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Sample records for human prostate normal

  1. Discrimination of zone-specific spectral signatures in normal human prostate using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Imran I; Martin, Francis L

    2010-12-01

    The prostate gland is the most common site of pathology in human males. Using the urethra as an anatomical reference point, it can be divided into three distinct zones known as the transition zone (TZ), peripheral zone (PZ) and central zone (CZ). The pathological conditions of benign prostatic hypertrophy and/or prostate adenocarcinoma are highly prevalent in this gland. This preliminary study set out to determine whether biochemical intra-individual differences between normal prostate zones could be identified using Raman spectroscopy with subsequent exploratory analyses. A normal (benign) prostate transverse tissue section perpendicular to the rectal surface and above the verumontanum was obtained in a paraffin-embedded block. A 10-µm-thick slice was floated onto a gold substrate, de-waxed and analysed using Raman spectroscopy (200 epithelial-cell and 140 stromal spectra/zone). Raman spectra were subsequently processed in the 1800-367 cm(-1) spectral region employing principal component analysis (PCA) to determine whether wavenumber-intensity relationships expressed as single points in hyperspace might reveal biochemical differences associated with inter-zone pathological susceptibility. Visualisation of PCA scores plots and their corresponding loadings plots highlighted 781 cm(-1) (cytosine/uracil) and 787 cm(-1) (DNA) as the key discriminating factors segregating PZ from less susceptible TZ and CZ epithelia (P prostate zones to specific pathological conditions.

  2. Effect of resveratrol and zinc on intracellular zinc status in normal human prostate epithelial cells

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    To evaluate the influence of resveratrol on cellular zinc status, normal human prostate epithelial (NHPrE) cells were treated with 6 levels of resveratrol (0, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 microM) and 4 levels of zinc [0, 4, 16, and 32 microM for zinc-deficient (ZD), zinc-normal (ZN), zinc-adequate (ZA), an...

  3. Sarcoglycan complex in human normal and pathological prostatic tissue: an immunohistochemical and RT-PCR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Bramanti, Placido; Favaloro, Angelo; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Trimarchi, Fabio; Di Mauro, Debora; Rinaldi, Carmela; Speciale, Francesco; Inferrera, Antonino; Santoro, Giuseppe; Arena, Salvatore; Patricolo, Mario; Magno, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    The sarcoglycan complex is a trans-membrane system playing a key role in mechano-signaling the connection from the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. While b-, d-, and e-sarcoglycans are widely distributed, g- and a-sarcoglycans are expressed exclusively in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Insufficient data are available on the distribution of sarcoglycans in nonmuscular tissue. In the present study, we used immunohistochemical and RT-PCR techniques to study the sarcoglycans also in normal human glandular tissue, a type of tissue never studied in relation to the sarcoglycan complex, with the aim of verifying the real wider distribution of this complex. To understand the role of sarcoglycans, we tested specimens collected from patients affected by benign prostatic hyperplasia and adenocarcinoma. For the first time, our results showed that all sarcoglycans are detectable in normal samples both in epithelial and in myoepithelial cells; in pathological prostate, sarcoglycans appeared severely reduced in number or were absent. These data demonstrated that all sarcoglycans have a wider distribution suggesting a new unknown role for these proteins. The decreased number of sarcoglycans, containing cadherin domain homologs in samples of prostate affected by hyperplasia, and the absence of proteins in prostate biopsies, in cases affected by adenocarcinoma, could be responsible for the loss of adhesion between epithelial cells, which in turn facilitates the progression of benign tumors and the invasive potential of malignant tumors.

  4. Frequency analysis of multispectral photoacoustic images for differentiating malignant region from normal region in excised human prostate

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    Sinha, Saugata; Rao, Navalgund A.; Valluru, Keerthi S.; Chinni, Bhargava K.; Dogra, Vikram S.; Helguera, Maria

    2014-03-01

    Frequency domain analysis of the photoacoustic (PA) radio frequency signals can potentially be used as a tool for characterizing microstructure of absorbers in tissue. This study investigates the feasibility of analyzing the spectrum of multiwavelength PA signals generated by excised human prostate tissue samples to differentiate between malignant and normal prostate regions. Photoacoustic imaging at five different wavelengths, corresponding to peak absorption coefficients of deoxyhemoglobin, whole blood, oxyhemoglobin, water and lipid in the near infrared (NIR) (700 nm - 1000 nm) region, was performed on freshly excised prostate specimens taken from patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy confirmed prostate cancer. The PA images were co-registered with the histopathology images of the prostate specimens to determine the region of interest (ROI) corresponding to malignant and normal tissue. The calibrated power spectrum of each PA signal from a selected ROI was fit to a linear model to extract the corresponding slope, midband fit and intercept parameters. The mean value of each parameter corresponding to malignant and adjacent normal prostate ROI was calculated for each of the five wavelengths. The results obtained for 9 different human prostate specimens, show that the mean values of midband fit and intercept are significantly different between malignant and normal regions. In addition, the average midband fit and intercept values show a decreasing trend with increasing wavelength. These preliminary results suggest that frequency analysis of multispectral PA signals can be used to differentiate malignant region from the adjacent normal region in human prostate tissue.

  5. Comparative analysis of gene expression in normal and cancer human prostate cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Rosenberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the main causes of mortality in men with malignant tumors. The urgent problem was a search for biomarkers of prostate cancer, which would allow distinguishing between aggressive metastatic and latent tumors. The aim of this work was to search for differentially expressed genes in normal epithelial cells PNT2 and prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, DU145 and PC3, produced from tumors with different aggressiveness and metas­tatic ability. Such genes might be used to create a panel of prognostic markers for aggressiveness and metastasis. Relative gene expression of 65 cancer-related genes was determined by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR. Expression of 29 genes was changed in LNCaP cells, 20 genes in DU145 and 16 genes in PC3 cell lines, compared with normal line PNT2. The obtained data make it possible to conclude that the epithelial-mesenchymal cell transition took place, which involved the loss of epithelial markers, reduced cell adhesion and increased migration. We have also found few differentially expressed genes among 3 prostate cancer cell lines. We have found that genes, involved in cell adhesion (CDH1, invasiveness and metastasis (IL8, CXCL2 and cell cycle control (P16, CCNE1 underwent most changes. These genes might be used for diagnosis and prognosis of invasive metastatic prostate tumors.

  6. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue

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    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K.; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissues obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small

  7. Characterization of adenoviral transduction profile in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue.

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    Ai, Jianzhong; Tai, Phillip W L; Lu, Yi; Li, Jia; Ma, Hong; Su, Qin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Hong; Gao, Guangping

    2017-09-01

    Prostate diseases are common in males worldwide with high morbidity. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for prostate diseases, however, it is currently underdeveloped. As well known, adeno virus (Ad) is the most widely used gene therapy vector. The aims of this study are to explore transduction efficiency of Ad in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue, thus further providing guidance for future prostate pathophysiological studies and therapeutic development of prostate diseases. We produced Ad expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and characterized the transduction efficiency of Ad in both human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as prostate tumor xenograft, and wild-type mouse prostate tissue in vivo. Ad transduction efficiency was determined by EGFP fluorescence using microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell type-specific transduction was examined by immunofluorescence staining of cell markers. Our data showed that Ad efficiently transduced human and mouse prostate cancer cells in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Following intratumoral and intraprostate injection, Ad could efficiently transduce prostate tumor xenograft and the major prostatic cell types in vivo, respectively. Our findings suggest that Ad can efficiently transduce prostate tumor cells in vitro as well as xenograft and normal prostate tissue in vivo, and further indicate that Ad could be a potentially powerful toolbox for future gene therapy of prostate diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Conditionally reprogrammed normal and primary tumor prostate epithelial cells: a novel patient-derived cell model for studies of human prostate cancer.

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    Timofeeva, Olga A; Palechor-Ceron, Nancy; Li, Guanglei; Yuan, Hang; Krawczyk, Ewa; Zhong, Xiaogang; Liu, Geng; Upadhyay, Geeta; Dakic, Aleksandra; Yu, Songtao; Fang, Shuang; Choudhury, Sujata; Zhang, Xueping; Ju, Andrew; Lee, Myeong-Seon; Dan, Han C; Ji, Youngmi; Hou, Yong; Zheng, Yun-Ling; Albanese, Chris; Rhim, Johng; Schlegel, Richard; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Liu, Xuefeng

    2017-04-04

    Our previous study demonstrated that conditional reprogramming (CR) allows the establishment of patient-derived normal and tumor epithelial cell cultures from a variety of tissue types including breast, lung, colon and prostate. Using CR, we have established matched normal and tumor cultures, GUMC-29 and GUMC-30 respectively, from a patient's prostatectomy specimen. These CR cells proliferate indefinitely in vitro and retain stable karyotypes. Most importantly, only tumor-derived CR cells (GUMC-30) produced tumors in xenografted SCID mice, demonstrating maintenance of the critical tumor phenotype. Characterization of cells with DNA fingerprinting demonstrated identical patterns in normal and tumor CR cells as well as in xenografted tumors. By flow cytometry, both normal and tumor CR cells expressed basal, luminal, and stem cell markers, with the majority of the normal and tumor CR cells expressing prostate basal cell markers, CD44 and Trop2, as well as luminal marker, CD13, suggesting a transit-amplifying phenotype. Consistent with this phenotype, real time RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that CR cells predominantly expressed high levels of basal cell markers (KRT5, KRT14 and p63), and low levels of luminal markers. When the CR tumor cells were injected into SCID mice, the expression of luminal markers (AR, NKX3.1) increased significantly, while basal cell markers dramatically decreased. These data suggest that CR cells maintain high levels of proliferation and low levels of differentiation in the presence of feeder cells and ROCK inhibitor, but undergo differentiation once injected into SCID mice. Genomic analyses, including SNP and INDEL, identified genes mutated in tumor cells, including components of apoptosis, cell attachment, and hypoxia pathways. The use of matched patient-derived cells provides a unique in vitro model for studies of early prostate cancer.

  9. The Aging Prostate Is Never "Normal"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlomm, Thorsten; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We argue against the recently published statement that tumor-specific molecular alterations found in "normal" prostate tissue from cancer patients challenge focal therapy approaches that only target a visible cancer lesion and not the adjacent molecular field....

  10. Stereological evaluation of fibronectin in the periurethral region of the transitional zone from normal human prostates compared with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaia, Jorge H M; Cardoso, Gilberto P; Babinski, Marcio A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the volumetric density (Vv) of the fibronectin in the periurethral region of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and compare with a control group. Prostatic periurethral tissue samples were obtained from ten patients (age range 65 to 79 years, mean 66) with clinical symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction who had undergone open prostatectomy. The control group samples (periurethral tissue samples from the transitional zone) were collected from prostates obtained during autopsy of accidental death adults of less than 25 years. The volumetric density (Vv) of the fibronectin was determined with stereological methods from 25 random fields per sample using the point-count method with an M-42 grid test system. The quantitative data were analyzed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Mann-Whitney U tests. The Vv in the control and BPH groups was 21.9% ± 1.5% and 29.1% ± 1.2% in the fibronectin, respectively. BPH tissues presented a significant increase of fibronectin in prostatic periurethral region in the transitional zone that may cause lengthening of the prostatic urethra.

  11. PATE, a gene expressed in prostate cancer, normal prostate, and testis, identified by a functional genomic approach

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    Bera, Tapan K.; Maitra, Rangan; Iavarone, Carlo; Salvatore, Giuliana; Kumar, Vasantha; Vincent, James J.; Sathyanarayana, B. K.; Duray, Paul; Lee, B. K.; Pastan, Ira

    2002-03-01

    To identify target antigens for prostate cancer therapy, we have combined computer-based screening of the human expressed sequence tag database and experimental expression analysis to identify genes that are expressed in normal prostate and prostate cancer but not in essential human tissues. Using this approach, we identified a gene that is expressed specifically in prostate cancer, normal prostate, and testis. The gene has a 1.5-kb transcript that encodes a protein of 14 kDa. We named this gene PATE (expressed in prostate and testis). In situ hybridization shows that PATE mRNA is expressed in the epithelial cells of prostate cancers and in normal prostate. Transfection of the PATE cDNA with a Myc epitope tag into NIH 3T3 cells and subsequent cell fractionation analysis shows that the PATE protein is localized in the membrane fraction of the cell. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of PATE shows that it has structural similarities to a group of proteins known as three-finger toxins, which includes the extracellular domain of the type transforming growth factor receptor. Restricted expression of PATE makes it a potential candidate for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  12. Anatomy and Histology of the Human and Murine Prostate.

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    Ittmann, Michael

    2017-10-16

    The human and murine prostate glands have similar functional roles in the generation of seminal fluid to assist in reproduction. There are significant differences in the anatomy and histology of murine and human prostate and knowledge of the normal anatomy and histology of the murine prostate is essential to interpreting changes in genetically engineered mouse models. In this review, the normal anatomy and histology of both human and mouse prostate will be described. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  13. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

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    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  14. Novel Oncogene Induced Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cell Lines Define Human Prostate Cancer Progression Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiaoming; Ertel, Adam; Casimiro, Mathew; Yu, Zuoren; Meng, Hui; McCue, Peter A.; Walters, Rhonda; Fortina, Paolo; Lisanti, Michael P.; Pestell, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Herein, murine prostate cancer cell lines, generated via selective transduction with a single oncogene (c-Myc, Ha-Ras, and v-Src), demonstrated oncogene-specific prostate cancer molecular signatures that were recapitulated in human prostate cancer, and developed lung metastasis in immune competent mice. Interrogation of two independent retrospective cohorts of patient samples using the oncogene signature demonstrated an ability to distinguish tumor from normal prostate with a predictive value for prostate cancer of 98 – 99%. In a blinded study, the signature algorithm demonstrated independent substratification of reduced recurrence free survival by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The generation of new oncogene-specific prostate cancer cell lines that recapitulate human prostate cancer gene expression, that metastasize in immune-competent mice, are a valuable new resource for testing targeted therapy while the molecular signatures identified herein provides further value over current gene signature markers of prediction and outcome. PMID:23204233

  15. Accumulation of [{sup 11}C]acetate in normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia: comparison with prostate cancer

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    Kato, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Takei, Toshiki; Shiga, Tohru; Nakada, Kunihiro; Tamaki, Nagara [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Kita 15, Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Kuge, Yuji; Katoh, Chietsugu [Department of Tracer Kinetics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Shinohara, Nobuo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Carbon-11 acetate positron emission tomography (PET) has been reported to be of clinical value for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, no detailed analysis has yet been carried out on the physiological accumulation of [{sup 11}C]acetate in the prostate. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the physiological accumulation of [{sup 11}C]acetate in the prostate using dynamic PET. The study included 30 subjects without prostate cancer [21 with normal prostate and nine with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)] and six patients with prostate cancer. A dynamic PET study was performed for 20 min after intravenous administration of 555 MBq of [{sup 11}C]acetate. The standardised uptake value (SUV) at 16-20 min post tracer administration and the early-to-late-activity ratio of the SUV (E/L ratio), which was determined by dividing the SUV{sub 6-10} {sub min} by the SUV {sub 16-20min}, were calculated to evaluate the accumulation of [ {sup 11}C]acetate. The prostate was clearly visualised and distinguished from adjacent organs in PET images in most of the cases. The SUV of the prostate (2.6 {+-}0.8) was significantly higher than that of the rectum (1.7 {+-}0.4) or bone marrow (1.3 {+-}0.3) (P <0.0001 in each case). The SUV of the normal prostate of subjects aged <50 years (3.4 {+-}0.7) was significantly higher than both the SUV for the normal prostate of subjects aged {>=}50 years (2.3 {+-}0.7) and that of subjects with BPH (2.1 {+-}0.6) (P <0.01 in each case). The primary prostate cancer in six cases was visualised by [ {sup 11}C]acetate PET. However, the difference in the SUV between subjects aged {>=}50 with normal prostate or with BPH and the patients with prostate cancer (1.9 {+-}0.6) was not statistically significant. There was also no significant difference in the E/L ratio between subjects aged {>=}50 with normal prostate (0.98 {+-}0.04) or BPH (0.96 {+-}0.08) and patients with prostate cancer (1.02 {+-}0.12). In conclusion, a normal prostate exhibits age

  16. Endocrine Disruption and Human Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Risbridger, Gail

    2008-01-01

    .... In order to test the concept that Vinclozolin alters human prostate development and induces disease, we used our model system to study human prostate development and maturation over 8-12 weeks...

  17. Inorganic Arsenic and Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We critically evaluated the etiologic role of inorganic arsenic in human prostate cancer. Data sources We assessed data from relevant epidemiologic studies concerning environmental inorganic arsenic exposure. Whole animal studies were evaluated as were in vitro model systems of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis in the prostate. Data synthesis Multiple studies in humans reveal an association between environmental inorganic arsenic exposure and prostate cancer mortality or incidence. Many of these human studies provide clear evidence of a dose–response relationship. Relevant whole animal models showing a relationship between inorganic arsenic and prostate cancer are not available. However, cellular model systems indicate arsenic can induce malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in vitro. Arsenic also appears to impact prostate cancer cell progression by precipitating events leading to androgen independence in vitro. Conclusion Available evidence in human populations and human cells in vitro indicates that the prostate is a target for inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis. A role for this common environmental contaminant in human prostate cancer initiation and/or progression would be very important. PMID:18288312

  18. Evidence that arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase 2 is a negative cell cycle regulator in normal prostate epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shaohua; Bhatia, Bobby; Maldonado, Carlos J; Yang, Peiying; Newman, Robert A; Liu, Junwei; Chandra, Dhyan; Traag, Jeanine; Klein, Russell D; Fischer, Susan M; Chopra, Dharam; Shen, Jianjun; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K; Tang, Dean G

    2002-05-03

    15-Lipoxygenase 2 (15-LOX2) is a recently cloned human lipoxygenase that shows tissue-restricted expression in prostate, lung, skin, and cornea. The protein level and enzymatic activity of 15-LOX2 have been shown to be down-regulated in prostate cancers compared with normal and benign prostate tissues. The biological function of 15-LOX2 and the role of loss of 15-LOX2 expression in prostate tumorigenesis, however, remain unknown. We report the cloning and functional characterization of 15-LOX2 and its three splice variants (termed 15-LOX2sv-a, 15-LOX2sv-b, and 15-LOX2sv-c) from primary prostate epithelial cells. Western blotting with multiple primary prostate cell strains and prostate cancer cell lines reveals that the expression of 15-LOX2 is lost in all prostate cancer cell lines, accompanied by decreased enzymatic activity revealed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analyses. Further experiments show that the loss of 15-LOX2 expression results from transcriptional repression caused by mechanism(s) other than promoter hypermethylation or histone deacetylation. Subsequent functional studies indicate the following: 1) the 15-LOX2 product, 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, inhibits prostate cancer cell cycle progression; 2) 15-LOX2 expression in primary prostate epithelial cells is inversely correlated with cell cycle; and 3) restoration of 15-LOX2 expression in prostate cancer cells partially inhibits cell cycle progression. Taken together, these results suggest that 15-LOX2 could be a suppressor of prostate cancer development, which functions by restricting cell cycle progression.

  19. FYN is overexpressed in human prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadas, Edwin M.; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Robinson, Victoria L.; Jagadeeswaran, Ramasamy; Otto, Kristen; Kasza, Kristen E.; Tretiakova, Maria; Siddiqui, Javed; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Stadler, Walter M.; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie; Salgia, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Objective FYN is a member of the SRC family of kinases (SFKs), functionally distinct from other SFKs. It interacts with FAK and paxillin (PXN)- regulators of cell morphology and motility. We hypothesized that FYN is upregulated in prostate cancer (CaP). Patients and Methods Through datamining in Oncomine; cell line profiling with immunoblotting and quantitative RT-PCR; and immunohistochemical analysis, we describe FYN expression in CaP. This analysis included 32 cases of CaP, 9 prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and 19 normal. Samples were scored for the percentage of stained glands and intensity of staining (from 0-3). Each sample was assigned a composite score generated by multiplying percentage and intensity. Results Datamining showed an 8-fold increase in FYN expression in CaP compared to normal tissue. This was specific to FYN and not present for other SFKs. Expression of FYN in CaP cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC3, DuPro) was detected using quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot. Expression of FYN and its signaling partners FAK and PXN was demonstrated in human tissue. Comparing normal to cancer, there was a 2.1-fold increase in median composite score for FYN (p<0.001) 1.7-fold increase in FAK (p<0.001), and a 2-fold increase in PXN (p<0.05). There was a 1.7-fold increase in FYN (p<0.05), a 1.6-fold increase in FAK (p<0.01) in CaP as compared to PIN. Conclusions These studies support the hypothesis that the FYN and its related signaling partners are upregulated in CaP and supports further investigation into the role of the FYN as a therapeutic target. PMID:18990162

  20. Differentiation of prostate cancer from normal prostate tissue in an animal model: conventional MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemeinhardt, O; Lüdemann, L; Prochnow, D; Abramjuk, C; Taupitz, M; Hamm, B; Beyersdorff, D

    2005-07-01

    To differentiate orthotopically implanted prostate cancer from normal prostate tissue using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Gd-DTPA-BMA-enhanced dynamic MRI in the rat model. Tumors were induced in 15 rats by orthotopic implantation of G subline Dunning rat prostatic tumor cells. MRI was performed 56 to 60 days after tumor cell implantation using T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted turbo SE sequences, and a 2D FLASH sequence for the contrast medium based dynamic study. The interstitial leakage volume, normalized permeability and the permeability surface area product of tumor and healthy prostate were determined quantitatively using a pharmacokinetic model. The results were confirmed by histologic examination. Axial T2-weighted TSE images depicted low-intensity areas suspicious for tumor in all 15 animals. The mean tumor volume was 46.5 mm(3). In the dynamic study, the suspicious areas in all animals displayed faster and more pronounced signal enhancement than surrounding prostate tissue. The interstitial volume and the permeability surface area product of the tumors increased significantly by 420 % (p < 0.001) and 424 % (p < 0.001), respectively, compared to normal prostate tissue, while no significant difference was seen for normalized permeability alone. The results of the present study demonstrate that quantitative analysis of contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI data enables differentiation of small, slowly growing orthotopic prostate cancer from normal prostate tissue in the rat model.

  1. Using Human Stem Cells to Study the Role of the Stroma in the Initiation of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    prostatic tumour stroma and hormonal carcinogenesis. The Innovative Minds in Prostate Cancer Today (IMPacT) Conference, Orlando, Florida , USA. (Poster...2001 Comparative studies of the estrogen receptors beta and alpha and the androgen receptor in normal human prostate glands, dysplasia , and in primary

  2. Power and pulsed Doppler evaluation of prostatic artery blood flow in normal and benign prostatic hyperplasia-affected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelli, R; Orlandi, R; Troisi, A; Cardinali, L; Polisca, A

    2013-10-01

    This study was carried out with the objectives to test the differences in the haemodynamic characteristics of the prostatic artery in normal and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-affected dogs using Doppler ultrasonography. In sixteen male German shepherd dogs, prostatic volume was detected and prostatic biopsy was performed. The prostatic artery blood flow parameters determined were as follows: peak systolic velocity (PSV), end diastolic velocity (EDV), Resistive Index (RI) and Pulsatility Index. The power Doppler mode was used for colour flow mapping of the prostatic artery. In PW mode at marginal locations, the waveforms recorded showed a continuous pattern typical of the high-resistance vessels, while in subcapsular locations, the waveforms recorded were continuous characteristic of the low-resistance vessel. Peak systolic velocity and EDV in both locations were significantly higher in BPH group (p flow in the prostatic artery in dogs affected with BPH. Moreover, statistically significant differences of blood flow velocities in prostatic artery in normal and BPH-affected dogs were detected. The RI was not able to differentiate normal dogs from dogs affected by BPH and therefore is not a parameter usable for diagnostic purposes, while Power Doppler could represent an additional diagnostic tool. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Tactile sensing of prostate cancer : a resonance sensor method evaluated using human prostate tissue in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jalkanen, Ville

    2007-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in men in Europe and the USA. The methods presently used to detect and diagnose prostate cancer are inexact, and new techniques are needed. Prostate tumours can be regarded as harder than the surrounding normal healthy glandular tissue, and therefore it is of interest to be able to reliably measure prostate tissue stiffness. In this dissertation the approach was to evaluate tactile resonance sensor technology and its ability to measure mecha...

  4. FOXP3+regulatory T cells in normal prostate tissue, postatrophic hyperplasia, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and tumor histological lesions in men with and without prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Sabina; Andren, Ove; Ohlson, Anna-Lena; Carlsson, Jessica; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Giunchi, Francesca; Rider, Jennifer R; Fiorentino, Michelangelo

    2018-01-01

    The tumor promoting or counteracting effects of the immune response to cancer development are thought to be mediated to some extent by the infiltration of regulatory T cells (T regs ). In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of T reg populations in stromal and epithelial compartments of normal, post atrophic hyperplasia (PAH), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and tumor lesions in men with and without prostate cancer. Study subjects were 102 men consecutively diagnosed with localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy and 38 men diagnosed with bladder cancer undergoing cystoprostatectomy without prostate cancer at the pathological examination. Whole mount sections from all patients were evaluated for the epithelial and stromal expression of CD4 + T regs and CD8 + T regs in normal, PAH, PIN, and tumor lesions. A Friedmańs test was used to investigate differences in the mean number of T regs across histological lesions. Logistic regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) for prostate cancer for each histological area. In men with prostate cancer, similarly high numbers of stromal CD4 + T regs were identified in PAH and tumor, but CD4 + T regs were less common in PIN. Greater numbers of epithelial CD4+ T regs in normal prostatic tissue were positively associated with both Gleason score and pT-stage. We observed a fourfold increased risk of prostate cancer in men with epithelial CD4 + T regs in the normal prostatic tissue counterpart. Our results may suggest a possible pathway through which PAH develops directly into prostate cancer in the presence of CD4 + T regs and indicate that transformation of the anti-tumor immune response may be initiated even before the primary tumor is established. © 2017 The Authors. The Prostate Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  5. A Cancer-Indicative microRNA Pattern in Normal Prostate Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Schlomm

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the levels of selected micro-RNAs in normal prostate tissue to assess their potential to indicate tumor foci elsewhere in the prostate. Histologically normal prostate tissue samples from 31 prostate cancer patients and two cancer negative control groups with either unsuspicious or elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA levels (14 and 17 individuals, respectively were analyzed. Based on the expression analysis of 157 microRNAs in a pool of prostate tissue samples and information from data bases/literature, we selected eight microRNAs for quantification by real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs. Selected miRNAs were analyzed in histologically tumor-free biopsy samples from patients and healthy controls. We identified seven microRNAs (miR-124a, miR-146a & b, miR-185, miR-16 and let-7a & b, which displayed significant differential expression in normal prostate tissue from men with prostate cancer compared to both cancer negative control groups. Four microRNAs (miR-185, miR-16 and let-7a and let-7b remained to significantly discriminate normal tissues from prostate cancer patients from those of the cancer negative control group with elevated PSA levels. The transcript levels of these microRNAs were highly indicative for the presence of cancer in the prostates, independently of the PSA level. Our results suggest a microRNA-pattern in histologically normal prostate tissue, indicating prostate cancer elsewhere in the organ.

  6. Cancer related gene expression in the human prostate zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Heul-Nieuwenhuijsen (Leonie)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe normal prostate: The prostate is the largest accessory gland of the male reproductive system. (Figure 1) The healthy adult prostate is about the size of a chestnut and conical in shape. In general, it measures 20 ml in volume, though it can become five or six time that size with

  7. Prostate disorders in an apparently normal Nigerian population 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globally, prostate disorders constitute a lot of health concern for men. Early identification of risk factors and groups at risk minimizes the adverse effects of these disorders. The possible relationship between prostate disorders and parameters like age, blood group, Rhesus factor, haemoglobin genotype, serum total ...

  8. Percutaneous fine-needle biopsy of radiographically normal lymph nodes in the staging of prostatic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gothlin, J.H.; Hoiem, L.

    1981-11-01

    Bipedal lymphography was interpreted as normal in 24 patients with low-grade prostatic carcinoma. Six to ten pelvic lymph nodes in each patient were biopsied transperitoneally under local anesthesia during fluoroscopy, revealing metastases in 6 patients. This method may replace surgery and internal biopsy in staging not only prostatic carcinoma but also other urogenital tumors.

  9. The expression of β3-adrenoceptors and their function in the human prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahisa; Otsuka, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Rikiya; Furuse, Hiroshi; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about β3-adrenoceptor (AR) expression and function in human prostate. We examined the expression and distribution of β-AR subtypes in normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissues, and investigated which selective β-AR subtype agonist was most involved in the relaxation of isolated human prostate strips. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression for β1-, β2-, and β3 -ARs was investigated using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR). Quantitative analysis of mRNA expression of β-AR subtypes between normal prostate and BPH tissues was performed using quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR). Distributions were examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Strips of human normal prostate or BPH were suspended in organ baths and exposed to isoproterenol, dobutamine, procaterol, and TRK-380 to investigate their relaxant effects on KCl-induced contractions, and their inhibitory effects on electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced contractions. We confirmed the presence of mRNA for β1-, β2-, and β3-ARs both in normal prostate and in BPH tissues. For β3-AR, mRNA expression in BPH tissues was significantly higher than in normal prostate tissues, but there was no significant difference in β1- and β2-AR expression between normal and BPH tissues. IHC revealed differences in staining intensity between smooth muscle cells and glandular cells, with different proportions for different β-AR subtypes. Staining of β3-AR was particularly intense in smooth muscle cells as opposed to glandular cells. Isoproterenol and TRK-380 significantly decreased the tone of KCl-induced contractions of the normal prostate strips. The rank order of relaxant effects was isoproterenol > TRK-380 > procaterol > dobutamine. All selective β-AR agonists significantly decreased the amplitude of EFS-induced contractions of the normal prostate strips. The rank order of inhibitory effects was isoproterenol > dobutamine >TRK-380 > procaterol. In BPH strips, all selective

  10. High grade intraepithelial neoplasia of prostate is associated with values of prostate specific antigen related parameters intermediate between prostate cancer and normal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obralic, Nermina; Kulovac, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    High grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is widely regarded as the precancerous. The aim of this study was to determine PSA related parameters in patients with initial PSA values 2-10 ng/mL and diagnosis of HGPIN without finding carcinoma at the time of their first needle biopsy. Study groups consisted of 100 men who were diagnosed HGPIN, 84 with cancer and 183 with benign hyperplasia on first biopsy of prostate. Total PSA and free PSA were measured and ratio free/total PSA and PSA density calculated. Mean values of these parameters were compared, and receiver operating characteristic curves were used for comparison of PSA related parameters to discriminate groups of patients.Total PSA, free PSA level and PSA density in patients with HGPIN (6.388 ng/mL) did not differ significantly compared to prostate carcinoma (6.976 ng/mL) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (6.07 ng/mL) patients. Patients with HGPIN had significantly higher ratio free/total PSA than those with prostate carcinoma (0.168 vs 0.133), but significantly lower than patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (0.168 vs 0.185). Ratio of free/total PSA significantly discriminate HGPIN from prostate carcinoma with sensitivity 84.52 and specify 45.00 at cut-off point of ≤ 0.18. Values of PSA, free PSA and ratio free/total PSA in cases of HGPIN appear to be intermediate between prostate cancer and normal levels. Ratio of free/total PSA may help in decision to repeat biopsies in the presence of HGPIN on biopsy, without concomitant prostate cancer, in patients suitable for curative treatment, with normal digito-rectal examination and trans-rectal sonography.

  11. High grade intraepithelial neoplasia of prostate is associated with values of prostate specific antigen related parameters intermediate between prostate cancer and normal levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermina Obralic

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available High grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN is widely regarded as the precancerous. The aim of this study was to determine PSA related parameters in patients with initial PSA values 2-10 ng/mL and diagnosis of HGPIN without finding carcinoma at the time of their first needle biopsy. Study groups consisted of 100 men who were diagnosed HGPIN, 84 with cancer and 183 with benign hyperplasia on first biopsy of prostate. Total PSA and free PSA were measured and ratio free/total PSA and PSA density calculated. Mean values of these parameters were compared, and receiver operating characteristic curves were used for comparison of PSA related parameters to discriminate groups of patients. Total PSA, free PSA level and PSA density in patients with HGPIN (6.388 ng/mL did not differ significantly compared to prostate carcinoma (6.976 ng/mL or benign prostatic hyperplasia (6.07 ng/mL patients. Patients with HGPIN had significantly higher ratio free/total PSA than those with prostate carcinoma (0.168 vs 0.133, but significantly lower than patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (0.168 vs 0.185. Ratio of free/total PSA significantly discriminate HGPIN from prostate carcinoma with sensitivity 84.52 and specify 45.00 at cut-off point of ≤ 0.18. Values of PSA, free PSA and ratio free/total PSA in cases of HGPIN appear to be intermediate between prostate cancer and normal levels. Ratio of free/total PSA may help in decision to repeat biopsies in the presence of HGPIN on biopsy, without concomitant prostate cancer, in patients suitable for curative treatment, with normal digito-rectal examination and trans-rectal sonography.

  12. Paracrine Regulation of Prostatic Carcinogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayward, Simon

    2003-01-01

    .... The objective of the proposed research is to establish immortalized stromal cell lines derived from normal human prostate and from human prostate cancer and to use these cells to investigate the role...

  13. Prostate disorders in an apparently normal Nigerian population 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) constitutes a lot of health burden for adult males. Prevalence statistics are well documented in the developed world, but not so well documented in Africa, especially in Nigeria. This study was therefore carried out to provide information on the prevalence of BPH in this locality. Adult males ...

  14. Sexual steroids in serum and prostatic tissue of human non-cancerous prostate (STERPROSER trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzillet, Yann; Raynaud, Jean-Pierre; Radulescu, Camélia; Fiet, Jean; Giton, Franck; Dreyfus, Jean-François; Ghoneim, Tarek P; Lebret, Thierry; Botto, Henry

    2017-11-01

    The specific involvement of the sex steroids in the growth of the prostatic tissue remains unclear. Sex steroid concentrations in plasma and in fresh surgical samples of benign central prostate were correlated to prostate volume. Monocentric prospective study performed between September 2014 and January 2017. Age, obesity parameters, and both serum and intraprostatic concentrations of sex steroids were collected complying with the latest Endocrine Society guidelines and the steroids assessed by GC/MS. Statistical calculations were adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI). Thirty-two patients, equally divided between normal- and high-volume prostate groups, were included in the analysis. High-volume prostate patients were older, heavier and had higher BMI. Comparison adjusted for age and BMI showed higher DHT concentrations in high-volume prostate. Both normal- and high-volume prostate tissues concentrate sex steroids in a similar way. Comparison of enzymatic activity surrogate marker ratios within tissue highlighted similar TT/E1 and TT/E2 ratios, and higher DHT/E1 ratio and lower DHT/PSA ratio in the high-volume prostates. STERPROSER trial provides evidence for higher DHT concentration in highvolume prostates, that could reflect either higher 5-alpha reductase expression or lower expression of downstream metabolizing enzymes such as 3a-hydoxysteroid dehydrogenase. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Epidermal growth factor increases LRF/Pokemon expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-10-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (LRF/Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of proteins that promotes oncogenesis in several forms of cancer. Recently, we found higher LRF expression in human breast and prostate carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissues. The aim of this study was to examine the regulation of LRF expression in human prostate cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptors mediate several tumorigenic cascades that regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and survival of prostate cancer cells. There was significantly higher level of LRF expression in the nucleus of LNCaP and PC-3 cells than RWPE-1 cells. A significant increase in LRF expression was observed with increasing doses of EGF in more aggressive and androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells suggesting that EGF signaling pathway is critical in upregulating the expression of LRF/Pokemon to promote oncogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Estrogen receptors in the human male bladder, prostatic urethra, and prostate. An immunohistochemical and biochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, A; Balslev, E; Juul, B R

    1995-01-01

    The distribution and quantity of estrogen receptors (ERs) in the human male bladder, prostatic urethra and the prostate were studied in eight males with recurrent papillomas of the bladder or monosymptomatic hematuria (median age 61 years), 14 men undergoing transurethral resection due to benign...

  17. Constitutive and inducible expression of cytochromes P4501A (CYP1A1 and CYP1A2) in normal prostate and prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Kenneth M; Cutroneo, Kenneth R

    2004-02-01

    Constitutive and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) inducible expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in prostate cancer and normal prostate epithelial cells were examined by immunoblotting. Androgen independent prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 have constitutive expression of CYP1A and CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, respectively. Four micromolar B[a]P did not appear to induce CYP1A1 or CYP1A2 expression in DU145 or PC3 cells. The androgen dependent prostate cancer cell line, LnCap, also has constitutive expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2. However, both CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 are induced by treatment of LnCap cells with 4 microM B[a]P. Untreated normal prostate and primary prostate tumor cells have no detectable CYP1A1 expression. Treatment with 4 microM B[a]P induced CYP1A1 expression in both normal and primary tumor prostate cells. Constitutive CYP1A2 expression was detected in normal prostate cells with little or no induction by exposure to 4 microM B[a]P. Primary prostate tumor cells did not show constitutive expression of CYP1A2. However, CYP1A2 was induced by 4 microM B[a]P in primary prostate tumor cells. These observations indicate that hormonal and cancer specific factors affect the expression and induction of the phase I metabolic enzymes, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in prostate cells. These observations may be related to the potential smoking-linked higher risk of prostate cancer development and morbidity of prostate cancer patients who smoke. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Virus, Oncolytic Virus and Human Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guang Bin; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Lifang; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa), a disease, is characterized by abnormal cell growth in the prostate - a gland in the male reproductive system. Although older age and a family history of the disease have been recognized as the risk factors of PCa, the cause of this cancer remains unclear. Currently, PCa is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men of all races. In this review study, we first discuss the controversy of the contribution of virus infection to PCa, and subsequently summarize the development of oncolytic virotherapy for PCa in the past several years. Mounting evidence suggests that infections with various viruses are causally linked to PCa pathogenesis. Published studies have provided strong evidence that at least two viruses (RXMV and HPV) contribute to prostate tumourigenicity and impact on the survival of patients with malignant PCa. Traditional therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy are unable to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells, which are a significant drawback and leads to toxicities for PCa patients undergoing treatment. So far, few other options are available for treating patients with advanced PCa. For PCa treatment, oncolytic virotherapy appears to be much more attractive, which uses live viruses to selectively kill cancer cells. Oncolytic viruses can be genetically engineered to induce cancer cell lysis through virus replication and expression of cytotoxic proteins. Virotherapy is being developed to be a novel therapy for cancers, which uses oncotropic and oncolytic viruses with their abilities to find and destroy malignant cells in the body. As oncolytic viruses are a relatively new class of anti-cancer immunotherapy agents, several important barriers still exist on the road to the use of oncolytic viruses for PCa therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold D Love

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate carcinoma (CaP are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1 highly expressed in prostate, 2 had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3 encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  20. Prostate cancer progression correlates with increased humoral immune response to a human endogenous retrovirus GAG protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Bernardo Sgarbi; Jungbluth, Achim A; Frosina, Denise; Holz, Megan; Ritter, Erika; Nakayama, Eiichi; Ishida, Toshiaki; Obata, Yuichi; Carver, Brett; Scher, Howard; Scardino, Peter T; Slovin, Susan; Subudhi, Sumit K; Reuter, Victor E; Savage, Caroline; Allison, James P; Melamed, Jonathan; Jäger, Elke; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd J; Gnjatic, Sacha

    2013-11-15

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) encode 8% of the human genome. While HERVs may play a role in autoimmune and neoplastic disease, no mechanistic association has yet been established. We studied the expression and immunogenicity of a HERV-K GAG protein encoded on chromosome 22q11.23 in relation to the clinical course of prostate cancer. In vitro expression of GAG-HERV-K was analyzed in panels of normal and malignant tissues, microarrays, and cell lines, and effects of demethylation and androgen stimulation were evaluated. Patient sera were analyzed for seroreactivity to GAG-HERV-K and other self-antigens by ELISA and seromics (protein array profiling). GAG-HERV-K expression was most frequent in prostate tissues and regulated both by demethylation of the promoter region and by androgen stimulation. Serum screening revealed that antibodies to GAG-HERV-K are found in a subset of patients with prostate cancer (33 of 483, 6.8%) but rarely in male healthy donors (1 of 55, 1.8%). Autoantibodies to GAG-HERV-K occurred more frequently in patients with advanced prostate cancer (29 of 191 in stage III-IV, 21.0%) than in early prostate cancer (4 of 292 in stages I-II, 1.4%). Presence of GAG-HERV-K serum antibody was correlated with worse survival of patients with prostate cancer, with a trend for faster biochemical recurrence in patients with antibodies to GAG-HERV-K. Preferential expression of GAG-HERV-K ch22q11.23 in prostate cancer tissue and increased frequency of autoantibodies observed in patients with advanced prostate cancer make this protein one of the first bona fide retroviral cancer antigens in humans, with potential as a biomarker for progression and biochemical recurrence rate of prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 19(22); 6112-25. ©2013 AACR.

  1. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-Ying Sung

    Full Text Available Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers.

  2. Identification of intermediate cell types by keratin expression in the developing human prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Y; Smedts, F; Debruyne, FMJ; de la Rosette, JJMCH; Schalken, JA

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The secretory acini of the adult human prostate contain basal, luminal, and intermediate types of exocrine cells. Intermediate cells are thought to play an important role in normal growth and neoplastic transformation. In this study we investigated whether this cell type is present in

  3. Estrogen receptors in the human male prostatic urethra and prostate in prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, A; Bruun, J; Balslev, E

    1999-01-01

    demonstrated in the prostatic stroma and/or prostatic urethra in 6 out of 11 cases. In both BPH and PC patients, immunoreactivity was weak and confined to few cells, indicating low ER content in the prostate as well as in the prostatic urethra. Dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) analysis was used for detection...

  4. Role of ART-27, a Novel Androgen Receptor Coactivator, in Normal Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    07$15.00/0 Printed m U 8 .A. Molecular Endocrino logy 21 (12):2864- 2876 Copyright C’l 2007 by The Endocrine Society d ol: 10.121G/ me.2007-0094...mutations identified in prostate cancer and androgen insensitivity syndrome display aberrant ART -27 coacti- vator function. Mol Endocrino l 19

  5. The small leucine rich proteoglycan fibromodulin is overexpressed in human prostate epithelial cancer cell lines in culture and human prostate cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Niradiz; Benedetti, Ines; Bettin, Alfonso; Rebollo, Juan; Geliebter, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Fibromodulin is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan important for extracellular matrix organization and essential for tissue repair in multiple organs. The main function of this proteoglycan is the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis; however, more recently described roles for fibromodulin have expanded to include regulation of angiogenesis, reprogramming of human fibroblasts into pluripotent cells, modulation of TGF-β activity, inflammatory processes and association with metastatic phenotypes. Additionally, fibromodulin has been identified as a novel tumor-associated antigen in leukemia, lymphoma, and leiomyoma. Knowledge about its expression in the prostate is limited. Fibromodulin expression was analyzed in two different malignant and one non-tumorigenic prostatic cell lines in culture, and in benign and malignant human prostate tissue. Expression was analyzed by real time PCR, immunocytochemistry, and immunohistochemistry. DNA sequencing was performed on a PCR fragment amplified with primers specific for the FMOD gene from cDNA obtained from the cultured cell lines. Both immunostaining and real time PCR analysis of cell lines indicated that fibromodulin was differentially expressed in the cancerous cell lines compared to the non-tumorigenic cell line. Likewise, cancerous tissue expressed significantly higher levels of intracellular fibromodulin compared to matched, benign tissue from the same patients, as well as compared to tissue from patients with only benign disease. The expression of fibromodulin was higher in prostatic cancer cells (cell-lines and human tissue) than in normal/benign prostatic cells. Additional studies are required to determine the biological and clinical significance and whether this proteoglycan has a role in carcinogenesis of the prostate or in prostate cancer related inflammatory processes.

  6. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of normal, benign and malignant conditions in the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visschere, Pieter J.L. de; Pattyn, Eva; Villeirs, Geert M. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Vral, Anne [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent (Belgium); Perletti, Gianpaolo [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent (Belgium); University of Insubria, Clinical Pharmacology, Medical and Surgical Sciences Section, Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, Varese (Italy); Praet, Marleen [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Ghent (Belgium); Magri, Vittorio [Instituti Clinici di Perfezionamento, Urology Clinic, Milano (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    To identify the multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) characteristics of normal, benign and malignant conditions in the prostate. Fifty-six histopathological whole-mount radical prostatectomy specimens from ten randomly selected patients with prostate cancer (PC) were matched with corresponding transverse mpMRI slices. The mpMRI was performed prior to biopsy and consisted of T2-weighted imaging (T2-WI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCE) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). In each prostate specimen, a wide range of histopathological conditions were observed. They showed consistent but overlapping characteristics on mpMRI. Normal glands in the transition zone showed lower signal intensity (SI) on T2-WI, lower ADC values and lower citrate peaks on MRSI as compared to the peripheral zone (PZ) due to sparser glandular elements and more prominent collagenous fibres. In the PZ, normal glands were iso-intense on T2-WI, while high SI areas represented cystic atrophy. Mimickers of well-differentiated PC on mpMRI were inflammation, adenosis, HG-PIN and post-atrophic hyperplasia. Each prostate is a unique mix of normal, benign and/or malignant areas that vary in extent and distribution resulting in very heterogeneous characteristics on mpMRI. Understanding the main concepts of this mpMRI-histopathological correlation may increase the diagnostic confidence in reporting mpMRI. (orig.)

  7. Differential gene expression in tumor adjacent histologically normal prostatic tissue indicates field cancerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaland, C M; Heaphy, C M; Butler, K S; Fischer, E G; Griffith, J K; Bisoffi, M

    2009-09-01

    Field cancerization denotes the occurrence of aberrant cells in tumor adjacent histologically normal tissues (TAHN). To characterize field cancerization in prostate cancer, we used RNA from paired patient tumor and TAHN tissues excised at 1 cm from the tumor margin and subjected them to microarray expression analysis comparative to RNA from normal cancer-free prostatic tissues. Eleven novel transcripts were significantly up-regulated in TAHN tissues and also in tumors. Expression of early growth response protein 1, tristetraprolin, testican, and fatty acid synthase, mutually up-regulated at different levels in tumors and TAHN tissues was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR in the experimental and in an independent validation set. This study offers proof of expressional changes in field cancerized prostatic TAHN tissues at defined distances from tumor margins. Markers of field cancerized prostatic tissues could be early diagnostic indicators in biopsies after abnormal prostate-specific antigen and digital rectal examination and independent of cancerous histology and/or early targets for chemo-preventive intervention in pre-malignant disease.

  8. Functional Analysis of the Aurora Kinase A Ile31 Allelic Variant in Human Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Matarasso

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the centrosome-associated serine/ threonine kinase Aurora Kinase A (AURKA has been demonstrated in both advanced prostate cancer and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions. The single-nucleotide polymorphism T91A (Phe3lile has been implicated in AURKA overexpression and has been suggested as a low-penetrance susceptibility allele in multiple human cancers, including prostate cancer. We studied the transcriptional consequences of the AURKA Ile31 allele in 28 commercial normal prostate tissue RNA samples (median age, 27 years. Significant overexpression of AURKA was demonstrated in homozygous and heterozygous AURKA Ile31 prostate RNA (2.07-fold and 1.93-fold, respectively; P < .05. Expression levels of 1509 genes differentiated between samples homozygous for Phe31 alleles and samples homozygous for Ile31 alleles (P = .05. Gene Ontology classification revealed overrepresentation of cell cycle arrest, ubiquitin cycle, antiapoptosis, angiogenesisrelated genes. When these hypothesis-generating results were subjected to more stringent statistical criteria, overexpression of a novel transcript of the natural killer tumor recognition sequence (NKTR gene was revealed and validated in homozygous Ile31 samples (2.6-fold; P < .05. In summary, our data suggest an association between the AURKA Ile31 allele and an altered transcriptome in normal non-neopasic prostates.

  9. Secretagogin is a new neuroendocrine marker in the human prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adolf, Katja; Wagner, Ludwig; Bergh, Anders

    2007-01-01

    marker in carcinoid tumors of the lung and the gastrointestinal tract. The present study analyzes the expression of secretagogin in normal and malign prostate tissue. METHODS: We analyzed immunoreactivity for secretagogin, chromogranin A (CgA), neuron specific enolase (NSE), and synaptophysin (SYN...... and co-localized with the NE markers CgA and NSE. The expression of secretagogin is significantly correlated to CgA (P marker in the prostate with more extended...... immunoreactivity compared to the NE markers CgA, SYN, and NSE. Secretagogin is widely expressed in prostatic adenocarcinoma as opposed to adenocarcinomas in other organs....

  10. Isolation and functional interrogation of adult human prostate epithelial stem cells at single cell resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yang Hu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Using primary cultures of normal human prostate epithelial cells, we developed a novel prostasphere-based, label-retention assay that permits identification and isolation of stem cells at a single cell level. Their bona fide stem cell nature was corroborated using in vitro and in vivo regenerative assays and documentation of symmetric/asymmetric division. Robust WNT10B and KRT13 levels without E-cadherin or KRT14 staining distinguished individual stem cells from daughter progenitors in spheroids. Following FACS to isolate label-retaining stem cells from label-free progenitors, RNA-seq identified unique gene signatures for the separate populations which may serve as useful biomarkers. Knockdown of KRT13 or PRAC1 reduced sphere formation and symmetric self-renewal highlighting their role in stem cell maintenance. Pathways analysis identified ribosome biogenesis and membrane estrogen-receptor signaling enriched in stem cells with NF-ĸB signaling enriched in progenitors; activities that were biologically confirmed. Further, bioassays identified heightened autophagy flux and reduced metabolism in stem cells relative to progenitors. These approaches similarly identified stem-like cells from prostate cancer specimens and prostate, breast and colon cancer cell lines suggesting wide applicability. Together, the present studies isolate and identify unique characteristics of normal human prostate stem cells and uncover processes that maintain stem cell homeostasis in the prostate gland.

  11. High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are present in benign prostate tissues before development of HPV associated prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Wendy K; Ngan, Christopher C; Amos, Timothy G; Edwards, Richard J; Swift, Joshua; Lutze-Mann, Louise; Shang, Fei; Whitaker, Noel J; Lawson, James S

    2017-01-01

    Although high risk HPVs are associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer it is not known if they have a causal role. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential role of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in prostate cancer. The aims are (i) to investigate the presence and confirm the identity of high risk HPVs in benign prostate tissues prior to the development of HPV positive prostate cancer in the same patients, and (ii) to determine if HPVs are biologically active. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify HPVs in specimens from 52 Australian men with benign prostate biopsies who 1 to 10 years later developed prostate cancer. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assess the expression of HPV E7 oncoproteins, cytokeratin and prostate specific antigen (PSA). We used RNASeq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify possible HPV RNA sequences in prostate cancer. HPV screening using standard PCR was conducted on 28 of the 52 sets of benign and later prostate cancers. HPV L1 genes were identified in 13 (46%) benign and 8 (29%) of 28 later prostate cancers in the same patients. HPV E7 genes were identified in 23 (82%) benign and 19 (68%) of 28 subsequent prostate cancers in the same patients. The same HPV types were present in both the benign and subsequent prostate cancers in 9 sets of specimens. HPV type 16 was identified in 15% of benign and 3% of prostate cancers. HPV type 18 was identified in 26% of benign and 16% of prostate cancers. Small numbers of HPV types 45, 47, 76 and 115 were also identified. High confidence RNA-Seq evidence for high risk HPV types 16 and 18 was identified in 12 (2%) of the 502 TCGA prostate cancer transcriptomes. High risk HPV E7 oncoprotein was positively expressed in 23 (82%) of 28 benign prostate specimens but only in 8 (29%) of 28 of the later prostate cancer specimens. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.001). Prostate specific antigen (PSA) was more highly expressed in 26

  12. Enoxacin penetration into human prostatic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, M G; Roy, R; Lessard, C; Foucault, P

    1988-01-01

    Concurrent enoxacin concentrations in serum and prostatic tissue were determined in 14 patients. The mean ratios of enoxacin concentration in tissue over concentration in serum were 1.4 +/- 0.2 (standard error of the mean). The levels in serum and prostatic tissue were above the MICs for most urinary pathogens. PMID:3196004

  13. Testicular steroids, prolactin, relaxin and prostate gland markers in peripheral blood and seminal plasma of normal dogs and dogs with prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, K; Kayacelebi, H; Urhausen, C; Piechotta, M; Mischke, R; Kramer, S; Einspanier, A; Oei, C H Y; Günzel-Apel, A

    2012-12-01

    Concentrations of 17β-oestradiol (E(2) ), testosterone (T), 5α-dihydrotestosterone, prolactin (PRL) and relaxin (RLN) were determined in peripheral blood serum or plasma and prostatic secretion of 77 physically healthy intact male dogs (19 Rhodesian Ridgebacks/RR, 58 dogs of other breeds, 1-9 years of age). Furthermore, the concentrations of acid phosphatase in prostatic secretion and canine prostate-specific esterase (CPSE) were measured in blood plasma. All dogs were submitted to a complete breeding soundness examination, including B-mode sonography. Prostatic volume was larger, and blood plasma levels of CPSE were higher in ageing dogs and in dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) compared with young dogs and dogs with normal prostate. Furthermore, a higher E(2) /T ratio was found in dogs with BPH. Despite missing significant differences in PRL concentrations, the slight increases in PRL concentrations in the prostatic secretion observed both with increasing age and in dogs with BPH and the observed correlations between concentrations of PRL and testicular steroids may possibly indicate a role of PRL in the pathogenesis of canine BPH. Serum RLN concentrations were at similar level in all dogs. Regarding breed differences, an appreciably larger prostatic volume and higher concentration of CPSE were verified in RR than in other pure-bred dogs, confirming our suspicion of a premature enlargement of the prostate gland, which may result from a genetic disposition for BPH in this breed. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. The Expression of MTUS1/ATIP and Its Major Isoforms, ATIP1 and ATIP3, in Human Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, Simon N.S., E-mail: simonnsl@unimelb.edu.au; Chow, Laurie T.C.; Varghayee, Naghmeh; Rezmann, Linda A.; Frauman, Albert G.; Louis, William J. [Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Austin Health, Heidelberg 3084, Victoria (Australia)

    2011-10-11

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), the main effector of the renin angiotensin system, acts upon two distinct transmembrane receptors, the Ang II type 1 and the type 2 (AT{sub 2}-) receptor, to induce promotion and inhibition of ERK2 phosphorylation. The AT{sub 2}-receptor, through an interaction with its putative signaling partner MTUS1/ATIP (AT{sub 2}-receptor interacting protein), inhibits the mitogenic effects of EGF in prostate cancer cell lines representing both early and late stage disease. This is the first report on the expression of ATIP in normal and malignant human prostatic biopsies. The expression of ATIP and its major isoforms, ATIP1 and ATIP3, in normal prostatic cells and three prostate cancer cell lines was examined using QPCR and immunohistochemistry. Human biopsies containing benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and well, moderately and poorly differentiated prostate cancer were also examined. Overall, ATIP1 and ATIP3 mRNA expression was increased in malignant compared to normal tissues and cell lines. ATIP immunostaining was low or absent in both the basal and columnar epithelial cell layers surrounding BPH acini; however, it was observed in high concentration in neoplastic epithelial cells of HGPIN and was clearly evident in cytoplasms of malignant cells in all prostate cancer grades. ATIP immunostaining was also identified in the cytoplasms of LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cells. As the AT{sub 2}-receptor/ATIP inhibitory signaling pathway exists in malignant cells in all grades of prostate cancer, enhancement of this pathway may be a therapeutic target even after the development of androgen-independence.

  15. The variability problem of normal human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjær, Tine

    2012-01-01

    Previous investigations have suggested considerable inter-individual variability in the time course pattern of net joint moments during normal human walking, although the limited sample sizes precluded statistical analyses. The purpose of the present study was to obtain joint moment patterns from...

  16. Calcitonin secretion in normal human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthemore, J.G.; Deftos, L.J.

    1978-07-01

    A sensitive RIA for human calcitonin has been developed which can detect 1 to 2 pg hormone. This procedure permits the measurement of the low concentrations of calcitonin in the unextracted plasma of normal human subjects. In 55 normal adults, mean plasma calcitonin was 24 pg/ml with an SD of +-18 pg/ml, an SE of +-2 pg/ml, and a range of less than 10 to 75 pg/ml. There were no discernible age or sex differences in basal hormone concentration. Infusions of calcium, pentagastrin, and glucagon stimulated plasma calcitonin, whereas food and oral calcium did not. The stimulatory effect of pentagastrin was greater in males than in females. These data demonstrate that the low concentration of calcitonin in humans can be stimulated by several secretagogues and suggest that females may have decreased calcitonin reserve.

  17. The Isolation and Characterization of Human Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    demonstrating the identification of prostate CSCs from primary human tissue with subsequent illustration that the proffered CSC is tumor-initiating in...noted to be positive for chromogranin A and vice versa (for illustration , an area with abundant NE cells are shown in Fig. 6A). In order to definitively...Res. 1993; 53:2853–2857. Hobisch A, Culig Z, Radmayr C, Bartsch G, Klocker H, Hittmair A. Distant metastases from prostatic carcinoma express androgen

  18. Lysophosphatidic Acid Regulation and Roles in Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    therapeutic measures. LPA (lysophosphatidic acid): a potent mitogen for prostate cancer For over 50 years, the primary form of therapy for advanced prostate...androgen independent, resistant to therapy , and ultimately cause the death of the patient. The most likely way to develop new and effective therapies ...Mazurais, D., Robert, P., Gout , B., Berrebi-Bertrand, I., Laville, M. P., and Calmels, T. (2002). Cell type-specific localization of human cardiac S1P

  19. Overexpression and knock-down studies highlight that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28 controls proliferation and migration in human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicka, Caroline; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Okada, Yasunori; McLaughlin, Claire; Leedman, Peter J; Stuart, Lisa; Epis, Michael; Hoyne, Gerard; Boulos, Sherif; Johnson, Liam; Schlaich, Markus; Matthews, Vance

    2016-10-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in men. It is critical to identify and characterize oncogenes that drive the pathogenesis of human prostate cancer. The current study builds upon previous research showing that a disintegrin and metallproteinase (ADAM)28 is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers. Our novel study used overexpression, pharmacological, and molecular approaches to investigate the biological function of ADAM28 in human prostate cancer cells, with a focus on cell proliferation and migration. The results of this study provide important insights into the role of metalloproteinases in human prostate cancer.The expression of ADAM28 protein levels was assessed within human prostate tumors and normal adjacent tissue by immunohistochemistry. Immunocytochemistry and western blotting were used to assess ADAM28 protein expression in human prostate cancer cell lines. Functional assays were conducted to assess proliferation and migration in human prostate cancer cells in which ADAM28 protein expression or activity had been altered by overexpression, pharmacological inhibition, or by siRNA gene knockdown.The membrane bound ADAM28 was increased in human tumor biopsies and prostate cancer cell lines. Pharmacological inhibition of ADAM28 activity and/or knockdown of ADAM28 significantly reduced proliferation and migration of human prostate cancer cells, while overexpression of ADAM28 significantly increased proliferation and migration.ADAM28 is overexpressed in primary human prostate tumor biopsies, and it promotes human prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration. This study supports the notion that inhibition of ADAM28 may be a potential novel therapeutic strategy for human prostate cancer.

  20. Expression of periglandular tenascin-C and basement membrane laminin in normal prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Y.; Li, J.; Latijnhouwers, M. A.; Smedts, F.; Umbas, R.; Aalders, T. W.; Debruyne, F. M.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Schalken, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the structural relationship of the distribution between tenascin (tenascin-C, an extra-cellular matrix glycoprotein involved in stromal-epithelial interactions in both normal and pathological conditions) and laminin, an important component of the basement membrane, in normal and

  1. Disposition of the striated urethral sphincter and its relation to the prostate in human fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano A. Favorito

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the arrangement of the muscle fibers of the striated urethral sphincter and its relationship with the prostate during the fetal period in humans. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed 17 prostates from well preserved fresh human fetuses ranging in age from 10 to 31 weeks postconception (WPC. Transversal sections were obtained and stained with Gomori's trichrome and immunolabeled with anti alpha-actin antibody. RESULTS: We found that the urethral striated sphincter (rabdosphincter is located on the periphery of the smooth muscle and there was no merge between striated and smooth muscle fibers in any fetal period. In the prostate apex, the striated sphincter shows a circular arrangement and covers completely the urethra externally, whereas adjacent to verumontanum, it looks like a "horseshoe" and covers only the anterior and lateral surfaces of the urethra. Near the bladder neck, in fetuses younger than 20 WPC, we have found striated muscle fibers only at the anterior surface of the prostate, while in fetuses older than 20 WPC, the striated muscle covers the anterior and lateral surfaces of the prostate. CONCLUSIONS: The urethral sphincter muscle covers the anterior and lateral surfaces of the urethra in all fetuses older than 20 WPC, close to the bladder neck and at the distal prostate. In the region of the prostate apex, the urethral sphincter covers completely the urethra circularly. The knowledge of the normal anatomy of the urethral sphincter in fetuses could be important to understand its alterations in congenital anomalies involving the base of the bladder, the bladder neck and the proximal urethra.

  2. Research on Normal Human Plantar Pressure Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xi Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FSR400 pressure sensor, nRF905 wireless transceiver and MSP40 SCM are used to design the insole pressure collection system, LabVIEW is used to make HMI of data acquisition, collecting a certain amount of normal human foot pressure data, statistical analysis of pressure distribution relations about five stages of swing phase during walking, using the grid closeness degree to identify plantar pressure distribution pattern recognition, and the algorithm simulation, experimental results demonstrated this method feasible.

  3. Particularlies normal microflora of the human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Sklyar

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowdays it marks the constant growth of diseases connected to changes of biological balance between macroorganism and various microbial populations of its organs and systems which formed during evolution. The literary data and experimental data of artors are generalised in this article. They concern structure microflora of human organism, factors influencing process of its formation, meaning normal microflora for functioning organism as a whole, and for systems and organs

  4. Galectin-3 Is a Substrate for Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) in Human Seminal Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswati, Sarika; Block, Ashley S.; Davidson, Mari. K.; Rank, Roger. G.; Mahadevan, Maha; Diekman, Alan B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Galectin-3 is a multivalent carbohydrate-binding protein involved in cell adhesion, cell cycle control, immunomodulation, and cancer progression, including prostate cancer. Galectin-3 function is regulated by proteolytic cleavage that destroys galectin-3 multivalency while preserving carbohydrate-binding activity. In human semen, galectin-3 is present in seminal plasma and is also associated with prostasomes, exosome-like vesicles secreted by the prostate. In the current study, we characterized the proteolytic activity that cleaves galectin-3 in human seminal plasma. Methods An in vitro assay was developed to investigate galectin-3 cleavage in seminal plasma. The effect of protease inhibitors, divalent ion chelators, and Zn2+ on the cleavage activity was determined. Proteases enriched from seminal plasma were tested for their ability to cleave galectin-3. Affinity purification and microsequence analysis were used to identify the cleavage site in galectin-3. Results Galectin-3 was identified in human seminal plasma in an intact and truncated form. Gelatinases enriched from seminal plasma did not cleave galectin-3. Inhibitor studies indicated that the galectin-3 cleavage activity in seminal plasma is a Zn2+ sensitive, serine protease. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) was demonstrated to cleave galectin-3 between tyrosine107-glycine108 and produce a functionally-active, monovalent lectin. Conclusions PSA is a chymotrypsin-like serine protease secreted by the prostatic epithelium and normally functions in liquefaction of semen following ejaculation. Furthermore, PSA is implicated in the promotion of localized prostate tumors and bone metastases by its roles in immunomodulation, invasion, and apoptosis. Our results indicate that PSA regulates galectin-3 in human semen and may regulate galectin-3 function during prostate cancer progression. PMID:20672323

  5. Pilot Comparison of Stromal Gene Expression among Normal Prostate Tissues and Primary Prostate Cancer Tissues in White and Black Men

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bova, G. S

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in prostate biology suggest that stromal cells surrounding prostate epithelia may play a key role in permitting or stimulating epithelial cells to lose control and form precancerous and cancerous lesions...

  6. Human prostate cancer ZIP1/zinc/citrate genetic/metabolic relationship in the TRAMP prostate cancer animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Leslie C; Franklin, Renty B; Zou, Jing; Feng, Pei; Bok, Robert; Swanson, Mark G; Kurhanewicz, John

    2011-12-15

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men. The availability of animal models that represent the events and factors that exist in the natural history and biology of human prostate cancer is essential in dealing with prostate cancer. In recent decades and presently, emphasis has been directed at the development and employment of prostate cancer induced in transgenic mice. However, the important consistent hallmark characteristic and event of decrease in zinc and citrate and downregulation of ZIP1 zinc transporter in prostate malignancy has not been studied or identified in any animal model. We investigated the status of these parameters in TRAMP tumors as compared with human prostate cancer. The results show that citrate levels are markedly decreased in the developing and advancing stages of malignancy in TRAMP. Zinc levels are also decreased and ZIP1 transporter is lost in TRAMP tumors. In vitro studies show that zinc treatment of TRAMP C2 cells exhibits cytotoxic effects. Collectively, these results mimic the ZIP1, zinc, and citrate status and relationship that exist in human prostate cancer. This is the first report that establishes the existence of the human prostate zinc/citrate hallmark characteristic and relationship in an animal model. It now appears that the TRAMP model will be suitable for studies relating to the implications and role of zinc- and citrate-related metabolism in the development and progression of human prostate cancer.

  7. Normal human variation: refocussing the enhancement debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahane, Guy; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-02-01

    This article draws attention to several common mistakes in thinking about biomedical enhancement, mistakes that are made even by some supporters of enhancement. We illustrate these mistakes by examining objections that John Harris has recently raised against the use of pharmacological interventions to directly modulate moral decision-making. We then apply these lessons to other influential figures in the debate about enhancement. One upshot of our argument is that many considerations presented as powerful objections to enhancement are really strong considerations in favour of biomedical enhancement, just in a different direction. Another upshot is that it is unfortunate that much of the current debate focuses on interventions that will radically transform normal human capacities. Such interventions are unlikely to be available in the near future, and may not even be feasible. But our argument shows that the enhancement project can still have a radical impact on human life even if biomedical enhancement operated entirely within the normal human range. © 2013 The Authors. Bioethics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Trevino

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell

  9. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antczak, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J; Guindani, Michele; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication networks

  10. Efficient eradication of hormone-resistant human prostate cancers by inactivated Sendai virus particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miyamoto, Yasuhide; Inoue, Takehiro; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2009-05-15

    Hormone-refractory prostate cancer is one of the intractable human cancers in the world. Here, we examined the direct tumor-killing activity of inactivated Sendai virus particle [hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E)] through induction of Type I interferon (IFN) in the hormone-resistant human prostate cancer cell lines PC3 and DU145. Preferential binding of HVJ-E to PC3 and DU145 over hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell and normal prostate epithelium was observed, resulting in a number of fused cells. After HVJ-E treatment, a number of IFN-related genes were up-regulated, resulting in Type I IFN production in PC3 cells. Then, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) helicase which activates Type I IFN expression after Sendai virus infection was up-regulated in cancer cells after HVJ-E treatment. Produced IFN-alpha and -beta enhanced caspase 8 expression via Janus kinases/Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription pathway, activated caspase 3 and induced apoptosis in cancer cells. When HVJ-E was directly injected into a mass of PC3 tumor cells in SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice, a marked reduction in the bulk of each tumor mass was observed and 85% of the mice became tumor-free. Although co-injection of an anti-asialo GM1 antibody with HVJ-E into each tumor mass slightly attenuated the tumor suppressive activity of HVJ-E, significant suppression of tumor growth was observed even in the presence of anti-asialo GM1 antibody. This suggests that natural killer cell activation made small contribution to tumor regression following HVJ-E treatment in hormone-resistant prostate cancer model in vivo. Thus, HVJ-E effectively targets hormone-resistant prostate cancer by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells, as well as activating anti-tumor immunity. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Human seminal proteinase and prostate-specific antigen are the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEARCH U

    Lilja H 1985 A kallikrein-like serine protease in prostatic fluid cleaves the predominant seminal vesicle protein; J. Clin. Invest. 76 1899–1903. Lovgren J, Airas K and Lilja H 1999 Enzymatic action of human glandular kallikrein 2 (hK2). Substrate specificity and regulation by Zn2+ and extracellular protease inhibitors; Eur.

  12. SEM and X-ray microanalysis of human prostatic calculi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilches, J.; Lopez, A.; De Palacio, L.; Munoz, C.; Gomez, J.

    1982-02-01

    Calculi removed from human prostates affected with nodular hyperplasia were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and EDAX system. The general spectrum was made up of Na, Al, Mg, S, P, Ca and Zn. Two types of stone were identified morphostructurally and microanalytically: calculi type I of nodular surface with high peaks of S, and calculi type II polyfaceted with high peaks of P and Ca. Their formation from corpora amylacea and/or exogenous constituents is discussed. The superficial deposit of Zn suggests its incorporation from the prostatic liquid and does not seem to play an important role in the genesis.

  13. Honokiol, a constituent of Magnolia species, inhibits adrenergic contraction of human prostate strips and induces stromal cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Herrmann

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: Honokiol inhibits smooth muscle contraction in the human prostate, and induces cell death in cultured stromal cells. Because prostate smooth muscle tone and prostate growth may cause LUTS, it appears possible that honokiol improves voiding symptoms.

  14. Cascaded discrimination of normal, abnormal, and confounder classes in histopathology: Gleason grading of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doyle Scott

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated classification of histopathology involves identification of multiple classes, including benign, cancerous, and confounder categories. The confounder tissue classes can often mimic and share attributes with both the diseased and normal tissue classes, and can be particularly difficult to identify, both manually and by automated classifiers. In the case of prostate cancer, they may be several confounding tissue types present in a biopsy sample, posing as major sources of diagnostic error for pathologists. Two common multi-class approaches are one-shot classification (OSC, where all classes are identified simultaneously, and one-versus-all (OVA, where a “target” class is distinguished from all “non-target” classes. OSC is typically unable to handle discrimination of classes of varying similarity (e.g. with images of prostate atrophy and high grade cancer, while OVA forces several heterogeneous classes into a single “non-target” class. In this work, we present a cascaded (CAS approach to classifying prostate biopsy tissue samples, where images from different classes are grouped to maximize intra-group homogeneity while maximizing inter-group heterogeneity. Results We apply the CAS approach to categorize 2000 tissue samples taken from 214 patient studies into seven classes: epithelium, stroma, atrophy, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, and prostate cancer Gleason grades 3, 4, and 5. A series of increasingly granular binary classifiers are used to split the different tissue classes until the images have been categorized into a single unique class. Our automatically-extracted image feature set includes architectural features based on location of the nuclei within the tissue sample as well as texture features extracted on a per-pixel level. The CAS strategy yields a positive predictive value (PPV of 0.86 in classifying the 2000 tissue images into one of 7 classes, compared with the OVA (0.77 PPV and OSC

  15. Dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for large prostate volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: mcbiagioli@yahoo.com [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: to evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and methods: one hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results: median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p-0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions: dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. (author)

  16. Intermediate cells in normal and malignant prostate epithelium express c-MET: implications for prostate cancer invasion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, G.J.L.H. van; Balken, B. van; Aalders, M.W.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Ruiter, D.J.; Schalken, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of keratin (K) expression discriminates luminal (K18) and intermediate (K5/18) cells in prostate carcinoma, while basal (K5/14) cells are absent. Intermediate cells have been proposed as targets of malignant transformation in prostate cancer and precursors of

  17. Finasteride inhibits human prostate cancer cell invasion through MMP2 and MMP9 downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Andrei; Delella, Flávia K; Almeida, Rodrigo; Lacorte, Lívia Maria; Fávaro, Wágner José; Deffune, Elenice; Felisbino, Sérgio L

    2013-01-01

    The use of the 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) finasteride and dutasteride for prostate cancer prevention is still under debate. The FDA recently concluded that the increased prevalence of high-grade tumors among 5-ARI-treated patients must not be neglected, and they decided to disallow the use of 5-ARIs for prostate cancer prevention. This study was conducted to verify the effects of finasteride on prostate cell migration and invasion and the related enzymes/proteins in normal human and tumoral prostatic cell lines. RWPE-1, LNCaP, PC3 and DU145 cells were cultivated to 60% confluence and exposed for different periods to either 10 µM or 50 µM finasteride that was diluted in culture medium. The conditioned media were collected and concentrated, and MMP2 and MMP9 activities and TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 protein expression were determined. Cell viability, migration and invasion were analyzed, and the remaining cell extracts were submitted to androgen receptor (AR) detection by western blotting techniques. Experiments were carried out in triplicate. Cell viability was not significantly affected by finasteride exposure. Finasteride significantly downregulated MMP2 and MMP9 activities in RWPE-1 and PC3 cells and MMP2 in DU145 cells. TIMP-2 expression in RWPE-1 cells was upregulated after exposure. The cell invasion of all four tested cell lines was inhibited by exposure to 50 µM of finasteride, and migration inhibition only occurred for RWPE-1 and LNCaP cells. AR was expressed by LNCaP, RWPE-1 and PC3 cells. Although the debate on the higher incidence of high-grade prostate cancer among 5-ARI-treated patients remains, our findings indicate that finasteride may attenuate tumor aggressiveness and invasion, which could vary depending on the androgen responsiveness of a patient's prostate cells.

  18. Finasteride inhibits human prostate cancer cell invasion through MMP2 and MMP9 downregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Moroz

    Full Text Available The use of the 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs finasteride and dutasteride for prostate cancer prevention is still under debate. The FDA recently concluded that the increased prevalence of high-grade tumors among 5-ARI-treated patients must not be neglected, and they decided to disallow the use of 5-ARIs for prostate cancer prevention. This study was conducted to verify the effects of finasteride on prostate cell migration and invasion and the related enzymes/proteins in normal human and tumoral prostatic cell lines.RWPE-1, LNCaP, PC3 and DU145 cells were cultivated to 60% confluence and exposed for different periods to either 10 µM or 50 µM finasteride that was diluted in culture medium. The conditioned media were collected and concentrated, and MMP2 and MMP9 activities and TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 protein expression were determined. Cell viability, migration and invasion were analyzed, and the remaining cell extracts were submitted to androgen receptor (AR detection by western blotting techniques. Experiments were carried out in triplicate.Cell viability was not significantly affected by finasteride exposure. Finasteride significantly downregulated MMP2 and MMP9 activities in RWPE-1 and PC3 cells and MMP2 in DU145 cells. TIMP-2 expression in RWPE-1 cells was upregulated after exposure. The cell invasion of all four tested cell lines was inhibited by exposure to 50 µM of finasteride, and migration inhibition only occurred for RWPE-1 and LNCaP cells. AR was expressed by LNCaP, RWPE-1 and PC3 cells.Although the debate on the higher incidence of high-grade prostate cancer among 5-ARI-treated patients remains, our findings indicate that finasteride may attenuate tumor aggressiveness and invasion, which could vary depending on the androgen responsiveness of a patient's prostate cells.

  19. Altered glycosylation pattern allows the distinction between prostate-specific antigen (PSA) from normal and tumor origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracaula, Rosa; Tabarés, Glòria; Royle, Louise; Harvey, David J; Dwek, Raymond A; Rudd, Pauline M; de Llorens, Rafael

    2003-06-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a glycoprotein secreted by prostate epithelial cells. PSA is currently used as a marker of prostate carcinoma because high levels of PSA are indicative of a tumor situation. However, PSA tests still suffer from a lack of specificity to distinguish between benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer. To determine whether PSA glycosylation could provide a means of differentiating between PSA from normal and tumor origins, N-glycan characterization of PSA from seminal fluid and prostate cancer cells (LNCaP cell line) by sequencing analysis and mass spectrometry was carried out. Glycans from normal PSA (that correspond to low and high pI PSA fractions) were sialylated biantennary complex structures, half of them being disialylated in the low pI PSA fraction and mostly monosialylated in the high pI PSA. PSA from LNCaP cells was purified to homogeneity, and its glycan analysis showed a significantly different pattern, especially in the outer ends of the biantennary complex structures. In contrast to normal PSA glycans, which were sialylated, LNCaP PSA oligosaccharides were all neutral and contained a higher fucose content. In 10-15% of the structures fucose was linked alpha1-2 to galactose, forming the H2 epitope absent in normal PSA. GalNAc was increased in LNCaP glycans to 65%, whereas in normal PSA it was only present in 25% of the structures. These carbohydrate differences allow a distinction to be made between PSA from normal and tumor origins and suggest a valuable biochemical tool for diagnosis and follow-up purposes.

  20. Extended use of Prostate Health Index and percentage of [-2]pro-prostate-specific antigen in Chinese men with prostate specific antigen 10–20 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination

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    Peter Ka-Fung Chiu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We investigated the extended use of Prostate Health Index (PHI and percentage of [-2]pro-prostate-specific antigen (%p2PSA in Chinese men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination (DRE. Materials and Methods: All consecutive Chinese men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE who agreed for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided 10-core prostate biopsy were recruited. Blood samples were taken immediately before TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. The performances of total PSA (tPSA, %free-to-total PSA (%fPSA, %p2PSA, and PHI were compared using logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic, and decision curve analyses (DCA. Results: From 2008 to 2015, 312 consecutive Chinese men were included. Among them, 53 out of 312 (17.0% men were diagnosed to have prostate cancer on biopsy. The proportions of men with positive biopsies were 6.7% in PHI55 (chi-square test, p55 (chi-square test, p<0.001. By utilizing the PHI cutoff of 35 to men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE, 57.1% (178 of 312 biopsies could be avoided. Conclusions: Both PHI and %p2PSA performed well in predicting prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer. The use of PHI and %p2PSA should be extended to Chinese men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE.

  1. Fatty acid regulates gene expression and growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Chen, Y.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that the omega-6 fatty acids increase the rate of tumor growth. Here we test that hypothesis in the PC-3 human prostate tumor. We found that the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and the AA metabolite PGE(2) stimulate tumor growth while oleic acid (OA) and the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibited growth. In examining the role of AA in growth response, we extended our studies to analyze changes in early gene expression induced by AA. We demonstrate that c-fos expression is increased within minutes of addition in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the immediate early gene cox-2 is also increased in the presence of AA in a dose-dependent manner, while the constitutive cox-1 message was not increased. Three hours after exposure to AA, the synthesis of PGE(2) via COX-2 was also increased. Previous studies have demonstrated that AA was primarily delivered by low density lipoprotein (LDL) via its receptor (LDLr). Since it is known that hepatomas, acute myelogenous leukemia and colorectal tumors lack normal cholesterol feedback, we examined the role of the LDLr in growth regulation of the PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Analysis of ldlr mRNA expression and LDLr function demonstrated that human PC-3 prostate cancer cells lack normal feedback regulation. While exogenous LDL caused a significant stimulation of cell growth and PGE(2) synthesis, no change was seen in regulation of the LDLr by LDL. Taken together, these data show that normal cholesterol feedback of ldlr message and protein is lost in prostate cancer. These data suggest that unregulated over-expression of LDLr in tumor cells would permit increased availability of AA, which induces immediate early genes c-fos and cox-2 within minutes of uptake.

  2. A novel three serum phospholipid panel differentiates normal individuals from those with prostate cancer.

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    Nima Patel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The results of prostate specific antigen (PSA and digital rectal examination (DRE screenings lead to both under and over treatment of prostate cancer (PCa. As such, there is an urgent need for the identification and evaluation of new markers for early diagnosis and disease prognosis. Studies have shown a link between PCa, lipids and lipid metabolism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the concentrations and distribution of serum lipids in patients with PCa as compared with serum from controls. METHOD: Using Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS lipid profiling, we analyzed serum phospholipids from age-matched subjects who were either newly diagnosed with PCa or healthy (normal. RESULTS: We found that cholester (CE, dihydrosphingomyelin (DSM, phosphatidylcholine (PC, egg phosphatidylcholine (ePC and egg phosphatidylethanolamine (ePE are the 5 major lipid groups that varied between normal and cancer serums. ePC 38:5, PC 40:3, and PC 42:4 represent the lipids species most prevalent in PCa as compared with normal serum. Further analysis revealed that serum ePC 38:5 ≥0.015 nmoles, PC 40.3 ≤0.001 nmoles and PC 42:4 ≤0.0001 nmoles correlated with the absence of PCa at 94% prediction. Conversely, serum ePC 38:5 ≤0.015 nmoles, PC 40:3 ≥0.001 nmoles, and PC 42:4 ≥0.0001 nmoles correlated with the presence of PCa. CONCLUSION: In summary, we have demonstrated that ePC 38:5, PC 40:3, and PC 42:4 may serve as early predictive serum markers for the presence of PCa.

  3. Vibroacoustic stimulation in normal term human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, A; Pighetti, M; Vanacore, F; Fabbrocini, G; Arpaia, L

    2005-05-01

    To examine the effects of vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) on fetal heart rate (FHR) in term human fetuses by computerized carditocography system. FHR was analyzed 20 min before and 30 min after vibroacoustic stimulation using the Oxford Sonicaid System 8002 for computerized FHR measurement. Recordings were made in 31 uncomplicated pregnancies at 36-42 weeks' gestation. Vibroacustic stimulation of the fetus evoked a significant increase in all the parameters evaluated (number of fetal movements, of accelerations above 10 and 15 bpm, in high- and low-variability episodes, and in short-term variations). Concerning the effect of behavioural states on the response to VAS, some changes (FHR, high-variability episodes) occurred independently of behavioural states, while other parameters (accelerations >10 and 15 bpm: short-term variation) underwent statistically significant changes only for behavioural states 1F and 2F. Our study supports the hypothesis of a significant fetal response in normal term pregnancy, as clearly shown by computerized cardiotocography. The immediate response occurred independently of behavioural states, although some differences were present (mainly for F1 and F2 states) if the evaluation was extended in time.

  4. Role of antibodies to human papillomavirus 16 in prostate cancer: A seroscreening by peptide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaojun; Zhou, Zheng; Chen, Ye; Chen, Wen; Ma, Hongwei; Pu, Jinxian

    2017-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating in estimating the potential role of human papillomavirus infection in prostate carcinogenesis. However, the results remain inconclusive. We measured the serostatus of antibodies to one of the high-risk human papillomaviruses, human papillomavirus 16, with a newly developed peptide microarray. Serum samples were collected from 75 untreated prostate cancer patients, along with 80 control subjects. We identified 12 peptides with significant differences in prostate cancer samples from all 241 peptides derived from human papillomavirus 16. Our results showed human papillomavirus 16 infection in 64.0% of prostate cancer serum samples, which is significantly different compared with the controls ( p human papillomavirus 16 infection and risk of prostate cancer. The different serostatus of antibodies in the two subgroups indicated that human papillomavirus 16 infection might occur and play a potential role of progression in a minority of prostate cancer.

  5. Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Prostate Organoids In Vitro and its Perturbation by Low-Dose Bisphenol A Exposure.

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    Esther L Calderon-Gierszal

    Full Text Available Studies using rodent and adult human prostate stem-progenitor cell models suggest that developmental exposure to the endocrine disruptor Bisphenol-A (BPA can predispose to prostate carcinogenesis with aging. Unknown at present is whether the embryonic human prostate is equally susceptible to BPA during its natural developmental window. To address this unmet need, we herein report the construction of a pioneer in vitro human prostate developmental model to study the effects of BPA. The directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC into prostatic organoids in a spatial system was accomplished with precise temporal control of growth factors and steroids. Activin-induced definitive endoderm was driven to prostate specification by combined exposure to WNT10B and FGF10. Matrigel culture for 20-30 days in medium containing R-Spondin-1, Noggin, EGF, retinoic acid and testosterone was sufficient for mature prostate organoid development. Immunofluorescence and gene expression analysis confirmed that organoids exhibited cytodifferentiation and functional properties of the human prostate. Exposure to 1 nM or 10 nM BPA throughout differentiation culture disturbed early morphogenesis in a dose-dependent manner with 1 nM BPA increasing and 10 nM BPA reducing the number of branched structures formed. While differentiation of branched structures to mature organoids seemed largely unaffected by BPA exposure, the stem-like cell population increased, appearing as focal stem cell nests that have not properly entered lineage commitment rather than the rare isolated stem cells found in normally differentiated structures. These findings provide the first direct evidence that low-dose BPA exposure targets hESC and perturbs morphogenesis as the embryonic cells differentiate towards human prostate organoids, suggesting that the developing human prostate may be susceptible to disruption by in utero BPA exposures.

  6. Muscarinic receptor subtype mRNA expression in the human prostate: association with age, pathological diagnosis, prostate size, or potentially interfering medications?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Lambertus P. W.; Teitsma, Christine A.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Michel, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    As the prostate abundantly expresses muscarinic receptors and antagonists for such receptors are increasingly used in the treatment of men with voiding function and large prostates, we have explored an association of the mRNA expression of human M1, M2, M3, M4, and M5 receptors in human prostate

  7. A 6-kb promoter fragment mimics in transgenic mice the prostate-specific and androgen-regulated expression of the endogenous prostate-specific antigen gene in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.J.M. Cleutjens (Kitty); H.A.G.M. van der Korput (Hetty); C.C.E.M. Ehren-van Eekelen (Conny); R.A. Sikes; C. Fasciana (Claudia); L.W. Chung; J. Trapman (Jan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractProstate-specific antigen (PSA) is a kallikrein-like serine protease, which is almost exclusively synthesized in the luminal epithelial cells of the human prostate. PSA expression is androgen regulated. Previously, we characterized in vitro the proximal

  8. Deep RNA sequencing analysis of readthrough gene fusions in human prostate adenocarcinoma and reference samples

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    Nacu Serban

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Readthrough fusions across adjacent genes in the genome, or transcription-induced chimeras (TICs, have been estimated using expressed sequence tag (EST libraries to involve 4-6% of all genes. Deep transcriptional sequencing (RNA-Seq now makes it possible to study the occurrence and expression levels of TICs in individual samples across the genome. Methods We performed single-end RNA-Seq on three human prostate adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding normal tissues, as well as brain and universal reference samples. We developed two bioinformatics methods to specifically identify TIC events: a targeted alignment method using artificial exon-exon junctions within 200,000 bp from adjacent genes, and genomic alignment allowing splicing within individual reads. We performed further experimental verification and characterization of selected TIC and fusion events using quantitative RT-PCR and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Results Targeted alignment against artificial exon-exon junctions yielded 339 distinct TIC events, including 32 gene pairs with multiple isoforms. The false discovery rate was estimated to be 1.5%. Spliced alignment to the genome was less sensitive, finding only 18% of those found by targeted alignment in 33-nt reads and 59% of those in 50-nt reads. However, spliced alignment revealed 30 cases of TICs with intervening exons, in addition to distant inversions, scrambled genes, and translocations. Our findings increase the catalog of observed TIC gene pairs by 66%. We verified 6 of 6 predicted TICs in all prostate samples, and 2 of 5 predicted novel distant gene fusions, both private events among 54 prostate tumor samples tested. Expression of TICs correlates with that of the upstream gene, which can explain the prostate-specific pattern of some TIC events and the restriction of the SLC45A3-ELK4 e4-e2 TIC to ERG-negative prostate samples, as confirmed in 20 matched prostate tumor and normal

  9. Oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 expression in human breast and prostate cancer cases, and its regulation by sex steroid hormones

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    Cláudio Jorge Maia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 is an interferon-induced protein characterised by its capacity to catalyse the synthesis of 2ʹ-5ʹ-linked oligomers of adenosine from adenosine triphosphate (2-5A. The 2-5A binds to a latent Ribonuclease L (RNase L, which subsequently dimerises into its active form and may play an important role in the control of cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Previously, our research group identified OAS1 as a differentially-expressed gene in breast and prostate cancer cell lines when compared to normal cells. This study evaluates: i the expression of OAS1 in human breast and prostate cancer specimens; and ii the effect of sex steroid hormones in regulating the expression of OAS1 in breast (MCF-7 and prostate (LNCaP cancer cell lines. The obtained results showed that OAS1 expression was down-regulated in human infiltrative ductal carcinoma of breast, adenocarcinoma of prostate, and benign prostate hyperplasia, both at mRNA and protein level. In addition, OAS1 expression was negatively correlated with the progression of breast and prostate cancer. With regards to the regulation of OAS1 gene, it was demonstrated that 17β-estradiol (E2 down-regulates OAS1 gene in MCF-7 cell lines, an effect that seems to be dependent on the activation of oestrogen receptor (ER. On the other hand, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT treatment showed no effect on the expression of OAS1 in LNCaP cell lines. The lower levels of OAS1 in breast and prostate cancer cases indicated that the OAS1/RNaseL apoptotic pathway may be compromised in breast and prostate tumours. Moreover, the present findings suggested that this effect may be enhanced by oestrogen in ER-positive breast cancers.

  10. Cell Survival and DNA Damage in Normal Prostate Cells Irradiated Out-of-Field.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, L

    2014-10-31

    Interest in out-of-field radiation dose has been increasing with the introduction of new techniques, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These new techniques offer superior conformity of high-dose regions to the target compared to conventional techniques, however more normal tissue is exposed to low-dose radiation with VMAT. There is a potential increase in radiobiological effectiveness associated with lower energy photons delivered during VMAT as normal cells are exposed to a temporal change in incident photon energy spectrum. During VMAT deliveries, normal cells can be exposed to the primary radiation beam, as well as to transmission and scatter radiation. The impact of low-dose radiation, radiation-induced bystander effect and change in energy spectrum on normal cells are not well understood. The current study examined cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells after exposure to out-of-field radiation both with and without the transfer of bystander factors. The effect of a change in energy spectrum out-of-field compared to in-field was also investigated. Prostate cancer (LNCaP) and normal prostate (PNT1A) cells were placed in-field and out-of-field, respectively, with the PNT1A cells being located 1 cm from the field edge when in-field cells were being irradiated with 2 Gy. Clonogenic and γ-H2AX assays were performed postirradiation to examine cell survival and DNA damage. The assays were repeated when bystander factors from the LNCaP cells were transferred to the PNT1A cells and also when the PNT1A cells were irradiated in-field to a different energy spectrum. An average out-of-field dose of 10.8 ± 4.2 cGy produced a significant reduction in colony volume and increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci\\/cell in the PNT1A cells compared to the sham-irradiated control cells. An adaptive response was observed in the PNT1A cells having first received a low out-of-field dose and then the bystander factors. The PNT1A cells showed a significant

  11. Different Phenotypes in Human Prostate Cancer: α6 or α3 Integrin in Cell-extracellular Adhesion Sites

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    Monika Schmelz

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of α6/α3 integrin in adhesion complexes at the basal membrane in human normal and cancer prostate glands was analyzed in 135 biopsies from 61 patients. The levels of the polarized α6/α3 integrin expression at the basal membrane of prostate tumor glands were determined by quantitative immunohistochemistry. The α6/α3 integrin expression was compared with Gleason sum score, pathological stage, and preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA. The associations were assessed by statistical methods. Eighty percent of the tumors expressed the α6 or α3 integrin and 20% was integrin-negative. Gleason sum score, but not serum PSA, was associated with the integrin expression. Low Gleason sum score correlated with increased integrin expression, high Gleason sum score with low and negative integrin expression. Three prostate tumor phenotypes were distinguished based on differential integrin expression. Type I coexpressed both α6 and α3 subunits, type II exclusively expressed a6 integrin, and type III expressed α3 integrin only. Fifteen cases were further examined for the codistribution of vinculin, paxillin, and CD 151 on frozen serial sections using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The α6/α3 integrins, CD151, paxillin, and vinculin were present within normal glands. In prostate carcinoma, α6 integrin was colocalized with CD 151, but not with vinculin or paxillin. In tumor phenotype I, the α6 subunit did not colocalize with the α3 subunit indicating the existence of two different adhesion complexes. Human prostate tumors display on their cell surface the α6β1 and/or α3β1 integrins. Three tumor phenotypes associated with two different adhesion complexes were identified, suggesting a reorganization of cell adhesion structures in prostate cancer.

  12. Discrimination of prostate cancer from normal peripheral zone and central gland tissue by using dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbrecht, M.R.W.; Huisman, H.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jager, G.J.; Leenders, G.J.L.H. van; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Rosette, J.J.M.H.C. de la; Blickman, J.G.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate which parameters of dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and T2 relaxation rate would result in optimal discrimination of prostatic carcinoma from normal peripheral zone (PZ) and central gland (CG) tissues and to correlate these parameters with tumor stage, Gleason score,

  13. Obesity inversely correlates with prostate-specific antigen levels in a population with normal screening results of prostate cancer in northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Ma, M; Nan, X; Sheng, B

    2016-07-11

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a diagnostic biomarker of prostate cancer and is possibly associated with obesity. This study aimed to explore the relationships between obesity indicators [body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC)] with PSA in Chinese men. A cross-sectional study of men aged 30-85 years undergoing prostate cancer screening was conducted from August 2008 to July 2013 in Xi'an, China. Data were obtained from clinical reports, condition was recorded based on self-report including demographics, weight, height, and WC (>90 cm=obese). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and prostate volume (PV) were assessed clinically. Patients were grouped by BMI (normal=22.9, overweight=23-27.4, obese≥27.5 kg/m2). PSA parameters of density (PSAD), PSA serum level, and PSA increasing rate per year (PSAR) were calculated per BMI and age groups (30-40, 41-59, 60-85 years). Obesity indicators (BMI and WC) and PSA parameter relationships were modeled by age-stratified linear regression. Of 35,632 Chinese men surveyed, 13,084 were analyzed, including 13.44% obese, 57.44% overweight, and 29.12% normal weight, according to BMI; 25.84% were centrally (abdominally) obese according to WC. BMI and WC were negatively associated with all PSA parameters, except PSAD and PSAR [Pobesity was associated with lower PSA in Chinese men. Therefore, an individual's BMI and WC should be considered when PSA is used to screen for prostate cancer.

  14. Obesity inversely correlates with prostate-specific antigen levels in a population with normal screening results of prostate cancer in northwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA is a diagnostic biomarker of prostate cancer and is possibly associated with obesity. This study aimed to explore the relationships between obesity indicators [body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (WC] with PSA in Chinese men. A cross-sectional study of men aged 30-85 years undergoing prostate cancer screening was conducted from August 2008 to July 2013 in Xi'an, China. Data were obtained from clinical reports, condition was recorded based on self-report including demographics, weight, height, and WC (>90 cm=obese. Fasting blood glucose (FBG and prostate volume (PV were assessed clinically. Patients were grouped by BMI (normal=22.9, overweight=23-27.4, obese≥27.5 kg/m2. PSA parameters of density (PSAD, PSA serum level, and PSA increasing rate per year (PSAR were calculated per BMI and age groups (30-40, 41-59, 60-85 years. Obesity indicators (BMI and WC and PSA parameter relationships were modeled by age-stratified linear regression. Of 35,632 Chinese men surveyed, 13,084 were analyzed, including 13.44% obese, 57.44% overweight, and 29.12% normal weight, according to BMI; 25.84% were centrally (abdominally obese according to WC. BMI and WC were negatively associated with all PSA parameters, except PSAD and PSAR [P<0.05, BMI: β=-0.081 (95%CI=-0.055 to -0.036, WC: β=-0.101 (-0.021 to -0.015], and independent of FBG and PV (P<0.05 in an age-adjusted model. In conclusion, obesity was associated with lower PSA in Chinese men. Therefore, an individual's BMI and WC should be considered when PSA is used to screen for prostate cancer.

  15. The expression of Egfl7 in human normal tissues and epithelial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chun; Yang, Lian-Yue; Wu, Fan; Tao, Yi-Ming; Liu, Lin-Sen; Zhang, Jin-Fan; He, Ya-Ning; Tang, Li-Li; Chen, Guo-Dong; Guo, Lei

    2013-04-23

    To investigate the expression of Egfl7 in normal adult human tissues and human epithelial tumors.
 RT-PCR and Western blot were employed to detect Egfl7 expression in normal adult human tissues and 10 human epithelial tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), lung cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, esophageal cancer, malignant glioma, ovarian cancer and renal cancer. Immunohistochemistry and cytoimmunofluorescence were subsequently used to determine the localization of Egfl7 in human epithelial tumor tissues and cell lines. ELISA was also carried out to examine the serum Egfl7 levels in cancer patients. In addition, correlations between Egfl7 expression and clinicopathological features as well as prognosis of HCC and breast cancer were also analyzed on the basis of immunohistochemistry results.
 Egfl7 was differentially expressed in 19 adult human normal tissues and was overexpressed in all 10 human epithelial tumor tissues. The serum Egfl7 level was also significantly elevated in cancer patients. The increased Egfl7 expression in HCC correlated with vein invasion, absence of capsule formation, multiple tumor nodes and poor prognosis. Similarly, upregulation of Egfl7 in breast cancer correlated strongly with TNM stage, lymphatic metastasis, estrogen receptor positivity, Her2 positivity and poor prognosis. 
 Egfl7 is significantly upregulated in human epithelial tumor tissues, suggesting Egfl7 to be a potential biomarker for human epithelial tumors, especially HCC and breast cancer.

  16. Establishment and characterization of a human prostatic carcinoma cell line (PC-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaighn, M E; Narayan, K S; Ohnuki, Y; Lechner, J F; Jones, L W

    1979-07-01

    The establishment, characterization, and tumorigenicity of a new epithelial cell line (PC-3) from a human prostatic adenocarcinoma metastatic to bone is reported. The cultured cells show anchorage-independent growth in both monolayers and in soft agar suspension and produce subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Culture of the transplanted tumor yielded a human cell line with characteristics identical to those used initially to produce the tumor. PC-3 has a greatly reduced dependence upon serum for growth when compared to normal prostatic epithelial cells and does not respond to androgens, glucocorticoids, or epidermal or fibroblast gowth factors. Karyotypic analysis by quinacrine banding revealed the cells to be completely aneuploid with a modal chromosome number in the hypotriploid range. At least 10 distinctive marker chromosomes were identified. The overall karyotype as well as the marker chromosomes are distinct from those of the HeLa cell. Electron microscopic studies revealed many features common to neoplastic cells of epithelial origin including numerous microvilli, junctional complexes, abnormal nuclei and nucleoli, abnormal mitochondria, annulate lamellae, and lipoidal bodies. Overall, the functional and morphologic characteristics of PC-3 are those of a poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma. These cells should be useful in investigating the biochemical changes in advanced prostatic cancer cells and in assessing their response to chemotherapeutic agents.

  17. Optimization and comprehensive characterization of a faithful tissue culture model of the benign and malignant human prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maund, Sophia Lisette; Nolley, Rosalie; Peehl, Donna Mae

    2014-02-01

    Few preclinical models accurately depict normal human prostate tissue or primary prostate cancer (PCa). In vitro systems typically lack complex cellular interactions among structured prostatic epithelia and a stromal microenvironment, and genetic and molecular fidelity are concerns in both in vitro and in vivo models. 'Tissue slice cultures' (TSCs) provide realistic preclinical models of diverse tissues and organs, but have not been fully developed or widely utilized for prostate studies. Problems encountered include degeneration of differentiated secretory cells, basal cell hyperplasia, and poor survival of PCa. Here, we optimized, characterized, and applied a TSC model of primary human PCa and benign prostate tissue that overcomes many deficiencies of current in vitro models. Tissue cores from fresh prostatectomy specimens were precision-cut at 300 μm and incubated in a rotary culture apparatus. The ability of varied culture conditions to faithfully maintain benign and cancer cell and tissue structure and function over time was evaluated by immunohistological and biochemical assays. After optimization of the culture system, molecular and cellular responses to androgen ablation and to piperlongumine (PL), purported to specifically reduce androgen signaling in PCa, were investigated. Optimized culture conditions successfully maintained the structural and functional fidelity of both benign and PCa TSCs for 5 days. TSCs exhibited androgen dependence, appropriately undergoing ductal degeneration, reduced proliferation, and decreased prostate-specific antigen expression upon androgen ablation. Further, TSCs revealed cancer-specific reduction of androgen receptor and increased apoptosis upon treatment with PL, validating data from cell lines. We demonstrate a TSC model that authentically recapitulates the structural, cellular, and genetic characteristics of the benign and malignant human prostate, androgen dependence of the native tissue, and cancer-specific response

  18. Expression of interleukin-17RC protein in normal human tissues

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    Ge Dongxia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-17 (IL-17 cytokines and receptors play an important role in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. IL-17 receptors IL-17RA and IL-17RC have been found to form a heterodimer for mediating the signals of IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines. While the function and signaling pathway of IL-17RA has been revealed, IL-17RC has not been well characterized. The function and signaling pathway of IL-17RC remain largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to systematically examine IL-17RC protein expression in 53 human tissues. Results IL-17RC expression in 51 normal human tissues and two benign tumors (i.e., lymphangioma and parathyroid adenoma on the tissue microarrays was determined by immunohistochemical staining, using two polyclonal antibodies against IL-17RC. IL-17RC protein was expressed in many cell types including the myocardial cells, vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, glandular cells (of the adrenal, parathyroid, pituitary, thyroid, pancreas, parotid salivary, and subepidermal glands, epithelial cells (of the esophagus, stomach, intestine, anus, renal tubule, breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, epididymis, seminal vesicle, prostate, gallbladder, bronchus, lung, and skin, oocytes in the ovary, Sertoli cells in the testis, motor neurons in the spinal cord, autonomic ganglia and nerves in the intestine, skeletal muscle cells, adipocytes, articular chondrocytes, and synovial cells. High levels of IL-17RC protein expression were observed in most vascular and lymphatic endothelium and squamous epithelium. The epithelium of the breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, kidney, bladder and bronchus also expressed high levels of IL-17RC, so did the glandular cells in the adrenal cortex, parotid salivary and subepidermal glands. In contrast, IL-17RC protein was not detectable in the smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, antral mucosa of the stomach, mucosa of the colon, endometrium of the uterus, neurons of the brain

  19. The calcium-binding protein S100P in normal and malignant human tissues

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    Pastorek Jaromir

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S100P is a Ca2+ binding protein overexpressed in a variety of cancers, and thus, has been considered a potential tumor biomarker. Very little has been studied about its normal expression and functions. Methods We examined S100P expression in normal human tissues by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. S100P protein expression was also studied in a series of tumors, consisting of 74 ovarian, 11 pancreatic, 56 gastric, 57 colorectal, 89 breast and 193 prostate carcinomas using a novel anti-S100P monoclonal antibody. Results Among the normal tissues, the highest S100P mRNA levels were observed in the placenta and esophagus. Moderate signals were also detected in the stomach, duodenum, large intestine, prostate and leukocytes. At the protein level, the highest reactions for S100P were seen in the placenta and stomach. Immunostaining of tumor specimens showed that S100P protein is expressed in all the tumor categories included in the study, being most prevalent in gastric tumors. Conclusion Based on our observations, S100P is widely expressed in both normal and malignant tissues. The high expression in some tumors suggests that it may represent a potential target molecule for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  20. Computational imaging reveals shape differences between normal and malignant prostates on MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Mirabela; Purysko, Andrei S.; Verma, Sadhna; Kiechle, Jonathan; Gollamudi, Jay; Ghose, Soumya; Herrmann, Karin; Gulani, Vikas; Paspulati, Raj; Ponsky, Lee; Böhm, Maret; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Moses, Daniel; Shnier, Ron; Delprado, Warick; Thompson, James; Stricker, Phillip; Madabhushi, Anant

    2017-01-01

    We seek to characterize differences in the shape of the prostate and the central gland (combined central and transitional zones) between men with biopsy confirmed prostate cancer and men who were identified as not having prostate cancer either on account of a negative biopsy or had pelvic imaging done for a non-prostate malignancy. T2w MRI from 70 men were acquired at three institutions. The cancer positive group (PCa+) comprised 35 biopsy positive (Bx+) subjects from three institutions (Gleason scores: 6–9, Stage: T1–T3). The negative group (PCa−) combined 24 biopsy negative (Bx−) from two institutions and 11 subjects diagnosed with rectal cancer but with no clinical or MRI indications of prostate cancer (Cl−). The boundaries of the prostate and central gland were delineated on T2w MRI by two expert raters and were used to construct statistical shape atlases for the PCa+, Bx− and Cl− prostates. An atlas comparison was performed via per-voxel statistical tests to localize shape differences (significance assessed at p hypertrophy in the Bx− subpopulation, resulting in significant volume and posterior side shape differences relative to PCa+ group. Significant differences in the corresponding prostate shapes were noted at the apex when comparing the Cl− and PCa+ prostates. PMID:28145532

  1. Is Human Papillomavirus Associated with Prostate Cancer Survival?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarosa Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of human papillomavirus (HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is highly controversial: some studies suggest a positive association between HPV infection and an increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa, whereas others do not reveal any correlation. In this study, we investigated the prognostic impact of HPV infection on survival in 150 primary PCa patients. One hundred twelve (74.67% patients had positive expression of HPV E7 protein, which was evaluated in tumour tissue by immunohistochemistry. DNA analysis on a subset of cases confirmed HPV infection and revealed the presence of genotype 16. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, HPV-positive cancer patients showed worse overall survival (OS (median 4.59 years compared to HPV-negative (median 8.24 years, P=0.0381. In multivariate analysis age (P<0.001, Gleason score (P<0.001, nuclear grading (P=0.002, and HPV status (P=0.034 were independent prognostic factors for OS. In our cohort, we observed high prevalence of HPV nuclear E7 oncoprotein and an association between HPV infection and PCa survival. In the debate about the oncogenic activity of HPV in PCa, our results further confirm the need for additional studies to clarify the possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis.

  2. Constitutional Aneuploidy in the Normal Human Brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rehen, Stevens K; Yung, Yun C; McCreight, Matthew P; Kaushal, Dhruv; Yang, Amy H; Almeida, Beatriz S. V; Kingsbury, Marcy A; Cabral, Katia M. S; McConnell, Michael J; Anliker, Brigitte; Fontanoz, Marisa; Chun, Jerold

    2005-01-01

    .... Chromosome 21 aneuploid cells constitute approximately 4% of the estimated one trillion cells in the human brain and include non-neuronal cells and postmitotic neurons identified by the neuronspecific nuclear protein marker...

  3. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPES 16, 18 AND 31 SEROSTATUS AND PROSTATE CANCER RISK IN THE PROSTATE CANCER PREVENTION TRIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Hoque, Ashraful M.; Hsing, Ann W.; Thompson, Ian M.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Since human papillomavirus (HPV) infection was first identified as a risk factor for cervical cancer, several seroepidemiologic and tissue-based studies have investigated HPV in relation to prostate cancer, another common genitourinary malignancy, with mixed results. To further inform this potential association, we conducted a large, prospective investigation of HPV types 16, 18, and 31 in relation to risk of prostate cancer in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT). Cases were a sample of men diagnosed with prostate cancer after visit 2 or on their end-of-study biopsy (n=616). Controls were men not diagnosed with prostate cancer during the trial or on their end-of-study biopsy (n=616). Controls were frequency-matched to cases by age, treatment arm, and family history of prostate cancer. Sera from visit 2 were tested for IgG antibodies against HPV-16, -18 and -31. No associations were observed for weak or strong HPV-16 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53–1.64, and OR=1.07, 95% CI: 077–1.48, respectively), HPV-18 (OR=0.75, 95% CI: 0.27–2.04, and OR=0.87, 95% CI: 0.47–1.63) or HPV-31 seropositivity (OR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.45–1.28, and OR=1.15, 95% CI: 0.80–1.64) and risk of prostate cancer. Considering this finding in the context of the HPV and prostate cancer literature, HPV does not appear to be associated with risk of prostate cancer, at least by mechanisms proposed to date, and using epidemiologic designs and laboratory techniques currently available. PMID:20142255

  4. Calcium regulation of androgen receptor expression in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Blok (Leen); J.E. Perry; J.K. Lindzey; D.J. Tindall; Y. Gong (Yuewen)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractElevation of intracellular calcium levels in the presence of normal androgen levels has been implicated in apoptotic prostate cell death. Since the androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the regulation of growth and differentiation of the prostate, it was of

  5. Choline Autoradiography of Human Prostate Cancer Xenograft: Effect of Castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of castration and tracer uptake time interval on the level of radiolabeled choline accumulation in murine-implanted human prostate tumor xenografts using quantitative autoradiography. We implanted androgen-dependent (CWR22 and androgen-independent (PC3 human prostate cancer cells in castrated (n = 9 and noncastrated (n = 9 athymic male mice and allowed tumors to grow to 1 cm3. The mice were euthanized at 5, 10, and 20 minutes after injection of 5 µCi [14C]-choline. Mice were prepared for quantitative autoradiography with density light units of viable tumor sections converted to units of radioactivity (nCi/mm2 using calibration. Two-group comparisons were performed using a two-tailed Student t-test with unequal variance and with a significance probability level of less than .05. Two-group comparisons between the means of the tracer uptake level for each tumor type at each of three time points for each of two host types showed that (1 the level of tracer localization in the two tumor types was affected little in relation to the host type and (2 PC3 tumor uptake level tended to increase slowly with time only in the noncastrated host, whereas this was not observed in the castrated host or with CWR22 tumor in either host type. The uptake time interval and castration do not appear to significantly affect the level of radiolabeled choline uptake by the human prostate cancer xenograft.

  6. Physiological normal levels of androgen inhibit proliferation of prostate cancer cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitao Song

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For more than 70 years, it has been believed that a severe reduction of serum androgen levels caused regression of prostate cancer (PCa and that increasing androgen levels enhanced growth of PCa. However, numerous recent studies have questioned this traditional belief. In our study, LNCaP and MDA PCa 2b PCa cells were treated with various levels of androgens for 10 or 20 days, and the cell growth was measured with crystal violet mitogenic assay. The results indicated that the effect of androgens on the proliferation of PCa cells occurs in a biphasic pattern, with the androgen levels promoting optimal cell growth at approximately 0.23 ng ml−1 for LNCaP cells and between 1 and 2 ng ml−1 for MDA PCa 2b cells. Both of the optimal androgen levels are within the adult men's physiological low range (<2.4 ng ml−1 . At lower concentrations than the optimal androgen level, increasing androgen concentration promoted the proliferation of PCa cells. However, at the higher concentrations, increasing androgen concentration resulted in a dose-dependent proliferative inhibition. We conclude that physiologically normal levels of androgen inhibit the proliferation of PCa cells in vitro. However, at very low levels androgens are essential for initial growth of PCa cells.

  7. Loss of Expression of Human Spectrin Src Homology Domain Binding Protein 1 is Associated with 10p Loss in Human Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A. Macoska

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene encoding human spectrin Src homology domain binding protein 1, or Hssh3bpl, which is a marker of macropinocytic vesicles and a potential regulator of macropinocytosis, co-localizes to a YAC containing chromosome 10p sequences at loci D10S89 and D10S111 that are frequently deleted in prostate tumors. Expression of Hssh3bp1 was evaluated at the protein level in 17 paired normal and malignant prostate tumor samples using the monoclonal antibody 2G8 to Hssh3bpl. These experiments demonstrated that 4/6 tumors (67% with 10p deletion failed to express Hssh3bp1 protein compared to 5/11 (46% tumors with intact 10p. Thus, loss of Hssh3bp1 expression is concordant with allelic loss of adjacent 10p sequences in human prostate tumors. In addition, two prostate tumor cell lines contain an exon skipping mutation in the Hssh3bp1 gene that leads to the abnormal splicing of the mRNA and loss of a portion of Abl tyrosine kinase SH3 domain binding site in the protein. These data are consistent with a role for Hssh3bp1 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene inactivated during prostate tumorigenesis.

  8. Early human prostate adenocarcinomas harbor androgen-independent cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita R Fiñones

    Full Text Available Although blockade of androgen receptor (AR signaling represents the main treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PrCa, many patients progress to a lethal phenotype of "Castration-Resistant" prostate cancer (CR-PrCa. With the hypothesis that early PrCa may harbor a population of androgen-unresponsive cancer cells as precursors to CR-recurrent disease, we undertook the propagation of androgen-independent cells from PrCa-prostatectomy samples of early, localized (Stage-I cases. A collection of 120 surgical specimens from prostatectomy cases was established, among which 54 were adenocarcinomas. Hormone-free cell culture conditions were developed allowing routine propagation of cells expressing prostate basal cell markers and stem/progenitor cell markers, and which proliferated as spheres/spheroids in suspension cultures. Colonies of androgen-independent epithelial cells grew out from 30/43 (70% of the adenocarcinoma cases studied in detail. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that CR-PrCa cells were positive for CD44, CD133, CK5/14, c-kit, integrin α2β1, SSEA4, E-Cadherin and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH. All 30 CR-PrCa cell cultures were also TERT-positive, but negative for TMPRSS2-ERG. Additionally, a subset of 22 of these CR-PrCa cell cultures was examined by orthotopic xenografting in intact and castrated SCID mice, generating histologically typical locally-invasive human PrCa or undifferentiated cancers, respectively, in 6-8 weeks. Cultured PrCa cells and orthotopically-induced in vivo cancers lacked PSA expression. We report here the propagation of Cancer Initiating Cells (CIC directly from Stage I human PrCa tissue without selection or genetic manipulation. The propagation of stem/progenitor-like CR-PrCa cells derived from early human prostate carcinomas suggests the existence of a subpopulation of cells resistant to androgen-deprivation therapy and which may drive the subsequent emergence of disseminated CR-PrCa.

  9. Immunolocalization of transforming growth factor alpha in normal human tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M E; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1996-01-01

    anchorage-independent growth of normal cells and was, therefore, considered as an "oncogenic" growth factor. Later, its immunohistochemical presence in normal human cells as well as its biological effects in normal human tissues have been demonstrated. The aim of the present investigation was to elucidate...... the distribution of the growth factor in a broad spectrum of normal human tissues. Indirect immunoenzymatic staining methods were used. The polypeptide was detected with a polyclonal as well as a monoclonal antibody. The polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies demonstrated almost identical immunoreactivity. TGF......-alpha was found to be widely distributed in cells of normal human tissues derived from all three germ layers, most often in differentiated cells. In epithelial cells, three different kinds of staining patterns were observed, either diffuse cytoplasmic, cytoplasmic in the basal parts of the cells, or distinctly...

  10. An In Vivo Mouse Model for Human Prostate Cancer Metastasis

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    Aaron M. Havens

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We developed a sensitive real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR assay that allows us to track early lodging/homing events in vivo. We used this technology to develop a metastasis assay of human prostate cancer (PCa growth in severe combined immunodeficient mice. For this purpose, marked human PCa cell lines were implanted subcutaneously or in the prostate (orthotopically of severe combined immunodeficient mice as models of primary tumors. Mice were then sacrificed at various time points, and distant tissues were investigated for the presence of metastatic cells. At 3 weeks, a number of tissues were recovered and evaluated by QPCR for the presence of metastatic cells. The data demonstrate that several PCa cell lines are able to spread from the primary lesion and take up residence in distant sites. If the primary tumors were resected at 3 weeks, in several cases, metastastic lesions were identified over the course of 9 months. We propose that this new model may be particularly useful in exploring the molecular events in early metastasis, identifying the metastatic niche, and studying issues pertaining to dormancy.

  11. Human prostatic urethra expresses vitamin D receptor and responds to vitamin D receptor ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeglio, P; Chavalmane, A K; Fibbi, B; Filippi, S; Marchetta, M; Marini, M; Morelli, A; Penna, G; Vignozzi, L; Vannelli, G B; Adorini, L; Maggi, M

    2010-11-01

    Chronic inflammation is now considered a determinant of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), promoting, together with the hormonal milieu, prostate overgrowth and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Prostatic urethra actively participates in determining progression of LUTS associated with BPH. To investigate the expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the ability of the VDR agonist elocalcitol to reduce inflammatory responses in human prostatic urethra (hPU) cells. Human prostatic urethra, prostate and bladder neck were obtained from patients affected by BPH. Immunohistochemical studies for VDR expression were performed in tissue samples, from which primary cell cultures were also derived. In hPU cells, proliferation and chemiotaxis were studied, along with Rho kinase (ROCK) activity (MYPT-1 phosphorylation) by western blot. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed for VDR, cyclooxygenase (COX-2), and interleukin (IL)-8 expression. Urethra displays higher VDR expression compared to prostate and bladder neck tissues. The VDR agonist elocalcitol partially reverts COX-2 and IL-8 mRNA upregulation induced by a pro-inflammatory cytokine mixture (IL-17, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α) and inhibits cell migration in urethral cells. Elocalcitol prevents activation of ROCK, as previously demonstrated in bladder and prostate cell cultures. Our results suggest that prostatic urethra is, within the lower urinary tract, a novel target for VDR agonists, as shown by the capacity of elocalcitol to inhibit ROCK activity and to limit inflammatory responses in human primary urethra cells.

  12. The struggle towards 'the New Normal': a qualitative insight into psychosexual adjustment to prostate cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanly, Narelle; Mireskandari, Shab; Juraskova, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    .... The aim of this qualitative study was to explore factors influencing psychosexual adjustment, self-perception, and unmet information and support needs of prostate cancer patients and their partners...

  13. Volume effects of late term normal tissue toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonta, Dacian Viorel

    Modeling of volume effects for treatment toxicity is paramount for optimization of radiation therapy. This thesis proposes a new model for calculating volume effects in gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. The radiobiological and the pathological basis for this model and its relationship to other models are detailed. A review of the radiobiological experiments and published clinical data identified salient features and specific properties a biologically adequate model has to conform to. The new model was fit to a set of actual clinical data. In order to verify the goodness of fit, two established NTCP models and a non-NTCP measure for complication risk were fitted to the same clinical data. The method of fit for the model parameters was maximum likelihood estimation. Within the framework of the maximum likelihood approach I estimated the parameter uncertainties for each complication prediction model. The quality-of-fit was determined using the Aikaike Information Criterion. Based on the model that provided the best fit, I identified the volume effects for both types of toxicities. Computer-based bootstrap resampling of the original dataset was used to estimate the bias and variance for the fitted parameter values. Computer simulation was also used to estimate the population size that generates a specific uncertainty level (3%) in the value of predicted complication probability. The same method was used to estimate the size of the patient population needed for accurate choice of the model underlying the NTCP. The results indicate that, depending on the number of parameters of a specific NTCP model, 100 (for two parameter models) and 500 patients (for three parameter models) are needed for accurate parameter fit. Correlation of complication occurrence in patients was also investigated. The results suggest that complication outcomes are correlated in a patient, although

  14. Conversion of androgen receptor signaling from a growth suppressor in normal prostate epithelial cells to an oncogene in prostate cancer cells involves a gain of function in c-Myc regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Griend, Donald J; Litvinov, Ivan V; Isaacs, John T

    2014-01-01

    In normal prostate, androgen-dependent androgen receptor (AR) signaling within prostate stromal cells induces their secretion of paracrine factors, termed "andromedins" which stimulate growth of the epithelial cells. The present studies demonstrate that androgen-dependent andromedin-driven growth stimulation is counter-balanced by androgen-induced AR signaling within normal adult prostate epithelial cells resulting in terminal G0 growth arrest coupled with terminal differentiation into ΔNp63-negative, PSA-expressing secretory luminal cells. This cell autonomous AR-driven terminal differentiation requires DNA-binding of the AR protein, is associated with decreases in c-Myc m-RNA and protein, are coupled with increases in p21, p27, and SKP-2 protein expression, and does not require functional p53. These changes result in down-regulation of Cyclin D1 protein and RB phosphoryation. shRNA knockdown documents that neither RB, p21, p27 alone or in combination are required for such AR-induced G0 growth arrest. Transgenic expression of a constitutive vector to prevent c-Myc down-regulation overrides AR-mediated growth arrest in normal prostate epithelial cells, which documents that AR-induced c-Myc down-regulation is critical in terminal growth arrest of normal prostate epithelial cells. In contrast, in prostate cancer cells, androgen-induced AR signaling paradoxically up-regulates c-Myc expression and stimulates growth as documented by inhibition of both of these responses following exposure to the AR antagonist, bicalutamide. These data document that AR signaling is converted from a growth suppressor in normal prostate epithelial cells to an oncogene in prostate cancer cells during prostatic carcinogenesis and that this conversion involves a gain of function for regulation of c-Myc expression.

  15. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of human body fluids and tissues in relation to prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Virendra; Dwivedi, Durgesh K; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution NMR spectroscopic studies of prostate tissue extracts, prostatic fluid, seminal fluid, serum and urine can be used for the detection of prostate cancer, based on the differences in their metabolic profiles. Useful diagnostic information is obtained by the detection or quantification of as many metabolites as possible and comparison with normal samples. Only a few studies have shown the potential of high-resolution in vitro NMR of prostate tissues. A survey of the literature has revealed that studies on body fluids, such as urine and serum, in relation to prostate cancer are rare. In addition, the potential of NMR of nuclei other than (1)H, such as (13)C and (31)P, has not been exploited fully. The metabolomic analysis of metabolites, detected by high-resolution NMR, may help to identify metabolites which could serve as useful biomarkers for prostate cancer detection. Such NMR-derived biomarkers would not only help in prostate cancer detection and in understanding the in vivo MRS metabolic profile, but also to investigate the biochemical and metabolic changes associated with cancer. Here, we review the published research work on body fluids in relation to prostate and prostate tissue extracts, and highlight the potential of such studies for future work. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Intermediate cells in human prostate epithelium are enriched in proliferative inflammatory atrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, G.J.L.H. van; Gage, W.R.; Hicks, J.L.; Balken, B. van; Aalders, T.W.; Schalken, J.A.; Marzo, A.M. De

    2003-01-01

    Within the human prostate epithelium four cell populations can be discriminated based on their expression of keratins (K). Basal cells express high levels of K5 and K14, as well as p63, whereas they have very low levels of androgen receptor, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), K8, and K18. Luminal

  17. Evaluating baculovirus as a vector for human prostate cancer gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L Swift

    Full Text Available Gene therapy represents an attractive strategy for the non-invasive treatment of prostate cancer, where current clinical interventions show limited efficacy. Here, we evaluate the use of the insect virus, baculovirus (BV, as a novel vector for human prostate cancer gene therapy. Since prostate tumours represent a heterogeneous environment, a therapeutic approach that achieves long-term regression must be capable of targeting multiple transformed cell populations. Furthermore, discrimination in the targeting of malignant compared to non-malignant cells would have value in minimising side effects. We employed a number of prostate cancer models to analyse the potential for BV to achieve these goals. In vitro, both traditional prostate cell lines as well as primary epithelial or stromal cells derived from patient prostate biopsies, in two- or three-dimensional cultures, were used. We also evaluated BV in vivo in murine prostate cancer xenograft models. BV was capable of preferentially transducing invasive malignant prostate cancer cell lines compared to early stage cancers and non-malignant samples, a restriction that was not a function of nuclear import. Of more clinical relevance, primary patient-derived prostate cancer cells were also efficiently transduced by BV, with robust rates observed in epithelial cells of basal phenotype, which expressed BV-encoded transgenes faster than epithelial cells of a more differentiated, luminal phenotype. Maximum transduction capacity was observed in stromal cells. BV was able to penetrate through three-dimensional structures, including in vitro spheroids and in vivo orthotopic xenografts. BV vectors containing a nitroreductase transgene in a gene-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy approach were capable of efficiently killing malignant prostate targets following administration of the pro-drug, CB1954. Thus, BV is capable of transducing a large proportion of prostate cell types within a heterogeneous 3-D prostate

  18. RATIONAL APPLICATION OF HUMAN NORMAL IMMUNOGLOBULIN FOR THE INTRAVENOUS INDUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.D. Fesenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous induction of human normal immunoglobulin is widely applied to treat various diseases; this is a highly effective and rather a safe treatment approach. According to the findings of the randomized controlled tests, the effectiveness of the given group of medications was proved in a number of immunopathologic states. On the other hand, sometimes the range of diseases, during which human normal immunoglobulin is applied, has groundlessly been extended of late. The article highlights the modern data about the contents, indications, mechanisms of impact, frequency and types of adverse reactions to the induction of human normal immunoglobulin, as well as the data about relative effectiveness of different medications.Key words: human normal immunoglobulin, adverse reactions, children.

  19. SIRT1 Promotes Differentiation of Normal Human Keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Blander, Gil; Bhimavarapu, Anupama; Mammone, Thomas; Maes, Daniel; Elliston, Keith; Reich, Christian; Matsui, Mary Steidl; Guarente, Leonard; Loureiro, Joseph Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Sir2 regulates lifespan in model organisms, which has stimulated interest in understanding human Sir2 homolog functions. The human Sir2 gene family comprises seven members (SIRT1–SIRT7). SIRT1, the human ortholog of the yeast Sir2 by closest sequence similarity, is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacetylase with enzymatic properties indistinguishable from the yeast enzyme. We studied the involvement of SIRT1 in normal human keratinocyte physiology by a transcriptional mi...

  20. Echinophora platyloba DC (Apiaceae crude extract induces apoptosis in human prostate adenocarcinoma cells (PC 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zare Shahneh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the second leading malignancy worldwide and the second prominent cause of cancer-related deaths among men. Therefore, there is a serious necessity for finding advanced alternative therapeutic measures against this lethal malignancy. In this article, we report the cytotoxicity and the mechanism of cell death of the methanolic extract prepared from Echinophora platyloba DC plant against human prostate adenocarcinoma PC 3 cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells HUVEC cell line. Methods: Cytotoxicity and viability of the methanolic extract were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and dye exclusion assay. Cell death enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was employed to quantify the nucleosome production resulting from nuclear DNA fragmentation during apoptosis and determine whether the mechanism involves induction of apoptosis or necrosis. The cell death was identified as apoptosis using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay and DNA fragmentation gel electrophoresis. Results: E. platyloba could decrease cell viability in malignant cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 values against PC 3 were determined as 236.136 ± 12.4, 143.400 ± 7.2, and 69.383 ± 1.29 μg/ml after 24, 36, and 48 h, respectively, but there was no significant activity in HUVEC normal cell (IC50 > 800 μg/ml. Morphological characterizations and DNA laddering assay showed that the methanolic extract treated cells displayed marked apoptotic characteristics such as nuclear fragmentation, appearance of apoptotic bodies, and DNA laddering fragment. Increase in an early apoptotic population was observed in a dose-dependent manner. PC 3 cell death elicited by the extract was found to be apoptotic in nature based a clear indication of TUNEL assay and gel electrophoresis DNA fragmentation, which is a hallmark of apoptosis

  1. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-03-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  2. Obesity and prostate cancer: gene expression signature of human periprostatic adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Ricardo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periprostatic (PP adipose tissue surrounds the prostate, an organ with a high predisposition to become malignant. Frequently, growing prostatic tumor cells extend beyond the prostatic organ towards this fat depot. This study aimed to determine the genome-wide expression of genes in PP adipose tissue in obesity/overweight (OB/OW and prostate cancer patients. Methods Differentially expressed genes in human PP adipose tissue were identified using microarrays. Analyses were conducted according to the donors' body mass index characteristics (OB/OW versus lean and prostate disease (extra prostatic cancer versus organ confined prostate cancer versus benign prostatic hyperplasia. Selected genes with altered expression were validated by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA was used to investigate gene ontology, canonical pathways and functional networks. Results In the PP adipose tissue of OB/OW subjects, we found altered expression of genes encoding molecules involved in adipogenic/anti-lipolytic, proliferative/anti-apoptotic, and mild immunoinflammatory processes (for example, FADS1, down-regulated, and LEP and ANGPT1, both up-regulated. Conversely, in the PP adipose tissue of subjects with prostate cancer, altered genes were related to adipose tissue cellular activity (increased cell proliferation/differentiation, cell cycle activation and anti-apoptosis, whereas a downward impact on immunity and inflammation was also observed, mostly related to the complement (down-regulation of CFH. Interestingly, we found that the microRNA MIRLET7A2 was overexpressed in the PP adipose tissue of prostate cancer patients. Conclusions Obesity and excess adiposity modified the expression of PP adipose tissue genes to ultimately foster fat mass growth. In patients with prostate cancer the expression profile of PP adipose tissue accounted for hypercellularity and reduced immunosurveillance. Both findings may be liable to promote a favorable

  3. Enrichment of prostate cancer stem-like cells from human prostate cancer cell lines by culture in serum-free medium and chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Xing; Zheng, Xinmin; Wang, Xinghuan; Li, Shiwen; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Zhonghua; Xia, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of rare subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has created a new focus in cancer research. As CSCs demonstrate resistance to chemoradiation therapy relative to other cancer cells, this allows the enrichment of CSC populations by killing apoptosis-susceptible cancer cells. In this study, three commonly used human prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines (DU145, PC-3 and LNCaP) were examined for their expression of the putative stem cell markers CD133 and CD44 via flow cytometric analysis. Under normal culture conditions, CD133(+)/CD44(+) cells were only present in the DU145 cell line, and comprised only a minor percentage (0.1% ± 0.01%) of the total population. However, the proportion of these CD133(+)/CD44(+) prostate CSCs could be increased in these cell lines via culture in serum-free medium (SFM), or through chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Indeed, after culture in SFM, the proportion of CD133(+)/CD44(+) cells in DU145 and PC-3 had increased to 10.3% and 3.0%, respectively. Moreover, the proportion had increased to 9.8% enriched by chemotherapy and 3.5% by radiotherapy in DU145. Colony-formation tests, cell invasion assays, and tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice were used to evaluate the stem cell properties of CD133(+)/CD44(+) PCa cells that were isolated via fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). CD133(+)/CD44(+) cells had an enhanced colony-formation capability and invasive ability in vitro, and displayed greater tumorigenic properties in vivo. These results demonstrate the presence of CD133(+)/CD44(+) prostate CSCs in established PCa cell lines and that populations of these cells can be enriched by culture in SFM or chemoradiotherapy. Finding novel therapies to override chemoradiation resistance in the prostate CSCs is the key to improve long-term results in PCa management.

  4. Glycoproteomics: Identifying the Glycosylation of Prostate Specific Antigen at Normal and High Isoelectric Points by LC–MS/MS

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Ehwang; Mayampurath, Anoop; Yu, Chuan-Yih; Tang, Haixu; Mechref, Yehia

    2014-01-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker to diagnose prostate cancer. PSA testing has been widely used to detect and screen prostate cancer. However, in the diagnostic gray zone, the PSA test does not clearly distinguish between benign prostate hypertrophy and prostate cancer due to their overlap. To develop more specific and sensitive candidate biomarkers for prostate cancer, an in-depth understanding of the biochemical characteristics of PSA (such as glycosylation) i...

  5. Noninvasive discrimination between human normal and cancer cells by analysis of intracellular distribution of phase-shift data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Mutsumi; Tokunaga, Naochika

    2015-08-01

    Aiming to establish a method for the noninvasive discrimination of cancer cells from normal cells in adherent culture, we investigated to employ all phase shift data for all pixels inside a cell. The bird's-eye views of phase shifts of human prostate epithelial cells (PRECs) and human prostatic carcinoma epithelial cell (PC-3) lines acquired by phase-shifting laser microscopy showed tableland and cone shapes, respectively, while treatment of PRECs with cytochalasin D resulted in the cone shape. So, the profile of phase shift in both sections towards the x- and y-axes of the views through the peaks of the phase shifts in PRECs and PC-3 cells were trapezoid-like and triangle-like, respectively. Typical profiles of phase shifts in a section in PRECs or PC-3 cells were calculated by averaging from 10 cells and smoothing. Cancer index is defined as the deduction of sums of the squared difference between a real cell and the typical profiles for a PREC and a PC-3 cell. The cancer indices for PC-3 and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines were positive, while those for PRECs and human normal cryopreserved hepatocytes were negative. Cancer indices along the major axis of fibroblast-like cells of normal mesenchymal stem cells and the osteosarcoma cell line were negative and positive, respectively. Consequently, several cancer cells could be noninvasively discriminated from normal cells by calculating the cancer index employing phase shift for all pixels inside the cells.

  6. In vivo uptake of [C-11]choline does not correlate with cell proliferation in human prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruim, J; Jongen, MM; Suurmeijer, AJ; Vaalburg, W; Nijman, RJ; de Jong, IJ; Breeuwsma, J.

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among US men. Positron emission tomography (PET) with [C-11] choline has been shown to be useful in the staging and detection of prostate cancer. The background of the increased uptake of choline in human prostate cancer is

  7. Effects of a human plasma membrane-associated sialidase siRNA on prostate cancer invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaojie [Department of Pathophysiology, Prostate Diseases Prevention and Treatment Research Centre, Norman Bethune Medical School, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Taizhou Polytechnic College, Taizhou (China); Zhang, Ling; Shao, Yueting; Liang, Zuowen; Shao, Chen; Wang, Bo; Guo, Baofeng; Li, Na; Zhao, Xuejian [Department of Pathophysiology, Prostate Diseases Prevention and Treatment Research Centre, Norman Bethune Medical School, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Li, Yang, E-mail: lyang@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Pathophysiology, Prostate Diseases Prevention and Treatment Research Centre, Norman Bethune Medical School, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Xu, Deqi [Laboratory of Enteric and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neu3 is as one of the sialidases and regulates cell surface functions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Neu3-specific siRNA inhibited prostrate cancer cell invasion and migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Neu3-specific siRNA inhibited prostate cancer metastasis in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting Neu3 may have utility for gene-based therapy of human cancer metastasis. -- Abstract: Human plasma membrane-associated sialidase (Neu3) is one of several sialidases that hydrolyze sialic acids in the terminal position of the carbohydrate groups of glycolipids and glycoproteins. Neu3 is mainly localized in plasma membranes and plays crucial roles in the regulation of cell surface functions. In this study, we investigated the effects and molecular mechanisms of Neu3 on cell invasion and migration in vivo and in vitro. Initially, we found that the levels of Neu3 expression were higher in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines than in normal prostate tissues based on RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. We then applied a Neu3 siRNA approach to block Neu3 signaling using PC-3M cells as model cells. Transwell invasion assays and wound assays showed significantly decreased invasion and migration potential in the Neu3 siRNA-transfected cells. RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses revealed that Neu3 knockdown decreased the expressions of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. In vivo, mice injected with PC-3M cell tumors were evaluated by SPECT/CT to determine the presence of bone metastases. Mice treated with attenuated Salmonella carrying the Neu3 siRNA developed fewer bone metastases than mice treated with attenuated Salmonella carrying a control Scramble siRNA, attenuated Salmonella alone or PBS. The results for bone metastasis detection by pathology were consistent with the data obtained by SPECT/CT. Tumor blocks were evaluated by histochemical, RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. The results revealed

  8. Establishing the proteome of normal human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Schutzer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the entire protein content, the proteome, of normal human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF would enable insights into neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Until now technologic hurdles and access to true normal samples hindered attaining this goal.We applied immunoaffinity separation and high sensitivity and resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine CSF from healthy normal individuals. 2630 proteins in CSF from normal subjects were identified, of which 56% were CSF-specific, not found in the much larger set of 3654 proteins we have identified in plasma. We also examined CSF from groups of subjects previously examined by others as surrogates for normals where neurologic symptoms warranted a lumbar puncture but where clinical laboratory were reported as normal. We found statistically significant differences between their CSF proteins and our non-neurological normals. We also examined CSF from 10 volunteer subjects who had lumbar punctures at least 4 weeks apart and found that there was little variability in CSF proteins in an individual as compared to subject to subject.Our results represent the most comprehensive characterization of true normal CSF to date. This normal CSF proteome establishes a comparative standard and basis for investigations into a variety of diseases with neurological and psychiatric features.

  9. Castration resistance in human prostate cancer is conferred by a frequently occurring androgen receptor splice variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shihua; Sprenger, Cynthia C.T.; Vessella, Robert L.; Haugk, Kathleen; Soriano, Kathryn; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Page, Stephanie T.; Coleman, Ilsa M.; Nguyen, Holly M.; Sun, Huiying; Nelson, Peter S.; Plymate, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of prostate cancer following castration is associated with increased androgen receptor (AR) expression and signaling despite AR blockade. Recent studies suggest that these activities are due to the generation of constitutively active AR splice variants, but the mechanisms by which these splice variants could mediate such effects are not fully understood. Here we have identified what we believe to be a novel human AR splice variant in which exons 5, 6, and 7 are deleted (ARv567es) and demonstrated that this variant can contribute to cancer progression in human prostate cancer xenograft models in mice following castration. We determined that, in human prostate cancer cell lines, ARv567es functioned as a constitutively active receptor, increased expression of full-length AR (ARfl), and enhanced the transcriptional activity of AR. In human xenografts, human prostate cancer cells transfected with ARv567es cDNA formed tumors that were resistant to castration. Furthermore, the ratio of ARv567es to ARfl expression within the xenografts positively correlated with resistance to castration. Importantly, we also detected ARv567es frequently in human prostate cancer metastases. In summary, these data indicate that constitutively active AR splice variants can contribute to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancers and may serve as biomarkers for patients who are likely to suffer from early recurrence and are candidates for therapies directly targeting the AR rather than ligand. PMID:20644256

  10. Low frequency of human papillomavirus detection in prostate tissue from individuals from Northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte Silvestre

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV was evaluated in 65 samples of prostate tumours and six samples of prostates with benign prostatic hyperplasia from individuals from Northern Brazil. We used a highly sensitive test, the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test, to detect 37 high and low-risk HPV types. In this study, only 3% of tumour samples showed HPV infection. Our findings support the conclusion that, despite the high incidence of HPV infection in the geographic regions studied, HPV was not associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the frequency of HPV detection in prostatic tissue of individuals from Brazil.

  11. Decorin and biglycan of normal and pathologic human corneas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Roth, M. R.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Rodrigues, M. R.; Nirankari, V. S.; Conrad, G. W.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Corneas with scars and certain chronic pathologic conditions contain highly sulfated dermatan sulfate, but little is known of the core proteins that carry these atypical glycosaminoglycans. In this study the proteoglycan proteins attached to dermatan sulfate in normal and pathologic human corneas were examined to identify primary genes involved in the pathobiology of corneal scarring. METHODS: Proteoglycans from human corneas with chronic edema, bullous keratopathy, and keratoconus and from normal corneas were analyzed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), quantitative immunoblotting, and immunohistology with peptide antibodies to decorin and biglycan. RESULTS: Proteoglycans from pathologic corneas exhibit increased size heterogeneity and binding of the cationic dye alcian blue compared with those in normal corneas. Decorin and biglycan extracted from normal and diseased corneas exhibited similar molecular size distribution patterns. In approximately half of the pathologic corneas, the level of biglycan was elevated an average of seven times above normal, and decorin was elevated approximately three times above normal. The increases were associated with highly charged molecular forms of decorin and biglycan, indicating modification of the proteins with dermatan sulfate chains of increased sulfation. Immunostaining of corneal sections showed an abnormal stromal localization of biglycan in pathologic corneas. CONCLUSIONS: The increased dermatan sulfate associated with chronic corneal pathologic conditions results from stromal accumulation of decorin and particularly of biglycan in the affected corneas. These proteins bear dermatan sulfate chains with increased sulfation compared with normal stromal proteoglycans.

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect an abnormal growth within the prostate. help ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of ... Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top ...

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Isoalantolactone-Induced Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Isoalantolactone, a medicinal plant-derived natural compound, is known to induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. However, its effect on apoptosis in prostate cancer cells has not been addressed. Thus, we examined the effects of isoalantolactone on prostate cancer cells. It was found that isoalantolactone inhibits growth of both androgen-sensitive (LNCaP as well as androgen-independent (PC3 and DU-145 prostate cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, our results indicate that isoalantolactone-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer PC3 cells is associated with the generation of ROS and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm. In addition, isoalantolactone triggers apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via up-regulation of Bax, down-regulation of Bcl-2, survivin, and significant activation of caspase-3. Isoalantolactone-induced apoptosis is markedly abrogated when the cells were pretreated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, a specific ROS inhibitor, suggesting that the apoptosis-inducing effect of isoalantolactone in prostate cancer cells is mediated by reactive oxygen species. These findings indicate that isoalantolactone induces reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via a novel mechanism involving inhibition of survivin and provide the rationale for further in vivo and preclinical investigation of isoalantolactone against human prostate cancer.

  14. Norfloxacin penetration into human renal and prostatic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, M G; Thabet, M; Roy, R; Lessard, C; Foucault, P

    1985-01-01

    Concurrent norfloxacin concentrations in serum, kidney, and prostatic tissue were determined in 14 patients. Mean ratios of norfloxacin concentration in tissue over concentration in serum were 6.6 +/- 2.8 for the kidney and 1.7 +/- 0.2 for the prostate samples. The levels were above the MICs of most urinary pathogens. PMID:3834837

  15. Expression of leukemia/lymphoma related factor (LRF/Pokemon) in human benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Hunter, William J; Yohannes, Paulos; Khan, Ansar U; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-04-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor (LRF), also known as Pokemon, is a protein that belongs to the POK family of transcriptional repressors. It has an oncogenic role in many different solid tumors. In this study, the expression of LRF was evaluated in benign prostate hyperplastic (BPH) and prostate cancer (PC) tissues. The functional expression of LRF was studied using multiple cellular and molecular methods including RT-PCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. Paraffin-embedded human tissues of BPH and PC were used to examine LRF expression. Histological staining of the BPH and PC tissue sections revealed nuclear expression of LRF with minimal expression in the surrounding stroma. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western immunoblot analyses demonstrated significantly higher mRNA transcripts and protein expression in PC than BPH. High expression of LRF suggests that it may have a potential role in the pathogenesis of both BPH and prostate cancer. Further studies will help elucidate the mechanisms and signaling pathways that LRF may follow in the pathogenesis of prostate carcinoma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression and prognostic significance of ELL-associated factor 2 in human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yachen; Dong, Yun; Yang, Dongrong; Xue, Boxin; Li, Feng; Gu, Peng; Zhao, Haifeng; Wang, Shaoxiong; Zhou, Songlin; Ying, Rong; Wang, Zhou; Shan, Yuxi

    2016-05-01

    ELL-associated factor 2 (EAF2) is an androgen-regulated tumor suppressor in the prostate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of EAF2 protein in human prostate cancer specimens along with BPH specimens as a control, and to evaluate potential association of EAF2 expression with clinical characteristics and overall survival of the prostate cancer patients. The expression of EAF2 was evaluated in 44 prostate cancer and 23 BPH tissue specimens using immunohistochemistry. The relationships of EAF2 expression with clinical characteristics and overall survival rates were analyzed by Chi-square test and Kaplan-Meier method. The immunostaining intensity of EAF2 in BPH specimens was significantly higher than that in prostate cancer (p < 0.05). EAF2 expression decreased significantly in high-grade and advanced-stage human prostate tumors and inversely correlated with PSA level, Gleason scores, bone metastasis and tumor stage. Importantly, loss of EAF2 expression was associated with a significant decrease in patient survival. Expression of EAF2 is decreased in prostate carcinogenesis, and EAF2 loss is associated with high-risk patients and poor survival.

  17. Human papillomavirus in normal cervical smears from Cape Town ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types in South African women with normal cervical cytology and to determine whether our results are comparable to what has been found elsewhere in the wortd. Design: Cervical smears were collected from 262 women. Setting: The Cape Town ...

  18. In search of the molecular mechanisms mediating the inhibitory effect of the GnRH antagonist degarelix on human prostate cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Sakai

    Full Text Available Degarelix is a gonadrotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH receptor (GnRHR antagonist used in patients with prostate cancer who need androgen deprivation therapy. GnRHRs have been found in extra-pituitary tissues, including prostate, which may be affected by the GnRH and GnRH analogues used in therapy. The direct effect of degarelix on human prostate cell growth was evaluated. Normal prostate myofibroblast WPMY-1 and epithelial WPE1-NA22 cells, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH-1 cells, androgen-independent PC-3 and androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as VCaP cells derived from a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer were used. Discriminatory protein and lipid fingerprints of normal, hyperplastic, and cancer cells were generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI mass spectrometry (MS. The investigated cell lines express GNRHR1 and GNRHR2 and their endogenous ligands. Degarelix treatment reduced cell viability in all prostate cell lines tested, with the exception of the PC-3 cells; this can be attributed to increased apoptosis, as indicated by increased caspase 3/7, 8 and 9 levels. WPE1-NA22, BPH-1, LNCaP, and VCaP cell viability was not affected by treatment with the GnRH agonists leuprolide and goserelin. Using MALDI MS, we detected changes in m/z signals that were robust enough to create a complete discriminatory profile induced by degarelix. Transcriptomic analysis of BPH-1 cells provided a global map of genes affected by degarelix and indicated that the biological processes affected were related to cell growth, G-coupled receptors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway, angiogenesis and cell adhesion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (i the GnRH antagonist degarelix exerts a direct effect on prostate cell growth through apoptosis; (ii MALDI MS analysis provided a basis to fingerprint degarelix-treated prostate cells; and (iii the clusters of genes affected by degarelix

  19. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Ito

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR, a DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi. Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR, and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold. Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications.

  20. Interleukin-6: A multifunctional targetable cytokine in human prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culig, Zoran; Puhr, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Several cytokines are involved in regulation of cellular events in prostate cancer. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was frequently investigated in prostate cancer models because of its increased expression in cancer tissue at early stages of the disease. In patients with metastatic prostate cancer, it is well-known that IL-6 levels increase in serum. High levels of IL-6 were measured in the supernatants of cells which do not respond to androgenic stimulation. IL-6 expression in prostate cancer increases due to enhanced expression of transforming growth factor-beta, and members of the activating protein-1 complex, and loss of the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor. IL-6 activation of androgen receptor (AR) may contribute to progression of a subgroup of prostate cancers. Results obtained with two prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and MDA PCa 2b, indicate that IL-6 activation of AR may cause either stimulatory or inhibitory responses on proliferation. Interestingly, prolonged treatment with IL-6 led to establishment of an IL-6 autocrine loop, suppressed signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 activation, and increased mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. In several cell lines IL-6 acts as a survival molecule through activation of the signalling pathway of phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase. Expression of suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) has been studied in prostate cancer. SOCS-3 prevents phosphorylation of STAT3 and is an important anti-apoptotic factor in AR-negative prostate cancer cells. Experimental therapy against IL-6 in prostate cancer is based on the use of the monoclonal antibody siltuximab which may be used for personalised therapy coming in the future. PMID:21664423

  1. The diet as a cause of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, William G; Demarzo, Angelo M; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic prostate inflammation and prostate cancer have reached epidemic proportions among men in the developed world. Animal model studies implicate dietary carcinogens, such as the heterocyclic amines from over-cooked meats and sex steroid hormones, particularly estrogens, as candidate etiologies for prostate cancer. Each acts by causing epithelial cell damage, triggering an inflammatory response that can evolve into a chronic or recurrent condition. This milieu appears to spawn proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) lesions, a type of focal atrophy that represents the earliest of prostate cancer precursor lesions. Rare PIA lesions contain cells which exhibit high c-Myc expression, shortened telomere segments, and epigenetic silencing of genes such as GSTP1, encoding the π-class glutathione S-transferase, all characteristic of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer. Subsequent genetic changes, such as the gene translocations/deletions that generate fusion transcripts between androgen-regulated genes (such as TMPRSS2) and genes encoding ETS family transcription factors (such as ERG1), arise in PIN lesions and may promote invasiveness characteristic of prostatic adenocarcinoma cells. Lethal prostate cancers contain markedly corrupted genomes and epigenomes. Epigenetic silencing, which seems to arise in response to the inflamed microenvironment generated by dietary carcinogens and/or estrogens as part of an epigenetic "catastrophe" affecting hundreds of genes, persists to drive clonal evolution through metastatic dissemination. The cause of the initial epigenetic "catastrophe" has not been determined but likely involves defective chromatin structure maintenance by over-exuberant DNA methylation or histone modification. With dietary carcinogens and estrogens driving pro-carcinogenic inflammation in the developed world, it is tempting to speculate that dietary components associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, such as intake of

  2. Inhibition of chronic prostate inflammation by hyaluronic acid through an immortalized human prostate stromal cell line model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Che Liu

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is the most common urologic disease among elderly men. A well-established in vitro cell model is required to determine the therapeutic mechanism of BPH inflammation. In this study, we attempted to establish an immortalized human prostate stromal cell line by transfecting with HPV-16 E6/E7 and designated as ihPSC. No significant difference was found in fibroblast-like morphology between primary hPSC and ihPSC. The ihPSC possessed a significantly higher cell proliferation rate than primary hPSC. The prostate-specific markers and proteins including cytoskeleton (α-SMA and vimentin and smooth muscle (calponin, especially the androgen receptor (AR were also examined in ihPSC, almost identical to the primary hPSC. To create an in vitro model featuring chronic prostatic inflammation, ihPSC was stimulated with IFN-γ+IL-17 and then treated with the high molecular weight hyaluronic acid hylan G-F 20 as an alternative strategy for inhibiting BPH inflammation. Hylan G-F 20 could dose-dependently diminish the inflammation-induced proliferation in ihPSC. The enhanced expressions of inflammatory molecules including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2, inducible nitrogen oxide synthase (iNOS, and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 were all abolished by hylan G-F 20. For inflammatory signaling, hylan G-F 20 can also diminish the IFN-γ+IL-17-increased expression of iNOS and p65 in ihPSC. These findings suggest that ihPSC could provide a mechanism-based platform for investigating prostate inflammation. The hylan G-F 20 showed strong anti-inflammatory effects by decreasing inflammatory cytokines and signalings in the ihPSC, indicating its therapeutic potentials in BPH treatment in the future.

  3. Embelin-Induced Apoptosis of Human Prostate Cancer Cells Is Mediated through Modulation of Akt and β-Catenin Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahee Park

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that embelin, an active component of Embelia ribes, induces apoptosis in human cancer cells, but the detailed mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we have investigated the effect of embelin on the growth of human prostate cancer cells. Embelin strongly inhibited cell growth especially in human prostate cancer cell lines, including PC3, DU145, LNCaP-LN3 and normal prostate epithelial cell, RWPE-1 compared to breast cancer (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and T47D, hepatoma (HepG2, Hep3B, and HuH-7, or choriocarcinoma (JEG-3. We observed that embelin induced apoptosis of PC3 cells in a time-dependent manner correlated with decreased expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1, increased translocation of Bax into mitochondria, and a reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, embelin induced voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC 1 expression and oligomerization, which may promote cytochrome c and AIF release. Because embelin was able to inhibit Akt activation and cyclooxygenase-2 expression, the effects on Wnt/ β-catenin signaling were determined. Embelin activated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3β by preventing phosphorylation and suppressed β-catenin expression. Attenuation of β-catenin-mediated TCF transcriptional activity and gene transcription, such as cyclin D1, c-myc, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7, were shown in embelin-treated cells. The changes in β-catenin levels in response to embelin were blocked by lithium chloride, a GSK-3 inhibitor, indicating that embelin may decrease β-catenin expression via GSK-3β activation. Furthermore, exposure of PC3 cells to embelin resulted in a significant decrease in cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, these findings suggest that inhibition of Akt signaling and activation of GSK-3β partially contributes to the pro-apoptotic effect of embelin in prostate cancer cells.

  4. Terminal neuroendocrine differentiation of human prostate carcinoma cells in response to increased intracellular cyclic AMP.

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Y J; Pirnia, F; Fang, W G; Kang, W K; Sartor, O; Whitesell, L; Ha, M J; Tsokos, M.; Sheahan, M D; Nguyen, P.

    1994-01-01

    Recent clinicopathologic studies have shown that many prostatic adenocarcinomas express focal neuroendocrine differentiation and that neuroendocrine differentiation is most apparent in advanced anaplastic tumors. While studying growth-regulatory signal transduction events in human prostate carcinoma cell lines, we found that in two of four cell lines, the androgen-sensitive line LNCaP and the highly metastatic androgen-independent line PC-3-M, elevation of cAMP through addition of cAMP analog...

  5. Advancing the Capabilities of an Authentic Ex Vivo Model of Primary Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay is one of the most widely used assays for quantifying cytotoxicity in organotypic cultures. We performed LDH...R. Keshari et al., Metabolic reprogramming and validation of hyperpolarized 13C lactate as a prostate cancer biomarker using a human prostate tissue...inherent drawbacks hinder their clinical relevance.1,2 Cell lines, often artificially immortalized, acquire mutations in culture and lack the

  6. Free and bound water in normal and cataractous human lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heys, Karl R; Friedrich, Michael G; Truscott, Roger J W

    2008-05-01

    To analyze free and total water in human normal and cataractous lenses. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine total water, and differential scanning calorimetry was used for free water. In normal human lenses, the total water content of the nucleus remained unchanged with age, but the state of the water altered. The ratio of free to bound water increased steadily throughout adult life. In a 20-year-old person, there was approximately one bound water molecule for each free water molecule in the lens center, whereas in a 70- to 80-year-old person, there were two free water molecules for each bound water molecule. This conversion of bound to free water does not appear to be simply a consequence of the aggregation of soluble crystallins into high molecular weight aggregates because studies with intact pig lenses, in which such processes were facilitated by heat, did not show similar changes. The region of the lens in which the barrier to diffusion develops at middle age corresponds to a transition zone in which the protein concentration is intermediate between that of the cortex and the nucleus. In cataractous lenses, the free-to-bound water ratio was not significantly different from that of age-matched normal lenses; however, total water content in the center of advanced nuclear cataractous lenses was slightly lower than in normal lenses. As the human lens ages, bound water is progressively changed to free water. Advanced nuclear cataract may be associated with lower total hydration of the lens nucleus.

  7. Incorporating Oxygen-Enhanced MRI into Multi-Parametric Assessment of Human Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Heling; Hallac, Rami R; Yuan, Qing; Ding, Yao; Zhang, Zhongwei; Xie, Xian-Jin; Francis, Franto; Roehrborn, Claus G; Sims, R Douglas; Costa, Daniel N; Raj, Ganesh V; Mason, Ralph P

    2017-08-24

    Hypoxia is associated with prostate tumor aggressiveness, local recurrence, and biochemical failure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers insight into tumor pathophysiology and recent reports have related transverse relaxation rate (R₂*) and longitudinal relaxation rate (R₁) measurements to tumor hypoxia. We have investigated the inclusion of oxygen-enhanced MRI for multi-parametric evaluation of tumor malignancy. Multi-parametric MRI sequences at 3 Tesla were evaluated in 10 patients to investigate hypoxia in prostate cancer prior to radical prostatectomy. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD), tissue oxygen level dependent (TOLD), dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE), and diffusion weighted imaging MRI were intercorrelated and compared with the Gleason score. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was significantly lower in tumor than normal prostate. Baseline R₂* (BOLD-contrast) was significantly higher in tumor than normal prostate. Upon the oxygen breathing challenge, R₂* decreased significantly in the tumor tissue, suggesting improved vascular oxygenation, however changes in R₁ were minimal. R₂* of contralateral normal prostate decreased in most cases upon oxygen challenge, although the differences were not significant. Moderate correlation was found between ADC and Gleason score. ADC and R₂* were correlated and trends were found between Gleason score and R₂*, as well as maximum-intensity-projection and area-under-the-curve calculated from DCE. Tumor ADC and R₂* have been associated with tumor hypoxia, and thus the correlations are of particular interest. A multi-parametric approach including oxygen-enhanced MRI is feasible and promises further insights into the pathophysiological information of tumor microenvironment.

  8. Establishment and characterization of a human primary prostate carcinoma cell line, HH870.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvan, Senthamil R; Cornforth, Andrew N; Rao, Nagesh P; Reid, Yvonne A; Schiltz, Patric M; Liao, Ray P; Price, David T; Heinemann, F Scott; Dillman, Robert O

    2005-04-01

    Development of new therapeutic modalities for human prostate carcinoma has been impeded by a lack of adequate in vitro and in vivo models. Most in vitro studies have been carried out using a limited number of human prostate cancer cell lines that are mostly derived from metastatic tumors sites or are immortalized. Characterization of the prostate cancer cell line, HH870, included description of morphology, determination of doubling time, response to androgens, immunocytochemistry, and immunoblotting of proteins known to be associated with prostate carcinoma, karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), DNA profiling, and growth as xenograft in athymic rodents. HH870 expresses various epithelial marker antigens that correlate with known basic immunostaining profiles of prostate adenocarcinoma, although the cell line does not express PSA, PSMA, or PAP. HH870 exhibits complex chromosomal abnormalities and harbors no immortalizing HPV, BKV, JCV, and SV40 DNA. We report the successful establishment and characterization of a new long-term primary human prostate tumor cell line HH870. Copyright (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Primary Cilia Are Lost in Preinvasive and Invasive Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassounah, Nadia B.; Nagle, Ray; Saboda, Kathylynn; Roe, Denise J.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; McDermott, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Little is known about the role of primary cilia in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer. However, reduced cilia expression has been observed in human cancers including pancreatic cancer, renal cell carcinoma, breast cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, and melanoma. The aim of this study was to characterize primary cilia expression in preinvasive and invasive human prostate cancer, and to investigate the correlation between primary cilia and the Wnt signaling pathway. Human prostate tissues representative of stages of prostate cancer formation (normal prostate, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and invasive prostate cancer (including perineural invasion)) were stained for ciliary proteins. The frequency of primary cilia was determined. A decrease in the percentage of ciliated cells in PIN, invasive cancer and perineural invasion lesions was observed when compared to normal. Cilia lengths were also measured to indirectly test functionality. Cilia were shorter in PIN, cancer, and perineural invasion lesions, suggesting dysfunction. Primary cilia have been shown to suppress the Wnt pathway. Increased Wnt signaling has been implicated in prostate cancer. Therefore, we investigated a correlation between loss of primary cilia and increased Wnt signaling in normal prostate and in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer. To investigate Wnt signaling in our cohort, serial tissue sections were stained for β-catenin as a measure of Wnt signaling. Nuclear β-catenin was analyzed and Wnt signaling was found to be higher in un-ciliated cells in the normal prostate, PIN, a subset of invasive cancers, and perineural invasion. Our results suggest that cilia normally function to suppress the Wnt signaling pathway in epithelial cells and that cilia loss may play a role in increased Wnt signaling in some prostate cancers. These results suggest that cilia are dysfunctional in human prostate cancer, and

  10. Primary cilia are lost in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia B Hassounah

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Little is known about the role of primary cilia in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer. However, reduced cilia expression has been observed in human cancers including pancreatic cancer, renal cell carcinoma, breast cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, and melanoma. The aim of this study was to characterize primary cilia expression in preinvasive and invasive human prostate cancer, and to investigate the correlation between primary cilia and the Wnt signaling pathway. Human prostate tissues representative of stages of prostate cancer formation (normal prostate, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, and invasive prostate cancer (including perineural invasion were stained for ciliary proteins. The frequency of primary cilia was determined. A decrease in the percentage of ciliated cells in PIN, invasive cancer and perineural invasion lesions was observed when compared to normal. Cilia lengths were also measured to indirectly test functionality. Cilia were shorter in PIN, cancer, and perineural invasion lesions, suggesting dysfunction. Primary cilia have been shown to suppress the Wnt pathway. Increased Wnt signaling has been implicated in prostate cancer. Therefore, we investigated a correlation between loss of primary cilia and increased Wnt signaling in normal prostate and in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer. To investigate Wnt signaling in our cohort, serial tissue sections were stained for β-catenin as a measure of Wnt signaling. Nuclear β-catenin was analyzed and Wnt signaling was found to be higher in un-ciliated cells in the normal prostate, PIN, a subset of invasive cancers, and perineural invasion. Our results suggest that cilia normally function to suppress the Wnt signaling pathway in epithelial cells and that cilia loss may play a role in increased Wnt signaling in some prostate cancers. These results suggest that cilia are dysfunctional in human

  11. Primary cilia are lost in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassounah, Nadia B; Nagle, Ray; Saboda, Kathylynn; Roe, Denise J; Dalkin, Bruce L; McDermott, Kimberly M

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Little is known about the role of primary cilia in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer. However, reduced cilia expression has been observed in human cancers including pancreatic cancer, renal cell carcinoma, breast cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, and melanoma. The aim of this study was to characterize primary cilia expression in preinvasive and invasive human prostate cancer, and to investigate the correlation between primary cilia and the Wnt signaling pathway. Human prostate tissues representative of stages of prostate cancer formation (normal prostate, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and invasive prostate cancer (including perineural invasion)) were stained for ciliary proteins. The frequency of primary cilia was determined. A decrease in the percentage of ciliated cells in PIN, invasive cancer and perineural invasion lesions was observed when compared to normal. Cilia lengths were also measured to indirectly test functionality. Cilia were shorter in PIN, cancer, and perineural invasion lesions, suggesting dysfunction. Primary cilia have been shown to suppress the Wnt pathway. Increased Wnt signaling has been implicated in prostate cancer. Therefore, we investigated a correlation between loss of primary cilia and increased Wnt signaling in normal prostate and in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer. To investigate Wnt signaling in our cohort, serial tissue sections were stained for β-catenin as a measure of Wnt signaling. Nuclear β-catenin was analyzed and Wnt signaling was found to be higher in un-ciliated cells in the normal prostate, PIN, a subset of invasive cancers, and perineural invasion. Our results suggest that cilia normally function to suppress the Wnt signaling pathway in epithelial cells and that cilia loss may play a role in increased Wnt signaling in some prostate cancers. These results suggest that cilia are dysfunctional in human prostate cancer, and

  12. DNA fragmentation and apoptosis induced by safranal in human prostate cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Samarghandian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Apoptosis, an important mechanism that contributes to cell growth reduction, is reported to be induced by Crocus sativus (Saffron in different cancer types. However, limited effort has been made to correlate these effects to the active ingredients of saffron. The present study was designed to elucidate cytotoxic and apoptosis induction by safranal, the major coloring compound in saffron, in a human prostate cancer cell line (PC-3. Materials and Methods: PC-3 and human fetal lung fibroblast (MRC-5 cells were cultured and exposed to safranal (5, 10, 15, and 20 μg/ml. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay was performed to assess cytotoxicity. DNA fragmentation was assessed by gel electrophoresis. Cells were incubated with different concentrations of safranal, and cell morphologic changes and apoptosis were determined by the normal inverted microscope, Annexin V, and propidium iodide, followed by flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Results: MTT assay revealed a remarkable and concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect of safranal on PC-3 cells in comparison with non-malignant cell line. The morphologic alterations of the cells confirmed the MTT results. The IC 50 values against PC-3 cells were found to be 13.0 ΁ 0.07 and 6.4 ΁ 0.09 μg/ml at 48 and 72 h, respectively. Safranal induced an early and late apoptosis in the flow cytometry histogram of treated cells, indicating apoptosis is involved in this toxicity. DNA analysis revealed typical ladders as early as 48 and 72 h after treatment, indicative of apoptosis. Conclusions: Our preclinical study demonstrated a prostate cancer cell line to be highly sensitive to safranal-mediated growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death. Although the molecular mechanisms of safranal action are not clearly understood, it appears to have potential as a therapeutic agent.

  13. Baculoviruses as Vectors for Gene Therapy against Human Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay J. Stanbridge

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Current curative strategies for prostate cancer are restricted to the primary tumour, and the effect of treatments to control metastatic disease is not sustained. Therefore, the application of gene therapy to prostate cancer is an attractive alternative. Baculoviruses are highly restricted insect viruses, which can enter, but not replicate in mammalian cells. Baculoviruses can incorporate large amounts of extra genetic material, and will express transgenes in mammalian cells when under the control of a mammalian or strong viral promoter. Successful gene delivery has been achieved both in vitro and in vivo and into both dividing and nondividing cells, which is important since prostate cancers divide relatively slowly. In addition, the envelope protein gp64 is sufficiently mutable to allow targeted transduction of particular cell types. In this review, the advantages of using baculoviruses for prostate cancer gene therapy are explored, and the mechanisms of viral entry and transgene expression are described.

  14. (3H)bunazosin, a novel selective radioligand of alpha 1 adrenoceptors in human prostates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, S.; Suzuki, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Kato, Y.; Kimura, R.; Maruyama, M.; Kawabe, K. (School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka (Japan))

    1991-09-01

    The binding properties of a new radioligand, (3H)bunazosin, were studied in membranes of human prostates with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Specific binding of (3H)bunazosin was saturable, reversible, and of high affinity (Kd = 0.55 {plus minus} 0.04 nM). The density of (3H)bunazosin binding sites (Bmax) was 676 {plus minus} 33 fmol/mg. protein. (3H)Bunazosin rapidly associated with its binding sites in membranes of human prostates and reached steady state by 20 min. at 25C. The rate constants for association and dissociation of (3H)bunazosin binding were calculated to be 0.11 {plus minus} 0.01/nM/min. and 0.05 {plus minus} 0.02/min. (n = 4), respectively. Seven alpha 1 adrenoceptor antagonists competed with (3H)bunazosin for the binding sites in the rank order: R-(-)-YM-12617 greater than prazosin greater than SGB-1534 greater than bunazosin greater than terazosin greater than naftopidil greater than urapidil. In parallel studies with (3H)bunazosin, the Kd and Bmax values for (3H)prazosin binding in human prostates were slightly lower. There was a similarity in the potency and rank order of seven alpha 1, adrenoceptor antagonists for the inhibition of (3H) bunazosin and (3H)prazosin binding in human prostates. The new (3H)bunazosin binding assay in human prostates is remarkable for its low degree of nonspecific binding as compared to (3H)prazosin, especially at high ligand concentrations. Thus, (3H)bunazosin may become a useful radioligand for the further analysis of the alph 1 adrenoceptor binding sites in human prostates.

  15. Screening and Characterization of a Novel RNA Aptamer That Specifically Binds to Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase and Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hoon Young; Byun, Jonghoe

    2015-01-01

    Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) expression increases proportionally with prostate cancer progression, making it useful in prognosticating intermediate to high-risk prostate cancers. A novel ligand that can specifically bind to PAP would be very helpful for guiding prostate cancer therapy. RNA aptamers bind to target molecules with high specificity and have key advantages such as low immunogenicity and easy synthesis. Here, human PAP-specific aptamers were screened from a 2′-fluoropyrimidine (FY)-modified RNA library by SELEX. The candidate aptamer families were identified within six rounds followed by analysis of their sequences and PAP-specific binding. A gel shift assay was used to identify PAP binding aptamers and the 6N aptamer specifically bound to PAP with a Kd value of 118 nM. RT-PCR and fluorescence labeling analyses revealed that the 6N aptamer bound to PAP-positive mammalian cells, such as PC-3 and LNCaP. IMR-90 negative control cells did not bind the 6N aptamer. Systematic minimization analyses revealed that 50 nucleotide sequences and their two hairpin structures in the 6N 2′-FY RNA aptamer were equally important for PAP binding. Renewed interest in PAP combined with the versatility of RNA aptamers, including conjugation of anti-cancer drugs and nano-imaging probes, could open up a new route for early theragnosis of prostate cancer. PMID:25591398

  16. d -Limonene sensitizes docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity in human prostate cancer cells: Generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis

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    Rabi Thangaiyan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical trials have shown that docetaxel combined with other novel agents can improve the survival of androgen-independent prostate cancer patients. d -Limonene, a non-nutrient dietary component, has been found to inhibit various cancer cell growths without toxicity. We sought to characterize whether a non-toxic dose of d -limonene may enhance tumor response to docetaxel in an in vitro model of metastatic prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Human prostate carcinoma DU-145 and normal prostate epithelial PZ-HPV-7 cells were treated with various concentrations of d -limonene, docetaxel or a combination of both, and cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, reduced glutathione (GSH and caspase activity were measured. Apoptosis and apoptosis-related proteins were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting, respectively. Results: d -Limonene and docetaxel in combination significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity to DU-145 cells than PZ-HPV-7 cells. Exposure of DU-145 cells to a combined d -limonene and docetaxel resulted in higher ROS generation, depletion of GSH, accompanied by increased caspase activity than docetaxel alone. It also triggered a series of effects involving cytochrome c , cleavages of caspase-9, 3 and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase, and a shift in Bad:Bcl-xL ratio in favor of apoptosis. Apoptotic effect was significantly blocked on pretreatment with N -acetylcystein, indicating that antitumor effect is initiated by ROS generation, and caspase cascades contribute to the cell death. Conclusion: Our results show, for the first time, that d -limonene enhanced the antitumor effect of docetaxel against prostate cancer cells without being toxic to normal prostate epithelial cells. The combined beneficial effect could be through the modulation of proteins involved in mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. d -Limonene could be used as a potent non-toxic agent to

  17. Baculoviruses as Vectors for Gene Therapy against Human Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay J. Stanbridge; Vincent Dussupt; Norman J Maitland

    2003-01-01

    Current curative strategies for prostate cancer are restricted to the primary tumour, and the effect of treatments to control metastatic disease is not sustained. Therefore, the application of gene therapy to prostate cancer is an attractive alternative. Baculoviruses are highly restricted insect viruses, which can enter, but not replicate in mammalian cells. Baculoviruses can incorporate large amounts of extra genetic material, and will express transgenes in mammalian cells when under the co...

  18. Developmental exposure to estrogen alters differentiation and epigenetic programming in a human fetal prostate xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia M Saffarini

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most frequent non-cutaneous malignancy in men. There is strong evidence in rodents that neonatal estrogen exposure plays a role in the development of this disease. However, there is little information regarding the effects of estrogen in human fetal prostate tissue. This study explored early life estrogen exposure, with and without a secondary estrogen and testosterone treatment in a human fetal prostate xenograft model. Histopathological lesions, proliferation, and serum hormone levels were evaluated at 7, 30, 90, and 200-day time-points after xenografting. The expression of 40 key genes involved in prostatic glandular and stromal growth, cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, hormone receptors and tumor suppressors was evaluated using a custom PCR array. Epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed on whole tissue, and laser capture-microdissection (LCM isolated epithelial and stromal compartments of 200-day prostate xenografts. Combined initial plus secondary estrogenic exposures had the most severe tissue changes as revealed by the presence of hyperplastic glands at day 200. Gene expression changes corresponded with the cellular events in the KEGG prostate cancer pathway, indicating that initial plus secondary exposure to estrogen altered the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, ultimately resulting in apoptosis inhibition and an increase in cell cycle progression. DNA methylation revealed that differentially methylated CpG sites significantly predominate in the stromal compartment as a result of estrogen-treatment, thereby providing new targets for future investigation. By using human fetal prostate tissue and eliminating the need for species extrapolation, this study provides novel insights into the gene expression and epigenetic effects related to prostate carcinogenesis following early life estrogen exposure.

  19. Frequent Loss of Cystatin E/M Expression Implicated in the Progression of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pulukuri, Sai Murali Krishna; Gorantla, Bharathi; Knost, James A.; Rao, Jasti S.

    2009-01-01

    Cystatin E/M (CST6) is a natural inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteases. Recent studies have shown that experimental manipulation of CST6 expression alters the metastatic behavior of human breast cancer cells. However, the association of CST6 with prostate cancer invasion and progression is remains unclear. Here, we show that CST6 is robustly expressed in normal human prostate epithelium while its expression is downregulated in metastatic prostate cell lines and prostate tumor tissues. Tre...

  20. Incidence and mortality of prostate cancer and their relationship with the Human Development Index worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanipour-Azgomi, S; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Towhidi, Farhad; Jamehshorani, Saeid; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer and their relationship with the Human Development Index (HDI) and its components in Asia in 2012. This study was an ecological study conducted based on the GLOBOCAN project of the World Health Organization. The correlation between standardized incidence rate (SIR) and standardized mortality rate (SMR) of prostate cancer with HDI and its components was assessed using SPSS Inc Version 18.0 (Chicago). There were 1,094,916 incident cases of prostate cancer and 307,481 deaths recorded in 2012 worldwide. SIR and SMR due to HDI were 72 and 9.7 in very high human development regions, 37.5 and 12.9 in high human development regions, 7 and 3.7 in medium human development regions, and 14.9 and 12.1 in low human development regions per 100,000 people, respectively. A positive correlation of 0.475 was seen between SIR of prostate cancer and HDI (P ≤ 0.001). Also, a negative correlation of 0.160 was seen between SMR of prostate cancer and HDI (P = 0.032). The incidence of prostate cancer is high in countries with higher development. A positive correlation was observed between the SIR of prostate cancer and the HDI and its components, such as life expectancy at birth, mean years of schooling, and the gross national income per capita. In addition, there was a negative correlation between SMR and HDI.

  1. Hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering imaging facilitates accurate diagnosis of human prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Sishan; Wang, Ping; Yue, Shuhua

    2017-02-01

    Due to the subject nature of histopathology, there is a significant inter-observer discordance for the differentiation between low-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score Gleason score >6), which requires active treatment. Our previous study using Raman spectromicroscopy reveals that cholesteryl ester accumulation underlies human prostate cancer aggressiveness. However, Raman spectromicroscopy could only provide compositional information of certain lipid droplets of interest, which overlooked cell-to-cell variation and hindered translation to accurate automated diagnosis. Here, we demonstrated quantitative mapping of cholesteryl ester molar percentage in human prostate cancer tissues using hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy that renders compositional information for every pixel in the image. Specifically, hundreds of SRS images at Raman shift between 2800 3000 cm-1 were taken, and multivariate curve resolution algorism was used to retrieve concentration images of lipid, lipofuscin, and protein. We found that the height ratio between the prominent cholesterol band at 2870 cm-1 and the CH2 stretching band at 2850 cm-1 was proportional to the molar percentage of cholesteryl ester present in the total lipids. Based on the calibration curve, we were able to quantitatively map cholesteryl ester level in intact prostate cancer tissues. Our data showed that not only the amount of cholesteryl ester-rich lipid droplets, but also the CE molar percentage, was significantly greater in prostate cancer tissues with Gleason score > 6 compared to the ones with Gleason score <= 6. Our study offers an opportunity towards more accurate prostate cancer diagnosis.

  2. Bioenergetic and Antiapoptotic Properties of Mitochondria from Cultured Human Prostate Cancer Cell Lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, Alexander; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ). Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA) the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca2+ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP) when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca2+-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca2+. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia. PMID:23951286

  3. Bioenergetic and antiapoptotic properties of mitochondria from cultured human prostate cancer cell lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Panov

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC, metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ. Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca²⁺ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca²⁺-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca²⁺. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia.

  4. Proteasome activator complex PA28 identified as an accessible target in prostate cancer by in vivo selection of human antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, David; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Ximénez-Embún, Pilar; Fernández-Periáñez, Rodrigo; Martín, M. Teresa; Molina-Privado, Irene; Ruppen-Cañás, Isabel; Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Cañamero, Marta; Cuesta, Ángel M.; Compte, Marta; Kremer, Leonor; Bellas, Carmen; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Sanz, Laura; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Antibody cancer therapies rely on systemically accessible targets and suitable antibodies that exert a functional activity or deliver a payload to the tumor site. Here, we present proof-of-principle of in vivo selection of human antibodies in tumor-bearing mice that identified a tumor-specific antibody able to deliver a payload and unveils the target antigen. By using an ex vivo enrichment process against freshly disaggregated tumors to purge the repertoire, in combination with in vivo biopanning at optimized phage circulation time, we have identified a human domain antibody capable of mediating selective localization of phage to human prostate cancer xenografts. Affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry analysis showed that the antibody recognizes the proteasome activator complex PA28. The specificity of soluble antibody was confirmed by demonstrating its binding to the active human PA28αβ complex. Whereas systemically administered control phage was confined in the lumen of blood vessels of both normal tissues and tumors, the selected phage spread from tumor vessels into the perivascular tumor parenchyma. In these areas, the selected phage partially colocalized with PA28 complex. Furthermore, we found that the expression of the α subunit of PA28 [proteasome activator complex subunit 1 (PSME1)] is elevated in primary and metastatic human prostate cancer and used anti-PSME1 antibodies to show that PSME1 is an accessible marker in mouse xenograft tumors. These results support the use of PA28 as a tumor marker and a potential target for therapeutic intervention in prostate cancer. PMID:23918357

  5. Malignant transformation of human benign prostate epithelial cells by high linear energy transfer alpha-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongzhen; Gu, Yongpeng; Miki, Jun; Hukku, Bharati; McLeod, David G; Hei, Tom K; Rhim, Johng S

    2007-09-01

    Although epidemiological studies have suggested a positive correlation between environmental radon exposure and prostate cancer, the mechanism involved is not clear. In the present study, we examined the oncogenic transforming potency of alpha-particles using non-tumorigenic, telomerase-immortalized human benign prostate epithelial cells. We report the malignant transformation of human benign prostate epithelial cells after a single exposure to 0.6 Gy dose of alpha-particles. Transformed cells showed anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and induced progressively growing tumors when transplanted into SCID mice. The tumors were characterized histologically as poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas. The cell line derived from tumor (SCID 5015), like the unirradiated cells, expressed cytokeratin 5, 8 and 18, NKX3.1 and AMACR. The malignant cells showed increased secretion of MMP2. Stepwise chromosomal changes in the progression to tumorigenicity were observed. Chromosome abnormalities were identified in both irradiated and tumorigenic cells relative to the non-irradiated control cells. Prominent changes in chromosomes 6, 11 and 16, as well as mutations and deletions of the p53 gene were observed in the tumor outgrowth and tumor cells. These findings provide the first evidence of malignant transformation of human benign prostate epithelial cells exposed to a single dose of alpha-particles. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular alterations that occur in radiation carcinogenesis in human prostate cells.

  6. Microbeam X-ray fluorescence mapping of Cu and Fe in human prostatic carcinoma cell lines using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, K.M.J.; Leitao, R.G.; Oliveira-Barros, E.G.; Oliveira, M.A.; Canellas, C.G.L.; Anjos, M.J.; Nasciutti, L.E.; Lopes, R.T., E-mail: kjose@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: eligouveab@gmail.com, E-mail: maria_aparecida_ufrj@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: luiz.nasciutti@histo.ufrj.br, E-mail: roberta.leitao@uerj.br, E-mail: marcelin@uerj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2017-11-01

    Cancer is a worldwide public health problem and prostate cancer continues to be one of the most common fatal cancers in men. Copper plays an important role in the aetiology and growth of tumours however, whether intratumoral copper is actually elevated in prostate cancer patients has not been established. Iron, an important trace element, plays a vital function in oxygen metabolism, oxygen uptake, and electron transport in mitochondria, energy metabolism, muscle function, and hematopoiesis. The X-ray microfluorescence technique (μXRF) is a rapid and non-destructive method of elemental analysis that provides useful elemental information about samples without causing damage or requiring extra sample preparations. This study investigated the behavior of cells in spheroids of human prostate cells, tumour cell line (DU145) and normal cell line (RWPE-1), after supplementation with zinc chloride by 24 hours using synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence (μSRXRF). The measurements were performed with a standard geometry of 45 deg of incidence, excited by a white beam using a pixel of 25 μm and a time of 300 ms/pixel at the XRF beamline at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results by SRμXRF showed non-uniform Cu and Fe distributions in all the spheroids analyzed. (author)

  7. Neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Popescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This review aims to provide practicing clinicians with the most recent knowledge of the biological nature of prostate cancer especially the information regarding neuroendocrine differentiation. Methods: Review of the literature using PubMed search and scientific journal publications. Results: Much progress has been made towards an understanding of the development and progression of prostate cancer. The prostate is a male accessory sex gland which produces a fraction of seminal fluid. The normal human prostate is composed of a stromal compartment (which contains: nerves, fibroblast, smooth muscle cells, macrophages surrounding glandular acins – epithelial cells. Neuroendocrine cells are one of the epithelial populations in the normal prostate and are believed to provide trophic signals trough the secretion of neuropeptides that diffuse and influence surrounding epithelial cells. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men. In prostate cancer, neuroendocrine cells can stimulate growth of surrounding prostate adenocarcinoma cells (proliferation of neighboring cancer cells in a paracrine manner by secretion of neuroendocrine products. Neuroendocrine prostate cancer is an aggressive variant of prostate cancer that commonly arises in later stages of castration resistant prostate cancer. The detection of neuroendocrine prostate cancer has clinical implications. These patients are often treated with platinum chemotherapy rather than with androgen receptor targeted therapies. Conclusion: This review shows the need to improve our knowledge regarding diagnostic and treatment methods of the Prostate Cancer, especially cancer cells with neuroendocrine phenotype.

  8. AR-Signaling in Human Malignancies: Prostate Cancer and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Schweizer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 1940s Charles Huggins reported remarkable palliative benefits following surgical castration in men with advanced prostate cancer, and since then the androgen receptor (AR has remained the main therapeutic target in this disease. Over the past couple of decades, our understanding of AR-signaling biology has dramatically improved, and it has become apparent that the AR can modulate a number of other well-described oncogenic signaling pathways. Not surprisingly, mounting preclinical and epidemiologic data now supports a role for AR-signaling in promoting the growth and progression of several cancers other than prostate, and early phase clinical trials have documented preliminary signs of efficacy when AR-signaling inhibitors are used in several of these malignancies. In this article, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting the use of AR-directed therapies in prostate as well as other cancers, with an emphasis on the rationale for targeting AR-signaling across tumor types.

  9. INTESTINAL VIROME AND NORMAL MICROFLORA OF HUMAN: FEATURES OF INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobyr V.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Intestinal bacteria defend the host organism and narrow pathogenic bacterial colonization. However, the microbiome effect to enteric viruses is unexplored largely as well as role of microbiota in the pathogenesis of viral infections in general. This review focuses on precisely these issues. Keywords: microbiome, virome, normal microflora, enteric viruses, contagiousness. In this review article, facts about viral persistence in the human gut are summarized. It is described the role of viral populations during health and diseases. After analyzing of the literary facts it was concluded that the gastrointestinal tract is an environment for one from the most complex microbial ecosystems, which requires of more deeper study of its composition, role in physiological processes, as well as the dynamics of changes under influence of the environment. Normal microflora performs a different important functions providing the physiological homeostasis of the human body, including, in particular, an important role in the human metabolic processes, supporting of homeostasis, limiting of colonization by infectious bacteria. The multifactorial significance of the normal gastrointestinal microflora can be divided into immunological, structural and metabolic functions. At the same time, interaction between intestinal microflora and enteric viruses has not been studied largely. In recent years, much attention is paid to study of viruses-bacteria associations, and it is possible, obtained results should change our understanding of microbiota role in the systematic pathogenesis of the diseases with viral etiology. In contrast to the well-known benefits of normal microflora to the host, the viruses can use intestinal microflora as a trigger for replication at the optimal region. Recent studies give a reason for assumption that depletion of normal microflora with antibiotics can determining the antiviral effect. Thus, the role of commensal bacteria in viral

  10. Human factors of flight-deck checklists: The normal checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degani, Asaf; Wiener, Earl L.

    1991-01-01

    Although the aircraft checklist has long been regarded as the foundation of pilot standardization and cockpit safety, it has escaped the scrutiny of the human factors profession. The improper use, or the non-use, of the normal checklist by flight crews is often cited as the probable cause or at least a contributing factor to aircraft accidents. An attempt is made to analyze the normal checklist, its functions, format, design, length, usage, and the limitations of the humans who must interact with it. The development of the checklist from the certification of a new model to its delivery and use by the customer are discussed. The influence of the government, particularly the FAA Principle Operations Inspector, the manufacturer's philosophy, the airline's culture, and the end user, the pilot, influence the ultimate design and usage of this device. The effects of airline mergers and acquisitions on checklist usage and design are noted. In addition, the interaction between production pressures and checklist usage and checklist management are addressed. Finally, a list of design guidelines for normal checklists is provided.

  11. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  12. The Role of XMRV, a Novel Xenotropic Murine Retrovirus, in Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    human papilloma viruses most often initiate cervical carcinomas has focused efforts on viral detection for...related virus (XMRV) was recently discovered in human prostate cancers and is the first gammaretrovirus known to infect humans . While...INTRODUCTION     Xenotropic  murine  leukemia   virus –related   virus  (XMRV)  was  recently  discovered  in   human  

  13. Epigenetic Regulation of Vitamin D 24-Hydroxylase/CYP24A1 in Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Karpf, Adam R.; Deeb, Kristin K.; Muindi, Josephia R.; Morrison, Carl D.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Calcitriol, a regulator of calcium homeostasis with antitumor properties, is degraded by the product of the CYP24A1 gene which is downregulated in human prostate cancer by unknown mechanisms. We found that CYP24A1 expression is inversely correlated with promoter DNA methylation in prostate cancer cell lines. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) activates CYP24A1 expression in prostate cancer cells. In vitro methylation of the CYP24A1 promoter represses its promoter activity. Furthermore, inhibition of histone deacetylases by trichostatin A (TSA) enhances the expression of CYP24A1 in prostate cancer cells. ChIP-qPCR reveals that specific histone modifications are associated with the CYP24A1 promoter region. Treatment with TSA increases H3K9ac and H3K4me2 and simultaneously decreases H3K9me2 at the CYP24A1 promoter. ChIP-qPCR assay reveals that treatment with DAC and TSA increases the recruitment of VDR to the CYP24A1 promoter. RT-PCR analysis of paired human prostate samples reveals that CYP24A1 expression is down-regulated in prostate malignant lesions compared to adjacent histologically benign lesions. Bisulfite pyrosequencing shows that CYP24A1 gene is hypermethylated in malignant lesions compared to matched benign lesions. Our findings indicate that repression of CYP24A1 gene expression in human prostate cancer cells is mediated in part by promoter DNA methylation and repressive histone modifications. PMID:20587525

  14. Noscapine inhibits human prostate cancer progression and metastasis in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barken, Israel; Geller, Jack; Rogosnitzky, Moshe

    2008-01-01

    Noscapine, a non-toxic alkaloid and common constituent of cough medicine, stabilises tubulin. It inhibits the growth of several human and murine neoplasms, with no significant toxicity. Its effect on prostate cancer has not been evaluated. Noscapine was administered orally (300 mg/kg per day) for 56 days to PC3 human prostate cancer-bearing immunodeficient mice (n=10). Immunodeficient control mice (n=10) received only diluent in an identical regimen. Mean total tumour weight was 0.42 +/- 0.23 g and 0.97 +/- 0.31 g (pmodel, supporting its therapeutic potential as a nontoxic and easily administered treatment for metastatic cancer.

  15. [Human uterine contractility during normal puerperium (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Salinas, G; Vera-Cázares, R; La Torre-Rasguido, F; Escalera-Villarreal, G; Bandera-González, B

    1980-01-01

    In order to determine the morphology and the normal values of uterine contractility during the puerperium, 26 patients with the following characteristics were studied: multiparous during puerperium, without recent episiotomy, with healthy cervix, absence of genital septic focus, uterine tumours or malformations; all of them breast feeding. In the hypothesis it was considered that the endogenous oxytocin increases and stimulates the mammary myoepithelium and uterine contractility. For recording uterine contractility, the technique of Jaumandreu and Hendricks was used. The recordings were made during the 24 hours postpartum, at 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 days with a duration of 2 to 3 hours. All the studies were longitudinal. The change of human uterine contractility during normal puerperium were estimated. The range of the tonus was 22--41 mmHg, the intensity 5--18 mmHg, the frequency 17--23 contractions in 10 minutes, and the uterine activity 102--223 Montevideo Units.

  16. Sarcoglycan subcomplex in normal and pathological human muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, G; Cutroneo, G; Rizzo, G; Favaloro, A

    2007-01-01

    Sarcoglycans are a sub-complex of transmembrane proteins which are part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC). They are expressed above all in the skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle. Although numerous studies have been conducted on the sarcoglycan sub-complex in skeletal and cardiac muscle, the manner of distribution and localization of these proteins along the non-junctional sarcolemma is still not clear. Furthermore, there are unclear data about the actual role of sarcoglycans in human skeletal muscle affected by sarcoglycanopathies. In our studies on human skeletal muscle, normal and pathological, we determined the localization, distribution and interaction of these glycoproteins. Our results, on normal human skeletal muscle, showed that the sarcoglycans can be localized both in the region of the sarcolemma over the I band and over the A band, hypothesizing a correlation between regions of the sarcolemma occupied by costameres and the metabolic type of the fibers (slow and fast). Our data on skeletal muscle affected by sarcoglycanopathy confirmed the hypothesis of a bidirectional signaling between sarcoglycans and integrins and the interaction of filamin2 with both sarcoglycans and integrins. In addition, we have recently demonstrated, in smooth muscle, the presence of alpha-SG, in contrast with data of other Authors. Finally, we analyzed the association between contractile activity and quantitative correlation between alpha- and epsilon-SG, in order to better define the arrangement of sarcoglycan subcomplex.

  17. Lithocholic acid induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Gafar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lithocholic acid (LCA is a secondary bile acid that is selectively toxic to human neuroblastoma, breast and prostate cancer cells, whilst sparing normal cells. We previously reported that LCA inhibited cell viability and proliferation and induced apoptosis and necrosis of androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in the toxicity of LCA in PC-3 and autophagy deficient, androgen-independent DU-145 cells. LCA induced ER stress-related proteins, such as CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP, and the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (p-eIF2α and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK in both cancer cell-types. The p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA and B cell lymphoma-like protein 11 (BIM levels were decreased at overtly toxic LCA concentrations, although PUMA levels increased at lower LCA concentrations in both cell lines. LCA induced autophagy-related conversion of microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (LC3BI–LC3BII, and autophagy-related protein ATG5 in PC-3 cells, but not in autophagy-deficient DU-145 cells. LCA (>10 µM increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS concentration-dependently in PC-3 cells, whereas ROS levels were not affected in DU-145 cells. Salubrinal, an inhibitor of eIF2α dephosphorylation and ER stress, reduced LCA-induced CHOP levels slightly in PC-3, but not DU-145 cells. Salubrinal pre-treatment increased the cytotoxicity of LCA in PC-3 and DU-145 cells and resulted in a statistically significant loss of cell viability at normally non-toxic concentrations of LCA. The late-stage autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 exacerbated LCA toxicity at subtoxic LCA concentrations in PC-3 cells. The antioxidant α-tocotrienol strongly inhibited the toxicity of LCA in PC-3 cells, but not in DU-145 cells

  18. Lithocholic acid induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in human prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafar, Ahmed A.; Draz, Hossam M.; Goldberg, Alexander A.; Bashandy, Mohamed A.; Bakry, Sayed; Khalifa, Mahmoud A.; AbuShair, Walid; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2016-01-01

    Lithocholic acid (LCA) is a secondary bile acid that is selectively toxic to human neuroblastoma, breast and prostate cancer cells, whilst sparing normal cells. We previously reported that LCA inhibited cell viability and proliferation and induced apoptosis and necrosis of androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in the toxicity of LCA in PC-3 and autophagy deficient, androgen-independent DU-145 cells. LCA induced ER stress-related proteins, such as CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (p-eIF2α) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK) in both cancer cell-types. The p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) and B cell lymphoma-like protein 11 (BIM) levels were decreased at overtly toxic LCA concentrations, although PUMA levels increased at lower LCA concentrations in both cell lines. LCA induced autophagy-related conversion of microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (LC3BI–LC3BII), and autophagy-related protein ATG5 in PC-3 cells, but not in autophagy-deficient DU-145 cells. LCA (>10 µM) increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration-dependently in PC-3 cells, whereas ROS levels were not affected in DU-145 cells. Salubrinal, an inhibitor of eIF2α dephosphorylation and ER stress, reduced LCA-induced CHOP levels slightly in PC-3, but not DU-145 cells. Salubrinal pre-treatment increased the cytotoxicity of LCA in PC-3 and DU-145 cells and resulted in a statistically significant loss of cell viability at normally non-toxic concentrations of LCA. The late-stage autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 exacerbated LCA toxicity at subtoxic LCA concentrations in PC-3 cells. The antioxidant α-tocotrienol strongly inhibited the toxicity of LCA in PC-3 cells, but not in DU-145 cells. Collectively

  19. Muscadine grape skin extract reverts snail-mediated epithelial mesenchymal transition via superoxide species in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Liza J; Barnett, Petrina; Smith, Basil; Arnold, Rebecca S; Hudson, Tamaro; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Odero-Marah, Valerie A

    2014-03-12

    Snail transcription factor can induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), associated with decreased cell adhesion-associated molecules like E-cadherin, increased mesenchymal markers like vimentin, leading to increased motility, invasion and metastasis. Muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth and induce apoptosis without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. We investigated novel molecular mechanisms by which Snail promotes EMT in prostate cancer cells via Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and whether it can be antagonized by MSKE. ARCaP and LNCaP cells overexpressing Snail were utilized to examine levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), specifically, superoxide, in vitro using Dihydroethidium (DHE) or HydroCy3 dyes. Mitosox staining was performed to determine whether the source of ROS was mitochondrial in origin. We also investigated the effect of Muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE) on EMT marker expression by western blot analysis. Migration and cell viability using MTS proliferation assay was performed following MSKE treatments. Snail overexpression in ARCaP and LNCaP cells was associated with increased concentration of mitochondrial superoxide, in vitro. Interestingly, MSKE decreased superoxide levels in ARCaP and LNCaP cells. Additionally, MSKE and Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) reverted EMT as evidenced by decreased vimentin levels and re-induction of E-cadherin expression in ARCaP-Snail cells after 3 days, concomitant with reduced cell migration. MSKE also decreased Stat-3 activity in ARCaP-Snail cells. This study shows that superoxide species may play a role in Snail transcription factor-mediated EMT. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Snail with various antioxidants such as MSKE may prove beneficial in abrogating EMT and ROS-mediated tumor progression in human prostate cancer.

  20. Urtica dioica Induces Cytotoxicity in Human Prostate Carcinoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the cytotoxic mechanisms of an extract from the leaves of the Urtica dioica (UD) plant in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Methods: LNCaP cells were exposed to the UD extract for 24hrs and cell viability assessed using the. MTT assay. Reactive oxygen species generation was assessed using the NBT ...

  1. Epac inhibits migration and proliferation of human prostate carcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grandoch, M.; Rose, A.; ter Braak, M.; Jendrossek, V.; Ruebben, H.; Fischer, J. W.; Schmidt, M.; Weber, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It was recently found that cAMP mediates protein kinase A-independent effects through Epac proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Epac in migration and proliferation of prostate carcinoma cells. METHODS: The effect of Epac activation was determined by [(3)H

  2. Urtica dioica Induces Cytotoxicity in Human Prostate Carcinoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the cytotoxic mechanisms of an extract from the leaves of the Urtica dioica (UD) plant in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Methods: LNCaP cells were exposed to the UD extract for 24hrs and cell viability assessed using the MTT assay. Reactive oxygen species generation was assessed using the NBT ...

  3. A new plan-scoring method using normal tissue complication probability for personalized treatment plan decisions in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Suk; Shim, Jang Bo; Yang, Dae Sik; Yoon, Won Sup; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cao, Yuan Jie; Chang, Kyung Hwan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to derive a new plan-scoring index using normal tissue complication probabilities to verify different plans in the selection of personalized treatment. Plans for 12 patients treated with tomotherapy were used to compare scoring for ranking. Dosimetric and biological indexes were analyzed for the plans for a clearly distinguishable group ( n = 7) and a similar group ( n = 12), using treatment plan verification software that we developed. The quality factor ( QF) of our support software for treatment decisions was consistent with the final treatment plan for the clearly distinguishable group (average QF = 1.202, 100% match rate, n = 7) and the similar group (average QF = 1.058, 33% match rate, n = 12). Therefore, we propose a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) based on the plan scoring index for verification of different plans for personalized treatment-plan selection. Scoring using the new QF showed a 100% match rate (average NTCP QF = 1.0420). The NTCP-based new QF scoring method was adequate for obtaining biological verification quality and organ risk saving using the treatment-planning decision-support software we developed for prostate cancer.

  4. Preclinical Remodeling of Human Prostate Cancer through the PTEN/AKT Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. De Velasco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge gained from the identification of genetic and epigenetic alterations that contribute to the progression of prostate cancer in humans is now being implemented in the development of functionally relevant translational models. GEM (genetically modified mouse models are being developed to incorporate the same molecular defects associated with human prostate cancer. Haploinsufficiency is common in prostate cancer and homozygous loss of PTEN is strongly correlated with advanced disease. In this paper, we discuss the evolution of the PTEN knockout mouse and the cooperation between PTEN and other genetic alterations in tumor development and progression. Additionally, we will outline key points that make these models key players in the development of personalized medicine, as potential tools for target and biomarker development and validation as well as models for drug discovery.

  5. Fisetin Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effect of Cabazitaxel against Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Eiman; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Siddiqui, Imtiaz Ahmad; Verma, Ajit Kumar; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2016-12-01

    Although treatment of prostate cancer has improved over the past several years, taxanes, such as cabazitaxel, remain the only form of effective chemotherapy that improves survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, the effectiveness of this class of drugs has been associated with various side effects and drug resistance. We previously reported that fisetin, a hydroxyflavone, is a microtubule-stabilizing agent and inhibits prostate cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and suggested its use as an adjuvant for treatment of prostate and other cancer types. In this study, we investigated the effect of fisetin in combination with cabazitaxel with the objective to achieve maximum therapeutic benefit, reduce dose and toxicity, and minimize or delay the induction of drug resistance and metastasis. Our data show for the first time that a combination of fisetin (20 μmol/L) enhances cabazitaxel (5 nmol/L) and synergistically reduces 22Rν1, PC-3M-luc-6, and C4-2 cell viability and metastatic properties with minimal adverse effects on normal prostate epithelial cells. In addition, the combination of fisetin with cabazitaxel was associated with inhibition of proliferation and enhancement of apoptosis. Furthermore, combination treatment resulted in the inhibition of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis when assessed in two in vivo xenograft mouse models. These results provide evidence that fisetin may have therapeutic benefit for patients with advanced prostate cancer through enhancing the efficacy of cabazitaxel under both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent conditions. This study underscores the benefit of the combination of fisetin with cabazitaxel for the treatment of advanced and resistant prostate cancer and possibly other cancer types. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2863-74. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Spatiotemporal analysis of normal and pathological human vocal fold vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausert, Christopher R; Liang, Yufang; Zhang, Yu; Rieves, Adam L; Geurink, Kyle R; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-01-01

    For spatiotemporal analysis to become a relevant clinical tool, it must be applied to human vocal fold vibration. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis will help assess the ability of spatiotemporal parameters to detect pathological vibration. Spatiotemporal parameters of correlation length and entropy were extracted from high-speed videos of 124 subjects, 67 without vocal fold pathology and 57 with either vocal fold polyps or nodules. Mann-Whitney rank sum tests were performed to compare normal vocal fold vibrations to pathological vibrations, and ROC analysis was used to assess the diagnostic value of spatiotemporal analysis. A statistically significant difference was found between the normal and pathological groups in both correlation length (P nodules and polyps groups in either correlation length (P = .227) or entropy (P = .943). The ROC analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.63 for correlation length and 0.51 for entropy. Although they could not effectively distinguish vibration of vocal folds with nodules from those with polyps, the spatiotemporal parameters correlation length and entropy exhibit the ability to differentiate normal and pathological vocal fold vibration and may represent a diagnostic tool for objectively detecting abnormal vibration in the future, especially in neurological voice disorders and vocal folds without a visible lesion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) expression increases with high gleason score, advanced stage and bone metastasis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Z; Thomas, G; Yamashiro, J; Shintaku, I P; Dorey, F; Raitano, A; Witte, O N; Said, J W; Loda, M; Reiter, R E

    2000-03-02

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a recently defined homologue of the Thy-1/Ly-6 family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell surface antigens. PSCA mRNA is expressed in the basal cells of normal prostate and in more than 80% of prostate cancers. The purpose of the present study was to examine PSCA protein expression in clinical specimens of human prostate cancer. Five monoclonal antibodies were raised against a PSCA-GST fusion protein and screened for their ability to recognize PSCA on the cell surface of human prostate cancer cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of PSCA expression was performed on paraffin-embedded sections from 25 normal tissues, 112 primary prostate cancers and nine prostate cancers metastatic to bone. The level of PSCA expression in prostate tumors was quantified and compared with expression in adjacent normal glands. The antibodies detect PSCA expression on the cell surface of normal and malignant prostate cells and distinguish three extracellular epitopes on PSCA. Prostate and transitional epithelium reacted strongly with PSCA. PSCA staining was also seen in placental trophoblasts, renal collecting ducts and neuroendocrine cells in the stomach and colon. All other normal tissues tested were negative. PSCA protein expression was identified in 105/112 (94%) primary prostate tumors and 9/9 (100%) bone metastases. The level of PSCA expression increased with higher Gleason score (P=0.016), higher tumor stage (P=0.010) and progression to androgen-independence (P=0. 021). Intense, homogeneous staining was seen in all nine bone metastases. PSCA is a cell surface protein with limited expression in extraprostatic normal tissues. PSCA expression correlates with tumor stage, grade and androgen independence and may have prognostic utility. Because expression on the surface of prostate cancer cells increases with tumor progression, PSCA may be a useful molecular target in advanced prostate cancer.

  8. Subditine, a new monoterpenoid indole alkaloid from bark of Nauclea subdita (Korth. Steud. induces apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook Yee Liew

    Full Text Available In this study, a new apoptotic monoterpenoid indole alkaloid, subditine (1, and four known compounds were isolated from the bark of Nauclea subdita. Complete (1H- and (13C- NMR data of the new compound were reported. The structures of isolated compounds were elucidated with various spectroscopic methods such as 1D- and 2D- NMR, IR, UV and LCMS. All five compounds were screened for cytotoxic activities on LNCaP and PC-3 human prostate cancer cell-lines. Among the five compounds, the new alkaloid, subditine (1, demonstrated the most potent cell growth inhibition activity and selective against LNCaP with an IC50 of 12.24±0.19 µM and PC-3 with an IC50 of 13.97±0.32 µM, compared to RWPE human normal epithelial cell line (IC50 = 30.48±0.08 µM. Subditine (1 treatment induced apoptosis in LNCaP and PC-3 as evidenced by increased cell permeability, disruption of cytoskeletal structures and increased nuclear fragmentation. In addition, subditine (1 enhanced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production, as reflected by increased expression of glutathione reductase (GR to scavenge damaging free radicals in both prostate cancer cell-lines. Excessive ROS could lead to disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, release of cytochrome c and subsequent caspase 9, 3/7 activation. Further Western blot analyses showed subditine (1 induced down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl expression, whereas p53 was up-regulated in LNCaP (p53-wild-type, but not in PC-3 (p53-null. Overall, our data demonstrated that the new compound subditine (1 exerts anti-proliferative effect on LNCaP and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells through induction of apoptosis.

  9. Anatomy of the normal human cochlear aqueduct with functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopen, Q; Rosowski, J J; Merchant, S N

    1997-05-01

    There is great variation in published descriptions of the shape, size, and patency of the human cochlear aqueduct. The first part of this paper describes the anatomy of the normal human cochlear aqueduct as determined from a study of 101 temporal bones. Nineteen bones aged 0-1 years and approximately 10 bones per decade of life until age 100 years were examined. The aqueduct was found to have a funnel shaped aperture at the cranial end with a dural sheath extending into it for a varying distance. The rest of the aqueduct was filled with a meshwork of loose connective tissue, often with a central lumen within it. Four types of patencies were noted: central lumen patent throughout length of aqueduct (34%), lumen filled with loose connective tissue (59%), lumen occluded by bone (4%), and obliteration of the aqueduct (3%). The mean value (+/- SD) of the narrowest portion was 138 (+/- 58) microns which occurred 200-300 microns from the cochlear end of the aqueduct. There was no correlation between age and narrowest diameter, or between age and category of patency. In the second part of this paper, we propose quantitative models of aqueduct function, based on measurements of ductal dimensions and known acoustical properties of the inner ear. Our model analyses suggest that in normal ears, the aqueduct (1) cannot support fluid flows large enough to explain stapedectomy gushers, (2) does filter out cardiac- and respiration-induced pulses in CSF and prevents them from affecting cochlear function, and (3) has little effect on normal ossicular transmission of sound for frequencies above 20 Hz. In pathological ears, such as those with ossicular disruption or after a type IV tympanoplasty, a patent aqueduct might affect hearing for frequencies below 150 Hz.

  10. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides induce apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells and inhibits prostate cancer growth in a xenograft mouse model of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qiong; Li, Zhuoneng; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Fan; Xu, Ruo-Jun; Cai, Yi-Zhong

    2009-08-01

    Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBPs) are important functional constituents in red-colored fruits of L. barbarum (Guo Qi Zi, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal plant commonly known as Goji berry or wolfberry). The influence of LBP on human prostate cancer cells was systematically investigated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro effects of LBP on two cell lines (PC-3 and DU-145) were examined by using trypan blue exclusion staining, single-cell gel electrophoresis, flow cytometry, terminal dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and immunohistochemical assay (assessment of Bcl-2 and Bax expression). The in vivo effect of LBP on PC-3 cells was assessed in the nude mouse xenograft tumor model. The in vitro results showed that LBP can dose- and time-dependently inhibit the growth of both PC-3 and DU-145 cells. LBP caused the breakage of DNA strands of PC-3 and DU-145 cells; the tail frequency and tail length were significantly higher than that of control cells. LBP also markedly induced PC-3 and DU-145 cell apoptosis, with the highest apoptosis rates at 41.5% and 35.5%, respectively. The ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein expression following LBP treatments decreased significantly with a dose-effect relationship, which suggested that LBP can regulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax to induce apoptosis of PC-3 and DU-145 cells. The in vivo experimental results indicate that LBP might significantly inhibit PC-3 tumor growth in nude mice. Both the tumor volume and weight of the LBP treatment group were significantly lower than those of the control group.

  11. Human prostate supports more efficient replication of HIV-1 R5 than X4 strains ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Hélène

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to determine whether human prostate can be productively infected by HIV-1 strains with different tropism, and thus represent a potential source of HIV in semen, an organotypic culture of prostate from men undergoing prostatic adenomectomy for benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH was developed. The presence of potential HIV target cells in prostate tissues was investigated using immunohistochemistry. The infection of prostate explants following exposures with HIV-1 R5, R5X4 and X4 strains was analyzed through the measure of RT activity in culture supernatants, the quantification of HIV DNA in the explants and the detection of HIV RNA+ cells in situ. Results The overall prostate characteristics were retained for 21/2 weeks in culture. Numerous potential HIV-1 target cells were detected in the prostate stroma. Whilst HIV-1 R5SF162 strain consistently productively infected prostatic T lymphocytes and macrophages, the prototypic X4IIIB strain and a primary R5X4 strain showed less efficient replication in this organ. Conclusion The BPH prostate is a site of HIV-1 R5 replication that could contribute virus to semen. A limited spreading of HIV-1 X4 and R5X4 in this organ could participate to the preferential sexual transmission of HIV-1 R5 strains.

  12. Human prostate supports more efficient replication of HIV-1 R5 than X4 strains ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tortorec, Anna; Satie, Anne-Pascale; Denis, Hélène; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Havard, Laurence; Ruffault, Annick; Jégou, Bernard; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie

    2008-12-31

    In order to determine whether human prostate can be productively infected by HIV-1 strains with different tropism, and thus represent a potential source of HIV in semen, an organotypic culture of prostate from men undergoing prostatic adenomectomy for benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) was developed. The presence of potential HIV target cells in prostate tissues was investigated using immunohistochemistry. The infection of prostate explants following exposures with HIV-1 R5, R5X4 and X4 strains was analyzed through the measure of RT activity in culture supernatants, the quantification of HIV DNA in the explants and the detection of HIV RNA+ cells in situ. The overall prostate characteristics were retained for 21/2 weeks in culture. Numerous potential HIV-1 target cells were detected in the prostate stroma. Whilst HIV-1 R5SF162 strain consistently productively infected prostatic T lymphocytes and macrophages, the prototypic X4IIIB strain and a primary R5X4 strain showed less efficient replication in this organ. The BPH prostate is a site of HIV-1 R5 replication that could contribute virus to semen. A limited spreading of HIV-1 X4 and R5X4 in this organ could participate to the preferential sexual transmission of HIV-1 R5 strains.

  13. Normalization of Deviation: Quotation Error in Human Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Jordan; Bearman, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Objective The objective of this paper is to examine quotation error in human factors. Background Science progresses through building on the work of previous research. This requires accurate quotation. Quotation error has a number of adverse consequences: loss of credibility, loss of confidence in the journal, and a flawed basis for academic debate and scientific progress. Quotation error has been observed in a number of domains, including marine biology and medicine, but there has been little or no previous study of this form of error in human factors, a domain that specializes in the causes and management of error. Methods A study was conducted examining quotation accuracy of 187 extracts from 118 published articles that cited a control article (Vaughan's 1996 book: The Challenger Launch Decision: Risky Technology, Culture, and Deviance at NASA). Results Of extracts studied, 12.8% ( n = 24) were classed as inaccurate, with 87.2% ( n = 163) being classed as accurate. A second dimension of agreement was examined with 96.3% ( n = 180) agreeing with the control article and only 3.7% ( n = 7) disagreeing. The categories of accuracy and agreement form a two by two matrix. Conclusion Rather than simply blaming individuals for quotation error, systemic factors should also be considered. Vaughan's theory, normalization of deviance, is one systemic theory that can account for quotation error. Application Quotation error is occurring in human factors and should receive more attention. According to Vaughan's theory, the normal everyday systems that promote scholarship may also allow mistakes, mishaps, and quotation error to occur.

  14. Inhibition of normal human lung fibroblast growth by beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, N M; Gary, R K; Marrone, B L; Lehnert, B E

    2001-03-07

    Inhalation of particulate beryllium (Be) and its compounds causes chronic Be disease (CBD) in a relatively small subset ( approximately 1-6%) of exposed individuals. Hallmarks of this pulmonary disease include increases in several cell types, including lung fibroblasts, that contribute to the fibrotic component of the disorder. In this regard, enhancements in cell proliferation appear to play a fundamental role in CBD development and progression. Paradoxically, however, some existing evidence suggests that Be actually has antiproliferative effects. In order to gain further information about the effects of Be on cell growth, we: (1) assessed cell proliferation and cell cycle effects of low concentrations of Be in normal human diploid fibroblasts, and (2) investigated the molecular pathway(s) by which the cell cycle disturbing effects of Be may be mediated. Treatment of human lung and skin fibroblasts with Be added in the soluble form of BeSO(4) (0.1-100 microM) caused inhibitions of their growth in culture in a concentration-dependent manner. Such growth inhibition was found to persist, even after cells were further cultured in Be(2+)-free medium. Flow cytometric analyses of cellular DNA labeled with the DNA-binding fluorochrome DAPI revealed that Be causes a G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest. Western blot analyses indicated that the Be-induced G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest involves elevations in TP53 (p53) and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21(Waf-1,Cip1)). That Be at low concentrations inhibits the growth of normal human fibroblasts suggests the possibility of the existence of abnormal cell cycle inhibitory responses to Be in individuals who are sensitive to the metal and ultimately develop CBD.

  15. Differential expression of 5-alpha reductase isozymes in the prostate and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of human benign or malignant prostatic diseases is closely associated with androgens, primarily testosterone (T and dihydrotestosterone (DHT. T is converted to DHT by 5-alpha reductase (5-AR isozymes. Differential expression of 5-AR isozymes is observed in both human benign and malignant prostatic tissues. 5-AR inhibitors (5-ARI are commonly used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and were once promoted as chemopreventive agents for prostate cancer (PCa. This review discusses the role of the differential expression of 5-AR in the normal development of the human prostate and in the pathogenesis and progression of BPH and PCa.

  16. Studies on the human prostatic cancer cell line LNCaP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Veldscholte (Jos); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); E. Mulder (Eppo)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe effects of androgens, antiandrogens, and other steroid hormones on growth of the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP were studied. Despite the absence of receptors for progesterone and estradiol, the growth rate of the androgen responsive LNCaP-FGC cells increased when cultured in

  17. Cyclic AMP Induces Transforming Growth Factor β2 Gene Expression and Growth Arrest in the Human Androgen-Independent Prostate Carcinoma Cell Line PC-3

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yung-Jue Bang; Seong-Jin Kim; David Danielpour; Michael A. O'Reilly; Kyung Young Kim; Charles E. Myers; Jane B. Trepel

    1992-01-01

    .... To develop an additional approach to the treatment of advanced prostate cancer, we have been studying the signal transductions controlling the growth of human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell lines...

  18. Cyclic AMP induces transforming growth factor beta 2 gene expression and growth arrest in the human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell line PC-3

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Y J Bang; S J Kim; D Danielpour; M A O'Reilly; K Y Kim; C E Myers; J B Trepel

    1992-01-01

    .... To develop an additional approach to the treatment of advanced prostate cancer, we have been studying the signal transductions controlling the growth of human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell lines...

  19. Prediction of Aggressive Human Prostate Cancer by Cathepsin B

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    20.0ng/ml. Cathepsin B and stefin A reaction products were found in the cytoplasm of basal and columnar/cuboidal cells of benign prostatic...cancer and invasive cells were acquired at 200X (10X ocular and 20X objective) magnification directly from microscope slides to a computer using a...independent prognostic factor for squamous cell carcinoma patients. Brit. J. Cancer. 81: 510-519, 1999. 17. Chambers AF and Matrisian LM: Changing views of

  20. Protein Phosphatase 2A Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    How To 8 I PubMed H.__ ________________________ ----, Advanced Display Settings: 8 Abstract Mol Cancer Ther. 2011 May;1 0(5):720-31. doi: 10.11 58...alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of advanced androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID: 21393425 [ PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE...PMCID: PMC3669395 Free PMC Article Images from this publication. See all images (61 Free text Publication TYpes, MeSH Terms, Substances, Grant

  1. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the anti-survival effect of sulforaphane on human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Yanxi [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); College of Life Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan (China); Wu, Bo [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Cao, Qiuhui [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); Wu, Lingyun [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Department of Pharmacology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Yang, Guangdong, E-mail: gyang@lakeheadu.ca [The School of Kinesiology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a novel gasotransmitter that regulates cell proliferation and other cellular functions. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a sulfur-containing compound that exhibits anticancer properties, and young sprouts of broccoli are particularly rich in SFN. There is consistent epidemiological evidence that the consumption of sulfur-containing vegetables, such as garlic and cruciferous vegetables, may help reduce the occurrence of prostate cancer. Here we found that a large amount of H{sub 2}S is released when SFN is added into cell culture medium or mixed with mouse liver homogenates, respectively. Both SFN and NaHS (a H{sub 2}S donor) decreased the viability of PC-3 cells (a human prostate cancer cell line) in a dose-dependent manner, and supplement of methemoglobin or oxidized glutathione (two H{sub 2}S scavengers) reversed SFN-reduced cell viability. We further found both cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta-synthase are expressed in PC-3 cells and mouse prostate tissues. H{sub 2}S production in prostate tissues from CSE knockout mice was only 20% of that from wild-type mice, suggesting CSE is a major H{sub 2}S-producing enzyme in prostate. CSE overexpression enhanced H{sub 2}S production and inhibited cell viability in PC-3 cells. In addition, both SFN and NaHS activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Pre-treatment of PC-3 cells with methemoglobin decreased SFN-stimulated MAPK activities. Suppression of both p38 MAPK and JNK reversed H{sub 2}S- or SFN-reduced viability of PC-3 cells. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}S mediates the inhibitory effect of SFN on the proliferation of PC-3 cells, which suggests that H{sub 2}S-releasing diet or drug might be beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large amount of H{sub 2}S is released from sulforaphane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}S mediates the anti-survival effect of

  2. Proliferative activity and branching morphogenesis in the human prostate: a closer look at pre- and postnatal prostate growth.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Y.; Sonke, G.S.; Schoots, C.; Schalken, J.A.; Verhofstad, A.A.J.; Rosette, J.J.M.H.C. de la; Smedts, F.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To gain further insight into the molecular cell biologic features of prostate development, we investigated the proliferative activity of prostate epithelial and stromal cells and their topographic relationship with neuroendocrine (NE) cell distribution and regional heterogeneity.

  3. Proliferative activity and branching morphogenesis in the human prostate: a closer look at pre- and postnatal prostate growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Y.; Sonke, G.; Schoots, C.; Schalken, J.; Verhofstad, A.; de la Rosette, J.; Smedts, F.

    2001-01-01

    To gain further insight into the molecular cell biologic features of prostate development, we investigated the proliferative activity of prostate epithelial and stromal cells and their topographic relationship with neuroendocrine (NE) cell distribution and regional heterogeneity. Consecutive

  4. Serenoa repens extract targets mitochondria and activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Antonella; Mancini, Mariangela; Caldwell, Elizabeth; Cabrelle, Anna; Bernardi, Paolo; Pagano, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the effects of Serenoa repens extract (Sr) in human PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer and MCF7 breast cancer cells, with specific emphasis on the role of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, as the molecular pathway through which Sr, a natural product of plant origin, induces death of prostate cancer cells in culture is still unknown. Cellular and mitochondrial structure and function, and the cell cycle, were analysed using light, electron and fluorescence microscopy, spectrophotometry and flow cytometry. Apoptosis was evaluated using biochemical and cytohistochemical methods. Cells treated with Sr underwent massive vacuolization and cytosolic condensation, followed by cell death only in the prostate lines. Within minutes of adding Sr to prostate cells, it caused opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP), which led to complete mitochondrial depolarization within 2 h, and to the appearance of small, pycnotic mitochondria. Release of cytochrome c and SMAC/Diablo to the cytosol was detectable after 4 h of treatment, while caspase 9 activation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 cleavage occurred at 16 h, followed by appearance of a sub-G1 peak and apoptosis at 24 h. Sr selectively induces apoptotic cell death of prostate cancer cells through the intrinsic pathway, and activation of the mitochondrial PTP might play a central role in this process.

  5. Regulation of Na,K-pump-mediated transport by prolactin in cultured human prostate epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, M J; Chosseler, M; Pressley, TA

    2004-11-01

    The prostate gland is unique in its ability to secrete large amounts of zinc and citrate, suggesting that it employs unusual transport mechanisms. Intracellular ionic homeostasis in prostate is likely to be mediated by the Na,K-pump, yet there have been few studies of its regulation in this tissue. Accordingly, we explored the expression of the Na,K-pump in PC3 cells, an established cell line of human prostate epithelial cells. Total RNA from confluent monolayers of PC3 cells was isolated, reverse transcribed, and the resulting complementary DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for each of the pump's constituent subunits. The amplification revealed a complex pattern of Na,K-pump expression, with detection of mRNAs encoding the alpha1-, alpha3-, alpha4-, betal-, beta2- and beta3-isoforms. We next examined the effect on pump activity of prolactin, an important mediator of cell proliferation in prostate cancer. Monolayers exposed to 10 nM prolactin for 24 hr revealed an inhibition of 40% in ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake, a sensitive measure of pump-mediated transport. These experiments suggest that the unique transport properties of prostate may depend, at least in part, on a complicated pattern of Na,K-pump expression and regulation.

  6. Reproducible pattern of microRNA in normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Line; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Gniadecki, Robert

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis via specific targeting of messenger RNA (mRNA). Aberrant mRNA expression contributes to pathological processes such as carcinogenesis. To take advantage of miRNA profiling in skin disease it is essential to investigate miRNA...... expression pattern in normal human skin. Here we investigated miRNA expression profiles from skin biopsies of 8 healthy volunteers taken from sun protected and mildly photo damaged skin using the modified protocol for miRNA extraction. We were able to show a constant pattern of miRNA expression between...... different individuals. We did not find any significant differences in miRNA expression between sun protected and mildly photodamaged skin. These results may be valuable for future design of studies on miRNA expression in skin disease....

  7. A Novel Role of Silibinin as a Putative Epigenetic Modulator in Human Prostate Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Anestopoulos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Silibinin, extracted from milk thistle (Silybum marianum L., has exhibited considerable preclinical activity against prostate carcinoma. Its antitumor and chemopreventive activities have been associated with diverse effects on cell cycle, apoptosis, and receptor-dependent mitogenic signaling pathways. Here we hypothesized that silibinin’s pleiotropic effects may reflect its interference with epigenetic mechanisms in human prostate cancer cells. More specifically, we have demonstrated that silibinin reduces gene expression levels of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2 members Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2, Suppressor of Zeste Homolog 12 (SUZ12, and Embryonic Ectoderm Development (EED in DU145 and PC3 human prostate cancer cells, as evidenced by Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR. Furthermore immunoblot and immunofluorescence analysis revealed that silibinin-mediated reduction of EZH2 levels was accompanied by an increase in trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine (Κ-27 residue (H3K27me3 levels and that such response was, in part, dependent on decreased expression levels of phosphorylated Akt (ser473 (pAkt and phosphorylated EZH2 (ser21 (pEZH2. Additionally silibinin exerted other epigenetic effects involving an increase in total DNA methyltransferase (DNMT activity while it decreased histone deacetylases 1-2 (HDACs1-2 expression levels. We conclude that silibinin induces epigenetic alterations in human prostate cancer cells, suggesting that subsequent disruptions of central processes in chromatin conformation may account for some of its diverse anticancer effects.

  8. ChromSorter PC: a database of chromosomal regions associated with human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etim, Ann; Zhou, Guohui; Wen, Xinyu; Liu, Hang; Ruotti, Victor; Twigger, Simon; Jin, Weihong; Matysiak, Brian; Mathis, Jedidiah; Tonellato, Peter J; Datta, Milton W

    2004-04-28

    Our increasing use of genetic and genomic strategies to understand human prostate cancer means that we need access to simplified and integrated information present in the associated biomedical literature. In particular, microarray gene expression studies and associated genetic mapping studies in prostate cancer would benefit from a generalized understanding of the prior work associated with this disease. This would allow us to focus subsequent laboratory studies to genomic regions already related to prostate cancer by other scientific methods. We have developed a database of prostate cancer related chromosomal information from the existing biomedical literature. The input material was based on a broad literature search with subsequent hand annotation of information relevant to prostate cancer. The database was then analyzed for identifiable trends in the whole scale literature. We have used this database, named ChromSorter PC, to present graphical summaries of chromosomal regions associated with prostate cancer broken down by age, ethnicity and experimental method. In addition we have placed the database information on the human genome using the Generic Genome Browser tool that allows the visualization of the data with respect to user generated datasets. We have used this database as an additional dataset for the filtering of genes identified through genetics and genomics studies as warranting follow-up validation studies. We would like to make this dataset publicly available for use by other groups. Using the Genome Browser allows for the graphical analysis of the associated data http://www.prostategenomics.org/datamining/chrom-sorter_pc.html. Additional material from the database can be obtained by contacting the authors (mdatta@mcw.edu).

  9. ChromSorter PC: A database of chromosomal regions associated with human prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathis Jedidiah

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our increasing use of genetic and genomic strategies to understand human prostate cancer means that we need access to simplified and integrated information present in the associated biomedical literature. In particular, microarray gene expression studies and associated genetic mapping studies in prostate cancer would benefit from a generalized understanding of the prior work associated with this disease. This would allow us to focus subsequent laboratory studies to genomic regions already related to prostate cancer by other scientific methods. We have developed a database of prostate cancer related chromosomal information from the existing biomedical literature. The input material was based on a broad literature search with subsequent hand annotation of information relevant to prostate cancer. Description The database was then analyzed for identifiable trends in the whole scale literature. We have used this database, named ChromSorter PC, to present graphical summaries of chromosomal regions associated with prostate cancer broken down by age, ethnicity and experimental method. In addition we have placed the database information on the human genome using the Generic Genome Browser tool that allows the visualization of the data with respect to user generated datasets. Conclusions We have used this database as an additional dataset for the filtering of genes identified through genetics and genomics studies as warranting follow-up validation studies. We would like to make this dataset publicly available for use by other groups. Using the Genome Browser allows for the graphical analysis of the associated data http://www.prostategenomics.org/datamining/chrom-sorter_pc.html. Additional material from the database can be obtained by contacting the authors (mdatta@mcw.edu.

  10. Androgen-Sensitized Apoptosis of HPr-1AR Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Chen

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR signaling is crucial to the development and homeostasis of the prostate gland, and its dysregulation mediates common prostate pathologies. The mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells have been investigated in human and rodent adult prostate. However, the cellular stress response of human prostate epithelial cells is not well understood, though it is central to prostate health and pathology. Here, we report that androgen sensitizes HPr-1AR and RWPE-AR human prostate epithelial cells to cell stress agents and apoptotic cell death. Although 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT treatment alone did not induce cell death, co-treatment of HPr-1AR cells with DHT and an apoptosis inducer, such as staurosporine (STS, TNFt, or hydrogen peroxide, synergistically increased cell death in comparison to treatment with each apoptosis inducer by itself. We found that the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer led to activation of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is supported by robust cleavage activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Further, the dramatic depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential that we observed upon co-treatment with DHT and STS is consistent with increased mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP in the pro-apoptotic mechanism. Interestingly, the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer was abolished by AR antagonists and inhibitors of transcription and protein synthesis, suggesting that AR mediates pro-apoptotic synergy through transcriptional regulation of MOMP genes. Expression analysis revealed that pro-apoptotic genes (BCL2L11/BIM and AIFM2 were DHT-induced, whereas pro-survival genes (BCL2L1/BCL-XL and MCL1 were DHT-repressed. Hence, we propose that the net effect of these AR-mediated expression changes shifts the balance of BCL2-family proteins

  11. A comparative study of recombinant and native frutalin binding to human prostate tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A; Schmitt, Fernando; Domingues, Lucília

    2009-09-09

    Numerous studies indicate that cancer cells present an aberrant glycosylation pattern that can be detected by lectin histochemistry. Lectins have shown the ability to recognise these modifications in several carcinomas, namely in the prostate carcinoma, one of the most lethal diseases in man. Thus, the aim of this work was to investigate if the alpha-D-galactose-binding plant lectin frutalin is able to detect such changes in the referred carcinoma. Frutalin was obtained from different sources namely, its natural source (plant origin) and a recombinant source (Pichia expression system). Finally, the results obtained with the two lectins were compared and their potential use as prostate tumour biomarkers was discussed. The binding of recombinant and native frutalin to specific glycoconjugates expressed in human prostate tissues was assessed by using an immuhistochemical technique. A total of 20 cases of prostate carcinoma and 25 cases of benign prostate hyperplasia were studied. Lectins bound directly to the tissues and anti-frutalin polyclonal antibody was used as the bridge to react with the complex biotinilated anti-rabbit IgG plus streptavidin-conjugated peroxidase. DAB was used as visual indicator to specifically localise the binding of the lectins to the tissues. Both lectins bound to the cells cytoplasm of the prostate carcinoma glands. The binding intensity of native frutalin was stronger in the neoplasic cells than in hyperplasic cells; however no significant statistical correlation could be found (P = 0.051). On the other hand, recombinant frutalin bound exclusively to the neoplasic cells and a significant positive statistical correlation was obtained (P Native and recombinant frutalin yielded different binding responses in the prostate tissues due to their differences in carbohydrate-binding affinities. Also, this study shows that both lectins may be used as histochemical biomarkers for the prostate cancer. Moreover, the successful use of a recombinant

  12. A comparative study of recombinant and native frutalin binding to human prostate tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingues Lucília

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous studies indicate that cancer cells present an aberrant glycosylation pattern that can be detected by lectin histochemistry. Lectins have shown the ability to recognise these modifications in several carcinomas, namely in the prostate carcinoma, one of the most lethal diseases in man. Thus, the aim of this work was to investigate if the α-D-galactose-binding plant lectin frutalin is able to detect such changes in the referred carcinoma. Frutalin was obtained from different sources namely, its natural source (plant origin and a recombinant source (Pichia expression system. Finally, the results obtained with the two lectins were compared and their potential use as prostate tumour biomarkers was discussed. Results The binding of recombinant and native frutalin to specific glycoconjugates expressed in human prostate tissues was assessed by using an immuhistochemical technique. A total of 20 cases of prostate carcinoma and 25 cases of benign prostate hyperplasia were studied. Lectins bound directly to the tissues and anti-frutalin polyclonal antibody was used as the bridge to react with the complex biotinilated anti-rabbit IgG plus streptavidin-conjugated peroxidase. DAB was used as visual indicator to specifically localise the binding of the lectins to the tissues. Both lectins bound to the cells cytoplasm of the prostate carcinoma glands. The binding intensity of native frutalin was stronger in the neoplasic cells than in hyperplasic cells; however no significant statistical correlation could be found (P = 0.051. On the other hand, recombinant frutalin bound exclusively to the neoplasic cells and a significant positive statistical correlation was obtained (P Conclusion Native and recombinant frutalin yielded different binding responses in the prostate tissues due to their differences in carbohydrate-binding affinities. Also, this study shows that both lectins may be used as histochemical biomarkers for the prostate

  13. Altered Human Memory Modification in the Presence of Normal Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Censor, Nitzan; Buch, Ethan R; Nader, Karim; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2016-09-01

    Following initial learning, the memory is stabilized by consolidation mechanisms, and subsequent modification of memory strength occurs via reconsolidation. Yet, it is not clear whether consolidation and memory modification are the same or different systems-level processes. Here, we report disrupted memory modification in the presence of normal consolidation of human motor memories, which relate to differences in lesioned brain structure after stroke. Furthermore, this behavioral dissociation was associated with macrostructural network architecture revealed by a graph-theoretical approach, and with white-matter microstructural integrity measured by diffusion-weighted MRI. Altered macrostructural network architecture and microstructural integrity of white-matter underlying critical nodes of the related network predicted disrupted memory modification. To the best of our knowledge, this provides the first evidence of mechanistic differences between consolidation, and subsequent memory modification through reconsolidation, in human procedural learning. These findings enable better understanding of these memory processes, which may guide interventional strategies to enhance brain function and resulting behavior. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Effect of dioxin on normal and leukemic human hematopoietic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambertenghi-Deliliers, G.; Soligo, D. [Univ. degli Studi, Milan (Italy). Dipt. die Ematologia, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS; Fracchiolla, N.S. [Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Ematologia; Servida, F. [Fondazione Matarelli, Milan (Italy); Bertazzi, P.A. [Istituti Clinici di Perfezionamento, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Medicina del Lavoro

    2004-09-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) arises from chlorination of phenolic substrates or from partial combustion of organic materials in the presence of chlorine sources. TCDD has a large number of biological effects such as long-lasting skin disease, cardiovascular disease, diabete and cancer. TCDD is the prototypical agonist of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a member of the erb-A family that also includes the receptors for steroids, thyroid hormones, peroxisome proliferators and retinoids. When bound to dioxin, the AhR can bind to DNA and alter the expression of some genes including cytokines and growth factors. In this study, we analyzed the effect of escalating doses of TCDD on human CD34{sup +} progenitor cells from the leukapheresis of normal donors stimulated with G-CSF as well as the human myeloid leukemic cell lines HL60 (promyelocytic leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia). The possible specific modulation of gene expression induced by the TCDD exposure was then tested by means of microarray analyses.

  15. Phospholipase D inhibitors reduce human prostate cancer cell proliferation and colony formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Amanda R; Maitland, Norman J; Berney, Daniel M; Rumsby, Martin G

    2018-01-01

    Phospholipases D1 and D2 (PLD1/2) hydrolyse cell membrane glycerophospholipids to generate phosphatidic acid, a signalling lipid, which regulates cell growth and cancer progression through effects on mTOR and PKB/Akt. PLD expression and/or activity is raised in breast, colorectal, gastric, kidney and thyroid carcinomas but its role in prostate cancer (PCa), the major cancer of men in the western world, is unclear. PLD1 protein expression in cultured PNT2C2, PNT1A, P4E6, LNCaP, PC3, PC3M, VCaP, 22RV1 cell lines and patient-derived PCa cells was analysed by western blotting. PLD1 protein localisation in normal, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) tissue sections and in a PCa tissue microarray (TMA) was examined by immunohistochemistry. PLD activity in PCa tissue was assayed using an Amplex Red method. The effect of PLD inhibitors on PCa cell viability was measured using MTS and colony forming assays. PLD1 protein expression was low in the luminal prostate cell lines (LNCaP, VCaP, 22RV1) compared with basal lines (PC3 and PC3M). PLD1 protein expression was elevated in BPH biopsy tissue relative to normal and PCa samples. In normal and BPH tissue, PLD1 was predominantly detected in basal cells as well in some stromal cells, rather than in luminal cells. In PCa tissue, luminal cells expressed PLD1. In a PCa TMA, the mean peroxidase intensity per DAB-stained Gleason 6 and 7 tissue section was significantly higher than in sections graded Gleason 9. In CRPC tissue, PLD1 was expressed prominently in the stromal compartment, in luminal cells in occasional glands and in an expanding population of cells that co-expressed chromogranin A and neurone-specific enolase. Levels of PLD activity in normal and PCa tissue samples were similar. A specific PLD1 inhibitor markedly reduced the survival of both prostate cell lines and patient-derived PCa cells compared with two dual PLD1/PLD2 inhibitors. Short-term exposure of PCa cells to the

  16. Expression of ATP7B in normal human liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Fanni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available ATP7B is a copper transporting P-type ATPase, also known as Wilson disease protein, which plays a key role in copper distribution inside cells. Recent experimental data in cell culture have shown that ATP7B putatively serves a dual function in hepatocytes: when localized to the Golgi apparatus, it has a biosynthetic role, delivering copper atoms to apoceruloplasmin; when the hepatocytes are under copper stress, ATP7B translocates to the biliary pole to transport excess copper out of the cell and into the bile canaliculus for subsequent excretion from the body via the bile. The above data on ATP7B localization have been mainly obtained in tumor cell systems in vitro. The aim of the present work was to assess the presence and localization of the Wilson disease protein in the human liver. We tested immunoreactivity for ATP7B in 10 human liver biopsies, in which no significant pathological lesion was found using a polyclonal antiserum specific for ATP7B. In the normal liver, immunoreactivity for ATP7B was observed in hepatocytes and in biliary cells. In the hepatocytes, immunoreactivity for ATP7B was observed close to the plasma membrane, both at the sinusoidal and at the biliary pole. In the biliary cells, ATP7B was localized close to the cell membrane, mainly concentrated at the basal pole of the cells. The data suggest that, in human liver, ATP7B is localized to the plasma membrane of both hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells.

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an ... you should be able to resume your normal activities immediately. top of page Who interprets the results ...

  18. Quantification of expression of netrins, slits and their receptors in human prostate tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latil, Alain; Chêne, Laurent; Cochant-Priollet, Béatrix; Mangin, Philippe; Fournier, Georges; Berthon, Philippe; Cussenot, Olivier

    2003-01-20

    Recently, DCC (Deleted in Colorectal Cancer) protein has been forwarded as a receptor for netrin. The Netrin/DCC complex is critical for axon guidance and cell migration. In the developing nervous system, netrin protein secreted by midline cells attracts commissural axons by activating the DCC receptor on growth cones. This attraction can be switched to repulsion or silenced completely, depending on the DCC binding partner. The potential suppressor function of DCC in prostate tumorigenesis, through a still unknown mechanism, prompted us to quantify the expression of several genes involved in this axon guidance pathway. The relative expression levels of DCC, NEO1, NTN1, NTN2L, NTN4, UNC5C, Slit1, Slit2, Slit3, Robo1 and Robo2 were simultaneous quantified in 48 tumors and 7 normal prostate tissues by using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A reduction in DCC, NEO1, NTN1 and NTN4 expression was observed in prostate tumors, while many of the same prostate tumors over-expressed either Slit genes or their receptors, Robo. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Noninvasive multiparametric imaging of metastasis-permissive microenvironments in a human prostate cancer xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Pathak, Arvind P; Raman, Venu; Ballesteros, Paloma; Artemov, Dmitri; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2009-11-15

    Metastasis continues to be one of the major causes of mortality from prostate cancer. Because human malignant cell lines metastasize more readily from orthotopic sites than from heterotopic sites, to identify metastasis-permissive tumor microenvironments, we used noninvasive imaging to compare the in vivo vascular, metabolic, and physiologic characteristics of a human prostate cancer xenograft implanted orthotopically in the prostate or s.c. in the flank. Hypoxia was detected in these xenografts by placing an enhanced green fluorescence protein optical reporter under the control of a hypoxia response element. A multiparametric analysis of hypoxia, extracellular pH, vascularization, and metabolism provided a characterization of environments that are permissive for metastasis to occur. We found that orthotopic tumors, which metastasized more easily, were characterized by higher vascular volume, permeability, and total choline and a more acidic extracellular pH. Interestingly, metastatic deposits in the lymph nodes as well as cancer cells in ascites fluid were found to be hypoxic, explaining, in part, the refractory nature of metastatic disease. These results also provide the basis for clinically translatable noninvasive imaging markers for predicting metastatic risk in prostate cancer.

  20. Noninvasive Multi-parametric Imaging of Metastasis-Permissive Microenvironments in a Human Prostate Cancer Xenograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Pathak, Arvind P.; Raman, Venu; Ballesteros, Paloma; Artemov, Dmitri; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis continues to be one of the major causes of mortality from prostate cancer. Since human malignant cell lines metastasize more readily from orthotopic sites than from heterotopic sites, to identify metastasis-permissive tumor microenvironments, we used noninvasive imaging to compare the in vivo vascular, metabolic and physiological characteristics of a human prostate cancer xenograft implanted orthotopically in the prostate or subcutaneously in the flank. Hypoxia was detected in these xenografts by placing an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) optical reporter under the control of a hypoxia response element (HRE). A multi-parametric analysis of hypoxia, extracellular pH (pHe), vascularization and metabolism provided a characterization of environments that are permissive for metastasis to occur. We found that orthotopic tumors, which metastasized more easily, were characterized by higher vascular volume, permeability, and total choline, and a more acidic pHe. Interestingly, metastatic deposits in the lymph nodes as well as cancer cells in ascites fluid were found to be hypoxic, explaining in part, the refractory nature of metastatic disease. These results also provide the basis for clinically translatable noninvasive imaging markers for predicting metastatic risk in prostate cancer. PMID:19861534

  1. The human retrovirus XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Robert H; Nguyen, Carvell; Weight, Christopher J; Klein, Eric A

    2010-07-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is an authentic, newly recognized human retrovirus first identified in prostate cancer tissues from men with a deficiency in the innate immunity gene RNASEL. At present, studies have detected XMRV at widely different rates in prostate cancer cases (0-27%) and in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS; 0-67%). Indirect or direct modes of carcinogenesis by XMRV have been suggested depending on whether the virus was found in stroma or malignant epithelium. Viral replication in the prostate might be affected by androgens, which stimulate XMRV through a transcriptional enhancer site in viral DNA. By contrast, host restriction factors, such as APOBEC3 and tetherin, inhibit virus replication. Immune dysfunction mediated by XMRV has been suggested as a possible factor in CFS. Recent studies show that some existing antiretroviral drugs suppress XMRV infections and diagnostic assays are under development. Although other retroviruses of the same genus as XMRV (gammaretroviruses) cause cancer and neurological disease in animals, whether XMRV is a cause of either prostate cancer or CFS remains unknown. Emerging science surrounding XMRV is contributing to our knowledge of retroviral infections while focusing intense interest on two major human diseases.

  2. Potent anti-cancer effects of citrus peel flavonoids in human prostate xenograft tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Shu; Li, Shiming; Miyauchi, Yutaka; Suzawa, Michiko; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Fruit and vegetable consumption is a novel, non-toxic therapeutic approach that can be used to prevent and treat prostate cancer. Citrus peels and their extracts have been reported to have potent pharmacological activities and health benefits due to the abundance of flavonoids in citrus fruits, particularly in the peels. Our previous studies demonstrated that oral administration of Gold Lotion (GL), an extract of multiple varieties of citrus peels containing abundant flavonoids, including a large percentage of polymethoxyflavones (PMFs), effectively suppressed azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic tumorigenesis. However, the efficacy of GL against prostate cancer has not yet been investigated. Here, we explored the anti-tumor effects of GL using a human prostate tumor xenograft mouse model. Our data demonstrated that treatment with GL by both intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and oral administration dramatically reduced both the weights (57%-100% inhibition) and volumes (78%-94% inhibition) of the tumors without any observed toxicity. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by mechanistic down-regulation of the protein levels of inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2, COX-2), metastasis (matrix metallopeptidase-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF), and proliferative molecules, as well as by the induction of apoptosis in prostate tumors. Our findings suggest that GL is an effective anti-cancer agent that may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment.

  3. Cellular distribution of Glut-1 and Glut-5 in benign and malignant human prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinicke, Karin; Sotomayor, Paula; Cisterna, Pedro; Delgado, Carolina; Nualart, Francisco; Godoy, Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    Over-expression of hexose transporters (Gluts), specifically Glut-1, is a common event in human malignancies. In prostate cancer (CaP), however, expression of Gluts has been characterized poorly. In this study, expression and distribution of Glut-1 and Glut-5 proteins were characterized using immunohistochemistry in 76 specimens of benign prostate, 10 specimens of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), and 28 specimens of CaP. In addition, mRNA expression of Glut-2, Glut-7, Glut-9, and Glut-11 was analyzed in a set of five specimens of benign prostate and CaP. In benign prostate, Glut-1 localized to the basal cells and to the basolateral membrane of secretory/luminal epithelial cells. Glut-5, however, localized to the apical membrane of secretory/luminal epithelial cells. In HGPIN, Glut-1 was immunohistochemically undetectable. Glut-5, however, localized to the apical membrane of the neoplastic epithelial cells. In CaP, Glut-1 and Glut-5, were immunohistochemically undetectable. However, over-expression of GLUT1 was observed in some specimens of highly proliferative intraductal CaP. Glut-7, Glut-9, and Glut-11 mRNAs were detected in benign prostate and CaP, however, only Glut-11 mRNA was consistently up-regulated in CaP compared to benign prostate. Low levels of expression of Glut-1 protein in the majority of CaP could explain, at least in part, the limited clinical applicability of positron emission tomography using 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for imaging CaP. Moreover, expression of Glut-5 in HGPIN suggested that fructose could be utilized as potential metabolic substrate in HGPIN. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in regulation/dysregulation of Gluts in CaP could provide insight in the understanding of hexose metabolism in CaP. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Novel Monoclonal Antibodies Recognizing Human Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) as Research and Theranostic Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Zora; Foss, Catherine A; Copeland, Benjamin T; Morath, Volker; Baranová, Petra; Havlínová, Barbora; Skerra, Arne; Pomper, Martin G; Barinka, Cyril

    2017-05-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a validated target for the imaging and therapy of prostate cancer. Here, we report the detailed characterization of four novel murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing human PSMA as well as PSMA orthologs from different species. Performance of purified mAbs was assayed using a comprehensive panel of in vitro experimental setups including Western blotting, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, ELISA, flow cytometry, and surface-plasmon resonance. Furthermore, a mouse xenograft model of prostate cancer was used to compare the suitability of the mAbs for in vivo applications. All mAbs demonstrate high specificity for PSMA as documented by the lack of cross-reactivity to unrelated human proteins. The 3F11 and 1A11 mAbs bind linear epitopes spanning residues 226-243 and 271-288 of human PSMA, respectively. 3F11 is also suitable for the detection of PSMA orthologs from mouse, pig, dog, and rat in experimental setups where the denatured form of PSMA is used. 5D3 and 5B1 mAbs recognize distinct surface-exposed conformational epitopes and are useful for targeting PSMA in its native conformation. Most importantly, using a mouse xenograft model of prostate cancer we show that both the intact 5D3 and its Fab fragment are suitable for in vivo imaging. With apparent affinities of 0.14 and 1.2 nM as determined by ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively, 5D3 has approximately 10-fold higher affinity for PSMA than the clinically validated mAb J591 and, therefore, is a prime candidate for the development of next-generation theranostics to target PSMA. Prostate 77:749-764, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Recombinant human endostatin normalizes tumor vasculature and enhances radiation response in xenografted human nasopharyngeal carcinoma models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxic tumor cells can reduce the efficacy of radiation. Antiangiogenic therapy may transiently "normalize" the tumor vasculature to make it more efficient for oxygen delivery. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the recombinant human endostatin (endostar can create a "vascular normalization window" to alleviate hypoxia and enhance the inhibitory effects of radiation therapy in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transient changes in morphology of tumor vasculature and hypoxic tumor cell fraction in response to endostar were detected in mice bearing CNE-2 and 5-8F human NPC xenografts. Various treatment schedules were tested to assess the influence of endostar on the effect of radiation therapy. Several important factors relevant to the angiogenesis were identified through immunohistochemical staining. During endostar treatment, tumor vascularity decreased, while the basement membrane and pericyte coverage associated with endothelial cells increased, which supported the idea of vessel normalization. Hypoxic tumor cell fraction also decreased after the treatment. The transient modulation of tumor physiology caused by endostar improved the effect of radiation treatment compared with other treatment schedules. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-14 decreased, while the level of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF increased. CONCLUSIONS: Endostar normalized tumor vasculature, which alleviated hypoxia and significantly sensitized the function of radiation in anti-tumor in human NPC. The results provide an important experimental basis for combining endostar with radiation therapy in human NPC.

  6. A quantitative transcriptome reference map of the normal human hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracausi, Maria; Rigon, Vania; Piovesan, Allison; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara

    2016-01-01

    We performed an innovative systematic meta-analysis of 41 gene expression profiles of normal human hippocampus to provide a quantitative transcriptome reference map of it, i.e. a reference typical value of expression for each of the 30,739 known mapped and the 16,258 uncharacterized (unmapped) transcripts. For this aim, we used the software called TRAM (Transcriptome Mapper), which is able to generate transcriptome maps based on gene expression data from multiple sources. We also analyzed differential expression by comparing the hippocampus with the whole brain transcriptome map to identify a typical expression pattern of this subregion compared with the whole organ. Finally, due to the fact that the hippocampus is one of the main brain region to be severely affected in trisomy 21 (the best known genetic cause of intellectual disability), a particular attention was paid to the expression of chromosome 21 (chr21) genes. Data were downloaded from microarray databases, processed, and analyzed using TRAM software. Among the main findings, the most over-expressed loci in the hippocampus are the expressed sequence tag cluster Hs.732685 and the member of the calmodulin gene family CALM2. The tubulin folding cofactor B (TBCB) gene is the best gene at behaving like a housekeeping gene. The hippocampus vs. the whole brain differential transcriptome map shows the over-expression of LINC00114, a long non-coding RNA mapped on chr21. The hippocampus transcriptome map was validated in vitro by assaying gene expression through several magnitude orders by "Real-Time" reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The highly significant agreement between in silico and experimental data suggested that our transcriptome map may be a useful quantitative reference benchmark for gene expression studies related to human hippocampus. Furthermore, our analysis yielded biological insights about those genes that have an intrinsic over-/under-expression in the hippocampus. © 2015

  7. TRPM8 ion channels differentially modulate proliferation and cell cycle distribution of normal and cancer prostate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ll Valero

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the cation-permeable channel TRPM8 in prostate cancers might represent a novel opportunity for their treatment. Inhibitors of TRPM8 reduce the growth of prostate cancer cells. We have used two recently described and highly specific blockers, AMTB and JNJ41876666, and RNAi to determine the relevance of TRPM8 expression in the proliferation of non-tumor and tumor cells. Inhibition of the expression or function of the channel reduces proliferation rates and proliferative fraction in all tumor cells tested, but not of non-tumor prostate cells. We observed no consistent acceleration of growth after stimulation of the channel with menthol or icilin, indicating that basal TRPM8 expression is enough to sustain growth of prostate cancer cells.

  8. TRPM8 ion channels differentially modulate proliferation and cell cycle distribution of normal and cancer prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, María Ll; Mello de Queiroz, Fernanda; Stühmer, Walter; Viana, Félix; Pardo, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of the cation-permeable channel TRPM8 in prostate cancers might represent a novel opportunity for their treatment. Inhibitors of TRPM8 reduce the growth of prostate cancer cells. We have used two recently described and highly specific blockers, AMTB and JNJ41876666, and RNAi to determine the relevance of TRPM8 expression in the proliferation of non-tumor and tumor cells. Inhibition of the expression or function of the channel reduces proliferation rates and proliferative fraction in all tumor cells tested, but not of non-tumor prostate cells. We observed no consistent acceleration of growth after stimulation of the channel with menthol or icilin, indicating that basal TRPM8 expression is enough to sustain growth of prostate cancer cells.

  9. Efavirenz induces autophagy and aberrant differentiation in normal human keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DONG, QINGHUA; OH, JU-EUN; YI, JIN KYU; KIM, REUBEN H.; SHIN, KI-HYUK; MITSUYASU, RONALD; PARK, NO-HEE; KANG, MO K.

    2013-01-01

    Although efavirenz (EFV) is efficacious as an anti-retroviral therapy when combined with other antiretroviral drugs, it may cause adverse clinical effects, including skin and mucosal eruptions, central nervous system complications, hepatotoxicity, renal failure and pulmonary complications. The present study investigated the phenotypic alterations caused by EFV in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) and determined the cell death pathways leading to the lack of epithelial proliferation and regeneration. Replication kinetics, cellular morphology, and protein and mRNA levels of cell cycle regulatory genes and cell death markers were compared between the EFV-exposed cells and the untreated control. EFV treatment led to cell proliferation arrest and cell death of the NHKs by inducing autophagy mediated by proteasome-dependent degradation of p53. EFV also reduced the levels of mTOR and active ERK signaling in NHKs. Chemical inhibition of p53 degradation with a proteasome inhibitor led to reduced autophagic response of NHKs to EFV. In addition, EFV triggered terminal differentiation of NHKs by inducing the expression of involucrin, filaggrin, loricrin and genes involved in cornified envelope formation. Inhibition of autophagy in the EFV-treated NHKs with 3-methylalanine reduced the levels of involucrin and the extent of cell death. Our data indicate that EFV elicits cytotoxic effects on NHKs in part through induction of autophagy and aberrant differentiation of cells. PMID:23563240

  10. Mechanical compression attenuates normal human bronchial epithelial wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavia Nikita

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway narrowing associated with chronic asthma results in the transmission of injurious compressive forces to the bronchial epithelium and promotes the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and the denudation of the bronchial epithelium. While the individual effects of compression or denudation are well characterized, there is no data to elucidate how these cells respond to the application of mechanical compression in the presence of a compromised epithelial layer. Methods Accordingly, differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to one of four conditions: 1 unperturbed control cells, 2 single scrape wound only, 3 static compression (6 hours of 30 cmH2O, and 4 6 hours of static compression after a scrape wound. Following treatment, wound closure rate was recorded, media was assayed for mediator content and the cytoskeletal network was fluorescently labeled. Results We found that mechanical compression and scrape injury increase TGF-β2 and endothelin-1 secretion, while EGF content in the media is attenuated with both injury modes. The application of compression after a pre-existing scrape wound augmented these observations, and also decreased PGE2 media content. Compression stimulated depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton and significantly attenuated wound healing. Closure rate was partially restored with the addition of exogenous PGE2, but not EGF. Conclusion Our results suggest that mechanical compression reduces the capacity of the bronchial epithelium to close wounds, and is, in part, mediated by PGE2 and a compromised cytoskeleton.

  11. Robust HPLC-MS/MS method for levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin determination in human prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szerkus, O; Jacyna, J; Gibas, A; Sieczkowski, M; Siluk, D; Matuszewski, M; Kaliszan, R; Markuszewski, M J

    2017-01-05

    Fluoroquinolones are the drugs of choice in the prevention of bacterial infections after transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. In order to improve assessment of antibacterial efficacy in the target tissue a simple, selective, rapid and robust HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method for the determination of levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin concentrations in human prostate bioptates was developed and validated. Preparation procedure for prostate samples (10mg) was carried out using homogenization and filtration steps. Analyses were performed within 3.5min using RP C18 column in the isocratic elution mode with mobile phase composed of a mixture of 0.1% formic acid aqueous solution and 0.1% formic acid methanol solution (v/v; 79:21). The method was linear between 0.3μg/g and 15μg/g for levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin with coefficient of correlation (r) ≥0.999. The limit of detection and the limit of quantification for levofloxacin were 0.06μg/g and 0.2μg/g and for ciprofloxacin were 0.04μg/g and 0.13μg/g, respectively. Average concentrations (±SD) of levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin obtained from patients tissue were 5.4±2.2μg/g and 3.9±1.5μg/g, respectively. Additionally, during validation procedure a novel, experimental design approach was applied for the robustness study. For evaluation of analytical method robustness, Plackett-Burman design was employed and for sample preparation method robustness Fractional Factorial design was used. The developed and validated method was successfully applied to examine prostate tissue samples obtained from patients enrolled into a clinical study. Up to now, there has been no other HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method reported for the simultaneous determination of levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in human prostatic tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. PI-RADS version 2: Preoperative role in the detection of normal-sized pelvic lymph node metastasis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Yoon; Shin, Su-Jin; Jung, Dae Chul; Cho, Nam Hoon; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon; Oh, Young Taik

    2017-06-01

    To analyze whether Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADSv2) scores are associated with a risk of normal-sized pelvic lymph node metastasis (PLNM) in prostate cancer (PCa). A consecutive series of 221 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging and radical prostatectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) for PCa were retrospectively analyzed under the approval of institutional review board in our institution. No patients had enlarged (≥0.8cm in short-axis diameter) lymph nodes. Clinical parameters [prostate-specific antigen (PSA), greatest percentage of biopsy core, and percentage of positive cores], and PI-RADSv2 score from two independent readers were analyzed with multivariate logistic regression and receiver operating-characteristic curve for PLNM. Diagnostic performance of PI-RADSv2 and Briganti nomogram was compared. Weighted kappa was investigated regarding PI-RADSv2 scoring. Normal-sized PLNM was found in 9.5% (21/221) of patients. In multivariate analysis, PI-RADSv2 (reader 1, p=0.009; reader 2, p=0.026) and PSA (reader 1, p=0.008; reader 2, p=0.037) were predictive of normal-sized PLNM. Threshold of PI-RADSv2 was a score of 5, where PI-RADSv2 was associated with high sensitivity (reader 1, 95.2% [20/21]; reader 2, 90.5% [19/21]) and negative predictive value (reader 1, 99.2% [124/125]; reader 2, 98.6% [136/138]). However, diagnostic performance of PI-RADSv2 (AUC=0.786-0.788) was significantly lower than that of Briganti nomogram (AUC=0.890) for normal-sized PLNM (pPI-RADSv2 of 5 or not (weighted kappa=0.804). PI-RADSv2 scores may be associated with the risk of normal-sized PLNM in PCa. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Penetration of piperacillin-tazobactam into human prostate tissue and dosing considerations for prostatitis based on site-specific pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ikuo; Ikawa, Kazuro; Nakamura, Kogenta; Nishikawa, Genya; Kajikawa, Keishi; Yoshizawa, Takahiko; Watanabe, Masahito; Kato, Yoshiharu; Zennami, Kenji; Kanao, Kent; Tobiume, Motoi; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Mitsui, Kenji; Narushima, Masahiro; Morikawa, Norifumi; Sumitomo, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the penetration of PIPC-TAZ into human prostate, and to assess effectiveness of PIPC-TAZ against prostatitis by evaluating site-specific PK-PD. Patients with prostatic hypertrophy (n = 47) prophylactically received a 0.5 h infusion of PIPC-TAZ (8:1.2-0.25 g or 4-0.5 g) before transurethral resection of the prostate. PIPC-TAZ concentrations in plasma (0.5-5 h) and prostate tissue (0.5-1.5 h) were analyzed with a three-compartment PK model. The estimated model parameters were, then used to estimate the drug exposure time above the minimum inhibitory concentration for bacteria (T > MIC, the PD indicator for antibacterial effects) in prostate tissue for six PIPC-TAZ regimens (2.25 or 4.5 g; once, twice, three times or four times daily; 0.5 h infusions). Prostate tissue/plasma ratio of PIPC was about 36% both for the maximum drug concentration (Cmax) and the area under the drug concentration-time curve (AUC). Against MIC distributions for isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella species and Proteus species, regimens of 4.5 g twice daily and 2.25 g three times daily achieved a >90% probability of attaining the bacteriostatic target for PIPC (30% T > MIC) in prostate tissue; regimens of 4.5 g three times daily and 2.25 g four times daily achieved a >90% probability of attaining the bactericidal target for PIPC (50% T > MIC) in prostate tissue. However, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, none of the tested regimens achieved a >90% probability. PIPC-TAZ is appropriate for the treatment of prostatitis from the site-specific PK-PD perspective. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Inhibition of telomerase potentiates enzalutamide efficiency of androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gecgel, Karaca Kaan; Muduroglu, Mustafa; Erdogan, Suat

    2017-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is one of the main strategies to treat prostate cancer (PCa) at various stages of its development. Androgen receptor (AR) antagonists such as enzalutamide are mainstay treatments for castration-sensitive prostate cancer. Though, a majority of patients initially respond to ADT, most will eventually progress to castrate-resistant, due to the development of different mutations on the AR. PCa cells express high telomerase activity, and there is a correlation between the total activity of telomerase and the Gleason score. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination of enzalutamide plus a telomerase inhibitor could be more effective than enzalutamide alone in decreasing cell survival. In this study MTT test, RT-qPCR and imagebased cytometry were used to investigate cell viability, apoptosis and cell cycle progression of androgen-responsive human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. The cells were treated with 5 μM enzalutamide and 40 μM telomerase inhibitor BIBR 1532, or with their combinations for 72 hrs. Enzalutamide and BIBR 1532 alone inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. The combinations of the two agents could synergistically induce apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Either inhibition of telomerase by BIBR 1532 or AR blockages by enzalutamide decreased prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and the catalytic component of telomerase, hTERT, expression. These results suggest that telomerase inhibition therapy may contribute to the efficacy of enzalutamide in the androgen-sensitive PCa model.

  15. Identification of prognostic molecular features in the reactive stroma of human breast and prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Planche

    Full Text Available Primary tumor growth induces host tissue responses that are believed to support and promote tumor progression. Identification of the molecular characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and elucidation of its crosstalk with tumor cells may therefore be crucial for improving our understanding of the processes implicated in cancer progression, identifying potential therapeutic targets, and uncovering stromal gene expression signatures that may predict clinical outcome. A key issue to resolve, therefore, is whether the stromal response to tumor growth is largely a generic phenomenon, irrespective of the tumor type or whether the response reflects tumor-specific properties. To address similarity or distinction of stromal gene expression changes during cancer progression, oligonucleotide-based Affymetrix microarray technology was used to compare the transcriptomes of laser-microdissected stromal cells derived from invasive human breast and prostate carcinoma. Invasive breast and prostate cancer-associated stroma was observed to display distinct transcriptomes, with a limited number of shared genes. Interestingly, both breast and prostate tumor-specific dysregulated stromal genes were observed to cluster breast and prostate cancer patients, respectively, into two distinct groups with statistically different clinical outcomes. By contrast, a gene signature that was common to the reactive stroma of both tumor types did not have survival predictive value. Univariate Cox analysis identified genes whose expression level was most strongly associated with patient survival. Taken together, these observations suggest that the tumor microenvironment displays distinct features according to the tumor type that provides survival-predictive value.

  16. Secondary metabolites from Commiphora opobalsamum and their antiproliferative effect on human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tao; Wan, Wenzhu; Yuan, Huiqing; Kong, Feng; Guo, Huaifang; Fan, Peihong; Lou, Hongxiang

    2007-05-01

    A cycloartane-type triterpenoid (1), an aliphatic alcohol glycoside (2), an eudesmane-type sesquiterpenoid (3), and a guaiane-type sesquiterpenoid (4) were isolated from the resinous exudates of Commiphora opobalsamum along with six known sesquiterpenoids (5-10). Their structures were established by extensive analysis of their 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data and chemical methods. The isolated compounds 1-3 and 5-9 were tested against human prostate cancer cell PC 3 and LNCaP. Among them, 1 and 2 showed moderate antiproliferative effects on human prostate cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 5.7 to 23.6 microM; they were also able to inhibit the expression of androgen receptor (AR) in LNCaP cells. The six sesquiterpenoids were inactive in the bioassays.

  17. Prophylactic noscapine therapy inhibits human prostate cancer progression and metastasis in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barken, Israel; Geller, Jack; Rogosnitzky, Moshe

    2010-02-01

    Noscapine has demonstrated potent antitumour activity and minimum toxicity in cancer models. Recently, noscapine has been shown to limit tumour growth and lymphatic metastasis of PC3 human prostate cancer mice. The prophylactic effects of noscapine are not known. Nude mice received oral noscapine (300 mg/kg per day; 'treatment'; n=10) or diluent ('control'; n=10) for 56 days, beginning 7 days after inoculation with PC3 human prostate cancer cells; or noscapine for 70 days, beginning 7 days before inoculation ('pretreatment'; n=10). Mean total tumour volumes were 1731.6+/-602.0 mm(3) in the control group, 644.3+/-545.1 mm(3) in the noscapine pretreatment group and 910.9+/-501.1 mm(3) in the noscapine treatment group (pmodel and conferred a significant additional benefit over noscapine treatment in final tumour volume.

  18. Studies on the human prostatic cancer cell line LNCaP

    OpenAIRE

    Veldscholte, Jos; Berrevoets, Cor; Mulder, Eppo

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe effects of androgens, antiandrogens, and other steroid hormones on growth of the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP were studied. Despite the absence of receptors for progesterone and estradiol, the growth rate of the androgen responsive LNCaP-FGC cells increased when cultured in the presence of either estrogens or progestagens. In addition, most antiandrogens were also growth stimulators. This aberrant response was due to a threonine to alanine substitution at amino acid p...

  19. Differential intracochlear sound pressure measurements in normal human temporal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S; Merchant, Saumil N; Ravicz, Michael E; Rosowski, John J

    2009-03-01

    We present the first simultaneous sound pressure measurements in scala vestibuli and scala tympani of the cochlea in human cadaveric temporal bones. The technique we employ, which exploits microscale fiberoptic pressure sensors, enables the study of differential sound pressure at the cochlear base. This differential pressure is the input to the cochlear partition, driving cochlear waves and auditory transduction. In our results, the sound pressure in scala vestibuli (P (SV)) was much greater than scala tympani pressure (P (ST)), except for very low and high frequencies where P (ST) significantly affected the input to the cochlea. The differential pressure (P (SV) - P (ST)) is a superior measure of ossicular transduction of sound compared to P (SV) alone: (P (SV)-P (ST)) was reduced by 30 to 50 dB when the ossicular chain was disarticulated, whereas P (SV) was not reduced as much. The middle ear gain P (SV)/P (EC) and the differential pressure normalized to ear canal pressure (P (SV) - P (ST))/P (EC) were generally bandpass in frequency dependence. At frequencies above 1 kHz, the group delay in the middle ear gain is about 83 micros, over twice that of the gerbil. Concurrent measurements of stapes velocity produced estimates of cochlear input impedance, the differential impedance across the partition, and round window impedance. The differential impedance was generally resistive, while the round window impedance was consistent with compliance in conjunction with distributed inertia and damping. Our technique of measuring differential pressure can be used to study inner ear conductive pathologies (e.g., semicircular dehiscence), as well as non-ossicular cochlear stimulation (e.g., round window stimulation and bone conduction)--situations that cannot be completely quantified by measurements of stapes velocity or scala vestibuli pressure by themselves.

  20. Registration methodology for histological sections and in vivo imaging of human prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjin; Piert, Morand R; Khan, Asra; Shah, Rajal; Hussain, Hero; Siddiqui, Javed; Chenevert, Thomas L; Meyer, Charles R

    2008-08-01

    Registration enables quantitative spatial correlation of features from different imaging modalities. Our objective is to register in vivo imaging with histologic sections of the human prostate so that histologic truth can be correlated with in vivo imaging features. In vivo imaging of the prostate included T2-weighted anatomic and diffusion weighted 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as 11C-choline positron emission tomography (PET). In addition, ex vivo 3-T MRI of the prostate specimen, histology, and associated block face photos of the prostate specimen were obtained. A standard registration method based on mutual information (MI) and thin-plate spline (TPS) was applied. Registration among in vivo imaging modalities is well established; however, accurate registration involving histology is difficult. Our approach breaks up the difficult direct registration of histology and in vivo imaging into achievable subregistration tasks involving intermediate ex vivo modalities like block face photography and specimen MRI. Results of subregistration tasks are combined to compute the intended, final registration between in vivo imaging and histology. The methodology was applied to two patients and found to be clinically feasible. Overall registered anatomic MRI, diffusion MRI, and 11C-choline PET aligned well with histology qualitatively for both patients. There is no ground truth of registration accuracy as the scans are real patient scans. An indirect validation of the registration accuracy has been proposed comparing tumor boundary markings found in diffusion MRI and histologic sections. Registration errors for two patients between diffusion MRI and histology were 3.74 and 2.26 mm. This proof of concept paper demonstrates a method based on intrinsic image information content for successfully registering in vivo imaging of the human prostate with its post-resection histology, which does not require the use of extrinsic fiducial markers. The methodology

  1. Intracellular distribution and biological effects of phytochemicals in a sex steroid- sensitive model of human prostate adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeriglio, Antonella; Trombetta, Domenico; Marcoccia, Daniele; Narciso, Laura; Mantovani, Alberto; Lorenzetti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Prostate function is critical for male fertility and its well-known oncological biomarker, namely Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA), can be also used to monitor prostate epithelial human cells upon treatment with pharmaceutical drugs or natural bioactive compounds. The LNCaP human prostate cell line was previously set up as a model system to investigate chemicals affecting prostate epithelium functionality by means of a tiered approach integrating two different toxicological endpoints, cell viability (MTS) and PSA secretion assays. Here, the same approach has been used to characterize the biological effects of phytochemicals on prostate epithelium. The antiandrogenic ability of phytochemicals to inhibit DHT-induced PSA secretion has been investigated also characterizing their intracellular distribution, in the presence or absence of sex steroids. Intracellular distribution allows to verify whether and to which extent each phytochemical is able to enter the cell and to reach the nucleus, the latter being the target of the supposed transcriptional modulatory activity upon phytochemicals' binding to sex steroid receptors. Some phytochemicals, supposed to have a role in the functionality of the prostate epithelium, have been tested in a dose-dependent manner in both MTS and PSA secretion assays. In parallel, to establish the "effective concentration", in comparison to the "nominal one", the intracellular amount of each phytochemical has been assessed upon cell fractionation of LNCaP-treated cells and subsequent chromatographic measurements.

  2. Everyman's prostate phantom: kiwi-fruit substitute for human prostates at magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich G; Murer, Sophie; Mueller-Lisse, Ulrike L; Kuhn, Marissa; Scheidler, Juergen; Scherr, Michael

    2017-08-01

    To apply an easy-to-assemble phantom substitute for human prostates in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2WI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and 3D magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Kiwi fruit were fixed with gel hot and cold compress packs on two plastic nursery pots, separated by a plastic plate, and submerged in tap water inside a 1-L open-spout plastic watering can for T2WI (TR/TE 7500/101 ms), DWI (5500/61 ms, ADC b50-800 s/mm 2 map) and MRS (940/145 ms) at 3.0 T, with phased array surface coils. One green kiwi fruit was additionally examined with an endorectal coil. Retrospective comparison with benign peripheral zone (PZ) and transitional zone (TZ) of prostate (n = 5), Gleason 6-7a prostate cancer (n = 8) and Gleason 7b-9 prostate cancer (n = 7) validated the phantom. Mean contrast between central placenta (CP) and outer pericarp (OP, 0.346-0.349) or peripheral placenta (PP, 0.364-0.393) of kiwi fruit was similar to Gleason 7b-9 prostate cancer and PZ (0.308) in T2WI. ADC values of OP and PP (1.27 ± 0.07-1.37 ± 0.08 mm 2 /s × 10 -3 ) resembled PZ and TZ (1.39 ± 0.17-1.60 ± 0.24 mm 2 /s × 10 -3 ), while CP (0.91 ± 0.14-0.99 ± 0.10 mm 2 /s × 10 -3 ) resembled Gleason 7b-9 prostate cancer (1.00 ± 0.25 mm 2 /s × 10 -3 ). MR spectra showed peaks of citrate and myo-inositol in kiwi fruit, and citrate and "choline+creatine" in prostates. The phantom worked with an endorectal coil, too. The kiwi fruit phantom reproducibly showed zones similar to PZ, TZ and cancer in human prostates in T2WI and DWI and two metabolite peaks in MRS and appears suitable to compare different MR protocols, coil systems and scanners. • Kiwi fruit appear suitable as phantoms for human prostate in MR examinations. • Kiwi fruit show zonal anatomy like human prostates in T2-weighted MRI and DWI. • MR spectroscopy reliably shows peaks in kiwi fruit (citrate/inositol) and human prostates (citrate

  3. Glycoproteomics: identifying the glycosylation of prostate specific antigen at normal and high isoelectric points by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ehwang; Mayampurath, Anoop; Yu, Chuan-Yih; Tang, Haixu; Mechref, Yehia

    2014-12-05

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker to diagnose prostate cancer. PSA testing has been widely used to detect and screen prostate cancer. However, in the diagnostic gray zone, the PSA test does not clearly distinguish between benign prostate hypertrophy and prostate cancer due to their overlap. To develop more specific and sensitive candidate biomarkers for prostate cancer, an in-depth understanding of the biochemical characteristics of PSA (such as glycosylation) is needed. PSA has a single glycosylation site at Asn69, with glycans constituting approximately 8% of the protein by weight. Here, we report the comprehensive identification and quantitation of N-glycans from two PSA isoforms using LC-MS/MS. There were 56 N-glycans associated with PSA, whereas 57 N-glycans were observed in the case of the PSA-high isoelectric point (pI) isoform (PSAH). Three sulfated/phosphorylated glycopeptides were detected, the identification of which was supported by tandem MS data. One of these sulfated/phosphorylated N-glycans, HexNAc5Hex4dHex1s/p1 was identified in both PSA and PSAH at relative intensities of 0.52 and 0.28%, respectively. Quantitatively, the variations were monitored between these two isoforms. Because we were one of the laboratories participating in the 2012 ABRF Glycoprotein Research Group (gPRG) study, those results were compared to that presented in this study. Our qualitative and quantitative results summarized here were comparable to those that were summarized in the interlaboratory study.

  4. Glycoproteomics: Identifying the Glycosylation of Prostate Specific Antigen at Normal and High Isoelectric Points by LC–MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker to diagnose prostate cancer. PSA testing has been widely used to detect and screen prostate cancer. However, in the diagnostic gray zone, the PSA test does not clearly distinguish between benign prostate hypertrophy and prostate cancer due to their overlap. To develop more specific and sensitive candidate biomarkers for prostate cancer, an in-depth understanding of the biochemical characteristics of PSA (such as glycosylation) is needed. PSA has a single glycosylation site at Asn69, with glycans constituting approximately 8% of the protein by weight. Here, we report the comprehensive identification and quantitation of N-glycans from two PSA isoforms using LC–MS/MS. There were 56 N-glycans associated with PSA, whereas 57 N-glycans were observed in the case of the PSA-high isoelectric point (pI) isoform (PSAH). Three sulfated/phosphorylated glycopeptides were detected, the identification of which was supported by tandem MS data. One of these sulfated/phosphorylated N-glycans, HexNAc5Hex4dHex1s/p1 was identified in both PSA and PSAH at relative intensities of 0.52 and 0.28%, respectively. Quantitatively, the variations were monitored between these two isoforms. Because we were one of the laboratories participating in the 2012 ABRF Glycoprotein Research Group (gPRG) study, those results were compared to that presented in this study. Our qualitative and quantitative results summarized here were comparable to those that were summarized in the interlaboratory study. PMID:25327667

  5. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defraene, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.defraene@uzleuven.be [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Van den Bergh, Laura [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Haustermans, Karin [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Heemsbergen, Wilma [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lebesque, Joos V. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints

  6. Quantitative proteome profiling of normal human circulating microparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer T; Iversen, Line V

    2012-01-01

    Circulating microparticles (MPs) are produced as part of normal physiology. Their numbers, origin, and composition change in pathology. Despite this, the normal MP proteome has not yet been characterized with standardized high-resolution methods. We here quantitatively profile the normal MP...... proteome using nano-LC-MS/MS on an LTQ-Orbitrap with optimized sample collection, preparation, and analysis of 12 different normal samples. Analytical and procedural variation were estimated in triply processed samples analyzed in triplicate from two different donors. Label-free quantitation was validated...... by the correlation of cytoskeletal protein intensities with MP numbers obtained by flow cytometry. Finally, the validity of using pooled samples was evaluated using overlap protein identification numbers and multivariate data analysis. Using conservative parameters, 536 different unique proteins were quantitated...

  7. Everyman's prostate phantom: kiwi-fruit substitute for human prostates at magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich G.; Murer, Sophie; Kuhn, Marissa [University of Munich (' ' Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet' ' , LMU), Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); Mueller-Lisse, Ulrike L. [University of Munich (' ' Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet' ' , LMU), Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); Interdisciplinary Oncology Centre Munich (IOZ), Department of Urology, Munich (Germany); Scheidler, Juergen [University of Munich (' ' Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet' ' , LMU), Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); Radiology Centre Munich (RZM), Muenchen (Germany); Scherr, Michael [University of Munich (' ' Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet' ' , LMU), Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); BG Unfallklinik Murnau, Department of Radiology, Murnau am Staffelsee (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    To apply an easy-to-assemble phantom substitute for human prostates in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2WI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and 3D magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Kiwi fruit were fixed with gel hot and cold compress packs on two plastic nursery pots, separated by a plastic plate, and submerged in tap water inside a 1-L open-spout plastic watering can for T2WI (TR/TE 7500/101 ms), DWI (5500/61 ms, ADC b50-800 s/mm{sup 2} map) and MRS (940/145 ms) at 3.0 T, with phased array surface coils. One green kiwi fruit was additionally examined with an endorectal coil. Retrospective comparison with benign peripheral zone (PZ) and transitional zone (TZ) of prostate (n = 5), Gleason 6-7a prostate cancer (n = 8) and Gleason 7b-9 prostate cancer (n = 7) validated the phantom. Mean contrast between central placenta (CP) and outer pericarp (OP, 0.346-0.349) or peripheral placenta (PP, 0.364-0.393) of kiwi fruit was similar to Gleason 7b-9 prostate cancer and PZ (0.308) in T2WI. ADC values of OP and PP (1.27 ± 0.07-1.37 ± 0.08 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}) resembled PZ and TZ (1.39 ± 0.17-1.60 ± 0.24 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}), while CP (0.91 ± 0.14-0.99 ± 0.10 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}) resembled Gleason 7b-9 prostate cancer (1.00 ± 0.25 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}). MR spectra showed peaks of citrate and myo-inositol in kiwi fruit, and citrate and ''choline+creatine'' in prostates. The phantom worked with an endorectal coil, too. The kiwi fruit phantom reproducibly showed zones similar to PZ, TZ and cancer in human prostates in T2WI and DWI and two metabolite peaks in MRS and appears suitable to compare different MR protocols, coil systems and scanners. (orig.)

  8. Anticancer activity of midostaurin in hormone refractory human prostate cancer DU145 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jun Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We tried a new method of prostate cancer treatment by inducing in vitro differentiation which resulted in reduction of cancer cells growth. A protein kinase inhibitor, midostaurin's ability to trigger the human prostate cancer cell line, DU145 to segregate into nerve cells was studied. Midostaurin (100 nM suppressed the growth of DU145 cells but without change in the number of dead cells. Midostaurin started to extend neurites on DU145 cells after 24 hours and differentiated into nerve cells by 72 hours. The microtubule was stabilized by tau protein and its mRNA expression showed time-dependent increase in midostaurin-treated DU145 cells. At the same time, the amount of acetylcholinesterase was also increased. The midostaurin-treated DU145 cells showed 40% less activity than control in the colony forming assay. The results suggests that midostaurin can induce differentiation of DU145 cells into nerve cells.

  9. Low p16INK4a Expression in Early Passage Human Prostate Basal Epithelial Cells Enables Immortalization by Telomerase Expression Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mindy Kim; Principessa, Lorenzo; Antony, Lizamma; Meeker, Alan K; Isaacs, John T

    2017-03-01

    There are two principal senescence barriers that must be overcome to successfully immortalize primary human epithelial cells in culture, stress-induced senescence, and replicative senescence. The p16INK4a /retinoblastoma protein (p16/Rb) pathway mediates stress-induced senescence, and is generally upregulated by primary epithelial cells in response to the artificial conditions from tissue culture. Replicative senescence is associated with telomere loss. Following each round of cell division, telomeres progressively shorten. Once telomeres shorten to a critical length, the DNA damage response pathway is activated, and the tumor suppressor p53 pathway triggers replicative senescence. Exogenous expression of telomerase in normal human epithelial cells extends the replicative capacity of cells, and in some cases, immortalizes cells. However reliable immortalization of epithelial cells usually requires telomerase activity coupled with inactivation of the p16/Rb pathway. A lentiviral vector, pLOX-TERT-iresTK (Addgene #12245), containing a CMV promoter upstream of a bicistronic coding cassette that includes loxP sites flanking the catalytic subunit of human telomerase gene (TERT) and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase gene (HSV1-tk) was used to transduce normal prostate basal epithelial cells (PrECs) initiated in cell culture from prostate cancer patients undergoing radical prostatectomies. Transduction of early (i.e., 7) passage PrECs were unsuccessful. Late passage PrECs, which acquired elevated p16, were unable to overcome the senescence barrier. Immortalized PrECs (TERT-PrECs) retained a normal male karyotype and low p16 expression. Additionally, TERT-PrECs were non-tumorigenic when inoculated into intact male immunodeficient NSG mice. The present studies document that early passage human PrECs have sufficiently low p16 to permit immortalization by TERT expression alone. TERT-PrECs developed using this transduction approach provides an appropriate and

  10. The in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer activities of a standardized quassinoids composition from Eurycoma longifolia on LNCaP human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kind Leng Tong

    Full Text Available Quassinoids are a group of diterpenoids found in plants from the Simaroubaceae family. They are also the major bioactive compounds found in Eurycoma longifolia which is commonly used as traditional medicine in South East Asia to treat various ailments including sexual dysfunction and infertility. These uses are attributed to its ability to improve testosterone level in men. Chronic consumption of E. longifolia extracts has been reported to increase testosterone level in men and animal model but its effect on prostate growth remains unknown. Therefore, the present study investigates the effects of a standardized total quassinoids composition (SQ40 containing 40% of the total quassinoids found in E. longifolia on LNCaP human prostate cancer cell line. SQ40 inhibited LNCaP cell growth at IC50 value of 5.97 μg/mL while the IC50 on RWPE-1 human prostate normal cells was 59.26 μg/mL. SQ40 also inhibited 5α-dihydrotestosterone-stimulated growth in LNCaP cells dose-dependently. The inhibitory effect of SQ40 in anchorage-independent growth of LNCaP cells was also demonstrated using soft agar assay. SQ40 suppressed LNCaP cell growth via G0/G1 phase arrest which was accompanied by the down-regulation of CDK4, CDK2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin D3 and up-regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 protein levels. SQ40 at higher concentrations or longer treatment duration can cause G2M growth arrest leading to apoptotic cell death as demonstrated by the detection of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage in LNCaP cells. Moreover, SQ40 also inhibited androgen receptor translocation to nucleus which is important for the transactivation of its target gene, prostate-specific antigen (PSA and resulted in a significant reduction of PSA secretion after the treatment. In addition, intraperitoneal injection of 5 and 10 mg/kg of SQ40 also significantly suppressed the LNCaP tumor growth on mouse xenograft model. Results from the present study suggest that the standardized total quassinoids

  11. Expression of K+ channels in normal and cancerous human breast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brevet, Marie; Ahidouch, Ahmed; Sevestre, Henri; Merviel, Philippe; El Hiani, Yassine; Robbe, Micheline; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima

    2008-01-01

    ...), Ca2+-activated K channel (K Ca 1.1), voltage activated K+ channels (KV 1.1 and KV 1.3) and of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 in normal and cancerous breast tissues and compared their expression with clinicopathological data...

  12. Human papillomavirus infection in Honduran women with normal cytology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabora, N.; Bakkers, J.M.J.E.; Quint, W.G.V.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Matute, J.A.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Ferrera, A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was aimed at estimating type-specific HPV prevalence and its cofactors among Honduran women with normal cytology in order to provide valuable information to health policymakers about the epidemiology of this important sexually transmitted infection. METHODS: A total of 591

  13. Human papillomavirus in normal cervical smears from Cape Town

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (55/68) of cervical carcinoma biopsies and 66% (66/98) of. GIN grade 3 biopsies from Gape Town.111.19 HPV 16 was the predominant HPV type in both these studies. At present there is no information on the prevalence and types of HPV DNA present in cervical smears from women with normal cytology in South Africa.

  14. Cardiovascular, endocrine, and renal effects of urodilatin in normal humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestle, M H; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Christensen, P

    1999-01-01

    Effects of urodilatin (5, 10, 20, and 40 ng. kg-1. min-1) infused over 2 h on separate study days were studied in eight normal subjects with use of a randomized, double-blind protocol. All doses decreased renal plasma flow (hippurate clearance, 13-37%) and increased fractional Li+ clearance (7-22...

  15. p,p'-Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) repress prostate specific antigen levels in human prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lilian I L; Labrecque, Mark P; Ibuki, Naokazu; Cox, Michael E; Elliott, John E; Beischlag, Timothy V

    2015-03-25

    Despite stringent restrictions on their use by many countries since the 1970s, the endocrine disrupting chemicals, DDT and DDE are still ubiquitous in the environment. However, little attention has been directed to p,p'-DDT and the anti-androgen, p,p'-DDE on androgen receptor (AR) target gene transcription in human cells. Inhibitors of androgenic activity may have a deleterious clinical outcome in prostate cancer screens and progression, therefore we determined whether environmentally relevant concentrations of p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE negatively impact AR-regulated expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and other AR target genes in human LNCaP and VCaP prostate cancer cells. Quantitative real-time PCR and immuno-blotting techniques were used to measure intracellular PSA, PSMA and AR mRNA and protein levels. We have shown for the first time that p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE repressed R1881-inducible PSA mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we used the fully automated COBAS PSA detection system to determine that extracellular PSA levels were also significantly repressed. These chemicals achieve this by blocking the recruitment of AR to the PSA promoter region at 10 μM, as demonstrated by the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in LNCaP cells. Both p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE repressed R1881-inducible AR protein accumulation at 10 μM. Thus, we conclude that men who have been exposed to either DDT or DDE may produce a false-negative PSA test when screening for prostate cancer, resulting in an inaccurate clinical diagnosis. More importantly, prolonged exposure to these anti-androgens may mimic androgen ablation therapy in individuals with prostate cancer, thus exacerbating the condition by inadvertently forcing adaptation to this stress early in the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Human kallikrein 2 (hK2), but not prostate-specific antigen (PSA), rapidly complexes with protease inhibitor 6 (PI-6) released from prostate carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedi, M S; Zhu, Z; Marker, K; Liu, R S; Carpenter, P M; Rittenhouse, H; Mikolajczyk, S D

    2001-11-01

    Human kallikrein 2 (hK2) is a secreted, trypsin-like protease that shares 80% amino acid sequence identity with prostate-specific antigen (PSA). hK2 has been shown to be a serum marker for prostate cancer and may also play a role in cancer progression and metastasis. We have previously identified a novel complex between human kallikrein 2 (hK2) and protease inhibitor 6 (PI-6) in prostate cancer tissue. PI-6 is an intracellular serine protease inhibitor with both antitrypsin and antichymotrypsin activity. In the current study we have shown that PI-6 forms a rapid in vitro complex with hK2 but does not complex with PSA. Recombinant mammalian cells expressing both hK2 and PI-6 showed hK2-PI-6 complex in the spent media only after cell death and lysis. Similarly, LNCaP cells expressing endogenous hK2 and PI-6 showed extracellular hK2-PI-6 complex formation concurrently with cell death. Immunostaining of prostate cancer tissues with PI-6 monoclonal antibodies showed a marked preferential staining pattern in cancerous epithelial cells compared with noncancerous tissue. These results indicate that the hK2-PI-6 complex may be a naturally occurring marker of tissue damage and necrosis associated with neoplasia. Both hK2 and PI-6 were shed into the lumen of prostate cancer glands as granular material that appeared to be cellular necrotic debris. The differential staining pattern of PI6 in tissues suggests a complex regulation of PI-6 expression that may play a role in other aspects of neoplastic progression. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. The prostatic utricle: An under-recognized condition resulting in significant morbidity in boys with both hypospadias and normal external genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Austin G; Kogan, Stanley J

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric presentations of a prostatic utricle have received only scant attention. Though recognized with increased frequency in boys with hypospadias, little is described about their incidence and potential for morbidity in boys with normal external genitalia. We initially reviewed a cohort of 64 patients with hypospadias seen over a 3-year period to determine the frequency of investigative lower urinary tract studies and utricle identification. Children with disorders of sexual differentiation were excluded from this review. A subsequent group of 70 boys with hypospadias and 23 boys with normal external genitalia presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) who were found to have an unsuspected utricle were reviewed. This comparative group was investigated since symptomatology was the indication for evaluation, contrasting with those in the hypospadias group who were investigated because of hypospadias presence alone. In our initial review of 64 patients only 24 (37.5%) underwent an investigative study and six (9.4%) had a utricle. Three (50%) required surgical excision, allowing their hypospadias repair to proceed. Results in the subsequent group with hypospadias confirmed these findings with increased rates of investigation and identification. The boys with normal external male genitalia all required surgery since symptoms were the result of the utricle alone. Penile pain with voiding, hematuria, epididymitis, and urinary infection were the most common causes for interventions. The prostatic utricle should be considered as a cause of morbidity in boys with both normal external genitalia and those with hypospadias. Endoscopic or radiological evaluation (see Figure) should be undertaken in all boys with proximal hypospadias, boys with hypospadias and associated cryptorchidism, and those with hypospadias with associated urinary symptoms. Boys with normal external genitalia with lower urinary tract symptoms not explained with imaging should undergo

  18. Tocopherols and saponins derived from Argania spinosa exert, an antiproliferative effect on human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drissi, A; Bennani, H; Giton, F; Charrouf, Z; Fiet, J; Adlouni, A

    2006-10-01

    The aim of our study is to evaluate the antiproliferative effect of tocopherols obtained from alimentary virgin argan oil extracted from the endemic argan tree of Morocco and of saponins extracted from argan press cake on three human prostatic cell lines (DU145, LNCaP, and PC3). The results were compared to 2-methoxyestradiol as antiproliferative drug candidates. Cytotoxicity and antiproliferative effects were investigated after cells' treatment with tocopherols and saponins compared to 2-Methoxyoestradiol as the positive control. Tocopherols and saponins extracted from argan tree and 2-methoxyestradiol exhibit a dose-response cytotoxic effect and an antiproliferative action on the tested cell lines. The best antiproliferative effect of tocopherols is obtained with DU145 and LNCaP cell lines (28 microg/ml and 32 microg/ml, respectively, as GI50). The saponins fraction displayed the best antiproliferative effect on the PC3 cell line with 18 microg/ml as GI50. Our results confirm the antiproliferative effect of 2-methoxyestradiol and show for the first time the antiproliferative effect of tocopherols and saponins extracted from the argan tree on hormone-dependent and hormone-independent prostate cancer cell lines. These data suggest that argan oil is of potential interest in developing new strategies for prostate cancer prevention.

  19. α-Pinene Inhibits Human Prostate Cancer Growth in a Mouse Xenograft Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunqi; Chen, Ran; Wang, Yun; Yang, Yixin

    2017-10-26

    α-Pinene is one of the most widely found terpenoids in nature. Substantial evidence shows that α-pinene has cancer prevention properties. In this study, the PC-3 cell line was used to establish subcutaneous xenograft tumors in nude mice. Cytotoxicity was measured with the MTT assay, and apoptosis and cell cycle analyses were conducted using flow cytometry in vitro. The PC-3 cell line was used to establish subcutaneous xenograft tumors in nude mice. We found that treatment with α-pinene significantly inhibited human prostate cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the cell line-based model. Furthermore, tumor progression was inhibited more in mice treated with α-pinene than in control mice. We detected less Ki67 and proliferation cell nuclear antigen in paraffin sections from xenograft tumor specimens taken from α-pinene-treated mice than in those from the control group. Meanwhile, α-pinene treatment induced apoptosis in xenograft tumors as determined by the TUNEL assay. These data strongly suggest that α-pinene inhibits prostate cancer growth in a xenograft model and may be an effective therapeutic agent for prostate cancer treatment. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Chronic prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batstone, G Richard D; Doble, Andrew; Batstone, D

    2003-01-01

    This review covers recent developments in the classification, epidemiology, aetiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients diagnosed with chronic prostatitis (NIH classification types II, IIIa/IIIb and IV prostatitis) in the period of review (2001-2002). Recent studies highlight some of the problems with the 1995 NIH classification. Epidemiological studies have confirmed that "prostatitis" is common, with a prevalence of 10-15%. Associations of prostatitis include benign prostatic hyperplasia, sexually transmitted disease, lower urinary tract symptoms, stress, and reduced sunlight exposure. Elevated levels of cytokines in the seminal plasma and prostatic secretions have been detected in men with chronic prostatitis compared with normal individuals, suggesting an active inflammatory process in the male genital tract. This inflammatory reaction may be mediated by an adaptive immune response directed against a genital tract antigen(s) (autoimmunity). Increased levels of bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA in the prostates of men with chronic prostatitis compared with controls are compatible with the notion that a bacterial inflammatory event initiates an auto-immune process; however, the role of bacteria in the continuation of symptoms is unknown. The aetiology of chronic pelvic pain syndrome is still not certain, although an auto-immune process is favoured. Further research is required to determine the putative auto-antigen, the immune responses of patients, the role of bacteria in the inflammatory process, and the patients' pain response to genitourinary insults. As yet no diagnostic tests (other than to eliminate other pathology) and few treatments for chronic prostatitis can be recommended on the basis of scientific evidence.

  1. Lead levels in human placentae from normal and malformed births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberley, D G; Khera, A K; Edwards, J H; Rushton, D I

    1977-10-01

    Placental lead levels were studied in a series of Birmingham births classified by stillbirth, neonatal death, or survival beyond one week. There was an appreciable range of lead levels even in normal births (0.15-3.56 microgram/g) but nevertheless average results showed a pronounced excess of lead in those who failed to survive both birth and the neonatal period. There was no association of placental lead with impaired birthweight among survivors but, in common with other authors, we noted a seasonal variation. The placentae from Indian women had similar lead levels to those from European women and lower values were found in the normal sibs of stillbirths and neonatal deaths. The possibility is discussed that under conditions of impaired fetal health in late pregnancy the placenta may concentrate lead.

  2. Normal RNAi response in human fragile x fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte; Grønskov, Karen; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fragile x syndrome is caused by loss of expression of the FMRP protein involved in the control of a large number of mRNA targets. The Drosophila ortholog dFXR interacts with a protein complex that includes Argonaute2, an essential component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC......). Furthermore dFXR associates with Dicer, another essential processing enzyme of the RNAi pathway. Both microRNA and microRNA precursors can co-immunoprecipitate with dFXR. Consequently it has been suggested that the Fragile x syndrome may be due to a defect in an RNAi-related apparatus. FINDINGS: We have...... investigated the RNAi response in Fragile x patient cells lacking FMRP compared with normal controls. RNAi responses were successfully detected, but no statistically significant difference between the response in normal cells compared to patients cells was found - neither one nor two days after transfection...

  3. Activated α2-Macroglobulin Binding to Human Prostate Cancer Cells Triggers Insulin-like Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Uma Kant; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface GRP78 by activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*) promotes cell proliferation and suppresses apoptosis. α2M*-treated human prostate cancer cells exhibit a 2–3-fold increase in glucose uptake and lactate secretion, an effect similar to insulin treatment. In both α2M* and insulin-treated cells, the mRNA levels of SREBP1-c, SREBP2, fatty-acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, ATP citrate lyase, and Glut-1 were significantly increased together with their protein levels, except for SREBP2. Pretreatment of cells with α2M* antagonist antibody directed against the carboxyl-terminal domain of GRP78 blocks these α2M*-mediated effects, and silencing GRP78 expression by RNAi inhibits up-regulation of ATP citrate lyase and fatty-acid synthase. α2M* induces a 2–3-fold increase in lipogenesis as determined by 6-[14C]glucose or 1-[14C]acetate incorporation into free cholesterol, cholesterol esters, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and phosphatidylcholine, which is blocked by inhibitors of fatty-acid synthase, PI 3-kinase, mTORC, or an antibody against the carboxyl-terminal domain of GRP78. We also assessed the incorporation of [14CH3]choline into phosphatidylcholine and observed similar effects. Lipogenesis is significantly affected by pretreatment of prostate cancer cells with fatostatin A, which blocks sterol regulatory element-binding protein proteolytic cleavage and activation. This study demonstrates that α2M* functions as a growth factor, leading to proliferation of prostate cancer cells by promoting insulin-like responses. An antibody against the carboxyl-terminal domain of GRP78 may have important applications in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:25720493

  4. BTG2 Antiproliferative Gene and Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walden, Paul D

    2007-01-01

    Levels of the BTG2 tumor suppressor protein diminish during the transition of normal prostate epithelial cells into prostate cancer cells and restoration of BTG2 expression in prostate cancer cells...

  5. Designed modulation of sex steroid signaling inhibits telomerase activity and proliferation of human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Vishal [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sharma, Siddharth; Bishnoi, Ajay Kumar [Division of Medicinal and Process Chemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Chandra, Vishal; Maikhuri, J.P.; Dwivedi, Anila [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Kumar, Atul [Division of Medicinal and Process Chemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Gupta, Gopal, E-mail: g_gupta@cdri.res.in [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India)

    2014-10-15

    The predominant estrogen-receptor (ER)-β signaling in normal prostate is countered by increased ER-α signaling in prostate cancer (CaP), which in association with androgen-receptor (AR) signaling results in pathogenesis of the disease. However CaP treatments mostly target AR signaling which is initially effective but eventually leads to androgen resistance, hence simultaneous targeting of ERs has been proposed. A novel series of molecules were designed with multiple sex-steroid receptor modulating capabilities by coalescing the pharmacophores of known anti-CaP molecules that act via modulation of ER(α/β) and/or AR, viz. 3,3′diindolylmethane (DIM), mifepristone, toremifene, tamoxifen and raloxifene. N,N-diethyl-4-((2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl) aniline (DIMA) was identified as the most promising structure of this new series. DIMA increased annexin-V labelling, cell-cycle arrest and caspase-3 activity, and decreased expression of AR and prostate specific antigen in LNCaP cells, in vitro. Concurrently, DIMA increased ER-β, p21 and p27 protein levels in LNCaP cells and exhibited ∼ 5 times more selective binding for ER-β than ER-α, in comparison to raloxifene. DIMA exhibited a dose-dependent ER-β agonism and ER-α antagonism in classical gene reporter assay and decreased hTERT (catalytic subunit of telomerase) transcript levels in LNCaP at 3.0 μM (P < 0.05). DIMA also dose-dependently decreased telomerase enzyme activity in prostate cancer cells. It is thus concluded that DIMA acts as a multi-steroid receptor modulator and effectively inhibits proliferation of prostate cancer cells through ER-β mediated telomerase inhibition, by countering actions of ER-α and AR. Its unique molecular design can serve as a lead structure for generation of potent agents against endocrine malignancies like the CaP.

  6. Gene expression of 17beta-estradiol-metabolizing isozymes: comparison of normal human mammary gland to normal human liver and to cultured human breast adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Leane; Wagner, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic activation of 17beta-estradiol (E2) to catechols and quinones together with lack of deactivation constitute risk factors in human breast carcinogenesis. E2-catchols are generated by cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases (CYPs). Deactivation of E2, E2-catechols, and E2-quinones is mediated by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), sulfotransferase (SULT), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and NADPH-quinone-oxidoreductase (QR) isozymes, respectively. The aim of the present study was to quantify mRNA levels of E2-metabolizing isozymes expressed in MCF-7 cells cultured in the presence/absence of steroids by reverse transcription/competitive PCR in relation to the housekeeping gene hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and compare them with expression levels in normal human mammary gland (MG) and liver tissue. CYP1A1, 1B1, SULT1A1, 1A2, membrane-bound and soluble COMT, GSTT1, QR1, and UGT2B7 were detected in both tissues and MCF-7 cells; however, most enzymes were expressed at least tenfold higher in liver. Yet, CYP1B1 was expressed as high in breast as in liver and UGTs were not detected in MCF-7 cells cultured with steroids. MCF-7 cells cultured steroid-free additionally expressed CYP1A2 as well as UGT1A4, 1A8, and 1A9. Normal human liver but not MG expressed CYP1A2, 3A4, UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A9, and SULT2A1. UGT1A8 was only detected in MCF7 cells but was not found in human liver. Thus, our study provides a comprehensive overview of expression levels of E2-metabolizing enzymes in a popular in vitro model and in human tissues, which will contribute to the interpretation of in vitro studies concerning the activation/deactivation of E2.

  7. Immunohistochemical distribution of cAMP- and cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes in the human prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uckert, Stefan; Oelke, Matthias; Stief, Christian G.; Andersson, K.-E.; Jonas, Udo; Hedlund, Petter

    2006-01-01

    With the introduction of sildenafil citrate (Viagra), the concept of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition has gained tremendous interest in the field of urology. Cyclic nucleotide second messengers cGMP and cAMP have been assumed to be involved in the control of the normal function of the prostate.

  8. Human seminal proteinase and prostate-specific antigen are the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Based on published studies and the present results, the broad proteolytic specificity of human seminal proteinase suggests a role for this protein in several ... St Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63104, USA; Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110 025, ...

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid enhances vascular endothelial growth factor-C expression in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-En Lin

    Full Text Available Clinical evidence suggests that lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis are important processes during the progression of prostate cancer. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-C was shown to be a key regulator in these processes. Our previous studies demonstrated that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, a low-molecular-weight lipid growth factor, enhances VEGF-C expression in human endothelial cells. We previously demonstrated that the LPA receptor plays an important role in lymphatic development in zebrafish embryos. However, the effects of LPA on VEGF-C expression in prostate cancer are not known. Herein, we demonstrate that LPA up-regulated VEGF-C expression in three different human prostate cancer cell lines. In PC-3 human prostate cancer cells, the enhancing effects of LPA were mediated through both LPA1 and LPA3. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS production and lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF expression were involved in LPA(1/3-dependent VEGF-C expression. Furthermore, autotaxin (ATX, an enzyme responsible for LPA synthesis, also participates in regulating VEGF-C expression. By interrupting LPA(1/3 of PC-3, conditioned medium (CM -induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC lymphatic markers expression was also blocked. In summary, we found that LPA enhances VEGF-C expression through activating LPA(1/3-, ROS-, and LEDGF-dependent pathways. These novel findings could potentially shed light on developing new strategies for preventing lymphatic metastasis of prostate cancer.

  10. Multiplexed quantum dot labeling of activated c-Met signaling in castration-resistant human prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhen Hu

    Full Text Available The potential application of multiplexed quantum dot labeling (MQDL for cancer detection and prognosis and monitoring therapeutic responses has attracted the interests of bioengineers, pathologists and cancer biologists. Many published studies claim that MQDL is effective for cancer biomarker detection and useful in cancer diagnosis and prognosis, these studies have not been standardized against quantitative biochemical and molecular determinations. In the present study, we used a molecularly characterized human prostate cancer cell model exhibiting activated c-Met signaling with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and lethal metastatic progression to bone and soft tissues as the gold standard, and compared the c-Met cell signaling network in this model, in clinical human prostate cancer tissue specimens and in a castration-resistant human prostate cancer xenograft model. We observed c-Met signaling network activation, manifested by increased phosphorylated c-Met in all three. The downstream survival signaling network was mediated by NF-κB and Mcl-1 and EMT was driven by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL, at the single cell level in clinical prostate cancer specimens and the xenograft model. Results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and western blots in a human prostate cancer cell model. MQDL is a powerful tool for assessing biomarker expression and it offers molecular insights into cancer progression at both the cell and tissue level with high degree of sensitivity.

  11. Effects of chronic exposure to arsenic and estrogen on epigenetic regulatory genes expression and epigenetic code in human prostate epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin N Treas

    Full Text Available Chronic exposures to arsenic and estrogen are known risk factors for prostate cancer. Though the evidence suggests that exposure to arsenic or estrogens can disrupt normal DNA methylation patterns and histone modifications, the mechanisms by which these chemicals induce epigenetic changes are not fully understood. Moreover, the epigenetic effects of co-exposure to these two chemicals are not known. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic exposure to arsenic and estrogen, both alone and in combination, on the expression of epigenetic regulatory genes, their consequences on DNA methylation, and histone modifications. Human prostate epithelial cells, RWPE-1, chronically exposed to arsenic and estrogen alone and in combination were used for analysis of epigenetic regulatory genes expression, global DNA methylation changes, and histone modifications at protein level. The result of this study revealed that exposure to arsenic, estrogen, and their combination alters the expression of epigenetic regulatory genes and changes global DNA methylation and histone modification patterns in RWPE-1 cells. These changes were significantly greater in arsenic and estrogen combination treated group than individually treated group. The findings of this study will help explain the epigenetic mechanism of arsenic- and/or estrogen-induced prostate carcinogenesis.

  12. Validation of Reference Genes for Normalization Gene Expression in Reverse Transcription Quantitative PCR in Human Normal Thyroid and Goiter Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Weber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR has been recognized as the most accurate method for quantifying mRNA transcripts, but normalization of samples is a prerequisite for correct data interpretation. So, this study aimed to evaluate the most stable reference gene for RT-qPCR in human normal thyroid and goiter tissues. Beta-actin (ACTB; glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; succinate dehydrogenase, subunit A, flavoprotein (Fp (SDHA; hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase I (HPRTI; tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ; and beta-2-microglobulin (B2M were evaluated in 14 thyroid tissue samples (7 normal and 7 goiter tissues by RT-qPCR. The mean Cq and the maximum fold change (MFC and NormFinder software were used to assess the stability of the genes. As a result, ACTB gene was more stable than GAPDH, SDHA, HPRTI, YWHAZ, and B2M. In conclusion, ACTB could be used to normalize RT-qPCR data in normal thyroid and goiter tissues.

  13. Effects of organophosphorus flame retardant TDCPP on normal human corneal epithelial cells: Implications for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ping; Liu, Rong-Yan; Li, Chao; Gao, Peng; Cui, Xin-Yi; Ma, Lena Q

    2017-11-01

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) is one of the most detected organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) in the environment, especially in indoor dust. Continuous daily exposure to TDCPP-containing dust may adversely impact human cornea. However, its detrimental effects on human corneal epithelium are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the cell apoptosis in normal human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) after TDCPP exposure and elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms. Our data indicated a dose-dependent decrease of cell viability after TDCPP exposure with LC 50 at 202 μg/mL. A concentration-dependent apoptotic sign was observed in HCECs after exposing to ≥2 μg/mL TDCPP. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induction was evidenced by up-regulation of its biomarker genes (ATF-4, CHOP, BiP, and XBP1). Furthermore, alternation of Bcl-2/Bax expression, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, cellular ATP content decrease, and caspase-3 and -9 activity increase were observed after exposing to 2 or 20 μg/mL TDCPP. Taken together, the data implicated the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress in TDCPP-induced HCEC apoptosis, probably mediated by mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Our findings showed TDCPP exposure induced toxicity to human cornea. Due to TDCPP's presence at high levels in indoor dust, further study is warranted to evaluate its health risk on human corneas. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Vulnerability of Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells to Oncogenic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    escape senescence and acquire genomic changes. Nature 2001;409:633–7. 10. Olsen CL, Gardie B, Yaswen P, Stampfer MR. Raf-1- induced growth arrest in...p16INK4a. Cell 88:593–602. 10. Olsen CL, Gardie B, Yaswen P, Stampfer MR (2002) Raf-1-induced growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells is p16...Cycle 3, 244–246. Olsen CL, Gardie B, Yaswen P, Stampfer MR (2002) Raf-1-induced growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells is p16-independent and

  15. A basal stem cell signature identifies aggressive prostate cancer phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan A.; Sokolov, Artem; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Baertsch, Robert; Newton, Yulia; Graim, Kiley; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M.; Witte, Owen N.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from numerous cancers suggests that increased aggressiveness is accompanied by up-regulation of signaling pathways and acquisition of properties common to stem cells. It is unclear if different subtypes of late-stage cancer vary in stemness properties and whether or not these subtypes are transcriptionally similar to normal tissue stem cells. We report a gene signature specific for human prostate basal cells that is differentially enriched in various phenotypes of late-stage metastatic prostate cancer. We FACS-purified and transcriptionally profiled basal and luminal epithelial populations from the benign and cancerous regions of primary human prostates. High-throughput RNA sequencing showed the basal population to be defined by genes associated with stem cell signaling programs and invasiveness. Application of a 91-gene basal signature to gene expression datasets from patients with organ-confined or hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer revealed that metastatic small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma was molecularly more stem-like than either metastatic adenocarcinoma or organ-confined adenocarcinoma. Bioinformatic analysis of the basal cell and two human small cell gene signatures identified a set of E2F target genes common between prostate small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and primary prostate basal cells. Taken together, our data suggest that aggressive prostate cancer shares a conserved transcriptional program with normal adult prostate basal stem cells. PMID:26460041

  16. Uptake and antitumoral effects of iodine and 6-iodolactone in differentiated and undifferentiated human prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Nuri; Sosa, Susana; Delgado, Guadalupe; Aceves, Carmen; Anguiano, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that iodine per se could be implicated in the physiology of several organs that can internalize it. In thyroid and breast cancer, iodine treatments inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis through a direct (mitochondria) and/or indirect effect (iodolipid generation). Here, we determined the uptake of iodide (I(-) ) and iodine (I(2) ), as well as the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of 6-iodolactone (6-IL) and both forms of iodine in human prostate cells lines. Non-cancerous (RWPE-1) and cancerous (LNCaP, DU-145) cells, as well as nude mice xenotransplanted with DU-145 cells were used as cancer models. Iodine uptake was analyzed with radioactive tracers, transporter expression by qRT-PCR, cell proliferation by blue trypan, apoptosis by enzyme immunoassay or fluorescence, BAX and BCL-2 by western-blot, and caspsase 3 by enzymatic assay. All three cell lines take up both forms of iodine. In RWPE-1 cells, I(-) uptake depends on the Na(+) /I(-) symporter (NIS), whereas it was independent of NIS in LNCaP and DU-145 cells. Antiproliferative effects of iodine and 6-IL were dose and time dependent; RWPE-1 was most sensitive to I(-) and 6-IL, whereas LNCaP was more sensitive to I(2) . In the three cell lines both forms of iodine activated the intrinsic apoptotic pathway (increasing the BAX/BCL-2 index and caspases). Iodine supplementation impaired growth of the DU-145 tumor in nude mice. Normal and cancerous prostate cells can take up iodine, and depending on the chemical form, it exerts antiproliferative and apoptotic effects both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Contouring variability of human- and deformable-generated contours in radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Kim, Jinkoo; Liu, Chang; Pradhan, Deepak; Aref, Ibrahim; Cattaneo, Richard, II; Vance, Sean; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate contouring variability of human-and deformable-generated contours on planning CT (PCT) and CBCT for ten patients with low-or intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For each patient in this study, five radiation oncologists contoured the prostate, bladder, and rectum, on one PCT dataset and five CBCT datasets. Consensus contours were generated using the STAPLE method in the CERR software package. Observer contours were compared to consensus contour, and contour metrics (Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, Contour Distance, Center-of-Mass [COM] Deviation) were calculated. In addition, the first day CBCT was registered to subsequent CBCT fractions (CBCTn: CBCT2-CBCT5) via B-spline Deformable Image Registration (DIR). Contours were transferred from CBCT1 to CBCTn via the deformation field, and contour metrics were calculated through comparison with consensus contours generated from human contour set. The average contour metrics for prostate contours on PCT and CBCT were as follows: Dice coefficient—0.892 (PCT), 0.872 (CBCT-Human), 0.824 (CBCT-Deformed); Hausdorff distance—4.75 mm (PCT), 5.22 mm (CBCT-Human), 5.94 mm (CBCT-Deformed); Contour Distance (overall contour)—1.41 mm (PCT), 1.66 mm (CBCT-Human), 2.30 mm (CBCT-Deformed); COM Deviation—2.01 mm (PCT), 2.78 mm (CBCT-Human), 3.45 mm (CBCT-Deformed). For human contours on PCT and CBCT, the difference in average Dice coefficient between PCT and CBCT (approx. 2%) and Hausdorff distance (approx. 0.5 mm) was small compared to the variation between observers for each patient (standard deviation in Dice coefficient of 5% and Hausdorff distance of 2.0 mm). However, additional contouring variation was found for the deformable-generated contours (approximately 5.0% decrease in Dice coefficient and 0.7 mm increase in Hausdorff distance relative to human-generated contours on CBCT). Though deformable contours provide a reasonable starting point for contouring on

  18. Animal models of human prostate cancer: The Consensus Report of the New York Meeting of the Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium Prostate Pathology Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittmann, Michael; Huang, Jiaoti; Radaelli, Enrico; Martin, Philip; Signoretti, Sabina; Sullivan, Ruth; Simons, Brian W.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Robinson, Brian D.; Chu, Gerald C.; Loda, Massimo; Thomas, George; Borowsky, Alexander; Cardiff, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models, particularly mouse models, play a central role in the study of the etiology, prevention and treatment of human prostate cancer (PCa). While tissue culture models are extremely useful in understanding the biology of PCa, they cannot recapitulate the complex cellular interactions within the tumor microenvironment that play a key role in cancer initiation and progression. The NCI Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium convened a group of human and veterinary pathologists to review the current animal models of PCa and make recommendations regarding the pathological analysis of these models. Over 40 different models with 439 samples were reviewed including genetically engineered mouse models, xenograft, rat and canine models. Numerous relevant models have been developed over the last 15 years and each approach has strengths and weaknesses. Analysis of multiple genetically engineered models has shown that reactive stroma formation is present in all the models developing invasive carcinomas. In addition, numerous models with multiple genetic alterations display aggressive phenotypes characterized by sarcomatoid carcinomas and metastases, which is presumably a histological manifestation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The significant progress in development of improved models of PCa has already accelerated our understanding the complex biology of PCa and promises to enhance development of new approaches to prevention, detection and treatment of this common malignancy. PMID:23610450

  19. Effects of recombinant humant erythropoietin in normal humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2011-01-01

    This review describes some of the physiological effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) in healthy humans. At the blood level EPO increases the arterial O2 content not only by increasing red blood cell volume, but also by an equally important decrease in plasma volume. Well before that...... result in suppression of endogenous EPO production through a decrease in intrarenal oxygen consumption. EPO elevates the arterial blood pressure even in healthy subjects. The receptor for EPO is present in many tissues. However, the functional effects of EPO in the skeletal muscle seem limited......, and although it has been speculated that non-erythropoietic effects of EPO (angiogenesis, shift in muscle fibre types, cognitive effects) may be responsible for the increase in exercise performance, this has not been confirmed. EPO induced haemodynamic effects call for careful monitoring during...

  20. First Evidence that Sika Deer (Cervus nippon) Velvet Antler Extract Suppresses Migration of Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, YuJiao; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Wang, Yanmei; Choi, Eun-Ju; Kim, Yon-Suk; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Park, Pyo-Jam; Moon, Sang Ho; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Deer velvet antler (DVA) is one of the most popular medicines in China. Numerous studies have demonstrated that velvet antler possess biological effects. However, data regarding its anti-migration activity on prostate cancer is scarce. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of top DVA (T-DVA) on the expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and migration-related genes in the human prostate cancer cell, LNCaP. The T-DVA down-regulated the expression of PSA. In addition, the Radius(TM) assay revealed that T-DVA inhibited the migration behavior of prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was also decreased with T-DVA. On the contrary, T-DVA increased the tissue inhibition of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and (TIMP)-2. Taken together, our findings indicate that the T-DVA possesses anti-migration activity on prostate cancer cells. This is the first study of DVA to report the anti-migration activity on prostate cancer.

  1. Targeting Tumor Oct4 to Deplete Prostate Tumor- and Metastasis-Initiating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Background: Genome -wide association studies (GWAS) have linked human chromosome 8q24.21 region with increased risk for prostatic carcinoma...cells, HPV -immortalized normal prostate epithelial cells (Figure 2 A). Further, we examined POU5F1B expression in prostate tumor tissue by...amino acids change may contribute to protein structure , such as R33L, from basic, positive, polar to neutral hydrophobic; G97S, hydrophobic to polar

  2. The normal growth of the tracheal wall in human foetuses

    OpenAIRE

    Szpinda, Micha?; Daroszewski, Marcin; Szpinda, Anna; Wo?niak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Flisi?ski, Piotr; Wi?niewski, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal wall thickness is a substantial indicator in various pathological changes. The present study was performed to compile normative data and formulae for the tracheal wall thickness and volume at varying gestational age. Material and methods Using anatomical dissection, digital image analysis and statistics a range of the wall thickness, proximal internal-to-external cross-sectional area ratio, and wall volume for the trachea in 73 spontaneously aborted human fetuses aged 14...

  3. Accelerated aging syndromes, are they relevant to normal human aging?

    OpenAIRE

    Dreesen, Oliver; Stewart, Colin L.

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS) and Werner syndromes are diseases that clinically resemble some aspects of accelerated aging. HGPS is caused by mutations in theLMNA gene resulting in post-translational processing defects that trigger Progeria in children. Werner syndrome, arising from mutations in the WRN helicase gene, causes premature aging in young adults. What are the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these disorders and what aspects of the diseases resemble physiological human aging? ...

  4. Formaldehyde solutions in simulated sweat increase human melanoma but not normal human keratinocyte cells proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, M; Cravello, B; Tonello, S; Renò, F

    2016-12-01

    Our skin is in close contact with clothes most of the time thus risking potentially noxious chemicals contact. One of the potentially harmful manufacturing by-products that can be released by textiles when sweating is formaldehyde, used as an anti-crease treatment. As it is known to be carcinogenic to humans and a potent skin sensitizer, the aim of this study was to investigate its effects on both normal human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) and on a highly invasive malignant melanoma cell line (SK-MEL-28) in order to contribute to the definition of safety cut-off to be applied to the production processes. Formaldehyde concentrations below the commonly accepted limits (10-50μM) were obtained by diluting formaldehyde in simulated sweat (UNI EN ISO 105-E04). The effects on cell proliferation were evaluated by cell counting, while ERK pathway activation was evaluated by western blot. Low concentrations of formaldehyde (10μM) in both acidic and alkaline simulated sweat were able to increase malignant melanoma cell proliferation, while not affecting normal keratinocytes. Melanoma proliferation increase was greater in acidic (pH=5.5) than in alkaline (pH=8) conditions. Moreover, formaldehyde stimulation was able to induce ERK pathway activation. The data obtained suggest the need for an even increasing attention to the potentially harmful effects of textile manufacturing by-products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Human papilloma virus DNAs immortalize normal human mammary epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, V.; Zajchowski, D.; Kulesa, V.; Sager, R. (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are most commonly associated with cervical carcinoma in patients and induce immortalization of human keratinocytes in culture. HPV has not been associated with breast cancer. This report describes the immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (76N) by plasmid pHPV18 or pHPV16, each containing the linearized viral genome. Transfectants were grown continuously for more than 60 passages, whereas 76N cells senesce after 18-20 passages. The transfectants also differ from 76N cells in cloning in a completely defined medium called D2 and growing a minimally supplemented defined medium (D3) containing epidermal growth factor. All transfectant tested contain integrated HPV DNA, express HPV RNA, and produce HPV E7 protein. HPV transfectants do not form tumors in a nude mouse assay. It is concluded that products of the HPV genome induce immortalization of human breast epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. This result raises the possibility that HPV might be involved in breast cancer. Furthermore, other tissue-specific primary epithelial cells that are presently difficult to grown and investigate may also be immortalized by HPV.

  6. alpha6 integrin cleavage: sensitizing human prostate cancer to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Sangita C; Dougherty, Shona; Pennington, Michael E; Demetriou, Manolis C; Stea, B Dino; Dorr, Robert T; Cress, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    The goal was to determine if prostate tumor cells containing a mutant alpha6 integrin would be defective in tumor re-population following clinically relevant fractionated ionizing radiation (IR) treatments. Human prostate cancer cells derived from PC3N cells were used which conditionally expressed a cleavable, wild type form of alpha6 integrin (PC3N-alpha6-WT) or a mutated non-cleavable form of alpha6 integrin (PC3N-alpha6-RR). The resulting tumor growth before, during and after fractionated doses of IR (3 Gyx10 days) was analyzed using the endpoints of tumor growth inhibition (T/C), tumor growth delay (T-C), tumor doubling time (Td) and tumor cell kill (Log(10) cell kill). The T/C values were 36.1% and 39.5%, the T-C values were 20.5 days and 28.5 days and the Td values were 5.5 and 10.5 days for the irradiated PC3N-alpha6-WT and PC3N-alpha6-RR cells, respectively. The Log(10) was 1.1 for the PC3N-alpha6-WT cells and 0.8 for the PC3N-alpha6-RR cells. The tumor response to IR was altered in tumors expressing the mutant alpha6 integrin as indicated by a significant increase in tumor growth inhibition, an increase in tumor growth delay, an increase in tumor doubling time and an increase in tumor cell kill. Blocking integrin cleavage in vivo may be efficacious for increasing the IR responsiveness of slow growing, pro-metastatic human prostate cancer.

  7. In vitro study on the vaporization ratio of 2-microm laser in human prostatic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Sun, Dongchong; Wei, Zhitao; Xu, Feng; Hong, Baofa; Zhang, Xu

    2010-04-01

    In this study, the vaporization ratio of the 2-mum laser in the prostatic tissue with benign prostatic hyperplasia was examined in vitro, to explore a technique to estimate the clearance rate of prostatic tissue during the transurethral vaporesection of the prostate. A total of 9 fresh prostatic tissue specimens were obtained by open surgery and the wet weight of the prostatic tissue were measured immediately after the sample collection. Under the simulated conditions of transurethral vaporesection of the prostate by 2-microm laser, each prostate gland was completely vaporesected into fragments with a diameter of less than 1.0 cm in vitro. After the vaporesection, the whole fragments of prostatic tissue were collected and measured. Then the lost weight of prostatic tissue, the weight of the collected prostatic tissue and the ratio of the lost weight of prostatic tissue to the wet weight of the prostate glandular organ specimen were calculated. The correlation between the weight of collected prostatic tissue and the weight of the whole glandular organ was analyzed. All the experimental procedures were carried out by one operator. Wet weight of the prostatic gland specimen and the weight of the harvested prostatic tissues after the procedure were recorded. With respect to the wet weight of prostate gland specimen, the percentage of the weight of collected prostatic tissue was (34.45 + or - 1.51) %, and the percentage of the lost weight of prostatic tissue was (65.55 + or - 1.51)%. Satisfactory linear relationship was observed between the weight of collected prostatic tissue and the wet weight of prostate gland specimen [y = 3.245 x -6.475 (t=15.097, P=0.000)]. It is concluded that under the simulated conditions of transurethral vaporesection of the prostate by 2-mum laser, the vaporization ratio of prostatic tissue can be calculated on the basis of the weight of collected prostatic tissue, and thereby the clearance of prostatic tissue during the formal operation by 2

  8. Jacaric acid and its octadecatrienoic acid geoisomers induce apoptosis selectively in cancerous human prostate cells: a mechanistic and 3-D structure-activity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Jihane; Thomas Sanderson, J

    2013-06-15

    Plant-derived non-essential fatty acids are important dietary nutrients, and some are purported to have chemopreventive properties against various cancers, including that of the prostate. In this study, we determined the ability of seven dietary C-18 fatty acids to cause cytotoxicity and induce apoptosis in various types of human prostate cancer cells. These fatty acids included jacaric and punicic acid found in jacaranda and pomegranate seed oil, respectively, three octadecatrienoic geometric isomers (alpha- and beta-calendic and catalpic acid) and two mono-unsaturated C-18 fatty acids (trans- and cis-vaccenic acid). Jacaric acid and four of its octadecatrienoic geoisomers selectively induced apoptosis in hormone-dependent (LNCaP) and -independent (PC-3) human prostate cancer cells, whilst not affecting the viability of normal human prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1). Jacaric acid induced concentration- and time-depedent LNCaP cell death through activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways resulting in cleavage of PARP-1, modulation of pro- and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family of proteins and increased cleavage of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Moreover, activation of a cell death-inducing signalling cascade involving death receptor 5 was observed. Jacaric acid induced apoptosis in PC-3 cells by activation of the intrinsic pathway only. The spatial conformation cis, trans, cis of jacaric and punicic acid was shown to play a key role in the increased potency and efficacy of these two fatty acids in comparison to the five other C-18 fatty acids tested. Three-dimensional conformational analysis using the PubChem Database (http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) showed that the cytotoxic potency of the C-18 fatty acids was related to their degree of conformational similarity to our cytotoxic reference compound, punicic acid, based on optimized shape (ST) and feature (CT) similarity scores, with jacaric acid being most 'biosimilar' (ST(ST-opt)=0.81; CT(CT-opt)=0.45). This 3-D

  9. Reconstruction of normal and pathological human epidermis on polycarbonate filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuyst, Evelyne; Charlier, Céline; Giltaire, Séverine; De Glas, Valérie; de Rouvroit, Catherine Lambert; Poumay, Yves

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides methods suitable for the culture of primary human keratinocytes in serum-free culture conditions, starting from very small skin biopsies. It also explains procedures required for reconstruction of a stratified epidermis on polycarbonate filter, starting from keratinocytes cultured in serum-free conditions. Tissues reconstructed according to this method have been proven suitable for characterization of epidermal morphogenesis and for in vitro studies of the epidermal barrier. Utilization of the same method for successful isolation of keratinocytes from a patient suffering from Darier's disease and the reconstruction of a pathological epidermis which displays the same histological features as in vivo are also presented.

  10. Ezrin mediates c-Myc actions in prostate cancer cell invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuan, Yin Choy; Iglesias Gato, Diego; Fernandez-Perez, L

    2010-01-01

    The forced overexpression of c-Myc in mouse prostate and in normal human prostate epithelial cells results in tumor transformation with an invasive phenotype. How c-Myc regulates cell invasion is poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the interplay of c-Myc and androgens in the re...

  11. Cyclic AMP induces transforming growth factor beta 2 gene expression and growth arrest in the human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell line PC-3.

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Y J; Kim, S.J.; Danielpour, D; O Reilly, M. A.; Kim, K Y; Myers, C E; Trepel, J B

    1992-01-01

    The standard therapy for advanced prostate cancer is androgen ablation. Despite transitory responses, hormonally treated patients ultimately relapse with androgen-independent disease that is resistant to further hormonal manipulation and cytotoxic chemotherapy. To develop an additional approach to the treatment of advanced prostate cancer, we have been studying the signal transductions controlling the growth of human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell lines. We report here that elev...

  12. Inhibition of microRNA-500 has anti-cancer effect through its conditional downstream target of TFPI in human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bing; Chen, Wei; Pan, Yue; Chen, Hongde; Zhang, Yirong; Weng, Zhiliang; Li, Yeping

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the prognostic potential and regulatory mechanism of microRNA-500 (miR-500), and human gene of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in prostate cancer. MiR-500 expression was assessed by qRT-PCR in prostate cancer cell lines and primary tumors. Cancer patients' clinicopathological factors and overall survival were analyzed according to endogenous miR-500 level. MiR-500 was downregulated in DU145 and VCaP cells. Its effect on prostate cancer proliferation, invasion in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo, were probed. Possible downstream target of miR-500, TFPI was assessed by luciferase assay and qRT-PCR in prostate cancer cells. In miR-500-downregulated DU145 and VCaP cells, TFPI was silenced to see whether it was directly involved in the regulation of miR-500 in prostate cancer. TFPI alone was either upregulated or downregulated in DU145 and VCaP cells. Their effect on prostate cancer development was further evaluated. MiR-500 is upregulated in both prostate cancer cells and primary tumors. In prostate cancer patients, high miR-500 expression is associated with poor prognosis and overall survival. In DU145 and VCaP cells, miR-500 downregulation inhibited cancer proliferation, invasion in vitro, and explant growth in vivo. TFPI was verified to be associated with miR-500 in prostate cancer. Downregulation of TFPI reversed anti-cancer effects of miR-500 downregulation in prostate cancer cells. However, neither TFPI upregulation nor downregulation alone had any functional impact on prostate cancer development. MiR-500 may be a potential biomarker and molecular target in prostate cancer. TFPI may conditionally regulate prostate cancer in miR-500-downregualted prostate cancer cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 is an enhancer of tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván González-Chavarría

    Full Text Available Altered expression and function of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1 has been associated with several diseases such as endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and obesity. In these pathologies, oxLDL/LOX-1 activates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, cell motility and angiogenesis. Recent studies have indicated that olr1 mRNA is over-expressed in stage III and IV of human prostatic adenocarcinomas. However, the function of LOX-1 in prostate cancer angiogenesis remains to be determined. Our aim was to analyze the contribution of oxLDL and LOX-1 to tumor angiogenesis using C4-2 prostate cancer cells. We analyzed the expression of pro-angiogenic molecules and angiogenesis on prostate cancer tumor xenografts, using prostate cancer cell models with overexpression or knockdown of LOX-1 receptor. Our results demonstrate that the activation of LOX-1 using oxLDL increases cell proliferation, and the expression of the pro-angiogenic molecules VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner. Noticeably, these effects were prevented in the C4-2 prostate cancer model when LOX-1 expression was knocked down. The angiogenic effect of LOX-1 activated with oxLDL was further demonstrated using the aortic ring assay and the xenograft model of tumor growth on chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. Consequently, we propose that LOX-1 activation by oxLDL is an important event that enhances tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

  14. Hybrid Synthetic Receptors on MOSFET Devices for Detection of Prostate Specific Antigen in Human Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboli, Vibha K; Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Bowen, Chris R; Taylor, John T; Bowen, Jenna L; Allender, Chris J; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-12-06

    The study reports the use of extended gate field-effect transistors (FET) for the label-free and sensitive detection of prostate cancer (PCa) biomarkers in human plasma. The approach integrates for the first time hybrid synthetic receptors comprising of highly selective aptamer-lined pockets (apta-MIP) with FETs for sensitive detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) at clinically relevant concentrations. The hybrid synthetic receptors were constructed by immobilizing an aptamer-PSA complex on gold and subjecting it to 13 cycles of dopamine electropolymerization. The polymerization resulted in the creation of highly selective polymeric cavities that retained the ability to recognize PSA post removal of the protein. The hybrid synthetic receptors were subsequently used in an extended gate FET setup for electrochemical detection of PSA. The sensor was reported to have a limit of detection of 0.1 pg/mL with a linear detection range from 0.1 pg/mL to 1 ng/mL PSA. Detection of 1-10 pg/mL PSA was also achieved in diluted human plasma. The present apta-MIP sensor developed in conjunction with FET devices demonstrates the potential for clinical application of synthetic hybrid receptors for the detection of clinically relevant biomarkers in complex samples.

  15. Gene Expression in Single Cells Isolated from the CWR-R1 Prostate Cancer Cell Line and Human Prostate Tissue Based on the Side Population Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangavarapu, Kalyan J; Miller, Austin; Huss, Wendy J

    2016-09-01

    Defining biological signals at the single cell level can identify cancer initiating driver mutations. Techniques to isolate single cells such as microfluidics sorting and magnetic capturing systems have limitations such as: high cost, labor intense, and the requirement of a large number of cells. Therefore, the goal of our current study is to identify a cost and labor effective, reliable, and reproducible technique that allows single cell isolation for analysis to promote regular laboratory use, including standard reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). In the current study, we utilized single prostate cells isolated from the CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line and human prostate clinical specimens, based on the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter efflux of dye cycle violet (DCV), side population assay. Expression of four genes: ABCG2; Aldehyde dehydrogenase1A1 (ALDH1A1); androgen receptor (AR); and embryonic stem cell marker, Oct-4, were determined. Results from the current study in the CWR-R1 cell line showed ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 gene expression in 67% of single side population cells and in 17% or 100% of non-side population cells respectively. Studies using single cells isolated from clinical specimens showed that the Oct-4 gene is detected in only 22% of single side population cells and in 78% of single non-side population cells. Whereas, AR gene expression is in 100% single side population and non-side population cells isolated from the same human prostate clinical specimen. These studies show that performing RT-PCR on single cells isolated by FACS can be successfully conducted to determine gene expression in single cells from cell lines and enzymatically digested tissue. While these studies provide a simple yes/no expression readout, the more sensitive quantitative RT-PCR would be able to provide even more information if necessary.

  16. Histological distribution of phosphophoryn in normal and pathological human dentins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Y; Sasaki, S

    1986-10-01

    Dentin phosphophoryn is a highly phosphorylated protein which has a hydrophilic character but is not soluble in dilute acetic acid. A histochemical method was developed for staining this protein with Stains-all in situ utilizing those chemical properties. We have succeeded in detecting the presence of this protein in circumpulpal orthodentin of human permanent and deciduous teeth, but not in mantle dentin, secondary dentin and reparative dentin. Phosphophoryn staining was also absent in the dentin of dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) Type II, a genetic disorder of dentin formation. From these results, it is suggested that phosphophoryn is synthesized and secreted only by physiologically-differentiated odontoblasts and that the mineralization processes of mantle, secondary, reparative and DI dentins may be different from that of circumpulpal orthodentin.

  17. Regulation of normal human polyrnorphonuclear leucocytes by carnitine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Fattorossi

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of carnitine, a drug that plays an essential role in mitochondria metabolism, on some of the most important human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN activation steps including modulation of adhesion molecule density, reactive oxygen species production, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα production was investigated. The capability of carnitine in protecting PMN from deter ioration on storage was also studied. Data shows that carnitine exerts considerable effects on all PMN functions investigated. Although the ultimate effect was often donor dependent, TNFα production was exceptional in that carnitine was able to consistently reduce TNFα production in Staphylococcus aureus stimulated PMN in a clear dose-dependent fashion. It is concluded that carnitine may represent a useful active agent in situations characterized by PMN mobilization/activation.

  18. Angiogenesis in human normal and pathologic adrenal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, G P; Moretti, A; Bonadio, A G; Menicagli, M; Viacava, P; Naccarato, A G; Iacconi, P; Miccoli, P; Salvetti, A

    2002-11-01

    The angiogenic phenotype of 13 normal adrenal glands (N), 13 aldosterone-producing adenomas (APA), 12 cortisol-producing adenomas (CPA), 13 nonfunctioning adrenal cortical adenomas (NFA), and 13 adrenal cortical carcinomas (CA) was investigated. Intratumoral vascular density was explored by CD34, a marker of endothelial cells, and the angiogenic status was investigated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, an important angiogenic factor expressed by tumoral cells. Vascular density, quantified as the number of vessels per square millimeter, was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) in CA (110.3 +/- 27.8) than in N (336.6 +/- 14.5), APA (322.8 +/- 19.1), CPA (288.5 +/- 14.3), and NFA (274.2 +/- 19.8). VEGF expression, calculated as the percentage of positive cells, was significantly greater (P < 0.0001) in CA (85.3 +/- 2.1) than in APA (56.5 +/- 7.5), CPA (38.5 +/- 7.0), N (33.1 +/- 6.1), and NFA (0.76 +/- 0.6). In APA, a negative relation between CD34 and plasma renin activity (P < 0.0002) and a positive association between CD34 and aldosterone levels (P < 0.05) was found. In conclusion, the angiogenic phenotype of CA is characterized by VEGF overexpression but low vascularization, a finding suggesting a dissociation between angiogenic potential and neoangiogenic capabilities of these tumors. The lack of VEGF expression in NFA and the close association between angiogenesis and functional status in APA also suggest a possible influence of the angiogenic phenotype on hormonal secretion of these endocrine tumors.

  19. Nonlinear time series analysis of normal and pathological human walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwell, Jonathan B.; Cusumano, Joseph P.

    2000-12-01

    Characterizing locomotor dynamics is essential for understanding the neuromuscular control of locomotion. In particular, quantifying dynamic stability during walking is important for assessing people who have a greater risk of falling. However, traditional biomechanical methods of defining stability have not quantified the resistance of the neuromuscular system to perturbations, suggesting that more precise definitions are required. For the present study, average maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponents were estimated to quantify the local dynamic stability of human walking kinematics. Local scaling exponents, defined as the local slopes of the correlation sum curves, were also calculated to quantify the local scaling structure of each embedded time series. Comparisons were made between overground and motorized treadmill walking in young healthy subjects and between diabetic neuropathic (NP) patients and healthy controls (CO) during overground walking. A modification of the method of surrogate data was developed to examine the stochastic nature of the fluctuations overlying the nominally periodic patterns in these data sets. Results demonstrated that having subjects walk on a motorized treadmill artificially stabilized their natural locomotor kinematics by small but statistically significant amounts. Furthermore, a paradox previously present in the biomechanical literature that resulted from mistakenly equating variability with dynamic stability was resolved. By slowing their self-selected walking speeds, NP patients adopted more locally stable gait patterns, even though they simultaneously exhibited greater kinematic variability than CO subjects. Additionally, the loss of peripheral sensation in NP patients was associated with statistically significant differences in the local scaling structure of their walking kinematics at those length scales where it was anticipated that sensory feedback would play the greatest role. Lastly, stride-to-stride fluctuations in the

  20. Synergic effect of α-tocopherol and naringenin in transglutaminase-induced differentiation of human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Piera; Ricci, Pasquale; Provenzano, Bruno; Lentini, Alessandro; Tabolacci, Claudio

    2011-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide. Its prevention and treatment remain a challenge to clinicians. Thus, there is an urgent need to discover novel, less toxic, and more effective therapies for patients. Many vitamins and related chemicals, including vitamin E, (tocopherols) have shown their anti-cancer activities as anti-oxidants, activators of transcription factors or factors influencing epigenetic events. Although laboratory tests including the use of animal models showed that this vitamin may have anticancer properties, whether it can effectively prevent the development and/or progression of prostate cancer in humans remains to be intensively studied. This review provides up-to-date information regarding the recent outcomes of laboratory, epidemiology and/or clinical trials on the effects of tocopherols on prostate cancer development, along with our last observations on a combined treatment of a prostate cancer cell line (PC-3) with two natural antineoplastic compounds, naringenin (NG) and α-tocopherol (α-TOC). We report the synergic effect of α-TOC and NG in transglutaminase-induced differentiation of human PC-3 prostate cancer cells. While our results are based on one histological class of tumor, the most significant implication of this observation is that establishes a new way in the screening for detecting new differentiative antineoplastic agents.

  1. Lipids and FA analysis of canine prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar-Bashi, Nadia M; Orzeszko, Karyn; Slocombe, Ronald F; Sinclair, Andrew J

    2003-06-01

    It is widely reported that an association exists between dietary fat intake and the incidence of prostate cancer in humans. To study this association, there is a need for an animal model where prostate carcinogenesis occurs spontaneously. The canine prostate is considered a suitable experimental model for prostate cancer in humans since it is morphologically similar to the human prostate and both humans and dogs have a predisposition to benign and malignant prostate disease. In this study, the FA and lipids profiles of the normal canine prostate tissue from nine dogs were examined. The total lipid content of the canine prostate tissue was 1.7 +/- 0.5% (wet weight). The lipid composition analysis using TLC-FID showed that the two major lipid classes were phospholipids and TAG. Total FA, phospholipid, and TAG FA analysis showed that the major FA were palmitic acid (16:0), stearic acid (18:0), oleic acid (18:1), linoleic acid (18:2n-6), and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). The n-3 FA were present at diet of the dogs. FA analysis of dogfoods available in Australia showed that the n-3 content in both supermarket and premium brand dogfoods was <3% (wet weight), and the n-3/n-6 ratio was low.

  2. The physiology of the normal human breast: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Dixie; Gordon, Eva J; Casano, Ashley; Lahti, Sarah Michelle; Nguyen, Tinh; Preston, Alex; Tondre, Julie; Wu, Kuan; Yanase, Tiffany; Chan, Henry; Chia, David; Esfandiari, Mahtash; Himmel, Tiffany; Love, Susan M

    2011-12-01

    The physiology of the nonlactating human breast likely plays a key role in factors that contribute to the etiology of breast cancer and other breast conditions. Although there has been extensive research into the physiology of lactation, few reports explore the physiology of the resting mammary gland, including mechanisms by which compounds such as hormones, drugs, and potential carcinogens enter the breast ducts. The purpose of this study was to explore transport of exogenous drugs into ductal fluid in nonlactating women and determine if their concentrations in the fluid are similar to those observed in the breast milk of lactating women. We selected two compounds that have been well characterized during lactation, caffeine and cimetidine. Caffeine passively diffuses into breast milk, but cimetidine is actively transported and concentrated in breast milk. After ingestion of caffeine and cimetidine, 14 nonlactating subjects had blood drawn and underwent ductal lavage at five time points over 12 h to measure drug levels in the fluid and blood. The concentrations of both caffeine and cimetidine in lavage fluid were substantially less than those observed in breast milk. Our results support recent evidence that the cimetidine transporter is not expressed in the nonlactating mammary gland, and highlight intriguing differences in the physiology and molecular transport of the lactating and nonlactating breast. The findings of this exploratory study warrant further exploration into the physiology of the nonlactating mammary gland to elucidate factors involved in disease initiation and progression.

  3. Prostate Enlargement: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Prostate Prostate Enlargement (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia) Prostate Enlargement (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia) What is benign prostatic ... associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia. What is the prostate? The prostate is a walnut-shaped gland that ...

  4. Association of Human Development Index with global bladder, kidney, prostate and testis cancer incidence and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiman, Alyssa K; Rosoff, James S; Prasad, Sandip M

    2017-12-01

    To describe contemporary worldwide age-standardized incidence and mortality rates for bladder, kidney, prostate and testis cancer and their association with development. We obtained gender-specific, age-standardized incidence and mortality rates for 184 countries and 16 major world regions from the GLOBOCAN 2012 database. We compared the mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs) at national and regional levels in males and females, and assessed the association with socio-economic development using the 2014 United Nations Human Development Index (HDI). Age-standardized incidence rates were 2.9 (bladder) to 7.4 (testis) times higher for genitourinary malignancies in more developed countries compared with less developed countries. Age-standardized mortality rates were 1.5-2.2 times higher in more vs less developed countries for prostate, bladder and kidney cancer, with no variation in mortality rates observed in testis cancer. There was a strong inverse relationship between HDI and MIR in testis (regression coefficient 1.65, R2 = 0.78), prostate (regression coefficient -1.56, R2 = 0.85), kidney (regression coefficient -1.34, R2 = 0.74), and bladder cancer (regression coefficient -1.01, R2 = 0.80). While incidence and mortality rates for genitourinary cancers vary widely throughout the world, the MIR is highest in less developed countries for all four major genitourinary malignancies. Further research is needed to understand whether differences in comorbidities, exposures, time to diagnosis, access to healthcare, diagnostic techniques or treatment options explain the observed inequalities in genitourinary cancer outcomes. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Effect of small molecules modulating androgen receptor (SARMs in human prostate cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tesei

    Full Text Available The management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer represents a major challenge in the therapy of this tumor, and identification of novel androgen receptor antagonists is needed to render treatment more effective. We analyzed the activity of two novel androgen receptor antagonists, (S-11 and (R-9, in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. In vitro experiments were performed on LNCaP, LNCaP-AR, LNCaP-Rbic and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by SRB and BrdU uptake, AR transactivation by luciferase reporter assay and PSA levels by Real Time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Cell cycle progression-related markers were evaluated by western blot. In vivo experiments were performed on SCID mice xenografted with cells with different sensitivity to hormonal treatment. In hormone-sensitive LNCaP and LNCaP-AR cells, the latter expressing high androgen receptor levels, (R-9 and (S-11 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect compared to that of the reference compound ((R-bicalutamide, also in the presence of the synthetic androgen R1881. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect produced by (R-9 was higher than that of (S-11 in the two hormone-resistant LNCaP-AR and VCaP cells. A significant reduction in PSA levels was observed after exposure to both molecules. Moreover, (S-11 and (R-9 inhibited DNA synthesis by blocking the androgen-induced increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. In vivo studies on the toxicological profile of (R-9 did not reveal the presence of adverse events. Furthermore, (R-9 inhibited tumor growth in various in vivo models, especially LNCaP-Rbic xenografts, representative of recurrent disease. Our in vitro results highlight the antitumor activity of the two novel molecules (R-9 and (S-11, making them a potentially attractive option for the treatment of CRPC.

  6. Ecological impact of MCB3837 on the normal human microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Dalhoff, Axel; Bäckström, Tobias; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2014-08-01

    MCB3837 is a novel, water-soluble, injectable prodrug that is rapidly converted to the active substance MCB3681 in vivo following intravenous (i.v.) administration. Both MCB3837 and MCB3681 are oxazolidinone-quinolone hybrid molecules. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of MCB3681 on the human skin, nose, oropharyngeal and intestinal microbiota following administration of MCB3837. Twelve healthy male subjects received i.v. MCB3837 (6 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 5 days. Skin, nose, saliva and faecal samples were collected on Day -1 (pre dose), during administration on Days 2 and 5, and post dose on Days 8, 12 and 19. Micro-organisms were identified to genus level. No measurable concentrations of MCB3681 were found in any saliva samples or in the faecal samples on Day -1. On Day 2, 10 volunteers had faecal MCB3681 concentrations between 16.5 mg/kg faeces and 275.1mg/kg faeces; no MCB3681 in faeces could be detected in two of the volunteers. On Day 5, all volunteers had faecal concentrations of MCB3681 ranging from 98.9 to 226.3 mg/kg. MCB3681 caused no ecological changes in the skin, nasal and oropharyngeal microbiota. The numbers of enterococci, bifidobacteria, lactobacilli and clostridia decreased in the intestinal microbiota during administration of the drug. Numbers of Escherichia coli, other enterobacteria and Candida were not affected during the study. There was no impact on the number of Bacteroides. The faecal microbiota was normalised on Day 19. No new colonising aerobic or anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria with MCB3681 minimum inhibitory concentrations of ≥4 mg/L were found. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  7. The normal growth of the tracheal wall in human foetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpinda, Michał; Daroszewski, Marcin; Szpinda, Anna; Woźniak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Flisiński, Piotr; Wiśniewski, Marcin

    2013-10-31

    Tracheal wall thickness is a substantial indicator in various pathological changes. The present study was performed to compile normative data and formulae for the tracheal wall thickness and volume at varying gestational age. Using anatomical dissection, digital image analysis and statistics a range of the wall thickness, proximal internal-to-external cross-sectional area ratio, and wall volume for the trachea in 73 spontaneously aborted human fetuses aged 14-25 weeks was examined. No significant male-female differences were found. The values of tracheal wall thickness ranged from 0.36 ±0.01 mm for the 14-week group to 1.23 ±0.17 mm for the 25-week group of gestation, according to the linear function y = -0.823 + 0.083 × age ± 0.087. The tracheal lumen rate, expressed as the proximal internal-to-external cross-sectional area ratio, decreased from 42.61 ±1.11% to 26.78 ±4.95%, according to the function y = 62.239 - 1.487 × age ±3.119. The tracheal wall volume rose from 16.28 ±4.18 mm(3) in fetuses aged 14 weeks to 269.22 ±29.26 mm(3) in fetuses aged 25 weeks, according to the quintic function y = 0.000052 × age(4.894). The tracheal wall parameters show no sexual dimorphism. The tracheal wall grows linearly in its length, and according to a quintic function in its volume. A relative decrease in the tracheal lumen at the expense of an increase in both the wall thickness and wall volume of the trachea is found during gestation.

  8. Effects of Biebersteinia multifida hydro-ethanol extract on proliferation and apoptosis of human prostate cancer and human embryonic kidney cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Golshan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Biebersteinia (Geraniaceae has a history of use in traditional medicine in some countries including Iran. In the present study, cytotoxic and apoptogenic properties of hydro-ethanol extract of B. multifidi was investigated on human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and DU 145 and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293 cells. Materials and Methods: Cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 10% FBS at 37ºC in a humidified atmosphere of 95% air and 5% CO2. The root of the plant was macerated with EtOH 70%. Cytotoxic activity of ethanol extract of B. multifida was assessed using alamarBlue® assay after 48 hr of treatment. Apoptotic cells were stained with propidium iodide (PI and detected by flow cytometry (sub-G1 peak. Results: B. multifidi had cytotoxic effect on malignant cells and normal HEK293 cells in a dose-dependent manner and significantly decreased the cell viability (IC50 values were between 199.2 and 302.9 µg/ml. B. multifida increased the sub-G1 peak in flow cytometry histogram of treated PC3 cells compared to control showing the induction of apoptosis and DNA fragmentation. Conclusion: Due to cytotoxic and apoptotic activity of B. multifida, the plant is suggested for further phytochemical analysis and mechanistic evaluation.

  9. [Usefulness of screening for prostate cancer with prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the medical checkup ("human dock") at Onomichi Municipal Hospital: clinical significance of the cases diagnosed as prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeda, Tadashi; Kusumi, Norihiro; Takamoto, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    The usefulness of the screening for prostate cancer with prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the medical checkup ("Human Dock") at Onomichi Municipal Hospital was evaluated. From April 1997 to December 2007, serum PSA of 1,234 male (median age: 59) was measured in the medical checkup and each parameter of screening was evaluated. In addition, for the cases with prostate cancer, results of treatment and clinical significance were assessed. PSA was elevated in 82 cases (6.6%), aged 42-87 (median 64), in which PSA varied 3.1-66.5 ng/ml (median 5.4). Trans-rectal biopsy was performed in 35 cases and prostate cancer was detected in 15 (42.9% of biopsied cases and 1.2% of whole group), aged 58-81 (median 70), with PSA value 4.2-66.5 ng/ml (median 10.3). Clinical stage of these cases was cT1cN0M0 in 12 and cT2aN0M0 or more in 3, Gleason score was 3 + 3 in 4 and 3 + 4 or more in 11. Initial treatment was radical prostatectomy in 12, androgen-deprivation therapy in 2 and external beam irradiation in 1. During the follow-up for 8-107 months (median 60), 14 were alive with good control and 1 was alive with relapse. Only one case was "clinically insignificant" cancer (impalpable and localized and tumor volume less than 0.5 ml and Gleason score 3 + 3 or less). Most of the prostate cancers detected in the medical checkup were clinically significant, therefore, PSA screening doesn't result in overtreatment and it is meaningful to perform PSA screening in the medical checkup.

  10. Regulation of growth of LNCaP human prostate tumor cells by growth factors and steroid hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L.G. Schuurmans (Alex); J. Bolt (Joan); J. Veldscholte (Jos); E. Mulder (Eppo)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The mitogenic activity of several growth factors on androgen responsive LNCaP human prostate tumor cells was studied. A two-fold stimulation of cell proliferation was observed after a culture period of 6 days in 1 ng EGF/ml, 10 ng TGF-α/ml or 20 ng basic FGF/ml. TGF-β

  11. Carbohydrate structure and differential binding of prostate specific antigen to Maackia amurensis lectin between prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Chikara; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo; Oh-eda, Masayoshi; Yoshikawa, Kazuyuki; Habuchi, Tomonori; Arai, Yoichi; Fukuda, Minoru

    2004-08-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay is widely used for detection of prostate cancer. Because PSA is also synthesized from normal prostate, false positive diagnosis cannot be avoided by the conventional serum PSA test. To apply the cancer-associated carbohydrate alteration to the improvement of PSA assay, we first elucidated the structures of PSA purified from human seminal fluid. The predominant core structure of N-glycans of seminal fluid PSA was a complex type biantennary oligosaccharide and was consistent with the structure reported previously. However, we found the sialic acid alpha2-3 galactose linkage as an additional terminal carbohydrate structure on seminal fluid PSA. We then analyzed the carbohydrate moiety of serum PSA from the patients with prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy using lectin affinity chromatography. Lectin binding was assessed by lectin affinity column chromatography followed by determining the amount of total and free PSA. Concanavalin A, Lens culinaris, Aleuria aurantia, Sambucus nigra, and Maackia amurensis lectins were tested for their binding to the carbohydrates on PSA. Among the lectins examined, the M. amurensis agglutinin-bound fraction of free serum PSA is increased in prostate cancer patients compared to benign prostate hypertrophy patients. The binding of PSA to M. amurensis agglutinin, which recognizes alpha2,3-linked sialic acid, was also confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis. These results suggest that the differential binding of free serum PSA to M. amurensis agglutinin lectin between prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy could be a potential measure for diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  12. Testing the variability of PSA expression by different human prostate cancer cell lines by means of a new potentiometric device employing molecularly antibody assembled on graphene surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebelo, Tânia S.C.R. [BioMark-CINTESIS/ISEP, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Instituto Politécnico do Porto (Portugal); LAQV, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Noronha, João P.; Galésio, Marco; Santos, Hugo; Diniz, Mário [LAQV, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Sales, M. Goreti F. [BioMark-CINTESIS/ISEP, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Instituto Politécnico do Porto (Portugal); Fernandes, Maria H. [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Costa-Rodrigues, João, E-mail: jrodrigues@fmd.up.pt [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); ESTSP — Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saúde do Porto, Instituto Politécnico do Porto (Portugal)

    2016-02-01

    Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is widely used as a biomarker for prostate cancer. Recently, an electrochemical biosensor for PSA detection by means of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed. This work evaluated the performance and the effectiveness of that PSA biosensor in screening the biomarker PSA in biological media with complex composition, collected from different human prostate cell line cultures. For that, the prostate cancer LNCaP and PC3 cells, and the non-cancerous prostate cell line PNT2 were cultured for 2, 7 and 14 days in either α-MEM or RPMI in the presence of 10% or 30% fetal bovine serum. Human gingival fibroblasts were used as a non-cancerous non-prostatic control. The different culture conditions modulated cellular proliferation and the expression of several prostate markers, including PSA. The electrochemical biosensor was able to specifically detect PSA in the culture media and values obtained were similar to those achieved by a commercial Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit, the most commonly used method for PSA quantification in prostate cancer diagnosis. Thus, the tested biosensor may represent a useful alternative as a diagnostic tool for PSA determination in biological samples. - Highlights: • PSA quantification was performed in prostate cancer cell culture media. • Culture media composition and culture period significantly affect PSA production. • The PSA biosensor detected a wide range of PSA levels in complex media. • A high data correlation was observed between the biosensor and the ELISA analysis.

  13. (31) P MR spectroscopic imaging of the human prostate at 7 T: T1 relaxation times, Nuclear Overhauser Effect, and spectral characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagemaat, M.W.; Maas, M.C.; Vos, E.K.; Bitz, A.K.; Orzada, S.; Weiland, E.; Uden, M.J. van; Kobus, T.; Heerschap, A.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of phosphorus ((31) P) MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of the human prostate at 7 T by the evaluation of T1 relaxation times and the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) of phosphorus-containing metabolites.Twelve patients with prostate cancer and one healthy volunteer were scanned on a 7 T

  14. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 02: Radiogenomic Modeling of Normal Tissue Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, J [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Unit, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Jeyaseelan, K; Ybarra, N; David, M; Faria, S; Souhami, L; Cury, F; Duclos, M; El Naqa, I [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Unit, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC Canada (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Inter-patient radiation sensitivity variability has recently been shown to have a genetic component. This genetic component may play a key role in explaining the fluctuating rates of radiation-induced toxicities (RITs). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have thus far yielded inconsistent results in delineating RITs while copy number variations (CNVs) have not yet been investigated for such purposes. We explore a radiogenomic modeling approach to investigate the association of CNVs and SNPs, along with clinical and dosimetric variables, in radiation induced rectal bleeding (RB) and erectile dysfunction (ED) in prostate cancer patients treated with curative hypofractionated irradiation. A cohort of 62 prostate cancer patients who underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (66 Gy in 22 fractions) between 2002 to 2010 were retrospectively genotyped for CNV and SNP rs5489 in the xrcc1 DNA repair gene. Late toxicity rates for RB grade 2 and 3 and grade 3 alone were 29.0% and 12.9%, respectively. ED toxicity was found to be 62.9%. Radiogenomic model performance was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) and resampling by cross-validation. Binary variables were evaluated using Chi-squared contingency table analysis and multivariate models by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). Ten patients were found to have three copies of xrcc1 CNV (RB: χ{sup 2}=14.6, p<0.001 and ED: χ{sup 2}=4.88, p=0.0272) and twelve had heterozygous rs25489 SNP (RB: χ{sup 2}=0.278, p=0.599 and ED: χ{sup 2}=0.112, p=0.732). Radiogenomic modeling yielded significant, cross-validated NTCP models for RB (AUC=0.665) and ED (AUC=0.754). These results indicate that CNVs may be potential predictive biomarkers of both late ED and RB.

  15. The distribution of YKL-40 in osteoarthritic and normal human articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Ostergaard, K; Johansen, J S

    1999-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39, is a major secretory protein of human chondrocytes in cell culture. YKL-40 mRNA is expressed by cartilage from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but is not detectable in normal human cartilage. The aim was to investigate the distribution of YKL......-40 in osteoarthritic (n=9) and macroscopically normal (n=5) human articular cartilage, collected from 12 pre-selected areas of the femoral head, to discover a potential role for YKL-40 in cartilage remodelling in osteoarthritis. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that YKL-40 staining was found...

  16. Prostate secretions from men with chronic pelvic pain syndrome inhibit proinflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumbikat, Praveen; Shahrara, Shiva; Sobkoviak, Rudina; Done, Joseph; Pope, Richard M; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2010-10-01

    In the past numerous chemokines have been noted in the expressed prostatic secretions of patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. We examined the functional effects of chemokines in expressed prostatic secretions of patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome. We studied the functional effects of expressed prostatic secretions on human monocytes by examining monocyte chemotaxis in response to monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a major chemoattractant previously identified in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome cases. We determined effects on cellular signaling by quantifying intracellular calcium increase in monocytes and nuclear factor-κB activation in normal prostate epithelial cells. Results show that the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in expressed prostatic secretions is nonfunctional with an inability to mediate human monocyte chemotaxis, or mediate signaling in monocytes or prostate epithelial cells. This lack of functionality could be extended to other proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, when incubated with expressed prostatic secretions from patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The mechanism underlying this apparent ability to modulate proinflammatory cytokines involves heat labile extracellular proteases that mediate the inhibition of immune and prostate epithelial cell function. These results may have implications for the design of specific diagnostic and therapeutic methods targeted toward the complete resolution of prostate inflammatory insults. Copyright © 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantum dots-based multiplexed immunohistochemistry of protein expression in human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Shi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs are bright fluorescent nanoparticles that have been successfully used for the detection of biomarker expression in cells. The objective of the present study is to use this technology in a multiplexing manner to determine at a single cell level the expression of a cell-specific bio-marker, prostate-specific antigen (PSA expressed by human prostate cancer LNCaP and ARCaP cell lines. Here we compared the sensitivity of immunohistochemistry (IHC and QD-based detection of AR and PSA expression in these cell lines. Further, we conducted multiplexing QD-based detection of PSA and androgen receptor (AR expression in LNCaP cells subjecting to androgen (R1881 stimulation. The involvement of AR in PSA regulation in LNCaP cells, at a single cell level, was confirmed by the co-incubation of LNCaP cells in the presence of both R1881 and its receptor antagonist, bicalutamide (Casodex. We showed here the superior quality of QDs, in comparison to IHC, for the detection of AR and PSA in cultured LNCaP and ARCaP cells. Multiplexing QDs technique can be used to detect simultaneously AR and PSA expression induced by R1881 which promoted AR translocation from its cytosolic to the nuclear compartment.We observed AR antagonist, bicalutamide, inhibited AR nuclear translocation and PSA, but not AR expression in LNCaP cells.

  18. Galectin-3 regulates p21 stability in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Balan, V; Kho, D; Hogan, V; Nangia-Makker, P; Raz, A

    2013-10-17

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a multifunctional protein involved in cancer through regulation of cell adhesion, cell growth, apoptosis and metastasis, while p21 (Cip1/WAF1) is a negative regulator of the cell cycle, involved in apoptosis, transcription, DNA repair and metastasis. The results presented here demonstrate for the first time that the level of Gal-3 protein is associated with the level of p21 protein expression in human prostate cancer cells and the effects of Gal-3 on cell growth and apoptosis were reversed by modulating p21 expression level. Furthermore, Gal-3 regulates p21 expression at the post-translational level by stabilizing p21 protein via the carbohydrate-recognition domain. This is the first report suggesting a molecular function not yet described for Gal-3 as the regulator of p21 protein stability. This study provides a unique insight into the relationship of these two molecules during prostate cancer progression, and may provide a novel therapeutic target.

  19. Cabazitaxel-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles as a therapeutic agent against prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Na; Lee, Robert J; Sun, Yating; Cai, Guangsheng; Wang, Junyang; Wang, Mengqiao; Lu, Jiahui; Meng, Qingfan; Teng, Lirong; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2016-01-01

    Cabazitaxel-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles (Cbz-NPs) were synthesized to overcome vehicle-related toxicity of current clinical formulation of the drug based on Tween-80 (Cbz-Tween). A salting-out method was used for NP synthesis that avoids the use of chlorinated organic solvent and is simpler compared to the methods based on emulsion-solvent evaporation. Cbz-NPs had a narrow particle size distribution, suitable drug loading content (4.9%), and superior blood biocompatibility based on in vitro hemolysis assay. Blood circulation, tumor uptake, and antitumor activity of Cbz-NPs were assessed in prostatic cancer xenograft-bearing nude mice. Cbz-NPs exhibited prolonged blood circulation and greater accumulation of Cbz in tumors along with reduced toxicity compared to Cbz-Tween. Moreover, hematoxylin and eosin histopathological staining of organs revealed consistent results. The levels of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine in drug-treated mice showed that Cbz-NPs were less toxic than Cbz-Tween to the kidneys. In conclusion, Cbz-NPs provide a promising therapeutic for prostate cancer.

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? Men who have ...

  1. No evidence for infection of UK prostate cancer patients with XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis or human papilloma viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Harriet C T; Warren, Anne Y; Neal, David E; Bishop, Kate N

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of specific infections in UK prostate cancer patients was investigated. Serum from 84 patients and 62 controls was tested for neutralisation of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV) Envelope. No reactivity was found in the patient samples. In addition, a further 100 prostate DNA samples were tested for XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papilloma viruses by nucleic acid detection techniques. Despite demonstrating DNA integrity and assay sensitivity, we failed to detect the presence of any of these agents in DNA samples, bar one sample that was weakly positive for HPV16. Therefore we conclude that these infections are absent in this typical cohort of men with prostate cancer.

  2. Growth of human prostate carcinomas with and without hormone alpha- dehydrotestosterone in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisch, H; Otto, U; Fack, H

    1998-12-01

    The dependence of human prostate carcinoma growth on hormone was studied in xenotransplants in nude mice. The objective was to determine differences in cell kinetic parameters and volume growth of tumors growing with alpha-dehydrotestosterone (alphaDHT) and without alphaDHT. These differences could be used as arguments pro and contra the adaptation versus the clonal selection hypothesis. Human prostate carcinomas were xenotransplanted into nude mice. Growth of tumors was observed in castrated male mice without and with implanted osmotic pumps secreting alphaDHT. In a further series of experiments the alphaDHT tubes were removed when the tumors had reached a volume of 0.3 cm3. Tumor volume was measured to determine tumor doubling time with and without alphaDHT. Detailed cell kinetics were analyzed using the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) method with flow cytometry. Applying the relative movement (RM) and a simulation analysis to parallel single and multiple BrdUrd labelling experimental data we determined transit times through the phases of cell cycle, potential doubling time Tpot, growth fraction (GF) and cell loss. Five human prostate carcinomas were xenotransplanted into nude mice. Tumor take was only achieved when androgen hormone was present. However, when alphaDHT was removed when the tumors had grown to a volume of 0.3 cm3, they continued to grow at nearly the same Td as those tumors with continued alphaDHT application. The BrdUrd experiments, on the other hand, showed considerable increase of Tc and Tpot upon withdrawal of alphaDHT in 4 out of 5 tumors. The GF and labelling index (LI) were maintained at about the same level as alphaDHT consuming tumors. While small transplanted tumor pieces do not grow without alphaDHT, larger tumors grow with the same Td after removal of alphaDHT. The slower proliferation shown by the increased Tc and Tpot is balanced by less cell loss. Since GF and LI were maintained at about the same level, we conclude that in our tumors the

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the prostate is enlarged, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any ... size with caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- ...

  4. CXCL5 Promotes Prostate Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesa A Begley

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available CXCL5 is a proangiogenic CXC-type chemokine that is an inflammatory mediator and a powerful attractant for granulocytic immune cells. Unlike many other chemokines, CXCL5 is secreted by both immune (neutrophil, monocyte, and macrophage and nonimmune (epithelial, endothelial, and fibroblastic cell types. The current study was intended to determine which of these cell types express CXCL5 in normal and malignant human prostatic tissues, whether expression levels correlated with malignancy and whether CXCL5 stimulated biologic effects consistent with a benign or malignant prostate epithelial phenotype. The results of these studies show that CXCL5 protein expression levels are concordant with prostate tumor progression, are highly associated with inflammatory infiltrate, and are frequently detected in the lumens of both benign and malignant prostate glands. Exogenous administration of CXCL5 stimulates cellular proliferation and gene transcription in both nontransformed and transformed prostate epithelial cells and induces highly aggressive prostate cancer cells to invade through synthetic basement membrane in vitro. These findings suggest that the inflammatory mediator, CXCL5, may play multiple roles in the etiology of both benign and malignant proliferative diseases in the prostate.

  5. Multidimensional approaches in dealing with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Safdar; Ali, Sher

    2008-02-29

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies worldwide affecting the human male population. Different case-control, cohort or twin studies and segregation analyses point towards the presence of prostate cancer-susceptibility genes in the population. The studies have shown linkage of prostate susceptibility genes to multiple loci on chromosome 1 and single locus each on chromosomes 4, 8, 16, 17, 19, 20 and X chromosome. However, differences right from the mode of inheritance (autosomal dominant or X-linked recessive) to the target genes exist. There have been reports supporting no or weak linkage to these loci as well. Also, region (environmental factors), age and dietary habits have implications in different aspects of the disease. The important targets for treating prostate cancer are androgens and estrogen (synthesized from androgens by the action of enzyme aromatase) owing to their involvement in development and progression of prostate cancer. Further, prostate gland needs androgens (male hormones) for its normal maintenance and functioning. Besides, radiation therapy and surgical methods have also been used. The emerging areas include identifying and preparing successful vaccines from candidate peptides and gene therapy in several forms. This review deals with the paradox of linkage analyses and the various approaches in practice for treatment and management of prostate cancer.

  6. Pre-therapeutic dosimetry of normal organs and tissues of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) inhibitor in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabasakal, Levent; AbuQbeitah, Mohammad; Ayguen, Aslan; Yeyin, Nami [Istanbul University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [Istanbul University, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Pharmacy Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirci, Emre [Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Toklu, Turkay [Yeditepe University Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-12-15

    {sup 177}Lu-617-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand seems to be a promising tracer for radionuclide therapy of progressive prostate cancer. However, there are no published data regarding the radiation dose given to the normal tissues. The aim of the present study was to estimate the pretreatment radiation doses in patients who will undergo radiometabolic therapy using a tracer amount of {sup 177}Lu-labeled PSMA ligand. The study included seven patients with progressive prostate cancer with a mean age of 63.9 ± 3.9 years. All patients had prior PSMA positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and had intense tracer uptake at the lesions. The injected {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 activity ranged from 185 to 210 MBq with a mean of 192.6 ± 11.0 MBq. To evaluate bone marrow absorbed dose 2-cc blood samples were withdrawn in short variable times (3, 15, 30, 60, and 180 min and 24, 48, and 120 h) after injection. Whole-body images were obtained at 4, 24, 48, and 120 h post-injection (p.i.). The geometric mean of anterior and posterior counts was determined through region of interest (ROI) analysis. Attenuation correction was applied using PSMA PET/CT images. The OLINDA/EXM dosimetry program was used for curve fitting, residence time calculation, and absorbed dose calculations. The calculated radiation-absorbed doses for each organ showed substantial variation. The highest radiation estimated doses were calculated for parotid glands and kidneys. Calculated radiation-absorbed doses per megabecquerel were 1.17 ± 0.31 mGy for parotid glands and 0.88 ± 0.40 mGy for kidneys. The radiation dose given to the bone marrow was significantly lower than those of kidney and parotid glands (p < 0.05). The calculated radiation dose to bone marrow was 0.03 ± 0.01 mGy/MBq. Our first results suggested that {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 therapy seems to be a safe method. The dose-limiting organ seems to be the parotid glands rather than kidneys and bone marrow. The lesion radiation doses are

  7. A Novel Generalized Normal Distribution for Human Longevity and other Negatively Skewed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Henry T.; Allison, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Negatively skewed data arise occasionally in statistical practice; perhaps the most familiar example is the distribution of human longevity. Although other generalizations of the normal distribution exist, we demonstrate a new alternative that apparently fits human longevity data better. We propose an alternative approach of a normal distribution whose scale parameter is conditioned on attained age. This approach is consistent with previous findings that longevity conditioned on survival to the modal age behaves like a normal distribution. We derive such a distribution and demonstrate its accuracy in modeling human longevity data from life tables. The new distribution is characterized by 1. An intuitively straightforward genesis; 2. Closed forms for the pdf, cdf, mode, quantile, and hazard functions; and 3. Accessibility to non-statisticians, based on its close relationship to the normal distribution. PMID:22623974

  8. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the normal human eye and its expression pattern in selected eye tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinmei; Wu, Yazhen; Heegaard, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme involved in neoplastic processes. The purpose of the present study is to investigate COX-2 expression in the normal human eye and the expression pattern in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining...... using antibodies against COX-2 was performed on paraffin sections of normal human eyes and selected eye tumours arising from cells expressing COX-2. Results: Cyclooxygenase-2 expression was found in various structures of the normal eye. Abundant expression was seen in the cornea, iris, ciliary body...... and retina. The COX-2 expression was less in tumours deriving from the ciliary epithelium and also in retinoblastoma. Conclusion: Cyclooxygenase-2 is constitutively expressed in normal human eyes. The expression of COX-2 is much lower in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells....

  9. Discovery of CTCF-sensitive Cis-spliced fusion RNAs between adjacent genes in human prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fujun; Song, Zhenguo; Babiceanu, Mihaela; Song, Yansu; Facemire, Loryn; Singh, Ritambhara; Adli, Mazhar; Li, Hui

    2015-02-01

    Genes or their encoded products are not expected to mingle with each other unless in some disease situations. In cancer, a frequent mechanism that can produce gene fusions is chromosomal rearrangement. However, recent discoveries of RNA trans-splicing and cis-splicing between adjacent genes (cis-SAGe) support for other mechanisms in generating fusion RNAs. In our transcriptome analyses of 28 prostate normal and cancer samples, 30% fusion RNAs on average are the transcripts that contain exons belonging to same-strand neighboring genes. These fusion RNAs may be the products of cis-SAGe, which was previously thought to be rare. To validate this finding and to better understand the phenomenon, we used LNCaP, a prostate cell line as a model, and identified 16 additional cis-SAGe events by silencing transcription factor CTCF and paired-end RNA sequencing. About half of the fusions are expressed at a significant level compared to their parental genes. Silencing one of the in-frame fusions resulted in reduced cell motility. Most out-of-frame fusions are likely to function as non-coding RNAs. The majority of the 16 fusions are also detected in other prostate cell lines, as well as in the 14 clinical prostate normal and cancer pairs. By studying the features associated with these fusions, we developed a set of rules: 1) the parental genes are same-strand-neighboring genes; 2) the distance between the genes is within 30kb; 3) the 5' genes are actively transcribing; and 4) the chimeras tend to have the second-to-last exon in the 5' genes joined to the second exon in the 3' genes. We then randomly selected 20 neighboring genes in the genome, and detected four fusion events using these rules in prostate cancer and non-cancerous cells. These results suggest that splicing between neighboring gene transcripts is a rather frequent phenomenon, and it is not a feature unique to cancer cells.

  10. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and its two receptors in normal human endometrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海燕; 陈贵安

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: We try to demonstrate the expression of vascular endothelial growthfactor (VEGF) and its receptors, flt-1 and KDR, in normal human emdometrium duringthe menstrual cycle.Methods: Immunohistochemical method was used to observe the expression ofVEGF and its two receptors in emdometrium throughout the normal menstrual cyclemeanwhile the isoforms of VEGF were also detected by Western blot analysis. The en-dothelial cells of micro-vessels were marked with Ⅷ factor antibody.Results: VEGF and its receptors existed in endometrial glandular, stromal and vas-cular endothelial cells of human endometrium. Their expressions were higher in the mid-secretory phase of menstrual cycle and highest at menstruation. VEGF121 and VEGF165were the predominant isoforms in normal human endometrium.Conclusion: The expression of VEGF and its two receptors showed cycle-dependentin human endometrium, probably involved in embryonic implantation and endometrialproliferation and differentiation.

  11. Identification of markers for quiescent pancreatic stellate cells in the normal human pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2017-01-01

    cells in the normal human pancreas and perisinusoidal cells in the normal human liver. The immunolabelling capacity was evaluated according to a semiquantitative scoring system. Double-IF of the markers of interest together with markers for other periacinar cells was performed. Moreover, the utility...... of histochemical stains for the identification of human qPSCs was examined, and their ultrastructure was revisited by electron microscopy. Adipophilin, CRBP-1, cytoglobin and vinculin were expressed in qHSCs in the liver, whereas cytoglobin and adipophilin were expressed in qPSCs in the pancreas. Adipophilin...... are markers of qPSCs in the normal human pancreas. However, the use of adipophilin as a qPSC marker may be limited due to its high dependence on optimal PATI. Cytoglobin, on the other hand, is a sensitive marker for qPSCs but is expressed in FBs as well....

  12. Next generation quality: Assessing the physician in clinical history completeness and diagnostic interpretations using funnel plots and normalized deviations plots in 3,854 prostate biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bonert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Observational data and funnel plots are routinely used outside of pathology to understand trends and improve performance. Objective: Extract diagnostic rate (DR information from free text surgical pathology reports with synoptic elements and assess whether inter-rater variation and clinical history completeness information useful for continuous quality improvement (CQI can be obtained. Methods: All in-house prostate biopsies in a 6-year period at two large teaching hospitals were extracted and then diagnostically categorized using string matching, fuzzy string matching, and hierarchical pruning. DRs were then stratified by the submitting physicians and pathologists. Funnel plots were created to assess for diagnostic bias. Results: 3,854 prostate biopsies were found and all could be diagnostically classified. Two audits involving the review of 700 reports and a comparison of the synoptic elements with the free text interpretations suggest a categorization error rate of 40 cases and together assessed 3,690 biopsies. There was considerable inter-rater variability and a trend toward more World Health Organization/International Society of Urologic Pathology Grade 1 cancers in older pathologists. Normalized deviations plots, constructed using the median DR, and standard error can elucidate associated over- and under-calls for an individual pathologist in relation to their practice group. Clinical history completeness by submitting medical doctor varied significantly (100% to 22%. Conclusion: Free text data analyses have some limitations; however, they could be used for data-driven CQI in anatomical pathology, and could lead to the next generation in quality of care.

  13. Effect of Serenoa repens (Permixon®) on the expression of inflammation-related genes: analysis in primary cell cultures of human prostate carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Ida; Cattarino, Susanna; Aglianò, AnnaMaria; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Scarpa, Susanna; Salciccia, Stefano; Frati, Luigi; Gentile, Vincenzo; Sciarra, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the expression at basal level of inflammation-related cytokines and chemokines and the activation status of the NF-κB pathway, together with the proliferation and apoptosis indexes in two widely used in vitro tumor models, the androgen-dependent human Prostate Cancer (PC) cell line LNCaP and the androgen-independent PC3 , and in primary cultures of human PC cells. To assess in these models and primary cultures, the effects of Serenoa repens (LSESr, Permixon®) on proliferation/apoptosis ratio, inflammation-related genes expression and NF-κB pathway activation. The expression of IL-6, CCL-5, CCL-2, COX-1, COX-2, iNOS inflammation-related genes has been evaluated at the mRNA level in two in vitro human PC models (LNCaP and PC3 cell lines) and in 40 independent human prostatic primary cultures obtained from PC patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Tissue fragments were collected from both PC lesions and normal hyperplastic tissue counterparts for each case. All cultures were treated with two different amounts of Permixon® (44 and 88 μg/ml) for different time points (16, 24, 48 and 72 hours), depending on the cell type and the assay; the expression of inflammation-related genes, cell growth (proliferation/apoptosis ratio) and NF-κB activation has been analyzed in treated and untreated cells by means of semi-quantitative RNA-PCR, cell proliferation and immunofluorescence respectively. We detected a significant reduction (p <0.001) in PC and normal cells proliferation due to Permixon ® treatment. This result was related to an increase of the apoptotic activity showed by an increase in the number of anti-caspase-3 fluorescent cells. Almost all the inflammation-related genes (IL-6, CCL-5, CCL-2, COX-2 and iNOS) were expressed at the basal level in in vitro cultured cells and primary cultures and down-regulated by Permixon® treatment. This treatment interfered with NF-kB activation, detecting by the translocation of more than 30% of NF-κB p65

  14. Developmental patterns of DR6 in normal human hippocampus and in Down syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Iyer, Anand; van Scheppingen, Jackelien; Anink, Jasper; Milenkovic, Ivan; Kovács, Gabor G; Aronica, Eleonora

    2013-01-01

    Background Death receptor 6 (DR6) is highly expressed in the human brain: it has been shown to induce axon pruning and neuron death via distinct caspases and to mediate axonal degeneration through binding to N-terminal ? amyloid precursor protein (N-APP). Methods We investigated the expression of DR6 during prenatal and postnatal development in human hippocampus and temporal cortex by immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis (118 normal human brain specimens; 9 to 41 gestational weeks; 1...

  15. Examining the relationship between Cu-ATSM hypoxia selectivity and fatty acid synthase expression in human prostate cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavere, Amy L. [Division of Radiological Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Lewis, Jason S. [Division of Radiological Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)], E-mail: j.s.lewis@wustl.edu

    2008-04-15

    Introduction: Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with copper (II)-diacetyl-bis(N{sup 4}-Methylthiosemicarbazone)(Cu-ATSM) for delineating hypoxia has provided valuable clinical information, but investigations in animal models of prostate cancer have shown some inconsistencies. As a defense mechanism in prostate cancer cells, the fatty acid synthesis pathway harnesses its oxidizing power for improving the redox balance despite conditions of extreme hypoxia, potentially altering Cu-ATSM hypoxia selectivity. Methods: Human prostate tumor-cultured cell lines (PC-3, 22Rv1, LNCaP and LAPC-4), were treated with a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor (C75, 100 {mu}M) under anoxia. The {sup 64}Cu-ATSM uptake in these treated cells and nontreated anoxic cells was then examined. Fatty acid synthase expression level in each cell line was subsequently quantified by ELISA. An additional study was performed in PC-3 cells to examine the relationship between the restoration of {sup 64}Cu-ATSM hypoxia selectivity and the concentration of C75 (100, 20, 4 or 0.8 {mu}M) administered to the cells. Results: Inhibition of fatty acid synthesis with C75 resulted in a significant increase in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM retention in prostate tumor cells in vitro under anoxia over 60 min. Inhibition studies demonstrated higher uptake values of 20.9{+-}3.27%, 103.0{+-}32.6%, 144.2{+-}32.3% and 200.1{+-}79.3% at 15 min over control values for LAPC-4, PC-3, LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells, respectively. A correlation was seen (R{sup 2}=.911) with FAS expression plotted against percentage change in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM uptake with C75 treatment. Conclusions: Although Cu-ATSM has clinical relevance in the PET imaging of hypoxia in many tumor types, its translation to the imaging of prostate cancer may be limited by the overexpression of FAS associated with prostatic malignancies.

  16. Matched Cohort Analysis of Outcomes of Definitive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Shannon, E-mail: shannonkahn@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, Ashesh; Edelman, Scott; Rossi, Peter; Godette, Karen; Landry, Jerome; Anderson, Cynthia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the biochemical outcome and toxicity scores of men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and prostate cancer with a matched control population with negative or unknown HIV status when treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A single-institution database of men with prostate cancer treated with EBRT from 1999 to 2009 was reviewed. Thirteen men with HIV were identified and matched to 2 control patients according to age, race, T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, RT dose, intensity-modulated RT vs. three-dimensional conformal RT, and whole-pelvis vs. prostate-only RT, for a total of 39 cases. The median follow-up time was 39 months (range, 3-110 months). Results: The 4-year biochemical failure (BF)-free survival rate was 87% in the HIV-positive group vs. 89% in the controls (p = 0.94). Pre- and post-RT viral loads were found to be predictive of BF (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). No men with HIV died, whereas 2 in the control group died of causes unrelated to prostate cancer. Acute and chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity were less in the HIV-positive patients than in controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.003, and p < 0.001, respectively). The HIV-positive men experienced an average decline in CD4 count of 193 cells/mm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that men with HIV treated with EBRT have a similar risk of BF; however, high viral loads may contribute to an increased risk. This analysis supports that HIV-positive men with prostate cancer can be treated with definitive EBRT with similar disease control and toxicity outcomes as in the general population.

  17. Significance of common variants on human chromosome 8q24 in relation to the risk of prostate cancer in native Japanese men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosoi Takayuki

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common variants on human chromosome 8q24, rs1447295 (C/A and rs6983267 (T/G, have been recently linked to the prevalence of prostate cancer in European and American populations. Here, we evaluated whether the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs1447295 and rs6983267 were associated with the risk of sporadic prostate cancer as well as latent prostate cancer in a native Japanese population. Results We analyzed genomic DNA samples from 391 sporadic prostate cancer patients, 323 controls who had died from causes unrelated to cancer and 112 Japanese men who were diagnosed as having latent prostate cancer based on autopsy results. The polymorphisms were determined by allelic discrimination using a fluorescent-based TaqMan assay. The A allele of rs1447295 was significantly associated with the risk of sporadic prostate cancer (p = 0.04; age-adjusted OR, 1.34, while the G allele of rs6983267 showed a trend towards being a high-risk allele (p = 0.06; age-adjusted OR, 1.27. No significant difference between these two polymorphisms and the risk of latent prostate cancer was observed in the present Japanese population. Conclusion Known variants on human chromosome 8q24 may be risk factors for sporadic prostate cancer in native Japanese men.

  18. Dual activities of galectin-3 in human prostate cancer: tumor suppression of nuclear galectin-3 vs tumor promotion of cytoplasmic galectin-3

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Califice, Stéphane; Castronovo, Vincent; Bracke, Marc; van den Brûle, Frédéric

    2004-01-01

    ... of galectin-3 in human prostate cancer cells were associated to progression of the disease. In this study, we examined the biological roles of galectin-3 when expressed either in the nucleus or in the...

  19. A signal-on built in-marker electrochemical aptasensor for human prostate-specific antigen based on a hairbrush-like gold nanostructure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naghmeh Sattarahmady; Amid Rahi; Hossein Heli

    2017-01-01

    .... The nanostructure which comprised of arrays of nanospindles was then applied as a transducer to fabricate a signal-on built in-marker electrochemical aptasensor for the detection of human prostate-specific antigen (PSA...

  20. Influence of the neural microenvironment on prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coarfa, Christian; Florentin, Diego; Putluri, NagiReddy; Ding, Yi; Au, Jason; He, Dandan; Ragheb, Ahmed; Frolov, Anna; Michailidis, George; Lee, MinJae; Kadmon, Dov; Miles, Brian; Smith, Christopher; Ittmann, Michael; Rowley, David; Sreekumar, Arun; Creighton, Chad J; Ayala, Gustavo

    2018-02-01

    Nerves are key factors in prostate cancer (PCa), but the functional role of innervation in prostate cancer is poorly understood. PCa induced neurogenesis and perineural invasion (PNI), are associated with aggressive disease. We denervated rodent prostates chemically and physically, before orthotopically implanting cancer cells. We also performed a human neoadjuvant clinical trial using botulinum toxin type A (Botox) and saline in the same patient, before prostatectomy. Bilateral denervation resulted in reduced tumor incidence and size in mice. Botox treatment in humans resulted in increased apoptosis of cancer cells in the Botox treated side. A similar denervation gene array profile was identified in tumors arising in denervated rodent prostates, in spinal cord injury patients and in the Botox treated side of patients. Denervation induced exhibited a signature gene profile, indicating translation and bioenergetic shutdown. Nerves also regulate basic cellular functions of non-neoplastic epithelial cells. Nerves play a role in the homeostasis of normal epithelial tissues and are involved in prostate cancer tumor survival. This study confirms that interactions between human cancer and nerves are essential to disease progression. This work may make a major impact in general cancer treatment strategies, as nerve/cancer interactions are likely important in other cancers as well. Targeting the neural microenvironment may represent a therapeutic approach for the treatment of human prostate cancer. © 2017 The Authors. The Prostate Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Global gene expression analysis reveals reduced abundance of putative microRNA targets in human prostate tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs have taken centre stage in the field of human molecular oncology. Several studies have shown that miRNA profiling analyses offer new possibilities in cancer classification, diagnosis and prognosis. However, the function of miRNAs that are dysregulated in tumours remains largely a mystery. Global analysis of miRNA-target gene expression has helped illuminate the role of miRNAs in developmental gene expression programs, but such an approach has not been reported in cancer transcriptomics. Results In this study, we globally analysed the expression patterns of miRNA target genes in prostate cancer by using several public microarray datasets. Intriguingly, we found that, in contrast to global mRNA transcript levels, putative miRNA targets showed a reduced abundance in prostate tumours relative to benign prostate tissue. Additionally, the down-regulation of these miRNA targets positively correlated with the number of types of miRNA target-sites in the 3' untranslated regions of these targets. Further investigation revealed that the globally low expression was mainly driven by the targets of 36 specific miRNAs that were reported to be up-regulated in prostate cancer by a miRNA expression profiling study. We also found that the transcript levels of miRNA targets were lower in androgen-independent prostate cancer than in androgen-dependent prostate cancer. Moreover, when the global analysis was extended to four other cancers, significant differences in transcript levels between miRNA targets and total mRNA backgrounds were found. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis, along with further investigation, suggests that miRNA targets have a significantly reduced transcript abundance in prostate cancer, when compared with the combined pool of all mRNAs. The abnormal expression pattern of miRNA targets in human cancer could be a common feature of the human cancer transcriptome. Our study may help to shed new

  2. Variations of Human DNA Polymerase Genes as Biomarkers of Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Athens, Greece, 07/10 Makridakis N. Error-prone polymerase mutations and prostate cancer progression, COBRE /Cancer Genetics group seminar, Tulane...New Orleans, LA, 03/11 12 Makridakis N. Error-prone polymerases, genomic instability and prostate cancer progression, COBRE / External...Orleans, LA, 09/11 Makridakis N. Error-prone polymerases, genomic instability and prostate cancer progression, COBRE / External Advisory Board

  3. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Feng

    Full Text Available Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI and B(aP compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells. This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery.

  4. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenqiang; Guo, Juanjuan; Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery.

  5. Met-Independent Hepatocyte Growth Factor-mediated regulation of cell adhesion in human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Rodney

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer cells communicate reciprocally with the stromal cells surrounding them, inside the prostate, and after metastasis, within the bone. Each tissue secretes factors for interpretation by the other. One stromally-derived factor, Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, was found twenty years ago to regulate invasion and growth of carcinoma cells. Working with the LNCaP prostate cancer progression model, we found that these cells could respond to HGF stimulation, even in the absence of Met, the only known HGF receptor. The new HGF binding partner we find on the cell surface may help to clarify conflicts in the past literature about Met expression and HGF response in cancer cells. Methods We searched for Met or any HGF binding partner on the cells of the PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell models, using HGF immobilized on agarose beads. By using mass spectrometry analyses and sequencing we have identified nucleolin protein as a novel HGF binding partner. Antibodies against nucleolin (or HGF were able to ameliorate the stimulatory effects of HGF on met-negative prostate cancer cells. Western blots, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess nucleolin levels during prostate cancer progression in both LNCaP and PC3 models. Results We have identified HGF as a major signaling component of prostate stromal-conditioned media (SCM and have implicated the protein nucleolin in HGF signal reception by the LNCaP model prostate cancer cells. Antibodies that silence either HGF (in SCM or nucleolin (on the cell surfaces eliminate the adhesion-stimulatory effects of the SCM. Likewise, addition of purified HGF to control media mimics the action of SCM. C4-2, an LNCaP lineage-derived, androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, responds to HGF in a concentration-dependent manner by increasing its adhesion and reducing its migration on laminin substratum. These HGF effects are not due to shifts in the expression levels of

  6. Overexpression of Endothelial Cell-Specific Molecule 1 Correlates with Gleason Score and Expression of Androgen Receptor in Prostate Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chung-Yu; Chen, Chien-Min; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Liu, Chung-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial cell-specific molecule 1 (ESM1) is a major prognostic marker of several tumor types, but its value as a marker for prostate cancer is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to measure the relationship of ESM1 expression with androgen receptor (AR) expression and with Gleason score in human prostate carcinoma tissue. Expression of ESM1 and AR were determined by immunohistochemical staining of prostate tissues from healthy individuals and patients with prostate cancer. The results showed that ESM1 expression was significantly higher in prostate tumor tissues than in normal prostate tissues (p Gleason score (p Gleason grade (p Gleason score and Gleason grade (p < 0.001 for both comparisons), and also correlated with AR expression (R = 0.727, p < 0.001). In conclusion, our results demonstrated that ESM1 should be considered as a marker for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  7. The superoxide scavenger TEMPOL induces urokinase receptor (uPAR expression in human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Joseph

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is little understanding of the effect that reactive oxygen metabolites have on cellular behavior during the processes of invasion and metastasis. These oxygen metabolites could interact with a number of targets modulating their function such as enzymes involved in basement membrane dissolution, adhesion molecules involved in motility or receptors involved in proliferation. We investigated the effect of increased scavenging of superoxide anions on the expression of the urokinase receptor (uPAR in PC-3M human prostate cancer cells. Urokinase receptor is a GPI-linked cell surface molecule which mediates multiple functions including adhesion, proliferation and pericellular proteolysis. Addition of the superoxide scavenger 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxy (TEMPOL to PC-3M cultures stimulated expression of uPAR protein peaking between 48 and 72 hours. Cell surface expression of the uPAR was also increased. Surprisingly, uPAR transcript levels increased only slightly and this mild increase did not coincide with the striking degree of protein increase. This disparity indicates that the TEMPOL effect on uPAR occurs through a post-transcriptional mechanism. TEMPOL presence in PC-3M cultures reduced intracellular superoxide-type species by 75% as assayed by NBT dye conversion; however this reduction significantly diminished within hours following TEMPOL removal. The time gap between TEMPOL treatment and peak uPAR protein expression suggests that reduction of reactive oxygen metabolites in prostate cancer cells initiates a multistep pathway which requires several hours to culminate in uPAR induction. These findings reveal a novel pathway for uPAR regulation involving reactive oxygens such as superoxide anion.

  8. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effect of Morus nigra extract on human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Turan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morus nigra L. belongs to the family Moraceae and is frequently used in traditional medicine. Numerous studies have investigated the antiproliferative effects of various extracts of different Morus species, but studies involving the in vitro cytotoxic effect of M. nigra extract are very limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phenolic composition and antioxidant activity of dimethyl sulfoxide extract of M. nigra (DEM and to investigate, for the first time, the probable cytotoxic effect in human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC-3 cells together with the mechanism involved. Methods: Total polyphenolic contents (TPC, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and phenolic compounds of DEM were evaluated using spectrophotometric procedures and HPLC. The cytotoxic effect of DEM on PC-3 cells was revealed using the MTT assay. Mechanisms involved in the cytotoxic effect of DEM on PC-3 cells were then investigated in terms of apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell cycle using flow cytometry, while caspase activity was investigated using luminometric analysis. Results: TPC and FRAP values were 20.7 ± 0.3 mg gallic acid equivalents and 48.8 ± 1.6 mg trolox equivalents per g sample, respectively. Ascorbic acid and chlorogenic acid were the major phenolic compounds detected at HPLC analysis. DEM arrested the cell cycle of PC-3 cells at the G1 phase, induced apoptosis via increased caspase activity and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Conclusions: Our results indicate that M. nigra may be a novel candidate for the development of new natural product based therapeutic agents against prostate cancer.

  9. Validation of endogenous normalizing genes for expression analyses in adult human testis and germ cell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svingen, T; Jørgensen, A; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2014-08-01

    The measurement of gene expression levels in cells and tissues typically depends on a suitable point of reference for inferring biological relevance. For quantitative (or real-time) RT-PCR assays, the method of choice is often to normalize gene expression data to an endogenous gene that is stably expressed across the samples analysed: a so-called normalizing or housekeeping gene. Although this is a valid strategy, the identification of stable normalizing genes has proved challenging and a gene showing stable expression across all cells or tissues is unlikely to exist. Therefore, it is necessary to define suitable normalizing genes for specific cells and tissues. Here, we report on the performance of a panel of nine commonly employed normalizing genes in adult human testis and testicular pathologies. Our analyses revealed significant variability in transcript abundance for commonly used normalizers, highlighting the importance of selecting appropriate normalizing genes as comparative measurements can yield variable results when different normalizing genes are employed. Based on our results, we recommend using RPS20, RPS29 or SRSF4 when analysing relative gene expression levels in human testis and associated testicular pathologies. OCT4 and SALL4 can be used with caution as second-tier normalizers when determining changes in gene expression in germ cells and germ cell tumour components, but the relative transcript abundance appears variable between different germ cell tumour types. We further recommend that such studies should be accompanied by additional assessment of histology and cellularity of each sample. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Structure and function of adenylate kinase isozymes in normal humans and muscular dystrophy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, M; Takenaka, H; Fukumoto, K; Fukamachi, S; Yamaguchi, T; Sumida, M; Shiosaka, T; Kurokawa, Y; Okuda, H; Kuby, S A

    1987-01-01

    Two isozymes of adenylate kinase from human Duchenne muscular dystrophy serum, one of which was an aberrant form specific to DMD patients, were separated by Blue Sepharose CL-6B affinity chromatography. The separated aberrant form possessed a molecular weight of 98,000 +/- 1,500, whereas the normal serum isozyme had a weight of 87,000 +/- 1,600, as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, and sedimentation equilibrium. The sedimentation coefficients were 5.8 S and 5.6 S for the aberrant form and the normal form, respectively. Both serum isozymes are tetramers. The subunit size of the aberrant isozyme (Mr = 24,700) was very similar to that of the normal human liver isozyme, and the subunit size of the normal isozyme (Mr = 21,700) was very similar to that of the normal human muscle enzyme. The amino acid composition of the normal serum isozyme was similar to that of the muscle-type enzyme, and that of the aberrant isozyme was similar to that of the liver enzyme, with some exceptions in both cases.

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate ... physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ...

  12. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jennifer S; von Lersner, Ariana K; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? Men who have had the tail end of their bowel ( ...

  14. Deep sequencing as a probe of normal stem cell fate and preneoplasia in human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Benjamin D

    2016-01-05

    Using deep sequencing technology, methods based on the sporadic acquisition of somatic DNA mutations in human tissues have been used to trace the clonal evolution of progenitor cells in diseased states. However, the potential of these approaches to explore cell fate behavior of normal tissues and the initiation of preneoplasia remain underexploited. Focusing on the results of a recent deep sequencing study of eyelid epidermis, we show that the quantitative analysis of mutant clone size provides a general method to resolve the pattern of normal stem cell fate and to detect and characterize the mutational signature of rare field transformations in human tissues, with implications for the early detection of preneoplasia.

  15. Normal human adipose tissue functions and differentiation in patients with biallelic LPIN1 inactivating mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Michele; Testet, Eric; Le Lay, Soazig; Dugail, Isabelle; Tang, Xiaoyun; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Hamel, Yamina; Madrange, Marine; Blanc, Thomas; Odent, Thierry; McMullen, Todd P W; Alfò, Marco; Brindley, David N; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2017-12-01

    Lipin-1 is a Mg2+-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) that in mice is necessary for normal glycerolipid biosynthesis, controlling adipocyte metabolism, and adipogenic differentiation. Mice carrying inactivating mutations in the Lpin1 gene display the characteristic features of human familial lipodystrophy. Very little is known about the roles of lipin-1 in human adipocyte physiology. Apparently, fat distribution and weight is normal in humans carrying LPIN1 inactivating mutations, but a detailed analysis of adipose tissue appearance and functions in these patients has not been available so far. In this study, we performed a systematic histopathological, biochemical, and gene expression analysis of adipose tissue biopsies from human patients harboring LPIN1 biallelic inactivating mutations and affected by recurrent episodes of severe rhabdomyolysis. We also explored the adipogenic differentiation potential of human mesenchymal cell populations derived from lipin-1 defective patients. White adipose tissue from human LPIN1 mutant patients displayed a dramatic decrease in lipin-1 protein levels and PAP activity, with a concomitant moderate reduction of adipocyte size. Nevertheless, the adipose tissue develops without obvious histological signs of lipodystrophy and with normal qualitative composition of storage lipids. The increased expression of key adipogenic determinants such as SREBP1, PPARG, and PGC1A shows that specific compensatory phenomena can be activated in vivo in human adipocytes with deficiency of functional lipin-1. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Monascuspiloin enhances the radiation sensitivity of human prostate cancer cells by stimulating endoplasmic reticulum stress and inducing autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Wen Chiu

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a very common cancer among males. Traditional treatments for prostate cancer have limited efficacy; therefore, new therapeutic strategies and/or new adjuvant drugs must be explored. Red yeast rice (RYR is a traditional food spice made in Asia by fermenting white rice with Monascus purpureus Went yeast. Accumulating evidence indicates that RYR has antitumor activity. In this study, PC-3 cells (human prostate cancer cells were used to investigate the anti-cancer effects of ionizing radiation (IR combined with monascuspiloin (MP, a yellow pigment isolated from Monascus pilosus M93-fermented rice and to determine the underlying mechanisms of these effects in vitro and in vivo. We found that IR combined with MP showed increased therapeutic efficacy when compared with either treatment alone in PC-3 cells. In addition, the combined treatment enhanced DNA damage and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. The combined treatment induced primarily autophagy in PC-3 cells, and the cell death that was induced by the combined treatment was chiefly the result of inhibition of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. In an in vivo study, the combination treatment showed greater anti-tumor growth effects. These novel findings suggest that the combined treatment could be a potential therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer.

  17. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA and p53 codon 72 polymorphism in prostate carcinomas of patients from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn Tomas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs, causatively linked to cervical cancer, might also play a role in the development of prostate cancer. Furthermore, the polymorphism at codon 72 (encoding either arginine or proline of the p53 tumor-suppressor gene is discussed as a possible determinant for cancer risk. The HPV E6 oncoprotein induces degradation of the p53 protein. The aim of this study was to analyse prostate carcinomas and hyperplasias of patients from Argentina for the presence of HPV DNA and the p53 codon 72 polymorphism genotype. Methods HPV DNA detection and typing were done by consensus L1 and type-specific PCR assays, respectively, and Southern blot hybridizations. Genotyping of p53 codon 72 polymorphism was performed both by allele specific primer PCRs and PCR-RFLP (Bsh1236I. Fischer's test with Woolf's approximation was used for statistical analysis. Results HPV DNA was detected in 17 out of 41 (41.5 % carcinoma samples, whereas all 30 hyperplasia samples were HPV-negative. Differences in p53 codon 72 allelic frequencies were not observed, neither between carcinomas and hyperplasias nor between HPV-positive and HPV-negative carcinomas. Conclusion These results indicate that the p53 genotype is probably not a risk factor for prostate cancer, and that HPV infections could be associated with at least a subset of prostate carcinomas.

  18. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4 promotes human prostate cancer metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M Pavese

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second leading cause of cancer death in the US. Death from PCa primarily results from metastasis. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4 is overexpressed in invasive PCa lesions in humans, and can be inhibited by small molecule therapeutics that demonstrate favorable activity in phase II studies. However, MAP2K4's role in regulating metastatic behavior is controversial and unknown. To investigate, we engineered human PCa cell lines which overexpress either wild type or constitutive active MAP2K4. Orthotopic implantation into mice demonstrated MAP2K4 increases formation of distant metastasis. Constitutive active MAP2K4, though not wild type, increases tumor size and circulating tumor cells in the blood and bone marrow. Complementary in vitro studies establish stable MAP2K4 overexpression promotes cell invasion, but does not affect cell growth or migration. MAP2K4 overexpression increases the expression of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 protein and protease production, with the largest effect upon matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2, both in vitro and in mouse tumor samples. Further, MAP2K4-mediated increases in cell invasion are dependent upon heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 and MMP-2, but not upon MAP2K4's immediate downstream targets, p38 MAPK or JNK. We demonstrate that MAP2K4 increases human PCa metastasis, and prolonged over expression induces long term changes in cell signaling pathways leading to independence from p38 MAPK and JNK. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for human studies linking increases in HSP27 and MMP-2 to progression to metastatic disease. MAP2K4 is validated as an important therapeutic target for inhibiting human PCa metastasis.

  19. Identification of markers for quiescent pancreatic stellate cells in the normal human pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a central role as source of fibrogenic cells in pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. In contrast to quiescent hepatic stellate cells (qHSCs), a specific marker for quiescent PSCs (qPSCs) that can be used in formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) normal human pancreatic tissue has not been identified. The aim of this study was to identify a marker enabling the identification of qPSCs in normal human FFPE pancreatic tissue. Immunohistochemical (IHC), double-IHC, immunofluorescence (IF) and double-IF analyses were carried out using a tissue microarray consisting of cores with normal human pancreatic tissue. Cores with normal human liver served as control. Antibodies directed against adipophilin, α-SMA, CD146, CRBP-1, cytoglobin, desmin, GFAP, nestin, S100A4 and vinculin were examined, with special emphasis on their expression in periacinar cells in the normal human pancreas and perisinusoidal cells in the normal human liver. The immunolabelling capacity was evaluated according to a semiquantitative scoring system. Double-IF of the markers of interest together with markers for other periacinar cells was performed. Moreover, the utility of histochemical stains for the identification of human qPSCs was examined, and their ultrastructure was revisited by electron microscopy. Adipophilin, CRBP-1, cytoglobin and vinculin were expressed in qHSCs in the liver, whereas cytoglobin and adipophilin were expressed in qPSCs in the pancreas. Adipophilin immunohistochemistry was highly dependent on the preanalytical time interval (PATI) from removal of the tissue to formalin fixation. Cytoglobin, S100A4 and vinculin were expressed in periacinar fibroblasts (FBs). The other examined markers were negative in human qPSCs. Our data indicate that cytoglobin and adipophilin are markers of qPSCs in the normal human pancreas. However, the use of adipophilin as a qPSC marker may be limited due to its high dependence on optimal PATI

  20. Multipotent Basal Stem Cells, Maintained in Localized Proximal Niches, Support Directed Long-Ranging Epithelial Flows in Human Prostates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Moad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic mitochondrial DNA mutations serve as clonal marks providing access to the identity and lineage potential of stem cells within human tissues. By combining quantitative clonal mapping with 3D reconstruction of adult human prostates, we show that multipotent basal stem cells, confined to discrete niches in juxta-urethral ducts, generate bipotent basal progenitors in directed epithelial migration streams. Basal progenitors are then dispersed throughout the entire glandular network, dividing and differentiating to replenish the loss of apoptotic luminal cells. Rare lineage-restricted luminal stem cells, and their progeny, are confined to proximal ducts and provide only minor contribution to epithelial homeostasis. In situ cell capture from clonal maps identified delta homolog 1 (DLK1 enrichment of basal stem cells, which was validated in functional spheroid assays. This study establishes significant insights into niche organization and function of prostate stem and progenitor cells, with implications for disease.

  1. Notch activation is dispensable for D, L-sulforaphane-mediated inhibition of human prostate cancer cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ryeong Hahm

    Full Text Available D, L-Sulforaphane (SFN, a synthetic racemic analog of broccoli constituent L-sulforaphane, is a highly promising cancer chemopreventive agent with in vivo efficacy against chemically-induced as well as oncogene-driven cancer in preclinical rodent models. Cancer chemopreventive effect of SFN is characterized by G(2/M phase cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction, and inhibition of cell migration and invasion. Moreover, SFN inhibits multiple oncogenic signaling pathways often hyperactive in human cancers, including nuclear factor-κB, Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and androgen receptor. The present study was designed to determine the role of Notch signaling, which is constitutively active in many human cancers, in anticancer effects of SFN using prostate cancer cells as a model. Exposure of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3, LNCaP, and/or LNCaP-C4-2B to SFN as well as its naturally-occurring thio-, sulfinyl-, and sulfonyl-analogs resulted in cleavage (activation of Notch1, Notch2, and Notch4, which was accompanied by a decrease in levels of full-length Notch forms especially at the 16- and 24-hour time points. The SFN-mediated cleavage of Notch isoforms was associated with its transcriptional activation as evidenced by RBP-Jk-, HES-1A/B- and HEY-1 luciferase reporter assays. Migration of PC-3 and LNCaP cells was decreased significantly by RNA interference of Notch1 and Notch2, but not Notch4. Furthermore, SFN-mediated inhibition of PC-3 and LNCaP cell migration was only marginally affected by knockdown of Notch1 and Notch2. Strikingly, SFN administration to Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate transgenic mice failed to increase levels of cleaved Notch1, cleaved Notch2, and HES-1 proteins in vivo in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, well-differentiated carcinoma or poorly-differentiated prostate cancer lesions. These results indicate that Notch activation is largely dispensable for SFN-mediated inhibition of cell

  2. Cellular binding proteins for vitamin A in human carcinomas and in normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, P R; Romney, S L

    1980-11-01

    Blinded analyses of the concentrations of binding proteins for retinol and retinoic acid (CRABP) in homogenates of cancer and normal tissue aliquots obtained from human cervix, endometrium, ovary, breast, and lung were carried out by the sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation technique. In carcinomas of the cervix and endometrium, CRABP mean values of 50.4 and 123.2 pmol/g tissue, respectively were detected. Such concentrations represent a 3- and 4-fold increase over the mean values of CRABP in the normal cervix (16.9 pmol/g) and normal endometrium (30.8 pmol/g), respectively. In carcinomas of the ovary, the mean CRABP level was 128.6 pmol/g compared to the maximal mean value of less than or equal to 0.46 pmol/g in the normal ovary. Elevated levels of CRABP were also found in breast and lung carcinomas compared to the amounts detected in the same patient in normal tissue aliquots of the same organ. The differences between CRABP concentrations in cervical, endometrial, ovarian, and breast carcinomas and those in normal tissue are statistically significant. In contrast, cellular retinol-binding protein concentrations were reduced in the endometrial, ovarian, breast, and lung carcinomas compared to normal tissues. There were no significant differences between the log-mean concentrations of cellular retinol-binding proteins in the cytosols from tissue aliquots of carcinoma of the cervix and those in the cytosols from tissue aliquots of normal cervix.

  3. Human RecQL4 helicase plays critical roles in prostate carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Yanrong; Meador, Jarah A; Calaf, Gloria M

    2010-01-01

    for prostate cancer promotion. Observation of a direct interaction of retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F1 proteins with RecQL4 promoter suggests that Rb-E2F1 pathway may regulate RecQL4 expression. Collectively, our study shows that RecQL4 is an essential factor for prostate carcinogenesis....

  4. Incidence and mortality of prostate cancer and their relationship with the Human Development Index worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hassanipour-Azgomi

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: The incidence of prostate cancer is high in countries with higher development. A positive correlation was observed between the SIR of prostate cancer and the HDI and its components, such as life expectancy at birth, mean years of schooling, and the gross national income per capita. In addition, there was a negative correlation between SMR and HDI.

  5. Prevalence of human xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related gammaretrovirus (XMRV) in Dutch prostate cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegh, G.W.C.T.; Jong, A.S. de; Smit, F.P.; Jannink, S.A.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Schalken, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The occurrence of the retrovirus xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus (XMRV) has been reported in prostate tissue of patients with prostate cancer (PrCa). Considering the potential great medical and social relevance of this discovery, we investigated whether this finding

  6. A novel hybridoma antibody (PASE/4LJ) to human prostatic acid phosphatase suitable for immunohistochemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haines, A M; Larkin, S E; Richardson, A P; Stirling, R W; Heyderman, E

    1989-01-01

    ... in a pathological fracture of lymph node is of pros- tatic origin, or whether an adenocarcinoma in the wall of the rectum without obvious mucosal involvement is an invading carcinoma from the prostate, or is of primary rectal origin. Similarly, deciding whether tumours arising in the region of the bladder neck are of bladder or prostatic origin m...

  7. Evaluation of polymer shielding for adenovirus serotype 6 (Ad6 for systemic virotherapy against human prostate cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien V Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses hold promise as “self-amplifying” cancer therapies wherein a virally killed cell can produce thousands of new viral “drugs” that can kill more cancer cells. Adenoviruses (Ads are one family of oncolytic viruses. Most human studies have used human Ad serotype 5 (Ad5. Unfortunately, most patients are already immune to Ad5 increasing the likelihood that the agent will be neutralized if used as a cancer therapy. In this work, lower seroprevalence Ad6 was tested as a systemic therapy for prostate cancer. Ad5 and Ad6 were injected intravenously a single time in nude mice bearing human prostate tumors, and toxicity and efficacy were assessed. Ad6 was chemically shielded with polyethylene glycol (PEG to test if this would further improve its pharmacology. Ad6 produced 30-fold lower liver damage and less toxicity than Ad5. Ad6 significantly repressed the growth of androgen-resistant human DU145 prostate tumors and androgen-sensitive LNCaP tumors after single intravenous injection. PEGylation did not change virus distribution, but blunted liver damage and cytokine production by Ad6. PEGylated Ad6 eradicated LNCaP tumors and maintained body mass, but lost potency against the more challenging DU145 tumors. These and other data suggest that low seroprevalent Ad6 has better efficacy and safety than the benchmark oncolytic virus Ad5 for systemic therapy of prostate cancer. These data also indicate that PEGylation may improve Ad6 safety, but that this shielding may reduce oncolytic efficacy after intravenous treatment.

  8. α-Solanine Inhibits Invasion of Human Prostate Cancer Cell by Suppressing Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and MMPs Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Kun-Hung Shen; Alex Chien-Hwa Liao; Jui-Hsiang Hung; Wei-Jiunn Lee; Kai-Chieh Hu; Pin-Tsen Lin; Ruei-Fang Liao; Pin-Shern Chen

    2014-01-01

    α-Solanine, a naturally occurring steroidal glycoalkaloid found in nightshade (Solanum nigrum Linn.), was found to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanism involved in suppression of cancer cell metastasis by α-solanine remains unclear. This study investigates the suppression mechanism of α-solanine on motility of the human prostate cancer cell PC-3. Results show that α-solanine reduces the viability of PC-3 cells. When treated with non-toxic doses of ...

  9. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  10. Cytostasis of tumor cell lines by granulocytes from cancer patients and normal human donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korec, S; Herberman, R B; Cannon, G B; Reid, J; Braatz, J A

    1981-08-15

    Granulocytes of normal human donors were previously shown to have cytostatic activity in vitro against a variety of tumor cell lines. In the present study, we have compared the levels of granulocyte-mediated cytostatic activity in cancer patients and normal donors. In an initial study of 25 tumor-bearing patients and 21 individuals with benign or no disease, decreased cytostatic activity was observed in 84% of the cancer patients. Nine cancer patients with no evidence of disease had reactivity in the normal range. Granulocytes separated by a one-step method on a double Ficoll-Percoll gradient showed decreased reactivity. This procedure eliminated the differences previously detected between tumor-bearing patients and controls. Addition of either pooled normal AB human serum or autologous serum to the assay restored the reactivity. Only with autologous serum and not with allogeneic serum, were the differences between tumor-bearing patients and controls again seen. Therefore, in a subsequent study, we examined the effect of serum on cytostasis by normal granulocytes that were isolated on double gradients. We observed lowered serum restorative activity (SRA) in 41 of the 46 (89%) tumor-bearing patients tested. Fractionation of sera by Sephadex G-200 chromatography indicated that SRA of both cancer patients and normal donors was in the 100,000 molecular weight region.

  11. SPA-1 controls the invasion and metastasis of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yosuke; Hamazaki, Yoko; Hattori, Masakazu; Doi, Keiko; Terada, Naoki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Toda, Yoshinobu; Yamasaki, Toshinari; Inoue, Takahiro; Kajita, Yoichiro; Maeno, Atsushi; Kamba, Tomomi; Mikami, Yoshiki; Kamoto, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Tomomi; Kanno, Toru; Yoshikawa, Kiyotsugu; Ogawa, Osamu; Minato, Nagahiro; Nakamura, Eijiro

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that SIPA1 encoding a Rap GTPase-activating protein SPA-1 is a candidate metastasis efficiency-modifying gene in human breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of SPA-1 in human prostate cancer (CaP). Immunohistochemical studies of tumor specimens from CaP patients revealed a positive correlation of SPA-1 expression with disease progression and metastasis. The correlation was recapitulated in human CaP cell lines; LNCaP that rarely showed metastasis in SCID mice expressed an undetectable level of SPA-1, whereas highly metastatic PC3 showed abundant SPA-1 expression. Moreover, SIPA1 transduction in LNCaP caused prominent abdominal lymph node metastasis without affecting primary tumor size, whereas shRNA-mediated SIPA1 knockdown or expression of a dominant-active Rap1 mutant (Rap1V12) in PC3 suppressed metastasis. LNCaP transduced with SPA-1 (LNCaP/SPA-1) showed attenuated adhesion to the precoated extracellular matrices (ECM) including collagens and fibronectin, due to defective ECM-medicated Rap1 activation. In addition, LNCaP/SPA-1 showed a diminished level of nuclear Brd4, which is known to bind SPA-1, resulting in reduced expression of a series of ECM-related genes. These results suggest that SPA-1 plays an important role in controlling metastasis efficiency of human CaP by regulating the expression of and interaction with ECM in the primary sites. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves ... the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as detailed as with the transrectal probe. An MRI of the pelvis may be obtained as an ... Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate ...

  14. Alpha-amidated peptides derived from pro-opiomelanocortin in normal human pituitary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Johnsen, A H

    1988-01-01

    Normal human pituitaries were extracted in boiling water and acetic acid, and the alpha-amidated peptide products of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha MSH), gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (gamma 1MSH), and amidated hinge peptide (HP-N), as well...

  15. Characterization of human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Tălu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To characterize the human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal geometry and lacunarity parameters.METHODS:Multifractal analysis using a box counting algorithm was carried out for a set of 12 segmented and skeletonized human retinal images, corresponding to both normal (6 images and amblyopia states of the retina (6 images.RESULTS:It was found that the microvascular geometry of the human retina network represents geometrical multifractals, characterized through subsets of regions having different scaling properties that are not evident in the fractal analysis. Multifractal analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions show a higher average of the generalized dimensions (Dq for q=0, 1, 2 indicating a higher degree of the tree-dimensional complexity associated with the human retinal microvasculature network whereas images of healthy subjects show a lower value of generalized dimensions indicating normal complexity of biostructure. On the other hand, the lacunarity analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions show a lower average of the lacunarity parameter Λ than the corresponding values for normal images (segmented and skeletonized versions.CONCLUSION:The multifractal and lacunarity analysis may be used as a non-invasive predictive complementary tool to distinguish amblyopic subjects from healthy subjects and hence this technique could be used for an early diagnosis of patients with amblyopia.

  16. Nocturnal variations in subcutaneous blood flow rate in lower leg of normal human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Jørgensen, B

    1991-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate was measured in the lower leg of 22 normal human subjects over 12- to 20-h ambulatory conditions. The 133Xe washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage unit were used. The tracer depot was applied on the medial aspect...

  17. Absorption and excretion of mercury in man. XI. Mercury content of normal human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joselow, M.M.; Goldwater, L.J.; Weinberg, S.B.

    1967-07-01

    Mercury analyses were performed on 236 samples of tissues removed at autopsy from 39 normal human subjects. The samples represented 12 different tissues or organs. The highest values were found in the kidneys. Age did not appear to be a factor in the mercury levels. 14 references, 2 tables.

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the normal human eye and its expression pattern in selected eye tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinmei; Wu, Yazhen; Heegaard, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    and retina. The COX-2 expression was less in tumours deriving from the ciliary epithelium and also in retinoblastoma. Conclusion: Cyclooxygenase-2 is constitutively expressed in normal human eyes. The expression of COX-2 is much lower in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells....

  19. A novel gene signature for molecular diagnosis of human prostate cancer by RT-qPCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Rizzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer (CaP is one of the most relevant causes of cancer death in Western Countries. Although detection of CaP at early curable stage is highly desirable, actual screening methods present limitations and new molecular approaches are needed. Gene expression analysis increases our knowledge about the biology of CaP and may render novel molecular tools, but the identification of accurate biomarkers for reliable molecular diagnosis is a real challenge. We describe here the diagnostic power of a novel 8-genes signature: ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, ornithine decarboxylase antizyme (OAZ, adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC, spermidine/spermine N(1-acetyltransferase (SSAT, histone H3 (H3, growth arrest specific gene (GAS1, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and Clusterin (CLU in tumour detection/classification of human CaP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The 8-gene signature was detected by retrotranscription real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR in frozen prostate surgical specimens obtained from 41 patients diagnosed with CaP and recommended to undergo radical prostatectomy (RP. No therapy was given to patients at any time before RP. The bio-bank used for the study consisted of 66 specimens: 44 were benign-CaP paired from the same patient. Thirty-five were classified as benign and 31 as CaP after final pathological examination. Only molecular data were used for classification of specimens. The Nearest Neighbour (NN classifier was used in order to discriminate CaP from benign tissue. Validation of final results was obtained with 10-fold cross-validation procedure. CaP versus benign specimens were discriminated with (80+/-5% accuracy, (81+/-6% sensitivity and (78+/-7% specificity. The method also correctly classified 71% of patients with Gleason score or =7, an important predictor of final outcome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The method showed high sensitivity in a collection of specimens in which a significant

  20. Molecular decoy to the Y-box binding protein-1 suppresses the growth of breast and prostate cancer cells whilst sparing normal cell viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Law

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1 is an oncogenic transcription/translation factor that is activated by phosphorylation at S102 whereby it induces the expression of growth promoting genes such as EGFR and HER-2. We recently illustrated by an in vitro kinase assay that a novel peptide to YB-1 was highly phosphorylated by the serine/threonine p90 S6 kinases RSK-1 and RSK-2, and to a lesser degree PKCα and AKT. Herein, we sought to develop this decoy cell permeable peptide (CPP as a cancer therapeutic. This 9-mer was designed as an interference peptide that would prevent endogenous YB-1(S102 phosphorylation based on molecular docking. In cancer cells, the CPP blocked P-YB-1(S102 and down-regulated both HER-2 and EGFR transcript level and protein expression. Further, the CPP prevented YB-1 from binding to the EGFR promoter in a gel shift assay. Notably, the growth of breast (SUM149, MDA-MB-453, AU565 and prostate (PC3, LNCap cancer cells was inhibited by ∼90% with the CPP. Further, treatment with this peptide enhanced sensitivity and overcame resistance to trastuzumab in cells expressing amplified HER-2. By contrast, the CPP had no inhibitory effect on the growth of normal immortalized breast epithelial (184htert cells, primary breast epithelial cells, nor did it inhibit differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors. These data collectively suggest that the CPP is a novel approach to suppressing the growth of cancer cells while sparing normal cells and thereby establishes a proof-of-concept that blocking YB-1 activation is a new course of cancer therapeutics.

  1. Determination of doripenem penetration into human prostate tissue and assessment of dosing regimens for prostatitis based on site-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kogenta; Ikawa, Kazuro; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Arakawa, Maki; Zennami, Kenji; Nishikawa, Genya; Ikeda, Kayo; Morikawa, Norifumi; Honda, Nobuaki

    2012-02-01

    Prostatic hypertrophy patients prophylactically received a 0.5-hour infusion of doripenem (250 or 500 mg) before transurethral resection of the prostate. Doripenem concentrations in plasma and prostate tissue were measured chromatographically, and analysed pharmacokinetically using a three-compartment model. The approved doripenem regimens were assessed based on the time above the minimum inhibitory concentration for bacteria (T>MIC, % of 24 hours), an indicator for antibacterial effects, at the prostate. The prostate tissue/plasma ratios were 17.3% for the maximum drug concentration and 18.7% for the area under the drug concentration-time curve, and they were irrespective of the dose. Against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species isolates, 500 mg once daily achieved a >90% probability of attaining the bacteriostatic target (20% T>MIC) in prostate tissue, and 500 mg twice daily achieved a >90% probability of attaining the bactericidal target (40% T>MIC) in prostate tissue.

  2. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia after spontaneous human chorionic gonadotropin normalization following molar pregnancy evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Antonio; Maestá, Izildinha; Matos, Michelle; Elias, Kevin M; Rizzo, Julianna; Viggiano, Maurício Guilherme Campos

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the risk of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) after spontaneous human chorionic gonadotropin normalization in postmolar follow-up. Retrospective chart review of 2284 consecutive cases of hydatidiform mole with spontaneous normalization of hCG following uterine evacuation treated at one of five Brazilian reference centers from January 2002 to June 2013. After hCG normalization, GTN occurred in 10/2284 patients (0.4%; 95% CI 0.2%-0.8%). GTN developed in 9/1424 patients (0.6%; 95% CI 0.3%-1.2%) after a complete hydatidiform mole, in 1/849 patients (0.1%; 95% CI<0.01%-0.7%) after a partial hydatidiform mole, and in 0/13 patients (0%; 95% CI 0%-27%) after a twin molar pregnancy. The median time to GTN diagnosis after hCG normalization was 18months, and no diagnoses were made before six months of postmolar surveillance. Patients who required more than 56days to achieve a normal hCG value had a ten-fold increased risk of developing GTN after hCG normalization (9/1074; 0.8%; 95% CI 0.4%-1.6%) compared to those who reached a normal hCG level in fewer than 56days (1/1210;0.08%; 95% CI<0.01%-0.5%; p=0.008). All patients presented with symptoms at the time of GTN diagnosis. GTN after spontaneous hCG normalization following molar pregnancy is exceedingly rare, and the few patients who do develop GTN after achieving a normal hCG value are likely to be diagnosed after completing the commonly recommended six months of postmolar surveillance. Current recommendations for surveillance after hCG normalization should be revisited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolomic Profiling of Extracellular Vesicles and Alternative Normalization Methods Reveal Enriched Metabolites and Strategies to Study Prostate Cancer-Related Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhka, Maija; Takatalo, Maarit; Nordberg, Maria-Elisa; Valkonen, Sami; Nandania, Jatin; Aatonen, Maria; Yliperttula, Marjo; Laitinen, Saara; Velagapudi, Vidya; Mirtti, Tuomas; Kallioniemi, Olli; Rannikko, Antti; Siljander, Pia R-M; Af Hällström, Taija Maria

    2017-01-01

    Body fluids are a rich source of extracellular vesicles (EVs), which carry cargo derived from the secreting cells. So far, biomarkers for pathological conditions have been mainly searched from their protein, (mi)RNA, DNA and lipid cargo. Here, we explored the small molecule metabolites from urinary and platelet EVs relative to their matched source samples. As a proof-of-concept study of intra-EV metabolites, we compared alternative normalization methods to profile urinary EVs from prostate cancer patients before and after prostatectomy and from healthy controls. We employed targeted ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to profile over 100 metabolites in the isolated EVs, original urine samples and platelets. We determined the enrichment of the metabolites in the EVs and analyzed their subcellular origin, pathways and relevant enzymes or transporters through data base searches. EV- and urine-derived factors and ratios between metabolites were tested for normalization of the metabolomics data. Approximately 1 x 1010 EVs were sufficient for detection of metabolite profiles from EVs. The profiles of the urinary and platelet EVs overlapped with each other and with those of the source materials, but they also contained unique metabolites. The EVs enriched a selection of cytosolic metabolites including members from the nucleotide and spermidine pathways, which linked to a number of EV-resident enzymes or transporters. Analysis of the urinary EVs from the patients indicated that the levels of glucuronate, D-ribose 5-phosphate and isobutyryl-L-carnitine were 2-26-fold lower in all pre-prostatectomy samples compared to the healthy control and post-prostatectomy samples (p < 0.05). These changes were only detected from EVs by normalization to EV-derived factors or with metabolite ratios, and not from the original urine samples. Our results suggest that metabolite analysis of EVs from different samples is feasible using a high-throughput platform

  4. On the Normal Force Mechanotransduction of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabikashi, Amir; Wang, Qiuyun; Wilson, James; Wu, Qianhong; Vucbmss Team

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we report a cellular biomechanics study to examine the normal force mechanotransduction of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) with their implications on hypertension. Endothelial cells sense mechanical forces and adjust their structure and function accordingly. The mechanotransduction of normal forces plays a vital role in hypertension due to the higher pressure buildup inside blood vessels. Herein, HUVECs were cultured to full confluency and then exposed to different mechanical loadings using a novel microfluidic flow chamber. One various pressure levels while keeps the shear stress constant inside the flow chamber. Three groups of cells were examined, the control group (neither shear nor normal stresses), the normal pressure group (10 dyne/cm2 of shear stress and 95 mmHg of pressure), and the hypertensive group (10 dyne/cm2 of shear stress and 142 mmHg of pressure). Cellular response characterized by RT-PCR method indicates that, COX-2 expressed under normal pressure but not high pressure; Mn-SOD expressed under both normal and high pressure while this response was stronger for normal pressure; FOS and e-NOS did not respond under any condition. The differential behavior of COX-2 and Mn-SOD in response to changes in pressure, is instrumental for better understanding the pathogenesis of hypertensive cardiovascular diseases. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Award #1511096.

  5. Metformin targets c-MYC oncogene to prevent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyeke, Tunde; Matsumura, Satoko; Wang, Xinying; Wu, Yingjie; Schalfer, Eric D; Saxena, Anjana; Yan, Wenbo; Logan, Susan K; Li, Xin

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men and many PCa patients develop skeletal metastasis. Current treatment modalities for metastatic PCa are mostly palliative with poor prognosis. Epidemiological studies indicated that patients receiving the diabetic drug metformin have lower PCa risk and better prognosis, suggesting that metformin may have antineoplastic effects. The mechanism by which metformin acts as chemopreventive agent to impede PCa initiation and progression is unknown. The amplification of c-MYC oncogene plays a key role in early prostate epithelia cell transformation and PCa growth. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of metformin on c-myc expression and PCa progression. Our results demonstrated that (i) in Hi-Myc mice that display murine prostate neoplasia and highly resemble the progression of human prostate tumors, metformin attenuated the development of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, the precancerous lesion of prostate) and PCa lesions. (ii) Metformin reduced c-myc protein levels in vivo and in vitro. In Myc-CaP mouse PCa cells, metformin decreased c-myc protein levels by at least 50%. (iii) Metformin selectively inhibited the growth of PCa cells by stimulating cell cycle arrest and apoptosis without affecting the growth of normal prostatic epithelial cells (RWPE-1). (iv) Reduced PIN formation by metformin was associated with reduced levels of androgen receptor and proliferation marker Ki-67 in Hi-Myc mouse prostate glands. Our novel findings suggest that by downregulating c-myc, metformin can act as a chemopreventive agent to restrict prostatic neoplasia initiation and transformation. Metformin, an old antidiabetes drug, may inhibit prostate intraepithelial neoplasia transforming to cancer lesion via reducing c-MYC, an 'old' overexpressed oncogene. This study explores chemopreventive efficacy of metformin in prostate cancer and its link to cMYC in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Danish Prostate Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgstrand, J Thomas; Klemann, Nina; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2016-01-01

    of the prostate (TUR-Ps), and the remaining 22,028 (13.6%) specimens were derived from radical prostatectomies, bladder interventions, etc. A total of 48,078 (42.2%) males had histopathologically verified prostate cancer, and of these, 78.8% and 16.8% were diagnosed on prostate biopsies and TUR-Ps, respectively....... FUTURE PERSPECTIVES: A validated algorithm was successfully developed to convert complex prostate SNOMED codes into clinical useful data. A unique database, including males with both normal and cancerous histopathological data, was created to form the most comprehensive national prostate database to date......BACKGROUND: Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED) codes are computer-processable medical terms used to describe histopathological evaluations. SNOMED codes are not readily usable for analysis. We invented an algorithm that converts prostate SNOMED codes into an analyzable format. We...

  7. Normalized Metadata Generation for Human Retrieval Using Multiple Video Surveillance Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehoon Jung

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Since it is impossible for surveillance personnel to keep monitoring videos from a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an efficient technique is needed to help recognize important situations by retrieving the metadata of an object-of-interest. In a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an object detected in a camera has a different shape in another camera, which is a critical issue of wide-range, real-time surveillance systems. In order to address the problem, this paper presents an object retrieval method by extracting the normalized metadata of an object-of-interest from multiple, heterogeneous cameras. The proposed metadata generation algorithm consists of three steps: (i generation of a three-dimensional (3D human model; (ii human object-based automatic scene calibration; and (iii metadata generation. More specifically, an appropriately-generated 3D human model provides the foot-to-head direction information that is used as the input of the automatic calibration of each camera. The normalized object information is used to retrieve an object-of-interest in a wide-range, multiple-camera surveillance system in the form of metadata. Experimental results show that the 3D human model matches the ground truth, and automatic calibration-based normalization of metadata enables a successful retrieval and tracking of a human object in the multiple-camera video surveillance system.

  8. Normalized Metadata Generation for Human Retrieval Using Multiple Video Surveillance Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Inhye; Lee, Seungwon; Paik, Joonki

    2016-06-24

    Since it is impossible for surveillance personnel to keep monitoring videos from a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an efficient technique is needed to help recognize important situations by retrieving the metadata of an object-of-interest. In a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an object detected in a camera has a different shape in another camera, which is a critical issue of wide-range, real-time surveillance systems. In order to address the problem, this paper presents an object retrieval method by extracting the normalized metadata of an object-of-interest from multiple, heterogeneous cameras. The proposed metadata generation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) generation of a three-dimensional (3D) human model; (ii) human object-based automatic scene calibration; and (iii) metadata generation. More specifically, an appropriately-generated 3D human model provides the foot-to-head direction information that is used as the input of the automatic calibration of each camera. The normalized object information is used to retrieve an object-of-interest in a wide-range, multiple-camera surveillance system in the form of metadata. Experimental results show that the 3D human model matches the ground truth, and automatic calibration-based normalization of metadata enables a successful retrieval and tracking of a human object in the multiple-camera video surveillance system.

  9. A Comparative Pathophysiological Study of Normal and Growth Retarded Human Placental Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Moyosore Afodun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the pathophysiology of normal and growth retarded human placental tissues. Female patients were recruited from the Antenatal Clinic of Dolu Specialist Hospital, Mafoluku, Oshodi, Lagos, between 2008 and 2012. A total of 48 normal term placentas and 15 placentas of known IUGR cases were used for this study. IUGR cases were confirmed on the basis of ultrasound follow-up and diagnosis. Normal term placentas were collected at the point of delivery by a consultant gynaecologist, the cords were clamped, and membranes were then carefully trimmed after which each placenta was weighed. About 1 cm thickness of both normal and growth retarded placenta tissues was cut, processed for hematoxylin and eosin stain, while tissues for enzyme (ALP assay were homogenized in cold 0.5 M sucrose solution. Comparative analysis of the data was done using ANOVA; P<0.05 was taken as significant. The photomicrographs were observed/studied under light microscope, using the X150 and X600 magnifications. It was revealed therein that placental tissues are homogenous (regionally, compromised of maternal spiral arterioles and deregulated villous vasculogenesis, and that there is a significant difference in the level of alkaline phosphatase enzyme. We therefore concluded that there is a distinct difference between the normal and growth retarded human placenta tissue.

  10. Analysis of structural changes in normal and aneurismal human aortic tissues using FTIR microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, S; Bonnier, F; Sandt, C; Ventéo, L; Pluot, M; Baehrel, B; Manfait, M; Sockalingum, G D

    2008-02-01

    Aortic aneurisms are frequently asymptomatic but can induce dramatic complications. The diagnosis is only based on the aortic diameter and not on a structural and compositional basis. In this preliminary study, we propose infrared microspectroscopy to nondestructively probe normal and aneurismal human aortas. Spectra from 19 human ascending aortic biopsies (10 normal and 9 aneurismal) were acquired using infrared microspectroscopy. A 1500 x 150 microm(2) area of each 7-microm thick cryosection was investigated using a 30-microm spatial resolution with a total of about 200 spectra per sample. Spectral differences between normal and aneurismal tissues were mainly located in spectral regions related to proteins, such as elastin and collagen, and proteoglycans (1750-1000 cm(-1)). Tissue heterogeneity and sample classification have been evaluated using hierarchical cluster analysis of individual or mean spectra and their second derivative. Using spectral range related to proteins, 100% of good classification was obtained whereas the proteoglycan spectral range was less discriminant. This in vitro study demonstrates the potential of such technique to differentiate between normal and aneurismal aortas using selected spectral ranges. Future investigations will be focused on these specific spectral regions to determine the role of elastin and collagen in the discrimination of normal and pathological aortas. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Rapid elimination kinetics of free PSA or human kallikrein-related peptidase 2 after initiation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-antagonist treatment of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulmert, David; Vickers, Andrew J; Scher, Howard I

    2012-01-01

    The utility of conventional prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements in blood for monitoring rapid responses to treatment for prostate cancer is limited because of its slow elimination rate. Prior studies have shown that free PSA (fPSA), intact PSA (iPSA) and human kallikrein-related peptidase...... of tPSA, fPSA, iPSA and hK2 after rapid induction of castration with degarelix (Firmagon(®)), a novel GnRH antagonist....

  12. Analysis of expression of chorionic gonadotrophin transcripts in prostate cancer by quantitative Taqman and a modified molecular beacon RT-PCR.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Span, P.N.; Thomas, C.M.G.; Heuvel, J.J.T.M.; Bosch, R.R.; Schalken, J.A.; Locht, A.T.F. van de; Mensink, E.J.B.M.; Sweep, C.G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Expression of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) is associated with trophoblastic, testicular and other malignancies such as bladder, pancreatic, cervical, breast and prostate cancer. In the prostate, however, hCG expression, associated with neuroendocrine cells, is also found in normal tissue. Of

  13. Notch3 is activated by chronic hypoxia and contributes to the progression of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Giovanna; Di Serio, Claudia; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Sturli, Niccolò; Lonetto, Giuseppe; Rosati, Fabiana; Rocca, Bruno Jim; Ventimiglia, Giuseppina; del Vecchio, Maria Teresa; Prudovsky, Igor; Marchionni, Niccolò; Tarantini, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is still the second cause of cancer-related death among men. Although patients with metastatic presentation have an ominous outcome, the vast majority of PCs are diagnosed at an early stage. Nonetheless, even among patients with clinically localized disease the outcome may vary considerably. Other than androgen sensitivity, little is known about which other signaling pathways are deranged in aggressive, localized cancers. The elucidation of such pathways may help to develop innovative therapies aimed at specific molecular targets. We report that in a hormone-sensitive PC cell line, LNCaP, Notch3 was activated by hypoxia and sustained cell proliferation and colony formation in soft agar. Hypoxia also modulated cellular cholesterol content and the number and size of lipid rafts, causing a coalescence of small rafts into bigger clusters; under this experimental condition, Notch3 migrated from the non-raft into the raft compartment where it colocalized with the γ-secretase complex. We also looked at human PC biopsies and found that expression of Notch3 positively correlated with Gleason score and with expression of carbonic anhydrase IX, a marker of hypoxia. In conclusion, hypoxia triggers the activation of Notch3, which, in turn, sustains proliferation of PC cells. Notch3 pathway represents a promising target for adjuvant therapy in patients with PC. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  14. Combined Effects of Nonylphenol and Bisphenol A on the Human Prostate Epithelial Cell Line RWPE-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Gan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The xenoestrogens nonylphenol (NP and bisphenol A (BPA are regarded as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs which have widespread occurrence in our daily life. In the present study, the purpose was to analyze the combined effects of NP and BPA on the human prostate epithelial cell line RWPE-1 using two mathematical models based on the Loewe additivity (LA theory and the Bliss independence (BI theory. RWPE-1 cells were treated with NP (0.01–100 µM and BPA (1–5000 µM in either a single or a combined format. A cell viability assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH leakage rate assay were employed as endpoints. As predicted by the two models and based on the cell viability assay, significant synergism between NP and BPA were observed. However, based on the LDH assay, the trends were reversed. Given that environmental contaminants are frequently encountered simultaneously, these data indicated that there were potential interactions between NP and BPA, and the combined effects of the chemical mixture might be stronger than the additive values of individual chemicals combined, which should be taken into consideration for the risk assessment of EDCs.

  15. About the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Control Text: Please leave this field empty Normal Physiology The prostate is not essential for life, but is important for reproduction. It supplies substances that facilitate fertilization and sperm ...

  16. Antiapoptotic effects of estrogen in normal and cancer human cervical epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qifang; Li, Xin; Wang, Liqin; Feng, Ying-Hong; Zeng, Robin; Gorodeski, George

    2004-12-01

    The present study investigated the antiapoptotic effects of estrogen in normal and cancer human cervical cells and the mechanisms involved. Baseline apoptosis in human cervical epithelial cells is mediated predominantly by P2X7-receptor-induced, Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the mitochondrial (caspase-9) pathway. Treatment with 10 nM 17beta-estradiol blocked apoptosis induced by the P2X7-receptor ligands ATP and 2',3'-0-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP in normal human cervical epithelial cells (hECEs) and attenuated the effect in hECEs immortalized with human papillomavirus-16 (ECE16-1) and the cancer cervical cells HT3 and CaSki. Diethylstilbestrol and to a lesser degree estrone could mimic the effects of 17beta-estradiol, whereas actinomycin-D and cycloheximide attenuated the response. The antiapoptotic effect of estrogen did not depend on cell cycle phase, and in both normal and cancer cervical cells, it involved attenuation of activation of caspase-9 and the terminal caspase-3. However, involvement of cascades upstream to the caspase-9 differed in normal vs. cancer cervical cells. In the normal hECEs estrogen blocked P2X7-receptor-induced calcium influx. In contrast, in the cancer CaSki cells, estrogen up-regulated expression of Bcl-2 and attenuated Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial swelling (i.e. formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores). Estrogen had no effect on P2X7-receptor-induced apoptosis in the anaplastic SiHa and Hela cells. These results point to a novel antiapoptotic effect of estrogen in the cervix that is independent of its mitogenic function. The results also suggest that cancer cervical cells evolved antiapoptotic mechanisms that enable the cells to evade apoptosis and could therefore promote tumor progression.

  17. Human neural tuning estimated from compound action potentials in normal hearing human volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschooten, Eric; Desloovere, Christian; Joris, Philip X.

    2015-12-01

    The sharpness of cochlear frequency tuning in humans is debated. Evoked otoacoustic emissions and psychophysical measurements suggest sharper tuning in humans than in laboratory animals [15], but this is disputed based on comparisons of behavioral and electrophysiological measurements across species [14]. Here we used evoked mass potentials to electrophysiologically quantify tuning (Q10) in humans. We combined a notched noise forward masking paradigm [9] with the recording of trans tympanic compound action potentials (CAP) from masked probe tones in awake human and anesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta). We compare our results to data obtained with the same paradigm in cat and chinchilla [16], and find that CAP-Q10values in human are ˜1.6x higher than in cat and chinchilla and ˜1.3x higher than in monkey. To estimate frequency tuning of single auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) in humans, we derive conversion functions from ANFs in cat, chinchilla, and monkey and apply these to the human CAP measurements. The data suggest that sharp cochlear tuning is a feature of old-world primates.

  18. ULTRASONIC EXAMINATION OF THE BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERTROPHY

    OpenAIRE

    棚橋, 善克

    1982-01-01

    In normal cases, prostatic section shows triangular shape and inner gland occupies a small part in only upper sections as a echogenic portion. In prostatic hypertrophy cases, inner gland occupies more part of the prostate and outer gland is shown as a half moon shape, in late stage of hypertrophy, inner gland occupies almost whole the part of the prostate, and compressed outer gland is visualized as an orange peel in postero-inferior portion. In some cases with prostatic hypertrophy, some nod...

  19. Human-Machine interface for off normal and emergency situations in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-01-01

    Many nuclear power plants (NPPs) have reported that a high percentage of all major failures in the plants are caused by human errors. Therefore, there has been much focus on elimination of human errors, enhancement of human performance, and general improvement of human machine interface (HMI). Both the utility management and the regulators are demanding improvement in this area. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Specialists' Meeting on 'Human-Machine Interface for Off Normal and Emergency Situations in Nuclear Power Plants' was co-organized by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and the Korea Power Engineering Company, INC (KOPEC), and took place in Taejeon, Republic of Korea, 1999 October 26-28. Fifty eight participants, representing nine member countries reviewed recent developments and discussed directions for future efforts in the Human-Machine Interface for Off Normal and Emergency Situations in NPPs. Twenty papers were presented, covering a wide spectrum of technical and scientific subjects including recent experience and benefits from Operational Experience with HMI, Development of HMI System, Licensing Issues for HMI and Future Development and Trends. (Author)

  20. β-catenin is required for prostate development and cooperates with Pten loss to drive invasive carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Francis

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a major cause of male death in the Western world, but few frequent genetic alterations that drive prostate cancer initiation and progression have been identified. β-Catenin is essential for many developmental processes and has been implicated in tumorigenesis in many tissues, including prostate cancer. However, expression studies on human prostate cancer samples are unclear on the role this protein plays in this disease. We have used in vivo genetic studies in the embryo and adult to extend our understanding of the role of β-Catenin in the normal and neoplastic prostate. Our gene deletion analysis revealed that prostate epithelial β-Catenin is required for embryonic prostate growth and branching but is dispensable in the normal adult organ. During development, β-Catenin controls the number of progenitors in the epithelial buds and regulates a discrete network of genes, including c-Myc and Nkx3.1. Deletion of β-Catenin in a Pten deleted model of castration-resistant prostate cancer demonstrated it is dispensable for disease progression in this setting. Complementary overexpression experiments, through in vivo protein stabilization, showed that β-Catenin promotes the formation of squamous epithelia during prostate development, even in the absence of androgens. β-Catenin overexpression in combination with Pten loss was able to drive progression to invasive carcinoma together with squamous metaplasia. These studies demonstrate that β-Catenin is essential for prostate development and that an inherent property of high levels of this protein in prostate epithelia is to drive squamous fate differentiation. In addition, they show that β-Catenin overexpression can promote invasive prostate cancer in a clinically relevant model of this disease. These data provide novel information on cancer progression pathways that give rise to lethal prostate disease in humans.

  1. Cadmium, Zinc, and Selenium Levels in Carcinoma of the Human Prostate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarafanov, Andrey; Centeno, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    .... The objectives are: 1) to establish reliability of using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) prostate tissue for analysis of Zn, Se and Cd tissue by comparing their levels in the fresh specimen...

  2. SSeCKS/AKAP12 induces repulsion between human prostate cancer and microvessel endothelial cells through the activation of Semaphorin 3F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen; Su, Wei; Zhang, Lijuan; Shang, Qingkun; Su, Bing

    2017-09-02

    Metastasis remains the primary cause of prostate cancer related death. Cancer cells need to contact endothelial cells and disrupt endothelial junctions to cross the endothelium for invasion and metastasis. The suppression of heterotypic repulsion between cancer and endothelial cells allows cancer cells to invade into the surrounding tissue. Here, we demonstrate that SSeCKS/AKAP12 induced repulsion between human prostate cancer and microvessel endothelial cells, which was mediated by an angiogenesis inhibitor Semaphorin 3F. Moreover, we examined AKAP12 and Semaphorin 3F mRNA expression in 42 prostate cancer and 30 benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue samples, and found that the expression of AKAP12 and Semaphorin 3F mRNA was inversely associated with the degree of aggressiveness of prostate cancer cells and tissues. An ordinal logistic regression analysis indicates that there is a positive association between the expression of AKAP12 and Semaphorin 3F in prostate cancer, suggesting that the activation of Semaphorin 3F by SSeCKS/AKAP12 may be involved in prostate cancer progression and metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Differentially expressed androgen-regulated genes in androgen-sensitive tissues reveal potential biomarkers of early prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Dogus Murat; Allioli, Nathalie; Decaussin, Myriam; de Bernard, Simon; Ruffion, Alain; Samarut, Jacques; Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Several data favor androgen receptor implication in prostate cancer initiation through the induction of several gene activation programs. The aim of the study is to identify potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) among androgen-regulated genes (ARG) and to evaluate comparative expression of these genes in normal prostate and normal prostate-related androgen-sensitive tissues that do not (or rarely) give rise to cancer. ARG were selected in non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial RWPE-1 cells stably expressing an exogenous human androgen receptor, using RNA-microarrays and validation by qRT-PCR. Expression of 48 preselected genes was quantified in tissue samples (seminal vesicles, prostate transitional zones and prostate cancers, benign prostatic hypertrophy obtained from surgical specimens) using TaqMan® low-density arrays. The diagnostic performances of these potential biomarkers were compared to that of genes known to be associated with PCa (i.e. PCA3 and DLX1). By crossing expression studies in 26 matched PCa and normal prostate transitional zone samples, and 35 matched seminal vesicle and PCa samples, 14 genes were identified. Similarly, 9 genes were overexpressed in 15 benign prostatic hypertrophy samples, as compared to PCa samples. Overall, we selected 8 genes of interest to evaluate their diagnostic performances in comparison with that of PCA3 and DLX1. Among them, 3 genes: CRYAB, KCNMA1 and SDPR, were overexpressed in all 3 reference non-cancerous tissues. The areas under ROC curves of these genes reached those of PCA3 (0.91) and DLX1 (0.94). We identified ARG with reduced expression in PCa and with significant diagnostic values for discriminating between cancerous and non-cancerous prostatic tissues, similar that of PCA3. Given their expression pattern, they could be considered as potentially protective against prostate cancer. Moreover, they could be complementary to known genes overexpressed in PCa and included along

  4. Augmentation of the anticancer activity of CYT997 in human prostate cancer by inhibiting Src activity

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Teng; Yafei Cai; Wenhu Pi; Lixia Gao; Chloe Shay

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Abnormalities of tubulin polymerization and microtubule assembly are often seen in cancer, which make them very suitable targets for the development of therapeutic approach against rapidly dividing and aggressive cancer cells. CYT997 is a novel microtubule-disrupting agent with anticancer activity in multiple cancer types including prostate cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of action of CYT997 in prostate cancer have not been well characterized. Methods Src knockdo...

  5. Augmentation of the anticancer activity of CYT997 in human prostate cancer by inhibiting Src activity

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, Yong; Cai, Yafei; Pi, Wenhu; Gao, Lixia; Shay, Chloe

    2017-01-01

    Background Abnormalities of tubulin polymerization and microtubule assembly are often seen in cancer, which make them very suitable targets for the development of therapeutic approach against rapidly dividing and aggressive cancer cells. CYT997 is a novel microtubule-disrupting agent with anticancer activity in multiple cancer types including prostate cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of action of CYT997 in prostate cancer have not been well characterized. Methods Src knockdown cells ...

  6. Se-methylselenocysteine alters collagen gene and protein expression in human prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Rachel; Elliott, Ruan M; Goldson, Andrew J; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2008-09-28

    The anti-cancer activity of selenium is dose-dependent and species-specific but the mechanism is unclear. Se-methylselenocysteine (MSC), found in selenium-enriched alliums, is one of the most potent forms. We exposed two human prostate cell lines (LNCaP clone FGC and PNT1A) to nutritionally relevant doses of MSC and selenite, ranging from deficient to the equivalent of selenium supplementation in humans. The cells were adapted for one month to attain steady-state selenium status. Two microarray platforms, an in-house printed microarray (14,000 genes) and the Affymetrix U133A array (22,000 genes) were used to probe the molecular effects of selenium dose and form and several selenium-responsive genes were identified, many of which have been ascribed to cancer cell growth and progression. In response to MSC supplementation, the expression of 23 genes changed significantly, including several collagen genes. Quantitative RT-PCR assays were designed and optimized for four of the collagen genes to validate array data. Significant decreases in expression of collagen type I alpha 1 (COL1A1), COL1A2 and COL7A1 genes were observed in cells adapted to MSC supplementation compared to the control and selenite exposed cells. There were significant increases in genes encoding other types of collagen, including significant increases in COL6A1 and COL4A5 in response to MSC dose. Functional changes in collagen type I protein expression in response to MSC were confirmed by ELISA. This study reveals for the first time that MSC can alter the expression of several types of collagen and thus potentially modulate the extracellular matrix and stroma, which may at least partially explain the anti-cancer activity of MSC.

  7. miR-409-3p/-5p promotes tumorigenesis, epithelial to mesenchymal transition and bone metastasis of human prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josson, Sajni; Gururajan, Murali; Hu, Peizhen; Shao, Chen; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Liu, Chunyan; Lao, Kaiqin; Lu, Chia-Lun; Lu, Yi-Tsung; Lichterman, Jake; Nandana, Srinivas; Li, Quanlin; Rogatko, Andre; Berel, Dror; Posadas, Edwin M.; Fazli, Ladan; Sareen, Dhruv; Chung, Leland W. K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose miR-409-3p/-5p is a microRNA expressed by embryonic stem cells and its role in cancer biology and metastasis is unknown. Our pilot studies demonstrated elevated miR-409-3p/-5p expression in human prostate cancer bone metastatic cell lines, therefore we defined the biological impact of manipulation of miR-409-3p/-5p in prostate cancer progression and correlated the levels of its expression with clinical human prostate cancer bone metastatic specimens. Experimental Design miRNA profiling of prostate cancer bone metastatic EMT cell line model was performed. Gleason score human tissue array was probed for validation of specific miRNAs. Additionally, genetic manipulation of miR-409-3p/-5p was performed to determine its role in tumor growth, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and bone metastasis in mouse models. Results Elevated expression of miR-409-3p/-5p was observed in bone metastatic prostate cancer cell lines and human prostate cancer tissues with higher Gleason scores. Elevated miR-409-3p expression levels correlated with prostate cancer patient progression free survival. Orthotopic delivery of miR-409-3p/-5p in the murine prostate gland induced tumors where the tumors expressed, EMT and stemness markers. Intracardiac inoculation (to mimic systemic dissemination) of miR-409-5p inhibitor treated bone metastatic ARCaPM prostate cancer cells in mice, led to decreased bone metastasis and increased survival compared to control vehicle-treated cells. Conclusion miR-409-3p/-5p plays an important role in prostate cancer biology by facilitating tumor growth, EMT and bone metastasis. This finding bear’s particular translational importance since miR-409-3p/-5p appears to be an attractive biomarker and/or possibly a therapeutic target to treat bones metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:24963047

  8. miR-409-3p/-5p promotes tumorigenesis, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and bone metastasis of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josson, Sajni; Gururajan, Murali; Hu, Peizhen; Shao, Chen; Chu, GinaChia-Yi; Zhau, Haiyen E; Liu, Chunyan; Lao, Kaiqin; Lu, Chia-Lun; Lu, Yi-Tsung; Lichterman, Jake; Nandana, Srinivas; Li, Quanlin; Rogatko, Andre; Berel, Dror; Posadas, Edwin M; Fazli, Ladan; Sareen, Dhruv; Chung, Leland W K

    2014-09-01

    miR-409-3p/-5p is a miRNA expressed by embryonic stem cells, and its role in cancer biology and metastasis is unknown. Our pilot studies demonstrated elevated miR-409-3p/-5p expression in human prostate cancer bone metastatic cell lines; therefore, we defined the biologic impact of manipulation of miR-409-3p/-5p on prostate cancer progression and correlated the levels of its expression with clinical human prostate cancer bone metastatic specimens. miRNA profiling of a prostate cancer bone metastatic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) cell line model was performed. A Gleason score human tissue array was probed for validation of specific miRNAs. In addition, genetic manipulation of miR-409-3p/-5p was performed to determine its role in tumor growth, EMT, and bone metastasis in mouse models. Elevated expression of miR-409-3p/-5p was observed in bone metastatic prostate cancer cell lines and human prostate cancer tissues with higher Gleason scores. Elevated miR-409-3p expression levels correlated with progression-free survival of patients with prostate cancer. Orthotopic delivery of miR-409-3p/-5p in the murine prostate gland induced tumors where the tumors expressed EMT and stemness markers. Intracardiac inoculation (to mimic systemic dissemination) of miR-409-5p inhibitor-treated bone metastatic ARCaPM prostate cancer cells in mice led to decreased bone metastasis and increased survival compared with control vehicle-treated cells. miR-409-3p/-5p plays an important role in prostate cancer biology by facilitating tumor growth, EMT, and bone metastasis. This finding bears particular translational importance as miR-409-3p/-5p appears to be an attractive biomarker and/or possibly a therapeutic target to treat bone metastatic prostate cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Oncogenic CUL4A determines the response to thalidomide treatment in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shancheng; Xu, Chuanliang; Cui, Zilian; Yu, Yongwei; Xu, Weidong; Wang, Fubo; Lu, Ji; Wei, Min; Lu, Xin; Gao, Xu; Liang, You

    2013-01-01

    Thalidomide is experimentally used to treat various human cancers; however, clinical responses to thalidomide are sporadic. Here we demonstrate that CUL4A plays an oncogenic role in prostate cancer development and prostate cancer cells with higher level of CUL4A are particularly sensitive to thalidomide treatment. We show that CUL4A is frequently overexpressed in human primary prostate cancer and cell lines. Notably, subjects with tumors that highly expressed CUL4A had poor overall survival. CUL4A downregulation inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo, whereas CUL4A overexpression transformed human normal prostate epithelial cells and promoted invasion, which was attenuated by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor. We further show that the sensitivity to thalidomide is positively correlated with CUL4A expression in a panel of prostate cell lines. Ectopic CUL4A expression greatly enhanced sensitivity to thalidomide, while its downregulation conferred resistance to this drug. Mechanistically, thalidomide decreased CUL4A in a time- and dose-dependent manner, consequently leading to inaction of ERK pathway. Finally, we show that cereblon level is correlated with CUL4A expression and downregulated in thalidomide-resistant prostate cancer cell. Our results offer the first evidence that CUL4A is a potential therapeutic target for prostate cancer and may serve as a biomarker for assessing prognosis of human prostate cancer and response to thalidomide treatment. PMID:22422151

  10. Cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase activity role in normal and inflamed human dental pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoto, G; Ferrante, M; D'Intino, M; Rega, L; Dolci, M; Trentini, P; Ciavarelli, L

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) plays an important role in pulp tissues. High levels of cGMP PDE are found in dental pulp cells. In the present study cGMP PDE activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic cGMP PDE control values for normal healthy pulps were 4.74+/-0.32 nmol/mg of proteins. In reversible pulpitis the cGMP PDE activity increased almost 3 times. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values increased 4.5 times compared with the normal healthy pulps activity. The differences between the groups (control vs. reversible pulpitis and vs. irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant. These results point to a role of cGMP PDE in the initial pulp response after injury.

  11. Cyclic Amp phosphodiesterase activity in normal and inflamed human dental pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoto, G; Menna, V; Serra, E; Santoleri, F; Perfetti, G; Ciavarelli, L; Trentini, P

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (cAMP PDE) seems to be important in pulp tissues. High levels of cAMP PDE have been demonstrated to be in dental pulp cells. In the present study cAMP PDE activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic cAMP PDE control values for normal healthy pulps were 12.14 +/- 3.74 nmols/mg of proteins. In reversible pulpitis the cAMP PDE activity increased almost 2.5 times. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values increased 4.5 times compared with normal healthy pulps activity. The differences between the groups (control vs. reversible pulpitis and vs. irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant. These results could point to a role of cAMP PDE in the initial pulp response after injury.

  12. Simvastatin Up-Regulates Annexin A10 That Can Inhibit the Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion in Androgen-Independent Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Kato, Haruo; Furuya, Yosuke; Koike, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    Statins have recently been studied for their proapoptotic and antimetastatic effects. However, the exact mechanisms of their anticancer actions remain unclear. Using microarrays, we discovered up-regulation of annexin A10 (ANXA10) in PC-3 cells after simvastatin treatment. ANXA10 reportedly has antitumor effects. In this study, we evaluated the effects of simvastatin on ANXA10 signaling in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. PC-3, LNCaP-LA (which were derived from LNCaP cells and cultured in 10% charcoal-stripped fetal bovine serum for 3 months), and DU145 human prostate cancer cell lines were used. Prostate tissues were collected from 60 patients (benign prostatic hyperplasia [BPH], n = 20; prostate cancer with a Gleason score of 7, n = 20; prostate cancer with a Gleason score of 8-10, n = 20) at the time of prostate biopsies performed. We used a nude mouse tumor xenograft model with administration of simvastatin or phosphate-buffered saline via intraperitoneal injection. Simvastatin inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion of PC-3, LNCaP-LA, and DU145 cells. The expression level of ANXA10 was up-regulated by simvastatin in PC-3, LNCaP-LA, and DU145 cells. Transfection with ANXA10 inhibited PC-3 and LNCaP-LA cells proliferation, migration, and invasion. Knockdown of ANXA10 by siRNA increased the proliferation of PC-3 and LNCaP-LA cells. In a nude mouse xenograft model of PC-3 cells, simvastatin induced both reduction in the tumor size and up-regulation of ANXA10 expression. In human prostate biopsy samples, ANXA10 mRNA expression was significantly lower in the prostate cancer group than in the BPH group. Next, we found that up-regulation of ANXA10 in PC-3 resulted in down-regulation of S100 calcium binding protein A4 (S100A4), which is reportedly correlated with aggressiveness and a worse prognosis for patients with different types of carcinomas. Expression of S100A4 was down-regulated by simvastatin. In PC-3 cells, knockdown of S

  13. Genetic and epigenetic stability of human spermatogonial stem cells during long-term culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nickkholgh, Bita; Mizrak, S. Canan; van Daalen, Saskia K. M.; Korver, Cindy M.; Sadri-Ardekani, Hooman; Repping, Sjoerd; van Pelt, Ans M. M.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the genetic and epigenetic stability of human spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) during long-term culture. Experimental basic science study. Reproductive biology laboratory. Cryopreserved human testicular tissue from two prostate cancer patients with normal spermatogenesis. None.

  14. Characterising Castrate Tolerant Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    ASHLEE KATE CLARK

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a prevalent disease in aging males. This thesis explores prostate cancer cells that escape current therapy and give rise to end-stage disease. Using sophisticated experimental approaches, this important cancer cell population was identified and characterised in human prostate cancer tissues.  Our discoveries will eventually lead to improved cancer treatments for men with prostate cancer.

  15. Simple mucin-type carbohydrates in normal and malignant human endometrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, V; Mandel, U; Svenstrup, B

    1995-01-01

    The simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens, Tn, sialosyl-Tn, and T, are tumor-associated antigens of adenocarcinomas. We evaluated by immunohistochemistry the expression of Tn, sialosyl-Tn (s-Tn), T, and sialosyl-T (s-T) antigens in normal nonsecretory, early gestational, and malignant human...... and malignant endometrium, and the expression of s-T antigen was positively correlated with E2 levels in serum. Our findings suggest a hormonal influence on expression of simple mucin-type carbohydrates in human endometrium. However, the accumulation of Tn and s-Tn antigens in malignant endometrial cells seem...

  16. 3D Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model of Persistent VZV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  17. Localization of actin in normal human hepatocytes using fluorescent phallotoxins and immunohistochemical amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkoel, L; Brisse, J; Capo, C; Benoliel, A M; Bongrand, P; Garcia, T; Chamlian, A

    1992-07-01

    Two different methods, fluorescent phallotoxins and immunohistochemical amplification systems were used to visualize actin in normal human hepatocytes. With fluorescent phallotoxins (NBD-phallacidin or rhodamine phalloidin), F-actin was distributed along the plasma membranes and at the bile canaliculi. With immunohistochemical methods (biotin-avidin, biotin-streptavidin, silver enhancement), actin was found at the same level, however a cytoplasmic staining was observed and discussed as G-actin localization.

  18. Identification, characterization and expression of novel Sex Hormone Binding Globulin alternative first exons in the human prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Torres Inés

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG gene, located at 17p13.1, comprises, at least, two different transcription units regulated by two different promoters. The first transcription unit begins with the exon 1 sequence and is responsible for the production of plasma SHBG by the hepatocytes, while the second begins with an alternative exon 1 sequence, which replaces the exon 1 present in liver transcripts. Alternative exon 1 transcription and translation has only been demonstrated in the testis of transgenic mice containing an 11-kb human SHBG transgene and in the human testis. Our goal has been to further characterize the 5' end of the SHBG gene and analyze the presence of the SHBG alternative transcripts in human prostate tissue and derived cell lines. Results Using a combination of in silico and in vitro studies, we have demonstrated that the SHBG gene, along with exon 1 and alternative exon 1 (renamed here exon 1A, contains four additional alternative first exons: the novel exons 1B, 1C, and 1E, and a previously identified exon 1N, which has been further characterized and renamed as exon 1D. We have shown that these four alternative first exons are all spliced to the same 3' splice site of SHBG exon 2, and that exon 1A and the novel exon 1B can be spliced to exon 1. We have also demonstrated the presence of SHBG transcripts beginning with exons 1B, 1C and 1D in prostate tissues and cell lines, as well as in several non-prostatic cell lines. Finally, the alignment of the SHBG mammalian sequences revealed that, while exons 1C, 1D and 1E are very well conserved phylogenetically through non-primate mammal species, exon 1B probably aroused in apes due to a single nucleotide change that generated a new 5' splice site in exon 1B. Conclusion The identification of multiple transcription start sites (TSS upstream of the annotated first exon of human SHBG, and the detection of the alternative transcripts in human prostate

  19. Quantitation of human mammary epithelial antigens in cells cultured from normal and cancerous breast tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, M; Peterson, J A; Ceriani, R L

    1981-02-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay technique was developed to quantitate the level of human breast celltype specific antigens on cells from normal breast and from various established cell lines of breast and nonbreast origins. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed four major proteinaceous components (150,000; 75,000; 60,000; and 48,000) in human milk fat globule membranes that were used to immunize rabbits in order to elicit antimammary epithelial cell antibody. Antisera obtained were rendered specific by absorptions and were able to recognize three specific mammary epithelial components of the breast epithelial cell. Human mammary epithelial (HME) antigen expression was highest (1290 ng/10(6) cells) in normal breast epithelial cells from primary cultures of normal breasts. Lower levels (range: 955 to 330 ng/10(6) cells) were found in breast epithelial cells from cell lines established from cancerous breast tissue. Cells of nonbreast origins as well as fibroblasts from breast gave much lower values (less than 30 ng/10(6) cells). On treatment, with trypsin, of two breast epithelial cell lines (MDA-MB-157 and MCF-7) 80 to 85% of their HME antigen expression was lost, suggesting that a majority of these breast antigens reside on the cell surface.

  20. Laminin receptor 37/67LR regulates adhesion and proliferation of normal human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoufik Khalfaoui

    Full Text Available Interactions between the cell basal membrane domain and the basement membrane are involved in several cell functions including proliferation, migration and differentiation. Intestinal epithelial cells can interact with laminin, a major intestinal basement membrane glycoprotein, via several cell-surface laminin-binding proteins including integrin and non-integrin receptors. The 37/67kDa laminin receptor (37/67LR is one of these but its role in normal epithelial cells is still unknown. The aim of this study was to characterise the expression pattern and determine the main function of 37/67LR in the normal human small intestinal epithelium. Immunolocalization studies revealed that 37/67LR was predominantly present in the undifferentiated/proliferative region of the human intestinal crypt in both the immature and adult intestine. Using a human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC cell line as experimental model, we determined that 37/67LR was expressed in proliferative cells in both the cytoplasmic and membrane compartments. Small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction of 37/67LR expression led to HIEC cell-cycle reduction and loss of the ability to adhere to laminin-related peptides under conditions not altering ribosomal function. Taken together, these findings indicate that 37/67LR regulates proliferation and adhesion in normal intestinal epithelial cells independently of its known association with ribosomal function.

  1. Coregulatory effects of epidermal growth factor, dihydrotestosterone, and prolactin on benign human prostatic hyperplasia tissue culture proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, T; Petein, M; van Velthoven, R; De Decker, R; Assenmacher, C; Corbusier, A; Pasteels, J L; Kiss, R; Schulman, C

    1997-01-01

    A variety of hormones have demonstrated effects on prostatic tissue growth dynamics. Our goal was to define the effect of dihydrotestosterone (DHT), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and prolactin (PRL) on prostate cellular proliferation. Thirty benign human prostatic hyperplasias (BPH) were maintained 48 hr as in vitro cultures. Culture media were supplemented with EGF, DHT, and PRL alone and in combinations. Proliferation was assessed by labeling with tritiated thymidine. The proliferative response of individual BPH cultures was heterogeneous. DHT and EGF tended to have a greater proliferative effect than PRL, both in terms of the percent cultures responding and the magnitude of the response. PRL antagonized EGF-induced proliferative effects. EGF- and PRL-mediated effects correlated with each other, while DHT-mediated effects did not correlate with either those of PRL or EGF. The proliferative response of individual BPH to DHT, EGF, and PRL, alone or in combination, is too variable to define a predictable response to their influence. Our methodology represents a technique with the capacity to define therapeutic potential for individual cases.

  2. Skip Regulates TGF-β1-Induced Extracellular Matrix Degrading Proteases Expression in Human PC-3 Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Villar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether Ski-interacting protein (SKIP regulates TGF-β1-stimulated expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, and uPA Inhibitor (PAI-1 in the androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell model. Materials and Methods. PC-3 prostate cancer cell line was used. The role of SKIP was evaluated using synthetic small interference RNA (siRNA compounds. The expression of uPA, MMP-9, and PAI-1 was evaluated by zymography assays, RT-PCR, and promoter transactivation analysis. Results. In PC-3 cells TGF-β1 treatment stimulated uPA, PAI-1, and MMP-9 expressions. The knockdown of SKIP in PC-3 cells enhanced the basal level of uPA, and TGF-β1 treatment inhibited uPA production. Both PAI-1 and MMP-9 production levels were increased in response to TGF-β1. The ectopic expression of SKIP inhibited both TGF-β1-induced uPA and MMP-9 promoter transactivation, while PAI-1 promoter response to the factor was unaffected. Conclusions. SKIP regulates the expression of uPA, PAI-1, and MMP-9 stimulated by TGF-β1 in PC-3 cells. Thus, SKIP is implicated in the regulation of extracellular matrix degradation and can therefore be suggested as a novel therapeutic target in prostate cancer treatment.

  3. Evaluating intensity normalization on MRIs of human brain with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mohak; Xiao, Yiming; Subbanna, Nagesh; Francis, Simon; Arnold, Douglas L; Collins, D Louis; Arbel, Tal

    2011-04-01

    Intensity normalization is an important pre-processing step in the study and analysis of Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of human brains. As most parametric supervised automatic image segmentation and classification methods base their assumptions regarding the intensity distributions on a standardized intensity range, intensity normalization takes on a very significant role. One of the fast and accurate approaches proposed for intensity normalization is that of Nyul and colleagues. In this work, we present, for the first time, an extensive validation of this approach in real clinical domain where even after intensity inhomogeneity correction that accounts for scanner-specific artifacts, the MRI volumes can be affected from variations such as data heterogeneity resulting from multi-site multi-scanner acquisitions, the presence of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions and the stage of disease progression in the brain. Using the distributional divergence criteria, we evaluate the effectiveness of the normalization in rendering, under the distributional assumptions of segmentation approaches, intensities that are more homogenous for the same tissue type while simultaneously resulting in better tissue type separation. We also demonstrate the advantage of the decile based piece-wise linear approach on the task of MS lesion segmentation against a linear normalization approach over three image segmentation algorithms: a standard Bayesian classifier, an outlier detection based approach and a Bayesian classifier with Markov Random Field (MRF) based post-processing. Finally, to demonstrate the independence of the effectiveness of normalization from the complexity of segmentation algorithm, we evaluate the Nyul method against the linear normalization on Bayesian algorithms of increasing complexity including a standard Bayesian classifier with Maximum Likelihood parameter estimation and a Bayesian classifier with integrated data priors, in addition to the above Bayesian classifier

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Apoptosis by Gugulipid Extract of Ayurvedic Medicine Plant Commiphora mukul in Human Prostate Cancer Cells Is Regulated by c-Jun N-Terminal KinaseS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Prakash, Lakshmi; Badmaev, Vladmir; Majeed, Muhammed; Singh, Shivendra V.

    2011-01-01

    Gugulipid (GL), extract of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, has been used to treat a variety of ailments. We report an anticancer effect and mechanism of GL against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with GL significantly inhibited the viability of human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and its androgen-independent variant (C81) with an IC50 of ∼1 μM (24-h treatment), at pharmacologically relevant concentrations standardized to its major active constituent z-guggulsterone. The GL-induced growth inhibition correlated with apoptosis induction as evidenced by an increase in cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation and sub-G0/G1-DNA fraction, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The GL-induced apoptosis was associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. The induction of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak and a decrease of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein Bcl-2 were observed in GL-treated cells. SV40 immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Bax-Bak double-knockout mice were significantly more resistant to GL-induced cell killing compared with wild-type cells. It is interesting to note that a representative normal prostate epithelial cell line (PrEC) was relatively more resistant to GL-mediated cellular responses compared with prostate cancer cells. The GL treatment caused the activation of JNK that functioned upstream of Bax activation in apoptosis response. The GL-induced conformational change of Bax and apoptosis were significantly suppressed by genetic suppression of JNK activation. In conclusion, the present study indicates that ROS-dependent apoptosis by GL is regulated by JNK signaling axis. PMID:21115635

  5. Reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis by gugulipid extract of Ayurvedic medicine plant Commiphora mukul in human prostate cancer cells is regulated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dong; Zeng, Yan; Prakash, Lakshmi; Badmaev, Vladmir; Majeed, Muhammed; Singh, Shivendra V

    2011-03-01

    Gugulipid (GL), extract of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, has been used to treat a variety of ailments. We report an anticancer effect and mechanism of GL against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with GL significantly inhibited the viability of human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and its androgen-independent variant (C81) with an IC(50) of ∼1 μM (24-h treatment), at pharmacologically relevant concentrations standardized to its major active constituent z-guggulsterone. The GL-induced growth inhibition correlated with apoptosis induction as evidenced by an increase in cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation and sub-G(0)/G(1)-DNA fraction, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The GL-induced apoptosis was associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. The induction of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak and a decrease of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein Bcl-2 were observed in GL-treated cells. SV40 immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Bax-Bak double-knockout mice were significantly more resistant to GL-induced cell killing compared with wild-type cells. It is interesting to note that a representative normal prostate epithelial cell line (PrEC) was relatively more resistant to GL-mediated cellular responses compared with prostate cancer cells. The GL treatment caused the activation of JNK that functioned upstream of Bax activation in apoptosis response. The GL-induced conformational change of Bax and apoptosis were significantly suppressed by genetic suppression of JNK activation. In conclusion, the present study indicates that ROS-dependent apoptosis by GL is regulated by JNK signaling axis.

  6. [Identification of low-molecular weight prostate-specific antigen(PSA) and lactoferrin in the prostatic secretion of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke-xin; Wang, Xiao-feng

    2006-12-18

    To investigate the expression of low-molecular-weight PSA(lw-PSA) and lactoferrin in the expressed prostatic secretion (EPS) from both benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and normal prostate. Forty human EPS samples obtained from 20 BPH patients and 20 normal males were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Mass spectrometry was performed to confirm the nature of the secreted proteins in EPS. One uniquely expressed protein in BPH was detected and mass spectrometry determined its nature as lw-PSA (molecular weight 10x10(3), pI 8.5-9.3). More importantly, Western blotting analysis also revealed that lw-PSA detected in BPH-EPS, but was undetectable in BPH-free EPS. In addition, up-regulation of Lactoferrin (molecular weight 35x10(3), pI 7-7.5) in BPH-EPS, as compared with BPH-free EPS, was also observed. More interestingly, lactoferrin was absent in prostate cancer tissues. Our results indicate lw-PSA may be produced specifically by BPH epithelium and it has a potential to be used as a specific biological marker for the diagnosis of BPH. In addition, benign prostatic epithelium can produce more lactoferrin while prostate cancer tissues go without its lactoferrin secretion.

  7. Ageratum conyzoides L. inhibits 5-alpha-reductase gene expression in human prostate cells and reduces symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy in otherwise healthy men in a double blind randomized placebo controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detering, Matthew; Steels, Elizabeth; Koyyalamudi, Sundar Rao; Allifranchini, Elena; Bocchietto, Elena; Vitetta, Luis

    2017-10-19

    A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial assessed the efficacy and safety of Ageratum conyzoides in treating benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). In this study, 109 men with medically diagnosed BPH, aged 41-76 years, were administered the investigational product, A. conyzoides extract at a dose of 250 mg/d or placebo, q.d. for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measures were the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), daily urinary frequency and safety evaluations. The secondary outcome measures were testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, oestradiol, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) and cortisol levels, and prostate specific antigen (PSA), lipids, blood glucose, the Aging Male's Symptom (AMS) Score and sexual function assessed by Derogatis Interview for Sexual Functioning-Self Report (DISF-SR). The effect of A. conyzoides L extract on gene expression of 5-alpha-reductase in human prostate cells was also investigated to elucidate a potential mechanism of action. The clinical study, showed a significant reduction in total IPSS score (p prostate epithelial cells. The overall results indicate that A. conyzoides may be an effective treatment for reducing symptoms of BPH in healthy men, in part, through inhibition of 5-alpha-reductase enzyme activity. © 2017 BioFactors, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. Breast and prostate cancer productivity costs: a comparison of the human capital approach and the friction cost approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Paul; Timmons, Aileen; Walsh, Paul M; Sharp, Linda

    2012-05-01

    Productivity costs constitute a substantial proportion of the total societal costs associated with cancer. We compared the results of applying two different analytical methods--the traditional human capital approach (HCA) and the emerging friction cost approach (FCA)--to estimate breast and prostate cancer productivity costs in Ireland in 2008. Data from a survey of breast and prostate cancer patients were combined with population-level survival estimates and a national wage data set to calculate costs of temporary disability (cancer-related work absence), permanent disability (workforce departure, reduced working hours), and premature mortality. For breast cancer, productivity costs per person using the HCA were € 193,425 and those per person using the FCA were € 8,103; for prostate cancer, the comparable estimates were € 109,154 and € 8,205, respectively. The HCA generated higher costs for younger patients (breast cancer) because of greater lifetime earning potential. In contrast, the FCA resulted in higher productivity costs for older male patients (prostate cancer) commensurate with higher earning capacity over a shorter time period. Reduced working hours postcancer was a key driver of total HCA productivity costs. HCA costs were sensitive to assumptions about discount and growth rates. FCA costs were sensitive to assumptions about the friction period. The magnitude of the estimates obtained in this study illustrates the importance of including productivity costs when considering the economic impact of illness. Vastly different results emerge from the application of the HCA and the FCA, and this finding emphasizes the importance of choosing the study perspective carefully and being explicit about assumptions that underpin the methods. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. O-GlcNAc transferase integrates metabolic pathways to regulate the stability of c-MYC in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkonen, Harri M; Minner, Sarah; Guldvik, Ingrid J; Sandmann, Mareike Julia; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Berge, Viktor; Svindland, Aud; Schlomm, Thorsten; Mills, Ian G

    2013-08-15

    Metabolic disruptions that occur widely in cancers offer an attractive focus for generalized treatment strategies. The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) senses metabolic status and produces an essential substrate for O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT), which glycosylates and thereby modulates the function of its target proteins. Here, we report that the HBP is activated in prostate cancer cells and that OGT is a central regulator of c-Myc stability in this setting. HBP genes were overexpressed in human prostate cancers and androgen regulated in cultured human cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis of human specimens (n = 1987) established that OGT is upregulated at the protein level and that its expression correlates with high Gleason score, pT and pN stages, and biochemical recurrence. RNA interference-mediated siliencing or pharmacologic inhibition of OGT was sufficient to decrease prostate cancer cell growth. Microarray profiling showed that the principal effects of OGT inhibition in prostate cancer cells were related to cell-cycle progression and DNA replication. In particular, c-MYC was identified as a candidate upstream regulator of OGT target genes and OGT inhibition elicited a dose-dependent decrease in the levels of c-MYC protein but not c-MYC mRNA in cell lines. Supporting this relationship, expression of c-MYC and OGT was tightly correlated in human prostate cancer samples (n = 1306). Our findings identify HBP as a modulator of prostate cancer growth and c-MYC as a key target of OGT function in prostate cancer cells.

  10. Expression profiles of SnoN in normal and cancerous human tissues support its tumor suppressor role in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine S Jahchan

    Full Text Available SnoN is a negative regulator of TGF-β signaling and also an activator of the tumor suppressor p53 in response to cellular stress. Its role in human cancer is complex and controversial with both pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic activities reported. To clarify its role in human cancer and provide clinical relevance to its signaling activities, we examined SnoN expression in normal and cancerous human esophageal, ovarian, pancreatic and breast tissues. In normal tissues, SnoN is expressed in both the epithelium and the surrounding stroma at a moderate level and is predominantly cytoplasmic. SnoN levels in all tumor epithelia examined are lower than or similar to that in the matched normal samples, consistent with its anti-tumorigenic activity in epithelial cells. In contrast, SnoN expression in the stroma is highly upregulated in the infiltrating inflammatory cells in high-grade esophageal and ovarian tumor samples, suggesting that SnoN may potentially promote malignant progression through modulating the tumor microenvironment in these tumor types. The overall levels of SnoN expression in these cancer tissues do not correlate with the p53 status. However, in human cancer cell lines with amplification of the snoN gene, a strong correlation between increased SnoN copy number and inactivation of p53 was detected, suggesting that the tumor suppressor SnoN-p53 pathway must be inactivated, either through downregulation of SnoN or inactivation of p53, in order to allow cancer cell to proliferate and survive. These data strongly suggest that SnoN can function as a tumor suppressor at early stages of tumorigenesis in human cancer tissues.

  11. Regulation of Erk1/2 activation by osteopontin in PC3 human prostate cancer cells

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    Chellaiah Meenakshi A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteopontin (OPN has been shown to play many roles in the progression of cancer. We have recently demonstrated the activation of Akt by OPN. Integrin-linked kinase and PI3-kinase are integral proteins in OPN/AKT pathway in PC3 cells. To investigate the role of the extracellular receptors in OPN signaling, we have examined the spatio-temporal regulation of CD44 and integrin αvβ3 receptor in OPN-induced Akt activation in PC3 cells. Results Here, our studies demonstrate that OPN can activate Akt either through the αVβ3 integrin or the CD44 cell surface receptor. Members of the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK family have been shown to be up-regulated in a variety of human cancers and have been implicated in the metastatic behavior. Our studies have demonstrated an increase in the phosphorylation of c-Raf at Ser259 and Ser338 in PC3 cells over-expressing OPN. This increase matches up with the Erk1/2 phosphorylation at Thr202/204 and activation. However, the inhibition of Akt activity augments the phosphorylation state of ERK1/2 to two to three fold with a concomitant reduction in the phosphorylation state of c-Raf at Ser259. Conclusions Regulation c-Raf phosphorylation at Ser259 has a role in the anti-apoptotic pathways mediated by Akt or Raf/MEK/ERK proteins. OPN may have dual effects in the activation of Erk1/2. We propose this based on the observations that while OPN activates c-Raf and Erk1/2; it also acts to inhibit c-Raf and Erk1/2 activation through Akt pathway. Our observations suggest that the activation of c-Raf-ERK cascade may promote cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer cells and OPN signaling has a role in the anti-apoptotic mechanism.

  12. Human feasibility study of fluorescence spectroscopy guided optical biopsy needle for prostate cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werahera, Priya N; Jasion, Edward A; Liu, Yongjun; Daily, John W; Arangua, Paul; Jones, Clifford; Nash, S Russell; Morrell, Michael; Crawford, E David

    2015-01-01

    Current prostate biopsy cores have a very low diagnostic yield. These biopsies often fail to diagnose prostate cancer since 90% of cores are histopathologically classified as benign. The concentrations of endogenous fluorophores in prostate tissue vary with disease states. Thus, fluorescence spectroscopy could be utilized to quantify these variations for identification of malignant lesions. We investigated clinical feasibility of a 14 gauge (1.98 mm) optical biopsy needle guided by fluorescence spectroscopy for real-time in vivo prostate cancer diagnosis. Built-in optical sensor has 8×100μm fibers for tissue excitation and a single 200μm fiber to collect spectral data. Custom-made fluorometer has 2 light-emitting diodes at 290 and 340 nm and a spectrometer. User interface for fluorometer operation and data collection was developed using LabView software. Each spectral data acquisition required ~2 seconds. The in vivo biopsies were performed during radical retropubic prostatectomy surgery on the exposed prostate with blood flow to the gland intact. A tissue biopsy core was obtained from each biopsy site after acquisition of spectral data. Above procedure was repeated ex vivo after surgical excision of the prostate. Biopsy cores were histopathologically classified as either benign or malignant and correlated with corresponding spectral data. Partial Least Square analysis was performed to determine diagnostically significant principal components as potential classifiers. A linear support vector machine and leave-one-out cross validation method was employed for tissue classification. Thirteen patients were consented to the study. Histopathological analysis found cancer in 29/208 in vivo and 51/224 ex vivo viable biopsy cores. Study results show 72% sensitivity, 66% specificity, and 93% negative predictive value for in vivo and 75%, 80%, and 93%, respectively, for ex vivo malignant versus benign prostatic tissue classification. Optical biopsy needle has a very high

  13. Hypoxic regulation of cytoglobin and neuroglobin expression in human normal and tumor tissues

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    Emara Marwan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoglobin (Cygb and neuroglobin (Ngb are recently identified globin molecules that are expressed in vertebrate tissues. Upregulation of Cygb and Ngb under hypoxic and/or ischemic conditions in vitro and in vivo increases cell survival, suggesting possible protective roles through prevention of oxidative damage. We have previously shown that Ngb is expressed in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cell lines, and that expression of its transcript and protein can be significantly increased after exposure to physiologically relevant levels of hypoxia. In this study, we extended this work to determine whether Cygb is also expressed in GBM cells, and whether its expression is enhanced under hypoxic conditions. We also compared Cygb and Ngb expression in human primary tumor specimens, including brain tumors, as well as in human normal tissues. Immunoreactivity of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX, a hypoxia-inducible metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, was used as an endogenous marker of hypoxia. Results Cygb transcript and protein were expressed in human GBM cells, and this expression was significantly increased in most cells following 48 h incubation under hypoxia. We also showed that Cygb and Ngb are expressed in both normal tissues and human primary cancers, including GBM. Among normal tissues, Cygb and Ngb expression was restricted to distinct cell types and was especially prominent in ductal cells. Additionally, certain normal organs (e.g. stomach fundus, small bowel showed distinct regional co-localization of Ngb, Cygb and CA IX. In most tumors, Ngb immunoreactivity was significantly greater than that of Cygb. In keeping with previous in vitro results, tumor regions that were positively stained for CA IX were also positive for Ngb and Cygb, suggesting that hypoxic upregulation of Ngb and Cygb also occurs in vivo. Conclusions Our finding of hypoxic up-regulation of Cygb/Ngb in GBM cell lines and human

  14. The Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Prostate Cancer This booklet is about prostate cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer ... ePub This booklet covers: The anatomy of the prostate and basics about prostate cancer Treatments for prostate ...

  15. Distribution of a major connective tissue protein, fibronectin, in normal human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, S; Vaheri, A

    1978-04-01

    Fibronectin is a major surface-associated glycoprotein of cultured fibroblasts and it is also present in human plasma. Antiserum specific for human fibronectin was used to study the distribution of fibronectin in normal adult human tissues. The protein was detected (a) characteristically in various basement membranes including capillary walls: (b) around individual smooth muscle cells and in the sarcolemma of striated muscle fibers; and (c) in the stroma of lymphatic tissue and as thin fibers in loose connective tissue. The distribution of fibronectin was distinct from that of collagen and elastic fibers, but was very similar to reticulin, as demonstrated by conventional histological staining. The results indicate that fibronectin is a major component of connective tissue matrix. The distribution also indicates that most types of adherent cells abut fibronectin-containing structures. This supports the possible role of fibronectin in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in tissues.

  16. Evaluation of MCF10A as a Reliable Model for Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qu

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths for women worldwide. Various cell models have been developed to study breast cancer tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug sensitivity. The MCF10A human mammary epithelial cell line is a widely used in vitro model for studying normal breast cell function and transformation. However, there is limited knowledge about whether MCF10A cells reliably represent normal human mammary cells. MCF10A cells were grown in monolayer, suspension (mammosphere culture, three-dimensional (3D "on-top" Matrigel, 3D "cell-embedded" Matrigel, or mixed Matrigel/collagen I gel. Suspension culture was performed with the MammoCult medium and low-attachment culture plates. Cells grown in 3D culture were fixed and subjected to either immunofluorescence staining or embedding and sectioning followed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. Cells or slides were stained for protein markers commonly used to identify mammary progenitor and epithelial cells. MCF10A cells expressed markers representing luminal, basal, and progenitor phenotypes in two-dimensional (2D culture. When grown in suspension culture, MCF10A cells showed low mammosphere-forming ability. Cells in mammospheres and 3D culture expressed both luminal and basal markers. Surprisingly, the acinar structure formed by MCF10A cells in 3D culture was positive for both basal markers and the milk proteins β-casein and α-lactalbumin. MCF10A cells exhibit a unique differentiated phenotype in 3D culture which may not exist or be rare in normal human breast tissue. Our results raise a question as to whether the commonly used MCF10A cell line is a suitable model for human mammary cell studies.

  17. Differential Effects of Tea Extracts on Growth and Cytokine Production by Normal and Leukemic Human Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Bayer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tea is one of the world’s most highly consumed beverages, second only to water. It is affordable and abundant and thus has great potential for improving health of those in both developed and developing areas. Green, oolong, and black teas differ in the extent of fermentation and types of bioactive polyphenols produced. Green tea and its major polyphenol decrease growth of some cancer cells and effect production of immune system cytokines. This study compares the effects of different types of tea extracts on viability and cytokine production by normal and leukemic human T lymphocytes. Generation of the toxic reactive oxygen species H2O2 by extracts was also examined.Methods: The Jurkat T lymphoblastic leukemia cells and mitogen-stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used in this study. Cell viability was determined by (3-4,5-dimethylthiamizol-2-yl-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and production of interleukin-2 by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay. Levels of H2O2 generated by tea extracts were determined using the xylenol-orange method.Results: We found that green, oolong, and black tea extracts differentially effect the growth and viability of T lymphoblastic leukemia cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, substantially decreasing both growth and viability of leukemic T lymphocytes and having much lesser effects on their normal counterparts. Tea extracts also had differential effects on the production of the T lymphocyte growth factor interleukin-2, significantly decreasing production by leukemic cells while having only minor effects on normal cells. All three extracts induced H2O2 generation, with green and oolong tea extracts having the greatest effect. Leukemic cells were much more susceptible to growth inhibition and killing by H2O2 than normal lymphocytes.Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(4:72-85 Conclusions: The three tea extracts studied altered leukemic T lymphocyte

  18. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus load normalized by cell quantification as predictor of acute respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Novo, Miriam; Boga, José A; Álvarez-Argüelles, Marta E; Rojo-Alba, Susana; Fernández, Ana; Menéndez, María J; de Oña, María; Melón, Santiago

    2018-01-05

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a common cause of respiratory infections. The main objective is to analyze the prediction ability of viral load of HRSV normalized by cell number in respiratory symptoms. A prospective, descriptive and analytical study was performed. From 7307 respiratory samples processed between December 2014 to April 2016, 1019 HRSV-positive samples, were included in this study. Low respiratory tract infection was present in 729 patients (71.54%). Normalized HRSV load was calculated by quantification of HRSV genome and human β-globin gene and expressed as log10 copies/1000 cells. HRSV mean loads were 4.09 ± 2.08 and 4.82 ± 2.09 log10 copies/1000 cells in the 549 pharyngeal and 470 nasopharyngeal samples, respectively (p respiratory tract infection and 4.22 ± 2.28 log10 copies/1000 cells with upper respiratory tract infection or febrile syndrome (p < 0.05). A possible cut off value to predict LRTI evolution was tentatively established. Normalization of viral load by cell number in the samples is essential to ensure an optimal virological molecular diagnosis avoiding that the quality of samples affects the results. A high viral load can be a useful marker to predict disease progression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. [Physico-chemical and kinetic properties of hexokinase isoenzymes from human normal and tumor tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monakhov, N K; Shvartsman, A L; Neĭfakh, S A

    1975-01-01

    Individual hexokinase isoenzymes (isoHK) are isolated from normal and malignant human stomach mucosa. IsoHK from tumour tissue are found to have KM for glucose 10 times as low as isoHK from normal tissue. Molecular weights of individual isoHK from normal and tumour tissues are similar (at the range of 112,000-125,000). The treatment of protein preparation with 8M urea in the presence of 1% sodium docecyl sulphate resulted in the appearance of a single band with molecular weight of 58,000-60,000 for all the isoHK under polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Intensive bands with molecular weight of 60,000 and 96,000 and a number of minor bands were observed under polyacrylamide gel disc elect-ophoresis in the absence of urea. 2-Mercaptoethanol did not affect the results of disc electrophoresis. It is concluded that the molecule of human hexokinase consists of two subunits with molecular weight of 60,000.

  20. Primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma after human chorionic gonadotropin normalization following hydatidiform mole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maestá, Izildinha; Leite, Fábio Vicente; Michelin, Odair Carlito

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma (PPC) is rare and frequently leads to death. CASES: Two young patients presented with previous molar pregnancy and spontaneous serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) normalization. Patient 1 was referred to our center after partial response to chemo......BACKGROUND: Primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma (PPC) is rare and frequently leads to death. CASES: Two young patients presented with previous molar pregnancy and spontaneous serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) normalization. Patient 1 was referred to our center after partial response...... to chemotherapy. Pulmonary lobectomy was performed, and hCG rapidly declined. During further chemotherapy, liver metastasis was detected by positron emission tomography. Right hepatectomy was performed, and hCG declined for 28 days, but increased again despite chemotherapy. This patient died from hepatic failure...... 3 years after diagnosis. Patient 2 presented with persistently high hCG, though the affected organ was not identified. Chemotherapy was unsuccessful. Patient reevaluation showed an isolated pulmonary mass. Pulmonary lobectomy was performed; 2 weeks later, hCG was normal and consolidation with 2...

  1. Identification of a trypanocidal factor against Trypanosoma equiperdum in normal human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verducci, G; Perito, S; Rossi, R; Mannarino, E; Bistoni, F; Marconi, P

    1989-06-01

    Normal human serum (HS) contains trypanolytic activity and agglutinins to Trypanosoma equiperdum, while such activities are not found in sera from a range of animals susceptible to infection. HS given to T. equiperdum-infected mice caused a rapid decrease in the number of circulating trypanosomes and protection from lethal infection. Trypanolytic activity of human serum was found to be associated, after DEAE chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, with the fraction containing 19S antibodies. Immunofluorescence assays confirmed a binding of human IgM and C1q complement component onto the surface of T. equiperdum. Anti-T. equiperdum activity of HS was specifically directed to T. equiperdum surface components and not to some mouse serum components adsorbed on parasites during the growth in the host, because HS adsorbed in vivo in CD-1 mice retained full protective and agglutinating properties. Trypanocidal activity appears in human serum about the 7th month after birth and persists until late in life. On the contrary, human purified high-density lipoprotein had no significant in vitro or in vivo trypanocidal activity. In conclusion, strong natural anti-T. equiperdum activity in human serum was mainly mediated by natural antibodies of the IgM class. The presence of natural IgM active against T. equiperdum in HS could represent one of the natural mechanisms of resistance of refractory hosts against trypanosome infections. This phenomenon provides further evidence that host specificity of trypanosomes may be partly conditioned by the presence of natural antibodies.

  2. Study of human prostate spheroids treated with zinc using X-ray microfluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Pereira, Gabriela R., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: gpereira@metalmat.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Cursos de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Carlos A.N., E-mail: cansantos.bio@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (DIPRO/INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Palumbo Junior, Antonio; Nasciutti, Luiz E., E-mail: nasciutt@ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (ICB/CCS/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Interacoes Celulares; Souza, Pedro A.V.R., E-mail: pedroaugustoreis@uol.com.br [Hospital Federal do Andarai (HFA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Urologia; Anjos, Marcelino J., E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Estatual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2013-07-01

    Spheroids cell culture is a useful technique for tissue engineering or regenerative medicine re-search, pharmacological and toxicological studies, and fundamental studies in cell biology. In this study, we investigated Zn distribution in cell spheroids in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (DU145) and analyzed the differences in the response to Zinc (0-150 μM) treatment. The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 μm diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed non-uniform distribution of Zn in all the spheroids analyzed. The differential response to zinc of DU145 and BPH cell spheroids suggests that zinc may have an important role in prostate cancer and BPH diagnosis. (author)

  3. Dynamic knee alignment and collateral knee laxity and its variations in normal humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal eDeep

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alignment of normal, arthritic and replaced human knees is a much debated subject as is the collateral ligamentous laxity. Traditional quantitative values have been challenged. Methods used to measure these are also not without flaws. Authors review the recent literature and a novel method of measurement of these values has been included. This method includes use of computer navigation technique in clinic setting for assessment of the normal or affected knee before the surgery. Computer navigation has been known for achievement of alignment accuracy during knee surgery. Now its use in clinic setting has added to the inventory of measurement methods. Authors dispel the common myth of straight mechanical axis in normal knees and also look at quantification of amount of collateral knee laxity. Based on the scientific studies it has been shown that the mean alignment is in varus in normal knees. It changes from lying non weight bearing position to standing weight bearing position in both coronal and the sagittal planes. It also varies with gender and race. The collateral laxity is also different for males and females. Further studies are needed to define the ideal alignment and collateral laxity which the surgeon should aim for individual knees.

  4. Clinical utility of laser-Doppler vibrometer measurements in live normal and pathologic human ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosowski, John J; Nakajima, Hideko H; Merchant, Saumil N

    2008-01-01

    The laser-Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is a research tool that can be used to quickly measure the sound-induced velocity of the tympanic membrane near the umbo (the inferior tip of the malleus) in live human subjects and patients. In this manuscript we demonstrate the LDV to be a sensitive and selective tool for the diagnosis and differentiation of various ossicular disorders in patients with intact tympanic membranes and aerated middle ears. Patients with partial or total ossicular interruption or malleus fixation are readily separated from normal-hearing subjects with the LDV. The combination of LDV measurements and air-bone gap can distinguish patients with fixed stapes from those with normal ears. LDV measurements can also help differentiate air-bone gaps produced by ossicular pathologies from those associated with pathologies of inner-ear sound conduction such as a superior semicircular canal dehiscence.

  5. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity in subcellular fractions of normal and dystrophic human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, D; Rüstow, B; Olthoff, D; Jung, K

    1985-03-15

    Biopsy samples from normal and dystrophic human muscle (Duchenne type) were fractionated by differential centrifugation and microsomes, mitochondria and cytosol were assayed for phosphatidic acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.4) and marker enzymes of mitochondria and cytosol. The activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was significantly lower in microsomes and higher in cytosol and mitochondria of dystrophic muscle than in the corresponding subcellular fractions of normal muscle. The results support an explanation of earlier findings that there is reduced G3P incorporation into diglycerides and phosphatidylcholine and a qualitative and quantitative change in the amount of phosphatidylcholine in dystrophic microsomes. The possible reasons for the reduction in the activity of only microsomal PA-P-ase were discussed.

  6. Ghrelin stimulates gastric emptying and hunger in normal-weight humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, F; Edholm, T; Schmidt, P T

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: Ghrelin is produced primarily by enteroendocrine cells in the gastric mucosa and increases gastric emptying in patients with gastroparesis. MAIN OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin on gastric emptying, appetite, and postprandial hormone secretion...... in normal volunteers. DESIGN: This was a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. SUBJECTS: Subjects included normal human volunteers and patients with GH deficiency. INTERVENTION: Intervention included saline or ghrelin (10 pmol/kg.min) infusion for 180 min after intake of a radioactively labeled...... omelette (310 kcal) or GH substitution in GH-deficient patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Measures consisted of gastric empty-ing parameters and postprandial plasma levels of ghrelin, cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide YY, and motilin. RESULTS: The emptying rate was significantly faster...

  7. Differential expression of anterior gradient gene AGR2 in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knutzen Laura A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protein AGR2 is a putative member of the protein disulfide isomerase family and was first identified as a homolog of the Xenopus laevis gene XAG-2. AGR2 has been implicated in a number of human cancers. In particular, AGR2 has previously been found to be one of several genes that encode secreted proteins showing increased expression in prostate cancer cells compared to normal prostatic epithelium. Methods Gene expression levels of AGR2 were examined in prostate cancer cells by microarray analysis. We further examined the relationship of AGR2 protein expression to histopathology and prostate cancer outcome on a population basis using tissue microarray technology. Results At the RNA and protein level, there was an increase in AGR2 expression in adenocarcinoma of the prostate compared to morphologically normal prostatic glandular epithelium. Using a tissue microarray, this enhanced AGR2 expression was seen as early as premalignant PIN lesions. Interestingly, within adenocarcinoma samples, there was a slight trend toward lower levels of AGR2 with increasing Gleason score. Consistent with this, relatively lower levels of AGR2 were highly predictive of disease recurrence in patients who had originally presented with high-stage primary prostate cancer (P = 0.009. Conclusions We have shown for the first time that despite an increase in AGR2 expression in prostate cancer compared to non-malignant cells, relatively lower levels of AGR2 are highly predictive of disease recurrence following radical prostatectomy.

  8. Yes-Associated Protein Expression Is Correlated to the Differentiation of Prostate Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Myung-Giun; Kim, Sung Sun; Hwang, Eu Chang; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Choi, Chan

    2017-07-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) in the Hippo signaling pathway is a growth control pathway that regulates cell proliferation and stem cell functions. Abnormal regulation of YAP was reported in human cancers including liver, lung, breast, skin, colon, and ovarian cancer. However, the function of YAP is not known in prostate adenocarcinoma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of YAP in tumorigenesis, differentiation, and prognosis of prostate adenocarcinoma. The nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of YAP was examined in 188 cases of prostate adenocarcinoma using immunohistochemistry. YAP expression levels were evaluated in the nucleus and cytoplasm of the prostate adenocarcinoma and the adjacent normal prostate tissue. The presence of immunopositive tumor cells was evaluated and interpreted in comparison with the patients' clinicopathologic data. YAP expression levels were not significantly different between normal epithelial cells and prostate adenocarcinoma. However, YAP expression level was significantly higher in carcinomas with a high Gleason grades (8-10) than in carcinomas with a low Gleason grades (6-7) (p < .01). There was no statistical correlation between YAP expression and stage, age, prostate-specific antigen level, and tumor volume. Biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival was significantly lower in patients with high YAP expressing cancers (p = .02). However high YAP expression was not an independent prognostic factor for BCR in the Cox proportional hazards model. The results suggested that YAP is not associated with prostate adenocarcinoma development, but it may be associated with the differentiation of the adenocarcinoma. YAP was not associated with BCR.

  9. Prolactin and prostate hypertrophy: a pilot observational, prospective, case-control study in men with prolactinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colao, Annamaria; Vitale, Giovanni; Di Sarno, Antonella; Spiezia, Stefano; Guerra, Ermelinda; Ciccarelli, Antonio; Lombardi, Gaetano

    2004-06-01

    In experimental models, prolactin (PRL) displays independent hypertrophic effects on the prostate. To investigate whether hyperprolactinemia is associated with prostate enlargement in humans, we designed this open, prospective, case-control study enrolling 20 men with prolactinoma (aged 34 +/- 10 yr) and 20 age-matched healthy men. The endocrine profile and prostate transrectal ultrasonography were performed before and after 12 and 24 months of cabergoline treatment in the patients and at study entry and after 24 months in the controls. The patients had lower serum testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and IGF-I levels and prostate volume (15.4 +/- 3.5 vs. 19.6 +/- 5.1 ml; P prostate-specific antigen density than controls. There was no difference in prostate and transitional zone volumes between patients with normoandrogenemia (n = 8) or hypoandrogenemia (n = 12). After 12 and 24 months of treatment, PRL, testosterone, and DHT levels were normal in all cases, as were IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-3 levels. After 24 months, prostate volume was comparable to that in controls (21.7 +/- 4.5 vs. 22.5 +/- 4.7 ml). There were no changes in prostate structure throughout the study period in either the patients or the controls. In conclusion, in young men with prolactinoma PRL excess is unlikely to have effects on the prostate per se, because it is accompanied by low testosterone and DHT levels that produce the major effects.

  10. Sanguinarine causes cell cycle blockade and apoptosis of human prostate carcinoma cells via modulation of cyclin kinase inhibitor-cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Aziz, Moammir Hasan; Reagan-Shaw, Shannon R; Nihal, Minakshi; Mukhtar, Hasan; Ahmad, Nihal

    2004-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in males in the United States. This warrants the development of novel mechanism-based strategies for the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. Several studies have shown that plant-derived alkaloids possess remarkable anticancer effects. Sanguinarine, an alkaloid derived from the bloodroot plant Sanguinaria canadensis, has been shown to possess antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. Previously, we have shown that sanguinarine possesses strong antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells and immortalized human HaCaT keratinocytes. Here, employing androgen-responsive human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells and androgen-unresponsive human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells, we studied the antiproliferative properties of sanguinarine against prostate cancer. Sanguinarine (0.1-2 micromol/L) treatment of LNCaP and DU145 cells for 24 hours resulted in dose-dependent (1) inhibition of cell growth [as evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay], (2) arrest of cells in G0-G1 phase of the cell cycle (as assessed by DNA cell cycle analysis), and (3) induction of apoptosis (as evaluated by DNA ladder formation and flow cytometry). To define the mechanism of antiproliferative effects of sanguinarine against prostate cancer, we studied the effect of sanguinarine on critical molecular events known to regulate the cell cycle and the apoptotic machinery. Immunoblot analysis showed that sanguinarine treatment of both LNCaP and DU145 cells resulted in significant (1) induction of cyclin kinase inhibitors p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1; (2) down-regulation of cyclin E, D1, and D2; and (3) down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2, 4, and 6. A highlight of this study was the fact that sanguinarine induced growth inhibitory and antiproliferative effects in human prostate carcinoma cells irrespective of their androgen

  11. Pulse wave imaging in normal, hypertensive and aneurysmal human aortas in vivo: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronny X.; Luo, Jianwen; Balaram, Sandhya K.; Chaudhry, Farooq A.; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2013-07-01

    Arterial stiffness is a well-established biomarker for cardiovascular risk, especially in the case of hypertension. The progressive stages of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have also been associated with varying arterial stiffness. Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique that uses the pulse wave-induced arterial wall motion to map the propagation of the pulse wave and measure the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) as an index of arterial stiffness. In this study, the clinical feasibility of PWI was evaluated in normal, hypertensive, and aneurysmal human aortas. Radiofrequency-based speckle tracking was used to estimate the pulse wave-induced displacements in the abdominal aortic walls of normal (N = 15, mean age 32.5 ± 10.2 years), hypertensive (N = 13, mean age 60.8 ± 15.8 years), and aneurysmal (N = 5, mean age 71.6 ± 11.8 years) human subjects. Linear regression of the spatio-temporal variation of the displacement waveform in the anterior aortic wall over a single cardiac cycle yielded the slope as the PWV and the coefficient of determination r2 as an approximate measure of the pulse wave propagation uniformity. The aortic PWV measurements in all normal, hypertensive, and AAA subjects were 6.03 ± 1.68, 6.69 ± 2.80, and 10.54 ± 6.52 m s-1, respectively. There was no significant difference (p = 0.15) between the PWVs of the normal and hypertensive subjects while the PWVs of the AAA subjects were significantly higher (p pathologies that regionally alter the arterial wall mechanics.

  12. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) in Normal, Hypertensive and Aneurysmal Human Aortas In Vivo: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronny X.; Luo, Jianwen; Balaram, Sandhya K.; Chaudhry, Farooq A.; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa. E.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is a well-established biomarker for cardiovascular risk, especially in the case of hypertension. The progressive stages of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have also been associated with varying arterial stiffness. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique that uses the pulse wave-induced arterial wall motion to map the propagation of the pulse wave and measure the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) as an index of arterial stiffness. In this study, the clinical feasibility of PWI was evaluated in normal, hypertensive, and aneurysmal human aortas. Radiofrequency-based speckle tracking was used to estimate the pulse wave-induced displacements in the abdominal aortic walls of normal (N = 15, mean age 32.5 years ± 10.2), hypertensive (N = 13, mean age 60.8 years ± 15.8), and aneurysmal (N = 5, mean age 71.6 years ± 11.8) human subjects. Linear regression of the spatio-temporal variation of the displacement waveform in the anterior aortic wall over a single cardiac cycle yielded the slope as the PWV and the coefficient of determination r2 as an approximate measure of the pulse wave propagation uniformity. The aortic PWV measurements in all normal, hypertensive, and AAA subjects were 6.03 ± 1.68, 6.69 ± 2.80, and 10.54 ± 6.52 m/s, respectively. There was no significant difference (p = 0.15) between the PWVs of the normal and hypertensive subjects while the PWVs of the AAA subjects were significantly higher (p PWI, in addition to the PWI images and spatio-temporal maps that provide qualitative visualization of the pulse wave, may potentially provide valuable informa