenocorticotropin-secreting, and 1 thyrotropin-secreting tumours were studied. All clinically non-functioning and most of the hormone-secreting tumours were macroadenomas (38/46). The RT-PCR assay and electrophoresis of the PCR-products showed that p16(INK4A) mRNA was undetectable in: 62% of non-functioning, 8% of growth hormone-secreting, 17% of prolactin-secreting and 17% of adrenocorticotropin-secreting adenomas. Forty percent of all macroadenomas and 25% of microadenomas had negative p16(INK4A) mRNA, the latter results suggest that the absence of p16(INK4A) product might be an early event in tumours with no expression of this suppressor gene. Within the non-functioning adenomas 63% were "null cell" and 37% were positive for some hormone, both subgroups showed similar percentage of cases with absence of p16(INK4A) mRNA. Our results show that clinically non-functioning macroadenomas have impaired p16(INK4A) expression in a clearly higher proportion than any other pituitary tumour subtype investigated. Other regulatory pathways may be implicated in the development of tumours with positive p16(INK4A) expression.

  1. Targeting mesothelin receptors with drug-loaded bacterial nanocells suppresses human mesothelioma tumour growth in mouse xenograft models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A Alfaleh

    Full Text Available Human malignant mesothelioma is a chemoresistant tumour that develops from mesothelial cells, commonly associated with asbestos exposure. Malignant mesothelioma incidence rates in European countries are still rising and Australia has one of the highest burdens of malignant mesothelioma on a population basis in the world. Therapy using systemic delivery of free cytotoxic agents is associated with many undesirable side effects due to non-selectivity, and is thus dose-limited which limits its therapeutic potential. Therefore, increasing the selectivity of anti-cancer agents has the potential to dramatically enhance drug efficacy and reduce toxicity. EnGeneIC Dream Vectors (EDV are antibody-targeted nanocells which can be loaded with cytotoxic drugs and delivered to specific cancer cells via bispecific antibodies (BsAbs which target the EDV and a cancer cell-specific receptor, simultaneously. BsAbs were designed to target doxorubicin-loaded EDVs to cancer cells via cell surface mesothelin (MSLN. Flow cytometry was used to investigate cell binding and induction of apoptosis, and confocal microscopy to visualize internalization. Mouse xenograft models were used to assess anti-tumour effects in vivo, followed by immunohistochemistry for ex vivo evaluation of proliferation and necrosis. BsAb-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded EDVs were able to bind to and internalize within mesothelioma cells in vitro via MSLN receptors and induce apoptosis. In mice xenografts, the BsAb-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded EDVs suppressed the tumour growth and also decreased cell proliferation. Thus, the use of MSLN-specific antibodies to deliver encapsulated doxorubicin can provide a novel and alternative modality for treatment of mesothelioma.

  2. Tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-6 production induced by components associated with merozoite proteins of Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Moon, R; Ridley, R G

    1993-01-01

    purified from culture supernatants, using immobilized monoclonal antibodies specific for RAP-1 or MSP-1, stimulated normal human mononuclear cells to produce TNF and IL-6 in vitro. However, stimulation of TNF was absent, and that of IL-6 was reduced, when the antigens were purified from detergent extracts...... of infected erythrocytes. These results indicate that the RAP-1 and MSP-1 proteins themselves do not stimulate the production of TNF. Instead, other components associating with these exoantigens may be responsible for the TNF production. Mouse antisera blocking TNF production stimulated by P. yoelii...... exoantigens also blocked TNF production stimulated by material affinity purified from P. falciparum culture supernatants using RAP-1 specific monoclonal antibody, indicating the conserved structure of the TNF inducing component....

  3. Liver safety of non-tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in rheumatic patients with past hepatitis B virus infection: an observational, controlled, long-term study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalopoulos, Ioannis; Fanouriakis, Antonis; Kougkas, Nikolaos; Flouri, Irini; Sourvinos, George; Bertsias, George; Repa, Argyro; Avgoustidis, Nestor; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos

    2018-01-01

    The risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation with non-tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (non-TNFi) biologic agents in patients with rheumatic diseases and past HBV infection has not been definively elucidated. We assessed the comparative safety of non-TNFi and TNFi biologic agents in such patients in real-life clinical settings. We carried out a retrospective cohort study from the Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital of Heraklion. Patients who received abatacept (ABA), tocilizumab (TCZ) or rituximab (RTX) during the period 2003-2016 and were HbsAg(-), anti-HBc(+), anti-HBs(±) at baseline, were monitored for HBV reactivation. Patients treated with TNFi agents during the same period were used as a control group. 101 cases of non-TNFi (39 ABA, 32 RTX and 30 TCZ) and 111 cases of TNFi treatment were identified. In non-TNFi, 76 cases (75.2%) were anti-HBc(+)/anti-HBs(+) and 25 (24.8%) were anti-HBc(+)/anti-HBs(-), as compared to 82 (73.9%) and 29 (26.1%) in TNFi-treated, respectively. After a median (IQR) observation of 24.0 (34.7) months, two cases (2.0%) of HBV reactivation were identified in the non-TNFi group; one with ABA, successfully treated with entecavir, and one fatal case with RTX and prior exposure to cyclophosphamide. No reactivation was observed in the TNFi group (p=0.226 vs. non-TNFi). Αnti-HBs titres were significantly reduced compared to baseline in the non-TNFi group [median (IQR) 203.9 (954.7) mIU/ml before treatment versus 144.9 (962.9) mIU/ml after treatment, p=0.03]. Two cases of HBV reactivation highlight the risk for this complication in patients with past HBV infection under biologic therapy.

  4. Dehydroepiandrosterone in relation to other adrenal hormones during an acute inflammatory stressful disease state compared with chronic inflammatory disease: role of interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Rainer H; Lehle, Karin; Herfarth, Hans; Weber, Markus; Falk, Werner; Preuner, Jurgen; Scholmerich, Jurgen

    2002-03-01

    Serum levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulphate (DHEAS) are low in chronic inflammatory diseases, although the reasons are unexplained. Furthermore, the behaviour of serum levels of these hormones during an acute inflammatory stressful disease state is not well known. In this study in patients with an acute inflammatory stressful disease state (13 patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery) and patients with chronic inflammation (61 patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD)) vs. 120 controls, we aimed to investigate adrenal hormone shifts looking at serum levels of DHEA in relation to other adrenal hormones. Furthermore, we tested the predictive role of serum tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) for a change of serum levels of DHEA in relation to other adrenal hormones. The molar ratio of serum levels of DHEA/androstenedione (ASD) was increased in patients with an acute inflammatory stressful disease state and was decreased in patients with chronic inflammation. The molar ratio of serum levels of DHEAS/DHEA was reduced during an acute inflammatory stressful disease state and was increased in patients with chronic inflammation. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed that elevated serum levels of TNF were associated with a high ratio of serum levels of DHEA/ASD in all groups (for IL-6 in patients with an acute inflammatory stressful disease state only), and, similarly, elevated serum levels of TNF were associated with a high ratio of serum levels of DHEAS/DHEA only in IBD (for IL-6 only in healthy subjects). This study indicates that changes of serum levels of DHEA in relation to serum levels of other adrenal hormones are completely different in patients with an acute inflammatory stressful disease state compared with patients with chronic inflammation. The decrease of serum levels of DHEAS and DHEA is typical for chronic inflammation and TNF and IL-6 play a predictive role for these changes.

  5. Gene expression of tumour necrosis factor and insulin signalling-related factors in subcutaneous adipose tissue during the dry period and in early lactation in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri, H; Bruckmaier, R M; Rahmani, H R; Ghorbani, G R; Morel, I; van Dorland, H A

    2010-10-01

    Gene expression of adipose factors, which may be part of the mechanisms that underlie insulin sensitivity, were studied in dairy cows around parturition. Subcutaneous fat biopsies and blood samples were taken from 27 dairy cows in week 8 antepartum (a.p.), on day 1 postpartum (p.p.) and in week 5 p.p. In the adipose tissue samples, mRNA was quantified by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), insulin-independent glucose transporter (GLUT1), insulin-responsive glucose transporter (GLUT4), insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2), regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (p85) and catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase. Blood plasma was assayed for concentrations of glucose, β-hydroxybutyric acid, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and insulin. Plasma parameters followed a pattern typically observed in dairy cows. Gene expression changes were observed, but there were no changes in TNFα concentrations, which may indicate its local involvement in catabolic adaptation of adipose tissue. Changes in GLUT4 and GLUT1 mRNA abundance may reflect their involvement in reduced insulin sensitivity and in sparing glucose for milk synthesis in early lactation. Unchanged gene expression of IRS1, IRS2 and p85 over time may imply a lack of their involvement in terms of insulin sensitivity dynamics. Alternatively, it may indicate that post-transcriptional modifications of these factors came into play and may have concealed an involvement. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Interaction with extracellular matrix proteins influences Lsh/Ity/Bcg (candidate Nramp) gene regulation of macrophage priming/activation for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitrite release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, S; Roach, T I; Blackwell, J M

    1994-05-01

    The murine resistance gene Lsh/Ity/Bcg regulates activation of macrophages for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent production of nitric oxide mediating antimicrobial activity against Leishmania, Salmonella and Mycobacterium. As Lsh is differentially expressed in macrophages from different tissue sites, experiments were performed to determine whether interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins would influence the macrophage TNF-alpha response. Plating of bone marrow-derived macrophages onto purified fibrinogen or fibronectin-rich L929 cell-derived matrices, but not onto mannan, was itself sufficient to stimulate TNF-alpha release, with significantly higher levels released from congenic B10.L-Lshr compared to C57BL/10ScSn (Lshs) macrophages. Only macrophages plated onto fibrinogen also released measurable levels of nitrites, again higher in Lshr compared to Lshs macrophages. Addition of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, as a second signal enhanced the TNF-alpha and nitrite responses of macrophages plated onto fibrinogen, particularly in the Lshr macrophages. Interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin also primed macrophages for an enhanced TNF-alpha response to leishmanial parasites, but this was only translated into enhanced nitrite responses in the presence of IFN-gamma. In these experiments, Lshr macrophages remained superior in their TNF-alpha responses throughout, but to a degree which reflected the magnitude of the difference observed on ECM alone. Hence, the specificity for the enhanced TNF-alpha responses of Lshr macrophages lay in their interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin ECM, while a differential nitrite response was only observed with fibrinogen and/or IFN-gamma. The results are discussed in relation to the possible function of the recently cloned candidate gene Nramp, which has structural identity to eukaryote transporters and an N-terminal cytoplasmic

  7. English-language videos on YouTube as a source of information on self-administer subcutaneous anti-tumour necrosis factor agent injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolu, Sena; Yurdakul, Ozan Volkan; Basaran, Betul; Rezvani, Aylin

    2018-05-14

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability, content, and quality of videos for patients available on YouTube for learning how to self-administer subcutaneous anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) injections. We searched for the terms Humira injection, Enbrel injection, Simponi injection, and Cimzia injection. Videos were categorised as useful information, misleading information, useful patient opinion, and misleading patient opinion by two physicians. Videos were rated for quality on a 5-point global quality scale (GQS; 1 = poor quality, 5 = excellent quality) and reliability and content using the 5-point DISCERN scale (higher scores represent greater reliability and more comprehensive videos). Of the 142 English videos, 24 (16.9%) videos were classified as useful information, 6 (4.2%) as misleading information, 47 (33.1%) as useful patient opinion, and 65 (45.8%) as misleading patient opinion. Useful videos were the most comprehensive and had the highest reliability and quality scores. The useful information and useful patient opinion videos had the highest numbers of views per day (median 8.32, IQR: 3.40-14.28 and 5.46, IQR: 3.06-14.44), as compared with 2.32, IQR: 1.63-6.26 for misleading information videos and 2.15, IQR: 1.17-7.43 for misleading patient opinion videos (p = 0.001). Almost all (91.5%) misleading videos were uploaded by individual users. There are a substantial number of English-language YouTube videos, with high quality, and rich content and reliability that can be sources of information on proper technique of anti-TNF self-injections. Physicians should direct patients to the reliable resources of information and educate them in online resource assessment, thereby improving treatment outcomes.

  8. Higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are associated with greater odds of remission with anti-tumour necrosis factor-α medications among patients with inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, R W; Collins, E; Cao, B; Carrellas, M; Crowell, A M; Korzenik, J R

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin D has been linked to disease activity among patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Prior investigation has also suggested that vitamin D levels may affect duration of therapy with anti-tumour necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) medications among patients with IBD. To evaluate the relationship between vitamin D levels and odds of reaching remission while on an anti-TNF-α medication. A total of 521 IBD patients enrolled in the Brigham and Women's IBD Centre database were eligible for inclusion. Patients treated with anti-TNF-α therapy who had vitamin D levels drawn within 6 months prior or 2 weeks after initiation of anti-TNF-α medication and who had reported remission status at 3 months were included. A logistic regression model adjusting for age, gender, IBD diagnosis, anti-TNF-α medication (infliximab vs. adalimumab) and first or subsequent anti-TNF-α medication was used to identify the effect of vitamin D level on initial response to anti-TNF-α therapy. A total of 173 patients were included in the final analysis. On logistic regression, patients with normal vitamin D levels n = 122 at the time of anti-TNF-α medication initiation had a 2.64 increased odds of remission at 3 months compared to patients with low vitamin D levels n = 51 when controlling for age, gender, diagnosis, type of anti-TNF-α medication and first or subsequent anti-TNF-α medication (OR = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.31-5.32, P = 0.0067). These findings suggest that vitamin D levels may influence initial response to anti-TNF-α medication and that low vitamin D levels may pre-dispose patients to decreased odds of remission. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Optimizing treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis—a proof of principle and exploratory trial: is dose tapering practical in good responders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente-Cánovas, Beatriz; Doré, Caroline J; Bosworth, Ailsa; Ma, Margaret H; Galloway, James B; Cope, Andrew P; Pande, Ira; Walker, David; Scott, David L

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives RA patients receiving TNF inhibitors (TNFi) usually maintain their initial doses. The aim of the Optimizing Treatment with Tumour Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis trial was to evaluate whether tapering TNFi doses causes loss of clinical response. Methods We enrolled RA patients receiving etanercept or adalimumab and a DMARD with DAS28 under 3.2 for over 3 months. Initially (months 0–6) patients were randomized to control (constant TNFi) or two experimental groups (tapering TNFi by 33 or 66%). Subsequently (months 6–12) control subjects were randomized to taper TNFi by 33 or 66%. Disease flares (DAS28 increasing ⩾0.6 with at least one additional swollen joint) were the primary outcome. Results Two hundred and forty-four patients were screened, 103 randomized and 97 treated. In months 0–6 there were 8/50 (16%) flares in controls, 3/26 (12%) with 33% tapering and 6/21 (29%) with 66% tapering. Multivariate Cox analysis showed time to flare was unchanged with 33% tapering but was reduced with 66% tapering compared with controls (adjusted hazard ratio 2.81, 95% CI: 0.99, 7.94; P = 0.051). Analysing all tapered patients after controls were re-randomized (months 6–12) showed differences between groups: there were 6/48 (13%) flares with 33% tapering and 14/39 (36%) with 66% tapering. Multivariate Cox analysis showed 66% tapering reduced time to flare (adjusted hazard ratio 3.47, 95% CI: 1.26, 9.58; P = 0.016). Conclusion Tapering TNFi by 33% has no impact on disease flares and appears practical in patients in sustained remission and low disease activity states. Trail registration EudraCT, https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, 2010-020738-24; ISRCTN registry, https://www.isrctn.com, 28955701 PMID:28968858

  10. Optimizing treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis-a proof of principle and exploratory trial: is dose tapering practical in good responders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Fowzia; Lorente-Cánovas, Beatriz; Doré, Caroline J; Bosworth, Ailsa; Ma, Margaret H; Galloway, James B; Cope, Andrew P; Pande, Ira; Walker, David; Scott, David L

    2017-11-01

    RA patients receiving TNF inhibitors (TNFi) usually maintain their initial doses. The aim of the Optimizing Treatment with Tumour Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis trial was to evaluate whether tapering TNFi doses causes loss of clinical response. We enrolled RA patients receiving etanercept or adalimumab and a DMARD with DAS28 under 3.2 for over 3 months. Initially (months 0-6) patients were randomized to control (constant TNFi) or two experimental groups (tapering TNFi by 33 or 66%). Subsequently (months 6-12) control subjects were randomized to taper TNFi by 33 or 66%. Disease flares (DAS28 increasing ⩾0.6 with at least one additional swollen joint) were the primary outcome. Two hundred and forty-four patients were screened, 103 randomized and 97 treated. In months 0-6 there were 8/50 (16%) flares in controls, 3/26 (12%) with 33% tapering and 6/21 (29%) with 66% tapering. Multivariate Cox analysis showed time to flare was unchanged with 33% tapering but was reduced with 66% tapering compared with controls (adjusted hazard ratio 2.81, 95% CI: 0.99, 7.94; P = 0.051). Analysing all tapered patients after controls were re-randomized (months 6-12) showed differences between groups: there were 6/48 (13%) flares with 33% tapering and 14/39 (36%) with 66% tapering. Multivariate Cox analysis showed 66% tapering reduced time to flare (adjusted hazard ratio 3.47, 95% CI: 1.26, 9.58; P = 0.016). Tapering TNFi by 33% has no impact on disease flares and appears practical in patients in sustained remission and low disease activity states. EudraCT, https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, 2010-020738-24; ISRCTN registry, https://www.isrctn.com, 28955701. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

  11. Comparison of interferon {gamma} release assays and conventional screening tests before tumour necrosis factor {alpha} blockade in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, J

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the performance of two interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) and conventional screening tests in patients with inflammatory arthritis undergoing screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) before treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFalpha) compounds. METHODS: Successive patients were subjected to conventional LTBI screening, including a tuberculin skin test (TST). The T-SPOT.TB test was performed on all patients and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test was performed on a large subset. The results of the IGRAs were compared with the results of conventional screening tests. RESULTS: A total 150 patients were evaluated. The majority (57.9%) had rheumatoid arthritis. Previous vaccination with Bacille Calmette-Guerin was confirmed in 82% of patients. No patient had received prior anti-TB treatment. A total of 57 patients (38.0%) had at least one positive conventional risk factor. In contrast, an unequivocally positive T-SPOT.TB test was seen in only 14\\/143 (9.8%). There was 98.2% agreement between the two IGRAs. Statistically significant associations were found between each of the IGRAs and both TST and risk history, but not chest x-ray (CXR). A positive IGRA result was significantly associated with increased age. TB was not reactivated in any patient during the follow-up period. Interpretation: This study suggests that IGRAs may be useful when screening for LTBI before anti-TNFalpha therapy in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. The observations reported here also highlight the inadequate performance of CXR as a marker of LTBI.

  12. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  13. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Choi, Eun Ha; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future. (paper)

  14. Characterization of receptors for recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha from human placental membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiyer, R.A.; Aggarwal, B.B.

    1990-01-01

    High affinity receptors for recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rhTNF-alpha) were identified on membranes prepared from full term human placenta. Highly purified rhTNF-alpha iodinated by the iodogen method was found to bind placental membranes in a displaceable manner with an approximate dissociation constant (KD) of 1.9 nM. The membrane bound TNF-alpha receptor could be solubilized by several detergents with optimum extraction being obtained with 1% Triton X-100. The binding of 125I-rhTNF-alpha to the solubilized receptor was found to be time and temperature dependent, yielding maximum binding within 1 h, 24 h and 48 h at 37 degrees C, 24 degrees C and 4 degrees C, respectively. However, the maximum binding obtainable at 4 degrees C was only 40% of that at 37 degrees C. The binding 125I-rhTNF-alpha to solubilized placental membrane extracts was displaceable by unlabeled rhTNF-alpha, but not by a related protein recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-beta (rhTNF-beta; previously called lymphotoxin). This is similar to the behavior of TNF-alpha receptors derived from detergent-solubilized cell extracts, although on intact cells, both rhTNF-alpha and rhTNF-beta bind with equal affinity to TNF receptors. The Scatchard analysis of the binding data of the solubilized receptor revealed high affinity binding sites with a KD of approximately 0.5 nM and a receptor concentration of about 1 pmole/mg protein. Gel filtration of the solubilized receptor-ligand complexes on Sephacryl S-300 revealed two different peaks of radioactivity at approximate molecular masses of 50,000 Da and 400,000 Da. The 400,000 dalton peak corresponded to the receptor-ligand complex. Overall, our results suggest that high affinity receptors for TNF-alpha are present on human placental membranes and provide evidence that these receptors may be different from that of rhTNF-beta

  15. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. ..... rangement of the EGF receptor gene in primary human brain tumors ... the INK4A gene in superficial bladder tumors.

  16. Measurement of human normal tissue and tumour responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, G.; Yarnold, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The scarcity of quantitative measures of normal tissue damage and tumour response in patients undergoing radiotherapy is an obstacle to the clinical evaluation of new treatment strategies. Retrospective studies of complications in critical normal tissues taught important lessons in the past concerning the potential dangers of hypofractionation. However, it is unethical to use serious complications as planned end-points in prospective studies. This paper reviews the desirable characteristics of clinical end-points required to compare alternative treatments employing radiotherapy, with emphasis on simple scales applied by clinicians or even the patients themselves

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha modulates human in vivo lipolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plomgaard, Peter; Fischer, Christian P; Ibfelt, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Low-grade systemic inflammation is a feature of most lifestyle-related chronic diseases. Enhanced TNF-alpha concentrations have been implicated in the development of hyperlipidemia. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that an acute elevation of TNF-alpha in plasma would cause an increase...... in lipolysis, increasing circulatory free fatty acid (FFA) levels. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Using a randomized controlled, crossover design, healthy young male individuals (n = 10) received recombinant human (rh) TNF-alpha (700 ng/m(-2).h(-1)) for 4 h, and energy metabolism was evaluated using a combination...... of tracer dilution methodology and arterial-venous differences over the leg. RESULTS: Plasma TNF-alpha levels increased from 0.7 +/- 0.04 to 16.7 +/- 1.8 pg/ml, and plasma IL-6 increased from 1.0 +/- 0.2 to 9.2 +/- 1.0 pg/ml (P alpha infusion. Here, we demonstrate that 4-h rhTNF-alpha...

  18. Sources of information on lymphoma associated with anti-tumour necrosis factor agents: comparison of published case reports and cases reported to the French pharmacovigilance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théophile, Hélène; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Miremont-Salamé, Ghada; Abouelfath, Abdelilah; Kahn, Valentine; Haramburu, Françoise; Bégaud, Bernard

    2011-07-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) agents, through their intense immunoregulatory effect, have been suspected to increase the risk of malignant lymphoma. However, the classical epidemiological approaches conducted over about the last 10 years have not totally succeeded in addressing the question of a causal or artifactual association. Therefore, the analysis of a substantial set of case reports, although usually considered as poorly generalizable to the general population, could be particularly informative. Two main sources of case reports in postmarketing settings are available; publications in medical journals and reports to pharmacovigilance systems. The aim of the study was to compare the characteristics of case reports from both these sources in order to understand whether they provided the same information for the investigation of the causal link between lymphoma and anti-TNF agents. All case reports of malignant lymphoma in patients treated with an anti-TNF agent published in MEDLINE and all reports to the French pharmacovigilance system up to 1 February 2010 were identified. Cases of malignant lymphoma identified in postmarketing surveillance from both sources were compared regarding the following variables: age, sex, anti-TNF agent involved, indication for use, type of lymphoma, prior or concomitant immunosuppressive drugs and time to onset of lymphoma. A total of 81 published case reports and 61 cases reported to the French pharmacovigilance system were compared. In published reports, patients were younger (p = 0.03) and more frequently receiving a first anti-TNF treatment (p = 0.03), particularly infliximab (p = 0.03). Conversely, in the pharmacovigilance system reports, a succession of different anti-TNFs (p = 0.03) and adalimumab (p French pharmacovigilance system differed markedly for all characteristics tested, except sex and the use of prior or concomitant immunosuppressive drugs. Published case reports favoured convincing arguments

  19. An enhanced heterologous virus-like particle for human papillomavirus type 16 tumour immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairunadwa Jemon

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is caused by high-risk, cancer-causing human papillomaviruses (HPV and is the second highest cause of cancer deaths in women globally. The majority of cervical cancers express well-characterized HPV oncogenes, which are potential targets for immunotherapeutic vaccination. Here we develop a rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV virus-like particle (VLP-based vaccine designed for immunotherapy against HPV16 positive tumours. An RHDV-VLP, modified to contain the universal helper T cell epitope PADRE and decorated with an MHC I-restricted peptide (aa 48-57 from the HPV16 E6, was tested for its immunotherapeutic efficacy against the TC-1 HPV16 E6 and E7-expressing tumour in mice. The E6-RHDV-VLP-PADRE was administered therapeutically for the treatment of a pre-existing TC-1 tumour and was delivered with antibodies either to deplete regulatory T cells (anti-CD25 or to block T cell suppression mediated through CTLA-4. As a result, the tumour burden was reduced by around 50% and the median survival time of mice to the humane endpoint was almost doubled the compared to controls. The incorporation of PADRE into the RHDV-VLP was necessary for an E6-specific enhancement of the anti-tumour response and the co-administration of the immune modifying antibodies contributed to the overall efficacy of the immunotherapy. The E6-RHDV-VLP-PADRE shows immunotherapeutic efficacy, prolonging survival for HPV tumour-bearing mice. This was enhanced by the systemic administration of immune-modifying antibodies that are commercially available for use in humans. There is potential to further modify these particles for even greater efficacy in the path to development of an immunotherapeutic treatment for HPV precancerous and cancer stages.

  20. Deregulation of the RB pathway in human testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Lukas, Claudia; Sørensen, Claus S

    2003-01-01

    Deregulation of the RB pathway is shared by most human malignancies. Components upstream of the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor (pRB), namely the INK4 family of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, the D-type cyclins, their partner kinases CDK4/CDK6, and pRB as their critical substrate...

  1. Casein kinase II is elevated in solid human tumours and rapidly proliferating non-neoplastic tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münstermann, U; Fritz, G; Seitz, G

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase CKII (i.e. casein kinase II, CKII, NII) is expressed at a higher level in rapidly proliferating tissues and in solid human tumours (e.g. colorectal carcinomas) when compared to the corresponding non-neoplastic colorectal mucosa. This could be shown by (a) Western blotting of cellular...

  2. Human cytomegalovirus tegument protein pp65 is detected in all intra- and extra-axial brain tumours independent of the tumour type or grade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Libard

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV has been indicated being a significant oncomodulator. Recent reports have suggested that an antiviral treatment alters the outcome of a glioblastoma. We analysed the performance of commercial HCMV-antibodies applying the immunohistochemical (IHC methods on brain sample obtained from a subject with a verified HCMV infection, on samples obtained from 14 control subjects, and on a tissue microarray block containing cores of various brain tumours. Based on these trials, we selected the best performing antibody and analysed a cohort of 417 extra- and intra-axial brain tumours such as gliomas, medulloblastomas, primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and meningiomas. HCMV protein pp65 immunoreactivity was observed in all types of tumours analysed, and the IHC expression did not depend on the patient's age, gender, tumour type, or grade. The labelling pattern observed in the tumours differed from the labelling pattern observed in the tissue with an active HCMV infection. The HCMV protein was expressed in up to 90% of all the tumours investigated. Our results are in accordance with previous reports regarding the HCMV protein expression in glioblastomas and medulloblastomas. In addition, the HCMV protein expression was seen in primary brain lymphomas, low-grade gliomas, and in meningiomas. Our results indicate that the HCMV protein pp65 expression is common in intra- and extra-axial brain tumours. Thus, the assessment of the HCMV expression in tumours of various origins and pathologically altered tissue in conditions such as inflammation, infection, and even degeneration should certainly be facilitated.

  3. Detection of Apoptosis and Necrosis in Normal Human Lung Cells Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chwen-Ming; Ko, Wun-Chang; Yang, Liang-Yo; Lin, Chien-Ju; Wu, Jui-Sheng; Lo, Tsui-Yun; Wang, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Chien-Tsu

    2005-05-01

    This study aimed to detect apoptosis and necrosis in MRC-5, a normal human lung cell line, by using noninvasive proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). Live MRC-5 cells were processed first for 1H NMR spectroscopy; subsequently their types and the percentage of cell death were assessed on a flow cytometer. Cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) induced apoptosis and necrosis in MRC-5 cells, respectively, as revealed by phosphatidylserine externalization on a flow cytometer. The spectral intensity ratio of methylene (CH2) resonance (at 1.3 ppm) to methyl (CH3) resonance (at 0.9 ppm) was directly proportional to the percentage of apoptosis and strongly and positively correlated with PI staining after Cd treatment (r2 = 0.9868, P In contrast, this ratio only increased slightly within 2-h Hg treatment, and longer Hg exposure failed to produce further increase. Following 2-h Hg exposure, the spectral intensity of choline resonance (at 3.2 ppm) was abolished, but this phenomenon was absent in Cd-induced apoptosis. These findings together demonstrate that 1H NMR is a novel tool with a quantitative potential to distinguish apoptosis from necrosis as early as the onset of cell death in normal human lung cells.

  4. Specific Cytotoxicity Against Autologous Tumour and Proliferative Responses of Human Lymphocytes Grown in Interleukin 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-11

    reactivity against tumour cells. These cellular reagents will be useful in defining the antigenicity of human neoplasms and possibly in therapy . S, N 0) 02...Stjernswird. of human neoplasms and possibly in therapy . 1979; Vose et al., 1978; Vinky et al., 1979). Purifica- The derivation of cultured T cells...mononuclear cells were sepa- had increased 100- to 200-fold. Cells were cultured in rated by floatation on Ficoll-Hypaque (LSM, Litton- medium without IL-2 for

  5. Chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity testing of freshly explanted human tumour cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.

    1977-10-01

    In this thesis, in vitro testing for the chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity of freshly explanted human tumour cells is described. The cells were incubated with anti-tumour drugs and either a 6-day growth test performed or a clonal growth test as a measure of survival of cell reproductive capacity. It was shown that if one aims to develop a suitable in vitro method for predicting the subsequent response of human tumour cells in situ to cytotoxic chemotherapy, the test procedure must be initiated before the explanted cells have undergone significant growth in vitro. The survival of the reproductive capacity of tumour cell explants following X-radiation was also studied. Using a 'feeder' layer technique, values for the survival curve parameter Dsub(q) were in the range 400-610 rad and the values for D 0 were in the range 120-160 rad. The shape of the X-ray survival curves did not change when cells were retested after repeated subculturing in vitro. Therefore, unlike chemosensitivity measured by the same biological end-point, radiosensitivity apparently does not change once cells have reached their maximum growth potential. (UK)

  6. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our spe...

  7. Including adverse drug events in economic evaluations of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α drugs for adult rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review of economic decision analytic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, Eleanor M; Payne, Katherine; Harrison, Mark; Symmons, Deborah P M

    2014-02-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor-α drugs (anti-TNFs) have revolutionised the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). More effective than standard non-biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (nbDMARDs), anti-TNFs are also substantially more expensive. Consequently, a number of model-based economic evaluations have been conducted to establish the relative cost-effectiveness of anti-TNFs. However, anti-TNFs are associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs) such as serious infections relative to nbDMARDs. Such ADEs will likely impact on both the costs and consequences of anti-TNFs, for example, through hospitalisations and forced withdrawal from treatment. The aim of this review was to identify and critically appraise if, and how, ADEs have been incorporated into model-based cost-effectiveness analyses of anti-TNFs for adult patients with RA. A systematic literature review was performed. Electronic databases (Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid EMBASE; Web of Science; NHS Economic Evaluations Database) were searched for literature published between January 1990 and October 2013 using electronic search strategies. The reference lists of retrieved studies were also hand searched. In addition, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence technology appraisals were searched to identify economic models used to inform UK healthcare decision making. Only full economic evaluations that had used an economic model to evaluate biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) (including anti-TNFs) for adult patients with RA and had incorporated the direct costs and/or consequences of ADEs were critically appraised. To be included, studies also had to be available as a full text in English. Data extracted included general study characteristics and information concerning the methods used to incorporate ADEs and any associated assumptions made. The extracted data were synthesised using a tabular and narrative format. A total of 43 model-based economic evaluations of bDMARDs for adult RA

  8. Avascular Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Financial Reports Watchdog Ratings Feedback Contact Select Page Avascular Necrosis Home > Cancer Resources > Late Effects of Treatment > Avascular Necrosis Avascular necrosis (AVN) is a disorder resulting from ...

  9. Amperometric magnetoimmunoassay for the direct detection of tumor necrosis factor alpha biomarker in human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eletxigerra, U. [Micro-NanoFabrication Unit, IK4-Tekniker, Eibar (Spain); CIC microGUNE, Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); Martinez-Perdiguero, J. [CIC microGUNE, Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); Merino, S. [Micro-NanoFabrication Unit, IK4-Tekniker, Eibar (Spain); CIC microGUNE, Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); Villalonga, R.; Pingarrón, J.M. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Facultad de CC. Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Campuzano, S., E-mail: susanacr@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Química Analítica, Facultad de CC. Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Electrochemical magnetoimmunosensor for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) biomarker. • Sensitive and selective detection of TNFα in undiluted serum. • LOD achieved lower than the cut-off value established for relevant illnesses. • Useful and affordable alternative to ELISAs for TNFα determination in serum. - Abstract: An amperometric immunoassay for the determination of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) protein biomarker in human serum based on the use of magnetic microbeads (MBs) and disposable screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) has been developed. The specifically modified microbeads were magnetically captured on the working electrode surface and the amperometric responses were measured at −0.20 V (vs. Ag pseudo-reference electrode), upon addition of hydroquinone (HQ) as electron transfer mediator and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as the enzyme substrate. After a thorough optimization of the assay, extremely low limits of detection were achieved: 2.0 pg mL{sup −1} (36 fM) and 5.8 pg mL{sup −1} (105 fM) for standard solutions and spiked human serum, respectively. The simplicity, robustness and this clinically interesting LOD proved the developed TNFα immunoassay as a good contender for real clinical application.

  10. Amperometric magnetoimmunoassay for the direct detection of tumor necrosis factor alpha biomarker in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eletxigerra, U.; Martinez-Perdiguero, J.; Merino, S.; Villalonga, R.; Pingarrón, J.M.; Campuzano, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrochemical magnetoimmunosensor for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) biomarker. • Sensitive and selective detection of TNFα in undiluted serum. • LOD achieved lower than the cut-off value established for relevant illnesses. • Useful and affordable alternative to ELISAs for TNFα determination in serum. - Abstract: An amperometric immunoassay for the determination of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) protein biomarker in human serum based on the use of magnetic microbeads (MBs) and disposable screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) has been developed. The specifically modified microbeads were magnetically captured on the working electrode surface and the amperometric responses were measured at −0.20 V (vs. Ag pseudo-reference electrode), upon addition of hydroquinone (HQ) as electron transfer mediator and H 2 O 2 as the enzyme substrate. After a thorough optimization of the assay, extremely low limits of detection were achieved: 2.0 pg mL −1 (36 fM) and 5.8 pg mL −1 (105 fM) for standard solutions and spiked human serum, respectively. The simplicity, robustness and this clinically interesting LOD proved the developed TNFα immunoassay as a good contender for real clinical application

  11. Tumor necrosis factor alpha selectively sensitizes human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells to heat and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, G.H.; McHugh, T.; Weber, R.; Goeddel, D.V.

    1991-01-01

    We report here that infection of the human T-cell line HUT-78 with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) increases its sensitivity to heat and radiation toxicity. A possible explanation for this result may be the reduced expression of manganous superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in HIV-infected cells compared to uninfected cells. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) further sensitizes HIV-infected cells but not uninfected cells to heat and radiation. This is consistent with the ability of TNF-alpha to induce the expression of MnSOD in uninfected but not in HIV-infected cells. HIV-infected HUT-78 cell lines engineered to overexpress MnSOD are more resistant to heat and radiation than HIV-infected cells that do not overexpress MnSOD. However, treatment with TNF-alpha still sensitizes these cells to heat and radiation

  12. The acute in vitro and in vivo radiosensitivity of human lung tumour lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchesne, G.M.; Peacock, J.H.; Steel, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    Eleven human lung tumour lines have been established in xenograft or tissue culture, and the responses to acute irradiation of the 10 lines which cloned in soft agar were assayed. In vitro radiosensitivity was evaluated using the multitarget and linear quadratic models of cell survival and the surviving fraction at 2 Gy. Significant differences in the response of the different cell types were found, the large-cell phenotype exhibiting radioresistance, and small-cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas being radiosensitive. No differences in the capacity of the different tumour types to repair radiation damage were demonstrated. In vivo and spheroid response was modified by the effects of hypoxia and cell-contact phenomena. The results suggested that hyperfractionation would be useful in the clinical management of adenocarcinoma and small-cell carcinoma. (Auth.)

  13. Human α-defensin (DEFA) gene expression helps to characterise benign and malignant salivary gland tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Jochen; Wenghoefer, Matthias; Pantelis, Annette; Kraus, Dominik; Reckenbeil, Jan; Reich, Rudolf; Jepsen, Soeren; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Novak, Natalija

    2012-01-01

    Because of the infrequence of salivary gland tumours and their complex histopathological diagnosis it is still difficult to exactly predict their clinical course by means of recurrence, malignant progression and metastasis. In order to define new proliferation associated genes, purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of human α-defensins (DEFA) 1/3 and 4 in different tumour entities of the salivary glands with respect to malignancy. Tissue of salivary glands (n=10), pleomorphic adenomas (n=10), cystadenolymphomas (n=10), adenocarcinomas (n=10), adenoidcystic carcinomas (n=10), and mucoepidermoid carcinomas (n=10) was obtained during routine surgical procedures. RNA was extracted according to standard protocols. Transcript levels of DEFA 1/3 and 4 were analyzed by quantitative realtime PCR and compared with healthy salivary gland tissue. Additionally, the proteins encoded by DEFA 1/3 and DEFA 4 were visualized in paraffin-embedded tissue sections by immunohistochemical staining. Human α-defensins are traceable in healthy as well as in pathological altered salivary gland tissue. In comparison with healthy tissue, the gene expression of DEFA 1/3 and 4 was significantly (p<0.05) increased in all tumours – except for a significant decrease of DEFA 4 gene expression in pleomorphic adenomas and a similar transcript level for DEFA 1/3 compared to healthy salivary glands. A decreased gene expression of DEFA 1/3 and 4 might protect pleomorphic adenomas from malignant transformation into adenocarcinomas. A similar expression pattern of DEFA-1/3 and -4 in cystadenolymphomas and inflamed salivary glands underlines a potential importance of immunological reactions during the formation of Warthin’s tumour

  14. Detection of human cancer in an animal model using radio-labelled tumour-associated monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epenetos, A.A.; Arklie, J.; Knowles, R.W.; Bodmer, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to epithelial-cell antigenic determinants, labelled with 123 I and 125 I, were administered parenterally to immunodeficient mice bearing human tumours derived from a human cancer cell line. Anterior, posterior and lateral radioscans of the body were taken with a gamma scintillation camera at various times from immediately to 65 days after injection. Visual displays of the images were processed by standard computer techniques. The model used a human colon-cancer cell line, HT29, and the monoclonal antibody, AUAl, which is specific to an epithelial proliferating antigen. Tumour detection was achieved in all the mice. The smallest tumour detectable appeared to be about 1 mm in diameter. The degree of antibody uptake in a tumour depended on its size and the blood supply of its surrounding tissues. (author)

  15. Purification and characterization of an inhibitor (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor) for tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin obtained from the serum ultrafiltrates of human cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatanaga, Tetsuya; Whang, Chenduen; Cappuccini, F.; Lucci, J.A. III; Jeffes, E.W.B.; Kohr, W.; Lentz, R.; Tomich, J.; Yamamoto, R.S.; Granger, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Serum ultrafiltrates (SUF) from human patients with different types of cancer contain a blocking factor (BF) that inhibits the cytolytic activity of human tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in vitro. BF is a protein with a molecular mass of 28kDa on reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE). The active material was purified to homogeneity by a combination of affinity chromatography, PAGE, and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that BF is derived from the membrane TNF receptor. Purified BF blocks the lytic activity of recombinant human and mouse TNF-α and recombinant human lymphotoxin activity of TNF-α and recombinant human lymphotoxin on murine L929 cells in vitro. However, BF inhibits the lytic activity of TNF-α more effectively than it does that of lymphotoxin. The BF also inhibits the necrotizing activity of recombinant human TNF-α when coinjected into established cutaneous Meth A tumors in BALB/c mice. The BF may have an important role in (i) the regulation and control of TNF-α and lymphotoxin activity in cancer patients, (ii) interaction between the tumor and the host antitumor mechanisms, and (iii) use of systemically administered TNF-α in clinical trials with human cancer patients

  16. DNA fragmentation and cytotoxicity by recombinant human tumor necrosis factor in L929 fibroblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaka, T.; Kuwabara, M.; Koide, F.

    1992-01-01

    Induction of cell DNA fragmentation by treatment of recombinant human Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (rhTNF alpha) was examined by using mouse L929 cells derived from mouse fibroblast cells. The amount of DNA fragments derived from rhTNF alpha-treated cells, detected by alkaline elution technique, was smaller than that derived from X-irradiated cells. The rhTNF alpha caused the DNA fragmentation depending on its incubation time and concentration. The DNA damage caused by rhTNF alpha treatment correlated with its cytotoxicity. This result suggested that the DNA fragmentation is one of causes of cell death. The treatment with proteinase K of DNA obtained from rhTNF alpha-treated cells did not increase the amount of DNA fragmentation, which indicates that rhTNF alpha causes DNA-fragmentation but not DNA-protein cross-linking

  17. Human tumour xenografts established and serially transplanted in mice immunologically deprived by thymectomy, cytosine arabinoside and whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.J.; Thomas, J.M.; Peckham, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Mice immunologically deprived by thymectomy, cytosine arabinoside treatment and whole-body irradiation were used to study the growth of human tumours as xenografts. 10/16 melanoma biopsies, 4/13 ovarian carcinoma biopsies and 3/6 uterine cancer biopsies grew as serially transplantable xenograft lines. The tumour lines were studied through serial passages by histology, histo-chemistry, electron microscopy, chromosome analysis, immune fluorescence, growth rate measurement and mitotic counts. They retained the characteristics of the tumours of origin, with the exception of loss of pigmentation in two melanomas, histological dedifferentiation in the uterine carcinomas, and increased mitotic frequency and growth rate in some melanomas. It was concluded that this type of animal preparation is as useful as alternative methods of immunological deprivation, or as athymic nude mice, for the growth of human tumour xenografts, at least for some experimental purposes. (author)

  18. Scintigraphic assessment of vascularity and blood-tissue barrier of human brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Front, D.

    1978-01-01

    Assessment of vascularity and blood-tissue barrier was performed by sequential scintigraphy in 43 patients with brain tumours. The blood-tumour barrier was evaluated by use of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate, and vascularity using sup(99m)Tc-labelled red blood cells. Three groups of tumours were found: tumours with low vascularity and permeable barrier, tumours with high vascularity and permeable barrier, and tumours with low vascularity and relatively impermeable barrier. The first group indicates that when vessels are permeable, there may be a rapid penetration of large amounts of pertechnetate into the tumour even when vascularity is not increased. In the other two groups penetration of pertechnetate into the tumour is affected by vascularity, as it determines the total area where passage of the radiopharmaceutical takes place. It is suggested that the permeability of the blood-tumour barrier and the amount of vascularity may have an effect on the success of chemotherapy in brain tumours. (author)

  19. Early death, late death and repair factor in three human tumour cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courdi, A.; Gioanni, J.; Mari, D.; Chauvel, P.

    1997-01-01

    The in vivo colony method used to generate survival curves following exposure to ionizing irradiation allows to score large clones, representing surviving cells, and small colonies, representing late reproductive death. By subtraction, early-dying cells can be estimated. In the three human tumour cell lines examined, we have observed that early cell death is a major mode of action of irradiation. The contribution of early cell death to total mortality increases as the dose increases. Moreover, repair due to dose-splitting and delayed plating in densely-inhibited cells is not observed in early-dying cells. (authors)

  20. Inhibitory effects of CP on the growth of human gastric adenocarcinoma BGC-823 tumours in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Jun; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Bao-Jun; Zhang, Zhan-Xue; Li, Ai-Ying; An, Ran; Yue, Bin; Fan, Li-Qiao; Li, Yong

    2018-05-01

    Objective To investigate the potential antitumour effects of [2-(6-amino-purine-9-yl)-1-hydroxy-phosphine acyl ethyl] phosphonic acid (CP) against gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods Human BGC-823 xenotransplants were established in nude mice. Animals were randomly divided into control and CP groups, which were administered NaHCO 3 vehicle alone or CP dissolved in NaHCO 3 (200 µg/kg body weight) daily, respectively. Tumour volume was measured weekly for 6 weeks. Resected tumours were assayed for proliferative activity with anti-Ki-67 or anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) antibodies. Cell apoptosis was examined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assays and with caspase-3 immunostaining. Proteins were measured by Western blotting. Results There was a significant reduction in tumour volume and a reduced percentage of Ki-67-positive or PCNA-positive cells in the CP group compared with the control group. The percentage of TUNEL-positive or caspase 3-positive cells significantly increased following CP treatment compared with the control group. Tumours from the CP group had higher levels of phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and phosphorylated-AKT (p-AKT) compared with control tumours. Conclusion CP treatment inhibited tumour growth and induced tumour cell apoptosis in a nude mouse model of BGC-823 gastric adenocarcinoma. Activation of the AKT and ERK signalling pathways may mediate this antitumour activity.

  1. Ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation and morphological changes in response to the tumour promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate in primary human tumour cells, established and transformed cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rance, A J; Thönnes, M; Issinger, O G

    1985-01-01

    lifespan (fibroblasts, primary human tumour cells) can be mimicked by unknown steps also associated with immortalization (establishment function) and the transformed state of the tumour cells. Another interesting observation were morphological changes of the established and SV40-transformed cells which...

  2. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidants status in human malignant and non-malignant thyroid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, J A; Neelamohan, R; Suthagar, E; Vengatesh, G; Jayakumar, J; Chandrasekaran, M; Banu, S K; Aruldhas, M M

    2016-06-01

    Thyroid epithelial cells produce moderate amounts of reactive oxygen species that are physiologically required for thyroid hormone synthesis. Nevertheless, when they are produced in excessive amounts, they may become toxic. The present study is aimed to compare the lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes - superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and non-protein thiols (reduced glutathione (GSH)) in human thyroid tissues with malignant and non-malignant disorders. The study used human thyroid tissues and blood samples from 157 women (147 diseased and 10 normal). Thyroid hormones, oxidative stress markers and antioxidants were estimated by standard methods. LPO significantly increased in most of the papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC: 82.9%) and follicular thyroid adenoma (FTA: 72.9%) tissues, whilst in a majority of nodular goitre (69.2%) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT: 73.7%) thyroid tissues, it remained unaltered. GSH increased in PTC (55.3%), remained unaltered in FTA (97.3%) and all other goiter samples studied. SOD increased in PTC (51.1%) and all other malignant thyroid tissues studied. CAT remained unaltered in PTC (95.7%), FTA (97.3%) and all other non-malignant samples (HT, MNG, TMNG) studied. GPx increased in PTC (63.8%), all other malignant thyroid tissues and remained unaltered in many of the FTA (91.9%) tissues and all other non-malignant samples (HT, MNG, TMNG) studied. In the case of non-malignant thyroid tumours, the oxidant-antioxidant balance was undisturbed, whilst in malignant tumours the balance was altered, and the change in r value observed in the LPO and SOD pairs between normal and PTC tissues and also in many pairs with multi-nodular goitre (MNG)/toxic MNG tissues may be used as a marker to differentiate/detect different malignant/non-malignant thyroid tumours. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand triggers apoptosis in dividing but not in differentiating human epidermal keratinocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Bastiaan J. H.; van Ruissen, Fred; Cerneus, Stefanie; Cloin, Wendy; Bergers, Mieke; van Erp, Piet E. J.; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2003-01-01

    Using serial analysis of gene expression we have previously identified the expression of several pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes in cultured human primary epidermal keratinocytes, including tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). TRAIL is a potent inducer of apoptosis

  4. Tumour localization and pharmacokinetics of iodine-125 human monoclonal IgM antibody (COU-1) and its monomeric and half-monomeric fragments analysed in nude mice grafted with human tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditzel, H.; Erb, K.; Rasmussen, J.W.; Jensenius, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Human monoclonal IgM antibodies reactive with cancer-associated antigens may not have the optimal imaging capability due to their large size. Fragmentation of human IgM is less than straight-forward due to the loss of immunoreactivity. From the human monoclonal IgM antibody COU-1 we have prepared monomeric and half-monomeric fragments, which retain the ability to bind to colon cancer cells in vitro. The pharmacokinetics and tumour localization were evaluated in nude mice bearing human colon adenocarcinoma and human melanoma grafts. Faster clearance from the circulation was seen for the smaller half-monomeric fragment with a half-life (rapid phase/slow phase) of 2 h/16 h compared with the intact antibody, 4 h/25 h, and the monomeric fragment, 3 h/27 h. Intact COU-1 as well as the fragments accumulated in the colon tumour graft. Higher amounts of radioactivity were found in the colon tumour as compared to normal organs for intact COU-1 at days 4 and 6, for the monomeric fragment at day 4, and for the half-monomeric fragment at day 2 after injection. This investigation demonstrates the favourable biodistribution of the half monomeric COU-1 fragment. The fast clearance of this fragment resulted in a tumour-to-muscle ratio as high as 22 on day 2 after injection. Also, only this fragment gave a positive tumour-to-blood ratio. Normal IgM and its fragments were used as controls. Radioimmunoscintigraphy demonstrated the colon tumour discriminatory properties of each of the three iodine-labelled antibody preparations. The results compare favourably with previously reported investigations of the localization of human monoclonal antibodies and suggest that fragments of human monoclonal IgM antibodies may be useful tools for the immunodetection of cancer in patients. (orig.)

  5. 31P NMR spectroscopy studies of phospholipid metabolism in human melanoma xenograft lines differing in rate of tumour cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyng, H; Olsen, D R; Petersen, S B; Rofstad, E K

    1995-04-01

    The concentration of phospholipid metabolites in tumours has been hypothesized to be related to rate of cell membrane turnover and may reflect rate of cell proliferation. The purpose of the study reported here was to investigate whether 31P NMR resonance ratios involving the phosphomonoester (PME) or phosphodiester (PDE) resonance are correlated to fraction of cells in S-phase or volume-doubling time in experimental tumours. Four human melanoma xenograft lines (BEX-t, HUX-t, SAX-t, WIX-t) were included in the study. The tumours were grown subcutaneously in male BALB/c-nu/nu mice. 31P NMR spectroscopy was performed at a magnetic field strength of 4.7 T. Fraction of cells in S-phase was measured by flow cytometry. Tumour volume-doubling time was determined by Gompertzian analysis of volumetric growth data. BEX-t and SAX-t tumours differed in fraction of cells in S-phase and volume-doubling time, but showed similar 31P NMR resonance ratios. BEX-t and WIX-t tumours showed significantly different 31P NMR resonance ratios but similar fractions of cells in S-phase. The 31P NMR resonance ratios were significantly different for small and large HUX-t tumours even though fraction of cells in S-phase and volume-doubling time did not differ with tumour volume. None of the 31P NMR resonance ratios showed significant increase with increasing fraction of cells in S-phase or significant decrease with increasing tumour volume-doubling time across the four xenograft lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Modification of nucleotide metabolism in relationship with differentiation and in response to irradiation in human tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Shuang

    1998-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the metabolism of nucleotides in human tumour cells. The first part addresses the modifications of nucleotide (more specifically purine) metabolism in relationship with human melanoma cell proliferation and differentiation. The second part addresses the modifications of this metabolism in response to an irradiation in human colon tumour cells. For each part, the author proposes a bibliographic synthesis, and a presentation of studied cells and of methods used to grow cells, and respectively to proliferate and differentiate them or to irradiate them, and then discusses the obtained results [fr

  7. Gene Expression Changes in Femoral Head Necrosis of Human Bone Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadett Balla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH is the result of an interruption of the local circulation and the injury of vascular supply of bone. Multiple factors have been implicated in the development of the disease. However the mechanism of ischemia and necrosis in non-traumatic ONFH is not clear. The aim of our investigation was to identify genes that are differently expressed in ONFH vs. non-ONFH human bone and to describe the relationships between these genes using multivariate data analysis. Six bone tissue samples from ONFH male patients and 8 bone tissue samples from non-ONFH men were examined. The expression differences of selected 117 genes were analyzed by TaqMan probe-based quantitative real-time RT-PCR system. The significance test indicated marked differences in the expression of nine genes between ONFH and non-ONFH individuals. These altered genes code for collagen molecules, an extracellular matrix digesting metalloproteinase, a transcription factor, an adhesion molecule, and a growth factor. Canonical variates analysis demonstrated that ONFH and non-ONFH bone tissues can be distinguished by the multiple expression profile analysis of numerous genes controlled via canonical TGFB pathway as well as genes coding for extracellular matrix composing collagen type molecules. The markedly altered gene expression profile observed in the ONFH of human bone tissue may provide further insight into the pathogenetic process of osteonecrotic degeneration of bone.

  8. Modelling cell population growth with applications to cancer therapy in human tumour cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Britta; Baguley, Bruce C; Marshall, Elaine S; Wake, Graeme C; Wall, David J N

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the work undertaken to model a population of cells and the effects of cancer therapy. We began with a theoretical one compartment size structured cell population model and investigated its asymptotic steady size distributions (SSDs) (On a cell growth model for plankton, MMB JIMA 21 (2004) 49). However these size distributions are not similar to the DNA (size) distributions obtained experimentally via the flow cytometric analysis of human tumour cell lines (data obtained from the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, New Zealand). In our one compartment model, size was a generic term, but in order to obtain realistic steady size distributions we chose size to be DNA content and devised a multi-compartment mathematical model for the cell division cycle where each compartment corresponds to a distinct phase of the cell cycle (J. Math. Biol. 47 (2003) 295). We then incorporated another compartment describing the possible induction of apoptosis (cell death) from mitosis phase (Modelling cell death in human tumour cell lines exposed to anticancer drug paclitaxel, J. Math. Biol. 2004, in press). This enabled us to compare our model to flow cytometric data of a melanoma cell line where the anticancer drug, paclitaxel, had been added. The model gives a dynamic picture of the effects of paclitaxel on the cell cycle. We hope to use the model to describe the effects of other cancer therapies on a number of different cell lines. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC

  10. Human papilloma viruses and cervical tumours: mapping of integration sites and analysis of adjacent cellular sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, Eugene; Vinokourova, Svetlana; Moisjak, Elena; Rakhmanaliev, Elian; Kobseva, Vera; Laimins, Laimonis; Kisseljov, Fjodor; Sulimova, Galina

    2002-01-01

    In cervical tumours the integration of human papilloma viruses (HPV) transcripts often results in the generation of transcripts that consist of hybrids of viral and cellular sequences. Mapping data using a variety of techniques has demonstrated that HPV integration occurred without obvious specificity into human genome. However, these techniques could not demonstrate whether integration resulted in the generation of transcripts encoding viral or viral-cellular sequences. The aim of this work was to map the integration sites of HPV DNA and to analyse the adjacent cellular sequences. Amplification of the INTs was done by the APOT technique. The APOT products were sequenced according to standard protocols. The analysis of the sequences was performed using BLASTN program and public databases. To localise the INTs PCR-based screening of GeneBridge4-RH-panel was used. Twelve cellular sequences adjacent to integrated HPV16 (INT markers) expressed in squamous cell cervical carcinomas were isolated. For 11 INT markers homologous human genomic sequences were readily identified and 9 of these showed significant homologies to known genes/ESTs. Using the known locations of homologous cDNAs and the RH-mapping techniques, mapping studies showed that the INTs are distributed among different human chromosomes for each tumour sample and are located in regions with the high levels of expression. Integration of HPV genomes occurs into the different human chromosomes but into regions that contain highly transcribed genes. One interpretation of these studies is that integration of HPV occurs into decondensed regions, which are more accessible for integration of foreign DNA

  11. Mendelian analysis of a metastasis-prone substrain of BALB/c nude mice using a subcutaneously inoculated human tumour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, M; Brünner, N; Spang-Thomsen, M

    2006-01-01

    Most nude mice do not allow the formation of metastases after heterotransplantation of human malignant tumours. Here we describe a substrain of BALB/c nude mice (BALB/c/AnNCr) that reproducibly allows some human cancers to metastasize. By Mendelian analysis of hybrids between this substrain and C57...

  12. Prevention and treatment of colon cancer by peroral administration of HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthia, Manoj; Storm, Petter; Nadeem, Aftab; Hsiung, Sabrina; Svanborg, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Most colon cancers start with dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signalling and remain a major therapeutic challenge. Examining whether HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells) may be used for colon cancer treatment is logical, based on the properties of the complex and its biological context. To investigate if HAMLET can be used for colon cancer treatment and prevention. Apc(Min)(/+) mice, which carry mutations relevant to hereditary and sporadic human colorectal tumours, were used as a model for human disease. HAMLET was given perorally in therapeutic and prophylactic regimens. Tumour burden and animal survival of HAMLET-treated and sham-fed mice were compared. Tissue analysis focused on Wnt/β-catenin signalling, proliferation markers and gene expression, using microarrays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Confocal microscopy, reporter assay, immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, ion flux assays and holographic imaging were used to determine effects on colon cancer cells. Peroral HAMLET administration reduced tumour progression and mortality in Apc(Min)(/+) mice. HAMLET accumulated specifically in tumour tissue, reduced β-catenin and related tumour markers. Gene expression analysis detected inhibition of Wnt signalling and a shift to a more differentiated phenotype. In colon cancer cells with APC mutations, HAMLET altered β-catenin integrity and localisation through an ion channel-dependent pathway, defining a new mechanism for controlling β-catenin signalling. Remarkably, supplying HAMLET to the drinking water from the time of weaning also significantly prevented tumour development. These data identify HAMLET as a new, peroral agent for colon cancer prevention and treatment, especially needed in people carrying APC mutations, where colon cancer remains a leading cause of death.

  13. Selective targeting of tumour neovasculature by a radiohalogenated human antibody fragment specific for the ED-B domain of fibronectin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demartis, S.; Tarli, L.; Neri, D.; Borsi, L.; Zardi, L.

    2001-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a characteristic feature of many aggressive tumours and other disorders. Antibodies capable of binding to new blood vessels, but not to mature vessels, could be used as selective targeting agents for immunoscintigraphic and radioimmunotherapeutic applications. Here we show that scFv(L19), a recombinant human antibody fragment with sub-nanomolar affinity for the ED-B domain of fibronectin, a marker of angiogenesis, can be stably labelled with iodine-125 and astatine-211 with full retention of immunoreactivity, using a trimethyl-stannyl benzoate bifunctional derivative. Biodistribution studies in mice bearing two different types of tumour grafted subcutaneously, followed by ex vivo micro-autoradiographic analysis, revealed that scFv(L19) rapidly localises around tumour blood vessels, but not around normal vessels. Four hours after intravenous injection of the stably radioiodinated scFv(L19), tumour to blood ratios were 6:1 in mice bearing the F9 murine teratocarcinoma and 9:1 in mice bearing an FE8 rat sarcoma. As expected, all other organs (including kidney) contained significantly less radioactivity than the tumour. Since the ED-B domain of fibronectin has an identical sequence in mouse and man, scFv(L19) is a pan-species antibody and the results presented here suggest clinical utility of radiolabelled scFv(L19) for the scintigraphic detection of angiogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, it should now be possible to investigate scFv(L19) for the selective delivery of 211 At to the tumour neovasculature, causing the selective death of tumour endothelial cells and tumour collapse. (orig.)

  14. Potentially lethal damage repair in cell lines of radioresistant human tumours and normal skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchese, M.J.; Minarik, L.; Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation cell survival data were obtained in vitro for three cell lines isolated from human tumours traditionally considered to be radioresistant-two melanomas and one osteosarcoma-as well as from a diploid skin fibroblast cell line. One melanoma cell line was much more radioresistant than the other, while the osteosarcoma and fibroblast cell lines were more radiosensitive than either. For cells growing exponentially, little potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) could be demonstrated by comparing survival data for cells in which subculture was delayed by 6 h with those sub-cultured immediately after treatment. For the malignant cells in plateau phase, which in these cells might be better termed 'slowed growth phase', since an appreciable fraction of the cells are still cycling, a small amount of PLDR was observed, but not as much as reported by other investigators in the literature. The normal fibroblasts, which achieved a truer plateau phase in terms of noncycling cells, showed a significantly larger amount of PLDR than the tumour cells. (author)

  15. Lethality of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human tumour cell lines with different radiosensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco-Martin, J M; Ottenheim, C P; Bartelink, H; Begg, A C

    1996-03-01

    In order to find an explanation for the eventual disappearance of all chromosome aberrations in two radiosensitive human tumour cell lines, the type and stability of different aberration types was investigated in more detail. To classify the aberrations into unstable and stable types, three-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed, including a whole-chromosome probe, a pancentromere probe, and a stain for total DNA. This technique enables the appropriate classification of the aberrations principally by the presence (stable) or not (unstable) of a single centromere per chromosome. Unstable-type aberrations were found to disappear within 7 days (several divisions) in the two radiosensitive and the two radioresistant tumour lines investigated. Stable-type aberrations were found to remain at an approximately constant level over the duration of the experiment (14 days; 8-10 divisions) in the two radioresistant lines. In contrast, the majority of these stable-type aberrations had disappeared by 14 days in the two radiosensitive lines. The previous findings of disappearance of total aberrations in radiosensitive cells was therefore not due to a reduced induction of stable-type aberrations, but the complete disappearance of cells with this aberration type. These results could not be explained by differences in apoptosis or G1 blocks. Two possible explanations for these unexpected findings involve non-random induction of unstable-type aberrations, or lethality of stable-type aberrations. The results suggest caution in the use of stable-type aberration numbers as a predictor for radiosensitivity.

  16. Immunity to tumour antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Geng; Ali, Selman A; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Mian, Shahid; Ahmad, Murrium; Miles, Amanda; Rees, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade, a large number of human tumour antigens have been identified. These antigens are classified as tumour-specific shared antigens, tissue-specific differentiation antigens, overexpressed antigens, tumour antigens resulting from mutations, viral antigens and fusion proteins. Antigens recognised by effectors of immune system are potential targets for antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy. However, most tumour antigens are self-proteins and are generally of low immunogenicity and the immune response elicited towards these tumour antigens is not always effective. Strategies to induce and enhance the tumour antigen-specific response are needed. This review will summarise the approaches to discovery of tumour antigens, the current status of tumour antigens, and their potential application to cancer treatment.

  17. Effect of tumour promoter iodoacetate on γ-radiation induced chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjaria, K.B.; Shirsath, K.B.; Bhat, N.N.; Sreedevi, B.

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that tumour-promoting agents potentiate a number of genetic events induced by initiating agents in vitro Iodoacetate (IA) is reported to be a tumour promoter of moderate potency and although to the best of our knowledge, tumour promoting ability of IA in animals has not been reported, a large number of studies have reported various types of effects of IA, which may result in tumour promotion. In this paper, the modifying effects of tumour promoter IA on radiation induced dicentrics in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been reported

  18. Tribological changes in the articular cartilage of a human femoral head with avascular necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eun-Min; Shrestha, Suman K; Duong, Cong-Truyen; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Kim, Tae-Woo; Vijayachandra, Ayyappan; Thompson, Mark S; Cho, Myung Guk; Park, Sungchan; Kim, Kwanghoon; Park, Seonghun; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2015-06-29

    The present study evaluated the tribological properties of the articular cartilage surface of the human femoral head with postcollapse stage avascular necrosis (AVN) using atomic force microscopy. The cartilage surface in the postcollapse stage AVN of the femoral head was reported to resemble those of disuse conditions, which suggests that the damage could be reversible and offers the possibilities of success of head-sparing surgeries. By comparing the tribological properties of articular cartilage in AVN with that of osteoarthritis, the authors intended to understand the cartilage degeneration mechanism and reversibility of AVN. Human femoral heads with AVN were explanted from the hip replacement surgery of four patients (60-83 years old). Nine cylindrical cartilage samples (diameter, 5 mm and height, 0.5 mm) were sectioned from the weight-bearing areas of the femoral head with AVN, and the cartilage surface was classified according to the Outerbridge Classification System (AVN0, normal; AVN1, softening and swelling; and AVN2, partial thickness defect and fissuring). Tribological properties including surface roughness and frictional coefficients and histochemistry including Safranin O and lubricin staining were compared among the three groups. The mean surface roughness Rq values of AVN cartilage increased significantly with increasing Outerbridge stages: Rq = 137 ± 26 nm in AVN0, Rq = 274 ± 49 nm in AVN1, and Rq = 452 ± 77 nm in AVN2. Significant differences in Rq were observed among different Outerbridge stages in all cases (p AVN0, μ = 0.143 ± 0.025 in AVN1, and μ = 0.171 ± 0.039 in AVN2. Similarly to the statistical analysis of surface roughness, significant statistical differences were detected between different Outerbridge stages in all cases (p AVN. The underlying mechanism of these results can be related to proteoglycan loss within the articular cartilage that is also observed in osteoarthritis. With regard to the tribological properties, the

  19. Comparative Biochemical and Functional Analysis of Viral and Human Secreted Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Decoy Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontejo, Sergio M.; Alejo, Ali; Alcami, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The blockade of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by etanercept, a soluble version of the human TNF receptor 2 (hTNFR2), is a well established strategy to inhibit adverse TNF-mediated inflammatory responses in the clinic. A similar strategy is employed by poxviruses, encoding four viral TNF decoy receptor homologues (vTNFRs) named cytokine response modifier B (CrmB), CrmC, CrmD, and CrmE. These vTNFRs are differentially expressed by poxviral species, suggesting distinct immunomodulatory properties. Whereas the human variola virus and mouse ectromelia virus encode one vTNFR, the broad host range cowpox virus encodes all vTNFRs. We report the first comprehensive study of the functional and binding properties of these four vTNFRs, providing an explanation for their expression profile among different poxviruses. In addition, the vTNFRs activities were compared with the hTNFR2 used in the clinic. Interestingly, CrmB from variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, is the most potent TNFR of those tested here including hTNFR2. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new immunomodulatory activity of vTNFRs, showing that CrmB and CrmD also inhibit the activity of lymphotoxin β. Similarly, we report for the first time that the hTNFR2 blocks the biological activity of lymphotoxin β. The characterization of vTNFRs optimized during virus-host evolution to modulate the host immune response provides relevant information about their potential role in pathogenesis and may be used to improve anti-inflammatory therapies based on soluble decoy TNFRs. PMID:25940088

  20. Comparative Biochemical and Functional Analysis of Viral and Human Secreted Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Decoy Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontejo, Sergio M; Alejo, Ali; Alcami, Antonio

    2015-06-26

    The blockade of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by etanercept, a soluble version of the human TNF receptor 2 (hTNFR2), is a well established strategy to inhibit adverse TNF-mediated inflammatory responses in the clinic. A similar strategy is employed by poxviruses, encoding four viral TNF decoy receptor homologues (vTNFRs) named cytokine response modifier B (CrmB), CrmC, CrmD, and CrmE. These vTNFRs are differentially expressed by poxviral species, suggesting distinct immunomodulatory properties. Whereas the human variola virus and mouse ectromelia virus encode one vTNFR, the broad host range cowpox virus encodes all vTNFRs. We report the first comprehensive study of the functional and binding properties of these four vTNFRs, providing an explanation for their expression profile among different poxviruses. In addition, the vTNFRs activities were compared with the hTNFR2 used in the clinic. Interestingly, CrmB from variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, is the most potent TNFR of those tested here including hTNFR2. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new immunomodulatory activity of vTNFRs, showing that CrmB and CrmD also inhibit the activity of lymphotoxin β. Similarly, we report for the first time that the hTNFR2 blocks the biological activity of lymphotoxin β. The characterization of vTNFRs optimized during virus-host evolution to modulate the host immune response provides relevant information about their potential role in pathogenesis and may be used to improve anti-inflammatory therapies based on soluble decoy TNFRs. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells and associates with the nucleus in response to tumour necrosis factor α signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Catherine A.; Sun Zhong; Cliche, Dominic O.; Ming, Hong; Eshaque, Bithi; Jin Songmu; Hopkins, Marianne T.; Thai, Boun; Thompson, John E.

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is thought to function as a nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein. There are reports of its involvement in cell proliferation, and more recently it has also been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the effects of eIF5A over-expression on apoptosis and of siRNA-mediated suppression of eIF5A on expression of the tumour suppressor protein, p53. Over-expression of either eIF5A or a mutant of eIF5A incapable of being hypusinated was found to induce apoptosis in colon carcinoma cells. Our results also indicate that eIF5A is required for expression of p53 following the induction of apoptosis by treatment with Actinomycin D. Depiction of eIF5A localization by indirect immunofluorescence has indicated, for the first time, that the protein is rapidly translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus by death receptor activation or following treatment with Actinomycin D. These findings collectively indicate that unhypusinated eIF5A may have pro-apoptotic functions and that eIF5A is rapidly translocated to the nucleus following the induction of apoptotic cell death

  2. Interactive toxicity of inorganic mercury and trichloroethylene in rat and human proximal tubules: Effects on apoptosis, necrosis, and glutathione status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lash, Lawrence H.; Putt, David A.; Hueni, Sarah E.; Payton, Scott G.; Zwickl, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    Simultaneous or prior exposure to one chemical may alter the concurrent or subsequent response to another chemical, often in unexpected ways. This is particularly true when the two chemicals share common mechanisms of action. The present study uses the paradigm of prior exposure to study the interactive toxicity between inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ) and trichloroethylene (TRI) or its metabolite S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) in rat and human proximal tubule. Pretreatment of rats with a subtoxic dose of Hg 2+ increased expression of glutathione S-transferase-α1 (GSTα1) but decreased expression of GSTα2, increased activities of several GSH-dependent enzymes, and increased GSH conjugation of TRI. Primary cultures of rat proximal tubular (rPT) cells exhibited both necrosis and apoptosis after incubation with Hg 2+ . Pretreatment of human proximal tubular (hPT) cells with Hg 2+ caused little or no changes in GST expression or activities of GSH-dependent enzymes, decreased apoptosis induced by TRI or DCVC, but increased necrosis induced by DCVC. In contrast, pretreatment of hPT cells with TRI or DCVC protected from Hg 2+ by decreasing necrosis and increasing apoptosis. Thus, whereas pretreatment of hPT cells with Hg 2+ exacerbated cellular injury due to TRI or DCVC by shifting the response from apoptosis to necrosis, pretreatment of hPT cells with either TRI or DCVC protected from Hg 2+ -induced cytotoxicity by shifting the response from necrosis to apoptosis. These results demonstrate that by altering processes related to GSH status, susceptibilities of rPT and hPT cells to acute injury from Hg 2+ , TRI, or DCVC are markedly altered by prior exposures

  3. Human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in the etiology of testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Hørding, U; Nielsen, H W

    1994-01-01

    sequences of two viruses with known transforming abilities, human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used. In none of the 19 successfully amplified samples were DNA sequences of HPV type 16 or type 18 detected. In six cases a faint trace......Epidemiological features suggest that the risk of testicular cancer may be related to exposure to unknown infectious agents, including viruses. Therefore a series of twenty specimens of testicular germ cell tumours, including preinvasive carcinoma in-situ, were tested for the presence of DNA...... of EBV DNA was revealed in one of two experiments. These samples were examined by immunohistochemical staining with specific antibodies raised against the EBV protein products and in-situ hybridization with specific molecular probes, and were confirmed to be negative. The study indicates...

  4. Leonurine protects against tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated inflammation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhua; Pan, Lilong; Wang, Xianli; Gong, Qihai; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2012-05-01

    Leonurine, a bioactive alkaloid compound in Herba leonuri, has various pharmacological activities, including antioxidant and anti-apoptotic capacities. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that leonurine was able to attenuate tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) activation and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) activation, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, and inflammatory mediators expression were detected by Western blot or enzyme-liked immunosorbent assay, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NF-κB p65 translocation were measured by immunofluorescence, endothelial cell-monocyte interaction was detected by microscope. Leonurine inhibited U937 cells adhesion to TNF-α-activated HUVEC in a concentration dependent manner. Treatment with leonurine blocked TNF-α-induced mRNA and protein expression of adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1), cyclooxygenase-2, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in endothelial cells. In addition, leonurine attenuated TNF-α-induced intracellular ROS production in HUVEC. Furthermore, leonurine also suppressed the TNF-α-activated p38 phosphorylation and IκBα degradation. Subsequently, reduced NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and DNA-binding activity were also observed. Our results demonstrated for the first time that the anti-inflammatory properties of leonurine in endothelial cells, at least in part, through suppression of NF-κB activation, which may have a potential therapeutic use for inflammatory vascular diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor expression in patients with cervical human papillomavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cacilda Tezelli Junqueira Padovani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The progression of human papillomavirus (HPV infection in the anogenital tract has been associated with the involvement of cells with regulatory properties. Evidence has shown that glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR is an important surface molecule for the characterization of these cells and proposes that GITR ligand may constitute a rational treatment for many cancer types. We aimed to detect the presence of GITR and CD25 in cervical stroma cells with and without pathological changes or HPV infection to better understand the immune response in the infected tissue microenvironment. Methods We subjected 49 paraffin-embedded cervical tissue samples to HPV DNA detection and histopathological analysis, and subsequently immunohistochemistry to detect GITR and CD25 in lymphocytes. Results We observed that 76.9% of all samples with high GITR expression were HPV-positive regardless of histopathological findings. High GITR expression (77.8% was predominant in samples with ≥1,000 RLU/PCB. Of the HPV-positive samples negative for intraepithelial lesion and malignancy, 62.5% had high GITR expression. High GITR expression was observed in both carcinoma and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL samples (p = 0.16. CD25 was present in great quantities in all samples. Conclusions The predominance of high GITR expression in samples with high viral load that were classified as HSIL and carcinoma suggests that GITR+ cells can exhibit regulatory properties and may contribute to the progression of HPV-induced cervical neoplasia, emphasizing the importance of GITR as a potential target for immune therapy of cervical cancer and as a disease evolution biomarker.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraiolo, B.L.; Moore, J.A.; Crase, D.; Gribling, P.; Wilking, H.; Baughman, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The serum pharmacokinetics and the major organs of accumulation of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rHuTNF) were determined in BDF1 mice after intravenous and intramuscular administration. Serum concentrations of immunoreactive protein were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and radioactivity was quantitated by beta and gamma scintigraphy. The serum pharmacokinetics of labeled and unlabeled rHuTNF were identical when administered by the intravenous route. After intravenous doses of 165 to 320 micrograms/kg, the clearance was 2.9-3.6 ml/hr, the initial volume of distribution was 1.4-1.6 ml (70-80 ml/kg), and the half-life was 18.5-19.2 min. Intramuscular administration of 320 micrograms/kg resulted in a peak serum concentration of 112 ng/ml. The time of the peak concentration was 1 hr, and the bioavailability of the intramuscular dose was 12%. The data suggest that the disposition of this protein may be biexponential. If this is the case, the terminal phase would appear to account for less than 1% of the total AUC. Since serum concentrations in the terminal phase are at the sensitivity limit of the assay, a single half-life is reported. 125I-Labeled and metabolically labeled 3H-rHuTNF were used to examine tissue distribution. After intravenous 125I-rHuTNF administration, the rank order of accumulation of the 125I-radiolabel in the major organs (per cent dose per organ over 1440 min) was: liver greater than kidney greater than lung greater than heart greater than spleen. This rank order of accumulation was confirmed by intravenous 3H-rHuTNF administration

  7. Free hemoglobin enhances tumor necrosis factor-alpha production in isolated human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Eddy H; Gordon, Laura E; Richardson, J David; Polk, Hiram C

    2002-03-01

    A systemic inflammatory response (SIR) is seen in approximately 75% of patients with complex blunt liver injuries treated nonoperatively. Many feel this response is caused by blood, bile, and necrotic tissue accumulation in the peritoneal cavity. Our current treatment for these patients is a delayed laparoscopic washout of the peritoneal cavity, resulting in a dramatic resolution of the SIR. Spectrophotometric analysis of the intraperitoneal fluid has confirmed the presence of high concentrations of free hemoglobin (Hb). We hypothesize that free Hb enhances the local peritoneal response by increasing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production by monocytes, contributing to the local inflammatory response and SIR. Monocytes from five healthy volunteers were isolated and cultured in RPMI-1640 for 24 hours. Treatment groups included saline controls, lipopolysaccharide ([LPS], 10 ng/mL, from Escherichia coli), human Hb (25 microg/mL), and Hb + LPS. Supernatants were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Student's t test with Mann-Whitney posttest was used for statistical analysis with p < or = 0.05 considered significant. Free Hb significantly increased TNF-alpha production 915 +/- 223 pg/mL versus saline (p = 0.02). LPS and Hb + LPS further increased TNF-alpha production (2294 pg/mL and 2501 pg/mL, respectively, p < 0.001) compared with saline controls. These data confirm that free Hb is a proinflammatory mediator resulting in the production of significant amounts of TNF-alpha. These in vitro findings support our clinical data in which timely removal of intraperitoneal free hemoglobin helps prevent its deleterious local and systemic inflammatory effects in patients with complex liver injuries managed nonoperatively.

  8. Dual prognostic significance of tumour-associated macrophages in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated or untreated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caro, Giuseppe; Cortese, Nina; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Grizzi, Fabio; Gavazzi, Francesca; Ridolfi, Cristina; Capretti, Giovanni; Mineri, Rossana; Todoric, Jelena; Zerbi, Alessandro; Allavena, Paola; Mantovani, Alberto; Marchesi, Federica

    2016-10-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) play key roles in tumour progression. Recent evidence suggests that TAMs critically modulate the efficacy of anticancer therapies, raising the prospect of their targeting in human cancer. In a large retrospective cohort study involving 110 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we assessed the density of CD68-TAM immune reactive area (%IRA) at the tumour-stroma interface and addressed their prognostic relevance in relation to postsurgical adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX). In vitro, we dissected the synergism of CTX and TAMs. In human PDAC, TAMs predominantly exhibited an immunoregulatory profile, characterised by expression of scavenger receptors (CD206, CD163) and production of interleukin 10 (IL-10). Surprisingly, while the density of TAMs associated to worse prognosis and distant metastasis, CTX restrained their protumour prognostic significance. High density of TAMs at the tumour-stroma interface positively dictated prognostic responsiveness to CTX independently of T-cell density. Accordingly, in vitro, gemcitabine-treated macrophages became tumoricidal, activating a cytotoxic gene expression programme, inhibiting their protumoural effect and switching to an antitumour phenotype. In patients with human PDAC, neoadjuvant CTX was associated to a decreased density of CD206(+) and IL-10(+) TAMs at the tumour-stroma interface. Overall, our data highlight TAMs as critical determinants of prognostic responsiveness to CTX and provide clinical and in vitro evidence that CTX overall directly re-educates TAMs to restrain tumour progression. These results suggest that the quantification of TAMs could be exploited to select patients more likely to respond to CTX and provide the basis for novel strategies aimed at re-educating macrophages in the context of CTX. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Histological characteristics of human papilloma-virus-positive and -negative invasive and in situ squamous cell tumours of the penis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Dorrit; Jensen, Helle Lone; van den Brule, Adriaan J C

    2009-01-01

    A high prevalence of cervical cancer associated high-risk types of human papillomavirus (hrHPV) has been demonstrated in premalignant and invasive squamous cell lesions of the penis, but large studies correlating histological characteristics with HPV status are few in number. Tumour tissues from...

  10. Engineering N-terminal domain of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-3 to be a better inhibitor against tumour necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng-Huee; Verma, Vandana; Maskos, Klaus; Nath, Deepa; Knäuper, Vera; Dodds, Philippa; Amour, Augustin; Murphy, Gillian

    2002-01-01

    We previously reported that full-length tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3) and its N-terminal domain form (N-TIMP-3) displayed equal binding affinity for tissue necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-converting enzyme (TACE). Based on the computer graphic of TACE docked with a TIMP-3 model, we created a number of N-TIMP-3 mutants that showed significant improvement in TACE inhibition. Our strategy was to select those N-TIMP-3 residues that were believed to be in actual contact with the active-site pockets of TACE and mutate them to amino acids of a better-fitting nature. The activities of these mutants were examined by measuring their binding affinities (K(app)(i)) and association rates (k(on)) against TACE. Nearly all mutants at position Thr-2 exhibited slightly impaired affinity as well as association rate constants. On the other hand, some Ser-4 mutants displayed a remarkable increase in their binding tightness with TACE. In fact, the binding affinities of several mutants were less than 60 pM, beyond the sensitivity limits of fluorimetric assays. Further studies on cell-based processing of pro-TNF-alpha demonstrated that wild-type N-TIMP-3 and one of its tight-binding mutants, Ser-4Met, were capable of inhibiting the proteolytic shedding of TNF-alpha. Furthermore, the Ser-4Met mutant was also significantly more active (P<0.05) than the wild-type N-TIMP-3 in its cellular inhibition. Comparison of N-TIMP-3 and full-length TIMP-3 revealed that, despite their identical TACE-interaction kinetics, the latter was nearly 10 times more efficient in the inhibition of TNF-alpha shedding, with concomitant implications for the importance of the TIMP-3 C-terminal domain in vivo. PMID:11988096

  11. Stem cell pluripotency factor NANOG is expressed in human fetal gonocytes, testicular carcinoma in situ and germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Almstrup, K; Nielsen, J E

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: NANOG is a key regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and pluripotency. Our recent genome-wide gene expression profiling study of the precursor of testicular germ cell tumours, carcinoma in situ testis (CIS), showed close similarity between ESC and CIS, including high NANOG...... earlier than for OCT-4. We detected no expression at the protein level in normal testis. CONCLUSIONS: NANOG is a new marker for testicular CIS and germ cell tumours and the high level of NANOG along with OCT-4 are determinants of the stem cell-like pluripotency of the preinvasive CIS cell. Timing of NANOG...... expression. In the present study we analysed the protein expression of NANOG during normal development of human testis and in a large series of neoplastic/dysgenetic specimens. METHODS AND RESULTS: We detected abundant expression of NANOG in CIS and in CIS-derived testicular tumours with marked differences...

  12. FA1 immunoreactivity in endocrine tumours and during development of the human fetal pancreas; negative correlation with glucagon expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornehave, D; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Teisner, B

    1996-01-01

    Fetal antigen 1 (FA1) is a glycoprotein containing six epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats. It is closely similar to the protein translated from the human delta-like (dlk) cDNA and probably constitutes a proteolytically processed form of dlk. dlk is homologous to the Drosophila homeotic...... proteins delta and notch and to the murine preadipocyte differentiation factor Pref-1. These proteins participate in determining cell fate choices during differentiation. We now report that FA1 immunoreactivity is present in a number of neuroectodermally derived tumours as well as in pancreatic endocrine...... tumours. A negative correlation between FA1 and glucagon immunoreactants in these tumours prompted a reexamination of FA1 immunoreactants during fetal pancreatic development. At the earliest stages of development, FA1 was expressed by most of the non-endocrine parenchymal cells and, with ensuing...

  13. Variation in sensitizing effect of caffeine in human tumour cell lines after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenzuela, M.T.; Almodovar, M.R. de; Mateos, S.; McMillan, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated whether the protective role of the G2 checkpoint has increasing importance when the p53-dependent G1 checkpoint is inactivated. We have studied the differential effect of caffeine by clonogenic assays and flow cytometry in three human tumour cell lines with different functionality of p53 protein. The radiosensitizing effect of caffeine (2 mM) expressed itself as a significant decrease in surviving fraction at 2 Gy and a significant increase in α-values in RT112 and TE671, both with non-functional p53. However, no radiosensitizing effect was seen in cells with a normal p53 function (MCF-7 BUS). Two millimoles of caffeine also caused important changes in the cell cycle progression after irradiation. MCF-7 BUS showed a G1 arrest after irradiation and an early G2 arrest but those cells that reached the second G2 did not arrest significantly. In contrast, TE671 exhibited radiosensitization by caffeine, no G1 arrest, a G2 arrest in those cells irradiated in G2, no significant accumulation in the second G2 but an overall delay in release from the first cell cycle, which could be abrogated by caffeine. RT112 was similar to TE671 except that the emphasis in a G2 arrest was shifted from the block in cells irradiated in G2 to those irradiated at other cell cycle phases. The data presented confirm that p53 status can be a significant determinant of the efficacy of caffeine as radiosensitizer in these tumour cell lines, and document the importance of the G2 checkpoint in this effect. (author)

  14. Reproductive tract tumours: the scourge of woman reproduction ails Indian rhinoceroses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hermes

    Full Text Available In Indian rhinoceros, extensive leiomyoma, a benign smooth muscle tumour, was sporadically diagnosed post mortem and commonly thought of as contributing factor for reduced fecundity of this species in captivity. However, to date, the prevalence of reproductive tract tumours and their relevance for fecundity are unknown. Our analysis of the international studbook now reveals that females cease reproducing at the age of 18.1±1.2 years; equivalent to a reproductive lifespan of just 9.5±1.3 years. This short reproductive life is in sharp contrast to their longevity in captivity of over 40 years. Here we show, after examining 42% of the captive female population, that age-related genital tract tumours are highly prevalent in this endangered species. Growth and development of these tumours was found to be age-related, starting from the age of 10 years. All females older than 12 years had developed genital tumours, just 7-9 years past maturity. Tumour sizes ranged from 1.5-10 cm. With age, tumours became more numerous, sometimes merging into one large diffuse tumour mass. These tumours, primarily vaginal and cervical, presumably cause widespread young-age infertility by the age of 18 years. In few cases, tumour necrosis suggested possible malignancy of tumours. Possible consequences of such genital tract tumour infestation are hindered intromission, pain during mating, hampered sperm passage, risk of ascending infection during pregnancy, dystocia, or chronic vaginal bleeding. In humans, leiomyoma affect up to 80% of pre-menopause women. While a leading cause for infertility, pregnancy is known to reduce the risk of tumour development. However, different from human, surgical intervention is not a viable treatment option in rhinoceroses. Thus, in analogy to humans, we suggest early onset and seamless consecutive pregnancies to help reduce prevalence of this disease, better maintain a self-sustained captive population and improve animal welfare.

  15. Functional activities of receptors for tumor necrosis factor-alpha on human vascular endothelial cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paleolog, E.M.; Delasalle, S.A.; Buurman, W.A.; Feldmann, M.

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) plays a critical role in the control of endothelial cell function and hence in regulating traffic of circulating cells into tissues in vivo. Stimulation of endothelial cells in vitro by TNF-alpha increases the surface expression of leukocyte adhesion

  16. Divergent effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha on apoptosis of human neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, J. M.; Weyer, S.; Weening, J. J.; Roos, D.; Kuijpers, T. W.

    2001-01-01

    Apoptosis of neutrophils is a key mechanism to control the intensity of the acute inflammatory response. Previously, the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was reported by some to have pro-apoptotic and by others to have antiapoptotic effects on neutrophils. The aim of this study was

  17. Tumour oxygenation assessed by 18F-fluoromisonidazole PET and polarographic needle electrodes in human soft tissue tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, L.; Keiding, S.; Nordsmark, M.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of the study was to identify hypoxia in human soft tissue sarcomas (STS) by PET scanning using the hypoxia marker [F-18]-fluoromisonidazole ([F-18]FMISO) and invasive oxygen sensitive probes (Eppendorf pO(2) Histograph, Germany). Materials and methods: Thirteen pat...

  18. Expression and enzymatic activity of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV in human astrocytic tumours are associated with tumour grade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stremeňová, J.; Křepela, E.; Mareš, Vladislav; Trim, J.; Dbalý, V.; Marek, J.; Vaníčková, Z.; Lisá, Věra; Yea, Ch.; Šedo, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2007), s. 785-792 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV * human brain tumors * DASH molecules Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 2.295, year: 2007

  19. Immobilization increases interleukin-6, but not tumour necrosis factor-a, release from the leg during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reihmane, Dace; Hansen, Andreas Vigelsø; Jensen, Martin Gram

    2013-01-01

    have now studied the temporal relationship of leg IL-6 and TNF-a release before and during isolated two-legged exercise after 14 days of one-leg immobilization (IM) while the other leg served as the control (CON) leg. Fifteen healthy male subjects (mean ± SEM age, 23 ± 1 years; body mass index, 23.......6 ± 0.7 kg m; and maximal oxygen uptake, 46.8 ± 1.4 ml kg min) performed 45 min of two-legged dynamic knee-extensor exercise at 19.6 ± 0.8 W. Arterial and femoral venous blood samples from the CON and the IM leg were collected every 15 min during exercise, and leg blood flow was measured with Doppler...

  20. Interferon-¿- and tumour necrosis factor-a-producing cells in humans who are immune to cutaneous leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K; Theander, T G; Hviid, L

    1999-01-01

    Individuals infected with Leishmania major usually acquire immunity to cutaneous leishmaniasis. In this study we have investigated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated by Leishmania antigens in two groups of Sudanese individuals, one with a history of cutaneous leishmaniasis and one...... leishmaniasis produced significantly higher levels of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha than cells from individuals without a history of the disease. Similar levels of IL-10 were found in the two groups. Flow cytometric analysis revealed high numbers of CD3+ cells producing IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, and only a few CD3......+ cells containing IL-10, in the PBMC cultures from the individuals with a history of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Interferon-gamma and TNF-alpha were predominantly produced by CD4+ T cells rather than CD8+ T cells. The results suggest that cellular immunity against cutaneous leishmaniasis is mediated...

  1. Tumour microenvironment and radiation response in sarcomas originating from tumourigenic human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Andrea, Filippo Peder; Safwat, Akmal Ahmed; Burns, Jorge S.

    2012-01-01

    : Immune deficient female mice were implanted on the backs with cells from one of the clones. The subsequent tumours were subjected to either radiation treatment or had the tumour microenvironment assayed, when they reached 400mm3. Radiation was given as a single fraction of 0 to 15 Gy and the degree...

  2. Dosimetric Comparison of Simulated Human Eye And Water Phantom in Investigation of Iodine Source Effects on Tumour And Healthy Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadi, A.S.; Masoudi, F.S. K.N.Toosi University of Technology

    2011-01-01

    For better clinical analysis in ophthalmic brachytherapy dosimetry, there is a need for the dose determination in different parts of the eye, so simulating the eye and defining the material of any parts of that, is helpful for better investigating dosimetry in human eye. However in brachytherapy dosimetry, it is common to consider the water phantom as human eye globe. In this work, a full human eye is simulated with MCNP-4C code by considering all parts of the eye like; lens, cornea, retina, choroid, sclera, anterior chamber, optic nerve, bulk of the eye comprising vitreous body and tumour. The average dose in different parts of this full model of human eye is determined and the results are compared with the dose calculated in water phantom. The central axes depth dose and the dose in whole of the tumour for these two simulated eye model are calculated too, and the results are compared. At long last, as the aim of this work is comparing the result of investigating dosimetry between two water phantom as human eye and simulated eye globe, the ratios of the absorbed dose by the healthy tissues to the absorbed dose by the tumour are calculated in these simulations and the comparison between results is done eventually.

  3. Analysis of the local kinetics and localization of interleukin-1 alpha, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta, during the course of experimental pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Pando, R; Orozco, H; Arriaga, K; Sampieri, A; Larriva-Sahd, J; Madrid-Marina, V

    1997-01-01

    A mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis induced by the intratracheal instillation of live and virulent mycobacteria strain H37-Rv was used to examine the relationship of the histopathological findings with the local kinetics production and cellular distribution of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). The histopathological and immunological studies showed two phases of the disease: acute or early and chronic or advanced. The acute phase was characterized by inflammatory infiltrate in the alveolar-capillary interstitium, blood vessels and bronchial wall with formation of granulomas. During this acute phase, which lasted from 1 to 28 days, high percentages of TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha immunostained activated macrophages were observed principally in the interstium-intralveolar inflammatory infiltrate and in granulomas. Electron microscopy studies of these cells, showed extensive rough endoplasmic reticulum, numerous lysosomes and occasional mycobacteria. Double labelling with colloid gold showed that TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha were present in the same cells, but were confined to separate vacuoles near the Golgi area, and mixed in larger vacuoles near to cell membrane. The concentration of TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha as well as their respective mRNAs were elevated in the early phase, particularly at day 3 when the bacillary count decreased. A second peak was seen at days 14 and 21-28 when granulomas appeared and evolved to full maturation. In contrast, TGF-beta production and numbers of immunoreactive cells were low in comparison with the advanced phase of the disease. The chronic phase was characterized by histopathological changes indicative of more severity (i.e. pneumonia, focal necrosis and extensive interstitial fibrosis) with a decrease in the TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha production that coincided with the highest level of TGF-beta. The bacillary counts were highest as the macrophages

  4. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibits effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands on cell death in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatrehsamani, Mahdi; Soleimani, Masoud; Esfahani, Behjat A Moayedi; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Hakemi, Mazdak G; Mossahebimohammadi, Majid; Eskandari, Nahid; Adib, Minoo

    2015-01-01

    Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to diverse outcome in various kinds of cells. AhR activation may induce apoptosis or prevent of apoptosis and cell death. Recent studies suggest that apoptosis effects of AhR can be modulated by inflammatory cytokine like tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In this study, we try to investigate the possible interaction of TNF-α with the 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a ligand of AhR, on peripheral lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from peripheral blood by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation on ficoll. Isolated PBMCs were divided into four groups: Control group, TNF-α administered group, TCDD administered group, co-administered group with TCDD and TNF-α. Cells were maintained for a week in lymphocyte culture condition. Then, TNF-α was added to group 2 and 4. Finally, apoptosis and necrosis were analyzed in all samples using flowcytometry. In group 4, the mean percent of necrosis and apoptosis in TCDD treatment groups was significantly larger than other groups; (P 0.05). However, the mean percent of cell death in co-administered group with TCDD and TNF-α was significantly lower than other groups; (P < 0.05). TNF-α could significantly inhibit effects of TCDD on lymphocytes apoptosis. Combination effects of TNF-α and TCDD on lymphocyte increase cell survival.

  5. Unravelling the biology of human papillomavirus (HPV) related tumours to enhance their radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vozenin, M.C.; Lord, H.K.; Deutsch, E.; Vozenin, M.C.; Hartl, D.

    2010-01-01

    HPV infection is associated with most squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the uterine cervix and many head and neck SCC. While recent understanding of the mechanisms of HPV-induced carcinogenesis has lead to the development of prophylactic vaccines, the principal modality of treatment is radiotherapy and despite concurrent chemotherapy, outcomes remain suboptimal. Improving the radiotherapeutic index thus remains an important challenge as well as defining predictive assays for treatment outcome of HPV-related tumours. Therefore elucidating the influence of the HPV virus on tumour radiosensitivity is of major interest due to the prevalence of HPV-related tumours worldwide and due to evidence that head and neck HPV-tumours have markedly different clinical outcomes compared to non-HPV-related tumours. This difference may allow for different treatment strategies to be developed. The present review aims to summarize the current understanding of radiosensitivity and HPV-related tumour biology in order to subsequently develop new approaches to enhance the therapeutic index. This review also emphasizes the relevance of E6 and E7 onco-proteins to tumour cell response to radiotherapy suggesting that specific targeted approaches such as concomitant modulation of additional pathways using targeted therapies should offer new therapeutic avenues. (authors)

  6. Diglycolic acid is the nephrotoxic metabolite in diethylene glycol poisoning inducing necrosis in human proximal tubule cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Greg M; Martin, Sarah; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2011-11-01

    Diethylene glycol (DEG), a solvent and chemical intermediate, can produce an acute toxic syndrome, the hallmark of which is acute renal failure due to cortical tubular degeneration and proximal tubular necrosis. DEG is metabolized to two primary metabolites, 2-hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (2-HEAA) and diglycolic acid (DGA), which are believed to be the proximate toxicants. The precise mechanism of toxicity has yet to be elucidated, so these studies were designed to determine which metabolite was responsible for the proximal tubule cell death. Human proximal tubule (HPT) cells in culture, obtained from normal cortical tissue and passaged 3-6 times, were incubated with increasing concentrations of DEG, 2-HEAA, or DGA separately and in combination for 48 h at pH 6 or 7.4, and various parameters of necrotic and apoptotic cell death were measured. DEG and 2-HEAA did not produce any cell death. DGA produced dose-dependent necrosis at concentrations above 25 mmol/l. DGA did not affect caspase-3 activity and increased annexin V staining only in propidium iodide-stained cells. Hence, DGA induced necrosis, not apoptosis, as corroborated by severe depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate levels. DGA is structurally similar to citric acid cycle intermediates that are taken up by specific transporters in kidney cells. HPT cells, incubated with N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid, a sodium dicarboxylate-1 transporter inhibitor showed significantly decreased cell death compared with DGA alone. These studies demonstrate that DGA is the toxic metabolite responsible for DEG-induced proximal tubular necrosis and suggest a possible transporter-mediated uptake of DGA leading to toxic accumulation and cellular dysfunction.

  7. Oxidative stress by ascorbate/menadione association kills K562 human chronic myelogenous leukaemia cells and inhibits its tumour growth in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrax, Julien; Stockis, Julie; Tison, Aurélie; Taper, Henryk S; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2006-09-14

    The effect of oxidative stress induced by the ascorbate/menadione-redox association was examined in K562 cells, a human erythromyeloid leukaemia cell line. Our results show that ascorbate enhances menadione redox cycling, leading to the formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (as shown by dihydrorhodamine 123 oxidation). The incubation of cells in the presence of both ascorbate/menadione and aminotriazole, a catalase inhibitor, resulted in a strong decrease of cell survival, reinforcing the role of H(2)O(2) as the main oxidizing agent killing K562 cells. This cell death was not caspase-3-dependent. Indeed, neither procaspase-3 and PARP were processed and only a weak cytochrome c release was observed. Moreover, we observed only 23% of cells with depolarized mitochondria. In ascorbate/menadione-treated cells, DNA fragmentation was observed without any sign of chromatin condensation (DAPI and TUNEL tests). The cell demise by ascorbate/menadione is consistent with a necrosis-like cell death confirmed by both cytometric profile of annexin-V/propidium iodide labeled cells and by light microscopy examination. Finally, we showed that a single i.p. administration of the association of ascorbate and menadione is able to inhibit the growth of K562 cells by about 60% (in both tumour size and volume) in an immune-deficient mice model. Taken together, these results reinforced our previous claims about a potential application of the ascorbate/menadione association in cancer therapy.

  8. Decrease in sick leave among patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the first 12 months after start of treatment with tumour necrosis factor antagonists: a population-based controlled cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Tor; Englund, Martin; Saxne, Tore; Jöud, Anna; Jacobsson, Lennart T H; Geborek, Pierre; Allaire, Saralynn; Petersson, Ingemar F

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the effect of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) antagonist treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on sick leave (SL) and disability pension (DP) in a population-based setting in southern Sweden. All patients with RA in the South Swedish Arthritis Treatment Group register living in the county of Skåne (population 1.2 million), who started their first treatment with a TNF antagonist between January 2004 and December 2007 and were 18-58 years at treatment start (n = 365), were identified. For each patient with RA, four matched reference subjects from the general population were randomly selected. Data were linked to the Swedish Social Insurance Agency register and the point prevalence of SL and DP as well as days of SL and DP per month were calculated from 360 days before until 360 days after treatment start. At treatment start 38.6% of the patients with RA were registered for SL. During the first 6 months this share dropped to 28.5% (decrease by 26.2%, ptreatment year. Comparing patients with RA to the reference group the relative risk of being on SL was 6.6 (95% CI 5.2 to 8.5) at initiation of anti-TNF treatment and 5.2 (95% CI 4.0 to 6.8) 1 year after that. The corresponding figures for DP were 3.4 (95% CI 2.7 to 4.2) and 3.2 (95% CI 2.7 to 3.9). There was a marked decline in SL during the first 6 months of TNF antagonist treatment in patients with RA in southern Sweden, maintained throughout the first year, which was not offset by a corresponding increase in DP.

  9. Interleukin-5, interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels obtained within 24-h of admission do not predict high-risk infection in children with febrile neutropenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Aggarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Biomarkers that can predict the severity of febrile neutropenia (FN are potential tools for clinical practice. Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the reliability of plasma interleukin (IL levels as indicators of high-risk FN. Materials and Methods: Children with haematological malignancies and FN were enrolled prospectively. A blood sample was obtained within 24-h of admission for estimation of IL-5, IL-6, IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α level by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients were stratified into three groups. Group I (low-risk: No focus of infection; Group II: Clinical/radiological focus of infection; Group III: Microbiologically proven infection or FN related mortality. Groups II and III were analysed as high-risk. The cytokines were assessed at three different cut-off levels. Results: A total of 52 episodes of FN in 48 patients were evaluated. The mean age was 6 years (range: 2-13. Primary diagnosis included acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (82%, non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma (13% and acute myeloid leukaemia (5%. Absolute neutrophil count was < 200 cells/μl in half and 200-500 in 23%. Majority were categorised as Group I (69%, followed by Group II (16% and III (15%. The range of IL-5 was too narrow and similar in the two risk-groups to be of any relevance. The best sensitivity of TNF-α and IL-6 for high-risk group was 78% and 70%, respectively. The highest specificity observed was 35%. The negative predictive value of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α exceeded 80%. Conclusion: IL-5, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α failed as predictors of clinically localised or microbiologically documented infection in children with chemotherapy induced FN. However, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α could be useful in excluding the possibility of high-risk infection.

  10. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, caspase-3 and production of reactive oxygen intermediate on endothelial cells culture (HUVECs treated with P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and tumour necrosis factor-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loeki E. Fitri

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytoadherence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes on endothelial cells is a key factor in development of severe malaria. This process may associated with the activation of local immune that was enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. This study was conducted to see the influence of P.falciparum infected erythrocytes cytoadherence and TNF-α treatment in inducing endothelial cells activation in vitro. inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and caspase-3 expression, also reactive oxygen intermediate (ROI production were used as parameters. An Experimental laboratory study had been done to observe endothelial cells activation (HUVECs after treatment with TNF-α for 20 hours or P. falciparum infected erythrocytes for 1 hour or both of them. Normal endothelial cells culture had been used as a control. Using immunocytochemistry local immune activation of endothelial cells was determined by iNOS and caspase-3 expression. Nitro Blue Tetrazolium reduction-assay was conducted to see the ROI production semi quantitatively. inducible nitric oxide synthase expression only found on endothelial cells culture treated with P. falciparum infected erythrocytes or both P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and TNF-α. Caspase-3 expression found slightly on normal endothelial cells culture. This expression increased significantly on endothelial cells culture treated with both P.falciparum infected erythrocytes and TNF-α (p=0.000. The normal endothelial cells release low level of ROI in the presence of non-specific trigger, PMA. In the presence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes or TNF-α or both of them, some cells showed medium to high levels of ROI. Cytoadherence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and TNF α treatment on endothelial cells can induce activation of local immune marked by increase inducible nitric oxide synthase and release of free radicals that cause cell damage. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:151-6 Keywords: P.falciparum ,HUVECs, TNF-α, i

  11. Effectiveness of adalimumab for the treatment of ulcerative colitis in clinical practice: comparison between anti-tumour necrosis factor-naïve and non-naïve patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iborra, Marisa; Pérez-Gisbert, Javier; Bosca-Watts, Marta Maia; López-García, Alicia; García-Sánchez, Valle; López-Sanromán, Antonio; Hinojosa, Esther; Márquez, Lucía; García-López, Santiago; Chaparro, María; Aceituno, Montserrat; Calafat, Margalida; Guardiola, Jordi; Belloc, Blanca; Ber, Yolanda; Bujanda, Luis; Beltrán, Belén; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Cristina; Barrio, Jesús; Cabriada, José Luis; Rivero, Montserrat; Camargo, Raquel; van Domselaar, Manuel; Villoria, Albert; Schuterman, Hugo Salata; Hervás, David; Nos, Pilar

    2017-07-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) treatment is focused to achieve mucosal healing, avoiding disease progression. The study aimed to evaluate the real-world effectiveness of adalimumab (ADA) in UC and to identify predictors of remission to ADA. This cohort study used data from the ENEIDA registry. Clinical response, clinical remission, endoscopic remission, adverse events (AE), colectomy, and hospitalisations were evaluated; baseline characteristics and biological parameters were compared to determine predictors of response. We included 263 patients (87 naïve and 176 previously exposed to anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha, TNF). After 12 weeks, clinical response, clinical remission, and endoscopic remission rates were 51, 26, and 14 %, respectively. The naïve group demonstrated better response to treatment than the anti-TNF-exposed group at short-term. Clinical and endoscopic remission within 1 year of treatment was better in the naïve group (65 vs. 49 and 50 vs. 35 %, respectively). The rates of AE, dose-escalation, hospitalisations, and colectomy during the first year were higher in anti-TNF-exposed patients (40, 43, and 27 % vs. 26, 21, and 11 %, respectively). Patients with primary failure and intolerance to the first anti-TNF and severe disease were associated with worse clinical response. Primary non-response to prior anti-TNF treatment and severe disease were predictive of poorer clinical remission. Low levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and faecal calprotectin (FC) at baseline were predictors of clinical remission. In clinical practice, ADA was effective in UC, especially in anti-TNF naïve patients. FC and CRP could be predictors of treatment effectiveness.

  12. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus: Molecular Insights into the Most Recently Discovered Human Tumour Virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stakaitytė, Gabrielė; Wood, Jennifer J.; Knight, Laura M.; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Adzahar, Noor Suhana; Nwogu, Nnenna; Macdonald, Andrew; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    A fifth of worldwide cancer cases have an infectious origin, with viral infection being the foremost. One such cancer is Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare but aggressive skin malignancy. In 2008, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was discovered as the causative agent of MCC. It is found clonally integrated into the majority of MCC tumours, which require MCPyV oncoproteins to survive. Since its discovery, research has begun to reveal the molecular virology of MCPyV, as well as how it induces tumourigenesis. It is thought to be a common skin commensal, found at low levels in healthy individuals. Upon loss of immunosurveillance, MCPyV reactivates, and a heavy viral load is associated with MCC pathogenesis. Although MCPyV is in many ways similar to classical oncogenic polyomaviruses, such as SV40, subtle differences are beginning to emerge. These unique features highlight the singular position MCPyV has as the only human oncogenic polyomavirus, and open up new avenues for therapies against MCC

  13. The fate of hypoxic (pimonidazole-labelled) cells in human cervix tumours undergoing chemo-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Ralph E.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: A subset of patients in a clinical study where sequential biopsies were to be obtained during multifraction radiotherapy received pimonidazole prior to initiating treatment, allowing a unique opportunity of following hypoxic cells in situ during therapy. Material and methods: After institutional ethics review and with informed consent, women expecting to undergo radical treatment for cancer of the cervix received pimonidazole hydrochloride, with a biopsy approximately 24 h later. Therapy was then started, and weekly biopsies were obtained. In the laboratory, the biopsies were reduced to single cell suspensions for flow cytometry analysis of DNA content, pimonidazole, and proliferation markers. Results: Pre-treatment pimonidazole-positive cells were largely in G /G 1 . Pimonidazole-labelled cells, though expected to be radioresistant, were markedly decreased even early into treatment, and continued to disappear with a half-time of about 3 days. Concurrently, the cell cycle distribution of the previously hypoxic cells changed from predominantly quiescent to mostly proliferating. Conclusions: While a part of the rapid apparent loss of hypoxic cells was certainly due to loss of pimonidazole adducts through repair and dilution by cell division, the speed with which this occurred suggests that many labelled cells could rapidly re-enter the proliferative pool, a result consistent with many of those pimonidazole-labelled human cervix tumour cells being cyclically, rather than continuously, hypoxic

  14. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus: Molecular Insights into the Most Recently Discovered Human Tumour Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stakaitytė, Gabrielė; Wood, Jennifer J.; Knight, Laura M.; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Adzahar, Noor Suhana; Nwogu, Nnenna; Macdonald, Andrew; Whitehouse, Adrian, E-mail: A.Whitehouse@leeds.ac.uk [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Astbury Centre of Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-27

    A fifth of worldwide cancer cases have an infectious origin, with viral infection being the foremost. One such cancer is Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare but aggressive skin malignancy. In 2008, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was discovered as the causative agent of MCC. It is found clonally integrated into the majority of MCC tumours, which require MCPyV oncoproteins to survive. Since its discovery, research has begun to reveal the molecular virology of MCPyV, as well as how it induces tumourigenesis. It is thought to be a common skin commensal, found at low levels in healthy individuals. Upon loss of immunosurveillance, MCPyV reactivates, and a heavy viral load is associated with MCC pathogenesis. Although MCPyV is in many ways similar to classical oncogenic polyomaviruses, such as SV40, subtle differences are beginning to emerge. These unique features highlight the singular position MCPyV has as the only human oncogenic polyomavirus, and open up new avenues for therapies against MCC.

  15. Radioprotection by murine and human tumor-necrosis factor; Dose-dependent effects on hematopoiesis in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloerdal, L; Muench, M O; Warren, D J; Moore, M A.S. [James Ewing Laboratory of Developmental Hematopoiesis, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York (USA)

    1989-01-01

    Tumor-necrosis factor (TNF) has been shown to confer significant radioprotection in murine models. Herein, we demonstrate a dose-dependent enhancement of hematological recovery when single doses of either murine or human recombinant TNF are administered prior to irradiation. In addition to its action upon leukocytes and erythocytes, TNF also alleviates radiation-induced thrombocytopenia in the mouse. These effects on circulating blood constituents are further reflected in increased numbers of both primitive (CFU-S) and more differentiated (CFU-GM, CFU-Mega) hematopoietic progenitors in TNF-treated animals. This suggests that TNF exerts it radioprotective effects on a pool of primitive multi-potential hematopoietic cells. (author).

  16. Expression of FGFR3 during human testis development and in germ cell-derived tumours of young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewen, Katherine A; Olesen, Inge A; Winge, Sofia B

    2013-01-01

    development and to ascertain whether FGFR3 signalling is linked to germ cell proliferation and the pathogenesis of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) of young adult men. Using RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, we examined 58 specimens of human testes throughout development for FGFR3...... expression, and then compared expression of FGFR3 with proliferation markers (PCNA or Ki67). We also analysed for FGFR3 expression 30 TGCTs and 28 testes containing the tumour precursor cell, carcinoma in situ (CIS). Fetal and adult testes expressed exclusively the FGFR3IIIc isoform. FGFR3 protein expression...... was restricted to the cytoplasm/plasma membrane of spermatogonia and was most prevalent at mid-gestation, infancy and from puberty onwards. Phosphorylated (p)FGFR was detected in pre-spermatogonia at mid-gestation and in spermatogonia during puberty and in the adult testis. Throughout normal human testis...

  17. NMR metabolomics of human lung tumours reveals distinct metabolic signatures for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, CM; Barros, AS; Goodfellow, BJ; Carreira, IM; Gomes, AA; Sousa, V; Bernardo, J; Carvalho, L; Gil, AM; Duarte, IF

    2015-01-01

    Lung tumour subtyping, particularly the distinction between adenocarcinoma (AdC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC), is a critical diagnostic requirement. In this work, the metabolic signatures of lung carcinomas were investigated through (1)H NMR metabolomics, with a view to provide additional criteria for improved diagnosis and treatment planning. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to analyse matched tumour and adjacent control tissue...

  18. Inflammatory Cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor α Confers Precancerous Phenotype in an Organoid Model of Normal Human Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kwong

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we established an in vitro organoid model of normal human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE cells. The spheroids of these normal HOSE cells resembled epithelial inclusion cysts in human ovarian cortex, which are the cells of origin of ovarian epithelial tumor. Because there are strong correlations between chronic inflammation and the incidence of ovarian cancer, we used the organoid model to test whether protumor inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α would induce malignant phenotype in normal HOSE cells. Prolonged treatment of tumor necrosis factor α induced phenotypic changes of the HOSE spheroids, which exhibited the characteristics of precancerous lesions of ovarian epithelial tumors, including reinitiation of cell proliferation, structural disorganization, epithelial stratification, loss of epithelial polarity, degradation of basement membrane, cell invasion, and overexpression of ovarian cancer markers. The result of this study provides not only an evidence supporting the link between chronic inflammation and ovarian cancer formation but also a relevant and novel in vitro model for studying of early events of ovarian cancer.

  19. Promoter methylation-associated loss of ID4 expression is a marker of tumour recurrence in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noetzel, Erik; Veeck, Jürgen; Niederacher, Dieter; Galm, Oliver; Horn, Felicitas; Hartmann, Arndt; Knüchel, Ruth; Dahl, Edgar

    2008-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding/Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (ID4) is a critical factor for cell proliferation and differentiation in normal vertebrate development. ID4 has regulative functions for differentiation and growth of the developing brain. The role of ID1, ID2 and ID3 are expected to be oncogenic due to their overexpression in pancreatic cancer and colorectal adenocarcinomas, respectively. Aside from these findings, loss of ID3 expression was demonstrated in ovarian cancer. The aim of the present study was to reveal the factual role of ID4 in carcinogenesis in more detail, since its role for the pathogenesis of human breast cancer has been discussed controversially, assigning both oncogenic and tumour suppressive functions. ID4 promoter methylation, ID4 mRNA expression and ID4 protein expression were analysed in primary human breast cancer specimens using methylation-specific PCR (MSP) (n=170), semiquantitative realtime RT-PCR (n=46) and immunhistochemistry (n=3), respectively. In order to demonstrate a functional association of ID4 promoter methylation with its gene silencing, we performed DNA demethylation analysis with four human breast cell lines using MSP and semiquantitative realtime RT-PCR. In addition, we performed correlations of ID4 promoter methylation with ID4 mRNA and ID4 protein expression in matched samples of breast tumour and corresponding normal tissue. We carried out statistical analyses in order to find correlations between ID4 promoter methylation and clinicopathological parameters. Frequent ID4 promoter methylation was observed in primary breast cancer samples (69%, 117/170). We found a tight correlation (P<0.0001) between ID4 promoter methylation and loss of ID4 expression in primary breast cancer 3 specimens. Demethylating treatment with breast cancer cell lines was associated with clear ID4 mRNA re-expression. Tumours with ID4 promoter methylation showed distinct loss of ID4 expression on both transcription and protein level

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection causes different levels of apoptosis and necrosis in human macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelishvili, Lia; McGarvey, Jeffery; Li, Yong-Jun; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2003-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis interacts with macrophages and epithelial cells in the alveolar space of the lung, where it is able to invade and replicate in both cell types. M. tuberculosis-associated cytotoxicity to these cells has been well documented, but the mechanisms of host cell death are not well understood. We examined the induction of apoptosis and necrosis of human macrophages (U937) and type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549) by virulent (H37Rv) and attenuated (H37Ra) M. tuberculosis strains. Apoptosis was determined by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay, whereas necrosis was evaluated by the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Both virulent and attenuated M. tuberculosis induced apoptosis in macrophages; however, the attenuated strain resulted in significantly more apoptosis than the virulent strain after 5 days of infection. In contrast, cytotoxicity of alveolar cells was the result of necrosis, but not apoptosis. Although infection with M. tuberculosis strains resulted in apoptosis of 14% of the cells on the monolayer, cell death associated with necrosis was observed in 59% of alveolar epithelial cells after 5 days of infection. Infection with M. tuberculosis suppressed apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells induced by the kinase inhibitor, staurosporine. Because our findings suggest that M. tuberculosis can modulate the apoptotic response of macrophages and epithelial cells, we carried out an apoptosis pathway-specific cDNA microarray analysis of human macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells. Whereas the inhibitors of apoptosis, bcl-2 and Rb, were upregulated over 2.5-fold in infected (48 h) alveolar epithelial cells, the proapoptotic genes, bad and bax, were downregulated. The opposite was observed when U937 macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis. Upon infection of alveolar epithelial cells with M. tuberculosis, the generation of apoptosis, as determined by the

  1. Low tumour cell content in a lung tumour bank: implications for molecular characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Felicia; Duhig, Edwina E; Clarke, Belinda E; McCaul, Elizabeth; Passmore, Linda; Courtney, Deborah; Windsor, Morgan; Naidoo, Rishendren; Franz, Louise; Parsonson, Kylie; Yang, Ian A; Bowman, Rayleen V; Fong, Kwun M

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer encompasses multiple malignant epithelial tumour types, each with specific targetable, potentially actionable mutations, such that precision management mandates accurate tumour typing. Molecular characterisation studies require high tumour cell content and low necrosis content, yet lung cancers are frequently a heterogeneous mixture of tumour and stromal cells. We hypothesised that there may be systematic differences in tumour cell content according to histological subtype, and that this may have implications for tumour banks as a resource for comprehensive molecular characterisation studies in lung cancer. To investigate this, we estimated tumour cell and necrosis content of 4267 samples resected from 752 primary lung tumour specimens contributed to a lung tissue bank. We found that banked lung cancer samples had low tumour cell content (33%) generally, although it was higher in carcinoids (77.5%) than other lung cancer subtypes. Tumour cells comprise a variable and often small component of banked resected tumour samples, and are accompanied by stromal reaction, inflammation, fibrosis, and normal structures. This has implications for the adequacy of unselected tumour bank samples for diagnostic and molecular investigations, and further research is needed to determine whether tumour cell content has a significant impact on analytical results in studies using tissue from tumour bank resources. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E7 protein bodies cause tumour regression in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, Mark; Öhlschläger, Peter; Almajhdi, Fahad N; Alloza, Leonor; Marzábal, Pablo; Meyers, Ann E; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Rybicki, Edward P

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agents of cervical cancer in women, which results in over 250 000 deaths per year. Presently there are two prophylactic vaccines on the market, protecting against the two most common high-risk HPV types 16 and 18. These vaccines remain very expensive and are not generally affordable in developing countries where they are needed most. Additionally, there remains a need to treat women that are already infected with HPV, and who have high-grade lesions or cervical cancer. In this paper, we characterize the immunogenicity of a therapeutic vaccine that targets the E7 protein of the most prevalent high-risk HPV - type 16 – the gene which has previously been shown to be effective in DNA vaccine trials in mice. The synthetic shuffled HPV-16 E7 (16E7SH) has lost its transforming properties but retains all naturally-occurring CTL epitopes. This was genetically fused to Zera®, a self-assembly domain of the maize γ-zein able to induce the accumulation of recombinant proteins into protein bodies (PBs), within the endoplasmic reticulum in a number of expression systems. High-level expression of the HPV 16E7SH protein fused to Zera® in plants was achieved, and the protein bodies could be easily and cost-effectively purified. Immune responses comparable to the 16E7SH DNA vaccine were demonstrated in the murine model, with the protein vaccine successfully inducing a specific humoral as well as cell mediated immune response, and mediating tumour regression. The fusion of 16E7SH to the Zera® peptide was found to enhance the immune responses, presumably by means of a more efficient antigen presentation via the protein bodies. Interestingly, simply mixing the free PBs and 16E7SH also enhanced immune responses, indicating an adjuvant activity for the Zera® PBs

  3. Multimodal imaging utilising integrated MR-PET for human brain tumour assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuner, Irene; Kaffanke, Joachim B.; Langen, Karl-Josef; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Stoffels, Gabriele; Weirich, Christoph; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Herzog, Hans; Shah, N. Jon

    2012-01-01

    The development of integrated magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging opens up new horizons for imaging in neuro-oncology. In cerebral gliomas the definition of tumour extent may be difficult to ascertain using standard MR imaging (MRI) only. The differentiation of post-therapeutic scar tissue, tumour rests and tumour recurrence is challenging. The relationship to structures such as the pyramidal tract to the tumour mass influences the therapeutic neurosurgical approach. The diagnostic information may be enriched by sophisticated MR techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multiple-volume proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and functional MRI (fMRI). Metabolic imaging with PET, especially using amino acid tracers such as 18 F-fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET) or 11 C-l-methionine (MET) will indicate tumour extent and response to treatment. The new technologies comprising MR-PET hybrid systems have the advantage of providing comprehensive answers by a one-stop-job of 40-50 min. The combined approach provides data of different modalities using the same iso-centre, resulting in optimal spatial and temporal realignment. All images are acquired exactly under the same physiological conditions. We describe the imaging protocol in detail and provide patient examples for the different imaging modalities such as FET-PET, standard structural imaging (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1-weighted contrast agent enhanced), DTI, MRSI and fMRI. (orig.)

  4. Multimodal imaging utilising integrated MR-PET for human brain tumour assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuner, Irene [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Kaffanke, Joachim B. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); MR-Transfer e.K., Wuppertal (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Stoffels, Gabriele; Weirich, Christoph; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Herzog, Hans [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); Shah, N. Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The development of integrated magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging opens up new horizons for imaging in neuro-oncology. In cerebral gliomas the definition of tumour extent may be difficult to ascertain using standard MR imaging (MRI) only. The differentiation of post-therapeutic scar tissue, tumour rests and tumour recurrence is challenging. The relationship to structures such as the pyramidal tract to the tumour mass influences the therapeutic neurosurgical approach. The diagnostic information may be enriched by sophisticated MR techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multiple-volume proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and functional MRI (fMRI). Metabolic imaging with PET, especially using amino acid tracers such as {sup 18}F-fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET) or {sup 11}C-l-methionine (MET) will indicate tumour extent and response to treatment. The new technologies comprising MR-PET hybrid systems have the advantage of providing comprehensive answers by a one-stop-job of 40-50 min. The combined approach provides data of different modalities using the same iso-centre, resulting in optimal spatial and temporal realignment. All images are acquired exactly under the same physiological conditions. We describe the imaging protocol in detail and provide patient examples for the different imaging modalities such as FET-PET, standard structural imaging (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1-weighted contrast agent enhanced), DTI, MRSI and fMRI. (orig.)

  5. 99mTechnetium labelled vasoactive intestinal peptide analogue for rapid localization of tumours in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, M.L.; Pallela, V.; Marcus, C.S.; Diggles, L.; Pham, H.L.; Ahdoot, R.; Kalinowski, E.A.; Saeed, S.; Minami, C.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, imaging tumours with receptor specific biomolecules has been the focus of increasing interest. VIP has a high affinity for specific receptors that are expressed in high density on a large number of malignant tumours. VIP was modified (TP 3654) without compromising its biological activity, and labelled with 99m Tc. Pharmacokinetics and feasibility studies were performed in three normal volunteers and 11 patients with a history of cancer. Imaging was performed for up to two h post-injection. Within 24 h after injection of 99m Tc-TP 3654 (10-15 mCi/5 μg), approximately 70% of the tracer cleared through the kidneys, and 20% through the liver. Blood clearance was rapid. No adverse reaction was noted in any subjects. All known tumours were clearly delineated within 20 min. Findings were compared with the results of 99m Tc-MIBI, CT, MRI, or histology. There was concordance in nine patients. In the other two, only the VIP scan was positive for tumours known to express VIP receptors. The early results of imaging tumours with 99m Tc-VIP are promising and warrant further studies. (author)

  6. Recombinant Kunjin virus replicon vaccines induce protective T-cell immunity against human papillomavirus 16 E7-expressing tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herd, Karen A.; Harvey, Tracey; Khromykh, Alexander A.; Tindle, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    The persistence of the E7 oncoprotein in transformed cells in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cervical cancer provides a tumour-specific antigen to which immunotherapeutic strategies may be directed. Self-replicating RNA (replicon) vaccine vectors derived from the flavivirus Kunjin (KUN) have recently been reported to induce T-cell immunity. Here, we report that inclusion of a CTL epitope of HPV16 E7 protein into a polyepitope encoded by a KUN vector induced E7-directed T-cell responses and protected mice against challenge with an E7-expressing epithelial tumour. We found replicon RNA packaged into virus-like particles to be more effective than naked replicon RNA or plasmid DNA constructed to allow replicon RNA transcription in vivo. Protective immunity was induced although the E7 CTL epitope was subdominant in the context of other CTL epitopes in the polyepitope. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the KUN replicon vector system for inducing protective immunity directed towards a virally encoded human tumour-specific antigen, and for inducing multi-epitopic CTL responses

  7. Cloning of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor cDNA and expression of recombinant soluble TNF-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, P.W.; Barrett, K.; Chantry, D.; Turner, M.; Feldmann, M.

    1990-01-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extracellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10 -9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ)

  8. Butachlor induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative DNA damage and necrosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Butachlor exhibited strong binding affinity with DNA and produced 8-oxodG adducts. ► Butachlor induced DNA strand breaks and micronuclei formation in PBMN cells. ► Butachlor induced ROS and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential in cells. ► Butachlor resulted in cell cycle arrest and eventually caused cellular necrosis. -- Abstract: Butachlor is a systemic herbicide widely applied on rice, tea, wheat, beans and other crops; however, it concurrently exerts toxic effects on beneficial organisms like earthworms, aquatic invertebrates and other non-target animals including humans. Owing to the associated risk to humans, this chloroacetanilide class of herbicide was investigated with the aim to assess its potential for the (i) interaction with DNA, (ii) mitochondria membrane damage and DNA strand breaks and (iii) cell cycle arrest and necrosis in butachlor treated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant (Ka = 1.2 × 10 4 M −1 ) and binding capacity (n = 1.02) of butachlor with ctDNA. The oxidative potential of butachlor was ascertained based on its capacity of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and substantial amounts of promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts in DNA. Also, the discernible butachlor dose-dependent reduction in fluorescence intensity of a cationic dye rhodamine (Rh-123) and increased fluorescence intensity of 2′,7′-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in treated cells signifies decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) due to intracellular ROS generation. The comet data revealed significantly greater Olive tail moment (OTM) values in butachlor treated PBMN cells vs untreated and DMSO controls. Treatment of cultured PBMN cells for 24 h resulted in significantly increased number of binucleated micronucleated (BNMN) cells with a dose dependent reduction in the nuclear division index (NDI). The flow

  9. 1H MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours: a practical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callot, Virginie; Galanaud, Damien; Le Fur, Yann; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Cozzone, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is proposed in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to help in the characterization of brain tumours by detecting metabolic alterations that may be indicative of the tumour class. MRS can be routinely performed on clinical magnets, within a reasonable acquisition time and if performed under adequate conditions, MRS is reproducible and thus can be used for longitudinal follow-up of treatment. MRS can also be performed in clinical practice to guide the neurosurgeon into the most aggressive part of the lesions or to avoid unnecessary surgery, which may furthermore decrease the risk of surgical morbidity

  10. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours: a practical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callot, Virginie [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: virginie.callot@univmed.fr; Galanaud, Damien [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France); Departement de Neuroradiologie, Hopital La Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Le Fur, Yann; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Cozzone, Patrick J. [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France)

    2008-08-15

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is proposed in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to help in the characterization of brain tumours by detecting metabolic alterations that may be indicative of the tumour class. MRS can be routinely performed on clinical magnets, within a reasonable acquisition time and if performed under adequate conditions, MRS is reproducible and thus can be used for longitudinal follow-up of treatment. MRS can also be performed in clinical practice to guide the neurosurgeon into the most aggressive part of the lesions or to avoid unnecessary surgery, which may furthermore decrease the risk of surgical morbidity.

  11. Tumor necrosis factor increases the production of plasminogen activator inhibitor in human endothelial cells in vitro and in rats in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van; Kooistra, T.; Berg, E.A. van den; Princen, H.M.G.; Fiers, W.; Emeis, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    The vascular endothelium plays an important role in fibrinolysis by producing tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). The monokine tumor necrosis factor (human recombinant TNF) increased the production of PAI by cultured human endothelial cells from

  12. Analysis for apoptosis and necrosis on adipocytes, stromal vascular fraction, and adipose-derived stem cells in human lipoaspirates after liposuction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei Z; Fang, Xin-Hua; Williams, Shelley J; Stephenson, Linda L; Baynosa, Richard C; Wong, Nancy; Khiabani, Kayvan T; Zamboni, William A

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells have become the most studied adult stem cells. The authors examined the apoptosis and necrosis rates for adipocyte, stromal vascular fraction, and adipose-derived stem cells in fresh human lipoaspirates. Human lipoaspirate (n = 8) was harvested using a standard liposuction technique. Stromal vascular fraction cells were separated from adipocytes and cultured to obtain purified adipose-derived stem cells. A panel of stem cell markers was used to identify the surface phenotypes of cultured adipose-derived stem cells. Three distinct stem cell subpopulations (CD90/CD45, CD105/CD45, and CD34/CD31) were selected from the stromal vascular fraction. Apoptosis and necrosis were determined by annexin V/propidium iodide assay and analyzed by flow cytometry. The cultured adipose-derived stem cells demonstrated long-term proliferation and differentiation evidenced by cell doubling time and positive staining with oil red O and alkaline phosphatase. Isolated from lipoaspirates, adipocytes exhibited 19.7 ± 3.7 percent apoptosis and 1.1 ± 0.3 percent necrosis; stromal vascular fraction cells revealed 22.0 ± 6.3 percent of apoptosis and 11.2 ± 1.9 percent of necrosis; stromal vascular fraction cells had a higher rate of necrosis than adipocytes (p vascular fraction cells, 51.1 ± 3.7 percent expressed CD90/CD45, 7.5 ± 1.0 percent expressed CD105/CD45, and 26.4 ± 3.8 percent expressed CD34/CD31. CD34/CD31 adipose-derived stem cells had lower rates of apoptosis and necrosis compared with CD105/CD45 adipose-derived stem cells (p necrosis than adipocytes. However, the extent of apoptosis and necrosis was significantly different among adipose-derived stem cell subpopulations.

  13. TUMOUR VACCINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Ernst; Kircheis, Ralf; Crommelin, D.; Van Slooten, Maaike; Storm, Gert

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a tumour vaccine with a tumour antigen base. In addition to a source of tumour antigens, the vaccine contains a release system for the delayed release of the active agent IFN- gamma , the active dose of IFN- gamma being 50 ng to 5 mu g. The IFN- gamma is released over a

  14. Expression of receptors for gut peptides in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma and tumour-free pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, C.; Biemond, I.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Verspaget, W.; Lamers, C. B.

    1997-01-01

    Gut hormones that modulate the growth of normal pancreas may also modulate the growth of cancers originating from pancreas. This study visualized and compared the receptors for cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin (BBS), secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in tumour-free tissue sections of

  15. Localised in vivo 1H spectroscopy of human bone and soft tissue tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongers, H.; Schick, F.; Skalej, M.; Hess, C.F.; Jung, W.I.

    1992-01-01

    Localised 1 H in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to fibrous and bone tumours before and during cytostatic treatment and radiotherapy. The results of 24 studies in 18 patients with malignant tumours of the leg or pelvis are presented including cases of sarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, multiple myeloma, malignant lymphoma and metastasis. A double spin echo localisation method with water suppression was implemented on a 1.5 Tesla whole body unit. Voxel size was (13 mm) 3 or (20 mm) 3 . The most common resonances besides lipids (16/18) were those of choline (10/18) and creatine (5/18). Creatine was always decreased in comparison to choline and often absent from tumour spectra. Additional resonances with phase distorsions from J-coupling (chemical shift region 1.8-2.5 and 2.2-4.0 ppm) were recorded. In the presence of lipids, lactate remained undetectable because special editing techniques were not available. Significant spectral differences between different tumour types were not evident. In about 30% of the investigations the spectra contained only water and lipid signals. Follow-up studies in three patients during radio- and chemotherapy showed a decrease in metabolites (choline, creatine, unassigned signals between 1.0 and 2.5 ppm) after weeks and months. The decrease in choline was most pronounced paralleled by an increase in lipid/choline ratios. (orig.)

  16. Acetyltransferases and tumour suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A C; Vousden, Karen H

    2000-01-01

    The acetyltransferase p300 was first identified associated with the adenoviral transforming protein E1A, suggesting a potential role for p300 in the regulation of cell proliferation. Direct evidence demonstrating a role for p300 in human tumours was lacking until the recentl publication by Gayther et al, which strongly supports a role for p300 as a tumour suppressor. The authors identify truncating mutations associated with the loss or mutation of the second allele in both tumour samples and cell lines, suggesting that loss of p300 may play a role in the development of a subset of human cancers

  17. Proline-hydroxylated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α upregulation in human tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron E Snell

    Full Text Available The stabilisation of HIF-α is central to the transcriptional response of animals to hypoxia, regulating the expression of hundreds of genes including those involved in angiogenesis, metabolism and metastasis. HIF-α is degraded under normoxic conditions by proline hydroxylation, which allows for recognition and ubiquitination by the von-Hippel-Lindau (VHL E3 ligase complex. The aim of our study was to investigate the posttranslational modification of HIF-1α in tumours, to assess whether there are additional mechanisms besides reduced hydroxylation leading to stability. To this end we optimised antibodies against the proline-hydroxylated forms of HIF-1α for use in formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE immunohistochemistry to assess effects in tumour cells in vivo. We found that HIF-1α proline-hydroxylated at both VHL binding sites (Pro402 and Pro564, was present in hypoxic regions of a wide range of tumours, tumour xenografts and in moderately hypoxic cells in vitro. Staining for hydroxylated HIF-1α can identify a subset of breast cancer patients with poorer prognosis and may be a better marker than total HIF-1α levels. The expression of unhydroxylated HIF-1α positively correlates with VHL in breast cancer suggesting that VHL may be rate-limiting for HIF degradation. Our conclusions are that the degradation of proline-hydroxylated HIF-1α may be rate-limited in tumours and therefore provides new insights into mechanisms of HIF upregulation. Persistence of proline-hydroxylated HIF-1α in perinecrotic areas suggests there is adequate oxygen to support prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD activity and proline-hydroxylated HIF-1α may be the predominant form associated with the poorer prognosis that higher levels of HIF-1α confer.

  18. Spontaneous transformation of human granulosa cell tumours into an aggressive phenotype: a metastasis model cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Misa; Muraki, Miho; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi; Saito, Hidekazu; Seiki, Motoharu; Takahashi, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumours (GCTs) are frequently seen in menopausal women and are relatively indolent. Although the physiological properties of normal granulosa cells have been studied extensively, little is known about the molecular mechanism of GCT progression. Here, we characterise the unique behavioural properties of a granulosa tumour cell line, KGN cells, for the molecular analysis of GCT progression. Population doubling was carried out to examine the proliferation capacity of KGN cells. Moreover, the invasive capacity of these cells was determined using the in vitro invasion assay. The expression level of tumour markers in KGN cells at different passages was then determined by Western blot analysis. Finally, the growth and metastasis of KGN cells injected subcutaneously (s.c.) into nude mice was observed 3 months after injection. During in vitro culture, the advanced passage KGN cells grew 2-fold faster than the early passage cells, as determined by the population doubling assay. Moreover, we found that the advanced passage cells were 2-fold more invasive than the early passage cells. The expression pattern of tumour markers, such as p53, osteopontin, BAX and BAG-1, supported the notion that with passage, KGN cells became more aggressive. Strikingly, KGN cells at both early and advanced passages metastasized to the bowel when injected s.c. into nude mice. In addition, more tumour nodules were formed when the advanced passage cells were implanted. KGN cells cultured in vitro acquire an aggressive phenotype, which was confirmed by the analysis of cellular activities and the expression of biomarkers. Interestingly, KGN cells injected s.c. are metastatic with nodule formation occurring mostly in the bowel. Thus, this cell line is a good model for analysing GCT progression and the mechanism of metastasis in vivo

  19. The prognostic value of pimonidazole and tumour pO2 in human cervix carcinomas after radiation therapy: a prospective international multi-center study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Loncaster, Julie; Aquino-Parsons, Christina

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Hypoxia adversely affects treatment outcome in human uterine cervical cancer. Here, we present the results of a prospective international multi-centre study evaluating the prognostic value of pre-treatment tumour oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)) and the hypoxia marker pimon...... pimonidazole (pimo). MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and twenty-seven patients with primary cervix cancer were entered. Pre-treatment tumour pO(2) measurements were obtained, and reported by the median tumour pO(2), the fraction of pO(2) values......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Hypoxia adversely affects treatment outcome in human uterine cervical cancer. Here, we present the results of a prospective international multi-centre study evaluating the prognostic value of pre-treatment tumour oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)) and the hypoxia marker...

  20. Randomised controlled trial of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors against combination intensive therapy with conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in established rheumatoid arthritis: the TACIT trial and associated systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David L; Ibrahim, Fowzia; Farewell, Vern; O'Keeffe, Aidan G; Ma, Margaret; Walker, David; Heslin, Margaret; Patel, Anita; Kingsley, Gabrielle

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is initially treated with methotrexate and other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Active RA patients who fail such treatments can receive tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFis), which are effective but expensive. We assessed whether or not combination DMARDs (cDMARDs) give equivalent clinical benefits at lower costs in RA patients eligible for TNFis. An open-label, 12-month, pragmatic, randomised, multicentre, two-arm trial [Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors Against Combination Intensive Therapy (TACIT)] compared these treatment strategies. We then systematically reviewed all comparable published trials. The TACIT trial involved 24 English rheumatology clinics. Active RA patients eligible for TNFis. The TACIT trial compared cDMARDs with TNFis plus methotrexate or another DMARD; 6-month non-responders received (a) TNFis if in the cDMARD group; and (b) a second TNFi if in the TNFi group. The Heath Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) was the primary outcome measure. The European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), joint damage, Disease Activity Score for 28 Joints (DAS28), withdrawals and adverse effects were secondary outcome measures. Economic evaluation linked costs, HAQ changes and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). In total, 432 patients were screened; 104 started on cDMARDs and 101 started on TNFis. The initial demographic and disease assessments were similar between the groups. In total, 16 patients were lost to follow-up (nine in the cDMARD group, seven in the TNFi group) and 42 discontinued their intervention but were followed up (23 in the cDMARD group and 19 in the TNFi group). Intention-to-treat analysis with multiple imputation methods used for missing data showed greater 12-month HAQ score reductions with initial cDMARDs than with initial TNFis [adjusted linear regression coefficient 0.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.003 to 0.31; p = 0.046]. Increases in 12-month EQ-5D scores were greater with initial c

  1. Differences in radiosensitivity among cells in culture and in experimental tumours: Significance for the effectiveness of human cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barendsen, G.W.; Amsterdam Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Problems in the application of radiobiological data on various types of models, cell in vitro, experimental tumours, and clinical models, to the prediction of tumour radiocurability are discussed. On the basis of observations on cells in culture and experimental tumours it is suggested that heterogeneity in responsiveness of tumours in patients is caused in a large part by differences in intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity. Methods and developments are reviewed, which may yield better assays for the prediction of tumour responsiveness to treatments. (Auth.)

  2. Upregulated expression of human neutrophil peptides 1, 2 and 3 (HNP 1-3) in colon cancer serum and tumours: a biomarker study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Bøgebo, Rikke; Gammeltoft, Steen; Olsen, Jesper; Winther, Benny; Raskov, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Molecular markers for localized colon tumours and for prognosis following therapy are needed. Proteomics research is currently producing numerous biomarker studies with clinical potential. We investigate the protein composition of plasma and of tumour extracts with the aim of identifying biomarkers for colon cancer. By Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionisation – Time Of Flight / Mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF/MS) we compare the protein profiles of colon cancer serum with serum from healthy individuals and the protein profiles of colon tumours with normal colon tissue. By size exclusion chromatography, we investigate the binding of HNP 1-3 to high mass plasma proteins. By microflow we investigate the effect of HNP 1-3 on mammalian cells. Human Neutrophil Peptides -1, -2 and -3 (HNP 1-3), also known as alfa-defensin-1, -2 and -3, are present in elevated concentrations in serum from colon cancer patients and in protein extracts from colon tumours. A fraction of HNP 1-3 in serum is bound to unidentified high mass plasma proteins. HNP 1-3 purified from colon tumours are lethal to mammalian cells. HNP 1-3 may serve as blood markers for colon cancer in combination with other diagnostic tools. We propose that HNP 1-3 are carried into the bloodstream by attaching to high mass plasma proteins in the tumour microenvironment. We discuss the effect of HNP 1-3 on tumour progression

  3. TRAIL receptor upregulation and the implication of KRAS/BRAF mutations in human colon cancer tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oikonomou, E.; Kosmidou, V.; Katseli, A.; Kothonidis, K.; Mourtzoukou, D.; Kontogeorgos, G.; Anděra, Ladislav; Zografos, G.; Pintzas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 125, č. 9 (2009), s. 2127-2135 ISSN 0020-7136 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSHC-CT-2006-037278 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : colorectal tumours * TRAIL receptors expression * KRAS/ BRAF oncogenic mutations Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.722, year: 2009

  4. Hyaluronan and hyaluronectin in the extracellular matrix of human brain tumour stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, B; Maingonnat, C; Girard, N; Chauzy, C; Maunoury, R; Olivier, A; Tayot, J; Creissard, P

    1993-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) and the hyaluronan-binding glycoprotein hyaluronectin (HN) were measured in 23 gliomas and 8 meningiomas and their location was revisited in 35 tumours. A clear-cut difference was found in the HN/HA ratio values of glioblastomas (below 0.5) and that of astrocytomas (above 0.5 P edification of the extracellular matrix. In meningiomas only the stroma would be responsible for HA and HN production.

  5. Changes of E-cadherin and á-catenin in human and mouse intestinal tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šloncová, Eva; Frič, P.; Kučerová, Dana; Lojda, Z.; Tuháčková, Zdena; Sovová, Vlasta

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 1 (2001), s. 13-17 ISSN 0018-2214 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV312/96/K205; GA ČR GA301/00/0269; GA MZd IZ4217 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : E-cadherin * beta-catenin * intestinal tumours Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.169, year: 2001

  6. Tumour dosimetry and response in patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer using recombinant human thyrotropin before radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keizer, Bart de; Hoekstra, Anne; Rijk, Peter P. van; Klerk, John M.H. de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Room E02.222, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brans, Boudewijn; Dierckx, Rudi A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Zelissen, Pierre M.J.; Koppeschaar, Hans P.F.; Lips, Cees J.M. [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2003-03-01

    The development of recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) has given clinicians new options for diagnostic follow-up and treatment of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). This paper evaluates the tumour dosimetry and response following -iodine-131 treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer patients after rhTSH stimulation instead of classical hormone withdrawal-induced hypothyroidism. Nineteen consecutive {sup 131}I treatments in 16 patients were performed after rhTSH stimulation. All patients had undergone a near-total thyroidectomy followed by an ablative dosage of {sup 131}I. They all suffered from metastatic or recurrent disease showing tumoral {sup 131}I uptake on previous post-treatment scintigraphy. Dosimetric calculations were performed using {sup 131}I tumour uptake measurements from post-treatment {sup 131}I scintigrams and tumour volume estimations from radiological images. Response was assessed by comparing pre-treatment serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level with the Tg level 3 months post treatment. In 18 out of 19 treatments, uptake of {sup 131}I in metastatic or recurrent lesions was seen. The median tumour radiation dose was 26.3 Gy (range 1.3-368 Gy), and the median effective half-life was 2.7 days (range 0.5-6.5 days). Eleven of 19 treatments (10/16 patients) were evaluable for response after 3 months. {sup 131}I therapy with rhTSH resulted in a biochemical partial response in 3/11 or 27% of treatments (two patients), biochemical stable disease in 2/11 or 18% of treatments and biochemical progressive disease in 6/11 or 55% of treatments. Our study showed that although tumour doses in DTC patients treated with {sup 131}I after rhTSH were highly variable, 45% of treatments led to disease stabilisation or partial remission when using rhTSH in conjunction with {sup 131}I therapy, without serious side-effects and with minimal impact on quality of life. RhTSH is therefore adequately satisfactory as an adjuvant tool in therapeutic settings and is

  7. Regulated necrosis-related molecule mRNA expression in humans and mice and in murine acute tissue injury and systemic autoimmunity leading to progressive organ damage, and progressive fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarpisheh, Mohsen; Desai, Jyaysi; Marschner, Julian A; Weidenbusch, Marc; Lech, Maciej; Vielhauer, Volker; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Mulay, Shrikant R

    2016-12-01

    The species-specific, as well as organ-specific expression of regulated necrosis (RN)-related molecules, is not known. We determined the expression levels of tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1), receptor activated protein kinase (RIPK)1, RIPK3, mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL), CASP8, Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein (CIAP)1, CIAP2, glutathione peroxidase-4 (GPX4), cyclophilin D (CYPD), CASP1, NLRP3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) in human and mouse solid organs. We observed significant differences in expression of these molecules between human and mice. In addition, we characterized their expression profiles in acute as well as persistent tissue injury and chronic tissue remodelling using acute and chronic kidney injury models. We observed that the degree and pattern of induction of RN-related molecules were highly dependent on the trigger and disease pathogenesis. Furthermore, we studied their expression patterns in mice with lupus-like systemic autoimmunity, which revealed that the expression of MLKL, GPX4 and PARP1 significantly increased in the spleen along disease progression and CASP1, RIPK1, RIPK3 and CYPD were higher at the earlier stages but were significantly decreased in the later stages. In contrast, in the kidney, the expression of genes involved in pyroptosis, e.g. NLRP3 and CASP1 were significantly increased and TNFR1, RIPK1, RIPK3, CIAP1/2 and GPX4 were significantly decreased along the progression of lupus nephritis (LN). Thus, the organ- and species-specific expression of RN-related molecules should be considered during designing experiments, interpreting the results as well as extrapolating the conclusions from one species or organ to another species or organ respectively. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Radiation-induced apoptosis and cell cycle checkpoints in human colorectal tumour cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Playle, L.C.

    2001-03-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor gene is mutated in 75% of colorectal carcinomas and is critical for DNA damage-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Data presented in this thesis demonstrate that after treatment with Ionizing Radiation (IR), colorectal tumour cell lines with mutant p53 are unable to arrest at G1 and undergo cell cycle arrest at G2. The staurosporine derivative, UCN-01, was shown to abrogate the IR-induced G2 checkpoint in colorectal tumour cell lines. Furthermore, in some cell lines, abrogation of the G2 checkpoint was associated with radiosensitisation. Data presented in this study demonstrate that 2 out of 5 cell lines with mutant p53 were sensitised to IR by UCN-01. In order to determine whether radiosensitisation correlated with lack of functional p53, transfected derivatives of an adenoma-derived cell line were studied, in which endogenous wild type p53 was disrupted by expression of a dominant negative p53 mutant protein (and with a vector control). In both these cell lines UCN-01 abrogated the G2 arrest however this was not associated with radiosensitisation, indicating that radiosensitisation is a cell type-specific phenomenon. Although 2 colorectal carcinoma cell lines, with mutant p53, were sensitised to IR by UCN-01, the mechanisms of p53-independent IR-induced apoptosis in the colon are essentially unknown. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways (that is the JNK, p38 and ERK pathways) have been implicated in apoptosis in a range of cell systems and in IR-induced apoptosis in some cell types. Data presented in this study show that, although the MAPKs can be activated by the known activator anisomycin, there is no evidence of a role for MAPKs in IR-induced apoptosis in colorectal tumour cell lines, regardless of p53 status. In summary, some colorectal tumour cell lines with mutant p53 can be sensitised to IR-induced cell death by G2 checkpoint abrogation and this may be an important treatment strategy, however mechanisms of IR-induced p53

  9. The prognostic value of pimonidazole and tumour pO2 in human cervix carcinomas after radiation therapy: A prospective international multi-center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Loncaster, Julie; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Chou, S.-C.; Gebski, Val; West, Catharine; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Havsteen, Hanne; Davidson, Susan E.; Hunter, Robin; Raleigh, James A.; Overgaard, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypoxia adversely affects treatment outcome in human uterine cervical cancer. Here, we present the results of a prospective international multi-centre study evaluating the prognostic value of pre-treatment tumour oxygen partial pressure (pO 2 ) and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole (pimo). Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty-seven patients with primary cervix cancer were entered. Pre-treatment tumour pO 2 measurements were obtained, and reported by the median tumour pO 2 , the fraction of pO 2 values ≤10 mmHg (HP 1 ), ≤5 mmHg (HP 5 ) and ≤2.5 mmHg (HP 2.5 ). Following intravenous pimonidazole administration, biopsies were taken, stained for pimonidazole adducts, and scored for the area of labelled tumour cells on a scale from 0 to 4. Treatment modalities were surgery (11%), radiotherapy (98%), chemotherapy (33%) and carbogen (14%). Results: None of the hypoxia descriptors were statistically significant prognostic factors for loco-regional tumour control or overall survival when analyzed as continuous variables or divided by the sample median. By univariate analysis only tumour size and nodal status were significant prognostic factors for local control. Tumour size and FIGO stage were significant for overall survival. In a multivariate analysis stratified by centre, only tumour size above 5 cm and lower pre-treatment haemoglobin predicted poorer overall survival among FIGO stage, nodal involvement, tumour size, pre-treatment haemoglobin dichotomized at 12 g/dl and pimo 1, pimo 4 and HP 5 as continuous variables. Conclusion: Neither Eppendorf nor pimonidazole should be dismissed based on the current results. However, further investigations are needed to readdress the hypotheses of the current study having optimized statistical designs, and a population of sufficient size treated more homogenously following rigorous protocols

  10. An allelic polymorphism within the human tumor necrosis factor alpha promoter region is strongly associated with HLA A1, B8, and DR3 alleles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, A. G.; de Vries, N. [=Niek; Pociot, F.; di Giovine, F. S.; van der Putte, L. B.; Duff, G. W.

    1993-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha gene lies within the class III region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), telomeric to the class II and centromeric to the class I region. We have recently described the first polymorphism within the human TNF-alpha locus. This is biallelic and lies

  11. alpha-MSH and its receptors in regulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by human monocyte/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherzadeh, S; Sharma, S; Chhajlani, V; Gantz, I; Rajora, N; Demitri, M T; Kelly, L; Zhao, H; Ichiyama, T; Catania, A; Lipton, J M

    1999-05-01

    The hypothesis that macrophages contain an autocrine circuit based on melanocortin [ACTH and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH)] peptides has major implications for neuroimmunomodulation research and inflammation therapy. To test this hypothesis, cells of the THP-1 human monocyte/macrophage line were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence and absence of alpha-MSH. The inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was inhibited in relation to alpha-MSH concentration. Similar inhibitory effects on TNF-alpha were observed with ACTH peptides that contain the alpha-MSH amino acid sequence and act on melanocortin receptors. Nuclease protection assays indicated that expression of the human melanocortin-1 receptor subtype (hMC-1R) occurs in THP-1 cells; Southern blots of RT-PCR product revealed that additional subtypes, hMC-3R and hMC-5R, also occur. Incubation of resting macrophages with antibody to hMC-1R increased TNF-alpha concentration; the antibody also markedly reduced the inhibitory influence of alpha-MSH on TNF-alpha in macrophages treated with LPS. These results in cells known to produce alpha-MSH at rest and to increase secretion of the peptide when challenged are consistent with an endogenous regulatory circuit based on melanocortin peptides and their receptors. Targeting of this neuroimmunomodulatory circuit in inflammatory diseases in which myelomonocytic cells are prominent should be beneficial.

  12. Establishment and evaluation of a transgenic mouse model of arthritis induced by overexpressing human tumor necrosis factor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα plays a key role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Blockade of TNFα by monoclonal antibody has been widely used for the therapy of RA since the 1990s; however, its mechanism of efficacy, and potential safety concerns of the treatment are still not fully understood. This study sought to establish a transgenic arthritic mouse model by overexpressing human TNFα (hTNFα and to apply this model as a means to evaluate therapeutic consequences of TNFα inhibitors. The transgenic mouse line (TgTC with FVB background was generated by incorporating 3′-modified hTNFα gene sequences. A progressively erosive polyarthritis developed in the TgTC mice, with many characteristics observed in human rheumatoid arthritis, including polyarticular swelling, impairment of movement, synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone erosion. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that hTNFα is not only expressed in hyperplastic synovial membrane, but also in tissues without lesions, including brain, lung and kidney. Treatment of the TgTC mice with anti-hTNFα monoclonal antibodies (mAb significantly decreased the level of hTNFα in the diseased joint and effectively prevented development of arthritis in a dose-dependent response fashion. Our results indicated that the TgTC mice represent a genetic model which can be used to comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis and therapeutics of TNFα-related diseases.

  13. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  14. In vitro cytotoxicity of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha in association with radiotherapy in a human ovarian carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manetta, A.; Lucci, J.; Soopikian, J.; Granger, G.; Berman, M.L.; DiSaia, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    It has been speculated that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) may decrease the cytotoxicity of radiotherapy by increasing the scavenging of toxic superoxide radicals. Because of the possible clinical implications, the cytotoxicity of TNF-alpha in combination with radiotherapy (RT) was compared with that of RT alone in a human ovarian cancer cell line. NIH:OVCAR-3 cells were incubated with TNF-alpha at 10.0, 1.0, 0.1, and 0.01 microgram/ml. Plates were divided into two groups; one received 150 cGy of radiotherapy and the other received no further therapy. Seventy-two hours later, supernatants were aspirated and viable cells were stained with a 1% solution of crystal violet. Survival of cells treated with RT plus TNF-alpha was expressed as a percentage of surviving irradiated controls. Analysis of results revealed minimal additive cell killing effect between TNF-alpha and radiotherapy at all concentrations of tumor necrosis factor, with the greatest difference noted in the group treated with 10 micrograms/ml TNF-alpha. A continued radiotherapy dose-response study with TNF-alpha showed a similar additive, not radioprotective, effect. This may have implication as a potentiator of RT in some human tumors

  15. Interindividual concordance of methylation profiles in human genes for tumor necrosis factors α and β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochanek, S.; Toth, M.; Dehmel, A.; Renz, D.; Doerfler, W.

    1990-01-01

    The DNA in mammalian genomes is characterized by complex patterns of DNA methylation that reflect the states of all genetic activities of that genome. The modified nucleotide 5-methyldeoxycytidine ( 5 mdC) can affect the interactions of specific proteins with DNA sequence motifs. The most extensively studied effect of sequence-specific methylations is that of the long-term silencing of eukaryotic (mammalian) promoters. The authors have initiated studies on the methylation status of parts of the human genome to view patterns of DNA methylation as indicators for genetic activities. In this report, analyses using both restriction enzyme-Southern blotting and the very precise genomic sequencing technique have been done. The results are characterized by a remarkable interindividual concordance of DNA methylation in specific human cell types. The patterns are identical in the DNA from one cell type for different individuals even of different genetic origins but different in the DNA from different cell types. The TNF-β promoter is methylated in granulocytes from 9 different individuals, and TNF-β is not expressed. In human lymphocytes, the main source of TNF-β, the TNF-β promoter is free of 5 mdC residues

  16. Electrochemotherapy of tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sersa, G.; Cemazar, M.; Rudolf, Z.; Miklavcic, D.

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy consists of chemotherapy followed by local application of electric pulses to the tumour to increase drug delivery into cells. Drug uptake can be increased by electroporation for only those drugs whose transport through the plasma membrane is impeded. Among many drugs that have been tested so far, only bleomycin and cisplatin found their way from preclinical testing to clinical trials. In vitro studies demonstrated several fold increase of their cytotoxicity after electroporation of cells. In vivo, electroporation of tumours after local or systemic administration of either of the drugs, i.e. electrochemotherapy, proved to be an effective antitumour treatment. In preclinical studies on several tumour models, electrochemotherapy either with bleomycin or cisplatin was elaborated and parameters for effective local tumour control were determined. In veterinary medicine, electrochemotherapy also proved to be effective in the treatment of primary tumours in cats, dogs and horses. In human clinical studies, electrochemotherapy was performed on the patients with progressive disease and accessible tumour nodules of different malignancies. All clinical studies demonstrated that electrochemotherapy is an effective treatment for local tumour control in cancer patients. (author)

  17. Expression of FGFR3 during human testis development and in germ cell-derived tumours of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Katherine A; Olesen, Inge A; Winge, Sofia B; Nielsen, Ana R; Nielsen, John E; Graem, Niels; Juul, Anders; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Observations in patients with an activating mutation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) suggest a role for FGFR3 signalling in promoting proliferation or survival of germ cells. In this study, we aimed to identify the FGFR3 subtype and the ontogeny of expression during human testis development and to ascertain whether FGFR3 signalling is linked to germ cell proliferation and the pathogenesis of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) of young adult men. Using RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, we examined 58 specimens of human testes throughout development for FGFR3 expression, and then compared expression of FGFR3 with proliferation markers (PCNA or Ki67). We also analysed for FGFR3 expression 30 TGCTs and 28 testes containing the tumour precursor cell, carcinoma in situ (CIS). Fetal and adult testes expressed exclusively the FGFR3IIIc isoform. FGFR3 protein expression was restricted to the cytoplasm/plasma membrane of spermatogonia and was most prevalent at mid-gestation, infancy and from puberty onwards. Phosphorylated (p)FGFR was detected in pre-spermatogonia at mid-gestation and in spermatogonia during puberty and in the adult testis. Throughout normal human testis development, expression of FGFR3 did not directly correlate with proliferation markers. In preinvasive CIS cells and in TGCTs, including classical seminoma and embryonal carcinoma, FGFR3IIIc was detected only in a small number of cells, with a heterogeneous expression pattern. FGFR3 is an excellent marker for human pre-/spermatogonia throughout development. Signalling through this receptor is likely associated with spermatogonial survival rather than proliferation. FGFR3 is not expressed in gonocytes and may not be essential to the aetiology of TGCTs stemming from CIS.

  18. Tumour sleuths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.; Springolo, E.; Conradie, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a common disease in South Africa and its identification difficult. Methods for the diagnosis of this disease includes the production of hybridoma cell lines by inoculating laboratory mice with a purified human tumour-associated antigen or the antigen-containing surface membranes or the intact cells. In the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma, high concentrations of serum alpha fetoprotein (AFP) can be measured by means of radioimmunoassay techniques. The need for specific methods of diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma led to the investigation by the Isotope Production Centre at Pelindaba into the possibility of using radiolabelled monoclonal anti-AFP for diagnosis, and later, therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. The monoclonal antibodies can also be labelled with 131 I. Recently the Department of Nuclear Medicine of the University of the Witwatersrand is conducting diagnostic trials on patients who have given their informed consent, to assess the specificity of 131 I radiolabelled anti-AFP monoclonal antibodies to hepatocellular carcinoma cells in humans. Although the investigation is still in its infancy, monoclonal antibodies may prove to be successful non-invasive agents for detecting tumors in early stages

  19. Correlation Between Placental Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Protein Expression Throughout Gestation in Normal Human Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Jayasri; Agamasu, Enyonam; Bendek, Bolek; Salafia, Carolyn M; Mishra, Aruna; Lopez, Julia Vasquez; Kroes, Jessica; Dragich, Sharon Claire; Thakur, Ashley; Mikhail, Magdy

    2018-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), specifically MMP-9 plays a role in human placentation. The enzyme confers an invasive ability to cytotrophoblasts and degrades the endometrial matrix as the cells infiltrate the decidua to keep up with placental growth. Since tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) can induce the synthesis of MMP-9, we investigated the patterns of changes in and correlation between placental villous MMP-9 and TNF-α expressions throughout normal human gestation. Placentas were obtained from 179 normal pregnant women who underwent elective abortion or term delivery. Chorionic villi isolated from placental samples were grouped as first, second, and third trimester (7 0/7 -13 0/7 , 13 1/7 -23 6/7 , and 37 0/7 -42 4/7 weeks, respectively). Chorionic villous TNF-α and MMP-9 proteins were assayed using enzyme immunoassay kits. There were significant differences in MMP-9 and TNF-α protein expressions among the trimester groups ( P = .001). The MMP-9 protein increased progressively with an increase in gestational age (GA), but TNF-α peaked in the second trimester. Within each trimester group, we searched for the effects of variation of GA in days on the 2 variables. A significant positive correlation between MMP-9 and GA was noted in the first trimester ( r = 0.364, P = .005). No other comparisons were significant. When GA was controlled for, partial correlation revealed a significant positive correlation between TNF-α and MMP-9 only in the second trimester ( r = 0.300, P = .018). We hypothesize that the TNF-α peak and the positive correlation between TNF-α and MMP-9 in the second trimester of normal human gestation could contribute toward a successful pregnancy outcome.

  20. Coordinate viral induction of tumor necrosis factor α and interferon β in human B cells and monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfeld, A.E.; Maniatis, T.

    1989-01-01

    Human tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) gene expression can be induced primarily in cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage by a variety of inducers, including lipopolysaccharide, phorbol esters such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and virus or synthetic double-stranded RNA [poly(I)·poly(C)]. In this paper the authors show that the TNF-α gene also responds to virus and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in B lymphocytes and that virus is the most potent inducer of TNF-α mRNA in both monocyte and B-cell lines. In addition, they show that viral infection coinduces the expression of TNF-α and interferon β mRNA and that viral induction of both genes is blocked by the kinase inhibitor 2-aminopurine. Inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide had no effect on mRNA expression of the genes in one of three cell lines tested (U937) but blocked the viral induction of both genes in another (Namalwa). Thus, the regulatory factors required for mRNA induction of both genes are present prior to the addition of virus in U937 but not in Namalwa cells. However, in a third cell line (JY), cycloheximide blocked viral induction of the interferon β gene but not the TNF-α gene. Taken together, these observations suggest that viral induction of TNF-α and interferon β gene expression may involve overlapping pathways with both common and distinct regulatory factors

  1. Selective in vitro targeting of GRP and NMB receptors in human tumours with the new bombesin tracer 177Lu-AMBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waser, Beatrice; Eltschinger, Veronique; Reubi, Jean C.; Linder, Karen; Nunn, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the in vitro binding properties of a novel radiolabelled bombesin analogue, 177 Lu-AMBA, in human neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues selected for their expression of the bombesin receptor subtypes GRP-R, NMB-R and BRS-3. In vitro receptor autoradiography was performed in cancers expressing the various bombesin receptor subtypes. The novel radioligand 177 Lu-AMBA was used and compared with established bombesin radioligands such as 125 I-Tyr 4 -bombesin and 125 I-[D-Tyr 6 ,β-Ala 11 ,Phe 13 ,Nle 14 ]-bombesin(6-14). In vitro incidence of detection of each of the three bombesin receptor subtypes was evaluated in each tumour. 177 Lu-AMBA identified all GRP-R-expressing tumours, such as prostatic, mammary and renal cell carcinomas as well as gastrointestinal stromal tumours. 177 Lu-AMBA also identified all NMB-expressing tumours, but did not detect BRS-3-expressing tumours or BRS-3-expressing pancreatic islets. GRP-R-expressing peritumoural vessels were heavily labelled with 177 Lu-AMBA. In contrast to the strongly GRP-R-positive mouse pancreas, the human pancreas was not labelled with 177 Lu-AMBA unless chronic pancreatitis was diagnosed. In general, the sensitivity was slightly better with 177 Lu-AMBA than with the conventional bombesin radioligands. The present in vitro study suggests that 177 Lu-AMBA may be a very useful in vivo targeting agent for GRP-R-expressing tumours, NMB-R-expressing tumours and GRP-R-expressing neoangiogenic vessels. (orig.)

  2. Selective in vitro targeting of GRP and NMB receptors in human tumours with the new bombesin tracer {sup 177}Lu-AMBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Eltschinger, Veronique; Reubi, Jean C. [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, P.O. Box 62, Bern (Switzerland); Linder, Karen; Nunn, Adrian [Bracco Research USA Inc, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2007-01-15

    To investigate the in vitro binding properties of a novel radiolabelled bombesin analogue, {sup 177}Lu-AMBA, in human neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues selected for their expression of the bombesin receptor subtypes GRP-R, NMB-R and BRS-3. In vitro receptor autoradiography was performed in cancers expressing the various bombesin receptor subtypes. The novel radioligand {sup 177}Lu-AMBA was used and compared with established bombesin radioligands such as {sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4}-bombesin and {sup 125}I-[D-Tyr{sup 6},{beta}-Ala{sup 11},Phe{sup 13},Nle{sup 14}]-bombesin(6-14). In vitro incidence of detection of each of the three bombesin receptor subtypes was evaluated in each tumour. {sup 177}Lu-AMBA identified all GRP-R-expressing tumours, such as prostatic, mammary and renal cell carcinomas as well as gastrointestinal stromal tumours. {sup 177}Lu-AMBA also identified all NMB-expressing tumours, but did not detect BRS-3-expressing tumours or BRS-3-expressing pancreatic islets. GRP-R-expressing peritumoural vessels were heavily labelled with {sup 177}Lu-AMBA. In contrast to the strongly GRP-R-positive mouse pancreas, the human pancreas was not labelled with {sup 177}Lu-AMBA unless chronic pancreatitis was diagnosed. In general, the sensitivity was slightly better with {sup 177}Lu-AMBA than with the conventional bombesin radioligands. The present in vitro study suggests that {sup 177}Lu-AMBA may be a very useful in vivo targeting agent for GRP-R-expressing tumours, NMB-R-expressing tumours and GRP-R-expressing neoangiogenic vessels. (orig.)

  3. Radiosensitivity of primary tumour cultures as a determinant of curability of human head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, L.J.; Tofilon, P.J.; Goepfert, H.; Brock, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    Between November 1985 and November 1987, 31 patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck who were treated on protocol by surgery and post-operative radiotherapy at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center had radiosensitivity measurements made on primary cultures of the surgical specimens using the Adhesive Tumour Cell Culture System. The parameter of cell survival at 2 Gy (S 2 ) was correlated with the clinical outcome independently of pathological risk factors. All five recurrences have been in patients with S 2 values >0.3 (p = 0.08). Evidence of significant intratumoral heterogeneity of cellular radiosensitivity in vitro was demonstrated in one of four cultures tested. Mathematical modelling suggests that in the absence of marked heterogeneity, the S 2 parameter is likely to be more robust than other radiobiologically based assays in predicting clinical treatment outcome. (author)

  4. Monte Carlo dose calculations for BNCT treatment of diffuse human lung tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; Bruschi, P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to test the possibility to apply BNCT in the core of diffuse lung tumours, dose distribution calculations were made. The simulations were performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP.4c2, using the male computational phantom Adam, version 07/94. Volumes of interest were voxelized for the tally requests, and results were obtained for tissues with and without Boron. Different collimated neutron sources were tested in order to establish the proper energies, as well as single and multiple beams to maximize neutron flux uniformity inside the target organs. Flux and dose distributions are reported. The use of two opposite epithermal neutron collimated beams insures good levels of dose homogeneity inside the lungs, with a substantially lower radiation dose delivered to surrounding structures. (author)

  5. Nuclear translocation of β-catenin and decreased expression of epithelial cadherin in human papillomavirus-positive tonsillar cancer: an early event in human papillomavirus-related tumour progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Markus; Yosef, Basima; Huebbers, Christian U; Preuss, Simon F; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Odenthal, Margarete; Klussmann, Jens P

    2011-06-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) constitute an important risk factor for tonsillar cancer. This study describes changes in cell adhesion molecules during metastasis of HPV-related and HPV-unrelated tonsillar carcinomas. We examined 48 primary tonsillar carcinoma samples (25 HPV-16 DNA-positive, 23 HPV-16 DNA-negative) and their respective lymph node metastases for their HPV status and for the expression of p16, epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), β-catenin, and vimentin. A positive HPV-specific polymerase chain reaction finding correlated significantly with p16 overexpression in both primary tumours and their metastases (P<0.0001 for both). In HPV-unrelated carcinomas, the expression of E-cadherin was significantly lower in metastases than in primary tumours (P<0.001). In contrast, the expression of nuclear β-catenin was significantly higher in metastases than in primary tumours (P=0.016). In HPV-related carcinomas, nuclear localization of β-catenin expression was already apparent in primary tumours (P=0.030). The expression of vimentin significantly correlated with the grading of the primary tumour (P=0.021). Our data indicate that the down-regulation of E-cadherin and the up-regulation of nuclear β-catenin expression might be crucial steps during tumour progression of tonsillar carcinomas, being already present in primary tumours in HPV-driven carcinomas, but becoming apparent in HPV-unrelated tumours later in the process of metastasis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  6. Mitochondrial modulation of oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity in some human tumour cell lines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anoopkumar-Dukie, S

    2009-10-01

    Oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity of tumour cells reflects direct oxidative damage to DNA, but non-nuclear mechanisms including signalling pathways may also contribute. Mitochondria are likely candidates because not only do they integrate signals from each of the main kinase pathways but mitochondrial kinases responsive to oxidative stress communicate to the rest of the cell. Using pharmacological and immunochemical methods, we tested the role of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and the Bcl-2 proteins in oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity. Drug-treated or untreated cervical cancer HeLa, breast cancer MCF-7 and melanoma MeWo cell lines were irradiated at 6.2 Gy under normoxic and hypoxic conditions then allowed to proliferate for 7 days. The MPT blocker cyclosporin A (2 microM) strongly protected HeLa but not the other two lines against oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity. By contrast, bongkrekic acid (50 microM), which blocks MPT by targeting the adenine nucleotide transporter, had only marginal effect and calcineurin inhibitor FK-506 (0.1 microM) had none. Nor was evidence found for the modulation of oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity by Bax\\/Bcl-2 signalling, mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium (mitoK(ATP)) channels or mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. In conclusion, calcineurin-independent protection by cyclosporin A suggests that MPT but not mitoK(ATP) or the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway plays a causal role in oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity of HeLa cells. Targeting MPT may therefore improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy in some solid tumours.

  7. Histone H1x is highly expressed in human neuroendocrine cells and tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warneboldt, Julia; Haller, Florian; Horstmann, Olaf; Danner, Bernhard C; Füzesi, László; Doenecke, Detlef; Happel, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Histone H1x is a ubiquitously expressed member of the H1 histone family. H1 histones, also called linker histones, stabilize compact, higher order structures of chromatin. In addition to their role as structural proteins, they actively regulate gene expression and participate in chromatin-based processes like DNA replication and repair. The epigenetic contribution of H1 histones to these mechanisms makes it conceivable that they also take part in malignant transformation. Based on results of a Blast data base search which revealed an accumulation of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of H1x in libraries from neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), we evaluated the expression of H1x in NETs from lung and the gastrointestinal tract using immunohistochemisty. Relative protein and mRNA levels of H1x were analysed by Western blot analysis and quantitative real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Since several reports describe a change of the expression level of the replacement subtype H1.0 during tumourigenesis, the analysis of this subtype was included in this study. We found an increased expression of H1x but not of H1.0 in NET tissues in comparison to corresponding normal tissues. Even though the analysed NETs were heterogenous regarding their grade of malignancy, all except one showed a considerably higher protein amount of H1x compared with corresponding non-neoplastic tissue. Furthermore, double-labelling of H1x and chromogranin A in sections of pancreas and small intestine revealed that H1x is highly expressed in neuroendocrine cells of these tissues. We conclude that the high expression of histone H1x in NETs is probably due to the abundance of this protein in the cells from which these tumours originate

  8. Biochemical signatures of in vitro radiation response in human lung, breast and prostate tumour cells observed with Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Q; Jirasek, A; Lum, J J; Brolo, A G

    2011-01-01

    This work applies noninvasive single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS) and principal component analysis (PCA) to analyze and correlate radiation-induced biochemical changes in a panel of human tumour cell lines that vary by tissue of origin, p53 status and intrinsic radiosensitivity. Six human tumour cell lines, derived from prostate (DU145, PC3 and LNCaP), breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) and lung (H460), were irradiated in vitro with single fractions (15, 30 or 50 Gy) of 6 MV photons. Remaining live cells were harvested for RS analysis at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h post-irradiation, along with unirradiated controls. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 cells per sample utilizing a 785 nm excitation laser. All spectra (200 per cell line) were individually post-processed using established methods and the total data set for each cell line was analyzed with PCA using standard algorithms. One radiation-induced PCA component was detected for each cell line by identification of statistically significant changes in the PCA score distributions for irradiated samples, as compared to unirradiated samples, in the first 24-72 h post-irradiation. These RS response signatures arise from radiation-induced changes in cellular concentrations of aromatic amino acids, conformational protein structures and certain nucleic acid and lipid functional groups. Correlation analysis between the radiation-induced PCA components separates the cell lines into three distinct RS response categories: R1 (H460 and MCF7), R2 (MDA-MB-231 and PC3) and R3 (DU145 and LNCaP). These RS categories partially segregate according to radiosensitivity, as the R1 and R2 cell lines are radioresistant (SF 2 > 0.6) and the R3 cell lines are radiosensitive (SF 2 < 0.5). The R1 and R2 cell lines further segregate according to p53 gene status, corroborated by cell cycle analysis post-irradiation. Potential radiation-induced biochemical response mechanisms underlying our RS observations are proposed, such as (1) the

  9. MicroRNAs as tumour suppressors in canine and human melanoma cells and as a prognostic factor in canine melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, S; Mori, T; Hoshino, Y; Yamada, N; Maruo, K; Akao, Y

    2013-06-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) is one of the most aggressive cancers in dogs and in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of its development and progression remain unclear. Presently, we examined the expression profile of microRNAs (miRs) in canine oral MM tissues and paired normal oral mucosa tissues by using the microRNA-microarray assay and quantitative RT-PCR. Importantly, a decreased expression of miR-203 was significantly associated with a shorter survival time. Also, miR-203 and -205 were markedly down-regulated in canine and human MM cell lines tested. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of miR-205 had a significant inhibitory effect on the cell growth of canine and human melanoma cells tested by targeting erbb3. Our data suggest that miR-203 is a new prognostic factor in canine oral MMs and that miR-205 functions as a tumour suppressor by targeting erbb3 in both canine and human MM cells. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Tumour regrowth after irradiation. An experimental approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaura, H; Matsuzawa, T [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis, Leprosy and Cancer

    1979-03-01

    Structural changes in irradiated tumours and their regrowth were studied in a rat hepatoma, AH109A, using histological and transparent-chamber techniques. The development of the tumour was examined by means of vascular morphometry as observed in the chamber. Schematically, the tumour tissue was divided into four isocentric layers according to vascular morphology and measurements of vessel volume, surface area, and length per mm/sup 3/ of tissue. The vascularity was greatest in the outermost region, decreased towards the inner parts and reached an absence of vascularity at the central necrosis. The tumours were gamma- or X-irradiated with various doses. The inside hypoxic region was destroyed completely after 300 rad, and regrowths started exclusively from the outermost area of the tumour where enhancement of the effect of radiation by oxygen was thought to be greatest. Possible mechanisms of tumour regrowth are discussed.

  11. The effect of combining recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha with local radiation on tumor control probability of a human glioblastoma multiforme xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Peigen; Allam, Ayman; Perez, Luis A.; Taghian, Alphonse; Freeman, Jill; Suit, Herman D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rHuTNF-α) on a human glioblastoma multiforme (U87) xenograft in nude mice, and to study the effect of combining rHuTNF-α with local radiation on the tumor control probability of this tumor model. Methods and Materials: U87 xenograft was transplanted SC into the right hindleg of NCr/Sed nude mice (7-8 weeks old, male). When tumors reached a volume of about 110 mm 3 , mice were randomly assigned to treatment: rHuTNF-α alone compared with normal saline control; or local radiation plus rHuTNF-α vs. local radiation plus normal saline. Parameters of growth delay, volume doubling time, percentage of necrosis, and cell loss factor were used to assess the antitumor effects of rHuTNF-α on this tumor. The TCD 50 (tumor control dose 50%) was used as an endpoint to determine the effect of combining rHuTNF-α with local radiation. Results: Tumor growth in mice treated with a dose of 150 μg/kg body weight rHuTNF-α, IP injection daily for 7 consecutive days, was delayed about 8 days compared to that in controls. Tumors in the treatment group had a significantly longer volume doubling time, and were smaller in volume and more necrotic than matched tumors in control group. rHuTNF-α also induced a 2.3 times increase of cell loss factor. The administration of the above-mentioned dose of rHuTNF-α starting 24 h after single doses of localized irradiation under hypoxic condition, resulted in a significant reduction in TCD 50 from the control value of 60.9 Gy to 50.5 Gy (p 50 value in the treatment vs. the control groups

  12. HumanMethylation450K Array–Identified Biomarkers Predict Tumour Recurrence/Progression at Initial Diagnosis of High-risk Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark O Kitchen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (HR-NMIBC is a clinically unpredictable disease. Despite clinical risk estimation tools, many patients are undertreated with intra-vesical therapies alone, whereas others may be over-treated with early radical surgery. Molecular biomarkers, particularly DNA methylation, have been reported as predictive of tumour/patient outcomes in numerous solid organ and haematologic malignancies; however, there are few reports in HR-NMIBC and none using genome-wide array assessment. We therefore sought to identify novel DNA methylation markers of HR-NMIBC clinical outcomes that might predict tumour behaviour at initial diagnosis and help guide patient management. Patients and methods: A total of 21 primary initial diagnosis HR-NMIBC tumours were analysed by Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays and subsequently bisulphite Pyrosequencing. In all, 7 had not recurred at 1 year after resection and 14 had recurred and/or progressed despite intra-vesical BCG. A further independent cohort of 32 HR-NMIBC tumours (17 no recurrence and 15 recurrence and/or progression despite BCG were also assessed by bisulphite Pyrosequencing. Results: Array analyses identified 206 CpG loci that segregated non-recurrent HR-NMIBC tumours from clinically more aggressive recurrence/progression tumours. Hypermethylation of CpG cg11850659 and hypomethylation of CpG cg01149192 in combination predicted HR-NMIBC recurrence and/or progression within 1 year of diagnosis with 83% sensitivity, 79% specificity, and 83% positive and 79% negative predictive values. Conclusions: This is the first genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of a unique HR-NMIBC tumour cohort encompassing known 1-year clinical outcomes. Our analyses identified potential novel epigenetic markers that could help guide individual patient management in this clinically unpredictable disease.

  13. Modulation of actin dynamics as potential macrophage subtype-targeting anti-tumour strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergola, Carlo; Schubert, Katrin; Pace, Simona; Ziereisen, Jana; Nikels, Felix; Scherer, Olga; Hüttel, Stephan; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Weinigel, Christina; Rummler, Silke; Müller, Rolf; Raasch, Martin; Mosig, Alexander; Koeberle, Andreas; Werz, Oliver

    2017-01-30

    Tumour-associated macrophages mainly comprise immunosuppressive M2 phenotypes that promote tumour progression besides anti-tumoural M1 subsets. Selective depletion or reprogramming of M2 may represent an innovative anti-cancer strategy. The actin cytoskeleton is central for cellular homeostasis and is targeted for anti-cancer chemotherapy. Here, we show that targeting G-actin nucleation using chondramide A (ChA) predominantly depletes human M2 while promoting the tumour-suppressive M1 phenotype. ChA reduced the viability of M2, with minor effects on M1, but increased tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α release from M1. Interestingly, ChA caused rapid disruption of dynamic F-actin filaments and polymerization of G-actin, followed by reduction of cell size, binucleation and cell division, without cellular collapse. In M1, but not in M2, ChA caused marked activation of SAPK/JNK and NFκB, with slight or no effects on Akt, STAT-1/-3, ERK-1/2, and p38 MAPK, seemingly accounting for the better survival of M1 and TNFα secretion. In a microfluidically-supported human tumour biochip model, circulating ChA-treated M1 markedly reduced tumour cell viability through enhanced release of TNFα. Together, ChA may cause an anti-tumoural microenvironment by depletion of M2 and activation of M1, suggesting induction of G-actin nucleation as potential strategy to target tumour-associated macrophages in addition to neoplastic cells.

  14. Multiple roles of glyoxalase 1-mediated suppression of methylglyoxal glycation in cancer biology-Involvement in tumour suppression, tumour growth, multidrug resistance and target for chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Naila; Xue, Mingzhan; Weickert, Martin O; Thornalley, Paul J

    2018-04-01

    Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) is part of the glyoxalase system in the cytoplasm of all human cells. It catalyses the glutathione-dependent removal of the endogenous reactive dicarbonyl metabolite, methylglyoxal (MG). MG is formed mainly as a side product of anaerobic glycolysis. It modifies protein and DNA to form mainly hydroimidazolone MG-H1 and imidazopurinone MGdG adducts, respectively. Abnormal accumulation of MG, dicarbonyl stress, increases adduct levels which may induce apoptosis and replication catastrophe. In the non-malignant state, Glo1 is a tumour suppressor protein and small molecule inducers of Glo1 expression may find use in cancer prevention. Increased Glo1 expression is permissive for growth of tumours with high glycolytic activity and is thereby a biomarker of tumour growth. High Glo1 expression is a cause of multi-drug resistance. It is produced by over-activation of the Nrf2 pathway and GLO1 amplification. Glo1 inhibitors are antitumour agents, inducing apoptosis and necrosis, and anoikis. Tumour stem cells and tumours with high flux of MG formation and Glo1 expression are sensitive to Glo1 inhibitor therapy. It is likely that MG-induced cell death contributes to the mechanism of action of current antitumour agents. Common refractory tumours have high prevalence of Glo1 overexpression for which Glo1 inhibitors may improve therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-α-accelerated degradation of type I collagen in human skin is associated with elevated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Magnus S; Schnabel, Reinhild; Christensen, Lise H

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induces matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may disrupt skin integrity. We have investigated the effects and mechanisms of exogenous TNF-α on collagen degradation by incubating human skin explants in defined serum-free media with or without TNF-α (10ng/ml) in the a......Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induces matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may disrupt skin integrity. We have investigated the effects and mechanisms of exogenous TNF-α on collagen degradation by incubating human skin explants in defined serum-free media with or without TNF-α (10ng...... tissue-derived collagenolytic activity with TNF-α exposure was blocked by neutralizing MMP-1 monoclonal antibody and was not due to down-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. TNF-α increased production (pendogenous MMP-1...

  16. Sensitization of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-resistant malignant melanomas by quercetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katherine A; Manouchehri, Jasmine M; Kalafatis, Michael

    2018-03-28

    Malignant melanoma is the most commonly diagnosed skin cancer associated with a high rate of metastasis. Low-stage melanoma is easily treated, but metastatic malignant melanoma is an extremely treatment-resistant malignancy with low survival rates. The application of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rhTRAIL) for the treatment of metastatic malignant melanoma holds considerable promise because of its selective proapoptotic activity towards cancer cells and not nontransformed cells. Unfortunately, the clinical utilization of rhTRAIL has been terminated due to the resistance of many cancer cells to undergo apoptosis in response to rhTRAIL. However, rhTRAIL-resistance can be abrogated through the cotreatment with compounds derived from 'Mother Nature' such as quercetin that can modulate cellular components responsible for rhTRAIL-resistance. Here, we show that rhTRAIL-resistant malignant melanomas are sensitized by quercetin. Quercetin action is manifested by the upregulation of rhTRAIL-binding receptors DR4 and DR5 on the surface of cancer cells and by increased rate of the proteasome-mediated degradation of the antiapoptotic protein FLIP. Our data provide for a new efficient and nontoxic treatment of malignant melanoma.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  17. A monograph proposing the use of canine mammary tumours as a model for the study of hereditary breast cancer susceptibility genes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Katie; Merner, Nancy D

    2017-05-01

    Canines are excellent models for cancer studies due to their similar physiology and genomic sequence to humans, companion status and limited intra-breed heterogeneity. Due to their affliction to mammary cancers, canines can serve as powerful genetic models of hereditary breast cancers. Variants within known human breast cancer susceptibility genes only explain a fraction of familial cases. Thus, further discovery is necessary but such efforts have been thwarted by genetic heterogeneity. Reducing heterogeneity is key, and studying isolated human populations have helped in the endeavour. An alternative is to study dog pedigrees, since artificial selection has resulted in extreme homogeneity. Identifying the genetic predisposition to canine mammary tumours can translate to human discoveries - a strategy currently underutilized. To explore this potential, we reviewed published canine mammary tumour genetic studies and proposed benefits of next generation sequencing canine cohorts to facilitate moving beyond incremental advances.

  18. Erratum to: Psammoma bodies in two types of human ovarian tumours: a mineralogical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanlu; Wang, Changqiu; Li, Yan; Lu, Anhuai; Mei, Fang; Liu, Jianying; Du, Jingyun; Zhang, Yan

    2015-06-01

    Psammoma body (PB) is a common form of calcification in pathological diagnosis and closely relevant to tumours. This paper focuses on the mineralogical characteristics of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma by using polarization microscope (POM), environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FT-IR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), micro-area synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (μ-SRXRD) and fluorescence (μ-SRXRF). Both the PBs in tissues and separated from eight typical cases were investigated. POM and ESEM observation revealed the inside-out growth pattern of PBs. μ-SRXRD and micro-FT-IR results demonstrated the dominant mineral phase of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma was AB-type carbonate hydroxyapatite (Ca10[(PO4)6-x-y(CO3)x(HPO4)y][(OH)2-u(CO3)u] with 0 ≤ x,y,u ≤ 2). As observed by ESEM and TEM, the layer-rich PBs in teratoma were up to 70 μm and mainly consisted of 5 nm-wide, 5-12 nm-long columnar crystals; the PBs in ovarian serous cancer with a maximum diameter of 35 μm were composed of slightly longer columnar crystals and granulates with 20-100 nm in diameter. The selected area electron diffraction patterns showed dispersed polycrystalline diffraction rings with arching behavior of (002) diffraction, indicating the aggregated nanocrystals grew in the preferred orientation of (002) face. The EDX and μ-SRXRF results together indicated the existence of Na, Mg, Zn and Sr in PBs. These detailed mineralogical characteristics may help uncover the nature of the pathological PBs in ovary.

  19. Psammoma bodies in two types of human ovarian tumours: a mineralogical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanlu, Meng; Changqiu, Wang; Yan, Li; Anhuai, Lu; Fang, Mei; Jianying, Liu; Jingyun, Du; Yan, Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Psammoma body (PB) is a common form of calcification in pathological diagnosis and closely relevant to tumours. This paper focuses on the mineralogical characteristics of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma by using polarization microscope (POM), environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FT-IR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), micro-area synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (μ-SRXRD) and fluorescence (μ-SRXRF). Both the PBs in tissues and separated from eight typical cases were investigated. POM and ESEM observation revealed the inside-out growth pattern of PBs. μ-SRXRD and micro-FT-IR results demonstrated the dominant mineral phase of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma was AB-type carbonate hydroxyapatite (Ca10[(PO4)6-x-y(CO3)x(HPO4 2-)y][(OH)2-u(CO3)u] with 0 ≤ x,y,u ≤ 2). As observed by ESEM and TEM, the layer-rich PBs in teratoma were up to 70 μm and mainly consisted of 5 nm-wide, 5-12 nm-long columnar crystals; the PBs in ovarian serous cancer with a maximum diameter of 35 μm were composed of slightly longer columnar crystals and granulates with 20-100 nm in diameter. The selected area electron diffraction patterns showed dispersed polycrystalline diffraction rings with arching behavior of (002) diffraction, indicating the aggregated nanocrystals grew in the preferred orientation of (002) face. The EDX and μ-SRXRF results together indicated the existence of Na, Mg, Zn and Sr in PBs. These detailed mineralogical characteristics may help uncover the nature of the pathological PBs in ovary.

  20. Associations between the uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab, HER2 density and response to trastuzumab (Herceptin) in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous human tumour xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLarty, Kristin; Cornelissen, Bart; Scollard, Deborah A. [University of Toronto, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada); Done, Susan J. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Biophysics, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University of Toronto, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University Health Network, Department of Pathology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chun, Kathy [North York General Hospital, Genetics Program, Toronto, ON (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M. [University of Toronto, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University Health Network, Toronto General Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University of Toronto, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the associations between uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab, tumour HER2 density and response to trastuzumab (Herceptin) of human breast cancer (BC) xenografts in athymic mice. The tumour uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab in athymic mice bearing BC xenografts with increasing HER2 density (0 to 3+) was evaluated. Specific uptake ratios were established in biodistribution (SUR) and imaging studies (ROI-SUR) using {sup 111}In-labeled mouse IgG ({sup 111}In-DTPA-mIgG). Further corrections were made for circulating radioactivity using tumour-to-blood ratios defined as a localization index (LI) and region-of-interest localization index (ROI-LI), respectively. Mice were treated with trastuzumab (Herceptin). A tumour growth inhibition index (TGI) was calculated and relative TGIs calculated by dividing the TGI of control by that of trastuzumab-treated mice. Strong, nonlinear associations with HER2 density were obtained if the uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab was corrected for nonspecific IgG localization (i.e., SUR; r{sup 2}=0.99) and circulating radioactivity (i.e., LI; r{sup 2} =0.87), but without these corrections, the association between HER2 density and tumour uptake was poor (r{sup 2}=0.22). There was a strong association between ROI-SUR and ROI-LI values and HER2 expression (r{sup 2}=0.90 and r{sup 2}=0.95), respectively. All tumours were imaged. Relative TGI values were associated with increasing uncorrected tumour uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab but not always with HER2 density (i.e., MCF-HER2-18 cells with trastuzumab-resistance). HER2 expression (0 to 3+) can be differentiated using {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab, but requires correction of tumour uptake for nonspecific IgG localization and circulating radioactivity. The uncorrected uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab was associated with tumour response to trastuzumab. (orig.)

  1. Studies on the role of RNA tumour viruses in human leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nooter, K.

    1979-01-01

    A search has been made for an etiological role of retroviruses in human leukemia and cocultivation studies have led to the isolation of a presumed human type C virus which appeared to be oncogenic for experimental animals. The experimental procedures and results are fully discussed. The parallels between irradiation induced lymphomas in mice and leukaemias in man are explored. (C.F.)

  2. Postneonatal Mortality and Liver Changes in Cloned Pigs Associated with Human Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor I-Fc and Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geon A; Jin, Jun-Xue; Lee, Sanghoon; Taweechaipaisankul, Anukul; Oh, Hyun Ju; Hwang, Joing-Ik; Ahn, Curie; Saadeldin, Islam M; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2017-01-01

    Soluble human tumor necrosis factor (shTNFRI-Fc) and human heme oxygenase 1 (hHO-1) are key regulators for protection against oxidative and inflammatory injury for xenotransplantation. Somatic cells with more than 10 copy numbers of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 were employed in somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate cloned pigs, thereby resulting in seven cloned piglets. However, produced piglets were all dead within 24 hours after birth. Obviously, postnatal death with liver apoptosis was reported in the higher copy number of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 piglets. In liver, the transcript levels of ferritin heavy chain, light chain, transferrin, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were significantly highly expressed compared to those of lower copy number of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 piglets ( P hHO-1 piglets ( P hHO-1 overexpression may apparently induce free iron in the liver and exert oxidative stress by enhancing reactive oxygen species production and block normal postneonatal liver metabolism.

  3. Postneonatal Mortality and Liver Changes in Cloned Pigs Associated with Human Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor I-Fc and Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geon A. Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble human tumor necrosis factor (shTNFRI-Fc and human heme oxygenase 1 (hHO-1 are key regulators for protection against oxidative and inflammatory injury for xenotransplantation. Somatic cells with more than 10 copy numbers of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 were employed in somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate cloned pigs, thereby resulting in seven cloned piglets. However, produced piglets were all dead within 24 hours after birth. Obviously, postnatal death with liver apoptosis was reported in the higher copy number of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 piglets. In liver, the transcript levels of ferritin heavy chain, light chain, transferrin, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were significantly highly expressed compared to those of lower copy number of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 piglets (P<0.05. Also, H2O2 contents were increased, and superoxide dismutase was significantly lower in the higher copy number of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 piglets (P<0.05. These results indicate that TNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 overexpression may apparently induce free iron in the liver and exert oxidative stress by enhancing reactive oxygen species production and block normal postneonatal liver metabolism.

  4. Nitric oxide-releasing agents enhance cytokine-induced tumor necrosis factor synthesis in human mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eigler, A; Sinha, B; Endres, S

    1993-01-01

    In septic shock tumor necrosis factor (TNF) leads to increased nitric oxide (NO) production by induction of NO synthase. An inverse regulatory effect, the influence of NO on cytokine synthesis, has rarely been investigated. The present study assessed the influence of NO-releasing agents on TNF

  5. Specific receptors for epidermal growth factor in human bone tumour cells and its effect on synthesis of prostaglandin E2 by cultured osteosarcoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Y.; Uchihashi, M.; Nakashima, H.; Fujita, T.; Matsukura, S.; Matsui, K.

    1984-01-01

    Using tumour cell lines derived from human bone tumours, specific binding sites for epidermal growth factor (EGF), a potent growth stimulator in many tissues, and its effect on synthesis of prostaglandin (PG) E 2 , a potent bone-resorbing factor, by cultured osteosarcoma cell line were studied. Three tumour cell lines, one osteosarcoma (HOSO) and two giant cell tumours of the bone (G-1 and G-2), all possessed specific binding sites for 125 I-labelled EGF: the apparent dissociation constant was approximately 4-10 x 10 -10 M and the maximal binding capacity was 50 000-80 000 sites/cell. EGF had no mitogenic effect in these cell lines. However, these cell lines did not have specific binding sites for 125 I-labelled parathyroid hormone (PTH) or calcitonin. HOSO line produced and secreted PGE 2 into medium, while no significant amount of PGE 2 was demonstrated in G-1 or G-2 line. EGF significantly stimulated PGE 2 production in HOSO line in a dose-dependent manner (0.5-50 ng/ml); its stimulatory effect was completely abolished by indomethacin, an inhibitor of PG biosynthesis. Exogenous PGE 1 significantly stimulated cyclic AMP formation in HOSO line, whereas PGFsub(2α) PTH, calcitonin, or EGF had no effect. None of these calcium-regulating hormones affected cyclic AMP generation in either G-1 of G-2 line. These data indicate that human bone tumour cells have specific EGF receptors unrelated to cell growth, and suggest that EGF may be involved in bone resorption through a PGE 2 -mediated process in human osseous tissues. (author)

  6. Insulin resistance in vascular endothelial cells promotes intestinal tumour formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X; Häring, M-F; Rathjen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    in vascular endothelial cells. Strikingly, these mice had 42% more intestinal tumours than controls, no change in tumour angiogenesis, but increased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in primary culture of tumour endothelial cells. Insulin decreased VCAM-1 expression and leukocyte...... adhesion in quiescent tumour endothelial cells with intact insulin receptors and partly prevented increases in VCAM-1 and leukocyte adhesion after treatment with tumour necrosis factor-α. Knockout of insulin receptors in endothelial cells also increased leukocyte adhesion in mesenteric venules...

  7. The effect of combining recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha with local radiation on tumor control probability of a human glioblastoma multiforme xenograft in nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Peigen; Allam, Ayman; Perez, Luis A; Taghian, Alphonse; Freeman, Jill; Suit, Herman D

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rHuTNF-{alpha}) on a human glioblastoma multiforme (U87) xenograft in nude mice, and to study the effect of combining rHuTNF-{alpha} with local radiation on the tumor control probability of this tumor model. Methods and Materials: U87 xenograft was transplanted SC into the right hindleg of NCr/Sed nude mice (7-8 weeks old, male). When tumors reached a volume of about 110 mm{sup 3}, mice were randomly assigned to treatment: rHuTNF-{alpha} alone compared with normal saline control; or local radiation plus rHuTNF-{alpha} vs. local radiation plus normal saline. Parameters of growth delay, volume doubling time, percentage of necrosis, and cell loss factor were used to assess the antitumor effects of rHuTNF-{alpha} on this tumor. The TCD{sub 50} (tumor control dose 50%) was used as an endpoint to determine the effect of combining rHuTNF-{alpha} with local radiation. Results: Tumor growth in mice treated with a dose of 150 {mu}g/kg body weight rHuTNF-{alpha}, IP injection daily for 7 consecutive days, was delayed about 8 days compared to that in controls. Tumors in the treatment group had a significantly longer volume doubling time, and were smaller in volume and more necrotic than matched tumors in control group. rHuTNF-{alpha} also induced a 2.3 times increase of cell loss factor. The administration of the above-mentioned dose of rHuTNF-{alpha} starting 24 h after single doses of localized irradiation under hypoxic condition, resulted in a significant reduction in TCD{sub 50} from the control value of 60.9 Gy to 50.5 Gy (p < 0.01). Conclusion: rHuTNF-{alpha} exhibits an antitumor effect against U87 xenograft in nude mice, as evidenced by an increased delay in tumor growth as well as cell loss factor. Also, there was an augmentation of tumor curability when given in combination with radiotherapy, resulting in a significantly lower TCD{sub 50} value in the treatment vs. the

  8. Tumour-Derived Interleukin-1 Beta Induces Pro-inflammatory Response in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alajez, Nehad M; Al-toub, Mashael; Almusa, Abdulaziz

    ’ secreted factors as represented by a panel of human cancer cell lines (breast (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231); prostate (PC-3); lung (NCI-H522); colon (HT-29) and head & neck (FaDu)) on the biological characteristics of MSCs. Background Over the past several years, significant amount of research has emerged......, the goal of this study was to assess the cellular and molecular changes in MSCs in response to secreted factors present in conditioned media (CM) from a panel of human tumor cell lines covering a spectrum of human cancers (Breast, Prostate, Lung, colon, and head and neck). Research Morphological changes...... with bipolar processes. In association with phenotypic changes, genome-wide gene expression and bioinformatics analysis revealed an enhanced pro-inflammatory response of those MSCs. Pharmacological inhibitions of FAK and MAPKK severely impaired the pro-inflammatory response of MSCs to tumor CM (~80-99%, and 55...

  9. Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus and mouse mammary tumour virus as multiple viruses in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Wendy K; Heng, Benjamin; Delprado, Warick; Iacopetta, Barry; Whitaker, Noel J; Lawson, James S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV), high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV) co-exist in some breast cancers. All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis) and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc). EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk - EBV (35%), HPV, 20%) and MMTV (32%) of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. We conclude that (i) EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii) the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer.

  10. Correlation between human papillomavirus and p16 overexpression in oropharyngeal tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj Larsen, C; Gyldenløve, M; Jensen, D H

    2014-01-01

    A significant proportion of squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx (OP-SCC) are related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and p16 overexpression. This subgroup proves better prognosis and survival but no evidence exists on the correlation between HPV and p16 overexpression based on diag...

  11. Renal papillary necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asking your provider. Alternative Names Necrosis - renal papillae; Renal medullary necrosis Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Bushinsky DA, Monk RD. Nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. ...

  12. Treatment with HPMA copolymer-based doxorubicin conjugate containing human immunoglobulin induces long-lasting systemic anti-tumour immunity in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šírová, Milada; Strohalm, Jiří; Šubr, Vladimír; Plocová, Daniela; Rossmann, Pavel; Mrkvan, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel; Říhová, Blanka

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, - (2007), s. 35-47 ISSN 0340-7004 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505; GA ČR GA305/05/2268 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : targered tumour therapy * hpma * human immunoglobulin Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.728, year: 2007

  13. Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 and carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater: expression differences in tumour histotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Perrone

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1 is the major means by which gemcitabine enters human cells; recent evidence exists that hENT1 is expressed in carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater and that it should be considered as a molecular prognostic marker for patients with resected ampullary cancer. Aim of the present study is to evaluate the variations of hENT1 expression in ampullary carcinomas and to correlate such variations with histological subtypes and clinicopathological parameters. Forty-one ampullary carcinomas were histologically classified into intestinal, pancreaticobiliary and unusual types. hENT1 and Ki67 expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and apoptotic cells were identified by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate biotin nick end labelling (TUNEL method. hENT1 overexpression was detected in 63.4% ampullary carcinomas. A significant difference in terms of hENT1 and Ki67 expression was found between intestinal vs. pancreaticobiliary types (P=0.03 and P=0.009 respectively. Moreover, a significant statistical positive correlation was found between apoptotic and proliferative Index (P=0.036, while no significant correlation was found between hENT1 and apoptosis. Our results on hENT1 expression suggest that classification of ampullary carcinoma by morphological subtypes may represent an additional tool in prospective clinical trials aimed at examining treatment efficacy; in addition, data obtained from Ki67 and TUNEL suggest a key role of hENT1 in tumour growth of ampullary carcinoma.

  14. Modification of the radiation sensitivity of human tumour cells by a bis-benzimidazole derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P J; Anderson, C O [Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK)

    1984-10-01

    A comparison was made of the ability of either X-radiation or a DNA-specific ligand (the vital bis-benzimidazole dye; Hoechst 33342) to induce: cell killing, inhibition of de novo DNA synthesis, DNA strand breakage and the delay of cell division in human colon adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. Unlike radiation-induced cell killing, ligand-induced cytotoxicity appeared to be positively correlated with the extent of inhibition of de novo DNA synthesis-a feature consistent with the persistent binding of ligand molecules to nuclear DNA. Ligand-induced DNA strand-breaks disappeared slowly although ligand-treated cells retained apparently normal capacities to repair discrete radiogenic DNA strand-breaks. Pre-treatment of cells with Hoechst 33342 resulted in a dose-modifying enhancement of radiation resistance not associated with altered dosimetry for strand-break induction. However, radioresistance was accompanied by the protracted retention of cells in the G/sub 2/ phase of the cell cycle. We suggest that the results provide direct evidence that the retention of cells in G/sub 2/ phase is a sparing phenomenon and is triggered by the responses of chromatin domains to the presence of DNA damage.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits insulin's stimulating effect on glucose uptake and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask-Madsen, Christian; Domínguez, Helena; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mechanisms could be involved in the pathogenesis of both insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Therefore, we aimed at examining whether the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and insulin....../or TNF-alpha were coinfused. During infusion of insulin alone for 20 minutes, forearm glucose uptake increased by 220+/-44%. This increase was completely inhibited during coinfusion of TNF-alpha (started 10 min before insulin) with a more pronounced inhibition of glucose extraction than of blood flow....... Furthermore, TNF-alpha inhibited the ACh forearm blood flow response (Palpha...

  16. The in vitro effect of gefitinib ('Iressa' alone and in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy on human solid tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight Louise A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR triggers downstream signaling pathways that regulate many cellular processes involved in tumour survival and growth. Gefitinib ('Iressa' is an orally active tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI targeted to the ATP-binding domain of EGFR (HER1; erbB1. Methods In this study we have used a standardised ATP-based tumour chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA to measure the activity of gefitinib alone or in combination with different cytotoxic drugs (cisplatin, gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and treosulfan against a variety of solid tumours (n = 86, including breast, colorectal, oesophageal and ovarian cancer, carcinoma of unknown primary site, cutaneous and uveal melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and sarcoma. The IC50 and IC90 were calculated for each single agent or combination. To allow comparison between samples the IndexSUM was calculated based on the percentage tumour growth inhibition (TGI at each test drug concentration (TDC. Gefitinib was tested at concentrations ranging from 0.0625–2 microM (TDC = 0.446 microg/ml. This study represents the first use of a TKI in the assay. Results There was heterogeneity in the degree of TGI observed when tumours were tested against single agent gefitinib. 7% (6/86 of tumours exhibited considerable inhibition, but most showed a more modest response resulting in a low TGI. The median IC50 value for single agent gefitinib in all tumours tested was 3.98 microM. Interestingly, gefitinib had both positive and negative effects when used in combination with different cytotoxics. In 59% (45/76 of tumours tested, the addition of gefitinib appeared to potentiate the effect of the cytotoxic agent or combination (of these, 11% (5/45 had a >50% decrease in their IndexSUM. In 38% of tumours (29/76, the TGI was decreased when the combination of gefitinib + cytotoxic was used in comparison to the cytotoxic alone. In the remaining 3% (2/76 there was no

  17. 31P-NMR spectroscopy in measurements of physiological parameters and response to therapy of human melanoma xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Dag Rune

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether ''31P-NMR spectroscopy can be utilized in prediction and monitoring of response to therapy or tumours. The specific aims were: 1) To investigate possible correlations between on the one hand bio energetics status, phospholipids resonance ratios, intracellular pH and phosphorus T 1 s and on the other hand tumour blood supply and oxygenation, tumour proliferation and necrotic fraction across tumour lines. 2) Reveal possible correlations between changes in tumour bio energetics status and phosphorus T 1 s and the changes in tumour blood flow, tumour oxygenation and necrotic fraction. 3) To investigate whether irradiation and hyperthermia treatment of tumours affect bio energetics status and phosphorus T 1 s. 4) To identify the tumour physiological factors that is effected by the treatment and influence the bio energetics status and phosphorus T 1 s. The results are presented in 8 papers with titles: 1)''31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo of six human melanoma zeno graft lines: Tumour bio energetic status and blood supply. 2) ''31P NMR spectroscopy studies of phospholipid metabolism in human melanoma xenograft lines differing in rate of tumour cell proliferation. 3) ''31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo of four human melanoma xenograft lines: Spin-lattice relaxation times. 4) Effect of melanin on phosphorus T 1 s in human melanoma xenografts studied by ''31P MRS 5) Spin-lattice relaxation time of inorganic phosphate in human tumour xenografts measured in vivo by ''31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy influence of oxygen tension. 6) Effects of hyperthermia on bio energetic status and phosphorus T 1 s in human melanoma xenografts monitored by ''31P-MRS. 7) Monitoring of tumour reoxygenation following irradiation by ''31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy an experimental study of human melanoma xenografts. 8) Radiation-induced changes in phosphorus T 1 values in human melanoma xenografts studied

  18. Gastric Calcifying Fibrous Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Attila

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours; however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases.

  19. Interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha sensitize primarily resistant human endometrial stromal cells to Fas-mediated apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluhr, Herbert; Krenzer, Stefanie; Stein, Gerburg M

    2007-01-01

    The subtle interaction between the implanting embryo and the maternal endometrium plays a pivotal role during the process of implantation. Human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) express Fas and the implanting trophoblast cells secrete Fas ligand (FASLG, FasL), suggesting a possible role for Fas......-mediated signaling during early implantation. Here we show that ESCs are primarily resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis independently of their state of hormonal differentiation. Pre-treatment of ESCs with interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha sensitizes them to become apoptotic upon stimulation...... of Fas by an agonistic anti-Fas antibody. Incubation of ESCs with the early embryonic signal human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, CGB) does not influence their reaction to Fas stimulation. The sensitizing effect of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha was accompanied by a significant upregulation of Fas and FLICE...

  20. Tumour compartment transcriptomics demonstrates the activation of inflammatory and odontogenic programmes in human adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma and identifies the MAPK/ERK pathway as a novel therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, John R; Carreno, Gabriela; Gonzalez-Meljem, Jose Mario; Haston, Scott; Guiho, Romain; Cooper, Julie E; Manshaei, Saba; Jani, Nital; Hölsken, Annett; Pettorini, Benedetta; Beynon, Robert J; Simpson, Deborah M; Fraser, Helen C; Hong, Ying; Hallang, Shirleen; Stone, Thomas J; Virasami, Alex; Donson, Andrew M; Jones, David; Aquilina, Kristian; Spoudeas, Helen; Joshi, Abhijit R; Grundy, Richard; Storer, Lisa C D; Korbonits, Márta; Hilton, David A; Tossell, Kyoko; Thavaraj, Selvam; Ungless, Mark A; Gil, Jesus; Buslei, Rolf; Hankinson, Todd; Hargrave, Darren; Goding, Colin; Andoniadou, Cynthia L; Brogan, Paul; Jacques, Thomas S; Williams, Hywel J; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2018-05-01

    Adamantinomatous craniopharyngiomas (ACPs) are clinically challenging tumours, the majority of which have activating mutations in CTNNB1. They are histologically complex, showing cystic and solid components, the latter comprised of different morphological cell types (e.g. β-catenin-accumulating cluster cells and palisading epithelium), surrounded by a florid glial reaction with immune cells. Here, we have carried out RNA sequencing on 18 ACP samples and integrated these data with an existing ACP transcriptomic dataset. No studies so far have examined the patterns of gene expression within the different cellular compartments of the tumour. To achieve this goal, we have combined laser capture microdissection with computational analyses to reveal groups of genes that are associated with either epithelial tumour cells (clusters and palisading epithelium), glial tissue or immune infiltrate. We use these human ACP molecular signatures and RNA-Seq data from two ACP mouse models to reveal that cell clusters are molecularly analogous to the enamel knot, a critical signalling centre controlling normal tooth morphogenesis. Supporting this finding, we show that human cluster cells express high levels of several members of the FGF, TGFB and BMP families of secreted factors, which signal to neighbouring cells as evidenced by immunostaining against the phosphorylated proteins pERK1/2, pSMAD3 and pSMAD1/5/9 in both human and mouse ACP. We reveal that inhibiting the MAPK/ERK pathway with trametinib, a clinically approved MEK inhibitor, results in reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis in explant cultures of human and mouse ACP. Finally, we analyse a prominent molecular signature in the glial reactive tissue to characterise the inflammatory microenvironment and uncover the activation of inflammasomes in human ACP. We validate these results by immunostaining against immune cell markers, cytokine ELISA and proteome analysis in both solid tumour and cystic fluid from ACP

  1. Upregulated expression of human neutrophil peptides 1, 2 and 3 (HNP 1-3) in colon cancer serum and tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Bøgebo, Rikke; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2005-01-01

    of identifying biomarkers for colon cancer. METHODS: By Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionisation--Time Of Flight/Mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF/MS) we compare the protein profiles of colon cancer serum with serum from healthy individuals and the protein profiles of colon tumours with normal colon tissue...

  2. Small regions of overlapping deletions on 6q26 in human astrocytic tumours identified using chromosome 6 tile path array CGH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Koichi; Mungall, Andrew J; Fiegler, Heike; Pearson, Danita M.; Dunham, Ian; Carter, Nigel P; Collins, V. Peter

    2009-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 6 are a common abnormality in diverse human malignancies including astrocytic tumours, suggesting the presence of tumour suppressor genes (TSG). In order to help identify candidate TSGs, we have constructed a chromosome 6 tile path microarray. The array contains 1780 clones (778 PACs and 1002 BACs) that cover 98.3% of the published chromosome 6 sequences. A total of 104 adult astrocytic tumours (10 diffuse astrocytomas, 30 anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), 64 glioblastomas (GB)) were analysed using this array. Single copy number change was successfully detected and the result was in general concordant with a microsatellite analysis. The pattern of copy number change was complex with multiple interstitial deletions/gains. However, a predominance of telomeric 6q deletions was seen. Two small common and overlapping regions of deletion at 6q26 were identified. One was 1002 kb in size and contained PACRG and QKI, while the second was 199 kb and harbours a single gene, ARID1B. The data show that the chromosome 6 tile path array is useful in mapping copy number changes with high resolution and accuracy. We confirmed the high frequency of chromosome 6 deletions in AA and GB, and identified two novel commonly deleted regions that may harbour TSGs. PMID:16205629

  3. Irradiation specifically sensitises solid tumour cell lines to TRAIL mediated apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marini, Patrizia; Schmid, Angelika; Jendrossek, Verena; Faltin, Heidrun; Daniel, Peter T; Budach, Wilfried; Belka, Claus

    2005-01-01

    TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand) is an apoptosis inducing ligand with high specificity for malignant cell systems. Combined treatment modalities using TRAIL and cytotoxic drugs revealed highly additive effects in different tumour cell lines. Little is known about the efficacy and underlying mechanistic effects of a combined therapy using TRAIL and ionising radiation in solid tumour cell systems. Additionally, little is known about the effect of TRAIL combined with radiation on normal tissues. Tumour cell systems derived from breast- (MDA MB231), lung- (NCI H460) colorectal- (Colo 205, HCT-15) and head and neck cancer (FaDu, SCC-4) were treated with a combination of TRAIL and irradiation using two different time schedules. Normal tissue cultures from breast, prostate, renal and bronchial epithelia, small muscle cells, endothelial cells, hepatocytes and fibroblasts were tested accordingly. Apoptosis was determined by fluorescence microscopy and western blot determination of PARP processing. Upregulation of death receptors was quantified by flow cytometry. The combined treatment of TRAIL with irradiation strongly increased apoptosis induction in all treated tumour cell lines compared to treatment with TRAIL or irradiation alone. The synergistic effect was most prominent after sequential application of TRAIL after irradiation. Upregulation of TRAIL receptor DR5 after irradiation was observed in four of six tumour cell lines but did not correlate to tumour cell sensitisation to TRAIL. TRAIL did not show toxicity in normal tissue cell systems. In addition, pre-irradiation did not sensitise all nine tested human normal tissue cell cultures to TRAIL. Based on the in vitro data, TRAIL represents a very promising candidate for combination with radiotherapy. Sequential application of ionising radiation followed by TRAIL is associated with an synergistic induction of cell death in a large panel of solid tumour cell lines. However, TRAIL receptor

  4. Curcumin downregulates human tumor necrosis factor-α levels: A systematic review and meta-analysis ofrandomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Cicero, Arrigo F G; Simental-Mendía, Luis E; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gupta, Subash C

    2016-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a key inflammatory mediator and its reduction is a therapeutic target in several inflammatory diseases. Curcumin, a bioactive polyphenol from turmeric, has been shown in several preclinical studies to block TNF-α effectively. However, clinical evidence has not been fully conclusive. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin supplementation on circulating levels of TNF-α in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The search included PubMed-Medline, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases by up to September 21, 2015, to identify RCTs investigating the impact of curcumin on circulating TNF-α concentration. Quantitative data synthesis was performed using a random-effects model, with weighed mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) as summary statistics. Meta-regression and leave-one-out sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the modifiers of treatment response. Eight RCTs comprising nine treatment arms were finally selected for the meta-analysis. There was a significant reduction of circulating TNF-α concentrations following curcumin supplementation (WMD: -4.69pg/mL, 95% CI: -7.10, -2.28, pcurcumin with either dose or duration (slope: 0.197; 95% CI: -1.73, 2.12; p=0.841) of treatment. This meta-analysis of RCTs suggested a significant effect of curcumin in lowering circulating TNF-α concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Infection of Human Fallopian Tube Epithelial Cells with Neisseria gonorrhoeae Protects Cells from Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Induced Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Priscilla; Reyes, Paz; Vargas, Macarena; Rios, Miguel; Imarai, Mónica; Cardenas, Hugo; Croxatto, Horacio; Orihuela, Pedro; Vargas, Renato; Fuhrer, Juan; Heckels, John E.; Christodoulides, Myron; Velasquez, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Following infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, bacteria may ascend into the Fallopian tubes (FT) and induce salpingitis, a major cause of infertility. In the FT, interactions between mucosal epithelial cells and gonococci are pivotal events in the pathogen's infection cycle and the inflammatory response. In the current study, primary FT epithelial cells were infected in vitro with different multiplicities of infection (MOI) of Pil+ Opa+ gonococci. Bacteria showed a dose-dependent association with cells and induced the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). A significant finding was that gonococcal infection (MOI = 1) induced apoptosis in approximately 30% of cells, whereas increasing numbers of bacteria (MOI = 10 to 100) did not induce apoptosis. Apoptosis was observed in only 11% of cells with associated bacteria, whereas >84% of cells with no adherent bacteria were apoptotic. TNF-α was a key contributor to apoptosis, since (i) culture supernatants from cells infected with gonococci (MOI = 1) induced apoptosis in naïve cultures, suggesting that a soluble factor was responsible; (ii) gonococcal infection-induced apoptosis was inhibited with anti-TNF-α antibodies; and (iii) the addition of exogenous TNF-α induced apoptosis, which was inhibited by the presence of increasing numbers of bacteria (MOI = 10 to 100). These data suggest that TNF-α-mediated apoptosis of FT epithelial cells is likely a primary host defense mechanism to prevent pathogen colonization. However, epithelial cell-associated gonococci have evolved a mechanism to protect the cells from undergoing TNF-α-mediated apoptosis, and this modulation of the host innate response may contribute to establishment of infection. Understanding the antiapoptotic mechanisms used by Neisseria gonorrhoeae will inform the pathogenesis of salpingitis and could suggest new intervention strategies for prevention and treatment of the disease. PMID:16714596

  6. Association of the Met-196-Arg variation of human tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) with paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Sihem; Ben Nejma, Mouna; Zaafrane, Ferid; Gaha, Lotfi; Ben Salem, Kamel; Romdhane, Abdelaziz; Nour, Mohamed; Jrad, Besma Bel Hadj

    2011-03-01

    Research has provided strong evidence for oligodendrocyte and myelin-related genes dysfunction in schizophrenia. Several studies have suggested abnormalities in the expression of myelin-related genes including tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) involved in the neurodegeneration and remyelination. In order to further assess the role of TNFR2 in schizophrenia, we examined a functional bi-allelic polymorphism associated with an impaired NF-KB signaling and cell survival. In the present case/control study, 220 patients with schizophrenia and 176 healthy controls were genotyped by RFLP-PCR for the T/G polymorphism at the position 676 in exon 6 of the TNFR2 gene. We found a trend towards over-representation of TNFR2 676G in the patients compared to the controls (p=0.19 and 0.09 respectively). Interestingly, when we evaluated the association between this genetic polymorphism and the clinical variables of schizophrenia, our findings indicated that the frequencies of the G/G genotype and the G allele were significantly higher in paranoid (p=0.014 and p=0.012 respectively) and adult-onset paranoid (p=0.004 and p=0.004 respectively) schizophrenia patient group compared to the controls. The potential association was confirmed by a logistic regression model only for development of the paranoid form of schizophrenia (p=0.022) indicating a substantially increased risk for paranoid schizophrenia with inheritance of the TNFR2(G) allele. In conclusion, this polymorphism in TNFR2 or a gene in proximity seems to be associated specifically with paranoid schizophrenia, at least in the Tunisian population. A replication of our findings in other and larger populations could be of particular importance to establish TNFR2 as one of the susceptibility genes of paranoid schizophrenia.

  7. Functional characterization of rs2229094 (T>C polymorphism in the tumor necrosis factor locus and lymphotoxin alpha expression in human retina: the Retina 4 project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastor-Idoate S

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Salvador Pastor-Idoate,1,2 Irene Rodríguez-Hernández,2,3 Jimena Rojas,1 Lucia Gonzalez-Buendia,1 Santiago Delgado-Tirado,1,4 Jose Carlos López,1 Rogelio González-Sarmiento,2,3 Jose C Pastor1,4 1IOBA Eye Institute, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, 2Molecular Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine, 3Molecular and Cellular Cancer Biology Institute, High Council of Scientific Research, Biomedical Research Institute of Salamanca, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Valladolid, Spain Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine the expression and localization of lymphotoxin alpha (LTA in human retinas and the functionality of one of its polymorphisms rs2229094 (C13R (T>C, previously associated with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR development.Materials and methods: Total RNA from three healthy human retinas were extracted and subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis, using flanking primers of LTA cDNA. In addition, three human eyes with retinal detachment (RD and three healthy control eyes were subjected to immunohistochemistry (IHC with a specific antibody against LTA. The functionality of T and C alleles was assessed by using pCEFL-Flag expression vector and transient transfection assays in COS-1 cell line. In addition, expression analysis by RT-PCR, Western blot and subcellular localization of both alleles and by immunofluorescence assay was performed.Results: RT-PCR analysis revealed no significant levels of messenger RNA (mRNA LTA in healthy human retinas. Sequential IHC staining showed differences between healthy human and RD retinas. No differences in mRNA and protein expression levels and in subcellular localization between both alleles were found. Both alleles were located in the cytoplasm of COS-1 cells.Conclusion: Although results suggest lack of functionality, the differences found in IHC study and its strong association

  8. Fatty degeneration in a Wilms' tumour after chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanes, A.C.; Beese, R.C.; McHugh, K.; Ramsay, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of extensive fatty change in a Wilms' tumour after chemotherapy demonstrated on CT associated with an increase in tumour volume, in a 10-month-old girl with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Changes in tumour characteristics after chemotherapy on imaging usually reflect necrosis, haemorrhage and calcification. Assessment of response to therapy is dependent on a documented reduction in tumour volume. In this case, CT showed an increase in tumour size with development of an extensive fatty component following treatment. Subsequent histological examination on the nephrectomy specimen confirmed an extensive fatty component with no evidence of residual blastema. The development of such an extensive fatty component is very unusual. In this case such fatty change was an indicator of tumour sensitivity and response to treatment. (orig.)

  9. Chrysophanol-induced cell death (necrosis) in human lung cancer A549 cells is mediated through increasing reactive oxygen species and decreasing the level of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chien-Hang; Yu, Chun-Shu; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Huang, Hui-Ying; Chen, Po-Yuan; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Ip, Siu-Wan; Chiang, Su-Yin; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2014-05-01

    Chrysophanol (1,8-dihydroxy-3-methylanthraquinone) is one of the anthraquinone compounds, and it has been shown to induce cell death in different types of cancer cells. The effects of chrysophanol on human lung cancer cell death have not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to examine chrysophanol-induced cytotoxic effects and also to investigate such influences that involved apoptosis or necrosis in A549 human lung cancer cells in vitro. Our results indicated that chrysophanol decreased the viable A549 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Chrysophanol also promoted the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) and decreased the levels of mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm ) and adenosine triphosphate in A549 cells. Furthermore, chrysophanol triggered DNA damage by using Comet assay and DAPI staining. Importantly, chrysophanol only stimulated the cytocheome c release, but it did not activate other apoptosis-associated protein levels including caspase-3, caspase-8, Apaf-1, and AIF. In conclusion, human lung cancer A549 cells treated with chrysophanol exhibited a cellular pattern associated with necrotic cell death and not apoptosis in vitro. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 29: 740-749, 2014. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates fresh human monocytes to lyse actinomycin D-treated WEHI-164 target cells via increased secretion of a monokine similar to tumor necrosis factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, A.R.; McKinnon, K.P.; Koren, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on tumoricidal activity of human monocytes freshly isolated from peripheral blood were studied. Actinomycin D-treated WEHI-164 cells were used as targets because they are NK insensitive and are lysed rapidly by monocytes in 6-hr 51 Cr-release assays. Monocytes exhibited significant spontaneous activity without endotoxin. Monocytes either pretreated for 1 hr with LPS or assayed in the presence of LPS exhibited 100- to 1000-fold increased cytolytic activity. Cytolytic activity was heat labile and trypsin sensitive, and was recovered from Sepharose S-200 columns in a single peak with an apparent m.w. between 25,000 and 40,000. Actinomycin D or cycloheximide treatment of monocytes before the addition of LPS inhibited cytolytic monokine production. Cytolytic monokine activity was practically neutralized by specific rabbit antisera to human tumor necrosis factor (TNF). It was concluded that, although fresh human monocytes exhibit spontaneous tumoricidal activity, LPS is a potent activating agent. Its stimulatory effects depend on new transcription and translation and are mediated by enhanced secretion of a cytolytic monokine similar to TNF

  11. Relationship of tumor necrosis factor alpha genotypes with various biochemical parameters of normal, over weight and obese human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, M.; Chaudhary, B.; Shakoori, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-alpha) is expressed primarily in adipocytes and elevated levels of this cytokine have been associated with obesity. The purpose of this investigation was to test whether the TNF-alpha -308 polymorphism were associated with insulin resistance or obesity related traits in non-diabetic and diabetic patients visiting Sheikh Zayed Hospital, Lahore, Fatima Hospital and Irfan Clinic in Sargodha. In non diabetic subjects the AA allele carriers, compared with homozygous G allele carriers had significantly lower (28%) triglyceride values and 15% higher HDL yal ues, whereas other parameters tested 81id not show any significant variation. In diabetic patients the AA allele carriers, compared with GG allele carriers, besides having 31 % higher FBS and 26% higher creatinine, had 20% higher cholesterol and 34% higher triglycerides. The HDL values were 14% less, compared to GG allele carriers. In normal subjects (BMI 22.85:1:0.25 kgim2), the AA allele carriers showed 132%, 125%, 65% and 112% higher triglycerides, cholesterol and LDL values compared with GG allele carriers. The HDL and creatinine did not show any significant change. In the overweight subjects (BMI: 27.17+-0.17 kgim/sup 2/) all these values were lower than in AA allele carriers compared with GG allele carriers. The AA allele carries had FBS, triglycerides, cholesterol and LDL 28%, 48%, 14% and 14% lower than in the GG allele' carriers, respectively. In obese subjects, (BMI: 36.73+-0.78kgm/sup 2/), however, the FBS, triglycerides, cholesterol and creatinine values were 5%, 8%, 7% and 14% higher in AA allele carries compared to GG allele carriers, respectively. The LDL content was 8% lower in AA allele carrier as compared with the respective GG allele carriers, It is concluded that replacement of G at -308 with A leads to reduced risk for cardiovascular disease in non-diabetic subject, whereas in diabetic patients this mutation-increases the risk of CVD. Using BMI as index of obesity, it was

  12. Adnexal Tumours Of Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parate Sanjay N

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A total 120 cases of epidermal appendage tumours of skin were analysed and classified according to the classification provided by WHO’. Epidermal appendage tumours accounted for 12.87% of all skin tumours, of which 29.17% were benign and 70.83% were malignant. Most of the tumours (75.83% were in the head and face region. The most common tumour was basal cell epithelioma (55%.

  13. Chlamydia trachomatis induces an upregulation of molecular biomarkers podoplanin, Wilms' tumour gene 1, osteopontin and inflammatory cytokines in human mesothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Anna; Buommino, Elisabetta; Domenico, Marina Di; Feola, Antonia; Brunetti-Pierri, Raffaella; Rizzo, Antonietta

    2017-05-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most prevalent infection of the genital tract in women worldwide. C. trachomatis has a tendency to cause persistent infection and induce a state of chronic inflammation, which has been reported to play a role in carcinogenesis. We report that persistent C. trachomatis infection increases the expression of inflammatory tumour cytokines and upregulates molecular biomarkers such as podoplanin, Wilms' tumour gene 1 and osteopontin in primary cultures of mesothelial cells (Mes1) and human mesothelioma cells (NCI). Infection experiments showed that Mes1 and NCI supported the growth of C. trachomatisin vitro, and at an m.o.i. of 4, the inclusion-forming units/cell showed many intracellular inclusion bodies after 3 days of infection. However, after 7 days of incubation, increased proliferative and invasive activity was also observed in Mes1 cells, which was more evident after 14 days of incubation. ELISA analysis revealed an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α release in Mes1 cells infected for a longer period (14 days). Finally, real-time PCR analysis revealed a strong induction of podoplanin, Wilms' tumour gene 1 and osteopontin gene expression in infected Mes1 cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inflammatory response elicited by C. trachomatis persistent infection and the role played by inflammation in cell proliferation, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and molecular biomarkers of cancer. The results of this study suggest that increased molecular biomarkers of cancer by persistent inflammation from C. trachomatis infection might support cellular transformation, thus increasing the risk of cancer.

  14. Tributyltin (TBT) and Dibutyltin (DBT) Alter Secretion of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNFα) from Human Natural Killer (NK) Cells and a Mixture of T cells and NK Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Kelsi; Hurd-Brown, Tasia; Whalen, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Butyltins (BTs) have been in widespread use. Tributyltin (TBT) has been used as a biocide in a variety of applications and is found in human blood samples. Dibutyltin (DBT) has been used as a stabilizer in polyvinyl chloride plastics and as a de-worming agent in poultry. DBT, like TBT, is found in human blood. Human natural killer (NK) cells are the earliest defense against tumors and viral infections and secrete the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha (α). TNFα is an important regulator of adaptive and innate immune responses. TNFα promotes inflammation and an association between malignant transformation and inflammation has been established. Previously, we have shown that TBT and DBT were able to interfere with the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor target cells. Here we show that BTs alter cytokine secretion by NK cells as well as a mixture of T and NK lymphocytes (T/NK cells). We examined 24 h, 48 h, and 6 day exposures to TBT (200- 2.5 nM) and DBT (5- 0.05 µM) on TNFα secretion by highly enriched human NK cells and T/NK cells. The results indicate that TBT (200 - 2.5 nM) decreased TNFα secretion from NK cells. In the T/NK cells 200 nM TBT decreased secretion while 100-5 nM TBT increased secretion of TNFα. NK cells or T/NK cells exposed to higher concentrations of DBT showed decreased TNFα secretion while lower concentrations showed increased secretion. The effects of BTs on TNFα secretion are seen at concentrations present in human blood. PMID:23047847

  15. Human keratinocytes are a source for tumor necrosis factor alpha: Evidence for synthesis and release upon stimulation with endotoxin or ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeck, A.S.; Schwarz, T.; Kirnbauer, R.; Urbanski, A.; Perry, P.; Ansel, J.C.; Luger, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), in addition to being cytotoxic for certain tumor cells, has turned out as a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in the regulation of immunity and inflammation. Since human keratinocytes have been demonstrated to be a potent source of various cytokines, it was investigated whether epidermal cells synthesize and release TNF-alpha. Supernatants derived from normal human keratinocytes (HNK) and human epidermoid carcinoma cell lines (KB, A431) were tested both in a TNF-alpha-specific ELISA and a bioassay. In supernatants of untreated epidermal cells, no or minimal TNF-alpha activity was found, while after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or ultraviolet (UV) light, significant amounts were detected. Western blot analysis using an antibody directed against human TNF-alpha revealed a molecular mass of 17 kD for keratinocyte-derived TNF-alpha. These biological and biochemical data were also confirmed by Northern blot analysis revealing mRNA specific for TNF-alpha in LPS- or ultraviolet B (UVB)-treated HNK and KB cells. In addition, increased TNF-alpha levels were detected in the serum obtained from human volunteers 12 and 24 h after a single total body UVB exposure, which caused a severe sunburn reaction. These findings indicate that keratinocytes upon stimulation are able to synthesize and release TNF-alpha, which may gain access to the circulation. Thus, TNF-alpha in concert with other epidermal cell-derived cytokines may mediate local and systemic inflammatory reactions during host defense against injurious events caused by microbial agents or UV irradiation

  16. A matrix of cholesterol crystals, but not cholesterol alone, primes human monocytes/macrophages for excessive endotoxin-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Role in atherosclerotic inflammation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus; Christensen, Ole; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2014-01-01

    When exposed to small amounts of bacterial endotoxin, matrices of cholesterol crystals, but not cholesterol itself, primed human monocytes/macrophages to a highly augmented (>10-fold) production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α. Priming also sensitized the cells, as 10- to 100-fold lower...

  17. Expression of Monocarboxylate Transporters 1, 2, and 4 in Human Tumours and Their Association with CD147 and CD44

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Pinheiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs are important cellular pH regulators in cancer cells; however, the value of MCT expression in cancer is still poorly understood. In the present study, we analysed MCT1, MCT2, and MCT4 protein expression in breast, colon, lung, and ovary neoplasms, as well as CD147 and CD44. MCT expression frequency was high and heterogeneous among the different tumours. Comparing with normal tissues, there was an increase in MCT1 and MCT4 expressions in breast carcinoma and a decrease in MCT4 plasma membrane expression in lung cancer. There were associations between CD147 and MCT1 expressions in ovarian cancer as well as between CD147 and MCT4 in both breast and lung cancers. CD44 was only associated with MCT1 plasma membrane expression in lung cancer. An important number of MCT1 positive cases are negative for both chaperones, suggesting that MCT plasma membrane expression in tumours may depend on a yet nonidentified regulatory protein.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the expression of immunosuppressive proteins and enhances the cell growth in a human bone marrow-derived stem cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, Johanna A.; Pietilae, Mika; Salonen, Riikka J.; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Ylitalo, Kari; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Lehenkari, Petri

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in experimental treatments for various conditions that involve normal tissue regeneration via inflammatory repair. It is known that MSCs can secrete multiple soluble factors and suppress inflammation. Even though the effect of MSCs on inflammation has been extensively studied, the effect of inflammation on MSCs is poorly understood. One of the major cytokines released at the site of inflammation is tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) which is known to induce MSC invasion and proliferation. Therefore, we wanted to test the effects of TNF-α exposure on MSCs derived from human bone marrow. We found, as expected, that cell proliferation was significantly enhanced during TNF-α exposure. However, according to the cell surface marker analysis, the intensity of several antigens in the minimum criteria panel for MSCs proposed by International Society of Cellular Therapy (ISCT) was decreased dramatically, and in certain cases, the criteria for MSCs were not fulfilled. In addition, TNF-α exposure resulted in a significant but transient increase in human leukocyte antigen and CD54 expression. Additional proteomic analysis by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed three proteins whose expression levels decreased and 8 proteins whose expression levels increased significantly during TNF-α exposure. The majority of these proteins could be linked to immunosuppressive and signalling pathways. These results strongly support reactive and immunosuppressive activation of MSCs during TNF-α exposure, which might influence MSC differentiation stage and capacity.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the expression of immunosuppressive proteins and enhances the cell growth in a human bone marrow-derived stem cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miettinen, Johanna A., E-mail: johanna.miettinen@oulu.fi [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Pietilae, Mika [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Salonen, Riikka J. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Ohlmeier, Steffen [Proteomics Core Facility, Biocenter Oulu, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Ylitalo, Kari; Huikuri, Heikki V. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Lehenkari, Petri [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2011-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in experimental treatments for various conditions that involve normal tissue regeneration via inflammatory repair. It is known that MSCs can secrete multiple soluble factors and suppress inflammation. Even though the effect of MSCs on inflammation has been extensively studied, the effect of inflammation on MSCs is poorly understood. One of the major cytokines released at the site of inflammation is tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}) which is known to induce MSC invasion and proliferation. Therefore, we wanted to test the effects of TNF-{alpha} exposure on MSCs derived from human bone marrow. We found, as expected, that cell proliferation was significantly enhanced during TNF-{alpha} exposure. However, according to the cell surface marker analysis, the intensity of several antigens in the minimum criteria panel for MSCs proposed by International Society of Cellular Therapy (ISCT) was decreased dramatically, and in certain cases, the criteria for MSCs were not fulfilled. In addition, TNF-{alpha} exposure resulted in a significant but transient increase in human leukocyte antigen and CD54 expression. Additional proteomic analysis by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed three proteins whose expression levels decreased and 8 proteins whose expression levels increased significantly during TNF-{alpha} exposure. The majority of these proteins could be linked to immunosuppressive and signalling pathways. These results strongly support reactive and immunosuppressive activation of MSCs during TNF-{alpha} exposure, which might influence MSC differentiation stage and capacity.

  20. {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochwil, C.; Giesel, F.L.; Mier, W.; Haberkorn, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruchertseifer, F.; Apostolidis, C.; Morgenstern, A. [European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boll, R.; Murphy, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  1. 213Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratochwil, C.; Giesel, F.L.; Mier, W.; Haberkorn, U.; Bruchertseifer, F.; Apostolidis, C.; Morgenstern, A.; Boll, R.; Murphy, K.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as 90 Y/ 177 Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with 213 Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with 90 Y/ 177 Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of 213 Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of 213 Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of 213 Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  2. European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Pathobiology Group standard operating procedure for the preparation of human tumour tissue extracts suited for the quantitative analysis of tissue-associated biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Manfred; Mengele, Karin; Schueren, Elisabeth; Sweep, Fred C G J; Foekens, John A; Brünner, Nils; Laabs, Juliane; Malik, Abha; Harbeck, Nadia

    2007-03-01

    With the new concept of 'individualized treatment and targeted therapies', tumour tissue-associated biomarkers have been given a new role in selection of cancer patients for treatment and in cancer patient management. Tumour biomarkers can give support to cancer patient stratification and risk assessment, treatment response identification, or to identifying those patients who are expected to respond to certain anticancer drugs. As the field of tumour-associated biomarkers has expanded rapidly over the last years, it has become increasingly apparent that a strong need exists to establish guidelines on how to easily disintegrate the tumour tissue for assessment of the presence of tumour tissue-associated biomarkers. Several mechanical tissue (cell) disruption techniques exist, ranging from bead mill homogenisation and freeze-fracturing through to blade or pestle-type homogenisation, to grinding and ultrasonics. Still, only a few directives have been given on how fresh-frozen tumour tissues should be processed for the extraction and determination of tumour biomarkers. The PathoBiology Group of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer therefore has devised a standard operating procedure for the standardised preparation of human tumour tissue extracts which is designed for the quantitative analysis of tumour tissue-associated biomarkers. The easy to follow technical steps involved require 50-300 mg of deep-frozen cancer tissue placed into small size (1.2 ml) cryogenic tubes. These are placed into the shaking flask of a Mikro-Dismembrator S machine (bead mill) to pulverise the tumour tissue in the capped tubes in the deep-frozen state by use of a stainless steel ball, all within 30 s of exposure. RNA is isolated from the pulverised tissue following standard procedures. Proteins are extracted from the still frozen pulverised tissue by addition of Tris-buffered saline to obtain the cytosol fraction of the tumour or by the Tris buffer supplemented with

  3. Engineered, axially-vascularized osteogenic grafts from human adipose-derived cells to treat avascular necrosis of bone in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Tarek; Osinga, Rik; Todorov, Atanas; Haumer, Alexander; Tchang, Laurent A; Epple, Christian; Allafi, Nima; Menzi, Nadia; Largo, René D; Kaempfen, Alexandre; Martin, Ivan; Schaefer, Dirk J; Scherberich, Arnaud

    2017-11-01

    Avascular necrosis of bone (AVN) leads to sclerosis and collapse of bone and joints. The standard of care, vascularized bone grafts, is limited by donor site morbidity and restricted availability. The aim of this study was to generate and test engineered, axially vascularized SVF cells-based bone substitutes in a rat model of AVN. SVF cells were isolated from lipoaspirates and cultured onto porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds within a perfusion-based bioreactor system for 5days. The resulting constructs were inserted into devitalized bone cylinders mimicking AVN-affected bone. A ligated vascular bundle was inserted upon subcutaneous implantation of constructs in nude rats. After 1 and 8weeks in vivo, bone formation and vascularization were analyzed. Newly-formed bone was found in 80% of SVF-seeded scaffolds after 8weeks but not in unseeded controls. Human ALU+cells in the bone structures evidenced a direct contribution of SVF cells to bone formation. A higher density of regenerative, M2 macrophages was observed in SVF-seeded constructs. In both experimental groups, devitalized bone was revitalized by vascularized tissue after 8 weeks. SVF cells-based osteogenic constructs revitalized fully necrotic bone in a challenging AVN rat model of clinically-relevant size. SVF cells contributed to accelerated initial vascularization, to bone formation and to recruitment of pro-regenerative endogenous cells. Avascular necrosis (AVN) of bone often requires surgical treatment with autologous bone grafts, which is surgically demanding and restricted by significant donor site morbidity and limited availability. This paper describes a de novo engineered axially-vascularized bone graft substitute and tests the potential to revitalize dead bone and provide efficient new bone formation in a rat model. The engineering of an osteogenic/vasculogenic construct of clinically-relevant size with stromal vascular fraction of human adipose, combined to an arteriovenous bundle is described. This

  4. An in vitro model demonstrates the potential of neoplastic human germ cells to influence the tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, B; Schuppe, H-C; Bergmann, M; Hedger, M P; Loveland, B E; Loveland, K L

    2017-07-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT) typically contain high numbers of infiltrating immune cells, yet the functional nature and consequences of interactions between GCNIS (germ cell neoplasia in situ) or seminoma cells and immune cells remain unknown. A co-culture model using the seminoma-derived TCam-2 cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, n = 7 healthy donors) was established to investigate how tumour and immune cells each contribute to the cytokine microenvironment associated with TGCT. Three different co-culture approaches were employed: direct contact during culture to simulate in situ cellular interactions occurring within seminomas (n = 9); indirect contact using well inserts to mimic GCNIS, in which a basement membrane separates the neoplastic germ cells and immune cells (n = 3); and PBMC stimulation prior to direct contact during culture to overcome the potential lack of immune cell activation (n = 3). Transcript levels for key cytokines in PBMC and TCam-2 cell fractions were determined using RT-qPCR. TCam-2 cell fractions showed an immediate increase (within 24 h) in several cytokine mRNAs after direct contact with PBMC, whereas immune cell fractions did not. The high levels of interleukin-6 (IL6) mRNA and protein associated with TCam-2 cells implicate this cytokine as important to seminoma physiology. Use of PBMCs from different donors revealed a robust, repeatable pattern of changes in TCam-2 and PBMC cytokine mRNAs, independent of potential inter-donor variation in immune cell responsiveness. This in vitro model recapitulated previous data from clinical TGCT biopsies, revealing similar cytokine expression profiles and indicating its suitability for exploring the in vivo circumstances of TGCT. Despite the limitations of using a cell line to mimic in vivo events, these results indicate how neoplastic germ cells can directly shape the surrounding tumour microenvironment, including by influencing local immune responses. IL6

  5. Targeting of regulated necrosis in kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Martin-Sanchez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The term acute tubular necrosis was thought to represent a misnomer derived from morphological studies of human necropsies and necrosis was thought to represent an unregulated passive form of cell death which was not amenable to therapeutic manipulation. Recent advances have improved our understanding of cell death in acute kidney injury. First, apoptosis results in cell loss, but does not trigger an inflammatory response. However, clumsy attempts at interfering with apoptosis (e.g. certain caspase inhibitors may trigger necrosis and, thus, inflammation-mediated kidney injury. Second, and most revolutionary, the concept of regulated necrosis emerged. Several modalities of regulated necrosis were described, such as necroptosis, ferroptosis, pyroptosis and mitochondria permeability transition regulated necrosis. Similar to apoptosis, regulated necrosis is modulated by specific molecules that behave as therapeutic targets. Contrary to apoptosis, regulated necrosis may be extremely pro-inflammatory and, importantly for kidney transplantation, immunogenic. Furthermore, regulated necrosis may trigger synchronized necrosis, in which all cells within a given tubule die in a synchronized manner. We now review the different modalities of regulated necrosis, the evidence for a role in diverse forms of kidney injury and the new opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Resumen: La idea de que el término necrosis tubular aguda supone una denominación inapropiada se deriva de estudios morfológicos de necropsias humanas. La opinión generalizada ha sido que la necrosis representa una forma pasiva de muerte celular no regulada que no es susceptible de manipulación terapéutica. Los recientes avances han mejorado nuestra comprensión de la muerte celular en la lesión renal aguda. En primer lugar, la apoptosis origina una pérdida celular, pero no desencadena una respuesta inflamatoria. Sin embargo, los intentos rudimentarios de interferir en la apoptosis

  6. El factor de necrosis tumoral-α, la resistencia a la insulina, el metabolismo de lipoproteínas y la obesidad en humanos Tumor necrosis factor-α, insulin resistance, the lipoprotein metabolism and obesity in humans

    OpenAIRE

    M.ª M. Ramírez Alvarado; C. Sánchez Roitz

    2012-01-01

    En la obesidad el tejido adiposo produce moléculas proinflamatorias como el Factor de Necrosis tumoral-α, que tiene efectos locales en la fisiología del adipocito y efectos sistémicos en otros órganos. Muchos estudios relacionando TNF-α, obesidad, resistencia a la insulina y metabolismo lipídico se han realizado en ratas, conejos y perros, pero los resultados observados en varios de estos estudios han sido contradictorios y muchos de ellos no se han logrado reproducir en humanos, lo...

  7. Regulation of tumor necrosis factor gene expression by ionizing radiation in human myeloid leukemia cells and peripheral blood monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, M.L.; Datta, R.; Hallahan, D.E.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Kufe, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that ionizing radiation induces the expression of certain cytokines, such as TNF alpha/cachectin. However, there is presently no available information regarding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of cytokine gene expression by ionizing radiation. In this report, we describe the regulation of the TNF gene by ionizing radiation in human myeloid leukemia cells. The increase in TNF transcripts by x rays was both time- and dose-dependent as determined by Northern blot analysis. Similar findings were obtained in human peripheral blood monocytes. Transcriptional run-on analyses have demonstrated that ionizing radiation stimulates the rate of TNF gene transcription. Furthermore, induction of TNF mRNA was increased in the absence of protein synthesis. In contrast, ionizing radiation had little effect on the half-life of TNF transcripts. These findings indicate that the increase in TNF mRNA observed after irradiation is regulated by transcriptional mechanisms and suggest that production of this cytokine by myeloid cells may play a role in the pathophysiologic effects of ionizing radiation

  8. Alternative splicing of TIA-1 in human colon cancer regulates VEGF isoform expression, angiogenesis, tumour growth and bevacizumab resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdollah Zadeh, Maryam A; Amin, Elianna M; Hoareau-Aveilla, Coralie; Domingo, Enric; Symonds, Kirsty E; Ye, Xi; Heesom, Katherine J; Salmon, Andrew; D'Silva, Olivia; Betteridge, Kai B; Williams, Ann C; Kerr, David J; Salmon, Andrew H J; Oltean, Sebastian; Midgley, Rachel S; Ladomery, Michael R; Harper, Steven J; Varey, Alexander H R; Bates, David O

    2015-01-01

    The angiogenic capability of colorectal carcinomas (CRC), and their susceptibility to anti-angiogenic therapy, is determined by expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) isoforms. The intracellular protein T-cell Intracellular Antigen (TIA-1) alters post-transcriptional RNA processing and binds VEGF-A mRNA. We therefore tested the hypothesis that TIA-1 could regulate VEGF-A isoform expression in colorectal cancers. TIA-1 and VEGF-A isoform expression was measured in colorectal cancers and cell lines. We discovered that an endogenous splice variant of TIA-1 encoding a truncated protein, short TIA-1 (sTIA-1) was expressed in CRC tissues and invasive K-Ras mutant colon cancer cells and tissues but not in adenoma cell lines. sTIA-1 was more highly expressed in CRC than in normal tissues and increased with tumour stage. Knockdown of sTIA-1 or over-expression of full length TIA-1 (flTIA-1) induced expression of the anti-angiogenic VEGF isoform VEGF-A165b. Whereas flTIA-1 selectively bound VEGF-A165 mRNA and increased translation of VEGF-A165b, sTIA-1 prevented this binding. In nude mice, xenografted colon cancer cells over-expressing flTIA-1 formed smaller, less vascular tumours than those expressing sTIA-1, but flTIA-1 expression inhibited the effect of anti-VEGF antibodies. These results indicate that alternative splicing of an RNA binding protein can regulate isoform specific expression of VEGF providing an added layer of complexity to the angiogenic profile of colorectal cancer and their resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment and association of two useful tumour markers: alpha feto protein and human chornionic gonodotropin (beta hCG) hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhan, F.; Tahir, F.; Sultan, S.; Subhan, K.

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to determine serum Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and beta-h Chornionic Gonodotropin hormone (beta-hCG) levels among adult Pakistani population, and to observe their correlation. Serum AFP and beta-hCG levels were evaluated, using Micro-particle Enzyme Immuno Assay (MEIA) technology of M/s Abbott Laboratories. Data were compared using students t-test and correlation was computed. In the patients advised serum AFP assessment, 52% had normal AFP levels. comprising 37% male and 63% female subjects. For patients having a non-pathological picture, AFP levels varied non-significantly (p>0.05) between the Genders however, age varied highly significantly (p 0.05) and highly significant (p 0.05). Comparison of the population in the same age groups of both genders revealed significant (p 0.05), due to a large standard error. Although the differences in beta-hCG levels were highly significant (p 0.05). Among the studied cases, 67% patients had normal and 33% patients had raised beta-hCG levels. Beta-hCG levels show a decreasing trend with increasing age and beta-hCG levels were statistically significant (p<0.05) when patients under 50 years of age were compared with patients above 50 years. The coefficient of correlation between serum AFP and beta- hCG levels was 0.996454, which indicated a very strong. Significant positive correlation between the two tumour markers. The study showed that both serum AFP and beta-hCG are useful tumour markers and had a very strong positive correlation. (author)

  10. Germ cell tumours in neonates and infants: a distinct subgroup?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, I.M.; Schepens, M.T.M.; Looijenga, L.H.J.; Strong, L.C.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    Human germ cell tumours (GCTs) constitute a heterogeneous group of tumours that can be classified into four major subgroups. One of these subgroups encompasses (immature) teratomas and yolk sac tumours of patients under the age of 5 years. In this paper we review the various clinical, histological

  11. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) genetic polymorphisms and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Clinical Laboratory, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi 530021, People's Republic of China; Department of Occupational Health and Environmental Health, School of Public Health at Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi 530021, People's Republic of China ...

  12. Tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 10 gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-19

    Aug 19, 2011 ... 1Bhagwan Mahavir Medical Research Centre, Hyderabad 500 004, India. 2Institute of ... diagnosis and ischemic stroke cases were differentiated ... Diabetes Mellitus 2009). ..... South Indian patients with type 2 diabetes.

  13. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) genetic polymorphisms and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sensitivity analysis of the summary odds ratio coefficients on the association between TNF-α-308G/A polymorphism and AILD risk using a random effects model. (A allele vs G allele). Results were computed by omitting each study in turn. Error bars are 95% confidence interval. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 92, No. 3, December ...

  14. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) genetic polymorphisms and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and the risk of autoimmune liver disease: a meta-analysis. SHAN LI1∗, XIAMEI .... ORs of the three comparisons, we chose the dominant model. (AA + AG vs ...... Shan Li et al. Higgins J. P. T. and Thompson S. G. 2002 Quantifying heterogene-.

  15. Identification of the promoter region required for human adiponectin gene transcription: Association with CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-β and tumor necrosis factor-α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Atsushi; Yamasaki, Hironori; Kuwahara, Hironaga; Moriuchi, Akie; Fukushima, Keiko; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Ryoko; Abiru, Norio; Uotani, Shigeo; Kawasaki, Eiji; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2005-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipose tissue-specific plasma protein, is involved in insulin sensitizing and has anti-atherosclerotic properties. Plasma levels of adiponectin are decreased in obese individuals and patients with type 2 diabetes with insulin resistance. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) decreases the expression of adiponectin in adipocytes. The aims of the present study were: (1) to identify the promoter region responsible for basal transcription of the human adiponectin gene, and (2) to investigate the mechanism by which adiponectin was regulated by TNF-α. The human adiponectin promoter (2.1 kb) was isolated and used for luciferase reporter analysis by transient transfection into 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the promoter region from -676 to +41 was sufficient for basal transcriptional activity. Mutation analysis of putative response elements for sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) (-431 to -423) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) (-230 to -224) showed that both elements were required for basal promoter activity. Adiponectin transcription was increased 3-fold in cells that over-expressed constitutively active C/EBP-β. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, using nuclear extract from 3T3-L1 cells and the -258 to -199 region as a probe, demonstrated specific DNA-protein binding, which was abolished by TNF-α treatment. The present data indicate that the putative response elements for SREBP and C/EBP are required for human adiponectin promoter activity, and that suppression by TNF-α may, at least in part, be associated with inactivation of C/EBP-β

  16. Inflammatory microenvironment and tumor necrosis factor alpha as modulators of periostin and CCN2 expression in human non-healing skin wounds and dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Christopher G; Forbes, Thomas L; Leask, Andrew; Hamilton, Douglas W

    2015-04-01

    Non-healing skin wounds remain a significant clinical burden, and in recent years, the regulatory role of matricellular proteins in skin healing has received significant attention. Periostin and CCN2 are both upregulated at day 3 post-wounding in murine skin, where they regulate aspects of the proliferative phase of repair including mesenchymal cell infiltration and myofibroblast differentiation. In this study, we examined 1) the wound phenotype and expression patterns of periostin and CCN2 in non-healing skin wounds in humans and 2) the regulation of their expression in wound fibroblasts by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Chronic skin wounds had a pro-inflammatory phenotype, characterized by macrophage infiltration, TNFα immunoreactivity, and neutrophil infiltration. Periostin, but not CCN2, was significantly suppressed in non-healing wound edge tissue at the mRNA and protein level compared with non-involved skin. In vitro, human wound edge fibroblasts populations were still able to proliferate and contract collagen gels. Compared to cells from non-involved skin, periostin and α-SMA mRNA levels increased significantly in the presence of TGF-β1 in wound cells and were significantly decreased by TNFα, but not those of Col1A2 or CCN2. In the presence of both TGF-β1 and TNFα, periostin and α-SMA mRNA levels were significantly reduced compared to TGF-β1 treated wound cells. Effects of TGF-β1 and TNFα on gene expression were also more pronounced in wound edge cells compared to non-involved fibroblasts. We conclude that variations in the expression of periostin and CCN2, are related to an inflammatory microenvironment and the presence of TNFα in human chronic wounds. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The coffee diterpene kahweol inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Kim, Ji Young; Hwang, Yong Pil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2006-01-01

    Endothelial cells produce adhesion molecules after being stimulated with various inflammatory cytokines. These adhesion molecules play an important role in the development of atherogenesis. Recent studies have highlighted the chemoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of kahweol, a coffee-specific diterpene. This study examined the effects of kahweol on the cytokine-induced monocyte/human endothelial cell interaction, which is a crucial early event in atherogenesis. Kahweol inhibited the adhesion of TNFα-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNFα-induced protein and mRNA expression of the cell adhesion molecules, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Furthermore, kahweol inhibited the TNFα-induced JAK2-PI3K/Akt-NF-κB activation pathway in these cells. Overall, kahweol has anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic activities, which occurs partly by down-regulating the pathway that affects the expression and interaction of the cell adhesion molecules on endothelial cells

  18. Repeated subcutaneous administrations of krokodil causes skin necrosis and internal organs toxicity in Wistar rats: putative human implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Emanuele Amorim; Brandão, Pedro; Neves, João Filipe; Cravo, Sara Manuela; Soares, José Xavier; Grund, Jean-Paul C; Duarte, José Alberto; Afonso, Carlos M M; Pereira Netto, Annibal Duarte; Carvalho, Félix; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2017-05-01

    "Krokodil" is the street name for an impure homemade drug mixture used as a cheap substitute for heroin, containing desomorphine as the main opioid. Abscesses, gangrene, thrombophlebitis, limb ulceration and amputations, jaw osteonecrosis, skin discoloration, ulcers, skin infections, and bleeding are some of the typical reported signs in humans. This study aimed to understand the toxicity of krokodil using Wistar male rats as experimental model. Animals were divided into seven groups and exposed subcutaneously to NaCl 0.9% (control), krokodil mixture free of psychotropic substances (blank krokodil), pharmaceutical grade desomorphine 1 mg/kg, and four different concentrations of krokodil (containing 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg of desomorphine) synthesized accordingly to a "domestic" protocol followed by people who inject krokodil (PWIK). Daily injections for five consecutive days were performed, and animals were sacrificed 24 hr after the last administration. Biochemical and histological analysis were carried out. It was shown that the continuous use of krokodil may cause injury at the injection area, with formation of necrotic zones. The biochemical results evidenced alterations on cardiac and renal biomarkers of toxicity, namely, creatine kinase, creatine kinase-MB, and uric acid. Significant alteration in levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione on kidney and heart suggested that oxidative stress may be involved in krokodil-mediated toxicity. Cardiac congestion was the most relevant finding of continuous krokodil administration. These findings contribute notably to comprehension of the local and systemic toxicological impact of this complex drug mixture on major organs and will hopefully be useful for the development of appropriate treatment strategies towards the human toxicological effects of krokodil. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. of brain tumours

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    outline of the important clinical issues related to brain tumours and psychiatry. ... Left-sided, frontal tumours also seem to be associated with higher rates of depression, while those in the frontal lobe of the right .... Oxford: Blackwell Science,.

  20. Growth-inhibiting effect of tumor necrosis factor on human umbilical vein endothelial cells is enhanced with advancing age in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Y.; Kaji, K.; Ito, H.; Noda, K.; Matsuo, M.

    1990-01-01

    We have examined the effects of in vitro aging on the growth capacity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) under the influence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) with or without interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). The growth and colony-forming abilities of control cells were impaired with advancing age in vitro, especially at later stages (more than 70-80% of life span completed). It was found that treatment with TNF inhibited growth and colony-forming efficiency at any in vitro age. The effects of TNF were shown to increase with increasing in vitro age, as reflected by a more pronounced increase in doubling times, a decrease in saturation density, and a reduction in colony-forming efficiency. However, the characteristics of TNF receptors, including the dissociation constant, and the number of TNF-binding sites per cell-surface area remained rather constant. The effect of TNF was augmented by IFN-gamma at a dose that alone affected growth and colony formation only slightly. The augmentation by IFN-gamma was also found to depend on in vitro age; the synergy with TNF in the deterioration of colony-forming ability was observed only in aged cells. These results suggest that the intrinsic responsiveness of HUVECs to growth-inhibiting factors, as well as to growth-stimulating factors, changes during aging in vitro

  1. Effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma on expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, K Y; Moon, H S; Park, H Y; Lee, T Y; Woo, Y N; Kim, H J; Lee, S J; Kong, G

    2000-10-31

    We have investigated the effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon (INF-gamma), the potent Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-induced cytokines on the production of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2 and MT1-MMP in high grade human bladder cancer cell lines, T-24, J-82 and HT-1376 cell lines. MMP-2 expression and activity were decreased in T-24 cells treated with both cytokines in a dose dependent manner. However, J-82 cells treated with TNF-alpha and INF-gamma revealed dose dependent increases of MMP-9 expression and activity with similar baseline expression and activity of MMP-2. HT-1376 cells after exposure to TNF-alpha only enhanced the expression and activity of MMP-9. These results indicate that TNF-alpha and INF-gamma could regulate the production of MMP-2 or MMP-9 on bladder cancer cells and their patterns of regulation are cell specific. Furthermore, this diverse response of bladder cancer cells to TNF-alpha and INF-gamma suggests that BCG immunotherapy may enhance the invasiveness of bladder cancer in certain conditions with induction of MMPs.

  2. Specificity of tumor necrosis factor toxicity for human mammary carcinomas relative to normal mammary epithelium and correlation with response to doxorubicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollbaum, C.; Creasey, A.A.; Dairkee, S.H.; Hiller, A.J.; Rudolph, A.R.; Lin, L.; Vitt, C.; Smith, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    By using a unique short-term culture system capable of growing both normal and malignant breast epithelial tissue, human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) showed preferential cytotoxicity to malignant cells as compared to the corresponding nonmalignant cells. Most of the malignant specimens were sensitive to TNF with 13 of 18 specimens showing 90% inhibition of clonal growth (ID 90 ). In contrast, all 13 nonmalignant specimens tested clustered at the resistant end of the TNF response spectrum. This differential sensitivity to TNF was seen in three cases in which malignant and nonmalignant breast epithelial tissues from the same patient were studied. To investigate the mechanism of resistance to TNF by normal cells, the presence of receptors for TNF was determined. Five of six cultures showed specific binding of 125 I-labeled TNF and there was no relationship between the degree of resistance and the degree of specific binding. Simultaneous comparison of tumor responsiveness to doxorubicin and TNF revealed a positive correlation in ID 90 values; these results may have important implications for the clinical use of TNF in cancer patients heavily pretreated with doxorubicin

  3. Scopadulciol, Isolated from Scoparia dulcis, Induces β-Catenin Degradation and Overcomes Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis Ligand Resistance in AGS Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Rolly G; Toume, Kazufumi; Arai, Midori A; Sadhu, Samir K; Ahmed, Firoj; Ishibashi, Masami

    2015-04-24

    Scopadulciol (1), a scopadulan-type diterpenoid, was isolated from Scoparia dulcis along with three other compounds (2-4) by an activity-guided approach using the TCF reporter (TOP) luciferase-based assay system. A fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA) revealed that compound 1 was cytotoxic to AGS human gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The treatment of AGS cells with 1 decreased β-catenin levels and also inhibited its nuclear localization. The pretreatment of AGS cells with a proteasome inhibitor, either MG132 or epoxomicin, protected against the degradation of β-catenin induced by 1. The 1-induced degradation of β-catenin was also abrogated in the presence of pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53 transcriptional activity. Compound 1 inhibited TOP activity in AGS cells and downregulated the protein levels of cyclin D1, c-myc, and survivin. Compound 1 also sensitized AGS cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis by increasing the levels of the death receptors, DR4 and DR5, and decreasing the level of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Collectively, our results demonstrated that 1 induced the p53- and proteasome-dependent degradation of β-catenin, which resulted in the inhibition of TCF/β-catenin transcription in AGS cells. Furthermore, 1 enhanced apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant AGS when combined with TRAIL.

  4. Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α on Morphology and Mechanical Properties of HCT116 Human Colon Cancer Cells Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiqing; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Hongda; Du, Jun; Tang, Jilin

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammation orchestrates the tumor microenvironment and is strongly associated with cancer. Tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF α ) is involved in tumor invasion and metastasis by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). This process is defined by the loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal traits. The mechanisms of TNF α -induced EMT in cancer cells have been well studied. However, mechanical properties have not yet been probed. In this work, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to investigate the morphology and mechanical properties of EMT in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. A remarkable morphological change from cobblestone shape to spindle-like morphology was observed. In parallel, AFM images showed that the cellular cytoskeleton was rearranged from a cortical to a stress-fiber pattern. Moreover, cell stiffness measurements indicated that Young's modulus of cells gradually reduced from 1 to 3 days with TNF α -treatment, but it has an apparent increase after 4 days of treatment compared with that for 3 days. Additionally, Young's modulus of the cells treated with TNF α for 4 days is slightly larger than that for 1 or 2 days, but still less than that of the untreated cells. Our work contributes to a better understanding of colorectal cancer metastasis induced by inflammation.

  5. Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α on Morphology and Mechanical Properties of HCT116 Human Colon Cancer Cells Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqing Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation orchestrates the tumor microenvironment and is strongly associated with cancer. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα is involved in tumor invasion and metastasis by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. This process is defined by the loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal traits. The mechanisms of TNFα-induced EMT in cancer cells have been well studied. However, mechanical properties have not yet been probed. In this work, atomic force microscopy (AFM was applied to investigate the morphology and mechanical properties of EMT in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. A remarkable morphological change from cobblestone shape to spindle-like morphology was observed. In parallel, AFM images showed that the cellular cytoskeleton was rearranged from a cortical to a stress-fiber pattern. Moreover, cell stiffness measurements indicated that Young’s modulus of cells gradually reduced from 1 to 3 days with TNFα-treatment, but it has an apparent increase after 4 days of treatment compared with that for 3 days. Additionally, Young’s modulus of the cells treated with TNFα for 4 days is slightly larger than that for 1 or 2 days, but still less than that of the untreated cells. Our work contributes to a better understanding of colorectal cancer metastasis induced by inflammation.

  6. Use of anti-tumor necrosis factor biologics in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis does not change human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 markers: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umekita, Kunihiko; Umeki, Kazumi; Miyauchi, Shunichi; Ueno, Shiro; Kubo, Kazuyoshi; Kusumoto, Norio; Takajo, Ichiro; Nagatomo, Yasuhiro; Okayama, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) biologics are effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, it is still not clear whether this treatment promotes the development of malignancies such as lymphoma. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), which is a causative agent of adult T-cell lymphoma (ATL), is prevalent in Japan. Many HTLV-1-positive patients with RA are assumed to exist; however, there have thus far been no reports on the effect of anti-TNF biologics on HTLV-1-positive patients. We analyzed the response to treatment with anti-TNF biologics and change of HTLV-1 markers in two cases of RA. The two cases showed no response based on the European League Against of Rheumatism response criteria 60-96 weeks after administration of anti-TNF biologics (infliximab and etanercept). No signs of ATL were observed and HTLV-1 markers, such as proviral load and clonality of HTLV-1-infected cells, showed no significant change in either of two cases. Therefore, treatment with anti-TNF biologics did not induce activation of HTLV-1, although the effect on RA was not as effective as in HTLV-1-negative patients in this limited study. Further long-term study with a greater number of patients is necessary to clarify the safety and efficacy of anti-TNF biologics in HTLV-1-positive patients with RA.

  7. Multi-modality treatment in males with advanced malignant germ cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossaa, S.D.; Klepp, O.; Ous, S.; Lien, H.; Stenwig, J.T.; Abeler, V.; Eliasson, G.; Hoest, H.

    1984-01-01

    After chemotherapy with cis-platinum, vinblastine and bleomycin, 33 surgical prosedures were performed in 29 patients with advanced malignant germ-cell tumours. The tumour masses could be completely resected macroscopially in 26 patients. Patients with fibros/necrosis or completely resected mature teratoma had an excellent prognosis, whereas only 5 of the 11 patients with vital malignant tumour survived in spite of second-line treatment with chemotherapy/radiotherapy. Preoperatively elevated serum levels of AFP, β-HCG and/or LDH indicated the presence of residual germ cell tumour. Eight of 14 patients were rendered tumour-free by radiotherapy given as second- or third-line treatment. In general, tumour masses, remaining after cis-platinum-based induction chemotherapy should be resected as completely as possible even in the case of mature teratoma or fibrosis/necrosis. Radiotherapy should be considered as second -and thirdline treatment

  8. Unusual presentation of a large pituitary tumour in relation to diving.

    OpenAIRE

    Bakheit, A. M.; Kennedy, P. G.

    1989-01-01

    A case of necrosis of a pituitary tumour occurring in the context of diving is described. The presenting features and subsequent course suggested a brain stem vascular event. The tumour was not detected by routine computerized tomographic scanning, but was identified with magnetic resonance imaging. The possible pathophysiological mechanism is discussed.

  9. Induction of the early response protein EGR-1 in human tumour cells after ionizing radiation is correlated with a reduction of repair of lethal lesions and an increase of repair of sublethal lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; ten Cate, Rosemarie; van Bree, Chris; Haveman, Jaap

    2004-01-01

    The role of EGR-1 in potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) was studied. Induction of the early response protein EGR-1 and survival after ionizing radiation of two human tumour cell lines after culturing for 48 h in serum-deprived medium was investigated. The glioblastoma cell line (Gli-6) and a

  10. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1-infected T lymphocytes impair catabolism and uptake of glutamate by astrocytes via Tax-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymocha, R; Akaoka, H; Dutuit, M; Malcus, C; Didier-Bazes, M; Belin, M F; Giraudon, P

    2000-07-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of a chronic progressive myelopathy called tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). In this disease, lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with perivascular infiltration by lymphocytes. We and others have hypothesized that these T lymphocytes infiltrating the CNS may play a prominent role in TSP/HAM. Here, we show that transient contact of human or rat astrocytes with T lymphocytes chronically infected by HTLV-1 impairs some of the major functions of brain astrocytes. Uptake of extracellular glutamate by astrocytes was significantly decreased after transient contact with infected T cells, while the expression of the glial transporters GLAST and GLT-1 was decreased. In two-compartment cultures avoiding direct cell-to-cell contact, similar results were obtained, suggesting possible involvement of soluble factors, such as cytokines and the viral protein Tax-1. Recombinant Tax-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) decreased glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Tax-1 probably acts by inducing TNF-alpha, as the effect of Tax-1 was abolished by anti-TNF-alpha antibody. The expression of glutamate-catabolizing enzymes in astrocytes was increased for glutamine synthetase and decreased for glutamate dehydrogenase, the magnitudes of these effects being correlated with the level of Tax-1 transcripts. In conclusion, Tax-1 and cytokines produced by HTLV-1-infected T cells impair the ability of astrocytes to manage the steady-state level of glutamate, which in turn may affect neuronal and oligodendrocytic functions and survival.

  11. Inhibition of sup 125 I organification and thyroid hormone release by interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma in human thyrocytes in suspension culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Satoh, T.; Shizume, K.; Ozawa, M.; Han, D.C.; Imamura, H.; Tsushima, T.; Demura, H.; Kanaji, Y.; Ito, Y. (Institute of Clinical Endocrinology, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in patients with subacute thyroiditis and painless thyroiditis, human thyroid follicles were cultured with interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), and/or interferon-gamma (IFN gamma), and the effects of these cytokines on thyroid function were studied in vitro. When human thyrocytes were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium containing 0.5% fetal calf serum and TSH for 5-8 days, the cells incorporated 125I, synthesized de novo (125I)iodotyrosines and (125I)iodothyronines, and secreted (125I)T4 and (125I)T3 into the medium. IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta inhibited 125I incorporation and (125I)iodothyronine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The minimal inhibitory effect was detected at 10 pg/ml. Electron microscopic examination revealed a marked decrease in lysosome formation in IL-1-treated thyrocytes. TNF alpha and IFN gamma also inhibited thyroid function in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, when thyrocytes were cultured with IL-1, TNF alpha and IFN gamma, these cytokines more than additively inhibited thyroid function. Although the main mechanism of 131I uptake suppression in the thyroid gland in subacute thyroiditis is due to cellular damage and suppression of TSH release, our present findings suggest that IL-1, TNF alpha, and IFN gamma produced in the inflammatory process within the thyroid gland further inhibit iodine incorporation and at least partly account for the decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in destruction-induced hyperthyroidism.

  12. Inhibition of 125I organification and thyroid hormone release by interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma in human thyrocytes in suspension culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Satoh, T.; Shizume, K.; Ozawa, M.; Han, D.C.; Imamura, H.; Tsushima, T.; Demura, H.; Kanaji, Y.; Ito, Y.

    1990-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in patients with subacute thyroiditis and painless thyroiditis, human thyroid follicles were cultured with interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), and/or interferon-gamma (IFN gamma), and the effects of these cytokines on thyroid function were studied in vitro. When human thyrocytes were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium containing 0.5% fetal calf serum and TSH for 5-8 days, the cells incorporated 125I, synthesized de novo [125I]iodotyrosines and [125I]iodothyronines, and secreted [125I]T4 and [125I]T3 into the medium. IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta inhibited 125I incorporation and [125I]iodothyronine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The minimal inhibitory effect was detected at 10 pg/ml. Electron microscopic examination revealed a marked decrease in lysosome formation in IL-1-treated thyrocytes. TNF alpha and IFN gamma also inhibited thyroid function in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, when thyrocytes were cultured with IL-1, TNF alpha and IFN gamma, these cytokines more than additively inhibited thyroid function. Although the main mechanism of 131I uptake suppression in the thyroid gland in subacute thyroiditis is due to cellular damage and suppression of TSH release, our present findings suggest that IL-1, TNF alpha, and IFN gamma produced in the inflammatory process within the thyroid gland further inhibit iodine incorporation and at least partly account for the decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in destruction-induced hyperthyroidism

  13. Human murine mammary tumour virus-like agents are genetically distinct from endogenous retroviruses and are not detectable in breast cancer cell lines or biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mant, Christine; Gillett, Cheryl; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Cason, John

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that a human murine mammary tumour virus (MMTV)-like virus (HMLV), which may be an endogenous human retrovirus (HERV), occurs in the human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF-7 and, in 38% of human breast cancer biopsies. As the aetiology of most breast cancers remains unknown, it is important to verify these observations in differing breast cancer populations worldwide. Thus, we sought to determine the genetic relationships between HMLVs, MMTVs, and HERVs, and to investigate the association between HMLVs and breast cancer biopsies from South London, UK. Phylogenetic analyses of the env/pol region indicated that HMLVs are indistinct from MMTVs, and that MMTVS/HMLVs exhibit only low sequence homologies with HERVs. A search of the human genome confirmed that HMLVs are not endogenous. Using MMTV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers described previously, we amplified DNA from all cell lines except MCF-7 and from 7 of 44 (16%) breast cancer biopsies. A restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was designed to distinguish between HMLVs and MMTVs, and upon analyses, PCR amplicons appeared to be HMLVs. To confirm these findings, amplicons from the T47D cell line and from four randomly selected breast cancer patients were sequenced. Of 106 DNA sequences obtained, 103 were homologous with a short arm of human chromosome (Chr) 3 (3p13), two with Chr 4, and one with Chr 8. None of the sequences exhibited significant nucleotide homology with MMTVs, HMLVs, or with HERVs (all <50%). Thus, we conclude that (i) HMLVs are integral members of the MMTV family; (ii) MMTVs/HMLVs are genetically distinct from HERVs; (iii) MMTV/HMLV DNA is not present in human breast cancer cell lines or clinical biopsies in our locality

  14. Noninvasive quantification of 18F-FLT human brain PET for the assessment of tumour proliferation in patients with high-grade glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backes, Heiko; Ullrich, Roland; Neumaier, Bernd; Kracht, Lutz; Wienhard, Klaus; Jacobs, Andreas H.

    2009-01-01

    Compartmental modelling of 3 ' -deoxy-3 ' -[ 18 F]-fluorothymidine ( 18 F-FLT) PET-derived kinetics provides a method for noninvasive assessment of the proliferation rate of gliomas. Such analyses, however, require an input function generally derived by serial blood sampling and counting. In the current study, 18 F-FLT kinetic parameters obtained from image-derived input functions were compared with those from input functions derived from arterialized blood samples. Based on the analysis of 11 patients with glioma (WHO grade II-IV) a procedure for the automated extraction of an input function from 18 F-FLT brain PET data was derived. The time-activity curve of the volume of interest with the maximum difference in 18 F-FLT uptake during the first 5 min after injection and the period from 60 to 90 min was corrected for partial-volume effects and in vivo metabolism of 18 F-FLT. For each patient a two-compartment kinetic model was applied to the tumour tissue using the image-derived input function. The resulting kinetic rate constants K 1 (transport across the blood-brain barrier) and K i (metabolic rate constant or net influx constant) were compared with those obtained from the same data using the input function derived from blood samples. Additionally, the metabolic rate constant was correlated with the frequency of tumour cells stained with Ki-67, a widely used immunohistochemical marker of cell proliferation. The rate constants from kinetic modelling were comparable when the blood sample-derived input functions were replaced by the image-derived functions (K 1,img and K 1,sample , r = 0.95, p -5 ; K i,img and K i,sample , r = 0.86, p 1,img and K 1,sample , p = 0.20; K i,img and K i,sample , p = 0.92). Furthermore, a significant correlation between K i,img and the percentage of Ki-67-positive cells was observed (r = 0.73, p = 0.01). Kinetic modelling of 18 F-FLT brain PET data using image-derived input functions extracted from human brain PET data with the practical

  15. Regulation of human lung fibroblast C1q-receptors by transforming growth factor-beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurton, J; Soto, H; Narayanan, A S; Raghu, G

    1999-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are two polypeptide mediators which are believed to play a role in the evolution of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We have evaluated the effect of these two substances on the expression of receptors for collagen (cC1q-R) and globular (gC1q-R) domains of C1q and on type I collagen in human lung fibroblasts. Two fibroblast subpopulations differing in C1q receptor expression were obtained by culturing human lung explants in medium containing fresh human serum and heated plasma-derived serum and separating them based on C1q binding [Narayanan, Lurton and Raghu: Am J Resp Cell Mol Biol. 1998; 17:84]. The cells, referred to as HH and NL cells, respectively, were exposed to TGF-beta and TNF-alpha in serum-free conditions. The levels of mRNA were assessed by in situ hybridization and Northern analysis, and protein levels compared after SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. NL cells exposed to TGF-beta and TNF-alpha contained 1.4 and 1.6 times as much cC1q-R mRNA, respectively, whereas in HH cells cC1q-R mRNA increased 2.0- and 2.4-fold. The gC1q-R mRNA levels increased to a lesser extent in both cells. These increases were not reflected in protein levels of CC1q-R and gC1q-R, which were similar to or less than controls. Both TGF-beta and TNF-alpha also increased procollagen [I] mRNA levels in both cells. Overall, TNF-alpha caused a greater increase and the degree of response by HH fibroblasts to both TGF-beta and TNF-alpha was higher than NL cells. These results indicated that TGF-beta and TNF-alpha upregulate the mRNA levels for cC1q-R and collagen and that they do not affect gC1q-R mRNA levels significantly. They also indicated different subsets of human lung fibroblasts respond differently to inflammatory mediators.

  16. Programmed necrosis and necroptosis – molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Giżycka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Programmed necrosis has been proven vital for organism development and homeostasis maintenance. Its regulatory effects on functional activity of the immune system, as well as on pathways regulating the death mechanisms in cells with diminished apoptotic activity, including malignant cells, have been confirmed. There is also increasing evidence indicating necrosis involvement in many human pathologies. Contrary to previous beliefs, necrosis is not only a passive, pathological, gene-independent process. However, the current knowledge regarding molecular regulation of programmed necrosis is scarce. In part this is due to the multiplicity and complexity of signaling pathways involved in programmed necrosis, as well as the absence of specific cellular markers identifying this process, but also the ambiguous and imprecise international terminology. This review presents the current state of the art on molecular mechanisms of programmed necrosis. In particular, its specific and frequent form, necroptosis, is discussed. The role of RIP1 and RIP3 kinases in this process is presented, as well as the diverse pathways induced by ligation of tumor necrosis factor α, to its receptor, TNFR1, i.e. cell survival, apoptosis or necroptosis.

  17. A first-in-human phase I and pharmacokinetic study of CP-4126 (CO-101), a nucleoside analogue, in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, B; Awada, A; Evans, T R J; Dueland, S; Hendlisz, A; Rasch, W; Hernes, K; Hagen, S; Aamdal, S

    2015-10-01

    CP-4126 (gemcitabine elaidate, previously CO-101) is a lipid-drug conjugate of gemcitabine designed to circumvent human equilibrative nucleoside transporter1-related resistance to gemcitabine. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of CP-4126, and to describe its pharmacokinetic profile. Eligible patients with advanced refractory solid tumours, and adequate performance status, haematological, renal and hepatic function, were treated with one of escalating doses of CP-4126 administered by a 30-min intravenous infusion on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Blood and urine samples were collected to determine the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of CP-4126. Forty-three patients, median age 59 years (range 18-76; male = 27, female = 16), received one of ten dose levels (30-1600 mg/m(2)). Dose-limiting toxicities included grade 3 anaemia, grade 3 fatigue and grade 3 elevation of transaminases. The MTD and RP2D were 1250 mg/m(2) on basis of the toxicity and PK data. CP-4126 followed dose-dependent kinetics and maximum plasma concentrations occurred at the end of CP-4126 infusion. Seven patients achieved stable disease sustained for ≥3 months, including two patients with pancreatic cancer who had progressed on or after gemcitabine exposure. CP-4126 was well tolerated with comparable toxicity profile to gemcitabine. Future studies are required to determine its anti-tumour efficacy, either alone or in combination with other cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens.

  18. HIV-1 Tat C-mediated regulation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-3 by microRNA 32 in human microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Ritu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Tat protein is known to be associated with neuroinflammation, a condition that develops in almost half of patients infected with HIV-1. HIV-1 Tat can alter glial neuroprotective functions, leading to neurotoxicity within the CNS. HIV-1 Tat is known to be secreted from productively infected cells and can affect neighboring uninfected cells by modulating cellular gene expression in a bystander fashion. Methods We were interested to study whether exogenous exposure to HIV-1 Tat-C protein perturbs the microRNA (miRNA expression profile of human microglial cells, leading to altered protein expression. We used protein expression and purification, miRNA overexpression, miRNA knockdown, transfection, site-directed mutagenesis, real-time PCR, luciferase assay and western blotting techniques to perform our study. Results HIV-1 Tat-C treatment of human microglial cells resulted in a dose-dependent increase in miR-32 expression. We found that tumor necrosis factor-receptor–associated factor 3 TRAF3 is a direct target for miR-32, and overexpression of miR-32 in CHME3 cells decreased TRAF3 both at the mRNA and the protein level. Recovery of TRAF3 protein expression after transfection of anti-miR-32 and the results of the luciferase reporter assay provided direct evidence of TRAF3 regulation by miR-32. We found that the regulation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3 and IRF7 is controlled by cellular levels of TRAF3 protein in microglial cells, as after overexpression of miR-32 and application of anti-miR-32, expression levels of IRF3 and IRF7 were inversely regulated by expression levels of TRAF3. Thus, our results suggest a novel miRNA mediated mechanism for regulation of TRAF3 in human microglial cells exposed to HIV-1 Tat C protein. These results may help to elucidate the detrimental neuroinflammatory consequences of HIV-1 Tat C protein in bystander fashion. Conclusion HIV-1 Tat protein can modulate TRAF3 expression through

  19. Autocrine secretion of tumor necrosis factor under the influence of interferon-γ amplifies HLA-DR gene induction in human monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenzana-Seisdedos, F.; Mogensen, S.C.; Vuillier, F.; Fiers, W.; Virelizier, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant interferon-γ (IFN-γ) induced HLA-DR gene expression in both U937 and THP-1 human monocytic cell lines, although the former was only very weakly inducible. Combination of recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and IFN-γ resulted in a synergistic enhancement of DR mRNA and protein induction in both cell lines. TNF alone increased the constitutive expression of the DR gene in THP-1 cells. In the HLA class II-negative U937 cells, TNF used alone was not able to induce DR gene expression. Such a negative result was not due to a lack of TNF receptor expression in U937 cells, since TNF clearly induced HLA class I and TNF gene expression in this cell line. THP-1, but not U937, cells secreted TNF under the influence of IFN-γ. Neutralization of TNF by a specific antibody decreased IFN-γ-induced DR antigen expression in THP-1 cultures. These observations indicate that TNF is not able to directly induce DR gene expression, but rather amplifies ongoing expression of this gene, whether constitutive or induced by IFN-γ. In the two cell lines tested, the level of DR inducibility under the influence of IFN-γ used alone depended on a different inducibility of TNF secretion by IFN-γ. Altogether, the observations indicate that TNF, whether exogenous or endogenously produced under the influence of IFN-γ, amplifies DR gene expression in monocytes, a phenomenon that may provide to such antigen-presenting cells a selective sensitivity to the DR-inducing effects of IFN-γ

  20. Lactoferrin release and interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor production by human polymorphonuclear cells stimulated by various lipopolysaccharides: relationship to growth inhibition of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, C; Cassone, A; Serbousek, D; Pearson, C A; Djeu, J Y

    1992-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Salmonella typhimurium, at doses from 1 to 100 ng/ml, strongly enhanced growth inhibition of Candida albicans by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that LPS markedly augmented phagocytosis of Candida cells by increasing the number of yeasts ingested per neutrophil as well as the number of neutrophils capable of ingesting fungal cells. LPS activation caused augmented release of lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein which itself could inhibit the growth of C. albicans in vitro. Antibodies against lactoferrin effectively and specifically reduced the anti-C. albicans activity of both LPS-stimulated and unstimulated PMN. Northern (RNA blot) analysis showed enhanced production of mRNAs for interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6 and in neutrophils within 1 h of stimulation with LPS. The cytokines were also detected in the supernatant of the activated PMN, and their synthesis was prevented by pretreatment of LPS-stimulated PMN with protein synthesis inhibitors, such as emetine and cycloheximide. These inhibitors, however, did not block either lactoferrin release or the anti-Candida activity of LPS-stimulated PMN. These results demonstrate the ability of various bacterial LPSs to augment neutrophil function against C. albicans and suggest that the release of a candidastatic, iron-binding protein, lactoferrin, may contribute to the antifungal effect of PMN. Moreover, the ability to produce cytokines upon stimulation by ubiquitous microbial products such as the endotoxins points to an extraphagocytic, immunomodulatory role of PMN during infection.

  1. Human recombinant interleukin-1 beta- and tumor necrosis factor alpha-mediated suppression of heparin-like compounds on cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Shimada, K.; Ozawa, T.

    1990-01-01

    Cytokines are known to tip the balance of the coagulant-anticoagulant molecules on the endothelial cell surface toward intravascular coagulation. Their effects on endothelial cell surface-associated heparin-like compounds have not been examined yet. Incorporation of [35S]sulfate into heparan sulfate on cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells was suppressed by human recombinant interleukin-1 beta (rIL-1 beta) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (rTNF alpha) in a dose- and time-dependent manner with little effect on cell number, protein content, and [3H]leucine incorporation of cells. Maximal inhibition was achieved by incubation of cells with 100 ng/ml of rIL-1 beta or 5 ng/ml of rTNF alpha for 12-24 hours, resulting in a reduction of the synthesis of heparan sulfate on the cell surface by approximately 50%. The dose dependency was consistent with that seen in the stimulation of endothelial cell procoagulant activity by each cytokine. The suppression of heparan sulfate synthesis was sustained for at least 48 hours after pretreatment of cells with cytokines and was unchanged after the addition of indomethacin or polymyxin B. The rate of degradation of prelabeled 35S-heparan sulfate on the cell surface was not altered by cytokine treatments. Neither the size, the net negative charge, nor the proportion of the molecule with high affinity for antithrombin III of endothelial cell heparan sulfate was changed by cytokines. Furthermore, specific binding of 125I-labeled antithrombin III to the endothelial cell surface was reduced to 40-60% of control by cytokines. In parallel with reduction in binding, antithrombin III cofactor activity was partially diminished in cytokine-treated endothelial cells. Thus, cytokine-mediated suppression of heparin-like substance on endothelial cells appears to be another cytokine-inducible endothelial effects affecting coagulation

  2. Immunohistochemical localisation of keratin and luminal epithelial antigen in myoepithelial and luminal epithelial cells of human mammary and salivary gland tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathrath, W B; Wilson, P D; Trejdosiewicz, L K

    1982-01-01

    Rabbit antisera to human 40-63 000 MW epidermal keratin, one batch with restricted distribution of reactivity from an initial (aK1) and one with "broad spectrum" distribution of reactivity from a late bleeding (aK), and to "luminal epithelial antigen" (aLEA) were applied to formalin fixed paraffin embedded sections of human normal and neoplastic mammary and salivary glands using an indirect immunoperoxidase method. aK1 reacted with myoepithelial cells, aLEA with luminal epithelial cells and aK with both cell types in normal mammary and salivary gland. In breast carcinomas the majority of intraluminal and infiltrating carcinoma cells reacted with aLEA but not with aK1 which reacted only with surrounding myoepithelial cells. aK reacted with both myoepithelial cells and with intraluminal and infiltrating tumour cells. In the salivary gland adenomas the majority of cells reacted with aK, and those cells arranged in a tubular fashion reacted with aLEA.

  3. Auto-catalysed progression of aneuploidy explains the Hayflick limit of cultured cells, carcinogen-induced tumours in mice, and the age distribution of human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasnick, D

    2000-06-15

    Evidence continues to accumulate that aneuploidy, an imbalance in the number of chromosomes, is responsible for the characteristic phenotypes of cancer, including the abnormal cellular size and morphology of cancer cells, the appearance of tumour-associated antigens, as well as the high levels of membrane-bound and secreted proteins responsible for invasiveness and loss of contact inhibition. Aneuploidy has also been demonstrated to be the self-perpetuating source of the karyotypic instability of cancer cells. Here it is shown that the auto-catalysed progression of aneuploidy explains the kinetics of the finite lifetime of diploid cells in culture, the time course of the appearance of papillomas and carcinomas in benzo[a]pyrene-treated mice, and the age-dependence of human cancers. Modelling studies indicate that the ease of spontaneous transformation of mouse cells in culture may be due to a chaotic progression of aneuploidy. Conversely, the strong preference towards senescence and resistance to transformation of human cells in culture may be the result of a non-chaotic progression of aneuploidy. Finally, a method is proposed for quantifying the aneuploidogenic potencies of carcinogens.

  4. Ischemic necrosis and osteochondritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    Osteonecrosis indicates that ischemic death of the cellular constituents of bone and marrow has occurred. Historically, this first was thought to be related to sepsis in the osseous segments. However, continued studies led to the use of the term aseptic necrosis. Subsequent observations indicated that the necrotic areas of bone were not only aseptic, but were also avascular. This led to the terms ischemic necrosis, vascular necrosis and bone infarction. Ischemic necrosis of bone is discussed in this chapter. It results from a significant reduction in or obliteration of blood supply to the affected area. The various bone cells, including osteocytes, osteoclasts, and osteoblasts, usually undergo anoxic death in 12 to 48 hours after blood supply is cut off. The infarct that has thus developed in three-dimensional and can be divided into a number of zones: a central zone of cell death; an area of ischemic injury, most severe near the zone of cell death, and lessening as it moves peripherally; an area of active hyperemia and the zone of normal unaffected tissue. Once ischemic necrosis has begun, the cellular damage provokes an initial inflammatory response, which typically is characterized by vasodilatation, transudation of fluid and fibrin, and local infiltration of flammatory cells. This response can be considered the first stage in repair of the necrotic area

  5. Mitochondrial DNA maintenance is regulated in human hepatoma cells by glycogen synthase kinase 3β and p53 in response to tumor necrosis factor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadrot, Nathalie; Ghanem, Sarita; Braut, Françoise; Gavrilescu, Laura; Pilard, Nathalie; Mansouri, Abdellah; Moreau, Richard; Reyl-Desmars, Florence

    2012-01-01

    During chronic liver inflammation, up-regulated Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) targets hepatocytes and induces abnormal reactive oxygen species (ROS) production responsible for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations. The serine/threonine Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) plays a pivotal role during inflammation but its involvement in the maintenance of mtDNA remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate its involvement in TNF-α induced mtDNA depletion and its interrelationship with p53 a protein known to maintain mtDNA copy numbers. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) we found that at 30 min in human hepatoma HepG2 cells TNF-α induced 0.55±0.10 mtDNA lesions per 10 Kb and a 52.4±2.8% decrease in mtDNA content dependent on TNF-R1 receptor and ROS production. Both lesions and depletion returned to baseline from 1 to 6 h after TNF-α exposure. Luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (LAC) was used to measure the rapid (10 min) and transient TNF-α induced increase in ROS production (168±15%). A transient 8-oxo-dG level of 1.4±0.3 ng/mg DNA and repair of abasic sites were also measured by ELISA assays. Translocation of p53 to mitochondria was observed by Western Blot and co-immunoprecipitations showed that TNF-α induced p53 binding to GSK3β and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM). In addition, mitochondrial D-loop immunoprecipitation (mtDIP) revealed that TNF-α induced p53 binding to the regulatory D-loop region of mtDNA. The knockdown of p53 by siRNAs, inhibition by the phosphoSer(15)p53 antibody or transfection of human mutant active GSK3βS9A pcDNA3 plasmid inhibited recovery of mtDNA content while blockade of GSK3β activity by SB216763 inhibitor or knockdown by siRNAs suppressed mtDNA depletion. This study is the first to report the involvement of GSK3β in TNF-α induced mtDNA depletion. We suggest that p53 binding to GSK3β, TFAM and D-loop could induce recovery of mtDNA content through mtDNA repair.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA maintenance is regulated in human hepatoma cells by glycogen synthase kinase 3β and p53 in response to tumor necrosis factor α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Vadrot

    Full Text Available During chronic liver inflammation, up-regulated Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α targets hepatocytes and induces abnormal reactive oxygen species (ROS production responsible for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA alterations. The serine/threonine Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 beta (GSK3β plays a pivotal role during inflammation but its involvement in the maintenance of mtDNA remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate its involvement in TNF-α induced mtDNA depletion and its interrelationship with p53 a protein known to maintain mtDNA copy numbers. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR we found that at 30 min in human hepatoma HepG2 cells TNF-α induced 0.55±0.10 mtDNA lesions per 10 Kb and a 52.4±2.8% decrease in mtDNA content dependent on TNF-R1 receptor and ROS production. Both lesions and depletion returned to baseline from 1 to 6 h after TNF-α exposure. Luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (LAC was used to measure the rapid (10 min and transient TNF-α induced increase in ROS production (168±15%. A transient 8-oxo-dG level of 1.4±0.3 ng/mg DNA and repair of abasic sites were also measured by ELISA assays. Translocation of p53 to mitochondria was observed by Western Blot and co-immunoprecipitations showed that TNF-α induced p53 binding to GSK3β and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM. In addition, mitochondrial D-loop immunoprecipitation (mtDIP revealed that TNF-α induced p53 binding to the regulatory D-loop region of mtDNA. The knockdown of p53 by siRNAs, inhibition by the phosphoSer(15p53 antibody or transfection of human mutant active GSK3βS9A pcDNA3 plasmid inhibited recovery of mtDNA content while blockade of GSK3β activity by SB216763 inhibitor or knockdown by siRNAs suppressed mtDNA depletion. This study is the first to report the involvement of GSK3β in TNF-α induced mtDNA depletion. We suggest that p53 binding to GSK3β, TFAM and D-loop could induce recovery of mtDNA content through mtDNA repair.

  7. Increase in the fraction of necrotic, not apoptotic, cells in SiHa xenograft tumours shortly after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, P.L.; Vikse, C.M.; Vanderbyl, S.

    1999-01-01

    Background and purpose: Approximately 18% of the cells recovered by rapid mechanical dissociation of SiHa xenograft tumours contain large numbers of DNA strand breaks. The number of damaged cells increases to 30-40% 4-6 h after exposure to 5 or 15 Gy, returning to normal levels by 12 h. This observation is reminiscent of the rate of production of apoptotic cells in other murine and human xenograft tumours. The nature of this damage, rate of development and relation to cell proliferation rate were therefore examined in detail.Materials and methods: SiHa human cervical carcinoma cells were grown as xenograft tumours in SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions were prepared as a function of time after irradiation of the mouse and examined for DNA damage using the alkaline comet assay. Cell cycle progression was measured by flow cytometry evaluation of anti-bromodeoxyuridine-labelled tumour cells.Results: Significant numbers of apoptotic cells could not be detected in irradiated SiHa tumours using an end-labelling assay, electron microscopy, or histological examination of thin sections. Instead, xenograft cells exhibiting extensive DNA damage in the comet assay were predominantly necrotic cells. The increase in the proportion of heavily damaged cells 4-6 h after irradiation could be the result of an interplay between several factors including loss of viable cells and change in production or loss of necrotic cells. Analysis of the progression of BrdUrd-labelled cells confirmed that while 35% of cells from untreated SiHa tumours had divided and entered G 1 phase by 6 h after BrdUrd injection, none of the labelled cells from tumours exposed to 5 or 15 Gy had progressed to G 1 .Conclusions: The increase in the percentage of SiHa tumour cells with extensive DNA damage 4-6 h after irradiation is attributable to necrosis, not apoptosis. Cell cycle progression and cell loss are likely to influence the kinetics of appearance of both apoptotic and necrotic cells in irradiated tumours

  8. Imaging of sacral tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, S.; Ollivier, L.; Brisse, H.; Neuenschwander, S.; Leclere, J.; Vanel, D.; Missenard, G.; Pinieux, G. de

    2008-01-01

    All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed. (orig.)

  9. Imaging of sacral tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Ollivier, L.; Brisse, H.; Neuenschwander, S. [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Leclere, J. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Vanel, D. [The Rizzoli Institute, Department of Radiology, Bologna (Italy); Missenard, G. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Comite de pathologie tumorale de l' appareil locomoteur, Villejuif (France); Pinieux, G. de [CHRU de Tours, Department of Pathology, Hopital Trousseau, Tours (France)

    2008-04-15

    All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed. (orig.)

  10. Activity of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine in childhood neuroblastoma: lack of relation to tumour differentiation in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brans, B.; Wiele, C. van de; Simons, M.; Dierckx, R.A.; Laureys, G.; Dhooge, C.; Schelfhout, V.; Potter, C.R. de

    1998-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) tumour cells have a remarkable tendency to differentiate spontaneously or under the influence of certain drugs. It is not clear whether metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake correlates with differentiation of NB cells. In 28 tumours of 26 patients, iodine-123 MIBG uptake in primary NBs was studied in relation to tumour differentiation, tumour size, cell density and degree of necrosis in subsequently resected specimens. Genetic features such as the presence of chromosomal aberrations (1p-deletion and MYCN amplification) and/or P-glycoprotein (mdr-1 gene product) were also evaluated in relation to MIBG uptake. A highly variable and unpredictable intensity of MIBG uptake was observed in primary as well as secondary resected tumours. This intensity did not relate to any of the above-mentioned factors except that there was a trend towards more intense uptake with increasing size of the tumour. We conclude from our observations that, in contrast to commonly held opinion, well-differentiated tumours do not a priori show a lower MIBG uptake in vivo, even when there are a low number of viable cells and a high degree of necrosis. The degree of differentiation or tumour viability and necrosis following longstanding chemotherapeutic treatment cannot be predicted by the MIBG scan findings. The observed MIBG uptake may be importantly influenced by factors other than those associated with cellular differentiation. (orig.)

  11. Activity of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine in childhood neuroblastoma: lack of relation to tumour differentiation in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brans, B.; Wiele, C. van de; Simons, M.; Dierckx, R.A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Gent, Gent (Belgium); Laureys, G.; Dhooge, C. [Department of Pediatric Hemato-oncology, University Hospital Gent, Gent (Belgium); Schelfhout, V.; Potter, C.R. de [Department of Pathology, University Hospital Gent, Gent (Belgium)

    1998-02-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) tumour cells have a remarkable tendency to differentiate spontaneously or under the influence of certain drugs. It is not clear whether metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake correlates with differentiation of NB cells. In 28 tumours of 26 patients, iodine-123 MIBG uptake in primary NBs was studied in relation to tumour differentiation, tumour size, cell density and degree of necrosis in subsequently resected specimens. Genetic features such as the presence of chromosomal aberrations (1p-deletion and MYCN amplification) and/or P-glycoprotein (mdr-1 gene product) were also evaluated in relation to MIBG uptake. A highly variable and unpredictable intensity of MIBG uptake was observed in primary as well as secondary resected tumours. This intensity did not relate to any of the above-mentioned factors except that there was a trend towards more intense uptake with increasing size of the tumour. We conclude from our observations that, in contrast to commonly held opinion, well-differentiated tumours do not a priori show a lower MIBG uptake in vivo, even when there are a low number of viable cells and a high degree of necrosis. The degree of differentiation or tumour viability and necrosis following longstanding chemotherapeutic treatment cannot be predicted by the MIBG scan findings. The observed MIBG uptake may be importantly influenced by factors other than those associated with cellular differentiation. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 19 refs.

  12. Oxidative stress specifically downregulates survivin to promote breast tumour formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervin, S; Tran, L; Urman, R; Braga, M; Parveen, M; Li, S A; Chaudhuri, G; Singh, R

    2013-03-05

    Breast cancer, a heterogeneous disease has been broadly classified into oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) or oestrogen receptor negative (ER-) tumour types. Each of these tumours is dependent on specific signalling pathways for their progression. While high levels of survivin, an anti-apoptotic protein, increases aggressive behaviour in ER- breast tumours, oxidative stress (OS) promotes the progression of ER+ breast tumours. Mechanisms and molecular targets by which OS promotes tumourigenesis remain poorly understood. DETA-NONOate, a nitric oxide (NO)-donor induces OS in breast cancer cell lines by early re-localisation and downregulation of cellular survivin. Using in vivo models of HMLE(HRAS) xenografts and E2-induced breast tumours in ACI rats, we demonstrate that high OS downregulates survivin during initiation of tumourigenesis. Overexpression of survivin in HMLE(HRAS) cells led to a significant delay in tumour initiation and tumour volume in nude mice. This inverse relationship between survivin and OS was also observed in ER+ human breast tumours. We also demonstrate an upregulation of NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX1) and its activating protein p67, which are novel markers of OS in E2-induced tumours in ACI rats and as well as in ER+ human breast tumours. Our data, therefore, suggest that downregulation of survivin could be an important early event by which OS initiates breast tumour formation.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-α regulates expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and of its co-receptor neuropilin-1 in human vascular endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giraudo, E.; Primo, L.; Audero, E.; Gerber, H.-P.; Koolwijk, P.; Soker, S.; Klagsbrun, M.; Ferrara, N.; Bussolino, F.

    1998-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) modulates gene expression in endothelial cells and is angiogenic in vivo. TNF-α does not activate in vitro migration and proliferation of endothelium, and its angiogenic activity is elicited by synthesis of direct angiogenic inducers or of proteases. Here, we show

  14. Intermitted pharmacologic pretreatment by xenon, isoflurane, nitrous oxide, and the opioid morphine prevents tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced adhesion molecule expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Nina C.; Kandler, Jennis; Schlack, Wolfgang; Grueber, Yvonne; Frädorf, Jan; Preckel, Benedikt

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The barrier properties of the endothelium are of critical importance during pathophysiologic processes. These barrier properties depend on an intact cytoskeleton and are regulated by cell adhesion molecules. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is known to induce cell adhesion

  15. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of use of therapeutic monitoring of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors [LISA-TRACKER® enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits, TNF-α-Blocker ELISA kits and Promonitor® ELISA kits] versus standard care in patients with Crohn's disease: systematic reviews and economic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Karoline; Connock, Martin; Auguste, Peter; Taylor-Phillips, Sian; Mistry, Hema; Shyangdan, Deepson; Court, Rachel; Arasaradnam, Ramesh; Sutcliffe, Paul; Clarke, Aileen

    2016-11-01

    Systematic reviews and economic modelling of clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of therapeutic monitoring of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors [using LISA-TRACKER ® enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits (Theradiag, Marne La Vallee, France, or Alpha Laboratories, Heriot, UK), TNF-α-Blocker ELISA kits (Immundiagnostik AG, Bensheim, Germany) and Promonitor ® ELISA kits (Proteomika, Progenika Biopharma, Bizkaia, Spain)] versus standard care for Crohn's disease (CD). Multiple electronic databases were searched from inception to December 2014 in order to identify primary studies and meta-analyses. Patients with moderate to severe active CD treated with infliximab (IFX) (Remicade ® , Merck Sharp & Dohme Ltd, Kenilworth, NJ, USA) or adalimumab (ADA) (Humira ® , AbbVie Inc., North Chicago, IL, USA). Monitoring of serum anti-TNF-α (IFX or ADA) and/or of anti-drug antibody levels using test assays with a test-treatment algorithm. Standard care. Any patient-related outcome, test agreement and cost-effectiveness estimates. The quality assessments used recognised checklists (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2, Cochrane, Philips and Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards). Evidence was synthesised using narrative review and meta-analysis. A Markov model was built in TreeAge Pro 2013 (TreeAge Software, Inc., Williamstown, MA, USA). The model had a 4-week cycle and a 10-year time horizon, adopted a NHS and Personal Social Services perspective and used a linked evidence approach. Costs were adjusted to 2013/14 prices and discounted at 3.5%. We included 68 out of 2434 and 4 out of 2466 studies for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness reviews, respectively. Twenty-three studies comparing test methods were identified. Evidence on test concordance was sparse and contradictory, offering scant data for a linked evidence approach. Three studies [two randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and one

  16. Anti-proliferative activity of 2,6-dichloro-9- or 7-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-9H- or 7H-purines against several human solid tumour cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Fátima; Ramírez, Alberto; Conejo-García, Ana; Morata, Cynthia; Marchal, Juan A; Campos, Joaquín M

    2014-04-09

    As leads we took several benzo-fused seven- and six-membered scaffolds linked to the pyrimidine or purine moieties with notable anti-proliferative activity against human breast, colon and melanoma cancerous cell lines. We then decided to maintain the double-ringed nitrogenous bases and change the other components to the ethyl acetate moiety. This way six purine and two 5-fluorouracil derivatives were obtained and evaluated against the MCF-7, HCT-116, A-375 and G-361 cancer cell lines. Two QSARs are obtained between the anti-proliferative IC₅₀ values for compounds 26-33 and the clog P against the melanoma cell lines A-375 and G-361. Our results show that two of the analogues [ethyl 2-(2,6-dichloro-9H- or 7H-purine-9- or 7-yl)acetates (30 and 33, respectively)] are potent cytotoxic agents against all the tumour cell lines assayed, showing single-digit micromolar IC₅₀ values. This exemplifies the potential of our previously reported purine compounds to qualify as lead structures for medicinal chemistry campaigns, affording simplified analogues easy to synthesize and with a noteworthy bioactivity. The selective activity of 30 and 33 against the melanoma cell line A-375, via apoptosis, supposes a great advantage for a future therapeutic use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in radiosensitive and radioresistant human tumour cells measured by field inversion gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeets, M.F.M.A.; Mooren, E.H.M.; Begg, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage induction and repair was measured in two human squamous carcinoma cell lines with differing radiosensitivities. Experiments were carried out with field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE), adapted to measure DNA double strand break (DSB) induction and repair in unlabelled cells. The sensitivity of the method was increased by introducing a hybridization membrane into the agarose gel. Damaged DNA accumulated on one spot on the membrane resulting in high local concentrations. This DNA was quantified using radioactively-labelled total human DNA as a probe. Radiosensitivity differences at physiological temperatures could not be explained by differences in either induction or repair of DNA damage as measured by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. (author)

  18. Subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Berg, Jais O

    2016-01-01

    We have described subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis, which is benign, usually asymptomatic and underreported. Images have only been published on two earlier occasions, in which the necrotic nodules appear "pearly" than the cloudy yellow surface in present case. The presented image may help...

  19. Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wilms' tumour or nephroblastoma is a cancer of the kidney that ... It may be noticed by parents or it may be an incidental finding ... patients. It may lead to iron deficiency anaemia. Rarely Wilms' tumour may present with acquired von Willebrand's ... the best treatment approach. ... with multimodality therapy in paediatric.

  20. Differential effects of tumor necrosis factor-α on matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression in human myometrial and uterine leiomyoma smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuebing; Feng, Guowei; Wang, Jiyuan; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Yixin; Shi, Yiquan; Zhu, Yingjun; Lin, Wanjun; Xu, Yang; Li, Zongjin

    2015-01-01

    Does tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) differentially regulate matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression in leiomyomas compared with normal myometrium? TNF-α up-regulates MMP-2 expression and stimulates cell migration through the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway in leiomyoma smooth muscle cells (SMCs), but not in normal myometrial SMCs. Uterine leiomyoma, the benign smooth muscle cell tumor, is the single most common indication for hysterectomy. High expression of MMPs or TNF-α has been reported in uterine leiomyomas; however, the molecular mechanism underlying these observations remains unknown. Samples were obtained between 2009 and 2013 from 12 women of reproductive age at the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle by hysterectomy. Leiomyomas and matched normal myometrium from each woman were analyzed in vitro. Western blot, RT-qPCR and a wound-healing assay were used to investigate the effects of TNF-α on MMP-2 expression and intracellular signal transduction in cultured SMCs from leiomyomas and matched myometrium. Western blot and RT-qPCR analyses using tissues from clinical patients showed that the levels of MMP-2 protein (P = 0.008) and mRNA (P = 0.009) were significantly higher in uterine leiomyomas compared with their matched myometrium. Treatment with TNF-α significantly up-regulated the protein (P = 0.039) and mRNA (P = 0.037) levels of MMP-2 in cultured leiomyoma SMCs but not in matched myometrial SMCs. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathways were activated by TNF-α in leiomyoma SMCs. Specific inhibitors of the ERK or NF-κB pathway (PD98059 or Bay11-7082) suppressed TNF-α-induced MMP-2 expression in leiomyoma SMCs. The wound-healing assay revealed that TNF-α promoted the migration of cultured leiomyoma SMCs (P = 0.036); however, PD98059 compromised the cell migration triggered by TNF-α. This study is descriptive and although we observed clear

  1. Direct astatination of a tumour-binding protein, human epidermal growth factor, using nido-carborane as a prosthetic group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestroem, A.; Carlsson, J.; Lundqvist, H.; Koziorowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    A method for direct astatine labeling of proteins has been investigated. Binding sites for astatine were created by coupling of a nido-carborane derivative to a protein, the human epidermal growth factor (hEGF), using two different conjugation methods - by glutaraldehyde cross-linking or by introduction of sulfohydryl groups by Traut's reagent with subsequent linking of ANC-1 with m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide ester. The conjugates were astatinated using the Chloramine-T method in high yield. The best labeling was obtained by the glutaraldehyde conjugate with an average yield of 68 ± 9%. In vitro stability tests indicated that the glutaraldehyde conjugated label was as stable as hEGF labeled with astatobenzoate. (author)

  2. Supernatants from Staphylococcus epidermidis grown in the presence of different antibiotics induce differential release of tumor necrosis factor alpha from human monocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Mattsson, E; Van Dijk, H; Verhoef, J; Norrby, R; Rollof, J

    1996-01-01

    Bacterial products from gram-positive bacteria, such as peptidoglycan, teichoic acid, and toxins, activate mononuclear cells to produce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF). The present study evaluated the release of soluble cell wall components from Staphylococcus epidermidis capable of inducing TNF after exposure of the bacteria to various antibiotics. A clinical S. epidermidis isolate (694) was incubated with either penicillin, oxacillin, vancomycin, or clindamycin at five times the MIC. Supe...

  3. Provision of a simplified methodology for determining estradiol and progesterone receptors in human breast tumours. Internal and external quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farinate, Z.

    1990-10-01

    A simplified assay for the detection of progesterone receptors (PR) in human breast tissue is described. Tissue storage is at -20 deg. C rather than -70 deg. C and a centrifugation speed of 20,000 rpm avoids requirement of an ultracentrifuge. Cytosol preparations obtained from homogenized oestradiol benzoate primed wistar rat uteri performed satisfactorily as positive controls with stability of two months in liquid nitrogen. The use of iodinated tracer (progesterone 11 alpha glucuronide 125 I iodotyramine) proved disappointing in the progesterone receptor assay in contrast to 125 I oestradiol which worked well in a oestrogen receptor assay, previously developed. Hydroxyl-apatite was a better separating agent than dextran coated charcoal in both assays and yielded better sensitivity, particularly when protein concentrations were low. Five breast cancer specimens assayed yielded, by Scatchard analysis, Kd values between 12 to 22x10 -9 m|h, comparable to the positive controls. However, two of these had binding site capacity of less than 5 fmol/mg cytosol as compared to the three others and the positive controls where values ranged from 47-196 fmol/mg cytosol. 28 refs, 6 figs, 14 tabs

  4. Foxa2, a novel protein partner of the tumour suppressor menin, is deregulated in mouse and human MEN1 glucagonomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnavion, Rémy; Teinturier, Romain; Gherardi, Samuele; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Yu, Run; Cordier-Bussat, Martine; Du, Rui; Pattou, François; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Bertolino, Philippe; Lu, Jieli; Zhang, Chang Xian

    2017-05-01

    Foxa2, known as one of the pioneer factors, plays a crucial role in islet development and endocrine functions. Its expression and biological functions are regulated by various factors, including, in particular, insulin and glucagon. However, its expression and biological role in adult pancreatic α-cells remain elusive. In the current study, we showed that Foxa2 was overexpressed in islets from α-cell-specific Men1 mutant mice, at both the transcriptional level and the protein level. More importantly, immunostaining analyses showed its prominent nuclear accumulation, specifically in α-cells, at a very early stage after Men1 disruption. Similar nuclear FOXA2 expression was also detected in a substantial proportion (12/19) of human multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) glucagonomas. Interestingly, our data revealed an interaction between Foxa2 and menin encoded by the Men1 gene. Furthermore, using several approaches, we demonstrated the relevance of this interaction in the regulation of two tested Foxa2 target genes, including the autoregulation of the Foxa2 promoter by Foxa2 itself. The current study establishes menin, a novel protein partner of Foxa2, as a regulator of Foxa2, the biological functions of which extend beyond the pancreatic endocrine cells. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Tumour-induced osteomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minisola, Salvatore; Peacock, Munro; Fukumoto, Seijii; Cipriani, Cristiana; Pepe, Jessica; Tella, Sri Harsha; Collins, Michael T

    2017-07-13

    Tumour-induced osteomalacia (TIO), also known as oncogenic osteomalacia, is a rare paraneoplastic disorder caused by tumours that secrete fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Owing to the role of FGF23 in renal phosphate handling and vitamin D synthesis, TIO is characterized by decreased renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, by hypophosphataemia and by low levels of active vitamin D. Chronic hypophosphataemia ultimately results in osteomalacia (that is, inadequate bone mineralization). The diagnosis of TIO is usually suspected when serum phosphate levels are chronically low in the setting of bone pain, fragility fractures and muscle weakness. Locating the offending tumour can be very difficult, as the tumour is often very small and can be anywhere in the body. Surgical removal of the tumour is the only definitive treatment. When the tumour cannot be located or when complete resection is not possible, medical treatment with phosphate salts or active vitamin D is necessary. One of the most promising emerging treatments for unresectable tumours that cause TIO is the anti-FGF23 monoclonal antibody KRN23. The recent identification of a fusion of fibronectin and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) as a molecular driver in some tumours not only sheds light on the pathophysiology of TIO but also opens the door to a better understanding of the transcription, translocation, post-translational modification and secretion of FGF23, as well as suggesting approaches to targeted therapy. Further study will reveal if the FGFR1 pathway is also involved in tumours that do not harbour the translocation.

  6. In vitro gene imaging by luciferase to detect the expression and effect of human tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand in lung cancer A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Na; Cui Jianling; Guo Zhiyuan; Guo Zhiping; Sun Yingcai; Liu Jicun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To detect the expression and effect of human tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand(hTRAIL) in vitro by using a novel double expressing adenoviral vector encoding hTRAIL and firefly luciferase (luc) gene (Ad-hTRAIL-luc), in which luc was used as reporter gene. Methods: A549 cells were transduced with the adenoviral vector encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene (Ad-EGFP) at variable multiplicity of infection (MOI). Adenoviral transduction efficiency was determined 48 h later. A549 cells were transduced with Ad-hTRAIL-luc at variable MOI, and the following tests were performed 48h later, respectively: the expressive ratio of hTRAIL and the apoptotic ratio of A549 cells were measured by flow cytometer; counts per minute (cpm) of luminescence were measured by scintillation counters. A549 cells were transduced with Ad-luc at variable MOI, and cpm of luminescence was measured by scintillation counters 48 h later. After A549 cells were transduced with Ad-hTRAIL-luc, the expressive ratio of hTRAIL, the apoptotic ratio of A549 cells and cpm of luminescence were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. The positive ratio of EGFP and cpm of luminescence (Ad-luc) were analyzed by nonparametric ANOVA. Results: After A549 cells were transfected with Ad-hTRAIL-luc, the expressive ratio of hTRAIL on the cell membrane of the groups were (2.37±0.04)%, (3.16±0.03)%, (3.64± 0.03)%, (3.96±0.02)%, (4.24±0.02)%, (4.34±0.02)% respectively, which showed significant difference between each other (P<0.01); and the apoptotic ratio of A549 cells were (1.52±0.04)%, (2.93±0.02)%, (3.39±0.02)%, (3.64±0.02)%, (3.86±0.02)%, (4.08±0.02)%, (4.20± 0.02)%, respectively, and it showed significant difference between each other (P<0.01); cpm of luminescence were 465 561 ± 26 801, 1 038 576 ± 29 417, 937 655 ± 23 197, 786 432 ± 20 028, 524 288 ± 16 338, 401 566 ± 15 961, respectively, and it also showed significant difference between each other (P<0

  7. Malignant thyroid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, W.; Reiners, C.

    1987-01-01

    The subjects dealt with at the symposium cover all topical aspects of pathology, epidemiology, diagnosis, therapy, and aftercare of the malignant thyroid tumours. A survey of the histological classification of the thyroid tumours and a review of the latest findings concerning the radiocarcinogenesis are followed by a detailed discussion of the most significant tumours. There are also papers dealing with controversial aspects of the histological classification, the value of diagnostic methods, radicality of the therapy, or after care. For five conference papers, separate records are available in the database. (orig./ECB) With 59 figs.; 57 tabs [de

  8. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Amplification of Interleukin-1β and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production in THP-1 Human Monocytic Cells Stimulated with Lipopolysaccharide of Oral Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Baqui, A. A. M. A.; Meiller, Timothy F.; Chon, Jennifer J.; Turng, Been-Foo; Falkler, William A.

    1998-01-01

    Cytokines, including granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), are used to assist in bone marrow recovery during cancer chemotherapy. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) play important roles in inflammatory processes, including exacerbation of periodontal diseases, one of the most common complications in patients who undergo this therapy. A human monocyte cell line (THP-1) was utilized to investigate IL-1β and TNF-α production following GM-CSF suppl...

  9. Pick 'n' mix: neuropatholgical detection of peri-tumour taupathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lonergan, Roisin

    2013-11-01

    Radiotherapy is used to treat recurrent oligodendrogliomas, WHO grade 2 tumours. Potential morbitities include steroid-responsive radiation necrosis and radiation leucoencephalopathy, characterised pathologically by reactive astrogliosis, focal necrosis, demyelination, axonal loss, and clinically by progressive subcortical deficits (ataxia, amnesia, incontinence, cognitive decline), with relative sparing of cortical function. Although subcortical features may overlap with neurodegenerative conditions (eg frontotemporal dementia), focal cortical atrophy of FTD causes loss of language function in addition to memory, and specific histopathological features characterise FTD subtypes (eg Pick disease). Association between mitotic disease and tauopathy has not been reported widely, but co-existence is possible. Diagnostic accuracy may guide management.

  10. Targeting radiation to tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheldon, T.E.; Greater Glasgow Health Board, Glasgow

    1994-01-01

    Biologically targeted radiotherapy entails the preferential delivery of radiation to solid tumours or individual tumour cells by means of tumour-seeking delivery vehicles to which radionuclides can be conjugated. Monoclonal antibodies have attracted attention for some years as potentially selective targeting agents, but advances in tumour and molecular biology are now providing a much wider choice of molecular species. General radiobiological principles may be derived which are applicable to most forms of targeted radiotherapy. These principles provide guidelines for the appropriate choice of radionuclide in specific treatment situations and its optimal combination with other treatment modalities. In future, the availability of gene targeting agents will focus attention on the use of Auger electron emitters whose high potency and short range selectivity makes them attractive choices for specific killing of cancer cells whose genetic peculiarities are known. (author)

  11. [Gastric mesenchymal tumours (GIST)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivach, Arrigo; Fezzi, Margherita; Sartori, Alberto; Belgrano, Manuel; Rimondini, Alessandra; Cuttin-Zernich, Roberto; Covab, Maria Assunta; Bonifacio, Daniela; Buri, Luigi; Pagani, Carlo; Zanconati, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) has increased in recent years. A number of authors have attempted to define the actual nature of these tumours. Immunohistochemistry highlighting the positivity of tyrosine-kinase (CD117/c-Kit) has revealed the difference between gastrointestinal stromal tumours and other mesenchymal tumours and, therefore, the possibility of medical rather than surgical therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 19 patients affected by primary gastric GIST, who underwent surgery in recent years with subsequent follow-up. Gastroscopy and gastrointestinal tract radiography were used not only to obtain the diagnosis but also to establish the size, density, contours, ulceration, regional lymphadenopathy, mesenteric infiltration and the presence of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of endoscopy and radiology in this pathology and the advantages and limitations of each individual technique.

  12. Human CD34+ cells engineered to express membrane-bound tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand target both tumor cells and tumor vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavazza, Cristiana; Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Giacomini, Arianna; Cleris, Loredana; Righi, Marco; Sia, Daniela; Di Nicola, Massimo; Magni, Michele; Longoni, Paolo; Milanesi, Marco; Francolini, Maura; Gloghini, Annunziata; Carbone, Antonino; Formelli, Franca; Gianni, Alessandro M

    2010-03-18

    Adenovirus-transduced CD34+ cells expressing membrane-bound tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (CD34-TRAIL+ cells) exert potent antitumor activity. To further investigate the mechanism(s) of action of CD34-TRAIL+ cells, we analyzed their homing properties as well as antitumor and antivascular effects using a subcutaneous myeloma model in immunodeficient mice. After intravenous injection, transduced cells homed in the tumor peaking at 48 hours when 188 plus or minus 25 CD45+ cells per 10(5) tumor cells were detected. Inhibition experiments showed that tumor homing of CD34-TRAIL+ cells was largely mediated by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and stromal cell-derived factor-1. Both CD34-TRAIL+ cells and soluble (s)TRAIL significantly reduced tumor volume by 40% and 29%, respectively. Computer-aided analysis of TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling-stained tumor sections demonstrated significantly greater effectiveness for CD34-TRAIL+ cells in increasing tumor cell apoptosis and necrosis over sTRAIL. Proteome array analysis indicated that CD34-TRAIL+ cells and sTRAIL activate similar apoptotic machinery. In vivo staining of tumor vasculature with sulfosuccinimidyl-6-(biotinamido) hexanoate-biotin revealed that CD34-TRAIL+ cells but not sTRAIL significantly damaged tumor vasculature, as shown by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling+ endothelial cells, appearance of hemorrhagic areas, and marked reduction of endothelial area. These results demonstrate that tumor homing of CD34-TRAIL+ cells induces early vascular disruption, resulting in hemorrhagic necrosis and tumor destruction.

  13. Pentavalent 99Tcm - DMSA SPECT in primary brain tumours of glial cell origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, D.K.; Evans, S.G.; Larcos, G.; Gruenewald, S.; Kumar, V.; Barton, M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: 99 Tc m (V)-DMSA [DMSA(V)] has shown promise in brain tumour imaging. This study aimed to assess the role of DMSA(V) brain SPET in glioma for: (1) predicting the histopathological grade of malignancy, (2) monitoring response to therapy and (3) discriminating recurrent tumour from post-radiotherapy necrosis. Twenty-three patients (pts) (14 men, 9 women) of mean age 57 years (range 20-79) were referred with a lesion on CT/MRI (14 new presentations, 5 known and 4 suspected tumour recurrence). Up to 555 MBq of 99 Tc m (V)DMSA were administered and SPET was acquired at 3 h. Tumour uptake ratio (UR) was calculated by the ratio of activity in the tumour to a region in the contralateral brain. All 19 pts with known tumour showed DMSA(V) uptake. The 14 pts with new tumours (10 grade IV, I grade III, 2 grade II and 1 necrotic tumour) had a pre-therapy mean UR of 7.7 (range 2.8-13.6). The 3 lower-grade tumours were scattered widely within this range. Four pts completed radiotherapy and returned for a post-therapy scan, where the UR was less than the pre-therapy UR in 2, unchanged in 1 and greater in 1. The 5 known recurrent tumours had a mean UR of 13.5 (range 7.3-24.9). In the 4 pts with suspected recurrence, the DMSA(V) scan result agreed with clinical course or PET in 3 but was falsely positive in 1. In summary, 99 Tc m (V)-DMSA: (1) showed uptake in all known glial cell tumours in this series, however the UR did not correlate with the histopathological grade; (2) may be useful for discriminating tumour recurrence from post-radiotherapy necrosis; and (3) may have a role in predicting post-therapy prognosis

  14. Tirapazamine causes vascular dysfunction in HCT-116 tumour xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huxham, Lynsey A.; Kyle, Alastair H.; Baker, Jennifer H.E.; McNicol, Krista L.; Minchinton, Andrew I.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tirapazamine is a hypoxic cytotoxin currently undergoing Phase II/III clinical evaluation in combination with radiation and chemotherapeutics for the treatment of non-hematological cancers. Tissue penetration studies using multicellular models have suggested that tirapazamine exposure may be limited to cells close to blood vessels. However, animal studies show tirapazamine enhances the anti-tumour activity of radiation and chemotherapy and clinical studies with tirapazamine, so far, are promising. To investigate this apparent paradox we examined the microregional effects of tirapazamine in vivo by mapping drug effects with respect to the position of blood vessels in tumour cryosections. Patients and methods: Tirapazamine was administered i.p. to mice bearing HCT-116 tumours, which were excised at various times after treatment. Images of multiple-stained cryosections were overlaid to provide microregional information on the relative position of proliferating cells, hypoxia, perfusion and vasculature. Results: We observed extensive and permanent vascular dysfunction in a large proportion of tumours from mice treated with tirapazamine. In the affected tumours, blood flow ceased in the centrally located tumour vessels, leaving a rim of functional vessels around the periphery of the tumour. This vascular dysfunction commenced within 24 h after tirapazamine administration and the areas affected appeared to be replaced by necrosis over the following 24-48 h. Conclusions: Because the majority of hypoxic cells are located in the center of tumours we propose that the activity of tirapazamine in vivo may be related to its effects on tumour vasculature and that its activity against hypoxic cells located distal to functional blood vessels may not be as important as previously believed

  15. Resistin, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and human semen parameters in the presence of leukocytospermia, smoking habit, and varicocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Elena; Collodel, Giulia; Mazzi, Lucia; Campagna, MariaStella; Iacoponi, Francesca; Figura, Natale

    2014-08-01

    To explore the relationships between resistin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and semen parameters, sperm apoptosis, and necrosis in infertile patients and in control subjects with unknown reproductive potential with/without smoking habits, leukocytospermia, and varicocele. Prospective study. Sperm laboratory. A total of 110 selected men. Family history, clinical/physical examination, ELISA determination (resistin, IL-6, TNF-α), semen analysis, annexin V/propidium iodide assay. Relationships among resistin, IL-6, and TNF-α and semen parameters in the presence of smoking habits, varicocele, leukocytospermia, and in infertile subjects. Resistin level was higher in semen than in serum. Resistin semen levels showed negative correlations with sperm motility and positive correlations with apoptotic, necrotic sperm and TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Resistin, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels were higher in smokers compared with nonsmokers and in cases with leukocytospermia, in which an increase in necrotic sperm and a decrease in the number of sperm with normal morphology and motility were observed. Cytokine levels were significantly higher in infertile patients compared with control subjects with unknown reproductive potential. A total of 74.5% of infertile patients showed leukocytospermia. Semen resistin correlated with IL-6, TNF-α, and sperm quality; in cases of leukocytospermia and smoking habits, resistin concentrations were increased, suggesting that resistin may play a regulatory role in inflammation of the male reproductive system. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Femoral head avascular necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrysikopoulos, H.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.L.; Ashburn, W.; Pretorius, T.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging has been shown to be more sensitive and specific than planar scintigraphy for avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. However, experience with single photon emission CT (SPECT) is limited. The authors retrospectively compared 1.5-T MR imaging with SPECT in 14 patients with suspected femoral head AVN. Agreement between MR imaging and SPECT was present in 24 femurs, 14 normal and ten with AVN. MR imaging showed changes of AVN in the remaining four femoral heads. Of these, one was normal and the other three inconclusive for AVN by SPECT. The authors conclude that MR imaging is superior to SPECT for the evaluation of AVN of the hip

  17. Increased detectability of somatic changes in the DNA from human tumours after probing with "synthetic" and "genome-derived" hypervariable multilocus probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagoda, P J; Seitz, G; Epplen, J T

    1989-01-01

    intensities were observed. Together the probes 33.15 and (CAC)5/(GTG)5 detected deviating fingerprint patterns in 63% of the colorectal carcinomas investigated. In mammary and stomach carcinomas, only 1/11 and 2/11 tumours, respectively, showed differences with either of the three probes, 33.15, (GACA)4...

  18. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: correlation between MSCT features and pathological classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yanji; Dong, Zhi; Li, Zi-Ping; Feng, Shi-Ting [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Chen, Jie [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Gastroenterology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Chan, Tao; Chen, Minhu [Union Hospital, Hong Kong, Medical Imaging Department, Shatin, N.T. (China); Lin, Yuan [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Pathology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2014-11-15

    We aimed to evaluate the multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) features of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (P-NENs) and analyse the correlation between the MSCT features and pathological classification of P-NENs. Forty-one patients, preoperatively investigated by MSCT and subsequently operated on with a histological diagnosis of P-NENs, were included. Various MSCT features of the primary tumour, lymph node, and distant metastasis were analysed. The relationship between MSCT features and pathologic classification of P-NENs was analysed with univariate and multivariate models. Contrast-enhanced images showed significant differences among the three grades of tumours in the absolute enhancement (P = 0.013) and relative enhancement (P = 0.025) at the arterial phase. Univariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences among the tumours of different grades (based on World Health Organization [WHO] 2010 classification) in tumour size (P = 0.001), tumour contour (P < 0.001), cystic necrosis (P = 0.001), tumour boundary (P = 0.003), dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (P = 0.001), peripancreatic tissue or vascular invasion (P < 0.001), lymphadenopathy (P = 0.011), and distant metastasis (P = 0.012). Multivariate analysis suggested that only peripancreatic tissue or vascular invasion (HR 3.934, 95 % CI, 0.426-7.442, P = 0.028) was significantly associated with WHO 2010 pathological classification. MSCT is helpful in evaluating the pathological classification of P-NENs. (orig.)

  19. Human leucocyte antigen class I-redirected anti-tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M P; Dolton, G M; Gerry, A B; Brewer, J E; Bennett, A D; Pumphrey, N J; Jakobsen, B K; Sewell, A K

    2017-01-01

    CD4 + T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour-specific CD4 + T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low-affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4 + T cells with tumour-specific HLA class I-restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co-receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4 + cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4 + and CD8 + T cells expressing wild-type and a range of affinity-enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1- and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4 + T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4 + T cells than CD8 + T cells. These results indicate that the CD4 + T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8 + T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Society for Immunology.

  20. Modulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis by trimethyltin chloride in human tumour cells: Neuroblastoma SY5Y and cervix adenocarcinoma HeLa S3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florea, Ana-Maria; Splettstoesser, Frank; Dopp, Elke; Rettenmeier, Albert W.; Buesselberg, Dietrich

    2005-01-01

    Physiological modifications of intracellular Ca 2+ ([Ca 2+ ] i ) levels trigger and/or regulate a diversity of cellular activities (e.g. neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, muscular contraction, cell proliferation), while calcium overloads could result in cytotoxicity. Previously, we have shown that trimethyltin chloride (Me 3 SnCl; TMT) modulates calcium homeostasis in cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa S3) cells [Florea, A.-M., Dopp, E., Buesselberg, D., 2005. TMT induces elevated calcium transients in HeLa cells: types and levels of response. Cell Calcium 37, 252-258]. Here we compare [Ca 2+ ] i -changes induced by trimethyltin chloride in neuroblastoma SY5Y and HeLa S3 cells using calcium-sensitive dyes (fluo-4/AM (fluo-4) and rhod-2/AM (rhod-2)) and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). TMT-induced calcium elevations in neuroblastoma SY5Y as well as in HeLa S3 cells. [Ca 2+ ] i rose to a sustained plateau or to transient spikes. Overall, the detected averaged increase of the maximum calcium elevation were: 0.5 μM ∼125.6%; 5 μM ∼130.1%; 500 μM ∼145% in HeLa S3 cells and 0.5 μM ∼133.3%; 5 μM ∼136.1%; 500 μM ∼147.1% in neuroblastoma SY5Y cells. The calcium rise derived from internal stores did not significantly depend on the presence of calcium in the external solution: ∼109% (no calcium added) versus ∼117% (2 mM calcium; 5 μM TMT) in HeLa cells. This difference was similar in neuroblastoma SY5Y cells, were ∼127% versus ∼136% increase (5 μM TMT) were measured. Staining of calcium stores with rhod-2 showed a TMT-induced [Ca 2+ ] i -decrease in the stores followed by an increase of the calcium concentration in the nuclei of the two cell lines tested. Our results suggest that toxic effects in human tumour cells after exposure to trimethyltin compounds might be due to an elevation of [Ca 2+ ] i

  1. A low concentration of ethanol reduces the chemiluminescence of human granulocytes and monocytes but not the tumor necrosis factor alpha production by monocytes after endotoxin stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Diedrich, J. P.; Schäfer, Christian

    1998-01-01

    necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) from Mphi. Further, the efficiency of ethanol to inactivate chemically generated ROS was tested. Significant stimulation of ROS release occurred at endotoxin concentrations of 1 ng/ml or higher in both PMNs and Mphi. Ethanol significantly suppressed the formation of ROS...... immunogens and to increase the susceptibility of alcohol abusers to infectious diseases. As endotoxemia is common in alcohol abusers, we investigated the effect of ethanol (21.7 mmol/liter) on the luminol-amplified chemiluminescence of PMNs and Mphi after endotoxin stimulation and the release of tumor...... identical (6 to 8 ng/ml) in both PMNs and Mphi, independent of the presence of ethanol. In contrast to ROS formation, ethanol had no effect on the amount of TNF-alpha produced by endotoxin-stimulated Mphi. Ethanol was shown to be unable to decrease the levels of chemically generated ROS under physiological...

  2. Experimental tumour treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    This report of 1984 is the seventh in a series and presents that year's results of continuous studies in the domain of experimental tumour radiotherapy. In the year under review, more personnel has been available for the studies, and the scientific programmes for the assessment of acute and chronic side effects of radiotherapies have been extended. New models have been developed, among them a first system based on animal experiments, for quantifying the mucositis of the oral and pharyngeal mucosa, a limiting condition in the radiotherapy of head and throat tumours. Another significant advancement is a model for quantification of chronical damage to the ureter, which still is a serious problem in the radiotherapy of gynaecological tumours. The 1984 experimental tumour studies have been mainly devoted to the repopulation and split-dose recovery in various tumours, concentrating on dose fractionation as one of the major problems studies. Particular interest has been attached to the processes involved in treatments over several weeks with a daily effective dose of 2 Gy. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Morphological, functional and metabolic imaging biomarkers: assessment of vascular-disrupting effect on rodent liver tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huaijun; Li, Junjie; Keyzer, Frederik De; Yu, Jie; Feng, Yuanbo; Marchal, Guy; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng; Nuyts, Johan

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate effects of a vascular-disrupting agent on rodent tumour models. Twenty rats with liver rhabdomyosarcomas received ZD6126 intravenously at 20 mg/kg, and 10 vehicle-treated rats were used as controls. Multiple sequences, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with the microvascular permeability constant (K), were acquired at baseline, 1 h, 24 h and 48 h post-treatment by using 1.5-T MRI. [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose micro-positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG μPET) was acquired pre- and post-treatment. The imaging biomarkers including tumour volume, enhancement ratio, necrosis ratio, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and K from MRI, and maximal standardised uptake value (SUV max ) from FDG μPET were quantified and correlated with postmortem microangiography and histopathology. In the ZD6126-treated group, tumours grew slower with higher necrosis ratio at 48 h (P max dropped at 24 h (P < 0.01). Relative K of tumour versus liver at 48 h correlated with relative vascular density on microangiography (r = 0.93, P < 0.05). The imaging biomarkers allowed morphological, functional and metabolic quantifications of vascular shutdown, necrosis formation and tumour relapse shortly after treatment. A single dose of ZD6126 significantly diminished tumour blood supply and growth until 48 h post-treatment. (orig.)

  4. PTP1B controls non-mitochondrial oxygen consumption by regulating RNF213 to promote tumour survival during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banh, Robert S; Iorio, Caterina; Marcotte, Richard; Xu, Yang; Cojocari, Dan; Rahman, Anas Abdel; Pawling, Judy; Zhang, Wei; Sinha, Ankit; Rose, Christopher M; Isasa, Marta; Zhang, Shuang; Wu, Ronald; Virtanen, Carl; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Habu, Toshiyuki; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Koizumi, Akio; Wilkins, Sarah E; Kislinger, Thomas; Gygi, Steven P; Schofield, Christopher J; Dennis, James W; Wouters, Bradly G; Neel, Benjamin G

    2016-07-01

    Tumours exist in a hypoxic microenvironment and must limit excessive oxygen consumption. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) controls mitochondrial oxygen consumption, but how/if tumours regulate non-mitochondrial oxygen consumption (NMOC) is unknown. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) is required for Her2/Neu-driven breast cancer (BC) in mice, although the underlying mechanism and human relevance remain unclear. We found that PTP1B-deficient HER2(+) xenografts have increased hypoxia, necrosis and impaired growth. In vitro, PTP1B deficiency sensitizes HER2(+) BC lines to hypoxia by increasing NMOC by α-KG-dependent dioxygenases (α-KGDDs). The moyamoya disease gene product RNF213, an E3 ligase, is negatively regulated by PTP1B in HER2(+) BC cells. RNF213 knockdown reverses the effects of PTP1B deficiency on α-KGDDs, NMOC and hypoxia-induced death of HER2(+) BC cells, and partially restores tumorigenicity. We conclude that PTP1B acts via RNF213 to suppress α-KGDD activity and NMOC. This PTP1B/RNF213/α-KGDD pathway is critical for survival of HER2(+) BC, and possibly other malignancies, in the hypoxic tumour microenvironment.

  5. Further evidence for the absence of a hypoxic fraction in the 9L rat tumour multicellular spheroid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutin, P.H.; Barcellos, M.H.; Shrieve, D.C.; Sano, Y.; Bernstein, M.; Deen, D.F.

    1982-01-01

    The 9L gliosarcoma is an N-methylnitrosourea-induced rat brain tumour that has served as a predictive model for the efficacy of various chemotherapeutic agents against human brain tumours. Because it is one of two known animal tumour models that has no hypoxic fraction, the 9L model is of questionable value for the study of the radiobiology of hypoxic cell sensitizers. Hypoxic 9L monolayer cells are sensitive to misonidazole, as shown by the abrupt decrease in survival after a 2-4 h radiation exposure. However, when 9L spheroids in the size ranges of 200-300, 300-400, 500-600 and 1027+-33μm were incubated in euoxic spinner culture for up to 96 h in 1.5 or 3.0 mM misonidazole, there was no effect on the survival of the dissociated cells over a dose range 0-20 Gy. It is concluded that, in view of the demonstrated sensitivity to misonidazole of hypoxic 9L cells in monolayer culture, this finding provides further evidence that there are no hypoxic cells even in large 9L spheroids with a histologically distinct zone of central necrosis. Moreover, 9L spheroids irradiated in the presence of 3.0 mM misonidazole showed no dose enhancement. (U.K.)

  6. {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} imaging can accurately distinguish between mature teratoma and necrosis in {sup 18}F-FDG-negative residual masses after treatment of non-seminomatous testicular cancer: a preclinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aide, Nicolas [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre and Caen University, Bioticla Team, EA1772, IFR 146 ICORE, GRECAN, Caen (France); Caen University Hospital and Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, PET Unit, Caen (France); Centre Francois Baclesse, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Caen (France); Briand, Melanie; Dutoit, Soizic; Deslandes, Edwiges; Poulain, Laurent [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre and Caen University, Bioticla Team, EA1772, IFR 146 ICORE, GRECAN, Caen (France); Bohn, Pierre; Rouvet, Jean; Modzelewski, Romain; Vera, Pierre [Henri Becquerel Cancer Center and Rouen University Hospital and QuantIF- LITIS (EA4108), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rouen (France); Lasnon, Charline [Caen University Hospital and Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, PET Unit, Caen (France); Chasle, Jacques [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre and Caen University, Pathology Department, Caen (France); Vela, Antony [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre and Caen University, Radiophysics Unit, Caen (France); Carreiras, Franck [Universite de Cergy Pontoise, UFR Sciences et Techniques, ERRMECe, EA 1391, Institut des materiaux, Cergy-Pontoise (France)

    2011-02-15

    We assessed whether imaging {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin could distinguish mature teratoma from necrosis in human non-seminomatous germ cell tumour (NSGCT) post-chemotherapy residual masses. Human embryonal carcinoma xenografts (six/rat) were untreated (controls) or treated to form mature teratomas with low-dose cisplatin and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) over a period of 8 weeks. In another group, necrosis was induced in xenografts with high-dose cisplatin plus etoposide (two cycles).{sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) small animal positron emission tomography (SA PET) imaging was performed in three rats (one control and two treated for 4 and 8 weeks with cisplatin+ATRA). Imaging of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} expression was performed in six rats bearing mature teratomas and two rats with necrotic lesions on a microSPECT/CT device after injection of the tracer [{sup 99m}Tc]HYNIC-RGD [6-hydrazinonicotinic acid conjugated to cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys)]. Correlative immunohistochemistry studies of human and mouse {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} expression were performed. Cisplatin+ATRA induced differentiation of the xenografts. After 8 weeks, some glandular structures and mesenchymal cells were visible; in contrast, control tumours showed undifferentiated tissues. SA PET imaging showed that mature teratoma had very low avidity for {sup 18}F-FDG [mean standardised uptake value (SUV{sub mean}) = 0.48 {+-} 0.05] compared to untreated embryonal carcinoma (SUV{sub mean} = 0.92 {+-} 0.13) (p = 0.005). {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} imaging accurately distinguished mature teratoma (tumour to muscle ratio = 4.29 {+-} 1.57) from necrosis (tumour to muscle ratio = 1.3 {+-} 0.26) (p = 0.0002). Immunohistochemistry studies showed that {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin expression was strong in the glandular structures of mature teratoma lesions and negative in host stroma. Imaging {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin accurately distinguished mature teratoma from

  7. In vitro effects of substance P analogue [D-Arg1, D-Phe5, D-Trp7,9, Leu11] substance P on human tumour and normal cell growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Everard, M. J.; Macaulay, V. M.; Miller, J. L.; Smith, I. E.

    1992-01-01

    Analogues of the neurotransmitter substance P (SP) can interact with neuropeptide receptors, and are reported to inhibit growth of small cell lung cancer cell lines (SCLC CLs). We found [D-Arg1, D-Phe5, D-Trp7,9, Leu11] substance P (D-Phe5SP) significantly inhibited DNA synthesis by 10/10 human tumour CLs; six SCLC, one N-SCLC (squamous), two ovarian and one squamous cervical carcinoma, with inhibition to 50% control levels (IC50) of 20-50 microM. There was dose dependent inhibition of colony...

  8. Nicotinamide and carbogen: relationship between pO2 and radiosensitivity in three tumour lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.M.; Thomas, C.D.; Guichard, M.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of carbogen breathing, nicotinamide injection and their combination on tumour radiosensitivity were correlated with changes in tumour O 2 tension to determine the relationship between radiosensitivity and measured pO 2 . The radiosensitivity (in vivo-in vitro colony assay) and O 2 tension (computerized pO 2 histograph KIMOC 6650) of two human xenografted tumours (HRT18 and NA11 +) and one murine tumour (EMT6) were measured under similar experimental conditions. (author)

  9. Avascular Necrosis of the Capitate

    OpenAIRE

    Bekele, Wosen; Escobedo, Eva; Allen, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Avascular necrosis of the capitate is a rare entity. The most common reported etiology is trauma. We report a case of avascular necrosis of the capitate in a patient with chronic wrist pain that began after a single episode of remote trauma.

  10. Avascular Necrosis of the Capitate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Wosen; Escobedo, Eva; Allen, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Avascular necrosis of the capitate is a rare entity. The most common reported etiology is trauma. We report a case of avascular necrosis of the capitate in a patient with chronic wrist pain that began after a single episode of remote trauma. PMID:22470799

  11. Complete resolution of avascular necrosis of the human femoral head treated with adipose tissue-derived stem cells and platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Jeon, Jeong Ho; Lee, Sang Hee

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of a 43-year-old man with early stage (stage 1) avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head treated with adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). ASC-containing stromal vascular fraction was mixed with PRP and hyaluronic acid. This mixture was then injected into the diseased hip under ultrasound guidance. The affected hip was reinjected weekly with additional PRP for 4 weeks. The patient was followed-up with sequential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans at 3, 18, and 21 months after treatment, together with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) Walking Index, Functional Rating Index, Harris Hip Score, and Range of Motion (ROM) assessments. The patient's severe hip pain was considerably improved at 3 months after treatment, with pain scores, ROM and MRI showing near complete resolution of AVN. Pain scores, ROM and MRI at 18 and 21 months after treatment indicated complete resolution of AVN. This case represents the first evidence of complete resolution of early stage AVN of the hip following treatment with ASCs/PRP. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Effects of maleimide-polyethylene glycol-modified human hemoglobin (MP4 on tissue necrosis in SKH1-hr hairless mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goertz O

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Tissue hypoxia after blood loss, replantation and flap reperfusion remains a challenging task in surgery. Normovolemic hemodilution improves hemorheologic properties without increasing oxygen carrying capacity. Red blood cell transfusion is the current standard of treatment with its attendant risks. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of the chemically modified hemoglobin, MP4, to reduce skin flap necrosis and its effect on selected blood markers and kidneys. Materials and methods Tissue ischemia was induced in the ear of hairless mice (n = 26. Hemodilution was performed by replacing one third of blood volume with the similar amount of MP4, dextran, or blood. The extent of non-perfused tissue was assessed by intravital fluorescent microscopy. Results Of all groups, MP4 showed the smallest area of no perfusion (in percentage of the ear ± SEM: 16.3% ± 2.4, the control group the largest (22.4% ± 3.5. Leukocytes showed a significant increase in the MP4 and dextran group (from 8.7 to 13.6 respectively 15.4*109/l. On histology no changes of the kidneys could be observed. Conclusion MP4 causes an increase of leukocytes, improves the oxygen supply of the tissue and shows no evidence of renal impairment.

  13. Genetically modified tumour vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, Suppl. 1 (2005), S7 ISSN 1214-021X. [Cells VI - Biological Days /18./. 24.10.2005-26.10.2005, České Budějovice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : tumour vaccines * HPV16 Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  14. Putting tumours in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, M J; Radisky, D

    2001-10-01

    The interactions between cancer cells and their micro- and macroenvironment create a context that promotes tumour growth and protects it from immune attack. The functional association of cancer cells with their surrounding tissues forms a new 'organ' that changes as malignancy progresses. Investigation of this process might provide new insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and could also lead to new therapeutic targets.

  15. Metabolic epidermal necrosis in two dogs with different underlying diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, R; McNeil, P E; Evans, H; Srebernik, N

    1995-05-06

    Two dogs with metabolic epidermal necrosis had hyperkeratosis of the footpads accompanied by erythematous, erosive and crusting lesions affecting the muzzle, external genitalia, perineum and periocular regions. Histopathological examination of skin biopsies revealed a superficial hydropic dermatitis with marked parakeratosis. Both dogs had high plasma activities of alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase and high concentrations of glucose, and also a marked hypoaminoacidaemia. Despite these similarities, the cutaneous eruptions were associated with different underlying diseases. One dog had a pancreatic carcinoma which had metastasised widely; the primary tumour and the metastases showed glucagon immunoreactivity on immunocytochemical staining, and the dog's plasma glucagon concentration was markedly greater than that of control dogs. The other dog had diffuse hepatic disease; its plasma glucagon concentration was similar to that of control samples and cirrhosis was identified post mortem. Metabolic epidermal necrosis in dogs is a distinct cutaneous reaction pattern which may be associated with different underlying systemic diseases; however, the pathogenesis of the skin lesions remains unclear.

  16. Inhibition of platelet-tumour cell interaction with ibrutinib reduces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BTK) inhibitor, ibrutinib, in tumour cell-platelet crosstalk in lung cancer. Methods: Human lung cancer cells A549 were treated with ibrutinib or DMSO. mRNA expression was assessed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain ...

  17. Predictive value of histologic tumor necrosis after radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Taghian, A G; Rosenberg, A E; O'Connell, J; Okunieff, P; Suit, H D

    2001-12-20

    Postsurgical evaluation of histologic changes of tumors after preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy has been a routine clinical practice of pathologists and oncologists. There appears to be secure evidence that the extent of tumor necrosis vs. viable tumor cells postchemotherapy is a clinically useful predictor of outcome. The significance of histologic tumor necrosis after radiotherapy, however, has not been clearly established and deserves further investigation. We investigated the correlation between histological extent of tumor necrosis, survival of tumor transplants, and radiation doses in an experimental model using three human tumor xenografts. Three human tumor cell lines were investigated: STS-26, SCC-21, and HGL-21. Tumors were grown subcutaneously in athymic nude mice and received external beam radiation of different doses. Tumors were excised 2 weeks postirradiation. One-half of the tumor was divided into 1-mm(3) fragments and transplanted to naive mice. The other half was examined for histologic tumor necrosis. Transplant survival was strongly correlated with radiation dose, TCD(p) (radiation dose that results in local tumor control in proportion, p, to irradiated tumors). In contrast, there was no clear association between transplant survival rate and the extent of tumor necrosis. The experimental model demonstrated a strong inverse correlation between radiation doses and tumor transplant survival. Histologic tumor necrosis did not correlate well with radiation doses or transplant survival rates. Despite common practices in histologic examination of tumors posttherapy, clinical interpretations and implications of histologic tumor necrosis after radiotherapy should be considered with caution. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Femoral head necrosis; Hueftkopfnekrose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, J.; Scheurecker, G.; Scheurecker, A.; Stoeger, A.; Huber, A. [Roentgeninstitut am Schillerpark, Linz (Austria); Hofmann, S. [Orthopaedisches Landeskrankenhaus Stolzalpe (Austria)

    2009-05-15

    The epidemiology and pathohistogenesis of avascular femoral head necrosis has still not been clarified in detail. Because the course of the disease runs in stages and over a long time period nearly always culminates in the necessity for a total hip prosthesis, an exact radiological evaluation is of paramount importance for the treatment. There is a need for a common staging system to enable comparison of different therapy concepts and especially their long-term results. In this article the ARCO staging system is described in full detail, which includes all radiological modalities as well as histopathological alterations. (orig.) [German] Bei der avaskulaeren Femurkopfnekrose handelt es sich um ein Krankheitsbild, dessen Ursachen noch immer nicht vollstaendig geklaert sind. Da die Erkrankung stadienhaft verlaeuft und ueber einen laengeren Zeitraum betrachtet nahezu immer in einem prothetischen Hueftersatz muendet, ist eine genaue radiologische Abklaerung fuer die Behandlung von enormer Bedeutung. Um Langzeiterfolge verschiedener Therapiekonzepte vergleichen zu koennen, sind eine exakte Beschreibung und darauf basierend die Verwendung einer einheitlichen Stadieneinteilung wuenschenswert. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird die ARCO-Stadieneinteilung im Detail beschrieben, die alle bildgebenden Methoden beruecksichtigt und histopathologische Veraenderungen mit einbezieht. (orig.)

  19. Flavonoid metabolites reduce tumor necrosis factor-α secretion to a greater extent than their precursor compounds in human THP-1 monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Gesso, Jessica L; Kerr, Jason S; Zhang, Qingzhi; Raheem, Saki; Yalamanchili, Sai Krishna; O'Hagan, David; Kay, Colin D; O'Connell, Maria A

    2015-06-01

    Flavonoids are generally studied in vitro, in isolation, and as unmetabolized precursor structures. However, in the habitual diet, multiple flavonoids are consumed together and found present in the circulation as complex mixtures of metabolites. Using a unique study design, we investigated the potential for singular or additive anti-inflammatory effects of flavonoid metabolites relative to their precursor structures. Six flavonoids, 14 flavonoid metabolites, and 29 combinations of flavonoids and their metabolites (0.1-10 μM) were screened for their ability to reduce LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) secretion in THP-1 monocytes. One micromolar peonidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, and the metabolites isovanillic acid (IVA), IVA-glucuronide, vanillic acid-glucuronide, protocatechuic acid-3-sulfate, and benzoic acid-sulfate significantly reduced TNF-α secretion when in isolation, while there was no effect on TNF-α mRNA expression. Four combinations of metabolites that included 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4HBA) and/or protocatechuic acid also significantly reduced TNF-α secretion to a greater extent than the precursors or metabolites alone. The effects on LPS-induced IL-1β and IL-10 secretion and mRNA expression were also examined. 4HBA significantly reduced IL-1β secretion but none of the flavonoids or metabolites significantly modified IL-10 secretion. This study provides novel evidence suggesting flavonoid bioactivity results from cumulative or additive effects of circulating metabolites. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Flavonoid metabolites reduce tumor necrosis factor‐α secretion to a greater extent than their precursor compounds in human THP‐1 monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Gesso, Jessica L.; Kerr, Jason S.; Zhang, Qingzhi; Raheem, Saki; Yalamanchili, Sai Krishna; O'Hagan, David; Kay, Colin D.; O'Connell, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    1 Scope Flavonoids are generally studied in vitro, in isolation, and as unmetabolized precursor structures. However, in the habitual diet, multiple flavonoids are consumed together and found present in the circulation as complex mixtures of metabolites. Using a unique study design, we investigated the potential for singular or additive anti‐inflammatory effects of flavonoid metabolites relative to their precursor structures. 2 Methods and results Six flavonoids, 14 flavonoid metabolites, and 29 combinations of flavonoids and their metabolites (0.1–10 μM) were screened for their ability to reduce LPS‐induced tumor necrosis factor‐α (TNF‐α) secretion in THP‐1 monocytes. One micromolar peonidin‐3‐glucoside, cyanidin‐3‐glucoside, and the metabolites isovanillic acid (IVA), IVA‐glucuronide, vanillic acid‐glucuronide, protocatechuic acid‐3‐sulfate, and benzoic acid‐sulfate significantly reduced TNF‐α secretion when in isolation, while there was no effect on TNF‐α mRNA expression. Four combinations of metabolites that included 4‐hydroxybenzoic acid (4HBA) and/or protocatechuic acid also significantly reduced TNF‐α secretion to a greater extent than the precursors or metabolites alone. The effects on LPS‐induced IL‐1β and IL‐10 secretion and mRNA expression were also examined. 4HBA significantly reduced IL‐1β secretion but none of the flavonoids or metabolites significantly modified IL‐10 secretion. 3 Conclusion This study provides novel evidence suggesting flavonoid bioactivity results from cumulative or additive effects of circulating metabolites. PMID:25801720

  1. Airway necrosis after salvage esophagectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Norimitsu; Hokamura, Nobukazu; Tachimori, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Salvage esophagectomy is the sole curative intent treatment for patients with persistent or recurrent locoregional disease after definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal carcinoma. However, salvage esophagectomy is a very high-risk operation, and airway necrosis is a fatal complication. Between 1997 and 2007, 49 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer underwent salvage esophagectomy after definitive CRT. We retrospectively compared patients with and without airway necrosis, and investigated operative procedures related to airway necrosis. Airway necrosis occurred in five patients (10.2%), of four patients (80%) died during their hospitalization. Airway necrosis seemed to be closely related to operative procedures, such as resection of bronchial artery and cervical and subcarinal lymph node dissection. Bronchogastric fistula following necrosis of gastric conduit occured in 2 patients reconstructed through posterior mediastinal route. Airway necrosis is a highly lethal complication after salvage esophagectomy. It is important in salvage esophagectomy to take airway blood supply into consideration sufficiently and to reconstruct through retrosternal route to prevent bronchogastric fistula. (author)

  2. A first-in-human phase I study of SAR125844, a selective MET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumours with MET amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angevin, Eric; Spitaleri, Gianluca; Rodon, Jordi; Dotti, Katia; Isambert, Nicolas; Salvagni, Stefania; Moreno, Victor; Assadourian, Sylvie; Gomez, Corinne; Harnois, Marzia; Hollebecque, Antoine; Azaro, Analia; Hervieu, Alice; Rihawi, Karim; De Marinis, Filippo

    2017-12-01

    Dysregulated MET signalling is implicated in oncogenesis. The safety and preliminary efficacy of a highly selective MET kinase inhibitor (SAR125844) was investigated in patients with advanced solid tumours and MET dysregulation. This was a phase I dose-escalation (3 + 3 design [50-740 mg/m 2 ]) and dose-expansion study. In the dose escalation, patients had high total MET (t-MET) expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or MET amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. In the dose expansion, patients had MET amplification (including a subset of patients with non-small cell lung cancer [NSCLC]) or phosphorylated-MET (p-MET) expression (IHC). Objectives were determination of maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of once-weekly intravenous SAR125844 based on dose-limiting toxicities; safety and pharmacokinetic profile; preliminary efficacy of SAR125844 MTD in the expansion cohort. In total, 72 patients were enrolled: dose escalation, N = 33; dose expansion, N = 39; 570 mg/m 2 was established as the MTD. Most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were asthenia/fatigue (58.3%), nausea (31.9%), and abdominal pain, constipation, and dyspnea (27.8% for each); 58.3% of patients reported grade 3 AEs (19.4% were treatment related). Of the 29 evaluable patients with MET amplification treated at 570 mg/m 2 , five achieved a partial response, including four of 22 with NSCLC; 17 patients had stable disease. No response was observed in patients with high p-MET solid tumours. There was no correlation between tumour response and t-MET status or MET gene copy number. The MTD of once-weekly SAR125844 was 570 mg/m 2 ; SAR125844 was well tolerated, with significant antitumour activity in patients with MET-amplified NSCLC. NCT01391533. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies for radioimmunodetection of tumours and for targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, R.W.; Embleton, M.J.; Pimm, M.V.

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody 791T/36 prepared against human osteogenic sarcoma has been used to detect primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas by external imaging of patients following injection of 131 I-labelled antibody. In 10 of 11 patients radiolabelled 791T/36 antibody localized in tumours, the tumour/non tumour ratio of radioactivity ranging from 1.5:1 to 8.1. 791T/36 antibody was also evaluated for its potential for targeting anti-tumour agents including cytotoxic drugs (Vindesine) and immunomodulating agents (interferon). Vindesine-791T/36 conjugates were preferentially cytotoxic in vitro for target cells expressing the 791T/36 anti-body defined antigen. Also interferon conjugated to 791T/36 antibody, like free interferon activated peripheral blood natural killer cell activity. These in vitro tests together with related studies on antibody localization in vivo indicate the potential of monoclonal antibody targeting of anti-tumour agents

  4. The Janus face of death receptor signalling during tumour immunoediting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eimear O' Reilly

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immune-surveillance is essential for the inhibition of carcinogenesis. Malignantly transformed cells can be recognised by both the innate and adaptive immune systems through different mechanisms. Immune effector cells induce extrinsic cell death in the identified tumour cells by expressing death ligand cytokines of the tumour necrosis factor ligand family. However, some tumour cells can escape immune elimination and progress. Acquisition of resistance to the death-ligand induced apoptotic pathway can be obtained through cleavage of effector-cell expressed death-ligands into a poorly active form, mutations or silencing of the death receptors or overexpression of decoy receptors and pro-survival proteins. Although the immune system is highly effective in the elimination of malignantly transformed cells, abnormal/ dysfunctional death-ligand signalling curbs its cytotoxicity. Moreover, death receptors can also transmit pro-survival and pro-migratory signals. Consequently, dysfunctional death receptor-mediated apoptosis/necroptosis signalling does not only give a passive resistance against cell death, but actively drives tumour cell motility, invasion and contributes to consequent metastasis. This dual contribution of the death ligand-death receptor signalling in both the early, elimination phase and then in the late, escape phase of the tumour immunoediting process is discussed in this review. Death receptor agonists still hold potential for cancer therapy since they can execute the tumour-eliminating immune-effector function even in the absence of activation of the immune system against the tumour. The opportunities and challenges of developing death receptor agonists into effective cancer therapeutics are also discussed.

  5. Interleukin-1 or tumor necrosis factor-alpha augmented the cytotoxic effect of mycobacteria on human fibroblasts: application to evaluation of pathogenesis of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takii, T; Abe, C; Tamura, A; Ramayah, S; Belisle, J T; Brennan, P J; Onozaki, K

    2001-03-01

    Mycobacteria-induced in vitro events reflecting human tuberculosis can contribute to the evaluation of the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). In this study, we propose such an in vitro method based on live mycobacteria-induced cytotoxicity to human cell lines. When human lung-derived normal fibroblast cell line MRC-5 was infected with various strains of mycobacteria (M. tuberculosis H(37)Rv and H(37) Ra, Mycobacterium avium 427S and 2151SmO, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG Pasteur and Tokyo), the fibroblasts were killed by mycobacteria according to the degree of virulence. Other human originated macrophage (U-937, THP-1), myeloid (HL-60), and epithelial carcinoma (A549) cell lines exhibited a similar cytotoxic response to virulent mycobacteria. MRC-5 was most susceptible to virulent mycobacteria among various human cell lines examined. The cytotoxicity was enhanced by the proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-alpha), which in the absence of mycobacteria stimulate the growth of normal human fibroblasts. This in vitro evaluation system was applied to clinical isolates of drug-sensitive MTB (DS-MTB), drug-resistant MTB (DR-MTB) including multidrug-resistant (MDR-MTB), and M. avium complex (MAC). MTB strains (n = 24) exhibited strong cytotoxic activity, but MAC strains (n = 5) had only weak activity. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in cytotoxicity between DS-MTB (n = 11) and DR-MTB (n = 13). Collectively, these results suggest that this new in vitro system is useful for evaluating the pathogenesis of mycobacteria and that there was no difference in the pathogenesis between drug-susceptible and drug-resistant clinical isolates.

  6. Haemorrhagic pituitary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, C.M.; Philippine General Hospital, Manila; Guo, W.Y.; Sami, M.; Hindmarsch, T.; Ericson, K.; Hulting, A.L.; Wersaell, J.

    1994-01-01

    In a group of 69 patients with pituitary tumours, 12 were found to have evidence of intratumoral haemorrhage on MRI, characterized by high signal intensity on short TR/TE sequences. This was verified in all but 1 patient. The majority of the bleedings occurred in macroadenomas. Five (42%) were prolactinomas and 4 (33%) were non-functioning adenomas. There were 2 GH- and 1 ACTH-secreting tumours. All 5 patients with prolactinomas were on bromocriptine medication. Two of the patients had a clinical picture of pituitary apoplexy. The haemorrhage was not large enough to prompt surgery in any of the patients. However, surgical verification of the diagnosis was obtained in 5 cases, while 6 patients were examined with follow-up MRI. (orig.)

  7. Tumours following retinoblastoma radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollot, J.-P.

    1978-01-01

    Radioinduced tumours in young patients irradiated in childhood for retinoblastoma take on a particularly deadly aspect. The onset of this true clinical entity characterized by a long post-irradiation latency period induced by a dose above 6000 rads is a real tragedy. The vast majority of patients then enter into a long martyrdom ending in death. The only cure is surgical, but seldom possible. Treatment is limited to palliative radiotherapy, effective for a while, and chemiotherapy as a last resort but often difficult to prescribe. Prevention alone is the answer. The quality and reliability of the radiotherapeutic treatment depend not only on the personal talent of the radiotherapist but above all on the standard of the equipment. A strong reduction in the doses employed as well as recent technological progress improving the material, its precision and reproducibility appear already to have lowered the frequency curve of these fatal radioinduced tumours [fr

  8. Skull base tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Servico de Radiologia, Rua Professor Lima Basto, 1093 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)], E-mail: borgesalexandra@clix.pt

    2008-06-15

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  9. Skull base tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base

  10. Malignant salivary gland tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    The most frequent malignant salivary gland tumours are the mucoepidermoid tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The major salivary glands and the minor glands of the mouth and upper respiratory tract may potentially develop any of these malignant lesions. Malignant lesions most frequently present as a palpable mass and tend to enlarge more rapidly than benign neoplasms. Pain, paresthesia, muscle paralysis and fixation to surrounding tissue are all ominous signs and symptoms. The only reliable means of differential diagnosis of these lesions is biopsy and histologic analysis. Therapy involves surgery or a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. The ultimate prognosis is governed by the intrinsic biologic behaviour of the neoplasms, the extent of disease and adequate clinical therapy

  11. Malignant salivary gland tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S.H. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Oral Pathology)

    1982-08-01

    The most frequent malignant salivary gland tumours are the mucoepidermoid tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The major salivary glands and the minor glands of the mouth and upper respiratory tract may potentially develop any of these malignant lesions. Malignant lesions most frequently present as a palpable mass and tend to enlarge more rapidly than benign neoplasms. Pain, paresthesia, muscle paralysis and fixation to surrounding tissue are all ominous signs and symptoms. The only reliable means of differential diagnosis of these lesions is biopsy and histologic analysis. Therapy involves surgery or a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. The ultimate prognosis is governed by the intrinsic biologic behaviour of the neoplasms, the extent of disease and adequate clinical therapy.

  12. Imaging brain tumour microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Markus; Englund, Elisabet; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; van Westen, Danielle; Sundgren, Pia C

    2018-05-08

    Imaging is an indispensable tool for brain tumour diagnosis, surgical planning, and follow-up. Definite diagnosis, however, often demands histopathological analysis of microscopic features of tissue samples, which have to be obtained by invasive means. A non-invasive alternative may be to probe corresponding microscopic tissue characteristics by MRI, or so called 'microstructure imaging'. The promise of microstructure imaging is one of 'virtual biopsy' with the goal to offset the need for invasive procedures in favour of imaging that can guide pre-surgical planning and can be repeated longitudinally to monitor and predict treatment response. The exploration of such methods is motivated by the striking link between parameters from MRI and tumour histology, for example the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient and cellularity. Recent microstructure imaging techniques probe even more subtle and specific features, providing parameters associated to cell shape, size, permeability, and volume distributions. However, the range of scenarios in which these techniques provide reliable imaging biomarkers that can be used to test medical hypotheses or support clinical decisions is yet unknown. Accurate microstructure imaging may moreover require acquisitions that go beyond conventional data acquisition strategies. This review covers a wide range of candidate microstructure imaging methods based on diffusion MRI and relaxometry, and explores advantages, challenges, and potential pitfalls in brain tumour microstructure imaging. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. [Adrenal tumours in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Moreno, G A; Pozo-Román, J; Argente, J

    2013-09-01

    This special article aims to summarise the current knowledge regarding the two groups of tumours with their origin in the adrenal gland: 1) adrenocortical tumours, derived from the cortex of the adrenal gland and 2) phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, neuroendocrine tumours derived from nodes of neural crest derived cells symmetrically distributed at both sides of the entire spine (paragangliomas [PG]). These PGs can be functioning tumors that secrete catecholamines, which confers their typical dark colour after staining with chromium salts (chromaffin tumors). Among these, the term phaeochromocytoma (PC) is restricted to those PGs derived from the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (intra-adrenal PGs), whereas the term PG is used for those sympathetic or parasympathetic ones in an extra-adrenal location. We analyse the state of the art of their pathogenic and genetic bases, as well as their clinical signs and symptoms, the tests currently available for performing their diagnosis (biochemical, hormonal, imaging and molecular studies) and management (surgery, pre- and post-surgical medical treatment), considering the current and developing strategies in chemo- and radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Neutrophil-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium is facilitated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of different cytokines that are present in tumour-conditioned medium on human neutrophil (PMN)-induced tumour cell transmigration. DESIGN: Laboratory study. SETTING: University hospital, Ireland. MATERIAL: Isolated human PMN and cultured human breast tumour cell line, MDA-MB-231. Interventions: Human PMN treated with either tumour-conditioned medium or different media neutralised with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), and MDA-MB-231 cells were plated on macrovascular and microvascular endothelial monolayers in collagen-coated transwells to assess migration of tumour cells. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cytokines present in tumour-conditioned medium, PMN cytocidal function and receptor expression, and tumour cell transmigration. RESULTS: tumour-conditioned medium contained high concentrations of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and interleukin 8 (IL-8), but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3). Anti-GM-CSF MoAb significantly reduced PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05), whereas anti-VEGF and anti-IL-8 MoAbs did not affect their migration. In addition, anti-GM-CSF MoAb, but not anti-VEGF or anti-IL-8 MoAb, reduced PMN CD11b and CD18 overexpression induced by tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the GM-CSF that is present in tumour-conditioned medium may be involved, at least in part, in alterations in PMN function mediated by the medium and subsequently PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells.

  15. Cell death induced by ionizing radiations in human radio-resistant tumours: in-vitro and in-vivo study of mechanisms involved in its induction by different types of radiations and pharmacological modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmeyer, Anais

    2010-01-01

    Whereas chemo-radiotherapy protocols revealed to be very efficient when taking tumours into care, the treatment of some tumours remains very limited due to their critical location or to the weak radio-sensitivity to conventional radiations. One way to work around this problem is to use high linear energy transfer radiations or hadron therapy, in combination with radio-sensitizers. This research thesis reports the assessment of radio-sensitizer effects of different molecules on human radio-resistant cell lines and more particularly the SK-Hep1 line from a hepatocellular carcinoma. In vitro studies have been performed and then in vivo studies by using fast neutron irradiation on a mice liver sample. Observations made by optic fibre confocal microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy confirmed in vitro observations: the prevailing cell death after such an irradiation is the autophagic cell death. It shows the importance of the autophagic phenomenon induced by radiations with high linear transfer energy. This could lead to new therapeutic protocols for radio-resistant cancers [fr

  16. Lymphatic vessels assessment in feline mammary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarli, Giuseppe; Sassi, Francesco; Brunetti, Barbara; Rizzo, Antonio; Diracca, Laura; Benazzi, Cinzia

    2007-01-01

    The lymphatic vessels play a crucial role in a variety of human cancers since tumour cell lymphatic invasion significantly influences prognosis. It is not known if pre-existing lymphatics are enough for tumour dissemination or de novo development is necessary. VEGFR-3 is an angiogenetic mediator for both lymphatic and blood vessels during embryonic development, and only for lymphatics after birth. VEGF is a mediator of both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, regulates the growth of lymphatics in various experimental models, and is produced in many solid tumours. CD44 mediates hyaluronic acid (HA)-dependent cell adhesion: besides promoting invasion, this interaction also supports neoangiogenesis that indirectly stimulates tumour cell proliferation. The expression of VEGF-C (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor – C), its receptor VEGFR-3 and CD44, were studied on feline mammary samples to assess the importance of lymphangiogenesis and lymphangiotrophism in neoplasia. Samples were taken from six normal mammary glands (NMG), ten benign (BT) and 32 malignant (MT) tumours. Immunohistochemical laminin/VEGFR-3 double stain, VEGF-C and CD44 stains were applied to 4 μm-thick sections, and their expression evaluated in intratumoral/extratumoral and intramammary/extramammary fields. All groups revealed a higher number of lymphatics in the extratumoral/extramammary areas. VEGF-C expression in the epithelium paralleled the number of positive vessels in the NMG, BT and MT, whereas VEGF-C higher expression was noted in the intratumoral fields only in infiltrating MT. CD44 score was lower in extratumoral than intratumoral fields in tumours and showed a significant increase in extramammary/extratumoral fields from NMG to MT. Pearson test showed a significant and inversely proportional correlation between CD44 expression and the number of lymphatic vessels with VEGFR-3 in malignant infiltrating tumours. The number of both VEGFR-3 positive and negative lymphatics in the extratumoral

  17. Ten years summary: FDG-PET on irradiated brain tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuxia; Boethius, J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate FDG-PET in differentiation of post-radiotherapy status: recurrence, radiation necrosis, malignant regression of low grade primary brain tumour, and to evaluate PET in terms of survival prediction. Material and methods: 117 irradiated patients (156 PET) were consecutively included. PET results were judged by a set of rigid follow-up standards. Brain metastases from lung carcinoma were further studied. Survival time was analysed with Kaplan-Meier method. Results: There were 61 true-positive, 2 false-positive, 15 false-negative, 51 true-negative PET; leaving 5 positive and 22 negative PET results indeterminate. PET positive predictive value was 96% in all and 100% in brain metastasis from lung carcinoma. PET negative predictive value was 55.6% among surgically selected cases. Survival time was significantly longer in patient's with negative PET, both brain metastasis and primary brain tumour. Conclusions: FDG-PET was a good method to pick up tumour recurrence from radiation necrosis, especially metastasis from lung carcinoma. FDG uptake could be used as a non-invasive parameter to predict patient's prognosis. (authors)

  18. A PROSPECTIVE HISTOPATHOLOGICAL-BASED STUDY OF BRAIN TUMOURS IN A REFERRAL CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathima Gujjaru

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Brain neoplasms occur at all ages and account for around 2-3 percent of all deaths in adults. In children, the frequency increases to more than twenty percent. In children, it forms the second most common type of malignancy. Most of the tumours encountered are not related to any identifiable risk factors except for irradiation and some hereditary syndromes like subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, cerebellar haemangioblastoma, meningioma, Schwannoma of 7 th cranial nerve. Gliomas constitute fifty percent of the brain tumours and sixty percent of all gliomas are glioblastoma multiforme. Meningiomas constitute twenty percent and cerebral metastasis is seen in fifteen percent of the cases. Seventy percent of supratentorial tumours are found in adults and seventy percent of brain tumours in children are infratentorial. The three common tumours of cerebellum are medulloblastoma, haemangioblastoma and juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma. Brain tumours are space occupying lesions and cause compression and destruction of adjacent structures, brain oedema (Peritumoural tissue, infarction and ischaemia of brain by compressing/infiltrating cerebral blood vessels, obstruction of CSF flow causing hydrocephalus, and rise in intracranial pressure with herniations. Tumours can undergo ischaemic necrosis and necrotic tumours tend to bleed. Brain tumours generally do not metastasise. Schwannoma and meningioma are benign tumours. Medulloblastoma of childhood may have drop metastasis via CSF. A sincere effort has been put in this study to identify the incidence of each variety of brain tumour among the fifty confirmed and identified cases of brain tumours. METHODS The age range of the cases in present study was 5-72 years with a mean age of occurrence of 44.11 years and the peak age group affected were in the 3 rd and 4 th decades. Cerebral hemisphere was the commonest site for intracranial tumours. RESULT In the present study, fifty

  19. Tumour-cytolytic human monocyte-derived macrophages: a simple and efficient method for the generation and long-term cultivation as non-adherent cells in a serum-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, R J; Hurley, E L; Epstein, D A; Pauly, J L

    1992-01-01

    We report a simple and efficient culture procedure for the generation of tumour-cytolytic human monocyte-derived macrophages (MAC). In this method, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, isolated using a conventional Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient procedure, are cultured as a heterogenous leukocyte population in Teflon or other hydrophobic cultureware, in a commercially available serum-free culture medium (M-SFM) that has been formulated specifically for the cultivation and ex vivo stimulation of human monocytes and MAC, and in the absence of exogenous mitogens, antigens, cytokines or other stimulants. This procedure features a negative-selection technique that takes advantage of the differential survival of blood leukocytes. Using the prescribed in vitro conditions, lymphocytes survived relatively poorly, whereas monocytes differentiated in the absence of exogenous stimulants into mature tumour-cytolytic MAC. The MAC were present as non-adherent, single cells that expressed good viability (greater than 95%) for a prolonged period (greater than 60 days). When compared to conventional procedures for generating MAC, the prescribed technique is thought to offer several important advantages in that it: (a) eliminates the tedious and cumbersome monocyte isolation procedures, thus providing a significant savings not only in time and money but also in eliminating repetitive cell manipulations that have often been associated with damage to monocyte morphology and/or function; (b) reduces the loss of monocyte subsets that are not recovered during specific isolation procedures; (c) facilitates harvesting a single cell, non-adherent suspension of immunocompetent MAC suitable for various examinations including analyses defining MAC morphology, cytochemistry, phenotype and function; and (d) eliminates variability and artifacts associated with different sera that are utilised frequently as medium supplements. The utility of the prescribed method is illustrated by the

  20. Ex-vivo in-vitro inhibition of lipopolysaccharide stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta secretion in human whole blood by extractum urticae dioicae foliorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obertreis, B; Ruttkowski, T; Teucher, T; Behnke, B; Schmitz, H

    1996-04-01

    An extract of Urtica dioica folium (IDS 23, Rheuma-Hek), monographed positively for adjuvant therapy of rheumatic diseases and with known effects in partial inhibition of prostaglandin and leukotriene synthesis in vitro, was investigated with respect to effects of the extract on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in human whole blood of healthy volunteers. In the assay system used, LPS stimulated human whole blood showed a straight increase of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) secretion reaching maximum concentrations within 24 h following a plateau and slight decrease up to 65 h, respectively. The concentrations of these cytokines was strongly positively correlated with the number of monocytes/macrophages of each volunteer. TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta concentration after LPS stimulation was significantly reduced by simultaneously given IDS 23 in a strictly dose dependent manner. At time 24 h these cytokine concentrations were reduced by 50.8% and 99.7%, respectively, using the highest test IDS 23 assay concentration of 5 mg/ml (p flavonoides such as caffeic malic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, quercetin and rutin did not influence LPS stimulated TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 secretion in tested concentrations up to 5 x 10(-5) mol/l. These further findings on the pharmacological mechanism of action of Urticae dioica folia may explain the positive effects of this extract in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

  1. Multiple adenomatoid tumours in the Epididymis and Tunica vaginalis: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abroaf

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 65 year-old male presenting with a tender right testicular mass, confirmed to be a tumour on ultrasound. The patient underwent a radical inguinal orchidectomy and histology revealed multiple adenomatoid tumours in epididymis and tunica vaginalis. This is an infrequent benign tumour of mesothelial origin that has rarely been reported as multiple lesions in the literature. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that adenomatoid tumour and mesotheliomas share the expression of podoplanin (D2-40 which is helpful to differentiate them from carcinomas. On the other hand adenomatoid tumour is differentiated from mesothelioma on morphological grounds since the former does not exhibit cellular atypia, mitotic activity or bland focal tumour necrosis. Although testis preserving surgery can be an option for benign adenomatoid tumours, most patients (as in our case proceed to orchidectomy as diagnosing them confidently can be difficult.---------------------------Cite this article as: Abroaf A, Veeratterapillay R, Vasdev N, Majo J, Sherif AE, Paez E. Multiple adenomatoid tumours in the Epididymis and Tunica vaginalis : Case Report. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(1:02021.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0202.1

  2. Unsuccessful mitosis in multicellular tumour spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Annie; Couvet, Morgane; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2017-04-25

    Multicellular spheroids are very attractive models in oncology because they mimic the 3D organization of the tumour cells with their microenvironment. We show here using 3 different cell types (mammary TSA/pc, embryonic kidney Hek293 and cervical cancer HeLa), that when the cells are growing as spheroids the frequency of binucleated cells is augmented as occurs in some human tumours.We therefore describe mitosis in multicellular spheroids by following mitotic markers and by time-lapse experiments. Chromosomes alignment appears to be correct on the metaphasic plate and the passenger complex is well localized on centromere. Moreover aurora kinases are fully active and histone H3 is phosphorylated on Ser 10. Consequently, the mitotic spindle checkpoint is satisfied and, anaphase proceeds as illustrated by the transfer of survivin on the spindle and by the segregation of the two lots of chromosomes. However, the segregation plane is not well defined and oscillations of the dividing cells are observed. Finally, cytokinesis fails and the absence of separation of the two daughter cells gives rise to binucleated cells.Division orientation is specified during interphase and persists throughout mitosis. Our data indicate that the cancer cells, in multicellular spheroids, lose their ability to regulate their orientation, a feature commonly encountered in tumours.Moreover, multicellular spheroid expansion is still sensitive to mitotic drugs as pactlitaxel and aurora kinase inhibitors. The spheroids thus represent a highly relevant model for studying drug efficiency in tumours.

  3. Oral Squamomelanocytic Tumour in a Dog: a Unique Biphasic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, L V; Avallone, G; Benazzi, C; Sarli, G; Porcellato, I; Brachelente, C; Brunetti, B

    2016-01-01

    In human medicine, squamomelanocytic tumour is a malignant cutaneous neoplasm composed of closely intermingled neoplastic squamous cells and melanocytes. A multinodular gingival tumour in a 16-year-old, mixed breed neutered female dog was examined microscopically. Two populations of neoplastic cells, melanocytic and squamous epithelial cells were intermingled. The melanocytic cells were melan-A positive and cytokeratin AE1-AE3 negative and the squamous component was cytokeratin AE1-AE3 positive and melan-A negative. Bovine papillomavirus was not identified by immunohistochemistry or polymerase chain reaction. A diagnosis of squamomelanocytic tumour was made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vaginal haemangioendothelioma: an unusual tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, H

    2012-02-01

    Vaginal tumours are uncommon and this is a particularly rare case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma in a 38-year-old woman. Initial presentation consisted of symptoms similar to uterovaginal prolapse with "something coming down". Examination under anaesthesia demonstrated a necrotic anterior vaginal wall tumour. Histology of the lesion revealed a haemangioendothelioma which had some features of haemangiopericytoma. While the natural history of vaginal haemangioendothelioma is uncertain, as a group, they have a propensity for local recurrence. To our knowledge this is the third reported case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma. Management of this tumour is challenging given the paucity of literature on this tumour. There is a need to add rare tumours to our "knowledge bank" to guide management of these unusual tumours.

  5. Adaptive Evolution Coupled with Retrotransposon Exaptation Allowed for the Generation of a Human-Protein-Specific Coding Gene That Promotes Cancer Cell Proliferation and Metastasis in Both Haematological Malignancies and Solid Tumours: The Extraordinary Case of MYEOV Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros I. Papamichos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of cancer in human is high as compared to chimpanzee. However previous analysis has documented that numerous human cancer-related genes are highly conserved in chimpanzee. Till date whether human genome includes species-specific cancer-related genes that could potentially contribute to a higher cancer susceptibility remains obscure. This study focuses on MYEOV, an oncogene encoding for two protein isoforms, reported as causally involved in promoting cancer cell proliferation and metastasis in both haematological malignancies and solid tumours. First we document, via stringent in silico analysis, that MYEOV arose de novo in Catarrhini. We show that MYEOV short-isoform start codon was evolutionarily acquired after Catarrhini/Platyrrhini divergence. Throughout the course of Catarrhini evolution MYEOV acquired a gradually elongated translatable open reading frame (ORF, a gradually shortened translation-regulatory upstream ORF, and alternatively spliced mRNA variants. A point mutation introduced in human allowed for the acquisition of MYEOV long-isoform start codon. Second, we demonstrate the precious impact of exonized transposable elements on the creation of MYEOV gene structure. Third, we highlight that the initial part of MYEOV long-isoform coding DNA sequence was under positive selection pressure during Catarrhini evolution. MYEOV represents a Primate Orphan Gene that acquired, via ORF expansion, a human-protein-specific coding potential.

  6. Lactoferrin release and interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor production by human polymorphonuclear cells stimulated by various lipopolysaccharides: relationship to growth inhibition of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, C; Cassone, A; Serbousek, D; Pearson, C A; Djeu, J Y

    1992-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Salmonella typhimurium, at doses from 1 to 100 ng/ml, strongly enhanced growth inhibition of Candida albicans by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that LPS markedly augmented phagocytosis of Candida cells by increasing the number of yeasts ingested per neutrophil as well as the number of neutrophils capable of ingesting fungal cells. LPS activation caused augmented ...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of combretastatin A4 prodrug-induced disruption of tumour perfusion and energetic status

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The effects of combretastatin A4 prodrug on perfusion and the levels of 31P metabolites in an implanted murine tumour were investigated for 3 h after drug treatment using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS). The area of regions of low signal intensity in spin-echo images of tumours increased slightly after treatment with the drug. These regions of low signal intensity corresponded to necrosis seen in histological sections, whereas the expanding regions surrounding ...

  8. Primary bone tumours in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Cohen, D.H.; Padovani, J.; Tamaela, L.; Azouz, M.; Bale, P.; Martin, H.C.; Nayanar, V.V.; Arico, M.

    1985-09-01

    Ten cases of primary bone tumours in infants (1 osteosarcoma, 3 Ewing's sarcoma, 1 chondroblastoma and 5 angiomastosis) are reported. All cases of angiomatosis showed characteristic radiographic findings. In all the other tumours the X-ray appearances were different from those usually seen in older children and adolescents. In the auhtors' opinion the precise diagnosis of malignant bone tumours in infancy is very difficult as no characteristic X-ray features are present in this age period.

  9. Radiological diagnosis of liver tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundstedt, C.

    1987-01-01

    Sixty patients treated with an intra-arterial cytostatic drug for metastases from colo-rectal carcinoma were evaluated with angiography to determine prognostic parameters. The extent of tumour in the liver and an unchanged or diminished tumour volume following treatment, as demonstrated with angiography, were associated with significant prolongation of survival. Patients who developed occlusion of the hepatic artery or of branches of the portal vein, also survived longer. 189 patients examined with angiography, 161 with computed tomography (CT), 95 with computed tomographic arteriography (CTA) and 71 with ultrasound (US) were subjected to liver evaluation at laparotomy consisting of inspection and palpation. The result of this surgical liver evaluation was for the purpose of the study regarded as completely accurate and was used to assess the accuracy of the different radiological methods. The location of tumour in the liver lobes or segments was analysed, with a separate evaluation of the right and left liver lobes. The rate of detection of individual tumour nodules was also determined. Angiography detected 55% of liver areas affected by tumour and 47% of individual tumour nodules. CT detected 83% of liver lobes or segments containing tumour, and 70% of the tumour nodules. US detected 69% of the portions of liver holding tumour, and also 69% of the tumour nodules. CTA detected 85% of tumours areas and 74% of separate tumour nodules. Some lesions detected with CT were not seen with CTA and vice versa. More false-positive results were recorded with CTA than with CT using intravenous contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  10. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and matrix metalloproteinase-13 in human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Zafar; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N; Akhtar, Nahid; Ramamurthy, Sangeetha; Voss, Frank R; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2009-01-01

    The major risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA) is aging, but the mechanisms underlying this risk are only partly understood. Age-related accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) can activate chondrocytes and induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In the present study, we examined the effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on AGE-modified-BSA (AGE-BSA)-induced activation and production of TNFalpha and MMP-13 in human OA chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes were derived from OA cartilage by enzymatic digestion and stimulated with in vitro-generated AGE-BSA. Gene expression of TNFalpha and MMP-13 was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. TNFalpha protein in culture medium was determined using cytokine-specific ELISA. Western immunoblotting was used to analyze the MMP-13 production in the culture medium, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and the activation of NF-kappaB. DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB p65 was determined using a highly sensitive and specific ELISA. IkappaB kinase (IKK) activity was determined using an in vitro kinase activity assay. MMP-13 activity in the culture medium was assayed by gelatin zymography. EGCG significantly decreased AGE-stimulated gene expression and production of TNFalpha and MMP-13 in human chondrocytes. The inhibitory effect of EGCG on the AGE-BSA-induced expression of TNFalpha and MMP-13 was mediated at least in part via suppression of p38-MAPK and JNK activation. In addition, EGCG inhibited the phosphorylating activity of IKKbeta kinase in an in vitro activity assay and EGCG inhibited the AGE-mediated activation and DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB by suppressing the degradation of its inhibitory protein IkappaBalpha in the cytoplasm. These novel pharmacological actions of EGCG on AGE-BSA-stimulated human OA chondrocytes provide new suggestions that EGCG or EGCG-derived compounds may inhibit cartilage degradation by suppressing AGE

  11. Neurohypophysis granular cell tumours. Upon neurohypophysis rare tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrande, G.; Kujas, M.; Gancel, A.; Turpin, G.; Bruckert, E.; Kuhn, J.M.; Luton, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Granular cell tumours of neurohypophysis are rare. These tumours are more often encountered as incidental autopsy findings seen in up to 17 % of unselected adult autopsy cases. There are few reports of para-sellar granular cell tumours large enough to cause symptoms. We present three cases of neurohypophysis granular cell tumour and a review of the literature. In one patient, the asymptomatic granular cell tumour was incidentally discovered at surgical removal of a corticotrophic micro-adenoma. The remaining 2 patients had a symptomatic tumour which caused neurological symptoms such as visual disturbance and headaches and endocrine disorders such as hypopituitarism or hyper-prolactinaemia. In these 2 cases, computerized tomography showed a well-circumscribed, contrast-enhanced, intra-sellar and supra-sellar mass. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an isointense gadolinium-enhanced mass in T1-weighted-images. Trans-sphenoidal partial resection was performed and histology was interpreted as a granular cell tumour. The immunohistochemical study was positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GEAP) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) in 1 of the 2 tumours and positive for S100 protein and vimentin in both tumours but negative for CD68. The histogenesis of neurohypophysis granular cell tumours is still controversial but ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies support the theory that may arise from pituicytes, the glial cells of neurohypophysis. Management of these benign, slow growing, tumours is based mainly on neurosurgical resection. Data from the literature do not support a beneficial effect of post operative radiation therapy on postoperative recurrences. (authors). 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Management of parapharyngeal space tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F.; Waqar-Uddin; Khan, M.S.; Khawar, A.; Bangush, W.; Aslam, J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the role of clinical features, fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and computed tomography (CT) scan in diagnosing Para pharyngeal space (PPS) tumours and treatment options. Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: From July 2000 to July 2002 at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad. Patients and Methods: Patients diagnosed as having PPS tumours were studied. The medical record of patients was reviewed for their age, gender, clinical features, investigations (FNAC and CT scan) and treatment. The mean age, percentage of different clinical features and the sensitivity and specificity of FNAC was determined. Results: The mean age of patients presenting with PPS tumours was 33.6 years. The most common clinical features were neck mass (93%) and bulge in lateral pharyngeal wall (80%). The CT scan showed exact location and extent of tumour in 11 out of 15 cases. The sensitivity and specificity of FNAC was 70% and 85% respectively. The most common tumours were neurogenic tumours and salivary gland tumours. Surgery was performed in all except 2 patients with lymphoma in whom radiation and chemotherapy was recommended. Conclusion: This study indicates that PPS tumours are usually benign neurosurgeon and salivary gland tumours presenting with neck mass and bulge in or oropharynx. FNAC and CT scan are important in diagnostic work up and treatment planning. Surgery has the best results in most cases. (author)

  13. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition reduces tumor necrosis factor-induced inflammatory response in rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García, S.; Bodaño, A.; Pablos, J. L.; Gómez-Reino, J. J.; Conde, C.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibition on the production of inflammatory mediators and proliferation in tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Cultured FLS from patients with RA were

  14. Askin Tumour: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Carolina; Ramirez, Sandra Milena; Quesada, Diana Constanza; Unigarro Luz Adriana

    2011-01-01

    In this article we report a case of a 19 year-old woman with a final diagnosis of an extra skeletal Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor/Ewing sarcoma of the chest, also known as Askin tumour. The histologic features and the immunohistochemical profile were consistent with this aggressive malignancy of the chest wall that affects young people. Because the low incidence of this entity, as well as the clear radiological findings, we considered it interesting to describe this documented case and undertake a review of the literature.

  15. Evaluation of brain tumours by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, O.; Meyer, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    The clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) for the evaluation of brain tumours has proved clinically valuable. Amino acid and FDG-glucose PET provide information on the degree of malignancy and the prognosis during the initial evaluation. After therapy, the residual tumour can be visualized and recurrence can be differentiated from necrosis. Amino acids have advantages over FDG for these clinical applications. Blood flow, oxygen extraction and metabolism and blood-brain barrier permeability are of minor relevance in clinical situations. Comparison of PET with MRI and MRS will provide new data. The quantitative information of the unique information yielded by PET will lead to a more important clinical role, as will the extrapolation of this experience to the SPECT technique. (orig.) [de

  16. Gastric neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, David A; Donohoe, Claire L; Fitzgerald, Louise; Muldoon, Cian; Hayes, Brian; O'Toole, Dermot; Reynolds, John V

    2012-01-01

    Gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are increasingly recognised, and management decisions may be difficult due to an incomplete understanding of aetiology, natural history and optimum therapy. This article presents a current understanding based on recent advances in epidemiology, classification, molecular profiling, and treatment. Relevant medical literature was identified from searches of PubMed and references cited in appropriate articles identified. Selection of articles was based on peer review, journal and relevance. Gastric NETs may be divided into three clinical prognostic groups: type I is associated with autoimmune atrophic gastritis and hypergastrinaemia, type II is associated with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and type III lesions are gastrin-independent, have the greatest metastatic potential and poorest prognosis. There has been an increased frequency of gastric NETs reported. Management approaches have evolved in parallel with advances in endoscopic staging and surgery, as well as improved understanding of the biology and natural history of NETs. Gastric NETs present a spectrum of activity from indolent tumours to metastatic malignancy. Treatment decisions for patients must be individualised and are best managed by a multidisciplinary team approach. The current evidence base is limited to small series and efforts to treat patients within clinical networks of expertise are warranted. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Radiotherapy in ocular tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Ocular tumours at the Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay, form about 0.14% of all the proved cancer cases. In case of unilateral retinoblastoma with the other eye being not non-seeing for any reason, enucleation is advised, as the diagnosis may sometimes be in doubt. If after enucleation, optic nerve and/or peribulbar tissues are found to be involved, post-operative irradiation is given to the whole orbit. In bilateral retinoblastoma the more affected eye is enucleated and an attempt is made to preserve vision in the other eye. A tumour dose of 3500 to 4000 rad in about 4 weeks is given with a cobalt beam using a direct anterior field. A cataract that may develop has to be taken care of. Lateral and/or medial fields are used with deep X-rays. In certain cases, an implant of cobalt-60 or gold-198 grain is done. For carcinoma of conjuctiva, small lesions or early lesions are excised and a beta radiation dose of 2000 rad weekly for about 4 to 5 weeks is given; larger lesions require enucleation or exenteration followed by irradiation with super-voltage radiation. Post-irradiation sarcomas may develop many years later. Irradiation is repeated for recurrences. (M.G.B.)

  18. SPECTRUM OF NEUROENDOCRINE TUMOURS- A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupuleti Prathima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Neuroendocrine tumours occur at various sites in the human body. They are considered as one of the close differentials for many tumours. Various benign and malignant tumours undergo neuroendocrine differentiation. Its incidence is slightly increasing due to advanced imaging modalities. Although rare, they can be seen in breast, gallbladder and skin. The aim of the study is to study the spectrum of neuroendocrine tumours from various sites, their clinical presentation, histomorphological features with immunohistochemistry and review of literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a retrospective study for a period of 3 years (June 2013-June 2016. Surgical resection specimens were included in the study. Out of the total specimens received, 24 cases were of neuroendocrine tumours. Differential diagnosis of small round cell tumours also was considered and a panel of immunohistochemical markers were included to rule out them. Biopsy specimens were excluded from the study. RESULTS Out of the 24 cases, 18 cases were benign lesions. 6 cases were malignant lesions. Female preponderance was noted. Peak incidence was seen in 20-30 years of age group. CONCLUSION Neuroendocrine tumours can occur anywhere in the body and it should be considered in one of the differential diagnosis. Diagnosis must be accurately made.

  19. Review article: Pathogenesis and management of gastric carcinoid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkitt, M D; Pritchard, D M

    2006-11-01

    Gastric carcinoid tumours are rare, but are increasing in incidence. To discuss tumour pathogenesis and outline current approaches to patient management. Review of published articles following a Pubmed search. Although interest in gastric carcinoids has increased since it was recognized that they are associated with achlorhydria, to date there is no definite evidence that humans taking long-term acid suppressing medication are at increased risk. Type I tumours are associated with autoimmune atrophic gastritis and hypergastrinaemia, type II are associated with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 and hypergastrinaemia and sporadic type III carcinoids are gastrin-independent and carry the worst prognosis. Careful investigation of these patients is required, particularly to identify the tumour type, the source of hypergastrinaemia and the presence of metastases. Treatment can be directed at the source of hypergastrinaemia if type I or II tumours are still gastrin responsive and not growing autonomously. Type III tumours should be treated surgically. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoids have led to recent improvements in investigation and management. Challenges remain in identifying the genetic and environmental factors, in addition to hypergastrinaemia, that are responsible for tumour development in susceptible patients.

  20. Widespread marrow necrosis during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knickerbocker, W.J.; Quenville, N.F.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, a 22-year-old Caucasian female was referred to our Hospital two days post-partum. She had been feeling unwell during the last few days of her pregnancy and complained of multiple aches and pains, worst in the abdomen and lower back. Her admission platelet count was severely depressed and a bone biopsy showed extensive marrow necrosis with viable bony trabeculae. There was no evidence of vasculitis, vascular thrombosis, or malignancy. Widespread marrow necrosis in pregnancy followed by recovery, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  1. Cloning of the DNA-binding subunit of human nuclear factor κB: The level of its mRNA is strongly regulated by phorbol ester or tumor necrosis factor α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.; Hatada, E.N.; Bartsch, C.; Scheidereit, C.; Hohmann, H.P.; Haiker, M.; Roethlisberger, U.; Lahm, H.W.; Schlaeger, E.J.; van Loon, A.P.G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The DNA binding subunit of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), a B-cell protein that interacts with the immunoglobulin κ light-chain gene enhancer, has been purified from nuclei of human HL-60 cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and internal peptide sequences were obtained. Overlapping cDNA clones were isolated and sequenced. The encoded open reading frame of about 105 kDa contained at its N-terminal half all six tryptic peptide sequences, suggesting that the 51-kDa NF-κB protein is processed from a 105-kDa precursor. An in vitro synthesized protein containing most of the N-terminal half of the open reading frame bound specifically to an NF-κB binding site. This region also showed high homology to a domain shared by the Drosophila dorsal gene and the avian and mammalian rel (proto)oncogene products. The level of the 3.8-kilobase mRNA was strongly increased after stimulation with TNFα or phorbol ester. Thus, both factors not only activate NF-κB protein, as described previously, but also induce expression of the gene encoding the DNA-binding subunit of NF-κB

  2. The Extracellular Matrix Regulates Granuloma Necrosis in Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shammari, Basim; Shiomi, Takayuki; Tezera, Liku; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Workman, Victoria; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Mauri, Francesco; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Robertson, Brian D; D'Armiento, Jeanine; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2015-08-01

    A central tenet of tuberculosis pathogenesis is that caseous necrosis leads to extracellular matrix destruction and bacterial transmission. We reconsider the underlying mechanism of tuberculosis pathology and demonstrate that collagen destruction may be a critical initial event, causing caseous necrosis as opposed to resulting from it. In human tuberculosis granulomas, regions of extracellular matrix destruction map to areas of caseous necrosis. In mice, transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase 1 causes caseous necrosis, the pathological hallmark of human tuberculosis. Collagen destruction is the principal pathological difference between humanised mice and wild-type mice with tuberculosis, whereas the release of proinflammatory cytokines does not differ, demonstrating that collagen breakdown may lead to cell death and caseation. To investigate this hypothesis, we developed a 3-dimensional cell culture model of tuberculosis granuloma formation, using bioelectrospray technology. Collagen improved survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells analyzed on the basis of a lactate dehydrogenase release assay, propidium iodide staining, and measurement of the total number of viable cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that collagen destruction is an initial event in tuberculosis immunopathology, leading to caseous necrosis and compromising the immune response, revealing a previously unappreciated role for the extracellular matrix in regulating the host-pathogen interaction. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Implication of snail in metabolic stress-induced necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Hee Kim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Necrosis, a type of cell death accompanied by the rupture of the plasma membrane, promotes tumor progression and aggressiveness by releasing the pro-inflammatory and angiogenic cytokine high mobility group box 1. It is commonly found in the core region of solid tumors due to hypoxia and glucose depletion (GD resulting from insufficient vascularization. Thus, metabolic stress-induced necrosis has important clinical implications for tumor development; however, its regulatory mechanisms have been poorly investigated.Here, we show that the transcription factor Snail, a key regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is induced in a reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent manner in both two-dimensional culture of cancer cells, including A549, HepG2, and MDA-MB-231, in response to GD and the inner regions of a multicellular tumor spheroid system, an in vitro model of solid tumors and of human tumors. Snail short hairpin (sh RNA inhibited metabolic stress-induced necrosis in two-dimensional cell culture and in multicellular tumor spheroid system. Snail shRNA-mediated necrosis inhibition appeared to be linked to its ability to suppress metabolic stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition, which are the primary events that trigger necrosis.Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Snail is implicated in metabolic stress-induced necrosis, providing a new function for Snail in tumor progression.

  4. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of adhesion molecules in human endothelial cells by the saponins derived from roots of Platycodon grandiflorum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Song, Gyu-Yong; Chung, Young Chul; Roh, Seong Hwan; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2006-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play an important role in the development of atherogenesis and are produced by endothelial cells after being stimulated with various inflammatory cytokines. This study examined the effect of saponins that were isolated from the roots of Platycodon grandiflorum A. DC (Campanulaceae), Changkil saponins (CKS), on the cytokine-induced monocyte/human endothelial cell interaction, which is a crucial early event in atherogenesis. CKS significantly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells as well as decreased the protein and mRNA expression levels of vascular adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 on endothelial cells. Furthermore, CKS significantly inhibited the TNFα-induced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of NF-κB by preventing IκB degradation and inhibiting IκB kinase activity. Overall, CKS has anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory activity, which is least in part the result of it reducing the cytokine-induced endothelial adhesion to monocytes by inhibiting intracellular ROS production, NF-κB activation, and cell adhesion molecule expression in endothelial cells

  5. Carcinoid Tumour of the Ovary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A case of bilateral carcinoid tumour of the ovary, with benign cystic teratoma in one ovary, in a 38 year old woman is presented. She had total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingoophorectomy, infracolic omentectomy and appendectomy. There was no macroscopic tumour in the vermiform appendix and the ...

  6. Paediatric parotid neoplasms: a 10 year retrospective imaging and pathology review of these rare tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamlouk, M.D.; Rosbe, K.W.; Glastonbury, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the relative incidence of benign and malignant paediatric parotid gland tumours and whether particular presenting symptoms or imaging characteristics were more likely to predict malignancy. Materials and methods: Hospital records were reviewed for all patients <18 years with histopathology-proven parotid neoplasms over the 10 year period from 2003–2013. Infantile haemangiomas and patients with neurofibromatosis type I were excluded. The presenting clinical symptoms for each patient were recorded. All available CT and MRI examinations for these patients were evaluated for tumour imaging characteristics. Results: Seventeen patients (nine boys, eight girls; age range 2–17 years) were identified with neoplastic parotid masses; 11 tumours were malignant (65%) and six were benign (35%). The malignant tumours consisted of three acinic cell carcinomas, two mucoepidermoid carcinomas, one alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, one poorly differentiated carcinoma, one low-grade adenocarcinoma, and three metastases (two melanoma, one orbital medulloepithelioma). The benign tumours consisted of five pleomorphic adenomas and one schwannoma. Presenting clinical symptoms were similar between benign and malignant tumours. Twelve MRI and six CT examinations were available for review with five patients undergoing both techniques. MRI features commonly identified with malignant tumours included: hypointense T2 signal, restricted diffusion, ill-defined borders, and focal necrosis. Only four of the six tumours imaged at CT were visualized, and of those, the margins were indeterminate in three patients. Conclusion: Paediatric parotid masses are more likely to be malignant than benign. Presenting clinical symptoms and CT are not helpful for distinguishing benign and malignant disease. MRI features such as T2 hypointensity, restricted diffusion, ill-defined borders, and focal necrosis, although not specific, should raise concern for malignancy. - Highlights: • Pediatric parotid

  7. [Neonatal tumours and congenital malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbel Tornero, O; Ortega García, J A; Ferrís i Tortajada, J; García Castell, J; Donat i Colomer, J; Soldin, O P; Fuster Soler, J L

    2008-06-01

    The association between pediatric cancer and congenital abnormalities is well known but, there is no exclusive data on the neonatal period and the underlying etiopathogenic mechanisms are unknown. First, to analyze the frequency of neonatal tumours associated with congenital abnormalities; and second, to comment on the likely etiopathogenic hypotheses of a relationship between neonatal tumours and congenital abnormalities. Historical series of neonatal tumours from La Fe University Children's Hospital in Valencia (Spain), from January 1990 to December 1999. Histological varieties of neonatal tumours and associated congenital abnormalities were described. A systematic review of the last 25 years was carried out using Medline, Cancerlit, Index Citation Science and Embase. The search profile used was the combination of "neonatal/congenital-tumors/cancer/neoplasms" and "congenital malformations/birth defects". 72 neonatal tumours were identified (2.8% of all pediatric cancers diagnosed in our hospital) and in 15 cases (20.8%) there was some associated malformation, disease or syndrome. The association between congenital abnormalities and neonatal tumours were: a) angiomas in three patients: two patients with congenital heart disease with a choanal stenosis, laryngomalacia; b) neuroblastomas in two patients: horseshoe kidney with vertebral anomalies and other with congenital heart disease; c) teratomas in two patients: one with cleft palate with vertebral anomalies and other with metatarsal varus; d) one tumour of the central nervous system with Bochdaleck hernia; e) heart tumours in four patients with tuberous sclerosis; f) acute leukaemia in one patient with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease; g) kidney tumour in one case with triventricular hydrocephaly, and h) adrenocortical tumour: hemihypertrophy. The publications included the tumours diagnosed in different pediatric periods and without unified criteria to classify the congenital abnormalities. Little data

  8. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  9. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Soevik, Aste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Oeyvind S; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2006-01-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO 2 -related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO 2 -related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO 2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO 2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure

  10. Improving tumour response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, S.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation oncology is in the middle of the most exciting developments in its 100-year history. Progress in treatment planning and delivery, in medical imaging and in basic cancer and normal tissue biology is likely to change the indication for radiotherapy as well as the way it is prescribed and delivered. Technological and conceptual advances, in particular the development of the multi-leaf collimator and the concept of inverse treatment planning, have led to the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with its capability to plan and deliver non-uniform dose distributions in the clinic. This has forced us to re-think radiation oncology: refining the indication for radiotherapy, optimizing the prescription of dose distributions and considering how, based on clinical evidence, radiation can best be combined with other treatment modalities, surgery, cytotoxic chemotherapy and biologically targeted therapies. The attraction of radiation therapy as an element of multi-modality cancer therapy is that it induces DNA damage that can be modulated in space and time. Progress in basic cancer biology, genomics and proteomics, as well as biological imaging provides novel avenues for individualization of cancer therapy and for biological optimization of radiotherapy. In improving cancer care, it is the therapeutic ratio, rather than tumour control per se, that must be optimised. Interestingly, the two main avenues for improving the effectiveness of radiotherapy currently being actively pursued in the clinic generally aim at different sides of the therapeutic ratio: 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT predominantly aim to reduce normal-tissue side effects - and by doing this, open the way for dose escalation that may lead to increased tumour control rates - whereas combined radio-chemotherapy aims to improve tumour response - while keeping the fingers crossed that this will not increase normal-tissue complications to the same extent. In parallel with these

  11. Development of delayed radiation necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, ShigFeki; Takagi, Terumasa; Shibata, Taichiro; Nagai, Hajime.

    1983-01-01

    The authors discussed the developing process of delayed radiation necrosis of the brain from the case of a 42-year-old female who developed intracranial hypertension and left hemiparesis 5 and a half years after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. The initial sign of radiation necrosis was from a CT scan taken 3 and a half years after radiotherapy showing an irregular low density lesion in the right temporal lobe. CT scan 2 years later demonstrated displacement of the midline structures to the left and a larger low density lesion with partially high density in the right MCA territory that was enhanced with intravenous contrast medium. Recovery after a right temporal lobectomy and administration of steroid hormone were uneventful. Eight months later there were no signs of raised intracranial pressure nor of neurological deficits. Tissues obtained from the right temporal lobe at lobectomy revealed the characteristic changes of delayed radiation necrosis; a mixture of fresh, recent, and old vascular lesions in the same specimen. From these findings, it was speculated that delayed radiation necrosis might initially occur within several years after radiotherapy and might gradually take a progressive and extended course, even in cases whose clinical symptoms develop much later. (author)

  12. Cancer and tumour markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osifo, B.

    1999-02-01

    Cancer has been a major cause of death world wide and in Nigeria there are six commonest forms of manifestation of cancer known. Of these prostrate cancer is the highest with 16% occurrence of all known cancers according to a study by the Histopathology Department of the UCH. Many factors, amongst them dietary, environmental, lifestyle, age and sedentary work are possible causes. With the global rise in incidents, the IAEA initiated the Tumour Marker Project as a means of screening cancers in 15 African countries including Nigeria. In Nigeria, 4 groups of the commonest cancers have been chosen for screening. These are prostrate cancer, primary liver cancer, cancer of the GI tract and trophoblastic cancer

  13. Analysis of adrenocortical tumours morphology as regards their structure and potential malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajor, M.; Ciupinska-Kajor, M.; Dobrosz, Z.; Ziaja, J.; Krol, R.; Heitzman, M.; Cierpka, L.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: A consequence of diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is introduction of pharmacological therapy, precise monitoring of the patients and in some cases re-operation. The aim of the study is to analyse morphology of adrenocortical tumours as regards their malignancy by use of criteria proposed by Weiss. Material and methods: 110 adrenocortical tumours in 107 patients were analysed (M 27.1%, F 72.9%; age 32 to 77 years, mean 55.2 ± 9.7). Conn syndrome was diagnosed in 16 patients (14.9%), Cushing syndrome in 12 (11.2%), and virilisation in 3 (2.8%). In 76 patients (71.0%) biochemical tests did not reveal hormonal hyperactivity of the tumour. Results: In routine histopathological examination ACC was diagnosed in 6 tumours (5.4%), adrenocortical adenoma (ACA) in 92 (83.6%) and adrenocortical hyperplasia in 12 (10.9%). Nuclear grade III or IV was observed in 8 tumours (7.3%), mitotic rate > 5/50 high power fields in 6 (5.4%), atypical mitoses in 5 (4.5%), clear cells constituting < 25% of the tumour in 10 (9.1%), diffuse architecture in 8 (7.3%), necrosis in 16 (14.5%